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Sample records for carlo radiation transport

  1. Monte Carlo radiation transport in external beam radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Çeçen, Yiğit

    2013-01-01

    The use of Monte Carlo in radiation transport is an effective way to predict absorbed dose distributions. Monte Carlo modeling has contributed to a better understanding of photon and electron transport by radiotherapy physicists. The aim of this review is to introduce Monte Carlo as a powerful radiation transport tool. In this review, photon and electron transport algorithms for Monte Carlo techniques are investigated and a clinical linear accelerator model is studied for external beam radiot...

  2. THE MCNPX MONTE CARLO RADIATION TRANSPORT CODE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WATERS, LAURIE S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MCKINNEY, GREGG W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; DURKEE, JOE W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; FENSIN, MICHAEL L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; JAMES, MICHAEL R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; JOHNS, RUSSELL C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; PELOWITZ, DENISE B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-10

    MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) is a general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code with three-dimensional geometry and continuous-energy transport of 34 particles and light ions. It contains flexible source and tally options, interactive graphics, and support for both sequential and multi-processing computer platforms. MCNPX is based on MCNP4B, and has been upgraded to most MCNP5 capabilities. MCNP is a highly stable code tracking neutrons, photons and electrons, and using evaluated nuclear data libraries for low-energy interaction probabilities. MCNPX has extended this base to a comprehensive set of particles and light ions, with heavy ion transport in development. Models have been included to calculate interaction probabilities when libraries are not available. Recent additions focus on the time evolution of residual nuclei decay, allowing calculation of transmutation and delayed particle emission. MCNPX is now a code of great dynamic range, and the excellent neutronics capabilities allow new opportunities to simulate devices of interest to experimental particle physics; particularly calorimetry. This paper describes the capabilities of the current MCNPX version 2.6.C, and also discusses ongoing code development.

  3. Morse Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Code System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmett, M.B.

    1975-02-01

    The report contains sections containing descriptions of the MORSE and PICTURE codes, input descriptions, sample problems, deviations of the physical equations and explanations of the various error messages. The MORSE code is a multipurpose neutron and gamma-ray transport Monte Carlo code. Time dependence for both shielding and criticality problems is provided. General three-dimensional geometry may be used with an albedo option available at any material surface. The PICTURE code provide aid in preparing correct input data for the combinatorial geometry package CG. It provides a printed view of arbitrary two-dimensional slices through the geometry. By inspecting these pictures one may determine if the geometry specified by the input cards is indeed the desired geometry. 23 refs. (WRF)

  4. Implict Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Simulations of Four Test Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, N

    2007-08-01

    Radiation transport codes, like almost all codes, are difficult to develop and debug. It is helpful to have small, easy to run test problems with known answers to use in development and debugging. It is also prudent to re-run test problems periodically during development to ensure that previous code capabilities have not been lost. We describe four radiation transport test problems with analytic or approximate analytic answers. These test problems are suitable for use in debugging and testing radiation transport codes. We also give results of simulations of these test problems performed with an Implicit Monte Carlo photonics code.

  5. Discrete angle biasing in Monte Carlo radiation transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, S.N.

    1988-05-01

    An angular biasing procedure is presented for use in Monte Carlo radiation transport with discretized scattering angle data. As in more general studies, the method is shown to reduce statistical weight fluctuations when it is combined with the exponential transformation. This discrete data application has a simple analytic form which is problem independent. The results from a sample problem illustrate the variance reduction and efficiency characteristics of the combined biasing procedures, and a large neutron and gamma ray integral experiment is also calculated. A proposal is given for the possible code generation of the biasing parameter p and the preferential direction /ovr/Omega///sub 0/ used in the combined biasing schemes.

  6. Monte Carlo 2000 Conference : Advanced Monte Carlo for Radiation Physics, Particle Transport Simulation and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Baräo, Fernando; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Távora, Luis; Vaz, Pedro

    2001-01-01

    This book focusses on the state of the art of Monte Carlo methods in radiation physics and particle transport simulation and applications, the latter involving in particular, the use and development of electron--gamma, neutron--gamma and hadronic codes. Besides the basic theory and the methods employed, special attention is paid to algorithm development for modeling, and the analysis of experiments and measurements in a variety of fields ranging from particle to medical physics.

  7. Academic Training - The use of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes in radiation physics and dosimetry

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 27, 28, 29 June 11:00-12:00 - TH Conference Room, bldg. 4 The use of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes in radiation physics and dosimetry F. Salvat Gavalda,Univ. de Barcelona, A. FERRARI, CERN-AB, M. SILARI, CERN-SC Lecture 1. Transport and interaction of electromagnetic radiation F. Salvat Gavalda,Univ. de Barcelona Interaction models and simulation schemes implemented in modern Monte Carlo codes for the simulation of coupled electron-photon transport will be briefly reviewed. Different schemes for simulating electron transport will be discussed. Condensed algorithms, which rely on multiple-scattering theories, are comparatively fast, but less accurate than mixed algorithms, in which hard interactions (with energy loss or angular deflection larger than certain cut-off values) are simulated individually. The reliability, and limitations, of electron-interaction models and multiple-scattering theories will be analyzed. Benchmark comparisons of simu...

  8. Monte Carlo analysis of radiative transport in oceanographic lidar measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupini, E.; Ferro, G. [ENEA, Divisione Fisica Applicata, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy); Ferrari, N. [Bologna Univ., Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ingegneria Energetica, Nucleare e del Controllo Ambientale

    2001-07-01

    The analysis of oceanographic lidar systems measurements is often carried out with semi-empirical methods, since there is only a rough understanding of the effects of many environmental variables. The development of techniques for interpreting the accuracy of lidar measurements is needed to evaluate the effects of various environmental situations, as well as of different experimental geometric configurations and boundary conditions. A Monte Carlo simulation model represents a tool that is particularly well suited for answering these important questions. The PREMAR-2F Monte Carlo code has been developed taking into account the main molecular and non-molecular components of the marine environment. The laser radiation interaction processes of diffusion, re-emission, refraction and absorption are treated. In particular are considered: the Rayleigh elastic scattering, produced by atoms and molecules with small dimensions with respect to the laser emission wavelength (i.e. water molecules), the Mie elastic scattering, arising from atoms or molecules with dimensions comparable to the laser wavelength (hydrosols), the Raman inelastic scattering, typical of water, the absorption of water, inorganic (sediments) and organic (phytoplankton and CDOM) hydrosols, the fluorescence re-emission of chlorophyll and yellow substances. PREMAR-2F is an extension of a code for the simulation of the radiative transport in atmospheric environments (PREMAR-2). The approach followed in PREMAR-2 was to combine conventional Monte Carlo techniques with analytical estimates of the probability of the receiver to have a contribution from photons coming back after an interaction in the field of view of the lidar fluorosensor collecting apparatus. This offers an effective mean for modelling a lidar system with realistic geometric constraints. The retrieved semianalytic Monte Carlo radiative transfer model has been developed in the frame of the Italian Research Program for Antarctica (PNRA) and it is

  9. Progress Towards Optimally Efficient Schemes for Monte Carlo Thermal Radiation Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smedley-Stevenson, R P; Brooks III, E D

    2007-09-26

    In this summary we review the complementary research being undertaken at AWE and LLNL aimed at developing optimally efficient algorithms for Monte Carlo thermal radiation transport based on the difference formulation. We conclude by presenting preliminary results on the application of Newton-Krylov methods for solving the Symbolic Implicit Monte Carlo (SIMC) energy equation.

  10. The use of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes in radiation physics and dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Ferrari, Alfredo; Silari, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Transport and interaction of electromagnetic radiation Interaction models and simulation schemes implemented in modern Monte Carlo codes for the simulation of coupled electron-photon transport will be briefly reviewed. In these codes, photon transport is simulated by using the detailed scheme, i.e., interaction by interaction. Detailed simulation is easy to implement, and the reliability of the results is only limited by the accuracy of the adopted cross sections. Simulations of electron and positron transport are more difficult, because these particles undergo a large number of interactions in the course of their slowing down. Different schemes for simulating electron transport will be discussed. Condensed algorithms, which rely on multiple-scattering theories, are comparatively fast, but less accurate than mixed algorithms, in which hard interactions (with energy loss or angular deflection larger than certain cut-off values) are simulated individually. The reliability, and limitations, of electron-interacti...

  11. Radiation Transport for Explosive Outflows: A Multigroup Hybrid Monte Carlo Method

    CERN Document Server

    Wollaeger, Ryan T; Graziani, Carlo; Couch, Sean M; Jordan, George C; Lamb, Donald Q; Moses, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    We explore the application of Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) to radiation transport in strong fluid outflows with structured opacity. The IMC method of Fleck & Cummings is a stochastic computational technique for nonlinear radiation transport. IMC is partially implicit in time and may suffer in efficiency when tracking Monte Carlo particles through optically thick materials. The DDMC method of Densmore accelerates an IMC computation where the domain is diffusive. Recently, Abdikamalov extended IMC and DDMC to multigroup, velocity-dependent neutrino transport with the intent of modeling neutrino dynamics in core-collapse supernovae. Densmore has also formulated a multifrequency extension to the originally grey DDMC method. In this article we rigorously formulate IMC and DDMC over a high-velocity Lagrangian grid for possible application to photon transport in the post-explosion phase of Type Ia supernovae. The method described is suitable for a large variety of non-mono...

  12. A Monte Carlo transport code study of the space radiation environment using FLUKA and ROOT

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, T; Carminati, F; Brun, R; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Empl, A; MacGibbon, J

    2001-01-01

    We report on the progress of a current study aimed at developing a state-of-the-art Monte-Carlo computer simulation of the space radiation environment using advanced computer software techniques recently available at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva, Switzerland. By taking the next-generation computer software appearing at CERN and adapting it to known problems in the implementation of space exploration strategies, this research is identifying changes necessary to bring these two advanced technologies together. The radiation transport tool being developed is tailored to the problem of taking measured space radiation fluxes impinging on the geometry of any particular spacecraft or planetary habitat and simulating the evolution of that flux through an accurate model of the spacecraft material. The simulation uses the latest known results in low-energy and high-energy physics. The output is a prediction of the detailed nature of the radiation environment experienced in space as well a...

  13. Radiation Transport for Explosive Outflows: A Multigroup Hybrid Monte Carlo Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollaeger, Ryan T.; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Graziani, Carlo; Couch, Sean M.; Jordan, George C., IV; Lamb, Donald Q.; Moses, Gregory A.

    2013-12-01

    We explore Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and discrete diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) for radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with structured opacity. The IMC method is a stochastic computational technique for nonlinear radiation transport. IMC is partially implicit in time and may suffer in efficiency when tracking MC particles through optically thick materials. DDMC accelerates IMC in diffusive domains. Abdikamalov extended IMC and DDMC to multigroup, velocity-dependent transport with the intent of modeling neutrino dynamics in core-collapse supernovae. Densmore has also formulated a multifrequency extension to the originally gray DDMC method. We rigorously formulate IMC and DDMC over a high-velocity Lagrangian grid for possible application to photon transport in the post-explosion phase of Type Ia supernovae. This formulation includes an analysis that yields an additional factor in the standard IMC-to-DDMC spatial interface condition. To our knowledge the new boundary condition is distinct from others presented in prior DDMC literature. The method is suitable for a variety of opacity distributions and may be applied to semi-relativistic radiation transport in simple fluids and geometries. Additionally, we test the code, called SuperNu, using an analytic solution having static material, as well as with a manufactured solution for moving material with structured opacities. Finally, we demonstrate with a simple source and 10 group logarithmic wavelength grid that IMC-DDMC performs better than pure IMC in terms of accuracy and speed when there are large disparities between the magnitudes of opacities in adjacent groups. We also present and test our implementation of the new boundary condition.

  14. Event-by-event Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport in vapor and liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamichael, Georgios Ioannis

    A Monte-Carlo Simulation is presented for Radiation Transport in water. This process is of utmost importance, having applications in oncology and therapy of cancer, in protecting people and the environment, waste management, radiation chemistry and on some solid-state detectors. It's also a phenomenon of interest in microelectronics on satellites in orbit that are subject to the solar radiation and in space-craft design for deep-space missions receiving background radiation. The interaction of charged particles with the medium is primarily due to their electromagnetic field. Three types of interaction events are considered: Elastic scattering, impact excitation and impact ionization. Secondary particles (electrons) can be generated by ionization. At each stage, along with the primary particle we explicitly follow all secondary electrons (and subsequent generations). Theoretical, semi-empirical and experimental formulae with suitable corrections have been used in each case to model the cross sections governing the quantum mechanical process of interactions, thus determining stochastically the energy and direction of outgoing particles following an event. Monte-Carlo sampling techniques have been applied to accurate probability distribution functions describing the primary particle track and all secondary particle-medium interaction. A simple account of the simulation code and a critical exposition of its underlying assumptions (often missing in the relevant literature) are also presented with reference to the model cross sections. Model predictions are in good agreement with existing computational data and experimental results. By relying heavily on a theoretical formulation, instead of merely fitting data, it is hoped that the model will be of value in a wider range of applications. Possible future directions that are the object of further research are pointed out.

  15. NASA astronaut dosimetry: Implementation of scalable human phantoms and benchmark comparisons of deterministic versus Monte Carlo radiation transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Amir Alexander

    Astronauts are exposed to a unique radiation environment in space. United States terrestrial radiation worker limits, derived from guidelines produced by scientific panels, do not apply to astronauts. Limits for astronauts have changed throughout the Space Age, eventually reaching the current National Aeronautics and Space Administration limit of 3% risk of exposure induced death, with an administrative stipulation that the risk be assured to the upper 95% confidence limit. Much effort has been spent on reducing the uncertainty associated with evaluating astronaut risk for radiogenic cancer mortality, while tools that affect the accuracy of the calculations have largely remained unchanged. In the present study, the impacts of using more realistic computational phantoms with size variability to represent astronauts with simplified deterministic radiation transport were evaluated. Next, the impacts of microgravity-induced body changes on space radiation dosimetry using the same transport method were investigated. Finally, dosimetry and risk calculations resulting from Monte Carlo radiation transport were compared with results obtained using simplified deterministic radiation transport. The results of the present study indicated that the use of phantoms that more accurately represent human anatomy can substantially improve space radiation dose estimates, most notably for exposures from solar particle events under light shielding conditions. Microgravity-induced changes were less important, but results showed that flexible phantoms could assist in optimizing astronaut body position for reducing exposures during solar particle events. Finally, little overall differences in risk calculations using simplified deterministic radiation transport and 3D Monte Carlo radiation transport were found; however, for the galactic cosmic ray ion spectra, compensating errors were observed for the constituent ions, thus exhibiting the need to perform evaluations on a particle

  16. Modelling of neutron and photon transport in iron and concrete radiation shieldings by the Monte Carlo method - Version 2

    CERN Document Server

    Žukauskaite, A; Plukiene, R; Plukis, A

    2007-01-01

    Particle accelerators and other high energy facilities produce penetrating ionizing radiation (neutrons and γ-rays) that must be shielded. The objective of this work was to model photon and neutron transport in various materials, usually used as shielding, such as concrete, iron or graphite. Monte Carlo method allows obtaining answers by simulating individual particles and recording some aspects of their average behavior. In this work several nuclear experiments were modeled: AVF 65 – γ-ray beams (1-10 MeV), HIMAC and ISIS-800 – high energy neutrons (20-800 MeV) transport in iron and concrete. The results were then compared with experimental data.

  17. Monte Carlo techniques in radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Modern cancer treatment relies on Monte Carlo simulations to help radiotherapists and clinical physicists better understand and compute radiation dose from imaging devices as well as exploit four-dimensional imaging data. With Monte Carlo-based treatment planning tools now available from commercial vendors, a complete transition to Monte Carlo-based dose calculation methods in radiotherapy could likely take place in the next decade. Monte Carlo Techniques in Radiation Therapy explores the use of Monte Carlo methods for modeling various features of internal and external radiation sources, including light ion beams. The book-the first of its kind-addresses applications of the Monte Carlo particle transport simulation technique in radiation therapy, mainly focusing on external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. It presents the mathematical and technical aspects of the methods in particle transport simulations. The book also discusses the modeling of medical linacs and other irradiation devices; issues specific...

  18. Observing gas and dust in simulations of star formation with Monte Carlo radiation transport on Voronoi meshes

    CERN Document Server

    Hubber, D A; Dale, J

    2015-01-01

    Ionising feedback from massive stars dramatically affects the interstellar medium local to star forming regions. Numerical simulations are now starting to include enough complexity to produce morphologies and gas properties that are not too dissimilar from observations. The comparison between the density fields produced by hydrodynamical simulations and observations at given wavelengths relies however on photoionisation/chemistry and radiative transfer calculations. We present here an implementation of Monte Carlo radiation transport through a Voronoi tessellation in the photoionisation and dust radiative transfer code MOCASSIN. We show for the first time a synthetic spectrum and synthetic emission line maps of an hydrodynamical simulation of a molecular cloud affected by massive stellar feedback. We show that the approach on which previous work is based, which remapped hydrodynamical density fields onto Cartesian grids before performing radiative transfer/photoionisation calculations, results in significant ...

  19. A fast Monte Carlo code for proton transport in radiation therapy based on MCNPX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Seuntjens, Jan

    2014-07-01

    An important requirement for proton therapy is a software for dose calculation. Monte Carlo is the most accurate method for dose calculation, but it is very slow. In this work, a method is developed to improve the speed of dose calculation. The method is based on pre-generated tracks for particle transport. The MCNPX code has been used for generation of tracks. A set of data including the track of the particle was produced in each particular material (water, air, lung tissue, bone, and soft tissue). This code can transport protons in wide range of energies (up to 200 MeV for proton). The validity of the fast Monte Carlo (MC) code is evaluated with data MCNPX as a reference code. While analytical pencil beam algorithm transport shows great errors (up to 10%) near small high density heterogeneities, there was less than 2% deviation of MCNPX results in our dose calculation and isodose distribution. In terms of speed, the code runs 200 times faster than MCNPX. In the Fast MC code which is developed in this work, it takes the system less than 2 minutes to calculate dose for 10(6) particles in an Intel Core 2 Duo 2.66 GHZ desktop computer.

  20. A fast Monte Carlo code for proton transport in radiation therapy based on MCNPX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyvan Jabbari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An important requirement for proton therapy is a software for dose calculation. Monte Carlo is the most accurate method for dose calculation, but it is very slow. In this work, a method is developed to improve the speed of dose calculation. The method is based on pre-generated tracks for particle transport. The MCNPX code has been used for generation of tracks. A set of data including the track of the particle was produced in each particular material (water, air, lung tissue, bone, and soft tissue. This code can transport protons in wide range of energies (up to 200 MeV for proton. The validity of the fast Monte Carlo (MC code is evaluated with data MCNPX as a reference code. While analytical pencil beam algorithm transport shows great errors (up to 10% near small high density heterogeneities, there was less than 2% deviation of MCNPX results in our dose calculation and isodose distribution. In terms of speed, the code runs 200 times faster than MCNPX. In the Fast MC code which is developed in this work, it takes the system less than 2 minutes to calculate dose for 10 6 particles in an Intel Core 2 Duo 2.66 GHZ desktop computer.

  1. A fast Monte Carlo code for proton transport in radiation therapy based on MCNPX

    OpenAIRE

    Keyvan Jabbari; Jan Seuntjens

    2014-01-01

    An important requirement for proton therapy is a software for dose calculation. Monte Carlo is the most accurate method for dose calculation, but it is very slow. In this work, a method is developed to improve the speed of dose calculation. The method is based on pre-generated tracks for particle transport. The MCNPX code has been used for generation of tracks. A set of data including the track of the particle was produced in each particular material (water, air, lung tissue, bone, and soft t...

  2. Voxel2MCNP: software for handling voxel models for Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegenbart, Lars; Pölz, Stefan; Benzler, Andreas; Urban, Manfred

    2012-02-01

    Voxel2MCNP is a program that sets up radiation protection scenarios with voxel models and generates corresponding input files for the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. Its technology is based on object-oriented programming, and the development is platform-independent. It has a user-friendly graphical interface including a two- and three-dimensional viewer. A row of equipment models is implemented in the program. Various voxel model file formats are supported. Applications include calculation of counting efficiency of in vivo measurement scenarios and calculation of dose coefficients for internal and external radiation scenarios. Moreover, anthropometric parameters of voxel models, for instance chest wall thickness, can be determined. Voxel2MCNP offers several methods for voxel model manipulations including image registration techniques. The authors demonstrate the validity of the program results and provide references for previous successful implementations. The authors illustrate the reliability of calculated dose conversion factors and specific absorbed fractions. Voxel2MCNP is used on a regular basis to generate virtual radiation protection scenarios at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology while further improvements and developments are ongoing.

  3. A Monte Carlo Code for Relativistic Radiation Transport Around Kerr Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittman, Jeremy David; Krolik, Julian H.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new code for radiation transport around Kerr black holes, including arbitrary emission and absorption mechanisms, as well as electron scattering and polarization. The code is particularly useful for analyzing accretion flows made up of optically thick disks and optically thin coronae. We give a detailed description of the methods employed in the code and also present results from a number of numerical tests to assess its accuracy and convergence.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of radiation heat transfer in arrays of fixed discrete surfaces using cell-to-cell photon transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drost, M.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Welty, J.R. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Radiation heat transfer in an array of fixed discrete surfaces is an important problem that is particularly difficult to analyze because of the nonhomogeneous and anisotropic optical properties involved. This article presents an efficient Monte Carlo method for evaluating radiation heat transfer in arrays of fixed discrete surfaces. This Monte Carlo model has been optimized to take advantage of the regular arrangement of surfaces often encountered in these arrays. Monte Carlo model predictions have been compared with analytical and experimental results.

  5. Development of parallel monte carlo electron and photon transport (PMCEPT) code III: Applications to medical radiation physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kum, Oyeon; Han, Youngyih; Jeong, Hae Sun

    2012-05-01

    Minimizing the differences between dose distributions calculated at the treatment planning stage and those delivered to the patient is an essential requirement for successful radiotheraphy. Accurate calculation of dose distributions in the treatment planning process is important and can be done only by using a Monte Carlo calculation of particle transport. In this paper, we perform a further validation of our previously developed parallel Monte Carlo electron and photon transport (PMCEPT) code [Kum and Lee, J. Korean Phys. Soc. 47, 716 (2005) and Kim and Kum, J. Korean Phys. Soc. 49, 1640 (2006)] for applications to clinical radiation problems. A linear accelerator, Siemens' Primus 6 MV, was modeled and commissioned. A thorough validation includes both small fields, closely related to the intensity modulated radiation treatment (IMRT), and large fields. Two-dimensional comparisons with film measurements were also performed. The PMCEPT results, in general, agreed well with the measured data within a maximum error of about 2%. However, considering the experimental errors, the PMCEPT results can provide the gold standard of dose distributions for radiotherapy. The computing time was also much faster, compared to that needed for experiments, although it is still a bottleneck for direct applications to the daily routine treatment planning procedure.

  6. Voxel2MCNP: a framework for modeling, simulation and evaluation of radiation transport scenarios for Monte Carlo codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pölz, Stefan; Laubersheimer, Sven; Eberhardt, Jakob S; Harrendorf, Marco A; Keck, Thomas; Benzler, Andreas; Breustedt, Bastian

    2013-08-21

    The basic idea of Voxel2MCNP is to provide a framework supporting users in modeling radiation transport scenarios using voxel phantoms and other geometric models, generating corresponding input for the Monte Carlo code MCNPX, and evaluating simulation output. Applications at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology are primarily whole and partial body counter calibration and calculation of dose conversion coefficients. A new generic data model describing data related to radiation transport, including phantom and detector geometries and their properties, sources, tallies and materials, has been developed. It is modular and generally independent of the targeted Monte Carlo code. The data model has been implemented as an XML-based file format to facilitate data exchange, and integrated with Voxel2MCNP to provide a common interface for modeling, visualization, and evaluation of data. Also, extensions to allow compatibility with several file formats, such as ENSDF for nuclear structure properties and radioactive decay data, SimpleGeo for solid geometry modeling, ImageJ for voxel lattices, and MCNPX's MCTAL for simulation results have been added. The framework is presented and discussed in this paper and example workflows for body counter calibration and calculation of dose conversion coefficients is given to illustrate its application.

  7. Modeling of neutron and photon transport in iron and concrete radiation shields by using Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    Žukauskaitėa, A; Plukienė, R; Ridikas, D

    2007-01-01

    Particle accelerators and other high energy facilities produce penetrating ionizing radiation (neutrons and γ-rays) that must be shielded. The objective of this work was to model photon and neutron transport in various materials, usually used as shielding, such as concrete, iron or graphite. Monte Carlo method allows obtaining answers by simulating individual particles and recording some aspects of their average behavior. In this work several nuclear experiments were modeled: AVF 65 (AVF cyclotron of Research Center of Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Japan) – γ-ray beams (1-10 MeV), HIMAC (heavy-ion synchrotron of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba, Japan) and ISIS-800 (ISIS intensive spallation neutron source facility of the Rutherford Appleton laboratory, UK) – high energy neutron (20-800 MeV) transport in iron and concrete. The calculation results were then compared with experimental data.compared with experimental data.

  8. Radiation Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbatsch, Todd James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport in human skin with rigorous treatment of curved tissue boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majaron, Boris; Milanič, Matija; Premru, Jan

    2015-01-01

    In three-dimensional (3-D) modeling of light transport in heterogeneous biological structures using the Monte Carlo (MC) approach, space is commonly discretized into optically homogeneous voxels by a rectangular spatial grid. Any round or oblique boundaries between neighboring tissues thus become serrated, which raises legitimate concerns about the realism of modeling results with regard to reflection and refraction of light on such boundaries. We analyze the related effects by systematic comparison with an augmented 3-D MC code, in which analytically defined tissue boundaries are treated in a rigorous manner. At specific locations within our test geometries, energy deposition predicted by the two models can vary by 10%. Even highly relevant integral quantities, such as linear density of the energy absorbed by modeled blood vessels, differ by up to 30%. Most notably, the values predicted by the customary model vary strongly and quite erratically with the spatial discretization step and upon minor repositioning of the computational grid. Meanwhile, the augmented model shows no such unphysical behavior. Artifacts of the former approach do not converge toward zero with ever finer spatial discretization, confirming that it suffers from inherent deficiencies due to inaccurate treatment of reflection and refraction at round tissue boundaries.

  10. Monte Carlo methods for particle transport

    CERN Document Server

    Haghighat, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method has become the de facto standard in radiation transport. Although powerful, if not understood and used appropriately, the method can give misleading results. Monte Carlo Methods for Particle Transport teaches appropriate use of the Monte Carlo method, explaining the method's fundamental concepts as well as its limitations. Concise yet comprehensive, this well-organized text: * Introduces the particle importance equation and its use for variance reduction * Describes general and particle-transport-specific variance reduction techniques * Presents particle transport eigenvalue issues and methodologies to address these issues * Explores advanced formulations based on the author's research activities * Discusses parallel processing concepts and factors affecting parallel performance Featuring illustrative examples, mathematical derivations, computer algorithms, and homework problems, Monte Carlo Methods for Particle Transport provides nuclear engineers and scientists with a practical guide ...

  11. Development And Implementation Of Photonuclear Cross-section Data For Mutually Coupled Neutron-photon Transport Calculations In The Monte Carlo N-particle (mcnp) Radiation Transport Code

    CERN Document Server

    White, M C

    2000-01-01

    The fundamental motivation for the research presented in this dissertation was the need to development a more accurate prediction method for characterization of mixed radiation fields around medical electron accelerators (MEAs). Specifically, a model is developed for simulation of neutron and other particle production from photonuclear reactions and incorporated in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. This extension of the capability within the MCNP code provides for the more accurate assessment of the mixed radiation fields. The Nuclear Theory and Applications group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has recently provided first-of-a-kind evaluated photonuclear data for a select group of isotopes. These data provide the reaction probabilities as functions of incident photon energy with angular and energy distribution information for all reaction products. The availability of these data is the cornerstone of the new methodology for state-of-the-art mutually coupled photon-neutron tran...

  12. GPU-Accelerated Monte Carlo Electron Transport Methods: Development and Application for Radiation Dose Calculations Using Six GPU cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lin; Du, Xining; Liu, Tianyu; Xu, X. George

    2014-06-01

    An electron-photon coupled Monte Carlo code ARCHER - Accelerated Radiation-transport Computations in Heterogeneous EnviRonments - is being developed at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute as a software testbed for emerging heterogeneous high performance computers that utilize accelerators such as GPUs. This paper presents the preliminary code development and the testing involving radiation dose related problems. In particular, the paper discusses the electron transport simulations using the class-II condensed history method. The considered electron energy ranges from a few hundreds of keV to 30 MeV. For photon part, photoelectric effect, Compton scattering and pair production were modeled. Voxelized geometry was supported. A serial CPU code was first written in C++. The code was then transplanted to the GPU using the CUDA C 5.0 standards. The hardware involved a desktop PC with an Intel Xeon X5660 CPU and six NVIDIA Tesla™ M2090 GPUs. The code was tested for a case of 20 MeV electron beam incident perpendicularly on a water-aluminum-water phantom. The depth and later dose profiles were found to agree with results obtained from well tested MC codes. Using six GPU cards, 6x106 electron histories were simulated within 2 seconds. In comparison, the same case running the EGSnrc and MCNPX codes required 1645 seconds and 9213 seconds, respectively. On-going work continues to test the code for different medical applications such as radiotherapy and brachytherapy.

  13. Extremity dosimetry problems during the handling of radionuclides syringes in nuclear medicine: A Monte Carlo radiation transport simplified approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariotti, F., E-mail: francesca.mariotti@bologna.enea.i [ENEA-BAS-ION IRP Radiation Protection Institute, Via dei Colli 16, 40136, Bologna (Italy); Gualdrini, G. [ENEA-BAS-ION IRP Radiation Protection Institute, Via dei Colli 16, 40136, Bologna (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    The ORAMED (Optimization of RAdiation protection for MEDical staff) Working Tasks (WP4) is addressed at evaluating extremity doses (and dose distributions across the hands) of medical staff working in nuclear medicine departments, to study the influence of protective devices such as syringe and vial shields, to improve such devices when possible and to propose 'levels of reference doses' for each standard nuclear medicine procedure. In particular task 4 is concerned with the study of the extremity dosimetry for the hand of operators devoted to the preparation and administration stages of the usage, for example, of {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 18}F and {sup 90}Y (Zevalin) radionuclides. The aim of this report consists in the study of photon-electron equilibrium conditions at 0.07 mm in the skin to justify a simplified 'kerma approximation' approach in the planned complex Monte Carlo voxel hand modeling. Furthermore a detailed investigation on primary electron and secondary bremsstrahlung photon transport from {sup 90}Y to speed up the calculations was performed. The results obtained in the simplified investigated conditions could be of help for the production calculations, introducing, if necessary, suited correction factors applicable to the complex condition results.

  14. Development and Implementation of Photonuclear Cross-Section Data for Mutually Coupled Neutron-Photon Transport Calculations in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Radiation Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Morgan C. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The fundamental motivation for the research presented in this dissertation was the need to development a more accurate prediction method for characterization of mixed radiation fields around medical electron accelerators (MEAs). Specifically, a model is developed for simulation of neutron and other particle production from photonuclear reactions and incorporated in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. This extension of the capability within the MCNP code provides for the more accurate assessment of the mixed radiation fields. The Nuclear Theory and Applications group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has recently provided first-of-a-kind evaluated photonuclear data for a select group of isotopes. These data provide the reaction probabilities as functions of incident photon energy with angular and energy distribution information for all reaction products. The availability of these data is the cornerstone of the new methodology for state-of-the-art mutually coupled photon-neutron transport simulations. The dissertation includes details of the model development and implementation necessary to use the new photonuclear data within MCNP simulations. A new data format has been developed to include tabular photonuclear data. Data are processed from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Format (ENDF) to the new class ''u'' A Compact ENDF (ACE) format using a standalone processing code. MCNP modifications have been completed to enable Monte Carlo sampling of photonuclear reactions. Note that both neutron and gamma production are included in the present model. The new capability has been subjected to extensive verification and validation (V&V) testing. Verification testing has established the expected basic functionality. Two validation projects were undertaken. First, comparisons were made to benchmark data from literature. These calculations demonstrate the accuracy of the new data and transport routines to better than 25 percent. Second

  15. Angular Distribution of Particles Emerging from a Diffusive Region and its Implications for the Fleck-Canfield Random Walk Algorithm for Implicit Monte Carlo Radiation Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, M A

    2000-01-01

    We present various approximations for the angular distribution of particles emerging from an optically thick, purely isotropically scattering region into a vacuum. Our motivation is to use such a distribution for the Fleck-Canfield random walk method [1] for implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) [2] radiation transport problems. We demonstrate that the cosine distribution recommended in the original random walk paper [1] is a poor approximation to the angular distribution predicted by transport theory. Then we examine other approximations that more closely match the transport angular distribution.

  16. Pre-conditioned Backward Monte Carlo solutions to radiative transport in planetary atmospheres. Fundamentals: Sampling of propagation directions in polarising media

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz, García; Mills,; P, F

    2014-01-01

    Context. The interpretation of polarised radiation emerging from a planetary atmosphere must rely on solutions to the vector Radiative Transport Equation (vRTE). Monte Carlo integration of the vRTE is a valuable approach for its flexible treatment of complex viewing and/or illumination geometries and because it can intuitively incorporate elaborate physics. Aims. We present a novel Pre-Conditioned Backward Monte Carlo (PBMC) algorithm for solving the vRTE and apply it to planetary atmospheres irradiated from above. As classical BMC methods, our PBMC algorithm builds the solution by simulating the photon trajectories from the detector towards the radiation source, i.e. in the reverse order of the actual photon displacements. Methods. We show that the neglect of polarisation in the sampling of photon propagation directions in classical BMC algorithms leads to unstable and biased solutions for conservative, optically-thick, strongly-polarising media such as Rayleigh atmospheres. The numerical difficulty is avoid...

  17. Accurate and efficient radiation transport in optically thick media -- by means of the Symbolic Implicit Monte Carlo method in the difference formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szoke, A; Brooks, E D; McKinley, M; Daffin, F

    2005-03-30

    The equations of radiation transport for thermal photons are notoriously difficult to solve in thick media without resorting to asymptotic approximations such as the diffusion limit. One source of this difficulty is that in thick, absorbing media thermal emission is almost completely balanced by strong absorption. In a previous publication [SB03], the photon transport equation was written in terms of the deviation of the specific intensity from the local equilibrium field. We called the new form of the equations the difference formulation. The difference formulation is rigorously equivalent to the original transport equation. It is particularly advantageous in thick media, where the radiation field approaches local equilibrium and the deviations from the Planck distribution are small. The difference formulation for photon transport also clarifies the diffusion limit. In this paper, the transport equation is solved by the Symbolic Implicit Monte Carlo (SIMC) method and a comparison is made between the standard formulation and the difference formulation. The SIMC method is easily adapted to the derivative source terms of the difference formulation, and a remarkable reduction in noise is obtained when the difference formulation is applied to problems involving thick media.

  18. Challenges of Monte Carlo Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Alex Roberts [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-10

    These are slides from a presentation for Parallel Summer School at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Solving discretized partial differential equations (PDEs) of interest can require a large number of computations. We can identify concurrency to allow parallel solution of discrete PDEs. Simulated particles histories can be used to solve the Boltzmann transport equation. Particle histories are independent in neutral particle transport, making them amenable to parallel computation. Physical parameters and method type determine the data dependencies of particle histories. Data requirements shape parallel algorithms for Monte Carlo. Then, Parallel Computational Physics and Parallel Monte Carlo are discussed and, finally, the results are given. The mesh passing method greatly simplifies the IMC implementation and allows simple load-balancing. Using MPI windows and passive, one-sided RMA further simplifies the implementation by removing target synchronization. The author is very interested in implementations of PGAS that may allow further optimization for one-sided, read-only memory access (e.g. Open SHMEM). The MPICH_RMA_OVER_DMAPP option and library is required to make one-sided messaging scale on Trinitite - Moonlight scales poorly. Interconnect specific libraries or functions are likely necessary to ensure performance. BRANSON has been used to directly compare the current standard method to a proposed method on idealized problems. The mesh passing algorithm performs well on problems that are designed to show the scalability of the particle passing method. BRANSON can now run load-imbalanced, dynamic problems. Potential avenues of improvement in the mesh passing algorithm will be implemented and explored. A suite of test problems that stress DD methods will elucidate a possible path forward for production codes.

  19. Smart detectors for Monte Carlo radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Baes, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Many optimization techniques have been invented to reduce the noise that is inherent in Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations. As the typical detectors used in Monte Carlo simulations do not take into account all the information contained in the impacting photon packages, there is still room to optimize this detection process and the corresponding estimate of the surface brightness distributions. We want to investigate how all the information contained in the distribution of impacting photon packages can be optimally used to decrease the noise in the surface brightness distributions and hence to increase the efficiency of Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations. We demonstrate that the estimate of the surface brightness distribution in a Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulation is similar to the estimate of the density distribution in an SPH simulation. Based on this similarity, a recipe is constructed for smart detectors that take full advantage of the exact location of the impact of the photon pack...

  20. Radiative Equilibrium and Temperature Correction in Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Bjorkman, J. E.; Wood, Kenneth

    2001-01-01

    We describe a general radiative equilibrium and temperature correction procedure for use in Monte Carlo radiation transfer codes with sources of temperature-independent opacity, such as astrophysical dust. The technique utilizes the fact that Monte Carlo simulations track individual photon packets, so we may easily determine where their energy is absorbed. When a packet is absorbed, it heats a particular cell within the envelope, raising its temperature. To enforce radiative equilibrium, the ...

  1. Composite biasing in Monte Carlo radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Baes, Maarten; Lunttila, Tuomas; Bianchi, Simone; Camps, Peter; Juvela, Mika; Kuiper, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Biasing or importance sampling is a powerful technique in Monte Carlo radiative transfer, and can be applied in different forms to increase the accuracy and efficiency of simulations. One of the drawbacks of the use of biasing is the potential introduction of large weight factors. We discuss a general strategy, composite biasing, to suppress the appearance of large weight factors. We use this composite biasing approach for two different problems faced by current state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes: the generation of photon packages from multiple components, and the penetration of radiation through high optical depth barriers. In both cases, the implementation of the relevant algorithms is trivial and does not interfere with any other optimisation techniques. Through simple test models, we demonstrate the general applicability, accuracy and efficiency of the composite biasing approach. In particular, for the penetration of high optical depths, the gain in efficiency is spectacular for the spe...

  2. A study of Monte Carlo radiative transfer through fractal clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautier, C.; Lavallec, D.; O`Hirok, W.; Ricchiazzi, P. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    An understanding of radiation transport (RT) through clouds is fundamental to studies of the earth`s radiation budget and climate dynamics. The transmission through horizontally homogeneous clouds has been studied thoroughly using accurate, discreet ordinates radiative transfer models. However, the applicability of these results to general problems of global radiation budget is limited by the plane parallel assumption and the fact that real clouds fields show variability, both vertically and horizontally, on all size scales. To understand how radiation interacts with realistic clouds, we have used a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model to compute the details of the photon-cloud interaction on synthetic cloud fields. Synthetic cloud fields, generated by a cascade model, reproduce the scaling behavior, as well as the cloud variability observed and estimated from cloud satellite data.

  3. Scalable Domain Decomposed Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Matthew Joseph [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2013-12-05

    In this dissertation, we present the parallel algorithms necessary to run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on large numbers of processors (millions of processors). Previous algorithms were not scalable, and the parallel overhead became more computationally costly than the numerical simulation.

  4. Space Radiation Transport Methods Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J.; Tripathi, R.; Qualls, G.; Cucinotta, F.; Prael, R.; Norbury, J.

    Early space radiation shield code development relied on Monte Carlo methods for proton, neutron and pion transport and made important contributions to the space program. More recently Monte Carlo code LAHET has been upgraded to include high-energy multiple-charged light ions for GCR simulations and continues to be expanded in capability. To compensate for low computational efficiency, Monte Carlo methods have resorted to restricted one-dimensional problems leading to imperfect representations of appropriate boundary conditions. Even so, intensive computational requirements resulted and shield evaluation was made near the end of the design process and resolving shielding issues usually had a negative impact on the design. We evaluate the implications of these common one-dimensional assumptions on the evaluation of the Shuttle internal radiation field. Improved spacecraft shield design requires early entry of radiation constraints into the design process to maximize performance and minimize costs. As a result, we have been investigating high-speed computational procedures to allow shield analysis from the preliminary design concepts to the final design. In particular, we will discuss the progress towards a full three-dimensional and computationally efficient deterministic code for which the current HZETRN evaluates the lowest order asymptotic term. HZETRN is the first deterministic solution to the Boltzmann equation allowing field mapping within the International Space Station (ISS) in tens of minutes using standard Finite Element Method (FEM) geometry common to engineering design practice enabling development of integrated multidisciplinary design optimization methods. A single ray trace in ISS FEM geometry requires 14 milliseconds and severely limits application of Monte Carlo methods to such engineering models. A potential means of improving the Monte Carlo efficiency in coupling to spacecraft geometry is given in terms of reconfigurable computing and could be

  5. Radiation transport: Progress report, July 1, 1987-September 30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Dell, R.D.; Nagy, A.

    1988-05-01

    Research and development progress in radiation transport for the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Group S-6 for the fourth quarter of FY 87 is reported. Included are unclassified tasks in the areas of Deterministic Radiation Transport, Monte Carlo Radiation Transport, and Cross Sections and Physics. 23 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Coupled electron-photon radiation transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorence, L.; Kensek, R.P.; Valdez, G.D.; Drumm, C.R.; Fan, W.C.; Powell, J.L.

    2000-01-17

    Massively-parallel computers allow detailed 3D radiation transport simulations to be performed to analyze the response of complex systems to radiation. This has been recently been demonstrated with the coupled electron-photon Monte Carlo code, ITS. To enable such calculations, the combinatorial geometry capability of ITS was improved. For greater geometrical flexibility, a version of ITS is under development that can track particles in CAD geometries. Deterministic radiation transport codes that utilize an unstructured spatial mesh are also being devised. For electron transport, the authors are investigating second-order forms of the transport equations which, when discretized, yield symmetric positive definite matrices. A novel parallelization strategy, simultaneously solving for spatial and angular unknowns, has been applied to the even- and odd-parity forms of the transport equation on a 2D unstructured spatial mesh. Another second-order form, the self-adjoint angular flux transport equation, also shows promise for electron transport.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation for the transport beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, F.; Cuttone, G.; Jia, S. B.; Varisano, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Attili, A.; Marchetto, F.; Russo, G. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Via P.Giuria, 1 10125 Torino (Italy); Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania, Italy and Institute of Physics Czech Academy of Science, ELI-Beamlines project, Na Slovance 2, Prague (Czech Republic); Carpinelli, M. [INFN Sezione di Cagliari, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); Tramontana, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania, Italy and Università di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Via S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy)

    2013-07-26

    In the framework of the ELIMED project, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used to study the physical transport of charged particles generated by laser-target interactions and to preliminarily evaluate fluence and dose distributions. An energy selection system and the experimental setup for the TARANIS laser facility in Belfast (UK) have been already simulated with the GEANT4 (GEometry ANd Tracking) MC toolkit. Preliminary results are reported here. Future developments are planned to implement a MC based 3D treatment planning in order to optimize shots number and dose delivery.

  8. Benchmarking of Proton Transport in Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongfeng; Li, Gui; Song, Jing; Zheng, Huaqing; Sun, Guangyao; Hao, Lijuan; Wu, Yican

    2014-06-01

    The Monte Carlo (MC) method has been traditionally applied in nuclear design and analysis due to its capability of dealing with complicated geometries and multi-dimensional physics problems as well as obtaining accurate results. The Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program (SuperMC) is developed by FDS Team in China for fusion, fission, and other nuclear applications. The simulations of radiation transport, isotope burn-up, material activation, radiation dose, and biology damage could be performed using SuperMC. Complicated geometries and the whole physical process of various types of particles in broad energy scale can be well handled. Bi-directional automatic conversion between general CAD models and full-formed input files of SuperMC is supported by MCAM, which is a CAD/image-based automatic modeling program for neutronics and radiation transport simulation. Mixed visualization of dynamical 3D dataset and geometry model is supported by RVIS, which is a nuclear radiation virtual simulation and assessment system. Continuous-energy cross section data from hybrid evaluated nuclear data library HENDL are utilized to support simulation. Neutronic fixed source and critical design parameters calculates for reactors of complex geometry and material distribution based on the transport of neutron and photon have been achieved in our former version of SuperMC. Recently, the proton transport has also been intergrated in SuperMC in the energy region up to 10 GeV. The physical processes considered for proton transport include electromagnetic processes and hadronic processes. The electromagnetic processes include ionization, multiple scattering, bremsstrahlung, and pair production processes. Public evaluated data from HENDL are used in some electromagnetic processes. In hadronic physics, the Bertini intra-nuclear cascade model with exitons, preequilibrium model, nucleus explosion model, fission model, and evaporation model are incorporated to treat the intermediate energy nuclear

  9. Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Densmore, Jeffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kelly, Thompson G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbatish, Todd J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-11-17

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique.

  10. Fluence to absorbed dose, effective dose and gray equivalent conversion coefficients for iron nuclei from 10 MeV to 1 TeV, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Kyle; Parker, Donald E; Friedberg, Wallace

    2010-03-01

    Conversion coefficients have been calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult male and an adult female to (56)Fe(26+) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). The coefficients were calculated using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.A and BodyBuilder 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms modified to allow calculation of effective dose using tissues and tissue weighting factors from either the 1990 or 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Calculations using ICRP 2007 recommendations result in fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients that are almost identical at most energies to those calculated using ICRP 1990 recommendations.

  11. Alpha particles at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, effective dose, and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Kyle; Parker, Donald E; Friedberg, Wallace

    2010-03-01

    Conversion coefficients have been calculated for fluence to absorbed dose, fluence to effective dose and fluence to gray equivalent, for isotropic exposure to alpha particles in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). The coefficients were calculated using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.A and BodyBuilder 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms modified to allow calculation of effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Coefficients for effective dose are within 30 % of those calculated using ICRP 1990 recommendations.

  12. Radiation Transport Calculations and Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasso, Alberto; /SLAC; Ferrari, A.; /CERN

    2011-06-30

    This article is an introduction to the Monte Carlo method as used in particle transport. After a description at an elementary level of the mathematical basis of the method, the Boltzmann equation and its physical meaning are presented, followed by Monte Carlo integration and random sampling, and by a general description of the main aspects and components of a typical Monte Carlo particle transport code. In particular, the most common biasing techniques are described, as well as the concepts of estimator and detector. After a discussion of the different types of errors, the issue of Quality Assurance is briefly considered.

  13. The Premar Code for the Monte Carlo Simulation of Radiation Transport In the Atmosphere; Il codice PREMAR per la simulazione Montecarlo del trasporto della radiazione dell`atmosfera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupini, E. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche `Ezio Clementel`, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione; Borgia, M.G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche `Ezio Clementel`, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Energia; Premuda, M. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Bologna (Italy). Ist. FISBAT

    1997-03-01

    The Montecarlo code PREMAR is described, which allows the user to simulate the radiation transport in the atmosphere, in the ultraviolet-infrared frequency interval. A plan multilayer geometry is at present foreseen by the code, witch albedo possibility at the lower boundary surface. For a given monochromatic point source, the main quantities computed by the code are the absorption spatial distributions of aerosol and molecules, together with the related atmospheric transmittances. Moreover, simulation of of Lidar experiments are foreseen by the code, the source and telescope fields of view being assigned. To build-up the appropriate probability distributions, an input data library is assumed to be read by the code. For this purpose the radiance-transmittance LOWTRAN-7 code has been conveniently adapted as a source of the library so as to exploit the richness of information of the code for a large variety of atmospheric simulations. Results of applications of the PREMAR code are finally presented, with special reference to simulations of Lidar system and radiometer experiments carried out at the Brasimone ENEA Centre by the Environment Department.

  14. NASA Space Radiation Transport Code Development Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Lawrence W

    2005-01-01

    Recently, NASA established a consortium involving the University of Tennessee (lead institution), the University of Houston, Roanoke College and various government and national laboratories, to accelerate the development of a standard set of radiation transport computer codes for NASA human exploration applications. This effort involves further improvements of the Monte Carlo codes HETC and FLUKA and the deterministic code HZETRN, including developing nuclear reaction databases necessary to extend the Monte Carlo codes to carry out heavy ion transport, and extending HZETRN to three dimensions. The improved codes will be validated by comparing predictions with measured laboratory transport data, provided by an experimental measurements consortium, and measurements in the upper atmosphere on the balloon-borne Deep Space Test Bed (DSTB). In this paper, we present an overview of the consortium members and the current status and future plans of consortium efforts to meet the research goals and objectives of this extensive undertaking.

  15. Deuterons at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Kyle; Parker, Donald E; Friedberg, Wallace

    2011-01-01

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult female and an adult male to deuterons ((2)H(+)) in the energy range 10 MeV-1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Coefficients were calculated using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilder™ 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms. Phantoms were modified to allow calculation of the effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Coefficients for the equivalent and effective dose incorporated a radiation weighting factor of 2. At 15 of 19 energies for which coefficients for the effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 1990 and 2007 recommendations differed by <3%. The greatest difference, 47%, occurred at 30 MeV.

  16. Monte-Carlo Modeling of the Prompt Radiation Emitted by a Nuclear Device in the National Capital Region, Revision 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-10

    document presents the results from an analysis of the impact of urban geometry on the transport of prompt radiation from a simulated low-yield nuclear...Radiation Transport Nuclear Detonation Initial Radiation Urban Terrain Dose Estimate 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT...neutron, photon, electron, or coupled neutron/photon/electron transport (X-5 Monte Carlo Team 2008). The urban geometry is derived from LIDAR data which

  17. Application of Monte Carlo methods in tomotherapy and radiation biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ya-Yun

    Helical tomotherapy is an attractive treatment for cancer therapy because highly conformal dose distributions can be achieved while the on-board megavoltage CT provides simultaneous images for accurate patient positioning. The convolution/superposition (C/S) dose calculation methods typically used for Tomotherapy treatment planning may overestimate skin (superficial) doses by 3-13%. Although more accurate than C/S methods, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are too slow for routine clinical treatment planning. However, the computational requirements of MC can be reduced by developing a source model for the parts of the accelerator that do not change from patient to patient. This source model then becomes the starting point for additional simulations of the penetration of radiation through patient. In the first section of this dissertation, a source model for a helical tomotherapy is constructed by condensing information from MC simulations into series of analytical formulas. The MC calculated percentage depth dose and beam profiles computed using the source model agree within 2% of measurements for a wide range of field sizes, which suggests that the proposed source model provides an adequate representation of the tomotherapy head for dose calculations. Monte Carlo methods are a versatile technique for simulating many physical, chemical and biological processes. In the second major of this thesis, a new methodology is developed to simulate of the induction of DNA damage by low-energy photons. First, the PENELOPE Monte Carlo radiation transport code is used to estimate the spectrum of initial electrons produced by photons. The initial spectrum of electrons are then combined with DNA damage yields for monoenergetic electrons from the fast Monte Carlo damage simulation (MCDS) developed earlier by Semenenko and Stewart (Purdue University). Single- and double-strand break yields predicted by the proposed methodology are in good agreement (1%) with the results of published

  18. Radiation Transport for Explosive Outflows: Opacity Regrouping

    CERN Document Server

    Wollaeger, Ryan T

    2014-01-01

    Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) are methods used to stochastically solve the radiative transport and diffusion equations, respectively. These methods combine into a hybrid transport-diffusion method we refer to as IMC-DDMC. We explore a multigroup IMC-DDMC scheme that, in DDMC, combines frequency groups with sufficient optical thickness. We term this procedure "opacity regrouping". Opacity regrouping has previously been applied to IMC-DDMC calculations for problems in which the dependence of the opacity on frequency is monotonic. We generalize opacity regrouping to non-contiguous groups and implement this in \\supernu, a code designed to do radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with non-monotonic opacities. We find that regrouping of non-contiguous opacity groups generally improves the speed of IMC-DDMC radiation transport. We present an asymptotic analysis that informs the nature of the Doppler shift in DDMC groups and summarize the derivation of the Gentile-Fleck ...

  19. Path Toward a Unifid Geometry for Radiation Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kerry; Barzilla, Janet; Davis, Andrew; Zachmann

    2014-01-01

    The Direct Accelerated Geometry for Radiation Analysis and Design (DAGRAD) element of the RadWorks Project under Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) within the Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) of NASA will enable new designs and concepts of operation for radiation risk assessment, mitigation and protection. This element is designed to produce a solution that will allow NASA to calculate the transport of space radiation through complex computer-aided design (CAD) models using the state-of-the-art analytic and Monte Carlo radiation transport codes. Due to the inherent hazard of astronaut and spacecraft exposure to ionizing radiation in low-Earth orbit (LEO) or in deep space, risk analyses must be performed for all crew vehicles and habitats. Incorporating these analyses into the design process can minimize the mass needed solely for radiation protection. Transport of the radiation fields as they pass through shielding and body materials can be simulated using Monte Carlo techniques or described by the Boltzmann equation, which is obtained by balancing changes in particle fluxes as they traverse a small volume of material with the gains and losses caused by atomic and nuclear collisions. Deterministic codes that solve the Boltzmann transport equation, such as HZETRN [high charge and energy transport code developed by NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC)], are generally computationally faster than Monte Carlo codes such as FLUKA, GEANT4, MCNP(X) or PHITS; however, they are currently limited to transport in one dimension, which poorly represents the secondary light ion and neutron radiation fields. NASA currently uses HZETRN space radiation transport software, both because it is computationally efficient and because proven methods have been developed for using this software to analyze complex geometries. Although Monte Carlo codes describe the relevant physics in a fully three-dimensional manner, their computational costs have thus far prevented their

  20. Path Toward a Unified Geometry for Radiation Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kerry

    The Direct Accelerated Geometry for Radiation Analysis and Design (DAGRAD) element of the RadWorks Project under Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) within the Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) of NASA will enable new designs and concepts of operation for radiation risk assessment, mitigation and protection. This element is designed to produce a solution that will allow NASA to calculate the transport of space radiation through complex CAD models using the state-of-the-art analytic and Monte Carlo radiation transport codes. Due to the inherent hazard of astronaut and spacecraft exposure to ionizing radiation in low-Earth orbit (LEO) or in deep space, risk analyses must be performed for all crew vehicles and habitats. Incorporating these analyses into the design process can minimize the mass needed solely for radiation protection. Transport of the radiation fields as they pass through shielding and body materials can be simulated using Monte Carlo techniques or described by the Boltzmann equation, which is obtained by balancing changes in particle fluxes as they traverse a small volume of material with the gains and losses caused by atomic and nuclear collisions. Deterministic codes that solve the Boltzmann transport equation, such as HZETRN (high charge and energy transport code developed by NASA LaRC), are generally computationally faster than Monte Carlo codes such as FLUKA, GEANT4, MCNP(X) or PHITS; however, they are currently limited to transport in one dimension, which poorly represents the secondary light ion and neutron radiation fields. NASA currently uses HZETRN space radiation transport software, both because it is computationally efficient and because proven methods have been developed for using this software to analyze complex geometries. Although Monte Carlo codes describe the relevant physics in a fully three-dimensional manner, their computational costs have thus far prevented their widespread use for analysis of complex CAD models, leading

  1. Monte Carlo simulations of the radiation environment for the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mallows, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo radiation transport codes are used by the CMS Beam Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity (BRIL) project to estimate the radiation levels due to proton-proton collisions and machine induced background. Results are used by the CMS collaboration for various applications: comparison with detector hit rates, pile-up studies, predictions of radiation damage based on various models (Dose, NIEL, DPA), shielding design, estimations of residual dose environment. Simulation parameters, and the maintenance of the input files are summarised, and key results are presented. Furthermore, an overview of additional programs developed by the BRIL project to meet the specific needs of CMS community is given.

  2. Monte Carlo simulations of the radiation environment for the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallows, S., E-mail: sophie.mallows@cern.ch [KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I. [IHEP, Protvino (Russian Federation); Bergstrom, I.; Cooijmans, T.; Dabrowski, A.; Glöggler, L.; Guthoff, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Kurochkin, I. [IHEP, Protvino (Russian Federation); Vincke, H.; Tajeda, S. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2016-07-11

    Monte Carlo radiation transport codes are used by the CMS Beam Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity (BRIL) project to estimate the radiation levels due to proton–proton collisions and machine induced background. Results are used by the CMS collaboration for various applications: comparison with detector hit rates, pile-up studies, predictions of radiation damage based on various models (Dose, NIEL, DPA), shielding design, estimations of residual dose environment. Simulation parameters, and the maintenance of the input files are summarized, and key results are presented. Furthermore, an overview of additional programs developed by the BRIL project to meet the specific needs of CMS community is given.

  3. RADIATION TRANSPORT FOR EXPLOSIVE OUTFLOWS: OPACITY REGROUPING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollaeger, Ryan T. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison 1500 Engineering Drive, 410 ERB, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Van Rossum, Daniel R., E-mail: wollaeger@wisc.edu, E-mail: daan@flash.uchicago.edu [Flash Center for Computational Science, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) are methods used to stochastically solve the radiative transport and diffusion equations, respectively. These methods combine into a hybrid transport-diffusion method we refer to as IMC-DDMC. We explore a multigroup IMC-DDMC scheme that in DDMC, combines frequency groups with sufficient optical thickness. We term this procedure ''opacity regrouping''. Opacity regrouping has previously been applied to IMC-DDMC calculations for problems in which the dependence of the opacity on frequency is monotonic. We generalize opacity regrouping to non-contiguous groups and implement this in SuperNu, a code designed to do radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with non-monotonic opacities. We find that regrouping of non-contiguous opacity groups generally improves the speed of IMC-DDMC radiation transport. We present an asymptotic analysis that informs the nature of the Doppler shift in DDMC groups and summarize the derivation of the Gentile-Fleck factor for modified IMC-DDMC. We test SuperNu using numerical experiments including a quasi-manufactured analytic solution, a simple 10 group problem, and the W7 problem for Type Ia supernovae. We find that opacity regrouping is necessary to make our IMC-DDMC implementation feasible for the W7 problem and possibly Type Ia supernova simulations in general. We compare the bolometric light curves and spectra produced by the SuperNu and PHOENIX radiation transport codes for the W7 problem. The overall shape of the bolometric light curves are in good agreement, as are the spectra and their evolution with time. However, for the numerical specifications we considered, we find that the peak luminosity of the light curve calculated using SuperNu is ∼10% less than that calculated using PHOENIX.

  4. Tritons at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Kyle; Parker, Donald E; Friedberg, Wallace

    2010-12-01

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult female and an adult male to tritons ((3)H(+)) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Coefficients were calculated using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilder™ 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms. Phantoms were modified to allow calculation of effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and calculation of gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. At 15 of the 19 energies for which coefficients for effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 2007 and 1990 recommendations differed by less than 3%. The greatest difference, 43%, occurred at 30 MeV.

  5. Helions at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Kyle; Parker, Donald E; Friedberg, Wallace

    2010-12-01

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent, for isotropic exposure of an adult male and an adult female to helions ((3)He(2+)) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Calculations were performed using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilder™ 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms modified to allow calculation of effective dose using tissues and tissue weighting factors from either the 1990 or 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. At 15 of the 19 energies for which coefficients for effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 2007 and 1990 recommendations differed by less than 2%. The greatest difference, 62%, occurred at 100 MeV.

  6. Numerical system utilising a Monte Carlo calculation method for accurate dose assessment in radiation accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, F; Endo, A

    2007-01-01

    A system utilising radiation transport codes has been developed to derive accurate dose distributions in a human body for radiological accidents. A suitable model is quite essential for a numerical analysis. Therefore, two tools were developed to setup a 'problem-dependent' input file, defining a radiation source and an exposed person to simulate the radiation transport in an accident with the Monte Carlo calculation codes-MCNP and MCNPX. Necessary resources are defined by a dialogue method with a generally used personal computer for both the tools. The tools prepare human body and source models described in the input file format of the employed Monte Carlo codes. The tools were validated for dose assessment in comparison with a past criticality accident and a hypothesized exposure.

  7. Monte-Carlo Calculation of Radiation Shield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The electron accelerator is used in the industry and society more and more. It produces electron beam with high radiation dose and lots of X rays when the electron beam interact with material. Because the X

  8. Forms of Approximate Radiation Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Brunner, G

    2002-01-01

    Photon radiation transport is described by the Boltzmann equation. Because this equation is difficult to solve, many different approximate forms have been implemented in computer codes. Several of the most common approximations are reviewed, and test problems illustrate the characteristics of each of the approximations. This document is designed as a tutorial so that code users can make an educated choice about which form of approximate radiation transport to use for their particular simulation.

  9. Guideline of Monte Carlo calculation. Neutron/gamma ray transport simulation by Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    This report condenses basic theories and advanced applications of neutron/gamma ray transport calculations in many fields of nuclear energy research. Chapters 1 through 5 treat historical progress of Monte Carlo methods, general issues of variance reduction technique, cross section libraries used in continuous energy Monte Carlo codes. In chapter 6, the following issues are discussed: fusion benchmark experiments, design of ITER, experiment analyses of fast critical assembly, core analyses of JMTR, simulation of pulsed neutron experiment, core analyses of HTTR, duct streaming calculations, bulk shielding calculations, neutron/gamma ray transport calculations of the Hiroshima atomic bomb. Chapters 8 and 9 treat function enhancements of MCNP and MVP codes, and a parallel processing of Monte Carlo calculation, respectively. An important references are attached at the end of this report.

  10. Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulation of a cavity solar reactor for the reduction of cerium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villafan-Vidales, H.I.; Arancibia-Bulnes, C.A.; Dehesa-Carrasco, U. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Privada Xochicalco s/n, Col. Centro, A.P. 34, Temixco, Morelos 62580 (Mexico); Romero-Paredes, H. [Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No.186, Col. Vicentina, A.P. 55-534, Mexico D.F 09340 (Mexico)

    2009-01-15

    Radiative heat transfer in a solar thermochemical reactor for the thermal reduction of cerium oxide is simulated with the Monte Carlo method. The directional characteristics and the power distribution of the concentrated solar radiation that enters the cavity is obtained by carrying out a Monte Carlo ray tracing of a paraboloidal concentrator. It is considered that the reactor contains a gas/particle suspension directly exposed to concentrated solar radiation. The suspension is treated as a non-isothermal, non-gray, absorbing, emitting, and anisotropically scattering medium. The transport coefficients of the particles are obtained from Mie-scattering theory by using the optical properties of cerium oxide. From the simulations, the aperture radius and the particle concentration were optimized to match the characteristics of the considered concentrator. (author)

  11. Recent developments in the Los Alamos radiation transport code system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, R.A.; Parsons, K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-06-01

    A brief progress report on updates to the Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) for solving criticality and fixed-source problems is provided. LARTCS integrates the Diffusion Accelerated Neutral Transport (DANT) discrete ordinates codes with the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code. The LARCTS code is being developed with a graphical user interface for problem setup and analysis. Progress in the DANT system for criticality applications include a two-dimensional module which can be linked to a mesh-generation code and a faster iteration scheme. Updates to MCNP Version 4A allow statistical checks of calculated Monte Carlo results.

  12. TRIPOLI-4: Monte Carlo transport code functionalities and applications; TRIPOLI-4: code de transport Monte Carlo fonctionnalites et applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Both, J.P.; Lee, Y.K.; Mazzolo, A.; Peneliau, Y.; Petit, O.; Roesslinger, B. [CEA Saclay, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN), Service d' Etudes de Reacteurs et de Modelisation Avancee, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2003-07-01

    Tripoli-4 is a three dimensional calculations code using the Monte Carlo method to simulate the transport of neutrons, photons, electrons and positrons. This code is used in four application fields: the protection studies, the criticality studies, the core studies and the instrumentation studies. Geometry, cross sections, description of sources, principle. (N.C.)

  13. Development of a space radiation Monte Carlo computer simulation based on the FLUKA and ROOT codes

    CERN Document Server

    Pinsky, L; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Carminati, F; Brun, R

    2001-01-01

    This NASA funded project is proceeding to develop a Monte Carlo-based computer simulation of the radiation environment in space. With actual funding only initially in place at the end of May 2000, the study is still in the early stage of development. The general tasks have been identified and personnel have been selected. The code to be assembled will be based upon two major existing software packages. The radiation transport simulation will be accomplished by updating the FLUKA Monte Carlo program, and the user interface will employ the ROOT software being developed at CERN. The end-product will be a Monte Carlo-based code which will complement the existing analytic codes such as BRYNTRN/HZETRN presently used by NASA to evaluate the effects of radiation shielding in space. The planned code will possess the ability to evaluate the radiation environment for spacecraft and habitats in Earth orbit, in interplanetary space, on the lunar surface, or on a planetary surface such as Mars. Furthermore, it will be usef...

  14. Radiation hydrodynamics simulations of massive star formation using Monte Carlo radiation transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Harries, Tim J; Acreman, David

    2012-01-01

    We present a radiation hydrodynamics simulation of the formation of a massive star using a Monte Carlo treatment for the radiation field. We find that strong, high speed bipolar cavities are driven by the radiation from the protostar, and that accretion occurs stochastically from a circumstellar disc. We have computed spectral energy distributions and images at each timestep, which may in future be used to compare our models with photometric, spectroscopic, and interferometric observations of young massive stellar objects.

  15. SPAMCART: a code for smoothed particle Monte Carlo radiative transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomax, O.; Whitworth, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    We present a code for generating synthetic spectral energy distributions and intensity maps from smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation snapshots. The code is based on the Lucy Monte Carlo radiative transfer method, i.e. it follows discrete luminosity packets as they propagate through a density field, and then uses their trajectories to compute the radiative equilibrium temperature of the ambient dust. The sources can be extended and/or embedded, and discrete and/or diffuse. The density is not mapped on to a grid, and therefore the calculation is performed at exactly the same resolution as the hydrodynamics. We present two example calculations using this method. First, we demonstrate that the code strictly adheres to Kirchhoff's law of radiation. Secondly, we present synthetic intensity maps and spectra of an embedded protostellar multiple system. The algorithm uses data structures that are already constructed for other purposes in modern particle codes. It is therefore relatively simple to implement.

  16. Radiative heat transfer by the Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    Hartnett †, James P; Cho, Young I; Greene, George A; Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Yang, Wen-Jei; Kudo, Kazuhiko

    1995-01-01

    This book presents the basic principles and applications of radiative heat transfer used in energy, space, and geo-environmental engineering, and can serve as a reference book for engineers and scientists in researchand development. A PC disk containing software for numerical analyses by the Monte Carlo method is included to provide hands-on practice in analyzing actual radiative heat transfer problems.Advances in Heat Transfer is designed to fill the information gap between regularly scheduled journals and university level textbooks by providing in-depth review articles over a broader scope than journals or texts usually allow.Key Features* Offers solution methods for integro-differential formulation to help avoid difficulties* Includes a computer disk for numerical analyses by PC* Discusses energy absorption by gas and scattering effects by particles* Treats non-gray radiative gases* Provides example problems for direct applications in energy, space, and geo-environmental engineering

  17. SPAMCART: a code for smoothed particle Monte Carlo radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, O

    2016-01-01

    We present a code for generating synthetic SEDs and intensity maps from Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics simulation snapshots. The code is based on the Lucy (1999) Monte Carlo Radiative Transfer method, i.e. it follows discrete luminosity packets, emitted from external and/or embedded sources, as they propagate through a density field, and then uses their trajectories to compute the radiative equilibrium temperature of the ambient dust. The density is not mapped onto a grid, and therefore the calculation is performed at exactly the same resolution as the hydrodynamics. We present two example calculations using this method. First, we demonstrate that the code strictly adheres to Kirchhoff's law of radiation. Second, we present synthetic intensity maps and spectra of an embedded protostellar multiple system. The algorithm uses data structures that are already constructed for other purposes in modern particle codes. It is therefore relatively simple to implement.

  18. TRIPOLI-3: a neutron/photon Monte Carlo transport code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimal, J.C.; Vergnaud, T. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service d' Etudes de Reacteurs et de Mathematiques Appliquees

    2001-07-01

    The present version of TRIPOLI-3 solves the transport equation for coupled neutron and gamma ray problems in three dimensional geometries by using the Monte Carlo method. This code is devoted both to shielding and criticality problems. The most important feature for particle transport equation solving is the fine treatment of the physical phenomena and sophisticated biasing technics useful for deep penetrations. The code is used either for shielding design studies or for reference and benchmark to validate cross sections. Neutronic studies are essentially cell or small core calculations and criticality problems. TRIPOLI-3 has been used as reference method, for example, for resonance self shielding qualification. (orig.)

  19. Monte Carlo simulations of charge transport in heterogeneous organic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Pyie Phyo; Khanal, Kiran; Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta

    2015-03-01

    The efficiency of organic solar cells depends on the morphology and electronic properties of the active layer. Research teams have been experimenting with different conducting materials to achieve more efficient solar panels. In this work, we perform Monte Carlo simulations to study charge transport in heterogeneous materials. We have developed a coarse-grained lattice model of polymeric photovoltaics and use it to generate active layers with ordered and disordered regions. We determine carrier mobilities for a range of conditions to investigate the effect of the morphology on charge transport.

  20. 3D Monte Carlo radiation transfer modelling of photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, C. Louise; Christison, Craig; Brown, C. Tom A.; Wood, Kenneth; Valentine, Ronan M.; Moseley, Harry

    2015-06-01

    The effects of ageing and skin type on Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) for different treatment methods have been theoretically investigated. A multilayered Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer model is presented where both daylight activated PDT and conventional PDT are compared. It was found that light penetrates deeper through older skin with a lighter complexion, which translates into a deeper effective treatment depth. The effect of ageing was found to be larger for darker skin types. The investigation further strengthens the usage of daylight as a potential light source for PDT where effective treatment depths of about 2 mm can be achieved.

  1. Comparison of Two Accelerators for Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Calculations, NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPU and Intel Xeon Phi 5110p Coprocessor: A Case Study for X-ray CT Imaging Dose Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianyu; Xu, X. George; Carothers, Christopher D.

    2014-06-01

    Hardware accelerators are currently becoming increasingly important in boosting high performance computing sys- tems. In this study, we tested the performance of two accelerator models, NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPU and Intel Xeon Phi 5110p coprocessor, using a new Monte Carlo photon transport package called ARCHER-CT we have developed for fast CT imaging dose calculation. The package contains three code variants, ARCHER - CTCPU, ARCHER - CTGPU and ARCHER - CTCOP to run in parallel on the multi-core CPU, GPU and coprocessor architectures respectively. A detailed GE LightSpeed Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) scanner model and a family of voxel patient phantoms were included in the code to calculate absorbed dose to radiosensitive organs under specified scan protocols. The results from ARCHER agreed well with those from the production code Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). It was found that all the code variants were significantly faster than the parallel MCNPX running on 12 MPI processes, and that the GPU and coprocessor performed equally well, being 2.89~4.49 and 3.01~3.23 times faster than the parallel ARCHER - CTCPU running with 12 hyperthreads.

  2. Inverse methods for radiation transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bledsoe, Keith C.

    Implicit optimization methods for solving the inverse transport problems of interface location identification, source isotope weight fraction identification, shield material identification, and material mass density identification are explored. Among these optimization methods are the Schwinger inverse method, Levenberg-Marquardt method, and evolutionary algorithms. Inverse problems are studied in one-dimensional spherical and two-dimensional cylindrical geometries. The scalar fluxes of unscattered gamma-ray lines, leakages of neutron-induced gamma-ray lines, and/or neutron multiplication in the system are assumed to be measured. Each optimization method is studied on numerical test problems in which the measured data is simulated using the same deterministic transport code used in the optimization process (assuming perfectly consistent measurements) and using a Monte Carlo code (assuming less-consistent, more realistic measurements). The Schwinger inverse method and Levenberg-Marquardt methods are found to be successful for problems with relatively few (i.e. 4 or fewer) unknown parameters, with the former being the best for unknown isotope problems and the latter being more adept at interface location, unknown material mass density, and mixed parameter problems. A study of a variety of evolutionary algorithms indicates that the differential evolution method is the best for inverse transport problems, and outperforms the Levenberg-Marquardt method on problems with large numbers of unknowns. An algorithm created by combining different variants of the differential evolution method is shown to be highly successful on spherical problems with unscattered gamma-ray lines, while a basic differential evolution approach is more useful for problems with scattering and in cylindrical geometries. A hybrid differential evolution/Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm also was found to show promise for fast and robust solution of inverse problems.

  3. TU-EF-304-10: Efficient Multiscale Simulation of the Proton Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) for DNA Double Strand Break (DSB) Induction and Bio-Effective Dose in the FLUKA Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskvin, V; Tsiamas, P; Axente, M; Farr, J [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Stewart, R [University of Washington, Seattle, WA. (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: One of the more critical initiating events for reproductive cell death is the creation of a DNA double strand break (DSB). In this study, we present a computationally efficient way to determine spatial variations in the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of proton therapy beams within the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code. Methods: We used the independently tested Monte Carlo Damage Simulation (MCDS) developed by Stewart and colleagues (Radiat. Res. 176, 587–602 2011) to estimate the RBE for DSB induction of monoenergetic protons, tritium, deuterium, hellium-3, hellium-4 ions and delta-electrons. The dose-weighted (RBE) coefficients were incorporated into FLUKA to determine the equivalent {sup 6}°60Co γ-ray dose for representative proton beams incident on cells in an aerobic and anoxic environment. Results: We found that the proton beam RBE for DSB induction at the tip of the Bragg peak, including primary and secondary particles, is close to 1.2. Furthermore, the RBE increases laterally to the beam axis at the area of Bragg peak. At the distal edge, the RBE is in the range from 1.3–1.4 for cells irradiated under aerobic conditions and may be as large as 1.5–1.8 for cells irradiated under anoxic conditions. Across the plateau region, the recorded RBE for DSB induction is 1.02 for aerobic cells and 1.05 for cells irradiated under anoxic conditions. The contribution to total effective dose from secondary heavy ions decreases with depth and is higher at shallow depths (e.g., at the surface of the skin). Conclusion: Multiscale simulation of the RBE for DSB induction provides useful insights into spatial variations in proton RBE within pristine Bragg peaks. This methodology is potentially useful for the biological optimization of proton therapy for the treatment of cancer. The study highlights the need to incorporate spatial variations in proton RBE into proton therapy treatment plans.

  4. The macro response Monte Carlo method for electron transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svatos, M M

    1998-09-01

    The main goal of this thesis was to prove the feasibility of basing electron depth dose calculations in a phantom on first-principles single scatter physics, in an amount of time that is equal to or better than current electron Monte Carlo methods. The Macro Response Monte Carlo (MRMC) method achieves run times that are on the order of conventional electron transport methods such as condensed history, with the potential to be much faster. This is possible because MRMC is a Local-to-Global method, meaning the problem is broken down into two separate transport calculations. The first stage is a local, in this case, single scatter calculation, which generates probability distribution functions (PDFs) to describe the electron's energy, position and trajectory after leaving the local geometry, a small sphere or "kugel" A number of local kugel calculations were run for calcium and carbon, creating a library of kugel data sets over a range of incident energies (0.25 MeV - 8 MeV) and sizes (0.025 cm to 0.1 cm in radius). The second transport stage is a global calculation, where steps that conform to the size of the kugels in the library are taken through the global geometry. For each step, the appropriate PDFs from the MRMC library are sampled to determine the electron's new energy, position and trajectory. The electron is immediately advanced to the end of the step and then chooses another kugel to sample, which continues until transport is completed. The MRMC global stepping code was benchmarked as a series of subroutines inside of the Peregrine Monte Carlo code. It was compared to Peregrine's class II condensed history electron transport package, EGS4, and MCNP for depth dose in simple phantoms having density inhomogeneities. Since the kugels completed in the library were of relatively small size, the zoning of the phantoms was scaled down from a clinical size, so that the energy deposition algorithms for spreading dose across 5-10 zones per kugel could

  5. Efficient control variates for uncertainty quantification of radiation transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, A.; Iaccarino, G.

    2017-03-01

    Numerical simulations of problems involving radiation transport are challenging because of the associated computational cost; moreover, it is typically difficult to describe the optical properties of the system very precisely, and therefore uncertainties abound. We aim to represent the uncertainties explicitly and to characterize their impact on the output of interest. While stochastic collocation and polynomial chaos methods have been applied previously, these methods can suffer from the curse of dimensionality and fail in cases where the system response is discontinuous or highly non-linear. Monte Carlo methods are more robust, but they converge slowly. To that end, we apply the control variate method to uncertainty propagation via Monte Carlo. We leverage the modeling hierarchy of radiation transport to use low fidelity models such as the diffusion approximation and coarse angular discretizations to reduce the confidence interval on the quantity of interest. The efficiency of the control variate method is demonstrated in several problems involving stochastic media, thermal emission, and radiation properties with different quantities of interest. The control variates are able to provide significant variance reduction and efficiency increase in all problems considered. We conclude our study with a discussion of choosing optimal control variates and other extensions of Monte Carlo methods.

  6. Numerical computation of discrete differential scattering cross sections for Monte Carlo charged particle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Jonathan A., E-mail: walshjon@mit.edu [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, 24-107, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Palmer, Todd S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, 116 Radiation Center, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Urbatsch, Todd J. [XTD-IDA: Theoretical Design, Integrated Design and Assessment, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Generation of discrete differential scattering angle and energy loss cross sections. • Gauss–Radau quadrature utilizing numerically computed cross section moments. • Development of a charged particle transport capability in the Milagro IMC code. • Integration of cross section generation and charged particle transport capabilities. - Abstract: We investigate a method for numerically generating discrete scattering cross sections for use in charged particle transport simulations. We describe the cross section generation procedure and compare it to existing methods used to obtain discrete cross sections. The numerical approach presented here is generalized to allow greater flexibility in choosing a cross section model from which to derive discrete values. Cross section data computed with this method compare favorably with discrete data generated with an existing method. Additionally, a charged particle transport capability is demonstrated in the time-dependent Implicit Monte Carlo radiative transfer code, Milagro. We verify the implementation of charged particle transport in Milagro with analytic test problems and we compare calculated electron depth–dose profiles with another particle transport code that has a validated electron transport capability. Finally, we investigate the integration of the new discrete cross section generation method with the charged particle transport capability in Milagro.

  7. SKIRT: the design of a suite of input models for Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Baes, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is the most popular technique to perform radiative transfer simulations in a general 3D geometry. The algorithms behind and acceleration techniques for Monte Carlo radiative transfer are discussed extensively in the literature, and many different Monte Carlo codes are publicly available. On the contrary, the design of a suite of components that can be used for the distribution of sources and sinks in radiative transfer codes has received very little attention. The availability of such models, with different degrees of complexity, has many benefits. For example, they can serve as toy models to test new physical ingredients, or as parameterised models for inverse radiative transfer fitting. For 3D Monte Carlo codes, this requires algorithms to efficiently generate random positions from 3D density distributions. We describe the design of a flexible suite of components for the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code SKIRT. The design is based on a combination of basic building blocks (which can...

  8. Monte Carlo simulations for the space radiation superconducting shield project (SR2S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuolo, M.; Giraudo, M.; Musenich, R.; Calvelli, V.; Ambroglini, F.; Burger, W. J.; Battiston, R.

    2016-02-01

    Astronauts on deep-space long-duration missions will be exposed for long time to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE). The exposure to space radiation could lead to both acute and late effects in the crew members and well defined countermeasures do not exist nowadays. The simplest solution given by optimized passive shielding is not able to reduce the dose deposited by GCRs below the actual dose limits, therefore other solutions, such as active shielding employing superconducting magnetic fields, are under study. In the framework of the EU FP7 SR2S Project - Space Radiation Superconducting Shield - a toroidal magnetic system based on MgB2 superconductors has been analyzed through detailed Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 interface GRAS. Spacecraft and magnets were modeled together with a simplified mechanical structure supporting the coils. Radiation transport through magnetic fields and materials was simulated for a deep-space mission scenario, considering for the first time the effect of secondary particles produced in the passage of space radiation through the active shielding and spacecraft structures. When modeling the structures supporting the active shielding systems and the habitat, the radiation protection efficiency of the magnetic field is severely decreasing compared to the one reported in previous studies, when only the magnetic field was modeled around the crew. This is due to the large production of secondary radiation taking place in the material surrounding the habitat.

  9. Monte Carlo simulations for the space radiation superconducting shield project (SR2S).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuolo, M; Giraudo, M; Musenich, R; Calvelli, V; Ambroglini, F; Burger, W J; Battiston, R

    2016-02-01

    Astronauts on deep-space long-duration missions will be exposed for long time to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE). The exposure to space radiation could lead to both acute and late effects in the crew members and well defined countermeasures do not exist nowadays. The simplest solution given by optimized passive shielding is not able to reduce the dose deposited by GCRs below the actual dose limits, therefore other solutions, such as active shielding employing superconducting magnetic fields, are under study. In the framework of the EU FP7 SR2S Project - Space Radiation Superconducting Shield--a toroidal magnetic system based on MgB2 superconductors has been analyzed through detailed Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 interface GRAS. Spacecraft and magnets were modeled together with a simplified mechanical structure supporting the coils. Radiation transport through magnetic fields and materials was simulated for a deep-space mission scenario, considering for the first time the effect of secondary particles produced in the passage of space radiation through the active shielding and spacecraft structures. When modeling the structures supporting the active shielding systems and the habitat, the radiation protection efficiency of the magnetic field is severely decreasing compared to the one reported in previous studies, when only the magnetic field was modeled around the crew. This is due to the large production of secondary radiation taking place in the material surrounding the habitat.

  10. Monte Carlo modeling in CT-based geometries: dosimetry for biological modeling experiments with particle beam radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffenderfer, Eric S; Dolney, Derek; Schaettler, Maximilian; Sanzari, Jenine K; McDonough, James; Cengel, Keith A

    2014-03-01

    The space radiation environment imposes increased dangers of exposure to ionizing radiation, particularly during a solar particle event (SPE). These events consist primarily of low energy protons that produce a highly inhomogeneous dose distribution. Due to this inherent dose heterogeneity, experiments designed to investigate the radiobiological effects of SPE radiation present difficulties in evaluating and interpreting dose to sensitive organs. To address this challenge, we used the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation framework to develop dosimetry software that uses computed tomography (CT) images and provides radiation transport simulations incorporating all relevant physical interaction processes. We found that this simulation accurately predicts measured data in phantoms and can be applied to model dose in radiobiological experiments with animal models exposed to charged particle (electron and proton) beams. This study clearly demonstrates the value of Monte Carlo radiation transport methods for two critically interrelated uses: (i) determining the overall dose distribution and dose levels to specific organ systems for animal experiments with SPE-like radiation, and (ii) interpreting the effect of random and systematic variations in experimental variables (e.g. animal movement during long exposures) on the dose distributions and consequent biological effects from SPE-like radiation exposure. The software developed and validated in this study represents a critically important new tool that allows integration of computational and biological modeling for evaluating the biological outcomes of exposures to inhomogeneous SPE-like radiation dose distributions, and has potential applications for other environmental and therapeutic exposure simulations.

  11. Modeling and simulation of radiation from hypersonic flows with Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Ilyoup

    approximately 1 % was achieved with an efficiency about three times faster than the NEQAIR code. To perform accurate and efficient analyses of chemically reacting flowfield - radiation interactions, the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and the photon Monte Carlo (PMC) radiative transport methods are used to simulate flowfield - radiation coupling from transitional to peak heating freestream conditions. The non-catalytic and fully catalytic surface conditions were modeled and good agreement of the stagnation-point convective heating between DSMC and continuum fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation under the assumption of fully catalytic surface was achieved. Stagnation-point radiative heating, however, was found to be very different. To simulate three-dimensional radiative transport, the finite-volume based PMC (FV-PMC) method was employed. DSMC - FV-PMC simulations with the goal of understanding the effect of radiation on the flow structure for different degrees of hypersonic non-equilibrium are presented. It is found that except for the highest altitudes, the coupling of radiation influences the flowfield, leading to a decrease in both heavy particle translational and internal temperatures and a decrease in the convective heat flux to the vehicle body. The DSMC - FV-PMC coupled simulations are compared with the previous coupled simulations and correlations obtained using continuum flow modeling and one-dimensional radiative transport. The modeling of radiative transport is further complicated by radiative transitions occurring during the excitation process of the same radiating gas species. This interaction affects the distribution of electronic state populations and, in turn, the radiative transport. The radiative transition rate in the excitation/de-excitation processes and the radiative transport equation (RTE) must be coupled simultaneously to account for non-local effects. The QSS model is presented to predict the electronic state populations of radiating gas species taking

  12. Monte Carlo Radiation Hydrodynamics: Methods, Tests and Application to Supernova Type Ia Ejecta

    CERN Document Server

    Noebauer, U M; Kromer, M; Röpke, F K; Hillebrandt, W

    2012-01-01

    In astrophysical systems, radiation-matter interactions are important in transferring energy and momentum between the radiation field and the surrounding material. This coupling often makes it necessary to consider the role of radiation when modelling the dynamics of astrophysical fluids. During the last few years, there have been rapid developments in the use of Monte Carlo methods for numerical radiative transfer simulations. Here, we present an approach to radiation hydrodynamics that is based on coupling Monte Carlo radiative transfer techniques with finite-volume hydrodynamical methods in an operator-split manner. In particular, we adopt an indivisible packet formalism to discretize the radiation field into an ensemble of Monte Carlo packets and employ volume-based estimators to reconstruct the radiation field characteristics. In this paper the numerical tools of this method are presented and their accuracy is verified in a series of test calculations. Finally, as a practical example, we use our approach...

  13. Parallelization of a Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjidoukas, P.; Bousis, C.; Emfietzoglou, D.

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a high performance version of the Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code MC4. The original application code, developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) for Microsoft Excel, was first rewritten in the C programming language for improving code portability. Several pseudo-random number generators have been also integrated and studied. The new MC4 version was then parallelized for shared and distributed-memory multiprocessor systems using the Message Passing Interface. Two parallel pseudo-random number generator libraries (SPRNG and DCMT) have been seamlessly integrated. The performance speedup of parallel MC4 has been studied on a variety of parallel computing architectures including an Intel Xeon server with 4 dual-core processors, a Sun cluster consisting of 16 nodes of 2 dual-core AMD Opteron processors and a 200 dual-processor HP cluster. For large problem size, which is limited only by the physical memory of the multiprocessor server, the speedup results are almost linear on all systems. We have validated the parallel implementation against the serial VBA and C implementations using the same random number generator. Our experimental results on the transport and energy loss of electrons in a water medium show that the serial and parallel codes are equivalent in accuracy. The present improvements allow for studying of higher particle energies with the use of more accurate physical models, and improve statistics as more particles tracks can be simulated in low response time.

  14. Non-analog Monte Carlo estimators for radiation momentum deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Densmore, Jeffery D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hykes, Joshua M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The standard method for calculating radiation momentum deposition in Monte Carlo simulations is the analog estimator, which tallies the change in a particle's momentum at each interaction with the matter. Unfortunately, the analog estimator can suffer from large amounts of statistical error. In this paper, we present three new non-analog techniques for estimating momentum deposition. Specifically, we use absorption, collision, and track-length estimators to evaluate a simple integral expression for momentum deposition that does not contain terms that can cause large amounts of statistical error in the analog scheme. We compare our new non-analog estimators to the analog estimator with a set of test problems that encompass a wide range of material properties and both isotropic and anisotropic scattering. In nearly all cases, the new non-analog estimators outperform the analog estimator. The track-length estimator consistently yields the highest performance gains, improving upon the analog-estimator figure of merit by factors of up to two orders of magnitude.

  15. Intra-operative radiation therapy optimization using the Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosetti, M. [ENEA, Bologna (Italy); Benassi, M.; Bufacchi, A.; D' Andrea, M. [Ist. Regina Elena, Rome (Italy); Bruzzaniti, V. [ENEA, S. Maria di Galeria (Rome) (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    The problem addressed with reference to the treatment head optimization has been the choice of the proper design of the head of a new 12 MeV linear accelerator in order to have the required dose uniformity on the target volume while keeping the dose rate sufficiently high and the photon production and the beam impact with the head walls within acceptable limits. The second part of the optimization work, concerning the TPS, is based on the rationale that the TPSs generally used in radiotherapy use semi-empirical algorithms whose accuracy can be inadequate particularly when irregular surfaces and/or inhomogeneities, such as air cavities or bone, are present. The Monte Carlo method, on the contrary, is capable of accurately calculating the dose distribution under almost all circumstances. Furthermore it offers the advantage of allowing to start the simulation of the radiation transport in the patient from the beam data obtained with the transport through the specific treatment head used. Therefore the Monte Carlo simulations, which at present are not yet widely used for routine treatment planning due to the required computing time, can be employed as a benchmark and as an optimization tool for conventional TPSs. (orig.)

  16. Investigation of Radiation Protection Methodologies for Radiation Therapy Shielding Using Monte Carlo Simulation and Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanny, Sean

    The advent of high-energy linear accelerators for dedicated medical use in the 1950's by Henry Kaplan and the Stanford University physics department began a revolution in radiation oncology. Today, linear accelerators are the standard of care for modern radiation therapy and can generate high-energy beams that can produce tens of Gy per minute at isocenter. This creates a need for a large amount of shielding material to properly protect members of the public and hospital staff. Standardized vault designs and guidance on shielding properties of various materials are provided by the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) Report 151. However, physicists are seeking ways to minimize the footprint and volume of shielding material needed which leads to the use of non-standard vault configurations and less-studied materials, such as high-density concrete. The University of Toledo Dana Cancer Center has utilized both of these methods to minimize the cost and spatial footprint of the requisite radiation shielding. To ensure a safe work environment, computer simulations were performed to verify the attenuation properties and shielding workloads produced by a variety of situations where standard recommendations and guidance documents were insufficient. This project studies two areas of concern that are not addressed by NCRP 151, the radiation shielding workload for the vault door with a non-standard design, and the attenuation properties of high-density concrete for both photon and neutron radiation. Simulations have been performed using a Monte-Carlo code produced by the Los Alamos National Lab (LANL), Monte Carlo Neutrons, Photons 5 (MCNP5). Measurements have been performed using a shielding test port designed into the maze of the Varian Edge treatment vault.

  17. Nanoscale radiation transport and clinical beam modeling for gold nanoparticle dose enhanced radiotherapy (GNPT) using X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygmanski, Piotr; Sajo, Erno

    2016-01-01

    We review radiation transport and clinical beam modelling for gold nanoparticle dose-enhanced radiotherapy using X-rays. We focus on the nanoscale radiation transport and its relation to macroscopic dosimetry for monoenergetic and clinical beams. Among other aspects, we discuss Monte Carlo and deterministic methods and their applications to predicting dose enhancement using various metrics.

  18. The impact of advances in computer technology on particle transport Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, W.R. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Rathkopf, J.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Brown, F.B. [Knolls Atomic Power Lab., Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1992-01-21

    Advances in computer technology, including hardware, architectural, and software advances, have led to dramatic gains in computer performance over the past decade. We summarize these performance trends and discuss the extent to which particle transport Monte Carlo codes have been able to take advantage of these performance gains. We consider MIMD, SIMD, and parallel distributed computer configurations for particle transport Monte Carlo applications. Some specific experience with vectorization and parallelization of production Monte Carlo codes is included. The topic of parallel random number generation is discussed in some detail. Finally, some software issues that hinder the implementation of Monte Carlo methods on parallel processors are addressed.

  19. ITS Version 6 : the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Brian Claude; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Laub, Thomas William

    2008-04-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of lineartime-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 6, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 5.0 codes, and (2) conversion to Fortran 90. The general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through memory allocation to reduce the need for users to modify and recompile the code.

  20. A generic algorithm for Monte Carlo simulation of proton transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvat, Francesc, E-mail: francesc.salvat@ub.edu

    2013-12-01

    A mixed (class II) algorithm for Monte Carlo simulation of the transport of protons, and other heavy charged particles, in matter is presented. The emphasis is on the electromagnetic interactions (elastic and inelastic collisions) which are simulated using strategies similar to those employed in the electron–photon code PENELOPE. Elastic collisions are described in terms of numerical differential cross sections (DCSs) in the center-of-mass frame, calculated from the eikonal approximation with the Dirac–Hartree–Fock–Slater atomic potential. The polar scattering angle is sampled by employing an adaptive numerical algorithm which allows control of interpolation errors. The energy transferred to the recoiling target atoms (nuclear stopping) is consistently described by transformation to the laboratory frame. Inelastic collisions are simulated from DCSs based on the plane–wave Born approximation (PWBA), making use of the Sternheimer–Liljequist model of the generalized oscillator strength, with parameters adjusted to reproduce (1) the electronic stopping power read from the input file, and (2) the total cross sections for impact ionization of inner subshells. The latter were calculated from the PWBA including screening and Coulomb corrections. This approach provides quite a realistic description of the energy-loss distribution in single collisions, and of the emission of X-rays induced by proton impact. The simulation algorithm can be readily modified to include nuclear reactions, when the corresponding cross sections and emission probabilities are available, and bremsstrahlung emission.

  1. A generic algorithm for Monte Carlo simulation of proton transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvat, Francesc

    2013-12-01

    A mixed (class II) algorithm for Monte Carlo simulation of the transport of protons, and other heavy charged particles, in matter is presented. The emphasis is on the electromagnetic interactions (elastic and inelastic collisions) which are simulated using strategies similar to those employed in the electron-photon code PENELOPE. Elastic collisions are described in terms of numerical differential cross sections (DCSs) in the center-of-mass frame, calculated from the eikonal approximation with the Dirac-Hartree-Fock-Slater atomic potential. The polar scattering angle is sampled by employing an adaptive numerical algorithm which allows control of interpolation errors. The energy transferred to the recoiling target atoms (nuclear stopping) is consistently described by transformation to the laboratory frame. Inelastic collisions are simulated from DCSs based on the plane-wave Born approximation (PWBA), making use of the Sternheimer-Liljequist model of the generalized oscillator strength, with parameters adjusted to reproduce (1) the electronic stopping power read from the input file, and (2) the total cross sections for impact ionization of inner subshells. The latter were calculated from the PWBA including screening and Coulomb corrections. This approach provides quite a realistic description of the energy-loss distribution in single collisions, and of the emission of X-rays induced by proton impact. The simulation algorithm can be readily modified to include nuclear reactions, when the corresponding cross sections and emission probabilities are available, and bremsstrahlung emission.

  2. Radiation shielding design for neutron diffractometers assisted by Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, John C.; Ersez, Tunay; Braoudakis, George

    2006-11-01

    Monte Carlo simulations may be used to model radiation shielding for neutron diffractometers. The use of the MCNP computer program to assess shielding for a diffractometer is discussed. A comparison is made of shielding requirements for radiation generated by several materials commonly used in neutron optical elements and beam stops, including lithium-6 based absorbers where the Monte Carlo method can model the effects of fast neutrons generated by this material.

  3. Hybrid formulation of radiation transport in optically thick divertor plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosato, J.; Marandet, Y.; Bufferand, H.; Stamm, R. [PIIM, UMR 7345 Aix-Marseille Universite / CNRS, Centre de St-Jerome, Marseille (France); Reiter, D. [IEK-4 Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of coupled atom-radiation transport in optically thick divertor plasmas can be computationally very demanding, in particular in ITER relevant conditions or even larger devices, e.g. for power plant divertor studies. At high (∝ 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}) atomic densities, it can be shown that sufficiently large divertors behave in certain areas like a black body near the first resonance line of hydrogen (Lyman α). This suggests that, at least in part, the use of continuum model (radiation hydrodynamics) can be sufficiently accurate, while being less time consuming. In this work, we report on the development of a hybrid model devoted to switch automatically between a kinetic and a continuum description according to the plasma conditions. Calculations of the photo-excitation rate in a homogeneous slab are performed as an illustration. The outlined hybrid concept might be also applicable to neutral atom transport, due to mathematical analogy of transport equations for neutrals and radiation. (copyright 2016 The Authors. Contributions to Plasma Physics published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA Weinheim. This)

  4. Generation of discrete scattering cross sections and demonstration of Monte Carlo charged particle transport in the Milagro IMC code package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, J. A. [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, NW12-312 Albany, St. Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Palmer, T. S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, 116 Radiation Center, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Urbatsch, T. J. [XTD-5: Air Force Systems, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A new method for generating discrete scattering cross sections to be used in charged particle transport calculations is investigated. The method of data generation is presented and compared to current methods for obtaining discrete cross sections. The new, more generalized approach allows greater flexibility in choosing a cross section model from which to derive discrete values. Cross section data generated with the new method is verified through a comparison with discrete data obtained with an existing method. Additionally, a charged particle transport capability is demonstrated in the time-dependent Implicit Monte Carlo radiative transfer code package, Milagro. The implementation of this capability is verified using test problems with analytic solutions as well as a comparison of electron dose-depth profiles calculated with Milagro and an already-established electron transport code. An initial investigation of a preliminary integration of the discrete cross section generation method with the new charged particle transport capability in Milagro is also presented. (authors)

  5. Lunar radiation environment: a study by using Kaguya gamma-ray spectrometer and Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shingo; Hayatsu, Kanako; Uchihori, Yukio; Hareyama, Makoto; Hasebe, Nobuyuki; Fujibayashi, Yukari

    2012-07-01

    We have continued to improve the estimation of radiation dose on the Moon based on observation by remote sensing and calculation of the transportation of cosmic-ray particles in the lunar materials in order to provide basic data for a future manned lunar exploration. On the lunar surface, the dose of primary galactic cosmic rays (pGCR) is the most significant and the contributions of neutrons and gamma rays are relatively small and are approximately 10% and 1% of that of pGCR, respectively. However, these percentages are changed by use of thick shieldings and also geographical feature of the lunar surface, such as margin of a huge boulder, bottom of a pit, inside of a possible lava tube. In this case, the dose by pGCRs is moderated and the contributions of neutrons and gamma rays relatively increase. Here, we show the recent estimation of spatial variation of the lunar dose due to gamma ray and neutrons measured by Kaguya gamma-ray spectrometer. The energy spectrum of gamma rays from the lunar surface are precisely measured by a germanium (Ge) gamma-ray spectrometer onboard the Japanese lunar orbiter (Kaguya/SELENE). The flux of fast neutrons from the lunar surface was also measured by detecting the characteristic gamma rays due to the neutron inelastic reaction with the Ge of the spectrometer, that is 72Ge(n, n'g)72Ge. The estimation of radiation dose on the Moon based on Monte Carlo simulation will also be presented.

  6. Monte Carlo and analytic simulations in nanoparticle-enhanced radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paro AD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Autumn D Paro,1 Mainul Hossain,2 Thomas J Webster,1,3,4 Ming Su1,4 1Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 2NanoScience Technology Center and School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida, USA; 3Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 4Wenzhou Institute of Biomaterials and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Science, Wenzhou Medical University, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Analytical and Monte Carlo simulations have been used to predict dose enhancement factors in nanoparticle-enhanced X-ray radiation therapy. Both simulations predict an increase in dose enhancement in the presence of nanoparticles, but the two methods predict different levels of enhancement over the studied energy, nanoparticle materials, and concentration regime for several reasons. The Monte Carlo simulation calculates energy deposited by electrons and photons, while the analytical one only calculates energy deposited by source photons and photoelectrons; the Monte Carlo simulation accounts for electron–hole recombination, while the analytical one does not; and the Monte Carlo simulation randomly samples photon or electron path and accounts for particle interactions, while the analytical simulation assumes a linear trajectory. This study demonstrates that the Monte Carlo simulation will be a better choice to evaluate dose enhancement with nanoparticles in radiation therapy. Keywords: nanoparticle, dose enhancement, Monte Carlo simulation, analytical simulation, radiation therapy, tumor cell, X-ray 

  7. Study of carrier dynamics and radiative efficiency in InGaN/GaN LEDs with Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, I. Lin; Wu, Yuh-Renn [Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics and Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei (China); Singh, Jasprit [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-07-15

    In this paper, we have applied the Monte Carlo method to study carrier dynamics in InGaN quantum well. Vertical and lateral transport and its impact on device radiative efficiency is studied for different In compositions, dislocation densities, temperatures, and carrier densities. Our results show that the non-radiative recombination caused by the defect trapping plays a dominating role for higher indium composition and this limits the internal quantum efficiency (IQE). For lower indium composition cases, carrier leakage plays some role in the mid to high injection conditions and carrier leakage is strong in very high carrier density in all cases. Our results suggest that reducing the trap density and QCSE are still the key factors to improve the IQE. The paper examines the relative roles of leakage and non-radiative processes on IQE. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Backscattered radiation into a transmission ionization chamber: measurement and Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizumi, Maíra T; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Caldas, Linda V E

    2010-01-01

    Backscattered radiation (BSR) from field-defining collimators can affect the response of a monitor chamber in X-radiation fields. This contribution must be considered since this kind of chamber is used to monitor the equipment response. In this work, the dependence of a transmission ionization chamber response on the aperture diameter of the collimators was studied experimentally and using a Monte Carlo (MC) technique. According to the results, the BSR increases the chamber response of over 4.0% in the case of a totally closed collimator and 50 kV energy beam, using both techniques. The results from Monte Carlo simulation confirm the validity of the simulated geometry.

  9. TART98 a coupled neutron-photon 3-D, combinatorial geometry time dependent Monte Carlo Transport code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, D E

    1998-11-22

    TART98 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo radiation transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART98 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART98 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART98 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART98 and its data files.

  10. Evaluation of dose equivalent rate distribution in JCO critical accident by radiation transport calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Y

    2002-01-01

    In the prevention of nuclear disaster, there needs the information on the dose equivalent rate distribution inside and outside the site, and energy spectra. The three dimensional radiation transport calculation code is a useful tool for the site specific detailed analysis with the consideration of facility structures. It is important in the prediction of individual doses in the future countermeasure that the reliability of the evaluation methods of dose equivalent rate distribution and energy spectra by using of Monte Carlo radiation transport calculation code, and the factors which influence the dose equivalent rate distribution outside the site are confirmed. The reliability of radiation transport calculation code and the influence factors of dose equivalent rate distribution were examined through the analyses of critical accident at JCO's uranium processing plant occurred on September 30, 1999. The radiation transport calculations including the burn-up calculations were done by using of the structural info...

  11. Computer codes in nuclear safety, radiation transport and dosimetry; Les codes de calcul en radioprotection, radiophysique et dosimetrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordy, J.M.; Kodeli, I.; Menard, St.; Bouchet, J.L.; Renard, F.; Martin, E.; Blazy, L.; Voros, S.; Bochud, F.; Laedermann, J.P.; Beaugelin, K.; Makovicka, L.; Quiot, A.; Vermeersch, F.; Roche, H.; Perrin, M.C.; Laye, F.; Bardies, M.; Struelens, L.; Vanhavere, F.; Gschwind, R.; Fernandez, F.; Quesne, B.; Fritsch, P.; Lamart, St.; Crovisier, Ph.; Leservot, A.; Antoni, R.; Huet, Ch.; Thiam, Ch.; Donadille, L.; Monfort, M.; Diop, Ch.; Ricard, M

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this conference was to describe the present state of computer codes dedicated to radiation transport or radiation source assessment or dosimetry. The presentations have been parted into 2 sessions: 1) methodology and 2) uses in industrial or medical or research domains. It appears that 2 different calculation strategies are prevailing, both are based on preliminary Monte-Carlo calculations with data storage. First, quick simulations made from a database of particle histories built though a previous Monte-Carlo simulation and secondly, a neuronal approach involving a learning platform generated through a previous Monte-Carlo simulation. This document gathers the slides of the presentations.

  12. Monte Carlo estimation of radiation doses during paediatric barium meal and cystourethrography examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitriadis, A; Gialousis, G; Karlatira, M; Karaiskos, P; Georgiou, E; Yakoumakis, E [Medical Physics Department, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias Str., Goudi 11527, Athens (Greece); Makri, T; Papaodysseas, S, E-mail: anestisdim@yahoo.com [Radiological Imaging Department, Ag. Sofia Hospital, Lebadias and Thibon, Goudi 11527, Athens (Greece)

    2011-01-21

    Organ doses are important quantities in assessing the radiation risk. In the case of children, estimation of this risk is of particular concern due to their significant radiosensitivity and the greater health detriment. The purpose of this study is to estimate the organ doses to paediatric patients undergoing barium meal and micturating cystourethrography examinations by clinical measurements and Monte Carlo simulation. In clinical measurements, dose-area products (DAPs) were assessed during examination of 50 patients undergoing barium meal and 90 patients undergoing cystourethrography examinations, separated equally within three age categories: namely newborn, 1 year and 5 years old. Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport in male and female mathematical phantoms was applied using the MCNP5 code in order to estimate the equivalent organ doses. Regarding the micturating cystourethrography examinations, the organs receiving considerable amounts of radiation doses were the urinary bladder (1.87, 2.43 and 4.7 mSv, the first, second and third value in the parentheses corresponds to neonatal, 1 year old and 5 year old patients, respectively), the large intestines (1.54, 1.8, 3.1 mSv), the small intestines (1.34, 1.56, 2.78 mSv), the stomach (1.46, 1.02, 2.01 mSv) and the gall bladder (1.46, 1.66, 2.18 mSv), depending upon the age of the child. Organs receiving considerable amounts of radiation during barium meal examinations were the stomach (9.81, 9.92, 11.5 mSv), the gall bladder (3.05, 5.74, 7.15 mSv), the rib bones (9.82, 10.1, 11.1 mSv) and the pancreas (5.8, 5.93, 6.65 mSv), depending upon the age of the child. DAPs to organ/effective doses conversion factors were derived for each age and examination in order to be compared with other studies.

  13. Monte Carlo modelling of positron transport in real world applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanović, S.; Banković, A.; Šuvakov, M.; Petrović, Z. Lj

    2014-05-01

    Due to the unstable nature of positrons and their short lifetime, it is difficult to obtain high positron particle densities. This is why the Monte Carlo simulation technique, as a swarm method, is very suitable for modelling most of the current positron applications involving gaseous and liquid media. The ongoing work on the measurements of cross-sections for positron interactions with atoms and molecules and swarm calculations for positrons in gasses led to the establishment of good cross-section sets for positron interaction with gasses commonly used in real-world applications. Using the standard Monte Carlo technique and codes that can follow both low- (down to thermal energy) and high- (up to keV) energy particles, we are able to model different systems directly applicable to existing experimental setups and techniques. This paper reviews the results on modelling Surko-type positron buffer gas traps, application of the rotating wall technique and simulation of positron tracks in water vapor as a substitute for human tissue, and pinpoints the challenges in and advantages of applying Monte Carlo simulations to these systems.

  14. Monte Carlo radiation shielding and activation analyses for the Diagnostic Equatorial Port Plug in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serikov, A., E-mail: arkady.serikov@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Fischer, U.; Leichtle, D. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Pitcher, C.S. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115, St. Paul lez Durance (France)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Systematic neutronics analyses were conducted to assess the ITER Equatorial Port Plug radiation shielding performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shielding optimization was achieved by parametric analyses of several design variants using the MCNP5, FISPACT-2007, and R2Smesh codes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dominant effect of radiation streaming along the port plug gaps was recognized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination of the gap labyrinths and streaming stoppers or rails reduces shutdown doses by 2 orders of magnitude. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using the proposed shielding, the shutdown dose in the ITER port interspace is less than the personnel access limit of 100 {mu}Sv/h. - Abstract: This paper addresses neutronics aspects of the design development of the Diagnostic Generic Equatorial Port Plug (EPP) in ITER. To secure the personnel access at the EPP back-end interspace, parametric neutronics analyses of the EPP radiation environment have been performed and practical shielding solutions have been found. Radiation transport was performed with the Monte Carlo MCNP5 code. Activation calculations were conducted with the FISPACT-2007 inventory code. The R2Smesh approach was applied to couple transport and activation calculations. Newly created EPP local MCNP5 model was devised by extracting the EPP and adjacent blanket modules from the ITER Alite-4.1 model with proper modification of the EPP geometry in accordance with recent 3D CAD CATIA model. The EPP local model reproduces the EPP neutronically important features and allows investigation of the EPP neutronics effects in isolation from all other ITER components. Thorough EPP parametric analyses revealed dominant effect of gaps around EPP and several EPP design improvements were implemented as the outcomes of the analyses. Gap labyrinths and streaming stoppers inserted into the gaps were shown are capable to reduce the shutdown dose rate which is below the 100

  15. Prediction of rocket plume radiative heating using backward Monte-Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K. C.

    1993-01-01

    A backward Monte-Carlo plume radiation code has been developed to predict rocket plume radiative heating to the rocket base region. This paper provides a description of this code and provides sample results. The code was used to predict radiative heating to various locations during test firings of 48-inch solid rocket motors at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Comparisons with test measurements are provided. Predictions of full scale sea level Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) and Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) plume radiative heating to the Space Shuttle external tank (ET) dome center were also made. A comparison with the Development Flight Instrumentation (DFI) measurements is also provided.

  16. Study on the response of thermoluminescent dosemeters to synchrotron radiation: experimental method and Monte Carlo calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, A K; Chatterjee, S; Palani Selvam, T; Dhabekar, B S

    2010-07-01

    In the present study, the energy dependence of response of some popular thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) have been investigated such as LiF:Mg,Ti, LiF:Mg,Cu,P and CaSO(4):Dy to synchrotron radiation in the energy range of 10-34 keV. The study utilised experimental, Monte Carlo and analytical methods. The Monte Carlo calculations were based on the EGSnrc and FLUKA codes. The calculated energy response of all the TLDs using the EGSnrc and FLUKA codes shows excellent agreement with each other. The analytically calculated response shows good agreement with the Monte Carlo calculated response in the low-energy region. In the case of CaSO(4):Dy, the Monte Carlo-calculated energy response is smaller by a factor of 3 at all energies in comparison with the experimental response when polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) (75 % by wt) is included in the Monte Carlo calculations. When PTFE is ignored in the Monte Carlo calculations, the difference between the calculated and experimental response decreases (both responses are comparable >25 keV). For the LiF-based TLDs, the Monte Carlo-based response shows reasonable agreement with the experimental response.

  17. Investigation of stochastic radiation transport methods in random heterogeneous mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, Dustin Ray

    densely packed, optically thick kernels. A hybrid continuous energy Monte Carlo algorithm that combines homogeneous and explicit geometry models according to the energy dependent optical thickness was also developed. This resonance switch approach exhibited a remarkably high degree of accuracy in performing criticality calculations. The versatility of this hybrid modeling approach makes it an attractive acceleration strategy for a vast array of Monte Carlo radiation transport applications.

  18. Commissioning of a Monte Carlo treatment planning system for clinical use in radiation therapy; Evaluacion de un sistema de planificacion Monte Carlo de uso clinico para radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucca Aparcio, D.; Perez Moreno, J. M.; Fernandez Leton, P.; Garcia Ruiz-Zorrila, J.

    2016-10-01

    The commissioning procedures of a Monte Carlo treatment planning system (MC) for photon beams from a dedicated stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT) unit has been reported in this document. XVMC has been the MC Code available in the treatment planning system evaluated (BrainLAB iPlan RT Dose) which is based on Virtual Source Models that simulate the primary and scattered radiation, besides the electronic contamination, using gaussian components for whose modelling are required measurements of dose profiles, percentage depth dose and output factors, performed both in water and in air. The dosimetric accuracy of the particle transport simulation has been analyzed by validating the calculations in homogeneous and heterogeneous media versus measurements made under the same conditions as the dose calculation, and checking the stochastic behaviour of Monte Carlo calculations when using different statistical variances. Likewise, it has been verified how the planning system performs the conversion from dose to medium to dose to water, applying the stopping power ratio water to medium, in the presence of heterogeneities where this phenomenon is relevant, such as high density media (cortical bone). (Author)

  19. New electron multiple scattering distributions for Monte Carlo transport simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chibani, Omar (Haut Commissariat a la Recherche (C.R.S.), 2 Boulevard Franz Fanon, Alger B.P. 1017, Alger-Gare (Algeria)); Patau, Jean Paul (Laboratoire de Biophysique et Biomathematiques, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques, Universite Paul Sabatier, 35 Chemin des Maraichers, 31062 Toulouse cedex (France))

    1994-10-01

    New forms of electron (positron) multiple scattering distributions are proposed. The first is intended for use in the conditions of validity of the Moliere theory. The second distribution takes place when the electron path is so short that only few elastic collisions occur. These distributions are adjustable formulas. The introduction of some parameters allows impositions of the correct value of the first moment. Only positive and analytic functions were used in constructing the present expressions. This makes sampling procedures easier. Systematic tests are presented and some Monte Carlo simulations, as benchmarks, are carried out. ((orig.))

  20. ELRADGEN: Monte Carlo generator for radiative events in elastic electron-proton scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasiev, A V; Ilyichev, A N; Niczyporuk, B B

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the theoretical approach and practical algorithms for simulation of radiative events in elastic ep-scattering. A new Monte Carlo generator for real photon emission events in the process of elastic electron-proton scattering is presented. We perform a few consistency checks and present numerical results.

  1. Radiative corrections and Monte Carlo generators for physics at flavor factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montagna Guido

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available I review the state of the art of precision calculations and related Monte Carlo generators used in physics at flavor factories. The review describes the tools relevant for the measurement of the hadron production cross section (via radiative return, energy scan and in γγ scattering, luminosity monitoring, searches for new physics and physics of the τ lepton.

  2. OBJECT KINETIC MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS OF RADIATION DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN TUNGSTEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandipati, Giridhar; Setyawan, Wahyu; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the accumulation of radiation damage created by primary knock-on atoms (PKAs) of various energies, at 300 K and for a dose rate of 10-4 dpa/s in bulk tungsten using the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) method.

  3. Monte Carlo method of radiative transfer applied to a turbulent flame modeling with LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Gicquel, Olivier; Veynante, Denis; Taine, Jean

    2009-06-01

    Radiative transfer plays an important role in the numerical simulation of turbulent combustion. However, for the reason that combustion and radiation are characterized by different time scales and different spatial and chemical treatments, the radiation effect is often neglected or roughly modelled. The coupling of a large eddy simulation combustion solver and a radiation solver through a dedicated language, CORBA, is investigated. Two formulations of Monte Carlo method (Forward Method and Emission Reciprocity Method) employed to resolve RTE have been compared in a one-dimensional flame test case using three-dimensional calculation grids with absorbing and emitting media in order to validate the Monte Carlo radiative solver and to choose the most efficient model for coupling. Then the results obtained using two different RTE solvers (Reciprocity Monte Carlo method and Discrete Ordinate Method) applied on a three-dimensional flame holder set-up with a correlated-k distribution model describing the real gas medium spectral radiative properties are compared not only in terms of the physical behavior of the flame, but also in computational performance (storage requirement, CPU time and parallelization efficiency). To cite this article: J. Zhang et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  4. Exploring Monte Carlo methods

    CERN Document Server

    Dunn, William L

    2012-01-01

    Exploring Monte Carlo Methods is a basic text that describes the numerical methods that have come to be known as "Monte Carlo." The book treats the subject generically through the first eight chapters and, thus, should be of use to anyone who wants to learn to use Monte Carlo. The next two chapters focus on applications in nuclear engineering, which are illustrative of uses in other fields. Five appendices are included, which provide useful information on probability distributions, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes for radiation transport, and other matters. The famous "Buffon's needle proble

  5. Monte Carlo study of electron transport in monolayer silicene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowik, Piotr; Thobel, Jean-Luc; Adamowicz, Leszek

    2016-11-01

    Electron mobility and diffusion coefficients in monolayer silicene are calculated by Monte Carlo simulations using simplified band structure with linear energy bands. Results demonstrate reasonable agreement with the full-band Monte Carlo method in low applied electric field conditions. Negative differential resistivity is observed and an explanation of the origin of this effect is proposed. Electron mobility and diffusion coefficients are studied in low applied electric field conditions. We demonstrate that a comparison of these parameter values can provide a good check that the calculation is correct. Low-field mobility in silicene exhibits {T}-3 temperature dependence for nondegenerate electron gas conditions and {T}-1 for higher electron concentrations, when degenerate conditions are imposed. It is demonstrated that to explain the relation between mobility and temperature in nondegenerate electron gas the linearity of the band structure has to be taken into account. It is also found that electron-electron scattering only slightly modifies low-field electron mobility in degenerate electron gas conditions.

  6. Monte Carlo calculation of radiation energy absorbed in plastic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainardi, R.T.; Bonzi, E.V. [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba (Argentina). Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica

    1995-05-01

    Monte Carlo calculations of the rate of absorbed energy from a photon beam were carried out to compare the response of commercial plastic scintillators with that of air in the energy region below 1 MeV. We have found that for photon energies above 100 keV, the response of different kinds of plastics is proportional to that of air, while below this value of energy, we have obtained differences between the responses of plastics and air. In a literature search, we have also found discrepancies with other authors as well as among them. In this paper, we investigate the possibilities of eliminating these differences and explaining discrepancies. We found that doping a plastic scintillator with silicon makes the composite materials behave like air from 2 keV up to 600 keV, making the ratio of absorbed energy constant. This energy region is of interest in radiology and surface radiotherapy and we conclude that a plastic scintillator with truly air-equivalent behavior is of importance to carry out more precise dosimetry. Other elements such as fluorine and magnesium were also considered, but silicon was found to be more appropriate due to its greater atomic number and its interchangeability with carbon in hydrocarbon molecules. (author).

  7. Evaluation of atomic electron binding energies for Monte Carlo particle transport

    CERN Document Server

    Pia, Maria Grazia; Batic, Matej; Begalli, Marcia; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Quintieri, Lina; Saracco, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    A survey of atomic binding energies used by general purpose Monte Carlo systems is reported. Various compilations of these parameters have been evaluated; their accuracy is estimated with respect to experimental data. Their effects on physics quantities relevant to Monte Carlo particle transport are highlighted: X-ray fluorescence emission, electron and proton ionization cross sections, and Doppler broadening in Compton scattering. The effects due to different binding energies are quantified with respect to experimental data. The results of the analysis provide quantitative ground for the selection of binding energies to optimize the accuracy of Monte Carlo simulation in experimental use cases. Recommendations on software design dealing with these parameters and on the improvement of data libraries for Monte Carlo simulation are discussed.

  8. Monte Carlo simulations of the complex field in the LHC radiation test facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Tsoulou, A; Rausch, R; Wijnands, Thijs

    2004-01-01

    The hard radiation environment of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) demands for a careful choice of COTS (Components Off The Shelf) that will be installed in the tunnel. All the electronic equipment should be tested in a mixed radiation field, similar to that of the LHC. To obtain optimum results it is essential to study thoroughly the complex radiation field in the test facility at CERN. For this purpose a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the test area was carried out and the calculations were compared with the dosimetry measurements already available.

  9. Antiproton annihilation physics annihilation physics in the Monte Carlo particle transport code particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taasti, Vicki Trier; Knudsen, Helge; Holzscheiter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A is designed to simulate therapeutic beams for cancer radiotherapy with fast ions. SHIELD-HIT12A allows creation of antiproton beam kernels for the treatment planning system TRiP98, but first it must be benchmarked against experimental data...

  10. Incorporation of polarization effects in Monte Carlo simulations of radiative heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, C.; Palmer, B.J.; Drost, M.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Welty, J.R. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The electric field vector of individual photons has been incorporated into Monte Carlo simulations of radiative heat transfer to examine the effects of polarization on the optical properties of arrays of fixed discrete surfaces. Simulations are performed on arrays that have specular surfaces with high and low reflectivity. Two different arrays are illuminated by polarized and unpolarized light and compared with conventional Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that if the initial illumination is either partially or fully polarized, polarization effects are substantial, especially for low-reflectivity surfaces and for arrays that favor a large number of grazing-angle reflections.

  11. ACCELERATING FUSION REACTOR NEUTRONICS MODELING BY AUTOMATIC COUPLING OF HYBRID MONTE CARLO/DETERMINISTIC TRANSPORT ON CAD GEOMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biondo, Elliott D [ORNL; Ibrahim, Ahmad M [ORNL; Mosher, Scott W [ORNL; Grove, Robert E [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Detailed radiation transport calculations are necessary for many aspects of the design of fusion energy systems (FES) such as ensuring occupational safety, assessing the activation of system components for waste disposal, and maintaining cryogenic temperatures within superconducting magnets. Hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/deterministic techniques are necessary for this analysis because FES are large, heavily shielded, and contain streaming paths that can only be resolved with MC. The tremendous complexity of FES necessitates the use of CAD geometry for design and analysis. Previous ITER analysis has required the translation of CAD geometry to MCNP5 form in order to use the AutomateD VAriaNce reducTion Generator (ADVANTG) for hybrid MC/deterministic transport. In this work, ADVANTG was modified to support CAD geometry, allowing hybrid (MC)/deterministic transport to be done automatically and eliminating the need for this translation step. This was done by adding a new ray tracing routine to ADVANTG for CAD geometries using the Direct Accelerated Geometry Monte Carlo (DAGMC) software library. This new capability is demonstrated with a prompt dose rate calculation for an ITER computational benchmark problem using both the Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) method an the Forward Weighted (FW)-CADIS method. The variance reduction parameters produced by ADVANTG are shown to be the same using CAD geometry and standard MCNP5 geometry. Significant speedups were observed for both neutrons (as high as a factor of 7.1) and photons (as high as a factor of 59.6).

  12. Using Nuclear Theory, Data and Uncertainties in Monte Carlo Transport Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rising, Michael Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-03

    These are slides for a presentation on using nuclear theory, data and uncertainties in Monte Carlo transport applications. The following topics are covered: nuclear data (experimental data versus theoretical models, data evaluation and uncertainty quantification), fission multiplicity models (fixed source applications, criticality calculations), uncertainties and their impact (integral quantities, sensitivity analysis, uncertainty propagation).

  13. ITS version 5.0 : the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Brian Claude; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Laub, Thomas William

    2004-06-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state of the art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent couple electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 5.0, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 3.0 continuous-energy codes, (2)multigroup codes with adjoint transport capabilities, and (3) parallel implementations of all ITS codes. Moreover the general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through increased internal error checking and improved code portability.

  14. Analysis of Far-Field Radiation from Apertures Using Monte Carlo Integration Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Fakharian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An integration technique based on the use of Monte Carlo Integration (MCI is proposed for the analysis of the electromagnetic radiation from apertures. The technique that can be applied to the calculation of the aperture antenna radiation patterns is the equivalence principle followed by physical optics, which can then be used to compute far-field antenna radiation patterns. However, this technique is often complex mathematically, because it requires integration over the closed surface. This paper presents an extremely simple formulation to calculate the far-fields from some types of aperture radiators by using MCI technique. The accuracy and effectiveness of this technique are demonstrated in three cases of radiation from the apertures and results are compared with the solutions using FE simulation and Gaussian quadrature rules.

  15. Monte Carlo path sampling approach to modeling aeolian sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, E. J.; Mitasova, H.; Mitas, L.

    2011-12-01

    Coastal communities and vital infrastructure are subject to coastal hazards including storm surge and hurricanes. Coastal dunes offer protection by acting as natural barriers from waves and storm surge. During storms, these landforms and their protective function can erode; however, they can also erode even in the absence of storms due to daily wind and waves. Costly and often controversial beach nourishment and coastal construction projects are common erosion mitigation practices. With a more complete understanding of coastal morphology, the efficacy and consequences of anthropogenic activities could be better predicted. Currently, the research on coastal landscape evolution is focused on waves and storm surge, while only limited effort is devoted to understanding aeolian forces. Aeolian transport occurs when the wind supplies a shear stress that exceeds a critical value, consequently ejecting sand grains into the air. If the grains are too heavy to be suspended, they fall back to the grain bed where the collision ejects more grains. This is called saltation and is the salient process by which sand mass is transported. The shear stress required to dislodge grains is related to turbulent air speed. Subsequently, as sand mass is injected into the air, the wind loses speed along with its ability to eject more grains. In this way, the flux of saltating grains is itself influenced by the flux of saltating grains and aeolian transport becomes nonlinear. Aeolian sediment transport is difficult to study experimentally for reasons arising from the orders of magnitude difference between grain size and dune size. It is difficult to study theoretically because aeolian transport is highly nonlinear especially over complex landscapes. Current computational approaches have limitations as well; single grain models are mathematically simple but are computationally intractable even with modern computing power whereas cellular automota-based approaches are computationally efficient

  16. SRTC++: a New Monte Carlo Radiative Transfer Model for Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jason W.; MacKenzie, Shannon; Young, Eliot F.

    2016-10-01

    Titan's vertically extended and highly scattering atmosphere poses a challenge to interpreting near-infrared observations of its surface. Not only does Titan's extended atmosphere often require accommodation of its spherical geometry, it is also difficult to separate surface albedos from scattering or absorption within low-altitude atmospheric layers. One way to disentangle the surface and atmosphere is to combine observations in which terrain on Titan is imaged from a range of viewing geometries. To address this type of problem, we have developed a new algorithm, Spherical Radiative Transfer in C++ or SRTC++.This code is written from scratch in fast C++ and designed from the ground up to run efficiently in parallel. We see SRTC++ as complementary to existing plane-parallel codes, not in competition with them as the first problems that we seek to address will be spatial in nature. For example, we will be able to investigate spatial resolution limits in the various spectral windows, discrimination of vertical atmospheric layers, the adjacency effect, and indirect illumination past Titan's terminator.

  17. A Radiative Transport Model for Blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Tiffany; Justin, Finke; Becker, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Blazars are observed across the electromagnetic spectrum, often with strong variability throughout. The underlying electron distribution associated with the observed emission is typically not computed from first principles. We start from first-principles to build up a transport model, whose solution is the electron distribution, rather than assuming a convenient functional form. Our analytical transport model considers shock acceleration, adiabatic expansion, stochastic acceleration, Bohm diffusion, and synchrotron radiation. We use this solution to generate predictions for the X-ray spectrum and time lags, and compare the results with data products from BeppoSAX observations of X-ray flares from Mrk 421. This new self-consistent model provides an unprecedented view into the jet physics at play in this source, especially the strength of the shock and stochastic acceleration components and the size of the acceleration region.More recently, we augmented the transport model to incorporate Compton scattering, including Klein-Nishina effects. In this case, an analytical solution cannot be derived, and therefore we obtain the steady-state electron distribution computationally. We compare the resulting radiation spectrum with multi-wavelength data for 3C 279. We show that our new Compton + synchrotron blazar model is the first to successfully fit the FermiLAT gamma-ray data for this source based on a first-principles physical calculation.

  18. Monte Carlo transport simulation of velocity undershoot in zinc blende and wurtzite InN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shulong; Liu, Hongxia; Gao, Bo; Zhuo, Qingqing [School of Microelectronics, Key Laboratory of Wide Band-gap Semiconductor Materials and Device, Xidian University, Xi& #x27; an, 710071 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Velocity undershoot in zinc blende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ) InN is investigated by ensemble Monte Carlo (EMC) calculation. The results show that velocity undershoot arises from the relatively long energy relaxation time compared with momentum. Monte Carlo transport simulations over wide range of electric fields is presented in the paper. The results show that velocity undershoot impacts the electron transport greatly, compared with velocity overshoot, when the electric field changes quickly with time and space. A comparison study between WZ and ZB InN shows that WZ InN has more advantages in device applications due to its excellent electron transport properties. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Comparison of dose estimates using the buildup-factor method and a Baryon transport code (BRYNTRN) with Monte Carlo results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Judy L.; Wilson, John W.; Nealy, John E.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1990-01-01

    Continuing efforts toward validating the buildup factor method and the BRYNTRN code, which use the deterministic approach in solving radiation transport problems and are the candidate engineering tools in space radiation shielding analyses, are presented. A simplified theory of proton buildup factors assuming no neutron coupling is derived to verify a previously chosen form for parameterizing the dose conversion factor that includes the secondary particle buildup effect. Estimates of dose in tissue made by the two deterministic approaches and the Monte Carlo method are intercompared for cases with various thicknesses of shields and various types of proton spectra. The results are found to be in reasonable agreement but with some overestimation by the buildup factor method when the effect of neutron production in the shield is significant. Future improvement to include neutron coupling in the buildup factor theory is suggested to alleviate this shortcoming. Impressive agreement for individual components of doses, such as those from the secondaries and heavy particle recoils, are obtained between BRYNTRN and Monte Carlo results.

  20. Split exponential track length estimator for Monte-Carlo simulations of small-animal radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smekens, F.; Létang, J. M.; Noblet, C.; Chiavassa, S.; Delpon, G.; Freud, N.; Rit, S.; Sarrut, D.

    2014-12-01

    We propose the split exponential track length estimator (seTLE), a new kerma-based method combining the exponential variant of the TLE and a splitting strategy to speed up Monte Carlo (MC) dose computation for low energy photon beams. The splitting strategy is applied to both the primary and the secondary emitted photons, triggered by either the MC events generator for primaries or the photon interactions generator for secondaries. Split photons are replaced by virtual particles for fast dose calculation using the exponential TLE. Virtual particles are propagated by ray-tracing in voxelized volumes and by conventional MC navigation elsewhere. Hence, the contribution of volumes such as collimators, treatment couch and holding devices can be taken into account in the dose calculation. We evaluated and analysed the seTLE method for two realistic small animal radiotherapy treatment plans. The effect of the kerma approximation, i.e. the complete deactivation of electron transport, was investigated. The efficiency of seTLE against splitting multiplicities was also studied. A benchmark with analog MC and TLE was carried out in terms of dose convergence and efficiency. The results showed that the deactivation of electrons impacts the dose at the water/bone interface in high dose regions. The maximum and mean dose differences normalized to the dose at the isocenter were, respectively of 14% and 2% . Optimal splitting multiplicities were found to be around 300. In all situations, discrepancies in integral dose were below 0.5% and 99.8% of the voxels fulfilled a 1%/0.3 mm gamma index criterion. Efficiency gains of seTLE varied from 3.2 × 105 to 7.7 × 105 compared to analog MC and from 13 to 15 compared to conventional TLE. In conclusion, seTLE provides results similar to the TLE while increasing the efficiency by a factor between 13 and 15, which makes it particularly well-suited to typical small animal radiation therapy applications.

  1. Parallel distributed, reciprocal Monte Carlo radiation in coupled, large eddy combustion simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsaker, Isaac L.

    Radiation is the dominant mode of heat transfer in high temperature combustion environments. Radiative heat transfer affects the gas and particle phases, including all the associated combustion chemistry. The radiative properties are in turn affected by the turbulent flow field. This bi-directional coupling of radiation turbulence interactions poses a major challenge in creating parallel-capable, high-fidelity combustion simulations. In this work, a new model was developed in which reciprocal monte carlo radiation was coupled with a turbulent, large-eddy simulation combustion model. A technique wherein domain patches are stitched together was implemented to allow for scalable parallelism. The combustion model runs in parallel on a decomposed domain. The radiation model runs in parallel on a recomposed domain. The recomposed domain is stored on each processor after information sharing of the decomposed domain is handled via the message passing interface. Verification and validation testing of the new radiation model were favorable. Strong scaling analyses were performed on the Ember cluster and the Titan cluster for the CPU-radiation model and GPU-radiation model, respectively. The model demonstrated strong scaling to over 1,700 and 16,000 processing cores on Ember and Titan, respectively.

  2. The Monte Carlo approach to transport modeling in deca-nanometer MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangiorgi, Enrico; Palestri, Pierpaolo; Esseni, David; Fiegna, Claudio; Selmi, Luca

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, we review recent developments of the Monte Carlo approach to the simulation of semi-classical carrier transport in nano-MOSFETs, with particular focus on the inclusion of quantum-mechanical effects in the simulation (using either the multi-subband approach or quantum corrections to the electrostatic potential) and on the numerical stability issues related to the coupling of the transport with the Poisson equation. Selected applications are presented, including the analysis of quasi-ballistic transport, the determination of the RF characteristics of deca-nanometric MOSFETs, and the study of non-conventional device structures and channel materials.

  3. A new hybrid method--combined heat flux method with Monte-Carlo method to analyze thermal radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A new hybrid method, Monte-Carlo-Heat-Flux (MCHF) method, was presented to analyze the radiative heat transfer of participating medium in a three-dimensional rectangular enclosure using combined the Monte-Carlo method with the heat flux method. Its accuracy and reliability was proved by comparing the computational results with exact results from classical "Zone Method".

  4. Ant colony algorithm implementation in electron and photon Monte Carlo transport: Application to the commissioning of radiosurgery photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Pareja, S.; Galan, P.; Manzano, F.; Brualla, L.; Lallena, A. M. [Servicio de Radiofisica Hospitalaria, Hospital Regional Universitario ' ' Carlos Haya' ' , Avda. Carlos Haya s/n, E-29010 Malaga (Spain); Unidad de Radiofisica Hospitalaria, Hospital Xanit Internacional, Avda. de los Argonautas s/n, E-29630 Benalmadena (Malaga) (Spain); NCTeam, Strahlenklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, D-45122 Essen (Germany); Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors describe an approach which has been developed to drive the application of different variance-reduction techniques to the Monte Carlo simulation of photon and electron transport in clinical accelerators. Methods: The new approach considers the following techniques: Russian roulette, splitting, a modified version of the directional bremsstrahlung splitting, and the azimuthal particle redistribution. Their application is controlled by an ant colony algorithm based on an importance map. Results: The procedure has been applied to radiosurgery beams. Specifically, the authors have calculated depth-dose profiles, off-axis ratios, and output factors, quantities usually considered in the commissioning of these beams. The agreement between Monte Carlo results and the corresponding measurements is within {approx}3%/0.3 mm for the central axis percentage depth dose and the dose profiles. The importance map generated in the calculation can be used to discuss simulation details in the different parts of the geometry in a simple way. The simulation CPU times are comparable to those needed within other approaches common in this field. Conclusions: The new approach is competitive with those previously used in this kind of problems (PSF generation or source models) and has some practical advantages that make it to be a good tool to simulate the radiation transport in problems where the quantities of interest are difficult to obtain because of low statistics.

  5. Data decomposition of Monte Carlo particle transport simulations via tally servers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Paul K., E-mail: paul.k.romano@gmail.com [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Siegel, Andrew R., E-mail: siegala@mcs.anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Theory and Computing Sciences, 9700 S Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Forget, Benoit, E-mail: bforget@mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Smith, Kord, E-mail: kord@mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    An algorithm for decomposing large tally data in Monte Carlo particle transport simulations is developed, analyzed, and implemented in a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, OpenMC. The algorithm is based on a non-overlapping decomposition of compute nodes into tracking processors and tally servers. The former are used to simulate the movement of particles through the domain while the latter continuously receive and update tally data. A performance model for this approach is developed, suggesting that, for a range of parameters relevant to LWR analysis, the tally server algorithm should perform with minimal overhead on contemporary supercomputers. An implementation of the algorithm in OpenMC is then tested on the Intrepid and Titan supercomputers, supporting the key predictions of the model over a wide range of parameters. We thus conclude that the tally server algorithm is a successful approach to circumventing classical on-node memory constraints en route to unprecedentedly detailed Monte Carlo reactor simulations.

  6. Application of Photon Transport Monte Carlo Module with GPU-based Parallel System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang Je [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shon, Heejeong [Golden Eng. Co. LTD, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Donghak [CoCo Link Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In general, it takes lots of computing time to get reliable results in Monte Carlo simulations especially in deep penetration problems with a thick shielding medium. To mitigate such a weakness of Monte Carlo methods, lots of variance reduction algorithms are proposed including geometry splitting and Russian roulette, weight windows, exponential transform, and forced collision, etc. Simultaneously, advanced computing hardware systems such as GPU(Graphics Processing Units)-based parallel machines are used to get a better performance of the Monte Carlo simulation. The GPU is much easier to access and to manage when comparing a CPU cluster system. It also becomes less expensive these days due to enhanced computer technology. There, lots of engineering areas adapt GPU-bases massive parallel computation technique. based photon transport Monte Carlo method. It provides almost 30 times speedup without any optimization and it is expected almost 200 times with fully supported GPU system. It is expected that GPU system with advanced parallelization algorithm will contribute successfully for development of the Monte Carlo module which requires quick and accurate simulations.

  7. Analysis of the radiation shielding of the bunker of a 230MeV proton cyclotron therapy facility; comparison of analytical and Monte Carlo techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunil, C

    2016-04-01

    The neutron ambient dose equivalent outside the radiation shield of a proton therapy cyclotron vault is estimated using the unshielded dose equivalent rates and the attenuation lengths obtained from the literature and by simulations carried out with the FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The source terms derived from the literature and that obtained from the FLUKA calculations differ by a factor of 2-3, while the attenuation lengths obtained from the literature differ by 20-40%. The instantaneous dose equivalent rates outside the shield differ by a few orders of magnitude, not only in comparison with the Monte Carlo simulation results, but also with the results obtained by line of sight attenuation calculations with the different parameters obtained from the literature. The attenuation of neutrons caused by the presence of bulk iron, such as magnet yokes is expected to reduce the dose equivalent by as much as a couple of orders of magnitude outside the shield walls.

  8. Neutron cross-section probability tables in TRIPOLI-3 Monte Carlo transport code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, S.H.; Vergnaud, T.; Nimal, J.C. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Lab. d`Etudes de Protection et de Probabilite

    1998-03-01

    Neutron transport calculations need an accurate treatment of cross sections. Two methods (multi-group and pointwise) are usually used. A third one, the probability table (PT) method, has been developed to produce a set of cross-section libraries, well adapted to describe the neutron interaction in the unresolved resonance energy range. Its advantage is to present properly the neutron cross-section fluctuation within a given energy group, allowing correct calculation of the self-shielding effect. Also, this PT cross-section representation is suitable for simulation of neutron propagation by the Monte Carlo method. The implementation of PTs in the TRIPOLI-3 three-dimensional general Monte Carlo transport code, developed at Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, and several validation calculations are presented. The PT method is proved to be valid not only in the unresolved resonance range but also in all the other energy ranges.

  9. Monte Carlo techniques for time-dependent radiative transfer in 3-D supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Lucy, L B

    2004-01-01

    Monte Carlo techniques based on indivisible energy packets are described for computing light curves and spectra for 3-D supernovae. The radiative transfer is time-dependent and includes all effects of O(v/c). Monte Carlo quantization is achieved by discretizing the initial distribution of 56Ni into radioactive pellets. Each pellet decays with the emission of a single energy packet comprising gamma-ray photons representing one line from either the 56Ni or the 56Co decay spectrum. Subsequently, these energy packets propagate through the homologously-expanding ejecta with appropriate changes in the nature of their contained energy as they undergo Compton scatterings and pure absorptions. The 3-D code is tested by applying it to a spherically-symmetric SN in which the transfer of optical radiation is treated with a grey absorption coefficient. This 1-D problem is separately solved using Castor's co-moving frame moment equations. Satisfactory agreement is obtained. The Monte Carlo code is a platform onto which mor...

  10. Using hybrid implicit Monte Carlo diffusion to simulate gray radiation hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleveland, Mathew A., E-mail: cleveland7@llnl.gov; Gentile, Nick

    2015-06-15

    This work describes how to couple a hybrid Implicit Monte Carlo Diffusion (HIMCD) method with a Lagrangian hydrodynamics code to evaluate the coupled radiation hydrodynamics equations. This HIMCD method dynamically applies Implicit Monte Carlo Diffusion (IMD) [1] to regions of a problem that are opaque and diffusive while applying standard Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) [2] to regions where the diffusion approximation is invalid. We show that this method significantly improves the computational efficiency as compared to a standard IMC/Hydrodynamics solver, when optically thick diffusive material is present, while maintaining accuracy. Two test cases are used to demonstrate the accuracy and performance of HIMCD as compared to IMC and IMD. The first is the Lowrie semi-analytic diffusive shock [3]. The second is a simple test case where the source radiation streams through optically thin material and heats a thick diffusive region of material causing it to rapidly expand. We found that HIMCD proves to be accurate, robust, and computationally efficient for these test problems.

  11. High-resolution and Monte Carlo additions to the SASKTRAN radiative transfer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Zawada

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imaging System (OSIRIS instrument on board the Odin spacecraft has been measuring limb-scattered radiance since 2001. The vertical radiance profiles measured as the instrument nods are inverted, with the aid of the SASKTRAN radiative transfer model, to obtain vertical profiles of trace atmospheric constituents. Here we describe two newly developed modes of the SASKTRAN radiative transfer model: a high-spatial-resolution mode and a Monte Carlo mode. The high-spatial-resolution mode is a successive-orders model capable of modelling the multiply scattered radiance when the atmosphere is not spherically symmetric; the Monte Carlo mode is intended for use as a highly accurate reference model. It is shown that the two models agree in a wide variety of solar conditions to within 0.2 %. As an example case for both models, Odin–OSIRIS scans were simulated with the Monte Carlo model and retrieved using the high-resolution model. A systematic bias of up to 4 % in retrieved ozone number density between scans where the instrument is scanning up or scanning down was identified. The bias is largest when the sun is near the horizon and the solar scattering angle is far from 90°. It was found that calculating the multiply scattered diffuse field at five discrete solar zenith angles is sufficient to eliminate the bias for typical Odin–OSIRIS geometries.

  12. High resolution and Monte Carlo additions to the SASKTRAN radiative transfer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Zawada

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The OSIRIS instrument on board the Odin spacecraft has been measuring limb scattered radiance since 2001. The vertical radiance profiles measured as the instrument nods are inverted, with the aid of the SASKTRAN radiative transfer model, to obtain vertical profiles of trace atmospheric constituents. Here we describe two newly developed modes of the SASKTRAN radiative transfer model: a high spatial resolution mode, and a Monte Carlo mode. The high spatial resolution mode is a successive orders model capable of modelling the multiply scattered radiance when the atmosphere is not spherically symmetric; the Monte Carlo mode is intended for use as a highly accurate reference model. It is shown that the two models agree in a wide variety of solar conditions to within 0.2%. As an example case for both models, Odin-OSIRIS scans were simulated with the Monte Carlo model and retrieved using the high resolution model. A systematic bias of up to 4% in retrieved ozone number density between scans where the instrument is scanning up or scanning down was identified. It was found that calculating the multiply scattered diffuse field at five discrete solar zenith angles is sufficient to eliminate the bias for typical Odin-OSIRIS geometries.

  13. A Monte Carlo Simulation for the Ion Transport in Glow Discharges with Dusts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ai-Ping; PU Wei; QIU Xiao-Ming

    2001-01-01

    We use the Monte Carlo method to simulate theion transport in the rf parallel plate glow discharge with a negative-voltage pulse connected to the electrode. It is found that self-consistent field, dust charge, dust concentration,and dust size influence the energy distribution and the density of the ions arriving at the target, and in particular, the latter two make significant influence. As dust concentration or dust size increases, the number of ions arriving at the target reduces greatly.

  14. MORSE Monte Carlo code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, S.N.

    1984-01-01

    The MORSE code is a large general-use multigroup Monte Carlo code system. Although no claims can be made regarding its superiority in either theoretical details or Monte Carlo techniques, MORSE has been, since its inception at ORNL in the late 1960s, the most widely used Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The principal reason for this popularity is that MORSE is relatively easy to use, independent of any installation or distribution center, and it can be easily customized to fit almost any specific need. Features of the MORSE code are described.

  15. GPU-based Monte Carlo dust radiative transfer scheme applied to AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Heymann, Frank

    2012-01-01

    A three dimensional parallel Monte Carlo (MC) dust radiative transfer code is presented. To overcome the huge computing time requirements of MC treatments, the computational power of vectorized hardware is used, utilizing either multi-core computer power or graphics processing units. The approach is a self-consistent way to solve the radiative transfer equation in arbitrary dust configurations. The code calculates the equilibrium temperatures of two populations of large grains and stochastic heated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Anisotropic scattering is treated applying the Heney-Greenstein phase function. The spectral energy distribution (SED) of the object is derived at low spatial resolution by a photon counting procedure and at high spatial resolution by a vectorized ray-tracer. The latter allows computation of high signal-to-noise images of the objects at any frequencies and arbitrary viewing angles. We test the robustness of our approach against other radiative transfer codes. The SED and dust...

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of ultra high vacuum and synchrotron radiation for particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082330; Leonid, Rivkin

    With preparation of Hi-Lumi LHC fully underway, and the FCC machines under study, accelerators will reach unprecedented energies and along with it very large amount of synchrotron radiation (SR). This will desorb photoelectrons and molecules from accelerator walls, which contribute to electron cloud buildup and increase the residual pressure - both effects reducing the beam lifetime. In current accelerators these two effects are among the principal limiting factors, therefore precise calculation of synchrotron radiation and pressure properties are very important, desirably in the early design phase. This PhD project shows the modernization and a major upgrade of two codes, Molflow and Synrad, originally written by R. Kersevan in the 1990s, which are based on the test-particle Monte Carlo method and allow ultra-high vacuum and synchrotron radiation calculations. The new versions contain new physics, and are built as an all-in-one package - available to the public. Existing vacuum calculation methods are overvi...

  17. Monte Carlo Simulations of Synchrotron Radiation and Vacuum Performance of the MAX IV Light Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Ady, M; Grabski, M

    2014-01-01

    In the 3 GeV ring of MAX IV light source in Lund, Sweden, the intense synchrotron radiation (SR) distributed along the ring generates important thermal and vacuum effects. By means of a Monte Carlo simulation package, which is currently developed at CERN, both thermal and vacuum effects are quantitatively analysed, in particular near the crotch absorbers and the surrounding NEG-coated vacuum chambers. Using SynRad+, the beam trajectory of the upstream bending magnet is calculated; SR photons are generated and traced through the geometry until their absorption. This allows an analysis of the incident power density on the absorber, and to calculate the photon induced outgassing. The results are imported to Molflow+, a Monte Carlo vacuum simulator that works in the molecular flow regime, and the pressure in the vacuum system and the saturation length of the NEG coating are determined using iterations.

  18. TRIGA IPR-R1 reactor simulation using Monte Carlo transport methods

    OpenAIRE

    Hugo Moura Dalle

    2005-01-01

    Resumo: A utilização do método Monte Carlo na simulação do transporte de partículas em reatores nucleares é crescente e constitui uma tendência mundial. O maior inconveniente dessa técnica, a grande exigência de capacidade de processamento, vem sendo superado pelo contínuo desenvolvimento de processadores cada vez mais rápidos. Esse contexto permitiu o desenvolvimento de metodologias de cálculo neutrônico de reatores nas quais se acopla a parte do transporte de partículas, feita com um código...

  19. Neutral Particle Transport in Cylindrical Plasma Simulated by a Monte Carlo Code

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Deliang; YAN Longwen; ZHONG Guangwu; LU Jie; YI Ping

    2007-01-01

    A Monte Carlo code (MCHGAS) has been developed to investigate the neutral particle transport.The code can calculate the radial profile and energy spectrum of neutral particles in cylindrical plasmas.The calculation time of the code is dramatically reduced when the Splitting and Roulette schemes are applied. The plasma model of an infinite cylinder is assumed in the code,which is very convenient in simulating neutral particle transports in small and middle-sized tokamaks.The design of the multi-channel neutral particle analyser (NPA) on HL-2A can be optimized by using this code.

  20. A Deterministic-Monte Carlo Hybrid Method for Time-Dependent Neutron Transport Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Justin Pounders; Farzad Rahnema

    2001-10-01

    A new deterministic-Monte Carlo hybrid solution technique is derived for the time-dependent transport equation. This new approach is based on dividing the time domain into a number of coarse intervals and expanding the transport solution in a series of polynomials within each interval. The solutions within each interval can be represented in terms of arbitrary source terms by using precomputed response functions. In the current work, the time-dependent response function computations are performed using the Monte Carlo method, while the global time-step march is performed deterministically. This work extends previous work by coupling the time-dependent expansions to space- and angle-dependent expansions to fully characterize the 1D transport response/solution. More generally, this approach represents and incremental extension of the steady-state coarse-mesh transport method that is based on global-local decompositions of large neutron transport problems. An example of a homogeneous slab is discussed as an example of the new developments.

  1. Asymptotic diffusion limit of cell temperature discretisation schemes for thermal radiation transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smedley-Stevenson, Richard P., E-mail: richard.smedley-stevenson@awe.co.uk [AWE PLC, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); McClarren, Ryan G., E-mail: rmcclarren@ne.tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A & M University, College Station, TX 77843-3133 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This paper attempts to unify the asymptotic diffusion limit analysis of thermal radiation transport schemes, for a linear-discontinuous representation of the material temperature reconstructed from cell centred temperature unknowns, in a process known as ‘source tilting’. The asymptotic limits of both Monte Carlo (continuous in space) and deterministic approaches (based on linear-discontinuous finite elements) for solving the transport equation are investigated in slab geometry. The resulting discrete diffusion equations are found to have nonphysical terms that are proportional to any cell-edge discontinuity in the temperature representation. Based on this analysis it is possible to design accurate schemes for representing the material temperature, for coupling thermal radiation transport codes to a cell centred representation of internal energy favoured by ALE (arbitrary Lagrange–Eulerian) hydrodynamics schemes.

  2. Transport and radiation in complex LTE mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Jesper; Peerenboom, Kim; Suijker, Jos; Gnybida, Mykhailo; van Dijk, Jan

    2014-10-01

    Complex LTE mixtures are for example encountered in re-entry, welding, spraying and lighting. These mixtures typically contain a rich chemistry in combination with large temperature gradients. LTE conditions are also interesting because they can aid in the validation of NLTE algorithms. An example is the calculation of transport properties. In this work a mercury free high intensity discharge lamp is considered. The investigation focusses on using salts like InI or SnI as a buffer species. By using these species a dominant background gas like mercury is no longer present. As a consequence the diffusion algorithms based on Fick's law are no longer applicable and the Stefan-Maxwell equations must be solved. This system of equations is modified with conservation rules to set a coldspot pressure for saturated species and enforce the mass dosage for unsaturated species. The radiative energy transport is taken into account by raytracing. Quantum mechanical simulations have been used to calculate the potential curves and the transition dipole moments for indium with iodine and tin with iodine. The results of these calculations have been used to predict the quasistatic broadening by iodine. The work was supported by the project SCHELP from the Belgium IWT (Project Number 110003) and the CATRENE SEEL Project (CA502).

  3. A portable, parallel, object-oriented Monte Carlo neutron transport code in C++

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.R.; Cummings, J.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nolen, S.D. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-05-01

    We have developed a multi-group Monte Carlo neutron transport code using C++ and the Parallel Object-Oriented Methods and Applications (POOMA) class library. This transport code, called MC++, currently computes k and {alpha}-eigenvalues and is portable to and runs parallel on a wide variety of platforms, including MPPs, clustered SMPs, and individual workstations. It contains appropriate classes and abstractions for particle transport and, through the use of POOMA, for portable parallelism. Current capabilities of MC++ are discussed, along with physics and performance results on a variety of hardware, including all Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) hardware. Current parallel performance indicates the ability to compute {alpha}-eigenvalues in seconds to minutes rather than hours to days. Future plans and the implementation of a general transport physics framework are also discussed.

  4. An accelerated Monte Carlo method to solve two-dimensional radiative transfer and molecular excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Hogerheijde, M R; Hogerheijde, Michiel R.; Tak, Floris F. S. van der

    2000-01-01

    We present a numerical method and computer code to calculate the radiative transfer and excitation of molecular lines. Formulating the Monte Carlo method from the viewpoint of cells rather than photons allows us to separate local and external contributions to the radiation field. This separation is critical to accurate and fast performance at high optical depths (tau>100). The random nature of the Monte Carlo method serves to verify the independence of the solution to the angular, spatial, and frequency sampling of the radiation field. These features allow use of our method in a wide variety of astrophysical problems without specific adaptations: in any axially symmetric source model and for all atoms or molecules for which collisional rate coefficients are available. Continuum emission and absorption by dust is explicitly taken into account but scattering is neglected. We illustrate these features in calculations of (i) the HCO+ J=1-0 and 3-2 emission from a flattened protostellar envelope with infall and ro...

  5. Generalized Subtraction Schemes for the Difference Formulation in Radiation Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luu, T; Brooks, E; Szoke, A

    2008-07-25

    In the difference formulation for the transport of thermally emitted photons, the photon intensity is defined relative to a reference field, the black body at the local material temperature. This choice of reference field removes the cancellation between thermal emission and absorption that is responsible for noise in the Monte Carlo solution of thick systems, but introduces time and space derivative source terms that can not be determined until the end of the time step. It can also lead to noise induced crashes under certain conditions where the real physical photon intensity differs strongly from a black body at the local material temperature. In this report, we consider a difference formulation relative to the material temperature at the beginning of the time step, and in the situations where the radiation intensity more closely follows a temperature other than the local material temperature, that temperature. The result is a method where iterative solution of the material energy equation is efficient and noise induced crashes are avoided. To support our contention that the resulting generalized subtraction scheme is robust, and therefore suitable for practical use, we perform a stability analysis in the thick limit where instabilities usually occur.

  6. Reverse Monte Carlo studies of CeO2 using neutron and synchrotron radiation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Adam H.; Marchbank, Huw R.; Hyde, Timothy I.; Playford, Helen Y.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Sankar, Gopinathan

    2017-03-01

    A reverse Monte Carlo analysis method was employed to extract the structure of CeO2 from Neutron total scattering (comprising both neutron diffraction (ND) and pair-distribution functions (PDF) and Ce L3- and K-edge EXAFS data. Here it is shown that there is a noticeable difference between using short ranged x-ray absorption spectroscopy data and using medium-long range PDF and ND data in regards to the disorder of the cerium atoms. This illustrates the importance of considering multiple length scales and radiation sources.

  7. Solution of the radiative transfer theory problems by the Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchuk, G. I.; Mikhailov, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is used for two types of problems. First, there are interpretation problems of optical observations from meteorological satellites in the short wave part of the spectrum. The sphericity of the atmosphere, the propagation function, and light polarization are considered. Second, problems dealt with the theory of spreading narrow light beams. Direct simulation of light scattering and the mathematical form of medium radiation model representation are discussed, and general integral transfer equations are calculated. The dependent tests method, derivative estimates, and solution to the inverse problem are also considered.

  8. Applying graphics processor units to Monte Carlo dose calculation in radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhtiari M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the potential in using of using a graphics processor unit (GPU for Monte-Carlo (MC-based radiation dose calculations. The percent depth dose (PDD of photons in a medium with known absorption and scattering coefficients is computed using a MC simulation running on both a standard CPU and a GPU. We demonstrate that the GPU′s capability for massive parallel processing provides a significant acceleration in the MC calculation, and offers a significant advantage for distributed stochastic simulations on a single computer. Harnessing this potential of GPUs will help in the early adoption of MC for routine planning in a clinical environment.

  9. Update on the Development and Validation of MERCURY: A Modern, Monte Carlo Particle Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procassini, R J; Taylor, J M; McKinley, M S; Greenman, G M; Cullen, D E; O' Brien, M J; Beck, B R; Hagmann, C A

    2005-06-06

    An update on the development and validation of the MERCURY Monte Carlo particle transport code is presented. MERCURY is a modern, parallel, general-purpose Monte Carlo code being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. During the past year, several major algorithm enhancements have been completed. These include the addition of particle trackers for 3-D combinatorial geometry (CG), 1-D radial meshes, 2-D quadrilateral unstructured meshes, as well as a feature known as templates for defining recursive, repeated structures in CG. New physics capabilities include an elastic-scattering neutron thermalization model, support for continuous energy cross sections and S ({alpha}, {beta}) molecular bound scattering. Each of these new physics features has been validated through code-to-code comparisons with another Monte Carlo transport code. Several important computer science features have been developed, including an extensible input-parameter parser based upon the XML data description language, and a dynamic load-balance methodology for efficient parallel calculations. This paper discusses the recent work in each of these areas, and describes a plan for future extensions that are required to meet the needs of our ever expanding user base.

  10. Benchmark experiment to verify radiation transport calculations for dosimetry in radiation therapy; Benchmark-Experiment zur Verifikation von Strahlungstransportrechnungen fuer die Dosimetrie in der Strahlentherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renner, Franziska [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are regarded as the most accurate method of solving complex problems in the field of dosimetry and radiation transport. In (external) radiation therapy they are increasingly used for the calculation of dose distributions during treatment planning. In comparison to other algorithms for the calculation of dose distributions, Monte Carlo methods have the capability of improving the accuracy of dose calculations - especially under complex circumstances (e.g. consideration of inhomogeneities). However, there is a lack of knowledge of how accurate the results of Monte Carlo calculations are on an absolute basis. A practical verification of the calculations can be performed by direct comparison with the results of a benchmark experiment. This work presents such a benchmark experiment and compares its results (with detailed consideration of measurement uncertainty) with the results of Monte Carlo calculations using the well-established Monte Carlo code EGSnrc. The experiment was designed to have parallels to external beam radiation therapy with respect to the type and energy of the radiation, the materials used and the kind of dose measurement. Because the properties of the beam have to be well known in order to compare the results of the experiment and the simulation on an absolute basis, the benchmark experiment was performed using the research electron accelerator of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), whose beam was accurately characterized in advance. The benchmark experiment and the corresponding Monte Carlo simulations were carried out for two different types of ionization chambers and the results were compared. Considering the uncertainty, which is about 0.7 % for the experimental values and about 1.0 % for the Monte Carlo simulation, the results of the simulation and the experiment coincide.

  11. Thermal transport in nanocrystalline Si and SiGe by ab initio based Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lina; Minnich, Austin J

    2017-03-14

    Nanocrystalline thermoelectric materials based on Si have long been of interest because Si is earth-abundant, inexpensive, and non-toxic. However, a poor understanding of phonon grain boundary scattering and its effect on thermal conductivity has impeded efforts to improve the thermoelectric figure of merit. Here, we report an ab-initio based computational study of thermal transport in nanocrystalline Si-based materials using a variance-reduced Monte Carlo method with the full phonon dispersion and intrinsic lifetimes from first-principles as input. By fitting the transmission profile of grain boundaries, we obtain excellent agreement with experimental thermal conductivity of nanocrystalline Si [Wang et al. Nano Letters 11, 2206 (2011)]. Based on these calculations, we examine phonon transport in nanocrystalline SiGe alloys with ab-initio electron-phonon scattering rates. Our calculations show that low energy phonons still transport substantial amounts of heat in these materials, despite scattering by electron-phonon interactions, due to the high transmission of phonons at grain boundaries, and thus improvements in ZT are still possible by disrupting these modes. This work demonstrates the important insights into phonon transport that can be obtained using ab-initio based Monte Carlo simulations in complex nanostructured materials.

  12. Explicit solutions of the radiative transport equation in the P{sub 3} approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liemert, André, E-mail: andre.liemert@ilm.uni-ulm.de; Kienle, Alwin [Institut für Lasertechnologien in der Medizin und Meßtechnik an der Universität Ulm, Helmholtzstr.12, Ulm D-89081 (Germany)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Explicit solutions of the monoenergetic radiative transport equation in the P{sub 3} approximation have been derived which can be evaluated with nearly the same computational effort as needed for solving the standard diffusion equation (DE). In detail, the authors considered the important case of a semi-infinite medium which is illuminated by a collimated beam of light. Methods: A combination of the classic spherical harmonics method and the recently developed method of rotated reference frames is used for solving the P{sub 3} equations in closed form. Results: The derived solutions are illustrated and compared to exact solutions of the radiative transport equation obtained via the Monte Carlo (MC) method as well as with other approximated analytical solutions. It is shown that for the considered cases which are relevant for biomedical optics applications, the P{sub 3} approximation is close to the exact solution of the radiative transport equation. Conclusions: The authors derived exact analytical solutions of the P{sub 3} equations under consideration of boundary conditions for defining a semi-infinite medium. The good agreement to Monte Carlo simulations in the investigated domains, for example, in the steady-state and time domains, as well as the short evaluation time needed suggests that the derived equations can replace the often applied solutions of the diffusion equation for the homogeneous semi-infinite medium.

  13. TART97 a coupled neutron-photon 3-D, combinatorial geometry Monte Carlo transport code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, D.E.

    1997-11-22

    TART97 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo transport code. This code can on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART97 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART97 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on- line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART97 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART97 and its data riles.

  14. Development of perturbation Monte Carlo methods for polarized light transport in a discrete particle scattering model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jennifer; Hayakawa, Carole K; Mourant, Judith R; Venugopalan, Vasan; Spanier, Jerome

    2016-05-01

    We present a polarization-sensitive, transport-rigorous perturbation Monte Carlo (pMC) method to model the impact of optical property changes on reflectance measurements within a discrete particle scattering model. The model consists of three log-normally distributed populations of Mie scatterers that approximate biologically relevant cervical tissue properties. Our method provides reflectance estimates for perturbations across wavelength and/or scattering model parameters. We test our pMC model performance by perturbing across number densities and mean particle radii, and compare pMC reflectance estimates with those obtained from conventional Monte Carlo simulations. These tests allow us to explore different factors that control pMC performance and to evaluate the gains in computational efficiency that our pMC method provides.

  15. Numerical Study of Light Transport in Apple Models Based on Monte Carlo Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Lamine Askoura

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the quantification of light transport in apple models using Monte Carlo simulations. To this end, apple was modeled as a two-layer spherical model including skin and flesh bulk tissues. The optical properties of both tissue types used to generate Monte Carlo data were collected from the literature, and selected to cover a range of values related to three apple varieties. Two different imaging-tissue setups were simulated in order to show the role of the skin on steady-state backscattering images, spatially-resolved reflectance profiles, and assessment of flesh optical properties using an inverse nonlinear least squares fitting algorithm. Simulation results suggest that apple skin cannot be ignored when a Visible/Near-Infrared (Vis/NIR steady-state imaging setup is used for investigating quality attributes of apples. They also help to improve optical inspection techniques in the horticultural products.

  16. Description of Transport Codes for Space Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation describes transport codes and their use for studying and designing space radiation shielding. When combined with risk projection models radiation transport codes serve as the main tool for study radiation and designing shielding. There are three criteria for assessing the accuracy of transport codes: (1) Ground-based studies with defined beams and material layouts, (2) Inter-comparison of transport code results for matched boundary conditions and (3) Comparisons to flight measurements. These three criteria have a very high degree with NASA's HZETRN/QMSFRG.

  17. METHES: A Monte Carlo collision code for the simulation of electron transport in low temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabie, M.; Franck, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    We present a freely available MATLAB code for the simulation of electron transport in arbitrary gas mixtures in the presence of uniform electric fields. For steady-state electron transport, the program provides the transport coefficients, reaction rates and the electron energy distribution function. The program uses established Monte Carlo techniques and is compatible with the electron scattering cross section files from the open-access Plasma Data Exchange Project LXCat. The code is written in object-oriented design, allowing the tracing and visualization of the spatiotemporal evolution of electron swarms and the temporal development of the mean energy and the electron number due to attachment and/or ionization processes. We benchmark our code with well-known model gases as well as the real gases argon, N2, O2, CF4, SF6 and mixtures of N2 and O2.

  18. Monte Carlo Study of Temperature-dependent Non-diffusive Thermal Transport in Si Nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Lei; Liu, Mengmeng; Zhao, Xuxin; Wu, Qixing; Sun, Hongyuan

    2016-01-01

    Non-diffusive thermal transport has gained extensive research interest recently due to its important implications on fundamental understanding of material phonon mean free path distributions and many nanoscale energy applications. In this work, we systematically investigate the role of boundary scattering and nanowire length on the nondiffusive thermal transport in thin silicon nanowires by rigorously solving the phonon Boltzmann transport equation using a variance reduced Monte Carlo technique across a range of temperatures. The simulations use the complete phonon dispersion and spectral lifetime data obtained from first-principle density function theory calculations as input without any adjustable parameters. Our BTE simulation results show that the nanowire length plays an important role in determining the thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires. In addition, our simulation results suggest significant phonon confinement effect for the previously measured silicon nanowires. These findings are important fo...

  19. The application of Monte Carlo method to electron and photon beams transport; Zastosowanie metody Monte Carlo do analizy transportu elektronow i fotonow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zychor, I. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    The application of a Monte Carlo method to study a transport in matter of electron and photon beams is presented, especially for electrons with energies up to 18 MeV. The SHOWME Monte Carlo code, a modified version of GEANT3 code, was used on the CONVEX C3210 computer at Swierk. It was assumed that an electron beam is mono directional and monoenergetic. Arbitrary user-defined, complex geometries made of any element or material can be used in calculation. All principal phenomena occurring when electron beam penetrates the matter are taken into account. The use of calculation for a therapeutic electron beam collimation is presented. (author). 20 refs, 29 figs.

  20. Molecular line radiative transfer in protoplanetary disks: Monte Carlo simulations versus approximate methods

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlyuchenkov, Ya; Henning, T; Guilloteau, St; Pietu, V; Launhardt, R; Dutrey, A

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the line radiative transfer in protoplanetary disks using several approximate methods and a well-tested Accelerated Monte Carlo code. A low-mass flaring disk model with uniform as well as stratified molecular abundances is adopted. Radiative transfer in low and high rotational lines of CO, C18O, HCO+, DCO+, HCN, CS, and H2CO is simulated. The corresponding excitation temperatures, synthetic spectra, and channel maps are derived and compared to the results of the Monte Carlo calculations. A simple scheme that describes the conditions of the line excitation for a chosen molecular transition is elaborated. We find that the simple LTE approach can safely be applied for the low molecular transitions only, while it significantly overestimates the intensities of the upper lines. In contrast, the Full Escape Probability (FEP) approximation can safely be used for the upper transitions ($J_{\\rm up} \\ga 3$) but it is not appropriate for the lowest transitions because of the maser effect. In general, the molec...

  1. Radiative transfer and spectroscopic databases: A line-sampling Monte Carlo approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtier, Mathieu; Blanco, Stéphane; Dauchet, Jérémi; El Hafi, Mouna; Eymet, Vincent; Fournier, Richard; Roger, Maxime; Spiesser, Christophe; Terrée, Guillaume

    2016-03-01

    Dealing with molecular-state transitions for radiative transfer purposes involves two successive steps that both reach the complexity level at which physicists start thinking about statistical approaches: (1) constructing line-shaped absorption spectra as the result of very numerous state-transitions, (2) integrating over optical-path domains. For the first time, we show here how these steps can be addressed simultaneously using the null-collision concept. This opens the door to the design of Monte Carlo codes directly estimating radiative transfer observables from spectroscopic databases. The intermediate step of producing accurate high-resolution absorption spectra is no longer required. A Monte Carlo algorithm is proposed and applied to six one-dimensional test cases. It allows the computation of spectrally integrated intensities (over 25 cm-1 bands or the full IR range) in a few seconds, regardless of the retained database and line model. But free parameters need to be selected and they impact the convergence. A first possible selection is provided in full detail. We observe that this selection is highly satisfactory for quite distinct atmospheric and combustion configurations, but a more systematic exploration is still in progress.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of secondary radiation exposure from high-energy photon therapy using an anthropomorphic phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankl, Matthias; Macián-Juan, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    The development of intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatments delivering large amounts of monitor units (MUs) recently raised concern about higher risks for secondary malignancies. In this study, optimised combinations of several variance reduction techniques (VRTs) have been implemented in order to achieve a high precision in Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport simulations and the calculation of in- and out-of-field photon and neutron dose-equivalent distributions in an anthropomorphic phantom using MCNPX, v.2.7. The computer model included a Varian Clinac 2100C treatment head and a high-resolution head phantom. By means of the applied VRTs, a relative uncertainty for the photon dose-equivalent distribution of 8 MeV, has been calculated. Relative uncertainty, calculated for each voxel, could be kept below 5 % in average over all voxels of the phantom. Thus, a very detailed neutron dose distribution could be obtained. The achieved precision now allows a far better estimation of both photon and especially neutron doses out-of-field, where neutrons can become the predominant component of secondary radiation.

  3. Srna - Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulation in combined and voxelized geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Radovan D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes new Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulations in complex geometrical forms and in materials of different composition. The SRNA codes were developed for three dimensional (3D dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry. The model of these codes is based on the theory of proton multiple scattering and a simple model of compound nucleus decay. The developed package consists of two codes: SRNA-2KG and SRNA-VOX. The first code simulates proton transport in combined geometry that can be described by planes and second order surfaces. The second one uses the voxelized geometry of material zones and is specifically adopted for the application of patient computer tomography data. Transition probabilities for both codes are given by the SRNADAT program. In this paper, we will present the models and algorithms of our programs, as well as the results of the numerical experiments we have carried out applying them, along with the results of proton transport simulation obtained through the PETRA and GEANT programs. The simulation of the proton beam characterization by means of the Multi-Layer Faraday Cup and spatial distribution of positron emitters obtained by our program indicate the imminent application of Monte Carlo techniques in clinical practice.

  4. On-the-fly estimation strategy for uncertainty propagation in two-step Monte Carlo calculation for residual radiation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Gi Young; Seo, Bo Kyun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety,, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do Hyun; Shin, Chang Ho; Kim, Song Hyun [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sun, Gwang Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    In analyzing residual radiation, researchers generally use a two-step Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The first step (MC1) simulates neutron transport, and the second step (MC2) transports the decay photons emitted from the activated materials. In this process, the stochastic uncertainty estimated by the MC2 appears only as a final result, but it is underestimated because the stochastic error generated in MC1 cannot be directly included in MC2. Hence, estimating the true stochastic uncertainty requires quantifying the propagation degree of the stochastic error in MC1. The brute force technique is a straightforward method to estimate the true uncertainty. However, it is a costly method to obtain reliable results. Another method, called the adjoint-based method, can reduce the computational time needed to evaluate the true uncertainty; however, there are limitations. To address those limitations, we propose a new strategy to estimate uncertainty propagation without any additional calculations in two-step MC simulations. To verify the proposed method, we applied it to activation benchmark problems and compared the results with those of previous methods. The results show that the proposed method increases the applicability and user-friendliness preserving accuracy in quantifying uncertainty propagation. We expect that the proposed strategy will contribute to efficient and accurate two-step MC calculations.

  5. Hybrid Parallel Programming Models for AMR Neutron Monte-Carlo Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dureau, David; Poëtte, Gaël

    2014-06-01

    This paper deals with High Performance Computing (HPC) applied to neutron transport theory on complex geometries, thanks to both an Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) algorithm and a Monte-Carlo (MC) solver. Several Parallelism models are presented and analyzed in this context, among them shared memory and distributed memory ones such as Domain Replication and Domain Decomposition, together with Hybrid strategies. The study is illustrated by weak and strong scalability tests on complex benchmarks on several thousands of cores thanks to the petaflopic supercomputer Tera100.

  6. Geometric optimization using Monte Carlo simulations of mini-beams of radiation synchrotron; Optimizacion geometrica mediante simulacion Monte Carlo de minihaces de radiacion sincrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manchado de Sola, F.; Vilches Pacheco, M.; Lallena Rojo, A. M.; Prezado, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Still in testing phase, radiation therapy with mini-beams is presented as a promising form of treatment. The irradiation with beams constituted by a group of parallel strips of radiation and shade (peaks and valleys), each an of the which has a width of the order of microns. We studied using Monte Carlo simulation, the effect of the brain caused by the heartbeat pulsed on the reason of dose peak-valley in cranial radiotherapy with mini-beams, depending on the width of peak and the rate of irradiation. (Author)

  7. Monte Carlo generator comparisons to ATLAS measurements constraining QCD radiation in top anti-top final states

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Recently the ATLAS collaboration has measured several final state observables that are sensitive to additional parton radiation in top anti-top quark final states produced in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energies of $sqrt{s}=7$~TeV. These measurements are compared to modern Monte Carlo generators implementing several different models and with systematic model parameter variations. Future measurements to constrain parton radiation are also proposed and the predictions of various Monte Carlo generators are compared.

  8. A hybrid transport-diffusion model for radiative transfer in absorbing and scattering media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger, M., E-mail: maxime.roger@insa-lyon.fr [Université de Lyon, CNRS, INSA-Lyon, CETHIL, UMR5008, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); Caliot, C. [PROMES-UPR CNRS 6144, 7 rue du Four Solaire, 66120 Font Romeu Odeillo (France); Crouseilles, N. [INRIA-Rennes Bretagne-Atlantique (IPSO Project) and Université de Rennes 1 (IRMAR), Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Coelho, P.J. [Mechanical Engineering Department, LAETA, IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-10-15

    A new multi-scale hybrid transport-diffusion model for radiative transfer is proposed in order to improve the efficiency of the calculations close to the diffusive regime, in absorbing and strongly scattering media. In this model, the radiative intensity is decomposed into a macroscopic component calculated by the diffusion equation, and a mesoscopic component. The transport equation for the mesoscopic component allows to correct the estimation of the diffusion equation, and then to obtain the solution of the linear radiative transfer equation. In this work, results are presented for stationary and transient radiative transfer cases, in examples which concern solar concentrated and optical tomography applications. The Monte Carlo and the discrete-ordinate methods are used to solve the mesoscopic equation. It is shown that the multi-scale model allows to improve the efficiency of the calculations when the medium is close to the diffusive regime. The proposed model is a good alternative for radiative transfer at the intermediate regime where the macroscopic diffusion equation is not accurate enough and the radiative transfer equation requires too much computational effort.

  9. Monte Carlo Neutrino Transport Through Remnant Disks from Neutron Star Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Richers, S; O'Connor, Evan; Fernandez, Rodrigo; Ott, Christian

    2015-01-01

    We present Sedonu, a new open source, steady-state, special relativistic Monte Carlo (MC) neutrino transport code, available at bitbucket.org/srichers/sedonu. The code calculates the energy- and angle-dependent neutrino distribution function on fluid backgrounds of any number of spatial dimensions, calculates the rates of change of fluid internal energy and electron fraction, and solves for the equilibrium fluid temperature and electron fraction. We apply this method to snapshots from two dimensional simulations of accretion disks left behind by binary neutron star mergers, varying the input physics and comparing to the results obtained with a leakage scheme for the case of a central black hole and a central hypermassive neutron star. Neutrinos are guided away from the densest regions of the disk and escape preferentially around 45 degrees from the equatorial plane. Neutrino heating is strengthened by MC transport a few scale heights above the disk midplane near the innermost stable circular orbit, potentiall...

  10. Particle Communication and Domain Neighbor Coupling: Scalable Domain Decomposed Algorithms for Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, M. J.; Brantley, P. S.

    2015-01-20

    In order to run Monte Carlo particle transport calculations on new supercomputers with hundreds of thousands or millions of processors, care must be taken to implement scalable algorithms. This means that the algorithms must continue to perform well as the processor count increases. In this paper, we examine the scalability of:(1) globally resolving the particle locations on the correct processor, (2) deciding that particle streaming communication has finished, and (3) efficiently coupling neighbor domains together with different replication levels. We have run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on up to 221 = 2,097,152 MPI processes on the IBM BG/Q Sequoia supercomputer and observed scalable results that agree with our theoretical predictions. These calculations were carefully constructed to have the same amount of work on every processor, i.e. the calculation is already load balanced. We also examine load imbalanced calculations where each domain’s replication level is proportional to its particle workload. In this case we show how to efficiently couple together adjacent domains to maintain within workgroup load balance and minimize memory usage.

  11. Radiation doses in volume-of-interest breast computed tomography—A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Chao-Jen, E-mail: cjlai3711@gmail.com; Zhong, Yuncheng; Yi, Ying; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C. [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030-4009 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Cone beam breast computed tomography (breast CT) with true three-dimensional, nearly isotropic spatial resolution has been developed and investigated over the past decade to overcome the problem of lesions overlapping with breast anatomical structures on two-dimensional mammographic images. However, the ability of breast CT to detect small objects, such as tissue structure edges and small calcifications, is limited. To resolve this problem, the authors proposed and developed a volume-of-interest (VOI) breast CT technique to image a small VOI using a higher radiation dose to improve that region’s visibility. In this study, the authors performed Monte Carlo simulations to estimate average breast dose and average glandular dose (AGD) for the VOI breast CT technique. Methods: Electron–Gamma-Shower system code-based Monte Carlo codes were used to simulate breast CT. The Monte Carlo codes estimated were validated using physical measurements of air kerma ratios and point doses in phantoms with an ion chamber and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. The validated full cone x-ray source was then collimated to simulate half cone beam x-rays to image digital pendant-geometry, hemi-ellipsoidal, homogeneous breast phantoms and to estimate breast doses with full field scans. 13-cm in diameter, 10-cm long hemi-ellipsoidal homogeneous phantoms were used to simulate median breasts. Breast compositions of 25% and 50% volumetric glandular fractions (VGFs) were used to investigate the influence on breast dose. The simulated half cone beam x-rays were then collimated to a narrow x-ray beam with an area of 2.5 × 2.5 cm{sup 2} field of view at the isocenter plane and to perform VOI field scans. The Monte Carlo results for the full field scans and the VOI field scans were then used to estimate the AGD for the VOI breast CT technique. Results: The ratios of air kerma ratios and dose measurement results from the Monte Carlo simulation to those from the physical

  12. A Monte Carlo study of the radiation quality dependence of DNA fragmentation spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloni, D; Campa, A; Belli, M; Esposito, G; Facoetti, A; Friedland, W; Liotta, M; Mariotti, L; Paretzke, H G; Ottolenghi, A

    2010-03-01

    We simulated the irradiation of human fibroblasts with gamma rays, protons and helium, carbon and iron ions at a fixed dose of 5 Gy. The simulations were performed with the biophysical Monte Carlo code PARTRAC. From the output of the code, containing in particular the genomic positions of the radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), we obtained the DNA fragmentation spectra. Very small fragments, in particular those related to "complex lesions" (few tens of base pairs), are probably very important for the late cellular consequences, but their detection is not possible with the common experimental techniques. We paid special attention to the differences among the various ions in the production of these very small fragments; in particular, we compared the fragmentation spectra for ions of the same specific energy and for ions of the same LET (linear energy transfer). As found previously for iron ions, we found that the RBE (relative biological effectiveness) for DSB production was considerably higher than 1 for all high-LET radiations considered. This is at variance with the results obtainable from experimental data, and it is due to the ability to count the contribution of small fragments. It should be noted that for a given LET this RBE decreases with increasing ion charge, due mainly to the increasing mean energy of secondary electrons. A precise quantification of the DNA initial damage can be of great importance for both radiation protection, particularly in open-space long-term manned missions, and hadrontherapy.

  13. Monte Carlo method for polarized radiative transfer in gradient-index media

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, J M; Liu, L H

    2014-01-01

    Light transfer in gradient-index media generally follows curved ray trajectories, which will cause light beam to converge or diverge during transfer and induce the rotation of polarization ellipse even when the medium is transparent. Furthermore, the combined process of scattering and transfer along curved ray path makes the problem more complex. In this paper, a Monte Carlo method is presented to simulate polarized radiative transfer in gradient-index media that only support planar ray trajectories. The ray equation is solved to the second order to address the effect induced by curved ray trajectories. Three types of test cases are presented to verify the performance of the method, which include transparent medium, Mie scattering medium with assumed gradient index distribution, and Rayleigh scattering with realistic atmosphere refractive index profile. It is demonstrated that the atmospheric refraction has significant effect for long distance polarized light transfer.

  14. An Efficient Monte Carlo Method for Modeling Radiative Transfer in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Stacy

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods have been shown to be effective and versatile in modeling radiative transfer processes to calculate model temperature profiles for protoplanetary disks. Temperatures profiles are important for connecting physical structure to observation and for understanding the conditions for planet formation and migration. However, certain areas of the disk such as the optically thick disk interior are under-sampled, or are of particular interest such as the snow line (where water vapor condenses into ice) and the area surrounding a protoplanet. To improve the sampling, photon packets can be preferentially scattered and reemitted toward the preferred locations at the cost of weighting packet energies to conserve the average energy flux. Here I report on the weighting schemes developed, how they can be applied to various models, and how they affect simulation mechanics and results. We find that improvements in sampling do not always imply similar improvements in temperature accuracies and calculation speeds.

  15. Monte Carlo Calculations for Neutron and Gamma Radiation Fields on a Fast Neutron Irradiation Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, A.; Ramalho, A.; Gonçalves, I. C.; Fernandes, A.; Barradas, N.; Marques, J. G.; Prata, J.; Chaussy, Ch.

    We used the Monte Carlo program MCNP to calculate the neutron and gamma fluxes on a fast neutron irradiation facility being installed on the Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI). The purpose of this facility is to provide a fast neutron beam for irradiation of electronic circuits. The gamma dose should be minimized. This is achieved by placing a lead shield preceded by a thin layer of boral. A fast neutron flux of the order of 109 n/cm2s is expected at the exit of the tube, while the gamma radiation is kept below 20 Gy/h. We will present results of the neutron and gamma doses for several locations along the tube and different thickness of the lead shield. We found that the neutron beam is very collimated at the end of the tube with a dominant component on the fast region.

  16. Radiation safety in sea transport of radioactive material in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odano, N. [National Maritime Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Yanagi, H. [Nuclear Fuel Transport Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Radiation safety for sea transport of radioactive material in Japan has been discussed based on records of the exposed dose of sea transport workers and measured data of dose rate equivalents distribution inboard exclusive radioactive material shipping vessels. Recent surveyed records of the exposed doses of workers who engaged in sea transport operation indicate that exposed doses of transport workers are significantly low. Measured distribution of the exposed dose equivalents inboard those vessels indicates that dose rate equivalents inside those vessels are lower than levels regulated by the transport regulations of Japan. These facts clarify that radiation safety of inboard environment and handling of transport casks in sea transport of radioactive material in Japan are assured.

  17. Recommended direct simulation Monte Carlo collision model parameters for modeling ionized air transport processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminathan-Gopalan, Krishnan; Stephani, Kelly A., E-mail: ksteph@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    A systematic approach for calibrating the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) collision model parameters to achieve consistency in the transport processes is presented. The DSMC collision cross section model parameters are calibrated for high temperature atmospheric conditions by matching the collision integrals from DSMC against ab initio based collision integrals that are currently employed in the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) and Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) high temperature computational fluid dynamics solvers. The DSMC parameter values are computed for the widely used Variable Hard Sphere (VHS) and the Variable Soft Sphere (VSS) models using the collision-specific pairing approach. The recommended best-fit VHS/VSS parameter values are provided over a temperature range of 1000-20 000 K for a thirteen-species ionized air mixture. Use of the VSS model is necessary to achieve consistency in transport processes of ionized gases. The agreement of the VSS model transport properties with the transport properties as determined by the ab initio collision integral fits was found to be within 6% in the entire temperature range, regardless of the composition of the mixture. The recommended model parameter values can be readily applied to any gas mixture involving binary collisional interactions between the chemical species presented for the specified temperature range.

  18. C5 Benchmark Problem with Discrete Ordinate Radiation Transport Code DENOVO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesilyurt, Gokhan [ORNL; Clarno, Kevin T [ORNL; Evans, Thomas M [ORNL; Davidson, Gregory G [ORNL; Fox, Patricia B [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The C5 benchmark problem proposed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency was modeled to examine the capabilities of Denovo, a three-dimensional (3-D) parallel discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) radiation transport code, for problems with no spatial homogenization. Denovo uses state-of-the-art numerical methods to obtain accurate solutions to the Boltzmann transport equation. Problems were run in parallel on Jaguar, a high-performance supercomputer located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Both the two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D configurations were analyzed, and the results were compared with the reference MCNP Monte Carlo calculations. For an additional comparison, SCALE/KENO-V.a Monte Carlo solutions were also included. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was performed for the optimal angular quadrature and mesh resolution for both the 2-D and 3-D infinite lattices of UO{sub 2} fuel pin cells. Denovo was verified with the C5 problem. The effective multiplication factors, pin powers, and assembly powers were found to be in good agreement with the reference MCNP and SCALE/KENO-V.a Monte Carlo calculations.

  19. Reciprocity relation for the vector radiative transport equation and its application to diffuse optical tomography with polarized light

    CERN Document Server

    Tricoli, Ugo; Da Silva, Anabela; Markel, Vadim A

    2016-01-01

    We derive a reciprocity relation for vector radiative transport equation (vRTE) that describes propagation of polarized light in multiple-scattering media. We then show how this result, together with translational invariance of a plane-parallel sample, can be used to compute efficiently the sensitivity kernel of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) by Monte Carlo simulations. Numerical examples of polarization-selective sensitivity kernels thus computed are given.

  20. Monte Carlo Spectral Integration: a Consistent Approximation for Radiative Transfer in Large Eddy Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Pincus

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Large-eddy simulation (LES refers to a class of calculations in which the large energy-rich eddies are simulated directly and are insensitive to errors in the modeling of sub-grid scale processes. Flows represented by LES are often driven by radiative heating and therefore require the calculation of radiative transfer along with the fluid-dynamical simulation. Current methods for detailed radiation calculations, even those using simple one-dimensional radiative transfer, are far too expensive for routine use, while popular shortcuts are either of limited applicability or run the risk of introducing errors on time and space scales that might affect the overall simulation. A new approximate method is described that relies on Monte Carlo sampling of the spectral integration in the heating rate calculation and is applicable to any problem. The error introduced when using this method is substantial for individual samples (single columns at single times but is uncorrelated in time and space and so does not bias the statistics of scales that are well resolved by the LES. The method is evaluated through simulation of two test problems; these behave as expected. A scaling analysis shows that the errors introduced by the method diminish as flow features become well resolved. Errors introduced by the approximation increase with decreasing spatial scale but the spurious energy introduced by the approximation is less than the energy expected in the unperturbed flow, i.e. the energy associated with the spectral cascade from the large scale, even on the grid scale.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields and dosimetry devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guoqing

    2011-12-22

    Monte Carlo methods based on random sampling are widely used in different fields for the capability of solving problems with a large number of coupled degrees of freedom. In this work, Monte Carlos methods are successfully applied for the simulation of the mixed neutron-gamma field in an interim storage facility and neutron dosimeters of different types. Details are discussed in two parts: In the first part, the method of simulating an interim storage facility loaded with CASTORs is presented. The size of a CASTOR is rather large (several meters) and the CASTOR wall is very thick (tens of centimeters). Obtaining the results of dose rates outside a CASTOR with reasonable errors costs usually hours or even days. For the simulation of a large amount of CASTORs in an interim storage facility, it needs weeks or even months to finish a calculation. Variance reduction techniques were used to reduce the calculation time and to achieve reasonable relative errors. Source clones were applied to avoid unnecessary repeated calculations. In addition, the simulations were performed on a cluster system. With the calculation techniques discussed above, the efficiencies of calculations can be improved evidently. In the second part, the methods of simulating the response of neutron dosimeters are presented. An Alnor albedo dosimeter was modelled in MCNP, and it has been simulated in the facility to calculate the calibration factor to get the evaluated response to a Cf-252 source. The angular response of Makrofol detectors to fast neutrons has also been investigated. As a kind of SSNTD, Makrofol can detect fast neutrons by recording the neutron induced heavy charged recoils. To obtain the information of charged recoils, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes were used for transporting incident neutrons. The response of Makrofol to fast neutrons is dependent on several factors. Based on the parameters which affect the track revealing, the formation of visible tracks was determined. For

  2. Discontinuous Galerkin for the Radiative Transport Equation

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2013-10-11

    This note presents some recent results regarding the approximation of the linear radiative transfer equation using discontinuous Galerkin methods. The locking effect occurring in the diffusion limit with the upwind numerical flux is investigated and a correction technique is proposed.

  3. COMET-PE as an Alternative to Monte Carlo for Photon and Electron Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Robert M.; Rahnema, Farzad

    2014-06-01

    Monte Carlo methods are a central component of radiotherapy treatment planning, shielding design, detector modeling, and other applications. Long calculation times, however, can limit the usefulness of these purely stochastic methods. The coarse mesh method for photon and electron transport (COMET-PE) provides an attractive alternative. By combining stochastic pre-computation with a deterministic solver, COMET-PE achieves accuracy comparable to Monte Carlo methods in only a fraction of the time. The method's implementation has been extended to 3D, and in this work, it is validated by comparison to DOSXYZnrc using a photon radiotherapy benchmark. The comparison demonstrates excellent agreement; of the voxels that received more than 10% of the maximum dose, over 97.3% pass a 2% / 2mm acceptance test and over 99.7% pass a 3% / 3mm test. Furthermore, the method is over an order of magnitude faster than DOSXYZnrc and is able to take advantage of both distributed-memory and shared-memory parallel architectures for increased performance.

  4. All about FAX: a Female Adult voXel phantom for Monte Carlo calculation in radiation protection dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, R; Khoury, H J; Vieira, J W; Loureiro, E C M; Lima, V J M; Lima, F R A; Hoff, G

    2004-12-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has created a task group on dose calculations, which, among other objectives, should replace the currently used mathematical MIRD phantoms by voxel phantoms. Voxel phantoms are based on digital images recorded from scanning of real persons by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Compared to the mathematical MIRD phantoms, voxel phantoms are true to the natural representations of a human body. Connected to a radiation transport code, voxel phantoms serve as virtual humans for which equivalent dose to organs and tissues from exposure to ionizing radiation can be calculated. The principal database for the construction of the FAX (Female Adult voXel) phantom consisted of 151 CT images recorded from scanning of trunk and head of a female patient, whose body weight and height were close to the corresponding data recommended by the ICRP in Publication 89. All 22 organs and tissues at risk, except for the red bone marrow and the osteogenic cells on the endosteal surface of bone ('bone surface'), have been segmented manually with a technique recently developed at the Departamento de Energia Nuclear of the UFPE in Recife, Brazil. After segmentation the volumes of the organs and tissues have been adjusted to agree with the organ and tissue masses recommended by ICRP for the Reference Adult Female in Publication 89. Comparisons have been made with the organ and tissue masses of the mathematical EVA phantom, as well as with the corresponding data for other female voxel phantoms. The three-dimensional matrix of the segmented images has eventually been connected to the EGS4 Monte Carlo code. Effective dose conversion coefficients have been calculated for exposures to photons, and compared to data determined for the mathematical MIRD-type phantoms, as well as for other voxel phantoms.

  5. Monte Carlo Simulations of Charge Transport in 2D Organic Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagorik, Adam G; Mohin, Jacob W; Kowalewski, Tomasz; Hutchison, Geoffrey R

    2013-01-01

    The effect of morphology on charge transport in organic photovoltaics is assessed using Monte Carlo. In isotopic two-phase morphologies, increasing the domain size from 6.3 to 18.3 nm improves the fill factor by 11.6%, a result of decreased tortuosity and relaxation of Coulombic barriers. Additionally, when small aggregates of electron acceptors are interdispersed into the electron donor phase, charged defects form in the system, reducing fill factors by 23.3% on average, compared with systems without aggregates. In contrast, systems with idealized connectivity show a 3.31% decrease in fill factor when domain size was increased from 4 to 64 nm. We attribute this to a decreased rate of exciton separation at donor-acceptor interfaces. Finally, we notice that the presence of Coulomb interactions increases device performance as devices become smaller. The results suggest that for commonly found isotropic morphologies the Coulomb interactions between charge carriers dominates exciton separation effects.

  6. Towards scalable parellelism in Monte Carlo particle transport codes using remote memory access

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Paul K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Forrest B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Forget, Benoit [MIT

    2010-01-01

    One forthcoming challenge in the area of high-performance computing is having the ability to run large-scale problems while coping with less memory per compute node. In this work, they investigate a novel data decomposition method that would allow Monte Carlo transport calculations to be performed on systems with limited memory per compute node. In this method, each compute node remotely retrieves a small set of geometry and cross-section data as needed and remotely accumulates local tallies when crossing the boundary of the local spatial domain. initial results demonstrate that while the method does allow large problems to be run in a memory-limited environment, achieving scalability may be difficult due to inefficiencies in the current implementation of RMA operations.

  7. Monte Carlo Simulations of Spin Transport in Nanoscale InGaAs Field Effect Transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Thorpe, B; Langbein, F; Schirmer, S

    2016-01-01

    By augmenting an in-house developed, experimentally verified Monte Carlo device simulator with a Bloch equation model with a spin-orbit interaction Hamiltonian accounting for Dresselhaus and Rashba couplings, we simulate electron spin transport in a \\SI{25}{nm} gate length InGaAs MOSFET. We observe non-uniform decay of the net magnetization between the source and gate electrodes and an interesting magnetization recovery effect due to spin refocusing induced by high electric field between the gate and drain electrodes. We demonstrate coherent control of the polarization vector of the drain current via the source-drain and gate voltages, and show that the magnetization of the drain current is sensitive to strain in the channel, suggesting that the device could act as a room-temperature nanoscale strain sensor.

  8. GPU-based high performance Monte Carlo simulation in neutron transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heimlich, Adino; Mol, Antonio C.A.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Inteligencia Artificial Aplicada], e-mail: cmnap@ien.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    Graphics Processing Units (GPU) are high performance co-processors intended, originally, to improve the use and quality of computer graphics applications. Since researchers and practitioners realized the potential of using GPU for general purpose, their application has been extended to other fields out of computer graphics scope. The main objective of this work is to evaluate the impact of using GPU in neutron transport simulation by Monte Carlo method. To accomplish that, GPU- and CPU-based (single and multicore) approaches were developed and applied to a simple, but time-consuming problem. Comparisons demonstrated that the GPU-based approach is about 15 times faster than a parallel 8-core CPU-based approach also developed in this work. (author)

  9. penORNL: a parallel Monte Carlo photon and electron transport package using PENELOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekar, Kursat B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, Thomas Martin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Patton, Bruce W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Weber, Charles F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The parallel Monte Carlo photon and electron transport code package penORNL was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to enable advanced scanning electron microscope (SEM) simulations on high-performance computing systems. This paper discusses the implementations, capabilities and parallel performance of the new code package. penORNL uses PENELOPE for its physics calculations and provides all available PENELOPE features to the users, as well as some new features including source definitions specifically developed for SEM simulations, a pulse-height tally capability for detailed simulations of gamma and x-ray detectors, and a modified interaction forcing mechanism to enable accurate energy deposition calculations. The parallel performance of penORNL was extensively tested with several model problems, and very good linear parallel scaling was observed with up to 512 processors. penORNL, along with its new features, will be available for SEM simulations upon completion of the new pulse-height tally implementation.

  10. Space applications of the MITS electron-photon Monte Carlo transport code system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kensek, R.P.; Lorence, L.J.; Halbleib, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morel, J.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-07-01

    The MITS multigroup/continuous-energy electron-photon Monte Carlo transport code system has matured to the point that it is capable of addressing more realistic three-dimensional adjoint applications. It is first employed to efficiently predict point doses as a function of source energy for simple three-dimensional experimental geometries exposed to simulated uniform isotropic planar sources of monoenergetic electrons up to 4.0 MeV. Results are in very good agreement with experimental data. It is then used to efficiently simulate dose to a detector in a subsystem of a GPS satellite due to its natural electron environment, employing a relatively complex model of the satellite. The capability for survivability analysis of space systems is demonstrated, and results are obtained with and without variance reduction.

  11. Domain Decomposition of a Constructive Solid Geometry Monte Carlo Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, M J; Joy, K I; Procassini, R J; Greenman, G M

    2008-12-07

    Domain decomposition has been implemented in a Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) Monte Carlo neutron transport code. Previous methods to parallelize a CSG code relied entirely on particle parallelism; but in our approach we distribute the geometry as well as the particles across processors. This enables calculations whose geometric description is larger than what could fit in memory of a single processor, thus it must be distributed across processors. In addition to enabling very large calculations, we show that domain decomposition can speed up calculations compared to particle parallelism alone. We also show results of a calculation of the proposed Laser Inertial-Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) facility, which has 5.6 million CSG parts.

  12. Core-scale solute transport model selection using Monte Carlo analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Malama, Bwalya; James, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    Model applicability to core-scale solute transport is evaluated using breakthrough data from column experiments conducted with conservative tracers tritium (H-3) and sodium-22, and the retarding solute uranium-232. The three models considered are single-porosity, double-porosity with single-rate mobile-immobile mass-exchange, and the multirate model, which is a deterministic model that admits the statistics of a random mobile-immobile mass-exchange rate coefficient. The experiments were conducted on intact Culebra Dolomite core samples. Previously, data were analyzed using single- and double-porosity models although the Culebra Dolomite is known to possess multiple types and scales of porosity, and to exhibit multirate mobile-immobile-domain mass transfer characteristics at field scale. The data are reanalyzed here and null-space Monte Carlo analysis is used to facilitate objective model selection. Prediction (or residual) bias is adopted as a measure of the model structural error. The analysis clearly shows ...

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of phonon transport in variable cross-section nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A dedicated Monte Carlo (MC) model is proposed to investigate the mechanism of phonon transport in variable cross-section silicon nanowires (NWs). Emphasis is placed on understanding the thermal rectification effect and thermal conduction in tapered cross-section and incremental cross-section NWs. In the simulations, both equal and unequal heat input conditions are discussed. Under the latter condition, the tapered cross-section NW has a more prominent thermal rectification effect. Additionally, the capacity of heat conduction in the tapered cross-section NW is always higher than that of the incremental one. Two reasons may be attributed to these behaviors: one is their different boundary conditions and the other is their different volume distribution. Although boundary scattering plays an important role in nanoscale structures, the results suggest the influence of boundary scattering on heat conduction is less obvious than that of volume distribution in NWs with variable cross-sections.

  14. Comparison of implicit and symbolic implicit Monte Carlo line transport with frequency weight vector extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, Michael Scott; Brooks, Eugene D., III; Szoke, Abraham

    2003-07-01

    We compare the implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) technique to the symbolic IMC (SIMC) technique, with and without weight vectors in frequency space, for time-dependent line transport in the presence of collisional pumping. We examine the efficiency and accuracy of the IMC and SIMC methods for test problems involving the evolution of a collisionally pumped trapping problem to its steady-state, the surface heating of a cold medium by a beam, and the diffusion of energy from a localized region that is collisionally pumped. The importance of spatial biasing and teleportation for problems involving high opacity is demonstrated. Our numerical solution, along with its associated teleportation error, is checked against theoretical calculations for the last example.

  15. Srna-Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulation in combined and voxelized geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Ilic, R D; Stankovic, S J

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes new Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulations in complex geometrical forms and in materials of different composition. The SRNA codes were developed for three dimensional (3D) dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry. The model of these codes is based on the theory of proton multiple scattering and a simple model of compound nucleus decay. The developed package consists of two codes: SRNA-2KG and SRNA-VOX. The first code simulates proton transport in combined geometry that can be described by planes and second order surfaces. The second one uses the voxelized geometry of material zones and is specifically adopted for the application of patient computer tomography data. Transition probabilities for both codes are given by the SRNADAT program. In this paper, we will present the models and algorithms of our programs, as well as the results of the numerical experiments we have carried out applying them, along with the results of proton transport simulation obtaine...

  16. MCNPX Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport in SiC semiconductor detectors of fast neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlačková, K.; Zat'ko, B.; Šagátová, A.; Pavlovič, M.; Nečas, V.; Stacho, M.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate particle transport properties of a fast neutron detector based on silicon carbide. MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) code was used in our study because it allows seamless particle transport, thus not only interacting neutrons can be inspected but also secondary particles can be banked for subsequent transport. Modelling of the fast-neutron response of a SiC detector was carried out for fast neutrons produced by 239Pu-Be source with the mean energy of about 4.3 MeV. Using the MCNPX code, the following quantities have been calculated: secondary particle flux densities, reaction rates of elastic/inelastic scattering and other nuclear reactions, distribution of residual ions, deposited energy and energy distribution of pulses. The values of reaction rates calculated for different types of reactions and resulting energy deposition values showed that the incident neutrons transfer part of the carried energy predominantly via elastic scattering on silicon and carbon atoms. Other fast-neutron induced reactions include inelastic scattering and nuclear reactions followed by production of α-particles and protons. Silicon and carbon recoil atoms, α-particles and protons are charged particles which contribute to the detector response. It was demonstrated that although the bare SiC material can register fast neutrons directly, its detection efficiency can be enlarged if it is covered by an appropriate conversion layer. Comparison of the simulation results with experimental data was successfully accomplished.

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of ballistic transport in high-mobility channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabatini, G; Marinchio, H; Palermo, C; Varani, L; Daoud, T; Teissier, R [Institut d' Electronique du Sud (CNRS UMR 5214) - Universite Montpellier II (France); Rodilla, H; Gonzalez, T; Mateos, J, E-mail: sabatini@ies.univ-montp2.f [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada - Universidad de Salamanca (Spain)

    2009-11-15

    By means of Monte Carlo simulations coupled with a two-dimensional Poisson solver, we evaluate directly the possibility to use high mobility materials in ultra fast devices exploiting ballistic transport. To this purpose, we have calculated specific physical quantities such as the transit time, the transit velocity, the free flight time and the mean free path as functions of applied voltage in InAs channels with different lengths, from 2000 nm down to 50 nm. In this way the transition from diffusive to ballistic transport is carefully described. We remark a high value of the mean transit velocity with a maximum of 14x10{sup 5} m/s for a 50 nm-long channel and a transit time shorter than 0.1 ps, corresponding to a cutoff frequency in the terahertz domain. The percentage of ballistic electrons and the number of scatterings as functions of distance are also reported, showing the strong influence of quasi-ballistic transport in the shorter channels.

  18. Modeling parameterized geometry in GPU-based Monte Carlo particle transport simulation for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yujie; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun

    2016-08-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) particle transport simulation on a graphics-processing unit (GPU) platform has been extensively studied recently due to the efficiency advantage achieved via massive parallelization. Almost all of the existing GPU-based MC packages were developed for voxelized geometry. This limited application scope of these packages. The purpose of this paper is to develop a module to model parametric geometry and integrate it in GPU-based MC simulations. In our module, each continuous region was defined by its bounding surfaces that were parameterized by quadratic functions. Particle navigation functions in this geometry were developed. The module was incorporated to two previously developed GPU-based MC packages and was tested in two example problems: (1) low energy photon transport simulation in a brachytherapy case with a shielded cylinder applicator and (2) MeV coupled photon/electron transport simulation in a phantom containing several inserts of different shapes. In both cases, the calculated dose distributions agreed well with those calculated in the corresponding voxelized geometry. The averaged dose differences were 1.03% and 0.29%, respectively. We also used the developed package to perform simulations of a Varian VS 2000 brachytherapy source and generated a phase-space file. The computation time under the parameterized geometry depended on the memory location storing the geometry data. When the data was stored in GPU's shared memory, the highest computational speed was achieved. Incorporation of parameterized geometry yielded a computation time that was ~3 times of that in the corresponding voxelized geometry. We also developed a strategy to use an auxiliary index array to reduce frequency of geometry calculations and hence improve efficiency. With this strategy, the computational time ranged in 1.75-2.03 times of the voxelized geometry for coupled photon/electron transport depending on the voxel dimension of the auxiliary index array, and in 0

  19. Modeling parameterized geometry in GPU-based Monte Carlo particle transport simulation for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yujie; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun

    2016-08-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) particle transport simulation on a graphics-processing unit (GPU) platform has been extensively studied recently due to the efficiency advantage achieved via massive parallelization. Almost all of the existing GPU-based MC packages were developed for voxelized geometry. This limited application scope of these packages. The purpose of this paper is to develop a module to model parametric geometry and integrate it in GPU-based MC simulations. In our module, each continuous region was defined by its bounding surfaces that were parameterized by quadratic functions. Particle navigation functions in this geometry were developed. The module was incorporated to two previously developed GPU-based MC packages and was tested in two example problems: (1) low energy photon transport simulation in a brachytherapy case with a shielded cylinder applicator and (2) MeV coupled photon/electron transport simulation in a phantom containing several inserts of different shapes. In both cases, the calculated dose distributions agreed well with those calculated in the corresponding voxelized geometry. The averaged dose differences were 1.03% and 0.29%, respectively. We also used the developed package to perform simulations of a Varian VS 2000 brachytherapy source and generated a phase-space file. The computation time under the parameterized geometry depended on the memory location storing the geometry data. When the data was stored in GPU’s shared memory, the highest computational speed was achieved. Incorporation of parameterized geometry yielded a computation time that was ~3 times of that in the corresponding voxelized geometry. We also developed a strategy to use an auxiliary index array to reduce frequency of geometry calculations and hence improve efficiency. With this strategy, the computational time ranged in 1.75-2.03 times of the voxelized geometry for coupled photon/electron transport depending on the voxel dimension of the auxiliary index array, and in 0

  20. GPU-based Monte Carlo Dust Radiative Transfer Scheme Applied to Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymann, Frank; Siebenmorgen, Ralf

    2012-05-01

    A three-dimensional parallel Monte Carlo (MC) dust radiative transfer code is presented. To overcome the huge computing-time requirements of MC treatments, the computational power of vectorized hardware is used, utilizing either multi-core computer power or graphics processing units. The approach is a self-consistent way to solve the radiative transfer equation in arbitrary dust configurations. The code calculates the equilibrium temperatures of two populations of large grains and stochastic heated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Anisotropic scattering is treated applying the Heney-Greenstein phase function. The spectral energy distribution (SED) of the object is derived at low spatial resolution by a photon counting procedure and at high spatial resolution by a vectorized ray tracer. The latter allows computation of high signal-to-noise images of the objects at any frequencies and arbitrary viewing angles. We test the robustness of our approach against other radiative transfer codes. The SED and dust temperatures of one- and two-dimensional benchmarks are reproduced at high precision. The parallelization capability of various MC algorithms is analyzed and included in our treatment. We utilize the Lucy algorithm for the optical thin case where the Poisson noise is high, the iteration-free Bjorkman & Wood method to reduce the calculation time, and the Fleck & Canfield diffusion approximation for extreme optical thick cells. The code is applied to model the appearance of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at optical and infrared wavelengths. The AGN torus is clumpy and includes fluffy composite grains of various sizes made up of silicates and carbon. The dependence of the SED on the number of clumps in the torus and the viewing angle is studied. The appearance of the 10 μm silicate features in absorption or emission is discussed. The SED of the radio-loud quasar 3C 249.1 is fit by the AGN model and a cirrus component to account for the far-infrared emission.

  1. Landauer Transport Model for Hawking Radiation from a Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Nation, P D; Nori, Franco

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the Hawking radiation energy and entropy flow rates from a black hole viewed as a one-dimensional (1D) Landauer transport process. The conformal symmetry in the near-horizon region leads directly to radiation rates that are identical to those of a single 1D quantum channel connected to a thermal reservoir at the Hawking temperature. The particle statistics independence of the 1D energy and entropy currents is applied to a black hole radiating into vacuum as well as one near thermal equilibrium with its environment. The Hawking radiation entropy production ratio is also examined.

  2. Monte Carlo feasibility study of orthogonal bremsstrahlung beams for improved radiation therapy imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Sarfehnia, Arman; Podgorsak, Ervin B; Seuntjens, Jan P [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, 1650 avenue Cedar, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2007-02-21

    The basic characteristics of orthogonal bremsstrahlung beams are studied and the feasibility of improved contrast imaging with such a beam is evaluated. In the context of this work, orthogonal bremsstrahlung beams represent the component of the bremsstrahlung distribution perpendicular to the electron beam impinging on an accelerator target. The BEAMnrc Monte Carlo code was used to study target characteristics, energy spectra and relative fluences of orthogonal beams to optimize target design. The reliability of the simulations was verified by comparing our results with benchmark experiments. Using the results of the Monte Carlo optimization, the targets with various materials and a collimator were designed and built. The primary pencil electron beam from the research port of a Varian Clinac-18 accelerator striking on Al, Pb and C targets was used to create orthogonal beams. For these beams, diagnostic image contrast was tested by placing simple Lucite objects in the path of the beams and comparing image contrast obtained in the orthogonal direction to the one obtained in the forward direction. The simulations for various target materials and various primary electron energies showed that a width of 80% of the continuous-slowing-down approximation range (R{sub CSDA}) is sufficient to remove electron contamination in the orthogonal direction. The photon fluence of the orthogonal beam for high Z targets is larger compared to low Z targets, i.e. by a factor of 20 for W compared to Be. For a 6 MeV electron beam, the mean energy for low Z targets is calculated to be 320 keV for Al and 150 keV for Be, and for a high Z target like Pb to be 980 keV. For irradiation times of 1.2 s in an electron mode of the linac, the contrast of diagnostic images created with orthogonal beams from the Al target is superior to that in the forward direction. The image contrast and the beam profile of the bremsstrahlung beams were also studied. Both the Monte Carlo study and experiment showed

  3. Monte Carlo feasibility study of orthogonal bremsstrahlung beams for improved radiation therapy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Sarfehnia, Arman; Podgorsak, Ervin B.; Seuntjens, Jan P.

    2007-02-01

    The basic characteristics of orthogonal bremsstrahlung beams are studied and the feasibility of improved contrast imaging with such a beam is evaluated. In the context of this work, orthogonal bremsstrahlung beams represent the component of the bremsstrahlung distribution perpendicular to the electron beam impinging on an accelerator target. The BEAMnrc Monte Carlo code was used to study target characteristics, energy spectra and relative fluences of orthogonal beams to optimize target design. The reliability of the simulations was verified by comparing our results with benchmark experiments. Using the results of the Monte Carlo optimization, the targets with various materials and a collimator were designed and built. The primary pencil electron beam from the research port of a Varian Clinac-18 accelerator striking on Al, Pb and C targets was used to create orthogonal beams. For these beams, diagnostic image contrast was tested by placing simple Lucite objects in the path of the beams and comparing image contrast obtained in the orthogonal direction to the one obtained in the forward direction. The simulations for various target materials and various primary electron energies showed that a width of 80% of the continuous-slowing-down approximation range (RCSDA) is sufficient to remove electron contamination in the orthogonal direction. The photon fluence of the orthogonal beam for high Z targets is larger compared to low Z targets, i.e. by a factor of 20 for W compared to Be. For a 6 MeV electron beam, the mean energy for low Z targets is calculated to be 320 keV for Al and 150 keV for Be, and for a high Z target like Pb to be 980 keV. For irradiation times of 1.2 s in an electron mode of the linac, the contrast of diagnostic images created with orthogonal beams from the Al target is superior to that in the forward direction. The image contrast and the beam profile of the bremsstrahlung beams were also studied. Both the Monte Carlo study and experiment showed an

  4. A study of the earth radiation budget using a 3D Monte-Carlo radiative transer code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okata, M.; Nakajima, T.; Sato, Y.; Inoue, T.; Donovan, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the earth's radiation budget when data are available from satellite-borne active sensors, i.e. cloud profiling radar (CPR) and lidar, and a multi-spectral imager (MSI) in the project of the Earth Explorer/EarthCARE mission. For this purpose, we first developed forward and backward 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes that can treat a broadband solar flux calculation including thermal infrared emission calculation by k-distribution parameters of Sekiguchi and Nakajima (2008). In order to construct the 3D cloud field, we tried the following three methods: 1) stochastic cloud generated by randomized optical thickness each layer distribution and regularly-distributed tilted clouds, 2) numerical simulations by a non-hydrostatic model with bin cloud microphysics model and 3) Minimum cloud Information Deviation Profiling Method (MIDPM) as explained later. As for the method-2 (numerical modeling method), we employed numerical simulation results of Californian summer stratus clouds simulated by a non-hydrostatic atmospheric model with a bin-type cloud microphysics model based on the JMA NHM model (Iguchi et al., 2008; Sato et al., 2009, 2012) with horizontal (vertical) grid spacing of 100m (20m) and 300m (20m) in a domain of 30km (x), 30km (y), 1.5km (z) and with a horizontally periodic lateral boundary condition. Two different cell systems were simulated depending on the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration. In the case of horizontal resolution of 100m, regionally averaged cloud optical thickness, , and standard deviation of COT, were 3.0 and 4.3 for pristine case and 8.5 and 7.4 for polluted case, respectively. In the MIDPM method, we first construct a library of pair of observed vertical profiles from active sensors and collocated imager products at the nadir footprint, i.e. spectral imager radiances, cloud optical thickness (COT), effective particle radius (RE) and cloud top temperature (Tc). We then select a best

  5. Overview. Department of Environmental and Radiation Transport Physics. Section 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loskiewicz, J. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Research activities in the Department of Environmental and Radiation Transport Physics are carried out by three Laboratories: Laboratory of Environmental Physics, Laboratory of Neutron Transport Physics and Laboratory of Physics and Modeling of Radiation Transport. The researches provided in 1994 cover: tracer transport and flows in porous media, studies on pollution in atmospheric air, physics of molecular phenomena in chromatographic detectors, studies on neutron transport in heterogenous media, studies on evaluation of neutron cross-section in the thermal region, studies on theory and utilization of neural network in data evaluation, numerical modelling of particle cascades for particle accelerator shielding purpose. In this section the description of mentioned activities as well as the information about personnel employed in the Department, papers and reports published in 1994, contribution to conferences and grants is also given.

  6. Boltzmann equation analysis and Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport in N2-O2 streamer discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dujko, S.; Ebert, U.; White, R.D.; Petrović, Z.L.

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive investigation of electron transport in N$_{2}$-O$_{2}$ mixtures has been carried out using a multi term theory for solving the Boltzmann equation and Monte Carlo simulation technique instead of conventional two-term theory often employed in plasma modeling community. We focus on the

  7. Calculation of isodose curves from initial neutron radiation of a hypothetical nuclear explosion using Monte Carlo Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Marcos P.C.; Rebello, Wilson F.; Andrade, Edson R., E-mail: rebello@ime.eb.br, E-mail: daltongirao@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear; Silva, Ademir X., E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br [Corrdenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Egenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear explosions are usually described in terms of its total yield and associated shock wave, thermal radiation and nuclear radiation effects. The nuclear radiation produced in such events has several components, consisting mainly of alpha and beta particles, neutrinos, X-rays, neutrons and gamma rays. For practical purposes, the radiation from a nuclear explosion is divided into {sup i}nitial nuclear radiation{sup ,} referring to what is issued within one minute after the detonation, and 'residual nuclear radiation' covering everything else. The initial nuclear radiation can also be split between 'instantaneous or 'prompt' radiation, which involves neutrons and gamma rays from fission and from interactions between neutrons and nuclei of surrounding materials, and 'delayed' radiation, comprising emissions from the decay of fission products and from interactions of neutrons with nuclei of the air. This work aims at presenting isodose curves calculations at ground level by Monte Carlo simulation, allowing risk assessment and consequences modeling in radiation protection context. The isodose curves are related to neutrons produced by the prompt nuclear radiation from a hypothetical nuclear explosion with a total yield of 20 KT. Neutron fluency and emission spectrum were based on data available in the literature. Doses were calculated in the form of ambient dose equivalent due to neutrons H*(10){sub n}{sup -}. (author)

  8. Load balancing in highly parallel processing of Monte Carlo code for particle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Kenji; Takemiya, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Kawasaki, Takuji [Fuji Research Institute Corporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    In parallel processing of Monte Carlo(MC) codes for neutron, photon and electron transport problems, particle histories are assigned to processors making use of independency of the calculation for each particle. Although we can easily parallelize main part of a MC code by this method, it is necessary and practically difficult to optimize the code concerning load balancing in order to attain high speedup ratio in highly parallel processing. In fact, the speedup ratio in the case of 128 processors remains in nearly one hundred times when using the test bed for the performance evaluation. Through the parallel processing of the MCNP code, which is widely used in the nuclear field, it is shown that it is difficult to attain high performance by static load balancing in especially neutron transport problems, and a load balancing method, which dynamically changes the number of assigned particles minimizing the sum of the computational and communication costs, overcomes the difficulty, resulting in nearly fifteen percentage of reduction for execution time. (author)

  9. Monte Carlo calculation model for heat radiation of inclined cylindrical flames and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhangyu; Ji, Jingwei; Huang, Yuankai; Wang, Zhiyi; Li, Qingjie

    2017-02-01

    Based on Monte Carlo method, a calculation model and its C++ calculating program for radiant heat transfer from an inclined cylindrical flame are proposed. In this model, the total radiation energy of the inclined cylindrical flame is distributed equally among a certain number of energy beams, which are emitted randomly from the flame surface. The incident heat flux on a surface is calculated by counting the number of energy beams which could reach the surface. The paper mainly studies the geometrical evaluation criterion for validity of energy beams emitted by inclined cylindrical flames and received by other surfaces. Compared to Mudan's formula results for a straight cylinder or a cylinder with 30° tilt angle, the calculated view factors range from 0.0043 to 0.2742 and the predicted view factors agree well with Mudan's results. The changing trend and values of incident heat fluxes computed by the model is consistent with experimental data measured by Rangwala et al. As a case study, incident heat fluxes on a gasoline tank, both the side and the top surface are calculated by the model. The heat radiation is from an inclined cylindrical flame generated by another 1000 m3 gasoline tank 4.6 m away from it. The cone angle of the flame to the adjacent oil tank is 45° and the polar angle is 0°. The top surface and the side surface of the tank are divided into 960 and 5760 grids during the calculation, respectively. The maximum incident heat flux on the side surface is 39.64 and 51.31 kW/m2 on the top surface. Distributions of the incident heat flux on the surface of the oil tank and on the ground around the fire tank are obtained, too.

  10. STUDI PEMODELAN DAN PERHITUNGAN TRANSPORT MONTE CARLO DALAM TERAS HTR PEBBLE BED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhair .

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Konsep sistem energi VHTR baik yang berbahan bakar pebble (VHTR pebble bed maupun blok prismatik (VHTR prismatik menarik perhatian fisikawan reaktor nuklir. Salah satu kelebihan teknologi bahan bakar bola adalah menawarkan terobosan teknologi pengisian bahan bakar tanpa harus menghentikan produksi listrik. Selain itu, partikel bahan bakar pebble dengan kernel uranium oksida (UO2 atau uranium oksikarbida (UCO yang dibalut TRISO dan pelapisan silikon karbida (SiC dianggap sebagai opsi utama dengan pertimbangan performa tinggi pada burn-up bahan bakar dan temperatur tinggi. Makalah ini mendiskusikan pemodelan dan perhitungan transport Monte Carlo dalam teras HTR pebble bed. HTR pebble bed adalah reaktor berpendingin gas temperatur tinggi dan bermoderator grafit dengan kemampuan kogenerasi. Perhitungan dikerjakan dengan program MCNP5 pada temperatur 1200 K. Pustaka data nuklir energi kontinu ENDF/B-V dan ENDF/B-VI dimanfaatkan untuk melengkapi analisis. Hasil perhitungan secara keseluruhan menunjukkan konsistensi dengan nilai keff yang hampir sama untuk pustaka data nuklir yang digunakan. Pustaka ENDF/B-VI (66c selalu memproduksi keff lebih besar dibandingkan ENDF/B-V (50c maupun ENDF/B-VI (60c dengan bias kurang dari 0,25%. Kisi BCC memprediksi keff hampir selalu lebih kecil daripada kisi lainnya, khususnya FCC. Nilai keff kisi BCC lebih dekat dengan kisi FCC dengan bias kurang dari 0,19% sedangkan dengan kisi SH bias perhitungannya kurang dari 0,22%. Fraksi packing yang sedikit berbeda (BCC= 61%, SH= 60,459% tidak membuat bias perhitungan menjadi berbeda jauh. Estimasi keff ketiga model kisi menyimpulkan bahwa model BCC lebih bisa diadopsi dalam perhitungan HTR pebble bed dibandingkan model FCC dan SH. Verifikasi hasil estimasi ini perlu dilakukan dengan simulasi Monte Carlo atau bahkan program deterministik lainnya guna optimisasi perhitungan teras reaktor temperatur tinggi.   Kata-kunci: kernel, TRISO, bahan bakar pebble, HTR pebble bed

  11. Monte Carlo dosimetry for forthcoming clinical trials in x-ray microbeam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MartInez-Rovira, I; Bravin, A; Prezado, Y [ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), B.P. 220, 6 Jules Horowitz, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Sempau, J [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fernandez-Varea, J M, E-mail: yolanda.prezado@esrf.f [Facultat de Fisica (ECM and ICC), Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-08-07

    The purpose of this work is to define safe irradiation protocols in microbeam radiation therapy. The intense synchrotron-generated x-ray beam used for the treatment is collimated and delivered in an array of 50 {mu}m-sized rectangular fields with a centre-to-centre distance between microplanes of 400 {mu}m. The absorbed doses received by the tumour and the healthy tissues in a human head phantom have been assessed by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The identification of safe dose limits is carried out by evaluating the maximum peak and valley doses achievable in the tumour while keeping the valley doses in the healthy tissues under tolerances. As the skull receives a significant fraction of the dose, the dose limits are referred to this tissue. Dose distributions with high spatial resolution are presented for various tumour positions, skull thicknesses and interbeam separations. Considering a unidirectional irradiation (field size of 2x2 cm{sup 2}) and a centrally located tumour, the largest peak and valley doses achievable in the tumour are 55 Gy and 2.6 Gy, respectively. The corresponding maximum valley doses received by the skin, bone and healthy brain are 4 Gy, 14 Gy and 7 Gy (doses in one fraction), respectively, i.e. within tolerances (5% probability of complication within 5 years).

  12. Evaluation of the scattered radiation components produced in a gamma camera using Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polo, Ivon Oramas, E-mail: ivonoramas67@gmail.com [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Technologies, Higher Institute of Applied Science and Technology (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba)

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: this paper presents a simulation for evaluation of the scattered radiation components produced in a gamma camera PARK using Monte Carlo code SIMIND. It simulates a whole body study with MDP (Methylene Diphosphonate) radiopharmaceutical based on Zubal anthropomorphic phantom, with some spinal lesions. Methods: the simulation was done by comparing 3 configurations for the detected photons. The corresponding energy spectra were obtained using Low Energy High Resolution collimator. The parameters related with the interactions and the fraction of events in the energy window, the simulated events of the spectrum and scatter events were calculated. Results: the simulation confirmed that the images without influence of scattering events have a higher number of valid recorded events and it improved the statistical quality of them. A comparison among different collimators was made. The parameters and detector energy spectrum were calculated for each simulation configuration with these collimators using {sup 99m}Tc. Conclusion: the simulation corroborated that LEHS collimator has higher sensitivity and HEHR collimator has lower sensitivity when they are used with low energy photons. (author)

  13. MC21 v.6.0 - A Continuous-Energy Monte Carlo Particle Transport Code with Integrated Reactor Feedback Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesheimer, D. P.; Gill, D. F.; Nease, B. R.; Sutton, T. M.; Stedry, M. H.; Dobreff, P. S.; Carpenter, D. C.; Trumbull, T. H.; Caro, E.; Joo, H.; Millman, D. L.

    2014-06-01

    MC21 is a continuous-energy Monte Carlo radiation transport code for the calculation of the steady-state spatial distributions of reaction rates in three-dimensional models. The code supports neutron and photon transport in fixed source problems, as well as iterated-fission-source (eigenvalue) neutron transport problems. MC21 has been designed and optimized to support large-scale problems in reactor physics, shielding, and criticality analysis applications. The code also supports many in-line reactor feedback effects, including depletion, thermal feedback, xenon feedback, eigenvalue search, and neutron and photon heating. MC21 uses continuous-energy neutron/nucleus interaction physics over the range from 10-5 eV to 20 MeV. The code treats all common neutron scattering mechanisms, including fast-range elastic and non-elastic scattering, and thermal- and epithermal-range scattering from molecules and crystalline materials. For photon transport, MC21 uses continuous-energy interaction physics over the energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV. The code treats all common photon interaction mechanisms, including Compton scattering, pair production, and photoelectric interactions. All of the nuclear data required by MC21 is provided by the NDEX system of codes, which extracts and processes data from EPDL-, ENDF-, and ACE-formatted source files. For geometry representation, MC21 employs a flexible constructive solid geometry system that allows users to create spatial cells from first- and second-order surfaces. The system also allows models to be built up as hierarchical collections of previously defined spatial cells, with interior detail provided by grids and template overlays. Results are collected by a generalized tally capability which allows users to edit integral flux and reaction rate information. Results can be collected over the entire problem or within specific regions of interest through the use of phase filters that control which particles are allowed to score each

  14. Stochastic methods for uncertainty quantification in radiation transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtl, Erin D.

    The use of stochastic spectral expansions, specifically generalized polynomial chaos (gPC) and Karhunen-Loeve (KL) expansions, is investigated for uncertainty quantification in radiation transport. The gPC represents second-order random processes in terms of an expansion of orthogonal polynomials of random variables. The KL expansion is a Fourier-type expansion that represents a second-order random process with known covariance function in terms of a set of uncorrelated random variables and the eigenmodes of the covariance function. The flux and, in multiplying materials, the k-eigenvalue, which are the problem unknowns, are always expanded in a gPC expansion since their covariance functions are also unknown. This work assumes a single uncertain input---the total macroscopic cross section---although this does not represent a limitation of the approaches considered here. Two particular types of input parameter uncertainty are investigated: The cross section as a univariate Gaussian, log-normal, gamma or beta random variable, and the cross section as a spatially varying Gaussian or log-normal random process. In the first case, a gPC expansion in terms of a univariate random variable suffices, while in the second, a truncated KL expansion is first necessary followed by a gPC expansion in terms of multivariate random variables. Two solution methods are examined: The Stochastic Finite Element Method (SFEM) and the Stochastic Collocation Method (SCM). The SFEM entails taking Galerkin projections onto the orthogonal basis, which yields a system of fully-coupled equations for the PC coefficients of the flux and the k-eigenvalue. This system is linear when there is no multiplication and can be solved using Richardson iteration, employing a standard operator splitting such as block Gauss-Seidel or block Jacobi, or a Krylov iterative method, which can be preconditioned using these splittings. When multiplication is present, the SFEM system is non-linear and a Newton

  15. 1-D EQUILIBRIUM DISCRETE DIFFUSION MONTE CARLO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. EVANS; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    We present a new hybrid Monte Carlo method for 1-D equilibrium diffusion problems in which the radiation field coexists with matter in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This method, the Equilibrium Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (EqDDMC) method, combines Monte Carlo particles with spatially discrete diffusion solutions. We verify the EqDDMC method with computational results from three slab problems. The EqDDMC method represents an incremental step toward applying this hybrid methodology to non-equilibrium diffusion, where it could be simultaneously coupled to Monte Carlo transport.

  16. FY2008 Report on GADRAS Radiation Transport Methods.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattingly, John.; Mitchell, Dean J; Harding, Lee T.; Varley, Eric S.; Hilton, Nathan R.

    2008-10-01

    The primary function of the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) is the solution of inverse radiation transport problems, by which the con-figuration of an unknown radiation source is inferred from one or more measured radia-tion signatures. GADRAS was originally developed for the analysis of gamma spec-trometry measurements. During fiscal years 2007 and 2008, GADRAS was augmented to implement the simultaneous analysis of neutron multiplicity measurements. This report describes the radiation transport methods developed to implement this new capability. This work was performed at the direction of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development. It was executed as an element of the Proliferation Detection Program's Simulation, Algorithm, and Modeling element. Acronyms BNL Brookhaven National Laboratory CSD Continuous Slowing-Down DU depleted uranium ENSDF Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data Files GADRAS Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software HEU highly enriched uranium LANL Los Alamos National Laboratory LLNL Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory NA-22 Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development NNDC National Nuclear Data Center NNSA National Nuclear Security Administration ODE ordinary differential equation ONEDANT One-dimensional diffusion accelerated neutral particle transport ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory PARTISN Parallel time-dependent SN PDP Proliferation Detection Program RADSAT Radiation Scenario Analysis Toolkit RSICC Radiation Safety Information Computational Center SAM Simulation, Algorithms, and Modeling SNL Sandia National Laboratories SNM special nuclear material ToRI Table of Radioactive Isotopes URI uniform resource identifier XML Extensible Markup Language

  17. MONTE CARLO NEUTRINO TRANSPORT THROUGH REMNANT DISKS FROM NEUTRON STAR MERGERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richers, Sherwood; Ott, Christian D. [TAPIR, Mailcode 350-17, Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kasen, Daniel; Fernández, Rodrigo [Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); O’Connor, Evan [Department of Physics, Campus Code 8202, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    We present Sedonu, a new open source, steady-state, special relativistic Monte Carlo (MC) neutrino transport code, available at bitbucket.org/srichers/sedonu. The code calculates the energy- and angle-dependent neutrino distribution function on fluid backgrounds of any number of spatial dimensions, calculates the rates of change of fluid internal energy and electron fraction, and solves for the equilibrium fluid temperature and electron fraction. We apply this method to snapshots from two-dimensional simulations of accretion disks left behind by binary neutron star mergers, varying the input physics and comparing to the results obtained with a leakage scheme for the cases of a central black hole and a central hypermassive neutron star. Neutrinos are guided away from the densest regions of the disk and escape preferentially around 45° from the equatorial plane. Neutrino heating is strengthened by MC transport a few scale heights above the disk midplane near the innermost stable circular orbit, potentially leading to a stronger neutrino-driven wind. Neutrino cooling in the dense midplane of the disk is stronger when using MC transport, leading to a globally higher cooling rate by a factor of a few and a larger leptonization rate by an order of magnitude. We calculate neutrino pair annihilation rates and estimate that an energy of 2.8 × 10{sup 46} erg is deposited within 45° of the symmetry axis over 300 ms when a central BH is present. Similarly, 1.9 × 10{sup 48} erg is deposited over 3 s when an HMNS sits at the center, but neither estimate is likely to be sufficient to drive a gamma-ray burst jet.

  18. A GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation code for photon transport in a voxel phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellezzo, M.; Do Nascimento, E.; Yoriyaz, H., E-mail: mbellezzo@gmail.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    As the most accurate method to estimate absorbed dose in radiotherapy, Monte Carlo method has been widely used in radiotherapy treatment planning. Nevertheless, its efficiency can be improved for clinical routine applications. In this paper, we present the CUBMC code, a GPU-based Mc photon transport algorithm for dose calculation under the Compute Unified Device Architecture platform. The simulation of physical events is based on the algorithm used in Penelope, and the cross section table used is the one generated by the Material routine, als present in Penelope code. Photons are transported in voxel-based geometries with different compositions. To demonstrate the capabilities of the algorithm developed in the present work four 128 x 128 x 128 voxel phantoms have been considered. One of them is composed by a homogeneous water-based media, the second is composed by bone, the third is composed by lung and the fourth is composed by a heterogeneous bone and vacuum geometry. Simulations were done considering a 6 MeV monoenergetic photon point source. There are two distinct approaches that were used for transport simulation. The first of them forces the photon to stop at every voxel frontier, the second one is the Woodcock method, where the photon stop in the frontier will be considered depending on the material changing across the photon travel line. Dose calculations using these methods are compared for validation with Penelope and MCNP5 codes. Speed-up factors are compared using a NVidia GTX 560-Ti GPU card against a 2.27 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. (Author)

  19. Vertical shear instability in accretion disc models with radiation transport

    CERN Document Server

    Stoll, Moritz H R

    2014-01-01

    The origin of turbulence in accretion discs is still not fully understood. While the magneto-rotational instability is considered to operate in sufficiently ionized discs, its role in the poorly ionized protoplanetary disc is questionable. Recently, the vertical shear instability (VSI) has been suggested as a possible alternative. Our goal is to study the characteristics of this instability and the efficiency of angular momentum transport, in extended discs, under the influence of radiative transport and irradiation from the central star. We use multi-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to model a larger section of an accretion disc. First we study inviscid and weakly viscous discs using a fixed radial temperature profile in two and three spatial dimensions. The simulations are then extended to include radiative transport and irradiation from the central star. In agreement with previous studies we find for the isothermal disc a sustained unstable state with a weak positive angular momentum transport of the o...

  20. Monte Carlo simulation for radiation dose in children radiology; Simulacao Monte Carlo da dose para radiologia pediatrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Hitalo R.; Tomal, Alessandra [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin

    2016-07-01

    The dosimetry in pediatric radiology is essential due to the higher risk that children have in comparison to adults. The focus of this study is to present how the dose varies depending on the depth in a 10 year old and a newborn, for this purpose simulations are made using the Monte Carlo method. Potential differences were considered 70 and 90 kVp for the 10 year old and 70 and 80 kVp for the newborn. The results show that in both cases, the dose at the skin surface is larger for smaller potential value, however, it decreases faster for larger potential values. Another observation made is that because the newborn is less thick the ratio between the initial dose and the final is lower compared to the case of a 10 year old, showing that it is possible to make an image using a smaller entrance dose in the skin, keeping the same level of exposure at the detector. (author)

  1. Parallel Monte Carlo transport modeling in the context of a time-dependent, three-dimensional multi-physics code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procassini, R.J. [Lawrence Livermore National lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The fine-scale, multi-space resolution that is envisioned for accurate simulations of complex weapons systems in three spatial dimensions implies flop-rate and memory-storage requirements that will only be obtained in the near future through the use of parallel computational techniques. Since the Monte Carlo transport models in these simulations usually stress both of these computational resources, they are prime candidates for parallelization. The MONACO Monte Carlo transport package, which is currently under development at LLNL, will utilize two types of parallelism within the context of a multi-physics design code: decomposition of the spatial domain across processors (spatial parallelism) and distribution of particles in a given spatial subdomain across additional processors (particle parallelism). This implementation of the package will utilize explicit data communication between domains (message passing). Such a parallel implementation of a Monte Carlo transport model will result in non-deterministic communication patterns. The communication of particles between subdomains during a Monte Carlo time step may require a significant level of effort to achieve a high parallel efficiency.

  2. Monte-Carlo investigation of radiation beam quality of the CRNA neutron irradiator for calibration purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazrou, Hakim, E-mail: mazrou_h@crna.d [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger (CRNA), 02 Boulevard Frantz, Fanon, B.P. 399, Alger-RP 16000 (Algeria); Sidahmed, Tassadit [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger (CRNA), 02 Boulevard Frantz, Fanon, B.P. 399, Alger-RP 16000 (Algeria); Allab, Malika [Faculte de Physique, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie de Houari-Boumediene (USTHB), 16111, Alger (Algeria)

    2010-10-15

    An irradiation system has been acquired by the Nuclear Research Center of Algiers (CRNA) to provide neutron references for metrology and dosimetry purposes. It consists of an {sup 241}Am-Be radionuclide source of 185 GBq (5 Ci) activity inside a cylindrical steel-enveloped polyethylene container with radially positioned beam channel. Because of its composition, filled with hydrogenous material, which is not recommended by ISO standards, we expect large changes in the physical quantities of primary importance of the source compared to a free-field situation. Thus, the main goal of the present work is to fully characterize neutron field of such special delivered set-up. This was conducted by both extensive Monte-Carlo calculations and experimental measurements obtained by using BF{sub 3} and {sup 3}He based neutron area dosimeters. Effects of each component present in the bunker facility of the Algerian Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL) on the energy neutron spectrum have been investigated by simulating four irradiation configurations and comparison to the ISO spectrum has been performed. The ambient dose equivalent rate was determined based upon a correct estimate of the mean fluence to ambient dose equivalent conversion factors at different irradiations positions by means of a 3-D transport code MCNP5. Finally, according to practical requirements established for calibration purposes an optimal irradiation position has been suggested to the SSDL staff to perform, in appropriate manner, their routine calibrations.

  3. Monte Carlo study of radiation dose enhancement by gadolinium in megavoltage and high dose rate radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G Zhang

    Full Text Available MRI is often used in tumor localization for radiotherapy treatment planning, with gadolinium (Gd-containing materials often introduced as a contrast agent. Motexafin gadolinium is a novel radiosensitizer currently being studied in clinical trials. The nanoparticle technologies can target tumors with high concentration of high-Z materials. This Monte Carlo study is the first detailed quantitative investigation of high-Z material Gd-induced dose enhancement in megavoltage external beam photon therapy. BEAMnrc, a radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation package, was used to calculate dose enhancement as a function of Gd concentration. Published phase space files for the TrueBeam flattening filter free (FFF and conventional flattened 6MV photon beams were used. High dose rate (HDR brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was also investigated as a reference. The energy spectra difference caused a dose enhancement difference between the two beams. Since the Ir-192 photons have lower energy yet, the photoelectric effect in the presence of Gd leads to even higher dose enhancement in HDR. At depth of 1.8 cm, the percent mean dose enhancement for the FFF beam was 0.38±0.12, 1.39±0.21, 2.51±0.34, 3.59±0.26, and 4.59±0.34 for Gd concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL, respectively. The corresponding values for the flattened beam were 0.09±0.14, 0.50±0.28, 1.19±0.29, 1.68±0.39, and 2.34±0.24. For Ir-192 with direct contact, the enhanced were 0.50±0.14, 2.79±0.17, 5.49±0.12, 8.19±0.14, and 10.80±0.13. Gd-containing materials used in MRI as contrast agents can also potentially serve as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. This study demonstrates that Gd can be used to enhance radiation dose in target volumes not only in HDR brachytherapy, but also in 6 MV FFF external beam radiotherapy, but higher than the currently used clinical concentration (>5 mg/mL would be needed.

  4. Monte Carlo study of radiation dose enhancement by gadolinium in megavoltage and high dose rate radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daniel G; Feygelman, Vladimir; Moros, Eduardo G; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey G

    2014-01-01

    MRI is often used in tumor localization for radiotherapy treatment planning, with gadolinium (Gd)-containing materials often introduced as a contrast agent. Motexafin gadolinium is a novel radiosensitizer currently being studied in clinical trials. The nanoparticle technologies can target tumors with high concentration of high-Z materials. This Monte Carlo study is the first detailed quantitative investigation of high-Z material Gd-induced dose enhancement in megavoltage external beam photon therapy. BEAMnrc, a radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation package, was used to calculate dose enhancement as a function of Gd concentration. Published phase space files for the TrueBeam flattening filter free (FFF) and conventional flattened 6MV photon beams were used. High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was also investigated as a reference. The energy spectra difference caused a dose enhancement difference between the two beams. Since the Ir-192 photons have lower energy yet, the photoelectric effect in the presence of Gd leads to even higher dose enhancement in HDR. At depth of 1.8 cm, the percent mean dose enhancement for the FFF beam was 0.38±0.12, 1.39±0.21, 2.51±0.34, 3.59±0.26, and 4.59±0.34 for Gd concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL, respectively. The corresponding values for the flattened beam were 0.09±0.14, 0.50±0.28, 1.19±0.29, 1.68±0.39, and 2.34±0.24. For Ir-192 with direct contact, the enhanced were 0.50±0.14, 2.79±0.17, 5.49±0.12, 8.19±0.14, and 10.80±0.13. Gd-containing materials used in MRI as contrast agents can also potentially serve as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. This study demonstrates that Gd can be used to enhance radiation dose in target volumes not only in HDR brachytherapy, but also in 6 MV FFF external beam radiotherapy, but higher than the currently used clinical concentration (>5 mg/mL) would be needed.

  5. Signal Processing Model for Radiation Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, D H

    2008-07-28

    This note describes the design of a simplified gamma ray transport model for use in designing a sequential Bayesian signal processor for low-count detection and classification. It uses a simple one-dimensional geometry to describe the emitting source, shield effects, and detector (see Fig. 1). At present, only Compton scattering and photoelectric absorption are implemented for the shield and the detector. Other effects may be incorporated in the future by revising the expressions for the probabilities of escape and absorption. Pair production would require a redesign of the simulator to incorporate photon correlation effects. The initial design incorporates the physical effects that were present in the previous event mode sequence simulator created by Alan Meyer. The main difference is that this simulator transports the rate distributions instead of single photons. Event mode sequences and other time-dependent photon flux sequences are assumed to be marked Poisson processes that are entirely described by their rate distributions. Individual realizations can be constructed from the rate distribution using a random Poisson point sequence generator.

  6. The Wigner Monte-Carlo method for nanoelectronic devices a particle description of quantum transport and decoherence

    CERN Document Server

    Querlioz, Damien

    2013-01-01

    This book gives an overview of the quantum transport approaches for nanodevices and focuses on the Wigner formalism. It details the implementation of a particle-based Monte Carlo solution of the Wigner transport equation and how the technique is applied to typical devices exhibiting quantum phenomena, such as the resonant tunnelling diode, the ultra-short silicon MOSFET and the carbon nanotube transistor. In the final part, decoherence theory is used to explain the emergence of the semi-classical transport in nanodevices.

  7. Monte Carlo method based radiative transfer simulation of stochastic open forest generated by circle packing application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shengye; Tamura, Masayuki

    2013-10-01

    Monte Carlo Ray Tracing (MCRT) method is a versatile application for simulating radiative transfer regime of the Solar - Atmosphere - Landscape system. Moreover, it can be used to compute the radiation distribution over a complex landscape configuration, as an example like a forest area. Due to its robustness to the complexity of the 3-D scene altering, MCRT method is also employed for simulating canopy radiative transfer regime as the validation source of other radiative transfer models. In MCRT modeling within vegetation, one basic step is the canopy scene set up. 3-D scanning application was used for representing canopy structure as accurately as possible, but it is time consuming. Botanical growth function can be used to model the single tree growth, but cannot be used to express the impaction among trees. L-System is also a functional controlled tree growth simulation model, but it costs large computing memory. Additionally, it only models the current tree patterns rather than tree growth during we simulate the radiative transfer regime. Therefore, it is much more constructive to use regular solid pattern like ellipsoidal, cone, cylinder etc. to indicate single canopy. Considering the allelopathy phenomenon in some open forest optical images, each tree in its own `domain' repels other trees. According to this assumption a stochastic circle packing algorithm is developed to generate the 3-D canopy scene in this study. The canopy coverage (%) and the tree amount (N) of the 3-D scene are declared at first, similar to the random open forest image. Accordingly, we randomly generate each canopy radius (rc). Then we set the circle central coordinate on XY-plane as well as to keep circles separate from each other by the circle packing algorithm. To model the individual tree, we employ the Ishikawa's tree growth regressive model to set the tree parameters including DBH (dt), tree height (H). However, the relationship between canopy height (Hc) and trunk height (Ht) is

  8. Numerical simulations of a coupled radiative?conductive heat transfer model using a modified Monte Carlo method

    KAUST Repository

    Kovtanyuk, Andrey E.

    2012-01-01

    Radiative-conductive heat transfer in a medium bounded by two reflecting and radiating plane surfaces is considered. This process is described by a nonlinear system of two differential equations: an equation of the radiative heat transfer and an equation of the conductive heat exchange. The problem is characterized by anisotropic scattering of the medium and by specularly and diffusely reflecting boundaries. For the computation of solutions of this problem, two approaches based on iterative techniques are considered. First, a recursive algorithm based on some modification of the Monte Carlo method is proposed. Second, the diffusion approximation of the radiative transfer equation is utilized. Numerical comparisons of the approaches proposed are given in the case of isotropic scattering. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Monte Carlo modeling of photon transport in buried bone tissue layer for quantitative Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert H.; Dooley, Kathryn A.; Morris, Michael D.; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2009-02-01

    Light-scattering spectroscopy has the potential to provide information about bone composition via a fiber-optic probe placed on the skin. In order to design efficient probes, one must understand the effect of all tissue layers on photon transport. To quantitatively understand the effect of overlying tissue layers on the detected bone Raman signal, a layered Monte Carlo model was modified for Raman scattering. The model incorporated the absorption and scattering properties of three overlying tissue layers (dermis, subdermis, muscle), as well as the underlying bone tissue. The attenuation of the collected bone Raman signal, predominantly due to elastic light scattering in the overlying tissue layers, affected the carbonate/phosphate (C/P) ratio by increasing the standard deviation of the computational result. Furthermore, the mean C/P ratio varied when the relative thicknesses of the layers were varied and the elastic scattering coefficient at the Raman scattering wavelength of carbonate was modeled to be different from that at the Raman scattering wavelength of phosphate. These results represent the first portion of a computational study designed to predict optimal probe geometry and help to analyze detected signal for Raman scattering experiments involving bone.

  10. Monte Carlo model of neutral-particle transport in diverted plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heifetz, D.; Post, D.; Petravic, M.; Weisheit, J.; Bateman, G.

    1981-11-01

    The transport of neutral atoms and molecules in the edge and divertor regions of fusion experiments has been calculated using Monte-Carlo techniques. The deuterium, tritium, and helium atoms are produced by recombination in the plasma and at the walls. The relevant collision processes of charge exchange, ionization, and dissociation between the neutrals and the flowing plasma electrons and ions are included, along with wall reflection models. General two-dimensional wall and plasma geometries are treated in a flexible manner so that varied configurations can be easily studied. The algorithm uses a pseudo-collision method. Splitting with Russian roulette, suppression of absorption, and efficient scoring techniques are used to reduce the variance. The resulting code is sufficiently fast and compact to be incorporated into iterative treatments of plasma dynamics requiring numerous neutral profiles. The calculation yields the neutral gas densities, pressures, fluxes, ionization rates, momentum transfer rates, energy transfer rates, and wall sputtering rates. Applications have included modeling of proposed INTOR/FED poloidal divertor designs and other experimental devices.

  11. Criticality coefficient calculation for a small PWR using Monte Carlo Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trombetta, Debora M.; Su, Jian, E-mail: dtrombetta@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: sujian@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Chirayath, Sunil S., E-mail: sunilsc@tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute, Texas A and M University, TX (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Computational models of reactors are increasingly used to predict nuclear reactor physics parameters responsible for reactivity changes which could lead to accidents and losses. In this work, preliminary results for criticality coefficient calculation using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX were presented for a small PWR. The computational modeling developed consists of the core with fuel elements, radial reflectors, and control rods inside a pressure vessel. Three different geometries were simulated, a single fuel pin, a fuel assembly and the core, with the aim to compare the criticality coefficients among themselves.The criticality coefficients calculated were: Doppler Temperature Coefficient, Coolant Temperature Coefficient, Coolant Void Coefficient, Power Coefficient, and Control Rod Worth. The coefficient values calculated by the MCNP code were compared with literature results, showing good agreement with reference data, which validate the computational model developed and allow it to be used to perform more complex studies. Criticality Coefficient values for the three simulations done had little discrepancy for almost all coefficients investigated, the only exception was the Power Coefficient. Preliminary results presented show that simple modelling as a fuel assembly can describe changes at almost all the criticality coefficients, avoiding the need of a complex core simulation. (author)

  12. Comparison of some popular Monte Carlo solution for proton transportation within pCT problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evseev, Ivan; Assis, Joaquim T. de; Yevseyeva, Olga [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Inst. Politecnico], E-mail: evseev@iprj.uerj.br, E-mail: joaquim@iprj.uerj.br, E-mail: yevseyeva@iprj.uerj.br; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Cardoso, Jose J.B.; Silva, Ademir X. da [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear], E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: jjbrum@oi.com.br, E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br; Vinagre Filho, Ubirajara M. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear IEN/CNEN-RJ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: bira@ien.gov.br; Hormaza, Joel M. [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biociencias], E-mail: jmesa@ibb.unesp.br; Schelin, Hugo R.; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Setti, Joao A.P.; Milhoretto, Edney [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)], E-mail: schelin@cpgei.cefetpr.br, E-mail: sergei@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: jsetti@gmail.com, E-mail: edneymilhoretto@yahoo.com

    2007-07-01

    The proton transport in matter is described by the Boltzmann kinetic equation for the proton flux density. This equation, however, does not have a general analytical solution. Some approximate analytical solutions have been developed within a number of significant simplifications. Alternatively, the Monte Carlo simulations are widely used. Current work is devoted to the discussion of the proton energy spectra obtained by simulation with SRIM2006, GEANT4 and MCNPX packages. The simulations have been performed considering some further applications of the obtained results in computed tomography with proton beam (pCT). Thus the initial and outgoing proton energies (3 / 300 MeV) as well as the thickness of irradiated target (water and aluminum phantoms within 90% of the full range for a given proton beam energy) were considered in the interval of values typical for pCT applications. One from the most interesting results of this comparison is that while the MCNPX spectra are in a good agreement with analytical description within Fokker-Plank approximation and the GEANT4 simulated spectra are slightly shifted from them the SRIM2006 simulations predict a notably higher mean energy loss for protons. (author)

  13. Core-scale solute transport model selection using Monte Carlo analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malama, Bwalya; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; James, Scott C.

    2013-06-01

    Model applicability to core-scale solute transport is evaluated using breakthrough data from column experiments conducted with conservative tracers tritium (3H) and sodium-22 (22Na ), and the retarding solute uranium-232 (232U). The three models considered are single-porosity, double-porosity with single-rate mobile-immobile mass-exchange, and the multirate model, which is a deterministic model that admits the statistics of a random mobile-immobile mass-exchange rate coefficient. The experiments were conducted on intact Culebra Dolomite core samples. Previously, data were analyzed using single-porosity and double-porosity models although the Culebra Dolomite is known to possess multiple types and scales of porosity, and to exhibit multirate mobile-immobile-domain mass transfer characteristics at field scale. The data are reanalyzed here and null-space Monte Carlo analysis is used to facilitate objective model selection. Prediction (or residual) bias is adopted as a measure of the model structural error. The analysis clearly shows single-porosity and double-porosity models are structurally deficient, yielding late-time residual bias that grows with time. On the other hand, the multirate model yields unbiased predictions consistent with the late-time -5/2 slope diagnostic of multirate mass transfer. The analysis indicates the multirate model is better suited to describing core-scale solute breakthrough in the Culebra Dolomite than the other two models.

  14. Detailed Monte Carlo Simulation of electron transport and electron energy loss spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attarian Shandiz, M; Salvat, F; Gauvin, R

    2016-11-01

    A computer program for detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the transport of electrons with kinetic energies in the range between about 0.1 and about 500 keV in bulk materials and in thin solid films is presented. Elastic scattering is described from differential cross sections calculated by the relativistic (Dirac) partial-wave expansion method with different models of the scattering potential. Inelastic interactions are simulated from an optical-data model based on an empirical optical oscillator strength that combines optical functions of the solid with atomic photoelectric data. The generalized oscillator strength is built from the adopted optical oscillator strength by using an extension algorithm derived from Lindhard's dielectric function for a free-electron gas. It is shown that simulated backscattering fractions of electron beams from bulk (semi-infinite) specimens are in good agreement with experimental data for beam energies from 0.1 keV up to about 100 keV. Simulations also yield transmitted and backscattered fractions of electron beams on thin solid films that agree closely with measurements for different film thicknesses and incidence angles. Simulated most probable deflection angles and depth-dose distributions also agree satisfactorily with measurements. Finally, electron energy loss spectra of several elemental solids are simulated and the effects of the beam energy and the foil thickness on the signal to background and signal to noise ratios are investigated. SCANNING 38:475-491, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Minibeam radiation therapy for the management of osteosarcomas: A Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Rovira, I.; Prezado, Y., E-mail: prezado@gmail.com [Laboratoire d’Imagerie et Modélisation en Neurobiologie et Cancérologie (IMNC), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Campus universitaire, Bât. 440, 1er étage, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, 91406 Orsay cedex (France)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Minibeam radiation therapy (MBRT) exploits the well-established tissue-sparing effect provided by the combination of submillimetric field sizes and a spatial fractionation of the dose. The aim of this work is to evaluate the feasibility and potential therapeutic gain of MBRT, in comparison with conventional radiotherapy, for osteosarcoma treatments. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations (PENELOPE/PENEASY code) were used as a method to study the dose distributions resulting from MBRT irradiations of a rat femur and a realistic human femur phantoms. As a figure of merit, peak and valley doses and peak-to-valley dose ratios (PVDR) were assessed. Conversion of absorbed dose to normalized total dose (NTD) was performed in the human case. Several field sizes and irradiation geometries were evaluated. Results: It is feasible to deliver a uniform dose distribution in the target while the healthy tissue benefits from a spatial fractionation of the dose. Very high PVDR values (⩾20) were achieved in the entrance beam path in the rat case. PVDR values ranged from 2 to 9 in the human phantom. NTD{sub 2.0} of 87 Gy might be reached in the tumor in the human femur while the healthy tissues might receive valley NTD{sub 2.0} lower than 20 Gy. The doses in the tumor and healthy tissues might be significantly higher and lower than the ones commonly delivered used in conventional radiotherapy. Conclusions: The obtained dose distributions indicate that a gain in normal tissue sparing might be expected. This would allow the use of higher (and potentially curative) doses in the tumor. Biological experiments are warranted.

  16. An Overview of the Monte Carlo Methods, Codes, & Applications Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trahan, Travis John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-30

    This report sketches the work of the Group to deliver first-principle Monte Carlo methods, production quality codes, and radiation transport-based computational and experimental assessments using the codes MCNP and MCATK for such applications as criticality safety, non-proliferation, nuclear energy, nuclear threat reduction and response, radiation detection and measurement, radiation health protection, and stockpile stewardship.

  17. Monte Carlo neutral particle transport through a binary stochastic mixture using chord length sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Timothy J.

    A Monte Carlo algorithm is developed to estimate the ensemble-averaged behavior of neutral particles within a binary stochastic mixture. A special case stochastic mixture is examined, in which non-overlapping spheres of constant radius are uniformly mixed in a matrix material. Spheres are chosen to represent the stochastic volumes due to their geometric simplicity and because spheres are a common approximation to a large number of applications. The boundaries of the mixture are impenetrable, meaning that spheres in the stochastic mixture cannot be assumed to overlap the mixture boundaries. The algorithm employs a method called Limited Chord Length Sampling (LCLS). While in the matrix material, LCLS uses chord-length sampling to sample the distance to the next stochastic interface. After a surface crossing into a stochastic sphere, transport is treated explicitly until the particle exits or is killed. This capability eliminates the need to explicitly model a representation of the random geometry of the mixture. The algorithm is first proposed and tested against benchmark results for a two dimensional, fixed source model using stand-alone Monte Carlo codes. The algorithm is then implemented and tested in a test version of the Los Alamos M&barbelow;onte C&barbelow;arlo ṉ-p&barbelow;article Code MCNP. This prototype MCNP version has the capability to calculate LCLS results for both fixed source and multiplied source (i.e., eigenvalue) problems. Problems analyzed with MCNP range from simple binary mixtures, designed to test LCLS over a range of optical thicknesses, to a detailed High Temperature Gas Reactor fuel element, which tests the value of LCLS in a current problem of practical significance. Comparisons of LCLS and benchmark results include both accuracy and efficiency comparisons. To ensure conservative efficiency comparisons, the statistical basis for the benchmark technique is derived and a formal method for optimizing the benchmark calculations is developed

  18. A CUMULATIVE MIGRATION METHOD FOR COMPUTING RIGOROUS TRANSPORT CROSS SECTIONS AND DIFFUSION COEFFICIENTS FOR LWR LATTICES WITH MONTE CARLO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhaoyuan Liu; Kord Smith; Benoit Forget; Javier Ortensi

    2016-05-01

    A new method for computing homogenized assembly neutron transport cross sections and dif- fusion coefficients that is both rigorous and computationally efficient is proposed in this paper. In the limit of a homogeneous hydrogen slab, the new method is equivalent to the long-used, and only-recently-published CASMO transport method. The rigorous method is used to demonstrate the sources of inaccuracy in the commonly applied “out-scatter” transport correction. It is also demonstrated that the newly developed method is directly applicable to lattice calculations per- formed by Monte Carlo and is capable of computing rigorous homogenized transport cross sections for arbitrarily heterogeneous lattices. Comparisons of several common transport cross section ap- proximations are presented for a simple problem of infinite medium hydrogen. The new method has also been applied in computing 2-group diffusion data for an actual PWR lattice from BEAVRS benchmark.

  19. CONDENSED MONTE-CARLO SIMULATIONS FOR THE DESCRIPTION OF LIGHT TRANSPORT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GRAAFF, R; KOELINK, MH; DEMUL, FFM; ZIJLSTRA, WG; DASSEL, ACM; AARNOUDSE, JG

    1993-01-01

    A novel method, condensed Monte Carlo simulation, is presented that applies the results of a single Monte Carlo simulation for a given albedo mu(s)/(mu(a) + mu(s)) to obtaining results for other albedos; mu(s) and mu(a) are the scattering and absorption coefficients, respectively. The method require

  20. FitSKIRT: genetic algorithms to automatically fit dusty galaxies with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code

    CERN Document Server

    De Geyter, Gert; Fritz, Jacopo; Camps, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We present FitSKIRT, a method to efficiently fit radiative transfer models to UV/optical images of dusty galaxies. These images have the advantage that they have better spatial resolution compared to FIR/submm data. FitSKIRT uses the GAlib genetic algorithm library to optimize the output of the SKIRT Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. Genetic algorithms prove to be a valuable tool in handling the multi- dimensional search space as well as the noise induced by the random nature of the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. FitSKIRT is tested on artificial images of a simulated edge-on spiral galaxy, where we gradually increase the number of fitted parameters. We find that we can recover all model parameters, even if all 11 model parameters are left unconstrained. Finally, we apply the FitSKIRT code to a V-band image of the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC4013. This galaxy has been modeled previously by other authors using different combinations of radiative transfer codes and optimization methods. Given the different...

  1. TRIPOLI capabilities proved by a set of solved problems. [Monte Carlo neutron and gamma ray transport code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vergnaud, T.; Nimal, J.C. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France))

    1990-01-01

    The three-dimensional polycinetic Monte Carlo particle transport code TRIPOLI has been under development in the French Shielding Laboratory at Saclay since 1965. TRIPOLI-1 began to run in 1970 and became TRIPOLI-2 in 1978: since then its capabilities have been improved and many studies have been performed. TRIPOLI can treat stationary or time dependent problems in shielding and in neutronics. Some examples of solved problems are presented to demonstrate the many possibilities of the system. (author).

  2. The application of the Monte-Carlo neutron transport code MCNP to a small "nuclear battery" system

    OpenAIRE

    Puigdellívol Sadurní, Roger

    2009-01-01

    The project consist in calculate the keff to a small nuclear battery. The code Monte- Carlo neutron transport code MCNP is used to calculate the keff. The calculations are done at the beginning of life to know the capacity of the core becomes critical in different conditions. These conditions are the study parameters that determine the criticality of the core. These parameters are the uranium enrichment, the coated particles (TRISO) packing factor and the size of the core. More...

  3. McSCIA: application of the Equivalence Theorem in a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model for spherical shell atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Spada

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available A new multiple-scattering Monte Carlo 3-D radiative transfer model named McSCIA (Monte Carlo for SCIAmachy is presented. The backward technique is used to efficiently simulate narrow field of view instruments. The McSCIA algorithm has been formulated as a function of the Earth's radius, and can thus perform simulations for both plane-parallel and spherical atmospheres. The latter geometry is essential for the interpretation of limb satellite measurements, as performed by SCIAMACHY on board of ESA's Envisat. The model can simulate UV-vis-NIR radiation.

    First the ray-tracing algorithm is presented in detail, and then successfully validated against literature references, both in plane-parallel and in spherical geometry. A simple 1-D model is used to explain two different ways of treating absorption. One method uses the single scattering albedo while the other uses the equivalence theorem. The equivalence theorem is based on a separation of absorption and scattering. It is shown that both methods give, in a statistical way, identical results for a wide variety of scenarios. Both absorption methods are included in McSCIA, and it is shown that also for a 3-D case both formulations give identical results. McSCIA limb profiles for atmospheres with and without absorption compare well with the one of the state of the art Monte Carlo radiative transfer model MCC++.

    A simplification of the photon statistics may lead to very fast calculations of absorption features in the atmosphere. However, these simplifications potentially introduce biases in the results. McSCIA does not use simplifications and is therefore a relatively slow implementation of the equivalence theorem. For the first time, however, the validity of the equivalence theorem is demonstrated in a spherical 3-D radiative transfer model.

  4. A geometric approach for radiation transport inside complex systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fumeron, S. [Groupe de Recherche en Ingenierie des Procedes et Systemes, Departement des Sciences Appliquees, Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, 555 Boulevard de l' Universite, Chicoutimi, PQ (Canada)]. E-mail: sebastien_fumeron@uqac.ca

    2006-09-04

    The aim of this Letter is to extend the phenomenological theory of radiation transfer to complex systems. For elastic or electromagnetic waves, one presents a geometrization of matter based on relativistic gravitation models. In this approach, particles experience material media as curved spacetimes, which locally affect the energetic processes. The general form of Clausius invariant is calculated and the curved radiative transfer equation is derived. An application to phonon transport in solids shows that the presence of a defect can amplify the elastic energy carried in particular directions of propagation.

  5. An analysis of exposure dose on hands of radiation workers using a Monte Carlo simulation in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Dong Gun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences Cancer Center, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, SeSik; Kim, Jung Hoon; KIm, Chang Soo [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Workers in nuclear medicine have performed various tasks such as production, distribution, preparation and injection of radioisotope. This process could cause high radiation exposure to workers’ hand. The purpose of this study was to investigate shielding effect for r-rays of 140 and 511 keV by using Monte-Carlo simulation. As a result, it was effective, regardless of lead thickness for radiation shielding in 140 keV r-ray. However, it was effective in shielding material with thickness of more than only 1.1 mm in 511 keV r-ray. And also it doesn’t effective in less than 1.1 mm due to secondary scatter ray and exposure dose was rather increased. Consequently, energy of radionuclide and thickness of shielding materials should be considered to reduce radiation exposure.

  6. Monte Carlo Studies of the Radiation Fields in the Linac Coherent Light Source Undulators and of the Corresponding Signals in the Cerenkov Beam Loss Monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana Leitner, Mario; Fasso, Alberto; Fisher, Alan S.; Nuhn, Heinz D.; /SLAC; Dooling, Jeffrey C.; Berg, William; Yang, Bin X.; /Argonne

    2010-09-14

    In 2009 the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Center started free electron laser (FEL) operation. In order to continue to produce the bright and short-pulsed x-ray laser demanded by FEL scientists, this pioneer hard x-ray FEL requires a perfectly tailored magnetic field at the undulators, so that the photons generated at the electron wiggling path interact at the right phase with the electron beam. In such a precise system, small (>0.01%) radiation-induced alterations of the magnetic field in the permanent magnets could affect FEL performance. This paper describes the simulation studies of radiation fields in permanent magnets and the expected signal in the detectors. The transport of particles from the radiation sources (i.e. diagnostic insert) to the undulator magnets and to the beam loss monitors (BLM) was simulated with the intra nuclear cascade codes FLUKA and MARS15. In order to accurately reproduce the optics of LCLS, lattice capabilities and magnetic fields were enabled in FLUKA and betatron oscillations were validated against reference data. All electron events entering the BLMs were printed in data files. The paper also introduces the Radioactive Ion Beam Optimizer (RIBO) Monte Carlo 3-D code, which was used to read from the event files, to compute Cerenkov production and then to simulate the optical coupling of the BLM detectors, accounting for the transmission of light through the quartz.

  7. Radiation induced currents in parallel plate ionization chambers: measurement and Monte Carlo simulation for megavoltage photon and electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Wamied; Seuntjens, Jan P; Verhaegen, Frank; Podgorsak, Ervin B

    2006-09-01

    Polarity effects in ionization chambers are caused by a radiation induced current, also known as Compton current, which arises as a charge imbalance due to charge deposition in electrodes of ionization chambers. We used a phantom-embedded extrapolation chamber (PEEC) for measurements of Compton current in megavoltage photon and electron beams. Electron contamination of photon beams and photon contamination of electron beams have a negligible effect on the measured Compton current. To allow for a theoretical understanding of the Compton current produced in the PEEC effect we carried out Monte Carlo calculations with a modified user code, the COMPTON/ EGSnrc. The Monte Carlo calculated COMPTON currents agree well with measured data for both photon and electron beams; the calculated polarity correction factors, on the other hand, do not agree with measurement results. The conclusions reached for the PEEC can be extended to parallel-plate ionization chambers in general.

  8. The practice of recent radiative transfer Monte Carlo advances and its contribution to the field of microorganisms cultivation in photobioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauchet, Jérémi; Blanco, Stéphane; Cornet, Jean-François; El Hafi, Mouna; Eymet, Vincent; Fournier, Richard

    2013-10-01

    The present text illustrates the practice of integral formulation, zero-variance approaches and sensitivity evaluations in the field of radiative transfer Monte Carlo simulation, as well as the practical implementation of the corresponding algorithms, for such realistic systems as photobioreactors involving spectral integration, multiple scattering and complex geometries. We try to argue that even in such non-academic contexts, strong benefits can be expected from the effort of translating the considered Monte Carlo algorithm into a rigorously equivalent integral formulation. Modifying the initial algorithm to simultaneously compute sensitivities is then straightforward (except for domain deformation sensitivities) and the question of enhancing convergence is turned into that of modeling a set of well identified physical quantities.

  9. An assessment of the Photon Contamination due to Bremsstrahlung Radiation in the Electron Beams of a NEPTUN 10PC Linac using a Monte Carlo Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrollah Jabbari

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In clinical electron beams, most of bremsstrahlung radiation is produced by various linac head structures. This bremsstrahlung radiation dose is influenced by the geometry and construction of every component of the linac treatment head structures. Thus, it can be expected that the amount of the contaminated photon dose due to bremsstrahlung radiation varies among different linacs, even for the same electron beam energy. The aims of this study were to simulate the NEPTUN 10PC linac electron beams and to calculate the photon contamination dose due to bremsstrahlung radiation in these beams using a Monte Carlo method. Materials and methods: A NEPTUN 10PC linac was simulated in its electron mode using the BEAMnrc code. This linac can provide three electron beam energies of 6, 8 and 10 MeV. Detailed information required for the simulation, including the geometry and materials of various components of the linac treatment head, was provided by the vender. For all simulations, the cut-off energies for electron and photon transport were set at ECUT=0.521 MeV and PCUT=0.010 MeV, respectively. The KS statistical test was used for validation of the simulated models. Then, relevant bremsstrahlung radiation doses for the three electron beam energies of the linac were calculated for the reference field using the Monte Carlo method.   Results: The KS test showed a good agreement between the calculated values (resulting from the simulations and the measured ones. The results showed that the amount of contaminated photon dose due to bremsstrahlung radiation from various components of the simulated linac at the surface of the phantom was between 0.2%-0.5% of the maximum dose for the three electron beam energies. Conclusion:  Considering the good agreement between the measured and simulated data, it can be concluded that the simulation method as well as the calculated bremsstrahlung doses have been made at a good level of accuracy and precision

  10. Update on the Status of the FLUKA Monte Carlo Transport Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsky, L.; Anderson, V.; Empl, A.; Lee, K.; Smirnov, G.; Zapp, N; Ferrari, A.; Tsoulou, K.; Roesler, S.; Vlachoudis, V.; Battisoni, G.; Ceruti, F.; Gadioli, M. V.; Garzelli, M.; Muraro, S.; Rancati, T.; Sala, P.; Ballarini, R.; Ottolenghi, A.; Parini, V.; Scannicchio, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Wilson, T. L.

    2004-01-01

    The FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code is a well-known simulation tool in High Energy Physics. FLUKA is a dynamic tool in the sense that it is being continually updated and improved by the authors. Here we review the progresses achieved in the last year on the physics models. From the point of view of hadronic physics, most of the effort is still in the field of nucleus--nucleus interactions. The currently available version of FLUKA already includes the internal capability to simulate inelastic nuclear interactions beginning with lab kinetic energies of 100 MeV/A up the the highest accessible energies by means of the DPMJET-II.5 event generator to handle the interactions for greater than 5 GeV/A and rQMD for energies below that. The new developments concern, at high energy, the embedding of the DPMJET-III generator, which represent a major change with respect to the DPMJET-II structure. This will also allow to achieve a better consistency between the nucleus-nucleus section with the original FLUKA model for hadron-nucleus collisions. Work is also in progress to implement a third event generator model based on the Master Boltzmann Equation approach, in order to extend the energy capability from 100 MeV/A down to the threshold for these reactions. In addition to these extended physics capabilities, structural changes to the programs input and scoring capabilities are continually being upgraded. In particular we want to mention the upgrades in the geometry packages, now capable of reaching higher levels of abstraction. Work is also proceeding to provide direct import into ROOT of the FLUKA output files for analysis and to deploy a user-friendly GUI input interface.

  11. Antiproton annihilation physics in the Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taasti, Vicki Trier; Knudsen, Helge [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University (Denmark); Holzscheiter, Michael H. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University (Denmark); Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico (United States); Sobolevsky, Nikolai [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences (INR), Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Thomsen, Bjarne [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University (Denmark); Bassler, Niels, E-mail: bassler@phys.au.dk [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University (Denmark)

    2015-03-15

    The Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A is designed to simulate therapeutic beams for cancer radiotherapy with fast ions. SHIELD-HIT12A allows creation of antiproton beam kernels for the treatment planning system TRiP98, but first it must be benchmarked against experimental data. An experimental depth dose curve obtained by the AD-4/ACE collaboration was compared with an earlier version of SHIELD-HIT, but since then inelastic annihilation cross sections for antiprotons have been updated and a more detailed geometric model of the AD-4/ACE experiment was applied. Furthermore, the Fermi–Teller Z-law, which is implemented by default in SHIELD-HIT12A has been shown not to be a good approximation for the capture probability of negative projectiles by nuclei. We investigate other theories which have been developed, and give a better agreement with experimental findings. The consequence of these updates is tested by comparing simulated data with the antiproton depth dose curve in water. It is found that the implementation of these new capture probabilities results in an overestimation of the depth dose curve in the Bragg peak. This can be mitigated by scaling the antiproton collision cross sections, which restores the agreement, but some small deviations still remain. Best agreement is achieved by using the most recent antiproton collision cross sections and the Fermi–Teller Z-law, even if experimental data conclude that the Z-law is inadequately describing annihilation on compounds. We conclude that more experimental cross section data are needed in the lower energy range in order to resolve this contradiction, ideally combined with more rigorous models for annihilation on compounds.

  12. Topological Angular Momentum and Radiative Heat Transport in Closed Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Silveirinha, Mario G

    2016-01-01

    Here, we study the role of topological edge states of light in the transport of thermally generated radiation in a closed cavity at a thermodynamic equilibrium. It is shown that even in the zero temperature limit - when the field fluctuations are purely quantum mechanical - there is a persistent flow of electromagnetic momentum in the cavity in closed orbits, deeply rooted in the emergence of spatially separated unidirectional edge state channels. It is highlighted the electromagnetic orbital angular momentum of the system is nontrivial, and that the energy circulation is towards the same direction as that determined by incomplete cyclotron orbits near the cavity walls. Our findings open new inroads in topological photonics and suggest that topological states of light can determine novel paradigms in the context of radiative heat transport.

  13. Monte Carlo transport model comparison with 1A GeV accelerated iron experiment: heavy-ion shielding evaluation of NASA space flight-crew foodstuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, D. L.; Townsend, L. W.; Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, L.

    Deep-space manned flight as a reality depends on a viable solution to the radiation problem. Both acute and chronic radiation health threats are known to exist, with solar particle events as an example of the former and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) of the latter. In this experiment Iron ions of 1A GeV are used to simulate GCR and to determine the secondary radiation field created as the GCR-like particles interact with a thick target. A NASA prepared food pantry locker was subjected to the iron beam and the secondary fluence recorded. A modified version of the Monte Carlo heavy ion transport code developed by Zeitlin at LBNL is compared with experimental fluence. The foodstuff is modeled as mixed nuts as defined by the 71 st edition of the Chemical Rubber Company (CRC) Handbook of Physics and Chemistry. The results indicate a good agreement between the experimental data and the model. The agreement between model and experiment is determined using a linear fit to ordered pairs of data. The intercept is forced to zero. The slope fit is 0.825 and the R 2 value is 0.429 over the resolved fluence region. The removal of an outlier, Z=14, gives values of 0.888 and 0.705 for slope and R 2 respectively.

  14. Size Effects of Gold and Iron Nanoparticles on Radiation Dose Enhancement in Brachytherapy and Teletherapy: A Monte Carlo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahad Ollah Ezzati

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In this study, we aimed to calculate dose enhancement factor (DEF for gold (Au and iron (Fe nanoparticles (NPs in brachytherapy and teletherapy, using Monte Carlo (MC method. Materials and Methods In this study, a new algorithm was introduced to calculate dose enhancement by AuNPs and FeNPs for Iridium-192 (Ir-192 brachytherapy and Cobalt-60 (Co-60 teletherapy sources, using the MC method. In this algorithm, the semi-random distribution of NPs was used instead of the regular distribution. Diameters were assumed to be 15, 30, and 100 nm in brachytherapy and 15 and 30 nm in teletherapy. Monte Carlo MCNP4C code was used for simulations, and NP density values were 0.107 mg/ml and 0.112 mg/ml in brachytherapy and teletherapy, respectively. Results AuNPs significantly enhanced the radiation dose in brachytherapy (approximately 60%, and 100 nm diameter NPs showed the most uniform dose distribution. AuNPs had an insignificant effect on teletherapy radiation field, with a dose enhancement ratio of 3% (about the calculation uncertainty or less. In addition, FeNPs had an insignificant effect on both brachytherapy and teletherapy radiation fields. FeNPs dose enhancement was 3% in brachytherapy and 6% (about the calculation uncertainty or less in teletherapy. Conclusion It can be concluded that AuNPs can significantly increase the absorbed dose in brachytherapy; however, FeNPs do not have a noticeable effect on the absorbed dose

  15. A Monte Carlo-based radiation safety assessment for astronauts in an environment with confined magnetic field shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Changran; Tang, Xiaobin; Gong, Chunhui; Guan, Fada; Johns, Jesse; Shu, Diyun; Chen, Da

    2015-12-01

    The active shielding technique has great potential for radiation protection in space exploration because it has the advantage of a significant mass saving compared with the passive shielding technique. This paper demonstrates a Monte Carlo-based approach to evaluating the shielding effectiveness of the active shielding technique using confined magnetic fields (CMFs). The International Commission on Radiological Protection reference anthropomorphic phantom, as well as the toroidal CMF, was modeled using the Monte Carlo toolkit Geant4. The penetrating primary particle fluence, organ-specific dose equivalent, and male effective dose were calculated for particles in galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) and solar particle events (SPEs). Results show that the SPE protons can be easily shielded against, even almost completely deflected, by the toroidal magnetic field. GCR particles can also be more effectively shielded against by increasing the magnetic field strength. Our results also show that the introduction of a structural Al wall in the CMF did not provide additional shielding for GCR; in fact it can weaken the total shielding effect of the CMF. This study demonstrated the feasibility of accurately determining the radiation field inside the environment and evaluating the organ dose equivalents for astronauts under active shielding using the CMF.

  16. Self-consistent modelling of line-driven hot-star winds with Monte Carlo radiation hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Noebauer, U M

    2015-01-01

    Radiative pressure exerted by line interactions is a prominent driver of outflows in astrophysical systems, being at work in the outflows emerging from hot stars or from the accretion discs of cataclysmic variables, massive young stars and active galactic nuclei. In this work, a new radiation hydrodynamical approach to model line-driven hot-star winds is presented. By coupling a Monte Carlo radiative transfer scheme with a finite-volume fluid dynamical method, line-driven mass outflows may be modelled self-consistently, benefiting from the advantages of Monte Carlo techniques in treating multi-line effects, such as multiple scatterings, and in dealing with arbitrary multidimensional configurations. In this work, we introduce our approach in detail by highlighting the key numerical techniques and verifying their operation in a number of simplified applications, specifically in a series of self-consistent, one-dimensional, Sobolev-type, hot-star wind calculations. The utility and accuracy of our approach is dem...

  17. New Monte Carlo model of laser radiation propagation in sprays, aerosols, and other complex polydisperse turbid media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrocal, E.; Jermy, M.; Meglinski, I. V.

    2006-08-01

    Modern optical diagnostics for quantitative characterization of polydisperse sprays and other aerosols which contain a wide range of droplet size encounter difficulties in the dense regions due to the multiple scattering of laser radiation with the surrounding droplets. The accuracy and efficiency of optical measurements can only be improved if the radiative transfer within such polydisperse turbid media is understood. A novel Monte Carlo code has been developed for modeling of optical radiation propagation in inhomogeneous polydisperse scattering media with typical drop size ranging from 2 μm to 200 μm in diameter. We show how strong variations of both particle size distribution and particle concentration within a 3D scattering medium can be taken into account via the Monte Carlo approach. A new approximation which reduces ~20 times the computational memory space required to determine the phase function is described. The approximation is verified by considering four log-normal drop size distributions. It is found valid for particle sizes in the range of 10-200 μm with increasing errors, due to additional photons scattered at large angles, as the number of particles below than 10 μm increases. The technique is applied to the simulation of typical planar Mie imaging of a hollow cone spray. Simulated and experimental images are compared and shown to agree well. The code has application in developing and testing new optical diagnostics for complex scattering media such as dense sprays.

  18. State-of-the-art Monte Carlo 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soran, P.D.

    1988-06-28

    Particle transport calculations in highly dimensional and physically complex geometries, such as detector calibration, radiation shielding, space reactors, and oil-well logging, generally require Monte Carlo transport techniques. Monte Carlo particle transport can be performed on a variety of computers ranging from APOLLOs to VAXs. Some of the hardware and software developments, which now permit Monte Carlo methods to be routinely used, are reviewed in this paper. The development of inexpensive, large, fast computer memory, coupled with fast central processing units, permits Monte Carlo calculations to be performed on workstations, minicomputers, and supercomputers. The Monte Carlo renaissance is further aided by innovations in computer architecture and software development. Advances in vectorization and parallelization architecture have resulted in the development of new algorithms which have greatly reduced processing times. Finally, the renewed interest in Monte Carlo has spawned new variance reduction techniques which are being implemented in large computer codes. 45 refs.

  19. ScintSim1: A new Monte Carlo simulation code for transport of optical photons in 2D arrays of scintillation detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Zarrini-Monfared, Zinat; Karbasi, Sareh; Zamani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) arrays of thick segmented scintillators are of interest as X-ray detectors for both 2D and 3D image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Their detection process involves ionizing radiation energy deposition followed by production and transport of optical photons. Only a very limited number of optical Monte Carlo simulation models exist, which has limited the number of modeling studies that have considered both stages of the detection process. We present ScintSim1, an in-house optical Monte Carlo simulation code for 2D arrays of scintillation crystals, developed in the MATLAB programming environment. The code was rewritten and revised based on an existing program for single-element detectors, with the additional capability to model 2D arrays of elements with configurable dimensions, material, etc., The code generates and follows each optical photon history through the detector element (and, in case of cross-talk, the surrounding ones) until it reaches a configurable receptor, or is attenuated. The new model was verified by testing against relevant theoretically known behaviors or quantities and the results of a validated single-element model. For both sets of comparisons, the discrepancies in the calculated quantities were all detector optimization.

  20. Monte Carlo-based treatment planning system calculation engine for microbeam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Rovira, I.; Sempau, J.; Prezado, Y. [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain) and ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 rue Jules Horowitz B.P. 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); Laboratoire Imagerie et modelisation en neurobiologie et cancerologie, UMR8165, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Universites Paris 7 et Paris 11, Bat 440., 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a synchrotron radiotherapy technique that explores the limits of the dose-volume effect. Preclinical studies have shown that MRT irradiations (arrays of 25-75-{mu}m-wide microbeams spaced by 200-400 {mu}m) are able to eradicate highly aggressive animal tumor models while healthy tissue is preserved. These promising results have provided the basis for the forthcoming clinical trials at the ID17 Biomedical Beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). The first step includes irradiation of pets (cats and dogs) as a milestone before treatment of human patients. Within this context, accurate dose calculations are required. The distinct features of both beam generation and irradiation geometry in MRT with respect to conventional techniques require the development of a specific MRT treatment planning system (TPS). In particular, a Monte Carlo (MC)-based calculation engine for the MRT TPS has been developed in this work. Experimental verification in heterogeneous phantoms and optimization of the computation time have also been performed. Methods: The penelope/penEasy MC code was used to compute dose distributions from a realistic beam source model. Experimental verification was carried out by means of radiochromic films placed within heterogeneous slab-phantoms. Once validation was completed, dose computations in a virtual model of a patient, reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) images, were performed. To this end, decoupling of the CT image voxel grid (a few cubic millimeter volume) to the dose bin grid, which has micrometer dimensions in the transversal direction of the microbeams, was performed. Optimization of the simulation parameters, the use of variance-reduction (VR) techniques, and other methods, such as the parallelization of the simulations, were applied in order to speed up the dose computation. Results: Good agreement between MC simulations and experimental results was achieved, even at

  1. NERO - A Post Maximum Supernova Radiation Transport Code

    CERN Document Server

    Maurer, I; Mazzali, P A; Taubenberger, S; Hachinger, S; Kromer, M; Sim, S; Hillebrandt, W

    2011-01-01

    The interpretation of supernova (SN) spectra is essential for deriving SN ejecta properties such as density and composition, which in turn can tell us about their progenitors and the explosion mechanism. A very large number of atomic processes are important for spectrum formation. Several tools for calculating SN spectra exist, but they mainly focus on the very early or late epochs. The intermediate phase, which requires a NLTE treatment of radiation transport has rarely been studied. In this paper we present a new SN radiation transport code, NERO, which can look at those epochs. All the atomic processes are treated in full NLTE, under a steady-state assumption. This is a valid approach between roughly 50 and 500 days after the explosion depending on SN type. This covers the post-maximum photospheric and the early and the intermediate nebular phase. As a test, we compare NERO to the radiation transport code of Jerkstrand et al. (2011) and to the nebular code of Mazzali et al. (2001). All three codes have bee...

  2. NERO- a post-maximum supernova radiation transport code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, I.; Jerkstrand, A.; Mazzali, P. A.; Taubenberger, S.; Hachinger, S.; Kromer, M.; Sim, S.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2011-12-01

    The interpretation of supernova (SN) spectra is essential for deriving SN ejecta properties such as density and composition, which in turn can tell us about their progenitors and the explosion mechanism. A very large number of atomic processes are important for spectrum formation. Several tools for calculating SN spectra exist, but they mainly focus on the very early or late epochs. The intermediate phase, which requires a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) treatment of radiation transport has rarely been studied. In this paper, we present a new SN radiation transport code, NERO, which can look at those epochs. All the atomic processes are treated in full NLTE, under a steady-state assumption. This is a valid approach between roughly 50 and 500 days after the explosion depending on SN type. This covers the post-maximum photospheric and the early and the intermediate nebular phase. As a test, we compare NERO to the radiation transport code of Jerkstrand, Fransson & Kozma and to the nebular code of Mazzali et al. All three codes have been developed independently and a comparison provides a valuable opportunity to investigate their reliability. Currently, NERO is one-dimensional and can be used for predicting spectra of synthetic explosion models or for deriving SN properties by spectral modelling. To demonstrate this, we study the spectra of the 'normal' Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2005cf between 50 and 350 days after the explosion and identify most of the common SN Ia line features at post-maximum epochs.

  3. ITS version 5.0 :the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/Photon monte carlo transport codes with CAD geometry.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Brian Claude; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Laub, Thomas William

    2005-09-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 5.0, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 3.0 continuous-energy codes, (2) multigroup codes with adjoint transport capabilities, (3) parallel implementations of all ITS codes, (4) a general purpose geometry engine for linking with CAD or other geometry formats, and (5) the Cholla facet geometry library. Moreover, the general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through increased internal error checking and improved code portability.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of radiation heat transfer from an infinite plane to parallel rows of infinitely long tubes -- Hottel extended

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualey, D.L.; Welty, J.R. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Drost, M.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-02-07

    A two-dimensional Monte Carlo method has been applied to a classic radiant energy exchange problem that models the interior of an industrial furnace. The configuration involves a source as an infinite radiating plane and the heat sink as parallel rows of infinitely long tubes. Hottel used a graphical technique to solve this furnace model for the two-tube-row configuration. This work extends Hottel`s results by increasing the number of rows in the original equilateral triangular array and then generalizing the results to isosceles triangular arrangements.

  5. Atmospheric transport, clouds and the Arctic longwave radiation paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlar, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Clouds interact with radiation, causing variations in the amount of electromagnetic energy reaching the Earth's surface, or escaping the climate system to space. While globally clouds lead to an overall cooling radiative effect at the surface, over the Arctic, where annual cloud fractions are high, the surface cloud radiative effect generally results in a warming. The additional energy input from absorption and re-emission of longwave radiation by the clouds to the surface can have a profound effect on the sea ice state. Anomalous atmospheric transport of heat and moisture into the Arctic, promoting cloud formation and enhancing surface longwave radiation anomalies, has been identified as an important mechanism in preconditioning Arctic sea ice for melt. Longwave radiation is emitted equally in all directions, and changes in the atmospheric infrared emission temperature and emissivity associated with advection of heat and moisture over the Arctic should correspondingly lead to an anomalous signal in longwave radiation at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). To examine the role of atmospheric heat and moisture transport into the Arctic on TOA longwave radiation, infrared satellite sounder observations from AIRS during 2003-2014 are analyzed for summer (JJAS). Thermodynamic metrics are developed to identify months characterized by a high frequency of warm and moist advection into the Arctic, and segregate the 2003-14 time period into climatological and anomalously warm, moist summer months. We find that anomalously warm, moist months result in a significant TOA longwave radiative cooling, which is opposite the forcing signal that the surface experiences during these months. At the timescale of the advective events, 3-10 days, the TOA cooling can be as large as the net surface energy budget during summer. When averaged on the monthly time scale, and over the full Arctic basin (poleward of 75°N), summer months experiencing frequent warm, moist advection events are

  6. Development of a Monte Carlo software to photon transportation in voxel structures using graphic processing units; Desenvolvimento de um software de Monte Carlo para transporte de fotons em estruturas de voxels usando unidades de processamento grafico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellezzo, Murillo

    2014-09-01

    As the most accurate method to estimate absorbed dose in radiotherapy, Monte Carlo Method (MCM) has been widely used in radiotherapy treatment planning. Nevertheless, its efficiency can be improved for clinical routine applications. In this thesis, the CUBMC code is presented, a GPU-based MC photon transport algorithm for dose calculation under the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) platform. The simulation of physical events is based on the algorithm used in PENELOPE, and the cross section table used is the one generated by the MATERIAL routine, also present in PENELOPE code. Photons are transported in voxel-based geometries with different compositions. There are two distinct approaches used for transport simulation. The rst of them forces the photon to stop at every voxel frontier, the second one is the Woodcock method, where the photon ignores the existence of borders and travels in homogeneous fictitious media. The CUBMC code aims to be an alternative of Monte Carlo simulator code that, by using the capability of parallel processing of graphics processing units (GPU), provide high performance simulations in low cost compact machines, and thus can be applied in clinical cases and incorporated in treatment planning systems for radiotherapy. (author)

  7. Monte Carlo transport simulation for a long counter neutron detector employed as a cosmic rays induced neutron monitor at ground level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazianotto, Mauricio Tizziani; Carlson, Brett Vern [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Federico, Claudio Antonio; Goncalez, Odair Lelis [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Estudos Avancados

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Great effort is required to understand better the cosmic radiation (CR) dose received by sensitive equipment, on-board computers and aircraft crew members at Brazil airspace, because there is a large area of South America and Brazil subject to the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). High energy neutrons are produced by interactions between primary cosmic ray and atmospheric atoms, and also undergo moderation resulting in a wider spectrum of energy ranging from thermal energies (0:025eV ) to energies of several hundreds of MeV. Measurements of the cosmic radiation dose on-board aircrafts need to be followed with an integral flow monitor on the ground level in order to register CR intensity variations during the measurements. The Long Counter (LC) neutron detector was designed as a directional neutron flux meter standard because it presents fairly constant response for energy under 10MeV. However we would like to use it as a ground based neutron monitor for cosmic ray induced neutron spectrum (CRINS) that presents an isotropic fluency and a wider spectrum of energy. The LC was modeled and tested using a Monte Carlo transport simulation for irradiations with known neutron sources ({sup 241}Am-Be and {sup 251}Cf) as a benchmark. Using this geometric model its efficiency was calculated to CRINS isotropic flux, introducing high energy neutron interactions models. The objective of this work is to present the model for simulation of the isotropic neutron source employing the MCNPX code (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) and then access the LC efficiency to compare it with experimental results for cosmic ray neutrons measures on ground level. (author)

  8. Orthovoltage radiation therapy treatment planning using Monte Carlo simulation: treatment of neuroendocrine carcinoma of the maxillary sinus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wanbao; Raeside, David E.

    1997-12-01

    Dose distributions that result from treating a patient with orthovoltage beams are best determined with a treatment planning system that uses the Monte Carlo method, and such systems are not readily available. In the present work, the Monte Carlo method was used to develop a computer code for determining absorbed dose distributions in orthovoltage radiation therapy. The code was used in planning treatment of a patient with a neuroendocrine carcinoma of the maxillary sinus. Two lateral high-energy photon beams supplemented by an anterior orthovoltage photon beam were utilized in the treatment plan. For the clinical case and radiation beams considered, a reasonably uniform dose distribution TOP"/> is achieved within the target volume, while the dose to the lens of each eye is 4 - 8% of the prescribed dose. Therefore, an orthovoltage photon beam, when properly filtered and optimally combined with megavoltage beams, can be effective in the treatment of cancers below the skin, providing that accurate treatment planning is carried out to establish with accuracy and precision the doses to critical structures.

  9. Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Ralph G.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.

    2006-10-31

    Computational modeling of radiation transport problems including homeland security, radiation shielding and protection, and criticality safety all depend upon material definitions. This document has been created to serve two purposes: 1) to provide a quick reference of material compositions for analysts and 2) a standardized reference to reduce the differences between results from two independent analysts. Analysts are always encountering a variety of materials for which elemental definitions are not readily available or densities are not defined. This document provides a location where unique or hard to define materials will be located to reduce duplication in research for modeling purposes. Additionally, having a common set of material definitions helps to standardize modeling across PNNL and provide two separate researchers the ability to compare different modeling results from a common materials basis.

  10. Verification of Three Dimensional Triangular Prismatic Discrete Ordinates Transport Code ENSEMBLE-TRIZ by Comparison with Monte Carlo Code GMVP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Yuto; Moriwaki, Hiroyuki; Ohki, Shigeo; Ikeda, Kazumi

    2014-06-01

    This paper deals with verification of three dimensional triangular prismatic discrete ordinates transport calculation code ENSEMBLE-TRIZ by comparison with multi-group Monte Carlo calculation code GMVP in a large fast breeder reactor. The reactor is a 750 MWe electric power sodium cooled reactor. Nuclear characteristics are calculated at beginning of cycle of an initial core and at beginning and end of cycle of equilibrium core. According to the calculations, the differences between the two methodologies are smaller than 0.0002 Δk in the multi-plication factor, relatively about 1% in the control rod reactivity, and 1% in the sodium void reactivity.

  11. TRIPOLI: a general Monte Carlo code, present state and future prospects. [Neutron and gamma ray transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimal, J.C.; Vergnaud, T. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France))

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the most important features of the Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-2. This code solves the Boltzmann equation in three-dimensional geometries for coupled neutron and gamma rays problems. A particular emphasis is devoted to the biasing techniques, which are very important for deep penetration. Future developments in TRIPOLI are described in the conclusion. (author).

  12. A novel hybrid scattering order-dependent variance reduction method for Monte Carlo simulations of radiative transfer in cloudy atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Cui, Shengcheng; Yang, Jun; Gao, Haiyang; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Zhibo

    2017-03-01

    We present a novel hybrid scattering order-dependent variance reduction method to accelerate the convergence rate in both forward and backward Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations involving highly forward-peaked scattering phase function. This method is built upon a newly developed theoretical framework that not only unifies both forward and backward radiative transfer in scattering-order-dependent integral equation, but also generalizes the variance reduction formalism in a wide range of simulation scenarios. In previous studies, variance reduction is achieved either by using the scattering phase function forward truncation technique or the target directional importance sampling technique. Our method combines both of them. A novel feature of our method is that all the tuning parameters used for phase function truncation and importance sampling techniques at each order of scattering are automatically optimized by the scattering order-dependent numerical evaluation experiments. To make such experiments feasible, we present a new scattering order sampling algorithm by remodeling integral radiative transfer kernel for the phase function truncation method. The presented method has been implemented in our Multiple-Scaling-based Cloudy Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (MSCART) model for validation and evaluation. The main advantage of the method is that it greatly improves the trade-off between numerical efficiency and accuracy order by order.

  13. Correlation of electron transport and photocatalysis of nanocrystalline clusters studied by Monte-Carlo continuity random walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baoshun; Li, Ziqiang; Zhao, Xiujian

    2015-02-21

    In this research, Monte-Carlo Continuity Random Walking (MC-RW) model was used to study the relation between electron transport and photocatalysis of nano-crystalline (nc) clusters. The effects of defect energy disorder, spatial disorder of material structure, electron density, and interfacial transfer/recombination on the electron transport and the photocatalysis were studied. Photocatalytic activity is defined as 1/τ from a statistical viewpoint with τ being the electron average lifetime. Based on the MC-RW simulation, a clear physical and chemical "picture" was given for the photocatalytic kinetic analysis of nc-clusters. It is shown that the increase of defect energy disorder and material spatial structural disorder, such as the decrease of defect trap number, the increase of crystallinity, the increase of particle size, and the increase of inter-particle connection, can enhance photocatalytic activity through increasing electron transport ability. The increase of electron density increases the electron Fermi level, which decreases the activation energy for electron de-trapping from traps to extending states, and correspondingly increases electron transport ability and photocatalytic activity. Reducing recombination of electrons and holes can increase electron transport through the increase of electron density and then increases the photocatalytic activity. In addition to the electron transport, the increase of probability for electrons to undergo photocatalysis can increase photocatalytic activity through the increase of the electron interfacial transfer speed.

  14. Thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor and Monte Carlo coupled simulation of deuteron/triton transport and secondary products generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guan-bo; Liu, Han-gang; Wang, Kan; Yang, Xin; Feng, Qi-jie

    2012-09-01

    Thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor has being studied in China Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP). Current Monte Carlo codes, such as MCNP and GEANT, are inadequate when applied in this multi-step reactions problems. A Monte Carlo tool RSMC (Reaction Sequence Monte Carlo) has been developed to simulate such coupled problem, from neutron absorption, to charged particle ionization and secondary neutron generation. "Forced particle production" variance reduction technique has been implemented to improve the calculation speed distinctly by making deuteron/triton induced secondary product plays a major role. Nuclear data is handled from ENDF or TENDL, and stopping power from SRIM, which described better for low energy deuteron/triton interactions. As a validation, accelerator driven mono-energy 14 MeV fusion neutron source is employed, which has been deeply studied and includes deuteron transport and secondary neutron generation. Various parameters, including fusion neutron angle distribution, average neutron energy at different emission directions, differential and integral energy distributions, are calculated with our tool and traditional deterministic method as references. As a result, we present the calculation results of convertor with RSMC, including conversion ratio of 1 mm 6LiD with a typical thermal neutron (Maxwell spectrum) incidence, and fusion neutron spectrum, which will be used for our experiment.

  15. A quantum transport model for atomic line radiation in plasmas*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Joël

    2017-02-01

    Emission and absorption lines in plasmas are investigated theoretically using a phase space formulation of quantum electrodynamics. A transport equation for the one-photon Wigner function is derived and formulated in terms of the noncommutative Moyal product. This equation reduces to the standard radiative transfer equation at the large spectral band limit, when the characteristic spectral band of the emission and absorption coefficients is larger than the inverse photon absorption length and time. We examine deviations to this limit. An ideal slab geometry is considered. The Wigner function relative to hydrogen Lyman α in stellar atmospheric conditions is calculated.

  16. A fast algorithm for radiative transport in isotropic media

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Kui; Zhong, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    We propose in this work a fast numerical algorithm for solving the equation of radiative transfer (ERT) in isotropic media. The algorithm has two steps. In the first step, we derive an integral equation for the angularly averaged ERT solution by taking advantage of the isotropy of the scattering kernel, and solve the integral equation with a fast multipole method (FMM). In the second step, we solve a scattering-free transport equation to recover the original ERT solution. Numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate the performance of the algorithm for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous media.

  17. Numerical calculation of radiation protective clothing efficiency by using Monte Carlo method

    OpenAIRE

    Моргунов, Владимир Викторович; Диденко, Наталья Викторовна; Трищ, Роман Михайлович

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the results of numerical experiments on modeling of absorption of gamma-radiation with/without using the proposed radiation-protective suit and radiation-shielding material (lead glass in the form of microspheres). The proposed method numerical experiments leads to the reduction of human, time and financial resources. When conducting numerical experiments we used the software package GEANT4. When conducting numerical experiments, we used a phantom of the human body (total...

  18. LPM-Effect in Monte Carlo Models of Radiative Energy Loss

    CERN Document Server

    Zapp, Korinna C; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2009-01-01

    Extending the use of Monte Carlo (MC) event generators to jets in nuclear collisions requires a probabilistic implementation of the non-abelian LPM effect. We demonstrate that a local, probabilistic MC implementation based on the concept of formation times can account fully for the LPM-effect. The main features of the analytically known eikonal and collinear approximation can be reproduced, but we show how going beyond this approximation can lead to qualitatively different results.

  19. LPM-Effect in Monte Carlo Models of Radiative Energy Loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapp, Korinna C. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Stachel, Johanna [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Wiedemann, Urs Achim [Physics Department, Theory Unit, CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland)

    2009-11-01

    Extending the use of Monte Carlo (MC) event generators to jets in nuclear collisions requires a probabilistic implementation of the non-abelian LPM effect. We demonstrate that a local, probabilistic MC implementation based on the concept of formation times can account fully for the LPM-effect. The main features of the analytically known eikonal and collinear approximation can be reproduced, but we show how going beyond this approximation can lead to qualitatively different results.

  20. Evaluation of a radiation transport modeling method for radioactive bone cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, T S [Department of Radiological Sciences, B170 Med Sci I, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Sehgal, V; Al-Ghazi, M S A L; Ramisinghani, N S [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Irvine Medical Center, Orange, CA 92868 (United States); Skinner, H B [St Jude Heritage Medical Group, Fullerton, CA 92835 (United States); Keyak, J H [Departments of Radiological Sciences, Biomedical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)], E-mail: tkaneko@uci.edu

    2010-05-07

    Spinal metastases are a common and serious manifestation of cancer, and are often treated with vertebroplasty/kyphoplasty followed by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). As an alternative, we have introduced radioactive bone cement, i.e. bone cement incorporated with a radionuclide. In this study, we present a Monte Carlo radiation transport modeling method to calculate dose distributions within vertebrae containing radioactive cement. Model accuracy was evaluated by comparing model-predicted depth-dose curves to those measured experimentally in eight cadaveric vertebrae using radiochromic film. The high-gradient regions of the depth-dose curves differed by radial distances of 0.3-0.9 mm, an improvement over EBRT dosimetry accuracy. The low-gradient regions differed by 0.033-0.055 Gy/h/mCi, which may be important in situations involving prior spinal cord irradiation. Using a more rigorous evaluation of model accuracy, four models predicted the measured dose distribution within the experimental uncertainty, as represented by the 95% confidence interval of the measured log-linear depth-dose curve. The remaining four models required modification to account for marrow lost from the vertebrae during specimen preparation. However, the accuracy of the modified model results indicated that, when this source of uncertainty is accounted for, this modeling method can be used to predict dose distributions in vertebrae containing radioactive cement.

  1. Evaluation of a radiation transport modeling method for radioactive bone cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, T. S.; Sehgal, V.; Skinner, H. B.; Al-Ghazi, M. S. A. L.; Ramisinghani, N. S.; Keyak, J. H.

    2010-05-01

    Spinal metastases are a common and serious manifestation of cancer, and are often treated with vertebroplasty/kyphoplasty followed by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). As an alternative, we have introduced radioactive bone cement, i.e. bone cement incorporated with a radionuclide. In this study, we present a Monte Carlo radiation transport modeling method to calculate dose distributions within vertebrae containing radioactive cement. Model accuracy was evaluated by comparing model-predicted depth-dose curves to those measured experimentally in eight cadaveric vertebrae using radiochromic film. The high-gradient regions of the depth-dose curves differed by radial distances of 0.3-0.9 mm, an improvement over EBRT dosimetry accuracy. The low-gradient regions differed by 0.033-0.055 Gy/h/mCi, which may be important in situations involving prior spinal cord irradiation. Using a more rigorous evaluation of model accuracy, four models predicted the measured dose distribution within the experimental uncertainty, as represented by the 95% confidence interval of the measured log-linear depth-dose curve. The remaining four models required modification to account for marrow lost from the vertebrae during specimen preparation. However, the accuracy of the modified model results indicated that, when this source of uncertainty is accounted for, this modeling method can be used to predict dose distributions in vertebrae containing radioactive cement.

  2. A new, coupled transport-diffusion method for radiative transfer calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollaber, A. B.; Warsa, J. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS D409, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos NM, 87545 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    We derive and present a new frequency- and angle-integrated low-order system of equations designed to enhance the accuracy of a coupled, high-order (transport) solution of the thermal radiative transfer equations. In particular, our new low-order system is designed to use intensity-weighted opacities and anisotropic diffusion coefficients generated by a solution of the Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) equations in order to predict the spatial dependence of the material temperature and radiation energies in the ensuing time cycle. The predicted temperature solution can then be exploited to generate appropriately time-centered opacities, specific heats, and Planck emission spectra for the upcoming IMC solution. Additionally, the relatively inexpensive solution of the low-order system can be iteratively solved to recommend an adaptive time step size before the IMC solution is computed. A test implementation has been implemented using existing software available from the Jayenne and Capsaicin projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We present initial results from a new driver code that has integrated these stochastic and deterministic software packages. (authors)

  3. Spectrum of Radiation-Induced Clustered Non-DSB Damage - A Monte Carlo Track Structure Modeling and Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ritsuko; Rahmanian, Shirin; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this report is to present the spectrum of initial radiation-induced cellular DNA damage [with particular focus on non-double-strand break (DSB) damage] generated by computer simulations. The radiation types modeled in this study were monoenergetic electrons (100 eV-1.5 keV), ultrasoft X-ray photons Ck, AlK and TiK, as well as some selected ions including 3.2 MeV/u proton; 0.74 and 2.4 MeV/u helium ions; 29 MeV/u nitrogen ions and 950 MeV/u iron ions. Monte Carlo track structure methods were used to simulate damage induction by these radiation types in a cell-mimetic condition from a single-track action. The simulations took into account the action of direct energy deposition events and the reaction of hydroxyl radicals on atomistic linear B-DNA segments of a few helical turns including the water of hydration. Our results permitted the following conclusions: a. The absolute levels of different types of damage [base damage, simple and complex single-strand breaks (SSBs) and DSBs] vary depending on the radiation type; b. Within each damage class, the relative proportions of simple and complex damage vary with radiation type, the latter being higher with high-LET radiations; c. Overall, for both low- and high-LET radiations, the ratios of the yields of base damage to SSBs are similar, being about 3.0 ± 0.2; d. Base damage contributes more to the complexity of both SSBs and DSBs, than additional SSB damage and this is true for both low- and high-LET radiations; and e. The average SSB/DSB ratio for low-LET radiations is about 18, which is about 5 times higher than that for high-LET radiations. The hypothesis that clustered DNA damage is more difficult for cells to repair has gained currency among radiobiologists. However, as yet, there is no direct in vivo experimental method to validate the dependence of kinetics of DNA repair on DNA damage complexity (both DSB and non-DSB types). The data on the detailed spectrum of DNA damage presented here, in particular

  4. Simulation of dose deposition in stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy: a fast approach combining Monte Carlo and deterministic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smekens, F; Freud, N; Letang, J M; Babot, D [CNDRI (Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiations) Laboratory, INSA-Lyon, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Adam, J-F; Elleaume, H; Esteve, F [INSERM U-836, Equipe 6 ' Rayonnement Synchrotron et Recherche Medicale' , Institut des Neurosciences de Grenoble (France); Ferrero, C; Bravin, A [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)], E-mail: francois.smekens@insa-lyon.fr

    2009-08-07

    A hybrid approach, combining deterministic and Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, is proposed to compute the distribution of dose deposited during stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy treatment. The proposed approach divides the computation into two parts: (i) the dose deposited by primary radiation (coming directly from the incident x-ray beam) is calculated in a deterministic way using ray casting techniques and energy-absorption coefficient tables and (ii) the dose deposited by secondary radiation (Rayleigh and Compton scattering, fluorescence) is computed using a hybrid algorithm combining MC and deterministic calculations. In the MC part, a small number of particle histories are simulated. Every time a scattering or fluorescence event takes place, a splitting mechanism is applied, so that multiple secondary photons are generated with a reduced weight. The secondary events are further processed in a deterministic way, using ray casting techniques. The whole simulation, carried out within the framework of the Monte Carlo code Geant4, is shown to converge towards the same results as the full MC simulation. The speed of convergence is found to depend notably on the splitting multiplicity, which can easily be optimized. To assess the performance of the proposed algorithm, we compare it to state-of-the-art MC simulations, accelerated by the track length estimator technique (TLE), considering a clinically realistic test case. It is found that the hybrid approach is significantly faster than the MC/TLE method. The gain in speed in a test case was about 25 for a constant precision. Therefore, this method appears to be suitable for treatment planning applications.

  5. A fast GPU-based Monte Carlo simulation of proton transport with detailed modeling of non-elastic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Tseung, H Wan Chan; Beltran, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Very fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of proton transport have been implemented recently on GPUs. However, these usually use simplified models for non-elastic (NE) proton-nucleus interactions. Our primary goal is to build a GPU-based proton transport MC with detailed modeling of elastic and NE collisions. Methods: Using CUDA, we implemented GPU kernels for these tasks: (1) Simulation of spots from our scanning nozzle configurations, (2) Proton propagation through CT geometry, considering nuclear elastic scattering, multiple scattering, and energy loss straggling, (3) Modeling of the intranuclear cascade stage of NE interactions, (4) Nuclear evaporation simulation, and (5) Statistical error estimates on the dose. To validate our MC, we performed: (1) Secondary particle yield calculations in NE collisions, (2) Dose calculations in homogeneous phantoms, (3) Re-calculations of head and neck plans from a commercial treatment planning system (TPS), and compared with Geant4.9.6p2/TOPAS. Results: Yields, en...

  6. An improved Monte Carlo study of coherent scattering effects of low energy charged particle transport in Percus-Yevick liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Tattersall, W J; Boyle, G J; White, R D

    2015-01-01

    We generalize a simple Monte Carlo (MC) model for dilute gases to consider the transport behavior of positrons and electrons in Percus-Yevick model liquids under highly non-equilibrium conditions, accounting rigorously for coherent scattering processes. The procedure extends an existing technique [Wojcik and Tachiya, Chem. Phys. Lett. 363, 3--4 (1992)], using the static structure factor to account for the altered anisotropy of coherent scattering in structured material. We identify the effects of the approximation used in the original method, and develop a modified method that does not require that approximation. We also present an enhanced MC technique that has been designed to improve the accuracy and flexibility of simulations in spatially-varying electric fields. All of the results are found to be in excellent agreement with an independent multi-term Boltzmann equation solution, providing benchmarks for future transport models in liquids and structured systems.

  7. New Parallel computing framework for radiation transport codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostin, M.A.; /Michigan State U., NSCL; Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab; Niita, K.; /JAERI, Tokai

    2010-09-01

    A new parallel computing framework has been developed to use with general-purpose radiation transport codes. The framework was implemented as a C++ module that uses MPI for message passing. The module is significantly independent of radiation transport codes it can be used with, and is connected to the codes by means of a number of interface functions. The framework was integrated with the MARS15 code, and an effort is under way to deploy it in PHITS. Besides the parallel computing functionality, the framework offers a checkpoint facility that allows restarting calculations with a saved checkpoint file. The checkpoint facility can be used in single process calculations as well as in the parallel regime. Several checkpoint files can be merged into one thus combining results of several calculations. The framework also corrects some of the known problems with the scheduling and load balancing found in the original implementations of the parallel computing functionality in MARS15 and PHITS. The framework can be used efficiently on homogeneous systems and networks of workstations, where the interference from the other users is possible.

  8. New Parallel computing framework for radiation transport codes

    CERN Document Server

    Kostin, M A; Niita, K

    2012-01-01

    A new parallel computing framework has been developed to use with general-purpose radiation transport codes. The framework was implemented as a C++ module that uses MPI for message passing. The module is significantly independent of radiation transport codes it can be used with, and is connected to the codes by means of a number of interface functions. The frame work was integrated with the MARS15 code, and an effort is under way to deploy it in PHITS. Besides the parallel computing functionality, the framework offers a checkpoint facility that allows restarting calculations with a saved checkpoint file. The checkpoint facility can be used in single process calculations as well as in the parallel regime. Several checkpoint files can be merged into one thus combining results of several calculations. The framework also corrects some of the known problems with the sch eduling and load balancing found in the original implementations of the parallel computing functionality in MARS15 and PHITS. The framework can be...

  9. Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConn, Ronald J.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.; Rucker, Robert A.; Williams III, Robert

    2011-03-04

    Introduction Meaningful simulations of radiation transport applications require realistic definitions of material composition and densities. When seeking that information for applications in fields such as homeland security, radiation shielding and protection, and criticality safety, researchers usually encounter a variety of materials for which elemental compositions are not readily available or densities are not defined. Publication of the Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling, Revision 0, in 2006 was the first step toward mitigating this problem. Revision 0 of this document listed 121 materials, selected mostly from the combined personal libraries of staff at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and thus had a scope that was recognized at the time to be limited. Nevertheless, its creation did provide a well-referenced source of some unique or hard-to-define material data in a format that could be used directly in radiation transport calculations being performed at PNNL. Moreover, having a single common set of material definitions also helped to standardize at least one aspect of the various modeling efforts across the laboratory by providing separate researchers the ability to compare different model results using a common basis of materials. The authors of the 2006 compendium understood that, depending on its use and feedback, the compendium would need to be revised to correct errors or inconsistencies in the data for the original 121 materials, as well as to increase (per users suggestions) the number of materials listed. This 2010 revision of the compendium has accomplished both of those objectives. The most obvious change is the increased number of materials from 121 to 372. The not-so-obvious change is the mechanism used to produce the data listed here. The data listed in the 2006 document were compiled, evaluated, entered, and error-checked by a group of individuals essentially by hand, providing no library

  10. A multi-agent quantum Monte Carlo model for charge transport: Application to organic field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Thilo; Jäger, Christof M. [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Computer-Chemistry-Center and Interdisciplinary Center for Molecular Materials, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Nägelsbachstrasse 25, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Jordan, Meredith J. T. [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Clark, Timothy, E-mail: tim.clark@fau.de [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Computer-Chemistry-Center and Interdisciplinary Center for Molecular Materials, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Nägelsbachstrasse 25, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Centre for Molecular Design, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 2DY (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-28

    We have developed a multi-agent quantum Monte Carlo model to describe the spatial dynamics of multiple majority charge carriers during conduction of electric current in the channel of organic field-effect transistors. The charge carriers are treated by a neglect of diatomic differential overlap Hamiltonian using a lattice of hydrogen-like basis functions. The local ionization energy and local electron affinity defined previously map the bulk structure of the transistor channel to external potentials for the simulations of electron- and hole-conduction, respectively. The model is designed without a specific charge-transport mechanism like hopping- or band-transport in mind and does not arbitrarily localize charge. An electrode model allows dynamic injection and depletion of charge carriers according to source-drain voltage. The field-effect is modeled by using the source-gate voltage in a Metropolis-like acceptance criterion. Although the current cannot be calculated because the simulations have no time axis, using the number of Monte Carlo moves as pseudo-time gives results that resemble experimental I/V curves.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation and Boltzmann equation analysis of non-conservative positron transport in H{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bankovic, A., E-mail: ana.bankovic@gmail.com [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Dujko, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica (CWI), P.O. Box 94079, 1090 GB Amsterdam (Netherlands); ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4810 (Australia); White, R.D. [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4810 (Australia); Buckman, S.J. [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Petrovic, Z.Lj. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2012-05-15

    This work reports on a new series of calculations of positron transport properties in molecular hydrogen under the influence of spatially homogeneous electric field. Calculations are performed using a Monte Carlo simulation technique and multi term theory for solving the Boltzmann equation. Values and general trends of the mean energy, drift velocity and diffusion coefficients as a function of the reduced electric field E/n{sub 0} are reported here. Emphasis is placed on the explicit and implicit effects of positronium (Ps) formation on the drift velocity and diffusion coefficients. Two important phenomena arise; first, for certain regions of E/n{sub 0} the bulk and flux components of the drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion coefficient are markedly different, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Second, and contrary to previous experience in electron swarm physics, there is negative differential conductivity (NDC) effect in the bulk drift velocity component with no indication of any NDC for the flux component. In order to understand this atypical manifestation of the drift and diffusion of positrons in H{sub 2} under the influence of electric field, the spatially dependent positron transport properties such as number of positrons, average energy and velocity and spatially resolved rate for Ps formation are calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation technique. The spatial variation of the positron average energy and extreme skewing of the spatial profile of positron swarm are shown to play a central role in understanding the phenomena.

  12. Optimizing light transport in scintillation crystals for time-of-flight PET: an experimental and optical Monte Carlo simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Eric; Roncali, Emilie; Cherry, Simon R

    2015-06-01

    Achieving excellent timing resolution in gamma ray detectors is crucial in several applications such as medical imaging with time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF-PET). Although many factors impact the overall system timing resolution, the statistical nature of scintillation light, including photon production and transport in the crystal to the photodetector, is typically the limiting factor for modern scintillation detectors. In this study, we investigated the impact of surface treatment, in particular, roughening select areas of otherwise polished crystals, on light transport and timing resolution. A custom Monte Carlo photon tracking tool was used to gain insight into changes in light collection and timing resolution that were observed experimentally: select roughening configurations increased the light collection up to 25% and improved timing resolution by 15% compared to crystals with all polished surfaces. Simulations showed that partial surface roughening caused a greater number of photons to be reflected towards the photodetector and increased the initial rate of photoelectron production. This study provides a simple method to improve timing resolution and light collection in scintillator-based gamma ray detectors, a topic of high importance in the field of TOF-PET. Additionally, we demonstrated utility of our Monte Carlo simulation tool to accurately predict the effect of altering crystal surfaces on light collection and timing resolution.

  13. Comptomization and radiation spectra of X-ray sources. Calculation of the Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdnyakov, L. A.; Sobol, I. M.; Sonyayev, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    The results of computations of the Comptomization of low frequency radiation in weakly relativistic plasma are presented. The influence of photoabsorption by iron ions on a hard X-ray spectrum is considered.

  14. 3D Continuum Radiative Transfer. An adaptive grid construction algorithm based on the Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niccolini, G.; Alcolea, J.

    Solving the radiative transfer problem is a common problematic to may fields in astrophysics. With the increasing angular resolution of spatial or ground-based telescopes (VLTI, HST) but also with the next decade instruments (NGST, ALMA, ...), astrophysical objects reveal and will certainly reveal complex spatial structures. Consequently, it is necessary to develop numerical tools being able to solve the radiative transfer equation in three dimensions in order to model and interpret these observations. I present a 3D radiative transfer program, using a new method for the construction of an adaptive spatial grid, based on the Monte Claro method. With the help of this tools, one can solve the continuum radiative transfer problem (e.g. a dusty medium), computes the temperature structure of the considered medium and obtain the flux of the object (SED and images).

  15. A review of the use and potential of the GATE Monte Carlo simulation code for radiation therapy and dosimetry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrut, David; Bardiès, Manuel; Boussion, Nicolas; Freud, Nicolas; Jan, Sébastien; Létang, Jean-Michel; Loudos, George; Maigne, Lydia; Marcatili, Sara; Mauxion, Thibault; Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis; Perrot, Yann; Pietrzyk, Uwe; Robert, Charlotte; Schaart, Dennis R; Visvikis, Dimitris; Buvat, Irène

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, the authors' review the applicability of the open-source GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform based on the GEANT4 toolkit for radiation therapy and dosimetry applications. The many applications of GATE for state-of-the-art radiotherapy simulations are described including external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, intraoperative radiotherapy, hadrontherapy, molecular radiotherapy, and in vivo dose monitoring. Investigations that have been performed using GEANT4 only are also mentioned to illustrate the potential of GATE. The very practical feature of GATE making it easy to model both a treatment and an imaging acquisition within the same framework is emphasized. The computational times associated with several applications are provided to illustrate the practical feasibility of the simulations using current computing facilities.

  16. A review of the use and potential of the GATE Monte Carlo simulation code for radiation therapy and dosimetry applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarrut, David, E-mail: david.sarrut@creatis.insa-lyon.fr [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1 (France); Centre Léon Bérard (France); Bardiès, Manuel; Marcatili, Sara; Mauxion, Thibault [Inserm, UMR1037 CRCT, F-31000 Toulouse, France and Université Toulouse III-Paul Sabatier, UMR1037 CRCT, F-31000 Toulouse (France); Boussion, Nicolas [INSERM, UMR 1101, LaTIM, CHU Morvan, 29609 Brest (France); Freud, Nicolas; Létang, Jean-Michel [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Centre Léon Bérard, 69008 Lyon (France); Jan, Sébastien [CEA/DSV/I2BM/SHFJ, Orsay 91401 (France); Loudos, George [Department of Medical Instruments Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Athens 12210 (Greece); Maigne, Lydia; Perrot, Yann [UMR 6533 CNRS/IN2P3, Université Blaise Pascal, 63171 Aubière (France); Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Athens, 12210, Athens (Greece); Pietrzyk, Uwe [Institut für Neurowissenschaften und Medizin, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich, Germany and Fachbereich für Mathematik und Naturwissenschaften, Bergische Universität Wuppertal, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany); Robert, Charlotte [IMNC, UMR 8165 CNRS, Universités Paris 7 et Paris 11, Orsay 91406 (France); and others

    2014-06-15

    In this paper, the authors' review the applicability of the open-source GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform based on the GEANT4 toolkit for radiation therapy and dosimetry applications. The many applications of GATE for state-of-the-art radiotherapy simulations are described including external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, intraoperative radiotherapy, hadrontherapy, molecular radiotherapy, and in vivo dose monitoring. Investigations that have been performed using GEANT4 only are also mentioned to illustrate the potential of GATE. The very practical feature of GATE making it easy to model both a treatment and an imaging acquisition within the same frameworkis emphasized. The computational times associated with several applications are provided to illustrate the practical feasibility of the simulations using current computing facilities.

  17. Physics study of microbeam radiation therapy with PSI-version of Monte Carlo code GEANT as a new computational tool

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanek, J; Laissue, J A; Lyubimova, N; Di Michiel, F; Slatkin, D N

    2000-01-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a currently experimental method of radiotherapy which is mediated by an array of parallel microbeams of synchrotron-wiggler-generated X-rays. Suitably selected, nominally supralethal doses of X-rays delivered to parallel microslices of tumor-bearing tissues in rats can be either palliative or curative while causing little or no serious damage to contiguous normal tissues. Although the pathogenesis of MRT-mediated tumor regression is not understood, as in all radiotherapy such understanding will be based ultimately on our understanding of the relationships among the following three factors: (1) microdosimetry, (2) damage to normal tissues, and (3) therapeutic efficacy. Although physical microdosimetry is feasible, published information on MRT microdosimetry to date is computational. This report describes Monte Carlo-based computational MRT microdosimetry using photon and/or electron scattering and photoionization cross-section data in the 1 e V through 100 GeV range distrib...

  18. Multilevel Monte Carlo methods using ensemble level mixed MsFEM for two-phase flow and transport simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Efendiev, Yalchin R.

    2013-08-21

    In this paper, we propose multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) methods that use ensemble level mixed multiscale methods in the simulations of multiphase flow and transport. The contribution of this paper is twofold: (1) a design of ensemble level mixed multiscale finite element methods and (2) a novel use of mixed multiscale finite element methods within multilevel Monte Carlo techniques to speed up the computations. The main idea of ensemble level multiscale methods is to construct local multiscale basis functions that can be used for any member of the ensemble. In this paper, we consider two ensemble level mixed multiscale finite element methods: (1) the no-local-solve-online ensemble level method (NLSO); and (2) the local-solve-online ensemble level method (LSO). The first approach was proposed in Aarnes and Efendiev (SIAM J. Sci. Comput. 30(5):2319-2339, 2008) while the second approach is new. Both mixed multiscale methods use a number of snapshots of the permeability media in generating multiscale basis functions. As a result, in the off-line stage, we construct multiple basis functions for each coarse region where basis functions correspond to different realizations. In the no-local-solve-online ensemble level method, one uses the whole set of precomputed basis functions to approximate the solution for an arbitrary realization. In the local-solve-online ensemble level method, one uses the precomputed functions to construct a multiscale basis for a particular realization. With this basis, the solution corresponding to this particular realization is approximated in LSO mixed multiscale finite element method (MsFEM). In both approaches, the accuracy of the method is related to the number of snapshots computed based on different realizations that one uses to precompute a multiscale basis. In this paper, ensemble level multiscale methods are used in multilevel Monte Carlo methods (Giles 2008a, Oper.Res. 56(3):607-617, b). In multilevel Monte Carlo methods, more accurate

  19. Benchmarks and models for 1-D radiation transport in stochastic participating media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D S

    2000-08-21

    Benchmark calculations for radiation transport coupled to a material temperature equation in a 1-D slab and 1-D spherical geometry binary random media are presented. The mixing statistics are taken to be homogeneous Markov statistics in the 1-D slab but only approximately Markov statistics in the 1-D sphere. The material chunk sizes are described by Poisson distribution functions. The material opacities are first taken to be constant and then allowed to vary as a strong function of material temperature. Benchmark values and variances for time evolution of the ensemble average of material temperature energy density and radiation transmission are computed via a Monte Carlo type method. These benchmarks are used as a basis for comparison with three other approximate methods of solution. One of these approximate methods is simple atomic mix. The second approximate model is an adaptation of what is commonly called the Levermore-Pomraning model and which is referred to here as the standard model. It is shown that recasting the temperature coupling as a type of effective scattering can be useful in formulating the third approximate model, an adaptation of a model due to Su and Pomraning which attempts to account for the effects of scattering in a stochastic context. This last adaptation shows consistent improvement over both the atomic mix and standard models when used in the 1-D slab geometry but shows limited improvement in the 1-D spherical geometry. Benchmark values are also computed for radiation transmission from the 1-D sphere without material heating present. This is to evaluate the performance of the standard model on this geometry--something which has never been done before. All of the various tests demonstrate the importance of stochastic structure on the solution. Also demonstrated are the range of usefulness and limitations of a simple atomic mix formulation.

  20. Mercury + VisIt: Integration of a Real-Time Graphical Analysis Capability into a Monte Carlo Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, M J; Procassini, R J; Joy, K I

    2009-03-09

    Validation of the problem definition and analysis of the results (tallies) produced during a Monte Carlo particle transport calculation can be a complicated, time-intensive processes. The time required for a person to create an accurate, validated combinatorial geometry (CG) or mesh-based representation of a complex problem, free of common errors such as gaps and overlapping cells, can range from days to weeks. The ability to interrogate the internal structure of a complex, three-dimensional (3-D) geometry, prior to running the transport calculation, can improve the user's confidence in the validity of the problem definition. With regard to the analysis of results, the process of extracting tally data from printed tables within a file is laborious and not an intuitive approach to understanding the results. The ability to display tally information overlaid on top of the problem geometry can decrease the time required for analysis and increase the user's understanding of the results. To this end, our team has integrated VisIt, a parallel, production-quality visualization and data analysis tool into Mercury, a massively-parallel Monte Carlo particle transport code. VisIt provides an API for real time visualization of a simulation as it is running. The user may select which plots to display from the VisIt GUI, or by sending VisIt a Python script from Mercury. The frequency at which plots are updated can be set and the user can visualize the simulation results as it is running.

  1. 3D unstructured-mesh radiation transport codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morel, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Three unstructured-mesh radiation transport codes are currently being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The first code is ATTILA, which uses an unstructured tetrahedral mesh in conjunction with standard Sn (discrete-ordinates) angular discretization, standard multigroup energy discretization, and linear-discontinuous spatial differencing. ATTILA solves the standard first-order form of the transport equation using source iteration in conjunction with diffusion-synthetic acceleration of the within-group source iterations. DANTE is designed to run primarily on workstations. The second code is DANTE, which uses a hybrid finite-element mesh consisting of arbitrary combinations of hexahedra, wedges, pyramids, and tetrahedra. DANTE solves several second-order self-adjoint forms of the transport equation including the even-parity equation, the odd-parity equation, and a new equation called the self-adjoint angular flux equation. DANTE also offers three angular discretization options: $S{_}n$ (discrete-ordinates), $P{_}n$ (spherical harmonics), and $SP{_}n$ (simplified spherical harmonics). DANTE is designed to run primarily on massively parallel message-passing machines, such as the ASCI-Blue machines at LANL and LLNL. The third code is PERICLES, which uses the same hybrid finite-element mesh as DANTE, but solves the standard first-order form of the transport equation rather than a second-order self-adjoint form. DANTE uses a standard $S{_}n$ discretization in angle in conjunction with trilinear-discontinuous spatial differencing, and diffusion-synthetic acceleration of the within-group source iterations. PERICLES was initially designed to run on workstations, but a version for massively parallel message-passing machines will be built. The three codes will be described in detail and computational results will be presented.

  2. High-Fidelity Kinetics and Radiation Transport for NLTE Hypersonic Flows Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The modeling of NLTE hypersonic flows combines several disciplines: chemistry, kinetics, radiation transport, fluid mechanics, and surface science. No single code or...

  3. Survey of radiation protection programmes for transport; Etude des programmes de radioprotection pour les transports de matieres radioactives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizot, M.T.; Perrin, M.L.; Sert, G. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dept. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, 92 (France); Lange, F.; Schwarz, G.; Feet, H.J.; Christ, R. [Gesellschaft fur Anlagen-und Reaktorsicherheit, GRS, mbH, Cologne (Germany); Shaw, K.B.; Hughes, J.S.; Gelder, R. [National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB), Oxon, OX (United Kingdom)

    2001-07-01

    The survey of radiation protection programmes for transport has been jointly performed by three scientific organisations I.P.S.N. (France), G.R.S. ( Germany), and N.R.P.B. (United kingdom) on behalf of the European Commission and the pertaining documentation summarises the findings and conclusions of the work that was undertaken with the principal objectives to provide guidance on the establishment, implementation and application of radiation protection programmes for the transport of radioactive materials by operators and the assessment and evaluation of such programmes by the competent authority and to review currently existing radiation protection programmes for the transport of radioactive materials. (N.C.)

  4. A Monte Carlo study on the effect of the orbital bone to the radiation dose delivered to the eye lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratis, Andreas; Zhang, Guozhi; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Bogaerts, Ria; Bosmans, Hilde

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of backscatter radiation from the orbital bone and the intraorbital fat on the eye lens dose in the dental CBCT energy range. To this end we conducted three different yet interrelated studies; A preliminary simulation study was conducted to examine the impact of a bony layer situated underneath a soft tissue layer on the amount of backscatter radiation. We compared the Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) curves in soft tissue with and without the bone layer and we estimated the depth in tissue where the decrease in backscatter caused by the presence of the bone is noticeable. In a supplementary study, an eye voxel phantom was designed with the DOSxyznrc code. Simulations were performed exposing the phantom at different x-ray energies sequentially in air, in fat tissue and in realistic anatomy with the incident beam perpendicular to the phantom. Finally, a virtual head phantom was implemented into a validated hybrid Monte Carlo (MC) framework to simulate a large Field of View protocol of a real CBCT scanner and examine the influence of scattered dose to the eye lens during the whole rotation of the paired tube-detector system. The results indicated an increase in the dose to the lens due to the fatty tissue in the surrounding anatomy. There is a noticeable dose reduction close to the bone-tissue interface which weakens with increasing distance from the interface, such that the impact of the orbital bone in the eye lens dose becomes small.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of the radiation environment encountered by a biochip during a space mission to Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Postollec, A; Incerti, S; Dobrijevic, M; Desorgher, L; Santin, G; Moretto, P; Vandenabeele-Trambouze, O; Coussot, G; Dartnell, L; Nieminen, P

    2009-04-01

    Simulations with a Monte Carlo tool kit have been performed to determine the radiation environment a specific device, called a biochip, would face if it were placed into a rover bound to explore Mars' surface. A biochip is a miniaturized device that can be used to detect organic molecules in situ. Its specific detection part is constituted of proteins whose behavior under cosmic radiation is completely unknown and must be investigated to ensure a good functioning of the device under space conditions. The aim of this study is to define particle species and energy ranges that could be relevant to investigate during experiments on irradiation beam facilities. Several primary particles have been considered for galactic cosmic ray (GCR) and solar energetic particle (SEP) contributions. Ionizing doses accumulated in the biochip and differential fluxes of protons, alphas, neutrons, gammas, and electrons have been established for both the Earth-Mars transit and the journey at Mars' surface. Neutrons and gammas appear as dominant species on martian soil, whereas protons dominate during the interplanetary travel. Depending on solar event occurrence during the mission, an ionizing dose of around a few Grays (1 Gy = 100 rad) is expected.

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of radiation heat transfer in a three-dimensional enclosure containing a circular cylinder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, S.H.; Welty, J.R.

    1999-09-01

    In any process involving high temperatures such as heat treatment, power generation, and other engineering applications, radiation heat transfer is an important mechanism. This paper presents the distribution of radiation heat flux within an enclosure containing a horizontal circular cylinder. Cases were examined both with and without an absorbing, emitting, and scattering medium present. The bottom surface of the square enclosure was considered a uniform heat flux surface, and the other surfaces were considered perfectly absorbing. A circular cylinder was located at various positions along the vertical centerline of the enclosure; its length was that of the enclosure depth. In the first part of this study (cases 1 and 2), different configurations were used with an optically thin ({tau} {much{underscore}lt} 1) medium in the enclosure, and in the second, different optical thicknesses were used with a fixed enclosure size. The amount of radiant energy transferred to the cylinder depends on its location, the optical thickness of the participating medium, and the enclosure depth. For the optically thin cases ({tau} {much{underscore}lt} 1) the Monte Carlo solution calculates geometric view factors.

  7. Stormtime transport of ring current and radiation belt ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Margaret W.; Schulz, Michael; Lyons, L. R.; Gorney, David J.

    1993-01-01

    This is an investigation of stormtime particle transport that leads to formation of the ring current. Our method is to trace the guiding-center motion of representative ions (having selected first adiabatic invariants mu) in response to model substorm-associated impulses in the convection electric field. We compare our simulation results qualitatively with existing analytically tractable idealizations of particle transport (direct convective access and radial diffusion) in order to assess the limits of validity of these approximations. For mu approximately less than 10 MeV/G (E approximately less than 10 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period on the final (ring-current) drift shell of interest (L equivalent to 3) exceeds the duration of the main phase of our model storm, and we find that the transport of ions to this drift shell is appropriately idealized as direct convective access, typically from open drift paths. Ion transport to a final closed drift path from an open (plasma-sheet) drift trajectory is possible for those portions of that drift path that lie outside the mean stormtime separatrix between closed and open drift trajectories, For mu approximately 10-25 MeV/G (110 keV approximately less than E approximately less than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the drift period at L equivalent to 3 is comparable to the postulated 3-hr duration of the storm, and the mode of transport is transitional between direct convective access and transport that resembles radial diffusion. (This particle population is transitional between the ring current and radiation belt). For mu approximately greater than 25 MeV/G (radiation-belt ions having E approximately greater than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period is considerably shorter than the main phase of a typical storm, and ions gain access to the ring-current region essentially via radial diffusion. By computing the mean and mean-square cumulative changes in 1/L among (in this case) 12 representative

  8. An improved empirical approach to introduce quantization effects in the transport direction in multi-subband Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palestri, P.; Lucci, L.; Dei Tos, S.; Esseni, D.; Selmi, L.

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we propose and validate a simple approach to empirically account for quantum effects in the transport direction of MOS transistors (i.e. source and drain tunneling and delocalized nature of the carrier wavepacket) in multi-subband Monte Carlo simulators, that already account for quantization in the direction normal to the semiconductor-oxide interface by solving the 1D Schrödinger equation in each section of the device. The model has been validated and calibrated against ballistic non-equilibrium Green's function simulations over a wide range of gate lengths, voltage biases and temperatures. The proposed model has just one adjustable parameter and our results show that it can achieve a good agreement with the NEGF approach.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation on electron transport in Si sub 1 sub - sub y C sub y alloy layers

    CERN Document Server

    Ihm, S H; Lee, C H; Lee, H J; Kim, J Y; Chun, S K

    1999-01-01

    We investigated electron transport in strained Si sub 1 sub - sub y C sub y alloy layers grown on Si(100) substrates using the Monte Carlo simulation. The electron mobility higher than that of bulk Si over a wide range of temperatures from 40 K to 300 K is mainly attributed to the valley splitting induced by the tensile strain in the Si sub 1 sub - sub y C sub y layer. For lower temperatures less than 100 K the mobility increases sharply depending on the carbon fraction up to about 0.6%. Beyond the fraction, however, it keeps almost constant regardless of increasing the carbon fraction. On the other hand, we observe a monotonic mobility increase with increasing the carbon for a higher temperature regime.

  10. Monte Carlo Simulation of Light Transport in Five-Layered Skin Tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Ling-Ling; ZHANG Chun-Ping; WANG Xin-Yu; ZHU Ming-Yao; ZHANG Lian-Shun; CHI Rong-Hua; ZHANG Jian-Dong; ZHANG Guang-Yin

    2000-01-01

    The light propagation and distribution in skin tissue is studied by using Monte Carlo technique. The radially resolved diffuse reflectance R and transmittance T vs radius r, angularly resolved R and Tvs the exiting angle of the photon, absorption energy density A and internal fiuence F vs r and z are simulated. Our results reveal that the light distribution for Gaussian beam is more centralized and its change is more rapid than those of circularly flat beam under the same incident energy and radius, no matter what R and T or A and F are. In addition,except that R(r) for circularly flat beam needs to be fitted by 15-order curve, the others can be fitted by 5-order or 6-order curve.

  11. Guidelines for effective radiation transport for cable SGEMP modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumm, Clifton Russell [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fan, Wesley C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turner, C. David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-07-01

    This report describes experiences gained in performing radiation transport computations with the SCEPTRE radiation transport code for System Generated ElectroMagnetic Pulse (SGEMP) applications. SCEPTRE is a complex code requiring a fairly sophisticated user to run the code effectively, so this report provides guidance for analysts interested in performing these types of calculations. One challenge in modeling coupled photon/electron transport for SGEMP is to provide a spatial mesh that is sufficiently resolved to accurately model surface charge emission and charge deposition near material interfaces. The method that has been most commonly used to date to compute cable SGEMP typically requires a sub-micron mesh size near material interfaces, which may be difficult for meshing software to provide for complex geometries. We present here an alternative method for computing cable SGEMP that appears to substantially relax this requirement. The report also investigates the effect of refining the energy mesh and increasing the order of the angular approximation to provide some guidance on determining reasonable parameters for the energy/angular approximation needed for x-ray environments. Conclusions for -ray environments may be quite different and will be treated in a subsequent report. In the course of the energy-mesh refinement studies, a bug in the cross-section generation software was discovered that may cause under prediction of the result by as much as an order of magnitude for the test problem studied here, when the electron energy group widths are much smaller than those for the photons. Results will be presented and compared using cross sections generated before and after the fix. We also describe adjoint modeling, which provides sensitivity of the total charge drive to the source energy and angle of incidence, which is quite useful for comparing the effect of changing the source environment and for determining most stressing angle of incidence and

  12. Guidelines for effective radiation transport for cable SGEMP modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumm, Clifton Russell [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fan, Wesley C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turner, C. David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-07-01

    This report describes experiences gained in performing radiation transport computations with the SCEPTRE radiation transport code for System Generated ElectroMagnetic Pulse (SGEMP) applications. SCEPTRE is a complex code requiring a fairly sophisticated user to run the code effectively, so this report provides guidance for analysts interested in performing these types of calculations. One challenge in modeling coupled photon/electron transport for SGEMP is to provide a spatial mesh that is sufficiently resolved to accurately model surface charge emission and charge deposition near material interfaces. The method that has been most commonly used to date to compute cable SGEMP typically requires a sub-micron mesh size near material interfaces, which may be difficult for meshing software to provide for complex geometries. We present here an alternative method for computing cable SGEMP that appears to substantially relax this requirement. The report also investigates the effect of refining the energy mesh and increasing the order of the angular approximation to provide some guidance on determining reasonable parameters for the energy/angular approximation needed for x-ray environments. Conclusions for γ-ray environments may be quite different and will be treated in a subsequent report. In the course of the energy-mesh refinement studies, a bug in the cross-section generation software was discovered that may cause underprediction of the result by as much as an order of magnitude for the test problem studied here, when the electron energy group widths are much smaller than those for the photons. Results will be presented and compared using cross sections generated before and after the fix. We also describe adjoint modeling, which provides sensitivity of the total charge drive to the source energy and angle of incidence, which is quite useful for comparing the effect of changing the source environment and for determining most stressing angle of incidence and source

  13. Evaluation of stability using Monte Carlo Simulation in 2 people isolation treatment room of radiation iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Dong Gun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences Cancer center, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Sung Jin; KIm, Chang Soo; Kim, Jung Hoon [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Radioactive iodine treatment that uses the 2 people isolation room is to cause unnecessary radiation exposure between patients. This research is to be tested safety of 2 people Isolation treatment room and dose-rate through conservative perspective except physiology characteristic and biology information on the assumption that patient have iodine without excretion in 2 people isolation treatment room. This research shows that 364 keV gamma rays emitted by the radioiodine was to determine that the air layer about 30 cm or lead shield 3 mm a half-layer. In addition, In addition, patients in the distance, and lead shielding, length of hospital stay (48 hours) for external radiation exposure that is received from the other patients, two of treatment as appears to be lower than the legal isolation standard dose less than 5 mSv isolation room effective analyzed that manageable.

  14. Application of proton boron fusion reaction to radiation therapy: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Suh, Tae Suk

    2014-12-01

    Three alpha particles are emitted from the point of reaction between a proton and boron. The alpha particles are effective in inducing the death of a tumor cell. After boron is accumulated in the tumor region, the emitted from outside the body proton can react with the boron in the tumor region. An increase of the proton's maximum dose level is caused by the boron and only the tumor cell is damaged more critically. In addition, a prompt gamma ray is emitted from the proton boron reaction point. Here, we show that the effectiveness of the proton boron fusion therapy was verified using Monte Carlo simulations. We found that a dramatic increase by more than half of the proton's maximum dose level was induced by the boron in the tumor region. This increase occurred only when the proton's maximum dose point was located within the boron uptake region. In addition, the 719 keV prompt gamma ray peak produced by the proton boron fusion reaction was positively detected. This therapy method features the advantages such as the application of Bragg-peak to the therapy, the accurate targeting of tumor, improved therapy effects, and the monitoring of the therapy region during treatment.

  15. Radiative transport produced by oblique illumination of turbid media with collimated beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Adam R; Kim, Arnold D; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2013-06-01

    We examine the general problem of light transport initiated by oblique illumination of a turbid medium with a collimated beam. This situation has direct relevance to the analysis of cloudy atmospheres, terrestrial surfaces, soft condensed matter, and biological tissues. We introduce a solution approach to the equation of radiative transfer that governs this problem, and develop a comprehensive spherical harmonics expansion method utilizing Fourier decomposition (SHEF(N)). The SHEF(N) approach enables the solution of problems lacking azimuthal symmetry and provides both the spatial and directional dependence of the radiance. We also introduce the method of sequential-order smoothing that enables the calculation of accurate solutions from the results of two sequential low-order approximations. We apply the SHEF(N) approach to determine the spatial and angular dependence of both internal and boundary radiances from strongly and weakly scattering turbid media. These solutions are validated using more costly Monte Carlo simulations and reveal important insights regarding the evolution of the radiant field generated by oblique collimated beams spanning ballistic and diffusely scattering regimes.

  16. Efficient, Multi-Scale Radiation Transport Modeling Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Focusing on a reduced-dimension problem of a hypersonic orbital/lunar reentry capsule, an algorithm will be built which combines the stochastic Monte Carlo method...

  17. Comparison between beta radiation dose distribution due to LDR and HDR ocular brachytherapy applicators using GATE Monte Carlo platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Laoues; Rachid, Khelifi; Ahmed, Sidi Moussa

    2016-08-01

    Eye applicators with 90Sr/90Y and 106Ru/106Rh beta-ray sources are generally used in brachytherapy for the treatment of eye diseases as uveal melanoma. Whenever, radiation is used in treatment, dosimetry is essential. However, knowledge of the exact dose distribution is a critical decision-making to the outcome of the treatment. The Monte Carlo technique provides a powerful tool for calculation of the dose and dose distributions which helps to predict and determine the doses from different shapes of various types of eye applicators more accurately. The aim of this work consisted in using the Monte Carlo GATE platform to calculate the 3D dose distribution on a mathematical model of the human eye according to international recommendations. Mathematical models were developed for four ophthalmic applicators, two HDR 90Sr applicators SIA.20 and SIA.6, and two LDR 106Ru applicators, a concave CCB model and a flat CCB model. In present work, considering a heterogeneous eye phantom and the chosen tumor, obtained results with the use of GATE for mean doses distributions in a phantom and according to international recommendations show a discrepancy with respect to those specified by the manufacturers. The QC of dosimetric parameters shows that contrarily to the other applicators, the SIA.20 applicator is consistent with recommendations. The GATE platform show that the SIA.20 applicator present better results, namely the dose delivered to critical structures were lower compared to those obtained for the other applicators, and the SIA.6 applicator, simulated with MCNPX generates higher lens doses than those generated by GATE.

  18. An interface for simulating radiative transfer in and around volcanic plumes with the Monte Carlo radiative transfer model McArtim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph

    2016-03-23

    This report describes two software tools that, when used as front ends for the three-dimensional backward Monte Carlo atmospheric-radiative-transfer model (RTM) McArtim, facilitate the generation of lookup tables of volcanic-plume optical-transmittance characteristics in the ultraviolet/visible-spectral region. In particular, the differential optical depth and derivatives thereof (that is, weighting functions), with regard to a change in SO2 column density or aerosol optical thickness, can be simulated for a specific measurement geometry and a representative range of plume conditions. These tables are required for the retrieval of SO2 column density in volcanic plumes, using the simulated radiative-transfer/differential optical-absorption spectroscopic (SRT-DOAS) approach outlined by Kern and others (2012). This report, together with the software tools published online, is intended to make this sophisticated SRT-DOAS technique available to volcanologists and gas geochemists in an operational environment, without the need for an indepth treatment of the underlying principles or the low-level interface of the RTM McArtim.

  19. Monte Carlo Simulations for the Detection of Buried Objects Using Single Sided Backscattered Radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Yip

    Full Text Available Detection of buried improvised explosive devices (IEDs is a delicate task, leading to a need to develop sensitive stand-off detection technology. The shape, composition and size of the IEDs can be expected to be revised over time in an effort to overcome increasingly sophisticated detection methods. As an example, for the most part, landmines are found through metal detection which has led to increasing use of non-ferrous materials such as wood or plastic containers for chemical based explosives being developed.Monte Carlo simulations have been undertaken considering three different commercially available detector materials (hyperpure-Ge (HPGe, lanthanum(III bromide (LaBr and thallium activated sodium iodide (NaI(Tl, applied at a stand-off distance of 50 cm from the surface and burial depths of 0, 5 and 10 cm, with sand as the obfuscating medium. Target materials representing medium density wood and mild steel have been considered. Each detector has been modelled as a 10 cm thick cylinder with a 20 cm diameter.It appears that HPGe represents the most promising detector for this application. Although it was not the highest density material studied, its excellent energy resolving capability leads to the highest quality spectra from which detection decisions can be inferred.The simulation work undertaken here suggests that a vehicle-born threat detection system could be envisaged using a single betatron and a series of detectors operating in parallel observing the space directly in front of the vehicle path. Furthermore, results show that non-ferrous materials such as wood can be effectively discerned in such remote-operated detection system, with the potential to apply a signature analysis template matching technique for real-time analysis of such data.

  20. Path-integral Monte Carlo simulations for electronic dynamics on molecular chains. II. Transport across impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlbacher, Lothar; Ankerhold, Joachim

    2005-05-01

    Electron transfer (ET) across molecular chains including an impurity is studied based on a recently improved real-time path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) approach [L. Mühlbacher, J. Ankerhold, and C. Escher, J. Chem. Phys. 121 12696 (2004)]. The reduced electronic dynamics is studied for various bridge lengths and defect site energies. By determining intersite hopping rates from PIMC simulations up to moderate times, the relaxation process in the extreme long-time limit is captured within a sequential transfer model. The total transfer rate is extracted and shown to be enhanced for certain defect site energies. Superexchange turns out to be relevant for extreme gap energies only and then gives rise to different dynamical signatures for high- and low-lying defects. Further, it is revealed that the entire bridge compound approaches a steady state on a much shorter time scale than that related to the total transfer. This allows for a simplified description of ET along donor-bridge-acceptor systems in the long-time range.

  1. Radiation-transport method to simulate noncontinuum gas flows for MEMS devices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Torczynski, John Robert

    2004-01-01

    A Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) typically consists of micron-scale parts that move through a gas at atmospheric or reduced pressure. In this situation, the gas-molecule mean free path is comparable to the geometric features of the microsystem, so the gas flow is noncontinuum. When mean-free-path effects cannot be neglected, the Boltzmann equation must be used to describe the gas flow. Solution of the Boltzmann equation is difficult even for the simplest case because of its sevenfold dimensionality (one temporal dimension, three spatial dimensions, and three velocity dimensions) and because of the integral nature of the collision term. The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is the method of choice to simulate high-speed noncontinuum flows. However, since DSMC uses computational molecules to represent the gas, the inherent statistical noise must be minimized by sampling large numbers of molecules. Since typical microsystem velocities are low (< 1 m/s) compared to molecular velocities ({approx}400 m/s), the number of molecular samples required to achieve 1% precision can exceed 1010 per cell. The Discrete Velocity Gas (DVG) method, an approach motivated by radiation transport, provides another way to simulate noncontinuum gas flows. Unlike DSMC, the DVG method restricts molecular velocities to have only certain discrete values. The transport of the number density of a velocity state is governed by a discrete Boltzmann equation that has one temporal dimension and three spatial dimensions and a polynomial collision term. Specification and implementation of DVG models are discussed, and DVG models are applied to Couette flow and to Fourier flow. While the DVG results for these benchmark problems are qualitatively correct, the errors in the shear stress and the heat flux can be order-unity even for DVG models with 88 velocity states. It is concluded that the DVG method, as described herein, is not sufficiently accurate to simulate the low-speed gas flows

  2. Deterministic methods in radiation transport. A compilation of papers presented February 4-5, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, A. F.; Roussin, R. W. [eds.

    1992-06-01

    The Seminar on Deterministic Methods in Radiation Transport was held February 4--5, 1992, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Eleven presentations were made and the full papers are published in this report, along with three that were submitted but not given orally. These papers represent a good overview of the state of the art in the deterministic solution of radiation transport problems for a variety of applications of current interest to the Radiation Shielding Information Center user community.

  3. Deterministic methods in radiation transport. A compilation of papers presented February 4--5, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, A.F.; Roussin, R.W. [eds.

    1992-06-01

    The Seminar on Deterministic Methods in Radiation Transport was held February 4--5, 1992, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Eleven presentations were made and the full papers are published in this report, along with three that were submitted but not given orally. These papers represent a good overview of the state of the art in the deterministic solution of radiation transport problems for a variety of applications of current interest to the Radiation Shielding Information Center user community.

  4. ARCHER, a New Monte Carlo Software Tool for Emerging Heterogeneous Computing Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X. George; Liu, Tianyu; Su, Lin; Du, Xining; Riblett, Matthew; Ji, Wei; Gu, Deyang; Carothers, Christopher D.; Shephard, Mark S.; Brown, Forrest B.; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Liu, Bob

    2014-06-01

    The Monte Carlo radiation transport community faces a number of challenges associated with peta- and exa-scale computing systems that rely increasingly on heterogeneous architectures involving hardware accelerators such as GPUs. Existing Monte Carlo codes and methods must be strategically upgraded to meet emerging hardware and software needs. In this paper, we describe the development of a software, called ARCHER (Accelerated Radiation-transport Computations in Heterogeneous EnviRonments), which is designed as a versatile testbed for future Monte Carlo codes. Preliminary results from five projects in nuclear engineering and medical physics are presented.

  5. OBJECT KINETIC MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS OF RADIATION DAMAGE IN BULK TUNGSTEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandipati, Giridhar; Setyawan, Wahyu; Heinisch, Howard L.; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-09-22

    We used our recently developed lattice based OKMC code; KSOME [1] to carryout simulations of radiation damage in bulk W. We study the effect of dimensionality of self interstitial atom (SIA) diffusion i.e. 1D versus 3D on the defect accumulation during irradiation with a primary knock-on atom (PKA) energy of 100 keV at 300 K for the dose rates of 10-5 and 10-6 dpa/s. As expected 3D SIA diffusion significantly reduces damage accumulation due to increased probability of recombination events. In addition, dose rate, over the limited range examined here, appears to have no effect in both cases of SIA diffusion.

  6. An OpenCL-based Monte Carlo dose calculation engine (oclMC) for coupled photon-electron transport

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Zhen; Folkerts, Michael; Qin, Nan; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method has been recognized the most accurate dose calculation method for radiotherapy. However, its extremely long computation time impedes clinical applications. Recently, a lot of efforts have been made to realize fast MC dose calculation on GPUs. Nonetheless, most of the GPU-based MC dose engines were developed in NVidia CUDA environment. This limits the code portability to other platforms, hindering the introduction of GPU-based MC simulations to clinical practice. The objective of this paper is to develop a fast cross-platform MC dose engine oclMC using OpenCL environment for external beam photon and electron radiotherapy in MeV energy range. Coupled photon-electron MC simulation was implemented with analogue simulations for photon transports and a Class II condensed history scheme for electron transports. To test the accuracy and efficiency of our dose engine oclMC, we compared dose calculation results of oclMC and gDPM, our previously developed GPU-based MC code, for a 15 MeV electron ...

  7. SHIELD-HIT12A - a Monte Carlo particle transport program for ion therapy research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, David Christoffer; Lühr, Armin;

    2014-01-01

    -HIT to a heavy ion dose optimization algorithm to provide MC-optimized treatment plans that include radiobiology. Methods: SHIELD-HIT12A is written in FORTRAN and carefully retains platform independence. A powerful scoring engine is implemented scoring relevant quantities such as dose and track-average LET....... We experienced that new users quickly learn to use SHIELD-HIT12A and setup new geometries. Contrary to previous versions of SHIELD-HIT, the 12A distribution comes along with easy-to-use example files and an English manual. A new implementation of Vavilov straggling resulted in a massive reduction...... of computation time. Scheduled for later release are CT import and photon-electron transport. Conclusions: SHIELD-HIT12A is an interesting alternative ion transport engine. Apart from being a flexible particle therapy research tool, it can also serve as a back end for a MC ion treatment planning system. More...

  8. Three-dimensional simulation of the Ring effect in observations of scattered sun light using Monte Carlo radiative transfer models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Deutschmann

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a new technique for the quantitative simulation of the "Ring effect" for scattered light observations from various platforms and under different atmospheric situations. The method is based on radiative transfer calculations at only one wavelength λ0 in the wavelength range under consideration, and is thus computationally fast. The strength of the Ring effect is calculated from statistical properties of the photon paths for a given situation, which makes Monte Carlo radiative transfer models in particular appropriate. We quantify the Ring effect by the so called rotational Raman scattering probability, the probability that an observed photon has undergone a rotational Raman scattering event. The Raman scattering probability is independent from the spectral resolution of the instrument and can easily be converted into various definitions used to characterise the strength of the Ring effect. We compare the results of our method to the results of previous studies and in general good quantitative agreement is found. In addition to the simulation of the Ring effect, we developed a detailed retrieval strategy for the analysis of the Ring effect based on DOAS retrievals, which allows the precise determination of the strength of the Ring effect for a specific wavelength while using the spectral information within a larger spectral interval around the selected wavelength. Using our technique, we simulated synthetic satellite observation of an atmospheric scenario with a finite cloud illuminated from different sun positions. The strength of the Ring effect depends systematically on the measurement geometry, and is strongest if the satellite points to the side of the cloud which lies in the shadow of the sun.

  9. Radiative Transfer Modeling of a Large Pool Fire by Discrete Ordinates, Discrete Transfer, Ray Tracing, Monte Carlo and Moment Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, K. A.; Ripoll, J.-F.; Wray, A. A.; Joseph, D.; ElHafi, M.

    2004-01-01

    Five computational methods for solution of the radiative transfer equation in an absorbing-emitting and non-scattering gray medium were compared on a 2 m JP-8 pool fire. The temperature and absorption coefficient fields were taken from a synthetic fire due to the lack of a complete set of experimental data for fires of this size. These quantities were generated by a code that has been shown to agree well with the limited quantity of relevant data in the literature. Reference solutions to the governing equation were determined using the Monte Carlo method and a ray tracing scheme with high angular resolution. Solutions using the discrete transfer method, the discrete ordinate method (DOM) with both S(sub 4) and LC(sub 11) quadratures, and moment model using the M(sub 1) closure were compared to the reference solutions in both isotropic and anisotropic regions of the computational domain. DOM LC(sub 11) is shown to be the more accurate than the commonly used S(sub 4) quadrature technique, especially in anisotropic regions of the fire domain. This represents the first study where the M(sub 1) method was applied to a combustion problem occurring in a complex three-dimensional geometry. The M(sub 1) results agree well with other solution techniques, which is encouraging for future applications to similar problems since it is computationally the least expensive solution technique. Moreover, M(sub 1) results are comparable to DOM S(sub 4).

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of the Cherenkov radiation emitted by TeO{sub 2} crystal when crossed by cosmic muons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casali, N., E-mail: nicola.casali@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, Università degli studi dell' Aquila, Coppito (AQ) (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (AQ) (Italy); Bellini, F. [Sapienza Università di roma, P.le A. Moro 2, Roma (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma, P.le A. Moro 2, Roma (Italy); Dafinei, I. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma, P.le A. Moro 2, Roma (Italy); Marafini, M. [Museo Storico della Fisisca e Centro Studi e Ricerche “Enrico Fermi“, Piazza del Viminale 1, Roma (Italy); Morganti, S.; Orio, F.; Pinci, D.; Vignati, M.; Voena, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma, P.le A. Moro 2, Roma (Italy)

    2013-12-21

    TeO{sub 2} crystals are currently used as bolometric detectors in experiments searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 130}Te. The extreme rarity of the studied signal forces the experiments to reach an ultra low background level. The main background source is represented by α particles emitted by radioactive contaminants placed in the materials that compose and surround the detector. Recent measurements show that a particle discrimination in TeO{sub 2} bolometers detecting the light emitted by β/γ particles is possible, opening the possibility to make large improvements in the performance of experiments based on this kind of materials. In order to understand the nature of this light emission a measurement at room temperature with TeO{sub 2} crystals was performed. According to these results, the detected light was compatible with the Cherenkov emission, even though the scintillation hypothesis could not be discarded. In this work a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of the Cherenkov radiation emitted by TeO{sub 2} crystal when crossed by cosmic muons was performed. The data from MC and the room temperature measurement are perfectly compatible and prove that the Cherenkov light is the only component of the light yield of TeO{sub 2} crystals.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transfer in human skin with geometrically correct treatment of boundaries between different tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premru, Jan; Milanič, Matija; Majaron, Boris

    2013-02-01

    In customary implementation of three-dimensional (3D) Monte Carlo (MC) numerical model of light transport in heterogeneous biological structures, the volume of interest is divided into voxels by a rectangular spatial grid. Each voxel is assumed to have homogeneous optical properties and curved boundaries between neighboring tissues inevitably become serrated. This raises some concerns over realism of the modeling results, especially with regard to reflection and refraction on such boundaries. In order to investigate the above concern, we have implemented an augmented 3D MC code, where tissue boundaries (e.g., blood vessel walls) are defined by analytical functions and thus maintain their shape regardless of grid discretization. Results of the customary and augmented model are compared for a few characteristic test geometries, mimicking a cutaneous blood vessel irradiated with a 532 nm laser beam of finite diameter. Our analysis shows that at specific locations inside the vessel, the amount of deposited laser energy can vary between the two models by up to 10%. Even physically relevant integral quantities, such as linear density of the energy absorbed by the vessel, can differ by as much as 30%. Moreover, the values obtained with the customary model vary strongly with discretization step and don't disappear with ever finer discretization. Meanwhile, our augmented model shows no such behavior, indicating that the customary approach suffers from inherent inaccuracies arising from physically flawed treatment of tissue boundaries.

  12. Web-based, GPU-accelerated, Monte Carlo simulation and visualization of indirect radiation imaging detector performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Han; Sharma, Diksha; Badano, Aldo, E-mail: aldo.badano@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Imaging, Diagnostics, and Software Reliability, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo simulations play a vital role in the understanding of the fundamental limitations, design, and optimization of existing and emerging medical imaging systems. Efforts in this area have resulted in the development of a wide variety of open-source software packages. One such package, hybridMANTIS, uses a novel hybrid concept to model indirect scintillator detectors by balancing the computational load using dual CPU and graphics processing unit (GPU) processors, obtaining computational efficiency with reasonable accuracy. In this work, the authors describe two open-source visualization interfaces, webMANTIS and visualMANTIS to facilitate the setup of computational experiments via hybridMANTIS. Methods: The visualization tools visualMANTIS and webMANTIS enable the user to control simulation properties through a user interface. In the case of webMANTIS, control via a web browser allows access through mobile devices such as smartphones or tablets. webMANTIS acts as a server back-end and communicates with an NVIDIA GPU computing cluster that can support multiuser environments where users can execute different experiments in parallel. Results: The output consists of point response and pulse-height spectrum, and optical transport statistics generated by hybridMANTIS. The users can download the output images and statistics through a zip file for future reference. In addition, webMANTIS provides a visualization window that displays a few selected optical photon path as they get transported through the detector columns and allows the user to trace the history of the optical photons. Conclusions: The visualization tools visualMANTIS and webMANTIS provide features such as on the fly generation of pulse-height spectra and response functions for microcolumnar x-ray imagers while allowing users to save simulation parameters and results from prior experiments. The graphical interfaces simplify the simulation setup and allow the user to go directly from specifying

  13. Tripoli-3: monte Carlo transport code for neutral particles - version 3.5 - users manual; Tripoli-3: code de transport des particules neutres par la methode de monte carlo - version 3.5 - manuel d'utilisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vergnaud, Th.; Nimal, J.C.; Chiron, M

    2001-07-01

    The TRIPOLI-3 code applies the Monte Carlo method to neutron, gamma-ray and coupled neutron and gamma-ray transport calculations in three-dimensional geometries, either in steady-state conditions or having a time dependence. It can be used to study problems where there is a high flux attenuation between the source zone and the result zone (studies of shielding configurations or source driven sub-critical systems, with fission being taken into account), as well as problems where there is a low flux attenuation (neutronic calculations -- in a fuel lattice cell, for example -- where fission is taken into account, usually with the calculation on the effective multiplication factor, fine structure studies, numerical experiments to investigate methods approximations, etc). TRIPOLI-3 has been operational since 1995 and is the version of the TRIPOLI code that follows on from TRIPOLI-2; it can be used on SUN, RISC600 and HP workstations and on PC using the Linux or Windows/NT operating systems. The code uses nuclear data libraries generated using the THEMIS/NJOY system. The current libraries were derived from ENDF/B6 and JEF2. There is also a response function library based on a number of evaluations, notably the dosimetry libraries IRDF/85, IRDF/90 and also evaluations from JEF2. The treatment of particle transport is the same in version 3.5 as in version 3.4 of the TRIPOLI code; but the version 3.5 is more convenient for preparing the input data and for reading the output. The french version of the user's manual exists. (authors)

  14. Estimation of tumour dose enhancement due to gold nanoparticles during typical radiation treatments: a preliminary Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, S H [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Unit 94, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2005-08-07

    A recent mice study demonstrated that gold nanoparticles could be safely administered and used to enhance the tumour dose during radiation therapy. The use of gold nanoparticles seems more promising than earlier methods because of the high atomic number of gold and because nanoparticles can more easily penetrate the tumour vasculature. However, to date, possible dose enhancement due to the use of gold nanoparticles has not been well quantified, especially for common radiation treatment situations. Therefore, the current preliminary study estimated this dose enhancement by Monte Carlo calculations for several phantom test cases representing radiation treatments with the following modalities: 140 kVp x-rays, 4 and 6 MV photon beams, and {sup 192}Ir gamma rays. The current study considered three levels of gold concentration within the tumour, two of which are based on the aforementioned mice study, and assumed either no gold or a single gold concentration level outside the tumour. The dose enhancement over the tumour volume considered for the 140 kVp x-ray case can be at least a factor of 2 at an achievable gold concentration of 7 mg Au/g tumour assuming no gold outside the tumour. The tumour dose enhancement for the cases involving the 4 and 6 MV photon beams based on the same assumption ranged from about 1% to 7%, depending on the amount of gold within the tumour and photon beam qualities. For the {sup 192}Ir cases, the dose enhancement within the tumour region ranged from 5% to 31%, depending on radial distance and gold concentration level within the tumour. For the 7 mg Au/g tumour cases, the loading of gold into surrounding normal tissue at 2 mg Au/g resulted in an increase in the normal tissue dose, up to 30%, negligible, and about 2% for the 140 kVp x-rays, 6 MV photon beam, and {sup 192}Ir gamma rays, respectively, while the magnitude of dose enhancement within the tumour was essentially unchanged. (note)

  15. Estimation of tumour dose enhancement due to gold nanoparticles during typical radiation treatments: a preliminary Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sang Hyun

    2005-08-07

    A recent mice study demonstrated that gold nanoparticles could be safely administered and used to enhance the tumour dose during radiation therapy. The use of gold nanoparticles seems more promising than earlier methods because of the high atomic number of gold and because nanoparticles can more easily penetrate the tumour vasculature. However, to date, possible dose enhancement due to the use of gold nanoparticles has not been well quantified, especially for common radiation treatment situations. Therefore, the current preliminary study estimated this dose enhancement by Monte Carlo calculations for several phantom test cases representing radiation treatments with the following modalities: 140 kVp x-rays, 4 and 6 MV photon beams, and 192Ir gamma rays. The current study considered three levels of gold concentration within the tumour, two of which are based on the aforementioned mice study, and assumed either no gold or a single gold concentration level outside the tumour. The dose enhancement over the tumour volume considered for the 140 kVp x-ray case can be at least a factor of 2 at an achievable gold concentration of 7 mg Au/g tumour assuming no gold outside the tumour. The tumour dose enhancement for the cases involving the 4 and 6 MV photon beams based on the same assumption ranged from about 1% to 7%, depending on the amount of gold within the tumour and photon beam qualities. For the 192Ir cases, the dose enhancement within the tumour region ranged from 5% to 31%, depending on radial distance and gold concentration level within the tumour. For the 7 mg Au/g tumour cases, the loading of gold into surrounding normal tissue at 2 mg Au/g resulted in an increase in the normal tissue dose, up to 30%, negligible, and about 2% for the 140 kVp x-rays, 6 MV photon beam, and 192Ir gamma rays, respectively, while the magnitude of dose enhancement within the tumour was essentially unchanged.

  16. Assessment of ocular beta radiation dose distribution due to 106Ru/106Rh brachytherapy applicators using MCNPX Monte Carlo code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilseia Aparecida Barbosa

    2014-08-01

    heterogeneous eye model, indicating that the homogeneous water eye model is a reasonable one. The determined isodose curves give a good visualization of dose distributions inside the eye structures, pointing out their most exposed volume....................................................Cite this article as:Barbosa NA, da Rosa LAR, de Menezes AF, Reis JP, Facure A, Braz D. Assessment of ocular beta radiation dose distribution due to 106Ru/106Rh brachytherapy applicators using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(3:02038. DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0203.8

  17. A general semi-analytic method to simulate discrete bremsstrahlung at very low radiated photon energies by the Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangiarotti, A. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, Coimbra (Portugal); Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Sona, P., E-mail: pietro.sona@fi.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Polo Scientifico, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze, Polo Scientifico, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Ballestrero, S. [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg (South Africa); PH/ADT, CERN, CH-1211, Geneve (Switzerland); Uggerhoj, U.I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2011-09-15

    A computer code for Monte-Carlo simulations in the framework of the GEANT 3 toolkit has been implemented for the description of the discrete bremsstrahlung radiation from high energy electrons crossing thick (semi-infinite) targets. The code is based on the Migdal theory which includes the LPM and dielectric suppression. Validation of the code has been performed by a comparison with the data from the SLAC E-146 experiment. The agreement between simulations and experimental data is generally very good.

  18. Radiation exposures of workers and the public associated with the transport of radioactive material in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, G.; Fett, H.J.; Lange, F. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Cologne (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Most radioactive material packages transported emit penetrating ionising radiation and radiation exposures of transport workers and the public may occur during their transport. The radiation exposures incurred by transport workers and members of the public can vary significantly depending on a number of factors: most important is the type of radiation emitted (primarily gamma and neutron radiation), the radiation field intensity in the surrounding of a package and conveyance and the duration of exposure to ionising radiation. The information and guidance material on occupational exposures has primarily been derived from a survey and analysis of personal monitoring data provided by a number of commercial transport operators in Germany known as major carrier and handler organisations of fuel cycle and non-fuel cycle material (in terms of the number of pack-ages and the activity carriaged). To some extent advantage was taken of compilations of statistical transport and exposure data collated within other transport safety analysis studies including research projects funded by the European Commission. The exposure data collected cover the time period of the last 4 - 8 years and are most representative for routine transport operations closely related to the movement phase of packaged radioactive material, i.e. receipt, vehicle loading, carriage, in-transit storage, intra-/intermodal transfer, vehicle unloading and delivery at the final destination of loads of radioactive material and packages and the related supervisory and health physics functions. Radiation dose monitoring of members of the public, however, is generally impracticable and, consequently, the information available relies on employing dose assessment models and reflects radiation exposures incurred by hypothetical or critical group individuals of members of the public under normal conditions of transport.

  19. A graphics-card implementation of Monte-Carlo simulations for cosmic-ray transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tautz, R. C.

    2016-05-01

    A graphics card implementation of a test-particle simulation code is presented that is based on the CUDA extension of the C/C++ programming language. The original CPU version has been developed for the calculation of cosmic-ray diffusion coefficients in artificial Kolmogorov-type turbulence. In the new implementation, the magnetic turbulence generation, which is the most time-consuming part, is separated from the particle transport and is performed on a graphics card. In this article, the modification of the basic approach of integrating test particle trajectories to employ the SIMD (single instruction, multiple data) model is presented and verified. The efficiency of the new code is tested and several language-specific accelerating factors are discussed. For the example of isotropic magnetostatic turbulence, sample results are shown and a comparison to the results of the CPU implementation is performed.

  20. Kinetic Monte Carlo of transport processes in Al/AlOx/Au-layers: Impact of defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Benedikt; Haeberle, Tobias; Gagliardi, Alessio; Lugli, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Ultrathin films of alumina were investigated by a compact kMC-model. Experimental jV-curves from Al/AlOx/Au-junctions with plasma- and thermal-grown AlOx were fitted by simulated ones. We found dominant defects at 2.3-2.5 eV below CBM for AlOx with an effective mass mox ∗= 0.35 m0 and a barrier EB ,A l /A l O x≈2.8 eV in agreement with literature. The parameterization is extended to varying defect levels, defect densities, injection barriers, effective masses and the thickness of AlOx. Thus, dominant charge transport processes and implications on the relevance of defects are derived and AlOx parameters are specified which are detrimental for the operation of devices.

  1. Kinetic Monte Carlo of transport processes in Al/AlOx/Au-layers: Impact of defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Weiler

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultrathin films of alumina were investigated by a compact kMC-model. Experimental jV-curves from Al/AlOx/Au-junctions with plasma- and thermal-grown AlOx were fitted by simulated ones. We found dominant defects at 2.3-2.5 eV below CBM for AlOx with an effective mass mox∗=0.35 m0 and a barrier EB,Al/AlOx≈2.8 eV in agreement with literature. The parameterization is extended to varying defect levels, defect densities, injection barriers, effective masses and the thickness of AlOx. Thus, dominant charge transport processes and implications on the relevance of defects are derived and AlOx parameters are specified which are detrimental for the operation of devices.

  2. Elucidating the electron transport in semiconductors via Monte Carlo simulations: an inquiry-driven learning path for engineering undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persano Adorno, Dominique; Pizzolato, Nicola; Fazio, Claudio

    2015-09-01

    Within the context of higher education for science or engineering undergraduates, we present an inquiry-driven learning path aimed at developing a more meaningful conceptual understanding of the electron dynamics in semiconductors in the presence of applied electric fields. The electron transport in a nondegenerate n-type indium phosphide bulk semiconductor is modelled using a multivalley Monte Carlo approach. The main characteristics of the electron dynamics are explored under different values of the driving electric field, lattice temperature and impurity density. Simulation results are presented by following a question-driven path of exploration, starting from the validation of the model and moving up to reasoned inquiries about the observed characteristics of electron dynamics. Our inquiry-driven learning path, based on numerical simulations, represents a viable example of how to integrate a traditional lecture-based teaching approach with effective learning strategies, providing science or engineering undergraduates with practical opportunities to enhance their comprehension of the physics governing the electron dynamics in semiconductors. Finally, we present a general discussion about the advantages and disadvantages of using an inquiry-based teaching approach within a learning environment based on semiconductor simulations.

  3. Feasibility assessment of the interactive use of a Monte Carlo algorithm in treatment planning for intraoperative electron radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Pedro; Udías, José M.; Herranz, Elena; Santos-Miranda, Juan Antonio; Herraiz, Joaquín L.; Valdivieso, Manlio F.; Rodríguez, Raúl; Calama, Juan A.; Pascau, Javier; Calvo, Felipe A.; Illana, Carlos; Ledesma-Carbayo, María J.; Santos, Andrés

    2014-12-01

    This work analysed the feasibility of using a fast, customized Monte Carlo (MC) method to perform accurate computation of dose distributions during pre- and intraplanning of intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) procedures. The MC method that was implemented, which has been integrated into a specific innovative simulation and planning tool, is able to simulate the fate of thousands of particles per second, and it was the aim of this work to determine the level of interactivity that could be achieved. The planning workflow enabled calibration of the imaging and treatment equipment, as well as manipulation of the surgical frame and insertion of the protection shields around the organs at risk and other beam modifiers. In this way, the multidisciplinary team involved in IOERT has all the tools necessary to perform complex MC dosage simulations adapted to their equipment in an efficient and transparent way. To assess the accuracy and reliability of this MC technique, dose distributions for a monoenergetic source were compared with those obtained using a general-purpose software package used widely in medical physics applications. Once accuracy of the underlying simulator was confirmed, a clinical accelerator was modelled and experimental measurements in water were conducted. A comparison was made with the output from the simulator to identify the conditions under which accurate dose estimations could be obtained in less than 3 min, which is the threshold imposed to allow for interactive use of the tool in treatment planning. Finally, a clinically relevant scenario, namely early-stage breast cancer treatment, was simulated with pre- and intraoperative volumes to verify that it was feasible to use the MC tool intraoperatively and to adjust dose delivery based on the simulation output, without compromising accuracy. The workflow provided a satisfactory model of the treatment head and the imaging system, enabling proper configuration of the treatment planning

  4. Feasibility assessment of the interactive use of a Monte Carlo algorithm in treatment planning for intraoperative electron radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Pedro; Udías, José M; Herranz, Elena; Santos-Miranda, Juan Antonio; Herraiz, Joaquín L; Valdivieso, Manlio F; Rodríguez, Raúl; Calama, Juan A; Pascau, Javier; Calvo, Felipe A; Illana, Carlos; Ledesma-Carbayo, María J; Santos, Andrés

    2014-12-01

    This work analysed the feasibility of using a fast, customized Monte Carlo (MC) method to perform accurate computation of dose distributions during pre- and intraplanning of intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) procedures. The MC method that was implemented, which has been integrated into a specific innovative simulation and planning tool, is able to simulate the fate of thousands of particles per second, and it was the aim of this work to determine the level of interactivity that could be achieved. The planning workflow enabled calibration of the imaging and treatment equipment, as well as manipulation of the surgical frame and insertion of the protection shields around the organs at risk and other beam modifiers. In this way, the multidisciplinary team involved in IOERT has all the tools necessary to perform complex MC dosage simulations adapted to their equipment in an efficient and transparent way. To assess the accuracy and reliability of this MC technique, dose distributions for a monoenergetic source were compared with those obtained using a general-purpose software package used widely in medical physics applications. Once accuracy of the underlying simulator was confirmed, a clinical accelerator was modelled and experimental measurements in water were conducted. A comparison was made with the output from the simulator to identify the conditions under which accurate dose estimations could be obtained in less than 3 min, which is the threshold imposed to allow for interactive use of the tool in treatment planning. Finally, a clinically relevant scenario, namely early-stage breast cancer treatment, was simulated with pre- and intraoperative volumes to verify that it was feasible to use the MC tool intraoperatively and to adjust dose delivery based on the simulation output, without compromising accuracy. The workflow provided a satisfactory model of the treatment head and the imaging system, enabling proper configuration of the treatment planning

  5. User manual for version 4.3 of the Tripoli-4 Monte-Carlo method particle transport computer code; Notice d'utilisation du code Tripoli-4, version 4.3: code de transport de particules par la methode de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Both, J.P.; Mazzolo, A.; Peneliau, Y.; Petit, O.; Roesslinger, B

    2003-07-01

    This manual relates to Version 4.3 TRIPOLI-4 code. TRIPOLI-4 is a computer code simulating the transport of neutrons, photons, electrons and positrons. It can be used for radiation shielding calculations (long-distance propagation with flux attenuation in non-multiplying media) and neutronic calculations (fissile medium, criticality or sub-criticality basis). This makes it possible to calculate k{sub eff} (for criticality), flux, currents, reaction rates and multi-group cross-sections. TRIPOLI-4 is a three-dimensional code that uses the Monte-Carlo method. It allows for point-wise description in terms of energy of cross-sections and multi-group homogenized cross-sections and features two modes of geometrical representation: surface and combinatorial. The code uses cross-section libraries in ENDF/B format (such as JEF2-2, ENDF/B-VI and JENDL) for point-wise description cross-sections in APOTRIM format (from the APOLLO2 code) or a format specific to TRIPOLI-4 for multi-group description. (authors)

  6. SU-E-T-559: Monte Carlo Simulation of Cobalt-60 Teletherapy Unit Modeling In-Field and Out-Of-Field Doses for Applications in Computational Radiation Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petroccia, H; Bolch, W [J. Crayton Pruitt Family of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Li, Z; Mendenhall, N [Radiation Oncology, UF Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Mean organ doses from structures located in field and outside of field boundaries during radiotherapy treatment must be considered when looking at secondary effects. Treatment planning in patients with 40 years of follow-up does not include 3-D treatment planning images and did not estimate dose to structures out of the direct field. Therefore, it is of interest to correlate actual clinical events with doses received. Methods: Accurate models of radiotherapy machines combined with whole body computational phantoms using Monte Carlo methods allow for dose reconstructions intended for studies on late radiation effects. The Theratron-780 radiotherapy unit and anatomically realistic hybrid computational phantoms are modeled in the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX. The major components of the machine including the source capsule, lead in the unit-head, collimators (fixed/adjustable), and trimmer bars are simulated. The MCNPX transport code is used to compare calculated values in a water phantom with published data from BJR suppl. 25 for in-field doses and experimental data from AAPM Task Group No. 36 for out-of-field doses. Next, the validated cobalt-60 teletherapy model is combined with the UF/NCI Family of Reference Hybrid Computational Phantoms as a methodology for estimating organ doses. Results: The model of Theratron-780 has shown to be agree with percentage depth dose data within approximately 1% and for out of field doses the machine is shown to agree within 8.8%. Organ doses are reported for reference hybrid phantoms. Conclusion: Combining the UF/NCI Family of Reference Hybrid Computational Phantoms along with a validated model of the Theratron-780 allows for organ dose estimates of both in-field and out-of-field organs. By changing field size, position, and adding patient-specific blocking more complicated treatment set-ups can be recreated for patients treated historically, particularly those who lack both 2D/3D image sets.

  7. Local dose enhancement in radiation therapy: Monte Carlo simulation study; Reforco local de dose em radioterapia utilizando nanoparticulas: estudo por simulacao Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Laura E. da; Nicolucci, Patricia, E-mail: laura.emilia.fm@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras

    2014-04-15

    The development of nanotechnology has boosted the use of nanoparticles in radiation therapy in order to achieve greater therapeutic ratio between tumor and healthy tissues. Gold has been shown to be most suitable to this task due to the high biocompatibility and high atomic number, which contributes to a better in vivo distribution and for the local energy deposition. As a result, this study proposes to study, nanoparticle in the tumor cell. At a range of 11 nm from the nanoparticle surface, results have shown an absorbed dose 141 times higher for the medium with the gold nanoparticle compared to the water for an incident energy spectrum with maximum photon energy of 50 keV. It was also noted that when only scattered radiation is interacting with the gold nanoparticles, the dose was 134 times higher compared to enhanced local dose that remained significant even for scattered radiation. (author)

  8. Using the FLUKA Monte Carlo Code to Simulate the Interactions of Ionizing Radiation with Matter to Assist and Aid Our Understanding of Ground Based Accelerator Testing, Space Hardware Design, and Secondary Space Radiation Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddell, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    Designing hardware to operate in the space radiation environment is a very difficult and costly activity. Ground based particle accelerators can be used to test for exposure to the radiation environment, one species at a time, however, the actual space environment cannot be duplicated because of the range of energies and isotropic nature of space radiation. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code is an integrated physics package based at CERN that has been under development for the last 40+ years and includes the most up-to-date fundamental physics theory and particle physics data. This work presents an overview of FLUKA and how it has been used in conjunction with ground based radiation testing for NASA and improve our understanding of secondary particle environments resulting from the interaction of space radiation with matter.

  9. Monte Carlo implementation of Schiff's approximation for estimating radiative properties of homogeneous, simple-shaped and optically soft particles: Application to photosynthetic micro-organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, Julien; Blanco, Stéphane; Cornet, Jean-François; Dauchet, Jérémi; El Hafi, Mouna; Fournier, Richard; Abboud, Mira Kaissar; Weitz, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    In the present paper, Schiff's approximation is applied to the study of light scattering by large and optically-soft axisymmetric particles, with special attention to cylindrical and spheroidal photosynthetic micro-organisms. This approximation is similar to the anomalous diffraction approximation but includes a description of phase functions. Resulting formulations for the radiative properties are multidimensional integrals, the numerical resolution of which requires close attention. It is here argued that strong benefits can be expected from a statistical resolution by the Monte Carlo method. But designing such efficient Monte Carlo algorithms requires the development of non-standard algorithmic tricks using careful mathematical analysis of the integral formulations: the codes that we develop (and make available) include an original treatment of the nonlinearity in the differential scattering cross-section (squared modulus of the scattering amplitude) thanks to a double sampling procedure. This approach makes it possible to take advantage of recent methodological advances in the field of Monte Carlo methods, illustrated here by the estimation of sensitivities to parameters. Comparison with reference solutions provided by the T-Matrix method is presented whenever possible. Required geometric calculations are closely similar to those used in standard Monte Carlo codes for geometric optics by the computer-graphics community, i.e. calculation of intersections between rays and surfaces, which opens interesting perspectives for the treatment of particles with complex shapes.

  10. A general hybrid radiation transport scheme for star formation simulations on an adaptive grid

    CERN Document Server

    Klassen, Mikhail; Pudritz, Ralph E; Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi; Buntemeyer, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Radiation feedback plays a crucial role in the process of star formation. In order to simulate the thermodynamic evolution of disks, filaments, and the molecular gas surrounding clusters of young stars, we require an efficient and accurate method for solving the radiation transfer problem. We describe the implementation of a hybrid radiation transport scheme in the adaptive grid-based FLASH general magnetohydrodynamics code. The hybrid scheme splits the radiative transport problem into a raytracing step and a diffusion step. The raytracer captures the first absorption event, as stars irradiate their environments, while the evolution of the diffuse component of the radiation field is handled by a flux-limited diffusion (FLD) solver. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method through a variety of benchmark tests including the irradiation of a static disk, subcritical and supercritical radiative shocks, and thermal energy equilibration. We also demonstrate the capability of our method for casting shadows and calc...

  11. Radiation dose considerations by intra-individual Monte Carlo simulations in dual source spiral coronary computed tomography angiography with electrocardiogram-triggered tube current modulation and adaptive pitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Matthias S.; Kuettner, Axel; Lell, Michael M.; Wuest, Wolfgang; Scharf, Michael; Uder, Michael [University of Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Deak, Paul; Kalender, Willi A. [University of Erlangen, Department of Medical Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Keller, Andrea K.; Haeberle, Lothar [University of Erlangen, Department of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, Erlangen (Germany); Achenbach, Stephan; Seltmann, Martin [University of Erlangen, Department of Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate radiation dose levels in patients undergoing spiral coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) on a dual-source system in clinical routine. Coronary CTA was performed for 56 patients with electrocardiogram-triggered tube current modulation (TCM) and heart-rate (HR) dependent pitch adaptation. Individual Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed for dose assessment. Retrospective simulations with constant tube current (CTC) served as reference. Lung tissue was segmented and used for organ and effective dose (ED) calculation. Estimates for mean relative ED was 7.1 {+-} 2.1 mSv/100 mAs for TCM and 12.5 {+-} 5.3 mSv/100 mAs for CTC (P < 0.001). Relative dose reduction at low HR ({<=}60 bpm) was highest (49 {+-} 5%) compared to intermediate (60-70 bpm, 33 {+-} 12%) and high HR (>70 bpm, 29 {+-} 12%). However lowest ED is achieved at high HR (5.2 {+-} 1.5 mSv/100 mAs), compared with intermediate (6.7 {+-} 1.6 mSv/100 mAs) and low (8.3 {+-} 2.1 mSv/100 mAs) HR when automated pitch adaptation is applied. Radiation dose savings up to 52% are achievable by TCM at low and regular HR. However lowest ED is attained at high HR by pitch adaptation despite inferior radiation dose reduction by TCM. circle Monte Carlo simulations allow for individual radiation dose calculations. (orig.)

  12. Aerosol properties and radiative forcing for three air masses transported in Summer 2011 to Sopot, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozwadowska, Anna; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Makuch, P.; Markowicz, K. M.; Petelski, T.; Strzałkowska, A.; Zieliński, T.

    2013-05-01

    Properties of atmospheric aerosols and solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface were measured during Summer 2011 in Sopot, Poland. Three cloudless days, characterized by different directions of incoming air-flows, which are typical transport pathways to Sopot, were used to estimate a radiative forcing due to aerosols present in each air mass.

  13. Monte Carlo simulations of scattered radiation fields in interventional radiology; Simulacion Monte Carlo de campos de radiacion dispersa en radiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duch, M. A.; Zaragoza, F. J.; Sempau, J.; Ginjaume, M.; Vano, E.; Sanchez, R.; Fernandez, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    The study shows that the MC simulation is a useful tool to facilitate the assessment of the spatial distribution of the dose due to the radiation scattered in interventional radiology procedures, as well as to determine the influence of various operational parameters in the same , avoiding experimental measures that require much time of use the Cath Labs. (Author)

  14. Evaluation of the response of a neutron detector of the Long-Counter type using a Monte Carlo transport simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazianotto, Mauricio Tizziani; Goncalez, Odair Lelis; Federico, Claudio Antonio [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (IEAv/CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Estudos Avancados; Carlson, Brett Vern [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (ITA/CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. Tecnologico de Aeronautica

    2010-07-01

    Full text: The Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv) is developing activities to study the dose levels of ionizing radiation from cosmic rays (CR) received by aircraft crews, sensitive equipment (on-board computers, for example) and embedded electronics in Brazilian airspace. Neutrons generated by the interaction of CR with the atmosphere are the dominant particles in the dose accumulation in electronic circuits and aircraft crews at flight altitude. Their production has a very broad energy spectrum, ranging from thermal neutrons (0.025eV ) to neutrons of several hundreds of MeV , making their detection a very difficult process. To observe the temporal variation in flow during the measurements, a detector of the Long Counter (LC) type is being used. This detector is designed to measure the one-way flow of neutrons with constant response over a wide energy range (thermal to 20 MeV ). However, to measure cosmic rays, the flow of which is non-directional, the dependence of the response on the angle of incidence, as well as energy, should be properly investigated. The objective of this study is to assess the angular response of the neutron detector (Long Counter) using the code MCNP5 (Monte Carlo N-Particle) and to compare it with the experimental data previously obtained with a {sup 241}Am-Be source at a distance of 1.66 m from the geometric center of the detector, varying the angle of incidence from 00 to 3600 in intervals of 150. The simulation was performed by modeling in detail the structure and materials of the LC, as well as the experimental arrangement for irradiation. The results of the simulation present reasonable agreement with the experimental data. This agreement shows that the modeling of the geometry of the source-detector system is adequate. The next step is to develop a model of neutron detection for the higher energy present in cosmic radiation fields, for which the experimental calibration is not so easily achievable. (author)

  15. Radiation heat transfer simulation in a window for a small particle solar receiver using the Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Alexander Jason

    Concentrating solar power systems are currently the predominant solar power technology for generating electricity at the utility scale. The central receiver system, which is a concentrating solar power system, uses a field of mirrors to concentrate solar radiation onto a receiver where a working fluid is heated to drive a turbine. Current central receiver systems operate on a Rankine cycle, which has a large demand for cooling water. This demand for water presents a challenge for the current central receiver systems as the ideal locations for solar power plants have arid climates. An alternative to the current receiver technology is the small particle receiver. The small particle receiver has the potential to produce working fluid temperatures suitable for use in a Brayton cycle which can be more efficient when pressurized to 0.5 MPa. Using a fused quartz window allows solar energy into the receiver while maintaining a pressurized small particle receiver. In this thesis, a detailed numerical investigation for a spectral, three dimensional, cylindrical glass window for a small particle receiver was performed. The window is 1.7 meters in diameter and 0.0254 meters thick. There are three Monte Carlo Ray Trace codes used within this research. The first MCRT code, MIRVAL, was developed by Sandia National Laboratory and modified by a fellow San Diego State University colleague Murat Mecit. This code produces the solar rays on the exterior surface of the window. The second MCRT code was developed by Steve Ruther and Pablo Del Campo. This code models the small particle receiver, which creates the infrared spectral direction flux on the interior surface of the window used in this work. The third MCRT, developed for this work, is used to model radiation heat transfer within the window itself and is coupled to an energy equation solver to produce a temperature distribution. The MCRT program provides a source term to the energy equation. This in turn, produces a new

  16. Recent Developments in Three Dimensional Radiation Transport Using the Green's Function Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockell, Candice; Tweed, John; Blattnig, Steve R.; Mertens, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    In the future, astronauts will be sent into space for longer durations of time compared to previous missions. The increased risk of exposure to dangerous radiation, such as Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Particle Events, is of great concern. Consequently, steps must be taken to ensure astronaut safety by providing adequate shielding. In order to better determine and verify shielding requirements, an accurate and efficient radiation transport code based on a fully three dimensional radiation transport model using the Green's function technique is being developed

  17. Calibration and Monte Carlo modelling of neutron long counters

    CERN Document Server

    Tagziria, H

    2000-01-01

    The Monte Carlo technique has become a very powerful tool in radiation transport as full advantage is taken of enhanced cross-section data, more powerful computers and statistical techniques, together with better characterisation of neutron and photon source spectra. At the National Physical Laboratory, calculations using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP-4B have been combined with accurate measurements to characterise two long counters routinely used to standardise monoenergetic neutron fields. New and more accurate response function curves have been produced for both long counters. A novel approach using Monte Carlo methods has been developed, validated and used to model the response function of the counters and determine more accurately their effective centres, which have always been difficult to establish experimentally. Calculations and measurements agree well, especially for the De Pangher long counter for which details of the design and constructional material are well known. The sensitivit...

  18. Transport analysis of high radiation and high density plasmas in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casali L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Future fusion reactors, foreseen in the “European road map” such as DEMO, will operate under more demanding conditions compared to present devices. They will require high divertor and core radiation by impurity seeding to reduce heat loads on divertor target plates. In addition, DEMO will have to work at high core densities to reach adequate fusion performance. The performance of fusion reactors depends on three essential parameters: temperature, density and energy confinement time. The latter characterizes the loss rate due to both radiation and transport processes. The DEMO foreseen scenarios described above were not investigated so far, but are now addressed at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. In this work we present the transport analysis of such scenarios. Plasma with high radiation by impurity seeding: transport analysis taking into account the radiation distribution shows no change in transport during impurity seeding. The observed confinement improvement is an effect of higher pedestal temperatures which extend to the core via stiffness. A non coronal radiation model was developed and compared to the bolometric measurements in order to provide a reliable radiation profile for transport calculations. High density plasmas with pellets: the analysis of kinetic profiles reveals a transient phase at the start of the pellet fuelling due to a slower density build up compared to the temperature decrease. The low particle diffusion can explain the confinement behaviour.

  19. Transport of Coherent VUV Radiation to Muon U-Line for Ultra Slow Muon Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Jumpei; Oishi, Yu; Saito, Norihito; Miyazaki, Koji; Yokoyama, Koji; Okamura, Kotaro; Makimura, Shunsuke; Miyake, Yasuhiro; Nagatomo, Takashi; Strasser, Patrick; Ikedo, Yutaka; Tomono, Dai; Shimomura, Koichiro; Wada, Satoshi; Kawamura, Naritoshi; Koda, Akihiro; Nishiyama, Kusuo

    At U-line/MUSE/J-PARC, thermal muonium generation and laser resonant ionization process are required to get Ultra Slow Muon Beam. Laser radiation sources for the laser resonant ionization have been developed at RIKEN, and installed in a laser cabin. The laser radiations are introduced to Muon U-line by a transport system of the laser pulses, which consists of a VUV steering chamber and a NO gas cell. Coherent VUV radiation can be separated from two "bright" fundamental radiations for wave mixing, and 355 nm radiation is guided to the muonium production chamber at nearly same angle as VUV radiation, at the VUV steering chamber which is an ultrahigh vacuum chamber. The NO gas cell consist of the parallel plate ionization chamber with nitrogen monoxide molecules for measuring intensity of the VUV radiation.

  20. A practical cone-beam CT scatter correction method with optimized Monte Carlo simulations for image-guided radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuan; Bai, Ti; Yan, Hao; Ouyang, Luo; Pompos, Arnold; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Linghong; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2015-05-07

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) has become the standard image guidance tool for patient setup in image-guided radiation therapy. However, due to its large illumination field, scattered photons severely degrade its image quality. While kernel-based scatter correction methods have been used routinely in the clinic, it is still desirable to develop Monte Carlo (MC) simulation-based methods due to their accuracy. However, the high computational burden of the MC method has prevented routine clinical application. This paper reports our recent development of a practical method of MC-based scatter estimation and removal for CBCT. In contrast with conventional MC approaches that estimate scatter signals using a scatter-contaminated CBCT image, our method used a planning CT image for MC simulation, which has the advantages of accurate image intensity and absence of image truncation. In our method, the planning CT was first rigidly registered with the CBCT. Scatter signals were then estimated via MC simulation. After scatter signals were removed from the raw CBCT projections, a corrected CBCT image was reconstructed. The entire workflow was implemented on a GPU platform for high computational efficiency. Strategies such as projection denoising, CT image downsampling, and interpolation along the angular direction were employed to further enhance the calculation speed. We studied the impact of key parameters in the workflow on the resulting accuracy and efficiency, based on which the optimal parameter values were determined. Our method was evaluated in numerical simulation, phantom, and real patient cases. In the simulation cases, our method reduced mean HU errors from 44 to 3 HU and from 78 to 9 HU in the full-fan and the half-fan cases, respectively. In both the phantom and the patient cases, image artifacts caused by scatter, such as ring artifacts around the bowtie area, were reduced. With all the techniques employed, we achieved computation time of less than 30 s including the

  1. Emission from Very Small Grains and PAH Molecules in Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer Codes: Application to the Edge-On Disk of Gomez's Hamburger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Kenneth; Whitney, Barbara A.; Robitaille, Thomas; Draine, Bruce T.

    2008-12-01

    We have modeled optical to far-infrared images, photometry, and spectroscopy of the object known as Gomez's Hamburger. We reproduce the images and spectrum with an edge-on disk of mass 0.3 M⊙ and radius 1600 AU, surrounding an A0 III star at a distance of 280 pc. Our mass estimate is in excellent agreement with recent CO observations. However, our distance determination is more than an order of magnitude smaller than previous analyses, which inaccurately interpreted the optical spectrum. To accurately model the infrared spectrum we have extended our Monte Carlo radiation transfer codes to include emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules and very small grains (VSG). We do this using precomputed PAH/VSG emissivity files for a wide range of values of the mean intensity of the exciting radiation field. When Monte Carlo energy packets are absorbed by PAHs/VSGs, we reprocess them to other wavelengths by sampling from the emissivity files, thus simulating the absorption and reemission process without reproducing lengthy computations of statistical equilibrium, excitation, and de-excitation in the complex many-level molecules. Using emissivity lookup tables in our Monte Carlo codes gives us the flexibility to use the latest grain physics calculations of PAH/VSG emissivity and opacity that are being continually updated in the light of higher resolution infrared spectra. We find our approach gives a good representation of the observed PAH spectrum from the disk of Gomez's Hamburger. Our models also indicate that the PAHs/VSGs in the disk have a larger scale height than larger radiative equilibrium grains, providing evidence for dust coagulation and settling to the midplane.

  2. A general semi-analytic method to simulate discrete bremsstrahlung at very low radiated photon energies by the Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    Sona, P; Mangiarotti, A; Uggerhoj, U I

    2011-01-01

    A computer code for Monte-Carlo simulations in the framework of the GEANT 3 toolkit has been implemented for the description of the discrete bremsstrahlung radiation from high energy electrons crossing thick (semi-infinite) targets. The code is based on the Migdal theory which includes the LPM and dielectric suppression. Validation of the code has been performed by a comparison with the data from the SLAC E-146 experiment. The agreement between simulations and experimental data is generally very good. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhanced radial transport and energization of radiation belt electrons due to drift orbit bifurcations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukhorskiy, A Y; Sitnov, M I; Millan, R M; Kress, B T; Smith, D C

    2014-01-01

    [1]Relativistic electron intensities in Earth's outer radiation belt can vary by multiple orders of magnitude on the time scales ranging from minutes to days. One fundamental process contributing to dynamic variability of radiation belt intensities is the radial transport of relativistic electrons across their drift shells. In this paper we analyze the properties of three-dimensional radial transport in a global magnetic field model driven by variations in the solar wind dynamic pressure. We use a test particle approach which captures anomalous effects such as drift orbit bifurcations. We show that the bifurcations lead to an order of magnitude increase in radial transport rates and enhance the energization at large equatorial pitch angles. Even at quiet time fluctuations in dynamic pressure, radial transport at large pitch angles exhibits strong deviations from the diffusion approximation. The radial transport rates are much lower at small pitch angle values which results in a better agreement with the diffusion approximation.

  4. The Roles of Transport and Wave-Particle Interactions on Radiation Belt Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Glocer, Alex; Zheng, Qiuhua

    2011-01-01

    Particle fluxes in the radiation belts can vary dramatically during geomagnetic active periods. Transport and wave-particle interactions are believed to be the two main types of mechanisms that control the radiation belt dynamics. Major transport processes include substorm dipolarization and injection, radial diffusion, convection, adiabatic acceleration and deceleration, and magnetopause shadowing. Energetic electrons and ions are also subjected to pitch-angle and energy diffusion when interact with plasma waves in the radiation belts. Important wave modes include whistler mode chorus waves, plasmaspheric hiss, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and magnetosonic waves. We investigate the relative roles of transport and wave associated processes in radiation belt variations. Energetic electron fluxes during several storms are simulated using our Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model. The model includes important transport and wave processes such as substorm dipolarization in global MHD fields, chorus waves, and plasmaspheric hiss. We discuss the effects of these competing processes at different phases of the storms and validate the results by comparison with satellite and ground-based observations. Keywords: Radiation Belts, Space Weather, Wave-Particle Interaction, Storm and Substorm

  5. The Role of Atmospheric Cloud Radiative Effect in Net Energy Transport in the Tropical Warm Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, B. E.; Hartmann, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    We use ERA-Interim and CERES data to calculate the energy budget of the tropical atmosphere as a function of sea surface temperature. We emphasize the role of the atmospheric cloud radiative effect (ACRE; the change in the radiative heating rate of the atmosphere due to the presence of clouds), which causes a heating of the atmosphere by trapping radiation that would otherwise be lost to space, and which then increases the requirement for the atmosphere to export energy from convective regions. Over the warm pool (10 S - 10 N, 150 - 180 E), the ACRE is shown to be roughly half the value of the net energy transport (~40 W/m2 ACRE from CERES data compared to ~70 W/m2 net energy transport calculated from ERA-Interim). Additionally, we show that over areas of warm SSTs (> 300 K), both ACRE and the energy transport increase with increasing sea surface temperature (SST). The increase in ACRE mirrors the increase in energy transport, suggesting that the increase in energy transport over warmer SSTs is largely driven by radiative heating from the clouds. The net cloud radiative effect at the top of the atmosphere is remarkably insensitive to SST, however.

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of the electron transport through thin slabs: A comparative study of PENELOPE, GEANT3, GEANT4, EGSnrc and MCNPX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilches, M. [Servicio de Fisica y Proteccion Radiologica, Hospital Regional Universitario ' Virgen de las Nieves' , Avda. de las Fuerzas Armadas, 2, E-18014 Granada (Spain)]. E-mail: mvilches@ugr.es; Garcia-Pareja, S. [Servicio de Radiofisica Hospitalaria, Hospital Regional Universitario ' Carlos Haya' , Avda. Carlos Haya, s/n, E-29010 Malaga (Spain)]. E-mail: garciapareja@gmail.com; Guerrero, R. [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario ' San Cecilio' , Avda. Dr. Oloriz, 16, E-18012 Granada (Spain)]. E-mail: rafael.guerrero.alcalde.sspa@juntadeandalucia.es; Anguiano, M. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)]. E-mail: mangui@ugr.es; Lallena, A.M. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)]. E-mail: lallena@ugr.es

    2007-01-15

    The Monte Carlo simulation of the electron transport through thin slabs is studied with five general purpose codes: PENELOPE, GEANT3, GEANT4, EGSnrc and MCNPX. The different material foils analyzed in the old experiments of Kulchitsky and Latyshev [L.A. Kulchitsky, G.D. Latyshev, Phys. Rev. 61 (1942) 254] and Hanson et al. [A.O. Hanson, L.H. Lanzl, E.M. Lyman, M.B. Scott, Phys. Rev. 84 (1951) 634] are used to perform the comparison between the Monte Carlo codes. Non-negligible differences are observed in the angular distributions of the transmitted electrons obtained with the some of the codes. The experimental data are reasonably well described by EGSnrc, PENELOPE (v.2005) and GEANT4. A general good agreement is found for EGSnrc and PENELOPE (v.2005) in all the cases analyzed.

  7. Nuclear medicine radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    McParland, Brian J

    2010-01-01

    Complexities of the requirements for accurate radiation dosimetry evaluation in both diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine (including PET) have grown over the past decade. This is due primarily to four factors: growing consideration of accurate patient-specific treatment planning for radionuclide therapy as a means of improving the therapeutic benefit, development of more realistic anthropomorphic phantoms and their use in estimating radiation transport and dosimetry in patients, design and use of advanced Monte Carlo algorithms in calculating the above-mentioned radiation transport and

  8. Implicit filtered PN for high-energy density thermal radiation transport using discontinuous Galerkin finite elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboure, Vincent M.; McClarren, Ryan G.; Hauck, Cory D.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we provide a fully-implicit implementation of the time-dependent, filtered spherical harmonics (FPN) equations for non-linear, thermal radiative transfer. We investigate local filtering strategies and analyze the effect of the filter on the conditioning of the system, showing in particular that the filter improves the convergence properties of the iterative solver. We also investigate numerically the rigorous error estimates derived in the linear setting, to determine whether they hold also for the non-linear case. Finally, we simulate a standard test problem on an unstructured mesh and make comparisons with implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) calculations.

  9. Implicit Filtered PN for High-Energy Density Thermal Radiation Transport using Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Elements

    CERN Document Server

    Laboure, Vincent M; Hauck, Cory D

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we provide a fully-implicit implementation of the time-dependent, filtered spherical harmonics (FPN) equations for non-linear, thermal radiative transfer. We investigate local filtering strategies and analyze the effect of the filter on the conditioning of the system in the streaming limit, showing in particular that the filter improves the convergence properties of the iterative solver. We also investigate numerically the rigorous error estimates derived in the linear setting, to determine whether they hold also for the non-linear case. Finally, we simulate a standard test problem on an unstructured mesh and make comparisons with implicit Monte-Carlo (IMC) calculations.

  10. A Monte Carlo Event Generator for W Off-shell Pair Production including Higher Order Electromagnetic Radiative Corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Anlauf, H; Manakos, P; Mannel, T

    1994-01-01

    We present the Monte Carlo event generator {\\tt WOPPER} for pair production of $W$'s and their decays at high energy $e^+e^-$ colliders. {\\tt WOPPER} includes the effects from finite $W$ width and focusses on the calculation of higher order electromagnetic corrections in the leading log approximation including soft photon exponentiation and explicit generation of exclusive hard photons.

  11. Radiative transfer equation for predicting light propagation in biological media: comparison of a modified finite volume method, the Monte Carlo technique, and an exact analytical solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asllanaj, Fatmir; Contassot-Vivier, Sylvain; Liemert, André; Kienle, Alwin

    2014-01-01

    We examine the accuracy of a modified finite volume method compared to analytical and Monte Carlo solutions for solving the radiative transfer equation. The model is used for predicting light propagation within a two-dimensional absorbing and highly forward-scattering medium such as biological tissue subjected to a collimated light beam. Numerical simulations for the spatially resolved reflectance and transmittance are presented considering refractive index mismatch with Fresnel reflection at the interface, homogeneous and two-layered media. Time-dependent as well as steady-state cases are considered. In the steady state, it is found that the modified finite volume method is in good agreement with the other two methods. The relative differences between the solutions are found to decrease with spatial mesh refinement applied for the modified finite volume method obtaining method is used for the time semi-discretization of the radiative transfer equation. An agreement among the modified finite volume method, Runge-Kutta method, and Monte Carlo solutions are shown, but with relative differences higher than in the steady state.

  12. Comparison of experimental and Monte-Carlo simulation of MeV particle transport through tapered/straight glass capillaries and circular collimators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hespeels, F., E-mail: felicien.hespeels@unamur.be [University of Namur, PMR, 61 rue de Bruxelles, 5000 Namur (Belgium); Tonneau, R. [University of Namur, PMR, 61 rue de Bruxelles, 5000 Namur (Belgium); Ikeda, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Lucas, S. [University of Namur, PMR, 61 rue de Bruxelles, 5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • Monte-Carlo simulation for beam transportation through collimations devices. • We confirm the focusing effect of tapered glass capillary. • We confirm the feasibility of using passive collimation devices for ion beam analysis application. - Abstract: This study compares the capabilities of three different passive collimation devices to produce micrometer-sized beams for proton and alpha particle beams (1.7 MeV and 5.3 MeV respectively): classical platinum TEM-like collimators, straight glass capillaries and tapered glass capillaries. In addition, we developed a Monte-Carlo code, based on the Rutherford scattering theory, which simulates particle transportation through collimating devices. The simulation results match the experimental observations of beam transportation through collimators both in air and vacuum. This research shows the focusing effects of tapered capillaries which clearly enable higher transmission flux. Nevertheless, the capillaries alignment with an incident beam is a prerequisite but is tedious, which makes the TEM collimator the easiest way to produce a 50 μm microbeam.

  13. Hawking Radiation of a Kaluza-Klein Black Hole Described by Landauer Transport Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    兰小刚; 韦联福

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the Hawking radiation of a Kaluza-Klein black hole by using one-dimensional(1D),non-equilibrium,Landauer transport model.The derived Hawking radiation temperature is in consistence with that obtained by using the usual anomaly method.With the Landauer transport model,we calculate the entropy flow out of the Kaluza-Klein black hole and the relevant entropy production rate.How these quantities depending on the physical parameters of the black hole is also discussed.

  14. Assessment of shielding analysis methods, codes, and data for spent fuel transport/storage applications. [Radiation dose rates from shielded spent fuels and high-level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, C.V.; Broadhead, B.L.; Hermann, O.W.; Tang, J.S.; Cramer, S.N.; Gauthey, J.C.; Kirk, B.L.; Roussin, R.W.

    1988-07-01

    This report provides a preliminary assessment of the computational tools and existing methods used to obtain radiation dose rates from shielded spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Particular emphasis is placed on analysis tools and techniques applicable to facilities/equipment designed for the transport or storage of spent nuclear fuel or HLW. Applications to cask transport, storage, and facility handling are considered. The report reviews the analytic techniques for generating appropriate radiation sources, evaluating the radiation transport through the shield, and calculating the dose at a desired point or surface exterior to the shield. Discrete ordinates, Monte Carlo, and point kernel methods for evaluating radiation transport are reviewed, along with existing codes and data that utilize these methods. A literature survey was employed to select a cadre of codes and data libraries to be reviewed. The selection process was based on specific criteria presented in the report. Separate summaries were written for several codes (or family of codes) that provided information on the method of solution, limitations and advantages, availability, data access, ease of use, and known accuracy. For each data library, the summary covers the source of the data, applicability of these data, and known verification efforts. Finally, the report discusses the overall status of spent fuel shielding analysis techniques and attempts to illustrate areas where inaccuracy and/or uncertainty exist. The report notes the advantages and limitations of several analysis procedures and illustrates the importance of using adequate cross-section data sets. Additional work is recommended to enable final selection/validation of analysis tools that will best meet the US Department of Energy's requirements for use in developing a viable HLW management system. 188 refs., 16 figs., 27 tabs.

  15. TARTNP: a coupled neutron--photon Monte Carlo transport code. [10-/sup 9/ to 20 MeV; in LLL FORTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plechaty, E.F.; Kimlinger, J.R.

    1976-07-04

    A Monte Carlo code was written that calculates the transport of neutrons, photons, and neutron-induced photons. The cross sections of these particles are derived from TARTNP's data base, the Evaluated Nuclear Data Library. The energy range of the neutron data in the Library is 10/sup -9/ MeV to 20 MeV; the photon energy range is 1 keV to 20 MeV. One of the chief advantages of the code is its flexibility: it allows up to 17 different kinds of output to be evaluated in the same problem.

  16. A general hybrid radiation transport scheme for star formation simulations on an adaptive grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klassen, Mikhail; Pudritz, Ralph E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University 1280 Main Street W, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Kuiper, Rolf [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Peters, Thomas [Institut für Computergestützte Wissenschaften, Universität Zürich Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Banerjee, Robi; Buntemeyer, Lars, E-mail: klassm@mcmaster.ca [Hamburger Sternwarte, Universität Hamburg Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-12-10

    Radiation feedback plays a crucial role in the process of star formation. In order to simulate the thermodynamic evolution of disks, filaments, and the molecular gas surrounding clusters of young stars, we require an efficient and accurate method for solving the radiation transfer problem. We describe the implementation of a hybrid radiation transport scheme in the adaptive grid-based FLASH general magnetohydrodyanmics code. The hybrid scheme splits the radiative transport problem into a raytracing step and a diffusion step. The raytracer captures the first absorption event, as stars irradiate their environments, while the evolution of the diffuse component of the radiation field is handled by a flux-limited diffusion solver. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method through a variety of benchmark tests including the irradiation of a static disk, subcritical and supercritical radiative shocks, and thermal energy equilibration. We also demonstrate the capability of our method for casting shadows and calculating gas and dust temperatures in the presence of multiple stellar sources. Our method enables radiation-hydrodynamic studies of young stellar objects, protostellar disks, and clustered star formation in magnetized, filamentary environments.

  17. A General Hybrid Radiation Transport Scheme for Star Formation Simulations on an Adaptive Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Mikhail; Kuiper, Rolf; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi; Buntemeyer, Lars

    2014-12-01

    Radiation feedback plays a crucial role in the process of star formation. In order to simulate the thermodynamic evolution of disks, filaments, and the molecular gas surrounding clusters of young stars, we require an efficient and accurate method for solving the radiation transfer problem. We describe the implementation of a hybrid radiation transport scheme in the adaptive grid-based FLASH general magnetohydrodyanmics code. The hybrid scheme splits the radiative transport problem into a raytracing step and a diffusion step. The raytracer captures the first absorption event, as stars irradiate their environments, while the evolution of the diffuse component of the radiation field is handled by a flux-limited diffusion solver. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method through a variety of benchmark tests including the irradiation of a static disk, subcritical and supercritical radiative shocks, and thermal energy equilibration. We also demonstrate the capability of our method for casting shadows and calculating gas and dust temperatures in the presence of multiple stellar sources. Our method enables radiation-hydrodynamic studies of young stellar objects, protostellar disks, and clustered star formation in magnetized, filamentary environments.

  18. How to prescribe lung stereotactic radiotherapy with algorithms taking electron transport into account (Monte Carlo, and so on)?; Comment prescrire en radiotherapie stereotaxique dans le poumon avec les algorithmes tenant compte du transport des electrons (Monte-Carlo, etc.)?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacornerie, T.; Prevost, B.; Reynaert, N. [Centre Oscar-Lambret, Lille (France); Lisbona, A.; Thillays, F. [Institut de cancerologie de l' Ouest Rene-Gauducheau, Nantes (France)

    2011-10-15

    As important differences are noticed in lung for some dose calculation algorithms (Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo for IPlan RT Dose, Ray-Tracing and Monte Carlo for CyberKnife, Pencil Beam and Collapsed Cone for Clinac 6V), the authors report the search for a way to adapt protocols established with old algorithms and to minimize the difference between teams who are using a same irradiation scheme, for example three 20 Gy fractions. They have studied whether the prescription of a peripheral isodose to the previsional target volume (PTV) is the best approach. Irradiation plans have been calculated for different types of accelerators, with two types of algorithms, and for three different lesion sizes. The doses received by 98, 50 and 2 per cent of the volume are analyzed for the PTV, the gross tumour volume (GTV) and for the irradiated lung volumes. Differences are as much important as target size is low. It appears that type B algorithms (Monte Carlo, Collapsed Cone) are recommended. Short communication

  19. Monte Carlo Simulation of K Fluorescence Radiation Spectrum and Fluorescence Yield%K 荧光能谱及荧光产额 MC 模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈成; 吴金杰; 周四春; 陈法君; 王佳; 葛良全

    2015-01-01

    K荧光X射线辐射装置能够开展各类核辐射探测器的校准和研究工作,基于MCNP5模拟程序建立了K荧光发生装置的模型。荧光辐射束是影响探测器校准的关键,辐射体厚度决定荧光的产额。通过蒙特卡罗模拟Cs2 SO4辐射体材料,得到辐射束各个位置的荧光出射谱、荧光产额和纯度与辐射体厚度的变化关系。结果表明,辐射束在1m处的半径大于25 cm且散射成分对荧光能谱的干扰小,辐射体存在饱和厚度。该研究结果可对实验制作各种辐射体以及荧光的定性和定量分析具有参考作用。%K fluorescent X ray radiation device can carry out various kinds of radiation detector calibration and research work.The fluorescence of K generator model is established based on MCNP5 simulation program.The fluorescence radiation beam is the key factor to influence detector calibration, radiator thickness decide the fluo-rescence yield.Through Monte Carlo simulation,Cs2 SO4 radiator material is studied, the fluorescence radiation beam emitted spectrum at each position, the relationship between fluorescence yield and purity as a fuction of the radiator thickness are obtained.The results show that, the radiation radius of the beam at the 1m is greater than 25 cm and scattering components of interference spectrum is small, and the various radiators have a satu-rated thickness.The results of this study can provided a reference for the experimental production of various ra-diators and the qualitative and quantitative analysis of fluorescence.

  20. Development and validation of MCNPX-based Monte Carlo treatment plan verification system

    OpenAIRE

    Iraj Jabbari; Shahram Monadi

    2015-01-01

    A Monte Carlo treatment plan verification (MCTPV) system was developed for clinical treatment plan verification (TPV), especially for the conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans. In the MCTPV, the MCNPX code was used for particle transport through the accelerator head and the patient body. MCTPV has an interface with TiGRT planning system and reads the information which is needed for Monte Carlo calculation transferred in digital image communications in medicine-radiation ...

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of nuclear energy study (II). Annual report on Nuclear Code Evaluation Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-01-01

    In the report, research results discussed in 1999 fiscal year at Nuclear Code Evaluation Committee of Nuclear Code Research Committee were summarized. Present status of Monte Carlo simulation on nuclear energy study was described. Especially, besides of criticality, shielding and core analyses, present status of applications to risk and radiation damage analyses, high energy transport and nuclear theory calculations of Monte Carlo Method was described. The 18 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  2. Transport of Terrestrial gamma-Radiation in Plane Semi-Infinite Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Peter; Løvborg, Leif

    1980-01-01

    The plane one-dimensional photon transport equation is solved for the scattered γ-radiation flux in the case of two adjacent media. One medium represents a natural ground with uniformly distributed potassium, uranium, and thorium γ-ray emitters. The other medium is air with no radioactive...

  3. New approach to the solution of the Boltzmann radiation transport equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffi, Vinicio C.; Dunn, William L.

    1987-03-01

    Transport monodimensional stationary solutions for the angular space-energy neutron flux, of interest in radiation penetration problems, are studied by Green's function method. Explicit analytical results for the spatial moments of the sought solution are obtained for the case of an isotropically scattering slab of infinite thickness and of a continuous slowing down model in energy.

  4. The use of symbolic computation in radiative, energy, and neutron transport calculations. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankel, J.I.

    1997-09-01

    This investigation used sysmbolic manipulation in developing analytical methods and general computational strategies for solving both linear and nonlinear, regular and singular integral and integro-differential equations which appear in radiative and mixed-mode energy transport. Contained in this report are seven papers which present the technical results as individual modules.

  5. Ultrasound modulated bioluminescence tomography and controllability of the radiative transport equation

    CERN Document Server

    Bal, Guillaume; Schotland, John C

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method to reconstruct the density of an optical source in a highly scattering medium from ultrasound-modulated optical measurements. Our approach is based on the solution to a hybrid inverse source problem for the radiative transport equation (RTE). A controllability result for the RTE plays an essential role in the analysis.

  6. Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, A. S. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Cooper, A. B.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schneider, M. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacLaren, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Graham, P. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Lu, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Seugling, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Satcher, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Klingmann, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Comley, A. J. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Marrs, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); May, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Glendinning, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Castor, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sain, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Back, C. A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Hund, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Baker, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsing, W. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, J. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Young, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Young, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in bench-marking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240 eV. This creates a subsonic di usive Marshak wave which propagates into a high atomic number Ta2O5 aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range

  7. Comparison of Stopping Power and Range Databases for Radiation Transport Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, H.; Bichsel, Hans; Wilson, John W.; Shinn, Judy L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Badavi, Francis F.

    1997-01-01

    The codes used to calculate stopping power and range for the space radiation shielding program at the Langley Research Center are based on the work of Ziegler but with modifications. As more experience is gained from experiments at heavy ion accelerators, prudence dictates a reevaluation of the current databases. Numerical values of stopping power and range calculated from four different codes currently in use are presented for selected ions and materials in the energy domain suitable for space radiation transport. This study of radiation transport has found that for most collision systems and for intermediate particle energies, agreement is less than 1 percent, in general, among all the codes. However, greater discrepancies are seen for heavy systems, especially at low particle energies.

  8. Cloud-radiative effects on implied oceanic energy transport as simulated by atmospheric general circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleckler, P. J.; Randall, D. A.; Boer, G.; Colman, R.; Dix, M.; Galin, V.; Helfand, M.; Kiehl, J.; Kitoh, A.; Lau, W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the ocean surface net energy flux simulated by fifteen atmospheric general circulation models constrained by realistically-varying sea surface temperatures and sea ice as part of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project. In general, the simulated energy fluxes are within the very large observational uncertainties. However, the annual mean oceanic meridional heat transport that would be required to balance the simulated surface fluxes is shown to be critically sensitive to the radiative effects of clouds, to the extent that even the sign of the Southern Hemisphere ocean heat transport can be affected by the errors in simulated cloud-radiation interactions. It is suggested that improved treatment of cloud radiative effects should help in the development of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models.

  9. Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation and the High Speed Civil Transport. Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiden, D. L.; Wilson, J. W.; Jones, I. W.; Goldhagen, P.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric ionizing radiation is produced by extraterrestrial radiations incident on the Earth's atmosphere. These extraterrestrial radiations are of two sources: ever present galactic cosmic rays with origin outside the solar system and transient solar particle events that are at times very intense events associated with solar activity lasting several hours to a few days. Although the galactic radiation penetrating through the atmosphere to the ground is low in intensity, the intensity is more than two orders of magnitude greater at commercial aircraft altitudes. The radiation levels at the higher altitudes of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) are an additional factor of two higher. Ionizing radiation produces chemically active radicals in biological tissues that alter the cell function or result in cell death. Protection standards against low levels of ionizing radiation are based on limitation of excess cancer mortality or limitation of developmental injury resulting in permanent damage to the offspring during pregnancy. The crews of commercial air transport operations are considered as radiation workers by the EPA, the FAA, and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The annual exposures of aircrews depend on the latitudes and altitudes of operation and flight time. Flight hours have significantly increased since deregulation of the airline industry in the 1980's. The FAA estimates annual subsonic aircrew exposures to range from 0.2 to 9.1 mSv compared to 0.5 mSv exposure of the average nuclear power plant worker in the nuclear industry. The commercial aircrews of the HSCT may receive exposures above recently recommended allowable limits for even radiation workers if flying their allowable number of flight hours. An adequate protection philosophy for background exposures in HSCT commercial airtraffic cannot be developed at this time due to current uncertainty in environmental levels. In addition, if a large solar particle event

  10. A punctual flux estimator and reactions rates optimization in neutral particles transport calculus by the Monte Carlo method; Mise au point d'un estimateur ponctuel du flux et des taux de reactions dans les calculs de transport de particules neutres par la methode de monte carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Authier, N

    1998-12-01

    One of the questions asked in radiation shielding problems is the estimation of the radiation level in particular to determine accessibility of working persons in controlled area (nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel reprocessing plants) or to study the dose gradients encountered in material (iron nuclear vessel, medical therapy, electronics in satellite). The flux and reaction rate estimators used in Monte Carlo codes give average values in volumes or on surfaces of the geometrical description of the system. But in certain configurations, the knowledge of punctual deposited energy and dose estimates are necessary. The Monte Carlo estimate of the flux at a point of interest is a calculus which presents an unbounded variance. The central limit theorem cannot be applied thus no easy confidencelevel may be calculated. The convergence rate is then very poor. We propose in this study a new solution for the photon flux at a point estimator. The method is based on the 'once more collided flux estimator' developed earlier for neutron calculations. It solves the problem of the unbounded variance and do not add any bias to the estimation. We show however that our new sampling schemes specially developed to treat the anisotropy of the photon coherent scattering is necessary for a good and regular behavior of the estimator. This developments integrated in the TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code add the possibility of an unbiased punctual estimate on media interfaces. (author)

  11. 超级蒙特卡罗核计算仿真软件系统SuperMC%Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program for Nuclear and Radiation Process:SuperMC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴宜灿; 孙光耀; 吴斌; 杨琪; 陈朝斌; 党同强; 方菱; 裴曦; 王芳; 汪进; 蒋洁琼; 宋婧; 汪建业; 赵柱民; FDS团队; 胡丽琴; 龙鹏程; 何桃; 程梦云; 郑华庆; 郝丽娟; 俞盛朋

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo method has distinct advantages in simulating complicated nuclear systems. However,great challenges to current MC methods and codes prevent its application in engineering proj ects, such as difficulties in the accurate modeling of complex geometries and material distribution,slow convergence of calculation,prompt and effective analysis of massive data. Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program for Nuclear and Radiation Process (SuperMC)is designed to perform the comprehensive neutronics calculation,taking the radiation transport as the core and including the depletion,radiation source term/dose/biohazard,material activation and transmutation,etc. It supports the multi-physics coupling calculation including thermo-hydraulics,structural mechanics,chemistry,biology,etc. Key techniques including automatic and accurate modeling,high efficient calculation,4D visualization were developed and more than 2000 international benchmark models and experiments were used to verify and validate SuperMC. SuperMC has been widely used in reactor engineering proj ects and etc. In this paper,the overview of SuperMC development was introduced.%蒙特卡罗方法对于复杂核系统的模拟具有明显优势,然而在实际工程应用中存在巨大的挑战,如复杂结构与材料分布精准建模难度大、计算收敛速度慢、海量数据难以及时有效分析等。超级蒙特卡罗核计算仿真软件系统 SuperMC设计为支持以辐射输运为核心,包含燃耗、辐射源项/剂量/生物危害、材料活化与嬗变等的综合中子学计算,支持热工水力学、结构力学、化学、生物学等多物理耦合模拟。 SuperMC目前已发展了精准建模、高效计算、四维可视化等关键技术,通过2000余个国际基准模型及实验的验证与确认,在反应堆工程等方面获得广泛应用,本文对其发展概况进行介绍。

  12. A Monte Carlo simulation of radiative transfer in the atmosphere applied to ToTaL-DOAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premuda, M.; Masieri, S.; Bortoli, D.; Margelli, F.; Ravegnani, F.; Petritoli, A.; Kostadinov, I.; Giovanelli, G.; Cupini, E.

    2009-09-01

    In the frame of DOAS, a Monte Carlo code has been developed, to calculate, for a given detector with assigned diameter and field of view, the single and multiple scattering radiance. Very general 3-D geometry is foreseen. Spatial distribution along the detector axis for the single and total scattering radiance are computed. Ground reflected contributions to the solar radiance are estimated. Differential effects due to small perturbations in physical parameters, such as ozone density, can simultaneously be taken into account in the same calculation. The code has been applied to ToTaL-DOAS (Topographic Target Light scattering-Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) measurements.

  13. Verification of a Monte-Carlo planetary surface radiation environment model using gamma-ray data from Lunar Prospector and 2001 Mars Odyssey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skidmore, M.S., E-mail: mss16@star.le.ac.u [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Ambrosi, R.M. [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-01

    Characterising a planetary radiation environment is important to: (1) assess the habitability of a planetary body for indigenous life; (2) assess the risks associated with manned exploration missions to a planetary body and (3) predict/interpret the results that remote sensing instrumentation may obtain from a planetary body (e.g. interpret the gamma-ray emissions from a planetary surface produced by radioactive decay or via the interaction of galactic cosmic rays to obtain meaningful estimates of the concentration of certain elements on the surface of a planet). The University of Leicester is developing instrumentation for geophysical applications that include gamma-ray spectroscopy, gamma-ray densitometry and radiometric dating. This paper describes the verification of a Monte-Carlo planetary radiation environment model developed using the MCNPX code. The model is designed to model the radiation environments of Mars and the Moon, but is applicable to other planetary bodies, and will be used to predict the performance of the instrumentation being developed at Leicester. This study demonstrates that the modelled gamma-ray data is in good agreement with gamma-ray data obtained by the gamma-ray spectrometers on 2001 Mars Odyssey and Lunar Prospector, and can be used to accurately model geophysical instrumentation for planetary science applications.

  14. Analysis and design of photobioreactors for microalgae production II: experimental validation of a radiation field simulator based on a Monte Carlo algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Josué Miguel; Niizawa, Ignacio; Botta, Fausto Adrián; Trombert, Alejandro Raúl; Irazoqui, Horacio Antonio

    2012-01-01

    In a previous study, we developed a methodology to assess the intrinsic optical properties governing the radiation field in algae suspensions. With these properties at our disposal, a Monte Carlo simulation program is developed and used in this study as a predictive autonomous program applied to the simulation of experiments that reproduce the common illumination conditions that are found in processes of large scale production of microalgae, especially when using open ponds such as raceway ponds. The simulation module is validated by comparing the results of experimental measurements made on artificially illuminated algal suspension with those predicted by the Monte Carlo program. This experiment deals with a situation that resembles that of an open pond or that of a raceway pond, except for the fact that for convenience, the experimental arrangement appears as if those reactors were turned upside down. It serves the purpose of assessing to what extent the scattering phenomena are important for the prediction of the spatial distribution of the radiant energy density. The simulation module developed can be applied to compute the local energy density inside photobioreactors with the goal to optimize its design and their operating conditions.

  15. Non-equilibrium Landauer transport model for Hawking radiation from a black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nation, P. D.; Blencowe, M. P.; Nori, Franco

    2012-03-01

    We propose that the Hawking radiation energy and entropy flow rates from a black hole can be viewed as a one-dimensional (1D), non-equilibrium Landauer transport process. Support for this viewpoint comes from previous calculations invoking conformal symmetry in the near-horizon region, which give radiation rates that are identical to those of a single 1D quantum channel connected to a thermal reservoir at the Hawking temperature. The Landauer approach shows in a direct way the particle statistics independence of the energy and entropy fluxes of a black hole radiating into vacuum, as well as one near thermal equilibrium with its environment. As an application of the Landauer approach, we show that Hawking radiation gives a net entropy production that is 50% larger than that obtained assuming standard 3D emission into vacuum.

  16. Effects of microwave radiation on microtubules and axonal transport. [Brain and vagus nerve of rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsson, L.E.; Hamnerius, Y.; McLean, W.G.

    1977-04-01

    Microwave radiation is known to have a variety of effects on man and experimental animals. We have looked for a common factor in these effects and have suggested that the action of the radiation on the subcellular structure microtubules could be such a factor. We have therefore studied the effect of 3.1 GHz pulsed microwave radiation on the chemical and functional properties of microtubules in vitro. The biological materials were obtained from albino rabbits. We have investigated the binding of colchicine in brain extracts, the polymerization of microtubules in brain extracts, and the transport of proteins in the vagus nerve during microwave irradiation. The absorbed power density was carefully determined and the temperature was kept within permissible limits. No effect of the radiation could be detected at absorbed power densities lower than 4 x 10/sup 5/ W/m/sup 3/ (mean).

  17. Characteristic parameters of diffusive supersonic radiation transport in low density materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Shao-En; Yang Jia-Min; Zheng Zhi-Jian; Ding Yong-Kun

    2007-01-01

    Diffusive heat waves play an important role in radiation hydrodynamics. In low density material, it may be possible that the radiative energy flux dominates the material energy flux and thus energy flow can be determined. In this paper by means of a simple algebraic method, the expressions characterizing the condition of diffusion approximation and supersonic transport of heat wave are found. In this case, the ratio of the radiative energy flux to the material energy flux is directly proportional to the product of Mach number M multiplied by optical depth τ. And it may also be expressed by radiation temperature heating material. The materiel density and length may be determined in order to aceve above-mentioned conditions when the driven temperature and duration are given.

  18. A Note on the Radiative and Collisional Branching Ratios in Polarized Radiation Transport with Coherent Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, R.; del Pino Alemán, T.; Manso Sainz, R.

    2017-02-01

    We discuss the implementation of physically meaningful branching ratios between the CRD and partial redistribution contributions to the emissivity of a polarized multi-term atom in the presence of both inelastic and elastic collisions. Our derivation is based on a recent theoretical formulation of partially coherent scattering, and it relies on a heuristic diagrammatic analysis of the various radiative and collisional processes to determine the proper form of the branching ratios. The expression we obtain for the emissivity is {\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}=[{{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}(1)-{{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}{{f}.{{s}}.}(2)]+{{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}(2), where {{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}(1) and {{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}(2) are the emissivity terms for the redistributed and partially coherent radiation, respectively, and where “f.s.” implies that the corresponding term must be evaluated assuming a flat-spectrum average of the incident radiation. This result is shown to be in agreement with prior literature on the subject in the limit of the unpolarized multi-level atom.

  19. 热辐射传递求解的蒙特卡罗法新型统计模式%New Statistical Mode of Monte Carlo Method for Radiative Heat Transfer in Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    艾青; 夏新林; 李德富

    2009-01-01

    A new statistical mode of Monte Carlo method for radiative heat transfer in medium is developed, which is based on both the reversibility of bundle trajectory and the reciprocity of thermal radiative energy exchange. The mode is an improvement of statistical calculation of the traditional Monte Carlo method. The performance parameter of radiative transfer coefficients are compared with the traditional Monte Carlo method. The analysis shows the superiority of improved Monte Carlo method to the traditional Monte Carlo method.%基于热辐射传输的光路可逆性原理,对求解热辐射传递的蒙特卡罗法的统计模式进行了改进.改进后的蒙特卡罗法利用可逆关系对样本同时进行正向和反向统计计算,提高了计算效率.比较了新型统计模式下的蒙特卡罗方法和传统蒙特卡罗法方法的性能,结果表明新型统计模式下的蒙特卡罗法相对传统蒙特卡罗法计算性能得到了提升.

  20. The influence of resonance radiation transport on the contraction of a glow discharge in argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubovskii, Yu B.; Maiorov, V. A.

    2015-04-01

    The role of resonance radiation transport in the contraction of a positive column in an argon glow discharge is studied numerically. The theory is based on the self-consistent solution of the ambipolar diffusion equation for electrons, the diffusion equation for metastable atoms and the Biberman-Holstein equation for resonance atoms. To calculate the ionization and excitation rates, the Boltzmann equation is solved in a local approximation taking into account elastic, inelastic and electron-electron collisions. A solution method for a boundary problem is developed which allows one to obtain a hysteresis of the parameters during a continuous transition from a diffuse mode to a contracted mode through an unstable branch. At small currents there is a diffuse discharge where the role of radiation transport is inessential because the radial distributions of electrons and excited atoms are close to the fundamental modes of the corresponding equations. Under these conditions, the traditional approximation of ‘effective lifetime’ is accurate enough. For a contracted discharge, this approximation is not applicable because the higher diffusion and radiation modes play a notable role and a more strict description of radiation transport is required. It is shown that, when radiation transport is taken into account, the width of a filament in a contracted discharge significantly exceeds that obtained in the traditional ‘effective lifetime’ approximation. The critical current, when the discharge abruptly turns into a contracted mode, is shifted towards higher current values. The results obtained in this paper can also relate to a discharge in other inert gases.

  1. In silico radiobiology: Have we reached the limit of Monte Carlo simulations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Y.; Toghyani, M.; Champion, C.; Kuncic, Z.

    2014-03-01

    Monte Carlo radiation transport models are increasingly being used to simulate biological damage. However, such radiation biophysics simulations require realistic molecular models for water, whereas existing Monte Carlo models are limited by their use of atomic cross-sections, which become inadequate for accurately modelling interactions of the very low-energy electrons that are responsible for biological damage. In this study, we borrow theoretical methods commonly employed in molecular dynamics simulations to model the molecular wavefunction of the water molecule as the first step towards deriving new molecular cross-sections. We calculate electron charge distributions for molecular water and find non-negligible differences between the vapor and liquid phases that can be attributed to intermolecular bonding in the condensed phase. We propose that a hybrid Monte Carlo - Molecular Dynamics (MC-MD) approach to modelling radiation biophysics will provide new insights into radiation damage and new opportunities to develop targeted molecular therapy strategies.

  2. Study on impurity radiation and transport of JT-60U plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishijima, Tatsuo [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    This thesis describes an investigation on impurity transport in the JT-60U tokamak plasma both in the core and the divertor plasmas to provide a better understanding of plasma physics. This work has been performed under the collaborative graduate school between University of Tsukuba and Naka Fusion Research Establishment of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. A radiative divertor experiment with neon gas puff was carried out with an aim of investigating impurity behaviors in the divertor, after the open divertor was modified to the pumped W-shaped divertor. To evaluate neon radiation, analysis was made for lines from neon ions measured with a VUV spectrometer in the divertor plasma. As a result, lines from Ne IV-Ne VIII were identified. By combining the measurement with an absolutely calibrated multi-channel interference filter spectrometer and that with the VUV spectrometer, the radiation loss through neon line emission was estimated in the divertor plasma. In the case of pumping off, the detached plasma evolved into a MARFE. It was observed that the line intensities of highly ionized neon (Ne VII, Ne VIII) increased simultaneously with the formation of the MARFE and furthermore increased after the MARFE formation. It is considered that after the divertor plasma was detached, the plasma flow velocity and the friction force were weaker in the case of pumping off than in the case of pumping on and more impurities moved toward the X-point region. This observation implies reduction of impurity back flow from the divertor to the upstream by the friction force. This thesis indicates that the plasma flow in the SOL (Scrape-Off Layer) is important to confine the impurity in the divertor region and prevent the MARFE for the first time. In reversed shear discharges with ITB (internal transport barrier), electron density, temperature and radiation power strongly increased inside the ITB. The core radiation was analyzed by bolometry, VUV spectrometer and CXRS (charge

  3. Monte Carlo study of the measurement of the Michel parameters in the radiative decay of the τ at Belle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, N.; Aihara, H.; Epifanov, D.

    2016-07-01

    Michel parameters are kinematic values defined as bilinear combinations of the coupling terms in the general matrix element of the Fermi interaction where all possible Lorentz-invariant scalar, vector and tensor terms are included. The leptonic τ decays provide an excellent laboratory in which to measure the Michel parameters. Any deviation of these parameters from the Standard Model expectation would indicate New Physics. Two Michel parameters, η bar and ξκ, can only be measured in the radiative leptonic decay. These parameters have previously been measured in the radiative decay of the muon but as yet have not been measured in τ decays. We report the results of a feasibility study of the measurement of η bar and ξκ in radiative leptonic τ decays at Belle and Belle II.

  4. Observation of subsonic and supersonic radiation fronts on OMEGA utilizing radiation transport through Sc-doped aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, H. M.; Kline, J.; Lanier, N.; Perry, T.; Fontes, C.; Fryer, C.; Brown, C.; Morton, J.; Hager, J.

    2016-10-01

    The propagation of a heat front in an astrophysical or inertial confinement fusion plasma involves both the equation of state and the opacity of the plasma, and is therefore an important and challenging radiation transport problem. Past experiments have used absorption spectroscopy in chlorinated foams to measure the heat front. (D. Hoarty et al. PRL 82, 3070, 1999). Recent development of Ti-doped cylindrical aerogel foam targets (J. Hager et al. submitted to RSI) results in a more suitable platform for higher temperatures on NIF than Cl dopant. Ti K-shell absorption spectra can be modeled with PrismSPECT to obtain spatially resolved temperature profiles between 100-180eV. Sc dopant has been selected to characterize the heat front between 60-100eV. Improved understanding of non-planckian x-ray drives generated by hohlraums will advance characterization of the radiation transport. Prior work demonstrates PrismSPECT with OPLIB is more physically complete for Sc (H. Johns et al. submitted to RSI). We will present the first application of spectroscopic analysis of the Sc-doped aerogels utilizing this method. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  5. Monte Carlo simulations of the Galileo energetic particle detector

    CERN Document Server

    Jun, I; Garrett, H B; McEntire, R W

    2002-01-01

    Monte Carlo radiation transport studies have been performed for the Galileo spacecraft energetic particle detector (EPD) in order to study its response to energetic electrons and protons. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiation transport codes, MCNP version 4B (for electrons) and MCNPX version 2.2.3 (for protons), were used throughout the study. The results are presented in the form of 'geometric factors' for the high-energy channels studied in this paper: B1, DC2, and DC3 for electrons and B0, DC0, and DC1 for protons. The geometric factor is the energy-dependent detector response function that relates the incident particle fluxes to instrument count rates. The trend of actual data measured by the EPD was successfully reproduced using the geometric factors obtained in this study.

  6. On the Momentum Transported by the Radiation Field of a Long Transient Dipole and Time Energy Uncertainty Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon Cooray

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the net momentum transported by the transient electromagnetic radiation field of a long transient dipole in free space. In the dipole a current is initiated at one end and propagates towards the other end where it is absorbed. The results show that the net momentum transported by the radiation is directed along the axis of the dipole where the currents are propagating. In general, the net momentum P transported by the electromagnetic radiation of the dipole is less than the quantity U / c , where U is the total energy radiated by the dipole and c is the speed of light in free space. In the case of a Hertzian dipole, the net momentum transported by the radiation field is zero because of the spatial symmetry of the radiation field. As the effective wavelength of the current decreases with respect to the length of the dipole (or the duration of the current decreases with respect to the travel time of the current along the dipole, the net momentum transported by the radiation field becomes closer and closer to U / c , and for effective wavelengths which are much shorter than the length of the dipole, P ≈ U / c . The results show that when the condition P ≈ U / c is satisfied, the radiated fields satisfy the condition Δ t Δ U ≥ h / 4 π where Δ t is the duration of the radiation, Δ U is the uncertainty in the dissipated energy and h is the Plank constant.

  7. Monte Carlo Simulation for Particle Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pia, Maria Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is an essential component of experimental particle physics in all the phases of its life-cycle: the investigation of the physics reach of detector concepts, the design of facilities and detectors, the development and optimization of data reconstruction software, the data analysis for the production of physics results. This note briefly outlines some research topics related to Monte Carlo simulation, that are relevant to future experimental perspectives in particle physics. The focus is on physics aspects: conceptual progress beyond current particle transport schemes, the incorporation of materials science knowledge relevant to novel detection technologies, functionality to model radiation damage, the capability for multi-scale simulation, quantitative validation and uncertainty quantification to determine the predictive power of simulation. The R&D on simulation for future detectors would profit from cooperation within various components of the particle physics community, and synerg...

  8. Comprehensive Evaluations of Cone-beam CT dose in Image-guided Radiation Therapy via GPU-based Monte Carlo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Montanari, Davide; Silvestri, Chiara; Graves, Yan J; Yan, Hao; Cervino, Laura; Rice, Roger; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2013-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) has been widely used for patient setup in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Radiation dose from CBCT scans has become a clinical concern. The purposes of this study are 1) to commission a GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation package gCTD for Varian On-Board Imaging (OBI) system and test the calculation accuracy, and 2) to quantitatively evaluate CBCT dose from the OBI system in typical IGRT scan protocols. We first conducted dose measurements in a water phantom. X-ray source model parameters used in gCTD are obtained through a commissioning process. gCTD accuracy is demonstrated by comparing calculations with measurements in water and in CTDI phantoms. 25 brain cancer patients are used to study dose in a standard-dose head protocol, and 25 prostate cancer patients are used to study dose in pelvis protocol and pelvis spotlight protocol. Mean dose to each organ is calculated. Mean dose to 2% voxels that have the highest dose is also computed to quantify the maximum dose. It is fo...

  9. An integrated high-performance beam optics-nuclear processes framework with hybrid transfer map-Monte Carlo particle transport and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandura, L., E-mail: bandura@msu.ed [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Erdelyi, B. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115 (United States); Nolen, J. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2010-12-01

    An integrated beam optics-nuclear processes framework is essential for accurate simulation of fragment separator beam dynamics. The code COSY INFINITY provides powerful differential algebraic methods for modeling and beam dynamics simulations in absence of beam-material interactions. However, these interactions are key for accurately simulating the dynamics of heavy ion fragmentation and fission. We have developed an extended version of the code that includes these interactions, and a set of new tools that allow efficient and accurate particle transport: by transfer map in vacuum and by Monte Carlo methods in materials. The new framework is presented, along with several examples from a preliminary layout of a fragment separator for a facility for rare isotope beams.

  10. A Monte Carlo simulation code for calculating damage and particle transport in solids: The case for electron-bombarded solids for electron energies up to 900 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qiang; Shao, Lin

    2017-03-01

    Current popular Monte Carlo simulation codes for simulating electron bombardment in solids focus primarily on electron trajectories, instead of electron-induced displacements. Here we report a Monte Carol simulation code, DEEPER (damage creation and particle transport in matter), developed for calculating 3-D distributions of displacements produced by electrons of incident energies up to 900 MeV. Electron elastic scattering is calculated by using full-Mott cross sections for high accuracy, and primary-knock-on-atoms (PKAs)-induced damage cascades are modeled using ZBL potential. We compare and show large differences in 3-D distributions of displacements and electrons in electron-irradiated Fe. The distributions of total displacements are similar to that of PKAs at low electron energies. But they are substantially different for higher energy electrons due to the shifting of PKA energy spectra towards higher energies. The study is important to evaluate electron-induced radiation damage, for the applications using high flux electron beams to intentionally introduce defects and using an electron analysis beam for microstructural characterization of nuclear materials.

  11. The role of radiation transport in the thermal response of semitransparent materials to localized laser heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colvin, Jeffrey [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shestakov, Aleksei [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stolken, James [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vignes, Ryan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-03-09

    Lasers are widely used to modify the internal structure of semitransparent materials for a wide variety of applications, including waveguide fabrication and laser glass damage healing. The gray diffusion approximation used in past models to describe radiation cooling is not adequate for these materials, particularly near the heated surface layer. In this paper we describe a computational model based upon solving the radiation transport equation in 1D by the Pn method with ~500 photon energy bands, and by multi-group radiationdiffusion in 2D with fourteen photon energy bands. The model accounts for the temperature-dependent absorption of infrared laser light and subsequent redistribution of the deposited heat by both radiation and conductive transport. We present representative results for fused silica irradiated with 2–12 W of 4.6 or 10.6 µm laser light for 5–10 s pulse durations in a 1 mm spot, which is small compared to the diameter and thickness of the silica slab. Furthermore, we show that, unlike the case for bulk heating, in localized infrared laser heatingradiation transport plays only a very small role in the thermal response of silica.

  12. MCMini: Monte Carlo on GPGPU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, Ryan C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-25

    MCMini is a proof of concept that demonstrates the possibility for Monte Carlo neutron transport using OpenCL with a focus on performance. This implementation, written in C, shows that tracing particles and calculating reactions on a 3D mesh can be done in a highly scalable fashion. These results demonstrate a potential path forward for MCNP or other Monte Carlo codes.

  13. Radiation shielding analysis and optimisation for the Mineral-PET Kimberlite sorting facility using the Monte Carlo calculation code MCNPX

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Phil. (Energy Studies) This dissertation details the radiation shielding analysis and optimization performed to design a shield for the mineral-PET (Positron Emission Tomography) facility. PET is a nuclear imaging technique currently used in diagnostic medicine. The technique is based on the detection of 511 keV coincident and co-linear photons produced from the annihilation of a positron (produced by a positron emitter) and a nearby electron. The technique is now being considered for th...

  14. F--Ray: A new algorithm for efficient transport of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yi; Zhang, J.; Wandelt, B. D.; Shapiro, P. R.; Iliev, I. T.

    2014-04-01

    We present a new algorithm for the 3D transport of ionizing radiation, called F2-Ray (Fast Fourier Ray-tracing method). The transfer of ionizing radiation with long mean free path in diffuse intergalactic gas poses a special challenge to standard numerical methods which transport the radiation in position space. Standard methods usually trace each individual ray until it is fully absorbed by the intervening gas. If the mean free path is long, the computational cost and memory load are likely to be prohibitive. We have developed an algorithm that overcomes these limitations and is, therefore, significantly more efficient. The method calculates the transfer of radiation collectively, using the Fast Fourier Transform to convert radiation between position and Fourier spaces, so the computational cost will not increase with the number of ionizing sources. The method also automatically combines parallel rays with the same frequency at the same grid cell, thereby minimizing the memory requirement. The method is explicitly photon-conserving, i.e. the depletion of ionizing photons is guaranteed to equal the photoionizations they caused, and explicitly obeys the periodic boundary condition, i.e. the escape of ionizing photons from one side of a simulation volume is guaranteed to be compensated by emitting the same amount of photons into the volume through the opposite side. Together, these features make it possible to numerically simulate the transfer of ionizing photons more efficiently than previous methods. Since ionizing radiation such as the X-ray is responsible for heating the intergalactic gas when first stars and quasars form at high redshifts, our method can be applied to simulate thermal distribution, in addition to cosmic reionization, in three-dimensional inhomogeneous cosmological density field.

  15. Relationship between mass density, electron density, and elemental composition of body tissues for Monte Carlo simulation in radiation treatment planning

    CERN Document Server

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: For Monte Carlo simulation of radiotherapy, x-ray CT number of every system needs to be calibrated and converted to mass density and elemental composition. This study aims to formulate material properties of body tissues for practical two-step conversion from CT number. Methods: We used the latest compilation on body tissues that constitute reference adult male and female. We formulated the relations among mass, electron, and elemental densities into polylines to connect representative tissues, for which we took mass-weighted mean for the tissues in limited density regions. We compared the polyline functions of mass density with a bi-line for electron density and broken lines for elemental densities, which were derived from preceding studies. Results: There was generally high correlation between mass density and the other densities except of C, N, and O for light spongiosa tissues occupying 1% of body mass. The polylines fitted to the dominant tissues and were generally consistent with the bi-line an...

  16. Estimation of radiation dose and risk to children undergoing cardiac catheterization for the treatment of a congenital heart disease using Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakoumakis, Emmanuel; Kostopoulou, Helen; Dimitriadis, Anastastios; Georgiou, Evaggelos [University of Athens, Medical Physics Department, Medical School, Athens (Greece); Makri, Triantafilia [' Agia Sofia' Hospital, Medical Physics Unit, Athens (Greece); Tsalafoutas, Ioannis [Anticancer-Oncology Hospital of Athens ' Agios Savvas' , Medical Physics Department, Athens (Greece)

    2013-03-15

    Children diagnosed with congenital heart disease often undergo cardiac catheterization for their treatment, which involves the use of ionizing radiation and therefore a risk of radiation-induced cancer. The purpose of this study was to calculate the effective and equivalent organ doses (H{sub T}) in those children and estimate the risk of exposure-induced death. Fifty-three children were divided into three groups: atrial septal defect (ASD), ventricular septal defect (VSD) and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). In all procedures, the exposure conditions and the dose-area product meters readings were recorded for each individual acquisition. Monte Carlo simulations were run using the PCXMC 2.0 code and mathematical phantoms simulating a child's anatomy. The H{sub T} values to all irradiated organs and the resulting E and risk of exposure-induced death values were calculated. The average dose-area product values were, respectively, 40 {+-} 12 Gy.cm{sup 2} for the ASD, 17.5 {+-} 0.7 Gy.cm{sup 2} for the VSD and 9.5 {+-} 1 Gy.cm{sup 2} for the PDA group. The average E values were 40 {+-} 12, 22 {+-} 2.5 and 17 {+-} 3.6 mSv for ASD, VSD and PDA groups, respectively. The respective estimated risk of exposure-induced death values per procedure were 0.109, 0.106 and 0.067%. Cardiac catheterizations in children involve a considerable risk for radiation-induced cancer that has to be further reduced. (orig.)

  17. Physics and Simulation of Diffusive Transport in Nanoscale Transistors MESFET Device Ga0.49 In0.51P Using Monte Carlo Method of Electronic Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourdine Massoum

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The field of microelectronics has made surprising advances in the last decade, mainly pushed by the enormous progress in semiconductor technology. Such a reduction of dimensions allows the fabrication of chips with more than one million components. In addition, it opens the way to new physical phenomena, which were not present in traditional structures. In this context, the Monte Carlo simulation has particular significance. This approach allowed conceiving applicable model for GaInP MESFET operating in the turn-one or pinch-off region, and valid for the short-channel and the long-channel GaInP MESFET, in which the two-dimensional potential distribution contributed by the depletion layer under the gate is obtained by conventional 1D approximation

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of simultaneous radiation detection in the hybrid tomography system ClearPET-XPAD3/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila, H. Olaya; Sevilla, A. C.; Castro, H. F.; Martínez, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Using the Geant4 based simulation framework SciFW1, a detailed simulation was performed for a detector array in the hybrid tomography prototype for small animals called ClearPET / XPAD, which was built in the Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille. The detector system consists of an array of phoswich scintillation detectors: LSO (Lutetium Oxy-ortosilicate doped with cerium Lu2SiO5:Ce) and LuYAP (Lutetium Ortoaluminate of Yttrium doped with cerium Lu0.7Y0.3AlO3:Ce) for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and hybrid pixel detector XPAD for Computed Tomography (CT). Simultaneous acquisition of deposited energy and the corresponding time - position for each recorded event were analyzed, independently, for both detectors. interference between detection modules for PET and CT. Information about amount of radiation reaching each phoswich crystal and XPAD detector using a phantom in order to study the effectiveness by radiation attenuation and influence the positioning of the radioactive source 22Na was obtained. The simulation proposed will improve distribution of detectors rings and interference values will be taken into account in the new versions of detectors.

  19. Estimating radiation doses from multidetector CT using Monte Carlo simulations: effects of different size voxelized patient models on magnitudes of organ and effective dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMarco, J J; Cagnon, C H; Cody, D D; Stevens, D M; McCollough, C H; Zankl, M; Angel, E; McNitt-Gray, M F

    2007-05-07

    The purpose of this work is to examine the effects of patient size on radiation dose from CT scans. To perform these investigations, we used Monte Carlo simulation methods with detailed models of both patients and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanners. A family of three-dimensional, voxelized patient models previously developed and validated by the GSF was implemented as input files using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. These patient models represent a range of patient sizes and ages (8 weeks to 48 years) and have all radiosensitive organs previously identified and segmented, allowing the estimation of dose to any individual organ and calculation of patient effective dose. To estimate radiation dose, every voxel in each patient model was assigned both a specific organ index number and an elemental composition and mass density. Simulated CT scans of each voxelized patient model were performed using a previously developed MDCT source model that includes scanner specific spectra, including bowtie filter, scanner geometry and helical source path. The scan simulations in this work include a whole-body scan protocol and a thoracic CT scan protocol, each performed with fixed tube current. The whole-body scan simulation yielded a predictable decrease in effective dose as a function of increasing patient weight. Results from analysis of individual organs demonstrated similar trends, but with some individual variations. A comparison with a conventional dose estimation method using the ImPACT spreadsheet yielded an effective dose of 0.14 mSv mAs(-1) for the whole-body scan. This result is lower than the simulations on the voxelized model designated 'Irene' (0.15 mSv mAs(-1)) and higher than the models 'Donna' and 'Golem' (0.12 mSv mAs(-1)). For the thoracic scan protocol, the ImPACT spreadsheet estimates an effective dose of 0.037 mSv mAs(-1), which falls between the calculated values for Irene (0.042 mSv mAs(-1)) and Donna (0.031 mSv mAs(-1)) and is higher relative

  20. Validation of a GPU-based Monte Carlo code (gPMC) for proton radiation therapy: clinical cases study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Schuemann, Jan; Jia, Xun; Dowdell, Stephen; Jiang, Steve; Paganetti, Harald

    2015-03-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are recognized as the gold-standard for dose calculation, however they have not replaced analytical methods up to now due to their lengthy calculation times. GPU-based applications allow MC dose calculations to be performed on time scales comparable to conventional analytical algorithms. This study focuses on validating our GPU-based MC code for proton dose calculation (gPMC) using an experimentally validated multi-purpose MC code (TOPAS) and compare their performance for clinical patient cases. Clinical cases from five treatment sites were selected covering the full range from very homogeneous patient geometries (liver) to patients with high geometrical complexity (air cavities and density heterogeneities in head-and-neck and lung patients) and from short beam range (breast) to large beam range (prostate). Both gPMC and TOPAS were used to calculate 3D dose distributions for all patients. Comparisons were performed based on target coverage indices (mean dose, V95, D98, D50, D02) and gamma index distributions. Dosimetric indices differed less than 2% between TOPAS and gPMC dose distributions for most cases. Gamma index analysis with 1%/1 mm criterion resulted in a passing rate of more than 94% of all patient voxels receiving more than 10% of the mean target dose, for all patients except for prostate cases. Although clinically insignificant, gPMC resulted in systematic underestimation of target dose for prostate cases by 1-2% compared to TOPAS. Correspondingly the gamma index analysis with 1%/1 mm criterion failed for most beams for this site, while for 2%/1 mm criterion passing rates of more than 94.6% of all patient voxels were observed. For the same initial number of simulated particles, calculation time for a single beam for a typical head and neck patient plan decreased from 4 CPU hours per million particles (2.8-2.9 GHz Intel X5600) for TOPAS to 2.4 s per million particles (NVIDIA TESLA C2075) for gPMC. Excellent agreement was

  1. Monte-Carlo Simulations of Radiation-Induced Activation in a Fast-Neutron and Gamma- Based Cargo Inspection System

    CERN Document Server

    Bromberger, B; Brandis, M; Dangendorf, V; Goldberg, M B; Kaufmann, F; Mor, I; Nolte, R; Schmiedel, M; Tittelmeier, K; Vartsky, D; Wershofen, H

    2012-01-01

    An air cargo inspection system combining two nuclear reaction based techniques, namely Fast-Neutron Resonance Radiography and Dual-Discrete-Energy Gamma Radiography is currently being developed. This system is expected to allow detection of standard and improvised explosives as well as special nuclear materials. An important aspect for the applicability of nuclear techniques in an airport inspection facility is the inventory and lifetimes of radioactive isotopes produced by the neutron and gamma radiation inside the cargo, as well as the dose delivered by these isotopes to people in contact with the cargo during and following the interrogation procedure. Using MCNPX and CINDER90 we have calculated the activation levels for several typical inspection scenarios. One example is the activation of various metal samples embedded in a cotton-filled container. To validate the simulation results, a benchmark experiment was performed, in which metal samples were activated by fast-neutrons in a water-filled glass jar. T...

  2. Analysis of the neutrons dispersion in a semi-infinite medium based in transport theory and the Monte Carlo method; Analisis de la dispersion de neutrones en un medio semi-infinito en base a teoria de transporte y el metodo de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arreola V, G. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Posgrado en Ciencias Fisicomatematicas, area en Ingenieria Nuclear, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edificio 9, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07730 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Vazquez R, R.; Guzman A, J. R., E-mail: energia.arreola.uam@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    In this work a comparative analysis of the results for the neutrons dispersion in a not multiplicative semi-infinite medium is presented. One of the frontiers of this medium is located in the origin of coordinates, where a neutrons source in beam form, i.e., {mu}{omicron}=1 is also. The neutrons dispersion is studied on the statistical method of Monte Carlo and through the unidimensional transport theory and for an energy group. The application of transport theory gives a semi-analytic solution for this problem while the statistical solution for the flow was obtained applying the MCNPX code. The dispersion in light water and heavy water was studied. A first remarkable result is that both methods locate the maximum of the neutrons distribution to less than two mean free trajectories of transport for heavy water, while for the light water is less than ten mean free trajectories of transport; the differences between both methods is major for the light water case. A second remarkable result is that the tendency of both distributions is similar in small mean free trajectories, while in big mean free trajectories the transport theory spreads to an asymptote value and the solution in base statistical method spreads to zero. The existence of a neutron current of low energy and toward the source is demonstrated, in contrary sense to the neutron current of high energy coming from the own source. (Author)

  3. Reduction of radiation risks in patients undergoing some X-ray examinations by using optimal projections: A Monte Carlo program-based mathematical calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Chaparian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this paper were calculation and comparison of the effective doses, the risks of exposure-induced cancer, and dose reduction in the gonads for male and female patients in different projections of some X-ray examinations. Radiographies of lumbar spine [in the eight projections of anteroposterior (AP, posteroanterior (PA, right lateral (RLAT, left lateral (LLAT, right anterior-posterior oblique (RAO, left anterior-posterior oblique (LAO, right posterior-anterior oblique (RPO, and left posterior-anterior oblique (LPO], abdomen (in the two projections of AP and PA, and pelvis (in the two projections of AP and PA were investigated. A solid-state dosimeter was used for the measuring of the entrance skin exposure. A Monte Carlo program was used for calculation of effective doses, the risks of radiation-induced cancer, and doses to the gonads related to the different projections. Results of this study showed that PA projection of abdomen, lumbar spine, and pelvis radiographies caused 50%-57% lower effective doses than AP projection and 50%-60% reduction in radiation risks. Also use of LAO projection of lumbar spine X-ray examination caused 53% lower effective dose than RPO projection and 56% and 63% reduction in radiation risk for male and female, respectively, and RAO projection caused 28% lower effective dose than LPO projection and 52% and 39% reduction in radiation risk for males and females, respectively. About dose reduction in the gonads, using of the PA position rather than AP in the radiographies of the abdomen, lumbar spine, and pelvis can result in reduction of the ovaries doses in women, 38%, 31%, and 25%, respectively and reduction of the testicles doses in males, 76%, 86%, and 94%, respectively. Also for oblique projections of lumbar spine X-ray examination, with employment of LAO rather than RPO and also RAO rather than LPO, demonstrated 22% and 13% reductions to the ovaries doses and 66% and 54% reductions in the

  4. 3D Monte-Carlo transport calculations of whole slab reactor cores: validation of deterministic neutronic calculation routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, J.M. [CEA Cadarache, Service de Physique des Reacteurs et du Cycle, Lab. de Projets Nucleaires, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents how Monte-Carlo calculations (French TRIPOLI4 poly-kinetic code with an appropriate pre-processing and post-processing software called OVNI) are used in the case of 3-dimensional heterogeneous benchmarks (slab reactor cores) to reduce model biases and enable a thorough and detailed analysis of the performances of deterministic methods and their associated data libraries with respect to key neutron parameters (reactivity, local power). Outstanding examples of application of these tools are presented regarding the new numerical methods implemented in the French lattice code APOLLO2 (advanced self-shielding models, new IDT characteristics method implemented within the discrete-ordinates flux solver model) and the JEFF3.1 nuclear data library (checked against JEF2.2 previous file). In particular we have pointed out, by performing multigroup/point-wise TRIPOLI4 (assembly and core) calculations, the efficiency (in terms of accuracy and computation time) of the new IDT method developed in APOLLO2. In addition, by performing 3-dimensional TRIPOLI4 calculations of the whole slab core (few millions of elementary volumes), the high quality of the new JEFF3.1 nuclear data files and revised evaluations (U{sup 235}, U{sup 238}, Hf) for reactivity prediction of slab cores critical experiments has been stressed. As a feedback of the whole validation process, improvements in terms of nuclear data (mainly Hf capture cross-sections) and numerical methods (advanced quadrature formulas accounting validation results, validation of new self-shielding models, parallelization) are suggested to improve even more the APOLLO2-CRONOS2 standard calculation route. (author)

  5. Measurements of photon and neutron leakage from medical linear accelerators and Monte Carlo simulation of tenth value layers of concrete used for intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaradat, Adnan Khalaf

    The x ray leakage from the housing of a therapy x ray source is regulated to be bubble detector of type BD-PND and using Track-Etch detectors. The highest neutron dose equivalent per unit electron dose was at 0° for all electron energies. The neutron leakage from photon beams was the highest between all the machines. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery consists of a summation of small beamlets having different weights that make up each field. A linear accelerator room designed exclusively for IMRT use would require different, probably lower, tenth value layers (TVL) for determining the required wall thicknesses for the primary barriers. The first, second, and third TVL of 60Co gamma rays and photons from 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV x ray beams by concrete have been determined and modeled using a Monte Carlo technique (MCNP version 4C2) for cone beams of half-opening angles of 0°, 3°, 6°, 9°, 12°, and 14°.

  6. Monte Carlo estimation of radiation dose in organs of female and male adult phantoms due to FDG-F18 absorbed in the lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belinato, Walmir; Santos, William S.; Silva, Rogério M. V.; Souza, Divanizia N.

    2014-03-01

    The determination of dose conversion factors (S values) for the radionuclide fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) absorbed in the lungs during a positron emission tomography (PET) procedure was calculated using the Monte Carlo method (MCNPX version 2.7.0). For the obtained dose conversion factors of interest, it was considered a uniform absorption of radiopharmaceutical by the lung of a healthy adult human. The spectrum of fluorine was introduced in the input data file for the simulation. The simulation took place in two adult phantoms of both sexes, based on polygon mesh surfaces called FASH and MASH with anatomy and posture according to ICRP 89. The S values for the 22 internal organs/tissues, chosen from ICRP No. 110, for the FASH and MASH phantoms were compared with the results obtained from a MIRD V phantoms called ADAM and EVA used by the Committee on Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD). We observed variation of more than 100% in S values due to structural anatomical differences in the internal organs of the MASH and FASH phantoms compared to the mathematical phantom.

  7. Monte Carlo estimation of radiation dose in organs of female and male adult phantoms due to FDG-F18 absorbed in the lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinato Walmir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The determination of dose conversion factors (S values for the radionuclide fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG absorbed in the lungs during a positron emission tomography (PET procedure was calculated using the Monte Carlo method (MCNPX version 2.7.0. For the obtained dose conversion factors of interest, it was considered a uniform absorption of radiopharmaceutical by the lung of a healthy adult human. The spectrum of fluorine was introduced in the input data file for the simulation. The simulation took place in two adult phantoms of both sexes, based on polygon mesh surfaces called FASH and MASH with anatomy and posture according to ICRP 89. The S values for the 22 internal organs/tissues, chosen from ICRP No. 110, for the FASH and MASH phantoms were compared with the results obtained from a MIRD V phantoms called ADAM and EVA used by the Committee on Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD. We observed variation of more than 100% in S values due to structural anatomical differences in the internal organs of the MASH and FASH phantoms compared to the mathematical phantom.

  8. Radiative recombination mechanisms in CdTe thin films deposited by elemental vapor transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Shamara [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Florida, 4202 East Fowler Ave, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States); Vatavu, Sergiu, E-mail: svatavu@usm.md [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Florida, 4202 East Fowler Ave, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States); Faculty of Physics and Engineering, Moldova State University, 60 A. Mateevici str., Chisinau, MD-2009, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Evani, Vamsi; Khan, Md; Bakhshi, Sara; Palekis, Vasilios [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Florida, 4202 East Fowler Ave, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States); Rotaru, Corneliu [Faculty of Physics and Engineering, Moldova State University, 60 A. Mateevici str., Chisinau, MD-2009, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Ferekides, Chris [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Florida, 4202 East Fowler Ave, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    A photoluminesence (PL) study of the radiative recombination mechanisms for CdTe films deposited under different Cd and Te overpressure by elemental vapor transport is presented. The experiment and analysis have been carried out in the temperature range of 12-130 K. The intensity of the PL laser excitation beam was varied by two orders of magnitude. It has been established that the bands in the 1.47-1.50 eV are determined by transitions involving shallow D and A states and the 1.36x-1.37x eV band is due to band to level transitions. Deep transitions at 1.042 eV and 1.129 eV are due to radiative transitions to levels determined by CdTe native defects. - Highlights: • Photoluminescense (PL) of CdTe thin films is present in the 0.8-1.6 eV spectral region. • High intensity excitonic peaks are among the main radiative paths. • Radiative transitions at 1.36x eV are assisted by dislocations caused levels. • Extremal Cd/Te overpressure ratios enhance PL for 1.497 eV, 1.486 eV, 1.474 eV bands. • PL intensity reaches its max value for the 0.45 and 1.25 Cd/Te overpressure ratios.

  9. Terahertz radiation induced chaotic electron transport in semiconductor superlattices with a tilted magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C., E-mail: cwang@mail.sim.ac.cn; Wang, F.; Cao, J. C., E-mail: jccao@mail.sim.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Terahertz Solid-State Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-09-01

    Chaotic electron transport in semiconductor superlattice induced by terahertz electric field that is superimposed on a dc electric field along the superlattice axis are studied using the semiclassical motion equations including the effect of dissipation. A magnetic field that is tilted relative to the superlattice axis is also applied to the system. Numerical simulation shows that electrons in superlattice miniband exhibit complicate nonlinear oscillating modes with the influence of terahertz radiation. Transitions between frequency-locking and chaos via pattern forming bifurcations are observed with the varying of terahertz amplitude. It is found that the chaotic regions gradually contract as the dissipation increases. We attribute the appearance of complicate nonlinear oscillation in superlattice to the interaction between terahertz radiation and internal cooperative oscillating mode relative to Bloch oscillation and cyclotron oscillation.

  10. Radiation doses from the transport of radioactive waste to a future repository in Denmark. A model study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-05-15

    The radiation doses modelled for transport of radioactive waste to a future repository in Denmark, demonstrates that the risk associated with road and sea transport should not limit the future selection of a location of the repository. From a safety perspective both road and sea transport seem to be feasible modes of transport. Although the modelling in most cases is performed conservatively, the modelled doses suggest that both transport methods can be carried out well within the national dose limits. Additionally, the dose levels associated with the modelled accident scenarios are low and the scenarios are thus found to be acceptable taken the related probabilities into account. (LN)

  11. Numerical modeling of photon migration in human neck based on the radiative transport equation

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, Hiroyuki; Nadamoto, Ken; Okada, Eiji; Yamada, Yukio; Hoshi, Yoko; Watanabe, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical optical imaging has a possibility of a comprehensive diagnosis of thyroid cancer in conjunction with ultrasound imaging. For improvement of the optical imaging, this study develops a higher order scheme for solving the time-dependent radiative transport equation (RTE) by use of the finite-difference and discrete-ordinate methods. The accuracy and efficiency of the developed scheme are examined by comparison with the analytical solutions of the RTE in homogeneous media. Then, the developed scheme is applied to describing photon migration in the human neck model. The numerical simulations show complex behaviors of photon migration in the human neck model due to multiple diffusive reflection near the trachea.

  12. A Polar Discrete Ordinate Radiation Transport Method for 2D ALE Meshes in HYDRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Britton; Marinak, Marty; Weber, Chris; Peterson, Luc

    2016-10-01

    The Polar Discrete Ordinate Radiation Transport Method in HYDRA has been extended to handle general 2D r-z meshes. Previously the method was only for orthogonal 2D meshes. The new method can be employed with the ALE methodology for managing mesh motion that is used to simulate Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities on NIF capsule implosions. The results of an examination of this kind will be compared to those obtained by the corresponding diffusion method. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Gray and multigroup radiation transport through 3D binary stochastic media with different sphere radii distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Gordon L.

    2017-03-01

    Gray and multigroup radiation is transported through 3D media consisting of spheres randomly placed in a uniform background. Comparisons are made between using constant radii spheres and three different distributions of sphere radii. Because of the computational cost of 3D calculations, only the lowest angle order, n=1, is tested. If the mean chord length is held constant, using different radii distributions makes little difference. This is true for both gray and multigroup solutions. 3D transport solutions are compared to 2D and 1D solutions with the same mean chord lengths. 2D disk and 3D sphere media give solutions that are nearly identical while 1D slab solutions are fundamentally different.

  14. The Nature of Angular Momentum Transport in Radiative Self-Gravitating Protostellar Discs

    CERN Document Server

    Forgan, Duncan; Cossins, Peter; Lodato, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Semi-analytic models of self-gravitating discs often approximate the angular momentum transport generated by the gravitational instability using the phenomenology of viscosity. This allows the employment of the standard viscous evolution equations, and gives promising results. It is, however, still not clear when such an approximation is appropriate. This paper tests this approximation using high resolution 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of self-gravitating protostellar discs with radiative transfer. The nature of angular momentum transport associated with the gravitational instability is characterised as a function of both the stellar mass and the disc-to-star mass ratio. The effective viscosity is calculated from the Reynolds and gravitational stresses in the disc. This is then compared to what would be expected if the effective viscosity were determined by assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium or, equivalently, that the local dissipation rate matches the local cooling rate. In gene...

  15. Transport and dissociation of neon dimer cations in neon gas: a joint dynamical and Monte Carlo modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhenni, Malika; Stachoň, Martin; Gadéa, Florent Xavier; Yousfi, Mohammed; Kalus, René

    2016-09-01

    A hybrid dynamical method based on the classical treatment of nuclei and the quantum treatment of electrons was used to calculate momentum transfer and dissociation cross-sections for collisions of neon dimer cations with neon atoms. For the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects, a semi-empirical factor was introduced to correct the hybrid momentum transfer cross-sections at low collision energies. Both uncorrected and quantum corrected hybrid cross-sections were used to calculate the {{Ne}}2+ mobility, and longitudinal and transverse characteristic diffusion energies over a wide range of the reduced electric field. Furthermore, the {{Ne}}2+ dissociation rate constant was calculated and compared to measured data. In addition, an approximate inverse method based on an effective isotropic interaction potential was also used to calculate the momentum transfer cross-sections and related transport data.

  16. Clinical implementation of the Peregrine Monte Carlo dose calculations system for photon beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, N; Bergstrom, P M; Daly, T P; Descalle, M; Garrett, D; House, R K; Knapp, D K; May, S; Patterson, R W; Siantar, C L; Verhey, L; Walling, R S; Welczorek, D

    1999-07-01

    PEREGRINE is a 3D Monte Carlo dose calculation system designed to serve as a dose calculation engine for clinical radiation therapy treatment planning systems. Taking advantage of recent advances in low-cost computer hardware, modern multiprocessor architectures and optimized Monte Carlo transport algorithms, PEREGRINE performs mm-resolution Monte Carlo calculations in times that are reasonable for clinical use. PEREGRINE has been developed to simulate radiation therapy for several source types, including photons, electrons, neutrons and protons, for both teletherapy and brachytherapy. However the work described in this paper is limited to linear accelerator-based megavoltage photon therapy. Here we assess the accuracy, reliability, and added value of 3D Monte Carlo transport for photon therapy treatment planning. Comparisons with clinical measurements in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms demonstrate PEREGRINE's accuracy. Studies with variable tissue composition demonstrate the importance of material assignment on the overall dose distribution. Detailed analysis of Monte Carlo results provides new information for radiation research by expanding the set of observables.

  17. Quality control of the treatment planning systems dose calculations in external radiation therapy using the Penelope Monte Carlo code; Controle qualite des systemes de planification dosimetrique des traitements en radiotherapie externe au moyen du code Monte-Carlo Penelope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazy-Aubignac, L

    2007-09-15

    The treatment planning systems (T.P.S.) occupy a key position in the radiotherapy service: they realize the projected calculation of the dose distribution and the treatment duration. Traditionally, the quality control of the calculated distribution doses relies on their comparisons with dose distributions measured under the device of treatment. This thesis proposes to substitute these dosimetry measures to the profile of reference dosimetry calculations got by the Penelope Monte-Carlo code. The Monte-Carlo simulations give a broad choice of test configurations and allow to envisage a quality control of dosimetry aspects of T.P.S. without monopolizing the treatment devices. This quality control, based on the Monte-Carlo simulations has been tested on a clinical T.P.S. and has allowed to simplify the quality procedures of the T.P.S.. This quality control, in depth, more precise and simpler to implement could be generalized to every center of radiotherapy. (N.C.)

  18. Comparison of a 3-D multi-group SN particle transport code with Monte Carlo for intracavitary brachytherapy of the cervix uteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Kent A; Wareing, Todd A; Failla, Gregory; Horton, John L; Eifel, Patricia J; Mourtada, Firas

    2009-12-03

    A patient dose distribution was calculated by a 3D multi-group S N particle transport code for intracavitary brachytherapy of the cervix uteri and compared to previously published Monte Carlo results. A Cs-137 LDR intracavitary brachytherapy CT data set was chosen from our clinical database. MCNPX version 2.5.c, was used to calculate the dose distribution. A 3D multi-group S N particle transport code, Attila version 6.1.1 was used to simulate the same patient. Each patient applicator was built in SolidWorks, a mechanical design package, and then assembled with a coordinate transformation and rotation for the patient. The SolidWorks exported applicator geometry was imported into Attila for calculation. Dose matrices were overlaid on the patient CT data set. Dose volume histograms and point doses were compared. The MCNPX calculation required 14.8 hours, whereas the Attila calculation required 22.2 minutes on a 1.8 GHz AMD Opteron CPU. Agreement between Attila and MCNPX dose calculations at the ICRU 38 points was within +/- 3%. Calculated doses to the 2 cc and 5 cc volumes of highest dose differed by not more than +/- 1.1% between the two codes. Dose and DVH overlays agreed well qualitatively. Attila can calculate dose accurately and efficiently for this Cs-137 CT-based patient geometry. Our data showed that a three-group cross-section set is adequate for Cs-137 computations. Future work is aimed at implementing an optimized version of Attila for radiotherapy calculations.

  19. Radial transport of radiation belt electrons due to stormtime Pc5 waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Y. Ukhorskiy

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During geomagnetic storms relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt exhibit dynamic variability over multiple orders of magnitude. This requires radial transport of electrons across their drift shells and implies violation of their third adiabatic invariant. Radial transport is induced by the interaction of the electron drift motion with electric and magnetic field fluctuations in the ULF frequency range. It was previously shown that solar-wind driven ULF waves have long azimuthal wave lengths and thus can violate the third invariant of trapped electrons in the process of resonant interaction with their gradient-curvature motion. However, the amplitude of solar-wind driven ULF waves rapidly decreases with decreasing L. It is therefore not clear what mechanisms are responsible for fast transport rates observed inside the geosynchronous orbit. In this paper we investigate wether stormtime Pc5 waves can contribute to this process. Stormtime Pc5s have short azimuthal wave lengths and therefore cannot exhibit resonance with the the electron drift motion. However we show that stormtime Pc5s can cause localized random scattering of electron drift motion that violates the third invariant. According to our results electron interaction with stormtime Pc5s can produce rapid radial transport even as low as L≃4. Numerical simulations show that electron transport can exhibit large deviations from radial diffusion. The diffusion approximation is not valid for individual storms but only applies to the statistically averaged response of the outer belt to stormtime Pc5 waves.

  20. The nature of angular momentum transport in radiative self-gravitating protostellar discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgan, Duncan; Rice, Ken; Cossins, Peter; Lodato, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Semi-analytic models of self-gravitating discs often approximate the angular momentum transport generated by the gravitational instability using the phenomenology of viscosity. This allows the employment of the standard viscous evolution equations, and gives promising results. It is, however, still not clear when such an approximation is appropriate. This paper tests this approximation using high-resolution 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of self-gravitating protostellar discs with radiative transfer. The nature of angular momentum transport associated with the gravitational instability is characterized as a function of both the stellar mass and the disc-to-star mass ratio. The effective viscosity is calculated from the Reynolds and gravitational stresses in the disc. This is then compared to what would be expected if the effective viscosity were determined by assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium or, equivalently, that the local dissipation rate matches the local cooling rate. In general, all the discs considered here settle into a self-regulated state where the heating generated by the gravitational instability is modulated by the local radiative cooling. It is found that low-mass discs can indeed be represented by a local α-parametrization, provided that the disc aspect ratio is small (H/r≤ 0.1) which is generally the case when the disc-to-star mass ratio q≲ 0.5. However, this result does not extend to discs with masses approaching that of the central object. These are subject to transient burst events and global wave transport, and the effective viscosity is not well modelled by assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium. In spite of these effects, it is shown that massive (compact) discs can remain stable and not fragment, evolving rapidly to reduce their disc-to-star mass ratios through stellar accretion and radial spreading.

  1. The effect of magnification on the image quality and the radiation dose in X-ray digital mammography: a Monte Carlo simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yu-Na; Kim, Hee-Joung; Park, Hye-Suk; Lee, Chang-Lae; Cho, Hyo-Min; Lee, Seung-Wan; Ryu, Hyun-Ju [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    There have been many efforts to advance the technology of X-ray digital mammography in order to enhance the early detection of breast pathology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate image quality and the radiation dose after magnifying X-ray digital mammography using the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE). In this study, we simulated a Monte Carlo model of an X-ray digital mammographic system, and we present a technique for magnification and discuss how it affects the image quality. The simulated X-ray digital mammographic system with GATE consists of an X-ray source, a compression paddle, a supporting plate, and an imaging plate (IP) of computed radiography (CR). The degree of magnification ranged from 1.0 to 2.0. We designed a semi-cylindrical phantom with a thickness of 45-mm and a radius of 50-mm in order to evaluate the image quality after magnification. The phantom was made of poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) and contained four spherical specks with diameters of 750, 500, 250, and 100-{mu}m to simulate microcalcifications. The simulation studies were performed with an X-ray energy spectrum calculated using the spectrum processor SRS-78. A combination of a molybdenum anode and a molybdenum filter (Mo/Mo) was used for the mammographic X-ray tubes. The effects of the degree of magnification were investigated in terms of both the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and the average glandular dose (AGD). The results show that the CNR increased as the degree of magnification increased and decreased as breast glandularity increased. The AGD showed only a minor increase with magnification. Based on the results, magnification of mammographic images can be used to obtain high image quality with an increased CNR. Our X-ray digital mammographic system model with GATE may be used as a basis for future studies on X-ray imaging characteristics.

  2. Fundamentals of Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollaber, Allan Benton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-16

    This is a powerpoint presentation which serves as lecture material for the Parallel Computing summer school. It goes over the fundamentals of the Monte Carlo calculation method. The material is presented according to the following outline: Introduction (background, a simple example: estimating π), Why does this even work? (The Law of Large Numbers, The Central Limit Theorem), How to sample (inverse transform sampling, rejection), and An example from particle transport.

  3. Soot formation, transport, and radiation in unsteady diffusion flames : LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Williams, Timothy C.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Jensen, Kirk A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Blevins, Linda Gail; Kearney, Sean Patrick (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Schefer, Robert W.

    2004-10-01

    Fires pose the dominant risk to the safety and security of nuclear weapons, nuclear transport containers, and DOE and DoD facilities. The thermal hazard from these fires primarily results from radiant emission from high-temperature flame soot. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the local transport and chemical phenomena that determine the distributions of soot concentration, optical properties, and temperature in order to develop and validate constitutive models for large-scale, high-fidelity fire simulations. This report summarizes the findings of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project devoted to obtaining the critical experimental information needed to develop such constitutive models. A combination of laser diagnostics and extractive measurement techniques have been employed in both steady and pulsed laminar diffusion flames of methane, ethylene, and JP-8 surrogate burning in air. For methane and ethylene, both slot and coannular flame geometries were investigated, as well as normal and inverse diffusion flame geometries. For the JP-8 surrogate, coannular normal diffusion flames were investigated. Soot concentrations, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) signals, hydroxyl radical (OH) LIF, acetylene and water vapor concentrations, soot zone temperatures, and the velocity field were all successfully measured in both steady and unsteady versions of these various flames. In addition, measurements were made of the soot microstructure, soot dimensionless extinction coefficient (&), and the local radiant heat flux. Taken together, these measurements comprise a unique, extensive database for future development and validation of models of soot formation, transport, and radiation.

  4. Theoretical investigation of coherent synchrotron radiation induced microbunching instability in transport and recirculation arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Cheng-Ying; Li, Rui; Tennant, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) of a high brightness electron beam traversing a series of dipoles, such as recirculation or transport arcs, may lead to the microbunching instability. We extend and develop a semi-analytical approach of the CSR-induced microbunching instability for a general lattice, based on the previous formulation with 1-D CSR model [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 5, 064401 (2002)] and apply it to investigate the physical processes of microbunching amplification for two example transport arc lattices. We find that the microbunching instability in transport arcs has a distinguishing feature of multistage amplification (e.g, up to 6th stage for our example arcs in contrast to two stage amplification for a 3-dipole chicane). By further extending the concept of stage gain as proposed by Huang and Kim [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 5, 074401 (2002)], we developed a method to quantitatively characterize the microbunching amplification in terms of iterative or staged orders that allows the compar...

  5. Dosimetric verification and clinical evaluation of a new commercially available Monte Carlo-based dose algorithm for application in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fragoso, Margarida; Wen Ning; Kumar, Sanath; Liu Dezhi; Ryu, Samuel; Movsas, Benjamin; Munther, Ajlouni; Chetty, Indrin J, E-mail: ichetty1@hfhs.or [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2010-08-21

    Modern cancer treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), have greatly increased the demand for more accurate treatment planning (structure definition, dose calculation, etc) and dose delivery. The ability to use fast and accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose calculations within a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) in the clinical setting is now becoming more of a reality. This study describes the dosimetric verification and initial clinical evaluation of a new commercial MC-based photon beam dose calculation algorithm, within the iPlan v.4.1 TPS (BrainLAB AG, Feldkirchen, Germany). Experimental verification of the MC photon beam model was performed with film and ionization chambers in water phantoms and in heterogeneous solid-water slabs containing bone and lung-equivalent materials for a 6 MV photon beam from a Novalis (BrainLAB) linear accelerator (linac) with a micro-multileaf collimator (m{sub 3} MLC). The agreement between calculated and measured dose distributions in the water phantom verification tests was, on average, within 2%/1 mm (high dose/high gradient) and was within {+-}4%/2 mm in the heterogeneous slab geometries. Example treatment plans in the lung show significant differences between the MC and one-dimensional pencil beam (PB) algorithms within iPlan, especially for small lesions in the lung, where electronic disequilibrium effects are emphasized. Other user-specific features in the iPlan system, such as options to select dose to water or dose to medium, and the mean variance level, have been investigated. Timing results for typical lung treatment plans show the total computation time (including that for processing and I/O) to be less than 10 min for 1-2% mean variance (running on a single PC with 8 Intel Xeon X5355 CPUs, 2.66 GHz). Overall, the iPlan MC algorithm is demonstrated to be an accurate and efficient dose algorithm, incorporating robust tools for MC

  6. Solving Inverse Radiation Transport Problems with Multi-Sensor Data in the Presence of Correlated Measurement and Modeling Errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Edward V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stork, Christopher L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mattingly, John K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Inverse radiation transport focuses on identifying the configuration of an unknown radiation source given its observed radiation signatures. The inverse problem is traditionally solved by finding the set of transport model parameter values that minimizes a weighted sum of the squared differences by channel between the observed signature and the signature pre dicted by the hypothesized model parameters. The weights are inversely proportional to the sum of the variances of the measurement and model errors at a given channel. The traditional implicit (often inaccurate) assumption is that the errors (differences between the modeled and observed radiation signatures) are independent across channels. Here, an alternative method that accounts for correlated errors between channels is described and illustrated using an inverse problem based on the combination of gam ma and neutron multiplicity counting measurements.

  7. PARALLELIZATION AND PERFECTION OF MCNP MONTE CARLO PARTICLE TRANSPORT CODE IN MPI%粒子输运蒙特卡罗程序MCNP在MPI下的并行化及完善

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓力; 刘杰; 张文勇

    2003-01-01

    The particle transport Monte Carlo code MCNP had been realized the paral-lelization in MPI (Message Passing Interface) in 1999. But due to adopting the leap random number producer, some differences were existed between the parallel result and the serial result. Now the same results have been achieved by using the segment random number. The speedup of the applied problem is the liner ups to 53 in 64-Processors and the parallel efficiencv is up to 83% in 64-Processors.

  8. Control of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation and Micro-Bunching Effects During Transport of High Brightness Electron Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Douglas, D R; Hutton, A; Krafft, G A; Li, R; Neil, G R; Roblin, Y; Tennant, C D; Tsai, C -Y

    2014-01-01

    Beam quality preservation during transport of high-brightness electron beams is of general concern in the design of modern accelerators. Methods to manage incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR) have been in place for decades; as beam brightness has improved coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) and the microbunching instability (uBI) have emerged as performance limitations. We apply the compensation analysis of diMitri, Cornacchia, and Spampinati - as previously used by Borland - to the design of transport systems for use with low-emittance beams, and find that appropriately configured second order achromats will suppress transverse emittance growth due to CSR and appear to limit uBI gain.

  9. Use of Transportable Radiation Detection Instruments to Assess Internal Contamination from Intakes of Radionuclides Part II: Calibration Factors and ICAT Computer Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anigstein, Robert; Olsher, Richard H; Loomis, Donald A; Ansari, Armin

    2016-12-01

    The detonation of a radiological dispersion device or other radiological incidents could result in widespread releases of radioactive materials and intakes of radionuclides by affected individuals. Transportable radiation monitoring instruments could be used to measure radiation from gamma-emitting radionuclides in the body for triaging individuals and assigning priorities to their bioassay samples for in vitro assessments. The present study derived sets of calibration factors for four instruments: the Ludlum Model 44-2 gamma scintillator, a survey meter containing a 2.54 × 2.54-cm NaI(Tl) crystal; the Captus 3000 thyroid uptake probe, which contains a 5.08 × 5.08-cm NaI(Tl) crystal; the Transportable Portal Monitor Model TPM-903B, which contains two 3.81 × 7.62 × 182.9-cm polyvinyltoluene plastic scintillators; and a generic instrument, such as an ionization chamber, that measures exposure rates. The calibration factors enable these instruments to be used for assessing inhaled or ingested intakes of any of four radionuclides: Co, I, Cs, and Ir. The derivations used biokinetic models embodied in the DCAL computer software system developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNPX radiation transport code. The three physical instruments were represented by MCNP models that were developed previously. The affected individuals comprised children of five ages who were represented by the revised Oak Ridge National Laboratory pediatric phantoms, and adult men and adult women represented by the Adult Reference Computational Phantoms described in Publication 110 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. These calibration factors can be used to calculate intakes; the intakes can be converted to committed doses by the use of tabulated dose coefficients. These calibration factors also constitute input data to the ICAT computer program, an interactive Microsoft Windows-based software package that estimates intakes of

  10. Monte Carlo simulation for pixel detectors: a feasibility study for X radiation applications; Simulacao de Monte Carlo para detectores de pixel: um estudo de viabilidade para aplicacoes com raios-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinho, F., E-mail: marinho@macae.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Macae, RJ (Brazil); Akiba, K. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we analyze the feasibility of a Monte Carlo simulation for the description of pixel semiconductor detectors as a tool for research and development of such devices and their applications for X-rays. We present as a result the technical aspects and main characteristics of a set of algorithms recently developed which allows one to estimate the energy spectrum and cluster classification. (author)

  11. Production of energetic light fragments in extensions of the CEM and LAQGSM event generators of the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashnik, Stepan G.; Kerby, Leslie M.; Gudima, Konstantin K.; Sierk, Arnold J.; Bull, Jeffrey S.; James, Michael R.

    2017-03-01

    We extend the cascade-exciton model (CEM), and the Los Alamos version of the quark-gluon string model (LAQGSM), event generators of the Monte Carlo N -particle transport code version 6 (MCNP6), to describe production of energetic light fragments (LF) heavier than 4He from various nuclear reactions induced by particles and nuclei at energies up to about 1 TeV/nucleon. In these models, energetic LF can be produced via Fermi breakup, preequilibrium emission, and coalescence of cascade particles. Initially, we study several variations of the Fermi breakup model and choose the best option for these models. Then, we extend the modified exciton model (MEM) used by these codes to account for a possibility of multiple emission of up to 66 types of particles and LF (up to 28Mg) at the preequilibrium stage of reactions. Then, we expand the coalescence model to allow coalescence of LF from nucleons emitted at the intranuclear cascade stage of reactions and from lighter clusters, up to fragments with mass numbers A ≤7 , in the case of CEM, and A ≤12 , in the case of LAQGSM. Next, we modify MCNP6 to allow calculating and outputting spectra of LF and heavier products with arbitrary mass and charge numbers. The improved version of CEM is implemented into MCNP6. Finally, we test the improved versions of CEM, LAQGSM, and MCNP6 on a variety of measured nuclear reactions. The modified codes give an improved description of energetic LF from particle- and nucleus-induced reactions; showing a good agreement with a variety of available experimental data. They have an improved predictive power compared to the previous versions and can be used as reliable tools in simulating applications involving such types of reactions.

  12. Vapor transport deposition of large-area polycrystalline CdTe for radiation image sensor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Keedong; Cha, Bokyung; Heo, Duchang; Jeon, Sungchae [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, 111 Hanggaul-ro, Ansan-si, Gyeonggi-do 426-170 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    Vapor transport deposition (VTD) process delivers saturated vapor to substrate, resulting in high-throughput and scalable process. In addition, VTD can maintain lower substrate temperature than close-spaced sublimation (CSS). The motivation of this work is to adopt several advantages of VTD for radiation image sensor application. Polycrystalline CdTe films were obtained on 300 mm x 300 mm indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass. The polycrystalline CdTe film has columnar structure with average grain size of 3 μm ∝ 9 μm, which can be controlled by changing the substrate temperature. In order to analyze electrical and X-ray characteristics, ITO-CdTe-Al sandwich structured device was fabricated. Effective resistivity of the polycrystalline CdTe film was ∝1.4 x 10{sup 9}Ωcm. The device was operated under hole-collection mode. The responsivity and the μτ product estimated to be 6.8 μC/cm{sup 2}R and 5.5 x 10{sup -7} cm{sup 2}/V. The VTD can be a process of choice for monolithic integration of CdTe thick film for radiation image sensor and CMOS/TFT circuitry. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Simulation of decay processes and radiation transport times in radioactivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Toraño, E.; Peyres, V.; Bé, M.-M.; Dulieu, C.; Lépy, M.-C.; Salvat, F.

    2017-04-01

    The Fortran subroutine package PENNUC, which simulates random decay pathways of radioactive nuclides, is described. The decay scheme of the active nuclide is obtained from the NUCLEIDE database, whose web application has been complemented with the option of exporting nuclear decay data (possible nuclear transitions, branching ratios, type and energy of emitted particles) in a format that is readable by the simulation subroutines. In the case of beta emitters, the initial energy of the electron or positron is sampled from the theoretical Fermi spectrum. De-excitation of the atomic electron cloud following electron capture and internal conversion is described using transition probabilities from the LLNL Evaluated Atomic Data Library and empirical or calculated energies of released X rays and Auger electrons. The time evolution of radiation showers is determined by considering the lifetimes of nuclear and atomic levels, as well as radiation propagation times. Although PENNUC is designed to operate independently, here it is used in conjunction with the electron-photon transport code PENELOPE, and both together allow the simulation of experiments with radioactive sources in complex material structures consisting of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces. The reliability of these simulation tools is demonstrated through comparisons of simulated and measured energy spectra from radionuclides with complex multi-gamma spectra, nuclides with metastable levels in their decay pathways, nuclides with two daughters, and beta plus emitters.

  14. Monte Carlo and nonlinearities

    CERN Document Server

    Dauchet, Jérémi; Blanco, Stéphane; Caliot, Cyril; Charon, Julien; Coustet, Christophe; Hafi, Mouna El; Eymet, Vincent; Farges, Olivier; Forest, Vincent; Fournier, Richard; Galtier, Mathieu; Gautrais, Jacques; Khuong, Anaïs; Pelissier, Lionel; Piaud, Benjamin; Roger, Maxime; Terrée, Guillaume; Weitz, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is widely used to numerically predict systems behaviour. However, its powerful incremental design assumes a strong premise which has severely limited application so far: the estimation process must combine linearly over dimensions. Here we show that this premise can be alleviated by projecting nonlinearities on a polynomial basis and increasing the configuration-space dimension. Considering phytoplankton growth in light-limited environments, radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres, electromagnetic scattering by particles and concentrated-solar-power-plant productions, we prove the real world usability of this advance on four test-cases that were so far regarded as impracticable by Monte Carlo approaches. We also illustrate an outstanding feature of our method when applied to sharp problems with interacting particles: handling rare events is now straightforward. Overall, our extension preserves the features that made the method popular: addressing nonlinearities does not compromise o...

  15. Improved non-local electron thermal transport model for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory [University of Wisconsin—Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Delettrez, Jacques [Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    An implicit, non-local thermal conduction algorithm based on the algorithm developed by Schurtz, Nicolai, and Busquet (SNB) [Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] for non-local electron transport is presented and has been implemented in the radiation-hydrodynamics code DRACO. To study the model's effect on DRACO's predictive capability, simulations of shot 60 303 from OMEGA are completed using the iSNB model, and the computed shock speed vs. time is compared to experiment. Temperature outputs from the iSNB model are compared with the non-local transport model of Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. Effects on adiabat are also examined in a polar drive surrogate simulation. Results show that the iSNB model is not only capable of flux-limitation but also preheat prediction while remaining numerically robust and sacrificing little computational speed. Additionally, the results provide strong incentive to further modify key parameters within the SNB theory, namely, the newly introduced non-local mean free path. This research was supported by the Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester.

  16. Differences in dose-volumetric data between the analytical anisotropic algorithm and the x-ray voxel Monte Carlo algorithm in stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mampuya, Wambaka Ange [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image–Applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Matsuo, Yukinori, E-mail: ymatsuo@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image–Applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Nakamura, Akira; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Miyabe, Yuki; Narabayashi, Masaru; Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image–Applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the differences in dose-volumetric data obtained using the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) vs the x-ray voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) algorithm for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Dose-volumetric data from 20 patients treated with SBRT for solitary lung cancer generated using the iPlan XVMC for the Novalis system consisting of a 6-MV linear accelerator and micro-multileaf collimators were recalculated with the AAA in Eclipse using the same monitor units and identical beam setup. The mean isocenter dose was 100.2% and 98.7% of the prescribed dose according to XVMC and AAA, respectively. Mean values of the maximal dose (D{sub max}), the minimal dose (D{sub min}), and dose received by 95% volume (D{sub 95}) for the planning target volume (PTV) with XVMC were 104.3%, 75.1%, and 86.2%, respectively. When recalculated with the AAA, those values were 100.8%, 77.1%, and 85.4%, respectively. Mean dose parameter values considered for the normal lung, namely the mean lung dose, V{sub 5}, and V{sub 20}, were 3.7 Gy, 19.4%, and 5.0% for XVMC and 3.6 Gy, 18.3%, and 4.7% for the AAA, respectively. All of these dose-volumetric differences between the 2 algorithms were within 5% of the prescribed dose. The effect of PTV size and tumor location, respectively, on the differences in dose parameters for the PTV between the AAA and XVMC was evaluated. A significant effect of the PTV on the difference in D{sub 95} between the AAA and XVMC was observed (p = 0.03). Differences in the marginal doses, namely D{sub min} and D{sub 95}, were statistically significant between peripherally and centrally located tumors (p = 0.04 and p = 0.02, respectively). Tumor location and volume might have an effect on the differences in dose-volumetric parameters. The differences between AAA and XVMC were considered to be within an acceptable range (<5 percentage points)

  17. A Monte Carlo study of I-125 prostate brachytherapy with gold nanoparticles: dose enhancement with simultaneous rectal dose sparing via radiation shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brivio, D.; Nguyen, P. L.; Sajo, E.; Ngwa, W.; Zygmanski, P.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate via Monte Carlo simulations a new 125I brachytherapy treatment technique for high-risk prostate cancer patients via injection of Au nanoparticle (AuNP) directly into the prostate. The purpose of using the nanoparticles is to increase the therapeutic index via two synergistic effects: enhanced energy deposition within the prostate and simultaneous shielding of organs at risk from radiation escaping from the prostate. Both uniform and non-uniform concentrations of AuNP are studied. The latter are modeled considering the possibility of AuNP diffusion after the injection using brachy needles. We study two extreme cases of coaxial AuNP concentrations: centered on brachy needles and centered half-way between them. Assuming uniform distribution of 30 mg g‑1 of AuNP within the prostate, we obtain a dose enhancement larger than a factor of 2 to the prostate. Non-uniform concentration of AuNP ranging from 10 mg g‑1 and 66 mg g‑1 were studied. The higher the concentration in a given region of the prostate the greater is the enhancement therein. We obtain the highest dose enhancement when the brachytherapy needles are coincident with AuNP injection needles but, at the same time, the regions in the tail are colder (average dose ratio of 0.7). The best enhancement uniformity is obtained with the seeds in the tail of the AuNP distribution. In both uniform and non-uniform cases the urethra and rectum receive less than 1/3 dose compared to an analog treatment without AuNP. Remarkably, employing AuNP not only significantly increases dose to the target but also decreases dose to the neighboring rectum and even urethra, which is embedded within the prostate. These are mutually interdependent effects as more enhancement leads to more shielding and vice-versa. Caution must be paid since cold spot or hot spots may be created if the AuNP concentration versus seed position is not properly distributed respect to the seed locations.

  18. Evaluation of dose-volume metrics for microbeam radiation therapy dose distributions in head phantoms of various sizes using Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Danielle; Siegbahn, E. Albert; Fallone, B. Gino; Serduc, Raphael; Warkentin, Brad

    2012-05-01

    This work evaluates four dose-volume metrics applied to microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) using simulated dosimetric data as input. We seek to improve upon the most frequently used MRT metric, the peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR), by analyzing MRT dose distributions from a more volumetric perspective. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate dose distributions in three cubic head phantoms: a 2 cm mouse head, an 8 cm cat head and a 16 cm dog head. The dose distribution was calculated for a 4 × 4 mm2 microbeam array in each phantom, as well as a 16 × 16 mm2 array in the 8 cm cat head, and a 32 × 32 mm2 array in the 16 cm dog head. Microbeam widths of 25, 50 and 75 µm and center-to-center spacings of 100, 200 and 400 µm were considered. The metrics calculated for each simulation were the conventional PVDR, the peak-to-mean valley dose ratio (PMVDR), the mean dose and the percentage volume below a threshold dose. The PVDR ranged between 3 and 230 for the 2 cm mouse phantom, and between 2 and 186 for the 16 cm dog phantom depending on geometry. The corresponding ranges for the PMVDR were much smaller, being 2-49 (mouse) and 2-46 (dog), and showed a slightly weaker dependence on phantom size and array size. The ratio of the PMVDR to the PVDR varied from 0.21 to 0.79 for the different collimation configurations, indicating a difference between the geometric dependence on outcome that would be predicted by these two metrics. For unidirectional irradiation, the mean lesion dose was 102%, 79% and 42% of the mean skin dose for the 2 cm mouse, 8 cm cat and 16 cm dog head phantoms, respectively. However, the mean lesion dose recovered to 83% of the mean skin dose in the 16 cm dog phantom in intersecting cross-firing regions. The percentage volume below a 10% dose threshold was highly dependent on geometry, with ranges for the different collimation configurations of 2-87% and 33-96% for the 2 cm mouse and 16 cm dog heads, respectively. The results of this study

  19. Conditions for coherent-synchrotron-radiation-induced microbunching suppression in multibend beam transport or recirculation arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, C.-Y.; Di Mitri, S.; Douglas, D.; Li, R.; Tennant, C.

    2017-02-01

    The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) of a high-brightness electron beam traversing a series of dipoles, such as transport or recirculation arcs, may result in beam phase space degradation. On one hand, CSR can perturb electron transverse motion in dispersive regions along the beam line and possibly cause emittance growth. On the other hand, the CSR effect on the longitudinal beam dynamics could result in microbunching instability. For transport arcs, several schemes have been proposed to suppress the CSR-induced emittance growth. Correspondingly, a few scenarios have been introduced to suppress CSR-induced microbunching instability, which however mostly aim for linac-based machines. In this paper we provide sufficient conditions for suppression of CSR-induced microbunching instability along transport or recirculation arcs. Examples are presented with the relevant microbunching analyses carried out by our developed semianalytical Vlasov solver [C.-Y. Tsai, D. Douglas, R. Li, and C. Tennant, Linear microbunching analysis for recirculation machines, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 19, 114401 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevAccelBeams.19.114401]. The example lattices include low-energy (˜100 MeV ) and high-energy (˜1 GeV ) recirculation arcs, and medium-energy compressor arcs. Our studies show that lattices satisfying the proposed conditions indeed have microbunching gain suppressed. Beam current dependences of maximal CSR microbunching gains are also demonstrated, which should help outline a beam line design for different scales of nominal currents. We expect this analysis can shed light on the lattice design approach that aims to control the CSR-induced microbunching.

  20. Monte Carlo simulations incorporating Mie calculations of light transport in tissue phantoms: Examination of photon sampling volumes for endoscopically compatible fiber optic probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mourant, J.R.; Hielscher, A.H.; Bigio, I.J.

    1996-04-01

    Details of the interaction of photons with tissue phantoms are elucidated using Monte Carlo simulations. In particular, photon sampling volumes and photon pathlengths are determined for a variety of scattering and absorption parameters. The Monte Carlo simulations are specifically designed to model light delivery and collection geometries relevant to clinical applications of optical biopsy techniques. The Monte Carlo simulations assume that light is delivered and collected by two, nearly-adjacent optical fibers and take into account the numerical aperture of the fibers as well as reflectance and refraction at interfaces between different media. To determine the validity of the Monte Carlo simulations for modeling the interactions between the photons and the tissue phantom in these geometries, the simulations were compared to measurements of aqueous suspensions of polystyrene microspheres in the wavelength range 450-750 nm.

  1. Heights integrated model as instrument for simulation of hydrodynamic, radiation transport, and heat conduction phenomena of laser-produced plasma in EUV applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sizyuk, V.; Hassanein, A.; Morozov, V.; Sizyuk, T.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2007-01-16

    The HEIGHTS integrated model has been developed as an instrument for simulation and optimization of laser-produced plasma (LPP) sources relevant to extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. The model combines three general parts: hydrodynamics, radiation transport, and heat conduction. The first part employs a total variation diminishing scheme in the Lax-Friedrich formulation (TVD-LF); the second part, a Monte Carlo model; and the third part, implicit schemes with sparse matrix technology. All model parts consider physical processes in three-dimensional geometry. The influence of a generated magnetic field on laser plasma behavior was estimated, and it was found that this effect could be neglected for laser intensities relevant to EUV (up to {approx}10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}). All applied schemes were tested on analytical problems separately. Benchmark modeling of the full EUV source problem with a planar tin target showed good correspondence with experimental and theoretical data. Preliminary results are presented for tin droplet- and planar-target LPP devices. The influence of three-dimensional effects on EUV properties of source is discussed.

  2. CADGbased neighbor search and bounding box algorithms for geometry navigation acceleration in Monte Carlo particle transport simulation%基于CAD邻居列表和包围盒的蒙特卡罗粒子输运几何跟踪加速方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈珍平; 宋婧; 吴斌; 郝丽娟; 胡丽琴; 孙光耀

    2016-01-01

    Geometry navigation plays the most fundamental role in Monte Carlo particle transport simulation. It’s mainly responsible for locating a particle inside which geometry volume it is and computing the distance to the volume boundary along the certain particle traj ectory during each particle history. Geometry navigation directly affects the run-time performance of the Monte Carlo particle transport simulation, especially for complicated fusion reactor models. Thus, two CAD-based geometry acceleration algorithms,the neighbor search and the bounding box,are presented for improving geometry navigation performance. The algorithms have been implemented in the Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program for Nuclear and Radiation Process (SuperMC). The fusion reactors of FDS-Ⅱ and ITER benchmark models have been tested to highlight the efficiency gains that can be achieved by using the acceleration algorithms. Testing results showed that efficiency of Monte Carlo simulation can be considerably enhanced by 50% to 60% with the acceleration algorithms.%几何跟踪主要进行蒙特卡罗粒子输运计算中粒子位置和径迹长度的计算,它是蒙特卡罗粒子输运计算的关键技术之一。由于聚变堆几何结构极其复杂,使得几何跟踪在整个蒙特卡罗粒子输运计算中占据30%~80%的计算时间,因此几何跟踪方法的效率是决定聚变堆蒙特卡罗粒子输运计算效率的重要因素之一。本文提出了基于CAD的邻居列表和包围盒加速方法,并基于 FDS 团队自主研发的超级蒙特卡罗核计算仿真软件系统 SuperMC进行实现。利用聚变堆 FDS-Ⅱ和 ITER模型对本文方法进行了数值验证,测试结果表明本文方法不影响计算结果,并能使程序计算效率提高50%~60%,证明了本文方法的正确性和有效性。

  3. Accurate dose assessment system for an exposed person utilising radiation transport calculation codes in emergency response to a radiological accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, F; Shigemori, Y; Seki, A

    2009-01-01

    A system has been developed to assess radiation dose distribution inside the body of exposed persons in a radiological accident by utilising radiation transport calculation codes-MCNP and MCNPX. The system consists mainly of two parts, pre-processor and post-processor of the radiation transport calculation. Programs for the pre-processor are used to set up a 'problem-dependent' input file, which defines the accident condition and dosimetric quantities to be estimated. The program developed for the post-processor part can effectively indicate dose information based upon the output file of the code. All of the programs in the dosimetry system can be executed with a generally used personal computer and accurately give the dose profile to an exposed person in a radiological accident without complicated procedures. An experiment using a physical phantom was carried out to verify the availability of the dosimetry system with the developed programs in a gamma ray irradiation field.

  4. Application of advanced Monte Carlo Methods in numerical dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichelt, U; Henniger, J; Lange, C

    2006-01-01

    Many tasks in different sectors of dosimetry are very complex and highly sensitive to changes in the radiation field. Often, only the simulation of radiation transport is capable of describing the radiation field completely. Down to sub-cellular dimensions the energy deposition by cascades of secondary electrons is the main pathway for damage induction in matter. A large number of interactions take place until such electrons are slowed down to thermal energies. Also for some problems of photon transport a large number of photon histories need to be processed. Thus the efficient non-analogue Monte Carlo program, AMOS, has been developed for photon and electron transport. Various applications and benchmarks are presented showing its ability. For radiotherapy purposes the radiation field of a brachytherapy source is calculated according to the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group Report 43 (AAPM/TG43). As additional examples, results for the detector efficiency of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and a dose estimation for an X-ray shielding for radiation protection are shown.

  5. Thin film AlSb carrier transport properties and room temperature radiation response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Erin Ivey

    Theoretical predictions for AlSb material properties have not been realized using bulk growth methods. This research was motivated by advances in molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) growth technology to produce high-quality thin-film AlSb for the purpose of evaluating transport properties and suitability for radiation detection. Simulations using MCNP5 were performed to benchmark an existing silicon surface barrier detector and to predict ideal AlSb detector behavior, with the finding that AlSb should have improved detection efficiency due to the larger atomic number of Sb compared with Si. GaSb diodes were fabricated by both homoepitaxial MBE and ion implantation methods in order to determine the effect on the radiation detection performance. It was found that the radiation response for the MBE grown GaSb diodes was very uniform, whereas the ion-implanted GaSb diodes exhibited highly variable spectral behavior. Two sets of AlSb heterostructures were fabricated by MBE methods; one for a Hall doping study and the other for a radiation response study. The samples were characterized for material quality using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Nomarski imaging, atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), I-V curve analysis, and Hall effect measurements. The Hall study samples were grown on semi-insulating (SI) GaAs substrates and contained a thin GaAs layer on top to protect the AlSb from oxygen. Doping for the AlSb layer was achieved using GaTe and Be for n- and p-type conductivity, respectively, with intended doping densities ranging from 1015 to 1017 cm -3. Results for net carrier concentration ranged 2x10 9 to 1x1017 cm-3, 60 to 3000 cm 2/Vs for mobility, and 2 to 106 Ω-cm for resistivity, with the undoped AlSb samples presenting the best values. The radiation detector samples were designed to be PIN diodes, with undoped AlSb sandwiched between n-type GaAs substrate and p-type GaSb as a conductive oxygen-protective layer. Energy spectra were measured

  6. Monte Carlo simulations of a D-T neutron generator shielding for landmine detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reda, A.M., E-mail: amreda2005@yahoo.com [College of Science, Shaqra University, Al-Dawadme, P.O. Box 1040 (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-10-15

    Shielding for a D-T sealed neutron generator has been designed using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The neutron generator will be used in field for the detection of explosives, landmines, drugs and other 'threat' materials. The optimization of the detection of buried objects was started by studying the signal-to-noise ratio for different geometric conditions. - Highlights: > A landmine detection system based on neutron fast/slow analysis has been designed. > Shielding for a D-T sealed neutron generator tube has been designed using Monte Carlo radiation transport code. > Detection of buried objects was started by studying the signal-to-noise ratio for different geometric conditions. > The signal-to-background ratio optimized at one position for all depths.

  7. 基于蒙特卡罗的小尺度参考辐射装置屏蔽研究%Shielding research of minitype reference radiation device based on Monte Carlo simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐阳; 魏彪; 毛本将; 刘易鑫; 冯鹏

    2016-01-01

    针对移动式小尺度参考辐射(MRR)装置(移动式校准装置),在进行射线辐射剂量测量的仪器仪表标定或刻度时,应满足其辐射屏蔽安全限值5μSv/h 的屏蔽技术要求,采用蒙特卡罗输运程序 MCNP,开展了移动式小尺度参考辐射装置表面剂量场屏蔽的模拟计算和研究分析工作。研究结果表明,通过 MCNP 模拟的屏蔽设计方法可以详尽反映 MRR 装置各个表面的剂量分布特征和规律,实现移动式小尺度参考辐射装置屏蔽设计,采用的铅钢材料复合屏蔽方案能够保证装置硬度且显著地减轻屏蔽体的重量,最终获取的优化MRR 屏蔽箱体重量约为271.9 kg。%When applied the minitype reference radiation (MRR)to calibrate gamma ray dosimeters,the shielding structure of the MRR should meet the shielding technique demand,in which the limit dose rate of the outside surface of the MRR must be lower than 5 μSv/h.In order to optimize the shielding design of the MRR,Monte Carlo particle transport code MCNP is em-ployed to simulate and analyze the dose distribution of the outside surface of the MRR.The results show that the dose distribution of each surface of the MRR can be described in detail with MCNP and it is conducive to complete shielding design.The lead-steel composite material is applied to increase the strength and reduce the weight of the MRR.The optimized weight of the MRR is a-bout 271.9 kg.

  8. Evidence for dust-driven, radial plasma transport in Saturn's inner radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Kollmann, P.; Paranicas, C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Andriopoulou, M.

    2016-08-01

    A survey of Cassini MIMI/LEMMS data acquired between 2004 and 2015 has led to the identification of 13 energetic electron microsignatures that can be attributed to particle losses on one of the several faint rings of the planet. Most of the signatures were detected near L-shells that map between the orbits of Mimas and Enceladus or near the G-ring. Our analysis indicates that it is very unlikely for these signatures to have originated from absorption on Mimas, Enceladus or unidentified Moons and rings, even though most were not found exactly at the L-shells of the known rings of the saturnian system (G-ring, Methone, Anthe, Pallene). The lack of additional absorbers is apparent in the L-shell distribution of MeV ions which are very sensitive for tracing the location of weakly absorbing material permanently present in Saturn's radiation belts. This sensitivity is demonstrated by the identification, for the first time, of the proton absorption signatures from the asteroid-sized Moons Pallene, Anthe and/or their rings. For this reason, we investigate the possibility that the 13 energetic electron events formed at known saturnian rings and the resulting depletions were later displaced radially by one or more magnetospheric processes. Our calculations indicate that the displacement magnitude for several of those signatures is much larger than the one that can be attributed to radial flows imposed by the recently discovered noon-to-midnight electric field in Saturn's inner magnetosphere. This observation is consistent with a mechanism where radial plasma velocities are enhanced near dusty obstacles. Several possibilities are discussed that may explain this observation, including a dust-driven magnetospheric interchange instability, mass loading by the pick-up of nanometer charged dust grains and global magnetospheric electric fields induced by perturbed orbits of charged dust due to the act of solar radiation pressure. Indirect evidence for a global scale interaction

  9. Monte Carlo Simulation of Photons Transport in LYSO Crystal%光子在LYSO晶体中传输的Monte Carlo模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴国城; 梁国栋; 李甲递; 邱少坤

    2011-01-01

    为了获得PET探测器设计中闪烁晶体表面不同处理方式对探测效率的影响,使用DETECT2000对光子在LYSO(Lu1.9Y0.1SiO5∶Ce,硅酸镥)晶体中的光学输运特性进行了蒙特卡罗模拟.探测器由一个4 mm×4 mm×25 mm的LYSO晶体与一个PMT耦合组成.模拟结果显示:入射面为粗糙面(漫反射面),其余均为抛光面并在外层(入射面和与PMT耦合的面除外)包有反射介质。反射介质的反射率越高,则探测效率越高,并且其探测效率是晶体所有表面作抛光处理方式的1.6倍.在探测器设计过程中,需要选取反射率大于0.98的反射介质作为反射层.%In order to find out the detector efficiency of the scintillation crystal over defined the different surface in PET detector system design,the DETECT 2000 Monte Carlo simulation program is used to simulate the optical transport in LYSO scintillation crystals.A detector system using 4 mm×4 mm×25 mm LYSO crystals coupled to a photomultiplier(PMT).The results given by this software demonstrate that the maximum light output(detector efficiency) can be obtained when its incident surface is a ground surface,the other surfaces are polished surfaces and all its surfaces(except the surface couple with the PMT) are coated with high reflection coefficient(more than 0.98) reflecting material,the detector efficiency about 1.6 times than the all surfaces are polished surfaces.