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Sample records for carlo radiation transport

  1. Parallel processing Monte Carlo radiation transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issues related to distributed-memory multiprocessing as applied to Monte Carlo radiation transport are discussed. Measurements of communication overhead are presented for the radiation transport code MCNP which employs the communication software package PVM, and average efficiency curves are provided for a homogeneous virtual machine

  2. Monte Carlo method in radiation transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In neutral radiation transport problems (neutrons, photons), two values are important: the flux in the phase space and the density of particles. To solve the problem with Monte Carlo method leads to, among other things, build a statistical process (called the play) and to provide a numerical value to a variable x (this attribution is called score). Sampling techniques are presented. Play biasing necessity is proved. A biased simulation is made. At last, the current developments (rewriting of programs for instance) are presented due to several reasons: two of them are the vectorial calculation apparition and the photon and neutron transport in vacancy media

  3. The MCNPX Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) is a general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code with three-dimensional geometry and continuous-energy transport of 34 particles and light ions. It contains flexible source and tally options, interactive graphics, and support for both sequential and multi-processing computer platforms. MCNPX is based on MCNP4c and has been upgraded to most MCNP5 capabilities. MCNP is a highly stable code tracking neutrons, photons and electrons, and using evaluated nuclear data libraries for low-energy interaction probabilities. MCNPX has extended this base to a comprehensive set of particles and light ions, with heavy ion transport in development. Models have been included to calculate interaction probabilities when libraries are not available. Recent additions focus on the time evolution of residual nuclei decay, allowing calculation of transmutation and delayed particle emission. MCNPX is now a code of great dynamic range, and the excellent neutronics capabilities allow new opportunities to simulate devices of interest to experimental particle physics, particularly calorimetry. This paper describes the capabilities of the current MCNPX version 2.6.C, and also discusses ongoing code development

  4. THE MCNPX MONTE CARLO RADIATION TRANSPORT CODE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WATERS, LAURIE S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MCKINNEY, GREGG W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; DURKEE, JOE W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; FENSIN, MICHAEL L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; JAMES, MICHAEL R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; JOHNS, RUSSELL C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; PELOWITZ, DENISE B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-10

    MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) is a general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code with three-dimensional geometry and continuous-energy transport of 34 particles and light ions. It contains flexible source and tally options, interactive graphics, and support for both sequential and multi-processing computer platforms. MCNPX is based on MCNP4B, and has been upgraded to most MCNP5 capabilities. MCNP is a highly stable code tracking neutrons, photons and electrons, and using evaluated nuclear data libraries for low-energy interaction probabilities. MCNPX has extended this base to a comprehensive set of particles and light ions, with heavy ion transport in development. Models have been included to calculate interaction probabilities when libraries are not available. Recent additions focus on the time evolution of residual nuclei decay, allowing calculation of transmutation and delayed particle emission. MCNPX is now a code of great dynamic range, and the excellent neutronics capabilities allow new opportunities to simulate devices of interest to experimental particle physics; particularly calorimetry. This paper describes the capabilities of the current MCNPX version 2.6.C, and also discusses ongoing code development.

  5. Morse Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Code System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmett, M.B.

    1975-02-01

    The report contains sections containing descriptions of the MORSE and PICTURE codes, input descriptions, sample problems, deviations of the physical equations and explanations of the various error messages. The MORSE code is a multipurpose neutron and gamma-ray transport Monte Carlo code. Time dependence for both shielding and criticality problems is provided. General three-dimensional geometry may be used with an albedo option available at any material surface. The PICTURE code provide aid in preparing correct input data for the combinatorial geometry package CG. It provides a printed view of arbitrary two-dimensional slices through the geometry. By inspecting these pictures one may determine if the geometry specified by the input cards is indeed the desired geometry. 23 refs. (WRF)

  6. Implict Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Simulations of Four Test Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, N

    2007-08-01

    Radiation transport codes, like almost all codes, are difficult to develop and debug. It is helpful to have small, easy to run test problems with known answers to use in development and debugging. It is also prudent to re-run test problems periodically during development to ensure that previous code capabilities have not been lost. We describe four radiation transport test problems with analytic or approximate analytic answers. These test problems are suitable for use in debugging and testing radiation transport codes. We also give results of simulations of these test problems performed with an Implicit Monte Carlo photonics code.

  7. Tracklength biassing in Monte Carlo radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracklength stretching is employed in deep penetration Monte Carlo studies for variance reduction. Incorporating a dependence of the biassing on the angular disposition of the track improves the procedure. Linear and exponential forms for this dependence are investigated here, using Spanier's self-learning technique. Suitable biassing parameters are worked out for representative shield systems, for use in practical simulations. Of the two, we find that the exponential scheme performs better. (orig.)

  8. MORSE Monte Carlo radiation transport code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is an addendum to the MORSE report, ORNL-4972, originally published in 1975. This addendum contains descriptions of several modifications to the MORSE Monte Carlo Code, replacement pages containing corrections, Part II of the report which was previously unpublished, and a new Table of Contents. The modifications include a Klein Nishina estimator for gamma rays. Use of such an estimator required changing the cross section routines to process pair production and Compton scattering cross sections directly from ENDF tapes and writing a new version of subroutine RELCOL. Another modification is the use of free form input for the SAMBO analysis data. This required changing subroutines SCORIN and adding new subroutine RFRE. References are updated, and errors in the original report have been corrected

  9. Applications of the Monte Carlo radiation transport toolkit at LLNL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sale, Kenneth E.; Bergstrom, Paul M., Jr.; Buck, Richard M.; Cullen, Dermot; Fujino, D.; Hartmann-Siantar, Christine

    1999-09-01

    Modern Monte Carlo radiation transport codes can be applied to model most applications of radiation, from optical to TeV photons, from thermal neutrons to heavy ions. Simulations can include any desired level of detail in three-dimensional geometries using the right level of detail in the reaction physics. The technology areas to which we have applied these codes include medical applications, defense, safety and security programs, nuclear safeguards and industrial and research system design and control. The main reason such applications are interesting is that by using these tools substantial savings of time and effort (i.e. money) can be realized. In addition it is possible to separate out and investigate computationally effects which can not be isolated and studied in experiments. In model calculations, just as in real life, one must take care in order to get the correct answer to the right question. Advancing computing technology allows extensions of Monte Carlo applications in two directions. First, as computers become more powerful more problems can be accurately modeled. Second, as computing power becomes cheaper Monte Carlo methods become accessible more widely. An overview of the set of Monte Carlo radiation transport tools in use a LLNL will be presented along with a few examples of applications and future directions.

  10. Guideline for radiation transport simulation with the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today, the photon and neutron transport calculations with the Monte Carlo method have been progressed with advanced Monte Carlo codes and high-speed computers. Monte Carlo simulation is rather suitable expression than the calculation. Once Monte Carlo codes become more friendly and performance of computer progresses, most of the shielding problems will be solved by using the Monte Carlo codes and high-speed computers. As those codes prepare the standard input data for some problems, the essential techniques for solving the Monte Carlo method and variance reduction techniques of the Monte Carlo calculation might lose the interests to the general Monte Carlo users. In this paper, essential techniques of the Monte Carlo method and the variance reduction techniques, such as importance sampling method, selection of estimator, and biasing technique, are described to afford a better understanding of the Monte Carlo method and Monte Carlo code. (author)

  11. Discrete angle biasing in Monte Carlo radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An angular biasing procedure is presented for use in Monte Carlo radiation transport with discretized scattering angle data. As in more general studies, the method is shown to reduce statistical weight fluctuations when it is combined with the exponential transformation. This discrete data application has a simple analytic form which is problem independent. The results from a sample problem illustrate the variance reduction and efficiency characteristics of the combined biasing procedures, and a large neutron and gamma ray integral experiment is also calculated. A proposal is given for the possible code generation of the biasing parameter p and the preferential direction /ovr/Omega//0 used in the combined biasing schemes

  12. Monte Carlo 2000 Conference : Advanced Monte Carlo for Radiation Physics, Particle Transport Simulation and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Baräo, Fernando; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Távora, Luis; Vaz, Pedro

    2001-01-01

    This book focusses on the state of the art of Monte Carlo methods in radiation physics and particle transport simulation and applications, the latter involving in particular, the use and development of electron--gamma, neutron--gamma and hadronic codes. Besides the basic theory and the methods employed, special attention is paid to algorithm development for modeling, and the analysis of experiments and measurements in a variety of fields ranging from particle to medical physics.

  13. Acceleration of a Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Execution time for the Integrated TIGER Series (ITS) Monte Carlo radiation transport code has been reduced by careful re-coding of computationally intensive subroutines. Three test cases for the TIGER (1-D slab geometry), CYLTRAN (2-D cylindrical geometry), and ACCEPT (3-D arbitrary geometry) codes were identified and used to benchmark and profile program execution. Based upon these results, sixteen top time-consuming subroutines were examined and nine of them modified to accelerate computations with equivalent numerical output to the original. The results obtained via this study indicate that speedup factors of 1.90 for the TIGER code, 1.67 for the CYLTRAN code, and 1.11 for the ACCEPT code are achievable. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  14. Academic Training - The use of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes in radiation physics and dosimetry

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 27, 28, 29 June 11:00-12:00 - TH Conference Room, bldg. 4 The use of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes in radiation physics and dosimetry F. Salvat Gavalda,Univ. de Barcelona, A. FERRARI, CERN-AB, M. SILARI, CERN-SC Lecture 1. Transport and interaction of electromagnetic radiation F. Salvat Gavalda,Univ. de Barcelona Interaction models and simulation schemes implemented in modern Monte Carlo codes for the simulation of coupled electron-photon transport will be briefly reviewed. Different schemes for simulating electron transport will be discussed. Condensed algorithms, which rely on multiple-scattering theories, are comparatively fast, but less accurate than mixed algorithms, in which hard interactions (with energy loss or angular deflection larger than certain cut-off values) are simulated individually. The reliability, and limitations, of electron-interaction models and multiple-scattering theories will be analyzed. Benchmark comparisons of simu...

  15. Monte Carlo analysis of radiative transport in oceanographic lidar measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupini, E.; Ferro, G. [ENEA, Divisione Fisica Applicata, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy); Ferrari, N. [Bologna Univ., Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ingegneria Energetica, Nucleare e del Controllo Ambientale

    2001-07-01

    The analysis of oceanographic lidar systems measurements is often carried out with semi-empirical methods, since there is only a rough understanding of the effects of many environmental variables. The development of techniques for interpreting the accuracy of lidar measurements is needed to evaluate the effects of various environmental situations, as well as of different experimental geometric configurations and boundary conditions. A Monte Carlo simulation model represents a tool that is particularly well suited for answering these important questions. The PREMAR-2F Monte Carlo code has been developed taking into account the main molecular and non-molecular components of the marine environment. The laser radiation interaction processes of diffusion, re-emission, refraction and absorption are treated. In particular are considered: the Rayleigh elastic scattering, produced by atoms and molecules with small dimensions with respect to the laser emission wavelength (i.e. water molecules), the Mie elastic scattering, arising from atoms or molecules with dimensions comparable to the laser wavelength (hydrosols), the Raman inelastic scattering, typical of water, the absorption of water, inorganic (sediments) and organic (phytoplankton and CDOM) hydrosols, the fluorescence re-emission of chlorophyll and yellow substances. PREMAR-2F is an extension of a code for the simulation of the radiative transport in atmospheric environments (PREMAR-2). The approach followed in PREMAR-2 was to combine conventional Monte Carlo techniques with analytical estimates of the probability of the receiver to have a contribution from photons coming back after an interaction in the field of view of the lidar fluorosensor collecting apparatus. This offers an effective mean for modelling a lidar system with realistic geometric constraints. The retrieved semianalytic Monte Carlo radiative transfer model has been developed in the frame of the Italian Research Program for Antarctica (PNRA) and it is

  16. BALTORO a general purpose code for coupling discrete ordinates and Monte-Carlo radiation transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general purpose code BALTORO was written for coupling the three-dimensional Monte-Carlo /MC/ with the one-dimensional Discrete Ordinates /DO/ radiation transport calculations. The quantity of a radiation-induced /neutrons or gamma-rays/ nuclear effect or the score from a radiation-yielding nuclear effect can be analysed in this way. (author)

  17. The use of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes in radiation physics and dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Ferrari, Alfredo; Silari, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Transport and interaction of electromagnetic radiation Interaction models and simulation schemes implemented in modern Monte Carlo codes for the simulation of coupled electron-photon transport will be briefly reviewed. In these codes, photon transport is simulated by using the detailed scheme, i.e., interaction by interaction. Detailed simulation is easy to implement, and the reliability of the results is only limited by the accuracy of the adopted cross sections. Simulations of electron and positron transport are more difficult, because these particles undergo a large number of interactions in the course of their slowing down. Different schemes for simulating electron transport will be discussed. Condensed algorithms, which rely on multiple-scattering theories, are comparatively fast, but less accurate than mixed algorithms, in which hard interactions (with energy loss or angular deflection larger than certain cut-off values) are simulated individually. The reliability, and limitations, of electron-interacti...

  18. A Residual Monte Carlo Method for Spatially Discrete, Angularly Continuous Radiation Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Residual Monte Carlo provides exponential convergence of statistical error with respect to the number of particle histories. In the past, residual Monte Carlo has been applied to a variety of angularly discrete radiation-transport problems. Here, we apply residual Monte Carlo to spatially discrete, angularly continuous transport. By maintaining angular continuity, our method avoids the deficiencies of angular discretizations, such as ray effects. For planar geometry and step differencing, we use the corresponding integral transport equation to calculate an angularly independent residual from the scalar flux in each stage of residual Monte Carlo. We then demonstrate that the resulting residual Monte Carlo method does indeed converge exponentially to within machine precision of the exact step differenced solution.

  19. Radiation Transport for Explosive Outflows: A Multigroup Hybrid Monte Carlo Method

    CERN Document Server

    Wollaeger, Ryan T; Graziani, Carlo; Couch, Sean M; Jordan, George C; Lamb, Donald Q; Moses, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    We explore the application of Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) to radiation transport in strong fluid outflows with structured opacity. The IMC method of Fleck & Cummings is a stochastic computational technique for nonlinear radiation transport. IMC is partially implicit in time and may suffer in efficiency when tracking Monte Carlo particles through optically thick materials. The DDMC method of Densmore accelerates an IMC computation where the domain is diffusive. Recently, Abdikamalov extended IMC and DDMC to multigroup, velocity-dependent neutrino transport with the intent of modeling neutrino dynamics in core-collapse supernovae. Densmore has also formulated a multifrequency extension to the originally grey DDMC method. In this article we rigorously formulate IMC and DDMC over a high-velocity Lagrangian grid for possible application to photon transport in the post-explosion phase of Type Ia supernovae. The method described is suitable for a large variety of non-mono...

  20. Advantages of Analytical Transformations in Monte Carlo Methods for Radiation Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo methods for radiation transport typically attempt to solve an integral by directly sampling analog or weighted particles, which are treated as physical entities. Improvements to the methods involve better sampling, probability games or physical intuition about the problem. We show that significant improvements can be achieved by recasting the equations with an analytical transform to solve for new, non-physical entities or fields. This paper looks at one such transform, the difference formulation for thermal photon transport, showing a significant advantage for Monte Carlo solution of the equations for time dependent transport. Other related areas are discussed that may also realize significant benefits from similar analytical transformations

  1. A comparison between the Monte Carlo radiation transport codes MCNP and MCBEND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawamura, Hidenori; Nishimura, Kazuya [Computer Software Development Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    In Japan, almost of all radiation analysts are using the MCNP code and MVP code on there studies. But these codes have not had automatic variance reduction. MCBEND code made by UKAEA have automatic variance reduction. And, MCBEND code is user friendly more than other Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Codes. Our company was first introduced MCBEND code in Japan. Therefore, we compared with MCBEND code and MCNP code about functions and production capacity. (author)

  2. Lorentz force correction to the Boltzmann radiation transport equation and its implications for Monte Carlo algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To establish a theoretical framework for generalizing Monte Carlo transport algorithms by adding external electromagnetic fields to the Boltzmann radiation transport equation in a rigorous and consistent fashion. Using first principles, the Boltzmann radiation transport equation is modified by adding a term describing the variation of the particle distribution due to the Lorentz force. The implications of this new equation are evaluated by investigating the validity of Fano’s theorem. Additionally, Lewis’ approach to multiple scattering theory in infinite homogeneous media is redefined to account for the presence of external electromagnetic fields. The equation is modified and yields a description consistent with the deterministic laws of motion as well as probabilistic methods of solution. The time-independent Boltzmann radiation transport equation is generalized to account for the electromagnetic forces in an additional operator similar to the interaction term. Fano’s and Lewis’ approaches are stated in this new equation. Fano’s theorem is found not to apply in the presence of electromagnetic fields. Lewis’ theory for electron multiple scattering and moments, accounting for the coupling between the Lorentz force and multiple elastic scattering, is found. However, further investigation is required to develop useful algorithms for Monte Carlo and deterministic transport methods. To test the accuracy of Monte Carlo transport algorithms in the presence of electromagnetic fields, the Fano cavity test, as currently defined, cannot be applied. Therefore, new tests must be designed for this specific application. A multiple scattering theory that accurately couples the Lorentz force with elastic scattering could improve Monte Carlo efficiency. The present study proposes a new theoretical framework to develop such algorithms. (paper)

  3. Lorentz force correction to the Boltzmann radiation transport equation and its implications for Monte Carlo algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Hugo; Bielajew, Alex

    2015-07-01

    To establish a theoretical framework for generalizing Monte Carlo transport algorithms by adding external electromagnetic fields to the Boltzmann radiation transport equation in a rigorous and consistent fashion. Using first principles, the Boltzmann radiation transport equation is modified by adding a term describing the variation of the particle distribution due to the Lorentz force. The implications of this new equation are evaluated by investigating the validity of Fano’s theorem. Additionally, Lewis’ approach to multiple scattering theory in infinite homogeneous media is redefined to account for the presence of external electromagnetic fields. The equation is modified and yields a description consistent with the deterministic laws of motion as well as probabilistic methods of solution. The time-independent Boltzmann radiation transport equation is generalized to account for the electromagnetic forces in an additional operator similar to the interaction term. Fano’s and Lewis’ approaches are stated in this new equation. Fano’s theorem is found not to apply in the presence of electromagnetic fields. Lewis’ theory for electron multiple scattering and moments, accounting for the coupling between the Lorentz force and multiple elastic scattering, is found. However, further investigation is required to develop useful algorithms for Monte Carlo and deterministic transport methods. To test the accuracy of Monte Carlo transport algorithms in the presence of electromagnetic fields, the Fano cavity test, as currently defined, cannot be applied. Therefore, new tests must be designed for this specific application. A multiple scattering theory that accurately couples the Lorentz force with elastic scattering could improve Monte Carlo efficiency. The present study proposes a new theoretical framework to develop such algorithms.

  4. Overview and applications of the Monte Carlo radiation transport kit at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern Monte Carlo radiation transport codes can be applied to model most applications of radiation, from optical to TeV photons, from thermal neutrons to heavy ions. Simulations can include any desired level of detail in three-dimensional geometries using the right level of detail in the reaction physics. The technology areas to which we have applied these codes include medical applications, defense, safety and security programs, nuclear safeguards and industrial and research system design and control. The main reason such applications are interesting is that by using these tools substantial savings of time and effort (i.e. money) can be realized. In addition it is possible to separate out and investigate computationally effects which can not be isolated and studied in experiments. In model calculations, just as in real life, one must take care in order to get the correct answer to the right question. Advancing computing technology allows extensions of Monte Carlo applications in two directions. First, as computers become more powerful more problems can be accurately modeled. Second, as computing power becomes cheaper Monte Carlo methods become accessible more widely. An overview of the set of Monte Carlo radiation transport tools in use a LLNL will be presented along with a few examples of applications and future directions

  5. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It has been developed to scale well from laptop to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers. Special features of Shift include hybrid capabilities for variance reduction such as CADIS and FW-CADIS, and advanced parallel decomposition and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. Shift has been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks and compares well to other state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiation transport codes such as MCNP5, CE KENO-VI, and OpenMC. Some specific benchmarks used for verification and validation include the CASL VERA criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000® problems. These benchmark and scaling studies show promising results

  6. Ge(Li) intrinsic efficiency calculation using Monte Carlo simulation for γ radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To solve a radiation transport problem by using Monte Carlo simulation method, the evolution of a large number of radiations must be simulated and also the analysis of their history must be done. The evolution of a radiation starts by the radiation emission, followed by the radiation unperturbed propagation in the medium between the successive interactions and then the radiation parameters modification in the points where interactions occur. The goal of this paper consists in the calculation of the total detection efficiency and the intrinsic efficiency for a coaxial Ge(Li) detector, using Monte Carlo method in order to simulate the γ radiation transport. A Ge(Li) detector with 106 cm3 active volume and γ photons with energies in 50 keV - 2 MeV range, emitted by a point source situated on the detector axis, were considered. Each γ photon evolution is simulated by an analogue process step-by-step until the photon escapes from the detector or is completely absorbed in the active volume of the detector. (author)

  7. Minimizing the cost of splitting in Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juzaitis, R.J.

    1980-10-01

    A deterministic analysis of the computational cost associated with geometric splitting/Russian roulette in Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations is presented. Appropriate integro-differential equations are developed for the first and second moments of the Monte Carlo tally as well as time per particle history, given that splitting with Russian roulette takes place at one (or several) internal surfaces of the geometry. The equations are solved using a standard S/sub n/ (discrete ordinates) solution technique, allowing for the prediction of computer cost (formulated as the product of sample variance and time per particle history, sigma/sup 2//sub s/tau p) associated with a given set of splitting parameters. Optimum splitting surface locations and splitting ratios are determined. Benefits of such an analysis are particularly noteworthy for transport problems in which splitting is apt to be extensively employed (e.g., deep penetration calculations).

  8. Minimizing the cost of splitting in Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A deterministic analysis of the computational cost associated with geometric splitting/Russian roulette in Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations is presented. Appropriate integro-differential equations are developed for the first and second moments of the Monte Carlo tally as well as time per particle history, given that splitting with Russian roulette takes place at one (or several) internal surfaces of the geometry. The equations are solved using a standard S/sub n/ (discrete ordinates) solution technique, allowing for the prediction of computer cost (formulated as the product of sample variance and time per particle history, sigma2/sub s/tau p) associated with a given set of splitting parameters. Optimum splitting surface locations and splitting ratios are determined. Benefits of such an analysis are particularly noteworthy for transport problems in which splitting is apt to be extensively employed

  9. Piecewise linear discretization of Symbolic Implicit Monte Carlo radiation transport in the difference formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks III, E D; Szoke, A; Peterson, J L

    2005-11-15

    We describe a Monte Carlo solution for time dependent photon transport, in the difference formulation with the material in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), that is piecewise linear in its treatment of the material state variable. Our method employs a Galerkin solution for the material energy equation while using Symbolic Implicit Monte Carlo (SIMC) to solve the transport equation. In constructing the scheme, one has the freedom to choose between expanding the material temperature, or the equivalent black body radiation energy density at the material temperature, in terms of finite element basis functions. The former provides a linear treatment of the material energy while the latter provides a linear treatment of the radiative coupling between zones. Subject to the conditional use of a lumped material energy in the vicinity of strong gradients, possible with a linear treatment of the material energy, our approach provides a robust solution for time dependent transport of thermally emitted radiation that can address a wide range of problems. It produces accurate results in the diffusion limit.

  10. A Monte Carlo transport code study of the space radiation environment using FLUKA and ROOT

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, T; Carminati, F; Brun, R; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Empl, A; MacGibbon, J

    2001-01-01

    We report on the progress of a current study aimed at developing a state-of-the-art Monte-Carlo computer simulation of the space radiation environment using advanced computer software techniques recently available at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva, Switzerland. By taking the next-generation computer software appearing at CERN and adapting it to known problems in the implementation of space exploration strategies, this research is identifying changes necessary to bring these two advanced technologies together. The radiation transport tool being developed is tailored to the problem of taking measured space radiation fluxes impinging on the geometry of any particular spacecraft or planetary habitat and simulating the evolution of that flux through an accurate model of the spacecraft material. The simulation uses the latest known results in low-energy and high-energy physics. The output is a prediction of the detailed nature of the radiation environment experienced in space as well a...

  11. Radiation transport in random disperse media implemented in the Monte Carlo code PRIZMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes PRIZMA capabilities for modeling radiation transport in random disperse media by the Monte Carlo method. It proposes a method for simulating radiation transport in binary media with variable volume fractions. The method models the medium consequently from one grain crossed by a particle trajectory to another. Like in the Limited Chord Length Sampling (LCLS) method, particles in grains are tracked in the actual grain geometry, but unlike LCLS, the medium is modeled using only Matrix Chord Length Sampling (MCLS) from the exponential distribution and it is not necessary to know the grain chord length distribution. This helped us extend the method to media with randomly oriented, arbitrarily shaped convex grains. Other extensions include multicomponent media - grains of several sorts, and polydisperse media - grains of different sizes

  12. Vectorization and parallelization of Monte-Carlo programs for calculation of radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The versatile MCNP-3B Monte-Carlo code written in FORTRAN77, for simulation of the radiation transport of neutral particles, has been subjected to vectorization and parallelization of essential parts, without touching its versatility. Vectorization is not dependent on a specific computer. Several sample tasks have been selected in order to test the vectorized MCNP-3B code in comparison to the scalar MNCP-3B code. The samples are a representative example of the 3-D calculations to be performed for simulation of radiation transport in neutron and reactor physics. (1) 4πneutron detector. (2) High-energy calorimeter. (3) PROTEUS benchmark (conversion rates and neutron multiplication factors for the HCLWR (High Conversion Light Water Reactor)). (orig./HP)

  13. A numerical analysis of antithetic variates in Monte Carlo radiation transport with geometrical surface splitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A numerical study for effective implementation of the antithetic variates technique with geometric splitting/Russian roulette in Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations is presented. The study is based on the theory of Monte Carlo errors where a set of coupled integral equations are solved for the first and second moments of the score and for the expected number of flights per particle history. Numerical results are obtained for particle transmission through an infinite homogeneous slab shield composed of an isotropically scattering medium. Two types of antithetic transformations are considered. The results indicate that the antithetic transformations always lead to reduction in variance and increase in efficiency provided optimal antithetic parameters are chosen. A substantial gain in efficiency is obtained by incorporating antithetic transformations in rule of thumb splitting. The advantage gained for thick slabs (∼20 mfp) with low scattering probability (0.1-0.5) is attractively large . (author). 27 refs., 9 tabs

  14. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Tara M.; Johnson, Seth R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Godfrey, Andrew T.

    2016-03-01

    This work discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package authored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Shift has been developed to scale well from laptops to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers and includes features such as support for multiple geometry and physics engines, hybrid capabilities for variance reduction methods such as the Consistent Adjoint-Driven Importance Sampling methodology, advanced parallel decompositions, and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. The scaling studies presented in this paper demonstrate good weak and strong scaling behavior for the implemented algorithms. Shift has also been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks, including the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors' Virtual Environment for Reactor Analysis criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000® problems presented in this paper. These benchmark results compare well to those from other contemporary Monte Carlo codes such as MCNP5 and KENO.

  15. An object-oriented implementation of a parallel Monte Carlo code for radiation transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Pedro Duarte; Lani, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the main features of a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solver for radiation transport which has been implemented within COOLFluiD, a world-class open source object-oriented platform for scientific simulations. The Monte Carlo code makes use of efficient ray tracing algorithms (for 2D, axisymmetric and 3D arbitrary unstructured meshes) which are described in detail. The solver accuracy is first verified in testcases for which analytical solutions are available, then validated for a space re-entry flight experiment (i.e. FIRE II) for which comparisons against both experiments and reference numerical solutions are provided. Through the flexible design of the physical models, ray tracing and parallelization strategy (fully reusing the mesh decomposition inherited by the fluid simulator), the implementation was made efficient and reusable.

  16. Radiation Transport for Explosive Outflows: A Multigroup Hybrid Monte Carlo Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollaeger, Ryan T.; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Graziani, Carlo; Couch, Sean M.; Jordan, George C., IV; Lamb, Donald Q.; Moses, Gregory A.

    2013-12-01

    We explore Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and discrete diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) for radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with structured opacity. The IMC method is a stochastic computational technique for nonlinear radiation transport. IMC is partially implicit in time and may suffer in efficiency when tracking MC particles through optically thick materials. DDMC accelerates IMC in diffusive domains. Abdikamalov extended IMC and DDMC to multigroup, velocity-dependent transport with the intent of modeling neutrino dynamics in core-collapse supernovae. Densmore has also formulated a multifrequency extension to the originally gray DDMC method. We rigorously formulate IMC and DDMC over a high-velocity Lagrangian grid for possible application to photon transport in the post-explosion phase of Type Ia supernovae. This formulation includes an analysis that yields an additional factor in the standard IMC-to-DDMC spatial interface condition. To our knowledge the new boundary condition is distinct from others presented in prior DDMC literature. The method is suitable for a variety of opacity distributions and may be applied to semi-relativistic radiation transport in simple fluids and geometries. Additionally, we test the code, called SuperNu, using an analytic solution having static material, as well as with a manufactured solution for moving material with structured opacities. Finally, we demonstrate with a simple source and 10 group logarithmic wavelength grid that IMC-DDMC performs better than pure IMC in terms of accuracy and speed when there are large disparities between the magnitudes of opacities in adjacent groups. We also present and test our implementation of the new boundary condition.

  17. Description of a neutron field perturbed by a probe using coupled Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates radiation transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work concerns calculation of a neutron response, caused by a neutron field perturbed by materials surrounding the source or the detector. Solution of a problem is obtained using coupling of the Monte Carlo radiation transport computation for the perturbed region and the discrete ordinates transport computation for the unperturbed system. (author). 62 refs

  18. Comparison of Space Radiation Calculations from Deterministic and Monte Carlo Transport Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J. H.; Lin, Z. W.; Nasser, A. F.; Randeniya, S.; Tripathi, r. K.; Watts, J. W.; Yepes, P.

    2010-01-01

    The presentation outline includes motivation, radiation transport codes being considered, space radiation cases being considered, results for slab geometry, results from spherical geometry, and summary. ///////// main physics in radiation transport codes hzetrn uprop fluka geant4, slab geometry, spe, gcr,

  19. Event-by-event Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport in vapor and liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamichael, Georgios Ioannis

    A Monte-Carlo Simulation is presented for Radiation Transport in water. This process is of utmost importance, having applications in oncology and therapy of cancer, in protecting people and the environment, waste management, radiation chemistry and on some solid-state detectors. It's also a phenomenon of interest in microelectronics on satellites in orbit that are subject to the solar radiation and in space-craft design for deep-space missions receiving background radiation. The interaction of charged particles with the medium is primarily due to their electromagnetic field. Three types of interaction events are considered: Elastic scattering, impact excitation and impact ionization. Secondary particles (electrons) can be generated by ionization. At each stage, along with the primary particle we explicitly follow all secondary electrons (and subsequent generations). Theoretical, semi-empirical and experimental formulae with suitable corrections have been used in each case to model the cross sections governing the quantum mechanical process of interactions, thus determining stochastically the energy and direction of outgoing particles following an event. Monte-Carlo sampling techniques have been applied to accurate probability distribution functions describing the primary particle track and all secondary particle-medium interaction. A simple account of the simulation code and a critical exposition of its underlying assumptions (often missing in the relevant literature) are also presented with reference to the model cross sections. Model predictions are in good agreement with existing computational data and experimental results. By relying heavily on a theoretical formulation, instead of merely fitting data, it is hoped that the model will be of value in a wider range of applications. Possible future directions that are the object of further research are pointed out.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation for radiation transport. Applications in medical physics; Simulacion Monte Carlo del transporte de la radiacion. Aplicaciones en el campo de fisica medica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sempau, J. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is the most accurate technique currently available for solving problems related with the transport of radiation in complex geometries, such as those encountered in medical application. In this work we present a brief description of the basic features of the MC simulation of photons, electrons and positrons. Some of the most relevant applications of this technique in the field of medical physics are also discussed, namely, imaging in nuclear medicine, diagnostic radiology, calculations related with radiotherapy (i.e.,teletherapy, dose planning and brachytherapy) and microdosimetry. It is foreseen that this latter field will encompass the most challenging problems for the application of radiation physics to medicine during the 21 st century. (Author) 12 refs.

  1. Accelerating execution of the integrated TIGER series Monte Carlo radiation transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Execution of the integrated TIGER series (ITS) of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo radiation transport codes has been accelerated by modifying the FORTRAN source code for more efficient computation. Each member code of ITS was benchmarked and profiled with a specific test case that directed the acceleration effort toward the most computationally intensive subroutines. Techniques for accelerating these subroutines included replacing linear search algorithms with binary versions, replacing the pseudo-random number generator, reducing program memory allocation, and proofing the input files for geometrical redundancies. All techniques produced identical or statistically similar results to the original code. Final benchmark timing of the accelerated code resulted in speed-up factors of 2.00 for TIGER (the one-dimensional slab geometry code), 1.74 for CYLTRAN (the two-dimensional cylindrical geometry code), and 1.90 for ACCEPT (the arbitrary three-dimensional geometry code)

  2. Monte Carlo Radiative Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Whitney, Barbara A

    2011-01-01

    I outline methods for calculating the solution of Monte Carlo Radiative Transfer (MCRT) in scattering, absorption and emission processes of dust and gas, including polarization. I provide a bibliography of relevant papers on methods with astrophysical applications.

  3. NASA astronaut dosimetry: Implementation of scalable human phantoms and benchmark comparisons of deterministic versus Monte Carlo radiation transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Amir Alexander

    Astronauts are exposed to a unique radiation environment in space. United States terrestrial radiation worker limits, derived from guidelines produced by scientific panels, do not apply to astronauts. Limits for astronauts have changed throughout the Space Age, eventually reaching the current National Aeronautics and Space Administration limit of 3% risk of exposure induced death, with an administrative stipulation that the risk be assured to the upper 95% confidence limit. Much effort has been spent on reducing the uncertainty associated with evaluating astronaut risk for radiogenic cancer mortality, while tools that affect the accuracy of the calculations have largely remained unchanged. In the present study, the impacts of using more realistic computational phantoms with size variability to represent astronauts with simplified deterministic radiation transport were evaluated. Next, the impacts of microgravity-induced body changes on space radiation dosimetry using the same transport method were investigated. Finally, dosimetry and risk calculations resulting from Monte Carlo radiation transport were compared with results obtained using simplified deterministic radiation transport. The results of the present study indicated that the use of phantoms that more accurately represent human anatomy can substantially improve space radiation dose estimates, most notably for exposures from solar particle events under light shielding conditions. Microgravity-induced changes were less important, but results showed that flexible phantoms could assist in optimizing astronaut body position for reducing exposures during solar particle events. Finally, little overall differences in risk calculations using simplified deterministic radiation transport and 3D Monte Carlo radiation transport were found; however, for the galactic cosmic ray ion spectra, compensating errors were observed for the constituent ions, thus exhibiting the need to perform evaluations on a particle

  4. Energy conservation in radiation hydrodynamics. Application to the Monte-Carlo method used for photon transport in the fluid frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The description of the equations in the fluid frame has been done recently. A simplification of the collision term is obtained, but the streaming term now has to include angular deviation and the Doppler shift. We choose the latter description which is more convenient for our purpose. We introduce some notations and recall some facts about stochastic kernels and the Monte-Carlo method. We show how to apply the Monte-Carlo method to a transport equation with an arbitrary streaming term; in particular we show that the track length estimator is unbiased. We review some properties of the radiation hydrodynamics equations, and show how energy conservation is obtained. Then, we apply the Monte-Carlo method explained in section 2 to the particular case of the transfer equation in the fluid frame. Finally, we describe a physical example and give some numerical results

  5. Modelling of neutron and photon transport in iron and concrete radiation shieldings by the Monte Carlo method - Version 2

    CERN Document Server

    Žukauskaite, A; Plukiene, R; Plukis, A

    2007-01-01

    Particle accelerators and other high energy facilities produce penetrating ionizing radiation (neutrons and γ-rays) that must be shielded. The objective of this work was to model photon and neutron transport in various materials, usually used as shielding, such as concrete, iron or graphite. Monte Carlo method allows obtaining answers by simulating individual particles and recording some aspects of their average behavior. In this work several nuclear experiments were modeled: AVF 65 – γ-ray beams (1-10 MeV), HIMAC and ISIS-800 – high energy neutrons (20-800 MeV) transport in iron and concrete. The results were then compared with experimental data.

  6. Monte Carlo techniques in radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Modern cancer treatment relies on Monte Carlo simulations to help radiotherapists and clinical physicists better understand and compute radiation dose from imaging devices as well as exploit four-dimensional imaging data. With Monte Carlo-based treatment planning tools now available from commercial vendors, a complete transition to Monte Carlo-based dose calculation methods in radiotherapy could likely take place in the next decade. Monte Carlo Techniques in Radiation Therapy explores the use of Monte Carlo methods for modeling various features of internal and external radiation sources, including light ion beams. The book-the first of its kind-addresses applications of the Monte Carlo particle transport simulation technique in radiation therapy, mainly focusing on external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. It presents the mathematical and technical aspects of the methods in particle transport simulations. The book also discusses the modeling of medical linacs and other irradiation devices; issues specific...

  7. Observing gas and dust in simulations of star formation with Monte Carlo radiation transport on Voronoi meshes

    CERN Document Server

    Hubber, D A; Dale, J

    2015-01-01

    Ionising feedback from massive stars dramatically affects the interstellar medium local to star forming regions. Numerical simulations are now starting to include enough complexity to produce morphologies and gas properties that are not too dissimilar from observations. The comparison between the density fields produced by hydrodynamical simulations and observations at given wavelengths relies however on photoionisation/chemistry and radiative transfer calculations. We present here an implementation of Monte Carlo radiation transport through a Voronoi tessellation in the photoionisation and dust radiative transfer code MOCASSIN. We show for the first time a synthetic spectrum and synthetic emission line maps of an hydrodynamical simulation of a molecular cloud affected by massive stellar feedback. We show that the approach on which previous work is based, which remapped hydrodynamical density fields onto Cartesian grids before performing radiative transfer/photoionisation calculations, results in significant ...

  8. A Monte Carlo Method for the Analysis of Gamma Radiation Transport from Distributed Sources in Laminated Shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of a method for calculating the penetration and energy deposition of gamma radiation, based on Monte Carlo techniques. The essential feature is the application of the exponential transformation to promote the transport of penetrating quanta and to balance the steep spatial variations of the source distributions which appear in secondary gamma emission problems. The estimated statistical errors in a number of sample problems, involving concrete shields with thicknesses up to 500 cm, are shown to be quite favorable, even at relatively short computing times. A practical reactor shielding problem is also shown and the predictions compared with measurements

  9. Calculation of the radiation transport in rock salt using Monte Carlo methods. Final report. HAW project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides absorbed dose rate and photon fluence rate distributions in rock salt around 30 testwise emplaced canisters containing high-level radioactive material (HAW project) and around a single canister containing radioactive material of a lower activity level (INHAW experiment). The site of this test emplacement was located in test galleries at the 800-m-level in the Asse salt mine. The data given were calculated using a Monte Carlo method simulating photon transport in complex geometries of differently composed materials. The aim of these calculations was to enable determination of the dose absorbed in any arbitrary sample of salt to be further examined in the future with sufficient reliability. The geometry of the test arrangement, the materials involved and the calculational method are characterised and the results are shortly described and some figures presenting selected results are shown. In the appendices, the results for emplacement of the highly radioactive canisters are given in tabular form. (orig.)

  10. A Monte Carlo Code for Relativistic Radiation Transport Around Kerr Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittman, Jeremy David; Krolik, Julian H.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new code for radiation transport around Kerr black holes, including arbitrary emission and absorption mechanisms, as well as electron scattering and polarization. The code is particularly useful for analyzing accretion flows made up of optically thick disks and optically thin coronae. We give a detailed description of the methods employed in the code and also present results from a number of numerical tests to assess its accuracy and convergence.

  11. Modeling of neutron and photon transport in iron and concrete radiation shields by using Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    Žukauskaitėa, A; Plukienė, R; Ridikas, D

    2007-01-01

    Particle accelerators and other high energy facilities produce penetrating ionizing radiation (neutrons and γ-rays) that must be shielded. The objective of this work was to model photon and neutron transport in various materials, usually used as shielding, such as concrete, iron or graphite. Monte Carlo method allows obtaining answers by simulating individual particles and recording some aspects of their average behavior. In this work several nuclear experiments were modeled: AVF 65 (AVF cyclotron of Research Center of Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Japan) – γ-ray beams (1-10 MeV), HIMAC (heavy-ion synchrotron of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba, Japan) and ISIS-800 (ISIS intensive spallation neutron source facility of the Rutherford Appleton laboratory, UK) – high energy neutron (20-800 MeV) transport in iron and concrete. The calculation results were then compared with experimental data.compared with experimental data.

  12. Monte Carlo methods for particle transport

    CERN Document Server

    Haghighat, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method has become the de facto standard in radiation transport. Although powerful, if not understood and used appropriately, the method can give misleading results. Monte Carlo Methods for Particle Transport teaches appropriate use of the Monte Carlo method, explaining the method's fundamental concepts as well as its limitations. Concise yet comprehensive, this well-organized text: * Introduces the particle importance equation and its use for variance reduction * Describes general and particle-transport-specific variance reduction techniques * Presents particle transport eigenvalue issues and methodologies to address these issues * Explores advanced formulations based on the author's research activities * Discusses parallel processing concepts and factors affecting parallel performance Featuring illustrative examples, mathematical derivations, computer algorithms, and homework problems, Monte Carlo Methods for Particle Transport provides nuclear engineers and scientists with a practical guide ...

  13. Study of the response of a lithium yttrium borate scintillator based neutron rem counter by Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunil, C.; Tyagi, Mohit; Biju, K.; Shanbhag, A. A.; Bandyopadhyay, T.

    2015-12-01

    The scarcity and the high cost of 3He has spurred the use of various detectors for neutron monitoring. A new lithium yttrium borate scintillator developed in BARC has been studied for its use in a neutron rem counter. The scintillator is made of natural lithium and boron, and the yield of reaction products that will generate a signal in a real time detector has been studied by FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. A 2 cm lead introduced to enhance the gamma rejection shows no appreciable change in the shape of the fluence response or in the yield of reaction products. The fluence response when normalized at the average energy of an Am-Be neutron source shows promise of being used as rem counter.

  14. GPU - Accelerated Monte Carlo electron transport methods: development and application for radiation dose calculations using 6 GPU cards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electron-photon coupled Monte Carlo code ARCHER - Accelerated Radiation-transport Computations in Heterogeneous EnviRonments - is being developed at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute as a software test-bed for emerging heterogeneous high performance computers that utilize accelerators such as GPUs (Graphics Processing Units). This paper presents the preliminary code development and the testing involving radiation dose related problems. In particular, the paper discusses the electron transport simulations using the class-II condensed history method. The considered electron energy ranges from a few hundreds of keV to 30 MeV. As for photon part, photoelectric effect, Compton scattering and pair production were simulated. Voxelized geometry was supported. A serial CPU (Central Processing Unit)code was first written in C++. The code was then transplanted to the GPU using the CUDA C 5.0 standards. The hardware involved a desktop PC with an Intel Xeon X5660 CPU and six NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPUs. The code was tested for a case of 20 MeV electron beam incident perpendicularly on a water-aluminum-water phantom. The depth and later dose profiles were found to agree with results obtained from well tested MC codes. Using six GPU cards, 6*106 electron histories were simulated within 2 seconds. In comparison, the same case running the EGSnrc and MCNPX codes required 1645 seconds and 9213 seconds, respectively. On-going work continues to test the code for different medical applications such as radiotherapy and brachytherapy. (authors)

  15. Radiation Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbatsch, Todd James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  16. The Premar Code for the Monte Carlo Simulation of Radiation Transport In the Atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Montecarlo code PREMAR is described, which allows the user to simulate the radiation transport in the atmosphere, in the ultraviolet-infrared frequency interval. A plan multilayer geometry is at present foreseen by the code, witch albedo possibility at the lower boundary surface. For a given monochromatic point source, the main quantities computed by the code are the absorption spatial distributions of aerosol and molecules, together with the related atmospheric transmittances. Moreover, simulation of of Lidar experiments are foreseen by the code, the source and telescope fields of view being assigned. To build-up the appropriate probability distributions, an input data library is assumed to be read by the code. For this purpose the radiance-transmittance LOWTRAN-7 code has been conveniently adapted as a source of the library so as to exploit the richness of information of the code for a large variety of atmospheric simulations. Results of applications of the PREMAR code are finally presented, with special reference to simulations of Lidar system and radiometer experiments carried out at the Brasimone ENEA Centre by the Environment Department

  17. Application of the Monte Carlo technique to the study of radiation transport in a prompt gamma in vivo neutron activation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte Carlo code (MORSE-SGC) from the Radiation Shielding Information Centre at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA, has been adapted and used to model radiation transport in the Auckland prompt gamma in vivo neutron activation analysis facility. Preliminary results are presented for the slow neutron flux in an anthropomorphic phantom which are in broad agreement with those obtained by measurement via activation foils. Since experimental optimization is not logistically feasible and since theoretical optimization of neutron activation facilities has not previously been attempted, it is hoped that the Monte Carlo calculations can be used to provide a basis for improved system design

  18. Monte Carlo photon transport techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basis of Monte Carlo calculation of photon transport problems is the computer simulation of individual photon histories and their subsequent averaging to provide the quantities of interest. As the history of a photon is followed the values of variables are selected and decisions made by sampling known distributions using random numbers. The transport of photon is simulated by creation of particles from a defined source region, generally with a random initial orientation in space, with tracking of particles as they travel through the system, sampling the probability density functions for their interactions to evaluate their trajectories and energy deposition at different points in the system. The interactions determine the penetration and the motion of particles. The computational model, for radiation transport problems includes geometry and material specifications. Every computer code contains a database of experimentally obtained quantities, known as cross-sections that determine the probability of a particle interacting with the medium through which it is transported. Every cross-section is peculiar to the type and energy of the incident particle and to the kind of interaction it undergoes. These partial cross-sections are summed to form the total cross-section; the ratio of the partial cross-section to the total cross-section gives the probability of this particular interaction occurring. Cross-section data for the interaction types of interest must be supplied for each material present. The model also consists of algorithms used to compute the result of interactions (changes in particle energy, direction, etc.) based on the physical principles that describe the interaction of radiation with matter and the cross-section data provided

  19. An investigation of the adjoint method for external beam radiation therapy treatment planning using Monte Carlo transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A relatively new technique for achieving the right dose to the right tissue, is intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In this technique, a megavoltage x-ray beam is rotated around a patient, and the intensity and shape of the beam is modulated as a function of source position and patient anatomy. The relationship between beam-let intensity and patient dose can be expressed under a matrix form where the matrix Dij represents the dose delivered to voxel i by beam-let j per unit fluence. The Dij influence matrix is the key element that enables this approach. In this regard, sensitivity theory lends itself in a natural way to the process of computing beam weights for treatment planning. The solution of the adjoint form of the Boltzmann equation is an adjoint function that describes the importance of particles throughout the system in contributing to the detector response. In this case, adjoint methods can provide the sensitivity of the dose at a single point in the patient with respect to all points in the source field. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using the adjoint method and Monte Carlo transport for radiation therapy treatment planning

  20. Observing gas and dust in simulations of star formation with Monte Carlo radiation transport on Voronoi meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubber, D. A.; Ercolano, B.; Dale, J.

    2016-02-01

    Ionizing feedback from massive stars dramatically affects the interstellar medium local to star-forming regions. Numerical simulations are now starting to include enough complexity to produce morphologies and gas properties that are not too dissimilar from observations. The comparison between the density fields produced by hydrodynamical simulations and observations at given wavelengths relies however on photoionization/chemistry and radiative transfer calculations. We present here an implementation of Monte Carlo radiation transport through a Voronoi tessellation in the photoionization and dust radiative transfer code MOCASSIN. We show for the first time a synthetic spectrum and synthetic emission line maps of a hydrodynamical simulation of a molecular cloud affected by massive stellar feedback. We show that the approach on which previous work is based, which remapped hydrodynamical density fields on to Cartesian grids before performing radiative transfer/photoionization calculations, results in significant errors in the temperature and ionization structure of the region. Furthermore, we describe the mathematical process of tracing photon energy packets through a Voronoi tessellation, including optimizations, treating problematic cases and boundary conditions. We perform various benchmarks using both the original version of MOCASSIN and the modified version using the Voronoi tessellation. We show that for uniform grids, or equivalently a cubic lattice of cell generating points, the new Voronoi version gives the same results as the original Cartesian grid version of MOCASSIN for all benchmarks. For non-uniform initial conditions, such as using snapshots from smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations, we show that the Voronoi version performs better than the Cartesian grid version, resulting in much better resolution in dense regions.

  1. Development and Implementation of Photonuclear Cross-Section Data for Mutually Coupled Neutron-Photon Transport Calculations in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Radiation Transport Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental motivation for the research presented in this dissertation was the need to development a more accurate prediction method for characterization of mixed radiation fields around medical electron accelerators (MEAs). Specifically, a model is developed for simulation of neutron and other particle production from photonuclear reactions and incorporated in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. This extension of the capability within the MCNP code provides for the more accurate assessment of the mixed radiation fields. The Nuclear Theory and Applications group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has recently provided first-of-a-kind evaluated photonuclear data for a select group of isotopes. These data provide the reaction probabilities as functions of incident photon energy with angular and energy distribution information for all reaction products. The availability of these data is the cornerstone of the new methodology for state-of-the-art mutually coupled photon-neutron transport simulations. The dissertation includes details of the model development and implementation necessary to use the new photonuclear data within MCNP simulations. A new data format has been developed to include tabular photonuclear data. Data are processed from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Format (ENDF) to the new class ''u'' A Compact ENDF (ACE) format using a standalone processing code. MCNP modifications have been completed to enable Monte Carlo sampling of photonuclear reactions. Note that both neutron and gamma production are included in the present model. The new capability has been subjected to extensive verification and validation (V and V) testing. Verification testing has established the expected basic functionality. Two validation projects were undertaken. First, comparisons were made to benchmark data from literature. These calculations demonstrate the accuracy of the new data and transport routines to better than 25 percent. Second, the ability to

  2. Development and Implementation of Photonuclear Cross-Section Data for Mutually Coupled Neutron-Photon Transport Calculations in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Radiation Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan C. White

    2000-07-01

    The fundamental motivation for the research presented in this dissertation was the need to development a more accurate prediction method for characterization of mixed radiation fields around medical electron accelerators (MEAs). Specifically, a model is developed for simulation of neutron and other particle production from photonuclear reactions and incorporated in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. This extension of the capability within the MCNP code provides for the more accurate assessment of the mixed radiation fields. The Nuclear Theory and Applications group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has recently provided first-of-a-kind evaluated photonuclear data for a select group of isotopes. These data provide the reaction probabilities as functions of incident photon energy with angular and energy distribution information for all reaction products. The availability of these data is the cornerstone of the new methodology for state-of-the-art mutually coupled photon-neutron transport simulations. The dissertation includes details of the model development and implementation necessary to use the new photonuclear data within MCNP simulations. A new data format has been developed to include tabular photonuclear data. Data are processed from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Format (ENDF) to the new class ''u'' A Compact ENDF (ACE) format using a standalone processing code. MCNP modifications have been completed to enable Monte Carlo sampling of photonuclear reactions. Note that both neutron and gamma production are included in the present model. The new capability has been subjected to extensive verification and validation (V&V) testing. Verification testing has established the expected basic functionality. Two validation projects were undertaken. First, comparisons were made to benchmark data from literature. These calculations demonstrate the accuracy of the new data and transport routines to better than 25 percent. Second

  3. Angular Distribution of Particles Emerging from a Diffusive Region and its Implications for the Fleck-Canfield Random Walk Algorithm for Implicit Monte Carlo Radiation Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, M A

    2000-01-01

    We present various approximations for the angular distribution of particles emerging from an optically thick, purely isotropically scattering region into a vacuum. Our motivation is to use such a distribution for the Fleck-Canfield random walk method [1] for implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) [2] radiation transport problems. We demonstrate that the cosine distribution recommended in the original random walk paper [1] is a poor approximation to the angular distribution predicted by transport theory. Then we examine other approximations that more closely match the transport angular distribution.

  4. Pre-conditioned Backward Monte Carlo solutions to radiative transport in planetary atmospheres. Fundamentals: Sampling of propagation directions in polarising media

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz, García; Mills,; P, F

    2014-01-01

    Context. The interpretation of polarised radiation emerging from a planetary atmosphere must rely on solutions to the vector Radiative Transport Equation (vRTE). Monte Carlo integration of the vRTE is a valuable approach for its flexible treatment of complex viewing and/or illumination geometries and because it can intuitively incorporate elaborate physics. Aims. We present a novel Pre-Conditioned Backward Monte Carlo (PBMC) algorithm for solving the vRTE and apply it to planetary atmospheres irradiated from above. As classical BMC methods, our PBMC algorithm builds the solution by simulating the photon trajectories from the detector towards the radiation source, i.e. in the reverse order of the actual photon displacements. Methods. We show that the neglect of polarisation in the sampling of photon propagation directions in classical BMC algorithms leads to unstable and biased solutions for conservative, optically-thick, strongly-polarising media such as Rayleigh atmospheres. The numerical difficulty is avoid...

  5. Implementation and display of Computer Aided Design (CAD) models in Monte Carlo radiation transport and shielding applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Xwindow application capable of importing geometric information directly from two Computer Aided Design (CAD) based formats for use in radiation transport and shielding analyses is being developed at ORNL. The application permits the user to graphically view the geometric models imported from the two formats for verification and debugging. Previous models, specifically formatted for the radiation transport and shielding codes can also be imported. Required extensions to the existing combinatorial geometry analysis routines are discussed. Examples illustrating the various options and features which will be implemented in the application are presented. The use of the application as a visualization tool for the output of the radiation transport codes is also discussed

  6. A GAMOS plug-in for GEANT4 based Monte Carlo simulation of radiation-induced light transport in biological media

    OpenAIRE

    Glaser, Adam K.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Arce, Pedro; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a tissue optics plug-in that interfaces with the GEANT4/GAMOS Monte Carlo (MC) architecture, providing a means of simulating radiation-induced light transport in biological media for the first time. Specifically, we focus on the simulation of light transport due to the Čerenkov effect (light emission from charged particle’s traveling faster than the local speed of light in a given medium), a phenomenon which requires accurate modeling of both the high energy particle and subsequen...

  7. Monte Carlo applications to radiation shielding problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo methods are a class of computational algorithms that rely on repeated random sampling of physical and mathematical systems to compute their results. However, basic concepts of MC are both simple and straightforward and can be learned by using a personal computer. Uses of Monte Carlo methods require large amounts of random numbers, and it was their use that spurred the development of pseudorandom number generators, which were far quicker to use than the tables of random numbers which had been previously used for statistical sampling. In Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport, the history (track) of a particle is viewed as a random sequence of free flights that end with an interaction event where the particle changes its direction of movement, loses energy and, occasionally, produces secondary particles. The Monte Carlo simulation of a given experimental arrangement (e.g., an electron beam, coming from an accelerator and impinging on a water phantom) consists of the numerical generation of random histories. To simulate these histories we need an interaction model, i.e., a set of differential cross sections (DCS) for the relevant interaction mechanisms. The DCSs determine the probability distribution functions (pdf) of the random variables that characterize a track; 1) free path between successive interaction events, 2) type of interaction taking place and 3) energy loss and angular deflection in a particular event (and initial state of emitted secondary particles, if any). Once these pdfs are known, random histories can be generated by using appropriate sampling methods. If the number of generated histories is large enough, quantitative information on the transport process may be obtained by simply averaging over the simulated histories. The Monte Carlo method yields the same information as the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation, with the same interaction model, but is easier to implement. In particular, the simulation of radiation

  8. Verification of Monte Carlo transport codes FLUKA, GEANT4 and SHIELD for radiation protection purposes at relativistic heavy ion accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crucial problem for radiation shielding design at heavy ion accelerator facilities with beam energies of several GeV/n is the source term problem. Experimental data on double differential neutron yields from thick targets irradiated with high-energy uranium nuclei are lacking. At present there are not many Monte Carlo multipurpose codes that can work with primary high-energy uranium nuclei. These codes use different physical models for simulating nucleus-nucleus reactions. Therefore, verification of the codes with available experimental data is very important for selection of the most reliable code for practical tasks. This paper presents comparisons of the FLUKA, GEANT4 and SHIELD code simulations with experimental data on neutron production at 1 GeV/n 238U beam interaction with a thick Fe target

  9. Accurate and efficient radiation transport in optically thick media -- by means of the Symbolic Implicit Monte Carlo method in the difference formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szoke, A; Brooks, E D; McKinley, M; Daffin, F

    2005-03-30

    The equations of radiation transport for thermal photons are notoriously difficult to solve in thick media without resorting to asymptotic approximations such as the diffusion limit. One source of this difficulty is that in thick, absorbing media thermal emission is almost completely balanced by strong absorption. In a previous publication [SB03], the photon transport equation was written in terms of the deviation of the specific intensity from the local equilibrium field. We called the new form of the equations the difference formulation. The difference formulation is rigorously equivalent to the original transport equation. It is particularly advantageous in thick media, where the radiation field approaches local equilibrium and the deviations from the Planck distribution are small. The difference formulation for photon transport also clarifies the diffusion limit. In this paper, the transport equation is solved by the Symbolic Implicit Monte Carlo (SIMC) method and a comparison is made between the standard formulation and the difference formulation. The SIMC method is easily adapted to the derivative source terms of the difference formulation, and a remarkable reduction in noise is obtained when the difference formulation is applied to problems involving thick media.

  10. Radiation transport analyses for IFMIF design by the Attila software using a Monte-Carlo source model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arter, W. [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: wayne.arter@ukaea.org.uk; Loughlin, M.J. [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2009-01-15

    Accurate calculation of the neutron transport through the shielding of the IFMIF test cell, defined by CAD, is a difficult task for several reasons. The ability of the powerful deterministic radiation transport code Attila, to do this rapidly and reliably has been studied. Three models of increasing geometrical complexity were produced from the CAD using the CADfix software. A fourth model was produced to represent transport within the cell. The work also involved the conversion of the Vitenea-IEF database for high energy neutrons into a format usable by Attila, and the conversion of a particle source specified in MCNP wssaformat to a form usable by Attila. The final model encompassed the entire test cell environment, with only minor modifications. On a state-of-the-art PC, Attila took approximately 3 h to perform the calculations, as a consequence of a careful mesh 'layering'. The results strongly suggest that Attila will be a valuable tool for modelling radiation transport in IFMIF, and for similar problems.

  11. FOTELP - Monte Carlo simulation of photons, electrons and positrons transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the development of the algorithm and computer program FOTELP for photons, electrons and positrons transport by the Monte Carlo analog method. This program can be used in numerical experiments on the computer for dosimetry, radiation protection and radiation therapy. (author)

  12. Problems in radiation shielding calculations with Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo method is a very useful tool for solving a large class of radiation transport problem. In contrast with deterministic method, geometric complexity is a much less significant problem for Monte Carlo calculations. However, the accuracy of Monte Carlo calculations is of course, limited by statistical error of the quantities to be estimated. In this report, we point out some typical problems to solve a large shielding system including radiation streaming. The Monte Carlo coupling technique was developed to settle such a shielding problem accurately. However, the variance of the Monte Carlo results using the coupling technique of which detectors were located outside the radiation streaming, was still not enough. So as to bring on more accurate results for the detectors located outside the streaming and also for a multi-legged-duct streaming problem, a practicable way of ''Prism Scattering technique'' is proposed in the study. (author)

  13. PENGEOM-A general-purpose geometry package for Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport in material systems defined by quadric surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansa, Julio; Salvat-Pujol, Francesc; Díaz-Londoño, Gloria; Carnicer, Artur; Lallena, Antonio M.; Salvat, Francesc

    2016-02-01

    The Fortran subroutine package PENGEOM provides a complete set of tools to handle quadric geometries in Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport. The material structure where radiation propagates is assumed to consist of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces. The PENGEOM subroutines (a subset of the PENELOPE code) track particles through the material structure, independently of the details of the physics models adopted to describe the interactions. Although these subroutines are designed for detailed simulations of photon and electron transport, where all individual interactions are simulated sequentially, they can also be used in mixed (class II) schemes for simulating the transport of high-energy charged particles, where the effect of soft interactions is described by the random-hinge method. The definition of the geometry and the details of the tracking algorithm are tailored to optimize simulation speed. The use of fuzzy quadric surfaces minimizes the impact of round-off errors. The provided software includes a Java graphical user interface for editing and debugging the geometry definition file and for visualizing the material structure. Images of the structure are generated by using the tracking subroutines and, hence, they describe the geometry actually passed to the simulation code.

  14. Common misconceptions in Monte Carlo particle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booth, Thomas E., E-mail: teb@lanl.gov [LANL, XCP-7, MS F663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Monte Carlo particle transport is often introduced primarily as a method to solve linear integral equations such as the Boltzmann transport equation. This paper discusses some common misconceptions about Monte Carlo methods that are often associated with an equation-based focus. Many of the misconceptions apply directly to standard Monte Carlo codes such as MCNP and some are worth noting so that one does not unnecessarily restrict future methods. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adjoint variety and use from a Monte Carlo perspective. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Misconceptions and preconceived notions about statistical weight. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reasons that an adjoint based weight window sometimes works well or does not. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pulse height/probability of initiation tallies and 'the' transport equation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highlights unnecessary preconceived notions about Monte Carlo transport.

  15. Adjoint Monte Carlo simulation of fixed-energy secondary radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fixed energy secondary generation for adjoint Monte Carlo methods constitutes certain difficulties because of zero probability of reaching fixed value from continuous distribution. This paper proposes a possible approach to adjoint Monte Carlo simulation with fixed energy secondary radiation which does not contain any simplifying restriction. This approach uses the introduced before generalized particle concept developed for description of mixed-type radiation transport and allows adjoint Monte Carlo simulation of such processes. It treats particle type as additional discrete coordinate and always considers only one particle even for the interactions with many particles outgoing from the collision. The adjoint fixed energy secondary radiation simulation is performed as local energy estimator through the intermediate state with fixed energy. The proposed algorithm is tested on the example of coupled gamma/electron/positron transport with generation of annihilation radiation. Forward and adjoint simulation according to generalized particle concept show statistically similar results. (orig.)

  16. Monte Carlo electron/photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of nonplasma coupled electron/photon transport using Monte Carlo method is presented. Remarks are mainly restricted to linerarized formalisms at electron energies from 1 keV to 1000 MeV. Applications involving pulse-height estimation, transport in external magnetic fields, and optical Cerenkov production are discussed to underscore the importance of this branch of computational physics. Advances in electron multigroup cross-section generation is reported, and its impact on future code development assessed. Progress toward the transformation of MCNP into a generalized neutral/charged-particle Monte Carlo code is described. 48 refs

  17. Scalable Domain Decomposed Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Matthew Joseph [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2013-12-05

    In this dissertation, we present the parallel algorithms necessary to run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on large numbers of processors (millions of processors). Previous algorithms were not scalable, and the parallel overhead became more computationally costly than the numerical simulation.

  18. Dosimetric accuracy of a deterministic radiation transport based 192Ir brachytherapy treatment planning system. Part III. Comparison to Monte Carlo simulation in voxelized anatomical computational models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare TG43-based and Acuros deterministic radiation transport-based calculations of the BrachyVision treatment planning system (TPS) with corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results in heterogeneous patient geometries, in order to validate Acuros and quantify the accuracy improvement it marks relative to TG43. Methods: Dosimetric comparisons in the form of isodose lines, percentage dose difference maps, and dose volume histogram results were performed for two voxelized mathematical models resembling an esophageal and a breast brachytherapy patient, as well as an actual breast brachytherapy patient model. The mathematical models were converted to digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) image series for input to the TPS. The MCNP5 v.1.40 general-purpose simulation code input files for each model were prepared using information derived from the corresponding DICOM RT exports from the TPS. Results: Comparisons of MC and TG43 results in all models showed significant differences, as reported previously in the literature and expected from the inability of the TG43 based algorithm to account for heterogeneities and model specific scatter conditions. A close agreement was observed between MC and Acuros results in all models except for a limited number of points that lay in the penumbra of perfectly shaped structures in the esophageal model, or at distances very close to the catheters in all models. Conclusions: Acuros marks a significant dosimetry improvement relative to TG43. The assessment of the clinical significance of this accuracy improvement requires further work. Mathematical patient equivalent models and models prepared from actual patient CT series are useful complementary tools in the methodology outlined in this series of works for the benchmarking of any advanced dose calculation algorithm beyond TG43.

  19. Parallel MCNP Monte Carlo transport calculations with MPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The steady increase in computational performance has made Monte Carlo calculations for large/complex systems possible. However, in order to make these calculations practical, order of magnitude increases in performance are necessary. The Monte Carlo method is inherently parallel (particles are simulated independently) and thus has the potential for near-linear speedup with respect to the number of processors. Further, the ever-increasing accessibility of parallel computers, such as workstation clusters, facilitates the practical use of parallel Monte Carlo. Recognizing the nature of the Monte Carlo method and the trends in available computing, the code developers at Los Alamos National Laboratory implemented the message-passing general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP (version 4A). The PVM package was chosen by the MCNP code developers because it supports a variety of communication networks, several UNIX platforms, and heterogeneous computer systems. This PVM version of MCNP has been shown to produce speedups that approach the number of processors and thus, is a very useful tool for transport analysis. Due to software incompatibilities on the local IBM SP2, PVM has not been available, and thus it is not possible to take advantage of this useful tool. Hence, it became necessary to implement an alternative message-passing library package into MCNP. Because the message-passing interface (MPI) is supported on the local system, takes advantage of the high-speed communication switches in the SP2, and is considered to be the emerging standard, it was selected

  20. Composite biasing in Monte Carlo radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Baes, Maarten; Lunttila, Tuomas; Bianchi, Simone; Camps, Peter; Juvela, Mika; Kuiper, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Biasing or importance sampling is a powerful technique in Monte Carlo radiative transfer, and can be applied in different forms to increase the accuracy and efficiency of simulations. One of the drawbacks of the use of biasing is the potential introduction of large weight factors. We discuss a general strategy, composite biasing, to suppress the appearance of large weight factors. We use this composite biasing approach for two different problems faced by current state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes: the generation of photon packages from multiple components, and the penetration of radiation through high optical depth barriers. In both cases, the implementation of the relevant algorithms is trivial and does not interfere with any other optimisation techniques. Through simple test models, we demonstrate the general applicability, accuracy and efficiency of the composite biasing approach. In particular, for the penetration of high optical depths, the gain in efficiency is spectacular for the spe...

  1. Stochastic calculations for radiation risk assessment: a Monte-Carlo approach to the simulation of radiocesium transport in the pasture-cow-milk food chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of introducing probability distributions of the parameters in radionuclide transport models are investigated. Results from a Monte-Carlo simulation were presented for the transport of 137Cs via the pasture-cow-milk pathway, taking into the account the uncertainties and naturally occurring fluctuations in the rate constants. The results of the stochastic model calculations characterize the activity concentrations at a given time t and provide a great deal more information for analysis of the environmental transport of radionuclides than deterministic calculations in which the variation of parameters is not taken into consideration. Moreover the stochastic model permits an estimate of the variation of the physico-chemical behaviour of radionuclides in the environment in a more realistic way than by using only the highest transfer coefficients in deterministic approaches, which can lead to non-realistic overestimates of the probability with which high activity levels will be encountered. (U.K.)

  2. A study of Monte Carlo radiative transfer through fractal clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautier, C.; Lavallec, D.; O`Hirok, W.; Ricchiazzi, P. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    An understanding of radiation transport (RT) through clouds is fundamental to studies of the earth`s radiation budget and climate dynamics. The transmission through horizontally homogeneous clouds has been studied thoroughly using accurate, discreet ordinates radiative transfer models. However, the applicability of these results to general problems of global radiation budget is limited by the plane parallel assumption and the fact that real clouds fields show variability, both vertically and horizontally, on all size scales. To understand how radiation interacts with realistic clouds, we have used a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model to compute the details of the photon-cloud interaction on synthetic cloud fields. Synthetic cloud fields, generated by a cascade model, reproduce the scaling behavior, as well as the cloud variability observed and estimated from cloud satellite data.

  3. A residual Monte Carlo method for discrete thermal radiative diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Residual Monte Carlo methods reduce statistical error at a rate of exp(-bN), where b is a positive constant and N is the number of particle histories. Contrast this convergence rate with 1/√N, which is the rate of statistical error reduction for conventional Monte Carlo methods. Thus, residual Monte Carlo methods hold great promise for increased efficiency relative to conventional Monte Carlo methods. Previous research has shown that the application of residual Monte Carlo methods to the solution of continuum equations, such as the radiation transport equation, is problematic for all but the simplest of cases. However, the residual method readily applies to discrete systems as long as those systems are monotone, i.e., they produce positive solutions given positive sources. We develop a residual Monte Carlo method for solving a discrete 1D non-linear thermal radiative equilibrium diffusion equation, and we compare its performance with that of the discrete conventional Monte Carlo method upon which it is based. We find that the residual method provides efficiency gains of many orders of magnitude. Part of the residual gain is due to the fact that we begin each timestep with an initial guess equal to the solution from the previous timestep. Moreover, fully consistent non-linear solutions can be obtained in a reasonable amount of time because of the effective lack of statistical noise. We conclude that the residual approach has great potential and that further research into such methods should be pursued for more general discrete and continuum systems

  4. Radiation shielding analysis of a spent fuel transport cask with an actual configuration model using the Monte Carlo method - comparison with the discrete ordinates Sn method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to demonstrate the features of Monte Carlo method, in comparison with the two-dimensional discrete ordinates Sn method, detailed modeling of the canister containing the fuel basket with 14 spent fuel assemblies, supplement shields located around the lower nozzles of the fuels, and the cooling fins attached on the cask body of the NFT-14P cask are performed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4C. Furthermore, the water level in the canister is assimilated into the present MCNP 4C calculations. For more precise modeling of the canister, the generating points of gamma rays and neutrons are simulated accurately from the fuel assemblies installed in it. The supplement shields located around the lower nozzles of the fuels are designed to be effective especially for the activation 60Co gamma rays, and the cooling fins for gamma rays in particular. As predicated, compared with the DOT 3.5 calculations, the total dose-equivalent rates with the actual configurations are reduced to approximately 30% at 1m from the upper side surface and 85% at 1m from the lower side surface, respectively. Accordingly, the employment of detailed models for the Monte Carlo calculations is essential to accomplish more reasonable shielding design of a spent fuel transport cask and an interim storage cask. Quality of the actual configuration model of the canister containing the fuel basket with 12 spent fuel assemblies has already been demonstrated by the Monte Carlo analysis with MCNP 4B, in comparison with the measured dose-equivalent rates around the TN-12A cask

  5. Weighted-delta-tracking for Monte Carlo particle transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • This paper presents an alteration to the Monte Carlo Woodcock tracking technique. • The alteration improves computational efficiency within regions of high absorbers. • The rejection technique is replaced by a statistical weighting mechanism. • The modified Woodcock method is shown to be faster than standard Woodcock tracking. • The modified Woodcock method achieves a lower variance, given a specified accuracy. - Abstract: Monte Carlo particle transport (MCPT) codes are incredibly powerful and versatile tools to simulate particle behavior in a multitude of scenarios, such as core/criticality studies, radiation protection, shielding, medicine and fusion research to name just a small subset applications. However, MCPT codes can be very computationally expensive to run when the model geometry contains large attenuation depths and/or contains many components. This paper proposes a simple modification to the Woodcock tracking method used by some Monte Carlo particle transport codes. The Woodcock method utilizes the rejection method for sampling virtual collisions as a method to remove collision distance sampling at material boundaries. However, it suffers from poor computational efficiency when the sample acceptance rate is low. The proposed method removes rejection sampling from the Woodcock method in favor of a statistical weighting scheme, which improves the computational efficiency of a Monte Carlo particle tracking code. It is shown that the modified Woodcock method is less computationally expensive than standard ray-tracing and rejection-based Woodcock tracking methods and achieves a lower variance, given a specified accuracy

  6. Radiation transport: Progress report, July 1, 1987-September 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development progress in radiation transport for the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Group S-6 for the fourth quarter of FY 87 is reported. Included are unclassified tasks in the areas of Deterministic Radiation Transport, Monte Carlo Radiation Transport, and Cross Sections and Physics. 23 refs., 9 figs

  7. Benchmarking of proton transport in Super Monte Carlo simulation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of the publication follows. The Monte Carlo (MC) method has been traditionally applied in nuclear design and analysis due to its capability of dealing with complicated geometries and multi-dimensional physics problems as well as obtaining accurate results. The Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program (SuperMC) is developed by FDS Team in China for fusion, fission, and other nuclear applications. The simulations of radiation transport, isotope burn-up, material activation, radiation dose, and biology damage could be performed using SuperMC. Complicated geometries and the whole physical process of various types of particles in broad energy scale can be well handled. Bi-directional automatic conversion between general CAD models and full-formed input files of SuperMC is supported by MCAM, which is a CAD/image-based automatic modeling program for neutronics and radiation transport simulation. Mixed visualization of dynamical 3D dataset and geometry model is supported by RVIS, which is a nuclear radiation virtual simulation and assessment system. Continuous-energy cross section data from hybrid evaluated nuclear data library HENDL are utilized to support simulation. Neutronic fixed source and critical design parameters calculates for reactors of complex geometry and material distribution based on the transport of neutron and photon have been achieved in our former version of SuperMC. Recently, the proton transport has also been integrated in SuperMC in the energy region up to 10 GeV. The physical processes considered for proton transport include electromagnetic processes and hadronic processes. The electromagnetic processes include ionization, multiple scattering, Bremsstrahlung, and pair production processes. Public evaluated data from HENDL are used in some electromagnetic processes. In hadronic physics, the Bertini intra-nuclear cascade model with excitons, preequilibrium model, nucleus explosion model, fission model, and evaporation model are incorporated to

  8. Optimization of Monte Carlo transport simulations in stochastic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an accurate and efficient approach to optimize radiation transport simulations in a stochastic medium of high heterogeneity, like the Very High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR) configurations packed with TRISO fuel particles. Based on a fast nearest neighbor search algorithm, a modified fast Random Sequential Addition (RSA) method is first developed to speed up the generation of the stochastic media systems packed with both mono-sized and poly-sized spheres. A fast neutron tracking method is then developed to optimize the next sphere boundary search in the radiation transport procedure. In order to investigate their accuracy and efficiency, the developed sphere packing and neutron tracking methods are implemented into an in-house continuous energy Monte Carlo code to solve an eigenvalue problem in VHTR unit cells. Comparison with the MCNP benchmark calculations for the same problem indicates that the new methods show considerably higher computational efficiency. (authors)

  9. Verification of Monte-Carlo transport codes FLUKA, GEANT4 and SHIELD for radiation protection purposes at relativistic heavy-ion accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crucial problem for radiation shielding design at heavy-ion accelerator facilities with beam energies to several GeV/n is the source term problem. Experimental data on double differential neutron yields from thick target irradiated with high-energy uranium nuclei are lacking. At present, there are not many Monte-Carlo multipurpose codes that can work with primary high-energy uranium nuclei. These codes use different physical models for simulation of nucleus-nucleus reactions. Therefore, verification of the codes with available experimental data is very important for selection of the most reliable code for practical tasks. This paper presents comparisons of the FLUKA, GEANT4 and SHIELD codes simulations with the experimental data on neutron production at 1 GeV/n 238U beam interaction with thick Fe target

  10. Radiation transport. Progress report, April 1-December 31, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development progress in radiation transport by the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Group X-6 for the last nine months of CY 83 is reported. Included are unclassified tasks in the areas of Fission Reactor Neutronics, Deterministic Transport Methods, Monte Carlo Radiation Transport, and Cross Sections and Physics

  11. Radiation transport. Progress report, October 1, 1982-March 31, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development progress in radiation transport by the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Group X-6 for the first half of FY 83 is reported. Included are tasks in the areas of Fission Reactor Neutronics, Deterministic Transport Methods, and Monte Carlo Radiation Transport

  12. Condensed history Monte Carlo methods for photon transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study methods for accelerating Monte Carlo simulations that retain most of the accuracy of conventional Monte Carlo algorithms. These methods - called Condensed History (CH) methods - have been very successfully used to model the transport of ionizing radiation in turbid systems. Our primary objective is to determine whether or not such methods might apply equally well to the transport of photons in biological tissue. In an attempt to unify the derivations, we invoke results obtained first by Lewis, Goudsmit and Saunderson and later improved by Larsen and Tolar. We outline how two of the most promising of the CH models - one based on satisfying certain similarity relations and the second making use of a scattering phase function that permits only discrete directional changes - can be developed using these approaches. The main idea is to exploit the connection between the space-angle moments of the radiance and the angular moments of the scattering phase function. We compare the results obtained when the two CH models studied are used to simulate an idealized tissue transport problem. The numerical results support our findings based on the theoretical derivations and suggest that CH models should play a useful role in modeling light-tissue interactions

  13. Intercomparison of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes to model TEPC response in low-energy neutron and gamma-ray fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) can potentially be used as a portable and personal dosemeter in mixed neutron and gamma-ray fields, but what hinders this use is their typically large physical size. To formulate compact TEPC designs, the use of a Monte Carlo transport code is necessary to predict the performance of compact designs in these fields. To perform this modelling, three candidate codes were assessed: MCNPX 2.7.E, FLUKA 2011.2 and PHITS 2.24. In each code, benchmark simulations were performed involving the irradiation of a 5-in. TEPC with monoenergetic neutron fields and a 4-in. wall-less TEPC with monoenergetic gamma-ray fields. The frequency and dose mean lineal energies and dose distributions calculated from each code were compared with experimentally determined data. For the neutron benchmark simulations, PHITS produces data closest to the experimental values and for the gamma-ray benchmark simulations, FLUKA yields data closest to the experimentally determined quantities. (authors)

  14. Coupled MHD-Monte Carlo transport model for dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-dimensional, two fluid model of the MHD equations has been coupled to a Monte Carlo transport model of high energy, non-Maxwellian ions. The MHD part of the model assumes complete ionization and includes a perfect gas law for a scalar pressure, a tensor artificial viscosity, electron and ion thermal conduction, electron-ion coupling, and a radiation loss term. A simple Ohm's Law is used with a B/sub theta/ magnetic field. The MHD equations were solved in Lagrangian coordinates. The conservation equations were differenced explicitly and the diffusion-type equations implicitly using the splitting technique. The Monte Carlo model solves the equation of motion for high energy ions, moving through and suffering small and large angle collisions with the fluid Maxwellian plasma. The source of high energy ions is the thermonuclear reactions of the hydrogen isotopes, or it may be an externally injected beam of neutralized ions. In addition to using the usual Maxwell averaged thermonuclear cross sections for calculating the number of reactions taking place within the Maxwellian plasma, the high energy ions may suffer collisions resulting in a reaction. In the Monte Carlo model all neutrons are assumed to escape, and all energetic ions of Z less than or equal to 2 are followed

  15. Parallel Monte Carlo Synthetic Acceleration methods for discrete transport problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Stuart R.

    This work researches and develops Monte Carlo Synthetic Acceleration (MCSA) methods as a new class of solution techniques for discrete neutron transport and fluid flow problems. Monte Carlo Synthetic Acceleration methods use a traditional Monte Carlo process to approximate the solution to the discrete problem as a means of accelerating traditional fixed-point methods. To apply these methods to neutronics and fluid flow and determine the feasibility of these methods on modern hardware, three complementary research and development exercises are performed. First, solutions to the SPN discretization of the linear Boltzmann neutron transport equation are obtained using MCSA with a difficult criticality calculation for a light water reactor fuel assembly used as the driving problem. To enable MCSA as a solution technique a group of modern preconditioning strategies are researched. MCSA when compared to conventional Krylov methods demonstrated improved iterative performance over GMRES by converging in fewer iterations when using the same preconditioning. Second, solutions to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations were obtained by developing the Forward-Automated Newton-MCSA (FANM) method for nonlinear systems based on Newton's method. Three difficult fluid benchmark problems in both convective and driven flow regimes were used to drive the research and development of the method. For 8 out of 12 benchmark cases, it was found that FANM had better iterative performance than the Newton-Krylov method by converging the nonlinear residual in fewer linear solver iterations with the same preconditioning. Third, a new domain decomposed algorithm to parallelize MCSA aimed at leveraging leadership-class computing facilities was developed by utilizing parallel strategies from the radiation transport community. The new algorithm utilizes the Multiple-Set Overlapping-Domain strategy in an attempt to reduce parallel overhead and add a natural element of replication to the algorithm. It

  16. Status of vectorized Monte Carlo for particle transport analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conventional particle transport Monte Carlo algorithm is ill suited for modern vector supercomputers because the random nature of the particle transport process in the history based algorithm inhibits construction of vectors. An alternative, event-based algorithm is suitable for vectorization and has been used recently to achieve impressive gains in performance on vector supercomputers. This review describes the event-based algorithm and several variations of it. Implementations of this algorithm for applications in particle transport are described, and their relative merits are discussed. The implementation of Monte Carlo methods on multiple vector parallel processors is considered, as is the potential of massively parallel processors for Monte Carlo particle transport simulations

  17. Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Densmore, Jeffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kelly, Thompson G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbatish, Todd J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-11-17

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique.

  18. Temperature variance study in Monte-Carlo photon transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study different Monte-Carlo methods for solving radiative transfer problems, and particularly Fleck's Monte-Carlo method. We first give the different time-discretization schemes and the corresponding stability criteria. Then we write the temperature variance as a function of the variances of temperature and absorbed energy at the previous time step. Finally we obtain some stability criteria for the Monte-Carlo method in the stationary case

  19. Neutron transport calculations using Quasi-Monte Carlo methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskowitz, B.S.

    1997-07-01

    This paper examines the use of quasirandom sequences of points in place of pseudorandom points in Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations. For two simple demonstration problems, the root mean square error, computed over a set of repeated runs, is found to be significantly less when quasirandom sequences are used ({open_quotes}Quasi-Monte Carlo Method{close_quotes}) than when a standard Monte Carlo calculation is performed using only pseudorandom points.

  20. Verification of Monte Carlo transport codes by activation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the increasing energies and intensities of heavy-ion accelerator facilities, the problem of an excessive activation of the accelerator components caused by beam losses becomes more and more important. Numerical experiments using Monte Carlo transport codes are performed in order to assess the levels of activation. The heavy-ion versions of the codes were released approximately a decade ago, therefore the verification is needed to be sure that they give reasonable results. Present work is focused on obtaining the experimental data on activation of the targets by heavy-ion beams. Several experiments were performed at GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung. The interaction of nitrogen, argon and uranium beams with aluminum targets, as well as interaction of nitrogen and argon beams with copper targets was studied. After the irradiation of the targets by different ion beams from the SIS18 synchrotron at GSI, the γ-spectroscopy analysis was done: the γ-spectra of the residual activity were measured, the radioactive nuclides were identified, their amount and depth distribution were detected. The obtained experimental results were compared with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations using FLUKA, MARS and SHIELD. The discrepancies and agreements between experiment and simulations are pointed out. The origin of discrepancies is discussed. Obtained results allow for a better verification of the Monte Carlo transport codes, and also provide information for their further development. The necessity of the activation studies for accelerator applications is discussed. The limits of applicability of the heavy-ion beam-loss criteria were studied using the FLUKA code. FLUKA-simulations were done to determine the most preferable from the radiation protection point of view materials for use in accelerator components.

  1. Adjoint electron-photon transport Monte Carlo calculations with ITS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general adjoint coupled electron-photon Monte Carlo code for solving the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation has recently been created. It is a modified version of ITS 3.0, a coupled electronphoton Monte Carlo code that has world-wide distribution. The applicability of the new code to radiation-interaction problems of the type found in space environments is demonstrated

  2. Applications of the COG multiparticle Monte Carlo transport code to simulated imaging of complex objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COG is a major multiparticle simulation code in the LLNL Monte Carlo radiation transport toolkit. It was designed to solve deep-penetration radiation shielding problems in arbitrarily complex 3D geometries, involving coupled transport of photons, neutrons, and electrons. COG was written to provide as much accuracy as the underlying cross-sections will allow, and has a number of variance-reduction features to speed computations. Recently COG has been applied to the simulation of high- resolution radiographs of complex objects and the evaluation of contraband detection schemes. In this paper we will give a brief description of the capabilities of the COG transport code and show several examples of neutron and gamma-ray imaging simulations. Keywords: Monte Carlo, radiation transport, simulated radiography, nonintrusive inspection, neutron imaging

  3. The Premar Code for the Monte Carlo Simulation of Radiation Transport In the Atmosphere; Il codice PREMAR per la simulazione Montecarlo del trasporto della radiazione dell`atmosfera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupini, E. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche `Ezio Clementel`, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione; Borgia, M.G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche `Ezio Clementel`, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Energia; Premuda, M. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Bologna (Italy). Ist. FISBAT

    1997-03-01

    The Montecarlo code PREMAR is described, which allows the user to simulate the radiation transport in the atmosphere, in the ultraviolet-infrared frequency interval. A plan multilayer geometry is at present foreseen by the code, witch albedo possibility at the lower boundary surface. For a given monochromatic point source, the main quantities computed by the code are the absorption spatial distributions of aerosol and molecules, together with the related atmospheric transmittances. Moreover, simulation of of Lidar experiments are foreseen by the code, the source and telescope fields of view being assigned. To build-up the appropriate probability distributions, an input data library is assumed to be read by the code. For this purpose the radiance-transmittance LOWTRAN-7 code has been conveniently adapted as a source of the library so as to exploit the richness of information of the code for a large variety of atmospheric simulations. Results of applications of the PREMAR code are finally presented, with special reference to simulations of Lidar system and radiometer experiments carried out at the Brasimone ENEA Centre by the Environment Department.

  4. Radiation Transport Calculations and Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasso, Alberto; /SLAC; Ferrari, A.; /CERN

    2011-06-30

    This article is an introduction to the Monte Carlo method as used in particle transport. After a description at an elementary level of the mathematical basis of the method, the Boltzmann equation and its physical meaning are presented, followed by Monte Carlo integration and random sampling, and by a general description of the main aspects and components of a typical Monte Carlo particle transport code. In particular, the most common biasing techniques are described, as well as the concepts of estimator and detector. After a discussion of the different types of errors, the issue of Quality Assurance is briefly considered.

  5. PEREGRINE: An all-particle Monte Carlo code for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of radiation therapy is to deliver a lethal dose to the tumor while minimizing the dose to normal tissues. To carry out this task, it is critical to calculate correctly the distribution of dose delivered. Monte Carlo transport methods have the potential to provide more accurate prediction of dose distributions than currently-used methods. PEREGRINE is a new Monte Carlo transport code developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the specific purpose of modeling the effects of radiation therapy. PEREGRINE transports neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles, including protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, and alpha particles. This paper describes the PEREGRINE transport code and some preliminary results for clinically relevant materials and radiation sources

  6. Deuterons at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: Conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult female and an adult male to deuterons (2H+) in the energy range 10 MeV-1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Coefficients were calculated using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilderTM 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms. Phantoms were modified to allow calculation of the effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Coefficients for the equivalent and effective dose incorporated a radiation weighting factor of 2. At 15 of 19 energies for which coefficients for the effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 1990 and 2007 recommendations differed by < 3 %. The greatest difference, 47 %, occurred at 30 MeV. (authors)

  7. Application of Monte Carlo methods in tomotherapy and radiation biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ya-Yun

    Helical tomotherapy is an attractive treatment for cancer therapy because highly conformal dose distributions can be achieved while the on-board megavoltage CT provides simultaneous images for accurate patient positioning. The convolution/superposition (C/S) dose calculation methods typically used for Tomotherapy treatment planning may overestimate skin (superficial) doses by 3-13%. Although more accurate than C/S methods, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are too slow for routine clinical treatment planning. However, the computational requirements of MC can be reduced by developing a source model for the parts of the accelerator that do not change from patient to patient. This source model then becomes the starting point for additional simulations of the penetration of radiation through patient. In the first section of this dissertation, a source model for a helical tomotherapy is constructed by condensing information from MC simulations into series of analytical formulas. The MC calculated percentage depth dose and beam profiles computed using the source model agree within 2% of measurements for a wide range of field sizes, which suggests that the proposed source model provides an adequate representation of the tomotherapy head for dose calculations. Monte Carlo methods are a versatile technique for simulating many physical, chemical and biological processes. In the second major of this thesis, a new methodology is developed to simulate of the induction of DNA damage by low-energy photons. First, the PENELOPE Monte Carlo radiation transport code is used to estimate the spectrum of initial electrons produced by photons. The initial spectrum of electrons are then combined with DNA damage yields for monoenergetic electrons from the fast Monte Carlo damage simulation (MCDS) developed earlier by Semenenko and Stewart (Purdue University). Single- and double-strand break yields predicted by the proposed methodology are in good agreement (1%) with the results of published

  8. Development of Monte Carlo machine for particle transport problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo machine, Monte-4 has been developed to realize high performance computing of Monte Carlo codes for particle transport. The calculation for particle tracking in a complex geometry requires (1) classification of particles by the region types using multi-way conditional branches, and (2) determination whether intersections of particle paths with surfaces of the regions are on the boundaries of the regions or not, using nests of conditional branches. However, these procedures require scalar operations or unusual vector operations. Thus the speedup ratios have been low, i.e. nearly two times, in vector processing of Monte Carlo codes for particle transport on conventional vector processors. The Monte Carlo machine Monte-4 has been equipped with the special hardware called Monte Carlo pipelines to process these procedures with high performance. Additionally Monte-4 has been equipped with enhanced load/store pipelines to realize fast transfer of indirectly addressed data for the purpose of resolving imbalances between the performance of data transfers and arithmetic operations in vector processing of Monte Carlo codes on conventional vector processors. Finally, Monte-4 has a parallel processing capability with four processors to multiply the performance of vector processing. We have evaluated the effective performance of Monte-4 using production-level Monte Carlo codes such as vectorized KENO-IV and MCNP. In the performance evaluation, nearly ten times speedup ratios have been obtained, compared with scalar processing of the original codes. (author)

  9. Radiation transport in MEDUSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transport of energy by X-ray photons has been included in the lD Lagrangian hydrodynamics code, MEDUSA. Calculations of the implosion by 0.53 μm laser irradiation of plastic and glass microballoons of current interest at the Central Laser Facility show that radiation preheats the fill gas and alters the temperature and density profiles during the implosion. A lower maximum gas temperature is obtained and this results, for a DT gas fill, in a greatly reduced neutron yield. (author)

  10. Radiation Transport for Explosive Outflows: Opacity Regrouping

    CERN Document Server

    Wollaeger, Ryan T

    2014-01-01

    Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) are methods used to stochastically solve the radiative transport and diffusion equations, respectively. These methods combine into a hybrid transport-diffusion method we refer to as IMC-DDMC. We explore a multigroup IMC-DDMC scheme that, in DDMC, combines frequency groups with sufficient optical thickness. We term this procedure "opacity regrouping". Opacity regrouping has previously been applied to IMC-DDMC calculations for problems in which the dependence of the opacity on frequency is monotonic. We generalize opacity regrouping to non-contiguous groups and implement this in \\supernu, a code designed to do radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with non-monotonic opacities. We find that regrouping of non-contiguous opacity groups generally improves the speed of IMC-DDMC radiation transport. We present an asymptotic analysis that informs the nature of the Doppler shift in DDMC groups and summarize the derivation of the Gentile-Fleck ...

  11. Helions at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: Conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent, for isotropic exposure of an adult male and an adult female to helions (3He2+) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Calculations were performed using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilderTM 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms modified to allow calculation of effective dose using tissues and tissue weighting factors from either the 1990 or 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. At 15 of the 19 energies for which coefficients for effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 2007 and 1990 recommendations differed by less than 2%. The greatest difference, 62%, occurred at 100 MeV. Published by Oxford Univ. Press on behalf of the U.S. Government 2010. (authors)

  12. Tritons at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: Conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose, and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult female and an adult male to tritons (3H+) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Coefficients were calculated using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilderTM 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms. Phantoms were modified to allow calculation of effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and calculation of gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. At 15 of the 19 energies for which coefficients for effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 2007 and 1990 recommendations differed by less than 3%. The greatest difference, 43%, occurred at 30 MeV. Published by Oxford Univ. Press on behalf of the US Government 2010. (authors)

  13. Guideline of Monte Carlo calculation. Neutron/gamma ray transport simulation by Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    This report condenses basic theories and advanced applications of neutron/gamma ray transport calculations in many fields of nuclear energy research. Chapters 1 through 5 treat historical progress of Monte Carlo methods, general issues of variance reduction technique, cross section libraries used in continuous energy Monte Carlo codes. In chapter 6, the following issues are discussed: fusion benchmark experiments, design of ITER, experiment analyses of fast critical assembly, core analyses of JMTR, simulation of pulsed neutron experiment, core analyses of HTTR, duct streaming calculations, bulk shielding calculations, neutron/gamma ray transport calculations of the Hiroshima atomic bomb. Chapters 8 and 9 treat function enhancements of MCNP and MVP codes, and a parallel processing of Monte Carlo calculation, respectively. An important references are attached at the end of this report.

  14. Investigation of radiation effects in Hiroshima and Nagasaki using a general Monte Carlo-discrete ordinates coupling scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general Monte Carlo-discrete ordinates radiation transport coupling procedure has been created to study effects of the radiation environment in Hiroshima and Nagasaki due to the bombing of these two cities. The forward two-dimensional, free-field, air-over-ground flux is coupled with an adjoint Monte Carlo calculation. The size, orientation, or translation of the Monte Carlo geometry is unrestricted. The radiation effects calculated are the dose in the interior of a large concrete building in Nagasaki and the activation production of 60Co and 32P in Hiroshima

  15. A Monte Carlo solution to skyshine radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte Carlo method was used to calculate the skyshine doses from 2-ft exposure cell ceiling of an accelerator. Modifications were made to the Monte Carlo program MORSE code to perform this analysis. Adjoint mode calculations provided optimum Russian roulette and splitting parameters which were later used in the forward mode calculations. Russian roulette and splitting were used at the collision sites and at boundary crossings. Exponential transform was used for particle pathlength stretching. The TIGER code was used to generate the anisotropic source term and P5 Legendre expansion was used to compute the cross sections. Where negative fluxes occured at detector locations due to large angle scatterings, a macroscopic cross section data bank was used to make Klein-Nishina and pair production flux estimates. With the above modifications, sixty detectors at locations ranging from 10 to 300 ft from the cell wall showed good statistical responses (5 to 10% fsd)

  16. Computer codes in nuclear safety, radiation transport and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this conference was to describe the present state of computer codes dedicated to radiation transport or radiation source assessment or dosimetry. The presentations have been parted into 2 sessions: 1) methodology and 2) uses in industrial or medical or research domains. It appears that 2 different calculation strategies are prevailing, both are based on preliminary Monte-Carlo calculations with data storage. First, quick simulations made from a database of particle histories built though a previous Monte-Carlo simulation and secondly, a neuronal approach involving a learning platform generated through a previous Monte-Carlo simulation. This document gathers the slides of the presentations

  17. Monte Carlo simulations of the radiation environment for the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mallows, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo radiation transport codes are used by the CMS Beam Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity (BRIL) project to estimate the radiation levels due to proton-proton collisions and machine induced background. Results are used by the CMS collaboration for various applications: comparison with detector hit rates, pile-up studies, predictions of radiation damage based on various models (Dose, NIEL, DPA), shielding design, estimations of residual dose environment. Simulation parameters, and the maintenance of the input files are summarised, and key results are presented. Furthermore, an overview of additional programs developed by the BRIL project to meet the specific needs of CMS community is given.

  18. Monte Carlo simulations of the radiation environment for the CMS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallows, S.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bergstrom, I.; Cooijmans, T.; Dabrowski, A.; Glöggler, L.; Guthoff, M.; Kurochkin, I.; Vincke, H.; Tajeda, S.

    2016-07-01

    Monte Carlo radiation transport codes are used by the CMS Beam Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity (BRIL) project to estimate the radiation levels due to proton-proton collisions and machine induced background. Results are used by the CMS collaboration for various applications: comparison with detector hit rates, pile-up studies, predictions of radiation damage based on various models (Dose, NIEL, DPA), shielding design, estimations of residual dose environment. Simulation parameters, and the maintenance of the input files are summarized, and key results are presented. Furthermore, an overview of additional programs developed by the BRIL project to meet the specific needs of CMS community is given.

  19. Path Toward a Unifid Geometry for Radiation Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kerry; Barzilla, Janet; Davis, Andrew; Zachmann

    2014-01-01

    The Direct Accelerated Geometry for Radiation Analysis and Design (DAGRAD) element of the RadWorks Project under Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) within the Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) of NASA will enable new designs and concepts of operation for radiation risk assessment, mitigation and protection. This element is designed to produce a solution that will allow NASA to calculate the transport of space radiation through complex computer-aided design (CAD) models using the state-of-the-art analytic and Monte Carlo radiation transport codes. Due to the inherent hazard of astronaut and spacecraft exposure to ionizing radiation in low-Earth orbit (LEO) or in deep space, risk analyses must be performed for all crew vehicles and habitats. Incorporating these analyses into the design process can minimize the mass needed solely for radiation protection. Transport of the radiation fields as they pass through shielding and body materials can be simulated using Monte Carlo techniques or described by the Boltzmann equation, which is obtained by balancing changes in particle fluxes as they traverse a small volume of material with the gains and losses caused by atomic and nuclear collisions. Deterministic codes that solve the Boltzmann transport equation, such as HZETRN [high charge and energy transport code developed by NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC)], are generally computationally faster than Monte Carlo codes such as FLUKA, GEANT4, MCNP(X) or PHITS; however, they are currently limited to transport in one dimension, which poorly represents the secondary light ion and neutron radiation fields. NASA currently uses HZETRN space radiation transport software, both because it is computationally efficient and because proven methods have been developed for using this software to analyze complex geometries. Although Monte Carlo codes describe the relevant physics in a fully three-dimensional manner, their computational costs have thus far prevented their

  20. RADIATION TRANSPORT FOR EXPLOSIVE OUTFLOWS: OPACITY REGROUPING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) are methods used to stochastically solve the radiative transport and diffusion equations, respectively. These methods combine into a hybrid transport-diffusion method we refer to as IMC-DDMC. We explore a multigroup IMC-DDMC scheme that in DDMC, combines frequency groups with sufficient optical thickness. We term this procedure ''opacity regrouping''. Opacity regrouping has previously been applied to IMC-DDMC calculations for problems in which the dependence of the opacity on frequency is monotonic. We generalize opacity regrouping to non-contiguous groups and implement this in SuperNu, a code designed to do radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with non-monotonic opacities. We find that regrouping of non-contiguous opacity groups generally improves the speed of IMC-DDMC radiation transport. We present an asymptotic analysis that informs the nature of the Doppler shift in DDMC groups and summarize the derivation of the Gentile-Fleck factor for modified IMC-DDMC. We test SuperNu using numerical experiments including a quasi-manufactured analytic solution, a simple 10 group problem, and the W7 problem for Type Ia supernovae. We find that opacity regrouping is necessary to make our IMC-DDMC implementation feasible for the W7 problem and possibly Type Ia supernova simulations in general. We compare the bolometric light curves and spectra produced by the SuperNu and PHOENIX radiation transport codes for the W7 problem. The overall shape of the bolometric light curves are in good agreement, as are the spectra and their evolution with time. However, for the numerical specifications we considered, we find that the peak luminosity of the light curve calculated using SuperNu is ∼10% less than that calculated using PHOENIX

  1. RADIATION TRANSPORT FOR EXPLOSIVE OUTFLOWS: OPACITY REGROUPING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollaeger, Ryan T. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison 1500 Engineering Drive, 410 ERB, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Van Rossum, Daniel R., E-mail: wollaeger@wisc.edu, E-mail: daan@flash.uchicago.edu [Flash Center for Computational Science, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) are methods used to stochastically solve the radiative transport and diffusion equations, respectively. These methods combine into a hybrid transport-diffusion method we refer to as IMC-DDMC. We explore a multigroup IMC-DDMC scheme that in DDMC, combines frequency groups with sufficient optical thickness. We term this procedure ''opacity regrouping''. Opacity regrouping has previously been applied to IMC-DDMC calculations for problems in which the dependence of the opacity on frequency is monotonic. We generalize opacity regrouping to non-contiguous groups and implement this in SuperNu, a code designed to do radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with non-monotonic opacities. We find that regrouping of non-contiguous opacity groups generally improves the speed of IMC-DDMC radiation transport. We present an asymptotic analysis that informs the nature of the Doppler shift in DDMC groups and summarize the derivation of the Gentile-Fleck factor for modified IMC-DDMC. We test SuperNu using numerical experiments including a quasi-manufactured analytic solution, a simple 10 group problem, and the W7 problem for Type Ia supernovae. We find that opacity regrouping is necessary to make our IMC-DDMC implementation feasible for the W7 problem and possibly Type Ia supernova simulations in general. We compare the bolometric light curves and spectra produced by the SuperNu and PHOENIX radiation transport codes for the W7 problem. The overall shape of the bolometric light curves are in good agreement, as are the spectra and their evolution with time. However, for the numerical specifications we considered, we find that the peak luminosity of the light curve calculated using SuperNu is ∼10% less than that calculated using PHOENIX.

  2. MONTE-CARLO SIMULATION OF ROAD TRANSPORT EMISSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Torok

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There are microscopic, mezoscopic and macroscopic models in road traffic analysis and forecasting. From microscopic models one can calculate the macroscopic data by aggregation. The following paper describes the disaggregation method of macroscopic state, which could lead to microscopic properties of traffic. In order to ensure the transform between macroscopic and microscopic states Monte-Carlo simulation was used. MS Excel macro environment was built to run Monte-Carlo simulation. With this method the macroscopic data can be disaggregated to macroscopic data and as a byproduct mezoscopic, regional data can be gained. These mezoscopic data can be used further on regional environmental or transport policy assessment.

  3. Present status of vectorization for particle transport Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conventional particle transport Monte Carlo algorithm is ill-suited for modern vector supercomputers. This history-based algorithm is not amenable to vectorization due to the random nature of the particle transport process, which inhibits the construction of vectors that are necessary for efficient utilization of a vector (pipelined) processor. An alternative algorithm, the event-based algorithm, is suitable for vectorization and has been used by several researchers in recent years to achieve impressive gains (5-20) in performance on modern vector supercomputers. This paper describes the event-based algorithm in some detail and discusses several implementations of this algorithm for specific applications in particle transport, including photon transport in a nuclear fusion plasma and neutron transport in a nuclear reactor. A discussion of the relative merits of these alternative approaches is included. A short discussion of the implementation of Monte Carlo methods on parallel processors, in particular multiple vector processors such as the Cray X-MP/48 and the IBM 3090/400, is included. The paper concludes with some thoughts regarding the potential of massively parallel processors (vector and scalar) for Monte Carlo simulation

  4. Deterministic methods in radiation transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, A.F.; Roussin, R.W. (eds.)

    1992-06-01

    The Seminar on Deterministic Methods in Radiation Transport was held February 4--5, 1992, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Eleven presentations were made and the full papers are published in this report, along with three that were submitted but not given orally. These papers represent a good overview of the state of the art in the deterministic solution of radiation transport problems for a variety of applications of current interest to the Radiation Shielding Information Center user community.

  5. Deterministic methods in radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Seminar on Deterministic Methods in Radiation Transport was held February 4--5, 1992, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Eleven presentations were made and the full papers are published in this report, along with three that were submitted but not given orally. These papers represent a good overview of the state of the art in the deterministic solution of radiation transport problems for a variety of applications of current interest to the Radiation Shielding Information Center user community

  6. Transport radiation control and assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA Transport Regulations are adopted worldwide and have helped to achieve a high standard of safety in the transport of radioactive materials. The Regulations are periodically reviewed and revised to take account of both operational experience and technical advances. Radiation protection considerations are an important element of such reviews. A number of transport studies have been performed in recent years that provide data for current radiation protection considerations and some of these are covered in this paper. (author)

  7. Monte Carlo Radiation Analysis of a Spacecraft Radioisotope Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, M.

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo statistical computer analysis was used to create neutron and photon radiation predictions for the General Purpose Heat Source Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS RTG). The GPHS RTG is being used on several NASA planetary missions. Analytical results were validated using measured health physics data.

  8. Dosimetric accuracy of a deterministic radiation transport based 192Ir brachytherapy treatment planning system. Part II: Monte Carlo and experimental verification of a multiple source dwell position plan employing a shielded applicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this work is the dosimetric validation of a deterministic radiation transport based treatment planning system (BRACHYVISION v. 8.8, referred to as TPS in the following) for multiple 192Ir source dwell position brachytherapy applications employing a shielded applicator in homogeneous water geometries. Methods: TPS calculations for an irradiation plan employing seven VS2000 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) source dwell positions and a partially shielded applicator (GM11004380) were compared to corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results, as well as experimental results obtained using the VIP polymer gel-magnetic resonance imaging three-dimensional dosimetry method with a custom made phantom. Results: TPS and MC dose distributions were found in agreement which is mainly within ±2%. Considerable differences between TPS and MC results (greater than 2%) were observed at points in the penumbra of the shields (i.e., close to the edges of the ''shielded'' segment of the geometries). These differences were experimentally verified and therefore attributed to the TPS. Apart from these regions, experimental and TPS dose distributions were found in agreement within 2 mm distance to agreement and 5% dose difference criteria. As shown in this work, these results mark a significant improvement relative to dosimetry algorithms that disregard the presence of the shielded applicator since the use of the latter leads to dosimetry errors on the order of 20%-30% at the edge of the ''unshielded'' segment of the geometry and even 2%-6% at points corresponding to the potential location of the target volume in clinical applications using the applicator (points in the unshielded segment at short distances from the applicator). Conclusions: Results of this work attest the capability of the TPS to accurately account for the scatter conditions and the increased attenuation involved in HDR brachytherapy applications employing multiple source dwell positions and partially

  9. Dosimetric accuracy of a deterministic radiation transport based {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy treatment planning system. Part II: Monte Carlo and experimental verification of a multiple source dwell position plan employing a shielded applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrokokkinos, L.; Zourari, K.; Pantelis, E.; Moutsatsos, A.; Karaiskos, P.; Sakelliou, L.; Seimenis, I.; Georgiou, E.; Papagiannis, P. [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athens (Greece); Department of Physics, Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, Ilisia, 157 71 Athens (Greece); Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, 2nd Building of Preclinical Section, University Campus, Alexandroupolis 68100 (Greece); Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athens (Greece)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is the dosimetric validation of a deterministic radiation transport based treatment planning system (BRACHYVISION v. 8.8, referred to as TPS in the following) for multiple {sup 192}Ir source dwell position brachytherapy applications employing a shielded applicator in homogeneous water geometries. Methods: TPS calculations for an irradiation plan employing seven VS2000 {sup 192}Ir high dose rate (HDR) source dwell positions and a partially shielded applicator (GM11004380) were compared to corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results, as well as experimental results obtained using the VIP polymer gel-magnetic resonance imaging three-dimensional dosimetry method with a custom made phantom. Results: TPS and MC dose distributions were found in agreement which is mainly within {+-}2%. Considerable differences between TPS and MC results (greater than 2%) were observed at points in the penumbra of the shields (i.e., close to the edges of the ''shielded'' segment of the geometries). These differences were experimentally verified and therefore attributed to the TPS. Apart from these regions, experimental and TPS dose distributions were found in agreement within 2 mm distance to agreement and 5% dose difference criteria. As shown in this work, these results mark a significant improvement relative to dosimetry algorithms that disregard the presence of the shielded applicator since the use of the latter leads to dosimetry errors on the order of 20%-30% at the edge of the ''unshielded'' segment of the geometry and even 2%-6% at points corresponding to the potential location of the target volume in clinical applications using the applicator (points in the unshielded segment at short distances from the applicator). Conclusions: Results of this work attest the capability of the TPS to accurately account for the scatter conditions and the increased attenuation involved in HDR brachytherapy applications

  10. A Transport Condensed History Algorithm for Electron Monte Carlo Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced multiple scattering algorithm for the Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport problems is developed. Unlike established multiple scattering algorithms, this new method, called transport condensed history (TCH), is a true transport process - it simulates a transport equation that approximates the exact Boltzmann transport process. In addition to having a larger mean free path and a more isotropic scattering operator than the Boltzmann equation, the approximate transport equation also preserves the zeroth- and first-order angular moments of the exact equation. These features enable TCH to accurately predict electron position as a function of energy (path length) and to move particles across material boundaries and interfaces with acceptable accuracy and efficiency. Numerical results and dose calculations are shown to reveal the advantages of TCH over conventional condensed history schemes

  11. Analysis of error in Monte Carlo transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo method for neutron transport calculations suffers, in part, because of the inherent statistical errors associated with the method. Without an estimate of these errors in advance of the calculation, it is difficult to decide what estimator and biasing scheme to use. Recently, integral equations have been derived that, when solved, predicted errors in Monte Carlo calculations in nonmultiplying media. The present work allows error prediction in nonanalog Monte Carlo calculations of multiplying systems, even when supercritical. Nonanalog techniques such as biased kernels, particle splitting, and Russian Roulette are incorporated. Equations derived here allow prediction of how much a specific variance reduction technique reduces the number of histories required, to be weighed against the change in time required for calculation of each history. 1 figure, 1 table

  12. Discrete ordinates methods for radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discrete ordinates (SN) method, first developed for stellar atmospheres, has been used extensively on various other radiation transport problems. In reactor analysis the method is generally used to generate parameters for design models based on more approximate but less expensive methods (such as diffusion theory) so that the spatial-spectrum coupling is represented accurately on a microscopic reaction rate level. It has a decisive advantage over Monte Carlo methods in computing the pin and assembly power profiles. In shielding problems where the penetration of the radiation can be deep, the method is used widely in design calculations. In oil-well logging problems, which also involve deep penetration and have a stringent accuracy requirement on the detector responses, the method complements the Monte Carlo techniques. One early application of the SN method was on one-dimensional radiative transfer problems. The discrete ordinates method has also been used in charged-particle transport problems. While the method has been applied primarily to static problems, one-dimensional time-dependent codes have existed since the early 1970s. In this paper the authors briefly review the basic method, illustrate its applications, discuss its merits and pitfalls, and enumerate the recent advances in the attendant numerical techniques that have enhanced the capabilities of the method

  13. MORSE Monte Carlo radiation transport code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a number of years the MORSE user community has requested additional help in setting up problems using various options. The sample problems distributed with MORSE did not fully demonstrate the capability of the code. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory the code originators had a complete set of sample problems, but funds for documenting and distributing them were never available. Recently the number of requests for listings of input data and results for running some particular option the user was trying to implement has increased to the point where it is not feasible to handle them on an individual basis. Consequently it was decided to package a set of sample problems which illustrates more adequately how to run MORSE. This write-up may be added to Part III of the MORSE report. These sample problems include a combined neutron-gamma case, a neutron only case, a gamma only case, an adjoint case, a fission case, a time-dependent fission case, the collision density case, an XCHEKR run and a PICTUR run

  14. Efficient Monte Carlo methods for continuum radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Juvela, M

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the efficiency of Monte Carlo methods in solving continuum radiative transfer problems. The sampling of the radiation field and convergence of dust temperature calculations in the case of optically thick clouds are both studied. For spherically symmetric clouds we find that the computational cost of Monte Carlo simulations can be reduced, in some cases by orders of magnitude, with simple importance weighting schemes. This is particularly true for models consisting of cells of different sizes for which the run times would otherwise be determined by the size of the smallest cell. We present a new idea of extending importance weighting to scattered photons. This is found to be useful in calculations of scattered flux and could be important for three-dimensional models when observed intensity is needed only for one general direction of observations. Convergence of dust temperature calculations is studied for models with optical depths 10-10000. We examine acceleration methods where radiative interactio...

  15. A New Monte Carlo Neutron Transport Code at UNIST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo neutron transport code named MCS is under development at UNIST for the advanced reactor design and research purpose. This MC code can be used for fixed source calculation and criticality calculation. Continuous energy neutron cross section data and multi-group cross section data can be used for the MC calculation. This paper presents the overview of developed MC code and its calculation results. The real time fixed source calculation ability is also tested in this paper. The calculation results show good agreement with commercial code and experiment. A new Monte Carlo neutron transport code is being developed at UNIST. The MC codes are tested with several benchmark problems: ICSBEP, VENUS-2, and Hoogenboom-Martin benchmark. These benchmarks covers pin geometry to 3-dimensional whole core, and results shows good agreement with reference results

  16. Monte Carlo Calculations Applied to NRU Reactor and Radiation Physics Analyses

    OpenAIRE

    G.B. Wilkin; Nguyen, T. S.

    2012-01-01

    The statistical MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) code has been satisfactorily used for reactor and radiation physics calculations to support NRU operation and analysis. MCNP enables 3D modeling of the reactor and its components in great detail, the transport calculation of photons (in addition to neutrons), and the capability to model all locations in space, which are beyond the capabilities of the deterministic neutronics methods used for NRU. While the simple single-cell model is efficient for...

  17. Multipurpose Monte Carlo simulator for photon transport in turbid media

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra, Pedro; Aguirre, Juan; Ortuño, Juan E.; María J Ledesma-Carbayo; Vaquero, Juan José; Desco, Manuel; Santos, Andrés

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods provide a flexible and rigorous solution to the problem of light transport in turbid media, which enable approaching complex geometries for a closed analytical solution is not feasible. The simulator implements local rules of propagation in the form of probability density functions that depend on the local optical properties of the tissue. This work presents a flexible simulator that can be applied in multiple applications related to optical tomography. In particular...

  18. Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulation of a cavity solar reactor for the reduction of cerium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villafan-Vidales, H.I.; Arancibia-Bulnes, C.A.; Dehesa-Carrasco, U. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Privada Xochicalco s/n, Col. Centro, A.P. 34, Temixco, Morelos 62580 (Mexico); Romero-Paredes, H. [Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No.186, Col. Vicentina, A.P. 55-534, Mexico D.F 09340 (Mexico)

    2009-01-15

    Radiative heat transfer in a solar thermochemical reactor for the thermal reduction of cerium oxide is simulated with the Monte Carlo method. The directional characteristics and the power distribution of the concentrated solar radiation that enters the cavity is obtained by carrying out a Monte Carlo ray tracing of a paraboloidal concentrator. It is considered that the reactor contains a gas/particle suspension directly exposed to concentrated solar radiation. The suspension is treated as a non-isothermal, non-gray, absorbing, emitting, and anisotropically scattering medium. The transport coefficients of the particles are obtained from Mie-scattering theory by using the optical properties of cerium oxide. From the simulations, the aperture radius and the particle concentration were optimized to match the characteristics of the considered concentrator. (author)

  19. TRIPOLI-3: a neutron/photon Monte Carlo transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present version of TRIPOLI-3 solves the transport equation for coupled neutron and gamma ray problems in three dimensional geometries by using the Monte Carlo method. This code is devoted both to shielding and criticality problems. The most important feature for particle transport equation solving is the fine treatment of the physical phenomena and sophisticated biasing technics useful for deep penetrations. The code is used either for shielding design studies or for reference and benchmark to validate cross sections. Neutronic studies are essentially cell or small core calculations and criticality problems. TRIPOLI-3 has been used as reference method, for example, for resonance self shielding qualification. (orig.)

  20. Monte Carlo simulations of charge transport in heterogeneous organic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Pyie Phyo; Khanal, Kiran; Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta

    2015-03-01

    The efficiency of organic solar cells depends on the morphology and electronic properties of the active layer. Research teams have been experimenting with different conducting materials to achieve more efficient solar panels. In this work, we perform Monte Carlo simulations to study charge transport in heterogeneous materials. We have developed a coarse-grained lattice model of polymeric photovoltaics and use it to generate active layers with ordered and disordered regions. We determine carrier mobilities for a range of conditions to investigate the effect of the morphology on charge transport.

  1. Monte Carlo studies for radiation protection of LCLS-II XTOD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of LCLS-II X-ray Transport and Diagnostic (XTOD) system does not have the shielding wall separating electron dump line from Front End Enclosure (FEE), therefore any forward radiation may directly challenge the end wall. A series of radiation protection features are designed to protect users behind the end wall from the mixed radiation environment including FEL, spontaneous radiation, Bremsstrahlung and possible electron beam in accident. Detailed Monte Carlo studies are implemented for various beamline configurations, considering both normal operation and accidental electron beam loss, and the crucial requirement on the end wall is benchmarked by using both FLUKA and MARS. The leakage of Bremsstrahlung and spontaneous radiation along photon beam pipes into the experimental hall are also studied. It is found that a local safety collimator after the first mirror can help reduce the thickness and cost of the end wall, and a proper collimator system can sufficiently limit radiation leakage through photon beam pipes. (authors)

  2. JCOGIN. A parallel programming infrastructure for Monte Carlo particle transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantages of the Monte Carlo method for reactor analysis are well known, but the full-core reactor analysis challenges the computational time and computer memory. Meanwhile, the exponential growth of computer power in the last 10 years is now creating a great opportunity for large scale parallel computing on the Monte Carlo full-core reactor analysis. In this paper, a parallel programming infrastructure is introduced for Monte Carlo particle transport, named JCOGIN, which aims at accelerating the development of Monte Carlo codes for the large scale parallelism simulations of the full-core reactor. Now, JCOGIN implements the hybrid parallelism of the spatial decomposition and the traditional particle parallelism on MPI and OpenMP. Finally, JMCT code is developed on JCOGIN, which reaches the parallel efficiency of 70% on 20480 cores for fixed source problem. By the hybrid parallelism, the full-core pin-by-pin simulation of the Dayawan reactor was implemented, with the number of the cells up to 10 million and the tallies of the fluxes utilizing over 40GB of memory. (author)

  3. Radiation transport in diffractive media

    OpenAIRE

    Marklund, Mattias

    2005-01-01

    We consider radiation transport theory applied to non-dispersive but refractive media. This setting is used to discuss Minkowski's and Abraham's electromagnetic momentum, and to derive conservation equations independent of the choice of momentum definition. Using general relativistic kinetic theory, we derive and discuss a radiation gas energy-momentum conservation equation valid in arbitrary curved spacetime with diffractive media.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation for radiation monitoring in nuclear power plant environs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are currently building expertise and knowledge base in Monte Carlo techniques for radiation transport modelling and detector simulation utilizing Geant4 and MCNP tool-kits. In this paper, we present preliminary results obtained in the simulation of flux monitoring of an Am-Be neutron source, and the NaI(Tl) scintillation detector response modelling for rapid determination of environmental radionuclides. Monte Carlo techniques: MCNP-5 was used to simulate the Am-Be neutron source and Geant4 was used to simulate the scintillation detector response and the neutron flux monitoring applicable by gamma-ray spectroscopy, and prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) respectively. Preliminary results show that Monte Carlo simulation techniques are promising. Consequently we can now develop and optimize PGNAA using the Am-Be facility in order to achieve better sensitivity and lower detection limits. The presentation slides have been added to the article

  5. Radiation transport in numerical astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article, we discuss some of the numerical techniques developed by Jim Wilson and co-workers for the calculation of time-dependent radiation flow. Difference equations for multifrequency transport are given for both a discrete-angle representation of radiation transport and a Fick's law-like representation. These methods have the important property that they correctly describe both the streaming and diffusion limits of transport theory in problems where the mean free path divided by characteristic distances varies from much less than one to much greater than one. They are also stable for timesteps comparable to the changes in physical variables, rather than being limited by stability requirements

  6. Analytical band Monte Carlo analysis of electron transport in silicene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoh, K. H.; Ong, D. S.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Yong, T. K.; Lim, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    An analytical band Monte Carlo (AMC) with linear energy band dispersion has been developed to study the electron transport in suspended silicene and silicene on aluminium oxide (Al2O3) substrate. We have calibrated our model against the full band Monte Carlo (FMC) results by matching the velocity-field curve. Using this model, we discover that the collective effects of charge impurity scattering and surface optical phonon scattering can degrade the electron mobility down to about 400 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 and thereafter it is less sensitive to the changes of charge impurity in the substrate and surface optical phonon. We also found that further reduction of mobility to ∼100 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 as experimentally demonstrated by Tao et al (2015 Nat. Nanotechnol. 10 227) can only be explained by the renormalization of Fermi velocity due to interaction with Al2O3 substrate.

  7. Recent developments in the Los Alamos radiation transport code system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, R.A.; Parsons, K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-06-01

    A brief progress report on updates to the Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) for solving criticality and fixed-source problems is provided. LARTCS integrates the Diffusion Accelerated Neutral Transport (DANT) discrete ordinates codes with the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code. The LARCTS code is being developed with a graphical user interface for problem setup and analysis. Progress in the DANT system for criticality applications include a two-dimensional module which can be linked to a mesh-generation code and a faster iteration scheme. Updates to MCNP Version 4A allow statistical checks of calculated Monte Carlo results.

  8. The macro response Monte Carlo method for electron transport

    CERN Document Server

    Svatos, M M

    1999-01-01

    This thesis demonstrates the feasibility of basing dose calculations for electrons in radiotherapy on first-principles single scatter physics, in a calculation time that is comparable to or better than current electron Monte Carlo methods. The macro response Monte Carlo (MRMC) method achieves run times that have potential to be much faster than conventional electron transport methods such as condensed history. The problem is broken down into two separate transport calculations. The first stage is a local, single scatter calculation, which generates probability distribution functions (PDFs) to describe the electron's energy, position, and trajectory after leaving the local geometry, a small sphere or "kugel." A number of local kugel calculations were run for calcium and carbon, creating a library of kugel data sets over a range of incident energies (0.25-8 MeV) and sizes (0.025 to 0.1 cm in radius). The second transport stage is a global calculation, in which steps that conform to the size of the kugels in the...

  9. Parallel implementation of the Monte Carlo transport code EGS4 on the hypercube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo transport codes are commonly used in the study of particle interactions. The CALOR89 code system is a combination of several Monte Carlo transport and analysis programs. In order to produce good results, a typical Monte Carlo run will have to produce many particle histories. On a single processor computer, the transport calculation can take a huge amount of time. However, if the transport of particles were divided among several processors in a multiprocessor machine, the time can be drastically reduced

  10. Comparison of two accelerators for Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, Nvidia Tesla M2090 GPU and Intel Xeon Phi 5110p coprocessor: A case study for X-ray CT imaging dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new Monte Carlo photon transport code ARCHER-CT for CT dose calculations is developed to execute on the GPU and coprocessor. • ARCHER-CT is verified against MCNP. • The GPU code on an Nvidia M2090 GPU is 5.15–5.81 times faster than the parallel CPU code on an Intel X5650 6-core CPU. • The coprocessor code on an Intel Xeon Phi 5110p coprocessor is 3.30–3.38 times faster than the CPU code. - Abstract: Hardware accelerators are currently becoming increasingly important in boosting high performance computing systems. In this study, we tested the performance of two accelerator models, Nvidia Tesla M2090 GPU and Intel Xeon Phi 5110p coprocessor, using a new Monte Carlo photon transport package called ARCHER-CT we have developed for fast CT imaging dose calculation. The package contains three components, ARCHER-CTCPU, ARCHER-CTGPU and ARCHER-CTCOP designed to be run on the multi-core CPU, GPU and coprocessor architectures respectively. A detailed GE LightSpeed Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) scanner model and a family of voxel patient phantoms are included in the code to calculate absorbed dose to radiosensitive organs under user-specified scan protocols. The results from ARCHER agree well with those from the production code Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). It is found that all the code components are significantly faster than the parallel MCNPX run on 12 MPI processes, and that the GPU and coprocessor codes are 5.15–5.81 and 3.30–3.38 times faster than the parallel ARCHER-CTCPU, respectively. The M2090 GPU performs better than the 5110p coprocessor in our specific test. Besides, the heterogeneous computation mode in which the CPU and the hardware accelerator work concurrently can increase the overall performance by 13–18%

  11. Current status of the PSG Monte Carlo neutron transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PSG is a new Monte Carlo neutron transport code, developed at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). The code is mainly intended for fuel assembly-level reactor physics calculations, such as group constant generation for deterministic reactor simulator codes. This paper presents the current status of the project and the essential capabilities of the code. Although the main application of PSG is in lattice calculations, the geometry is not restricted in two dimensions. This paper presents the validation of PSG against the experimental results of the three-dimensional MOX fuelled VENUS-2 reactor dosimetry benchmark. (authors)

  12. Monte Carlo simulations of neoclassical transport in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FORTEC-3D code, which solves the drift-kinetic equation for torus plasmas and radial electric field using the δf Monte Carlo method, has developed to study the variety of issues relating to neoclassical transport phenomena in magnetic confinement plasmas. Here the numerical techniques used in FORTEC-3D are reviewed, and resent progress in the simulation method to simulate GAM oscillation is also explained. A band-limited white noise term is introduced in the equation of time evolution of radial electric field to excite GAM oscillation, which enables us to analyze GAM frequency using FORTEC-3D even in the case the collisionless GAM damping is fast. (author)

  13. Monte Carlo methods in electron transport problems. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The condensed-history Monte Carlo method for charged particles transport is reviewed and discussed starting from a general form of the Boltzmann equation (Part I). The physics of the electronic interactions, together with some pedagogic example will be introduced in the part II. The lecture is directed to potential users of the method, for which it can be a useful introduction to the subject matter, and wants to establish the basis of the work on the computer code RECORD, which is at present in a developing stage

  14. Development of a space radiation Monte Carlo computer simulation based on the FLUKA and ROOT codes

    CERN Document Server

    Pinsky, L; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Carminati, F; Brun, R

    2001-01-01

    This NASA funded project is proceeding to develop a Monte Carlo-based computer simulation of the radiation environment in space. With actual funding only initially in place at the end of May 2000, the study is still in the early stage of development. The general tasks have been identified and personnel have been selected. The code to be assembled will be based upon two major existing software packages. The radiation transport simulation will be accomplished by updating the FLUKA Monte Carlo program, and the user interface will employ the ROOT software being developed at CERN. The end-product will be a Monte Carlo-based code which will complement the existing analytic codes such as BRYNTRN/HZETRN presently used by NASA to evaluate the effects of radiation shielding in space. The planned code will possess the ability to evaluate the radiation environment for spacecraft and habitats in Earth orbit, in interplanetary space, on the lunar surface, or on a planetary surface such as Mars. Furthermore, it will be usef...

  15. Rare event simulation in radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation studies methods for estimating extremely small probabilities by Monte Carlo simulation. Problems in radiation transport typically involve estimating very rare events or the expected value of a random variable which is with overwhelming probability equal to zero. These problems often have high dimensional state spaces and irregular geometries so that analytic solutions are not possible. Monte Carlo simulation must be used to estimate the radiation dosage being transported to a particular location. If the area is well shielded the probability of any one particular particle getting through is very small. Because of the large number of particles involved, even a tiny fraction penetrating the shield may represent an unacceptable level of radiation. It therefore becomes critical to be able to accurately estimate this extremely small probability. Importance sampling is a well known technique for improving the efficiency of rare event calculations. Here, a new set of probabilities is used in the simulation runs. The results are multiple by the likelihood ratio between the true and simulated probabilities so as to keep the estimator unbiased. The variance of the resulting estimator is very sensitive to which new set of transition probabilities are chosen. It is shown that a zero variance estimator does exist, but that its computation requires exact knowledge of the solution. A simple random walk with an associated killing model for the scatter of neutrons is introduced. Large deviation results for optimal importance sampling in random walks are extended to the case where killing is present. An adaptive ''learning'' algorithm for implementing importance sampling is given for more general Markov chain models of neutron scatter. For finite state spaces this algorithm is shown to give with probability one, a sequence of estimates converging exponentially fast to the true solution

  16. Use of MOSFET dosimeters to validate Monte Carlo radiation treatment calculation in an anthropomorphic phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juste, Belén; Miró, R.; Abella, V.; Santos, A.; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2015-11-01

    Radiation therapy treatment planning based on Monte Carlo simulation provide a very accurate dose calculation compared to deterministic systems. Nowadays, Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters are increasingly utilized in radiation therapy to verify the received dose by patients. In the present work, we have used the MCNP6 (Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code) to simulate the irradiation of an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO) with a medical linear accelerator. The detailed model of the Elekta Precise multileaf collimator using a 6 MeV photon beam was designed and validated by means of different beam sizes and shapes in previous works. To include in the simulation the RANDO phantom geometry a set of Computer Tomography images of the phantom was obtained and formatted. The slices are input in PLUNC software, which performs the segmentation by defining anatomical structures and a Matlab algorithm writes the phantom information in MCNP6 input deck format. The simulation was verified and therefore the phantom model and irradiation was validated throughout the comparison of High-Sensitivity MOSFET dosimeter (Best medical Canada) measurements in different points inside the phantom with simulation results. On-line Wireless MOSFET provide dose estimation in the extremely thin sensitive volume, so a meticulous and accurate validation has been performed. The comparison show good agreement between the MOSFET measurements and the Monte Carlo calculations, confirming the validity of the developed procedure to include patients CT in simulations and approving the use of Monte Carlo simulations as an accurate therapy treatment plan.

  17. SPAMCART: a code for smoothed particle Monte Carlo radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, O

    2016-01-01

    We present a code for generating synthetic SEDs and intensity maps from Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics simulation snapshots. The code is based on the Lucy (1999) Monte Carlo Radiative Transfer method, i.e. it follows discrete luminosity packets, emitted from external and/or embedded sources, as they propagate through a density field, and then uses their trajectories to compute the radiative equilibrium temperature of the ambient dust. The density is not mapped onto a grid, and therefore the calculation is performed at exactly the same resolution as the hydrodynamics. We present two example calculations using this method. First, we demonstrate that the code strictly adheres to Kirchhoff's law of radiation. Second, we present synthetic intensity maps and spectra of an embedded protostellar multiple system. The algorithm uses data structures that are already constructed for other purposes in modern particle codes. It is therefore relatively simple to implement.

  18. Radiative heat transfer by the Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    Hartnett †, James P; Cho, Young I; Greene, George A; Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Yang, Wen-Jei; Kudo, Kazuhiko

    1995-01-01

    This book presents the basic principles and applications of radiative heat transfer used in energy, space, and geo-environmental engineering, and can serve as a reference book for engineers and scientists in researchand development. A PC disk containing software for numerical analyses by the Monte Carlo method is included to provide hands-on practice in analyzing actual radiative heat transfer problems.Advances in Heat Transfer is designed to fill the information gap between regularly scheduled journals and university level textbooks by providing in-depth review articles over a broader scope than journals or texts usually allow.Key Features* Offers solution methods for integro-differential formulation to help avoid difficulties* Includes a computer disk for numerical analyses by PC* Discusses energy absorption by gas and scattering effects by particles* Treats non-gray radiative gases* Provides example problems for direct applications in energy, space, and geo-environmental engineering

  19. The macro response Monte Carlo method for electron transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svatos, M M

    1998-09-01

    The main goal of this thesis was to prove the feasibility of basing electron depth dose calculations in a phantom on first-principles single scatter physics, in an amount of time that is equal to or better than current electron Monte Carlo methods. The Macro Response Monte Carlo (MRMC) method achieves run times that are on the order of conventional electron transport methods such as condensed history, with the potential to be much faster. This is possible because MRMC is a Local-to-Global method, meaning the problem is broken down into two separate transport calculations. The first stage is a local, in this case, single scatter calculation, which generates probability distribution functions (PDFs) to describe the electron's energy, position and trajectory after leaving the local geometry, a small sphere or "kugel" A number of local kugel calculations were run for calcium and carbon, creating a library of kugel data sets over a range of incident energies (0.25 MeV - 8 MeV) and sizes (0.025 cm to 0.1 cm in radius). The second transport stage is a global calculation, where steps that conform to the size of the kugels in the library are taken through the global geometry. For each step, the appropriate PDFs from the MRMC library are sampled to determine the electron's new energy, position and trajectory. The electron is immediately advanced to the end of the step and then chooses another kugel to sample, which continues until transport is completed. The MRMC global stepping code was benchmarked as a series of subroutines inside of the Peregrine Monte Carlo code. It was compared to Peregrine's class II condensed history electron transport package, EGS4, and MCNP for depth dose in simple phantoms having density inhomogeneities. Since the kugels completed in the library were of relatively small size, the zoning of the phantoms was scaled down from a clinical size, so that the energy deposition algorithms for spreading dose across 5-10 zones per kugel could

  20. Monte Carlo solution of a semi-discrete transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present the S∞ method, a hybrid neutron transport method in which Monte Carlo particles traverse discrete space. The goal of any deterministic/stochastic hybrid method is to couple selected characters from each of the methods in hopes of producing a better method. The S∞ method has the features of the lumped, linear-discontinuous (LLD) spatial discretization, yet it has no ray-effects because of the continuous angular variable. They derive the S∞ method for the solid-state, mono-energetic transport equation in one-dimensional slab geometry with isotropic scattering and an isotropic internal source. They demonstrate the viability of the S∞ method by comparing their results favorably to analytic and deterministic results

  1. Diffusion/transport hybrid discrete method for Monte Carlo solution of the neutron transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo method is widely used for solving neutron transport equation. Basically Monte Carlo method treats continuous angle, space and energy. It gives very accurate solution when enough many particle histories are used, but it takes too long computation time. To reduce computation time, discrete Monte Carlo method was proposed. It is called Discrete Transport Monte Carlo (DTMC) method. It uses discrete space but continuous angle in mono energy one dimension problem and uses lump, linear-discontinuous (LLD) equation to make probabilities of leakage, scattering, and absorption. LLD may cause negative angular fluxes in highly scattering problem, so two scatter variance reduction method is applied to DTMC and shows very accurate solution in various problems. In transport Monte Carlo calculation, the particle history does not end for scattering event. So it also takes much computation time in highly scattering problem. To further reduce computation time, Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) method is implemented. DDMC uses diffusion equation to make probabilities and has no scattering events. So DDMC takes very short computation time comparing with DTMC and shows very well-agreed results with cell-centered diffusion results. It is known that diffusion result may not be good in boundaries. So in hybrid method of DTMC and DDMC, boundary regions are calculated by DTMC and the other regions are calculated by DDMC. In this thesis, DTMC, DDMC and hybrid methods and their results of several problems are presented. The results show that DDMC and DTMC are well agreed with deterministic diffusion and transport results, respectively. The hybrid method shows transport-like results in problems where diffusion results are poor. The computation time of hybrid method is between DDMC and DTMC, as expected

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of transport from an electrothermal vaporizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo simulations were developed to elucidate the time and spatial distribution of analyte during the transport process from an electrothermal vaporizer to an inductively coupled plasma. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer was employed to collect experimental data that was compared with the simulated transient signals. Consideration was given to analyte transport as gaseous species as well as aerosol particles. In the case of aerosols, the simulation assumed formation of 5 nm particles and used the Einstein-Stokes equation to estimate the aerosol's diffusion coefficient, which was ca. 1% of the value for free atom diffusion. Desorption conditions for Cu that had been previously elucidated for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry were employed for the release processes from the electrothermal vaporizer. The primary distinguishing feature in the output signal to differentiate between gas and aerosol transport was a pronounced, long lived signal after the transient peak if aerosols were transported. Time and spatial distributions of particles within the transport system are presented. This characteristic was supported by independent atomic absorption measurements using a heated (or unheated) quartz T-tube with electrothermal vaporizer introduction

  3. Hybrid Deterministic-Monte Carlo Methods for Neutral Particle Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the history of transport analysis methodology for nuclear systems, there have been two fundamentally different methods, i.e., deterministic and Monte Carlo (MC) methods. Even though these two methods coexisted for the past 60 years and are complementary each other, they never been coded in the same computer codes. Recently, however, researchers have started to consider to combine these two methods in a computer code to make use of the strengths of two algorithms and avoid weaknesses. Although the advanced modern deterministic techniques such as method of characteristics (MOC) can solve a multigroup transport equation very accurately, there are still uncertainties in the MOC solutions due to the inaccuracy of the multigroup cross section data caused by approximations in the process of multigroup cross section generation, i.e., equivalence theory, interference effects, etc. Conversely, the MC method can handle the resonance shielding effect accurately when sufficiently many neutron histories are used but it takes a long calculation time. There was also a research to combine a multigroup transport and a continuous energy transport solver in a computer code system depending on the energy range. This paper proposes a hybrid deterministic-MC method in which a multigroup MOC method is used for high and low energy range and continuous MC method is used for the intermediate resonance energy range for efficient and accurate transport analysis

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of transport from an electrothermal vaporizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcombe, James A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)]. E-mail: holcombe@mail.utexas.edu; Ertas, Gulay [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Monte Carlo simulations were developed to elucidate the time and spatial distribution of analyte during the transport process from an electrothermal vaporizer to an inductively coupled plasma. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer was employed to collect experimental data that was compared with the simulated transient signals. Consideration was given to analyte transport as gaseous species as well as aerosol particles. In the case of aerosols, the simulation assumed formation of 5 nm particles and used the Einstein-Stokes equation to estimate the aerosol's diffusion coefficient, which was ca. 1% of the value for free atom diffusion. Desorption conditions for Cu that had been previously elucidated for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry were employed for the release processes from the electrothermal vaporizer. The primary distinguishing feature in the output signal to differentiate between gas and aerosol transport was a pronounced, long lived signal after the transient peak if aerosols were transported. Time and spatial distributions of particles within the transport system are presented. This characteristic was supported by independent atomic absorption measurements using a heated (or unheated) quartz T-tube with electrothermal vaporizer introduction.

  5. A Monte Carlo simulation of ion transport at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a Monte Carlo simulation for ion transport in hot background gases, which is an alternative way of solving the corresponding Boltzmann equation that determines the distribution function of ions. We consider the limit of low ion densities when the distribution function of the background gas remains unchanged due to collision with ions. Special attention has been paid to properly treating the thermal motion of the host gas particles and their influence on ions, which is very important at low electric fields, when the mean ion energy is comparable to the thermal energy of the host gas. We found the conditional probability distribution of gas velocities that correspond to an ion of specific velocity which collides with a gas particle. Also, we have derived exact analytical formulae for piecewise calculation of the collision frequency integrals. We address the cases when the background gas is monocomponent and when it is a mixture of different gases. The techniques described here are required for Monte Carlo simulations of ion transport and for hybrid models of non-equilibrium plasmas. The range of energies where it is necessary to apply the technique has been defined. The results we obtained are in excellent agreement with the existing ones obtained by complementary methods. Having verified our algorithm, we were able to produce calculations for Ar+ ions in Ar and propose them as a new benchmark for thermal effects. The developed method is widely applicable for solving the Boltzmann equation that appears in many different contexts in physics. (paper)

  6. KAMCCO, a reactor physics Monte Carlo neutron transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KAMCCO is a 3-dimensional reactor Monte Carlo code for fast neutron physics problems. Two options are available for the solution of 1) the inhomogeneous time-dependent neutron transport equation (census time scheme), and 2) the homogeneous static neutron transport equation (generation cycle scheme). The user defines the desired output, e.g. estimates of reaction rates or neutron flux integrated over specified volumes in phase space and time intervals. Such primary quantities can be arbitrarily combined, also ratios of these quantities can be estimated with their errors. The Monte Carlo techniques are mostly analogue (exceptions: Importance sampling for collision processes, ELP/MELP, Russian roulette and splitting). Estimates are obtained from the collision and track length estimators. Elastic scattering takes into account first order anisotropy in the center of mass system. Inelastic scattering is processed via the evaporation model or via the excitation of discrete levels. For the calculation of cross sections, the energy is treated as a continuous variable. They are computed by a) linear interpolation, b) from optionally Doppler broadened single level Breit-Wigner resonances or c) from probability tables (in the region of statistically distributed resonances). (orig.)

  7. Radiative Transfer in Prestellar Cores: A Monte Carlo Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Stamatellos, D.; Whitworth, A. P.

    2003-01-01

    We use our Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to study non-embedded prestellar cores and cores that are embedded at the centre of a molecular cloud. Our study indicates that the temperature inside embedded cores is lower than in isolated non-embedded cores, and generally less than 12 K, even when the cores are surrounded by an ambient cloud of small visual extinction (Av~5). Our study shows that the best wavelength region to observe embedded cores is between 400 and 500 microns, where the co...

  8. 3D Monte Carlo radiation transfer modelling of photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, C. Louise; Christison, Craig; Brown, C. Tom A.; Wood, Kenneth; Valentine, Ronan M.; Moseley, Harry

    2015-06-01

    The effects of ageing and skin type on Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) for different treatment methods have been theoretically investigated. A multilayered Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer model is presented where both daylight activated PDT and conventional PDT are compared. It was found that light penetrates deeper through older skin with a lighter complexion, which translates into a deeper effective treatment depth. The effect of ageing was found to be larger for darker skin types. The investigation further strengthens the usage of daylight as a potential light source for PDT where effective treatment depths of about 2 mm can be achieved.

  9. Radiative equilibrium in Monte Carlo radiative transfer using frequency distribution adjustment

    CERN Document Server

    Baes, M; Davies, J I; Whitworth, A P; Sabatini, S; Roberts, S; Linder, S M; Evans, R; Baes, Maarten; Stamatellos, Dimitris; Davies, Jonathan I.; Whitworth, Anthony P.; Sabatini, Sabina; Roberts, Sarah; Linder, Suzanne M.; Evans, Rhodri

    2005-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is a powerful tool for performing radiative equilibrium calculations, even in complex geometries. The main drawback of the standard Monte Carlo radiative equilibrium methods is that they require iteration, which makes them numerically very demanding. Bjorkman & Wood recently proposed a frequency distribution adjustment scheme, which allows radiative equilibrium Monte Carlo calculations to be performed without iteration, by choosing the frequency of each re-emitted photon such that it corrects for the incorrect spectrum of the previously re-emitted photons. Although the method appears to yield correct results, we argue that its theoretical basis is not completely transparent, and that it is not completely clear whether this technique is an exact rigorous method, or whether it is just a good and convenient approximation. We critically study the general problem of how an already sampled distribution can be adjusted to a new distribution by adding data points sampled from an adjustment ...

  10. Comparison of 2 accelerators of Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, NVIDIA tesla M2090 GPU and Intel Xeon Phi 5110p coprocessor: a case study for X-ray CT Imaging Dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardware accelerators are currently becoming increasingly important in boosting high performance computing systems. In this study, we tested the performance of two accelerator models, NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPU and Intel Xeon Phi 5110p coprocessor, using a new Monte Carlo photon transport package called ARCHER-CT we have developed for fast CT imaging dose calculation. The package contains three code variants, ARCHER-CT(CPU), ARCHER-CT(GPU) and ARCHER-CT(COP) to run in parallel on the multi-core CPU, GPU and coprocessor architectures respectively. A detailed GE LightSpeed Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) scanner model and a family of voxel patient phantoms were included in the code to calculate absorbed dose to radiosensitive organs under specified scan protocols. The results from ARCHER agreed well with those from the production code Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). It was found that all the code variants were significantly faster than the parallel MCNPX running on 12 MPI processes, and that the GPU and coprocessor performed equally well, being 2.89-4.49 and 3.01-3.23 times faster than the parallel ARCHER-CT(CPU) running with 12 hyper-threads. (authors)

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of transition radiation and δ electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper employs Monte Carlo simulations of the performance of a transition radiation detector (TRD). The program has been written for the TRD in the ZEUS spectrometer, which separates electrons from hadrons in the momentum range between 1 GeV/c and 30 GeV/c. Both, total charge method and cluster counting method were simulated taking into account various experimental parameters. In particular, it was found that the cluster counting method relies on a quantitative understanding of the background originating from the production of δ-electrons by charged particles. The results of the Monte Carlo calculations are in agreement with experimental data obtained with prototypes within a systematic uncertainty of 20%. We applied our Monte Carlo program to studies in order to find an optimum layout for the TRD within available space in the ZEUS spectrometer. In this context, the performance of TRD layouts with different geometries and materials has been evaluated comprehensively. The geometry found by optimization promises an improvement on hadron suppression by a factor of about two for both methods compared with present results from test measurements. Applying algorithms for a detailed analysis of the energy and space distributions of the clusters in the TRD, hadrons in the momentum range from 1 to 30 GeV/c can be suppressed to a level of less than 2%. This method of cluster analysing improves the suppression of hadrons by a factor of about two compared to the total charge method. (orig.)

  12. Modelling of an industrial environment, part 1.: Monte Carlo simulations of photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a nuclear accident releasing radioactive material into the environment the external exposures may contribute significantly to the radiation exposure of the population (UNSCEAR 1988, 2000). For urban populations the external gamma exposure from radionuclides deposited on the surfaces of the urban-industrial environments yields the dominant contributions to the total dose to the public (Kelly 1987; Jacob and Meckbach 1990). The radiation field is naturally influenced by the environment around the sources. For calculations of the shielding effect of the structures in complex and realistic urban environments Monte Carlo methods turned out to be useful tools (Jacob and Meckbach 1987; Meckbach et al. 1988). Using these methods a complex environment can be set up in which the photon transport can be solved on a reliable way. The accuracy of the methods is in principle limited only by the knowledge of the atomic cross sections and the computational time. Several papers using Monte Carlo results for calculating doses from the external gamma exposures were published (Jacob and Meckbach 1987, 1990; Meckbach et al. 1988; Rochedo et al. 1996). In these papers the Monte Carlo simulations were run in urban environments and for different photon energies. The industrial environment can be defined as such an area where productive and/or commercial activity is carried out. A good example can be a factory or a supermarket. An industrial environment can rather be different from the urban ones as for the types and structures of the buildings and their dimensions. These variations will affect the radiation field of this environment. Hence there is a need to run new Monte Carlo simulations designed specially for the industrial environments

  13. The derivation of Particle Monte Carlo methods for plasma modeling from transport equations

    OpenAIRE

    Longo, Savino

    2008-01-01

    We analyze here in some detail, the derivation of the Particle and Monte Carlo methods of plasma simulation, such as Particle in Cell (PIC), Monte Carlo (MC) and Particle in Cell / Monte Carlo (PIC/MC) from formal manipulation of transport equations.

  14. MCNP: a general Monte Carlo code for neutron and photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCNP is a very general Monte Carlo neutron photon transport code system with approximately 250 person years of Group X-6 code development invested. It is extremely portable, user-oriented, and a true production code as it is used about 60 Cray hours per month by about 150 Los Alamos users. It has as its data base the best cross-section evaluations available. MCNP contains state-of-the-art traditional and adaptive Monte Carlo techniques to be applied to the solution of an ever-increasing number of problems. Excellent user-oriented documentation is available for all facets of the MCNP code system. Many useful and important variants of MCNP exist for special applications. The Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee is the contact point for worldwide MCNP code and documentation distribution. A much improved MCNP Version 3A will be available in the fall of 1985, along with new and improved documentation. Future directions in MCNP development will change the meaning of MCNP to Monte Carlo N Particle where N particle varieties will be transported

  15. Transport methods: general. 2. Monte Carlo Particle Transport in Media with Exponentially Varying Time-Dependent Cross Sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated Monte Carlo schemes for analyzing particle transport through media with exponentially varying time-dependent cross sections. For such media, the cross sections are represented in the form Σ(t) = Σ0 e-at (1) or equivalently as Σ(x) = Σ0 e-bx (2) where b = av and v is the particle speed. For the following discussion, the parameters a and b may be either positive, for exponentially decreasing cross sections, or negative, for exponentially increasing cross sections. For most time-dependent Monte Carlo applications, the time and spatial variations of the cross-section data are handled by means of a stepwise procedure, holding the cross sections constant for each region over a small time interval Δt, performing the Monte Carlo random walk over the interval Δt, updating the cross sections, and then repeating for a series of time intervals. Continuously varying spatial- or time-dependent cross sections can be treated in a rigorous Monte Carlo fashion using delta-tracking, but inefficiencies may arise if the range of cross-section variation is large. In this paper, we present a new method for sampling collision distances directly for cross sections that vary exponentially in space or time. The method is exact and efficient and has direct application to Monte Carlo radiation transport methods. To verify that the probability density function (PDF) is correct and that the random-sampling procedure yields correct results, numerical experiments were performed using a one-dimensional Monte Carlo code. The physical problem consisted of a beam source impinging on a purely absorbing infinite slab, with a slab thickness of 1 cm and Σ0 = 1 cm-1. Monte Carlo calculations with 10 000 particles were run for a range of the exponential parameter b from -5 to +20 cm-1. Two separate Monte Carlo calculations were run for each choice of b, a continuously varying case using the random-sampling procedures described earlier, and a 'conventional' case where the

  16. Verification of Monte Carlo transport codes FLUKA, Mars and Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study is a continuation of the project 'Verification of Monte Carlo Transport Codes' which is running at GSI as a part of activation studies of FAIR relevant materials. It includes two parts: verification of stopping modules of FLUKA, MARS and SHIELD-A (with ATIMA stopping module) and verification of their isotope production modules. The first part is based on the measurements of energy deposition function of uranium ions in copper and stainless steel. The irradiation was done at 500 MeV/u and 950 MeV/u, the experiment was held at GSI from September 2004 until May 2005. The second part is based on gamma-activation studies of an aluminium target irradiated with an argon beam of 500 MeV/u in August 2009. Experimental depth profiling of the residual activity of the target is compared with the simulations. (authors)

  17. Monte Carlo Particle Transport Capability for Inertial Confinement Fusion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brantley, P S; Stuart, L M

    2006-11-06

    A time-dependent massively-parallel Monte Carlo particle transport calculational module (ParticleMC) for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) applications is described. The ParticleMC package is designed with the long-term goal of transporting neutrons, charged particles, and gamma rays created during the simulation of ICF targets and surrounding materials, although currently the package treats neutrons and gamma rays. Neutrons created during thermonuclear burn provide a source of neutrons to the ParticleMC package. Other user-defined sources of particles are also available. The module is used within the context of a hydrodynamics client code, and the particle tracking is performed on the same computational mesh as used in the broader simulation. The module uses domain-decomposition and the MPI message passing interface to achieve parallel scaling for large numbers of computational cells. The Doppler effects of bulk hydrodynamic motion and the thermal effects due to the high temperatures encountered in ICF plasmas are directly included in the simulation. Numerical results for a three-dimensional benchmark test problem are presented in 3D XYZ geometry as a verification of the basic transport capability. In the full paper, additional numerical results including a prototype ICF simulation will be presented.

  18. Monte-Carlo studies of radiation damage in the first wall caused by fusion neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte-Carlo Neutron Transport Program and Neutron Radiation Damage Program are presented for studying radiation damage in the First Wall. The programs are used to static multi-component amorphous target. With the average wall load 1 MW/m2, the following calculating results for EHR first wall (type 316 stainless steel) have been performed by using designed neutron spectrums at EHR first wall: the PKA energy spectrums (30 eV to 1 MeV), average displacement per atom rate (20.6 dpa/a) and average helium and hydrogen production rates (247.18 appm/a and 721.15 appm/a). It shows that Hybrid Reactor's radiation damage is more serious than pure Fusion reactor's by comparison of above results and EHP's calculated results in the same wall load. the cross-section data from MC (87) n library is used in the calculation

  19. Review of the Monte Carlo and deterministic codes in radiation protection and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modelling a physical system can be carried out either stochastically or deterministically. An example of the former method is the Monte Carlo technique, in which statistically approximate methods are applied to exact models. No transport equation is solved as individual particles are simulated and some specific aspect (tally) of their average behaviour is recorded. The average behaviour of the physical system is then inferred using the central limit theorem. In contrast, deterministic codes use mathematically exact methods that are applied to approximate models to solve the transport equation for the average particle behaviour. The physical system is subdivided in boxes in the phase-space system and particles are followed from one box to the next. The smaller the boxes the better the approximations become. Although the Monte Carlo method has been used for centuries, its more recent manifestation has really emerged from the Manhattan project of the Word War II. Its invention is thought to be mainly due to Metropolis, Ulah (through his interest in poker), Fermi, von Neuman and Richtmeyer. Over the last 20 years or so, the Monte Carlo technique has become a powerful tool in radiation transport. This is due to users taking full advantage of richer cross section data, more powerful computers and Monte Carlo techniques for radiation transport, with high quality physics and better known source spectra. This method is a common sense approach to radiation transport and its success and popularity is quite often also due to necessity, because measurements are not always possible or affordable. In the Monte Carlo method, which is inherently realistic because nature is statistical, a more detailed physics is made possible by isolation of events while rather elaborate geometries can be modelled. Provided that the physics is correct, a simulation is exactly analogous to an experimenter counting particles. In contrast to the deterministic approach, however, a disadvantage of the

  20. Evaluation of scattered radiation from radiographic intensifying screen on dental image contrast using Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most dental imaging is performed by means a imaging system consisting of a film/screen combination. Fluorescent intensifying screens for X-ray films are used in order to reduce the radiation dose. They produce visible light which increases the efficiency of the film. In addition, the primary radiation can be scattered elastically (Rayleigh scattering) and inelastically (Compton scattering) which will degrade the image resolution. Scattered radiation produced in Gd2O2S:Tb intensifying screens was simulated by using a Monte Carlo radiation transport code - the EGS4. The magnitude of scattered radiation striking the film is typically quantified using the scatter to primary radiation and the scatter fraction. The angular distribution of the intensity of the scattered radiation (sum of both the scattering effects) was simulated, showing that the ratio of secondary-to-primary radiation incident on the X-ray film is about 5.67% and 3.28 % and the scatter function is about 5.27% and 3.18% for the front and back screen, respectively, over the range from 0 to π rad. (author)

  1. Its version 3.0. The integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITS system is described, which is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields. It combines operational simplicity and physical accuracy in order to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Flexibility of construction permits tailoring of the codes to specific applications and extension of code capabilities to more complex applications through simple update procedures. (author)

  2. Parallelization of a Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjidoukas, P.; Bousis, C.; Emfietzoglou, D.

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a high performance version of the Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code MC4. The original application code, developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) for Microsoft Excel, was first rewritten in the C programming language for improving code portability. Several pseudo-random number generators have been also integrated and studied. The new MC4 version was then parallelized for shared and distributed-memory multiprocessor systems using the Message Passing Interface. Two parallel pseudo-random number generator libraries (SPRNG and DCMT) have been seamlessly integrated. The performance speedup of parallel MC4 has been studied on a variety of parallel computing architectures including an Intel Xeon server with 4 dual-core processors, a Sun cluster consisting of 16 nodes of 2 dual-core AMD Opteron processors and a 200 dual-processor HP cluster. For large problem size, which is limited only by the physical memory of the multiprocessor server, the speedup results are almost linear on all systems. We have validated the parallel implementation against the serial VBA and C implementations using the same random number generator. Our experimental results on the transport and energy loss of electrons in a water medium show that the serial and parallel codes are equivalent in accuracy. The present improvements allow for studying of higher particle energies with the use of more accurate physical models, and improve statistics as more particles tracks can be simulated in low response time.

  3. ITS - The integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TIGER series of time-independent coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes is a group of multimaterial, multidimensional codes designed to provide a state-of-the-art description of the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade. The codes follow both electrons and photons from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV, and the user has the option of combining the collisional transport with transport in macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Source particles can be either electrons or photons. The most important output data are (a) charge and energy deposition profiles, (b) integral and differential escape coefficients for both electrons and photons, (c) differential electron and photon flux, and (d) pulse-height distributions for selected regions of the problem geometry. The base codes of the series differ from one another primarily in their dimensionality and geometric modeling. They include (a) a one-dimensional multilayer code, (b) a code that describes the transport in two-dimensional axisymmetric cylindrical material geometries with a fully three-dimensional description of particle trajectories, and (c) a general three-dimensional transport code which employs a combinatorial geometry scheme. These base codes were designed primarily for describing radiation transport for those situations in which the detailed atomic structure of the transport medium is not important. For some applications, it is desirable to have a more detailed model of the low energy transport. The system includes three additional codes that contain a more elaborate ionization/relaxation model than the base codes. Finally, the system includes two codes that combine the collisional transport of the multidimensional base codes with transport in macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence

  4. Monte Carlo technique applications in the field of radiation dosimetry at the ENEA Radiation Protection Institute: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the ENEA (Ente Nazionale per le Nuove Technologie l'Energia e l'Ambiente) Institute of Bologna (Italy) many years of various activities have been carried out in the field of experimental dosimetry and radiation protection. As far as the external radiation monitoring is concerned, these activities dealt with the design, development and type test of photon personal dosemeters as well as routine reading and control of dosemeters, calibration activities etc. As far as the internal dosimetry activities are concerned a whole body counter (WBC) has been built and used many years both for research activities and for routine assessment of internal doses. The WBC has been extensively used in the recent years, especially after the Chernobyl accident, to assess doses from intake of radioactive nuclides for Italian workers employed in Russia as well as normal population mainly living in the north-eastern Italian areas. In recent years, the necessity of improving the general dose assessment capabilities and to provide accurate field parameters and operational quantities, according to the international recommendations, outlined the importance of coupling experimental work with Monte Carlo radiation transport modelling. The present paper summarizes some studies carried out with Monte Carlo in the framework of the ENEA contribution to the activities of the EURADOS Working Group 4; they are concerned with computations of field parameters and operational quantities for the ICRU sphere with reference photon beams and modelling and calculations for photon internal and external dose assessment with the ADAM anthropomorphic phantom

  5. SKIRT: the design of a suite of input models for Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Baes, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is the most popular technique to perform radiative transfer simulations in a general 3D geometry. The algorithms behind and acceleration techniques for Monte Carlo radiative transfer are discussed extensively in the literature, and many different Monte Carlo codes are publicly available. On the contrary, the design of a suite of components that can be used for the distribution of sources and sinks in radiative transfer codes has received very little attention. The availability of such models, with different degrees of complexity, has many benefits. For example, they can serve as toy models to test new physical ingredients, or as parameterised models for inverse radiative transfer fitting. For 3D Monte Carlo codes, this requires algorithms to efficiently generate random positions from 3D density distributions. We describe the design of a flexible suite of components for the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code SKIRT. The design is based on a combination of basic building blocks (which can...

  6. Monte Carlo calculations applied to NRU reactor and radiation physics analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, T.S.; Wilkin, G.B., E-mail: nguyens@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-12-15

    The statistical MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) code has been satisfactorily used for reactor and radiation physics calculations to support NRU operation and analysis. MCNP enables 3D modeling of the reactor and its components in great detail, the transport calculation of photons (in addition to neutrons), and the capability to model all locations in space, which are beyond the capabilities of the deterministic neutronics methods used for NRU. While the simple single-cell model is efficient for local analysis in any site of NRU, the complex full-reactor model is required for calculations of the core physics and beyond-the-core radiation. By supplementing, adjusting or benchmarking the results from the existing NRU codes, the MCNP calculations provide greater confidence that NRU remains within the licence envelope. (author)

  7. Monte Carlo calculations applied to NRU reactor and radiation physics analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The statistical MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) code has been satisfactorily used for reactor and radiation physics calculations to support NRU operation and analysis. MCNP enables 3D modeling of the reactor and its components in great detail, the transport calculation of photons (in addition to neutrons), and the capability to model all locations in space, which are beyond the capabilities of the deterministic neutronics methods used for NRU. While the simple single-cell model is efficient for local analysis in any site of NRU, the complex full-reactor model is required for calculations of the core physics and beyond-the-core radiation. By supplementing, adjusting or benchmarking the results from the existing NRU codes, the MCNP calculations provide greater confidence that NRU remains within the licence envelope. (author)

  8. Neutron spectrum obtained with Monte Carlo and transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of the computer, resulting in increasing memory capacity and processing speed, has enabled the application of Monte Carlo method to estimate the fluxes in thousands of fine bin energy structure. Usually the MC calculation is made using continuous energy nuclear data and exact geometry. Self shielding and interference of nuclides resonances are properly considered. Therefore, the fluxes obtained by this method may be a good estimation of the neutron energy distribution (spectrum) for the problem. In an early work it was proposed to use these fluxes as weighting spectrum to generate multigroup cross section for fast reactor analysis using deterministic codes. This non-traditional use of MC calculation needs a validation to gain confidence in the results. The work presented here is the validation start step of this scheme. The spectra of the JOYO first core fuel assembly MK-I and the benchmark Godiva were calculated using the tally flux estimator of the MCNP code and compared with the reference. Also, the two problems were solved with the multigroup transport theory code XSDRN of the AMPX system using the 171 energy groups VITAMIN-C library. The spectra differences arising from the utilization of these codes, the influence of evaluated data file and the application to fast reactor calculation are discussed. (author)

  9. Confidence interval procedures for Monte Carlo transport simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of obtaining valid confidence intervals based on estimates from sampled distributions using Monte Carlo particle transport simulation codes such as MCNP is examined. Such intervals can cover the true parameter of interest at a lower than nominal rate if the sampled distribution is extremely right-skewed by large tallies. Modifications to the standard theory of confidence intervals are discussed and compared with some existing heuristics, including batched means normality tests. Two new types of diagnostics are introduced to assess whether the conditions of central limit theorem-type results are satisfied: the relative variance of the variance determines whether the sample size is sufficiently large, and estimators of the slope of the right tail of the distribution are used to indicate the number of moments that exist. A simulation study is conducted to quantify the relationship between various diagnostics and coverage rates and to find sample-based quantities useful in indicating when intervals are expected to be valid. Simulated tally distributions are chosen to emulate behavior seen in difficult particle transport problems. Measures of variation in the sample variance s2 are found to be much more effective than existing methods in predicting when coverage will be near nominal rates. Batched means tests are found to be overly conservative in this regard. A simple but pathological MCNP problem is presented as an example of false convergence using existing heuristics. The new methods readily detect the false convergence and show that the results of the problem, which are a factor of 4 too small, should not be used. Recommendations are made for applying these techniques in practice, using the statistical output currently produced by MCNP

  10. Cost effective distributed computing for Monte Carlo radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: An inexpensive computing facility has been established for performing repetitive Monte Carlo simulations with the BEAM and EGS4/EGSnrc codes of linear accelerator beams, for calculating effective dose from diagnostic imaging procedures and of ion chambers and phantoms used for the Australian high energy absorbed dose standards. The facility currently consists of 3 dual-processor 450 MHz processor PCs linked by a high speed LAN. The 3 PCs can be accessed either locally from a single keyboard/monitor/mouse combination using a SwitchView controller or remotely via a computer network from PCs with suitable communications software (e.g. Telnet, Kermit etc). All 3 PCs are identically configured to have the Red Hat Linux 6.0 operating system. A Fortran compiler and the BEAM and EGS4/EGSnrc codes are available on the 3 PCs. The preparation of sequences of jobs utilising the Monte Carlo codes is simplified using load-distributing software (enFuzion 6.0 marketed by TurboLinux Inc, formerly Cluster from Active Tools) which efficiently distributes the computing load amongst all 6 processors. We describe 3 applications of the system - (a) energy spectra from radiotherapy sources, (b) mean mass-energy absorption coefficients and stopping powers for absolute absorbed dose standards and (c) dosimetry for diagnostic procedures; (a) and (b) are based on the transport codes BEAM and FLURZnrc while (c) is a Fortran/EGS code developed at ARPANSA. Efficiency gains ranged from 3 for (c) to close to the theoretical maximum of 6 for (a) and (b), with the gain depending on the amount of 'bookkeeping' to begin each task and the time taken to complete a single task. We have found the use of a load-balancing batch processing system with many PCs to be an economical way of achieving greater productivity for Monte Carlo calculations or of any computer intensive task requiring many runs with different parameters. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and

  11. High performance parallel Monte Carlo transport computations for ITER fusion neutronics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large scale neutronics calculations for radiation safety and machine reliability are required to support design activities for the ITER fusion reactor which is currently in phase of construction. Its large size and complexity of diagnostics, control and heating systems and ports, and also channel penetrations inside the thick blanket shielding surrounding the 14 MeV D-T neutron source are essential challenges for neutronics calculations. In the ITER tokamak geometry, the Monte Carlo (MC) method is the preferred one for radiation transport calculations. This method allows describing neutrons interactions with matter by tracking individual particle histories. The precision of the MC method depends on number of sampled particles according to statistical laws and on systematic uncertainties introduced by modeling assumptions. Due to the independence of particle histories, their tracks can be processed in parallel. Parallel computations on high performance cluster computers substantially increase number of sampled particles and therefore allow reaching the desired statistical precision of the MC results. Use of CAD-based approach with high spatial resolution improves systematic adequacy of the MC geometry modeling. These achievements are demonstrated on radiation transport calculations for designing the Blanket Shield Module and Auxiliary Shield of the ITER Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) upper launcher. (author)

  12. ITS, TIGER System of Coupled Electron Photon Transport by Monte-Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: ITS permits a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-integrated coupled electron/ photon radiation transport problems with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. 2 - Method of solution: Through a machine-portable utility that emulates the basic features of the CDC UPDATE processor, the user selects one of eight codes for running on a machine of one of four (at least) major vendors. With the ITS-3.0 release the PSR-0245/UPEML package is included to perform these functions. The ease with which this utility is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is maximized by employing the best available cross sections and sampling distributions, and the most complete physical model for describing the production and transport of the electron/ photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. Flexibility of construction permits the codes to be tailored to specific applications and the capabilities of the codes to be extended to more complex applications through update procedures. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: - Restrictions and/or limitations for ITS depend upon the local operating system

  13. ITS Version 6 : the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Brian Claude; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Laub, Thomas William

    2008-04-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of lineartime-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 6, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 5.0 codes, and (2) conversion to Fortran 90. The general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through memory allocation to reduce the need for users to modify and recompile the code.

  14. The Monte Carlo atmospheric radiative transfer model McArtim: Introduction and validation of Jacobians and 3D features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new Monte Carlo atmospheric radiative transfer model is presented which is designed to support the interpretation of UV/vis/near-IR spectroscopic measurements of scattered Sun light in the atmosphere. The integro differential equation describing the underlying transport process and its formal solution are discussed. A stochastic approach to solve the differential equation, the Monte Carlo method, is deduced and its application to the formal solution is demonstrated. It is shown how model photon trajectories of the resulting ray tracing algorithm are used to estimate functionals of the radiation field such as radiances, actinic fluxes and light path integrals. In addition, Jacobians of the former quantities with respect to optical parameters of the atmosphere are analyzed. Model output quantities are validated against measurements, by self-consistency tests and through inter comparisons with other radiative transfer models.

  15. Fast Monte Carlo Electron-Photon Transport Method and Application in Accurate Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Lijuan; Sun, Guangyao; Zheng, Huaqing; Song, Jing; Chen, Zhenping; Li, Gui

    2014-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method is the most accurate computational method for dose calculation, but its wide application on clinical accurate radiotherapy is hindered due to its poor speed of converging and long computation time. In the MC dose calculation research, the main task is to speed up computation while high precision is maintained. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the calculation speed of MC method for electron-photon transport with high precision and ultimately to reduce the accurate radiotherapy dose calculation time based on normal computer to the level of several hours, which meets the requirement of clinical dose verification. Based on the existing Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program (SuperMC), developed by FDS Team, a fast MC method for electron-photon coupled transport was presented with focus on two aspects: firstly, through simplifying and optimizing the physical model of the electron-photon transport, the calculation speed was increased with slightly reduction of calculation accuracy; secondly, using a variety of MC calculation acceleration methods, for example, taking use of obtained information in previous calculations to avoid repeat simulation of particles with identical history; applying proper variance reduction techniques to accelerate MC method convergence rate, etc. The fast MC method was tested by a lot of simple physical models and clinical cases included nasopharyngeal carcinoma, peripheral lung tumor, cervical carcinoma, etc. The result shows that the fast MC method for electron-photon transport was fast enough to meet the requirement of clinical accurate radiotherapy dose verification. Later, the method will be applied to the Accurate/Advanced Radiation Therapy System ARTS as a MC dose verification module.

  16. Non-analog Monte Carlo estimators for radiation momentum deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Densmore, Jeffery D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hykes, Joshua M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The standard method for calculating radiation momentum deposition in Monte Carlo simulations is the analog estimator, which tallies the change in a particle's momentum at each interaction with the matter. Unfortunately, the analog estimator can suffer from large amounts of statistical error. In this paper, we present three new non-analog techniques for estimating momentum deposition. Specifically, we use absorption, collision, and track-length estimators to evaluate a simple integral expression for momentum deposition that does not contain terms that can cause large amounts of statistical error in the analog scheme. We compare our new non-analog estimators to the analog estimator with a set of test problems that encompass a wide range of material properties and both isotropic and anisotropic scattering. In nearly all cases, the new non-analog estimators outperform the analog estimator. The track-length estimator consistently yields the highest performance gains, improving upon the analog-estimator figure of merit by factors of up to two orders of magnitude.

  17. Detailed Radiative Transport Modeling of a Radiative Divertor

    CERN Document Server

    Wan, A S; Scott, H A; Post, D; Rognlien, T D

    1995-01-01

    An effective radiative divertor maximizes the utilization of atomic processes to spread out the energy deposition to the divertor chamber walls and to reduce the peak heat flux. Because the mixture of neutral atoms and ions in the divertor can be optically thick to a portion of radiated power, it is necessary to accurately model the magnitude and distribution of line radiation in this complex region. To assess their importance we calculate the effects of radiation transport using CRETIN, a multi-dimensional, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium simulation code that includes the atomic kinetics and radiative transport processes necessary to model the complex environment of a radiative divertor. We also include neutral transport to model radiation from recycling neutral atoms. This paper presents a case study of a high-recycling radiative divertor with a typical large neutral pressure at the divertor plate to estimate the impact of H line radiation on the overall power balance in the divertor region with conside...

  18. Intra-operative radiation therapy optimization using the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem addressed with reference to the treatment head optimization has been the choice of the proper design of the head of a new 12 MeV linear accelerator in order to have the required dose uniformity on the target volume while keeping the dose rate sufficiently high and the photon production and the beam impact with the head walls within acceptable limits. The second part of the optimization work, concerning the TPS, is based on the rationale that the TPSs generally used in radiotherapy use semi-empirical algorithms whose accuracy can be inadequate particularly when irregular surfaces and/or inhomogeneities, such as air cavities or bone, are present. The Monte Carlo method, on the contrary, is capable of accurately calculating the dose distribution under almost all circumstances. Furthermore it offers the advantage of allowing to start the simulation of the radiation transport in the patient from the beam data obtained with the transport through the specific treatment head used. Therefore the Monte Carlo simulations, which at present are not yet widely used for routine treatment planning due to the required computing time, can be employed as a benchmark and as an optimization tool for conventional TPSs. (orig.)

  19. Intra-operative radiation therapy optimization using the Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosetti, M. [ENEA, Bologna (Italy); Benassi, M.; Bufacchi, A.; D' Andrea, M. [Ist. Regina Elena, Rome (Italy); Bruzzaniti, V. [ENEA, S. Maria di Galeria (Rome) (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    The problem addressed with reference to the treatment head optimization has been the choice of the proper design of the head of a new 12 MeV linear accelerator in order to have the required dose uniformity on the target volume while keeping the dose rate sufficiently high and the photon production and the beam impact with the head walls within acceptable limits. The second part of the optimization work, concerning the TPS, is based on the rationale that the TPSs generally used in radiotherapy use semi-empirical algorithms whose accuracy can be inadequate particularly when irregular surfaces and/or inhomogeneities, such as air cavities or bone, are present. The Monte Carlo method, on the contrary, is capable of accurately calculating the dose distribution under almost all circumstances. Furthermore it offers the advantage of allowing to start the simulation of the radiation transport in the patient from the beam data obtained with the transport through the specific treatment head used. Therefore the Monte Carlo simulations, which at present are not yet widely used for routine treatment planning due to the required computing time, can be employed as a benchmark and as an optimization tool for conventional TPSs. (orig.)

  20. Development of a space radiation Monte Carlo computer simulation based on the FLUKA and ROOT codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsky, L S; Wilson, T L; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Carminati, F; Brun, R

    2001-01-01

    This NASA funded project is proceeding to develop a Monte Carlo-based computer simulation of the radiation environment in space. With actual funding only initially in place at the end of May 2000, the study is still in the early stage of development. The general tasks have been identified and personnel have been selected. The code to be assembled will be based upon two major existing software packages. The radiation transport simulation will be accomplished by updating the FLUKA Monte Carlo program, and the user interface will employ the ROOT software being developed at CERN. The end-product will be a Monte Carlo-based code which will complement the existing analytic codes such as BRYNTRN/HZETRN presently used by NASA to evaluate the effects of radiation shielding in space. The planned code will possess the ability to evaluate the radiation environment for spacecraft and habitats in Earth orbit, in interplanetary space, on the lunar surface, or on a planetary surface such as Mars. Furthermore, it will be useful in the design and analysis of experiments such as ACCESS (Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for Space Station), which is an Office of Space Science payload currently under evaluation for deployment on the International Space Station (ISS). FLUKA will be significantly improved and tailored for use in simulating space radiation in four ways. First, the additional physics not presently within the code that is necessary to simulate the problems of interest, namely the heavy ion inelastic processes, will be incorporated. Second, the internal geometry package will be replaced with one that will substantially increase the calculation speed as well as simplify the data input task. Third, default incident flux packages that include all of the different space radiation sources of interest will be included. Finally, the user interface and internal data structure will be melded together with ROOT, the object-oriented data analysis infrastructure system. Beyond

  1. Accelerating Monte Carlo simulations of photon transport in a voxelized geometry using a massively parallel graphics processing unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: It is a known fact that Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport are computationally intensive and may require long computing times. The authors introduce a new paradigm for the acceleration of Monte Carlo simulations: The use of a graphics processing unit (GPU) as the main computing device instead of a central processing unit (CPU). Methods: A GPU-based Monte Carlo code that simulates photon transport in a voxelized geometry with the accurate physics models from PENELOPE has been developed using the CUDA programming model (NVIDIA Corporation, Santa Clara, CA). Results: An outline of the new code and a sample x-ray imaging simulation with an anthropomorphic phantom are presented. A remarkable 27-fold speed up factor was obtained using a GPU compared to a single core CPU. Conclusions: The reported results show that GPUs are currently a good alternative to CPUs for the simulation of radiation transport. Since the performance of GPUs is currently increasing at a faster pace than that of CPUs, the advantages of GPU-based software are likely to be more pronounced in the future.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of radiation streaming from a radioactive material shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulated detection of gamma radiation streaming from a radioactive material shipping cask have been performed with the Monte Carlo codes MCNP4A and MORSE-SGC/S. Despite inherent difficulties in simulating deep penetration of radiation and streaming, the simulations have yielded results that agree within one order of magnitude with the radiation survey data, with reasonable statistics. These simulations have also provided insight into modeling radiation detection, notably on location and orientation of the radiation detector with respect to photon streaming paths, and on techniques used to reduce variance in the Monte Carlo calculations. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Monte Carlo technique applications in field of radiation dosimetry at ENEA radiation protection institute: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report summarizes the activities concerned with numerical dosimetry as carried out at the Radiation Protection Institute of ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment) on photon dosimetric quantities. The first part is concerned with MCNP Monte Carlo calculation of field parameters and operational quantities for the ICRU sphere with reference photon beams for the design of personal dosemeters. The second part is related with studies on the ADAM anthropomorphic phantom using the SABRINA and MCNP codes. The results of other Monte Carlo studies carried out on electron conversion factors for various tissue equivalent slab phantoms are about to be published in other ENEA reports. The report has been produced in the framework of the EURADOS WG4 (numerical dosimetry) activities within a collaboration between the ENEA Environmental Department and ENEA Energy Department

  4. Monte Carlo simulation for internal radiation dosimetry based on the high resolution Visible Chinese Human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The internal radiation dose calculations based on Chinese models is important in nuclear medicine. Most of the existing models are based on the physical and anatomical data of Caucasian, whose anatomical structure and physiological parameters are quite different from the Chinese, may lead significant effect on internal radiation. Therefore, it is necessary to establish the model based on the Chinese ethnic characteristics, and applied to radiation dosimetry calculation. In this study, a voxel model was established based on the high resolution Visible Chinese Human (VCH). The transport procedure of photon and electron was simulated using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Absorbed fraction (AF) and specific absorbed fraction (SAF) were calculated and S-factors and mean absorbed doses for organs with 99mTc located in liver were also obtained. In comparison with those of VIP-Man and MIRD models, discrepancies were found to be correlated with the racial and anatomical differences in organ mass and inter-organ distance. The internal dosimetry data based on other models that were used to apply to Chinese adult population are replaced with Chinese specific data. The obtained results provide a reference for nuclear medicine, such as dose verification after surgery and potential radiation evaluation for radionuclides in preclinical research, etc. (authors)

  5. A review of Monte Carlo techniques used in various fields of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo methods and their utilization in radiation protection are overviewed. Basic principles and the most frequently used sampling methods are described. Examples range from the simulation of the random walk of photons and neutrons to neutron spectrum unfolding. (author)

  6. Application of Monte Carlo method in determination of secondary characteristic X radiation in XFA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondary characteristic radiation is excited by primary radiation from the X-ray tube and by secondary radiation of other elements so that excitations of several orders result. The Monte Carlo method was used to consider all these possibilities and the resulting flux of characteristic radiation was simulated for samples of silicate raw materials. A comparison of the results of these computations with experiments allows to determine the effect of sample preparation on the characteristic radiation flux. (M.D.)

  7. Construction of Monte Carlo operators in collisional transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte Carlo approach for investigating the dynamics of quiescent collisional magnetoplasmas is presented, based on the discretization of the gyrokinetic equation. The theory applies to a strongly rotating multispecies plasma, in a toroidally axisymmetric configuration. Expressions of the Monte Carlo collision operators are obtained for general v-space nonorthogonal coordinates systems, in terms of approximate solutions of the discretized gyrokinetic equation. Basic features of the Monte Carlo operators are that they fullfill all the required conservation laws, i.e., linear momentum and kinetic energy conservation, and in addition that they take into account correctly also off-diagonal diffusion coefficients. The present operators are thus potentially useful for describing the dynamics of a multispecies toroidal magnetoplasma. In particular, strict ambipolarity of particle fluxes is ensured automatically in the limit of small departures of the unperturbed particle trajectories from some initial axisymmetric toroidal magnetic surfaces

  8. Propagator description of radiation transport, applied to lighting discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichaidit, C; Hitchon, W N G [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Lawler, J E [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Lister, G G, E-mail: wichaidi@gmail.co [OSRAM SYLVANIA Inc., 71 Cherry Hill Dr., Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

    2009-01-21

    Radiation transport calculations based on the use of propagators (or Green's functions) are presented for the Hg resonance at 254 nm in the complete frequency redistribution regime. This resonance radiation plays a dominant role in the power balance of fluorescent lamps. Recent studies have suggested that transport modes above the fundamental are important in some lamp discharges. The Holstein transmittance function T(R) used to evaluate the probabilities is generated by numerical integration across the line profile at low and medium opacity. Complete hyperfine and isotopic patterns with a Voigt profile for each component are used in the model. A simple analytic expression for T(R) from a pure Lorentzian profile is used at high opacity. The calculation includes radial cataphoresis (a radial-dependent ground state Hg density). Evaluation of propagator matrix elements-probabilities of photons travelling from one cell to another-is done by integrating T(R) with the source points distributed radially across the source cell in cylindrical geometry. A radiation transport matrix or propagator function obtained from direct integration is compared with very detailed Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport in cylindrical geometry. The probability matrix is then used in a self-consistent fluorescent lamp discharge model. Details of the numerical model are discussed. The trapped decay rates at different discharge currents and temperatures obtained by fluorescent lamp discharge simulations are compared with those calculated from an analytic formula.

  9. Evaluation of light Collection in Radiation Portal Monitor with Multi PMTs using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Chang Hwy; Park, Jong Won; Lee, Junghee [Korea Research Institute of Ships and Ocean Engineering, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Myung Kook; Kim, Jongyul; Lee, Suhyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A plastic scintillator in the RPM is suited for the γ-ray detection of various-range energy and is the cost effective radiation detection material. In order to well inspect emitted radiation from the container cargo, the radiation detection area of a plastic scintillator should be larger than other general purpose radiation detector. However, the large size plastic scintillator affects the light collection efficiency at the photo-sensitive sensor due to the long light transport distance and light collisions in a plastic scintillator. Therefore, the improvement of light collection efficiency in a RPM is one of the major issues for the high performance RPM development. We calculated the change of the number of collected light according to changing of the attachment position and number of PMT. To calculate the number of collected light, the DETECT2000 and MCNP6 Monte Carlo simulation software tool was used. Response signal performance of RPM system is affected by the position of the incident radiation. If the distance between the radiation source and a PMT is long, the number of loss signal is larger. Generally, PMTs for signal detection in RPM system has been attached on one side of plastic scintillator. In contrast, RPM model in the study have 2 PMTs, which attached at the two side of plastic scintillator. We estimated difference between results using the old method and our method. According to results, uniformity of response signal was better than method using one side. If additive simulation and experiment is performed, it will be possible to develop the improved RPM system. In the future, we will perform additive simulation about many difference RPM model.

  10. MCNP: a general Monte Carlo code for neutron and photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general-purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP ca be used for neutron, photon, or coupled neutron-photon transport, including the capability to calculate eigenvalues for critical systems. The code treats an arbitrary three-dimensional configuration of materials in geometric cells bounded by first- and second-degree surfaces and some special fourth-degree surfaces (elliptical tori). Pointwise cross-section data are used. For neutrons, all reactions given in a particular cross-section evaluation are accounted for. Thermal neutrons are described by both the free-gas and S(α,β) models. For photons, the code takes account of incoherent and coherent scattering, the possibility of fluorescent emission following photoelectric absorption, and absorption in pair production with local emission of annihilation radiation. MCNP includes an elaborate, interactive plotting capability that allows the user to view his input geometry to help check for setup errors. Standard features which are available to improve computational efficiency include geometry splitting and Russian roulette, weight cutoff with Russian roulette, correlated sampling, analog capture or capture by weight reduction, the exponential transformation, energy splitting, forced collisions in designated cells, flux estimates at point or ring detectors, deterministically transporting pseudo-particles to designated regions, track-length estimators, source biasing, and several parameter cutoffs. Extensive summary information is provided to help the user better understand the physics and Monte Carlo simulation of his problem. The standard, user-defined output of MCNP includes two-way current as a function of direction across any set of surfaces or surface segments in the problem. Flux across any set of surfaces or surface segments is available. 58 figures, 28 tables

  11. Revealing the underlying mechanism of microbeam radiation therapy with low energy Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a new experimental oncological modality, intended for the treatment of inoperable brain tumours, particularly in difficult cases where conventional radiation therapy can cause irreversible damage. MRT consists of an array of highly collimated, quasi-parallel x-ray microbeams aimed at the tumour tissue, delivering high dose within the beam path and low doses in regions between the beams. For reasons still not fully understood, healthy tissue exposed to the microbeam array is able to regenerate while tumour volumes are significantly reduced. Low energy Monte Carlo radiative transport simulations provide new insight into understanding the underlying mechanisms of MRT. In particular, predicting the ionisation cluster distribution, which is a significant cause of lethal damage to cells, would provide insight into the biological responses. Geant4-DNA was used to model an x-ray microbeam of width 20 μm in liquid water. Secondary electrons, predominately responsible for ionisation clustering, were tracked to predict damage to cells within and adjacent to the beams. We find that higher energy beams (100 keV) produce less secondary electrons in the regions outside the beam than low energy beams (30-50 keV)

  12. Monte-Carlo studies of radiation damage by fusion neutron in the first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a Monte Carlo Neutron Transport Program NTGM and Neutron Radiation Damage Program NRDGM are presented for studying radiation damage of the First Wall. The programs are used to static multicomponent amorphous target. With the average wall load 1MW/m2 the PKA energy spectrums (30ev to 1MeV), average displacement per atom rate (16. 8 dpa/a), average helium and hydrogen production rates (204 appm/a and 623 appm)a) have been calculated for first wall (type 316 stainless steel) using designed neutron spectrums at EHR (Experimental Tokamak Fusion Fission Hybrid Reactor) first wall. It is showed that Hybrid Reactor's radiation damage more serious than pure Fusion Reactor's by comparison of above results and EHP's calculated results on the same wall load. The code can be used to calculate engineering materials including any numbers of element's kind. The calculation mode can be applied to light elements for dpa dose. The calculation results will be given in this paper

  13. Survey of radiation protection programmes for transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survey of radiation protection programmes for transport has been jointly performed by three scientific organisations I.P.S.N. (France), G.R.S. ( Germany), and N.R.P.B. (United kingdom) on behalf of the European Commission and the pertaining documentation summarises the findings and conclusions of the work that was undertaken with the principal objectives to provide guidance on the establishment, implementation and application of radiation protection programmes for the transport of radioactive materials by operators and the assessment and evaluation of such programmes by the competent authority and to review currently existing radiation protection programmes for the transport of radioactive materials. (N.C.)

  14. Monte Carlo Studies of Charge Transport Below the Mobility Edge

    OpenAIRE

    Jakobsson, Mattias

    2012-01-01

    Charge transport below the mobility edge, where the charge carriers are hopping between localized electronic states, is the dominant charge transport mechanism in a wide range of disordered materials. This type of incoherent charge transport is fundamentally different from the coherent charge transport in ordered crystalline materials. With the advent of organic electronics, where small organic molecules or polymers replace traditional inorganic semiconductors, the interest for this type of h...

  15. Monte Carlo perturbation theory in neutron transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need to obtain sensitivities in complicated geometrical configurations has resulted in the development of Monte Carlo sensitivity estimation. A new method has been developed to calculate energy-dependent sensitivities of any number of responses in a single Monte Carlo calculation with a very small time penalty. This estimation typically increases the tracking time per source particle by about 30%. The method of estimation is explained. Sensitivities obtained are compared with those calculated by discrete ordinates methods. Further theoretical developments, such as second-order perturbation theory and application to k/sub eff/ calculations, are discussed. The application of the method to uncertainty analysis and to the analysis of benchmark experiments is illustrated. 5 figures

  16. Efficient Monte Carlo methods for light transport in scattering media

    OpenAIRE

    Jarosz, Wojciech

    2008-01-01

    In this dissertation we focus on developing accurate and efficient Monte Carlo methods for synthesizing images containing general participating media. Participating media such as clouds, smoke, and fog are ubiquitous in the world and are responsible for many important visual phenomena which are of interest to computer graphics as well as related fields. When present, the medium participates in lighting interactions by scattering or absorbing photons as they travel through the scene. Though th...

  17. New Physics Data Libraries for Monte Carlo Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Augelli, M; Kuster, M; Han, M; Kim, C H; Pia, M G; Quintieri, L; Seo, H; Saracco, P; Weidenspointner, G; Zoglauer, A

    2010-01-01

    The role of data libraries as a collaborative tool across Monte Carlo codes is discussed. Some new contributions in this domain are presented; they concern a data library of proton and alpha ionization cross sections, the development in progress of a data library of electron ionization cross sections and proposed improvements to the EADL (Evaluated Atomic Data Library), the latter resulting from an extensive data validation process.

  18. Monte Carlo modelling of positron transport in real world applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the unstable nature of positrons and their short lifetime, it is difficult to obtain high positron particle densities. This is why the Monte Carlo simulation technique, as a swarm method, is very suitable for modelling most of the current positron applications involving gaseous and liquid media. The ongoing work on the measurements of cross-sections for positron interactions with atoms and molecules and swarm calculations for positrons in gasses led to the establishment of good cross-section sets for positron interaction with gasses commonly used in real-world applications. Using the standard Monte Carlo technique and codes that can follow both low- (down to thermal energy) and high- (up to keV) energy particles, we are able to model different systems directly applicable to existing experimental setups and techniques. This paper reviews the results on modelling Surko-type positron buffer gas traps, application of the rotating wall technique and simulation of positron tracks in water vapor as a substitute for human tissue, and pinpoints the challenges in and advantages of applying Monte Carlo simulations to these systems.

  19. Modelling of a general purpose irradiation chamber using a Monte Carlo particle transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full-text: The aim of this research is to stimulate the effectiveness use of a general purpose irradiation chamber to contain pure neutron particles obtained from a research reactor. The secondary neutron and gamma particles dose discharge from the chamber layers will be used as a platform to estimate the safe dimension of the chamber. The chamber, made up of layers of lead (Pb), shielding, polyethylene (PE), moderator and commercial grade aluminium (Al) cladding is proposed for the use of interacting samples with pure neutron particles in a nuclear reactor environment. The estimation was accomplished through simulation based on general Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code using Los Alamos MCNPX software. Simulations were performed on the model of the chamber subjected to high neutron flux radiation and its gamma radiation product. The model of neutron particle used is based on the neutron source found in PUSPATI TRIGA MARK II research reactor which holds a maximum flux value of 1 x 1012 neutron/ cm2s. The expected outcomes of this research are zero gamma dose in the core of the chamber and neutron dose rate of less than 10 μSv/ day discharge from the chamber system. (author)

  20. Radiation hydrodynamics simulations in massive star formation I - Fast and accurate frequency dependent radiation transport

    CERN Document Server

    Kuiper, Rolf; Dullemond, Cornelis; Kley, Wilhelm; Henning, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Context: Radiative feedback plays a crucial role in the formation of massive stars. The implementation of a fast and accurate description of the proceeding thermodynamics in pre-stellar cores and evolving accretion disks is therefore a main effort in current hydrodynamics simulations. Aims: We introduce our newly implemented three-dimensional frequency dependent radiation transport algorithm for hydrodynamics simulations of spatial configurations with a dominant central source. Methods: The module combines the advantage of the speed of an approximate Flux Limited Diffusion (FLD) solver with the high accuracy of a frequency dependent first order ray-tracing routine. Results: We prove the viability of the scheme in a standard radiation benchmark test compared to a full frequency dependent Monte-Carlo based radiative transfer code. The setup includes a central star, a circumstellar flared disk, as well as an envelope. The test is performed for different optical depths. Considering the frequency dependence of the...

  1. An Evaluation of the Adjoint Flux Using the Collision Probability Method for the Hybrid Monte Carlo Radiation Shielding Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is noted that the analog Monte Carlo method has low calculation efficiency at deep penetration problems such as radiation shielding analysis. In order to increase the calculation efficiency, variance reduction techniques have been introduced and applied for the shielding calculation. To optimize the variance reduction technique, the hybrid Monte Carlo method was introduced. For the determination of the parameters using the hybrid Monte Carlo method, the adjoint flux should be calculated by the deterministic methods. In this study, the collision probability method is applied to calculate adjoint flux. The solution of integration transport equation in the collision probability method is modified to calculate the adjoint flux approximately even for complex and arbitrary geometries. For the calculation, C++ program is developed. By using the calculated adjoint flux, importance parameters of each cell in shielding material are determined and used for variance reduction of transport calculation. In order to evaluate calculation efficiency with the proposed method, shielding calculations are performed with MCNPX 2.7. In this study, a method to calculate the adjoint flux in using the Monte Carlo variance reduction was proposed to improve Monte Carlo calculation efficiency of thick shielding problem. The importance parameter for each cell of shielding material is determined by calculating adjoint flux with the modified collision probability method. In order to calculate adjoint flux with the proposed method, C++ program is developed. The results show that the proposed method can efficiently increase the FOM of transport calculation. It is expected that the proposed method can be utilize for the calculation efficiency in thick shielding calculation

  2. Radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of massive star formation using Monte Carlo radiative transfer: I. Algorithms and numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Harries, Tim J

    2015-01-01

    We present a set of new numerical methods that are relevant to calculating radiation pressure terms in hydrodynamics calculations, with a particular focus on massive star formation. The radiation force is determined from a Monte Carlo estimator and enables a complete treatment of the detailed microphysics, including polychromatic radiation and anisotropic scattering, in both the free-streaming and optically-thick limits. Since the new method is computationally demanding we have developed two new methods that speed up the algorithm. The first is a photon packet splitting algorithm that enables efficient treatment of the Monte Carlo process in very optically thick regions. The second is a parallelisation method that distributes the Monte Carlo workload over many instances of the hydrodynamic domain, resulting in excellent scaling of the radiation step. We also describe the implementation of a sink particle method that enables us to follow the accretion onto, and the growth of, the protostars. We detail the resu...

  3. TART 2000: A Coupled Neutron-Photon, 3-D, Combinatorial Geometry, Time Dependent, Monte Carlo Transport Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TART2000 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo radiation transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input Preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART2000 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART2000 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART2000 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART2000 and its data files

  4. TART98 a coupled neutron-photon 3-D, combinatorial geometry time dependent Monte Carlo Transport code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, D E

    1998-11-22

    TART98 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo radiation transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART98 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART98 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART98 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART98 and its data files.

  5. A multigroup treatment of radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multi-group radiation package is outlined which will accurately handle radiation transfer problems in laser-produced plasmas. Bremsstrahlung, recombination and line radiation are included as well as fast electron Bremsstrahlung radiation. The entire radiation field is divided into a large number of groups (typically 20), which diffuse radiation energy in real space as well as in energy space, the latter occurring via electron-radiation interaction. Using this model a radiation transport code will be developed to be incorporated into MEDUSA. This modified version of MEDUSA will be used to study radiative preheat effects in laser-compression experiments at the Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Laboratory. The model is also relevant to heavy ion fusion studies. (author)

  6. A benchmark comparison of Monte Carlo particle transport algorithms for binary stochastic mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We numerically investigate the accuracy of two Monte Carlo algorithms originally proposed by Zimmerman and Zimmerman and Adams for particle transport through binary stochastic mixtures. We assess the accuracy of these algorithms using a standard suite of planar geometry incident angular flux benchmark problems and a new suite of interior source benchmark problems. In addition to comparisons of the ensemble-averaged leakage values, we compare the ensemble-averaged material scalar flux distributions. Both Monte Carlo transport algorithms robustly produce physically realistic scalar flux distributions for the benchmark transport problems examined. The base Monte Carlo algorithm reproduces the standard Levermore-Pomraning model results. The improved Monte Carlo algorithm generally produces significantly more accurate leakage values and also significantly more accurate material scalar flux distributions. We also present deterministic atomic mix solutions of the benchmark problems for comparison with the benchmark and the Monte Carlo solutions. Both Monte Carlo algorithms are generally significantly more accurate than the atomic mix approximation for the benchmark suites examined.

  7. PyMercury: Interactive Python for the Mercury Monte Carlo Particle Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iandola, F N; O' Brien, M J; Procassini, R J

    2010-11-29

    Monte Carlo particle transport applications are often written in low-level languages (C/C++) for optimal performance on clusters and supercomputers. However, this development approach often sacrifices straightforward usability and testing in the interest of fast application performance. To improve usability, some high-performance computing applications employ mixed-language programming with high-level and low-level languages. In this study, we consider the benefits of incorporating an interactive Python interface into a Monte Carlo application. With PyMercury, a new Python extension to the Mercury general-purpose Monte Carlo particle transport code, we improve application usability without diminishing performance. In two case studies, we illustrate how PyMercury improves usability and simplifies testing and validation in a Monte Carlo application. In short, PyMercury demonstrates the value of interactive Python for Monte Carlo particle transport applications. In the future, we expect interactive Python to play an increasingly significant role in Monte Carlo usage and testing.

  8. PyMercury: Interactive Python for the Mercury Monte Carlo Particle Transport Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo particle transport applications are often written in low-level languages (C/C++) for optimal performance on clusters and supercomputers. However, this development approach often sacrifices straightforward usability and testing in the interest of fast application performance. To improve usability, some high-performance computing applications employ mixed-language programming with high-level and low-level languages. In this study, we consider the benefits of incorporating an interactive Python interface into a Monte Carlo application. With PyMercury, a new Python extension to the Mercury general-purpose Monte Carlo particle transport code, we improve application usability without diminishing performance. In two case studies, we illustrate how PyMercury improves usability and simplifies testing and validation in a Monte Carlo application. In short, PyMercury demonstrates the value of interactive Python for Monte Carlo particle transport applications. In the future, we expect interactive Python to play an increasingly significant role in Monte Carlo usage and testing.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of gas-filled radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new simulation code has been developed that allows the response of gas-filled proportional counters to be calculated. The code is an electron transport code that simulates the elastic and inelastic scattering processes that occur as a result of electron-impact collisions with the gas atoms. The simulation concentrates on the avalanche development after the primary ionising particle has freed electrons in the gas volume, by tracking electrons until they reach the anode of the counter. The dynamics of the ions that accumulate in the gas volume are also considered. A major motivation for this work is the general renewed interest in proportional counters over the last decade, since the advent of micro-pattern detectors such as the micro-strip and the micro-gap detector. It is argued that the low relative cost, intrinsic amplification and environmental stability of these detectors gives them considerable advantages over other types of radiation detectors. The code has been benchmarked against experimental data. The manner in which the variation in the avalanche statistics affects the energy resolution properties of the detector is examined for single wire counters, micro-strip and micro-gap counters. The stability of micro-gap detectors when subjected to high rates of irradiation is also examined. It is envisaged that these detectors will be used in the future as part of a multiphase flow tomography device for imaging the flow of oil/water/natural gas mixtures that have been pumped through pipes from the seabed. (author)

  10. Vectorization techniques for neutron transport Monte Carlo codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four Monte Carlo codes, KENO IV, MORSE-DD, MCNP and VIM, have been vectorized already at JAERI Computing Center aiming at an increase in clculation performance, and speed-up ratios of vectorized codes to the original ones were found to be low values between 1.3 and 1.5. In this report the vectorization processes for these four codes are reviewed comprehensively, and methods of analysis for vectorization, modification of control structures of codes and debugging techniques are discussed. The reason for low speed-up ratios is also discussed. (author)

  11. New electron multiple scattering distributions for Monte Carlo transport simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chibani, Omar (Haut Commissariat a la Recherche (C.R.S.), 2 Boulevard Franz Fanon, Alger B.P. 1017, Alger-Gare (Algeria)); Patau, Jean Paul (Laboratoire de Biophysique et Biomathematiques, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques, Universite Paul Sabatier, 35 Chemin des Maraichers, 31062 Toulouse cedex (France))

    1994-10-01

    New forms of electron (positron) multiple scattering distributions are proposed. The first is intended for use in the conditions of validity of the Moliere theory. The second distribution takes place when the electron path is so short that only few elastic collisions occur. These distributions are adjustable formulas. The introduction of some parameters allows impositions of the correct value of the first moment. Only positive and analytic functions were used in constructing the present expressions. This makes sampling procedures easier. Systematic tests are presented and some Monte Carlo simulations, as benchmarks, are carried out. ((orig.))

  12. Applicability of deterministic and Monte Carlo neutron transport models coupled with thermo-fluiddynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seubert, A.; Langenbuch, S.; Velkov, K.; Zwermann, W. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Garching (Germany). Forschungsinstitute

    2007-07-01

    An overview is given of the recent progress at GRS concerning deterministic transport and Monte Carlo methods with thermal-hydraulic feedback. The development of the time-dependent 3D discrete ordinates transport code TORT-TD is described which has also been coupled with ATHLET. TORT-TD/ATHLET allows 3D pin-by-pin coupled analyses of transients using few energy groups and anisotropic scattering. As a step towards Monte Carlo steady-state calculations with nuclear point data and thermal-hydraulic feedback, MCNP has been prepared to incorporate thermal-hydraulic parameters. Results obtained for selected test cases demonstrate the applicability of deterministic and Monte Carlo neutron transport models coupled with thermo-fluiddynamics. (orig.)

  13. Radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of massive star formation using Monte Carlo radiative transfer: I. Algorithms and numerical methods

    OpenAIRE

    Harries, Tim J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a set of new numerical methods that are relevant to calculating radiation pressure terms in hydrodynamics calculations, with a particular focus on massive star formation. The radiation force is determined from a Monte Carlo estimator and enables a complete treatment of the detailed microphysics, including polychromatic radiation and anisotropic scattering, in both the free-streaming and optically-thick limits. Since the new method is computationally demanding we have developed two ...

  14. Memory bottlenecks and memory contention in multi-core Monte Carlo transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The performance of nuclear reactor Monte Carlo transport applications is examined. • A “proxy-application” (XSBench) is presented representing the key kernel. • In-depth performance analyses reveal the algorithm is bottlenecked by bandwidth. • Strategies are discussed to improve scalability on next generation HPC systems. - Abstract: We have extracted a kernel that executes only the most computationally expensive steps of the Monte Carlo particle transport algorithm – the calculation of macroscopic cross sections – in an effort to expose bottlenecks within multi-core, shared memory architectures

  15. Exploring Monte Carlo methods

    CERN Document Server

    Dunn, William L

    2012-01-01

    Exploring Monte Carlo Methods is a basic text that describes the numerical methods that have come to be known as "Monte Carlo." The book treats the subject generically through the first eight chapters and, thus, should be of use to anyone who wants to learn to use Monte Carlo. The next two chapters focus on applications in nuclear engineering, which are illustrative of uses in other fields. Five appendices are included, which provide useful information on probability distributions, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes for radiation transport, and other matters. The famous "Buffon's needle proble

  16. Development of Monte Carlo decay gamma-ray transport calculation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the DT fusion reactor, it is critical concern to evaluate the decay gamma-ray biological dose rates after the reactor shutdown exactly. In order to evaluate the decay gamma-ray biological dose rates exactly, three dimensional Monte Carlo decay gamma-ray transport calculation system have been developed by connecting the three dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code and the induced activity calculation code. The developed calculation system consists of the following four functions. (1) The operational neutron flux distribution is calculated by the three dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code. (2) The induced activities are calculated by the induced activity calculation code. (3) The decay gamma-ray source distribution is obtained from the induced activities. (4) The decay gamma-rays are generated by using the decay gamma-ray source distribution, and the decay gamma-ray transport calculation is conducted by the three dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code. In order to reduce the calculation time drastically, a biasing system for the decay gamma-ray source distribution has been developed, and the function is also included in the present system. In this paper, the outline and the detail of the system, and the execution example are reported. The evaluation for the effect of the biasing system is also reported. (author)

  17. A Monte Carlo Green's function method for three-dimensional neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a Monte Carlo transport kernel capability, which has recently been incorporated into the RACER continuous-energy Monte Carlo code. The kernels represent a Green's function method for neutron transport from a fixed-source volume out to a particular volume of interest. This method is very powerful transport technique. Also, since kernels are evaluated numerically by Monte Carlo, the problem geometry can be arbitrarily complex, yet exact. This method is intended for problems where an ex-core neutron response must be determined for a variety of reactor conditions. Two examples are ex-core neutron detector response and vessel critical weld fast flux. The response is expressed in terms of neutron transport kernels weighted by a core fission source distribution. In these types of calculations, the response must be computed for hundreds of source distributions, but the kernels only need to be calculated once. The advance described in this paper is that the kernels are generated with a highly accurate three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport calculation instead of an approximate method such as line-of-sight attenuation theory or a synthesized three-dimensional discrete ordinates solution

  18. Monte Carlo method for neutron transport calculations in graphics processing units (GPUs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo simulation is well suited for solving the Boltzmann neutron transport equation in an inhomogeneous media for complicated geometries. However, routine applications require the computation time to be reduced to hours and even minutes in a desktop PC. The interest in adopting Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) for Monte Carlo acceleration is rapidly growing. This is due to the massive parallelism provided by the latest GPU technologies which is the most promising solution to the challenge of performing full-size reactor core analysis on a routine basis. In this study, Monte Carlo codes for a fixed-source neutron transport problem were developed for GPU environments in order to evaluate issues associated with computational speedup using GPUs. Results obtained in this work suggest that a speedup of several orders of magnitude is possible using the state-of-the-art GPU technologies. (author)

  19. Monte Carlo shielding comparative analysis applied to TRIGA HEU and LEU spent fuel transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is a comparative study of LEU (low uranium enrichment) and HEU (highly enriched uranium) fuel utilization effects for the shielding analysis during spent fuel transport. A comparison against the measured data for HEU spent fuel, available from the last stage of spent fuel repatriation fulfilled in the summer of 2008, is also presented. All geometrical and material data for the shipping cask were considered according to NAC-LWT Cask approved model. The shielding analysis estimates radiation doses to shipping cask wall surface, and in air at 1 m and 2 m, respectively, from the cask by means of 3-dimensional Monte Carlo MORSE-SGC code. Before loading into the shipping cask TRIGA spent fuel source terms and spent fuel parameters have been obtained by means of ORIGEN-S code. Both codes are included in ORNL's SCALE 5 programs package. 60Co radioactivity is important for HEU spent fuel; actinides contribution to total fuel radioactivity is low. For LEU spent fuel 60Co radioactivity is insignificant; actinides contribution to total fuel radioactivity is high. Dose rates for both HEU and LEU fuel contents are below regulatory limits, LEU spent fuel photon dose rates being greater than the HEU ones. The comparison between HEU spent fuel theoretical and measured dose rates in selected measuring points shows a good agreement, the calculated values being greater than the measured ones both to cask wall surface (about 34% relative difference) and in air at 1 m distance from the cask surface (about 15% relative difference). (authors)

  20. Verification of Monte Carlo transport codes: FLUKA, MARS and SHIELD-A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo transport codes like FLUKA, MARS and SHIELD are widely used for the estimation of radiation hazards in accelerator facilities. Accurate simulations are especially important with increasing energies and intensities of the machines. As the physical models implied in the codes are being constantly further developed, the verification is needed to make sure that the simulations give reasonable results. We report on the verification of electronic stopping modules and the verification of nuclide production modules of the codes. The verification of electronic stopping modules is based on the results of irradiation of stainless steel, copper and aluminum by 500 MeV/u and 950 MeV/u uranium ions. The stopping ranges achieved experimentally are compared with the simulated ones. The verification of isotope production modules is done via comparing the experimental depth profiles of residual activity (aluminum targets were irradiated by 500 MeV/u and 950 MeV/u uranium ions) with the results of simulations. Correspondences and discrepancies between the experiment and the simulations are discussed.

  1. Verification of Monte Carlo transport codes: FLUKA, MARS and SHIELD-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetvertkova, Vera [IAP, J. W. Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Mustafin, Edil; Strasik, Ivan [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Ratzinger, Ulrich [IAP, J. W. Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Latysheva, Ludmila; Sobolevskiy, Nikolai [Institute for Nuclear Research RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-01

    Monte Carlo transport codes like FLUKA, MARS and SHIELD are widely used for the estimation of radiation hazards in accelerator facilities. Accurate simulations are especially important with increasing energies and intensities of the machines. As the physical models implied in the codes are being constantly further developed, the verification is needed to make sure that the simulations give reasonable results. We report on the verification of electronic stopping modules and the verification of nuclide production modules of the codes. The verification of electronic stopping modules is based on the results of irradiation of stainless steel, copper and aluminum by 500 MeV/u and 950 MeV/u uranium ions. The stopping ranges achieved experimentally are compared with the simulated ones. The verification of isotope production modules is done via comparing the experimental depth profiles of residual activity (aluminum targets were irradiated by 500 MeV/u and 950 MeV/u uranium ions) with the results of simulations. Correspondences and discrepancies between the experiment and the simulations are discussed.

  2. Using Nuclear Theory, Data and Uncertainties in Monte Carlo Transport Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rising, Michael Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-03

    These are slides for a presentation on using nuclear theory, data and uncertainties in Monte Carlo transport applications. The following topics are covered: nuclear data (experimental data versus theoretical models, data evaluation and uncertainty quantification), fission multiplicity models (fixed source applications, criticality calculations), uncertainties and their impact (integral quantities, sensitivity analysis, uncertainty propagation).

  3. Monte Carlo particle simulation and finite-element techniques for tandem mirror transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of numerical methods used in the study of axial transport in tandem mirrors owing to Coulomb collisions and rf diffusion. The methods are Monte Carlo particle simulations and direct solution to the Fokker-Planck equations by finite-element expansion. (author)

  4. Application of artificial intelligence techniques to the acceleration of Monte Carlo transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The techniques of learning theory and pattern recognition are used to learn splitting surface locations for the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCN. A study is performed to determine default values for several pattern recognition and learning parameters. The modified MCN code is used to reduce computer cost for several nontrivial example problems

  5. Remarkable moments in the history of neutron transport Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I highlight a few results from the past of the neutron and photon transport Monte Carlo methods which have caused me a great pleasure for their ingenuity and wittiness and which certainly merit to be remembered even when tricky methods are not needed anymore. (orig.)

  6. MCNP, a general Monte Carlo code for neutron and photon transport: a summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general-purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP can be used for neutron, photon, or coupled neutron-photon transport, including the capability to calculate eigenvalues for critical systems. The code treats an arbitrary three-dimensional configuration of materials in geometric cells bounded by first- and second-degree surfaces and some special fourth-degree surfaces

  7. Monte Carlo estimation of radiation doses during paediatric barium meal and cystourethrography examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitriadis, A; Gialousis, G; Karlatira, M; Karaiskos, P; Georgiou, E; Yakoumakis, E [Medical Physics Department, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias Str., Goudi 11527, Athens (Greece); Makri, T; Papaodysseas, S, E-mail: anestisdim@yahoo.com [Radiological Imaging Department, Ag. Sofia Hospital, Lebadias and Thibon, Goudi 11527, Athens (Greece)

    2011-01-21

    Organ doses are important quantities in assessing the radiation risk. In the case of children, estimation of this risk is of particular concern due to their significant radiosensitivity and the greater health detriment. The purpose of this study is to estimate the organ doses to paediatric patients undergoing barium meal and micturating cystourethrography examinations by clinical measurements and Monte Carlo simulation. In clinical measurements, dose-area products (DAPs) were assessed during examination of 50 patients undergoing barium meal and 90 patients undergoing cystourethrography examinations, separated equally within three age categories: namely newborn, 1 year and 5 years old. Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport in male and female mathematical phantoms was applied using the MCNP5 code in order to estimate the equivalent organ doses. Regarding the micturating cystourethrography examinations, the organs receiving considerable amounts of radiation doses were the urinary bladder (1.87, 2.43 and 4.7 mSv, the first, second and third value in the parentheses corresponds to neonatal, 1 year old and 5 year old patients, respectively), the large intestines (1.54, 1.8, 3.1 mSv), the small intestines (1.34, 1.56, 2.78 mSv), the stomach (1.46, 1.02, 2.01 mSv) and the gall bladder (1.46, 1.66, 2.18 mSv), depending upon the age of the child. Organs receiving considerable amounts of radiation during barium meal examinations were the stomach (9.81, 9.92, 11.5 mSv), the gall bladder (3.05, 5.74, 7.15 mSv), the rib bones (9.82, 10.1, 11.1 mSv) and the pancreas (5.8, 5.93, 6.65 mSv), depending upon the age of the child. DAPs to organ/effective doses conversion factors were derived for each age and examination in order to be compared with other studies.

  8. ACCELERATING FUSION REACTOR NEUTRONICS MODELING BY AUTOMATIC COUPLING OF HYBRID MONTE CARLO/DETERMINISTIC TRANSPORT ON CAD GEOMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biondo, Elliott D [ORNL; Ibrahim, Ahmad M [ORNL; Mosher, Scott W [ORNL; Grove, Robert E [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Detailed radiation transport calculations are necessary for many aspects of the design of fusion energy systems (FES) such as ensuring occupational safety, assessing the activation of system components for waste disposal, and maintaining cryogenic temperatures within superconducting magnets. Hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/deterministic techniques are necessary for this analysis because FES are large, heavily shielded, and contain streaming paths that can only be resolved with MC. The tremendous complexity of FES necessitates the use of CAD geometry for design and analysis. Previous ITER analysis has required the translation of CAD geometry to MCNP5 form in order to use the AutomateD VAriaNce reducTion Generator (ADVANTG) for hybrid MC/deterministic transport. In this work, ADVANTG was modified to support CAD geometry, allowing hybrid (MC)/deterministic transport to be done automatically and eliminating the need for this translation step. This was done by adding a new ray tracing routine to ADVANTG for CAD geometries using the Direct Accelerated Geometry Monte Carlo (DAGMC) software library. This new capability is demonstrated with a prompt dose rate calculation for an ITER computational benchmark problem using both the Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) method an the Forward Weighted (FW)-CADIS method. The variance reduction parameters produced by ADVANTG are shown to be the same using CAD geometry and standard MCNP5 geometry. Significant speedups were observed for both neutrons (as high as a factor of 7.1) and photons (as high as a factor of 59.6).

  9. Determination of Linear and Mass Attenuation Coefficients of Building Materials By Monte Carlo Particle Transport Code Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays, radioactive isotopes are used in many different fields, for instance in industry, energy production, archaeology and mainly in medical applications. In addition, bricks and stones, which are used to build these buildings and our homes, have higher natural radiation levels than other building materials such as wood. In this work, the linear and mass attenuation coefficients of different types building materials, needed for the protection of human health against radiation hazards, were investigated with Monte Carlo particle-transport code (MCNP) technique. Simulations were performed in order to obtain these coefficients at photon energies from 80 keV to 1333 keV for clay, perlite and PP. As should be anticipated, the density and photon energy are the main parameters that affect the mass attenuation coefficient

  10. Response matrix Monte Carlo based on a general geometry local calculation for electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Response Matrix Monte Carlo (RMMC) method has been developed for solving electron transport problems. This method was born of the need to have a reliable, computationally efficient transport method for low energy electrons (below a few hundred keV) in all materials. Today, condensed history methods are used which reduce the computation time by modeling the combined effect of many collisions but fail at low energy because of the assumptions required to characterize the electron scattering. Analog Monte Carlo simulations are prohibitively expensive since electrons undergo coulombic scattering with little state change after a collision. The RMMC method attempts to combine the accuracy of an analog Monte Carlo simulation with the speed of the condensed history methods. Like condensed history, the RMMC method uses probability distributions functions (PDFs) to describe the energy and direction of the electron after several collisions. However, unlike the condensed history method the PDFs are based on an analog Monte Carlo simulation over a small region. Condensed history theories require assumptions about the electron scattering to derive the PDFs for direction and energy. Thus the RMMC method samples from PDFs which more accurately represent the electron random walk. Results show good agreement between the RMMC method and analog Monte Carlo. 13 refs., 8 figs

  11. Modelling photon transport in non-uniform media for SPECT with a vectorized Monte Carlo code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M F

    1993-10-01

    A vectorized Monte Carlo code has been developed for modelling photon transport in non-uniform media for single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT). The code is designed to compute photon detection kernels, which are used to build system matrices for simulating SPECT projection data acquisition and for use in matrix-based image reconstruction. Non-uniform attenuating and scattering regions are constructed from simple three-dimensional geometric shapes, in which the density and mass attenuation coefficients are individually specified. On a Stellar GS1000 computer, Monte Carlo simulations are performed between 1.6 and 2.0 times faster when the vector processor is utilized than when computations are performed in scalar mode. Projection data acquired with a clinical SPECT gamma camera for a line source in a non-uniform thorax phantom are well modelled by Monte Carlo simulations. The vectorized Monte Carlo code was used to stimulate a 99Tcm SPECT myocardial perfusion study, and compensations for non-uniform attenuation and the detection of scattered photons improve activity estimation. The speed increase due to vectorization makes Monte Carlo simulation more attractive as a tool for modelling photon transport in non-uniform media for SPECT. PMID:8248288

  12. On the Application of a Hybrid Monte Carlo Technique to Radiation Transfer in the Post-Explosion Phase of Type IA Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollaeger, Ryan; van Rossum, Daniel; Graziani, Carlo; Couch, Sean; Jordan, George; Lamb, Donald; Moses, Gregory

    2013-10-01

    We apply Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) to Nomoto's W7 model of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia). IMC is a stochastic method for solving the nonlinear radiation transport equations. DDMC is a stochastic radiation diffusion method that is generally used to accelerate IMC for Monte Carlo (MC) particle histories in optically thick regions of space. The hybrid IMC-DDMC method has recently been extended to account for multifrequency and velocity effects. SNe Ia are thermonuclear explosions of white dwarf stars that produce characteristic light curves and spectra sourced by radioactive decay of 56Ni. We exhibit the advantages of the hybrid MC approach relative to pure IMC for the W7 model. These results shed light on the viability of IMC-DDMC in more sophisticated, multi-dimensional simulations of SNe Ia. This work was supported in part by the University of Chicago and the National Science Foundation under grant AST-0909132.

  13. Computer codes in nuclear safety, radiation transport and dosimetry; Les codes de calcul en radioprotection, radiophysique et dosimetrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordy, J.M.; Kodeli, I.; Menard, St.; Bouchet, J.L.; Renard, F.; Martin, E.; Blazy, L.; Voros, S.; Bochud, F.; Laedermann, J.P.; Beaugelin, K.; Makovicka, L.; Quiot, A.; Vermeersch, F.; Roche, H.; Perrin, M.C.; Laye, F.; Bardies, M.; Struelens, L.; Vanhavere, F.; Gschwind, R.; Fernandez, F.; Quesne, B.; Fritsch, P.; Lamart, St.; Crovisier, Ph.; Leservot, A.; Antoni, R.; Huet, Ch.; Thiam, Ch.; Donadille, L.; Monfort, M.; Diop, Ch.; Ricard, M

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this conference was to describe the present state of computer codes dedicated to radiation transport or radiation source assessment or dosimetry. The presentations have been parted into 2 sessions: 1) methodology and 2) uses in industrial or medical or research domains. It appears that 2 different calculation strategies are prevailing, both are based on preliminary Monte-Carlo calculations with data storage. First, quick simulations made from a database of particle histories built though a previous Monte-Carlo simulation and secondly, a neuronal approach involving a learning platform generated through a previous Monte-Carlo simulation. This document gathers the slides of the presentations.

  14. MC++: A parallel, portable, Monte Carlo neutron transport code in C++

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MC++ is an implicit multi-group Monte Carlo neutron transport code written in C++ and based on the Parallel Object-Oriented Methods and Applications (POOMA) class library. MC++ runs in parallel on and is portable to a wide variety of platforms, including MPPs, SMPs, and clusters of UNIX workstations. MC++ is being developed to provide transport capabilities to the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). It is also intended to form the basis of the first transport physics framework (TPF), which is a C++ class library containing appropriate abstractions, objects, and methods for the particle transport problem. The transport problem is briefly described, as well as the current status and algorithms in MC++ for solving the transport equation. The alpha version of the POOMA class library is also discussed, along with the implementation of the transport solution algorithms using POOMA. Finally, a simple test problem is defined and performance and physics results from this problem are discussed on a variety of platforms

  15. Parallel thermal radiation transport in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the distributed memory parallel implementation of a deterministic thermal radiation transport algorithm in a 2-dimensional ALE hydrodynamics code. The parallel algorithm consists of a variety of components which are combined in order to produce a state of the art computational capability, capable of solving large thermal radiation transport problems using Blue-Oak, the 3 Tera-Flop MPP (massive parallel processors) computing facility at AWE (United Kingdom). Particular aspects of the parallel algorithm are described together with examples of the performance on some challenging applications. (author)

  16. Monte Carlo calculation of the radiation field at aircraft altitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy spectra of secondary cosmic rays are calculated for aircraft altitudes and a discrete set of solar modulation parameters and rigidity cut-off values covering all possible conditions. The calculations are based on the Monte Carlo code FLUKA and on the most recent information on the interstellar cosmic ray flux including a detailed model of solar modulation. Results are compared to a large variety of experimental data obtained on the ground and aboard aircraft and balloons, such as neutron, proton, and muon spectra and yields of charged particles. Furthermore, particle fluence is converted into ambient dose equivalent and effective dose and the dependence of these quantities on height above sea level, solar modulation, and geographical location is studied. Finally, calculated dose equivalent is compared to results of comprehensive measurements performed aboard aircraft. (author)

  17. Ionizing radiation affects active ileal electrolyte transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to ionizing radiation has pronounced effects on gastrointestinal physiology eliciting the fluid and electrolyte loss of the gastrointestinal syndrome. This study reports on the effect of whole-body cobalt-60 exposure on active electrolyte transport by rabbit ileum in an effort to quantify these changes and to define the mechanism by which electrolyte transport is altered. The short-circuit current (lsc), a measure of active electrolyte transport, was determined for ileal segments isolated from rabbits radiated with 5 to 100 Gy and compared to those from sham irradiated control 1 to 96 hours after exposure. One hour after exposure there was no apparent effect of radiation. However by 24 hours, there was a significant increase in lsc of segments from animals exposed to doses of 7.5 Gy and greater. The lsc remained elevated during the 96 hours for 10 and 12 Gy whereas at 7.5 Gy it returned to control values by 72 hours. The response of the tissue to a secretagogue, theophylline, was reduced 72 hours post-irradiation. By 96 hours after exposure, the response to an actively transported amino acid, alanine, was also reduced. These results indicate that radiation-induced fluid and electrolyte loss is not simply a consequence of denudiation of the intestine but due in part to alterations in cellular transport processes

  18. ITS version 5.0 : the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Brian Claude; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Laub, Thomas William

    2004-06-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state of the art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent couple electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 5.0, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 3.0 continuous-energy codes, (2)multigroup codes with adjoint transport capabilities, and (3) parallel implementations of all ITS codes. Moreover the general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through increased internal error checking and improved code portability.

  19. ITS version 5.0 : the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state of the art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent couple electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 5.0, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 3.0 continuous-energy codes, (2)multigroup codes with adjoint transport capabilities, and (3) parallel implementations of all ITS codes. Moreover the general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through increased internal error checking and improved code portability

  20. Parallelization of MCATNP MONTE CARLO particle transport code by using MPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte Carlo code for simulating Atmospheric Transport of Neutrons and Photons (MCATNP) is used to simulate the ionization effects caused by high altitude nuclear detonation (HAND) and it was parallelized in MPI by adopting the leap random number producer and modifying the original serial code. The parallel results and serial results are identical. The speedup increases almost linearly with the number of processors used. The parallel efficiency is up to to 97% while 16 processors are used, and 94% while 32 are used. The experimental results show that parallelization can obviously reduce the calculation time of Monte Carlo simulation of HAND ionization effects. (authors)

  1. The application of Monte Carlo method to electron and photon beams transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of a Monte Carlo method to study a transport in matter of electron and photon beams is presented, especially for electrons with energies up to 18 MeV. The SHOWME Monte Carlo code, a modified version of GEANT3 code, was used on the CONVEX C3210 computer at Swierk. It was assumed that an electron beam is mono directional and monoenergetic. Arbitrary user-defined, complex geometries made of any element or material can be used in calculation. All principal phenomena occurring when electron beam penetrates the matter are taken into account. The use of calculation for a therapeutic electron beam collimation is presented. (author). 20 refs, 29 figs

  2. Evaluation of dose equivalent rate distribution in JCO critical accident by radiation transport calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Y

    2002-01-01

    In the prevention of nuclear disaster, there needs the information on the dose equivalent rate distribution inside and outside the site, and energy spectra. The three dimensional radiation transport calculation code is a useful tool for the site specific detailed analysis with the consideration of facility structures. It is important in the prediction of individual doses in the future countermeasure that the reliability of the evaluation methods of dose equivalent rate distribution and energy spectra by using of Monte Carlo radiation transport calculation code, and the factors which influence the dose equivalent rate distribution outside the site are confirmed. The reliability of radiation transport calculation code and the influence factors of dose equivalent rate distribution were examined through the analyses of critical accident at JCO's uranium processing plant occurred on September 30, 1999. The radiation transport calculations including the burn-up calculations were done by using of the structural info...

  3. Radiative corrections and Monte Carlo generators for physics at flavor factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montagna Guido

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available I review the state of the art of precision calculations and related Monte Carlo generators used in physics at flavor factories. The review describes the tools relevant for the measurement of the hadron production cross section (via radiative return, energy scan and in γγ scattering, luminosity monitoring, searches for new physics and physics of the τ lepton.

  4. Monte Carlo Application ToolKit (MCATK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Component-based Monte Carlo radiation transport parallel software library. • Designed to build specialized software applications. • Provides new functionality for existing general purpose Monte Carlo transport codes. • Time-independent and time-dependent algorithms with population control. • Algorithm verification and validation results are provided. - Abstract: The Monte Carlo Application ToolKit (MCATK) is a component-based software library designed to build specialized applications and to provide new functionality for existing general purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport codes. We will describe MCATK and its capabilities along with presenting some verification and validations results

  5. SPHERE: a spherical-geometry multimaterial electron/photon Monte Carlo transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SPHERE provides experimenters and theorists with a method for the routine solution of coupled electron/photon transport through multimaterial configurations possessing spherical symmetry. Emphasis is placed upon operational simplicity without sacrificing the rigor of the model. SPHERE combines condensed-history electron Monte Carlo with conventional single-scattering photon Monte Carlo in order to describe the transport of all generations of particles from several MeV down to 1.0 and 10.0 keV for electrons and photons, respectively. The model is more accurate at the higher energies, with a less rigorous description of the particle cascade at energies where the shell structure of the transport media becomes important. Flexibility of construction permits the user to tailor the model to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the model to more sophisticated applications through relatively simple update procedures. 8 figs., 3 tables

  6. Local dose enhancement in radiation therapy: Monte Carlo simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of nanotechnology has boosted the use of nanoparticles in radiation therapy in order to achieve greater therapeutic ratio between tumor and healthy tissues. Gold has been shown to be most suitable to this task due to the high biocompatibility and high atomic number, which contributes to a better in vivo distribution and for the local energy deposition. As a result, this study proposes to study, nanoparticle in the tumor cell. At a range of 11 nm from the nanoparticle surface, results have shown an absorbed dose 141 times higher for the medium with the gold nanoparticle compared to the water for an incident energy spectrum with maximum photon energy of 50 keV. It was also noted that when only scattered radiation is interacting with the gold nanoparticles, the dose was 134 times higher compared to enhanced local dose that remained significant even for scattered radiation. (author)

  7. Finite element radiation transport in one dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new physics package solves radiation transport equations in one space dimension, multiple energy groups and directions. A discontinuous finite element method discretizes radiation intensity with respect to space and angle, and a continuous finite element method discretizes electron temperature 'in space. A splitting method solves the resulting linear equations. This is a one-dimensional analog of Kershaw and Harte's two-dimensional package. This package has been installed in a two-dimensional inertial confinement fusion code, and has given excellent results for both thermal waves and highly directional radiation. In contrast, the traditional discrete ordinate and spherical harmonic methods show less accurate results in both cases

  8. Radiative heat transport instability in ICF plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozmus, W.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation losses and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic wave instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability. This instability develops in the wide range of angles and wavenumbers with the typical growth rate on the order of cs/LT (cs is the sound speed, LT is the temperature scale length). In addition to radiation dominated systems, a similar thermal transport driven ion acoustic instability was found before in plasmas where the thermal transport coefficient depends on electron density. However, under conditions of indirect drive ICF experiments the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered corresponding to a thermal conductivity coefficient that is inversely proportional to the square of local particle density. In the nonlinear regime this instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation.

  9. High-resolution Monte Carlo simulation of flow and conservative transport in heterogeneous porous media 2. Transport results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naff, R.L.; Haley, D.F.; Sudicky, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    In this, the second of two papers concerned with the use of numerical simulation to examine flow and transport parameters in heterogeneous porous media via Monte Carlo methods, results from the transport aspect of these simulations are reported on. Transport simulations contained herein assume a finite pulse input of conservative tracer, and the numerical technique endeavors to realistically simulate tracer spreading as the cloud moves through a heterogeneous medium. Medium heterogeneity is limited to the hydraulic conductivity field, and generation of this field assumes that the hydraulic- conductivity process is second-order stationary. Methods of estimating cloud moments, and the interpretation of these moments, are discussed. Techniques for estimation of large-time macrodispersivities from cloud second-moment data, and for the approximation of the standard errors associated with these macrodispersivities, are also presented. These moment and macrodispersivity estimation techniques were applied to tracer clouds resulting from transport scenarios generated by specific Monte Carlo simulations. Where feasible, moments and macrodispersivities resulting from the Monte Carlo simulations are compared with first- and second-order perturbation analyses. Some limited results concerning the possible ergodic nature of these simulations, and the presence of non- Gaussian behavior of the mean cloud, are reported on as well.

  10. AIRTRANS, Time-Dependent, Energy Dependent 3-D Neutron Transport, Gamma Transport in Air by Monte-Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: The function of the AIRTRANS system is to calculate by Monte Carlo methods the radiation field produced by neutron and/or gamma-ray sources which are located in the atmosphere. The radiation field is expressed as the time - and energy-dependent flux at a maximum of 50 point detectors in the atmosphere. The system calculates un-collided fluxes analytically and collided fluxes by the 'once-more collided' flux-at-a-point technique. Energy-dependent response functions can be applied to the fluxes to obtain desired flux functionals, such as doses, at the detector point. AIRTRANS also can be employed to generate sources of secondary gamma radiation. 2 - Method of solution - Neutron interactions treated in the calculational scheme include elastic (isotropic and anisotropic) scattering, inelastic (discrete level and continuum) scattering, and absorption. Charged particle reactions, e.g, (n,p) are treated as absorptions. A built-in kernel option can be employed to take neutrons from the 150 keV to thermal energy, thus eliminating the need for particle tracking in this energy range. Another option used in conjunction with the neutron transport problem creates an 'interaction tape' which describes all the collision events that can lead to the production of secondary gamma-rays. This interaction tape subsequently can be used to generate a source of secondary gamma rays. The gamma-ray interactions considered include Compton scattering, pair production, and the photoelectric effect; the latter two processes are treated as absorption events. Incorporated in the system is an option to use a simple importance sampling technique for detectors that are many mean free paths from the source. In essence, particles which fly far from the source are split into fragments, the degree of fragmentation being proportional to the penetration distance from the source. Each fragment is tracked separately, thus increasing the percentage of computer time spent

  11. Data decomposition of Monte Carlo particle transport simulations via tally servers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An algorithm for decomposing large tally data in Monte Carlo particle transport simulations is developed, analyzed, and implemented in a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, OpenMC. The algorithm is based on a non-overlapping decomposition of compute nodes into tracking processors and tally servers. The former are used to simulate the movement of particles through the domain while the latter continuously receive and update tally data. A performance model for this approach is developed, suggesting that, for a range of parameters relevant to LWR analysis, the tally server algorithm should perform with minimal overhead on contemporary supercomputers. An implementation of the algorithm in OpenMC is then tested on the Intrepid and Titan supercomputers, supporting the key predictions of the model over a wide range of parameters. We thus conclude that the tally server algorithm is a successful approach to circumventing classical on-node memory constraints en route to unprecedentedly detailed Monte Carlo reactor simulations

  12. Electron transport in radiotherapy using local-to-global Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Local-to-Global (L-G) Monte Carlo methods are a way to make three-dimensional electron transport both fast and accurate relative to other Monte Carlo methods. This is achieved by breaking the simulation into two stages: a local calculation done over small geometries having the size and shape of the ''steps'' to be taken through the mesh; and a global calculation which relies on a stepping code that samples the stored results of the local calculation. The increase in speed results from taking fewer steps in the global calculation than required by ordinary Monte Carlo codes and by speeding up the calculation per step. The potential for accuracy comes from the ability to use long runs of detailed codes to compile probability distribution functions (PDFs) in the local calculation. Specific examples of successful Local-to-Global algorithms are given

  13. Trade and transport of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The guide specifies the obligations pertaining to the trade in and transport of radiation sources and other matters to be taken into account in safety supervision. It also specifies obligations and procedures relating to transfrontier movements of radioactive waste contained in the EU Council Directive 92/3/Euratom. (7 refs.)

  14. Investigation of radiation effects in Hiroshima and Nagasaki using a general Monte Carlo-discrete ordinates coupling scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general adjoint Monte Carlo-forward discrete ordinates radiation transport calculational scheme has been created to study the effects of the radiation environment in Hiroshima and Nagasaki due to the bombing of these two cities. Various such studies for comparison with physical data have progressed since the end of World War II with advancements in computing machinery and computational methods. These efforts have intensified in the last several years with the U.S.-Japan joint reassessment of nuclear weapons dosimetry in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Three principal areas of investigation are: (1) to determine by experiment and calculation the neutron and gamma-ray energy and angular spectra and total yield of the two weapons; (2) using these weapons descriptions as source terms, to compute radiation effects at several locations in the two cities for comparison with experimental data collected at various times after the bombings and thus validate the source terms; and (3) to compute radiation fields at the known locations of fatalities and surviving individuals at the time of the bombings and thus establish an absolute cause-and-effect relationship between the radiation received and the resulting injuries to these individuals and any of their descendants as indicated by their medical records. It is in connection with the second and third items, the determination of the radiation effects and the dose received by individuals, that the current study is concerned

  15. BOT3P: a mesh generation software package for transport analysis with deterministic and Monte Carlo codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOT3P consists of a set of standard Fortran 77 language programs that gives the users of the deterministic transport codes DORT, TORT, TWODANT, THREEDANT, PARTISN and the sensitivity code SUSD3D some useful diagnostic tools to prepare and check the geometry of their input data files for both Cartesian and cylindrical geometries, including graphical display modules. Users can produce the geometrical and material distribution data for all the cited codes for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional applications and, only in 3-dimensional Cartesian geometry, for the Monte Carlo Transport Code MCNP, starting from the same BOT3P input. Moreover, BOT3P stores the fine mesh arrays and the material zone map in a binary file, the content of which can be easily interfaced to any deterministic and Monte Carlo transport code. This makes it possible to compare directly for the same geometry the effects stemming from the use of different data libraries and solution approaches on transport analysis results. BOT3P Version 5.0 lets users optionally and with the desired precision compute the area/volume error of material zones with respect to the theoretical values, if any, because of the stair-cased representation of the geometry, and automatically update material densities on the whole zone domains to conserve masses. A local (per mesh) density correction approach is also available. BOT3P is designed to run on Linux/UNIX platforms and is publicly available from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA)/Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank. Through the use of BOT3P, radiation transport problems with complex 3-dimensional geometrical structures can be modelled easily, as a relatively small amount of engineer-time is required and refinement is achieved by changing few parameters. This tool is useful for solving very large challenging problems, as successfully demonstrated not only in some complex neutron shielding and criticality benchmarks but also in a power

  16. Radiation transport calculations for Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods and data used to calculate the Hiroshima and Nagasaki prompt and delayed radiation fluences for the DS02 study represent a considerable improvement over the methods and data used for the DS86 study. During the intervening sixteen years, enhancements were made in the radiation transport codes and the nuclear data that are used to describe the migration of the neutrons and gamma rays from the bomb location through the intervening air and into, out of and off the surface of the ground. Increased computational capability permits better descriptions of the weapon source spectra and their extension to higher neutron and photon energies. The weapon leakage spectra were generated in the same neutron and gamma-ray energy structures that were used in the transport calculations. No interpolation or fitting of the leakage spectra was necessary, assuring consistent and accurate representations of the data were used in the transport calculations. (J.P.N.)

  17. Deterministic and Monte Carlo transport models with thermal-hydraulic feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seubert, A.; Langenbuch, S.; Velkov, K.; Zwermann, W. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Garching (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    This paper gives an overview of recent developments concerning deterministic transport and Monte Carlo methods with thermal-hydraulic feedback. The timedependent 3D discrete ordinates transport code TORT-TD allows pin-by-pin analyses of transients using few energy groups and anisotropic scattering by solving the timedependent transport equation using the unconditionally stable implicit method. To account for thermal-hydraulic feedback, TORT-TD has been coupled with the system code ATHLET. Applications to, e.g., a control rod ejection in a 2 x 2 PWR fuel assembly arrangement demonstrate the applicability of the coupled code TORT-TD/ATHLET for test cases. For Monte Carlo steady-state calculations with nuclear point data and thermalhydraulic feedback, MCNP has been prepared to incorporate thermal-hydraulic parameters. As test case has been chosen the uncontrolled steady state of the 2 x 2 PWR fuel assembly arrangement for which the thermal-hydraulic parameter distribution has been obtained from a preceding coupled TORT-TD/ATHLET analysis. The result demonstrates the applicability of MCNP to problems with spatial distributions of thermal-fluiddynamic parameters. The comparison with MCNP results confirms that the accuracy of deterministic transport calculations with pin-wise homogenised few-group cross sections is comparable to Monte Carlo simulations. The presented cases are considered as a pre-stage of performing calculations of larger configurations like a quarter core which is in preparation. (orig.)

  18. Deterministic and Monte Carlo transport models with thermal-hydraulic feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives an overview of recent developments concerning deterministic transport and Monte Carlo methods with thermal-hydraulic feedback. The timedependent 3D discrete ordinates transport code TORT-TD allows pin-by-pin analyses of transients using few energy groups and anisotropic scattering by solving the timedependent transport equation using the unconditionally stable implicit method. To account for thermal-hydraulic feedback, TORT-TD has been coupled with the system code ATHLET. Applications to, e.g., a control rod ejection in a 2 x 2 PWR fuel assembly arrangement demonstrate the applicability of the coupled code TORT-TD/ATHLET for test cases. For Monte Carlo steady-state calculations with nuclear point data and thermalhydraulic feedback, MCNP has been prepared to incorporate thermal-hydraulic parameters. As test case has been chosen the uncontrolled steady state of the 2 x 2 PWR fuel assembly arrangement for which the thermal-hydraulic parameter distribution has been obtained from a preceding coupled TORT-TD/ATHLET analysis. The result demonstrates the applicability of MCNP to problems with spatial distributions of thermal-fluiddynamic parameters. The comparison with MCNP results confirms that the accuracy of deterministic transport calculations with pin-wise homogenised few-group cross sections is comparable to Monte Carlo simulations. The presented cases are considered as a pre-stage of performing calculations of larger configurations like a quarter core which is in preparation. (orig.)

  19. Monte Carlo neutron transport simulation of the Ghana Research Reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stochastic Monte Carlo neutron particle transport methods have been applied to successfully model in 3-D, the HEU-fueled Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1), a commercial version of the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) using the MCNP version 4c3 particle transport code. The preliminary multigroup neutronic criticality calculations yielded a keff is contained in 1.00449 with a corresponding cold clean excess reactivity of 4.47mk (447pcm) compared with experimental values of keff is contained in 1.00402 and excess reactivity of 4.00mk (400pcm). The Monte Carlo simulations also show comparable results in the neutron fluxes in the HEU core and some regions of interest. The observed trends in the radial and axial flux distributions in the core, beryllium annular reflector and the water region in the top shim reflector tray were reproduced, indicating consistency of the results, accuracy of the model, precision of the MCNP transport code and the comparability of the Monte Carlo simulations. The results further illustrate the close agreement between stochastic transport theory and the experimental measurements conducted during off-site zero power cold tests. (author)

  20. Application of Photon Transport Monte Carlo Module with GPU-based Parallel System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang Je [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shon, Heejeong [Golden Eng. Co. LTD, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Donghak [CoCo Link Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In general, it takes lots of computing time to get reliable results in Monte Carlo simulations especially in deep penetration problems with a thick shielding medium. To mitigate such a weakness of Monte Carlo methods, lots of variance reduction algorithms are proposed including geometry splitting and Russian roulette, weight windows, exponential transform, and forced collision, etc. Simultaneously, advanced computing hardware systems such as GPU(Graphics Processing Units)-based parallel machines are used to get a better performance of the Monte Carlo simulation. The GPU is much easier to access and to manage when comparing a CPU cluster system. It also becomes less expensive these days due to enhanced computer technology. There, lots of engineering areas adapt GPU-bases massive parallel computation technique. based photon transport Monte Carlo method. It provides almost 30 times speedup without any optimization and it is expected almost 200 times with fully supported GPU system. It is expected that GPU system with advanced parallelization algorithm will contribute successfully for development of the Monte Carlo module which requires quick and accurate simulations.

  1. Application of Photon Transport Monte Carlo Module with GPU-based Parallel System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In general, it takes lots of computing time to get reliable results in Monte Carlo simulations especially in deep penetration problems with a thick shielding medium. To mitigate such a weakness of Monte Carlo methods, lots of variance reduction algorithms are proposed including geometry splitting and Russian roulette, weight windows, exponential transform, and forced collision, etc. Simultaneously, advanced computing hardware systems such as GPU(Graphics Processing Units)-based parallel machines are used to get a better performance of the Monte Carlo simulation. The GPU is much easier to access and to manage when comparing a CPU cluster system. It also becomes less expensive these days due to enhanced computer technology. There, lots of engineering areas adapt GPU-bases massive parallel computation technique. based photon transport Monte Carlo method. It provides almost 30 times speedup without any optimization and it is expected almost 200 times with fully supported GPU system. It is expected that GPU system with advanced parallelization algorithm will contribute successfully for development of the Monte Carlo module which requires quick and accurate simulations

  2. A ''local'' exponential transform method for global variance reduction in Monte Carlo transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous variance reduction techniques, such as splitting/Russian roulette, weight windows, and the exponential transform exist for improving the efficiency of Monte Carlo transport calculations. Typically, however, these methods, while reducing the variance in the problem area of interest tend to increase the variance in other, presumably less important, regions. As such, these methods tend to be not as effective in Monte Carlo calculations which require the minimization of the variance everywhere. Recently, ''Local'' Exponential Transform (LET) methods have been developed as a means of approximating the zero-variance solution. A numerical solution to the adjoint diffusion equation is used, along with an exponential representation of the adjoint flux in each cell, to determine ''local'' biasing parameters. These parameters are then used to bias the forward Monte Carlo transport calculation in a manner similar to the conventional exponential transform, but such that the transform parameters are now local in space and energy, not global. Results have shown that the Local Exponential Transform often offers a significant improvement over conventional geometry splitting/Russian roulette with weight windows. Since the biasing parameters for the Local Exponential Transform were determined from a low-order solution to the adjoint transport problem, the LET has been applied in problems where it was desirable to minimize the variance in a detector region. The purpose of this paper is to show that by basing the LET method upon a low-order solution to the forward transport problem, one can instead obtain biasing parameters which will minimize the maximum variance in a Monte Carlo transport calculation

  3. Stationary neutrino radiation transport by maximum entropy closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors obtain the angular distributions that maximize the entropy functional for Maxwell-Boltzmann (classical), Bose-Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac radiation. In the low and high occupancy limits, the maximum entropy closure is bounded by previously known variable Eddington factors that depend only on the flux. For intermediate occupancy, the maximum entropy closure depends on both the occupation density and the flux. The Fermi-Dirac maximum entropy variable Eddington factor shows a scale invariance, which leads to a simple, exact analytic closure for fermions. This two-dimensional variable Eddington factor gives results that agree well with exact (Monte Carlo) neutrino transport calculations out of a collapse residue during early phases of hydrostatic neutron star formation

  4. Ant colony algorithm implementation in electron and photon Monte Carlo transport: Application to the commissioning of radiosurgery photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Pareja, S.; Galan, P.; Manzano, F.; Brualla, L.; Lallena, A. M. [Servicio de Radiofisica Hospitalaria, Hospital Regional Universitario ' ' Carlos Haya' ' , Avda. Carlos Haya s/n, E-29010 Malaga (Spain); Unidad de Radiofisica Hospitalaria, Hospital Xanit Internacional, Avda. de los Argonautas s/n, E-29630 Benalmadena (Malaga) (Spain); NCTeam, Strahlenklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, D-45122 Essen (Germany); Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors describe an approach which has been developed to drive the application of different variance-reduction techniques to the Monte Carlo simulation of photon and electron transport in clinical accelerators. Methods: The new approach considers the following techniques: Russian roulette, splitting, a modified version of the directional bremsstrahlung splitting, and the azimuthal particle redistribution. Their application is controlled by an ant colony algorithm based on an importance map. Results: The procedure has been applied to radiosurgery beams. Specifically, the authors have calculated depth-dose profiles, off-axis ratios, and output factors, quantities usually considered in the commissioning of these beams. The agreement between Monte Carlo results and the corresponding measurements is within {approx}3%/0.3 mm for the central axis percentage depth dose and the dose profiles. The importance map generated in the calculation can be used to discuss simulation details in the different parts of the geometry in a simple way. The simulation CPU times are comparable to those needed within other approaches common in this field. Conclusions: The new approach is competitive with those previously used in this kind of problems (PSF generation or source models) and has some practical advantages that make it to be a good tool to simulate the radiation transport in problems where the quantities of interest are difficult to obtain because of low statistics.

  5. Ant colony algorithm implementation in electron and photon Monte Carlo transport: Application to the commissioning of radiosurgery photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In this work, the authors describe an approach which has been developed to drive the application of different variance-reduction techniques to the Monte Carlo simulation of photon and electron transport in clinical accelerators. Methods: The new approach considers the following techniques: Russian roulette, splitting, a modified version of the directional bremsstrahlung splitting, and the azimuthal particle redistribution. Their application is controlled by an ant colony algorithm based on an importance map. Results: The procedure has been applied to radiosurgery beams. Specifically, the authors have calculated depth-dose profiles, off-axis ratios, and output factors, quantities usually considered in the commissioning of these beams. The agreement between Monte Carlo results and the corresponding measurements is within ∼3%/0.3 mm for the central axis percentage depth dose and the dose profiles. The importance map generated in the calculation can be used to discuss simulation details in the different parts of the geometry in a simple way. The simulation CPU times are comparable to those needed within other approaches common in this field. Conclusions: The new approach is competitive with those previously used in this kind of problems (PSF generation or source models) and has some practical advantages that make it to be a good tool to simulate the radiation transport in problems where the quantities of interest are difficult to obtain because of low statistics.

  6. MCVIEW: a radiation view factor computer program for three dimensional geometries using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Computer program MCVIEW calculates the radiation view factor between surfaces for three dimensional geometries. MCVIEW was developed to calculate view factors for input data to heat transfer analysis programs TRUMP, HEATING-5, HEATING-6 and so on. In the paper, brief illustration of calculation method using Monte Carlo for view factor is presented. The second section presents comparisons between view factors of other methods such as area integration, line integration and cross string and Monte Carlo methods, concerning with calculation error and computer execution time. The third section provides a user's input guide for MCVIEW. (author)

  7. Polarization imaging of multiply-scattered radiation based on integral-vector Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new integral-vector Monte Carlo method (IVMCM) is developed to analyze the transfer of polarized radiation in 3D multiple scattering particle-laden media. The method is based on a 'successive order of scattering series' expression of the integral formulation of the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE) for application of efficient statistical tools to improve convergence of Monte Carlo calculations of integrals. After validation against reference results in plane-parallel layer backscattering configurations, the model is applied to a cubic container filled with uniformly distributed monodispersed particles and irradiated by a monochromatic narrow collimated beam. 2D lateral images of effective Mueller matrix elements are calculated in the case of spherical and fractal aggregate particles. Detailed analysis of multiple scattering regimes, which are very similar for unpolarized radiation transfer, allows identifying the sensitivity of polarization imaging to size and morphology.

  8. EGS-Ray, a program for the visualization of Monte-Carlo calculations in the radiation physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Windows program is introduced which allows a relatively easy and interactive access to Monte Carlo techniques in clinical radiation physics. Furthermore, this serves as a visualization tool of the methodology and the results of Monte Carlo simulations. The program requires only little effort to formulate and calculate a Monte Carlo problem. The Monte Carlo module of the program is based on the well-known EGS4/PRESTA code. The didactic features of the program are presented using several examples common to the routine of the clinical radiation physicist. (orig.)

  9. A New Monte Carlo Photon Transport Code for Research Reactor Hotcell Shielding Calculation using Splitting and Russian Roulette Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo method was used to build a new code for the simulation of particle transport. Several calculations were done after that for verification, where different sources were used, the source term was obtained using the ORIGEN-S code. Water and lead shield were used with spherical geometry, and the tally results were obtained on the external surface of the shield, afterward the results were compared with the results of MCNPX for verification of the new code. The variance reduction techniques of splitting and Russian Roulette were implemented in the code to be more efficient, by reducing the amount of custom programming required, by artificially increasing the particles being tallied with decreasing the weight. The code shows lower results than the results of MCNPX, this can be interpreted by the effect of the secondary gamma radiation that can be produced by the electron, which is ejected by the primary radiation. In the future a more study will be made on the effect of the electron production and transport, either by a real transport of the electron or by simply using an approximation such the thick target bremsstahlung(TTB) option which is used in MCNPX

  10. A New Monte Carlo Photon Transport Code for Research Reactor Hotcell Shielding Calculation using Splitting and Russian Roulette Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alnajjar, Alaaddin [Univ. of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang Je; Lee, Byunchul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The Monte Carlo method was used to build a new code for the simulation of particle transport. Several calculations were done after that for verification, where different sources were used, the source term was obtained using the ORIGEN-S code. Water and lead shield were used with spherical geometry, and the tally results were obtained on the external surface of the shield, afterward the results were compared with the results of MCNPX for verification of the new code. The variance reduction techniques of splitting and Russian Roulette were implemented in the code to be more efficient, by reducing the amount of custom programming required, by artificially increasing the particles being tallied with decreasing the weight. The code shows lower results than the results of MCNPX, this can be interpreted by the effect of the secondary gamma radiation that can be produced by the electron, which is ejected by the primary radiation. In the future a more study will be made on the effect of the electron production and transport, either by a real transport of the electron or by simply using an approximation such the thick target bremsstahlung(TTB) option which is used in MCNPX.

  11. MCNP: a general Monte Carlo code for neutron and photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general-purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP can be used for neutron, photon, or coupled neutron--photon transport. The code treats an arbitrary three-dimensional configuration of materials in geometric cells bounded by first- and second-degree surfaces and some special fourth-degree surfaces (elliptical tori). Pointwise cross-section data are used. For neutrons, all reactions given in a particular cross-section evaluation (such as ENDF/B-IV) are accounted for. For photons, the code takes account of incoherent and coherent scattering, the possibility of fluorescent emission following photoelectric absorption, and absorption in pair production with local emission of annihilation radiation. Standard optional variance reduction schemes include geometry splitting and Russian roulette, the exponential transformation, energy splitting, forced collisions in designated cells, flux estimates at point detectors, track-length estimators, and source biasing. The standard output of MCNP includes two-way current as a function of energy, time, and angle with the normal, across any subset of bounding surfaces in the problem. Fluxes across any set of bounding surfaces are available as a function of time and energy. Similarly, the flux at designated points and the average flux in a cell (track length per unit volume) are standard tallies. Reactions such as fissions or absorptions may be obtained in a subset of geometric cells. The heating tallies give the energy deposition per starting particle. In addition, particles may be flagged when they cross specified surfaces or enter designated cells, and the contributions of these flagged particles to certain of the tallies are listed separately. All quantities printed out have their relative errors listed also. 11 figures, 27 tables

  12. Monte Carlo shielding comparative analysis applied to TRIGA HEU and LEU spent fuel transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margeanu, C. A.; Iorgulis, C. [Reactor Physics, Nuclear Fuel Performances and Nuclear Safety Department, Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, P.O Box 78, Pitesti (Romania); Margeanu, S. [Radiation Protection Department, Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, Pitesti (Romania); Barbos, D. [TRIGA Research Reactor Department, Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, Pitesti (Romania)

    2009-07-01

    The paper is a comparative study of LEU (low uranium enrichment) and HEU (highly enriched uranium) fuel utilization effects for the shielding analysis during spent fuel transport. A comparison against the measured data for HEU spent fuel, available from the last stage of spent fuel repatriation fulfilled in the summer of 2008, is also presented. All geometrical and material data for the shipping cask were considered according to NAC-LWT Cask approved model. The shielding analysis estimates radiation doses to shipping cask wall surface, and in air at 1 m and 2 m, respectively, from the cask by means of 3-dimensional Monte Carlo MORSE-SGC code. Before loading into the shipping cask TRIGA spent fuel source terms and spent fuel parameters have been obtained by means of ORIGEN-S code. Both codes are included in ORNL's SCALE 5 programs package. {sup 60}Co radioactivity is important for HEU spent fuel; actinides contribution to total fuel radioactivity is low. For LEU spent fuel {sup 60}Co radioactivity is insignificant; actinides contribution to total fuel radioactivity is high. Dose rates for both HEU and LEU fuel contents are below regulatory limits, LEU spent fuel photon dose rates being greater than the HEU ones. The comparison between HEU spent fuel theoretical and measured dose rates in selected measuring points shows a good agreement, the calculated values being greater than the measured ones both to cask wall surface (about 34% relative difference) and in air at 1 m distance from the cask surface (about 15% relative difference). (authors)

  13. Penelope - A code system for Monte Carlo simulation of electron and photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer code system PENELOPE (version 2001) performs Monte Carlo simulation of coupled electron-photon transport in arbitrary materials for a wide energy range, from a few hundred eV to about 1 GeV. Photon transport is simulated by means of the standard, detailed simulation scheme. Electron and positron histories are generated on the basis of a mixed procedure, which combines detailed simulation of hard events with condensed simulation of soft interactions. A geometry package called PENGEOM permits the generation of random electron-photon showers in material systems consisting of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces, i.e. planes, spheres, cylinders, etc. This report is intended not only to serve as a manual of the PENELOPE code system, but also to provide the user with the necessary information to understand the details of the Monte-Carlo algorithm. (authors)

  14. Radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of massive star formation using Monte Carlo radiative transfer - I. Algorithms and numerical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Tim J.

    2015-04-01

    We present a set of new numerical methods that are relevant to calculating radiation pressure terms in hydrodynamics calculations, with a particular focus on massive star formation. The radiation force is determined from a Monte Carlo estimator and enables a complete treatment of the detailed microphysics, including polychromatic radiation and anisotropic scattering, in both the free-streaming and optically thick limits. Since the new method is computationally demanding we have developed two new methods that speed up the algorithm. The first is a photon packet splitting algorithm that enables efficient treatment of the Monte Carlo process in very optically thick regions. The second is a parallelization method that distributes the Monte Carlo workload over many instances of the hydrodynamic domain, resulting in excellent scaling of the radiation step. We also describe the implementation of a sink particle method that enables us to follow the accretion on to, and the growth of, the protostars. We detail the results of extensive testing and benchmarking of the new algorithms.

  15. Modular, object-oriented redesign of a large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the modular, object-oriented redesign of a large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport program. This effort represents a complete 'white sheet of paper' rewrite of the code. In this paper, the motivation driving this project, the design objectives for the new version of the program, and the design choices and their consequences will be discussed. The design itself will also be described, including the important subsystems as well as the key classes within those subsystems

  16. Systems guide to MCNP (Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon Transport Code)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of this report is the implementation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon Transport Code - Version 3 (MCNP) on the different types of computer systems, especially the IBM MVS system. The report supplements the documentation of the RSIC computer code package CCC-200/MCNP. Details of the procedure to follow in executing MCNP on the IBM computers, either in batch mode or interactive mode, are provided

  17. A computationally efficient moment-preserving Monte Carlo electron transport method with implementation in Geant4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, D.A., E-mail: ddixon@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS P365, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Prinja, A.K., E-mail: prinja@unm.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, MSC01 1120, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States); Franke, B.C., E-mail: bcfrank@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87123 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    This paper presents the theoretical development and numerical demonstration of a moment-preserving Monte Carlo electron transport method. Foremost, a full implementation of the moment-preserving (MP) method within the Geant4 particle simulation toolkit is demonstrated. Beyond implementation details, it is shown that the MP method is a viable alternative to the condensed history (CH) method for inclusion in current and future generation transport codes through demonstration of the key features of the method including: systematically controllable accuracy, computational efficiency, mathematical robustness, and versatility. A wide variety of results common to electron transport are presented illustrating the key features of the MP method. In particular, it is possible to achieve accuracy that is statistically indistinguishable from analog Monte Carlo, while remaining up to three orders of magnitude more efficient than analog Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, it is shown that the MP method can be generalized to any applicable analog scattering DCS model by extending previous work on the MP method beyond analytical DCSs to the partial-wave (PW) elastic tabulated DCS data.

  18. A vectorized Monte Carlo code for modeling photon transport in SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A vectorized Monte Carlo computer code has been developed for modeling photon transport in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The code models photon transport in a uniform attenuating region and photon detection by a gamma camera. It is adapted from a history-based Monte Carlo code in which photon history data are stored in scalar variables and photon histories are computed sequentially. The vectorized code is written in FORTRAN77 and uses an event-based algorithm in which photon history data are stored in arrays and photon history computations are performed within DO loops. The indices of the DO loops range over the number of photon histories, and these loops may take advantage of the vector processing unit of our Stellar GS1000 computer for pipelined computations. Without the use of the vector processor the event-based code is faster than the history-based code because of numerical optimization performed during conversion to the event-based algorithm. When only the detection of unscattered photons is modeled, the event-based code executes 5.1 times faster with the use of the vector processor than without; when the detection of scattered and unscattered photons is modeled the speed increase is a factor of 2.9. Vectorization is a valuable way to increase the performance of Monte Carlo code for modeling photon transport in SPECT

  19. Thermal radiation heat transport using discrete ordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DOT-IV discrete ordinates code is used to analyze radiative heat transport through absorbing, emitting and scattering media in two-dimensional cylindrical enclosures. The emissive power distributions and surface heat transfer rates for enclosures with diffuse boundary or distributed sources are determined using various orders of quadrature and comparative results are presented. The effects of anisotropic scattering, optical thickness and wall emissivity are discussed. Using the multigroup capability of the DOT-IV code, the analysis is extended to nongray radiation by a combustion gas mixture based on the exponential wide band model

  20. Optimal Spatial Subdivision method for improving geometry navigation performance in Monte Carlo particle transport simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The subdivision combines both advantages of uniform and non-uniform schemes. • The grid models were proved to be more efficient than traditional CSG models. • Monte Carlo simulation performance was enhanced by Optimal Spatial Subdivision. • Efficiency gains were obtained for realistic whole reactor core models. - Abstract: Geometry navigation is one of the key aspects of dominating Monte Carlo particle transport simulation performance for large-scale whole reactor models. In such cases, spatial subdivision is an easily-established and high-potential method to improve the run-time performance. In this study, a dedicated method, named Optimal Spatial Subdivision, is proposed for generating numerically optimal spatial grid models, which are demonstrated to be more efficient for geometry navigation than traditional Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) models. The method uses a recursive subdivision algorithm to subdivide a CSG model into non-overlapping grids, which are labeled as totally or partially occupied, or not occupied at all, by CSG objects. The most important point is that, at each stage of subdivision, a conception of quality factor based on a cost estimation function is derived to evaluate the qualities of the subdivision schemes. Only the scheme with optimal quality factor will be chosen as the final subdivision strategy for generating the grid model. Eventually, the model built with the optimal quality factor will be efficient for Monte Carlo particle transport simulation. The method has been implemented and integrated into the Super Monte Carlo program SuperMC developed by FDS Team. Testing cases were used to highlight the performance gains that could be achieved. Results showed that Monte Carlo simulation runtime could be reduced significantly when using the new method, even as cases reached whole reactor core model sizes

  1. SU-E-T-560: Monte Carlo Simulation of the Neutron Radiation Field Around a Medical 18 MV Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Today the majority of radiation therapy treatments are performed at medical electron linear accelerators (linacs). The accelerated electrons are used for the generation of bremsstrahlung photons. The use of higher electron respectively photon energies has some advantages over lower energies such as the longer dose build-up. However photons with energies higher than ∼7 MeV can additionally to the interaction with bound electrons undergo inelastic reactions with nuclei. These photonuclear reactions lead to the emission of fast neutrons which contaminate the primary photon field. The neutrons might penetrate through the collimators and deliver out-of-field dose to the patient. Furthermore the materials inside the linac head as well as the air inside the treatment room get activated which might deliver dose to the medical employees even when the linac is not in operation. A detailed knowledge of these effects is essential for adequate radiation protection of the employees and an optimal patient treatment. Methods: It is a common method to study the radiation fields of such linacs by means of Monte Carlo simulations. For the investigation of the effects caused by photonuclear reactions a typical linac in high energy mode (Varian Clinac 18 MV-X) as well as the surrounding bunker were modelled and simulated using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA which includes extensive nuclear reaction and neutron transport models additional to electron-photon transport as well as capabilities for a detailed study of effective dose distributions and activation yields. Results: Neutron spectra as well as neutron effective dose distributions within the bunker were obtained, reaching up to some mSv/Gy in the patient’s plane. The results are normalized per Gy in the depth dose maximum at 10×10 cm2 field size. Therefore an absolute interpretation is possible. Conclusion: The obtained data gives a better understanding of the photonuclear reaction caused effects

  2. Variance analysis of the Monte-Carlo perturbation source method in inhomogeneous linear particle transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The perturbation source method may be a powerful Monte-Carlo means to calculate small effects in a particle field. In a preceding paper we have formulated this methos in inhomogeneous linear particle transport problems describing the particle fields by solutions of Fredholm integral equations and have derived formulae for the second moment of the difference event point estimator. In the present paper we analyse the general structure of its variance, point out the variance peculiarities, discuss the dependence on certain transport games and on generation procedures of the auxiliary particles and draw conclusions to improve this method

  3. Time-implicit Monte-Carlo collision algorithm for particle-in-cell electron transport models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A time-implicit Monte-Carlo collision algorithm has been developed to allow particle-in-cell electron transport models to be applied to arbitrarily collisional systems. The algorithm is formulated for electrons moving in response to electric and magnetic accelerations and subject to collisional drag and scattering due to a background plasma. The correct fluid or streaming transport results are obtained in the respective limits of strongly- or weakly-collisional systems, and reasonable behavior is produced even for time steps greatly exceeding the magnetic-gyration and collisional-scattering times

  4. A portable, parallel, object-oriented Monte Carlo neutron transport code in C++

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a multi-group Monte Carlo neutron transport code using C++ and the Parallel Object-Oriented Methods and Applications (POOMA) class library. This transport code, called MC++, currently computes k and α-eigenvalues and is portable to and runs parallel on a wide variety of platforms, including MPPs, clustered SMPs, and individual workstations. It contains appropriate classes and abstractions for particle transport and, through the use of POOMA, for portable parallelism. Current capabilities of MC++ are discussed, along with physics and performance results on a variety of hardware, including all Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) hardware. Current parallel performance indicates the ability to compute α-eigenvalues in seconds to minutes rather than hours to days. Future plans and the implementation of a general transport physics framework are also discussed

  5. Development of a Monte-Carlo Radiative Transfer Code for the Juno/JIRAM Limb Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindoni, G.; Adriani, A.; Mayorov, B.; Aoki, S.; Grassi, D.; Moriconi, M.; Oliva, F.

    2013-09-01

    The Juno/JIRAM instrument will acquire limb spectra of the Jupiter atmosphere in the infrared spectral range. The analysis of these spectra requires a radiative transfer code that takes into account the multiple scattering by particles in a spherical-shell atmosphere. Therefore, we are developing a code based on the Monte-Carlo approach to simulate the JIRAM observations. The validation of the code was performed by comparison with DISORT-based codes.

  6. Split exponential track length estimator for Monte-Carlo simulations of small-animal radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smekens, F.; Létang, J. M.; Noblet, C.; Chiavassa, S.; Delpon, G.; Freud, N.; Rit, S.; Sarrut, D.

    2014-12-01

    We propose the split exponential track length estimator (seTLE), a new kerma-based method combining the exponential variant of the TLE and a splitting strategy to speed up Monte Carlo (MC) dose computation for low energy photon beams. The splitting strategy is applied to both the primary and the secondary emitted photons, triggered by either the MC events generator for primaries or the photon interactions generator for secondaries. Split photons are replaced by virtual particles for fast dose calculation using the exponential TLE. Virtual particles are propagated by ray-tracing in voxelized volumes and by conventional MC navigation elsewhere. Hence, the contribution of volumes such as collimators, treatment couch and holding devices can be taken into account in the dose calculation. We evaluated and analysed the seTLE method for two realistic small animal radiotherapy treatment plans. The effect of the kerma approximation, i.e. the complete deactivation of electron transport, was investigated. The efficiency of seTLE against splitting multiplicities was also studied. A benchmark with analog MC and TLE was carried out in terms of dose convergence and efficiency. The results showed that the deactivation of electrons impacts the dose at the water/bone interface in high dose regions. The maximum and mean dose differences normalized to the dose at the isocenter were, respectively of 14% and 2% . Optimal splitting multiplicities were found to be around 300. In all situations, discrepancies in integral dose were below 0.5% and 99.8% of the voxels fulfilled a 1%/0.3 mm gamma index criterion. Efficiency gains of seTLE varied from 3.2 × 105 to 7.7 × 105 compared to analog MC and from 13 to 15 compared to conventional TLE. In conclusion, seTLE provides results similar to the TLE while increasing the efficiency by a factor between 13 and 15, which makes it particularly well-suited to typical small animal radiation therapy applications.

  7. Cooling of radiative quantum-dot excitons by terahertz radiation: A spin-resolved Monte Carlo carrier dynamics model

    OpenAIRE

    Boxberg, Fredrik; Tulkki, Jukka; Yusa, Go; Sakaki, Hiroyuki

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a theoretical model to analyze the anomalous cooling of radiative quantum dot (QD) excitons by THz radiation reported by Yusa et al [Proc. 24th ICPS, 1083 (1998)]. We have made three-dimensional (3D) modeling of the strain and the piezoelectric field and calculated the 3D density of states of strain induced quantum dots. On the basis of this analysis we have developed a spin dependent Monte Carlo model, which describes the carrier dynamics in QD's when the intraband relaxati...

  8. A new hybrid method--combined heat flux method with Monte-Carlo method to analyze thermal radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A new hybrid method, Monte-Carlo-Heat-Flux (MCHF) method, was presented to analyze the radiative heat transfer of participating medium in a three-dimensional rectangular enclosure using combined the Monte-Carlo method with the heat flux method. Its accuracy and reliability was proved by comparing the computational results with exact results from classical "Zone Method".

  9. Modeling radiation effects at the atomic scale with artificial neural network based kinetic Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We briefly present our atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo approach to model the diffusion of point-defects in Fe-based alloys, and therefore to simulate diffusion induced mass transport and subsequent nano-structural and microchemical changes. This methodology has been hitherto successfully applied to the simulation of thermal annealing experiments. We here present our achievements in the generalization of this method to the simulation of neutron irradiation damage. (authors)

  10. Monte Carlo modelling of radiation shielding of cpb-g type containers for pharmacological industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The containers of the type CPB-G are used for the containing, manipulation and transportation in Radiopharmacology taken place in the Centre of Isotopes of Cuba (CENTIS) and one of the important magnitudes for its radiological validation is the dose rate in the surface of the container. For the obtaining of the dose rate was used the code MCNP-4b based on the Monte Carlo method. The obtained results were validated with data of experiments carried out in the CENTIS

  11. A priori efficiency calculations for Monte Carlo applications in neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a general derivation is given of equations describing the variance of an arbitrary detector response in a Monte Carlo simulation and the average number of collisions a particle will suffer until its history ends. The theory is validated for a simple slab system using the two-direction transport model and for a two-group infinite system, which both allow analytical solutions. Numerical results from the analytical solutions are compared with actual Monte Carlo calculations, showing excellent agreement. These analytical solutions demonstrate the possibilities for optimizing the weight window settings with respect to variance. Using the average number of collisions as a measure for the simulation time a cost function inversely proportional to the usual figure of merit is defined, which allows optimization with respect to overall efficiency of the Monte Carlo calculation. For practical applications it is outlined how the equations for the variance and average number of collisions can be solved using a suitable existing deterministic neutron transport code with adapted number of energy groups and scattering matrices. (author)

  12. Consistent comparison of Monte Carlo and whole-core transport solutions for cores with thermal feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For systematic and consistent comparison of Monte Carlo and whole-core transport solutions in various core states including power generating conditions, a test problem set that spans from two-dimensional uniform temperature pin cell problems to three-dimensional core problems involving thermal feedback is solved by a continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCCARD and a multigroup whole-core transport code DeCART. The neutron spectra, k-effective, pin-wise power distribution, fuel temperature distribution, and Doppler coefficients obtained from the two solutions are compared taking the MCCARD solution as the reference. For the uniform temperature problems, excellent agreement between the two solutions is observed in every solution aspect. The pin power distribution error is less than 1% and the k-effective error is within 100 pcm in most cases. For the problems with thermal feedback, the discrepancy becomes larger, yet within the tolerable range. In the hot-full-power mini-core calculation, a maximum of 3.7% error in the radial pin power distribution and the k-effective error of about 260 pcm are observed. Through this comparison, it is demonstrated that accurate multigroup direct whole-core calculations are possible even at power generating conditions with a much less computing time than the corresponding Monte Carlo calculations. (authors)

  13. FTREE. Single-history Monte Carlo analysis for radiation detection and measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work introduces FTREE, which describes radiation cascades following impingement of a source particle on matter. The ensuing radiation field is characterised interaction by interaction, accounting for each generation of secondaries recursively. Each progeny is uniquely differentiated and catalogued into a family tree; the kinship is identified without ambiguity. This mode of observation, analysis and presentation goes beyond present-day detector technologies, beyond conventional Monte Carlo simulations and beyond standard pedagogy. It is able to observe rare events far out in the Gaussian tail which would have been lost in averaging-events less probable, but no less correct in physics. (author)

  14. THE COUPLING OF A DETERMINISTIC TRANSPORT FIELD SOLUTION TO A MONTE CARLO BOUNDARY CONDITION FOR THE SIMULATION OF LARGE GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo methods are typically used for simulating radiation fields around gamma-ray spectrometers and pulse-height tallies within those spectrometers. Deterministic codes that discretize the linear Boltzmann transport equation can offer significant advantages in computational efficiency for calculating radiation fields, but stochastic codes remain the most dependable tools for calculating the response within spectrometers. For a deterministic field solution to become useful to radiation detection analysts, it must be coupled to a method for calculating spectrometer response functions. This coupling is done in the RADSAT toolbox. Previous work has been successful using a Monte Carlo boundary sphere around a handheld detector. It is desirable to extend this coupling to larger detector systems such as the portal monitors now being used to screen vehicles crossing borders. Challenges to providing an accurate Monte Carlo boundary condition from the deterministic field solution include the greater possibility of large radiation gradients along the detector and the detector itself perturbing the field solution, unlike smaller detector systems. The method of coupling the deterministic results to a stochastic code for large detector systems can be described as spatially defined rectangular patches that minimize gradients. The coupled method was compared to purely stochastic simulation data of identical problems, showing the methods produce consistent detector responses while the purely stochastic run times are substantially longer in some cases, such as highly shielded geometries. For certain cases, this method has the ability to faithfully emulate large sensors in a more reasonable amount of time than other methods.

  15. Multiple compton scattering effect on the spectrum of X-ray radiation. Monte-Carlo computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computation of the X-ray radiation spectrum forming at multiple scattering of low-frequency photons on relativistic electrons is carried out. A spherical cloud of relativistic plasma with optical depth on Thomson scattering tau and a given temperature of Maxwellian electrons kTsub(e) is considered. There is a point source of low frequency radiation in the centre of the cloud with a Planckian spectrum. Monte-Carlo computations and analytical estimates show that in the case of small optical depth tau < 1, the radiation escaping from the cloud has a power-law spectrum Isub(ν) approximately νsup(-α) where α is the spectral index. In the case of an optically thick cloud, the escaping radiation spectrum tends to the Wien equilibrium shape. The energy loss rate of the cloud is computed. The transfer of hard radiation from a central point source through a plasma cloud with kTsub(e) approximately 3 keV is considered. Monte-Carlo techniques for computing such problems are decribed

  16. Parallel processing of Monte Carlo code MCNP for particle transport problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Kenji; Kawasaki, Takuji

    1996-06-01

    It is possible to vectorize or parallelize Monte Carlo codes (MC code) for photon and neutron transport problem, making use of independency of the calculation for each particle. Applicability of existing MC code to parallel processing is mentioned. As for parallel computer, we have used both vector-parallel processor and scalar-parallel processor in performance evaluation. We have made (i) vector-parallel processing of MCNP code on Monte Carlo machine Monte-4 with four vector processors, (ii) parallel processing on Paragon XP/S with 256 processors. In this report we describe the methodology and results for parallel processing on two types of parallel or distributed memory computers. In addition, we mention the evaluation of parallel programming environments for parallel computers used in the present work as a part of the work developing STA (Seamless Thinking Aid) Basic Software. (author)

  17. METHES: A Monte Carlo collision code for the simulation of electron transport in low temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabie, M.; Franck, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    We present a freely available MATLAB code for the simulation of electron transport in arbitrary gas mixtures in the presence of uniform electric fields. For steady-state electron transport, the program provides the transport coefficients, reaction rates and the electron energy distribution function. The program uses established Monte Carlo techniques and is compatible with the electron scattering cross section files from the open-access Plasma Data Exchange Project LXCat. The code is written in object-oriented design, allowing the tracing and visualization of the spatiotemporal evolution of electron swarms and the temporal development of the mean energy and the electron number due to attachment and/or ionization processes. We benchmark our code with well-known model gases as well as the real gases argon, N2, O2, CF4, SF6 and mixtures of N2 and O2.

  18. The application of Monte Carlo method to electron and photon beams transport; Zastosowanie metody Monte Carlo do analizy transportu elektronow i fotonow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zychor, I. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    The application of a Monte Carlo method to study a transport in matter of electron and photon beams is presented, especially for electrons with energies up to 18 MeV. The SHOWME Monte Carlo code, a modified version of GEANT3 code, was used on the CONVEX C3210 computer at Swierk. It was assumed that an electron beam is mono directional and monoenergetic. Arbitrary user-defined, complex geometries made of any element or material can be used in calculation. All principal phenomena occurring when electron beam penetrates the matter are taken into account. The use of calculation for a therapeutic electron beam collimation is presented. (author). 20 refs, 29 figs.

  19. Application of general-purpose radiation transport code into study for laser-produced plasma ions acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general-purpose Monte Carlo particle and heavy ion transport code system (PHITS), which consists of various quantum dynamics models, was used to study laser-driven ion acceleration. Our simulation reasonably predicted not only the laser driven ion's trajectories detected by the monitors but also the radiation shielding of these particles. (author)

  20. Monte Carlo simulations of the particle transport in semiconductor detectors of fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several Monte Carlo all-particle transport codes are under active development around the world. In this paper we focused on the capabilities of the MCNPX code (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) to follow the particle transport in semiconductor detector of fast neutrons. Semiconductor detector based on semi-insulating GaAs was the object of our investigation. As converter material capable to produce charged particles from the (n, p) interaction, a high-density polyethylene (HDPE) was employed. As the source of fast neutrons, the 239Pu–Be neutron source was used in the model. The simulations were performed using the MCNPX code which makes possible to track not only neutrons but also recoiled protons at all interesting energies. Hence, the MCNPX code enables seamless particle transport and no other computer program is needed to process the particle transport. The determination of the optimal thickness of the conversion layer and the minimum thickness of the active region of semiconductor detector as well as the energy spectra simulation were the principal goals of the computer modeling. Theoretical detector responses showed that the best detection efficiency can be achieved for 500 μm thick HDPE converter layer. The minimum detector active region thickness has been estimated to be about 400 μm. -- Highlights: ► Application of the MCNPX code for fast neutron detector design is demonstrated. ► Simulations of the particle transport through conversion film of HDPE are presented. ► Simulations of the particle transport through detector active region are presented. ► The optimal thickness of the HDPE conversion film has been calculated. ► Detection efficiency of 0.135% was reached for 500 μm thick HDPE conversion film

  1. Using hybrid implicit Monte Carlo diffusion to simulate gray radiation hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleveland, Mathew A., E-mail: cleveland7@llnl.gov; Gentile, Nick

    2015-06-15

    This work describes how to couple a hybrid Implicit Monte Carlo Diffusion (HIMCD) method with a Lagrangian hydrodynamics code to evaluate the coupled radiation hydrodynamics equations. This HIMCD method dynamically applies Implicit Monte Carlo Diffusion (IMD) [1] to regions of a problem that are opaque and diffusive while applying standard Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) [2] to regions where the diffusion approximation is invalid. We show that this method significantly improves the computational efficiency as compared to a standard IMC/Hydrodynamics solver, when optically thick diffusive material is present, while maintaining accuracy. Two test cases are used to demonstrate the accuracy and performance of HIMCD as compared to IMC and IMD. The first is the Lowrie semi-analytic diffusive shock [3]. The second is a simple test case where the source radiation streams through optically thin material and heats a thick diffusive region of material causing it to rapidly expand. We found that HIMCD proves to be accurate, robust, and computationally efficient for these test problems.

  2. Using hybrid implicit Monte Carlo diffusion to simulate gray radiation hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Mathew A.; Gentile, Nick

    2015-06-01

    This work describes how to couple a hybrid Implicit Monte Carlo Diffusion (HIMCD) method with a Lagrangian hydrodynamics code to evaluate the coupled radiation hydrodynamics equations. This HIMCD method dynamically applies Implicit Monte Carlo Diffusion (IMD) [1] to regions of a problem that are opaque and diffusive while applying standard Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) [2] to regions where the diffusion approximation is invalid. We show that this method significantly improves the computational efficiency as compared to a standard IMC/Hydrodynamics solver, when optically thick diffusive material is present, while maintaining accuracy. Two test cases are used to demonstrate the accuracy and performance of HIMCD as compared to IMC and IMD. The first is the Lowrie semi-analytic diffusive shock [3]. The second is a simple test case where the source radiation streams through optically thin material and heats a thick diffusive region of material causing it to rapidly expand. We found that HIMCD proves to be accurate, robust, and computationally efficient for these test problems.

  3. High-resolution and Monte Carlo additions to the SASKTRAN radiative transfer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Zawada

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imaging System (OSIRIS instrument on board the Odin spacecraft has been measuring limb-scattered radiance since 2001. The vertical radiance profiles measured as the instrument nods are inverted, with the aid of the SASKTRAN radiative transfer model, to obtain vertical profiles of trace atmospheric constituents. Here we describe two newly developed modes of the SASKTRAN radiative transfer model: a high-spatial-resolution mode and a Monte Carlo mode. The high-spatial-resolution mode is a successive-orders model capable of modelling the multiply scattered radiance when the atmosphere is not spherically symmetric; the Monte Carlo mode is intended for use as a highly accurate reference model. It is shown that the two models agree in a wide variety of solar conditions to within 0.2 %. As an example case for both models, Odin–OSIRIS scans were simulated with the Monte Carlo model and retrieved using the high-resolution model. A systematic bias of up to 4 % in retrieved ozone number density between scans where the instrument is scanning up or scanning down was identified. The bias is largest when the sun is near the horizon and the solar scattering angle is far from 90°. It was found that calculating the multiply scattered diffuse field at five discrete solar zenith angles is sufficient to eliminate the bias for typical Odin–OSIRIS geometries.

  4. Using hybrid implicit Monte Carlo diffusion to simulate gray radiation hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes how to couple a hybrid Implicit Monte Carlo Diffusion (HIMCD) method with a Lagrangian hydrodynamics code to evaluate the coupled radiation hydrodynamics equations. This HIMCD method dynamically applies Implicit Monte Carlo Diffusion (IMD) [1] to regions of a problem that are opaque and diffusive while applying standard Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) [2] to regions where the diffusion approximation is invalid. We show that this method significantly improves the computational efficiency as compared to a standard IMC/Hydrodynamics solver, when optically thick diffusive material is present, while maintaining accuracy. Two test cases are used to demonstrate the accuracy and performance of HIMCD as compared to IMC and IMD. The first is the Lowrie semi-analytic diffusive shock [3]. The second is a simple test case where the source radiation streams through optically thin material and heats a thick diffusive region of material causing it to rapidly expand. We found that HIMCD proves to be accurate, robust, and computationally efficient for these test problems

  5. Exact modeling of the torus geometry with Monte Carlo transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is valuable to model torus geometry exactry for the neutronics design of fusion reactor in order to assess neutronics characteristics such as tritium breeding ratio, heat generation rate, etc, near the plasma. Monte Carlo code MORSE-GG which plays important role in the radiation streaming calculation of fusion reactors had been able to deal with the geometry composed of second order surfaces. The MORSE-GG program is modified to be able to deal with torus geometry which has fourth order surface by solving biquadratic equations, hoping that MORSE-GG code becomes more effective for the neutronics calculation of the Tokamak fusion reactor. (author)

  6. Srna - Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulation in combined and voxelized geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Radovan D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes new Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulations in complex geometrical forms and in materials of different composition. The SRNA codes were developed for three dimensional (3D dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry. The model of these codes is based on the theory of proton multiple scattering and a simple model of compound nucleus decay. The developed package consists of two codes: SRNA-2KG and SRNA-VOX. The first code simulates proton transport in combined geometry that can be described by planes and second order surfaces. The second one uses the voxelized geometry of material zones and is specifically adopted for the application of patient computer tomography data. Transition probabilities for both codes are given by the SRNADAT program. In this paper, we will present the models and algorithms of our programs, as well as the results of the numerical experiments we have carried out applying them, along with the results of proton transport simulation obtained through the PETRA and GEANT programs. The simulation of the proton beam characterization by means of the Multi-Layer Faraday Cup and spatial distribution of positron emitters obtained by our program indicate the imminent application of Monte Carlo techniques in clinical practice.

  7. ACCEPT: three-dimensional electron/photon Monte Carlo transport code using combinatorial geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ACCEPT code provides experimenters and theorists with a method for the routine solution of coupled electron/photon transport through three-dimensional multimaterial geometries described by the combinational method. Emphasis is placed upon operational simplicity without sacrificing the rigor of the model. ACCEPT combines condensed-history electron Monte Carlo with conventional single-scattering photon Monte Carlo in order to describe the transport of all generations of particles from several MeV down to 1.0 and 10.0 keV for electrons and photons, respectively. The model is more accurate at the higher energies with a less rigorous description of the particle cascade at energies where the shell structure of the transport media becomes important. Flexibility of construction permits the user to tailor the model to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the model to more sophisticated applications through relatively simple update procedures. The ACCEPT code is currently running on the CDC-7600 (66000) where the bulk of the cross-section data and the statistical variables are stored in Large Core Memory

  8. Development of a Monte Carlo software to photon transportation in voxel structures using graphic processing units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the most accurate method to estimate absorbed dose in radiotherapy, Monte Carlo Method (MCM) has been widely used in radiotherapy treatment planning. Nevertheless, its efficiency can be improved for clinical routine applications. In this thesis, the CUBMC code is presented, a GPU-based MC photon transport algorithm for dose calculation under the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) platform. The simulation of physical events is based on the algorithm used in PENELOPE, and the cross section table used is the one generated by the MATERIAL routine, also present in PENELOPE code. Photons are transported in voxel-based geometries with different compositions. There are two distinct approaches used for transport simulation. The rst of them forces the photon to stop at every voxel frontier, the second one is the Woodcock method, where the photon ignores the existence of borders and travels in homogeneous fictitious media. The CUBMC code aims to be an alternative of Monte Carlo simulator code that, by using the capability of parallel processing of graphics processing units (GPU), provide high performance simulations in low cost compact machines, and thus can be applied in clinical cases and incorporated in treatment planning systems for radiotherapy. (author)

  9. Srna-Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulation in combined and voxelized geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes new Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulations in complex geometrical forms and in materials of different composition. The SRNA codes were developed for three dimensional (3D) dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry. The model of these codes is based on the theory of proton multiple scattering and a simple model of compound nucleus decay. The developed package consists of two codes: SRNA-2KG and SRNA-VOX. The first code simulates proton transport in combined geometry that can be described by planes and second order surfaces. The second one uses the voxelized geometry of material zones and is specifically adopted for the application of patient computer tomography data. Transition probabilities for both codes are given by the SRNADAT program. In this paper, we will present the models and algorithms of our programs, as well as the results of the numerical experiments we have carried out applying them, along with the results of proton transport simulation obtained through the PETRA and GEANT programs. The simulation of the proton beam characterization by means of the Multi-Layer Faraday Cup and spatial distribution of positron emitters obtained by our program indicate the imminent application of Monte Carlo techniques in clinical practice. (author)

  10. Transport methods and interactions for space radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Schimmerling, Walter S.; Khandelwal, Govind S.; Khan, Ferdous S.; Nealy, John E.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Shinn, Judy L.; Norbury, John W.

    1991-01-01

    A review of the program in space radiation protection at the Langley Research Center is given. The relevant Boltzmann equations are given with a discussion of approximation procedures for space applications. The interaction coefficients are related to solution of the many-body Schroedinger equation with nuclear and electromagnetic forces. Various solution techniques are discussed to obtain relevant interaction cross sections with extensive comparison with experiments. Solution techniques for the Boltzmann equations are discussed in detail. Transport computer code validation is discussed through analytical benchmarking, comparison with other codes, comparison with laboratory experiments and measurements in space. Applications to lunar and Mars missions are discussed.

  11. Hybrid parallel programming models for AMR neutron Monte-Carlo transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with High Performance Computing (HPC) applied to neutron transport theory on complex geometries, thanks to both an Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) algorithm and a Monte-Carlo (MC) solver. Several Parallelism models are presented and analyzed in this context, among them shared memory and distributed memory ones such as Domain Replication and Domain Decomposition, together with Hybrid strategies. The study is illustrated by weak and strong scalability tests on complex benchmarks on several thousands of cores thanks to the peta-flop supercomputer Tera100. (authors)

  12. The Moment Condensed History Algorithm for Monte Carlo Electron Transport Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce a new Condensed History algorithm for the Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport. To obtain more accurate simulations, the new algorithm preserves the mean position and the variance in the mean position exactly for electrons that have traveled a given path length and are traveling in a given direction. This is accomplished by deriving the zeroth-, first-, and second-order spatial moments of the Spencer-Lewis equation and employing this information directly in the Condensed History process. Numerical calculations demonstrate the advantages of our method over standard Condensed History methods

  13. A vectorized Monte Carlo method with pseudo-scattering for neutron transport analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A vectorized Monte Carlo method has been developed for the neutron transport analysis on the vector supercomputer HITAC S810. In this method, a multi-particle tracking algorithm is adopted and fundamental processing such as pseudo-random number generation is modified to use the vector processor effectively. The flight analysis of this method is characterized by the new algorithm with pseudo-scattering. This algorithm was verified by comparing its results with those of the conventional one. The method realized a speed-up of factor 10; about 7 times by vectorization and 1.5 times by the new algorithm for flight analysis

  14. Monte-Carlo method for electron transport in a material with electron field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The precise mathematical and physical foundations of the Monte-Carlo method for electron transport with the electromagnetic field are established. The condensed histories method given by M.J. Berger is generalized to the case where electromagnetic field exists in the material region. The full continuous-slowing-down method and the coupling method of continuous-slowing-down and catastrophic collision are compared. Using the approximation of homogeneous electronic field, the thickness of material for shielding the supra-thermal electrons produced by laser light irradiated target is evaluated

  15. Study of muonic hydrogen transport in TRIUMF experiment 742 by the Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wozniak, J. [Inst. of Physics and Nuclear Techniques, Cracow (Poland); Bystritsky, V.M. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Mulhauser, F. [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland)

    1996-10-01

    A technique of neutral muonic atom beams is proposed in the TRIUMF E742 experiment for measuring the scattering cross sections of muonic hydrogen isotopes in solid hydrogen. We present the results of Monte Carlo modeling of p{mu} and d{mu} atoms transport under the conditions of this experiment, taking into account the main physical as well as the geometrical aspects. The optimization of set-up parameters is performed in order to choose the most sensitive experimental conditions. (orig.). 14 refs.

  16. Domain decomposition and terabyte tallies with the OpenMC Monte Carlo neutron transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memory limitations are a key obstacle to applying Monte Carlo neutron transport methods to high-fidelity full-core reactor analysis. Billions of unique regions are needed to carry out full-core depletion and fuel performance analyses, equating to terabytes of memory for isotopic abundances and tally scores - far more than can fit on a single computational node in modern architectures. This work introduces an implementation of domain decomposition that addresses this problem, demonstrating excellent scaling up to a 2.39TB mesh-tally distributed across 512 compute nodes running a full-core reactor benchmark on the Mira Blue Gene/Q supercomputer at Argonne National Laboratory. (author)

  17. 3-D Monte Carlo neutron-photon transport code JMCT and its algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JMCT Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code has been developed which is based on the JCOGIN toolbox. JCOGIN includes the geometry operation, tally, the domain decomposition and the parallel computation about particle (MPI) and spatial domain (OpenMP) etc. The viewdata of CAD is equipped in JMCT preprocessor. The full-core pin-mode, which is from Chinese Qinshan-II nuclear power station, is design and simulated by JMCT. The detail pin-power distribution and keff results are shown in this paper. (author)

  18. The calculation of criticality using the three dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport code SPARTAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two methods of calculating criticality are available in the 3D generalised geometry Monte Carlo particle transport code SPARTAN (Bending and Heffer, 1975). The first is a matrix technique in which the multiplication constant and source distribution of the system under study are calculated from estimates of fission probabilities and the second a method in which the multiplication constant is inferred from estimates of changes in neutron population over a number of neutron generations. Modifications are described which have been made to the way in which these methods are used in SPARTAN in order to improve the efficiency of criticality calculations. (author)

  19. Mechanisms of transport in radiative improved mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improvement of confinement by a deliberate seeding of impurities line neon and argon has been found in many devices. Most intensively this phenomenon was studied in the limiter tokamak TEXTOR, where it was called radiative improved (RI) mode, and in the divertor machine DII-D. Recent experiments on TFTR, JT-60 and JET have demonstrated that by an optimization of seeding procedure a positive effect of impurities can be achieved in reactor scale devices. Extensive theoretical and modelling activities were performed during past years in order to understand the mechanisms of confinement improvement in RI-mode. Characteristics of drift instabilities namely the ion temperature gradient (ITG) and dissipate trapped electron (DTE) modes, which provide the main contribution to the anomalous transport in tokamaks, have been analyzed by the code for Gyro-Kinetic Stability. The behavior of non-linear turbulent eddies and vortices was studied in 'particle in cell' simulations. Fluid approximation has been applied to asses the effect of impurities on anomalous transport. All these studies predict a reduction of turbulence originated from the most dangerous ITG modes. Computations by a transport code with models for anomalous transport coefficients due to drift micro-instabilities reproduce many peculiarities of RI-plasmas. (author)

  20. GPU-based Monte Carlo dust radiative transfer scheme applied to AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Heymann, Frank

    2012-01-01

    A three dimensional parallel Monte Carlo (MC) dust radiative transfer code is presented. To overcome the huge computing time requirements of MC treatments, the computational power of vectorized hardware is used, utilizing either multi-core computer power or graphics processing units. The approach is a self-consistent way to solve the radiative transfer equation in arbitrary dust configurations. The code calculates the equilibrium temperatures of two populations of large grains and stochastic heated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Anisotropic scattering is treated applying the Heney-Greenstein phase function. The spectral energy distribution (SED) of the object is derived at low spatial resolution by a photon counting procedure and at high spatial resolution by a vectorized ray-tracer. The latter allows computation of high signal-to-noise images of the objects at any frequencies and arbitrary viewing angles. We test the robustness of our approach against other radiative transfer codes. The SED and dust...

  1. Monte Carlo simulations of ultra high vacuum and synchrotron radiation for particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082330; Leonid, Rivkin

    With preparation of Hi-Lumi LHC fully underway, and the FCC machines under study, accelerators will reach unprecedented energies and along with it very large amount of synchrotron radiation (SR). This will desorb photoelectrons and molecules from accelerator walls, which contribute to electron cloud buildup and increase the residual pressure - both effects reducing the beam lifetime. In current accelerators these two effects are among the principal limiting factors, therefore precise calculation of synchrotron radiation and pressure properties are very important, desirably in the early design phase. This PhD project shows the modernization and a major upgrade of two codes, Molflow and Synrad, originally written by R. Kersevan in the 1990s, which are based on the test-particle Monte Carlo method and allow ultra-high vacuum and synchrotron radiation calculations. The new versions contain new physics, and are built as an all-in-one package - available to the public. Existing vacuum calculation methods are overvi...

  2. Effects of Nuclear Interactions in Space Radiation Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Barghouty, A. F.

    2005-01-01

    Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation effects behind materials in human mission to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We study how nuclear fragmentation processes affect predictions from such radiation transport codes. In particular, we investigate the effects of fragmentation cross sections at different energies on fluxes, dose and dose-equivalent from galactic cosmic rays behind typical shielding materials.

  3. Reverse Monte Carlo ray-tracing for radiative heat transfer in combustion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaojing

    Radiative heat transfer is a dominant heat transfer phenomenon in high temperature systems. With the rapid development of massive supercomputers, the Monte-Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) method starts to see its applications in combustion systems. This research is to find out if Monte-Carlo ray tracing can offer more accurate and efficient calculations than the discrete ordinates method (DOM). Monte-Carlo ray tracing method is a statistical method that traces the history of a bundle of rays. It is known as solving radiative heat transfer with almost no approximation. It can handle nonisotropic scattering and nongray gas mixtures with relative ease compared to conventional methods, such as DOM and spherical harmonics method, etc. There are two schemes in Monte-Carlo ray tracing method: forward and backward/reverse. Case studies and the governing equations demonstrate the advantages of reverse Monte-Carlo ray tracing (RMCRT) method. The RMCRT can be easily implemented for domain decomposition parallelism. In this dissertation, different efficiency improvements techniques for RMCRT are introduced and implemented. They are the random number generator, stratified sampling, ray-surface intersection calculation, Russian roulette, and important sampling. There are two major modules in solving the radiative heat transfer problems: the RMCRT RTE solver and the optical property models. RMCRT is first fully verified in gray, scattering, absorbing and emitting media with black/nonblack, diffuse/nondiffuse bounded surface problems. Sensitivity analysis is carried out with regard to the ray numbers, the mesh resolutions of the computational domain, optical thickness of the media and effects of variance reduction techniques (stratified sampling, Russian roulette). Results are compared with either analytical solutions or benchmark results. The efficiency (the product of error and computation time) of RMCRT has been compared to DOM and suggest great potential for RMCRT's application

  4. Monte Carlo method for polarized radiative transfer in gradient-index media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light transfer in gradient-index media generally follows curved ray trajectories, which will cause light beam to converge or diverge during transfer and induce the rotation of polarization ellipse even when the medium is transparent. Furthermore, the combined process of scattering and transfer along curved ray path makes the problem more complex. In this paper, a Monte Carlo method is presented to simulate polarized radiative transfer in gradient-index media that only support planar ray trajectories. The ray equation is solved to the second order to address the effect induced by curved ray trajectories. Three types of test cases are presented to verify the performance of the method, which include transparent medium, Mie scattering medium with assumed gradient index distribution, and Rayleigh scattering with realistic atmosphere refractive index profile. It is demonstrated that the atmospheric refraction has significant effect for long distance polarized light transfer. - Highlights: • A Monte Carlo method for polarized radiative transfer in gradient index media. • Effect of curved ray paths on polarized radiative transfer is considered. • Importance of atmospheric refraction for polarized light transfer is demonstrated

  5. A Monte-Carlo model of ionic transport across a solid interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved Monte-Carlo model of ionic transport across a solid interface in two-dimensional triangular lattice is presented. The new features of the model are: (i) more-realistic form of the microscopic potential of the ion-ion interaction, and (ii) accounting of the mutual ion interactions up to second nearest neighbors. This way it is possible to simulate more flexible the ionic transport across the real interface between a fast-ion conducting glass and the intercalate in the cathode of a Lithium thin-film battery. Numerical results computed with this model are presented by emphasizing on the influence of the internal interface on the ion distribution, the site energies and the open circuit voltage. (author). 15 refs, 5 figs

  6. Monte Carlo Neutrino Transport Through Remnant Disks from Neutron Star Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Richers, S; O'Connor, Evan; Fernandez, Rodrigo; Ott, Christian

    2015-01-01

    We present Sedonu, a new open source, steady-state, special relativistic Monte Carlo (MC) neutrino transport code, available at bitbucket.org/srichers/sedonu. The code calculates the energy- and angle-dependent neutrino distribution function on fluid backgrounds of any number of spatial dimensions, calculates the rates of change of fluid internal energy and electron fraction, and solves for the equilibrium fluid temperature and electron fraction. We apply this method to snapshots from two dimensional simulations of accretion disks left behind by binary neutron star mergers, varying the input physics and comparing to the results obtained with a leakage scheme for the case of a central black hole and a central hypermassive neutron star. Neutrinos are guided away from the densest regions of the disk and escape preferentially around 45 degrees from the equatorial plane. Neutrino heating is strengthened by MC transport a few scale heights above the disk midplane near the innermost stable circular orbit, potentiall...

  7. A computer code package for Monte Carlo photon-electron transport simulation Comparisons with experimental benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer code package (PTSIM) for particle transport Monte Carlo simulation was developed using object oriented techniques of design and programming. A flexible system for simulation of coupled photon, electron transport, facilitating development of efficient simulation applications, was obtained. For photons: Compton and photo-electric effects, pair production and Rayleigh interactions are simulated, while for electrons, a class II condensed history scheme was considered, in which catastrophic interactions (Moeller electron-electron interaction, bremsstrahlung, etc.) are treated in detail and all other interactions with reduced individual effect on electron history are grouped together using continuous slowing down approximation and energy straggling theories. Electron angular straggling is simulated using Moliere theory or a mixed model in which scatters at large angles are treated as distinct events. Comparisons with experimentally benchmarks for electron transmission and bremsstrahlung emissions energy and angular spectra, and for dose calculations are presented

  8. Monte Carlo Simulation of Electron Transport in 4H- and 6H-SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of electron transport properties at high electric field region in 4H- and 6H-SiC are presented. This MC model includes two non-parabolic conduction bands. Based on the material parameters, the electron scattering rates included polar optical phonon scattering, optical phonon scattering and acoustic phonon scattering are evaluated. The electron drift velocity, energy and free flight time are simulated as a function of applied electric field at an impurity concentration of 1x1018 cm3 in room temperature. The simulated drift velocity with electric field dependencies is in a good agreement with experimental results found in literature. The saturation velocities for both polytypes are close, but the scattering rates are much more pronounced for 6H-SiC. Our simulation model clearly shows complete electron transport properties in 4H- and 6H-SiC.

  9. Particle Communication and Domain Neighbor Coupling: Scalable Domain Decomposed Algorithms for Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to run Monte Carlo particle transport calculations on new supercomputers with hundreds of thousands or millions of processors, care must be taken to implement scalable algorithms. This means that the algorithms must continue to perform well as the processor count increases. In this paper, we examine the scalability of: (1) globally resolving the particle locations on the correct processor, (2) deciding that particle streaming communication has finished, and (3) efficiently coupling neighbor domains together with different replication levels. We have run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on up to 221 = 2,097,152 MPI processes on the IBM BG/Q Sequoia supercomputer and observed scalable results that agree with our theoretical predictions. These calculations were carefully constructed to have the same amount of work on every processor, i.e. the calculation is already load balanced. We also examine load imbalanced calculations where each domain's replication level is proportional to its particle workload. In this case we show how to efficiently couple together adjacent domains to maintain within workgroup load balance and minimize memory usage.

  10. Particle Communication and Domain Neighbor Coupling: Scalable Domain Decomposed Algorithms for Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, M. J.; Brantley, P. S.

    2015-01-20

    In order to run Monte Carlo particle transport calculations on new supercomputers with hundreds of thousands or millions of processors, care must be taken to implement scalable algorithms. This means that the algorithms must continue to perform well as the processor count increases. In this paper, we examine the scalability of:(1) globally resolving the particle locations on the correct processor, (2) deciding that particle streaming communication has finished, and (3) efficiently coupling neighbor domains together with different replication levels. We have run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on up to 221 = 2,097,152 MPI processes on the IBM BG/Q Sequoia supercomputer and observed scalable results that agree with our theoretical predictions. These calculations were carefully constructed to have the same amount of work on every processor, i.e. the calculation is already load balanced. We also examine load imbalanced calculations where each domain’s replication level is proportional to its particle workload. In this case we show how to efficiently couple together adjacent domains to maintain within workgroup load balance and minimize memory usage.

  11. Hybrid two-dimensional Monte-Carlo electron transport in self-consistent electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physics and numerics of the hybrid electron transport code ANTHEM are described. The need for the hybrid modeling of laser generated electron transport is outlined, and a general overview of the hybrid implementation in ANTHEM is provided. ANTHEM treats the background ions and electrons in a laser target as coupled fluid components moving relative to a fixed Eulerian mesh. The laser converts cold electrons to an additional hot electron component which evolves on the mesh as either a third coupled fluid or as a set of Monte Carlo PIC particles. The fluids and particles move in two-dimensions through electric and magnetic fields calculated via the Implicit Moment method. The hot electrons are coupled to the background thermal electrons by Coulomb drag, and both the hot and cold electrons undergo Rutherford scattering against the ion background. Subtleties of the implicit E- and B-field solutions, the coupled hydrodynamics, and large time step Monte Carlo particle scattering are discussed. Sample applications are presented

  12. Point KENO V.a: A continuous-energy Monte Carlo code for transport applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KENO V.a is a multigroup Monte Carlo code that solves the Boltzmann transport equation and is used extensively in the criticality safety community to calculate the effective multiplication factor of systems with fissionable material. In this work, a continuous-energy or pointwise version of KENO V.a has been developed by first designing a new continuous-energy cross-section format and then by developing the appropriate Monte Carlo transport procedures to sample the new cross-section format. In order to generate pointwise cross sections for a test library, a series of cross-section processing modules were developed and used to process 50 ENDF/B-VI Release 7 nuclides for the test library. Once the cross-section processing procedures were in place, a continuous-energy version of KENO V.a was developed and tested by calculating 46 test cases that include critical and calculational benchmark problems. The Point KENO-calculated results for the test problems are in agreement with calculated results obtained with the multigroup version of KENO V.a and MCNP4C. Based on the calculated results with the prototypic cross-section library, a continuous-energy version of the KENO V.a code has been successfully developed and demonstrated for modeling systems with fissionable material. (authors)

  13. A 'local' exponential transform method for global variance reduction in Monte Carlo transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We develop a 'Local' Exponential Transform method which distributes the particles nearly uniformly across the system in Monte Carlo transport calculations. An exponential approximation to the continuous transport equation is used in each mesh cell to formulate biasing parameters. The biasing parameters, which resemble those of the conventional exponential transform, tend to produce a uniform sampling of the problem geometry when applied to a forward Monte Carlo calculation, and thus they help to minimize the maximum variance of the flux. Unlike the conventional exponential transform, the biasing parameters are spatially dependent, and are automatically determined from a forward diffusion calculation. We develop two versions of the forward Local Exponential Transform method, one with spatial biasing only, and one with spatial and angular biasing. The method is compared to conventional geometry splitting/Russian roulette for several sample one-group problems in X-Y geometry. The forward Local Exponential Transform method with angular biasing is found to produce better results than geometry splitting/Russian roulette in terms of minimizing the maximum variance of the flux. (orig.)

  14. Large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations with thermal hydraulic feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Method of internal coupling, based on dynamic material distribution, is presented. • The Wielandt shift method is implemented to accelerate Mote Carlo calculations. • The Uniform Fission Site method is introduced for tallies with large numbers of bins. • The stochastic approximation scheme is used to stabilize coupled code convergence. - Abstract: The Monte Carlo method provides the most accurate description of the particle transport problem. The criticality problem is simulated by following the histories of individual particles without approximating the energy, angle or the coordinate dependence. These calculations are usually done using homogeneous thermal hydraulic conditions. This is a very crude approximation in the general case. In this paper, the method of internal coupling between neutron transport and thermal hydraulics is presented. The method is based on dynamic material distribution, where coordinate dependent temperature and density information is supplied on the fly during the transport calculation. This method does not suffer from the deficiencies characteristic of the external coupling via the input files. In latter case, the geometry is split into multiple cells having distinct temperatures and densities to supply the feedback. The possibility to efficiently simulate large scale geometries at pin-by-pin and subchannel level resolution was investigated. The Wielandt shift method for reducing the dominance ratio of the system and accelerating the fission source convergence was implemented. During the coupled iteration a detailed distribution of the fission heat deposition is required by the thermal hydraulics calculation. Providing reasonable statistical uncertainties for tallies having large numbers of bins, is a complicated task. This problem was resolved by applying the Uniform Fission Site method. Previous investigations showed that the convergence of the coupled neutron transport/thermal hydraulics calculation is limited by

  15. Multilevel Monte Carlo for Two Phase Flow and Transport in a Subsurface Reservoir with Random Permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Florian; Jenny, Patrick; Daniel, Meyer

    2014-05-01

    To a large extent, the flow and transport behaviour within a subsurface reservoir is governed by its permeability. Typically, permeability measurements of a subsurface reservoir are affordable at few spatial locations only. Due to this lack of information, permeability fields are preferably described by stochastic models rather than deterministically. A stochastic method is needed to asses the transition of the input uncertainty in permeability through the system of partial differential equations describing flow and transport to the output quantity of interest. Monte Carlo (MC) is an established method for quantifying uncertainty arising in subsurface flow and transport problems. Although robust and easy to implement, MC suffers from slow statistical convergence. To reduce the computational cost of MC, the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method was introduced. Instead of sampling a random output quantity of interest on the finest affordable grid as in case of MC, MLMC operates on a hierarchy of grids. If parts of the sampling process are successfully delegated to coarser grids where sampling is inexpensive, MLMC can dramatically outperform MC. MLMC has proven to accelerate MC for several applications including integration problems, stochastic ordinary differential equations in finance as well as stochastic elliptic and hyperbolic partial differential equations. In this study, MLMC is combined with a reservoir simulator to assess uncertain two phase (water/oil) flow and transport within a random permeability field. The performance of MLMC is compared to MC for a two-dimensional reservoir with a multi-point Gaussian logarithmic permeability field. It is found that MLMC yields significant speed-ups with respect to MC while providing results of essentially equal accuracy. This finding holds true not only for one specific Gaussian logarithmic permeability model but for a range of correlation lengths and variances.

  16. Semi-analog Monte Carlo (SMC) method for time-dependent non-linear three-dimensional heterogeneous radiative transfer problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiative transfer is a complex phenomenon in which radiation field interacts with material. This thermal radiative transfer phenomenon is composed of two equations which are the balance equation of photons and the material energy balance equation. The two equations involve non-linearity due to the temperature and that makes the radiative transfer equation more difficult to solve. During the last several years, there have been many efforts to solve the non-linear radiative transfer problems by Monte Carlo method. Among them, it is known that Semi-Analog Monte Carlo (SMC) method developed by Ahrens and Larsen is accurate regard-less of the time step size in low temperature region. But their works are limited to one-dimensional, low temperature problems. In this thesis, we suggest some method to remove their limitations in the SMC method and apply to the more realistic problems. An initially cold problem was solved over entire temperature region by using piecewise linear interpolation of the heat capacity, while heat capacity is still fitted as a cubic curve within the lowest temperature region. If we assume the heat capacity to be linear in each temperature region, the non-linearity still remains in the radiative transfer equations. We then introduce the first-order Taylor expansion to linearize the non-linear radiative transfer equations. During the linearization procedure, absorption-reemission phenomena may be described by a conventional reemission time sampling scheme which is similar to the repetitive sampling scheme in particle transport Monte Carlo method. But this scheme causes significant stochastic errors, which necessitates many histories. Thus, we present a new reemission time sampling scheme which reduces stochastic errors by storing the information of absorption times. The results of the comparison of the two schemes show that the new scheme has less stochastic errors. Therefore, the improved SMC method is able to solve more realistic problems with

  17. An algorithm for Monte-Carlo time-dependent radiation transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Harries, Tim J.

    2011-01-01

    A new Monte-Carlo algorithm for calculating time-dependent radiative-transfer under the assumption of LTE is presented. Unlike flux-limited diffusion the method is polychromatic, includes scattering, and is able to treat the optically thick and free-streaming regimes simultaneously. The algorithm is tested on a variety of 1-d and 2-d problems, and good agreement with benchmark solutions is found. The method is used to calculate the time-varying spectral energy distribution from a circumstella...

  18. Calculation of radiation dose to the lens of the eye using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation dose to the lens of the eye of patients undergoing diagnostic and interventional radiological procedures of the lacrimal drainage system has been calculated using a Monte Carlo technique. The technique has also been suggested for the retrospective estimation of the lens dose; when applied to individual patients, good correlation is obtained. In such study, data is required for image acquisition frame numbers and fluoro on-time, mean exposure values for these parameters, and the ratio of lens-to-air dose (viz. the head factor, HF) derived for a standard adult head

  19. Applying graphics processor units to Monte Carlo dose calculation in radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhtiari M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the potential in using of using a graphics processor unit (GPU for Monte-Carlo (MC-based radiation dose calculations. The percent depth dose (PDD of photons in a medium with known absorption and scattering coefficients is computed using a MC simulation running on both a standard CPU and a GPU. We demonstrate that the GPU′s capability for massive parallel processing provides a significant acceleration in the MC calculation, and offers a significant advantage for distributed stochastic simulations on a single computer. Harnessing this potential of GPUs will help in the early adoption of MC for routine planning in a clinical environment.

  20. Split exponential track length estimator for Monte-Carlo simulations of small-animal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose the split exponential track length estimator (seTLE), a new kerma-based method combining the exponential variant of the TLE and a splitting strategy to speed up Monte Carlo (MC) dose computation for low energy photon beams. The splitting strategy is applied to both the primary and the secondary emitted photons, triggered by either the MC events generator for primaries or the photon interactions generator for secondaries. Split photons are replaced by virtual particles for fast dose calculation using the exponential TLE. Virtual particles are propagated by ray-tracing in voxelized volumes and by conventional MC navigation elsewhere. Hence, the contribution of volumes such as collimators, treatment couch and holding devices can be taken into account in the dose calculation. We evaluated and analysed the seTLE method for two realistic small animal radiotherapy treatment plans. The effect of the kerma approximation, i.e. the complete deactivation of electron transport, was investigated. The efficiency of seTLE against splitting multiplicities was also studied. A benchmark with analog MC and TLE was carried out in terms of dose convergence and efficiency. The results showed that the deactivation of electrons impacts the dose at the water/bone interface in high dose regions. The maximum and mean dose differences normalized to the dose at the isocenter were, respectively of 14% and 2% . Optimal splitting multiplicities were found to be around 300. In all situations, discrepancies in integral dose were below 0.5% and 99.8% of the voxels fulfilled a 1%/0.3 mm gamma index criterion. Efficiency gains of seTLE varied from 3.2 × 105 to 7.7 × 105 compared to analog MC and from 13 to 15 compared to conventional TLE. In conclusion, seTLE provides results similar to the TLE while increasing the efficiency by a factor between 13 and 15, which makes it particularly well-suited to typical small animal radiation therapy applications. (paper)

  1. Monte Carlo application tool-kit (MCATK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo Application tool-kit (MCATK) is a C++ component-based software library designed to build specialized applications and to provide new functionality for existing general purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport codes such as MCNP. We will describe MCATK and its capabilities along with presenting some verification and validations results. (authors)

  2. ScintSim1: A new Monte Carlo simulation code for transport of optical photons in 2D arrays of scintillation detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Zarrini-Monfared, Zinat; Karbasi, Sareh; Zamani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) arrays of thick segmented scintillators are of interest as X-ray detectors for both 2D and 3D image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Their detection process involves ionizing radiation energy deposition followed by production and transport of optical photons. Only a very limited number of optical Monte Carlo simulation models exist, which has limited the number of modeling studies that have considered both stages of the detection process. We present ScintSim1, an in-house opti...

  3. Thermal Hyper-Conductivity: radiative energy transport in hyperbolic media

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, J; Narimanov, E.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a theoretical description of radiative thermal conductivity in hyperbolic metamaterials. We demonstrate a dramatic enhancement of the radiative thermal transport due to the super-singularity of the photonic density of states in hyperbolic media, leading to the radiative heat conductivity which can be comparable to the non-radiative contribution.

  4. Asymptotic diffusion limit of cell temperature discretisation schemes for thermal radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper attempts to unify the asymptotic diffusion limit analysis of thermal radiation transport schemes, for a linear-discontinuous representation of the material temperature reconstructed from cell centred temperature unknowns, in a process known as ‘source tilting’. The asymptotic limits of both Monte Carlo (continuous in space) and deterministic approaches (based on linear-discontinuous finite elements) for solving the transport equation are investigated in slab geometry. The resulting discrete diffusion equations are found to have nonphysical terms that are proportional to any cell-edge discontinuity in the temperature representation. Based on this analysis it is possible to design accurate schemes for representing the material temperature, for coupling thermal radiation transport codes to a cell centred representation of internal energy favoured by ALE (arbitrary Lagrange–Eulerian) hydrodynamics schemes

  5. Recommended direct simulation Monte Carlo collision model parameters for modeling ionized air transport processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic approach for calibrating the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) collision model parameters to achieve consistency in the transport processes is presented. The DSMC collision cross section model parameters are calibrated for high temperature atmospheric conditions by matching the collision integrals from DSMC against ab initio based collision integrals that are currently employed in the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) and Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) high temperature computational fluid dynamics solvers. The DSMC parameter values are computed for the widely used Variable Hard Sphere (VHS) and the Variable Soft Sphere (VSS) models using the collision-specific pairing approach. The recommended best-fit VHS/VSS parameter values are provided over a temperature range of 1000-20 000 K for a thirteen-species ionized air mixture. Use of the VSS model is necessary to achieve consistency in transport processes of ionized gases. The agreement of the VSS model transport properties with the transport properties as determined by the ab initio collision integral fits was found to be within 6% in the entire temperature range, regardless of the composition of the mixture. The recommended model parameter values can be readily applied to any gas mixture involving binary collisional interactions between the chemical species presented for the specified temperature range

  6. Recommended direct simulation Monte Carlo collision model parameters for modeling ionized air transport processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminathan-Gopalan, Krishnan; Stephani, Kelly A., E-mail: ksteph@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    A systematic approach for calibrating the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) collision model parameters to achieve consistency in the transport processes is presented. The DSMC collision cross section model parameters are calibrated for high temperature atmospheric conditions by matching the collision integrals from DSMC against ab initio based collision integrals that are currently employed in the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) and Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) high temperature computational fluid dynamics solvers. The DSMC parameter values are computed for the widely used Variable Hard Sphere (VHS) and the Variable Soft Sphere (VSS) models using the collision-specific pairing approach. The recommended best-fit VHS/VSS parameter values are provided over a temperature range of 1000-20 000 K for a thirteen-species ionized air mixture. Use of the VSS model is necessary to achieve consistency in transport processes of ionized gases. The agreement of the VSS model transport properties with the transport properties as determined by the ab initio collision integral fits was found to be within 6% in the entire temperature range, regardless of the composition of the mixture. The recommended model parameter values can be readily applied to any gas mixture involving binary collisional interactions between the chemical species presented for the specified temperature range.

  7. The electron transport problem sampling by Monte Carlo individual collision technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of electron transport is of most interest in all fields of the modern science. To solve this problem the Monte Carlo sampling has to be used. The electron transport is characterized by a large number of individual interactions. To simulate electron transport the 'condensed history' technique may be used where a large number of collisions are grouped into a single step to be sampled randomly. Another kind of Monte Carlo sampling is the individual collision technique. In comparison with condensed history technique researcher has the incontestable advantages. For example one does not need to give parameters altered by condensed history technique like upper limit for electron energy, resolution, number of sub-steps etc. Also the condensed history technique may lose some very important tracks of electrons because of its limited nature by step parameters of particle movement and due to weakness of algorithms for example energy indexing algorithm. There are no these disadvantages in the individual collision technique. This report presents some sampling algorithms of new version BRAND code where above mentioned technique is used. All information on electrons was taken from Endf-6 files. They are the important part of BRAND. These files have not been processed but directly taken from electron information source. Four kinds of interaction like the elastic interaction, the Bremsstrahlung, the atomic excitation and the atomic electro-ionization were considered. In this report some results of sampling are presented after comparison with analogs. For example the endovascular radiotherapy problem (P2) of QUADOS2002 was presented in comparison with another techniques that are usually used. (authors)

  8. An EGS4 Monte Carlo user code for radiation therapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An EGS4 Monte Carlo user code (the UCRTP code) with voxel geometry has been developed as a prototype of the dose calculation engine for radiation therapy planning. A series of dose calculations for photon beam irradiation to a simplified heterogenous voxel phantom of a lung cancer patient has shown that significant build-up in lung tumor and build-down in surrounding normal lung tissue region exist due to the heterogeneity of the media and small field size. Most of the heterogeneity correction algorithms employed by the current commercial treatment planning systems are not satisfactory enough to account for the build-up/down. Since the commercial systems may significantly underestimate the dose in normal lung tissues, sufficient verification and quality assurance of the radiation therapy planning is needed especially in the lung cancer treatment. (author)

  9. Monte Carlo radiation transfer simulations of photospheric emission in long-duration Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Lazzati, Davide

    2016-01-01

    We present MCRaT, a Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer code for self-consistently computing the light curves and spectra of the photospheric emission from relativistic, unmagnetized jets. We apply MCRaT to a relativistic hydrodynamic simulation of a long duration gamma-ray burst jet, and present the resulting light-curves and time-dependent spectra for observers at various angles from the jet axis. We compare our results to observational results and find that photospheric emission is a viable model to explain the prompt phase of long-duration gamma-ray bursts at the peak frequency and above, but faces challenges in reproducing the flat spectrum below the peak frequency. We finally discuss possible limitations of these results both in terms of the hydrodynamics and the radiation transfer and how these limitations could affect the conclusions that we present.

  10. Radiative transfer and spectroscopic databases: A line-sampling Monte Carlo approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtier, Mathieu; Blanco, Stéphane; Dauchet, Jérémi; El Hafi, Mouna; Eymet, Vincent; Fournier, Richard; Roger, Maxime; Spiesser, Christophe; Terrée, Guillaume

    2016-03-01

    Dealing with molecular-state transitions for radiative transfer purposes involves two successive steps that both reach the complexity level at which physicists start thinking about statistical approaches: (1) constructing line-shaped absorption spectra as the result of very numerous state-transitions, (2) integrating over optical-path domains. For the first time, we show here how these steps can be addressed simultaneously using the null-collision concept. This opens the door to the design of Monte Carlo codes directly estimating radiative transfer observables from spectroscopic databases. The intermediate step of producing accurate high-resolution absorption spectra is no longer required. A Monte Carlo algorithm is proposed and applied to six one-dimensional test cases. It allows the computation of spectrally integrated intensities (over 25 cm-1 bands or the full IR range) in a few seconds, regardless of the retained database and line model. But free parameters need to be selected and they impact the convergence. A first possible selection is provided in full detail. We observe that this selection is highly satisfactory for quite distinct atmospheric and combustion configurations, but a more systematic exploration is still in progress.

  11. Development and validation of Monte Carlo dose computations for contrast-enhanced stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contrast-enhanced stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy (SSRT) is an innovative technique based on localized dose-enhancement effects obtained by reinforced photoelectric absorption in the tumor. Medium energy monochromatic X-rays (50 - 100 keV) are used for irradiating tumors previously loaded with a high-Z element. Clinical trials of SSRT are being prepared at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), an iodinated contrast agent will be used. In order to compute the energy deposited in the patient (dose), a dedicated treatment planning system (TPS) has been developed for the clinical trials, based on the ISOgray TPS. This work focuses on the SSRT specific modifications of the TPS, especially to the PENELOPE-based Monte Carlo dose engine. The TPS uses a dedicated Monte Carlo simulation of medium energy polarized photons to compute the deposited energy in the patient. Simulations are performed considering the synchrotron source, the modeled beamline geometry and finally the patient. Specific materials were also implemented in the voxelized geometry of the patient, to consider iodine concentrations in the tumor. The computation process has been optimized and parallelized. Finally a specific computation of absolute doses and associated irradiation times (instead of monitor units) was implemented. The dedicated TPS was validated with depth dose curves, dose profiles and absolute dose measurements performed at the ESRF in a water tank and solid water phantoms with or without bone slabs. (author)

  12. Simulating Radiation Transport in Curved Spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endeve, Eirik; Hauck, Cory; Xing, Yulong; Cardall, Christian; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2014-03-01

    We are developing methods for simulation of radiation transport in systems governed by strong gravity (e.g., neutrino transport in core-collapse supernovae). By employing conservative formulations of the general relativistic Boltzmann equation, we aim to develop methods that are (i) high-order accurate for computational efficiency; (ii) robust in the sense that the phase space density f preserves the maximum principle of the physical model (f ∈ [ 0 , 1 ] for fermions); and (iii) applicable to curvilinear coordinate systems to accommodate curved spacetimes, which result in gravity-induced frequency shift and angular aberration. Our approach is based on the Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin method, which has many attractive properties, including high-order accuracy on a compact stencil. We present the physical model, describe our numerical methods, and show results from implementations in spherical and axial symmetry. Our tests show that the method is high-order accurate and strictly preserves the maximum principle on f. We also demonstrate the ability of our method to accurately include effects of a strong gravitational field.

  13. Transport and radiation in complex LTE mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Jesper; Peerenboom, Kim; Suijker, Jos; Gnybida, Mykhailo; van Dijk, Jan

    2014-10-01

    Complex LTE mixtures are for example encountered in re-entry, welding, spraying and lighting. These mixtures typically contain a rich chemistry in combination with large temperature gradients. LTE conditions are also interesting because they can aid in the validation of NLTE algorithms. An example is the calculation of transport properties. In this work a mercury free high intensity discharge lamp is considered. The investigation focusses on using salts like InI or SnI as a buffer species. By using these species a dominant background gas like mercury is no longer present. As a consequence the diffusion algorithms based on Fick's law are no longer applicable and the Stefan-Maxwell equations must be solved. This system of equations is modified with conservation rules to set a coldspot pressure for saturated species and enforce the mass dosage for unsaturated species. The radiative energy transport is taken into account by raytracing. Quantum mechanical simulations have been used to calculate the potential curves and the transition dipole moments for indium with iodine and tin with iodine. The results of these calculations have been used to predict the quasistatic broadening by iodine. The work was supported by the project SCHELP from the Belgium IWT (Project Number 110003) and the CATRENE SEEL Project (CA502).

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of secondary radiation exposure from high-energy photon therapy using an anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatments delivering large amounts of monitor units (MUs) recently raised concern about higher risks for secondary malignancies. In this study, optimised combinations of several variance reduction techniques (VRTs) have been implemented in order to achieve a high precision in Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport simulations and the calculation of in- and out-of-field photon and neutron dose-equivalent distributions in an anthropomorphic phantom using MCNPX, v.2.7. The computer model included a Varian Clinac 2100C treatment head and a high-resolution head phantom. By means of the applied VRTs, a relative uncertainty for the photon dose-equivalent distribution of <1 % in-field and 15 % in average over the rest of the phantom could be obtained. Neutron dose equivalent, caused by photonuclear reactions in the linear accelerator components at photon energies of approximately >8 MeV, has been calculated. Relative uncertainty, calculated for each voxel, could be kept below 5 % in average over all voxels of the phantom. Thus, a very detailed neutron dose distribution could be obtained. The achieved precision now allows a far better estimation of both photon and especially neutron doses out-of-field, where neutrons can become the predominant component of secondary radiation. (authors)

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of secondary radiation exposure from high-energy photon therapy using an anthropomorphic phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankl, Matthias; Macián-Juan, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    The development of intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatments delivering large amounts of monitor units (MUs) recently raised concern about higher risks for secondary malignancies. In this study, optimised combinations of several variance reduction techniques (VRTs) have been implemented in order to achieve a high precision in Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport simulations and the calculation of in- and out-of-field photon and neutron dose-equivalent distributions in an anthropomorphic phantom using MCNPX, v.2.7. The computer model included a Varian Clinac 2100C treatment head and a high-resolution head phantom. By means of the applied VRTs, a relative uncertainty for the photon dose-equivalent distribution of 8 MeV, has been calculated. Relative uncertainty, calculated for each voxel, could be kept below 5 % in average over all voxels of the phantom. Thus, a very detailed neutron dose distribution could be obtained. The achieved precision now allows a far better estimation of both photon and especially neutron doses out-of-field, where neutrons can become the predominant component of secondary radiation. PMID:26311702

  16. Improved Convergence Rate of Multi-Group Scattering Moment Tallies for Monte Carlo Neutron Transport Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Adam

    Multi-group scattering moment matrices are critical to the solution of the multi-group form of the neutron transport equation, as they are responsible for describing the change in direction and energy of neutrons. These matrices, however, are difficult to correctly calculate from the measured nuclear data with both deterministic and stochastic methods. Calculating these parameters when using deterministic methods requires a set of assumptions which do not hold true in all conditions. These quantities can be calculated accurately with stochastic methods, however doing so is computationally expensive due to the poor efficiency of tallying scattering moment matrices. This work presents an improved method of obtaining multi-group scattering moment matrices from a Monte Carlo neutron transport code. This improved method of tallying the scattering moment matrices is based on recognizing that all of the outgoing particle information is known a priori and can be taken advantage of to increase the tallying efficiency (therefore reducing the uncertainty) of the stochastically integrated tallies. In this scheme, the complete outgoing probability distribution is tallied, supplying every one of the scattering moment matrices elements with its share of data. In addition to reducing the uncertainty, this method allows for the use of a track-length estimation process potentially offering even further improvement to the tallying efficiency. Unfortunately, to produce the needed distributions, the probability functions themselves must undergo an integration over the outgoing energy and scattering angle dimensions. This integration is too costly to perform during the Monte Carlo simulation itself and therefore must be performed in advance by way of a pre-processing code. The new method increases the information obtained from tally events and therefore has a significantly higher efficiency than the currently used techniques. The improved method has been implemented in a code system

  17. Study on shielding design method of radiation streaming in a tokamak-type DT fusion reactor based on Monte Carlo calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    three dimensional Monte Carlo calculation is required for the shielding calculation in the tokamak-type DT nuclear fusion reactor with many penetrations. 2) In Chapter 3, radiation streaming through the slit between the blanket modules is described, in Chapter 4, that through the small circular duct in the blanket modules is described, in Chapter 5, and that through the large opening duct in the vacuum vessel is described. The nuclear properties of the blanket, the vacuum vessel and the TF coil are systematically calculated for the various configurations. Based on the obtained results, the analytical formulas of these nuclear properties are deduced, and the guideline is proposed for the shielding design. 3) In Chapter 6, in order to evaluate the decay gamma ray dose rate around the duct due to radiation streaming through the large opening duct in the vacuum vessel, the evaluation method is proposed using the decay gamma ray Monte Carlo calculation. By replacing the prompt gamma-ray spectrum to the decay one in the Monte Carlo code, the decay gamma ray Monte Carlo transport calculation is conducted. The effective variance reduction method is developed for the decay gamma ray Monte Carlo calculation in the over-all tokamak region with drastically reducing the calculation time. Using this method, the shielding calculation is conducted for the ITER duct penetration, and the effectiveness of this method is demonstrated. (author)

  18. Testing the accuracy of electron transport in the Monte Carlo code FLUKA for calculation of ion chamber wall perturbation factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reliable Monte Carlo based investigation of ion chambers in medical physics problems depends on the accuracy of the charged particle transport and implementations of the condensed history technique. Improper handling of media interfaces can lead to anomalous results or 'interface artefacts'. This work presents a rigorous investigation of the electron transport algorithm in the general purpose Monte Carlo (MC) code FLUKA (2008.3b.1). A 'Fano test' was implemented in order to benchmark the accuracy of the algorithm. Furthermore, the calculation of wall perturbation factors pwall of a Roos type chamber irradiated by electrons were performed and compared with values based on the EGSnrc MC code

  19. Measured performances on vectorization and multitasking with a Monte Carlo code for neutron transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarized two improvements of a real production code by using vectorization and multitasking techniques. After a short description of Monte Carlo algorithms employed in our neutron transport problems, we briefly describe the work we have done in order to get a vector code. Vectorization principles will be presented and measured performances on the CRAY 1S, CYBER 205 and CRAY X-MP compared in terms of vector lengths. The second part of this work is an adaptation to multitasking on the CRAY X-MP using exclusively standard multitasking tools available with FORTRAN under the COS 1.13 system. Two examples will be presented. The goal of the first one is to measure the overhead inherent to multitasking when tasks become too small and to define a granularity threshold, that is to say a minimum size for a task. With the second example we propose a method that is very X-MP oriented in order to get the best speedup factor on such a computer. In conclusion we prove that Monte Carlo algorithms are very well suited to future vector and parallel computers. (orig.)

  20. Charge transport in a-Si:H detectors: Comparison of analytical and Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand the signal formation in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) p-i-n detectors, dispersive charge transport due to multiple trapping in a-Si:H tail states is studied both analytically and by Monte Carlo simulations. An analytical solution is found for the free electron and hole distributions n(x,t) and the transient current I(t) due to an initial electron-hole pair generated at an arbitrary depth in the detector for the case of exponential band tails and linear field profiles; integrating over all e-h pairs produced along the particle's trajectory yields the actual distributions and current; the induced charge Q(t) is obtained by numerically integrating the current. This generalizes previous models used to analyze time-of-flight experiments. The Monte Carlo simulation provides the same information but can be applied to arbitrary field profiles, field dependent mobilities and localized state distributions. A comparison of both calculations is made in a simple case to show that identical results are obtained over a large time domain. A comparison with measured signals confirms that the total induced charge depends on the applied bias voltage. The applicability of the same approach to other semiconductors is discussed

  1. Monte Carlo electron-photon transport using GPUs as an accelerator: Results for a water-aluminum-water phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electron-photon coupled Monte Carlo code ARCHER - Accelerated Radiation-transport Computations in Heterogeneous Environments - is being developed at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute as a software test bed for emerging heterogeneous high performance computers that utilize accelerators such as GPUs. In this paper, the preliminary results of code development and testing are presented. The electron transport in media was modeled using the class-II condensed history method. The electron energy considered ranges from a few hundred keV to 30 MeV. Moller scattering and bremsstrahlung processes above a preset energy were explicitly modeled. Energy loss below that threshold was accounted for using the Continuously Slowing Down Approximation (CSDA). Photon transport was dealt with using the delta tracking method. Photoelectric effect, Compton scattering and pair production were modeled. Voxelised geometry was supported. A serial ARHCHER-CPU was first written in C++. The code was then ported to the GPU platform using CUDA C. The hardware involved a desktop PC with an Intel Xeon X5660 CPU and six NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPUs. ARHCHER was tested for a case of 20 MeV electron beam incident perpendicularly on a water-aluminum-water phantom. The depth and lateral dose profiles were found to agree with results obtained from well tested MC codes. Using six GPU cards, 6x106 histories of electrons were simulated within 2 seconds. In comparison, the same case running the EGSnrc and MCNPX codes required 1645 seconds and 9213 seconds, respectively, on a CPU with a single core used. (authors)

  2. Monte Carlo electron-photon transport using GPUs as an accelerator: Results for a water-aluminum-water phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, L.; Du, X.; Liu, T.; Xu, X. G. [Nuclear Engineering Program, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    An electron-photon coupled Monte Carlo code ARCHER - Accelerated Radiation-transport Computations in Heterogeneous Environments - is being developed at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute as a software test bed for emerging heterogeneous high performance computers that utilize accelerators such as GPUs. In this paper, the preliminary results of code development and testing are presented. The electron transport in media was modeled using the class-II condensed history method. The electron energy considered ranges from a few hundred keV to 30 MeV. Moller scattering and bremsstrahlung processes above a preset energy were explicitly modeled. Energy loss below that threshold was accounted for using the Continuously Slowing Down Approximation (CSDA). Photon transport was dealt with using the delta tracking method. Photoelectric effect, Compton scattering and pair production were modeled. Voxelised geometry was supported. A serial ARHCHER-CPU was first written in C++. The code was then ported to the GPU platform using CUDA C. The hardware involved a desktop PC with an Intel Xeon X5660 CPU and six NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPUs. ARHCHER was tested for a case of 20 MeV electron beam incident perpendicularly on a water-aluminum-water phantom. The depth and lateral dose profiles were found to agree with results obtained from well tested MC codes. Using six GPU cards, 6x10{sup 6} histories of electrons were simulated within 2 seconds. In comparison, the same case running the EGSnrc and MCNPX codes required 1645 seconds and 9213 seconds, respectively, on a CPU with a single core used. (authors)

  3. Overview of TRIPOLI-4 version 7, Continuous-energy Monte Carlo Transport Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIPOLI-4 code is used essentially for four major classes of applications: shielding studies, criticality studies, core physics studies, and instrumentation studies. In this updated overview of the Monte Carlo transport code TRIPOLI-4, we list and describe its current main features, including recent developments or extended capacities like effective beta estimation, photo-nuclear reactions or extended mesh tallies. The code computes coupled neutron-photon propagation as well as the electron-photon cascade shower. While providing the user with common biasing techniques, it also implements an automatic weighting scheme. TRIPOLI-4 has support for execution in parallel mode. Special features and applications are also presented concerning: 'particles storage', resuming a stopped TRIPOLI-4 run, collision bands, Green's functions, source convergence in criticality mode, and mesh tally

  4. GPU-based high performance Monte Carlo simulation in neutron transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heimlich, Adino; Mol, Antonio C.A.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Inteligencia Artificial Aplicada], e-mail: cmnap@ien.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    Graphics Processing Units (GPU) are high performance co-processors intended, originally, to improve the use and quality of computer graphics applications. Since researchers and practitioners realized the potential of using GPU for general purpose, their application has been extended to other fields out of computer graphics scope. The main objective of this work is to evaluate the impact of using GPU in neutron transport simulation by Monte Carlo method. To accomplish that, GPU- and CPU-based (single and multicore) approaches were developed and applied to a simple, but time-consuming problem. Comparisons demonstrated that the GPU-based approach is about 15 times faster than a parallel 8-core CPU-based approach also developed in this work. (author)

  5. penORNL: a parallel Monte Carlo photon and electron transport package using PENELOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekar, Kursat B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, Thomas Martin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Patton, Bruce W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Weber, Charles F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The parallel Monte Carlo photon and electron transport code package penORNL was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to enable advanced scanning electron microscope (SEM) simulations on high performance computing systems. This paper discusses the implementations, capabilities and parallel performance of the new code package. penORNL uses PENELOPE for its physics calculations and provides all available PENELOPE features to the users, as well as some new features including source definitions specifically developed for SEM simulations, a pulse-height tally capability for detailed simulations of gamma and x-ray detectors, and a modified interaction forcing mechanism to enable accurate energy deposition calculations. The parallel performance of penORNL was extensively tested with several model problems, and very good linear parallel scaling was observed with up to 512 processors. penORNL, along with its new features, will be available for SEM simulations upon completion of the new pulse-height tally implementation.

  6. Analysis of Light Transport Features in Stone Fruits Using Monte Carlo Simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chizhu Ding

    Full Text Available The propagation of light in stone fruit tissue was modeled using the Monte Carlo (MC method. Peaches were used as the representative model of stone fruits. The effects of the fruit core and the skin on light transport features in the peaches were assessed. It is suggested that the skin, flesh and core should be separately considered with different parameters to accurately simulate light propagation in intact stone fruit. The detection efficiency was evaluated by the percentage of effective photons and the detection sensitivity of the flesh tissue. The fruit skin decreases the detection efficiency, especially in the region close to the incident point. The choices of the source-detector distance, detection angle and source intensity were discussed. Accurate MC simulations may result in better insight into light propagation in stone fruit and aid in achieving the optimal fruit quality inspection without extensive experimental measurements.

  7. MCPT: A Monte Carlo code for simulation of photon transport in tomographic scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCPT is a special-purpose Monte Carlo code designed to simulate photon transport in tomographic scanners. Variance reduction schemes and sampling games present in MCPT were selected to characterize features common to most tomographic scanners. Combined splitting and biasing (CSB) games are used to systematically sample important detection pathways. An efficient splitting game is used to tally particle energy deposition in detection zones. The pulse height distribution of each detector can be found by convolving the calculated energy deposition distribution with the detector's resolution function. A general geometric modelling package, HERMETOR, is used to describe the geometry of the tomographic scanners and provide MCPT information needed for particle tracking. MCPT's modelling capabilites are described and preliminary experimental validation is presented. (orig.)

  8. Application of ENDF nuclear data for testing a Monte-Carlo neutron and photon transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte-Carlo photon and neutron transport code was developed at OAEP. The code was written in C and C++ languages in an object-oriented programming style. Constructive solid geometry (CSG), rather than combinatorial, was used such that making its input file more readable and recognizable. As the first stage of code validation, data from some ENDF files, in the MCNP's specific format, were used and compared with experimental data. The neutron (from a 300 mCi Am/Be source) attenuation by water was chosen to compare the results. The agreement of the quantity 1/Σ among the calculation from SIPHON and MCNP, and the experiment - which are 10.39 cm, 9.71 cm and 10.25 cm respectively - was satisfactorily well within the experimental uncertainties. These results also agree with the 10.8 cm result of N.M., Mirza, et al. (author)

  9. Evaluation and comparison of SN and Monte-Carlo charged particle transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was done to evaluate a 3-D SN charged particle transport code called SMARTEPANTS1 and another 3-D Monte Carlo code called Integrated Tiger Series, ITS2. The evaluation study of SMARTEPANTS code was based on angular discretization and reflected boundary sensitivity whilst the evaluation of ITS was based on CPU time and variance reduction. The comparison of the two code was based on energy and charge deposition calculation in block of Gallium Arsenide with embedded gold cylinders. The result of evaluation tests shows that an S8 calculation maintains both accuracy and speed and calculations with reflected boundaries geometry produces full symmetrical results. As expected for ITS evaluation, the CPU time and variance reduction are opposite to a point beyond which the history augmentation while increasing the CPU time do not result in variance reduction. The comparison test problem showed excellent agreement in total energy deposition calculations

  10. Towards scalable parellelism in Monte Carlo particle transport codes using remote memory access

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Paul K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Forrest B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Forget, Benoit [MIT

    2010-01-01

    One forthcoming challenge in the area of high-performance computing is having the ability to run large-scale problems while coping with less memory per compute node. In this work, they investigate a novel data decomposition method that would allow Monte Carlo transport calculations to be performed on systems with limited memory per compute node. In this method, each compute node remotely retrieves a small set of geometry and cross-section data as needed and remotely accumulates local tallies when crossing the boundary of the local spatial domain. initial results demonstrate that while the method does allow large problems to be run in a memory-limited environment, achieving scalability may be difficult due to inefficiencies in the current implementation of RMA operations.

  11. GPU-based high performance Monte Carlo simulation in neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphics Processing Units (GPU) are high performance co-processors intended, originally, to improve the use and quality of computer graphics applications. Since researchers and practitioners realized the potential of using GPU for general purpose, their application has been extended to other fields out of computer graphics scope. The main objective of this work is to evaluate the impact of using GPU in neutron transport simulation by Monte Carlo method. To accomplish that, GPU- and CPU-based (single and multicore) approaches were developed and applied to a simple, but time-consuming problem. Comparisons demonstrated that the GPU-based approach is about 15 times faster than a parallel 8-core CPU-based approach also developed in this work. (author)

  12. Core-scale solute transport model selection using Monte Carlo analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Malama, Bwalya; James, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    Model applicability to core-scale solute transport is evaluated using breakthrough data from column experiments conducted with conservative tracers tritium (H-3) and sodium-22, and the retarding solute uranium-232. The three models considered are single-porosity, double-porosity with single-rate mobile-immobile mass-exchange, and the multirate model, which is a deterministic model that admits the statistics of a random mobile-immobile mass-exchange rate coefficient. The experiments were conducted on intact Culebra Dolomite core samples. Previously, data were analyzed using single- and double-porosity models although the Culebra Dolomite is known to possess multiple types and scales of porosity, and to exhibit multirate mobile-immobile-domain mass transfer characteristics at field scale. The data are reanalyzed here and null-space Monte Carlo analysis is used to facilitate objective model selection. Prediction (or residual) bias is adopted as a measure of the model structural error. The analysis clearly shows ...

  13. Srna-Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulation in combined and voxelized geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Ilic, R D; Stankovic, S J

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes new Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulations in complex geometrical forms and in materials of different composition. The SRNA codes were developed for three dimensional (3D) dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry. The model of these codes is based on the theory of proton multiple scattering and a simple model of compound nucleus decay. The developed package consists of two codes: SRNA-2KG and SRNA-VOX. The first code simulates proton transport in combined geometry that can be described by planes and second order surfaces. The second one uses the voxelized geometry of material zones and is specifically adopted for the application of patient computer tomography data. Transition probabilities for both codes are given by the SRNADAT program. In this paper, we will present the models and algorithms of our programs, as well as the results of the numerical experiments we have carried out applying them, along with the results of proton transport simulation obtaine...

  14. Adjoint-based deviational Monte Carlo methods for phonon transport calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péraud, Jean-Philippe M.; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas G.

    2015-06-01

    In the field of linear transport, adjoint formulations exploit linearity to derive powerful reciprocity relations between a variety of quantities of interest. In this paper, we develop an adjoint formulation of the linearized Boltzmann transport equation for phonon transport. We use this formulation for accelerating deviational Monte Carlo simulations of complex, multiscale problems. Benefits include significant computational savings via direct variance reduction, or by enabling formulations which allow more efficient use of computational resources, such as formulations which provide high resolution in a particular phase-space dimension (e.g., spectral). We show that the proposed adjoint-based methods are particularly well suited to problems involving a wide range of length scales (e.g., nanometers to hundreds of microns) and lead to computational methods that can calculate quantities of interest with a cost that is independent of the system characteristic length scale, thus removing the traditional stiffness of kinetic descriptions. Applications to problems of current interest, such as simulation of transient thermoreflectance experiments or spectrally resolved calculation of the effective thermal conductivity of nanostructured materials, are presented and discussed in detail.

  15. Quantitative comparisons between experimentally measured 2-D carbon radiation and Monte Carlo impurity (MCI) code simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimentally measured carbon line emissions and total radiated power distributions from the DIII-D divertor and Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) are compared to those calculated with the Monte Carlo Impurity (MCI) model. A UEDGE background plasma is used in MCI with the Roth and Garcia-Rosales (RG-R) chemical sputtering model and/or one of six physical sputtering models. While results from these simulations do not reproduce all of the features seen in the experimentally measured radiation patterns, the total radiated power calculated in MCI is in relatively good agreement with that measured by the DIII-D bolometric system when the Smith78 physical sputtering model is coupled to RG-R chemical sputtering in an unaltered UEDGE plasma. Alternatively, MCI simulations done with UEDGE background ion temperatures along the divertor target plates adjusted to better match those measured in the experiment resulted in three physical sputtering models which when coupled to the RG-R model gave a total radiated power that was within 10% of measured value

  16. Stochastic methods for uncertainty quantification in radiation transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fichtl, Erin D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prinja, Anil K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Warsa, James S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The use of generalized polynomial chaos (gPC) expansions is investigated for uncertainty quantification in radiation transport. The gPC represents second-order random processes in terms of an expansion of orthogonal polynomials of random variables and is used to represent the uncertain input(s) and unknown(s). We assume a single uncertain input-the total macroscopic cross section-although this does not represent a limitation of the approaches considered here. Two solution methods are examined: The Stochastic Finite Element Method (SFEM) and the Stochastic Collocation Method (SCM). The SFEM entails taking Galerkin projections onto the orthogonal basis, which, for fixed source problems, yields a linear system of fully -coupled equations for the PC coefficients of the unknown. For k-eigenvalue calculations, the SFEM system is non-linear and a Newton-Krylov method is employed to solve it. The SCM utilizes a suitable quadrature rule to compute the moments or PC coefficients of the unknown(s), thus the SCM solution involves a series of independent deterministic transport solutions. The accuracy and efficiency of the two methods are compared and contrasted. The PC coefficients are used to compute the moments and probability density functions of the unknown(s), which are shown to be accurate by comparing with Monte Carlo results. Our work demonstrates that stochastic spectral expansions are a viable alternative to sampling-based uncertainty quantification techniques since both provide a complete characterization of the distribution of the flux and the k-eigenvalue. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that, unlike perturbation methods, SFEM and SCM can handle large parameter uncertainty.

  17. Modeling parameterized geometry in GPU-based Monte Carlo particle transport simulation for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yujie; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun

    2016-08-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) particle transport simulation on a graphics-processing unit (GPU) platform has been extensively studied recently due to the efficiency advantage achieved via massive parallelization. Almost all of the existing GPU-based MC packages were developed for voxelized geometry. This limited application scope of these packages. The purpose of this paper is to develop a module to model parametric geometry and integrate it in GPU-based MC simulations. In our module, each continuous region was defined by its bounding surfaces that were parameterized by quadratic functions. Particle navigation functions in this geometry were developed. The module was incorporated to two previously developed GPU-based MC packages and was tested in two example problems: (1) low energy photon transport simulation in a brachytherapy case with a shielded cylinder applicator and (2) MeV coupled photon/electron transport simulation in a phantom containing several inserts of different shapes. In both cases, the calculated dose distributions agreed well with those calculated in the corresponding voxelized geometry. The averaged dose differences were 1.03% and 0.29%, respectively. We also used the developed package to perform simulations of a Varian VS 2000 brachytherapy source and generated a phase-space file. The computation time under the parameterized geometry depended on the memory location storing the geometry data. When the data was stored in GPU's shared memory, the highest computational speed was achieved. Incorporation of parameterized geometry yielded a computation time that was ~3 times of that in the corresponding voxelized geometry. We also developed a strategy to use an auxiliary index array to reduce frequency of geometry calculations and hence improve efficiency. With this strategy, the computational time ranged in 1.75-2.03 times of the voxelized geometry for coupled photon/electron transport depending on the voxel dimension of the auxiliary index array, and in 0

  18. Modeling parameterized geometry in GPU-based Monte Carlo particle transport simulation for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yujie; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun

    2016-08-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) particle transport simulation on a graphics-processing unit (GPU) platform has been extensively studied recently due to the efficiency advantage achieved via massive parallelization. Almost all of the existing GPU-based MC packages were developed for voxelized geometry. This limited application scope of these packages. The purpose of this paper is to develop a module to model parametric geometry and integrate it in GPU-based MC simulations. In our module, each continuous region was defined by its bounding surfaces that were parameterized by quadratic functions. Particle navigation functions in this geometry were developed. The module was incorporated to two previously developed GPU-based MC packages and was tested in two example problems: (1) low energy photon transport simulation in a brachytherapy case with a shielded cylinder applicator and (2) MeV coupled photon/electron transport simulation in a phantom containing several inserts of different shapes. In both cases, the calculated dose distributions agreed well with those calculated in the corresponding voxelized geometry. The averaged dose differences were 1.03% and 0.29%, respectively. We also used the developed package to perform simulations of a Varian VS 2000 brachytherapy source and generated a phase-space file. The computation time under the parameterized geometry depended on the memory location storing the geometry data. When the data was stored in GPU’s shared memory, the highest computational speed was achieved. Incorporation of parameterized geometry yielded a computation time that was ~3 times of that in the corresponding voxelized geometry. We also developed a strategy to use an auxiliary index array to reduce frequency of geometry calculations and hence improve efficiency. With this strategy, the computational time ranged in 1.75–2.03 times of the voxelized geometry for coupled photon/electron transport depending on the voxel dimension of the auxiliary index array, and in 0

  19. Transport of contaminated iron-scrap with ionic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the contribution author informs about problems with transport of contaminated iron-scrap with ionization radiation that are solved in our company ZSSK Cargo - Slovakia. In last years (2006 - 2013) there has been recurrence of transports, in which an increased amount of radioactivity was found. These were the shipments of iron-scrap with accidental ionizing radiation.

  20. Radiation doses in volume-of-interest breast computed tomography—A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Chao-Jen, E-mail: cjlai3711@gmail.com; Zhong, Yuncheng; Yi, Ying; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C. [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030-4009 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Cone beam breast computed tomography (breast CT) with true three-dimensional, nearly isotropic spatial resolution has been developed and investigated over the past decade to overcome the problem of lesions overlapping with breast anatomical structures on two-dimensional mammographic images. However, the ability of breast CT to detect small objects, such as tissue structure edges and small calcifications, is limited. To resolve this problem, the authors proposed and developed a volume-of-interest (VOI) breast CT technique to image a small VOI using a higher radiation dose to improve that region’s visibility. In this study, the authors performed Monte Carlo simulations to estimate average breast dose and average glandular dose (AGD) for the VOI breast CT technique. Methods: Electron–Gamma-Shower system code-based Monte Carlo codes were used to simulate breast CT. The Monte Carlo codes estimated were validated using physical measurements of air kerma ratios and point doses in phantoms with an ion chamber and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. The validated full cone x-ray source was then collimated to simulate half cone beam x-rays to image digital pendant-geometry, hemi-ellipsoidal, homogeneous breast phantoms and to estimate breast doses with full field scans. 13-cm in diameter, 10-cm long hemi-ellipsoidal homogeneous phantoms were used to simulate median breasts. Breast compositions of 25% and 50% volumetric glandular fractions (VGFs) were used to investigate the influence on breast dose. The simulated half cone beam x-rays were then collimated to a narrow x-ray beam with an area of 2.5 × 2.5 cm{sup 2} field of view at the isocenter plane and to perform VOI field scans. The Monte Carlo results for the full field scans and the VOI field scans were then used to estimate the AGD for the VOI breast CT technique. Results: The ratios of air kerma ratios and dose measurement results from the Monte Carlo simulation to those from the physical

  1. User manual for version 4.3 of the Tripoli-4 Monte-Carlo method particle transport computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manual relates to Version 4.3 TRIPOLI-4 code. TRIPOLI-4 is a computer code simulating the transport of neutrons, photons, electrons and positrons. It can be used for radiation shielding calculations (long-distance propagation with flux attenuation in non-multiplying media) and neutronic calculations (fissile medium, criticality or sub-criticality basis). This makes it possible to calculate keff (for criticality), flux, currents, reaction rates and multi-group cross-sections. TRIPOLI-4 is a three-dimensional code that uses the Monte-Carlo method. It allows for point-wise description in terms of energy of cross-sections and multi-group homogenized cross-sections and features two modes of geometrical representation: surface and combinatorial. The code uses cross-section libraries in ENDF/B format (such as JEF2-2, ENDF/B-VI and JENDL) for point-wise description cross-sections in APOTRIM format (from the APOLLO2 code) or a format specific to TRIPOLI-4 for multi-group description. (authors)

  2. Benchmark experiment for the verification of radiation transport calculations for the radiotherapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo simulations are regarded as the most accurate method of solving complex problems of radiation transport. Therefore, they have great potential to realize more exact dose calculations for treatment planning in radiation therapy. However, there is a lack of information on how correct the results of Monte Carlo calculations are on an absolute basis. A practical verification of the calculations can be performed by direct comparison with a benchmark experiment. Thereby, the uncertainties of the experimental result and of the simulation also have to be considered to make a meaningful comparison between the experiment and the simulation possible. This dissertation presents a benchmark experiment and its results, including the uncertainty, which can be used to test the accuracy of Monte Carlo calculations in the field of radiation therapy. The experiment was planned to have parallels to clinical radiation therapy, among other things, with respect to the radiation applied, the materials used and the manner of dose detection. The benchmark experiment aimed at an absolute comparison with a simulation result and because of this it was necessary to use a special research accelerator as a radiation source in the experiment. The accurate characterization of the accelerator beam was a precondition to define a realistic radiation source for the Monte Carlo simulation. Therefore, this work also deals with the characterization of the source and investigations regarding the X-ray target used. Additionally, the dissertation contains the verification of the widely used Monte Carlo program EGSnrc by the benchmark experiment. The simulation of the experiment by EGSnrc, the results and the estimation of the uncertainty related to the simulation are documented in this work.The results and findings of this dissertation end in a comparison between the results of the benchmark experiment and the corresponding calculations with EGSnrc. The benchmark experiment and the simulations

  3. Comparison of the TEP method for neutral particle transport in the plasma edge with the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transmission/escape probability (TEP) method for neutral particle transport has recently been introduced and implemented for the calculation of 2-D neutral atom transport in the edge plasma and divertor regions of tokamaks. The results of an evaluation of the accuracy of the approximations made in the calculation of the basic TEP transport parameters are summarized. Comparisons of the TEP and Monte Carlo calculations for model problems using tokamak experimental geometries and for the analysis of measured neutral densities in DIII-D are presented. The TEP calculations are found to agree rather well with Monte Carlo results, for the most part, but the need for a few extensions of the basic TEP transport methodology and for inclusion of molecular effects and a better wall reflection model in the existing code is suggested by the study. (author)

  4. SU-E-T-558: Monte Carlo Photon Transport Simulations On GPU with Quadric Geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Monte Carlo simulation on GPU has experienced rapid advancements over the past a few years and tremendous accelerations have been achieved. Yet existing packages were developed only in voxelized geometry. In some applications, e.g. radioactive seed modeling, simulations in more complicated geometry are needed. This abstract reports our initial efforts towards developing a quadric geometry module aiming at expanding the application scope of GPU-based MC simulations. Methods: We defined the simulation geometry consisting of a number of homogeneous bodies, each specified by its material composition and limiting surfaces characterized by quadric functions. A tree data structure was utilized to define geometric relationship between different bodies. We modified our GPU-based photon MC transport package to incorporate this geometry. Specifically, geometry parameters were loaded into GPU’s shared memory for fast access. Geometry functions were rewritten to enable the identification of the body that contains the current particle location via a fast searching algorithm based on the tree data structure. Results: We tested our package in an example problem of HDR-brachytherapy dose calculation for shielded cylinder. The dose under the quadric geometry and that under the voxelized geometry agreed in 94.2% of total voxels within 20% isodose line based on a statistical t-test (95% confidence level), where the reference dose was defined to be the one at 0.5cm away from the cylinder surface. It took 243sec to transport 100million source photons under this quadric geometry on an NVidia Titan GPU card. Compared with simulation time of 99.6sec in the voxelized geometry, including quadric geometry reduced efficiency due to the complicated geometry-related computations. Conclusion: Our GPU-based MC package has been extended to support photon transport simulation in quadric geometry. Satisfactory accuracy was observed with a reduced efficiency. Developments for charged

  5. SU-E-T-558: Monte Carlo Photon Transport Simulations On GPU with Quadric Geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Y; Tian, Z; Jiang, S; Jia, X [The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Ctr, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo simulation on GPU has experienced rapid advancements over the past a few years and tremendous accelerations have been achieved. Yet existing packages were developed only in voxelized geometry. In some applications, e.g. radioactive seed modeling, simulations in more complicated geometry are needed. This abstract reports our initial efforts towards developing a quadric geometry module aiming at expanding the application scope of GPU-based MC simulations. Methods: We defined the simulation geometry consisting of a number of homogeneous bodies, each specified by its material composition and limiting surfaces characterized by quadric functions. A tree data structure was utilized to define geometric relationship between different bodies. We modified our GPU-based photon MC transport package to incorporate this geometry. Specifically, geometry parameters were loaded into GPU’s shared memory for fast access. Geometry functions were rewritten to enable the identification of the body that contains the current particle location via a fast searching algorithm based on the tree data structure. Results: We tested our package in an example problem of HDR-brachytherapy dose calculation for shielded cylinder. The dose under the quadric geometry and that under the voxelized geometry agreed in 94.2% of total voxels within 20% isodose line based on a statistical t-test (95% confidence level), where the reference dose was defined to be the one at 0.5cm away from the cylinder surface. It took 243sec to transport 100million source photons under this quadric geometry on an NVidia Titan GPU card. Compared with simulation time of 99.6sec in the voxelized geometry, including quadric geometry reduced efficiency due to the complicated geometry-related computations. Conclusion: Our GPU-based MC package has been extended to support photon transport simulation in quadric geometry. Satisfactory accuracy was observed with a reduced efficiency. Developments for charged

  6. Monte Carlo study of electron-plasmon scattering effects on hot electron transport in GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown using Monte Carlo simulation that electron-plasmon scattering affects substantially the hot-electron energy distribution function and transport properties in bulk GaAs. However, this effect is found to be much less than that predicted in earlier paper of other authors. (author). 5 refs, 7 figs

  7. A fast GPU-based Monte Carlo simulation of proton transport with detailed modeling of non-elastic interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Tseung, H. Wan Chan; J. Ma; Beltran, C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Very fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of proton transport have been implemented recently on GPUs. However, these usually use simplified models for non-elastic (NE) proton-nucleus interactions. Our primary goal is to build a GPU-based proton transport MC with detailed modeling of elastic and NE collisions. Methods: Using CUDA, we implemented GPU kernels for these tasks: (1) Simulation of spots from our scanning nozzle configurations, (2) Proton propagation through CT geometry, consid...

  8. Monte Carlo simulation methods of determining red bone marrow dose from external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To provide evidence for a more reasonable method of determining red bone marrow dose by analyzing and comparing existing simulation methods. Methods: By utilizing Monte Carlo simulation software MCNPX, the absorbed doses of red hone marrow of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) adult female voxel phantom were calculated through 4 different methods: direct energy deposition.dose response function (DRF), King-Spiers factor method and mass-energy absorption coefficient (MEAC). The radiation sources were defined as infinite plate.sources with the energy ranging from 20 keV to 10 MeV, and 23 sources with different energies were simulated in total. The source was placed right next to the front of the RPI model to achieve a homogeneous anteroposterior radiation scenario. The results of different simulated photon energy sources through different methods were compared. Results: When the photon energy was lower than 100 key, the direct energy deposition method gave the highest result while the MEAC and King-Spiers factor methods showed more reasonable results. When the photon energy was higher than 150 keV taking into account of the higher absorption ability of red bone marrow at higher photon energy, the result of the King-Spiers factor method was larger than those of other methods. Conclusions: The King-Spiers factor method might be the most reasonable method to estimate the red bone marrow dose from external radiation. (authors)

  9. An algorithm for Monte-Carlo time-dependent radiation transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Harries, Tim J

    2011-01-01

    A new Monte-Carlo algorithm for calculating time-dependent radiative-transfer under the assumption of LTE is presented. Unlike flux-limited diffusion the method is polychromatic, includes scattering, and is able to treat the optically thick and free-streaming regimes simultaneously. The algorithm is tested on a variety of 1-d and 2-d problems, and good agreement with benchmark solutions is found. The method is used to calculate the time-varying spectral energy distribution from a circumstellar disc illuminated by a protostar whose accretion luminosity is varying. It is shown that the time lag between the optical variability and the infrared variability results from a combination of the photon travel time and the thermal response in the disc, and that the lag is an approximately linear function of wavelength.

  10. Biological effect produced by ionizing radiations on occupational workers in Carlos Andrade Marin Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to establish the biological effects on occupational workers. In this study, have made a bibliographic review of the changes on skin of 217 professionals; between 21 and 70 years radiologists, X-ray technicians, radioisotope workers, nurses and others, which were exposed to ionizing radiation, in the departments of Diagnosis and Treatment of the Hospital Carlos Andrade Marin of the Quito city. From this universe 133 workers were excluded of the analysis. From the totality of lesions produced on the skin; the depilation constituted 40.18%, hyper pigmentation 19.34%, hypo pigmentation 9 %, capillary fragility 13.39%, erythema 13.39%, alopecia 5.37%. From the totality of lesions produced in blood: the leukopenia constituted 20.23% between all workers. The percentage method was used for statical calculation. A bibliographic update is done and the most relevant clinical aspects are reviewed. (The author)

  11. Uncertainties in personal dosimetry for external radiation: A Monte Carlo approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper explores the possibilities of numerical methods for uncertainty analysis of personal dosimetry systems. Using a numerical method based on Monte Carlo sampling the probability density function (PDF) of the dose measured using a personal dosemeter can be calculated using type-test measurements. From this PDF the combined standard uncertainty in the measurements with the dosemeter and the confidence interval can be calculated. The method calculates the output PDF directly from the PDFs of the inputs of the system such as the spectral distribution of the radiation and distributions of detector parameters like sensitivity and zero signal. The method can be used not only in its own right but also for validating other methods because it is not limited by restrictions that apply to using the Law of Propagation of Uncertainty and the Central Limit Theorem. The use of the method is demonstrated using the type-test data of the NRG-TLD. (authors)

  12. An Efficient Monte Carlo Method for Modeling Radiative Transfer in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Stacy

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods have been shown to be effective and versatile in modeling radiative transfer processes to calculate model temperature profiles for protoplanetary disks. Temperatures profiles are important for connecting physical structure to observation and for understanding the conditions for planet formation and migration. However, certain areas of the disk such as the optically thick disk interior are under-sampled, or are of particular interest such as the snow line (where water vapor condenses into ice) and the area surrounding a protoplanet. To improve the sampling, photon packets can be preferentially scattered and reemitted toward the preferred locations at the cost of weighting packet energies to conserve the average energy flux. Here I report on the weighting schemes developed, how they can be applied to various models, and how they affect simulation mechanics and results. We find that improvements in sampling do not always imply similar improvements in temperature accuracies and calculation speeds.

  13. Oxygen transport properties estimation by classical trajectory–direct simulation Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, Domenico, E-mail: domenico.bruno@cnr.it [Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche– Via G. Amendola 122, 70125 Bari (Italy); Frezzotti, Aldo, E-mail: aldo.frezzotti@polimi.it; Ghiroldi, Gian Pietro, E-mail: gpghiro@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Aerospaziali, Politecnico di Milano–Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Coupling direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations with classical trajectory calculations is a powerful tool to improve predictive capabilities of computational dilute gas dynamics. The considerable increase in computational effort outlined in early applications of the method can be compensated by running simulations on massively parallel computers. In particular, Graphics Processing Unit acceleration has been found quite effective in reducing computing time of classical trajectory (CT)-DSMC simulations. The aim of the present work is to study dilute molecular oxygen flows by modeling binary collisions, in the rigid rotor approximation, through an accurate Potential Energy Surface (PES), obtained by molecular beams scattering. The PES accuracy is assessed by calculating molecular oxygen transport properties by different equilibrium and non-equilibrium CT-DSMC based simulations that provide close values of the transport properties. Comparisons with available experimental data are presented and discussed in the temperature range 300–900 K, where vibrational degrees of freedom are expected to play a limited (but not always negligible) role.

  14. Load balancing in highly parallel processing of Monte Carlo code for particle transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In parallel processing of Monte Carlo(MC) codes for neutron, photon and electron transport problems, particle histories are assigned to processors making use of independency of the calculation for each particle. Although we can easily parallelize main part of a MC code by this method, it is necessary and practically difficult to optimize the code concerning load balancing in order to attain high speedup ratio in highly parallel processing. In fact, the speedup ratio in the case of 128 processors remains in nearly one hundred times when using the test bed for the performance evaluation. Through the parallel processing of the MCNP code, which is widely used in the nuclear field, it is shown that it is difficult to attain high performance by static load balancing in especially neutron transport problems, and a load balancing method, which dynamically changes the number of assigned particles minimizing the sum of the computational and communication costs, overcomes the difficulty, resulting in nearly fifteen percentage of reduction for execution time. (author)

  15. Simulation of interaction of ion beams with tissue-like media with the shield-hit Monte-Carlo transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SHIELD Monte-Carlo transport code [1-2] simulates the interactions of hadrons and atomic nuclei of arbitrary charge and mass number (Z,A) with complex extended targets in a wide energy range, from 1 TeV/u down to 1 MeV/u or thermal energies in the case of neutrons. SHIELD is used for solving the same type of problems as other well-known Monte-Carlo codes, e.g. LAHET, HERMES, FLUKA, GEANT or MCNPX. Nuclear reactions are taken into account in an exclusive approach where all stages of hadron nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions are described. Thus, SHIELD can be used to simulate interactions of heavy ions with complex macroscopic targets. The version of the SHIELD code extended to simulate heavy ions transport in the context of the beam therapy in oncology is called SHIELD-HIT (Heavy Ion Transport) [3]. The results presented in this work stem from a cooperative research project between the Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institute (Stockholm) and the Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Science (Moscow). (author)

  16. Investigation of radiation damage in structural material of APEX reactor by using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► In this study was calculated effects of the radiation damage on the selected fluid rates and thicknesses of liquid second wall. ► MCNPX-2.5.0 Monte Carlo code was used for three-dimensional calculations. ► The heavy metal was found as appropriate 10% ThF4 for DPA and 10% UO2 for gas production. ► DPA in the structural material was calculated as appropriate for 40–50 cm thickness of the liquid second wall. - Abstract: In this study, ThF4, UF4 and UO2 heavy metals were used with ratios of 2% and 10% while Flibe (Li2BeF4) molten salt mixture and 100% Flibe were used as fluids in the liquid first wall, liquid second wall and shield zones of the APEX. The steel wall that is used as a structural material is 4 cm in thickness and calculations for each 0.5 cm thick zone of the steel wall were performed. In this study, the total changes caused by radiation damage in the steel used as a structural material for 20 cm, 30 cm, 40 cm and 50 cm thicknesses of liquid second wall, for each 0.5 cm thick zones of the steel wall and for the selected fluid rates were investigated for 30 full power years (FPY). The neutron wall load is assumed to be 10 MW/m2. Three-dimensional nucleonic calculations were performed using MCNPX-2.5.0 Monte Carlo code and ENDF/B-VI nuclear data library

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields and dosimetry devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guoqing

    2011-12-22

    Monte Carlo methods based on random sampling are widely used in different fields for the capability of solving problems with a large number of coupled degrees of freedom. In this work, Monte Carlos methods are successfully applied for the simulation of the mixed neutron-gamma field in an interim storage facility and neutron dosimeters of different types. Details are discussed in two parts: In the first part, the method of simulating an interim storage facility loaded with CASTORs is presented. The size of a CASTOR is rather large (several meters) and the CASTOR wall is very thick (tens of centimeters). Obtaining the results of dose rates outside a CASTOR with reasonable errors costs usually hours or even days. For the simulation of a large amount of CASTORs in an interim storage facility, it needs weeks or even months to finish a calculation. Variance reduction techniques were used to reduce the calculation time and to achieve reasonable relative errors. Source clones were applied to avoid unnecessary repeated calculations. In addition, the simulations were performed on a cluster system. With the calculation techniques discussed above, the efficiencies of calculations can be improved evidently. In the second part, the methods of simulating the response of neutron dosimeters are presented. An Alnor albedo dosimeter was modelled in MCNP, and it has been simulated in the facility to calculate the calibration factor to get the evaluated response to a Cf-252 source. The angular response of Makrofol detectors to fast neutrons has also been investigated. As a kind of SSNTD, Makrofol can detect fast neutrons by recording the neutron induced heavy charged recoils. To obtain the information of charged recoils, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes were used for transporting incident neutrons. The response of Makrofol to fast neutrons is dependent on several factors. Based on the parameters which affect the track revealing, the formation of visible tracks was determined. For

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields and dosimetry devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo methods based on random sampling are widely used in different fields for the capability of solving problems with a large number of coupled degrees of freedom. In this work, Monte Carlos methods are successfully applied for the simulation of the mixed neutron-gamma field in an interim storage facility and neutron dosimeters of different types. Details are discussed in two parts: In the first part, the method of simulating an interim storage facility loaded with CASTORs is presented. The size of a CASTOR is rather large (several meters) and the CASTOR wall is very thick (tens of centimeters). Obtaining the results of dose rates outside a CASTOR with reasonable errors costs usually hours or even days. For the simulation of a large amount of CASTORs in an interim storage facility, it needs weeks or even months to finish a calculation. Variance reduction techniques were used to reduce the calculation time and to achieve reasonable relative errors. Source clones were applied to avoid unnecessary repeated calculations. In addition, the simulations were performed on a cluster system. With the calculation techniques discussed above, the efficiencies of calculations can be improved evidently. In the second part, the methods of simulating the response of neutron dosimeters are presented. An Alnor albedo dosimeter was modelled in MCNP, and it has been simulated in the facility to calculate the calibration factor to get the evaluated response to a Cf-252 source. The angular response of Makrofol detectors to fast neutrons has also been investigated. As a kind of SSNTD, Makrofol can detect fast neutrons by recording the neutron induced heavy charged recoils. To obtain the information of charged recoils, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes were used for transporting incident neutrons. The response of Makrofol to fast neutrons is dependent on several factors. Based on the parameters which affect the track revealing, the formation of visible tracks was determined. For

  19. Advances in nuclear data and all-particle transport for radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast neutrons have been used to treat over 15,000 cancer patients worldwide and proton therapy is rapidly emerging as a treatment of choice for tumors around critical anatomical structures. Neutron therapy requires evaluated data to ∼70 MeV while proton therapy requires data to ∼250 MeV. Collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the medical physics community has revealed limitations in nuclear cross section evaluations and radiation transport capabilities that have prevented neutron and proton radiation therapy centers from using Monte Carlo calculations to accurately predict dose in patients. These evaluations require energy- and angle-dependent cross sections for secondary neutrons, charged-particles and recoil nuclei. We are expanding the LLNL nuclear databases to higher energies for biologically important elements and have developed a three-dimensional, all-particle Monte Carlo radiation transport code that uses computer-assisted-tomography (CT) images as the input mesh. This code, called PEREGRINE calculates dose distributions in the human body and can be used as a tool to determine the dependence of dose on details of the evaluated nuclear data. In this paper, we will review the status of the nuclear data required for neutron and proton therapy, describe the capabilities of the PEREGRINE package, and show the effects of tissue inhomogeneities on dose distribution

  20. STUDI PEMODELAN DAN PERHITUNGAN TRANSPORT MONTE CARLO DALAM TERAS HTR PEBBLE BED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhair .

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Konsep sistem energi VHTR baik yang berbahan bakar pebble (VHTR pebble bed maupun blok prismatik (VHTR prismatik menarik perhatian fisikawan reaktor nuklir. Salah satu kelebihan teknologi bahan bakar bola adalah menawarkan terobosan teknologi pengisian bahan bakar tanpa harus menghentikan produksi listrik. Selain itu, partikel bahan bakar pebble dengan kernel uranium oksida (UO2 atau uranium oksikarbida (UCO yang dibalut TRISO dan pelapisan silikon karbida (SiC dianggap sebagai opsi utama dengan pertimbangan performa tinggi pada burn-up bahan bakar dan temperatur tinggi. Makalah ini mendiskusikan pemodelan dan perhitungan transport Monte Carlo dalam teras HTR pebble bed. HTR pebble bed adalah reaktor berpendingin gas temperatur tinggi dan bermoderator grafit dengan kemampuan kogenerasi. Perhitungan dikerjakan dengan program MCNP5 pada temperatur 1200 K. Pustaka data nuklir energi kontinu ENDF/B-V dan ENDF/B-VI dimanfaatkan untuk melengkapi analisis. Hasil perhitungan secara keseluruhan menunjukkan konsistensi dengan nilai keff yang hampir sama untuk pustaka data nuklir yang digunakan. Pustaka ENDF/B-VI (66c selalu memproduksi keff lebih besar dibandingkan ENDF/B-V (50c maupun ENDF/B-VI (60c dengan bias kurang dari 0,25%. Kisi BCC memprediksi keff hampir selalu lebih kecil daripada kisi lainnya, khususnya FCC. Nilai keff kisi BCC lebih dekat dengan kisi FCC dengan bias kurang dari 0,19% sedangkan dengan kisi SH bias perhitungannya kurang dari 0,22%. Fraksi packing yang sedikit berbeda (BCC= 61%, SH= 60,459% tidak membuat bias perhitungan menjadi berbeda jauh. Estimasi keff ketiga model kisi menyimpulkan bahwa model BCC lebih bisa diadopsi dalam perhitungan HTR pebble bed dibandingkan model FCC dan SH. Verifikasi hasil estimasi ini perlu dilakukan dengan simulasi Monte Carlo atau bahkan program deterministik lainnya guna optimisasi perhitungan teras reaktor temperatur tinggi.   Kata-kunci: kernel, TRISO, bahan bakar pebble, HTR pebble bed

  1. FOCUS, Neutron Transport System for Complex Geometry Reactor Core and Shielding Problems by Monte-Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of problem or function: FOCUS enables the calculation of any quantity related to neutron transport in reactor or shielding problems, but was especially designed to calculate differential quantities, such as point values at one or more of the space, energy, direction and time variables of quantities like neutron flux, detector response, reaction rate, etc. or averages of such quantities over a small volume of the phase space. Different types of problems can be treated: systems with a fixed neutron source which may be a mono-directional source located out- side the system, and Eigen function problems in which the neutron source distribution is given by the (unknown) fundamental mode Eigen function distribution. Using Monte Carlo methods complex 3- dimensional geometries and detailed cross section information can be treated. Cross section data are derived from ENDF/B, with anisotropic scattering and discrete or continuous inelastic scattering taken into account. Energy is treated as a continuous variable and time dependence may also be included. 2 - Method of solution: A transformed form of the adjoint Boltzmann equation in integral representation is solved for the space, energy, direction and time variables by Monte Carlo methods. Adjoint particles are defined with properties in some respects contrary to those of neutrons. Adjoint particle histories are constructed from which estimates are obtained of the desired quantity. Adjoint cross sections are defined with which the nuclide and reaction type are selected in a collision. The energy after a collision is selected from adjoint energy distributions calculated together with the adjoint cross sections in advance of the actual Monte Carlo calculation. For multiplying systems successive generations of adjoint particles are obtained which will die out for subcritical systems with a fixed neutron source and will be kept approximately stationary for Eigen function problems. Completely arbitrary problems can

  2. A GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation code for photon transport in a voxel phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellezzo, M.; Do Nascimento, E.; Yoriyaz, H., E-mail: mbellezzo@gmail.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    As the most accurate method to estimate absorbed dose in radiotherapy, Monte Carlo method has been widely used in radiotherapy treatment planning. Nevertheless, its efficiency can be improved for clinical routine applications. In this paper, we present the CUBMC code, a GPU-based Mc photon transport algorithm for dose calculation under the Compute Unified Device Architecture platform. The simulation of physical events is based on the algorithm used in Penelope, and the cross section table used is the one generated by the Material routine, als present in Penelope code. Photons are transported in voxel-based geometries with different compositions. To demonstrate the capabilities of the algorithm developed in the present work four 128 x 128 x 128 voxel phantoms have been considered. One of them is composed by a homogeneous water-based media, the second is composed by bone, the third is composed by lung and the fourth is composed by a heterogeneous bone and vacuum geometry. Simulations were done considering a 6 MeV monoenergetic photon point source. There are two distinct approaches that were used for transport simulation. The first of them forces the photon to stop at every voxel frontier, the second one is the Woodcock method, where the photon stop in the frontier will be considered depending on the material changing across the photon travel line. Dose calculations using these methods are compared for validation with Penelope and MCNP5 codes. Speed-up factors are compared using a NVidia GTX 560-Ti GPU card against a 2.27 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. (Author)

  3. A GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation code for photon transport in a voxel phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the most accurate method to estimate absorbed dose in radiotherapy, Monte Carlo method has been widely used in radiotherapy treatment planning. Nevertheless, its efficiency can be improved for clinical routine applications. In this paper, we present the CUBMC code, a GPU-based Mc photon transport algorithm for dose calculation under the Compute Unified Device Architecture platform. The simulation of physical events is based on the algorithm used in Penelope, and the cross section table used is the one generated by the Material routine, als present in Penelope code. Photons are transported in voxel-based geometries with different compositions. To demonstrate the capabilities of the algorithm developed in the present work four 128 x 128 x 128 voxel phantoms have been considered. One of them is composed by a homogeneous water-based media, the second is composed by bone, the third is composed by lung and the fourth is composed by a heterogeneous bone and vacuum geometry. Simulations were done considering a 6 MeV monoenergetic photon point source. There are two distinct approaches that were used for transport simulation. The first of them forces the photon to stop at every voxel frontier, the second one is the Woodcock method, where the photon stop in the frontier will be considered depending on the material changing across the photon travel line. Dose calculations using these methods are compared for validation with Penelope and MCNP5 codes. Speed-up factors are compared using a NVidia GTX 560-Ti GPU card against a 2.27 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. (Author)

  4. SHIELD-HIT12A - a Monte Carlo particle transport program for ion therapy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The Monte Carlo (MC) code SHIELD-HIT simulates the transport of ions through matter. Since SHIELD-HIT08 we added numerous features that improves speed, usability and underlying physics and thereby the user experience. The '-A' fork of SHIELD-HIT also aims to attach SHIELD-HIT to a heavy ion dose optimization algorithm to provide MC-optimized treatment plans that include radiobiology. Methods: SHIELD-HIT12A is written in FORTRAN and carefully retains platform independence. A powerful scoring engine is implemented scoring relevant quantities such as dose and track-average LET. It supports native formats compatible with the heavy ion treatment planning system TRiP. Stopping power files follow ICRU standard and are generated using the libdEdx library, which allows the user to choose from a multitude of stopping power tables. Results: SHIELD-HIT12A runs on Linux and Windows platforms. We experienced that new users quickly learn to use SHIELD-HIT12A and setup new geometries. Contrary to previous versions of SHIELD-HIT, the 12A distribution comes along with easy-to-use example files and an English manual. A new implementation of Vavilov straggling resulted in a massive reduction of computation time. Scheduled for later release are CT import and photon-electron transport. Conclusions: SHIELD-HIT12A is an interesting alternative ion transport engine. Apart from being a flexible particle therapy research tool, it can also serve as a back end for a MC ion treatment planning system. More information about SHIELD-HIT12A and a demo version can be found on http://www.shieldhit.org.

  5. A hybrid transport-diffusion model for radiative transfer in absorbing and scattering media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new multi-scale hybrid transport-diffusion model for radiative transfer is proposed in order to improve the efficiency of the calculations close to the diffusive regime, in absorbing and strongly scattering media. In this model, the radiative intensity is decomposed into a macroscopic component calculated by the diffusion equation, and a mesoscopic component. The transport equation for the mesoscopic component allows to correct the estimation of the diffusion equation, and then to obtain the solution of the linear radiative transfer equation. In this work, results are presented for stationary and transient radiative transfer cases, in examples which concern solar concentrated and optical tomography applications. The Monte Carlo and the discrete-ordinate methods are used to solve the mesoscopic equation. It is shown that the multi-scale model allows to improve the efficiency of the calculations when the medium is close to the diffusive regime. The proposed model is a good alternative for radiative transfer at the intermediate regime where the macroscopic diffusion equation is not accurate enough and the radiative transfer equation requires too much computational effort

  6. Parallel Monte Carlo transport modeling in the context of a time-dependent, three-dimensional multi-physics code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procassini, R.J. [Lawrence Livermore National lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The fine-scale, multi-space resolution that is envisioned for accurate simulations of complex weapons systems in three spatial dimensions implies flop-rate and memory-storage requirements that will only be obtained in the near future through the use of parallel computational techniques. Since the Monte Carlo transport models in these simulations usually stress both of these computational resources, they are prime candidates for parallelization. The MONACO Monte Carlo transport package, which is currently under development at LLNL, will utilize two types of parallelism within the context of a multi-physics design code: decomposition of the spatial domain across processors (spatial parallelism) and distribution of particles in a given spatial subdomain across additional processors (particle parallelism). This implementation of the package will utilize explicit data communication between domains (message passing). Such a parallel implementation of a Monte Carlo transport model will result in non-deterministic communication patterns. The communication of particles between subdomains during a Monte Carlo time step may require a significant level of effort to achieve a high parallel efficiency.

  7. Monte Carlo Spectral Integration: a Consistent Approximation for Radiative Transfer in Large Eddy Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Pincus

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Large-eddy simulation (LES refers to a class of calculations in which the large energy-rich eddies are simulated directly and are insensitive to errors in the modeling of sub-grid scale processes. Flows represented by LES are often driven by radiative heating and therefore require the calculation of radiative transfer along with the fluid-dynamical simulation. Current methods for detailed radiation calculations, even those using simple one-dimensional radiative transfer, are far too expensive for routine use, while popular shortcuts are either of limited applicability or run the risk of introducing errors on time and space scales that might affect the overall simulation. A new approximate method is described that relies on Monte Carlo sampling of the spectral integration in the heating rate calculation and is applicable to any problem. The error introduced when using this method is substantial for individual samples (single columns at single times but is uncorrelated in time and space and so does not bias the statistics of scales that are well resolved by the LES. The method is evaluated through simulation of two test problems; these behave as expected. A scaling analysis shows that the errors introduced by the method diminish as flow features become well resolved. Errors introduced by the approximation increase with decreasing spatial scale but the spurious energy introduced by the approximation is less than the energy expected in the unperturbed flow, i.e. the energy associated with the spectral cascade from the large scale, even on the grid scale.

  8. Monte-Carlo Radiative Transfer Model of the Diffuse Galactic Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seon, Kwang-Il

    2015-02-01

    Monte-Carlo radiative models of the diffuse Galactic light (DGL) in our Galaxy are calcu-lated using the dust radiative transfer code MoCafe, which is three-dimensional and takes full account of multiple scattering. The code is recently updated to use a fast voxel traversal algorithm, which has dramatically increased the computing speed. The radiative transfer models are calculated with the gen-erally accepted dust scale-height of 0.1 kpc. The stellar scale-heights are assumed to be 0.1 or 0.35 kpc, appropriate for far-ultraviolet (FUV) and optical wavelengths, respectively. The face-on optical depth, measured perpendicular to the Galactic plane, is also varied from 0.2 to 0.6, suitable to the optical to FUV wavelengths, respectively. We find that the DGL at high Galactic latitudes is mostly due to backward or large-angle scattering of starlight originating from the local stars within a radial distance of r latitude DGL at the FUV wavelength band would be mostly caused by the stars located at a distance of r . 0.5 kpc and the optical DGL near the Galactic plane mainly originates from stars within a distance range of 1 . r . 2 kpc. We also calculate the radiative transfer models in a clumpy two-phase medium. The clumpy two-phase models provide lower intensities at high Galactic latitudes compared to the uniform density models, because of the lower effective optical depth in clumpy media. However, no significant difference in the intensity at the Galactic plane is found.

  9. MC21 v.6.0 - A continuous-energy Monte Carlo particle transport code with integrated reactor feedback capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MC21 is a continuous-energy Monte Carlo radiation transport code for the calculation of the steady-state spatial distributions of reaction rates in three-dimensional models. The code supports neutron and photon transport in fixed source problems, as well as iterated-fission-source (eigenvalue) neutron transport problems. MC21 has been designed and optimized to support large-scale problems in reactor physics, shielding, and criticality analysis applications. The code also supports many in-line reactor feedback effects, including depletion, thermal feedback, xenon feedback, eigenvalue search, and neutron and photon heating. MC21 uses continuous-energy neutron/nucleus interaction physics over the range from 10-5 eV to 20 MeV. The code treats all common neutron scattering mechanisms, including fast-range elastic and non-elastic scattering, and thermal- and epithermal-range scattering from molecules and crystalline materials. For photon transport, MC21 uses continuous-energy interaction physics over the energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV. The code treats all common photon interaction mechanisms, including Compton scattering, pair production, and photoelectric interactions. All of the nuclear data required by MC21 is provided by the NDEX system of codes, which extracts and processes data from EPDL-, ENDF-, and ACE-formatted source files. For geometry representation, MC21 employs a flexible constructive solid geometry system that allows users to create spatial cells from first- and second-order surfaces. The system also allows models to be built up as hierarchical collections of previously defined spatial cells, with interior detail provided by grids and template overlays. Results are collected by a generalized tally capability which allows users to edit integral flux and reaction rate information. Results can be collected over the entire problem or within specific regions of interest through the use of phase filters that control which particles are allowed to score each

  10. OMEGA, Subcritical and Critical Neutron Transport in General 3-D Geometry by Monte-Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of problem or function: OMEGA is a Monte Carlo code for the solution of the stationary neutron transport equation with k-eff as the Eigenvalue. A three-dimensional geometry is permitted consisting of a very general arrangement of three basic shapes (columns with circular, rectangular, or hexagonal cross section with a finite height and different material layers along their axes). The main restriction is that all the basic shapes must have parallel axes. Most real arrangements of fissile material inside and outside a reactor (e.g., in a fuel storage or transport container) can be described without approximation. The main field of application is the estimation of criticality safety. Many years of experience and comparison with reference cases have shown that the code together with the built-in cross section libraries gives reliable results. The following results can be calculated: - the effective multiplication factor k-eff; - the flux distribution; - reaction rates; - spatially and energetically condensed cross sections for later use in a subsequent OMEGA run. A running job may be interrupted and continued later, possibly with an increased number of batches for an improved statistical accuracy. The geometry as well as the k-eff results may be visualized. The use of the code is demonstrated by many illustrating examples. 2 - Method of solution: The Monte Carlo method is used with neutrons starting from an initial source distribution. The histories of a generation (or batch) of neutrons are followed from collision to collision until the histories are terminated by capture, fission, or leakage. For the solution of the Eigenvalue problem, the starting positions of the neutrons for a given generation are determined by the fission points of the preceding generation. The summation of the results starts only after some initial generations when the spatial part of the fission source has converged. At present the code uses the BNAB-78 subgroup library of the

  11. Transport of Ionizing Radiation in Terrestrial-like Exoplanet Atmospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, David S.; Scalo, John; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2003-01-01

    (Abridged) The propagation of ionizing radiation through model atmospheres of terrestrial-like exoplanets is studied for a large range of column densities and incident photon energies using a Monte Carlo code we have developed to treat Compton scattering and photoabsorption. Incident spectra from parent star flares, supernovae, and gamma-ray bursts are modeled and compared to energetic particles in importance. We find that terrestrial-like exoplanets with atmospheres thinner than about 100 g ...

  12. C5 Benchmark Problem with Discrete Ordinate Radiation Transport Code DENOVO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The C5 benchmark problem proposed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency was modeled to examine the capabilities of Denovo, a three-dimensional (3-D) parallel discrete ordinates (SN) radiation transport code, for problems with no spatial homogenization. Denovo uses state-of-the-art numerical methods to obtain accurate solutions to the Boltzmann transport equation. Problems were run in parallel on Jaguar, a high-performance supercomputer located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Both the two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D configurations were analyzed, and the results were compared with the reference MCNP Monte Carlo calculations. For an additional comparison, SCALE/KENO-V.a Monte Carlo solutions were also included. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was performed for the optimal angular quadrature and mesh resolution for both the 2-D and 3-D infinite lattices of UO2 fuel pin cells. Denovo was verified with the C5 problem. The effective multiplication factors, pin powers, and assembly powers were found to be in good agreement with the reference MCNP and SCALE/KENO-V.a Monte Carlo calculations.

  13. Reciprocity relation for the vector radiative transport equation and its application to diffuse optical tomography with polarized light

    CERN Document Server

    Tricoli, Ugo; Da Silva, Anabela; Markel, Vadim A

    2016-01-01

    We derive a reciprocity relation for vector radiative transport equation (vRTE) that describes propagation of polarized light in multiple-scattering media. We then show how this result, together with translational invariance of a plane-parallel sample, can be used to compute efficiently the sensitivity kernel of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) by Monte Carlo simulations. Numerical examples of polarization-selective sensitivity kernels thus computed are given.

  14. Monte Carlo calculation of the energy response characteristics of a RadFET radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Metal -Oxide Semiconductor Field-Effect-Transistor (MOSFET, RadFET) is frequently used as a sensor of ionizing radiation in nuclear-medicine, diagnostic-radiology, radiotherapy quality-assurance and in the nuclear and space industries. We focused our investigations on calculating the energy response of a p-type RadFET to low-energy photons in range from 12 keV to 2 MeV and on understanding the influence of uncertainties in the composition and geometry of the device in calculating the energy response function. All results were normalized to unit air kerma incident on the RadFET for incident photon energy of 1.1 MeV. The calculations of the energy response characteristics of a RadFET radiation detector were performed via Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNPX code and for a limited number of incident photon energies the FOTELP code was also used for the sake of comparison. The geometry of the RadFET was modeled as a simple stack of appropriate materials. Our goal was to obtain results with statistical uncertainties better than 1% (fulfilled in MCNPX calculations for all incident energies which resulted in simulations with 1 - 2x109 histories.

  15. MOCRA: a Monte Carlo code for the simulation of radiative transfer in the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premuda, Margherita; Palazzi, Elisa; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Bortoli, Daniele; Masieri, Samuele; Giovanelli, Giorgio

    2012-03-26

    This paper describes the radiative transfer model (RTM) MOCRA (MOnte Carlo Radiance Analysis), developed in the frame of DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) to correctly interpret remote sensing measurements of trace gas amounts in the atmosphere through the calculation of the Air Mass Factor. Besides the DOAS-related quantities, the MOCRA code yields: 1- the atmospheric transmittance in the vertical and sun directions, 2- the direct and global irradiance, 3- the single- and multiple- scattered radiance for a detector with assigned position, line of sight and field of view. Sample calculations of the main radiometric quantities calculated with MOCRA are presented and compared with the output of another RTM (MODTRAN4). A further comparison is presented between the NO2 slant column densities (SCDs) measured with DOAS at Evora (Portugal) and the ones simulated with MOCRA. Both comparisons (MOCRA-MODTRAN4 and MOCRA-observations) gave more than satisfactory results, and overall make MOCRA a versatile tool for atmospheric radiative transfer simulations and interpretation of remote sensing measurements. PMID:22453470

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of the sequential probability ratio test for radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer program simulates the Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) using Monte Carlo techniques. The program, SEQTEST, performs random-number sampling of either a Poisson or normal distribution to simulate radiation monitoring data. The results are in terms of the detection probabilities and the average time required for a trial. The computed SPRT results can be compared with tabulated single interval test (SIT) values to determine the better statistical test for particular monitoring applications. Use of the SPRT in a hand-and-foot alpha monitor shows that the SPRT provides better detection probabilities while generally requiring less counting time. Calculations are also performed for a monitor where the SPRT is not permitted to the take longer than the single interval test. Although the performance of the SPRT is degraded by this restriction, the detection probabilities are still similar to the SIT values, and average counting times are always less than 75% of the SIT time. Some optimal conditions for use of the SPRT are described. The SPRT should be the test of choice in many radiation monitoring situations. 6 references, 8 figures, 1 table

  17. The Wigner Monte-Carlo method for nanoelectronic devices a particle description of quantum transport and decoherence

    CERN Document Server

    Querlioz, Damien

    2013-01-01

    This book gives an overview of the quantum transport approaches for nanodevices and focuses on the Wigner formalism. It details the implementation of a particle-based Monte Carlo solution of the Wigner transport equation and how the technique is applied to typical devices exhibiting quantum phenomena, such as the resonant tunnelling diode, the ultra-short silicon MOSFET and the carbon nanotube transistor. In the final part, decoherence theory is used to explain the emergence of the semi-classical transport in nanodevices.

  18. Simulation of neutron transport process, photons and charged particles within the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Description is given to the program system BRAND designed for the accurate solution of non-stationary transport equation of neutrons, photons and charged particles in the conditions of real three-dimensional geometry. An extensive set of local and non-local estimates provides an opportunity of calculating a great set of linear functionals normally being of interest in the calculation of reactors, radiation protection and experiment simulation. The process of particle interaction with substance is simulated on the basis of individual non-group data on each isotope of the composition. 24 refs

  19. 1-D EQUILIBRIUM DISCRETE DIFFUSION MONTE CARLO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. EVANS; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    We present a new hybrid Monte Carlo method for 1-D equilibrium diffusion problems in which the radiation field coexists with matter in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This method, the Equilibrium Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (EqDDMC) method, combines Monte Carlo particles with spatially discrete diffusion solutions. We verify the EqDDMC method with computational results from three slab problems. The EqDDMC method represents an incremental step toward applying this hybrid methodology to non-equilibrium diffusion, where it could be simultaneously coupled to Monte Carlo transport.

  20. Development of a GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation code for coupled electron-photon transport

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Xun; Sempau, Josep; Choi, Dongju; Majumdar, Amitava; Jiang, Steve B

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is the most accurate method for absorbed dose calculations in radiotherapy. Its efficiency still requires improvement for routine clinical applications, especially for online adaptive radiotherapy. In this paper, we report our recent development on a GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation code for coupled electron-photon transport. We have implemented the Dose Planning Method (DPM) Monte Carlo dose calculation package (Sempau et al, Phys. Med. Biol., 45(2000)2263-2291) on GPU architecture under CUDA platform. The implementation has been tested with respect to the original sequential DPM code on CPU in two cases. Our results demonstrate the adequate accuracy of the GPU implementation for both electron and photon beams in radiotherapy energy range. A speed up factor of 4.5 and 5.5 times have been observed for electron and photon testing cases, respectively, using an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 GPU card against a 2.27GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor .

  1. Radiation safety in sea transport of radioactive material in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation safety for sea transport of radioactive material in Japan has been discussed based on records of the exposed dose of sea transport workers and measured data of dose rate equivalents distribution inboard exclusive radioactive material shipping vessels. Recent surveyed records of the exposed doses of workers who engaged in sea transport operation indicate that exposed doses of transport workers are significantly low. Measured distribution of the exposed dose equivalents inboard those vessels indicates that dose rate equivalents inside those vessels are lower than levels regulated by the transport regulations of Japan. These facts clarify that radiation safety of inboard environment and handling of transport casks in sea transport of radioactive material in Japan are assured

  2. Radiation safety in sea transport of radioactive material in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odano, N. [National Maritime Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Yanagi, H. [Nuclear Fuel Transport Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Radiation safety for sea transport of radioactive material in Japan has been discussed based on records of the exposed dose of sea transport workers and measured data of dose rate equivalents distribution inboard exclusive radioactive material shipping vessels. Recent surveyed records of the exposed doses of workers who engaged in sea transport operation indicate that exposed doses of transport workers are significantly low. Measured distribution of the exposed dose equivalents inboard those vessels indicates that dose rate equivalents inside those vessels are lower than levels regulated by the transport regulations of Japan. These facts clarify that radiation safety of inboard environment and handling of transport casks in sea transport of radioactive material in Japan are assured.

  3. Research on radiation safety accompanying transport of low level radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research aims at completing the code system that can evaluate in detail the radiation exposure in the sea transport of low level waste, and enabling the estimation of the safety margin of radiation shields. In fiscal year 1995, the second experiment on an actual ship and its analysis, and the evaluation of safety margin accompanying the modeling of the computed form were carried out. The LLW carrier ''Seiei-maru'' of about 100 m length and 3000 t deadweight has 7 holds, in which 384 containers or 3072 drums can be loaded. In the transport of this time, 360 containers were transported, and the radioactivity in respective holds is shown. The nuclides related to external exposure are 60Co and 137Cs. The dose measurement was carried out with the TCS-161 survey meter made by ALOKA Co. The maximum dose on hatch covers and in living section was far under the values of regulation, and it was able to be confirmed that the safety regarding the radiation exposure of crews at the time of this transport has been secured. The dose rate distribution on hatch covers was analyzed by using the continuous energy Monte Carlo code. MCNP 4A. The effect that the difference of modeling exerts to the result of calculation was examined. The results are reported. (K.I.)

  4. Modeling radiation from the atmosphere of Io with Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratiy, Sergey

    Conflicting observations regarding the dominance of either sublimation or volcanism as the source of the atmosphere on Io and disparate reports on the extent of its spatial distribution and the absolute column abundance invite the development of detailed computational models capable of improving our understanding of Io's unique atmospheric structure and origin. To validate a global numerical model of Io's atmosphere against astronomical observations requires a 3-D spherical-shell radiative transfer (RT) code to simulate disk-resolved images and disk-integrated spectra from the ultraviolet to the infrared spectral region. In addition, comparison of simulated and astronomical observations provides important information to improve existing atmospheric models. In order to achieve this goal, a new 3-D spherical-shell forward/backward photon Monte Carlo code capable of simulating radiation from absorbing/emitting and scattering atmospheres with an underlying emitting and reflecting surface was developed. A new implementation of calculating atmospheric brightness in scattered sunlight is presented utilizing the notion of an "effective emission source" function. This allows for the accumulation of the scattered contribution along the entire path of a ray and the calculation of the atmospheric radiation when both scattered sunlight and thermal emission contribute to the observed radiation---which was not possible in previous models. A "polychromatic" algorithm was developed for application with the backward Monte Carlo method and was implemented in the code. It allows one to calculate radiative intensity at several wavelengths simultaneously, even when the scattering properties of the atmosphere are a function of wavelength. The application of the "polychromatic" method improves the computational efficiency because it reduces the number of photon bundles traced during the simulation. A 3-D gas dynamics model of Io's atmosphere, including both sublimation and volcanic

  5. A new assembly-level Monte Carlo neutron transport code for reactor physics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new assembly-level Monte Carlo neutron transport code, specifically intended for diffusion code group-constant generation and other reactor physics calculations. The code is being developed at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), under the working title 'Probabilistic Scattering Game', or PSG. The PSG code uses a method known as Woodcock tracking to simulate neutron histories. The advantages of the method include fast simulation in complex geometries and relatively simple handling of complicated geometrical objects. The main drawback is the inability to calculate reaction rates in optically thin volumes. This narrows the field of application to calculations involving parameters integrated over large volumes. The main features of the PSG code and the Woodcock tracking method are introduced. The code is applied in three example cases, involving infinite lattices of two-dimensional LWR fuel assemblies. Comparison calculations are carried out using MCNP4C and CASMO-4E. The results reveal that the code performs quite well in the calculation cases of this study, especially when compared to MCNP. The PSG code is still under extensive development and there are both flaws in the simulation of the interaction physics and programming errors in the source code. The results presented here, however, seem very encouraging, especially considering the early development stage of the code. (author)

  6. Criticality coefficient calculation for a small PWR using Monte Carlo Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trombetta, Debora M.; Su, Jian, E-mail: dtrombetta@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: sujian@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Chirayath, Sunil S., E-mail: sunilsc@tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute, Texas A and M University, TX (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Computational models of reactors are increasingly used to predict nuclear reactor physics parameters responsible for reactivity changes which could lead to accidents and losses. In this work, preliminary results for criticality coefficient calculation using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX were presented for a small PWR. The computational modeling developed consists of the core with fuel elements, radial reflectors, and control rods inside a pressure vessel. Three different geometries were simulated, a single fuel pin, a fuel assembly and the core, with the aim to compare the criticality coefficients among themselves.The criticality coefficients calculated were: Doppler Temperature Coefficient, Coolant Temperature Coefficient, Coolant Void Coefficient, Power Coefficient, and Control Rod Worth. The coefficient values calculated by the MCNP code were compared with literature results, showing good agreement with reference data, which validate the computational model developed and allow it to be used to perform more complex studies. Criticality Coefficient values for the three simulations done had little discrepancy for almost all coefficients investigated, the only exception was the Power Coefficient. Preliminary results presented show that simple modelling as a fuel assembly can describe changes at almost all the criticality coefficients, avoiding the need of a complex core simulation. (author)

  7. Comparison of some popular Monte Carlo solution for proton transportation within pCT problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evseev, Ivan; Assis, Joaquim T. de; Yevseyeva, Olga [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Inst. Politecnico], E-mail: evseev@iprj.uerj.br, E-mail: joaquim@iprj.uerj.br, E-mail: yevseyeva@iprj.uerj.br; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Cardoso, Jose J.B.; Silva, Ademir X. da [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear], E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: jjbrum@oi.com.br, E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br; Vinagre Filho, Ubirajara M. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear IEN/CNEN-RJ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: bira@ien.gov.br; Hormaza, Joel M. [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biociencias], E-mail: jmesa@ibb.unesp.br; Schelin, Hugo R.; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Setti, Joao A.P.; Milhoretto, Edney [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)], E-mail: schelin@cpgei.cefetpr.br, E-mail: sergei@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: jsetti@gmail.com, E-mail: edneymilhoretto@yahoo.com

    2007-07-01

    The proton transport in matter is described by the Boltzmann kinetic equation for the proton flux density. This equation, however, does not have a general analytical solution. Some approximate analytical solutions have been developed within a number of significant simplifications. Alternatively, the Monte Carlo simulations are widely used. Current work is devoted to the discussion of the proton energy spectra obtained by simulation with SRIM2006, GEANT4 and MCNPX packages. The simulations have been performed considering some further applications of the obtained results in computed tomography with proton beam (pCT). Thus the initial and outgoing proton energies (3 / 300 MeV) as well as the thickness of irradiated target (water and aluminum phantoms within 90% of the full range for a given proton beam energy) were considered in the interval of values typical for pCT applications. One from the most interesting results of this comparison is that while the MCNPX spectra are in a good agreement with analytical description within Fokker-Plank approximation and the GEANT4 simulated spectra are slightly shifted from them the SRIM2006 simulations predict a notably higher mean energy loss for protons. (author)

  8. Tripoli-3: monte Carlo transport code for neutral particles - version 3.5 - users manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIPOLI-3 code applies the Monte Carlo method to neutron, gamma-ray and coupled neutron and gamma-ray transport calculations in three-dimensional geometries, either in steady-state conditions or having a time dependence. It can be used to study problems where there is a high flux attenuation between the source zone and the result zone (studies of shielding configurations or source driven sub-critical systems, with fission being taken into account), as well as problems where there is a low flux attenuation (neutronic calculations -- in a fuel lattice cell, for example -- where fission is taken into account, usually with the calculation on the effective multiplication factor, fine structure studies, numerical experiments to investigate methods approximations, etc). TRIPOLI-3 has been operational since 1995 and is the version of the TRIPOLI code that follows on from TRIPOLI-2; it can be used on SUN, RISC600 and HP workstations and on PC using the Linux or Windows/NT operating systems. The code uses nuclear data libraries generated using the THEMIS/NJOY system. The current libraries were derived from ENDF/B6 and JEF2. There is also a response function library based on a number of evaluations, notably the dosimetry libraries IRDF/85, IRDF/90 and also evaluations from JEF2. The treatment of particle transport is the same in version 3.5 as in version 3.4 of the TRIPOLI code; but the version 3.5 is more convenient for preparing the input data and for reading the output. The french version of the user's manual exists. (authors)

  9. Effects of Nuclear Interactions on Accuracy of Space Radiation Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Barghouty, A. F.

    2005-01-01

    Space radiation risk to astronauts and electronic equipments is one major obstacle in long term human space explorations. Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation effects behind materials in human missions to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We study how nuclear fragmentation processes affect the accuracy of predictions from such radiation transport. In particular, we investigate the effects of fragmentation cross sections at different energies on fluxes, dose and dose-equivalent from galactic cosmic rays behind typical shielding materials. These results tell us at what energies nuclear cross sections are the most important for radiation risk evaluations, and how uncertainties in our knowledge about nuclear fragmentations relate to uncertainties in space transport predictions.

  10. GPU-BASED MONTE CARLO DUST RADIATIVE TRANSFER SCHEME APPLIED TO ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three-dimensional parallel Monte Carlo (MC) dust radiative transfer code is presented. To overcome the huge computing-time requirements of MC treatments, the computational power of vectorized hardware is used, utilizing either multi-core computer power or graphics processing units. The approach is a self-consistent way to solve the radiative transfer equation in arbitrary dust configurations. The code calculates the equilibrium temperatures of two populations of large grains and stochastic heated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Anisotropic scattering is treated applying the Heney-Greenstein phase function. The spectral energy distribution (SED) of the object is derived at low spatial resolution by a photon counting procedure and at high spatial resolution by a vectorized ray tracer. The latter allows computation of high signal-to-noise images of the objects at any frequencies and arbitrary viewing angles. We test the robustness of our approach against other radiative transfer codes. The SED and dust temperatures of one- and two-dimensional benchmarks are reproduced at high precision. The parallelization capability of various MC algorithms is analyzed and included in our treatment. We utilize the Lucy algorithm for the optical thin case where the Poisson noise is high, the iteration-free Bjorkman and Wood method to reduce the calculation time, and the Fleck and Canfield diffusion approximation for extreme optical thick cells. The code is applied to model the appearance of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at optical and infrared wavelengths. The AGN torus is clumpy and includes fluffy composite grains of various sizes made up of silicates and carbon. The dependence of the SED on the number of clumps in the torus and the viewing angle is studied. The appearance of the 10 μm silicate features in absorption or emission is discussed. The SED of the radio-loud quasar 3C 249.1 is fit by the AGN model and a cirrus component to account for the far-infrared emission.

  11. Intense radiative heat transport across a nano-scale gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budaev, Bair V.; Ghafari, Amin; Bogy, David B.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we analyze the radiative heat transport in layered structures. The analysis is based on our prior description of the spectrum of thermally excited waves in systems with a heat flux. The developed method correctly predicts results for all known special cases for both large and closing gaps. Numerical examples demonstrate the applicability of our approach to the calculation of the radiative heat transport coefficient across various layered structures.

  12. Coefficients of an analytical aerosol forcing equation determined with a Monte-Carlo radiation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simple analytical equations for global-average direct aerosol radiative forcing are useful to quickly estimate aerosol forcing changes as function of key atmosphere, surface and aerosol parameters. The surface and atmosphere parameters in these analytical equations are the globally uniform atmospheric transmittance and surface albedo, and have so far been estimated from simplified observations under untested assumptions. In the present study, we take the state-of-the-art analytical equation and write the aerosol forcing as a linear function of the single scattering albedo (SSA) and replace the average upscatter fraction with the asymmetry parameter (ASY). Then we determine the surface and atmosphere parameter values of this equation using the output from the global MACR (Monte-Carlo Aerosol Cloud Radiation) model, as well as testing the validity of the equation. The MACR model incorporated spatio-temporally varying observations for surface albedo, cloud optical depth, water vapor, stratosphere column ozone, etc., instead of assuming as in the analytical equation that the atmosphere and surface parameters are globally uniform, and should thus be viewed as providing realistic radiation simulations. The modified analytical equation needs globally uniform aerosol parameters that consist of AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth), SSA, and ASY. The MACR model is run here with the same globally uniform aerosol parameters. The MACR model is also run without cloud to test the cloud effect. In both cloudy and cloud-free runs, the equation fits in the model output well whether SSA or ASY varies. This means the equation is an excellent approximation for the atmospheric radiation. On the other hand, the determined parameter values are somewhat realistic for the cloud-free runs but unrealistic for the cloudy runs. The global atmospheric transmittance, one of the determined parameters, is found to be around 0.74 in case of the cloud-free conditions and around 1.03 with cloud. The surface

  13. On the derivation of vector radiative transfer equation for polarized radiative transport in graded index media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light transport in graded index media follows a curved trajectory determined by Fermat's principle. Besides the effect of variation of the refractive index on the transport of radiative intensity, the curved ray trajectory will induce geometrical effects on the transport of polarization ellipse. This paper presents a complete derivation of vector radiative transfer equation for polarized radiation transport in absorption, emission and scattering graded index media. The derivation is based on the analysis of the conserved quantities for polarized light transport along curved trajectory and a novel approach. The obtained transfer equation can be considered as a generalization of the classic vector radiative transfer equation that is only valid for uniform refractive index media. Several variant forms of the transport equation are also presented, which include the form for Stokes parameters defined with a fixed reference and the Eulerian forms in the ray coordinate and in several common orthogonal coordinate systems.

  14. Comparative study using Monte Carlo methods of the radiation detection efficiency of LSO, LuAP, GSO and YAP scintillators for use in positron emission imaging (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation detection efficiency of four scintillators employed, or designed to be employed, in positron emission imaging (PET) was evaluated as a function of the crystal thickness by applying Monte Carlo Methods. The scintillators studied were the LuSiO5 (LSO), LuAlO3 (LuAP), Gd2SiO5 (GSO) and the YAlO3 (YAP). Crystal thicknesses ranged from 0 to 50 mm. The study was performed via a previously generated photon transport Monte Carlo code. All photon track and energy histories were recorded and the energy transferred or absorbed in the scintillator medium was calculated together with the energy redistributed and retransported as secondary characteristic fluorescence radiation. Various parameters were calculated e.g. the fraction of the incident photon energy absorbed, transmitted or redistributed as fluorescence radiation, the scatter to primary ratio, the photon and energy distribution within each scintillator block etc. As being most significant, the fraction of the incident photon energy absorbed was found to increase with increasing crystal thickness tending to form a plateau above the 30 mm thickness. For LSO, LuAP, GSO and YAP scintillators, respectively, this fraction had the value of 44.8, 36.9 and 45.7% at the 10 mm thickness and 96.4, 93.2 and 96.9% at the 50 mm thickness. Within the plateau area approximately (57-59)% (59-63)% (52-63)% and (58-61)% of this fraction was due to scattered and reabsorbed radiation for the LSO, GSO, YAP and LuAP scintillators, respectively. In all cases, a negligible fraction (<0.1%) of the absorbed energy was found to escape the crystal as fluorescence radiation

  15. Hybrid - Monte Carlo numerical study of helical ripple transport at low collision frequency in stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical theories which examine low collision frequencies are forced to make simplifying assumptions to make the problem tractable and Monte Carlo representations which employ guiding center equations are to slow to use in the collisional regime of interest. This talk reports results obtained from a hybrid Monte Carlo-bounce averaged/guiding center simulation of the trajectories of helically trapped particles

  16. Improvement of the symbolic Monte-Carlo method for the transport equation: P1 extension and coupling with diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clouet, J.F.; Samba, G. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France)

    2005-07-01

    We use asymptotic analysis to study the diffusion limit of the Symbolic Implicit Monte-Carlo (SIMC) method for the transport equation. For standard SIMC with piecewise constant basis functions, we demonstrate mathematically that the solution converges to the solution of a wrong diffusion equation. Nevertheless a simple extension to piecewise linear basis functions enables to obtain the correct solution. This improvement allows the calculation in opaque medium on a mesh resolving the diffusion scale much larger than the transport scale. Anyway, the huge number of particles which is necessary to get a correct answer makes this computation time consuming. Thus, we have derived from this asymptotic study an hybrid method coupling deterministic calculation in the opaque medium and Monte-Carlo calculation in the transparent medium. This method gives exactly the same results as the previous one but at a much lower price. We present numerical examples which illustrate the analysis. (authors)

  17. GPU-accelerated inverse identification of radiative properties of particle suspensions in liquid by the Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, C. Y.; Zhao, J. M.; Liu, L. H.; Zhang, L.; Li, X. C.; Jiang, B. C.

    2016-03-01

    Inverse identification of radiative properties of participating media is usually time consuming. In this paper, a GPU accelerated inverse identification model is presented to obtain the radiative properties of particle suspensions. The sample medium is placed in a cuvette and a narrow light beam is irradiated normally from the side. The forward three-dimensional radiative transfer problem is solved using a massive parallel Monte Carlo method implemented on graphics processing unit (GPU), and particle swarm optimization algorithm is applied to inversely identify the radiative properties of particle suspensions based on the measured bidirectional scattering distribution function (BSDF). The GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo simulation significantly reduces the solution time of the radiative transfer simulation and hence greatly accelerates the inverse identification process. Hundreds of speedup is achieved as compared to the CPU implementation. It is demonstrated using both simulated BSDF and experimentally measured BSDF of microalgae suspensions that the radiative properties of particle suspensions can be effectively identified based on the GPU-accelerated algorithm with three-dimensional radiative transfer modelling.

  18. Discontinuous Galerkin for the Radiative Transport Equation

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2013-10-11

    This note presents some recent results regarding the approximation of the linear radiative transfer equation using discontinuous Galerkin methods. The locking effect occurring in the diffusion limit with the upwind numerical flux is investigated and a correction technique is proposed.

  19. Coefficients of an analytical aerosol forcing equation determined with a Monte-Carlo radiation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Taufiq; Moosmüller, H.; Chung, Chul E.

    2015-10-01

    Simple analytical equations for global-average direct aerosol radiative forcing are useful to quickly estimate aerosol forcing changes as function of key atmosphere, surface and aerosol parameters. The surface and atmosphere parameters in these analytical equations are the globally uniform atmospheric transmittance and surface albedo, and have so far been estimated from simplified observations under untested assumptions. In the present study, we take the state-of-the-art analytical equation and write the aerosol forcing as a linear function of the single scattering albedo (SSA) and replace the average upscatter fraction with the asymmetry parameter (ASY). Then we determine the surface and atmosphere parameter values of this equation using the output from the global MACR (Monte-Carlo Aerosol Cloud Radiation) model, as well as testing the validity of the equation. The MACR model incorporated spatio-temporally varying observations for surface albedo, cloud optical depth, water vapor, stratosphere column ozone, etc., instead of assuming as in the analytical equation that the atmosphere and surface parameters are globally uniform, and should thus be viewed as providing realistic radiation simulations. The modified analytical equation needs globally uniform aerosol parameters that consist of AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth), SSA, and ASY. The MACR model is run here with the same globally uniform aerosol parameters. The MACR model is also run without cloud to test the cloud effect. In both cloudy and cloud-free runs, the equation fits in the model output well whether SSA or ASY varies. This means the equation is an excellent approximation for the atmospheric radiation. On the other hand, the determined parameter values are somewhat realistic for the cloud-free runs but unrealistic for the cloudy runs. The global atmospheric transmittance, one of the determined parameters, is found to be around 0.74 in case of the cloud-free conditions and around 1.03 with cloud. The surface

  20. Qualitative Simulation of Photon Transport in Free Space Based on Monte Carlo Method and Its Parallel Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimin Liang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past decade, Monte Carlo method has obtained wide applications in optical imaging to simulate photon transport process inside tissues. However, this method has not been effectively extended to the simulation of free-space photon transport at present. In this paper, a uniform framework for noncontact optical imaging is proposed based on Monte Carlo method, which consists of the simulation of photon transport both in tissues and in free space. Specifically, the simplification theory of lens system is utilized to model the camera lens equipped in the optical imaging system, and Monte Carlo method is employed to describe the energy transformation from the tissue surface to the CCD camera. Also, the focusing effect of camera lens is considered to establish the relationship of corresponding points between tissue surface and CCD camera. Furthermore, a parallel version of the framework is realized, making the simulation much more convenient and effective. The feasibility of the uniform framework and the effectiveness of the parallel version are demonstrated with a cylindrical phantom based on real experimental results.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation for the electron cascade due to gamma rays in semiconductor radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte Carlo code was developed for simulating the electron cascade in radiation detector materials. The electron differential scattering cross sections were derived from measured electron energy-loss and optical spectra, making the method applicable for a wide range of materials. The detector resolution in a simplified model system shows dependence on the bandgap, the plasmon strength and energy, and the valence band width. In principle, these parameters could be optimized to improve detector performance. The intrinsic energy resolution was calculated for three semiconductors: silicon (Si), gallium arsenide (GaAs), and zinc telluride (ZnTe). Setting the ionization thresholds for electrons and holes is identified as a critical issue, as this strongly affects both the average electron-hole pair energy w and the Fano factor F. Using an ionization threshold from impact ionization calculations as an effective bandgap yields pair energies that are well matched to measured values. Fano factors of 0.091 (Si), 0.100 (GaAs), and 0.075 (ZnTe) were calculated. The Fano factor calculated for silicon using this model was lower than some results from past simulations and experiments. This difference could be attributed to problems in simulating inter-band transitions and the scattering of low-energy electrons.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation for the electron cascade due to gamma rays in semiconductor radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, Raman D.; Miranda, Ryan; Rez, Peter [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States)

    2012-03-15

    A Monte Carlo code was developed for simulating the electron cascade in radiation detector materials. The electron differential scattering cross sections were derived from measured electron energy-loss and optical spectra, making the method applicable for a wide range of materials. The detector resolution in a simplified model system shows dependence on the bandgap, the plasmon strength and energy, and the valence band width. In principle, these parameters could be optimized to improve detector performance. The intrinsic energy resolution was calculated for three semiconductors: silicon (Si), gallium arsenide (GaAs), and zinc telluride (ZnTe). Setting the ionization thresholds for electrons and holes is identified as a critical issue, as this strongly affects both the average electron-hole pair energy w and the Fano factor F. Using an ionization threshold from impact ionization calculations as an effective bandgap yields pair energies that are well matched to measured values. Fano factors of 0.091 (Si), 0.100 (GaAs), and 0.075 (ZnTe) were calculated. The Fano factor calculated for silicon using this model was lower than some results from past simulations and experiments. This difference could be attributed to problems in simulating inter-band transitions and the scattering of low-energy electrons.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of polycrystalline airborne γ-ray spectrometer for ground radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Airborne γ-ray spectrometer has been used extensively over several decades for mineral exploration and geological mapping purposes to look for the peaks of potassium, uranium and thorium. And the low-energy ray is ignored. Purpose: In order to provide a basis for obtaining effective environmental radioactivity measurement results, Minimum detectable activity (MDA) values in monitoring ground radiation of the polycrystalline airborne γ-ray spectrometer need to be calculated. Methods: MDA is related with the detection efficiency. A Monte Carlo simulation was performed using the MCNP5 code for different radionuclides in the ground environment. Equivalent mass thickness was proposed to reduce variance, and the secondary source was used in the MCNP5 input. Results: The pulse height distributions of external detectors and internal detectors for 137Cs and 131I at different heights were obtained, which represent the counting rate decreased as the altitude increases. And the MDA of external detectors is better than that of internal detectors. Conclusion: The external detector is suggested to adopt in flight measurement for enhancing MDA. (authors)

  4. Multiple-scaling methods for Monte Carlo simulations of radiative transfer in cloudy atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two multiple-scaling methods for Monte Carlo simulations were derived from integral radiative transfer equation for calculating radiance in cloudy atmosphere accurately and rapidly. The first one is to truncate sharp forward peaks of phase functions for each order of scattering adaptively. The truncated functions for forward peaks are approximated as quadratic functions; only one prescribed parameter is used to set maximum truncation fraction for various phase functions. The second one is to increase extinction coefficients in optically thin regions for each order scattering adaptively, which could enhance the collision chance adaptively in the regions where samples are rare. Several one-dimensional and three-dimensional cloud fields were selected to validate the methods. The numerical results demonstrate that the bias errors were below 0.2% for almost all directions except for glory direction (less than 0.4%) and the higher numerical efficiency could be achieved when quadratic functions were used. The second method could decrease radiance noise to 0.60% for cumulus and accelerate convergence in optically thin regions. In general, the main advantage of the proposed methods is that we could modify the atmospheric optical quantities adaptively for each order of scattering and sample important contribution according to the specific atmospheric conditions.

  5. Evaluation of the scattered radiation components produced in a gamma camera using Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polo, Ivon Oramas, E-mail: ivonoramas67@gmail.com [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Technologies, Higher Institute of Applied Science and Technology (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba)

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: this paper presents a simulation for evaluation of the scattered radiation components produced in a gamma camera PARK using Monte Carlo code SIMIND. It simulates a whole body study with MDP (Methylene Diphosphonate) radiopharmaceutical based on Zubal anthropomorphic phantom, with some spinal lesions. Methods: the simulation was done by comparing 3 configurations for the detected photons. The corresponding energy spectra were obtained using Low Energy High Resolution collimator. The parameters related with the interactions and the fraction of events in the energy window, the simulated events of the spectrum and scatter events were calculated. Results: the simulation confirmed that the images without influence of scattering events have a higher number of valid recorded events and it improved the statistical quality of them. A comparison among different collimators was made. The parameters and detector energy spectrum were calculated for each simulation configuration with these collimators using {sup 99m}Tc. Conclusion: the simulation corroborated that LEHS collimator has higher sensitivity and HEHR collimator has lower sensitivity when they are used with low energy photons. (author)

  6. Radiation field characterization of a BNCT research facility using Monte Carlo method - code MCNP-4B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy - BNCT - is a selective cancer treatment and arises as an alternative therapy to treat cancer when usual techniques - surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy - show no satisfactory results. The main proposal of this work is to project a facility to BNCT studies. This facility relies on the use of an Am Be neutron source and on a set of moderators, filters and shielding which will provide the best neutron/gamma beam characteristic for these Becton studies, i.e., high intensity thermal and/or epithermal neutron fluxes and with the minimum feasible gamma rays and fast neutrons contaminants. A computational model of the experiment was used to obtain the radiation field in the sample irradiation position. The calculations have been performed with the MCNP 4B Monte Carlo Code and the results obtained can be regarded as satisfactory, i.e., a thermal neutron fluencyNT = 1,35x108 n/cm , a fast neutron dose of 5,86x10-10 Gy/NT and a gamma ray dose of 8,30x10-14 Gy/NT. (author)

  7. Radiation field characterization of a BNCT research facility using Monte Carlo Method - Code MCNP-4B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy - BNCT- is a selective cancer treatment and arises as an alternative therapy to treat cancer when usual techniques - surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy - show no satisfactory results. The main proposal of this work is to project a facility to BNCT studies. This facility relies on the use of an AmBe neutron source and on a set of moderators, filters and shielding which will provide the best neutron/gamma beam characteristic for these BNCT studies, i.e., high intensity thermal and/or epithermal neutron fluxes and with the minimum feasible gamma rays and fast neutrons contaminants. A computational model of the experiment was used to obtain the radiation field in the sample irradiation position. The calculations have been performed with the MCNP 4B Monte Carlo Code and the results obtained can be regarded as satisfactory, i.e., a thermal neutron fluency ΝΤ = 1,35x108 n/cm2, a fast neutron dose of 5,86x-10 Gy/ΝΤ and a gamma ray dose of 8,30x-14 Gy/ΝΤ. (author)

  8. MORSE-EMP, Monte-Carlo Neutron and Gamma Multigroup Transport with Array Geometry, for PC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A - Description of program or function: MORSE-CGA was developed to add the capability of modeling rectangular lattices for nuclear reactor cores or for multi-partitioned structures. It thus enhances the capability of the MORSE code system. The MORSE code is a multipurpose neutron and gamma-ray transport Monte Carlo code. It has been designed as a tool for solving most shielding problems. Through the use of multigroup cross sections, the solution of neutron, gamma-ray, or coupled neutron-gamma-ray problems may be obtained in either the forward or adjoint mode. Time dependence for both shielding and criticality problems is provided. General three-dimensional geometry may be used with an albedo option available at any material surface. Isotropic or anisotropic scattering up to a P16 expansion of the angular distribution is allowed. B - Method of solution: Monte Carlo methods are used to solve the forward and the adjoint transport equations. Quantities of interest are then obtained by summing the contributions over all collisions, and frequently over most of phase space. Standard multigroup cross sections, such as those used in discrete ordinates codes, may be used as input; either CCC-254/ANISN, CCC-42/DTF-IV, or CCC-89/DOT cross section formats are acceptable. Anisotropic scattering is treated for each group-to-group transfer by utilizing a generalized Gaussian quadrature technique. The Morse code is organised into functional modules with simplified interfaces such that new modules may be incorporated with reasonable ease. The modules are (1) random walk, (2) cross section, (3) geometry, (4) analysis, and (5) diagnostic. The MARS module allows the efficient modeling of complex lattice geometries. Computer memory requirements are minimized because fewer body specifications are needed and nesting and repetition of arrays is allowed. While the basic MORSE code assumes the analysis module is user-written, a general analysis package, SAMBO is included. SAMBO handles some

  9. Monte-Carlo investigation of radiation beam quality of the CRNA neutron irradiator for calibration purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazrou, Hakim, E-mail: mazrou_h@crna.d [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger (CRNA), 02 Boulevard Frantz, Fanon, B.P. 399, Alger-RP 16000 (Algeria); Sidahmed, Tassadit [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger (CRNA), 02 Boulevard Frantz, Fanon, B.P. 399, Alger-RP 16000 (Algeria); Allab, Malika [Faculte de Physique, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie de Houari-Boumediene (USTHB), 16111, Alger (Algeria)

    2010-10-15

    An irradiation system has been acquired by the Nuclear Research Center of Algiers (CRNA) to provide neutron references for metrology and dosimetry purposes. It consists of an {sup 241}Am-Be radionuclide source of 185 GBq (5 Ci) activity inside a cylindrical steel-enveloped polyethylene container with radially positioned beam channel. Because of its composition, filled with hydrogenous material, which is not recommended by ISO standards, we expect large changes in the physical quantities of primary importance of the source compared to a free-field situation. Thus, the main goal of the present work is to fully characterize neutron field of such special delivered set-up. This was conducted by both extensive Monte-Carlo calculations and experimental measurements obtained by using BF{sub 3} and {sup 3}He based neutron area dosimeters. Effects of each component present in the bunker facility of the Algerian Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL) on the energy neutron spectrum have been investigated by simulating four irradiation configurations and comparison to the ISO spectrum has been performed. The ambient dose equivalent rate was determined based upon a correct estimate of the mean fluence to ambient dose equivalent conversion factors at different irradiations positions by means of a 3-D transport code MCNP5. Finally, according to practical requirements established for calibration purposes an optimal irradiation position has been suggested to the SSDL staff to perform, in appropriate manner, their routine calibrations.

  10. Formal quality control for a proton Monte Carlo system in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TOPAS (TOol for PArticle Simulation) is a Monte Carlo particle transport tool being released to a wide variety of proton therapy users worldwide. Because TOPAS provides unprecedented ease in 4D placement of geometry components, beam sources and scoring, including options to place geometry components, beam sources or scorers within each other, Quality Control (QC) for TOPAS is both critical and challenging. All simulation details (geometry, particle sources, scoring, physics settings, time-dependent motions, gating, etc.) are specified in the TOPAS Parameter Control System (which catches many user errors). QC includes Unit and End-to-End Testing. Each code unit is tested (each geometry component, particle source option, scoring option, etc.) and these unit testing procedures are shared with end users so they can reproduce tests. End-to-End testing of several full clinical setups is routinely performed. End-to-End testing presents a challenge since one cannot anticipate all the ways users will combine TOPAS flexible units for their specific project. Automated checking catches geometry overlaps and some other problematic setups, but one can never rule out the potential for problems when users combine units in new setups. QC is ultimately a partnership between the tool developer and the user. Key is that the developer be clear to the end user about what has been tested and what has not.

  11. Development of CAD-Based Geometry Processing Module for a Monte Carlo Particle Transport Analysis Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As The Monte Carlo (MC) particle transport analysis for a complex system such as research reactor, accelerator, and fusion facility may require accurate modeling of the complicated geometry. Its manual modeling by using the text interface of a MC code to define the geometrical objects is tedious, lengthy and error-prone. This problem can be overcome by taking advantage of modeling capability of the computer aided design (CAD) system. There have been two kinds of approaches to develop MC code systems utilizing the CAD data: the external format conversion and the CAD kernel imbedded MC simulation. The first approach includes several interfacing programs such as McCAD, MCAM, GEOMIT etc. which were developed to automatically convert the CAD data into the MCNP geometry input data. This approach makes the most of the existing MC codes without any modifications, but implies latent data inconsistency due to the difference of the geometry modeling system. In the second approach, a MC code utilizes the CAD data for the direct particle tracking or the conversion to an internal data structure of the constructive solid geometry (CSG) and/or boundary representation (B-rep) modeling with help of a CAD kernel. MCNP-BRL and OiNC have demonstrated their capabilities of the CAD-based MC simulations. Recently we have developed a CAD-based geometry processing module for the MC particle simulation by using the OpenCASCADE (OCC) library. In the developed module, CAD data can be used for the particle tracking through primitive CAD surfaces (hereafter the CAD-based tracking) or the internal conversion to the CSG data structure. In this paper, the performances of the text-based model, the CAD-based tracking, and the internal CSG conversion are compared by using an in-house MC code, McSIM, equipped with the developed CAD-based geometry processing module

  12. Antiproton annihilation physics in the Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A is designed to simulate therapeutic beams for cancer radiotherapy with fast ions. SHIELD-HIT12A allows creation of antiproton beam kernels for the treatment planning system TRiP98, but first it must be benchmarked against experimental data. An experimental depth dose curve obtained by the AD-4/ACE collaboration was compared with an earlier version of SHIELD-HIT, but since then inelastic annihilation cross sections for antiprotons have been updated and a more detailed geometric model of the AD-4/ACE experiment was applied. Furthermore, the Fermi–Teller Z-law, which is implemented by default in SHIELD-HIT12A has been shown not to be a good approximation for the capture probability of negative projectiles by nuclei. We investigate other theories which have been developed, and give a better agreement with experimental findings. The consequence of these updates is tested by comparing simulated data with the antiproton depth dose curve in water. It is found that the implementation of these new capture probabilities results in an overestimation of the depth dose curve in the Bragg peak. This can be mitigated by scaling the antiproton collision cross sections, which restores the agreement, but some small deviations still remain. Best agreement is achieved by using the most recent antiproton collision cross sections and the Fermi–Teller Z-law, even if experimental data conclude that the Z-law is inadequately describing annihilation on compounds. We conclude that more experimental cross section data are needed in the lower energy range in order to resolve this contradiction, ideally combined with more rigorous models for annihilation on compounds

  13. TIMOC-72, 3-D Time-Dependent Homogeneous or Inhomogeneous Neutron Transport by Monte-Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: TIMOC solves the energy and time dependent (or stationary) homogeneous or inhomogeneous neutron transport equation in three-dimensional geometries. The program can treat all commonly used scattering kernels, such as absorption, fission, isotropic and anisotropic elastic scattering, level excitation, the evaporation model, and the energy transfer matrix model, which includes (n,2n) reactions. The exchangeable geometry routines consist at present of (a) periodical multilayer slab, spherical and cylindrical lattices, (b) an elaborate three-dimensional cylindrical geometry which allows all kinds of subdivisions, (c) the very flexible O5R geometry routine which is able to describe any body combinations with surfaces of second order. The program samples the stationary or time-energy-region dependent fluxes as well as the transmission ratios between geometrical regions and the following integral quantities or eigenvalues, the leakage rate, the slowing down density, the production to source ratio, the multiplication factor based on flux and collision estimator, the mean production time, the mean destruction time, time distribution of production and destruction, the fission rates, the energy dependent absorption rates, the energy deposition due to elastic scattering for the different geometrical regions. 2 - Method of solution: TIMOC is a Monte Carlo program and uses several, partially optional variance reducing techniques, such as the method of expected values (weight factor), Russian roulette, the method of fractional generated neutrons, double sampling, semi-systematic sampling and the method of expected leakage probability. Within the neutron lifetime a discrete energy value is given after each collision process. The nuclear data input is however done by group averaged cross sections. The program can generate the neutron fluxes either resulting from an external source or in the form of fundamental mode distributions by a special

  14. Predicting the timing properties of phosphor-coated scintillators using Monte Carlo light transport simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncali, Emilie; Schmall, Jeffrey P; Viswanath, Varsha; Berg, Eric; Cherry, Simon R

    2014-04-21

    Current developments in positron emission tomography focus on improving timing performance for scanners with time-of-flight (TOF) capability, and incorporating depth-of-interaction (DOI) information. Recent studies have shown that incorporating DOI correction in TOF detectors can improve timing resolution, and that DOI also becomes more important in long axial field-of-view scanners. We have previously reported the development of DOI-encoding detectors using phosphor-coated scintillation crystals; here we study the timing properties of those crystals to assess the feasibility of providing some level of DOI information without significantly degrading the timing performance. We used Monte Carlo simulations to provide a detailed understanding of light transport in phosphor-coated crystals which cannot be fully characterized experimentally. Our simulations used a custom reflectance model based on 3D crystal surface measurements. Lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals were simulated with a phosphor coating in contact with the scintillator surfaces and an external diffuse reflector (teflon). Light output, energy resolution, and pulse shape showed excellent agreement with experimental data obtained on 3 × 3 × 10 mm³ crystals coupled to a photomultiplier tube. Scintillator intrinsic timing resolution was simulated with head-on and side-on configurations, confirming the trends observed experimentally. These results indicate that the model may be used to predict timing properties in phosphor-coated crystals and guide the coating for optimal DOI resolution/timing performance trade-off for a given crystal geometry. Simulation data suggested that a time stamp generated from early photoelectrons minimizes degradation of the timing resolution, thus making this method potentially more useful for TOF-DOI detectors than our initial experiments suggested. Finally, this approach could easily be extended to the study of timing properties in other scintillation crystals, with a range of

  15. Department of Environmental and Radiation Transport Physics - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    structures, in collaboration with the Institute of Geological Sciences of Polish Academy of Sciences. The geological fault system which surrounds the ''Las Wolski'' horst is covered with loess overburden. An evident increase in radon concentration in the upper loess layer is observed over the fault position. This may have important environmental implications. Several samples of soil taken from those areas were analysed for the concentration of natural isotopes (U, Th, and K). Natural radioactivity measurements in various samples (soils, rocks, raw, and building materials, etc.) have been carried out using low background spectrometers (with NaI(Tl) and HPGe detectors). We took part in the national inter-comparison concerning the methodology of ''radon-in-water'' measurements. The results are to be published. A joint project ''The Radon Centre - Non- Governmental International Scientific Network'' has been started in co-operation with the Central Mining Institute in Katowice. The main goals are to prepare and execute joint research projects and programmes, and to disseminate and put into practice the results of research activities of particular Network members. Neutron methods are an important part of nuclear geophysics and are also used in medical modalities. Investigations of the neutron transport parameters require usually the detection and/or calculation of spatial, time, and energy distributions of fast, epithermal and thermal neutrons, and of the accompanying γ radiation. The research has been directed into several aspects: - Basic theoretical and experimental investigation for the thermal neutron transport: a) the temperature behaviour of the pulsed parameters in a hydrogenous moderator, b) diffusion cooling in small two-region systems containing substances of different types of energy characteristics of thermal neutron scattering. - Calculations of the radiation field and energy deposition in the water beam dump for the TESLA electron-positron collider for the DESY

  16. Monte-Carlo Impurity transport simulations in the edge of the DIII-D tokamak using the MCI code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte-Carlo Impurity (MCI) transport code is used to follow trace impurities through multiple ionization states in realistic 2-D tokamak geometries. The MCI code is used to study impurity transport along the open magnetic field lines of the Scrape-off Layer (SOL) and to understand how impurities get into the core from the SOL. An MCI study concentrating on the entrainment of carbon impurities ions by deuterium background plasma into the DIII-D divertor is discussed. MCI simulation results are compared to experimental DIII-D carbon measurements

  17. Monte Carlo Simulation of Scattered Light with Shear Waves Generated by Acoustic Radiation Force for Acousto-Optic Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte Carlo method of multiple scattered coherent light with the information of shear wave propagation in scattering media is presented. The established Monte-Carlo algorithm is mainly relative to optical phase variations due to the acoustic-radiation-force shear-wave-induced displacements of light scatterers. Both the distributions and temporal behaviors of optical phase increments in probe locations are obtained. Consequently, shear wave speed is evaluated quantitatively. It is noted that the phase increments exactly track the propagations of shear waves induced by focus-ultrasound radiation force. In addition, attenuations of shear waves are demonstrated in simulation results. By using linear regression processing, the shear wave speed, which is set to 2.1 m/s in simulation, is estimated to be 2.18 m/s and 2.35 m/s at time sampling intervals of 0.2 ms and 0.5 ms, respectively

  18. Overview. Department of Environmental and Radiation Transport Physics. Section 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loskiewicz, J. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Research activities in the Department of Environmental and Radiation Transport Physics are carried out by three Laboratories: Laboratory of Environmental Physics, Laboratory of Neutron Transport Physics and Laboratory of Physics and Modeling of Radiation Transport. The researches provided in 1994 cover: tracer transport and flows in porous media, studies on pollution in atmospheric air, physics of molecular phenomena in chromatographic detectors, studies on neutron transport in heterogenous media, studies on evaluation of neutron cross-section in the thermal region, studies on theory and utilization of neural network in data evaluation, numerical modelling of particle cascades for particle accelerator shielding purpose. In this section the description of mentioned activities as well as the information about personnel employed in the Department, papers and reports published in 1994, contribution to conferences and grants is also given.

  19. Spatiotemporal Monte Carlo transport methods in x-ray semiconductor detectors: Application to pulse-height spectroscopy in a-Se

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The authors describe a detailed Monte Carlo (MC) method for the coupled transport of ionizing particles and charge carriers in amorphous selenium (a-Se) semiconductor x-ray detectors, and model the effect of statistical variations on the detected signal. Methods: A detailed transport code was developed for modeling the signal formation process in semiconductor x-ray detectors. The charge transport routines include three-dimensional spatial and temporal models of electron-hole pair transport taking into account recombination and trapping. Many electron-hole pairs are created simultaneously in bursts from energy deposition events. Carrier transport processes include drift due to external field and Coulombic interactions, and diffusion due to Brownian motion. Results: Pulse-height spectra (PHS) have been simulated with different transport conditions for a range of monoenergetic incident x-ray energies and mammography radiation beam qualities. Two methods for calculating Swank factors from simulated PHS are shown, one using the entire PHS distribution, and the other using the photopeak. The latter ignores contributions from Compton scattering and K-fluorescence. Comparisons differ by approximately 2% between experimental measurements and simulations. Conclusions: The a-Se x-ray detector PHS responses simulated in this work include three-dimensional spatial and temporal transport of electron-hole pairs. These PHS were used to calculate the Swank factor and compare it with experimental measurements. The Swank factor was shown to be a function of x-ray energy and applied electric field. Trapping and recombination models are all shown to affect the Swank factor.

  20. A comprehensive system for dosimetric commissioning and Monte Carlo validation for the small animal radiation research platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our group has constructed the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) for delivering focal, kilo-voltage radiation to targets in small animals under robotic control using cone-beam CT guidance. The present work was undertaken to support the SARRP's treatment planning capabilities. We have devised a comprehensive system for characterizing the radiation dosimetry in water for the SARRP and have developed a Monte Carlo dose engine with the intent of reproducing these measured results. We find that the SARRP provides sufficient therapeutic dose rates ranging from 102 to 228 cGy min-1 at 1 cm depth for the available set of high-precision beams ranging from 0.5 to 5 mm in size. In terms of depth-dose, the mean of the absolute percentage differences between the Monte Carlo calculations and measurement is 3.4% over the full range of sampled depths spanning 0.5-7.2 cm for the 3 and 5 mm beams. The measured and computed profiles for these beams agree well overall; of note, good agreement is observed in the profile tails. Especially for the smallest 0.5 and 1 mm beams, including a more realistic description of the effective x-ray source into the Monte Carlo model may be important.

  1. Radiation transport in ultrafast heated high Z solid targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraschiv, Ioana; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Mancini, Roberto; Johzaki, Tomoyuki

    2013-10-01

    Ultra-intense laser-target interactions generate hot, dense, and radiating plasmas, especially in the case of high-Z target materials. In order to evaluate the effect of radiation and its transport on the laser-produced plasmas we have developed a radiation transport (RT) code and implemented it in a collisional particle-in-cell code, PICLS. The code uses a database of emissivities and opacities as functions of photon frequency, created for given densities and temperatures by the non-equilibrium, collisional-radiative atomic kinetics 0-D code FLYCHK together with its postprocessor FLYSPECTRA. Using the two-dimensional RT-PICLS code we have studied the X-ray transport in an ultrafast heated copper target, the X-ray conversion efficiency, and the exchange of energy between the radiation field and the target. The details of these results obtained from the implementation of the radiation transport model into the PICLS calculations will be reported in this presentation. Work supported by the DOE Office of Science grant no. DE-SC0008827 and by the NNSA/DOE grant no. DE-FC52-06NA27616.

  2. A punctual flux estimator and reactions rates optimization in neutral particles transport calculus by the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the questions asked in radiation shielding problems is the estimation of the radiation level in particular to determine accessibility of working persons in controlled area (nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel reprocessing plants) or to study the dose gradients encountered in material (iron nuclear vessel, medical therapy, electronics in satellite). The flux and reaction rate estimators used in Monte Carlo codes give average values in volumes or on surfaces of the geometrical description of the system. But in certain configurations, the knowledge of punctual deposited energy and dose estimates are necessary. The Monte Carlo estimate of the flux at a point of interest is a calculus which presents an unbounded variance. The central limit theorem cannot be applied thus no easy confidence level may be calculated. The convergence rate is then very poor. We propose in this study a new solution for the photon flux at a point estimator. The method is based on the 'once more collided flux estimator' developed earlier for neutron calculations. It solves the problem of the unbounded variance and do not add any bias to the estimation. We show however that our new sampling schemes specially developed to treat the anisotropy of the photon coherent scattering is necessary for a good and regular behavior of the estimator. This developments integrated in the TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code add the possibility of an unbiased punctual estimate on media interfaces. (author)

  3. Monte Carlo method based radiative transfer simulation of stochastic open forest generated by circle packing application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shengye; Tamura, Masayuki

    2013-10-01

    Monte Carlo Ray Tracing (MCRT) method is a versatile application for simulating radiative transfer regime of the Solar - Atmosphere - Landscape system. Moreover, it can be used to compute the radiation distribution over a complex landscape configuration, as an example like a forest area. Due to its robustness to the complexity of the 3-D scene altering, MCRT method is also employed for simulating canopy radiative transfer regime as the validation source of other radiative transfer models. In MCRT modeling within vegetation, one basic step is the canopy scene set up. 3-D scanning application was used for representing canopy structure as accurately as possible, but it is time consuming. Botanical growth function can be used to model the single tree growth, but cannot be used to express the impaction among trees. L-System is also a functional controlled tree growth simulation model, but it costs large computing memory. Additionally, it only models the current tree patterns rather than tree growth during we simulate the radiative transfer regime. Therefore, it is much more constructive to use regular solid pattern like ellipsoidal, cone, cylinder etc. to indicate single canopy. Considering the allelopathy phenomenon in some open forest optical images, each tree in its own `domain' repels other trees. According to this assumption a stochastic circle packing algorithm is developed to generate the 3-D canopy scene in this study. The canopy coverage (%) and the tree amount (N) of the 3-D scene are declared at first, similar to the random open forest image. Accordingly, we randomly generate each canopy radius (rc). Then we set the circle central coordinate on XY-plane as well as to keep circles separate from each other by the circle packing algorithm. To model the individual tree, we employ the Ishikawa's tree growth regressive model to set the tree parameters including DBH (dt), tree height (H). However, the relationship between canopy height (Hc) and trunk height (Ht) is

  4. Optimization of radiation protection in the transportation of radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collective effective dose equivalent incurred by the population in Argentina as a result of the distribution of radioisotopes for medical applications is estimated. An analysis is performed on the optimization of radiation protection in the transportation of radioisotopes, following the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). In Argentina, radiopharmaceutical products are arranged and distributed in type-A packages under the regulations for the safe transport of radioactive materials of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Additionally, the national regulatory authority requires the application of the dose limitation system to all practices involving radiation exposure by man. Radioisotopes are transported in special vehicles (60%), in domestic flights (30%) and in buses (10%). The collective effective dose equivalent was estimated by taking into account the different transportation means and the storage time while radioisotopes are in transit. The differential cost-benefit analysis shows that, in order to obtain an optimized level of protection, it would be necessary to reduce the current dose rates during transportation. This is particularly worthwhile when the distribution is made through public transportation, such as commercial planes or buses. It is concluded that, for the application of the dose limitation system to the transport of radioisotopes, it would be necessary to reduce the present IAEA limits of radiation levels at a one-meter distance from the packages in about a factor of ten. 6 references, 3 tables

  5. Mixed singular-regular boundary conditions in multislab radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reports a computational method for approximately solving radiation transport problems with anisotropic scattering defined on multislab domains irradiated from one side with a beam of monoenergetic neutral particles. We assume here that the incident beam may have a monodirectional component and a continuously distributed component in angle. We begin by defining the target problem representing the class of radiation transport problems that we are focused on. We then Chandrasekhar decompose the target problem into an uncollided transport problem with left singular boundary conditions and a diffusive transport problem with regular boundary conditions. We perform an analysis of these problems to derive the exact solution of the uncollided transport problem and a discrete ordinates solution in open form to the diffusive transport problem. These solutions are the basis for the definition of a computational method for approximately solving the target problem. We illustrate the numerical accuracy of our method with three basic problems in radiative transfer and neutron transport, and we conclude this article with a discussion and directions for future work

  6. Evaluation of Monte Carlo electron-Transport algorithms in the integrated Tiger series codes for stochastic-media simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stochastic-media simulations require numerous boundary crossings. We consider two Monte Carlo electron transport approaches and evaluate accuracy with numerous material boundaries. In the condensed-history method, approximations are made based on infinite-medium solutions for multiple scattering over some track length. Typically, further approximations are employed for material-boundary crossings where infinite-medium solutions become invalid. We have previously explored an alternative 'condensed transport' formulation, a Generalized Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck (GBFP) method, which requires no special boundary treatment but instead uses approximations to the electron-scattering cross sections. Some limited capabilities for analog transport and a GBFP method have been implemented in the Integrated Tiger Series (ITS) codes. Improvements have been made to the condensed history algorithm. The performance of the ITS condensed-history and condensed-transport algorithms are assessed for material-boundary crossings. These assessments are made both by introducing artificial material boundaries and by comparison to analog Monte Carlo simulations. (authors)

  7. The Development of WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Ryan

    Graphics processing units, or GPUs, have gradually increased in computational power from the small, job-specific boards of the early 1990s to the programmable powerhouses of today. Compared to more common central processing units, or CPUs, GPUs have a higher aggregate memory bandwidth, much higher floating-point operations per second (FLOPS), and lower energy consumption per FLOP. Because one of the main obstacles in exascale computing is power consumption, many new supercomputing platforms are gaining much of their computational capacity by incorporating GPUs into their compute nodes. Since CPU-optimized parallel algorithms are not directly portable to GPU architectures (or at least not without losing substantial performance), transport codes need to be rewritten to execute efficiently on GPUs. Unless this is done, reactor simulations cannot take full advantage of these new supercomputers. WARP, which can stand for ``Weaving All the Random Particles,'' is a three-dimensional (3D) continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code developed in this work as to efficiently implement a continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport algorithm on a GPU. WARP accelerates Monte Carlo simulations while preserving the benefits of using the Monte Carlo Method, namely, very few physical and geometrical simplifications. WARP is able to calculate multiplication factors, flux tallies, and fission source distributions for time-independent problems, and can run in both criticality or fixed source modes. WARP can transport neutrons in unrestricted arrangements of parallelepipeds, hexagonal prisms, cylinders, and spheres. WARP uses an event-based algorithm, but with some important differences. Moving data is expensive, so WARP uses a remapping vector of pointer/index pairs to direct GPU threads to the data they need to access. The remapping vector is sorted by reaction type after every transport iteration using a high-efficiency parallel radix sort, which serves to keep the

  8. MC21 v.6.0 – A continuous-energy Monte Carlo particle transport code with integrated reactor feedback capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Overview of the capabilities and features of the MC21 Monte Carlo code, version 6. • Detailed description of in-line reactor feedback capabilities in MC21. • Discussion of running strategies for Monte Carlo simulations with feedback effects. • Includes representative MC21 results for massively-parallel 3D reactor simulations. - Abstract: MC21 is a continuous-energy Monte Carlo radiation transport code for the calculation of the steady-state spatial distributions of reaction rates in three-dimensional models. The code supports neutron and photon transport in fixed source problems, as well as iterated-fission-source (eigenvalue) neutron transport problems. MC21 has been designed and optimized to support large-scale problems in reactor physics, shielding, and criticality analysis applications. The code also supports many in-line reactor feedback effects, including depletion, thermal feedback, xenon feedback, eigenvalue search, and neutron and photon heating. MC21 uses continuous-energy neutron/nucleus interaction physics over the range from 10−5 eV to 20 MeV. The code treats all common neutron scattering mechanisms, including fast-range elastic and non-elastic scattering, and thermal- and epithermal-range scattering from molecules and crystalline materials. For photon transport, MC21 uses continuous-energy interaction physics over the energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV. The code treats all common photon interaction mechanisms, including Compton scattering, pair production, and photoelectric interactions. All of the nuclear data required by MC21 is provided by the NDEX system of codes, which extracts and processes data from EPDL-, ENDF-, and ACE-formatted source files. For geometry representation, MC21 employs a flexible constructive solid geometry system that allows users to create spatial cells from first- and second-order surfaces. The system also allows models to be built up as hierarchical collections of previously defined spatial cells

  9. ScintSim1: A new Monte Carlo simulation code for transport of optical photons in 2D arrays of scintillation detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Zarrini-Monfared, Zinat; Karbasi, Sareh; Zamani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) arrays of thick segmented scintillators are of interest as X-ray detectors for both 2D and 3D image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Their detection process involves ionizing radiation energy deposition followed by production and transport of optical photons. Only a very limited number of optical Monte Carlo simulation models exist, which has limited the number of modeling studies that have considered both stages of the detection process. We present ScintSim1, an in-house optical Monte Carlo simulation code for 2D arrays of scintillation crystals, developed in the MATLAB programming environment. The code was rewritten and revised based on an existing program for single-element detectors, with the additional capability to model 2D arrays of elements with configurable dimensions, material, etc., The code generates and follows each optical photon history through the detector element (and, in case of cross-talk, the surrounding ones) until it reaches a configurable receptor, or is attenuated. The new model was verified by testing against relevant theoretically known behaviors or quantities and the results of a validated single-element model. For both sets of comparisons, the discrepancies in the calculated quantities were all optimization. PMID:24600168

  10. Minibeam radiation therapy for the management of osteosarcomas: A Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Minibeam radiation therapy (MBRT) exploits the well-established tissue-sparing effect provided by the combination of submillimetric field sizes and a spatial fractionation of the dose. The aim of this work is to evaluate the feasibility and potential therapeutic gain of MBRT, in comparison with conventional radiotherapy, for osteosarcoma treatments. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations (PENELOPE/PENEASY code) were used as a method to study the dose distributions resulting from MBRT irradiations of a rat femur and a realistic human femur phantoms. As a figure of merit, peak and valley doses and peak-to-valley dose ratios (PVDR) were assessed. Conversion of absorbed dose to normalized total dose (NTD) was performed in the human case. Several field sizes and irradiation geometries were evaluated. Results: It is feasible to deliver a uniform dose distribution in the target while the healthy tissue benefits from a spatial fractionation of the dose. Very high PVDR values (⩾20) were achieved in the entrance beam path in the rat case. PVDR values ranged from 2 to 9 in the human phantom. NTD2.0 of 87 Gy might be reached in the tumor in the human femur while the healthy tissues might receive valley NTD2.0 lower than 20 Gy. The doses in the tumor and healthy tissues might be significantly higher and lower than the ones commonly delivered used in conventional radiotherapy. Conclusions: The obtained dose distributions indicate that a gain in normal tissue sparing might be expected. This would allow the use of higher (and potentially curative) doses in the tumor. Biological experiments are warranted

  11. Intensity modulated radiation therapy using laser-accelerated protons: a Monte Carlo dosimetric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present Monte Carlo studies of intensity modulated radiation therapy using laser-accelerated proton beams. Laser-accelerated protons coming out of a solid high-density target have broad energy and angular spectra leading to dose distributions that cannot be directly used for therapeutic applications. Through the introduction of a spectrometer-like particle selection system that delivers small pencil beams of protons with desired energy spectra it is feasible to use laser-accelerated protons for intensity modulated radiotherapy. The method presented in this paper is a three-dimensional modulation in which the proton energy spectrum and intensity of each individual beamlet are modulated to yield a homogeneous dose in both the longitudinal and lateral directions. As an evaluation of the efficacy of this method, it has been applied to two prostate cases using a variety of beam arrangements. We have performed a comparison study between intensity modulated photon plans and those for laser-accelerated protons. For identical beam arrangements and the same optimization parameters, proton plans exhibit superior coverage of the target and sparing of neighbouring critical structures. Dose-volume histogram analysis of the resulting dose distributions shows up to 50% reduction of dose to the critical structures. As the number of fields is decreased, the proton modality exhibits a better preservation of the optimization requirements on the target and critical structures. It is shown that for a two-beam arrangement (parallel-opposed) it is possible to achieve both superior target coverage with 5% dose inhomogeneity within the target and excellent sparing of surrounding tissue

  12. Numerical simulations of a coupled radiative?conductive heat transfer model using a modified Monte Carlo method

    KAUST Repository

    Kovtanyuk, Andrey E.

    2012-01-01

    Radiative-conductive heat transfer in a medium bounded by two reflecting and radiating plane surfaces is considered. This process is described by a nonlinear system of two differential equations: an equation of the radiative heat transfer and an equation of the conductive heat exchange. The problem is characterized by anisotropic scattering of the medium and by specularly and diffusely reflecting boundaries. For the computation of solutions of this problem, two approaches based on iterative techniques are considered. First, a recursive algorithm based on some modification of the Monte Carlo method is proposed. Second, the diffusion approximation of the radiative transfer equation is utilized. Numerical comparisons of the approaches proposed are given in the case of isotropic scattering. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Prognosis of radiation damage probability in the time of railway transportation of radiation-dangerous objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The models for prediction of the intensity and probability of radiation accidents during railway transportation of radiation-dangerous objects are suggested. The models are based on those developed for transport accident with general cargoes. Ultimate velocity of the special train at a moment of accident characterizing the object stability is used as a criterion for transformation of a transport accident into radiation one. The formulae for calculation of radiation accident intensities as a result of different events including accidents with a special train, collision with a train moving in opposite direction on railroad between stations, natural phenomenon (earthquake) are derived. The conclusion is made that application of the models suggested in optimization problems gives an opportunity to reduce the total cost of radiation-dangerous object design and operation

  14. Multilevel Monte Carlo for two phase flow and Buckley–Leverett transport in random heterogeneous porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo (MC) is a well known method for quantifying uncertainty arising for example in subsurface flow problems. Although robust and easy to implement, MC suffers from slow convergence. Extending MC by means of multigrid techniques yields the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method. MLMC has proven to greatly accelerate MC for several applications including stochastic ordinary differential equations in finance, elliptic stochastic partial differential equations and also hyperbolic problems. In this study, MLMC is combined with a streamline-based solver to assess uncertain two phase flow and Buckley–Leverett transport in random heterogeneous porous media. The performance of MLMC is compared to MC for a two dimensional reservoir with a multi-point Gaussian logarithmic permeability field. The influence of the variance and the correlation length of the logarithmic permeability on the MLMC performance is studied

  15. Development of a Monte Carlo software to photon transportation in voxel structures using graphic processing units; Desenvolvimento de um software de Monte Carlo para transporte de fotons em estruturas de voxels usando unidades de processamento grafico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellezzo, Murillo

    2014-09-01

    As the most accurate method to estimate absorbed dose in radiotherapy, Monte Carlo Method (MCM) has been widely used in radiotherapy treatment planning. Nevertheless, its efficiency can be improved for clinical routine applications. In this thesis, the CUBMC code is presented, a GPU-based MC photon transport algorithm for dose calculation under the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) platform. The simulation of physical events is based on the algorithm used in PENELOPE, and the cross section table used is the one generated by the MATERIAL routine, also present in PENELOPE code. Photons are transported in voxel-based geometries with different compositions. There are two distinct approaches used for transport simulation. The rst of them forces the photon to stop at every voxel frontier, the second one is the Woodcock method, where the photon ignores the existence of borders and travels in homogeneous fictitious media. The CUBMC code aims to be an alternative of Monte Carlo simulator code that, by using the capability of parallel processing of graphics processing units (GPU), provide high performance simulations in low cost compact machines, and thus can be applied in clinical cases and incorporated in treatment planning systems for radiotherapy. (author)

  16. Monte Carlo transport calculations and analysis for reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of Monte Carlo methods for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) neutron fluence calculations is examined. As many commercial nuclear light water reactors approach the end of their design lifetime, it is of great consequence that reactor operators and regulators be able to characterize the structural integrity of the RPV accurately for financial reasons, as well as safety reasons, due to the possibility of plant life extensions. The Monte Carlo method, which offers explicit three-dimensional geometric representation and continuous energy and angular simulation, is well suited for this task. A model of the Three Mile Island unit 1 reactor is presented for determination of RPV fluence; Monte Carlo (MCNP) and deterministic (DORT) results are compared for this application; and numerous issues related to performing these calculations are examined. Synthesized three-dimensional deterministic models are observed to produce results that are comparable to those of Monte Carlo methods, provided the two methods utilize the same cross-section libraries. Continuous energy Monte Carlo methods are shown to predict more (15 to 20%) high-energy neutrons in the RPV than deterministic methods

  17. Induced Compton-scattering effects in radiation-transport approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of characteristics is used to solve radiation transport problems with induced Compton scattering effects included. The methods used to date have only addressed problems in which either induced Compton scattering is ignored, or problems in which linear scattering is ignored. Also, problems which include both induced Compton scattering and spatial effects have not been considered previously. The introduction of induced scattering into the radiation transport equation results in a quadratic nonlinearity. Methods are developed to solve problems in which both linear and nonlinear Compton scattering are important. Solutions to scattering problems are found for a variety of initial photon energy distributions

  18. Radiation exposure during air and ground transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a one year study program of radiation exposure experienced on both domestic and international flights of the China Airline and the Far East Airline in the Pacific, Southeast Asia and Taiwan areas and on trains and buses on Taiwan island are reported. CaSO4:Dy thermoluminescent dosimeters were used. It has been shown that transit exposures may amount to 10 times that on the ground with an altitude varying from 3,050 to 12,200 m. (U.K.)

  19. Radiation inactivation target size of rat adipocyte glucose transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ assembly states of rat adipocyte glucose transport protein in plasma membrane (PM) and in microsomal pool (MM) were assessed by measuring target size (TS) of D glucose-sensitive, cytochalasin B binding activity. High energy radiation inactivated the binding in both PM and MM by reducing the total capacity of the binding (B/sub T/) without affecting the dissociation constant (K/sub D/). The reduction in B/sub T/ as a function of radiation dose was analyzed based on classical target theory, from which TS was calculated. TS in the PM of insulin-treated adipocytes was 58 KDa. TS in the MM of noninsulin-treated and insulin-treated adipocytes were 112 and 109 KDa, respectively. With MM, however, inactivation data showed anomalously low radiation sensitivities at low radiation doses showing a shoulder in the semilog plots, which may be due to an interaction with a radiation sensitive inhibitor. With these results, they propose the following model: Adipocyte glucose transporter, while exists as a monomer (T) in PM, occurs in MM either as a homodimer (T2) or as a heterodimer (TX) with a protein X of a similar size. These dimers (T2 or TX) in MM, furthermore, may form a multi-molecular assembly with another, large (300-400 KDa) protein Y, and insulin increases this assembly formation. These putative, transporter-associated proteins X and Y may play an important role in control of transporter distribution between PM and MM, particularly in response to insulin

  20. A method of simulating dynamic multileaf collimators using Monte Carlo techniques for intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of modelling the dynamic motion of multileaf collimators (MLCs) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) was developed and implemented into the Monte Carlo simulation. The simulation of the dynamic MLCs (DMLCs) was based on randomizing leaf positions during a simulation so that the number of particle histories being simulated for each possible leaf position was proportional to the monitor units delivered to that position. This approach was incorporated into an EGS4 Monte Carlo program, and was evaluated in simulating the DMLCs for Varian accelerators (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA). The MU index of each segment, which was specified in the DMLC-control data, was used to compute the cumulative probability distribution function (CPDF) for the leaf positions. This CPDF was then used to sample the leaf positions during a real-time simulation, which allowed for either the step-shoot or sweeping-leaf motion in the beam delivery. Dose intensity maps for IMRT fields were computed using the above Monte Carlo method, with its accuracy verified by film measurements. The DMLC simulation improved the operational efficiency by eliminating the need to simulate multiple segments individually. More importantly, the dynamic motion of the leaves could be simulated more faithfully by using the above leaf-position sampling technique in the Monte Carlo simulation. (author)