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Sample records for carlo dose kernel

  1. Monte Carlo-based adaptive EPID dose kernel accounting for different field size responses of imagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Song; Gardner, Joseph K; Gordon, John J; Li, Weidong; Clews, Luke; Greer, Peter B; Siebers, Jeffrey V

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study is to present an efficient method to generate imager-specific Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose kernels for amorphous silicon-based electronic portal image device dose prediction and determine the effective backscattering thicknesses for such imagers. EPID field size-dependent responses were measured for five matched Varian accelerators from three institutions with 6 MV beams at the source to detector distance (SDD) of 105 cm. For two imagers, measurements were made with and without the imager mounted on the robotic supporting arm. Monoenergetic energy deposition kernels with 0-2.5 cm of water backscattering thicknesses were simultaneously computed by MC to a high precision. For each imager, the backscattering thickness required to match measured field size responses was determined. The monoenergetic kernel method was validated by comparing measured and predicted field size responses at 150 cm SDD, 10 x 10 cm2 multileaf collimator (MLC) sliding window fields created with 5, 10, 20, and 50 mm gaps, and a head-and-neck (H&N) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) patient field. Field size responses for the five different imagers deviated by up to 1.3%. When imagers were removed from the robotic arms, response deviations were reduced to 0.2%. All imager field size responses were captured by using between 1.0 and 1.6 cm backscatter. The predicted field size responses by the imager-specific kernels matched measurements for all involved imagers with the maximal deviation of 0.34%. The maximal deviation between the predicted and measured field size responses at 150 cm SDD is 0.39%. The maximal deviation between the predicted and measured MLC sliding window fields is 0.39%. For the patient field, gamma analysis yielded that 99.0% of the pixels have gamma < 1 by the 2%, 2 mm criteria with a 3% dose threshold. Tunable imager-specific kernels can be generated rapidly and accurately in a single MC simulation. The resultant kernels are imager position

  2. Application of dose kernel calculation using a simplified Monte Carlo method to treatment plan for scanned proton beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Shohei; Takada, Yoshihisa; Kohno, Ryosuke; Hotta, Kenji; Tansho, Ryohei; Akimoto, Tetsuo

    2016-03-01

    Full Monte Carlo (FMC) calculation of dose distribution has been recognized to have superior accuracy, compared with the pencil beam algorithm (PBA). However, since the FMC methods require long calculation time, it is difficult to apply them to routine treatment planning at present. In order to improve the situation, a simplified Monte Carlo (SMC) method has been introduced to the dose kernel calculation applicable to dose optimization procedure for the proton pencil beam scanning. We have evaluated accuracy of the SMC calculation by comparing a result of the dose kernel calculation using the SMC method with that using the FMC method in an inhomogeneous phantom. The dose distribution obtained by the SMC method was in good agreement with that obtained by the FMC method. To assess the usefulness of SMC calculation in clinical situations, we have compared results of the dose calculation using the SMC with those using the PBA method for three clinical cases of tumor treatment. The dose distributions calculated with the PBA dose kernels appear to be homogeneous in the planning target volumes (PTVs). In practice, the dose distributions calculated with the SMC dose kernels with the spot weights optimized with the PBA method show largely inhomogeneous dose distributions in the PTVs, while those with the spot weights optimized with the SMC method have moderately homogeneous distributions in the PTVs. Calculation using the SMC method is faster than that using the GEANT4 by three orders of magnitude. In addition, the graphic processing unit (GPU) boosts the calculation speed by 13 times for the treatment planning using the SMC method. Thence, the SMC method will be applicable to routine clinical treatment planning for reproduction of the complex dose distribution more accurately than the PBA method in a reasonably short time by use of the GPU-based calculation engine. PACS number(s): 87.55.Gh.

  3. SU-E-T-154: Calculation of Tissue Dose Point Kernels Using GATE Monte Carlo Simulation Toolkit to Compare with Water Dose Point Kernel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khazaee, M [shahid beheshti university, Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asl, A Kamali [Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran., Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Geramifar, P [Shariati Hospital, Tehran, Iran., Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: the objective of this study was to assess utilizing water dose point kernel (DPK)instead of tissue dose point kernels in convolution algorithms.to the best of our knowledge, in providing 3D distribution of absorbed dose from a 3D distribution of the activity, the human body is considered equivalent to water. as a Result tissue variations are not considered in patient specific dosimetry. Methods: In this study Gate v7.0 was used to calculate tissue dose point kernel. the beta emitter radionuclides which have taken into consideration in this simulation include Y-90, Lu-177 and P-32 which are commonly used in nuclear medicine. the comparison has been performed for dose point kernels of adipose, bone, breast, heart, intestine, kidney, liver, lung and spleen versus water dose point kernel. Results: In order to validate the simulation the Result of 90Y DPK in water were compared with published results of Papadimitroulas et al (Med. Phys., 2012). The results represented that the mean differences between water DPK and other soft tissues DPKs range between 0.6 % and 1.96% for 90Y, except for lung and bone, where the observed discrepancies are 6.3% and 12.19% respectively. The range of DPK difference for 32P is between 1.74% for breast and 18.85% for bone. For 177Lu, the highest difference belongs to bone which is equal to 16.91%. For other soft tissues the least discrepancy is observed in kidney with 1.68%. Conclusion: In all tissues except for lung and bone, the results of GATE for dose point kernel were comparable to water dose point kernel which demonstrates the appropriateness of applying water dose point kernel instead of soft tissues in the field of nuclear medicine.

  4. Primary and scattering contributions to beta scaled dose point kernels by means of Monte Carlo simulations; Contribuicoes primaria e espalhada para dosimetria beta calculadas pelo dose point kernels empregando simulacoes pelo Metodo Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente, Mauro [CONICET - Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas de La Republica Argentina (Conicet), Buenos Aires, AR (Brazil); Botta, Francesca; Pedroli, Guido [European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Medical Physics Department; Perez, Pedro, E-mail: valente@famaf.unc.edu.ar [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Cordoba (Argentina). Fac. de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica (FaMAF)

    2012-07-01

    Beta-emitters have proved to be appropriate for radioimmunotherapy. The dosimetric characterization of each radionuclide has to be carefully investigated. One usual and practical dosimetric approach is the calculation of dose distribution from a unit point source emitting particles according to any radionuclide of interest, which is known as dose point kernel. Absorbed dose distributions are due to primary and radiation scattering contributions. This work presented a method capable of performing dose distributions for nuclear medicine dosimetry by means of Monte Carlo methods. Dedicated subroutines have been developed in order to separately compute primary and scattering contributions to the total absorbed dose, performing particle transport up to 1 keV or least. Preliminarily, the suitability of the calculation method has been satisfactory, being tested for monoenergetic sources, and it was further applied to the characterization of different beta-minus radionuclides of nuclear medicine interests for radioimmunotherapy. (author)

  5. Calculation of electron and isotopes dose point kernels with FLUKA Monte Carlo code for dosimetry in nuclear medicine therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Mairani, A; Valente, M; Battistoni, G; Botta, F; Pedroli, G; Ferrari, A; Cremonesi, M; Di Dia, A; Ferrari, M; Fasso, A

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The calculation of patient-specific dose distribution can be achieved by Monte Carlo simulations or by analytical methods. In this study, FLUKA Monte Carlo code has been considered for use in nuclear medicine dosimetry. Up to now, FLUKA has mainly been dedicated to other fields, namely high energy physics, radiation protection, and hadrontherapy. When first employing a Monte Carlo code for nuclear medicine dosimetry, its results concerning electron transport at energies typical of nuclear medicine applications need to be verified. This is commonly achieved by means of calculation of a representative parameter and comparison with reference data. Dose point kernel (DPK), quantifying the energy deposition all around a point isotropic source, is often the one. Methods: FLUKA DPKS have been calculated in both water and compact bone for monoenergetic electrons (10-3 MeV) and for beta emitting isotopes commonly used for therapy ((89)Sr, (90)Y, (131)I, (153)Sm, (177)Lu, (186)Re, and (188)Re). Point isotropic...

  6. Calculation of electron and isotopes dose point kernels with fluka Monte Carlo code for dosimetry in nuclear medicine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botta, F; Di Dia, A; Pedroli, G; Mairani, A; Battistoni, G; Fasso, A; Ferrari, A; Ferrari, M; Paganelli, G

    2011-06-01

    The calculation of patient-specific dose distribution can be achieved by Monte Carlo simulations or by analytical methods. In this study, fluka Monte Carlo code has been considered for use in nuclear medicine dosimetry. Up to now, fluka has mainly been dedicated to other fields, namely high energy physics, radiation protection, and hadrontherapy. When first employing a Monte Carlo code for nuclear medicine dosimetry, its results concerning electron transport at energies typical of nuclear medicine applications need to be verified. This is commonly achieved by means of calculation of a representative parameter and comparison with reference data. Dose point kernel (DPK), quantifying the energy deposition all around a point isotropic source, is often the one.Methods: fluka DPKs have been calculated in both water and compact bone for monoenergetic electrons (10–3 MeV) and for beta emitting isotopes commonly used for therapy (89Sr, 90Y, 131I, 153Sm, 177Lu, 186Re, and 188Re). Point isotropic sources have been simulated at the center of a water (bone) sphere, and deposed energy has been tallied in concentric shells. fluka outcomes have been compared to penelope v.2008 results, calculated in this study as well. Moreover, in case of monoenergetic electrons in water, comparison with the data from the literature (etran, geant4, mcnpx) has been done. Maximum percentage differences within 0.8·RCSDA and 0.9·RCSDA for monoenergetic electrons (RCSDA being the continuous slowing down approximation range) and within 0.8·X90 and 0.9·X90 for isotopes (X90 being the radius of the sphere in which 90% of the emitted energy is absorbed) have been computed, together with the average percentage difference within 0.9·RCSDA and 0.9·X90 for electrons and isotopes, respectively.Results: Concerning monoenergetic electrons, within 0.8·RCSDA (where 90%–97% of the particle energy is deposed), fluka and penelope agree mostly within 7%, except for 10 and 20 keV electrons (12% in water, 8

  7. Calculation of electron and isotopes dose point kernels with fluka Monte Carlo code for dosimetry in nuclear medicine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botta, F.; Mairani, A.; Battistoni, G.; Cremonesi, M.; Di Dia, A.; Fasso, A.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, M.; Paganelli, G.; Pedroli, G.; Valente, M. [Medical Physics Department, European Institute of Oncology, Via Ripamonti 435, 20141 Milan (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (I.N.F.N.), Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Medical Physics Department, European Institute of Oncology, Via Ripamonti 435, 20141 Milan (Italy); Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Medical Physics Department, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Nuclear Medicine Department, European Institute of Oncology, Via Ripamonti 435, 2014 Milan (Italy); Medical Physics Department, European Institute of Oncology, Via Ripamonti 435, 20141 Milan (Italy); FaMAF, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba and CONICET, Cordoba, Argentina C.P. 5000 (Argentina)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The calculation of patient-specific dose distribution can be achieved by Monte Carlo simulations or by analytical methods. In this study, fluka Monte Carlo code has been considered for use in nuclear medicine dosimetry. Up to now, fluka has mainly been dedicated to other fields, namely high energy physics, radiation protection, and hadrontherapy. When first employing a Monte Carlo code for nuclear medicine dosimetry, its results concerning electron transport at energies typical of nuclear medicine applications need to be verified. This is commonly achieved by means of calculation of a representative parameter and comparison with reference data. Dose point kernel (DPK), quantifying the energy deposition all around a point isotropic source, is often the one. Methods: fluka DPKs have been calculated in both water and compact bone for monoenergetic electrons (10{sup -3} MeV) and for beta emitting isotopes commonly used for therapy ({sup 89}Sr, {sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I, {sup 153}Sm, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 186}Re, and {sup 188}Re). Point isotropic sources have been simulated at the center of a water (bone) sphere, and deposed energy has been tallied in concentric shells. fluka outcomes have been compared to penelope v.2008 results, calculated in this study as well. Moreover, in case of monoenergetic electrons in water, comparison with the data from the literature (etran, geant4, mcnpx) has been done. Maximum percentage differences within 0.8{center_dot}R{sub CSDA} and 0.9{center_dot}R{sub CSDA} for monoenergetic electrons (R{sub CSDA} being the continuous slowing down approximation range) and within 0.8{center_dot}X{sub 90} and 0.9{center_dot}X{sub 90} for isotopes (X{sub 90} being the radius of the sphere in which 90% of the emitted energy is absorbed) have been computed, together with the average percentage difference within 0.9{center_dot}R{sub CSDA} and 0.9{center_dot}X{sub 90} for electrons and isotopes, respectively. Results: Concerning monoenergetic electrons

  8. Searching for efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo proposal kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ziheng; Rodríguez, Carlos E

    2013-11-26

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) or the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm is a simulation algorithm that has made modern Bayesian statistical inference possible. Nevertheless, the efficiency of different Metropolis-Hastings proposal kernels has rarely been studied except for the Gaussian proposal. Here we propose a unique class of Bactrian kernels, which avoid proposing values that are very close to the current value, and compare their efficiency with a number of proposals for simulating different target distributions, with efficiency measured by the asymptotic variance of a parameter estimate. The uniform kernel is found to be more efficient than the Gaussian kernel, whereas the Bactrian kernel is even better. When optimal scales are used for both, the Bactrian kernel is at least 50% more efficient than the Gaussian. Implementation in a Bayesian program for molecular clock dating confirms the general applicability of our results to generic MCMC algorithms. Our results refute a previous claim that all proposals had nearly identical performance and will prompt further research into efficient MCMC proposals.

  9. Monte Carlo dose distributions for radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perucha, M.; Leal, A.; Rincon, M.; Carrasco, E. [Sevilla Univ. (Spain). Dept. Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica; Sanchez-Doblado, F. [Sevilla Univ. (Spain). Dept. Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica]|[Hospital Univ. Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain). Servicio de Oncologia Radioterapica; Nunez, L. [Clinica Puerta de Hierro, Madrid (Spain). Servicio de Radiofisica; Arrans, R.; Sanchez-Calzado, J.A.; Errazquin, L. [Hospital Univ. Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain). Servicio de Oncologia Radioterapica; Sanchez-Nieto, B. [Royal Marsden NHS Trust (United Kingdom). Joint Dept. of Physics]|[Inst. of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2001-07-01

    The precision of Radiosurgery Treatment planning systems is limited by the approximations of their algorithms and by their dosimetrical input data. This fact is especially important in small fields. However, the Monte Carlo methods is an accurate alternative as it considers every aspect of particle transport. In this work an acoustic neurinoma is studied by comparing the dose distribution of both a planning system and Monte Carlo. Relative shifts have been measured and furthermore, Dose-Volume Histograms have been calculated for target and adjacent organs at risk. (orig.)

  10. Suitability of point kernel dose calculation techniques in brachytherapy treatment planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshminarayanan Thilagam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachytherapy treatment planning system (TPS is necessary to estimate the dose to target volume and organ at risk (OAR. TPS is always recommended to account for the effect of tissue, applicator and shielding material heterogeneities exist in applicators. However, most brachytherapy TPS software packages estimate the absorbed dose at a point, taking care of only the contributions of individual sources and the source distribution, neglecting the dose perturbations arising from the applicator design and construction. There are some degrees of uncertainties in dose rate estimations under realistic clinical conditions. In this regard, an attempt is made to explore the suitability of point kernels for brachytherapy dose rate calculations and develop new interactive brachytherapy package, named as BrachyTPS, to suit the clinical conditions. BrachyTPS is an interactive point kernel code package developed to perform independent dose rate calculations by taking into account the effect of these heterogeneities, using two regions build up factors, proposed by Kalos. The primary aim of this study is to validate the developed point kernel code package integrated with treatment planning computational systems against the Monte Carlo (MC results. In the present work, three brachytherapy applicators commonly used in the treatment of uterine cervical carcinoma, namely (i Board of Radiation Isotope and Technology (BRIT low dose rate (LDR applicator and (ii Fletcher Green type LDR applicator (iii Fletcher Williamson high dose rate (HDR applicator, are studied to test the accuracy of the software. Dose rates computed using the developed code are compared with the relevant results of the MC simulations. Further, attempts are also made to study the dose rate distribution around the commercially available shielded vaginal applicator set (Nucletron. The percentage deviations of BrachyTPS computed dose rate values from the MC results are observed to be within plus/minus 5

  11. On optimality of kernels for approximate Bayesian computation using sequential Monte Carlo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, Sarah; Barnes, Chris P; Cornebise, Julien; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2013-03-26

    Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) has gained popularity over the past few years for the analysis of complex models arising in population genetics, epidemiology and system biology. Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) approaches have become work-horses in ABC. Here we discuss how to construct the perturbation kernels that are required in ABC SMC approaches, in order to construct a sequence of distributions that start out from a suitably defined prior and converge towards the unknown posterior. We derive optimality criteria for different kernels, which are based on the Kullback-Leibler divergence between a distribution and the distribution of the perturbed particles. We will show that for many complicated posterior distributions, locally adapted kernels tend to show the best performance. We find that the added moderate cost of adapting kernel functions is easily regained in terms of the higher acceptance rate. We demonstrate the computational efficiency gains in a range of toy examples which illustrate some of the challenges faced in real-world applications of ABC, before turning to two demanding parameter inference problems in molecular biology, which highlight the huge increases in efficiency that can be gained from choice of optimal kernels. We conclude with a general discussion of the rational choice of perturbation kernels in ABC SMC settings.

  12. Optical monitoring of rheumatoid arthritis: Monte Carlo generated reconstruction kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minet, O.; Beuthan, J.; Hielscher, A. H.; Zabarylo, U.

    2008-06-01

    Optical imaging in biomedicine is governed by the light absorption and scattering interaction on microscopic and macroscopic constituents in the medium. Therefore, light scattering characteristics of human tissue correlate with the stage of some diseases. In the near infrared range the scattering event with the coefficient approximately two orders of magnitude greater than absorption plays a dominant role. When measuring the optical parameters variations were discovered that correlate with the rheumatoid arthritis of a small joint. The potential of an experimental setup for transillumination the finger joint with a laser diode and the pattern of the stray light detection are demonstrated. The scattering caused by skin contains no useful information and it can be removed by a deconvolution technique to enhance the diagnostic value of this non-invasive optical method. Monte Carlo simulations ensure both the construction of the corresponding point spread function and both the theoretical verification of the stray light picture in rather complex geometry.

  13. GPU Acceleration of Mean Free Path Based Kernel Density Estimators for Monte Carlo Neutronics Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, TImothy P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kiedrowski, Brian C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martin, William R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-19

    Kernel Density Estimators (KDEs) are a non-parametric density estimation technique that has recently been applied to Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations. Kernel density estimators are an alternative to histogram tallies for obtaining global solutions in Monte Carlo tallies. With KDEs, a single event, either a collision or particle track, can contribute to the score at multiple tally points with the uncertainty at those points being independent of the desired resolution of the solution. Thus, KDEs show potential for obtaining estimates of a global solution with reduced variance when compared to a histogram. Previously, KDEs have been applied to neutronics for one-group reactor physics problems and fixed source shielding applications. However, little work was done to obtain reaction rates using KDEs. This paper introduces a new form of the MFP KDE that is capable of handling general geometries. Furthermore, extending the MFP KDE to 2-D problems in continuous energy introduces inaccuracies to the solution. An ad-hoc solution to these inaccuracies is introduced that produces errors smaller than 4% at material interfaces.

  14. Optimizing dose prescription in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumours using Monte Carlo dose calculation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widder, Joachim; Hollander, Miranda; Ubbels, Jan F.; Bolt, Rene A.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To define a method of dose prescription employing Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumours aiming at a dose as low as possible outside of the PTV. Methods and materials: Six typical T1 lung tumours - three small, three large - were construc

  15. Experimental pencil beam kernels derivation for 3D dose calculation in flattening filter free modulated fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego Azcona, Juan; Barbés, Benigno; Wang, Lilie; Burguete, Javier

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method to obtain the pencil-beam kernels that characterize a megavoltage photon beam generated in a flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerator (linac) by deconvolution from experimental measurements at different depths. The formalism is applied to perform independent dose calculations in modulated fields. In our previous work a formalism was developed for ideal flat fluences exiting the linac’s head. That framework could not deal with spatially varying energy fluences, so any deviation from the ideal flat fluence was treated as a perturbation. The present work addresses the necessity of implementing an exact analysis where any spatially varying fluence can be used such as those encountered in FFF beams. A major improvement introduced here is to handle the actual fluence in the deconvolution procedure. We studied the uncertainties associated to the kernel derivation with this method. Several Kodak EDR2 radiographic films were irradiated with a 10 MV FFF photon beam from two linacs from different vendors, at the depths of 5, 10, 15, and 20cm in polystyrene (RW3 water-equivalent phantom, PTW Freiburg, Germany). The irradiation field was a 50mm diameter circular field, collimated with a lead block. The 3D kernel for a FFF beam was obtained by deconvolution using the Hankel transform. A correction on the low dose part of the kernel was performed to reproduce accurately the experimental output factors. Error uncertainty in the kernel derivation procedure was estimated to be within 0.2%. Eighteen modulated fields used clinically in different treatment localizations were irradiated at four measurement depths (total of fifty-four film measurements). Comparison through the gamma-index to their corresponding calculated absolute dose distributions showed a number of passing points (3%, 3mm) mostly above 99%. This new procedure is more reliable and robust than the previous one. Its ability to perform accurate independent dose calculations was

  16. Monte Carlo PENRADIO software for dose calculation in medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrien, Camille; Lòpez Noriega, Mercedes; Bonniaud, Guillaume; Bordy, Jean-Marc; Le Loirec, Cindy; Poumarede, Bénédicte

    2014-06-01

    The increase on the collective radiation dose due to the large number of medical imaging exams has led the medical physics community to deeply consider the amount of dose delivered and its associated risks in these exams. For this purpose we have developed a Monte Carlo tool, PENRADIO, based on a modified version of PENELOPE code 2006 release, to obtain an accurate individualized radiation dose in conventional and interventional radiography and in computed tomography (CT). This tool has been validated showing excellent agreement between the measured and simulated organ doses in the case of a hip conventional radiography and a coronography. We expect the same accuracy in further results for other localizations and CT examinations.

  17. GMC: a GPU implementation of a Monte Carlo dose calculation based on Geant4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Lennart; Fleckenstein, Jens; Wenz, Frederik; Hesser, Jürgen

    2012-03-07

    We present a GPU implementation called GMC (GPU Monte Carlo) of the low energy (CUDA programming interface. The classes for electron and photon interactions as well as a new parallel particle transport engine were implemented. The way a particle is processed is not in a history by history manner but rather by an interaction by interaction method. Every history is divided into steps that are then calculated in parallel by different kernels. The geometry package is currently limited to voxelized geometries. A modified parallel Mersenne twister was used to generate random numbers and a random number repetition method on the GPU was introduced. All phantom results showed a very good agreement between GPU and CPU simulation with gamma indices of >97.5% for a 2%/2 mm gamma criteria. The mean acceleration on one GTX 580 for all cases compared to Geant4 on one CPU core was 4860. The mean number of histories per millisecond on the GPU for all cases was 658 leading to a total simulation time for one intensity-modulated radiation therapy dose distribution of 349 s. In conclusion, Geant4-based Monte Carlo dose calculations were significantly accelerated on the GPU.

  18. Dose point kernel for boron-11 decay and the cellular S values in boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yunzhi; Geng, JinPeng; Gao, Song; Bao, Shanglian

    2006-12-01

    The study of the radiobiology of boron neutron capture therapy is based on the cellular level dosimetry of boron-10's thermal neutron capture reaction 10B(n,alpha)7Li, in which one 1.47 MeV helium-4 ion and one 0.84 MeV lithium-7 ion are spawned. Because of the chemical preference of boron-10 carrier molecules, the dose is heterogeneously distributed in cells. In the present work, the (scaled) dose point kernel of boron-11 decay, called 11B-DPK, was calculated by GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code. The DPK curve drops suddenly at the radius of 4.26 microm, the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA) range of a lithium-7 ion. Then, after a slight ascending, the curve decreases to near zero when the radius goes beyond 8.20 microm, which is the CSDA range of a 1.47 MeV helium-4 ion. With the DPK data, S values for nuclei and cells with the boron-10 on the cell surface are calculated for different combinations of cell and nucleus sizes. The S value for a cell radius of 10 microm and a nucleus radius of 5 microm is slightly larger than the value published by Tung et al. [Appl. Radiat. Isot. 61, 739-743 (2004)]. This result is potentially more accurate than the published value since it includes the contribution of a lithium-7 ion as well as the alpha particle.

  19. SU-E-T-209: Independent Dose Calculation in FFF Modulated Fields with Pencil Beam Kernels Obtained by Deconvolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azcona, J [Department of Radiation Physics, Clinica Universidad de Navarra (Spain); Burguete, J [Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, Navarra (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To obtain the pencil beam kernels that characterize a megavoltage photon beam generated in a FFF linac by experimental measurements, and to apply them for dose calculation in modulated fields. Methods: Several Kodak EDR2 radiographic films were irradiated with a 10 MV FFF photon beam from a Varian True Beam (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) linac, at the depths of 5, 10, 15, and 20cm in polystyrene (RW3 water equivalent phantom, PTW Freiburg, Germany). The irradiation field was a 50 mm diameter circular field, collimated with a lead block. Measured dose leads to the kernel characterization, assuming that the energy fluence exiting the linac head and further collimated is originated on a point source. The three-dimensional kernel was obtained by deconvolution at each depth using the Hankel transform. A correction on the low dose part of the kernel was performed to reproduce accurately the experimental output factors. The kernels were used to calculate modulated dose distributions in six modulated fields and compared through the gamma index to their absolute dose measured by film in the RW3 phantom. Results: The resulting kernels properly characterize the global beam penumbra. The output factor-based correction was carried out adding the amount of signal necessary to reproduce the experimental output factor in steps of 2mm, starting at a radius of 4mm. There the kernel signal was in all cases below 10% of its maximum value. With this correction, the number of points that pass the gamma index criteria (3%, 3mm) in the modulated fields for all cases are at least 99.6% of the total number of points. Conclusion: A system for independent dose calculations in modulated fields from FFF beams has been developed. Pencil beam kernels were obtained and their ability to accurately calculate dose in homogeneous media was demonstrated.

  20. Kernel polynomial representation for imaginary-time Green’s functions in continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo impurity solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li

    2016-11-01

    Inspired by the recently proposed Legendre orthogonal polynomial representation for imaginary-time Green’s functions G(τ), we develop an alternate and superior representation for G(τ) and implement it in the hybridization expansion continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo impurity solver. This representation is based on the kernel polynomial method, which introduces some integral kernel functions to filter the numerical fluctuations caused by the explicit truncations of polynomial expansion series and can improve the computational precision significantly. As an illustration of the new representation, we re-examine the imaginary-time Green’s functions of the single-band Hubbard model in the framework of dynamical mean-field theory. The calculated results suggest that with carefully chosen integral kernel functions, whether the system is metallic or insulating, the Gibbs oscillations found in the previous Legendre orthogonal polynomial representation have been vastly suppressed and remarkable corrections to the measured Green’s functions have been obtained. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11504340).

  1. Monte Carlo dose calculation in dental amalgam phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Mohd Zahri Abdul; Yusoff, A L; Osman, N D; Abdullah, R; Rabaie, N A; Salikin, M S

    2015-01-01

    It has become a great challenge in the modern radiation treatment to ensure the accuracy of treatment delivery in electron beam therapy. Tissue inhomogeneity has become one of the factors for accurate dose calculation, and this requires complex algorithm calculation like Monte Carlo (MC). On the other hand, computed tomography (CT) images used in treatment planning system need to be trustful as they are the input in radiotherapy treatment. However, with the presence of metal amalgam in treatment volume, the CT images input showed prominent streak artefact, thus, contributed sources of error. Hence, metal amalgam phantom often creates streak artifacts, which cause an error in the dose calculation. Thus, a streak artifact reduction technique was applied to correct the images, and as a result, better images were observed in terms of structure delineation and density assigning. Furthermore, the amalgam density data were corrected to provide amalgam voxel with accurate density value. As for the errors of dose uncertainties due to metal amalgam, they were reduced from 46% to as low as 2% at d80 (depth of the 80% dose beyond Zmax) using the presented strategies. Considering the number of vital and radiosensitive organs in the head and the neck regions, this correction strategy is suggested in reducing calculation uncertainties through MC calculation.

  2. Monte carlo dose calculation in dental amalgam phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Zahri Abdul Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It has become a great challenge in the modern radiation treatment to ensure the accuracy of treatment delivery in electron beam therapy. Tissue inhomogeneity has become one of the factors for accurate dose calculation, and this requires complex algorithm calculation like Monte Carlo (MC. On the other hand, computed tomography (CT images used in treatment planning system need to be trustful as they are the input in radiotherapy treatment. However, with the presence of metal amalgam in treatment volume, the CT images input showed prominent streak artefact, thus, contributed sources of error. Hence, metal amalgam phantom often creates streak artifacts, which cause an error in the dose calculation. Thus, a streak artifact reduction technique was applied to correct the images, and as a result, better images were observed in terms of structure delineation and density assigning. Furthermore, the amalgam density data were corrected to provide amalgam voxel with accurate density value. As for the errors of dose uncertainties due to metal amalgam, they were reduced from 46% to as low as 2% at d80 (depth of the 80% dose beyond Zmax using the presented strategies. Considering the number of vital and radiosensitive organs in the head and the neck regions, this correction strategy is suggested in reducing calculation uncertainties through MC calculation.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation for radiation dose in children radiology; Simulacao Monte Carlo da dose para radiologia pediatrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Hitalo R.; Tomal, Alessandra [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin

    2016-07-01

    The dosimetry in pediatric radiology is essential due to the higher risk that children have in comparison to adults. The focus of this study is to present how the dose varies depending on the depth in a 10 year old and a newborn, for this purpose simulations are made using the Monte Carlo method. Potential differences were considered 70 and 90 kVp for the 10 year old and 70 and 80 kVp for the newborn. The results show that in both cases, the dose at the skin surface is larger for smaller potential value, however, it decreases faster for larger potential values. Another observation made is that because the newborn is less thick the ratio between the initial dose and the final is lower compared to the case of a 10 year old, showing that it is possible to make an image using a smaller entrance dose in the skin, keeping the same level of exposure at the detector. (author)

  4. A comparison of Monte Carlo dose calculation denoising techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Naqa, I.; Kawrakow, I.; Fippel, M.; Siebers, J. V.; Lindsay, P. E.; Wickerhauser, M. V.; Vicic, M.; Zakarian, K.; Kauffmann, N.; Deasy, J. O.

    2005-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that Monte Carlo (MC) denoising techniques can reduce MC radiotherapy dose computation time significantly by preferentially eliminating statistical fluctuations ('noise') through smoothing. In this study, we compare new and previously published approaches to MC denoising, including 3D wavelet threshold denoising with sub-band adaptive thresholding, content adaptive mean-median-hybrid (CAMH) filtering, locally adaptive Savitzky-Golay curve-fitting (LASG), anisotropic diffusion (AD) and an iterative reduction of noise (IRON) method formulated as an optimization problem. Several challenging phantom and computed-tomography-based MC dose distributions with varying levels of noise formed the test set. Denoising effectiveness was measured in three ways: by improvements in the mean-square-error (MSE) with respect to a reference (low noise) dose distribution; by the maximum difference from the reference distribution and by the 'Van Dyk' pass/fail criteria of either adequate agreement with the reference image in low-gradient regions (within 2% in our case) or, in high-gradient regions, a distance-to-agreement-within-2% of less than 2 mm. Results varied significantly based on the dose test case: greater reductions in MSE were observed for the relatively smoother phantom-based dose distribution (up to a factor of 16 for the LASG algorithm); smaller reductions were seen for an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) head and neck case (typically, factors of 2-4). Although several algorithms reduced statistical noise for all test geometries, the LASG method had the best MSE reduction for three of the four test geometries, and performed the best for the Van Dyk criteria. However, the wavelet thresholding method performed better for the head and neck IMRT geometry and also decreased the maximum error more effectively than LASG. In almost all cases, the evaluated methods provided acceleration of MC results towards statistically more accurate

  5. A comparison of Monte Carlo dose calculation denoising techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqa, I El [Washington University, St Louis, MO (United States); Kawrakow, I [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (Canada); Fippel, M [Univ Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Siebers, J V [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Lindsay, P E [Washington University, St Louis, MO (United States); Wickerhauser, M V [Washington University, St Louis, MO (United States); Vicic, M [Washington University, St Louis, MO (United States); Zakarian, K [Washington University, St Louis, MO (United States); Kauffmann, N [Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Deasy, J O [Washington University, St Louis, MO (United States)

    2005-03-07

    Recent studies have demonstrated that Monte Carlo (MC) denoising techniques can reduce MC radiotherapy dose computation time significantly by preferentially eliminating statistical fluctuations ('noise') through smoothing. In this study, we compare new and previously published approaches to MC denoising, including 3D wavelet threshold denoising with sub-band adaptive thresholding, content adaptive mean-median-hybrid (CAMH) filtering, locally adaptive Savitzky-Golay curve-fitting (LASG), anisotropic diffusion (AD) and an iterative reduction of noise (IRON) method formulated as an optimization problem. Several challenging phantom and computed-tomography-based MC dose distributions with varying levels of noise formed the test set. Denoising effectiveness was measured in three ways: by improvements in the mean-square-error (MSE) with respect to a reference (low noise) dose distribution; by the maximum difference from the reference distribution and by the 'Van Dyk' pass/fail criteria of either adequate agreement with the reference image in low-gradient regions (within 2% in our case) or, in high-gradient regions, a distance-to-agreement-within-2% of less than 2 mm. Results varied significantly based on the dose test case: greater reductions in MSE were observed for the relatively smoother phantom-based dose distribution (up to a factor of 16 for the LASG algorithm); smaller reductions were seen for an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) head and neck case (typically, factors of 2-4). Although several algorithms reduced statistical noise for all test geometries, the LASG method had the best MSE reduction for three of the four test geometries, and performed the best for the Van Dyk criteria. However, the wavelet thresholding method performed better for the head and neck IMRT geometry and also decreased the maximum error more effectively than LASG. In almost all cases, the evaluated methods provided acceleration of MC results towards

  6. Investigation of Nonuniform Dose Voxel Geometry in Monte Carlo Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiankui; Chen, Quan; Brindle, James; Zheng, Yiran; Lo, Simon; Sohn, Jason; Wessels, Barry

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the efficacy of using multi-resolution nonuniform dose voxel geometry in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. An in-house MC code based on the dose planning method MC code was developed in C++ to accommodate the nonuniform dose voxel geometry package since general purpose MC codes use their own coupled geometry packages. We devised the package in a manner that the entire calculation volume was first divided into a coarse mesh and then the coarse mesh was subdivided into nonuniform voxels with variable voxel sizes based on density difference. We name this approach as multi-resolution subdivision (MRS). It generates larger voxels in small density gradient regions and smaller voxels in large density gradient regions. To take into account the large dose gradients due to the beam penumbra, the nonuniform voxels can be further split using ray tracing starting from the beam edges. The accuracy of the implementation of the algorithm was verified by comparing with the data published by Rogers and Mohan. The discrepancy was found to be 1% to 2%, with a maximum of 3% at the interfaces. Two clinical cases were used to investigate the efficacy of nonuniform voxel geometry in the MC code. Applying our MRS approach, we started with the initial voxel size of 5 × 5 × 3 mm(3), which was further divided into smaller voxels. The smallest voxel size was 1.25 × 1.25 × 3 mm(3). We found that the simulation time per history for the nonuniform voxels is about 30% to 40% faster than the uniform fine voxels (1.25 × 1.25 × 3 mm(3)) while maintaining similar accuracy.

  7. Development of virtual CT DICOM images of patients with tumors: application for TPS and Monte Carlo dose evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milian, F. M.; Attili, A.; Russo, G; Marchetto, F.; Cirio, R., E-mail: felix_mas_milian@yahoo.com, E-mail: attili@to.infn.it, E-mail: russo@to.infn.it, E-mail: fmarchet@to.infn.it, E-mail: cirio@to.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Torino, TO (Italy); Bourhaleb, F., E-mail: bourhale@to.infn.it [Universita di Torino (UNITO), Torino, TO (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    A novel procedure for the generation of a realistic virtual Computed Tomography (CT) image of a patient, using the advanced Boundary RE Presentation (BREP)-based model MASH, has been implemented. This method can be used in radiotherapy assessment. It is shown that it is possible to introduce an artificial cancer, which can be modeled using mesh surfaces. The use of virtual CT images based on BREP models presents several advantages with respect to CT images of actual patients, such as automation, control and flexibility. As an example, two artificial cases, namely a brain and a prostate cancer, were created through the generation of images and tumor/organ contours. As a secondary objective, the described methodology has been used to generate input files for treatment planning system (TPS) and Monte Carlo code dose evaluation. In this paper, we consider treatment plans generated assuming a dose delivery via an active proton beam scanning performed with the INFN-IBA TPS kernel. Additionally, Monte Carlo simulations of the two treatment plans were carried out with GATE/GEANT4. The work demonstrates the feasibility of the approach based on the BREP modeling to produce virtual CT images. In conclusion, this study highlights the benefits in using digital phantom model capable of representing different anatomical structures and varying tumors across different patients. These models could be useful for assessing radiotherapy treatment planning systems (TPS) and computer simulations for the evaluation of the adsorbed dose. (author)

  8. Monte Carlo study of radiation dose enhancement by gadolinium in megavoltage and high dose rate radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G Zhang

    Full Text Available MRI is often used in tumor localization for radiotherapy treatment planning, with gadolinium (Gd-containing materials often introduced as a contrast agent. Motexafin gadolinium is a novel radiosensitizer currently being studied in clinical trials. The nanoparticle technologies can target tumors with high concentration of high-Z materials. This Monte Carlo study is the first detailed quantitative investigation of high-Z material Gd-induced dose enhancement in megavoltage external beam photon therapy. BEAMnrc, a radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation package, was used to calculate dose enhancement as a function of Gd concentration. Published phase space files for the TrueBeam flattening filter free (FFF and conventional flattened 6MV photon beams were used. High dose rate (HDR brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was also investigated as a reference. The energy spectra difference caused a dose enhancement difference between the two beams. Since the Ir-192 photons have lower energy yet, the photoelectric effect in the presence of Gd leads to even higher dose enhancement in HDR. At depth of 1.8 cm, the percent mean dose enhancement for the FFF beam was 0.38±0.12, 1.39±0.21, 2.51±0.34, 3.59±0.26, and 4.59±0.34 for Gd concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL, respectively. The corresponding values for the flattened beam were 0.09±0.14, 0.50±0.28, 1.19±0.29, 1.68±0.39, and 2.34±0.24. For Ir-192 with direct contact, the enhanced were 0.50±0.14, 2.79±0.17, 5.49±0.12, 8.19±0.14, and 10.80±0.13. Gd-containing materials used in MRI as contrast agents can also potentially serve as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. This study demonstrates that Gd can be used to enhance radiation dose in target volumes not only in HDR brachytherapy, but also in 6 MV FFF external beam radiotherapy, but higher than the currently used clinical concentration (>5 mg/mL would be needed.

  9. Monte Carlo study of radiation dose enhancement by gadolinium in megavoltage and high dose rate radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daniel G; Feygelman, Vladimir; Moros, Eduardo G; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey G

    2014-01-01

    MRI is often used in tumor localization for radiotherapy treatment planning, with gadolinium (Gd)-containing materials often introduced as a contrast agent. Motexafin gadolinium is a novel radiosensitizer currently being studied in clinical trials. The nanoparticle technologies can target tumors with high concentration of high-Z materials. This Monte Carlo study is the first detailed quantitative investigation of high-Z material Gd-induced dose enhancement in megavoltage external beam photon therapy. BEAMnrc, a radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation package, was used to calculate dose enhancement as a function of Gd concentration. Published phase space files for the TrueBeam flattening filter free (FFF) and conventional flattened 6MV photon beams were used. High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was also investigated as a reference. The energy spectra difference caused a dose enhancement difference between the two beams. Since the Ir-192 photons have lower energy yet, the photoelectric effect in the presence of Gd leads to even higher dose enhancement in HDR. At depth of 1.8 cm, the percent mean dose enhancement for the FFF beam was 0.38±0.12, 1.39±0.21, 2.51±0.34, 3.59±0.26, and 4.59±0.34 for Gd concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL, respectively. The corresponding values for the flattened beam were 0.09±0.14, 0.50±0.28, 1.19±0.29, 1.68±0.39, and 2.34±0.24. For Ir-192 with direct contact, the enhanced were 0.50±0.14, 2.79±0.17, 5.49±0.12, 8.19±0.14, and 10.80±0.13. Gd-containing materials used in MRI as contrast agents can also potentially serve as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. This study demonstrates that Gd can be used to enhance radiation dose in target volumes not only in HDR brachytherapy, but also in 6 MV FFF external beam radiotherapy, but higher than the currently used clinical concentration (>5 mg/mL) would be needed.

  10. Calculation of patient effective dose and scattered dose for dental mobile fluoroscopic equipment: application of the Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boram; Lee, Jungseok; Kang, Sangwon; Cho, Hyelim; Shin, Gwisoon; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Choi, Jonghak

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the patient effective dose and scattered dose from recently developed dental mobile equipment in Korea. The MCNPX 2.6 (Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA) was used in a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate both the effective and scattered doses. The MCNPX code was constructed identically as in the general use of equipment and the effective dose and scattered dose were calculated using the KTMAN-2 digital phantom. The effective dose was calculated as 906 μSv. The equivalent doses per organ were calculated via the MCNPX code, and were 32 174 and 19 μSv in the salivary gland and oesophagus, respectively. The scattered dose of 22.5-32.6 μSv of the tube side at 25 cm from the centre in anterior and posterior planes was measured as 1.4-3 times higher than the detector side of 10.5-16.0 μSv.

  11. A measurement-based generalized source model for Monte Carlo dose simulations of CT scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Liu, Ransheng; Yang, Chengwen; Zhou, Li; Zhai, Hezheng; Deng, Jun

    2017-03-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a generalized source model for accurate Monte Carlo dose simulations of CT scans based solely on the measurement data without a priori knowledge of scanner specifications. The proposed generalized source model consists of an extended circular source located at x-ray target level with its energy spectrum, source distribution and fluence distribution derived from a set of measurement data conveniently available in the clinic. Specifically, the central axis percent depth dose (PDD) curves measured in water and the cone output factors measured in air were used to derive the energy spectrum and the source distribution respectively with a Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm. The in-air film measurement of fan-beam dose profiles at fixed gantry was back-projected to generate the fluence distribution of the source model. A benchmarked Monte Carlo user code was used to simulate the dose distributions in water with the developed source model as beam input. The feasibility and accuracy of the proposed source model was tested on a GE LightSpeed and a Philips Brilliance Big Bore multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanners available in our clinic. In general, the Monte Carlo simulations of the PDDs in water and dose profiles along lateral and longitudinal directions agreed with the measurements within 4%/1 mm for both CT scanners. The absolute dose comparison using two CTDI phantoms (16 cm and 32 cm in diameters) indicated a better than 5% agreement between the Monte Carlo-simulated and the ion chamber-measured doses at a variety of locations for the two scanners. Overall, this study demonstrated that a generalized source model can be constructed based only on a set of measurement data and used for accurate Monte Carlo dose simulations of patients’ CT scans, which would facilitate patient-specific CT organ dose estimation and cancer risk management in the diagnostic and therapeutic radiology.

  12. Clinical implementation of the Peregrine Monte Carlo dose calculations system for photon beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, N; Bergstrom, P M; Daly, T P; Descalle, M; Garrett, D; House, R K; Knapp, D K; May, S; Patterson, R W; Siantar, C L; Verhey, L; Walling, R S; Welczorek, D

    1999-07-01

    PEREGRINE is a 3D Monte Carlo dose calculation system designed to serve as a dose calculation engine for clinical radiation therapy treatment planning systems. Taking advantage of recent advances in low-cost computer hardware, modern multiprocessor architectures and optimized Monte Carlo transport algorithms, PEREGRINE performs mm-resolution Monte Carlo calculations in times that are reasonable for clinical use. PEREGRINE has been developed to simulate radiation therapy for several source types, including photons, electrons, neutrons and protons, for both teletherapy and brachytherapy. However the work described in this paper is limited to linear accelerator-based megavoltage photon therapy. Here we assess the accuracy, reliability, and added value of 3D Monte Carlo transport for photon therapy treatment planning. Comparisons with clinical measurements in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms demonstrate PEREGRINE's accuracy. Studies with variable tissue composition demonstrate the importance of material assignment on the overall dose distribution. Detailed analysis of Monte Carlo results provides new information for radiation research by expanding the set of observables.

  13. Monte Carlo calculation of skyshine'' neutron dose from ALS (Advanced Light Source)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moin-Vasiri, M.

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics on skyshine'' neutron dose from ALS: Sources of radiation; ALS modeling for skyshine calculations; MORSE Monte-Carlo; Implementation of MORSE; Results of skyshine calculations from storage ring; and Comparison of MORSE shielding calculations.

  14. Gamma irradiator dose mapping: a Monte Carlo simulation and experimental measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Rogerio R.; Ribeiro, Mariana A.; Grynberg, Suely E.; Ferreira, Andrea V.; Meira-Belo, Luiz Claudio, E-mail: rrr@cdtn.b, E-mail: marianaalmeida@ufmg.b, E-mail: seg@cdtn.b, E-mail: avf@cdtn.b, E-mail: lcmb@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Sousa, Romulo V.; Sebastiao, Rita de C.O., E-mail: romuloverdolin@yahoo.com.b, E-mail: ritacos@ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Exatas. Dept. de Quimica

    2009-07-01

    Gamma irradiator facilities can be used in a wide range of applications such as biological and chemical researches, food treatment and sterilization of medical devices and products. Dose mapping must be performed in these equipment in order to establish plant operational parameters, as dose uniformity, source utilization efficiency and maximum and minimum dose positions. The isodoses curves are generally measured using dosimeters distributed throughout the device, and this procedure often consume a large amount of dosimeters, irradiation time and manpower. However, a detailed curve doses identification of the irradiation facility can be performed using Monte Carlo simulation, which reduces significantly the monitoring with dosimeters. The present work evaluates the absorbed dose in the CDTN/CNEN Gammacell Irradiation Facility, using the Monte Carlo N-particles (MCNP) code. The Gammacell 220, serial number 39, was produced by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and was loaded with sources of {sup 60}Co. Dose measurements using TLD and Fricke dosimeters were also performed to validate the calculations. The good agreement of the results shows that Monte Carlo simulations can be used as a predictive tool of irradiation planning for the CDTN/CNEN Gamma Cell Irradiator. (author)

  15. Organ doses for reference adult male and female undergoing computed tomography estimated by Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Long, Daniel; Fisher, Ryan; Tien, Chris; Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, Andre; Bolch, Wesley E. [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20852 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20852 (United States); Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To develop a computed tomography (CT) organ dose estimation method designed to readily provide organ doses in a reference adult male and female for different scan ranges to investigate the degree to which existing commercial programs can reasonably match organ doses defined in these more anatomically realistic adult hybrid phantomsMethods: The x-ray fan beam in the SOMATOM Sensation 16 multidetector CT scanner was simulated within the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX2.6. The simulated CT scanner model was validated through comparison with experimentally measured lateral free-in-air dose profiles and computed tomography dose index (CTDI) values. The reference adult male and female hybrid phantoms were coupled with the established CT scanner model following arm removal to simulate clinical head and other body region scans. A set of organ dose matrices were calculated for a series of consecutive axial scans ranging from the top of the head to the bottom of the phantoms with a beam thickness of 10 mm and the tube potentials of 80, 100, and 120 kVp. The organ doses for head, chest, and abdomen/pelvis examinations were calculated based on the organ dose matrices and compared to those obtained from two commercial programs, CT-EXPO and CTDOSIMETRY. Organ dose calculations were repeated for an adult stylized phantom by using the same simulation method used for the adult hybrid phantom. Results: Comparisons of both lateral free-in-air dose profiles and CTDI values through experimental measurement with the Monte Carlo simulations showed good agreement to within 9%. Organ doses for head, chest, and abdomen/pelvis scans reported in the commercial programs exceeded those from the Monte Carlo calculations in both the hybrid and stylized phantoms in this study, sometimes by orders of magnitude. Conclusions: The organ dose estimation method and dose matrices established in this study readily provides organ doses for a reference adult male and female for different

  16. Effects of physics change in Monte Carlo code on electron pencil beam dose distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toutaoui, Abdelkader, E-mail: toutaoui.aek@gmail.com [Departement de Physique Medicale, Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2 Bd Frantz Fanon BP399 Alger RP, Algiers (Algeria); Khelassi-Toutaoui, Nadia, E-mail: nadiakhelassi@yahoo.fr [Departement de Physique Medicale, Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2 Bd Frantz Fanon BP399 Alger RP, Algiers (Algeria); Brahimi, Zakia, E-mail: zsbrahimi@yahoo.fr [Departement de Physique Medicale, Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2 Bd Frantz Fanon BP399 Alger RP, Algiers (Algeria); Chami, Ahmed Chafik, E-mail: chafik_chami@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Sciences Nucleaires, Faculte de Physique, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumedienne, BP 32 El Alia, Bab Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria)

    2012-01-15

    Pencil beam algorithms used in computerized electron beam dose planning are usually described using the small angle multiple scattering theory. Alternatively, the pencil beams can be generated by Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport. In a previous work, the 4th version of the Electron Gamma Shower (EGS) Monte Carlo code was used to obtain dose distributions from monoenergetic electron pencil beam, with incident energy between 1 MeV and 50 MeV, interacting at the surface of a large cylindrical homogeneous water phantom. In 2000, a new version of this Monte Carlo code has been made available by the National Research Council of Canada (NRC), which includes various improvements in its electron-transport algorithms. In the present work, we were interested to see if the new physics in this version produces pencil beam dose distributions very different from those calculated with oldest one. The purpose of this study is to quantify as well as to understand these differences. We have compared a series of pencil beam dose distributions scored in cylindrical geometry, for electron energies between 1 MeV and 50 MeV calculated with two versions of the Electron Gamma Shower Monte Carlo Code. Data calculated and compared include isodose distributions, radial dose distributions and fractions of energy deposition. Our results for radial dose distributions show agreement within 10% between doses calculated by the two codes for voxels closer to the pencil beam central axis, while the differences are up to 30% for longer distances. For fractions of energy deposition, the results of the EGS4 are in good agreement (within 2%) with those calculated by EGSnrc at shallow depths for all energies, whereas a slightly worse agreement (15%) is observed at deeper distances. These differences may be mainly attributed to the different multiple scattering for electron transport adopted in these two codes and the inclusion of spin effect, which produces an increase of the effective range of

  17. Impact of photon cross section systematic uncertainties on Monte Carlo-determined depth-dose distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Aguirre, Eder; David, Mariano; deAlmeida, Carlos E

    2016-01-01

    This work studies the impact of systematic uncertainties associated to interaction cross sections on depth dose curves determined by Monte Carlo simulations. The corresponding sensitivity factors are quantified by changing cross sections in a given amount and determining the variation in the dose. The influence of total cross sections for all particles, photons and only for Compton scattering is addressed. The PENELOPE code was used in all simulations. It was found that photon cross section sensitivity factors depend on depth. In addition, they are positive and negative for depths below and above an equilibrium depth, respectively. At this depth, sensitivity factors are null. The equilibrium depths found in this work agree very well with the mean free path of the corresponding incident photon energy. Using the sensitivity factors reported here, it is possible to estimate the impact of photon cross section uncertainties on the uncertainty of Monte Carlo-determined depth dose curves.

  18. SU-E-T-202: Impact of Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Algorithm On Prostate SBRT Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venencia, C; Garrigo, E; Cardenas, J; Castro Pena, P [Instituto de Radioterapia - Fundacion Marie Curie, Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to quantify the dosimetric impact of using Monte Carlo algorithm on pre calculated SBRT prostate treatment with pencil beam dose calculation algorithm. Methods: A 6MV photon beam produced by a Novalis TX (BrainLAB-Varian) linear accelerator equipped with HDMLC was used. Treatment plans were done using 9 fields with Iplanv4.5 (BrainLAB) and dynamic IMRT modality. Institutional SBRT protocol uses a total dose to the prostate of 40Gy in 5 fractions, every other day. Dose calculation is done by pencil beam (2mm dose resolution), heterogeneity correction and dose volume constraint (UCLA) for PTV D95%=40Gy and D98%>39.2Gy, Rectum V20Gy<50%, V32Gy<20%, V36Gy<10% and V40Gy<5%, Bladder V20Gy<40% and V40Gy<10%, femoral heads V16Gy<5%, penile bulb V25Gy<3cc, urethra and overlap region between PTV and PRV Rectum Dmax<42Gy. 10 SBRT treatments plans were selected and recalculated using Monte Carlo with 2mm spatial resolution and mean variance of 2%. DVH comparisons between plans were done. Results: The average difference between PTV doses constraints were within 2%. However 3 plans have differences higher than 3% which does not meet the D98% criteria (>39.2Gy) and should have been renormalized. Dose volume constraint differences for rectum, bladder, femoral heads and penile bulb were les than 2% and within tolerances. Urethra region and overlapping between PTV and PRV Rectum shows increment of dose in all plans. The average difference for urethra region was 2.1% with a maximum of 7.8% and for the overlapping region 2.5% with a maximum of 8.7%. Conclusion: Monte Carlo dose calculation on dynamic IMRT treatments could affects on plan normalization. Dose increment in critical region of urethra and PTV overlapping region with PTV could have clinical consequences which need to be studied. The use of Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm is limited because inverse planning dose optimization use only pencil beam.

  19. Monte Carlo calculation of dose rate conversion factors for external exposure to photon emitters in soil

    CERN Document Server

    Clouvas, A; Antonopoulos-Domis, M; Silva, J

    2000-01-01

    The dose rate conversion factors D/sub CF/ (absorbed dose rate in air per unit activity per unit of soil mass, nGy h/sup -1/ per Bq kg/sup -1/) are calculated 1 m above ground for photon emitters of natural radionuclides uniformly distributed in the soil. Three Monte Carlo codes are used: 1) The MCNP code of Los Alamos; 2) The GEANT code of CERN; and 3) a Monte Carlo code developed in the Nuclear Technology Laboratory of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. The accuracy of the Monte Carlo results is tested by the comparison of the unscattered flux obtained by the three Monte Carlo codes with an independent straightforward calculation. All codes and particularly the MCNP calculate accurately the absorbed dose rate in air due to the unscattered radiation. For the total radiation (unscattered plus scattered) the D/sub CF/ values calculated from the three codes are in very good agreement between them. The comparison between these results and the results deduced previously by other authors indicates a good ag...

  20. Effect of statistical fluctuation in Monte Carlo based photon beam dose calculation on gamma index evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Yan Jiang; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2013-03-21

    The γ-index test has been commonly adopted to quantify the degree of agreement between a reference dose distribution and an evaluation dose distribution. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has been widely used for the radiotherapy dose calculation for both clinical and research purposes. The goal of this work is to investigate both theoretically and experimentally the impact of the MC statistical fluctuation on the γ-index test when the fluctuation exists in the reference, the evaluation, or both dose distributions. To the first order approximation, we theoretically demonstrated in a simplified model that the statistical fluctuation tends to overestimate γ-index values when existing in the reference dose distribution and underestimate γ-index values when existing in the evaluation dose distribution given the original γ-index is relatively large for the statistical fluctuation. Our numerical experiments using realistic clinical photon radiation therapy cases have shown that (1) when performing a γ-index test between an MC reference dose and a non-MC evaluation dose, the average γ-index is overestimated and the gamma passing rate decreases with the increase of the statistical noise level in the reference dose; (2) when performing a γ-index test between a non-MC reference dose and an MC evaluation dose, the average γ-index is underestimated when they are within the clinically relevant range and the gamma passing rate increases with the increase of the statistical noise level in the evaluation dose; (3) when performing a γ-index test between an MC reference dose and an MC evaluation dose, the gamma passing rate is overestimated due to the statistical noise in the evaluation dose and underestimated due to the statistical noise in the reference dose. We conclude that the γ-index test should be used with caution when comparing dose distributions computed with MC simulation.

  1. Poster — Thur Eve — 14: Improving Tissue Segmentation for Monte Carlo Dose Calculation using DECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Salvio, A.; Bedwani, S.; Carrier, J-F. [Centre hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal (Canada); Bouchard, H. [National Physics Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To improve Monte Carlo dose calculation accuracy through a new tissue segmentation technique with dual energy CT (DECT). Methods: Electron density (ED) and effective atomic number (EAN) can be extracted directly from DECT data with a stoichiometric calibration method. Images are acquired with Monte Carlo CT projections using the user code egs-cbct and reconstructed using an FDK backprojection algorithm. Calibration is performed using projections of a numerical RMI phantom. A weighted parameter algorithm then uses both EAN and ED to assign materials to voxels from DECT simulated images. This new method is compared to a standard tissue characterization from single energy CT (SECT) data using a segmented calibrated Hounsfield unit (HU) to ED curve. Both methods are compared to the reference numerical head phantom. Monte Carlo simulations on uniform phantoms of different tissues using dosxyz-nrc show discrepancies in depth-dose distributions. Results: Both SECT and DECT segmentation methods show similar performance assigning soft tissues. Performance is however improved with DECT in regions with higher density, such as bones, where it assigns materials correctly 8% more often than segmentation with SECT, considering the same set of tissues and simulated clinical CT images, i.e. including noise and reconstruction artifacts. Furthermore, Monte Carlo results indicate that kV photon beam depth-dose distributions can double between two tissues of density higher than muscle. Conclusions: A direct acquisition of ED and the added information of EAN with DECT data improves tissue segmentation and increases the accuracy of Monte Carlo dose calculation in kV photon beams.

  2. Validation of fast Monte Carlo dose calculation in small animal radiotherapy with EBT3 radiochromic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblet, C.; Chiavassa, S.; Smekens, F.; Sarrut, D.; Passal, V.; Suhard, J.; Lisbona, A.; Paris, F.; Delpon, G.

    2016-05-01

    In preclinical studies, the absorbed dose calculation accuracy in small animals is fundamental to reliably investigate and understand observed biological effects. This work investigated the use of the split exponential track length estimator (seTLE), a new kerma based Monte Carlo dose calculation method for preclinical radiotherapy using a small animal precision micro irradiator, the X-RAD 225Cx. Monte Carlo modelling of the irradiator with GATE/GEANT4 was extensively evaluated by comparing measurements and simulations for half-value layer, percent depth dose, off-axis profiles and output factors in water and water-equivalent material for seven circular fields, from 20 mm down to 1 mm in diameter. Simulated and measured dose distributions in cylinders of water obtained for a 360° arc were also compared using dose, distance-to-agreement and gamma-index maps. Simulations and measurements agreed within 3% for all static beam configurations, with uncertainties estimated to 1% for the simulation and 3% for the measurements. Distance-to-agreement accuracy was better to 0.14 mm. For the arc irradiations, gamma-index maps of 2D dose distributions showed that the success rate was higher than 98%, except for the 0.1 cm collimator (92%). Using the seTLE method, MC simulations compute 3D dose distributions within minutes for realistic beam configurations with a clinically acceptable accuracy for beam diameter as small as 1 mm.

  3. Monte Carlo Calculations of Dose to Medium and Dose to Water for Carbon Ion Beams in Various Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.; Jäkel, Oliver

    .     The dose to medium (Dm ) may however differ from Dw , due to the different particle spectrum and stopping power found herein. Monte Carlo particle transport codes are capable of directly calculating dose to medium (Dm ), and was for instance recently investigated by Paganetti 2009 for various proton...... treatment plans. Here, we quantisize the effect of dose to water vs. dose to medium for a series of typical target materials found in medical physics. 2     Material and Methods The Monte Carlo code FLUKA [Battistioni et al. 2007] is used to simulate the particle fluence spectrum in a series of target...... the PSTAR, ASTAR stopping power routines available at NIST1 and MSTAR2 provided by H. Paul et al. 3     Results For a pristine carbon ion beam we encountered a maximum deviation between Dw and Dm up to 8% for bone. In addition we investigate spread out Bragg peak configurations which dilutes the effect...

  4. Pre-treatment radiotherapy dose verification using Monte Carlo doselet modulation in a spherical phantom

    CERN Document Server

    Townson, Reid W

    2013-01-01

    Due to the increasing complexity of radiotherapy delivery, accurate dose verification has become an essential part of the clinical treatment process. The purpose of this work was to develop an electronic portal image (EPI) based pre-treatment verification technique capable of quickly reconstructing 3D dose distributions from both coplanar and non-coplanar treatments. The dose reconstruction is performed in a spherical water phantom by modulating, based on EPID measurements, pre-calculated Monte Carlo (MC) doselets defined on a spherical coordinate system. This is called the spherical doselet modulation (SDM) method. This technique essentially eliminates the statistical uncertainty of the MC dose calculations by exploiting both azimuthal symmetry in a patient-independent phase-space and symmetry of a virtual spherical water phantom. The symmetry also allows the number of doselets necessary for dose reconstruction to be reduced by a factor of about 250. In this work, 51 doselets were used. The SDM method mitiga...

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of glandular dose in a dedicated breast CT system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Xiao; WEI Long; ZHAO Wei; WANG Yan-Fang; SHU Hang; SUN Cui-Li; WEI Cun-Feng; CAO Da-Quan; QUE Jie-Min; SHI Rong-Jian

    2012-01-01

    A dedicated breast CT system (DBCT) is a new method for breast cancer detection proposed in recent years.In this paper,the glandular dose in the DBCT is simulated using the Monte Carlo method.The phantom shape is half ellipsoid,and a series of phantoms with different sizes,shapes and compositions were constructed. In order to optimize the spectra,monoenergy X-ray beams of 5-80 keV were used in simulation.The dose distribution of a breast phantom was studied:a higher energy beam generated more uniform distribution,and the outer parts got more dose than the inner parts.For polyenergtic spectra,four spectra of Al filters with different thicknesses were simulated,and the polyenergtic glandular dose was calculated as a spectral weighted combination of the monoenergetic dose.

  6. Radiation doses in volume-of-interest breast computed tomography—A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Chao-Jen, E-mail: cjlai3711@gmail.com; Zhong, Yuncheng; Yi, Ying; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C. [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030-4009 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Cone beam breast computed tomography (breast CT) with true three-dimensional, nearly isotropic spatial resolution has been developed and investigated over the past decade to overcome the problem of lesions overlapping with breast anatomical structures on two-dimensional mammographic images. However, the ability of breast CT to detect small objects, such as tissue structure edges and small calcifications, is limited. To resolve this problem, the authors proposed and developed a volume-of-interest (VOI) breast CT technique to image a small VOI using a higher radiation dose to improve that region’s visibility. In this study, the authors performed Monte Carlo simulations to estimate average breast dose and average glandular dose (AGD) for the VOI breast CT technique. Methods: Electron–Gamma-Shower system code-based Monte Carlo codes were used to simulate breast CT. The Monte Carlo codes estimated were validated using physical measurements of air kerma ratios and point doses in phantoms with an ion chamber and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. The validated full cone x-ray source was then collimated to simulate half cone beam x-rays to image digital pendant-geometry, hemi-ellipsoidal, homogeneous breast phantoms and to estimate breast doses with full field scans. 13-cm in diameter, 10-cm long hemi-ellipsoidal homogeneous phantoms were used to simulate median breasts. Breast compositions of 25% and 50% volumetric glandular fractions (VGFs) were used to investigate the influence on breast dose. The simulated half cone beam x-rays were then collimated to a narrow x-ray beam with an area of 2.5 × 2.5 cm{sup 2} field of view at the isocenter plane and to perform VOI field scans. The Monte Carlo results for the full field scans and the VOI field scans were then used to estimate the AGD for the VOI breast CT technique. Results: The ratios of air kerma ratios and dose measurement results from the Monte Carlo simulation to those from the physical

  7. Numerical system utilising a Monte Carlo calculation method for accurate dose assessment in radiation accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, F; Endo, A

    2007-01-01

    A system utilising radiation transport codes has been developed to derive accurate dose distributions in a human body for radiological accidents. A suitable model is quite essential for a numerical analysis. Therefore, two tools were developed to setup a 'problem-dependent' input file, defining a radiation source and an exposed person to simulate the radiation transport in an accident with the Monte Carlo calculation codes-MCNP and MCNPX. Necessary resources are defined by a dialogue method with a generally used personal computer for both the tools. The tools prepare human body and source models described in the input file format of the employed Monte Carlo codes. The tools were validated for dose assessment in comparison with a past criticality accident and a hypothesized exposure.

  8. Effects of CT based Voxel Phantoms on Dose Distribution Calculated with Monte Carlo Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Chaobin; Huang Qunying; Wu Yican

    2005-01-01

    A few CT-based voxel phantoms were produced to investigate the sensitivity of Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray beam and electron beam to the proportions of elements and the mass densities of the materials used to express the patient's anatomical structure. The human body can be well outlined by air, lung, adipose, muscle, soft bone and hard bone to calculate the dose distribution with Monte Carlo method. The effects of the calibration curves established by using various CT scanners are not clinically significant based on our investigation. The deviation from the values of cumulative dose volume histogram derived from CT-based voxel phantoms is less than 1% for the given target.

  9. Validation of Monte Carlo calculated surface doses for megavoltage photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Wamied; Seuntjens, Jan P; Verhaegen, Frank; Deblois, François; Podgorsak, Ervin B

    2005-01-01

    Recent work has shown that there is significant uncertainty in measuring build-up doses in mega-voltage photon beams especially at high energies. In this present investigation we used a phantom-embedded extrapolation chamber (PEEC) made of Solid Water to validate Monte Carlo (MC)-calculated doses in the dose build-up region for 6 and 18 MV x-ray beams. The study showed that the percentage depth ionizations (PDIs) obtained from measurements are higher than the percentage depth doses (PDDs) obtained with Monte Carlo techniques. To validate the MC-calculated PDDs, the design of the PEEC was incorporated into the simulations. While the MC-calculated and measured PDIs in the dose build-up region agree with one another for the 6 MV beam, a non-negligible difference is observed for the 18 MV x-ray beam. A number of experiments and theoretical studies of various possible effects that could be the source of this discrepancy were performed. The contribution of contaminating neutrons and protons to the build-up dose region in the 18 MV x-ray beam is negligible. Moreover, the MC calculations using the XCOM photon cross-section database and the NIST bremsstrahlung differential cross section do not explain the discrepancy between the MC calculations and measurement in the dose build-up region for the 18 MV. A simple incorporation of triplet production events into the MC dose calculation increases the calculated doses in the build-up region but does not fully account for the discrepancy between measurement and calculations for the 18 MV x-ray beam.

  10. Dose perturbation in the presence of metallic implants: treatment planning system versus Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieslander, Elinore; Knöös, Tommy

    2003-10-01

    An increasing number of patients receiving radiation therapy have metallic implants such as hip prostheses. Therefore, beams are normally set up to avoid irradiation through the implant; however, this cannot always be accomplished. In such situations, knowledge of the accuracy of the used treatment planning system (TPS) is required. Two algorithms, the pencil beam (PB) and the collapsed cone (CC), are implemented in the studied TPS. Comparisons are made with Monte Carlo simulations for 6 and 18 MV. The studied materials are steel, CoCrMo, Orthinox® (a stainless steel alloy and registered trademark of Stryker Corporation), TiAlV and Ti. Monte Carlo simulated depth dose curves and dose profiles are compared to CC and PB calculated data. The CC algorithm shows overall a better agreement with Monte Carlo than the PB algorithm. Thus, it is recommended to use the CC algorithm to get the most accurate dose calculation both for the planning target volume and for tissues adjacent to the implants when beams are set up to pass through implants.

  11. Applying graphics processor units to Monte Carlo dose calculation in radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhtiari M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the potential in using of using a graphics processor unit (GPU for Monte-Carlo (MC-based radiation dose calculations. The percent depth dose (PDD of photons in a medium with known absorption and scattering coefficients is computed using a MC simulation running on both a standard CPU and a GPU. We demonstrate that the GPU′s capability for massive parallel processing provides a significant acceleration in the MC calculation, and offers a significant advantage for distributed stochastic simulations on a single computer. Harnessing this potential of GPUs will help in the early adoption of MC for routine planning in a clinical environment.

  12. Denoising of electron beam Monte Carlo dose distributions using digital filtering techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deasy, Joseph O.

    2000-07-01

    The Monte Carlo (MC) method has long been viewed as the ultimate dose distribution computational technique. The inherent stochastic dose fluctuations (i.e. noise), however, have several important disadvantages: noise will affect estimates of all the relevant dosimetric and radiobiological indices, and noise will degrade the resulting dose contour visualizations. We suggest the use of a post-processing denoising step to reduce statistical fluctuations and also improve dose contour visualization. We report the results of applying four different two-dimensional digital smoothing filters to two-dimensional dose images. The Integrated Tiger Series MC code was used to generate 10 MeV electron beam dose distributions at various depths in two different phantoms. The observed qualitative effects of filtering include: (a) the suppression of voxel-to-voxel (high-frequency) noise and (b) the resulting contour plots are visually more comprehensible. Drawbacks include, in some cases, slight blurring of penumbra near the surface and slight blurring of other very sharp real dosimetric features. Of the four digital filters considered here, one, a filter based on a local least-squares principle, appears to suppress noise with negligible degradation of real dosimetric features. We conclude that denoising of electron beam MC dose distributions is feasible and will yield improved dosimetric reliability and improved visualization of dose distributions.

  13. Denoising of electron beam Monte Carlo dose distributions using digital filtering techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deasy, Joseph O. [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 510 So. Kingshighway Blvd, St Louis, MO 63110 (United States). E-mail: deasy at radonc.wustl.edu

    2000-07-01

    The Monte Carlo (MC) method has long been viewed as the ultimate dose distribution computational technique. The inherent stochastic dose fluctuations (i.e. noise), however, have several important disadvantages: noise will affect estimates of all the relevant dosimetric and radiobiological indices, and noise will degrade the resulting dose contour visualizations. We suggest the use of a post-processing denoising step to reduce statistical fluctuations and also improve dose contour visualization. We report the results of applying four different two-dimensional digital smoothing filters to two-dimensional dose images. The Integrated Tiger Series MC code was used to generate 10 MeV electron beam dose distributions at various depths in two different phantoms. The observed qualitative effects of filtering include: (a) the suppression of voxel-to-voxel (high-frequency) noise and (b) the resulting contour plots are visually more comprehensible. Drawbacks include, in some cases, slight blurring of penumbra near the surface and slight blurring of other very sharp real dosimetric features. Of the four digital filters considered here, one, a filter based on a local least-squares principle, appears to suppress noise with negligible degradation of real dosimetric features. We conclude that denoising of electron beam MC dose distributions is feasible and will yield improved dosimetric reliability and improved visualization of dose distributions. (author)

  14. Using the Monte Carlo method for assessing the tissue and organ doses of patients in dental radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarevich, K. O.; Minenko, V. F.; Verenich, K. A.; Kuten, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    This work is dedicated to modeling dental radiographic examinations to assess the absorbed doses of patients and effective doses. For simulating X-ray spectra, the TASMIP empirical model is used. Doses are assessed on the basis of the Monte Carlo method by using MCNP code for voxel phantoms of ICRP. The results of the assessment of doses to individual organs and effective doses for different types of dental examinations and features of X-ray tube are presented.

  15. Organ doses for reference pediatric and adolescent patients undergoing computed tomography estimated by Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Long, Daniel J.; Bolch, Wesley E. [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20852 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Gyeonggi-do, 446906 (Korea, Republic of); J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: To establish an organ dose database for pediatric and adolescent reference individuals undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations by using Monte Carlo simulation. The data will permit rapid estimates of organ and effective doses for patients of different age, gender, examination type, and CT scanner model. Methods: The Monte Carlo simulation model of a Siemens Sensation 16 CT scanner previously published was employed as a base CT scanner model. A set of absorbed doses for 33 organs/tissues normalized to the product of 100 mAs and CTDI{sub vol} (mGy/100 mAs mGy) was established by coupling the CT scanner model with age-dependent reference pediatric hybrid phantoms. A series of single axial scans from the top of head to the feet of the phantoms was performed at a slice thickness of 10 mm, and at tube potentials of 80, 100, and 120 kVp. Using the established CTDI{sub vol}- and 100 mAs-normalized dose matrix, organ doses for different pediatric phantoms undergoing head, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and chest-abdomen-pelvis (CAP) scans with the Siemens Sensation 16 scanner were estimated and analyzed. The results were then compared with the values obtained from three independent published methods: CT-Expo software, organ dose for abdominal CT scan derived empirically from patient abdominal circumference, and effective dose per dose-length product (DLP). Results: Organ and effective doses were calculated and normalized to 100 mAs and CTDI{sub vol} for different CT examinations. At the same technical setting, dose to the organs, which were entirely included in the CT beam coverage, were higher by from 40 to 80% for newborn phantoms compared to those of 15-year phantoms. An increase of tube potential from 80 to 120 kVp resulted in 2.5-2.9-fold greater brain dose for head scans. The results from this study were compared with three different published studies and/or techniques. First, organ doses were compared to those given by CT-Expo which revealed dose

  16. Uncertainties in Monte Carlo-based absorbed dose calculations for an experimental benchmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, F; Wulff, J; Kapsch, R-P; Zink, K

    2015-10-01

    There is a need to verify the accuracy of general purpose Monte Carlo codes like EGSnrc, which are commonly employed for investigations of dosimetric problems in radiation therapy. A number of experimental benchmarks have been published to compare calculated values of absorbed dose to experimentally determined values. However, there is a lack of absolute benchmarks, i.e. benchmarks without involved normalization which may cause some quantities to be cancelled. Therefore, at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt a benchmark experiment was performed, which aimed at the absolute verification of radiation transport calculations for dosimetry in radiation therapy. A thimble-type ionization chamber in a solid phantom was irradiated by high-energy bremsstrahlung and the mean absorbed dose in the sensitive volume was measured per incident electron of the target. The characteristics of the accelerator and experimental setup were precisely determined and the results of a corresponding Monte Carlo simulation with EGSnrc are presented within this study. For a meaningful comparison, an analysis of the uncertainty of the Monte Carlo simulation is necessary. In this study uncertainties with regard to the simulation geometry, the radiation source, transport options of the Monte Carlo code and specific interaction cross sections are investigated, applying the general methodology of the Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement. Besides studying the general influence of changes in transport options of the EGSnrc code, uncertainties are analyzed by estimating the sensitivity coefficients of various input quantities in a first step. Secondly, standard uncertainties are assigned to each quantity which are known from the experiment, e.g. uncertainties for geometric dimensions. Data for more fundamental quantities such as photon cross sections and the I-value of electron stopping powers are taken from literature. The significant uncertainty contributions are identified as

  17. GPUMCD: a new GPU-oriented Monte Carlo dose calculation platform

    CERN Document Server

    Hissoiny, Sami; Ozell, Benoît; Després, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo methods are considered the gold standard for dosimetric computations in radiotherapy. Their execution time is however still an obstacle to the routine use of Monte Carlo packages in a clinical setting. To address this problem, a completely new, and designed from the ground up for the GPU, Monte Carlo dose calculation package for voxelized geometries is proposed: GPUMCD. Method : GPUMCD implements a coupled photon-electron Monte Carlo simulation for energies in the range 0.01 MeV to 20 MeV. An analogue simulation of photon interactions is used and a Class II condensed history method has been implemented for the simulation of electrons. A new GPU random number generator, some divergence reduction methods as well as other optimization strategies are also described. GPUMCD was run on a NVIDIA GTX480 while single threaded implementations of EGSnrc and DPM were run on an Intel Core i7 860. Results : Dosimetric results obtained with GPUMCD were compared to EGSnrc. In all but one test case, 98% o...

  18. Photon dose estimation from ultraintense laser-solid interactions and shielding calculation with Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Qiu, Rui; Li, JunLi; Lu, Wei; Wu, Zhen; Li, Chunyan

    2017-02-01

    When a strong laser beam irradiates a solid target, a hot plasma is produced and high-energy electrons are usually generated (the so-called "hot electrons"). These energetic electrons subsequently generate hard X-rays in the solid target through the Bremsstrahlung process. To date, only limited studies have been conducted on this laser-induced radiological protection issue. In this study, extensive literature reviews on the physics and properties of hot electrons have been conducted. On the basis of these information, the photon dose generated by the interaction between hot electrons and a solid target was simulated with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. With some reasonable assumptions, the calculated dose can be regarded as the upper boundary of the experimental results over the laser intensity ranging from 1019 to 1021 W/cm2. Furthermore, an equation to estimate the photon dose generated from ultraintense laser-solid interactions based on the normalized laser intensity is derived. The shielding effects of common materials including concrete and lead were also studied for the laser-driven X-ray source. The dose transmission curves and tenth-value layers (TVLs) in concrete and lead were calculated through Monte Carlo simulations. These results could be used to perform a preliminary and fast radiation safety assessment for the X-rays generated from ultraintense laser-solid interactions.

  19. Patient-dependent beam-modifier physics in Monte Carlo photon dose calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schach von Wittenau, A E; Bergstrom, P M; Cox, L J

    2000-05-01

    Model pencil-beam on slab calculations are used as well as a series of detailed calculations of photon and electron output from commercial accelerators to quantify level(s) of physics required for the Monte Carlo transport of photons and electrons in treatment-dependent beam modifiers, such as jaws, wedges, blocks, and multileaf collimators, in photon teletherapy dose calculations. The physics approximations investigated comprise (1) not tracking particles below a given kinetic energy, (2) continuing to track particles, but performing simplified collision physics, particularly in handling secondary particle production, and (3) not tracking particles in specific spatial regions. Figures-of-merit needed to estimate the effects of these approximations are developed, and these estimates are compared with full-physics Monte Carlo calculations of the contribution of the collimating jaws to the on-axis depth-dose curve in a water phantom. These figures of merit are next used to evaluate various approximations used in coupled photon/electron physics in beam modifiers. Approximations for tracking electrons in air are then evaluated. It is found that knowledge of the materials used for beam modifiers, of the energies of the photon beams used, as well as of the length scales typically found in photon teletherapy plans, allows a number of simplifying approximations to be made in the Monte Carlo transport of secondary particles from the accelerator head and beam modifiers to the isocenter plane.

  20. Fast Monte Carlo Simulation for Patient-specific CT/CBCT Imaging Dose Calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Xun; Gu, Xuejun; Jiang, Steve B

    2011-01-01

    Recently, X-ray imaging dose from computed tomography (CT) or cone beam CT (CBCT) scans has become a serious concern. Patient-specific imaging dose calculation has been proposed for the purpose of dose management. While Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation can be quite accurate for this purpose, it suffers from low computational efficiency. In response to this problem, we have successfully developed a MC dose calculation package, gCTD, on GPU architecture under the NVIDIA CUDA platform for fast and accurate estimation of the x-ray imaging dose received by a patient during a CT or CBCT scan. Techniques have been developed particularly for the GPU architecture to achieve high computational efficiency. Dose calculations using CBCT scanning geometry in a homogeneous water phantom and a heterogeneous Zubal head phantom have shown good agreement between gCTD and EGSnrc, indicating the accuracy of our code. In terms of improved efficiency, it is found that gCTD attains a speed-up of ~400 times in the homogeneous water ...

  1. MO-G-BRF-09: Investigating Magnetic Field Dose Effects in Mice: A Monte Carlo Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinstein, A; Guindani, M; Followill, D; Melancon, A; Hazle, J; Court, L [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In MRI-linac treatments, radiation dose distributions are affected by magnetic fields, especially at high-density/low-density interfaces. Radiobiological consequences of magnetic field dose effects are presently unknown; therefore, preclinical studies are needed to ensure the safe clinical use of MRI-linacs. This study investigates the optimal combination of beam energy and magnetic field strength needed for preclinical murine studies. Methods: The Monte Carlo code MCNP6 was used to simulate the effects of a magnetic field when irradiating a mouse-sized lung phantom with a 1.0cmx1.0cm photon beam. Magnetic field effects were examined using various beam energies (225kVp, 662keV[Cs-137], and 1.25MeV[Co-60]) and magnetic field strengths (0.75T, 1.5T, and 3T). The resulting dose distributions were compared to Monte Carlo results for humans with various field sizes and patient geometries using a 6MV/1.5T MRI-linac. Results: In human simulations, the addition of a 1.5T magnetic field caused an average dose increase of 49% (range:36%–60%) to lung at the soft tissue-to-lung interface and an average dose decrease of 30% (range:25%–36%) at the lung-to-soft tissue interface. In mouse simulations, the magnetic fields had no effect on the 225kVp dose distribution. The dose increases for the Cs-137 beam were 12%, 33%, and 49% for 0.75T, 1.5T, and 3.0T magnetic fields, respectively while the dose decreases were 7%, 23%, and 33%. For the Co-60 beam, the dose increases were 14%, 45%, and 41%, and the dose decreases were 18%, 35%, and 35%. Conclusion: The magnetic field dose effects observed in mouse phantoms using a Co-60 beam with 1.5T or 3T fields and a Cs-137 beam with a 3T field compare well with those seen in simulated human treatments with an MRI-linac. These irradiator/magnet combinations are suitable for preclinical studies investigating potential biological effects of delivering radiation therapy in the presence of a magnetic field. Partially funded by Elekta.

  2. A Monte Carlo study on dose distribution evaluation of Flexisource 192Ir brachytherapy source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Majid; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Haghparast, Abbas; Zare, Naser; Ahmadi Moghaddas, Toktam

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to evaluate the dose distribution of the Flexisource 192Ir source. Background Dosimetric evaluation of brachytherapy sources is recommended by task group number 43 (TG. 43) of American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). Materials and methods MCNPX code was used to simulate Flexisource 192Ir source. Dose rate constant and radial dose function were obtained for water and soft tissue phantoms and compared with previous data on this source. Furthermore, dose rate along the transverse axis was obtained by simulation of the Flexisource and a point source and the obtained data were compared with those from Flexiplan treatment planning system (TPS). Results The values of dose rate constant obtained for water and soft tissue phantoms were equal to 1.108 and 1.106, respectively. The values of the radial dose function are listed in the form of tabulated data. The values of dose rate (cGy/s) obtained are shown in the form of tabulated data and figures. The maximum difference between TPS and Monte Carlo (MC) dose rate values was 11% in a water phantom at 6.0 cm from the source. Conclusion Based on dosimetric parameter comparisons with values previously published, the accuracy of our simulation of Flexisource 192Ir was verified. The results of dose rate constant and radial dose function in water and soft tissue phantoms were the same for Flexisource and point sources. For Flexisource 192Ir source, the results of TPS calculations in a water phantom were in agreement with the simulations within the calculation uncertainties. Furthermore, the results from the TPS calculation for Flexisource and MC calculation for a point source were practically equal within the calculation uncertainties. PMID:25949224

  3. Monte Carlo-based revised values of dose rate constants at discrete photon energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Palani Selvam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Absorbed dose rate to water at 0.2 cm and 1 cm due to a point isotropic photon source as a function of photon energy is calculated using the EDKnrc user-code of the EGSnrc Monte Carlo system. This code system utilized widely used XCOM photon cross-section dataset for the calculation of absorbed dose to water. Using the above dose rates, dose rate constants are calculated. Air-kerma strength S k needed for deriving dose rate constant is based on the mass-energy absorption coefficient compilations of Hubbell and Seltzer published in the year 1995. A comparison of absorbed dose rates in water at the above distances to the published values reflects the differences in photon cross-section dataset in the low-energy region (difference is up to 2% in dose rate values at 1 cm in the energy range 30-50 keV and up to 4% at 0.2 cm at 30 keV. A maximum difference of about 8% is observed in the dose rate value at 0.2 cm at 1.75 MeV when compared to the published value. S k calculations based on the compilation of Hubbell and Seltzer show a difference of up to 2.5% in the low-energy region (20-50 keV when compared to the published values. The deviations observed in the values of dose rate and S k affect the values of dose rate constants up to 3%.

  4. SU-E-T-238: Monte Carlo Estimation of Cerenkov Dose for Photo-Dynamic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chibani, O; Price, R; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Eldib, A [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University Cairo (Egypt); Mora, G [de Lisboa, Codex, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Estimation of Cerenkov dose from high-energy megavoltage photon and electron beams in tissue and its impact on the radiosensitization using Protoporphyrine IX (PpIX) for tumor targeting enhancement in radiotherapy. Methods: The GEPTS Monte Carlo code is used to generate dose distributions from 18MV Varian photon beam and generic high-energy (45-MV) photon and (45-MeV) electron beams in a voxel-based tissueequivalent phantom. In addition to calculating the ionization dose, the code scores Cerenkov energy released in the wavelength range 375–425 nm corresponding to the pick of the PpIX absorption spectrum (Fig. 1) using the Frank-Tamm formula. Results: The simulations shows that the produced Cerenkov dose suitable for activating PpIX is 4000 to 5500 times lower than the overall radiation dose for all considered beams (18MV, 45 MV and 45 MeV). These results were contradictory to the recent experimental studies by Axelsson et al. (Med. Phys. 38 (2011) p 4127), where Cerenkov dose was reported to be only two orders of magnitude lower than the radiation dose. Note that our simulation results can be corroborated by a simple model where the Frank and Tamm formula is applied for electrons with 2 MeV/cm stopping power generating Cerenkov photons in the 375–425 nm range and assuming these photons have less than 1mm penetration in tissue. Conclusion: The Cerenkov dose generated by high-energy photon and electron beams may produce minimal clinical effect in comparison with the photon fluence (or dose) commonly used for photo-dynamic therapy. At the present time, it is unclear whether Cerenkov radiation is a significant contributor to the recently observed tumor regression for patients receiving radiotherapy and PpIX versus patients receiving radiotherapy only. The ongoing study will include animal experimentation and investigation of dose rate effects on PpIX response.

  5. Impact of photon cross section uncertainties on Monte Carlo-determined depth-dose distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, E; David, M; deAlmeida, C E; Bernal, M A

    2016-09-01

    This work studies the impact of systematic uncertainties associated to interaction cross sections on depth dose curves determined by Monte Carlo simulations. The corresponding sensitivity factors are quantified by changing cross sections by a given amount and determining the variation in the dose. The influence of total and partial photon cross sections is addressed. Partial cross sections for Compton and Rayleigh scattering, photo-electric effect, and pair production have been accounted for. The PENELOPE code was used in all simulations. It was found that photon cross section sensitivity factors depend on depth. In addition, they are positive and negative for depths below and above an equilibrium depth, respectively. At this depth, sensitivity factors are null. The equilibrium depths found in this work agree very well with the mean free path of the corresponding incident photon energy. Using the sensitivity factors reported here, it is possible to estimate the impact of photon cross section uncertainties on the uncertainty of Monte Carlo-determined depth dose curves.

  6. Environmental dose rate assessment of ITER using the Monte Carlo method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimian Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to radiation is one of the main sources of risk to staff employed in reactor facilities. The staff of a tokamak is exposed to a wide range of neutrons and photons around the tokamak hall. The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER is a nuclear fusion engineering project and the most advanced experimental tokamak in the world. From the radiobiological point of view, ITER dose rates assessment is particularly important. The aim of this study is the assessment of the amount of radiation in ITER during its normal operation in a radial direction from the plasma chamber to the tokamak hall. To achieve this goal, the ITER system and its components were simulated by the Monte Carlo method using the MCNPX 2.6.0 code. Furthermore, the equivalent dose rates of some radiosensitive organs of the human body were calculated by using the medical internal radiation dose phantom. Our study is based on the deuterium-tritium plasma burning by 14.1 MeV neutron production and also photon radiation due to neutron activation. As our results show, the total equivalent dose rate on the outside of the bioshield wall of the tokamak hall is about 1 mSv per year, which is less than the annual occupational dose rate limit during the normal operation of ITER. Also, equivalent dose rates of radiosensitive organs have shown that the maximum dose rate belongs to the kidney. The data may help calculate how long the staff can stay in such an environment, before the equivalent dose rates reach the whole-body dose limits.

  7. SU-E-I-28: Evaluating the Organ Dose From Computed Tomography Using Monte Carlo Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, T; Araki, F [Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate organ doses from computed tomography (CT) using Monte Carlo (MC) calculations. Methods: A Philips Brilliance CT scanner (64 slice) was simulated using the GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) based on the EGSnrc user code. The X-ray spectra and a bowtie filter for MC simulations were determined to coincide with measurements of half-value layer (HVL) and off-center ratio (OCR) profile in air. The MC dose was calibrated from absorbed dose measurements using a Farmer chamber and a cylindrical water phantom. The dose distribution from CT was calculated using patient CT images and organ doses were evaluated from dose volume histograms. Results: The HVLs of Al at 80, 100, and 120 kV were 6.3, 7.7, and 8.7 mm, respectively. The calculated HVLs agreed with measurements within 0.3%. The calculated and measured OCR profiles agreed within 3%. For adult head scans (CTDIvol) =51.4 mGy), mean doses for brain stem, eye, and eye lens were 23.2, 34.2, and 37.6 mGy, respectively. For pediatric head scans (CTDIvol =35.6 mGy), mean doses for brain stem, eye, and eye lens were 19.3, 24.5, and 26.8 mGy, respectively. For adult chest scans (CTDIvol=19.0 mGy), mean doses for lung, heart, and spinal cord were 21.1, 22.0, and 15.5 mGy, respectively. For adult abdominal scans (CTDIvol=14.4 mGy), the mean doses for kidney, liver, pancreas, spleen, and spinal cord were 17.4, 16.5, 16.8, 16.8, and 13.1 mGy, respectively. For pediatric abdominal scans (CTDIvol=6.76 mGy), mean doses for kidney, liver, pancreas, spleen, and spinal cord were 8.24, 8.90, 8.17, 8.31, and 6.73 mGy, respectively. In head scan, organ doses were considerably different from CTDIvol values. Conclusion: MC dose distributions calculated by using patient CT images are useful to evaluate organ doses absorbed to individual patients.

  8. GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation using phase-space sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townson, Reid W.; Jia, Xun; Tian, Zhen; Jiang Graves, Yan; Zavgorodni, Sergei; Jiang, Steve B.

    2013-06-01

    A novel phase-space source implementation has been designed for graphics processing unit (GPU)-based Monte Carlo dose calculation engines. Short of full simulation of the linac head, using a phase-space source is the most accurate method to model a clinical radiation beam in dose calculations. However, in GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculations where the computation efficiency is very high, the time required to read and process a large phase-space file becomes comparable to the particle transport time. Moreover, due to the parallelized nature of GPU hardware, it is essential to simultaneously transport particles of the same type and similar energies but separated spatially to yield a high efficiency. We present three methods for phase-space implementation that have been integrated into the most recent version of the GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation package gDPM v3.0. The first method is to sequentially read particles from a patient-dependent phase-space and sort them on-the-fly based on particle type and energy. The second method supplements this with a simple secondary collimator model and fluence map implementation so that patient-independent phase-space sources can be used. Finally, as the third method (called the phase-space-let, or PSL, method) we introduce a novel source implementation utilizing pre-processed patient-independent phase-spaces that are sorted by particle type, energy and position. Position bins located outside a rectangular region of interest enclosing the treatment field are ignored, substantially decreasing simulation time with little effect on the final dose distribution. The three methods were validated in absolute dose against BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc and compared using gamma-index tests (2%/2 mm above the 10% isodose). It was found that the PSL method has the optimal balance between accuracy and efficiency and thus is used as the default method in gDPM v3.0. Using the PSL method, open fields of 4 × 4, 10 × 10 and 30 × 30 cm

  9. GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation using phase-space sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townson, Reid W; Jia, Xun; Tian, Zhen; Graves, Yan Jiang; Zavgorodni, Sergei; Jiang, Steve B

    2013-06-21

    A novel phase-space source implementation has been designed for graphics processing unit (GPU)-based Monte Carlo dose calculation engines. Short of full simulation of the linac head, using a phase-space source is the most accurate method to model a clinical radiation beam in dose calculations. However, in GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculations where the computation efficiency is very high, the time required to read and process a large phase-space file becomes comparable to the particle transport time. Moreover, due to the parallelized nature of GPU hardware, it is essential to simultaneously transport particles of the same type and similar energies but separated spatially to yield a high efficiency. We present three methods for phase-space implementation that have been integrated into the most recent version of the GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation package gDPM v3.0. The first method is to sequentially read particles from a patient-dependent phase-space and sort them on-the-fly based on particle type and energy. The second method supplements this with a simple secondary collimator model and fluence map implementation so that patient-independent phase-space sources can be used. Finally, as the third method (called the phase-space-let, or PSL, method) we introduce a novel source implementation utilizing pre-processed patient-independent phase-spaces that are sorted by particle type, energy and position. Position bins located outside a rectangular region of interest enclosing the treatment field are ignored, substantially decreasing simulation time with little effect on the final dose distribution. The three methods were validated in absolute dose against BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc and compared using gamma-index tests (2%/2 mm above the 10% isodose). It was found that the PSL method has the optimal balance between accuracy and efficiency and thus is used as the default method in gDPM v3.0. Using the PSL method, open fields of 4 × 4, 10 × 10 and 30 × 30 cm

  10. Monte Carlo Dosimetry of the 60Co BEBIG High Dose Rate for Brachytherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Tourinho Campos

    Full Text Available The use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy is currently a widespread practice worldwide. The most common isotope source is 192Ir, but 60Co is also becoming available for HDR. One of main advantages of 60Co compared to 192Ir is the economic and practical benefit because of its longer half-live, which is 5.27 years. Recently, Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG, Germany, introduced a new afterloading brachytherapy machine (MultiSource®; it has the option to use either the 60Co or 192Ir HDR source. The source for the Monte Carlo calculations is the new 60Co source (model Co0.A86, which is referred to as the new BEBIG 60Co HDR source and is a modified version of the 60Co source (model GK60M21, which is also from BEBIG.The purpose of this work is to obtain the dosimetry parameters in accordance with the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism with Monte Carlo calculations regarding the BEBIG 60Co high-dose-rate brachytherapy to investigate the required treatment-planning parameters. The geometric design and material details of the source was provided by the manufacturer and was used to define the Monte Carlo geometry. To validate the source geometry, a few dosimetry parameters had to be calculated according to the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism. The dosimetry studies included the calculation of the air kerma strength Sk, collision kerma in water along the transverse axis with an unbounded phantom, dose rate constant and radial dose function. The Monte Carlo code system that was used was EGSnrc with a new cavity code, which is a part of EGS++ that allows calculating the radial dose function around the source. The spectrum to simulate 60Co was composed of two photon energies, 1.17 and 1.33 MeV. Only the gamma part of the spectrum was used; the contribution of the electrons to the dose is negligible because of the full absorption by the stainless-steel wall around the metallic 60Co. The XCOM photon cross-section library was used in subsequent simulations, and the photoelectric effect, pair

  11. Monte Carlo Dosimetry of the 60Co BEBIG High Dose Rate for Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Luciana Tourinho; de Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Veloso

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy is currently a widespread practice worldwide. The most common isotope source is 192Ir, but 60Co is also becoming available for HDR. One of main advantages of 60Co compared to 192Ir is the economic and practical benefit because of its longer half-live, which is 5.27 years. Recently, Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG, Germany, introduced a new afterloading brachytherapy machine (MultiSource®); it has the option to use either the 60Co or 192Ir HDR source. The source for the Monte Carlo calculations is the new 60Co source (model Co0.A86), which is referred to as the new BEBIG 60Co HDR source and is a modified version of the 60Co source (model GK60M21), which is also from BEBIG. Objective and Methods The purpose of this work is to obtain the dosimetry parameters in accordance with the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism with Monte Carlo calculations regarding the BEBIG 60Co high-dose-rate brachytherapy to investigate the required treatment-planning parameters. The geometric design and material details of the source was provided by the manufacturer and was used to define the Monte Carlo geometry. To validate the source geometry, a few dosimetry parameters had to be calculated according to the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism. The dosimetry studies included the calculation of the air kerma strength Sk, collision kerma in water along the transverse axis with an unbounded phantom, dose rate constant and radial dose function. The Monte Carlo code system that was used was EGSnrc with a new cavity code, which is a part of EGS++ that allows calculating the radial dose function around the source. The spectrum to simulate 60Co was composed of two photon energies, 1.17 and 1.33 MeV. Only the gamma part of the spectrum was used; the contribution of the electrons to the dose is negligible because of the full absorption by the stainless-steel wall around the metallic 60Co. The XCOM photon cross-section library was used in subsequent simulations, and the

  12. Development of CT scanner models for patient organ dose calculations using Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jianwei

    There is a serious and growing concern about the CT dose delivered by diagnostic CT examinations or image-guided radiation therapy imaging procedures. To better understand and to accurately quantify radiation dose due to CT imaging, Monte Carlo based CT scanner models are needed. This dissertation describes the development, validation, and application of detailed CT scanner models including a GE LightSpeed 16 MDCT scanner and two image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners, kV CBCT and MV CBCT. The modeling process considered the energy spectrum, beam geometry and movement, and bowtie filter (BTF). The methodology of validating the scanner models using reported CTDI values was also developed and implemented. Finally, the organ doses to different patients undergoing CT scan were obtained by integrating the CT scanner models with anatomically-realistic patient phantoms. The tube current modulation (TCM) technique was also investigated for dose reduction. It was found that for RPI-AM, thyroid, kidneys and thymus received largest dose of 13.05, 11.41 and 11.56 mGy/100 mAs from chest scan, abdomen-pelvis scan and CAP scan, respectively using 120 kVp protocols. For RPI-AF, thymus, small intestine and kidneys received largest dose of 10.28, 12.08 and 11.35 mGy/100 mAs from chest scan, abdomen-pelvis scan and CAP scan, respectively using 120 kVp protocols. The dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. For MDCT with TCM schemas, the fetal dose can be reduced with 14%-25%. To demonstrate the applicability of the method proposed in this dissertation for modeling the CT scanner, additional MDCT scanner was modeled and validated by using the measured CTDI values. These results demonstrated that the

  13. Absorbed Dose Calculations Using Mesh-based Human Phantoms And Monte Carlo Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Richard

    2011-08-01

    Health risks attributable to the exposure to ionizing radiation are considered to be a function of the absorbed or equivalent dose to radiosensitive organs and tissues. However, as human tissue cannot express itself in terms of equivalent dose, exposure models have to be used to determine the distribution of equivalent dose throughout the human body. An exposure model, be it physical or computational, consists of a representation of the human body, called phantom, plus a method for transporting ionizing radiation through the phantom and measuring or calculating the equivalent dose to organ and tissues of interest. The FASH2 (Female Adult meSH) and the MASH2 (Male Adult meSH) computational phantoms have been developed at the University of Pernambuco in Recife/Brazil based on polygon mesh surfaces using open source software tools and anatomical atlases. Representing standing adults, FASH2 and MASH2 have organ and tissue masses, body height and body mass adjusted to the anatomical data published by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the reference male and female adult. For the purposes of absorbed dose calculations the phantoms have been coupled to the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code, which can transport photons, electrons and positrons through arbitrary media. This paper reviews the development of the FASH2 and the MASH2 phantoms and presents dosimetric applications for X-ray diagnosis and for prostate brachytherapy.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of depth dose distribution in several organic models for boron neutron capture therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T.

    2007-09-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are performed to evaluate depth-dose distributions for possible treatment of cancers by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The ICRU computational model of ADAM & EVA was used as a phantom to simulate tumors at a depth of 5 cm in central regions of the lungs, liver and pancreas. Tumors of the prostate and osteosarcoma were also centered at the depth of 4.5 and 2.5 cm in the phantom models. The epithermal neutron beam from a research reactor was the primary neutron source for the MCNP calculation of the depth-dose distributions in those cancer models. For brain tumor irradiations, the whole-body dose was also evaluated. The MCNP simulations suggested that a lethal dose of 50 Gy to the tumors can be achieved without reaching the tolerance dose of 25 Gy to normal tissue. The whole-body phantom calculations also showed that the BNCT could be applied for brain tumors without significant damage to whole-body organs.

  15. An improved Monte Carlo (MC) dose simulation for charged particle cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, C. K.; Kamil, W. A.; Shuaib, I. L.; Matsufuji, Naruhiro

    2014-02-01

    Heavy-particle therapy such as carbon ion therapy are more popular nowadays because of the nature characteristics of charged particle and almost no side effect to patients. An effective treatment is achieved with high precision of dose calculation, in this research work, Geant4 based Monte Carlo simulation method has been used to calculate the radiation transport and dose distribution. The simulation have the same setting with the treatment room in Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator, HIMAC. The carbon ion beam at the isocentric gantry nozzle for the therapeutic energy of 290 MeV/u was simulated, experimental work was carried out in National Institute of Radiological Sciences, NIRS, Chiba, Japan by using the HIMAC to confirm the accuracy and qualities dose distribution by MC methods. The Geant4 based simulated dose distribution were verified with measurements for Bragg peak and spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) respectively. The verification of results shows that the Bragg peak depth-dose and SOBP distributions in simulation has good agreement with measurements. In overall, the study showed that Geant4 based can be fully applied in the heavy-ion therapy field for simulation, further works need to be carry on to refine and improve the Geant4 MC simulations.

  16. An improved Monte Carlo (MC) dose simulation for charged particle cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, C. K. [Advanced Medical and Dental Institute, AMDI, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia and School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kota Bharu (Malaysia); Kamil, W. A. [Advanced Medical and Dental Institute, AMDI, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia and Radiology Department, Hospital USM, Kota Bharu (Malaysia); Shuaib, I. L. [Advanced Medical and Dental Institute, AMDI, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang (Malaysia); Matsufuji, Naruhiro [Research Centre of Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, NIRS, Chiba (Japan)

    2014-02-12

    Heavy-particle therapy such as carbon ion therapy are more popular nowadays because of the nature characteristics of charged particle and almost no side effect to patients. An effective treatment is achieved with high precision of dose calculation, in this research work, Geant4 based Monte Carlo simulation method has been used to calculate the radiation transport and dose distribution. The simulation have the same setting with the treatment room in Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator, HIMAC. The carbon ion beam at the isocentric gantry nozzle for the therapeutic energy of 290 MeV/u was simulated, experimental work was carried out in National Institute of Radiological Sciences, NIRS, Chiba, Japan by using the HIMAC to confirm the accuracy and qualities dose distribution by MC methods. The Geant4 based simulated dose distribution were verified with measurements for Bragg peak and spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) respectively. The verification of results shows that the Bragg peak depth-dose and SOBP distributions in simulation has good agreement with measurements. In overall, the study showed that Geant4 based can be fully applied in the heavy-ion therapy field for simulation, further works need to be carry on to refine and improve the Geant4 MC simulations.

  17. The denoising of Monte Carlo dose distributions using convolution superposition calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Naqa, I [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Cui, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Lindsay, P [MD Anderson, Houston, TX (United States); Olivera, G [Tomotherapy Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Deasy, J O [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States)

    2007-09-07

    Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations can be accurate but are also computationally intensive. In contrast, convolution superposition (CS) offers faster and smoother results but by making approximations. We investigated MC denoising techniques, which use available convolution superposition results and new noise filtering methods to guide and accelerate MC calculations. Two main approaches were developed to combine CS information with MC denoising. In the first approach, the denoising result is iteratively updated by adding the denoised residual difference between the result and the MC image. Multi-scale methods were used (wavelets or contourlets) for denoising the residual. The iterations are initialized by the CS data. In the second approach, we used a frequency splitting technique by quadrature filtering to combine low frequency components derived from MC simulations with high frequency components derived from CS components. The rationale is to take the scattering tails as well as dose levels in the high-dose region from the MC calculations, which presumably more accurately incorporates scatter; high-frequency details are taken from CS calculations. 3D Butterworth filters were used to design the quadrature filters. The methods were demonstrated using anonymized clinical lung and head and neck cases. The MC dose distributions were calculated by the open-source dose planning method MC code with varying noise levels. Our results indicate that the frequency-splitting technique for incorporating CS-guided MC denoising is promising in terms of computational efficiency and noise reduction. (note)

  18. NOTE: The denoising of Monte Carlo dose distributions using convolution superposition calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Naqa, I.; Cui, J.; Lindsay, P.; Olivera, G.; Deasy, J. O.

    2007-09-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations can be accurate but are also computationally intensive. In contrast, convolution superposition (CS) offers faster and smoother results but by making approximations. We investigated MC denoising techniques, which use available convolution superposition results and new noise filtering methods to guide and accelerate MC calculations. Two main approaches were developed to combine CS information with MC denoising. In the first approach, the denoising result is iteratively updated by adding the denoised residual difference between the result and the MC image. Multi-scale methods were used (wavelets or contourlets) for denoising the residual. The iterations are initialized by the CS data. In the second approach, we used a frequency splitting technique by quadrature filtering to combine low frequency components derived from MC simulations with high frequency components derived from CS components. The rationale is to take the scattering tails as well as dose levels in the high-dose region from the MC calculations, which presumably more accurately incorporates scatter; high-frequency details are taken from CS calculations. 3D Butterworth filters were used to design the quadrature filters. The methods were demonstrated using anonymized clinical lung and head and neck cases. The MC dose distributions were calculated by the open-source dose planning method MC code with varying noise levels. Our results indicate that the frequency-splitting technique for incorporating CS-guided MC denoising is promising in terms of computational efficiency and noise reduction.

  19. The use of Monte Carlo technique to optimize the dose distribution in total skin irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poli, M.E.R. E-mail: esmeraldapoli@hotmail.com; Pereira, S.A.; Yoriyaz, H

    2001-06-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (mycosis fungoides) is an indolent disease with a low percentage of cure. Total skin irradiation using an electron beam has become an efficient treatment of mycosis fungoides with curative intention, with success in almost 40% of the patients. In this work, we propose the use of a Monte Carlo technique to simulate the dose distribution in the patients during total skin irradiation treatments. Use was made of MCNP-4B, a well known and established code used to simulate transport of electrons, photons and neutrons through matter, especially in the area of reactor physics, and also finding increasing utility in medical physics. The goal of our work is to simulate different angles between each beam with a fixed treatment distance in order to obtain a uniform dose distribution in the patient.

  20. GPU-based fast Monte Carlo simulation for radiotherapy dose calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Xun; Graves, Yan Jiang; Folkerts, Michael; Jiang, Steve B

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is commonly considered to be the most accurate dose calculation method in radiotherapy. However, its efficiency still requires improvement for many routine clinical applications. In this paper, we present our recent progress towards the development a GPU-based MC dose calculation package, gDPM v2.0. It utilizes the parallel computation ability of a GPU to achieve high efficiency, while maintaining the same particle transport physics as in the original DPM code and hence the same level of simulation accuracy. In GPU computing, divergence of execution paths between threads can considerably reduce the efficiency. Since photons and electrons undergo different physics and hence attain different execution paths, we use a simulation scheme where photon transport and electron transport are separated to partially relieve the thread divergence issue. High performance random number generator and hardware linear interpolation are also utilized. We have also developed various components to hand...

  1. Monte Carlo dose calculation improvements for low energy electron beams using eMC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, Michael K; Frei, Daniel; Volken, Werner; Neuenschwander, Hans; Born, Ernst J; Manser, Peter

    2010-08-21

    The electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm in Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems) is based on the macro MC method and is able to predict dose distributions for high energy electron beams with high accuracy. However, there are limitations for low energy electron beams. This work aims to improve the accuracy of the dose calculation using eMC for 4 and 6 MeV electron beams of Varian linear accelerators. Improvements implemented into the eMC include (1) improved determination of the initial electron energy spectrum by increased resolution of mono-energetic depth dose curves used during beam configuration; (2) inclusion of all the scrapers of the applicator in the beam model; (3) reduction of the maximum size of the sphere to be selected within the macro MC transport when the energy of the incident electron is below certain thresholds. The impact of these changes in eMC is investigated by comparing calculated dose distributions for 4 and 6 MeV electron beams at source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 and 110 cm with applicators ranging from 6 x 6 to 25 x 25 cm(2) of a Varian Clinac 2300C/D with the corresponding measurements. Dose differences between calculated and measured absolute depth dose curves are reduced from 6% to less than 1.5% for both energies and all applicators considered at SSD of 100 cm. Using the original eMC implementation, absolute dose profiles at depths of 1 cm, d(max) and R50 in water lead to dose differences of up to 8% for applicators larger than 15 x 15 cm(2) at SSD 100 cm. Those differences are now reduced to less than 2% for all dose profiles investigated when the improved version of eMC is used. At SSD of 110 cm the dose difference for the original eMC version is even more pronounced and can be larger than 10%. Those differences are reduced to within 2% or 2 mm with the improved version of eMC. In this work several enhancements were made in the eMC algorithm leading to significant improvements in the accuracy of the dose

  2. Monte Carlo fast dose calculator for proton radiotherapy: application to a voxelized geometry representing a patient with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepes, Pablo; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Taddei, Phillip J; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2009-01-07

    The Monte Carlo method is used to provide accurate dose estimates in proton radiation therapy research. While it is more accurate than commonly used analytical dose calculations, it is computationally intense. The aim of this work was to characterize for a clinical setup the fast dose calculator (FDC), a Monte Carlo track-repeating algorithm based on GEANT4. FDC was developed to increase computation speed without diminishing dosimetric accuracy. The algorithm used a database of proton trajectories in water to calculate the dose of protons in heterogeneous media. The extrapolation from water to 41 materials was achieved by scaling the proton range and the scattering angles. The scaling parameters were obtained by comparing GEANT4 dose distributions with those calculated with FDC for homogeneous phantoms. The FDC algorithm was tested by comparing dose distributions in a voxelized prostate cancer patient as calculated with well-known Monte Carlo codes (GEANT4 and MCNPX). The track-repeating approach reduced the CPU time required for a complete dose calculation in a voxelized patient anatomy by more than two orders of magnitude, while on average reproducing the results from the Monte Carlo predictions within 2% in terms of dose and within 1 mm in terms of distance.

  3. GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation using phase-space sources

    CERN Document Server

    Townson, Reid; Tian, Zhen; Graves, Yan Jiang; Zavgorodni, Sergei; Jiang, Steve B

    2013-01-01

    A novel phase-space source implementation has been designed for GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation engines. Due to the parallelized nature of GPU hardware, it is essential to simultaneously transport particles of the same type and similar energies but separated spatially to yield a high efficiency. We present three methods for phase-space implementation that have been integrated into the most recent version of the GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation package gDPM v3.0. The first method is to sequentially read particles from a patient-dependent phase-space and sort them on-the-fly based on particle type and energy. The second method supplements this with a simple secondary collimator model and fluence map implementation so that patient-independent phase-space sources can be used. Finally, as the third method (called the phase-space-let, or PSL, method) we introduce a novel strategy to pre-process patient-independent phase-spaces and bin particles by type, energy and position. Position bins l...

  4. GPU-based fast Monte Carlo simulation for radiotherapy dose calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xun; Gu, Xuejun; Graves, Yan Jiang; Folkerts, Michael; Jiang, Steve B

    2011-11-21

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is commonly considered to be the most accurate dose calculation method in radiotherapy. However, its efficiency still requires improvement for many routine clinical applications. In this paper, we present our recent progress toward the development of a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based MC dose calculation package, gDPM v2.0. It utilizes the parallel computation ability of a GPU to achieve high efficiency, while maintaining the same particle transport physics as in the original dose planning method (DPM) code and hence the same level of simulation accuracy. In GPU computing, divergence of execution paths between threads can considerably reduce the efficiency. Since photons and electrons undergo different physics and hence attain different execution paths, we use a simulation scheme where photon transport and electron transport are separated to partially relieve the thread divergence issue. A high-performance random number generator and a hardware linear interpolation are also utilized. We have also developed various components to handle the fluence map and linac geometry, so that gDPM can be used to compute dose distributions for realistic IMRT or VMAT treatment plans. Our gDPM package is tested for its accuracy and efficiency in both phantoms and realistic patient cases. In all cases, the average relative uncertainties are less than 1%. A statistical t-test is performed and the dose difference between the CPU and the GPU results is not found to be statistically significant in over 96% of the high dose region and over 97% of the entire region. Speed-up factors of 69.1 ∼ 87.2 have been observed using an NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU card against a 2.27 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. For realistic IMRT and VMAT plans, MC dose calculation can be completed with less than 1% standard deviation in 36.1 ∼ 39.6 s using gDPM.

  5. Dose reduction in CT using bismuth shielding: measurements and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Wonho; Choo, Dong-Myung; Lee, Choon-Sik; Kim, Youhyun

    2010-03-01

    In this research, using direct measurements and Monte Carlo calculations, the potential dose reduction achieved by bismuth shielding in computed tomography was evaluated. The patient dose was measured using an ionisation chamber in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom that had five measurement points at the centre and periphery. Simulations were performed using the MCNPX code. For both the bare and the bismuth-shielded phantom, the differences of dose values between experiment and simulation were within 9%. The dose reductions due to the bismuth shielding were 1.2-55% depending on the measurement points, X-ray tube voltage and the type of shielding. The amount of dose reduction was significant for the positions covered by the bismuth shielding (34 - 46% for head and 41 - 55% for body phantom on average) and negligible for other peripheral positions. The artefact on the reconstructed images were minimal when the distance between the shielding and the organs was >1 cm, and hence the shielding should be selectively located to protect critical organs such as the eye lens, thyroid and breast. The simulation results using the PMMA phantom was compared with those using a realistically voxelised phantom (KTMAN-2). For eye and breast, the simulation results using the PMMA and KTMAN-2 phantoms were similar with each other, while for thyroid the simulation results were different due to the discrepancy of locations and the sizes of the phantoms. The dose reductions achieved by bismuth and lead shielding were compared with each other and the results showed that the difference of the dose reductions achieved by the two materials was less than 2-3%.

  6. Correction for FDG PET dose extravasations: Monte Carlo validation and quantitative evaluation of patient studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva-Rodríguez, Jesús, E-mail: jesus.silva.rodriguez@sergas.es; Aguiar, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.aguiar.fernandez@sergas.es [Fundación Ramón Domínguez, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782, Galicia (Spain); Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, Instituto de Investigación Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Sánchez, Manuel; Mosquera, Javier; Luna-Vega, Víctor [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Complexo Hospitalario Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782, Galicia (Spain); Cortés, Julia; Garrido, Miguel [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia, Spain and Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, Instituto de Investigación Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Pombar, Miguel [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Ruibal, Álvaro [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782, Galicia (Spain); Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, Instituto de Investigación Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Fundación Tejerina, 28003, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Current procedure guidelines for whole body [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) state that studies with visible dose extravasations should be rejected for quantification protocols. Our work is focused on the development and validation of methods for estimating extravasated doses in order to correct standard uptake value (SUV) values for this effect in clinical routine. Methods: One thousand three hundred sixty-seven consecutive whole body FDG-PET studies were visually inspected looking for extravasation cases. Two methods for estimating the extravasated dose were proposed and validated in different scenarios using Monte Carlo simulations. All visible extravasations were retrospectively evaluated using a manual ROI based method. In addition, the 50 patients with higher extravasated doses were also evaluated using a threshold-based method. Results: Simulation studies showed that the proposed methods for estimating extravasated doses allow us to compensate the impact of extravasations on SUV values with an error below 5%. The quantitative evaluation of patient studies revealed that paravenous injection is a relatively frequent effect (18%) with a small fraction of patients presenting considerable extravasations ranging from 1% to a maximum of 22% of the injected dose. A criterion based on the extravasated volume and maximum concentration was established in order to identify this fraction of patients that might be corrected for paravenous injection effect. Conclusions: The authors propose the use of a manual ROI based method for estimating the effectively administered FDG dose and then correct SUV quantification in those patients fulfilling the proposed criterion.

  7. Feasibility Study of Neutron Dose for Real Time Image Guided Proton Therapy: A Monte Carlo Study

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jin Sung; Kim, Daehyun; Shin, EunHyuk; Chung, Kwangzoo; Cho, Sungkoo; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Ju, Sanggyu; Chung, Yoonsun; Jung, Sang Hoon; Han, Youngyih

    2015-01-01

    Two full rotating gantry with different nozzles (Multipurpose nozzle with MLC, Scanning Dedicated nozzle) with conventional cyclotron system is installed and under commissioning for various proton treatment options at Samsung Medical Center in Korea. The purpose of this study is to investigate neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose, H/D, to x-ray imaging equipment under various treatment conditions with monte carlo simulation. At first, we investigated H/D with the various modifications of the beam line devices (Scattering, Scanning, Multi-leaf collimator, Aperture, Compensator) at isocenter, 20, 40, 60 cm distance from isocenter and compared with other research groups. Next, we investigated the neutron dose at x-ray equipments used for real time imaging with various treatment conditions. Our investigation showed the 0.07 ~ 0.19 mSv/Gy at x-ray imaging equipments according to various treatment options and intestingly 50% neutron dose reduction effect of flat panel detector was observed due to multi- lea...

  8. Use of Monte Carlo simulation software for calculating effective dose in cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes B, W. O., E-mail: wilsonottobatista@gmail.com [Instituto Federal da Bahia, Rua Emidio dos Santos s/n, Barbalho 40301-015, Salvador de Bahia (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    This study aimed to develop a geometry of irradiation applicable to the software PCXMC and the consequent calculation of effective dose in applications of the Computed Tomography Cone Beam (CBCT). We evaluated two different CBCT equipment s for dental applications: Care stream Cs 9000 3-dimensional tomograph; i-CAT and GENDEX GXCB-500. Initially characterize each protocol measuring the surface kerma input and the product kerma air-area, P{sub KA}, with solid state detectors RADCAL and PTW transmission chamber. Then we introduce the technical parameters of each preset protocols and geometric conditions in the PCXMC software to obtain the values of effective dose. The calculated effective dose is within the range of 9.0 to 15.7 μSv for 3-dimensional computer 9000 Cs; within the range 44.5 to 89 μSv for GXCB-500 equipment and in the range of 62-111 μSv for equipment Classical i-CAT. These values were compared with results obtained dosimetry using TLD implanted in anthropomorphic phantom and are considered consistent. Os effective dose results are very sensitive to the geometry of radiation (beam position in mathematical phantom). This factor translates to a factor of fragility software usage. But it is very useful to get quick answers to regarding process optimization tool conclusions protocols. We conclude that use software PCXMC Monte Carlo simulation is useful assessment protocols for CBCT tests in dental applications. (Author)

  9. PCXMC, a Monte Carlo program for calculating patient doses in medical x-ray examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapiovaara, M.; Siiskonen, T.

    2008-11-15

    PCXMC is a Monte Carlo program for calculating patients' organ doses and effective doses in medical x-ray examinations. The organs and tissues considered in the program are: active bone marrow, adrenals, brain, breasts, colon (upper and lower large intestine), extrathoracic airways, gall bladder, heart, kidneys, liver, lungs, lymph nodes, muscle, oesophagus, oral mucosa, ovaries, pancreas, prostate, salivary glands, skeleton, skin, small intestine, spleen, stomach, testicles, thymus, thyroid, urinary bladder and uterus. The program calculates the effective dose with both the present tissue weighting factors of ICRP Publication 103 (2007) and the old tissue weighting factors of ICRP Publication 60 (1991). The anatomical data are based on the mathematical hermaphrodite phantom models of Cristy and Eckerman (1987), which describe patients of six different ages: new-born, 1, 5, 10, 15-year-old and adult patients. Some changes are made to these phantoms in order to make them more realistic for external irradiation conditions and to enable the calculation of the effective dose according to the new ICRP Publication 103 tissue weighting factors. The phantom sizes are adjustable to mimic patients of an arbitrary weight and height. PCXMC allows a free adjustment of the x-ray beam projection and other examination conditions of projection radiography and fluoroscopy

  10. Monte Carlo modeling of proton therapy installations: a global experimental method to validate secondary neutron dose calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, J.; Martinetti, F.; Sayah, R.; Lacoste, V.; Donadille, L.; Trompier, F.; Nauraye, C.; De Marzi, L.; Vabre, I.; Delacroix, S.; Hérault, J.; Clairand, I.

    2014-06-01

    Monte Carlo calculations are increasingly used to assess stray radiation dose to healthy organs of proton therapy patients and estimate the risk of secondary cancer. Among the secondary particles, neutrons are of primary concern due to their high relative biological effectiveness. The validation of Monte Carlo simulations for out-of-field neutron doses remains however a major challenge to the community. Therefore this work focused on developing a global experimental approach to test the reliability of the MCNPX models of two proton therapy installations operating at 75 and 178 MeV for ocular and intracranial tumor treatments, respectively. The method consists of comparing Monte Carlo calculations against experimental measurements of: (a) neutron spectrometry inside the treatment room, (b) neutron ambient dose equivalent at several points within the treatment room, (c) secondary organ-specific neutron doses inside the Rando-Alderson anthropomorphic phantom. Results have proven that Monte Carlo models correctly reproduce secondary neutrons within the two proton therapy treatment rooms. Sensitive differences between experimental measurements and simulations were nonetheless observed especially with the highest beam energy. The study demonstrated the need for improved measurement tools, especially at the high neutron energy range, and more accurate physical models and cross sections within the Monte Carlo code to correctly assess secondary neutron doses in proton therapy applications.

  11. Monte Carlo modeling of proton therapy installations: a global experimental method to validate secondary neutron dose calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, J; Martinetti, F; Sayah, R; Lacoste, V; Donadille, L; Trompier, F; Nauraye, C; De Marzi, L; Vabre, I; Delacroix, S; Hérault, J; Clairand, I

    2014-06-07

    Monte Carlo calculations are increasingly used to assess stray radiation dose to healthy organs of proton therapy patients and estimate the risk of secondary cancer. Among the secondary particles, neutrons are of primary concern due to their high relative biological effectiveness. The validation of Monte Carlo simulations for out-of-field neutron doses remains however a major challenge to the community. Therefore this work focused on developing a global experimental approach to test the reliability of the MCNPX models of two proton therapy installations operating at 75 and 178 MeV for ocular and intracranial tumor treatments, respectively. The method consists of comparing Monte Carlo calculations against experimental measurements of: (a) neutron spectrometry inside the treatment room, (b) neutron ambient dose equivalent at several points within the treatment room, (c) secondary organ-specific neutron doses inside the Rando-Alderson anthropomorphic phantom. Results have proven that Monte Carlo models correctly reproduce secondary neutrons within the two proton therapy treatment rooms. Sensitive differences between experimental measurements and simulations were nonetheless observed especially with the highest beam energy. The study demonstrated the need for improved measurement tools, especially at the high neutron energy range, and more accurate physical models and cross sections within the Monte Carlo code to correctly assess secondary neutron doses in proton therapy applications.

  12. Monte Carlo estimation of radiation doses during paediatric barium meal and cystourethrography examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitriadis, A; Gialousis, G; Karlatira, M; Karaiskos, P; Georgiou, E; Yakoumakis, E [Medical Physics Department, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias Str., Goudi 11527, Athens (Greece); Makri, T; Papaodysseas, S, E-mail: anestisdim@yahoo.com [Radiological Imaging Department, Ag. Sofia Hospital, Lebadias and Thibon, Goudi 11527, Athens (Greece)

    2011-01-21

    Organ doses are important quantities in assessing the radiation risk. In the case of children, estimation of this risk is of particular concern due to their significant radiosensitivity and the greater health detriment. The purpose of this study is to estimate the organ doses to paediatric patients undergoing barium meal and micturating cystourethrography examinations by clinical measurements and Monte Carlo simulation. In clinical measurements, dose-area products (DAPs) were assessed during examination of 50 patients undergoing barium meal and 90 patients undergoing cystourethrography examinations, separated equally within three age categories: namely newborn, 1 year and 5 years old. Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport in male and female mathematical phantoms was applied using the MCNP5 code in order to estimate the equivalent organ doses. Regarding the micturating cystourethrography examinations, the organs receiving considerable amounts of radiation doses were the urinary bladder (1.87, 2.43 and 4.7 mSv, the first, second and third value in the parentheses corresponds to neonatal, 1 year old and 5 year old patients, respectively), the large intestines (1.54, 1.8, 3.1 mSv), the small intestines (1.34, 1.56, 2.78 mSv), the stomach (1.46, 1.02, 2.01 mSv) and the gall bladder (1.46, 1.66, 2.18 mSv), depending upon the age of the child. Organs receiving considerable amounts of radiation during barium meal examinations were the stomach (9.81, 9.92, 11.5 mSv), the gall bladder (3.05, 5.74, 7.15 mSv), the rib bones (9.82, 10.1, 11.1 mSv) and the pancreas (5.8, 5.93, 6.65 mSv), depending upon the age of the child. DAPs to organ/effective doses conversion factors were derived for each age and examination in order to be compared with other studies.

  13. GPU-based fast Monte Carlo dose calculation for proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xun; Schümann, Jan; Paganetti, Harald; Jiang, Steve B

    2012-12-07

    Accurate radiation dose calculation is essential for successful proton radiotherapy. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is considered to be the most accurate method. However, the long computation time limits it from routine clinical applications. Recently, graphics processing units (GPUs) have been widely used to accelerate computationally intensive tasks in radiotherapy. We have developed a fast MC dose calculation package, gPMC, for proton dose calculation on a GPU. In gPMC, proton transport is modeled by the class II condensed history simulation scheme with a continuous slowing down approximation. Ionization, elastic and inelastic proton nucleus interactions are considered. Energy straggling and multiple scattering are modeled. Secondary electrons are not transported and their energies are locally deposited. After an inelastic nuclear interaction event, a variety of products are generated using an empirical model. Among them, charged nuclear fragments are terminated with energy locally deposited. Secondary protons are stored in a stack and transported after finishing transport of the primary protons, while secondary neutral particles are neglected. gPMC is implemented on the GPU under the CUDA platform. We have validated gPMC using the TOPAS/Geant4 MC code as the gold standard. For various cases including homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms as well as a patient case, good agreements between gPMC and TOPAS/Geant4 are observed. The gamma passing rate for the 2%/2 mm criterion is over 98.7% in the region with dose greater than 10% maximum dose in all cases, excluding low-density air regions. With gPMC it takes only 6-22 s to simulate 10 million source protons to achieve ∼1% relative statistical uncertainty, depending on the phantoms and energy. This is an extremely high efficiency compared to the computational time of tens of CPU hours for TOPAS/Geant4. Our fast GPU-based code can thus facilitate the routine use of MC dose calculation in proton therapy.

  14. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jan T. M.; Shrimpton, Paul C.

    2016-07-01

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990’s. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10’s of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners.

  15. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jan T M; Shrimpton, Paul C

    2016-07-21

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990's. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10's of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners.

  16. SU-E-T-36: A GPU-Accelerated Monte-Carlo Dose Calculation Platform and Its Application Toward Validating a ViewRay Beam Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y; Mazur, T; Green, O; Hu, Y; Wooten, H; Yang, D; Zhao, T; Mutic, S; Li, H [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To build a fast, accurate and easily-deployable research platform for Monte-Carlo dose calculations. We port the dose calculation engine PENELOPE to C++, and accelerate calculations using GPU acceleration. Simulations of a Co-60 beam model provided by ViewRay demonstrate the capabilities of the platform. Methods: We built software that incorporates a beam model interface, CT-phantom model, GPU-accelerated PENELOPE engine, and GUI front-end. We rewrote the PENELOPE kernel in C++ (from Fortran) and accelerated the code on a GPU. We seamlessly integrated a Co-60 beam model (obtained from ViewRay) into our platform. Simulations of various field sizes and SSDs using a homogeneous water phantom generated PDDs, dose profiles, and output factors that were compared to experiment data. Results: With GPU acceleration using a dated graphics card (Nvidia Tesla C2050), a highly accurate simulation – including 100*100*100 grid, 3×3×3 mm3 voxels, <1% uncertainty, and 4.2×4.2 cm2 field size – runs 24 times faster (20 minutes versus 8 hours) than when parallelizing on 8 threads across a new CPU (Intel i7-4770). Simulated PDDs, profiles and output ratios for the commercial system agree well with experiment data measured using radiographic film or ionization chamber. Based on our analysis, this beam model is precise enough for general applications. Conclusions: Using a beam model for a Co-60 system provided by ViewRay, we evaluate a dose calculation platform that we developed. Comparison to measurements demonstrates the promise of our software for use as a research platform for dose calculations, with applications including quality assurance and treatment plan verification.

  17. A method for converting dose-to-medium to dose-to-tissue in Monte Carlo studies of gold nanoparticle-enhanced radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koger, B; Kirkby, C

    2016-03-07

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have shown potential in recent years as a means of therapeutic dose enhancement in radiation therapy. However, a major challenge in moving towards clinical implementation is the exact characterisation of the dose enhancement they provide. Monte Carlo studies attempt to explore this property, but they often face computational limitations when examining macroscopic scenarios. In this study, a method of converting dose from macroscopic simulations, where the medium is defined as a mixture containing both gold and tissue components, to a mean dose-to-tissue on a microscopic scale was established. Monte Carlo simulations were run for both explicitly-modeled GNPs in tissue and a homogeneous mixture of tissue and gold. A dose ratio was obtained for the conversion of dose scored in a mixture medium to dose-to-tissue in each case. Dose ratios varied from 0.69 to 1.04 for photon sources and 0.97 to 1.03 for electron sources. The dose ratio is highly dependent on the source energy as well as GNP diameter and concentration, though this effect is less pronounced for electron sources. By appropriately weighting the monoenergetic dose ratios obtained, the dose ratio for any arbitrary spectrum can be determined. This allows complex scenarios to be modeled accurately without explicitly simulating each individual GNP.

  18. Comparison of measured and Monte Carlo calculated dose distributions in inhomogeneous phantoms in clinical electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, R.; Olivares, M.; DeBlois, F.; Podgorsak, E. B.; Kawrakow, I.; Seuntjens, J.

    2003-08-01

    Calculations of dose distributions in heterogeneous phantoms in clinical electron beams, carried out using the fast voxel Monte Carlo (MC) system XVMC and the conventional MC code EGSnrc, were compared with measurements. Irradiations were performed using the 9 MeV and 15 MeV beams from a Varian Clinac-18 accelerator with a 10 × 10 cm2 applicator and an SSD of 100 cm. Depth doses were measured with thermoluminescent dosimetry techniques (TLD 700) in phantoms consisting of slabs of Solid WaterTM (SW) and bone and slabs of SW and lung tissue-equivalent materials. Lateral profiles in water were measured using an electron diode at different depths behind one and two immersed aluminium rods. The accelerator was modelled using the EGS4/BEAM system and optimized phase-space files were used as input to the EGSnrc and the XVMC calculations. Also, for the XVMC, an experiment-based beam model was used. All measurements were corrected by the EGSnrc-calculated stopping power ratios. Overall, there is excellent agreement between the corrected experimental and the two MC dose distributions. Small remaining discrepancies may be due to the non-equivalence between physical and simulated tissue-equivalent materials and to detector fluence perturbation effect correction factors that were calculated for the 9 MeV beam at selected depths in the heterogeneous phantoms.

  19. Comparison of measured and Monte Carlo calculated dose distributions in inhomogeneous phantoms in clinical electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doucet, R [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, 1650 Ave Cedar, Montreal H3G 1A4 (Canada); Olivares, M [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, 1650 Ave Cedar, Montreal H3G 1A4 (Canada); DeBlois, F [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, 1650 Ave Cedar, Montreal H3G 1A4 (Canada); Podgorsak, E B [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, 1650 Ave Cedar, Montreal H3G 1A4 (Canada); Kawrakow, I [National Research Council Canada, Ionizing Radiation Standards Group, Ottawa K1A 0R6, Canada (Canada); Seuntjens, J [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, 1650 Ave Cedar, Montreal H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2003-08-07

    Calculations of dose distributions in heterogeneous phantoms in clinical electron beams, carried out using the fast voxel Monte Carlo (MC) system XVMC and the conventional MC code EGSnrc, were compared with measurements. Irradiations were performed using the 9 MeV and 15 MeV beams from a Varian Clinac-18 accelerator with a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} applicator and an SSD of 100 cm. Depth doses were measured with thermoluminescent dosimetry techniques (TLD 700) in phantoms consisting of slabs of Solid Water{sup TM} (SW) and bone and slabs of SW and lung tissue-equivalent materials. Lateral profiles in water were measured using an electron diode at different depths behind one and two immersed aluminium rods. The accelerator was modelled using the EGS4/BEAM system and optimized phase-space files were used as input to the EGSnrc and the XVMC calculations. Also, for the XVMC, an experiment-based beam model was used. All measurements were corrected by the EGSnrc-calculated stopping power ratios. Overall, there is excellent agreement between the corrected experimental and the two MC dose distributions. Small remaining discrepancies may be due to the non-equivalence between physical and simulated tissue-equivalent materials and to detector fluence perturbation effect correction factors that were calculated for the 9 MeV beam at selected depths in the heterogeneous phantoms.

  20. Image quality and dose assessment in digital breast tomosynthesis: A Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, M.; Di Maria, S.; Oliveira, N.; Matela, N.; Janeiro, L.; Almeida, P.; Vaz, P.

    2014-11-01

    Mammography is considered a standard technique for the early detection of breast cancer. However, its sensitivity is limited essentially due to the issue of the overlapping breast tissue. This limitation can be partially overcome, with a relatively new technique, called digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). For this technique, optimization of acquisition parameters which maximize image quality, whilst complying with the ALARA principle, continues to be an area of considerable research. The aim of this work was to study the best quantum energies that optimize the image quality with the lowest achievable dose in DBT and compare these results with the digital mammography (DM) ones. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the state-of-the-art computer program MCNPX 2.7.0 in order to generate several 2D cranio-caudal (CC) projections obtained during an acquisition of a standard DBT examination. Moreover, glandular absorbed doses and photon flux calculations, for each projection image, were performed. A homogeneous breast computational phantom with 50%/50% glandular/adipose tissue composition was used and two compressed breast thicknesses were evaluated: 4 cm and 8 cm. The simulated projection images were afterwards reconstructed with an algebraic reconstruction tool and the signal difference to noise ratio (SDNR) was calculated in order to evaluate the image quality in DBT and DM. Finally, a thorough comparison between the results obtained in terms of SDNR and dose assessment in DBT and DM was performed.

  1. Patient-specific Monte Carlo dose calculations for 103Pd breast brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksys, N.; Cygler, J. E.; Caudrelier, J. M.; Thomson, R. M.

    2016-04-01

    This work retrospectively investigates patient-specific Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for 103Pd permanent implant breast brachytherapy, exploring various necessary assumptions for deriving virtual patient models: post-implant CT image metallic artifact reduction (MAR), tissue assignment schemes (TAS), and elemental tissue compositions. Three MAR methods (thresholding, 3D median filter, virtual sinogram) are applied to CT images; resulting images are compared to each other and to uncorrected images. Virtual patient models are then derived by application of different TAS ranging from TG-186 basic recommendations (mixed adipose and gland tissue at uniform literature-derived density) to detailed schemes (segmented adipose and gland with CT-derived densities). For detailed schemes, alternate mass density segmentation thresholds between adipose and gland are considered. Several literature-derived elemental compositions for adipose, gland and skin are compared. MC models derived from uncorrected CT images can yield large errors in dose calculations especially when used with detailed TAS. Differences in MAR method result in large differences in local doses when variations in CT number cause differences in tissue assignment. Between different MAR models (same TAS), PTV {{D}90} and skin {{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} each vary by up to 6%. Basic TAS (mixed adipose/gland tissue) generally yield higher dose metrics than detailed segmented schemes: PTV {{D}90} and skin {{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} are higher by up to 13% and 9% respectively. Employing alternate adipose, gland and skin elemental compositions can cause variations in PTV {{D}90} of up to 11% and skin {{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} of up to 30%. Overall, AAPM TG-43 overestimates dose to the PTV ({{D}90} on average 10% and up to 27%) and underestimates dose to the skin ({{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} on average 29% and up to 48%) compared to the various MC models derived using the post-MAR CT images studied

  2. Comprehensive evaluation and clinical implementation of commercially available Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aizhen; Wen, Ning; Nurushev, Teamour; Burmeister, Jay; Chetty, Indrin J

    2013-03-04

    A commercial electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm has become available in Eclipse treatment planning system. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the eMC algorithm and investigate the clinical implementation of this system. The beam modeling of the eMC algorithm was performed for beam energies of 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV for a Varian Trilogy and all available applicator sizes in the Eclipse treatment planning system. The accuracy of the eMC algorithm was evaluated in a homogeneous water phantom, solid water phantoms containing lung and bone materials, and an anthropomorphic phantom. In addition, dose calculation accuracy was compared between pencil beam (PB) and eMC algorithms in the same treatment planning system for heterogeneous phantoms. The overall agreement between eMC calculations and measurements was within 3%/2 mm, while the PB algorithm had large errors (up to 25%) in predicting dose distributions in the presence of inhomogeneities such as bone and lung. The clinical implementation of the eMC algorithm was investigated by performing treatment planning for 15 patients with lesions in the head and neck, breast, chest wall, and sternum. The dose distributions were calculated using PB and eMC algorithms with no smoothing and all three levels of 3D Gaussian smoothing for comparison. Based on a routine electron beam therapy prescription method, the number of eMC calculated monitor units (MUs) was found to increase with increased 3D Gaussian smoothing levels. 3D Gaussian smoothing greatly improved the visual usability of dose distributions and produced better target coverage. Differences of calculated MUs and dose distributions between eMC and PB algorithms could be significant when oblique beam incidence, surface irregularities, and heterogeneous tissues were present in the treatment plans. In our patient cases, monitor unit differences of up to 7% were observed between PB and eMC algorithms. Monitor unit calculations were also preformed

  3. Radioactivity determination of sealed pure beta-sources by surface dose measurements and Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Heon [Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seongmoon [Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kanghyuk; Son, Kwang-Jae; Lee, Jun Sig [Hanaro Applications Research, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ye, Sung-Joon, E-mail: sye@snu.ac.kr [Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Center for Convergence Research on Robotics, Advance Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-21

    This study aims to determine the activity of a sealed pure beta-source by measuring the surface dose rate using an extrapolation chamber. A conversion factor (cGy s{sup −1} Bq{sup −1}), which was defined as the ratio of surface dose rate to activity, can be calculated by Monte Carlo simulations of the extrapolation chamber measurement. To validate this hypothesis the certified activities of two standard pure beta-sources of Sr/Y-90 and Si/P-32 were compared with those determined by this method. In addition, a sealed test source of Sr/Y-90 was manufactured by the HANARO reactor group of KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) and used to further validate this method. The measured surface dose rates of the Sr/Y-90 and Si/P-32 standard sources were 4.615×10{sup −5} cGy s{sup −1} and 2.259×10{sup −5} cGy s{sup −1}, respectively. The calculated conversion factors of the two sources were 1.213×10{sup −8} cGy s{sup −1} Bq{sup −1} and 1.071×10{sup −8} cGy s{sup −1} Bq{sup −1}, respectively. Therefore, the activity of the standard Sr/Y-90 source was determined to be 3.995 kBq, which was 2.0% less than the certified value (4.077 kBq). For Si/P-32 the determined activity was 2.102 kBq, which was 6.6% larger than the certified activity (1.971 kBq). The activity of the Sr/Y-90 test source was determined to be 4.166 kBq, while the apparent activity reported by KAERI was 5.803 kBq. This large difference might be due to evaporation and diffusion of the source liquid during preparation and uncertainty in the amount of weighed aliquot of source liquid. The overall uncertainty involved in this method was determined to be 7.3%. We demonstrated that the activity of a sealed pure beta-source could be conveniently determined by complementary combination of measuring the surface dose rate and Monte Carlo simulations.

  4. Spatial fractionation of the dose using neon and heavier ions: A Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peucelle, C.; Martínez-Rovira, I.; Prezado, Y., E-mail: prezado@imnc.in2p3.fr [IMNC-UMR 8165, CNRS Paris 7 and Paris 11 Universities, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, Orsay Cedex 91406 (France)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: This work explores a new radiation therapy approach which might trigger a renewed use of neon and heavier ions to treat cancers. These ions were shown to be extremely efficient in radioresistant tumor killing. Unfortunately, the efficient region also extends into the normal tissue in front of the tumor. The strategy the authors propose is to profit from the well-established sparing effect of thin spatially fractionated beams, so that the impact on normal tissues might be minimized while a high tumor control is achieved. The main goal of this work is to provide a proof of concept of this new approach. With that aim, a dosimetric study was carried out as a first step to evaluate the interest of further explorations of this avenue. Methods: The GATE/GEANT4 v.6.1 Monte Carlo simulation platform was employed to simulate arrays of rectangular minibeams (700 μm × 2 cm) of four ions (Ne, Si, Ar, and Fe). The irradiations were performed with a 2 cm-long spread-out Bragg peak centered at 7 cm-depth. Dose distributions in a water phantom were scored considering two minibeams center-to-center distances: 1400 and 3500 μm. Peak and valley doses, peak-to-valley dose ratios (PVDRs), beam penumbras, and relative contribution of nuclear fragments and electromagnetic processes were assessed as figures of merit. In addition, the type and proportion of the secondary nuclear fragments were evaluated in both peak and valley regions. Results: Extremely high PVDR values (>100) and low valley doses were obtained. The higher the atomic number (Z) of the primary ion is, the lower the valleys and the narrower the penumbras. Although the yield of secondary nuclear products increases with Z, the actual dose being deposited by the secondary nuclear fragments in the valleys starts to be the dominant contribution at deeper points, helping in the sparing of proximal normal tissues. Additionally, a wider center-to-center distance leads to a minimized contribution of heavier secondary

  5. Dose calculation in nuclear fall-out areas using Monte Carlo simulation; Beraekning av straaldoser i belaeggningsfaelt med Monte Carlo simulering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berggren, L.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes the GRAMCS, a program that calculates the dose-rates in a fallout area using Monte Carlo simulation. GRAMCS processes gamma radiation from a mixture of nuclides, where interaction with the photoelectric effect, Thomson scattering, Compton scattering and pair production occurs. The contaminated field may be vertically inhomogeneous, and the surrounding structure consists of different types of environment with horizontal limits. The detector can be placed at any height or inside a human body. Results are visualized in a graph with dose-rate vs photon energies. Total dose-rate with error interval and primary dose-rate percentage are also shown. Input parameters used for calculations and data describing the graph are written in separate files. 13 refs, 6 figs.

  6. Towards real-time photon Monte Carlo dose calculation in the cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegenhein, Peter; Kozin, Igor; Kamerling, Cornelis Philippus; Oelfke, Uwe

    2017-01-31

    Near real-time application of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation in clinic and research is hindered by long computational runtimes of established software. Currently, fast MC software solutions are available utilising accelerators such as GPUs or clusters of central processing units (CPU)-based system. Both platforms are expensive in terms of purchase costs and maintenance and, in case of the GPU, provide only limited scalability. In this work we propose a cloud-based MC solution, which offers high scalability of accurate photon dose calculations. The MC simulations run on a private virtual supercomputer that forms in the cloud. Computational resources can be provisioned dynamically at low costs without upfront investment in expensive hardware. A client-server software solution has been developed which controls the simulations and efficiently transports data to and from the cloud. The client application integrates seamlessly into a Treatment Planning System (TPS). It runs the MC simulation workflow automatically and securely exchanges simulation data with the server side application that controls the virtual supercomputer. The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) was used to add an addition security layer which encrypts and decrypts patient data on-the-fly at the processor register level. We could show that our cloud-based MC framework enables near real-time dose computation. It delivers excellent linear scaling for high-resolution datasets with absolute runtimes of 1.1 to 10.9 seconds for simulating a clinical prostate and liver case up to 1\\% statistical uncertainty. The computation times include the data transportation processes with the cloud as well as process scheduling and synchronisation overhead. Cloud based MC simulations offer a fast, affordable and easily accessible alternative for near real-time accurate dose calculations to currently used GPU or cluster solutions.

  7. A Monte Carlo model for out-of-field dose calculation from high-energy photon therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kry, Stephen F; Titt, Uwe; Followill, David; Pönisch, Falk; Vassiliev, Oleg N; White, R Allen; Stovall, Marilyn; Salehpour, Mohammad

    2007-09-01

    As cancer therapy becomes more efficacious and patients survive longer, the potential for late effects increases, including effects induced by radiation dose delivered away from the treatment site. This out-of-field radiation is of particular concern with high-energy radiotherapy, as neutrons are produced in the accelerator head. We recently developed an accurate Monte Carlo model of a Varian 2100 accelerator using MCNPX for calculating the dose away from the treatment field resulting from low-energy therapy. In this study, we expanded and validated our Monte Carlo model for high-energy (18 MV) photon therapy, including both photons and neutrons. Simulated out-of-field photon doses were compared with measurements made with thermoluminescent dosimeters in an acrylic phantom up to 55 cm from the central axis. Simulated neutron fluences and energy spectra were compared with measurements using moderated gold foil activation in moderators and data from the literature. The average local difference between the calculated and measured photon dose was 17%, including doses as low as 0.01% of the central axis dose. The out-of-field photon dose varied substantially with field size and distance from the edge of the field but varied little with depth in the phantom, except at depths shallower than 3 cm, where the dose sharply increased. On average, the difference between the simulated and measured neutron fluences was 19% and good agreement was observed with the neutron spectra. The neutron dose equivalent varied little with field size or distance from the central axis but decreased with depth in the phantom. Neutrons were the dominant component of the out-of-field dose equivalent for shallow depths and large distances from the edge of the treatment field. This Monte Carlo model is useful to both physicists and clinicians when evaluating out-of-field doses and associated potential risks.

  8. Determination of surface dose rate of indigenous (32)P patch brachytherapy source by experimental and Monte Carlo methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Srinivasan, P; Sharma, S D; Saxena, Sanjay Kumar; Bakshi, A K; Dash, Ashutosh; Babu, D A R; Sharma, D N

    2015-09-01

    Isotope production and Application Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Center developed (32)P patch sources for treatment of superficial tumors. Surface dose rate of a newly developed (32)P patch source of nominal diameter 25 mm was measured experimentally using standard extrapolation ionization chamber and Gafchromic EBT film. Monte Carlo model of the (32)P patch source along with the extrapolation chamber was also developed to estimate the surface dose rates from these sources. The surface dose rates to tissue (cGy/min) measured using extrapolation chamber and radiochromic films are 82.03±4.18 (k=2) and 79.13±2.53 (k=2) respectively. The two values of the surface dose rates measured using the two independent experimental methods are in good agreement to each other within a variation of 3.5%. The surface dose rate to tissue (cGy/min) estimated using the MCNP Monte Carlo code works out to be 77.78±1.16 (k=2). The maximum deviation between the surface dose rates to tissue obtained by Monte Carlo and the extrapolation chamber method is 5.2% whereas the difference between the surface dose rates obtained by radiochromic film measurement and the Monte Carlo simulation is 1.7%. The three values of the surface dose rates of the (32)P patch source obtained by three independent methods are in good agreement to one another within the uncertainties associated with their measurements and calculation. This work has demonstrated that MCNP based electron transport simulations are accurate enough for determining the dosimetry parameters of the indigenously developed (32)P patch sources for contact brachytherapy applications.

  9. Monte Carlo study of neutron-ambient dose equivalent to patient in treatment room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, A; Afarideh, H; Abbasi Davani, F; Ghergherehchi, M; Arbabi, A

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an analytical method for the calculation of the neutron ambient dose equivalent H* (10) regarding patients, whereby the different concrete types that are used in the surrounding walls of the treatment room are considered. This work has been performed according to a detailed simulation of the Varian 2300C/D linear accelerator head that is operated at 18MV, and silver activation counter as a neutron detector, for which the Monte Carlo MCNPX 2.6 code is used, with and without the treatment room walls. The results show that, when compared to the neutrons that leak from the LINAC, both the scattered and thermal neutrons are the major factors that comprise the out-of field neutron dose. The scattering factors for the limonite-steel, magnetite-steel, and ordinary concretes have been calculated as 0.91±0.09, 1.08±0.10, and 0.371±0.01, respectively, while the corresponding thermal factors are 34.22±3.84, 23.44±1.62, and 52.28±1.99, respectively (both the scattering and thermal factors are for the isocenter region); moreover, the treatment room is composed of magnetite-steel and limonite-steel concretes, so the neutron doses to the patient are 1.79 times and 1.62 times greater than that from an ordinary concrete composition. The results also confirm that the scattering and thermal factors do not depend on the details of the chosen linear accelerator head model. It is anticipated that the results of the present work will be of great interest to the manufacturers of medical linear accelerators.

  10. A GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation code for photon transport in a voxel phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellezzo, M.; Do Nascimento, E.; Yoriyaz, H., E-mail: mbellezzo@gmail.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    As the most accurate method to estimate absorbed dose in radiotherapy, Monte Carlo method has been widely used in radiotherapy treatment planning. Nevertheless, its efficiency can be improved for clinical routine applications. In this paper, we present the CUBMC code, a GPU-based Mc photon transport algorithm for dose calculation under the Compute Unified Device Architecture platform. The simulation of physical events is based on the algorithm used in Penelope, and the cross section table used is the one generated by the Material routine, als present in Penelope code. Photons are transported in voxel-based geometries with different compositions. To demonstrate the capabilities of the algorithm developed in the present work four 128 x 128 x 128 voxel phantoms have been considered. One of them is composed by a homogeneous water-based media, the second is composed by bone, the third is composed by lung and the fourth is composed by a heterogeneous bone and vacuum geometry. Simulations were done considering a 6 MeV monoenergetic photon point source. There are two distinct approaches that were used for transport simulation. The first of them forces the photon to stop at every voxel frontier, the second one is the Woodcock method, where the photon stop in the frontier will be considered depending on the material changing across the photon travel line. Dose calculations using these methods are compared for validation with Penelope and MCNP5 codes. Speed-up factors are compared using a NVidia GTX 560-Ti GPU card against a 2.27 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. (Author)

  11. The impact of low-Z and high-Z metal implants in IMRT: A Monte Carlo study of dose inaccuracies in commercial dose algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spadea, Maria Francesca, E-mail: mfspadea@unicz.it [Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Magna Graecia, Catanzaro 88100, Italy and Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Verburg, Joost Mathias; Seco, Joao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Baroni, Guido [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano University, Milano 20133, Italy and Bioengineering Unit, Fondazione CNAO, Pavia 27100 (Italy)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the dosimetric impact of low-Z and high-Z metallic implants on IMRT plans. Methods: Computed tomography (CT) scans of three patients were analyzed to study effects due to the presence of Titanium (low-Z), Platinum and Gold (high-Z) inserts. To eliminate artifacts in CT images, a sinogram-based metal artifact reduction algorithm was applied. IMRT dose calculations were performed on both the uncorrected and corrected images using a commercial planning system (convolution/superposition algorithm) and an in-house Monte Carlo platform. Dose differences between uncorrected and corrected datasets were computed and analyzed using gamma index (Pγ{sub <1}) and setting 2 mm and 2% as distance to agreement and dose difference criteria, respectively. Beam specific depth dose profiles across the metal were also examined. Results: Dose discrepancies between corrected and uncorrected datasets were not significant for low-Z material. High-Z materials caused under-dosage of 20%–25% in the region surrounding the metal and over dosage of 10%–15% downstream of the hardware. Gamma index test yielded Pγ{sub <1}>99% for all low-Z cases; while for high-Z cases it returned 91% < Pγ{sub <1}< 99%. Analysis of the depth dose curve of a single beam for low-Z cases revealed that, although the dose attenuation is altered inside the metal, it does not differ downstream of the insert. However, for high-Z metal implants the dose is increased up to 10%–12% around the insert. In addition, Monte Carlo method was more sensitive to the presence of metal inserts than superposition/convolution algorithm. Conclusions: The reduction in terms of dose of metal artifacts in CT images is relevant for high-Z implants. In this case, dose distribution should be calculated using Monte Carlo algorithms, given their superior accuracy in dose modeling in and around the metal. In addition, the knowledge of the composition of metal inserts improves the accuracy of

  12. SU-E-T-467: Implementation of Monte Carlo Dose Calculation for a Multileaf Collimator Equipped Robotic Radiotherapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, JS; Fan, J; Ma, C-M [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To improve the treatment efficiency and capabilities for full-body treatment, a robotic radiosurgery system has equipped with a multileaf collimator (MLC) to extend its accuracy and precision to radiation therapy. To model the MLC and include it in the Monte Carlo patient dose calculation is the goal of this work. Methods: The radiation source and the MLC were carefully modeled to consider the effects of the source size, collimator scattering, leaf transmission and leaf end shape. A source model was built based on the output factors, percentage depth dose curves and lateral dose profiles measured in a water phantom. MLC leaf shape, leaf end design and leaf tilt for minimizing the interleaf leakage and their effects on beam fluence and energy spectrum were all considered in the calculation. Transmission/leakage was added to the fluence based on the transmission factors of the leaf and the leaf end. The transmitted photon energy was tuned to consider the beam hardening effects. The calculated results with the Monte Carlo implementation was compared with measurements in homogeneous water phantom and inhomogeneous phantoms with slab lung or bone material for 4 square fields and 9 irregularly shaped fields. Results: The calculated output factors are compared with the measured ones and the difference is within 1% for different field sizes. The calculated dose distributions in the phantoms show good agreement with measurements using diode detector and films. The dose difference is within 2% inside the field and the distance to agreement is within 2mm in the penumbra region. The gamma passing rate is more than 95% with 2%/2mm criteria for all the test cases. Conclusion: Implementation of Monte Carlo dose calculation for a MLC equipped robotic radiosurgery system is completed successfully. The accuracy of Monte Carlo dose calculation with MLC is clinically acceptable. This work was supported by Accuray Inc.

  13. Size Effects of Gold and Iron Nanoparticles on Radiation Dose Enhancement in Brachytherapy and Teletherapy: A Monte Carlo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahad Ollah Ezzati

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In this study, we aimed to calculate dose enhancement factor (DEF for gold (Au and iron (Fe nanoparticles (NPs in brachytherapy and teletherapy, using Monte Carlo (MC method. Materials and Methods In this study, a new algorithm was introduced to calculate dose enhancement by AuNPs and FeNPs for Iridium-192 (Ir-192 brachytherapy and Cobalt-60 (Co-60 teletherapy sources, using the MC method. In this algorithm, the semi-random distribution of NPs was used instead of the regular distribution. Diameters were assumed to be 15, 30, and 100 nm in brachytherapy and 15 and 30 nm in teletherapy. Monte Carlo MCNP4C code was used for simulations, and NP density values were 0.107 mg/ml and 0.112 mg/ml in brachytherapy and teletherapy, respectively. Results AuNPs significantly enhanced the radiation dose in brachytherapy (approximately 60%, and 100 nm diameter NPs showed the most uniform dose distribution. AuNPs had an insignificant effect on teletherapy radiation field, with a dose enhancement ratio of 3% (about the calculation uncertainty or less. In addition, FeNPs had an insignificant effect on both brachytherapy and teletherapy radiation fields. FeNPs dose enhancement was 3% in brachytherapy and 6% (about the calculation uncertainty or less in teletherapy. Conclusion It can be concluded that AuNPs can significantly increase the absorbed dose in brachytherapy; however, FeNPs do not have a noticeable effect on the absorbed dose

  14. Fast patient-specific Monte Carlo brachytherapy dose calculations via the correlated sampling variance reduction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampson, Andrew; Le Yi; Williamson, Jeffrey F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate potential of correlated sampling Monte Carlo (CMC) simulation to improve the calculation efficiency for permanent seed brachytherapy (PSB) implants without loss of accuracy. Methods: CMC was implemented within an in-house MC code family (PTRAN) and used to compute 3D dose distributions for two patient cases: a clinical PSB postimplant prostate CT imaging study and a simulated post lumpectomy breast PSB implant planned on a screening dedicated breast cone-beam CT patient exam. CMC tallies the dose difference, {Delta}D, between highly correlated histories in homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries. The heterogeneous geometry histories were derived from photon collisions sampled in a geometrically identical but purely homogeneous medium geometry, by altering their particle weights to correct for bias. The prostate case consisted of 78 Model-6711 {sup 125}I seeds. The breast case consisted of 87 Model-200 {sup 103}Pd seeds embedded around a simulated lumpectomy cavity. Systematic and random errors in CMC were unfolded using low-uncertainty uncorrelated MC (UMC) as the benchmark. CMC efficiency gains, relative to UMC, were computed for all voxels, and the mean was classified in regions that received minimum doses greater than 20%, 50%, and 90% of D{sub 90}, as well as for various anatomical regions. Results: Systematic errors in CMC relative to UMC were less than 0.6% for 99% of the voxels and 0.04% for 100% of the voxels for the prostate and breast cases, respectively. For a 1 x 1 x 1 mm{sup 3} dose grid, efficiency gains were realized in all structures with 38.1- and 59.8-fold average gains within the prostate and breast clinical target volumes (CTVs), respectively. Greater than 99% of the voxels within the prostate and breast CTVs experienced an efficiency gain. Additionally, it was shown that efficiency losses were confined to low dose regions while the largest gains were located where little difference exists between the homogeneous and

  15. Real time Monte Carlo simulation for evaluation of patient doses involved in radiological examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulea, D. [Institute of Public Health ' Prof.Dr.Iuliu Moldovan' , Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cosma, C. [Babes-Bolyai Univ., Faculty of Physics, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    In order to apply the Monte Carlo simulation technique for usual radiological examinations we developed a Pc program, 'IradMed', written entirely in Java. The main purpose of this program is to compute the organ doses and the effective dose of patients, which are exposed at a X-ray beam having photon energies in 10 to 150 keV radiodiagnostic range. Three major radiological procedures are considered, namely mammography, radiography and CT. The fluoroscopy implies an irregular geometry and therefore it is neglected. Nevertheless, a gross estimation of patient doses can be made taking into account the fluoroscopy as being composed of several radiographic examinations applied in different anatomical regions. The interactions between radiation and matter are well-known, and the accuracy of the calculation is limited by the accuracy of the anatomical model used to describe actual patients and by characterisation of the radiation field applied. In this version of IradMed, it is assumed that the absorbed dose is equal with kerma for all tissues. No procedure has been used to take account of the finite range of the secondary electrons that are produced by photoelectric or Compton interactions. These ranges are small compared with the dimensions of the organs, and the absorbed dose will not change abruptly with distance except at boundary where composition and density change. However these boundary effects would have little effect in the determination of the average doses to almost all organs, except the active bone marrow which is treated separately. Another justification for this kerma approximation is the fact that the sum of all electron energies that exit the organ is statistically equal with the sum of all electron energies that enter in that particular organ. In this version of program, it is considered the following interactions: the Rayleigh scattering, the Compton scattering and the photoelectric effect. The Compton scattering is modeled by several

  16. Experimental and Monte Carlo evaluation of Eclipse treatment planning system for effects on dose distribution of the hip prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlı, Serap; Tanır, Güneş

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of titanium, titanium alloy, and stainless steel hip prostheses on dose distribution based on the Monte Carlo simulation method, as well as the accuracy of the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) at 6 and 18MV photon energies. In the present study the pencil beam convolution (PBC) method implemented in the Eclipse TPS was compared to the Monte Carlo method and ionization chamber measurements. The present findings show that if high-Z material is used in prosthesis, large dose changes can occur due to scattering. The variance in dose observed in the present study was dependent on material type, density, and atomic number, as well as photon energy; as photon energy increased back scattering decreased. The dose perturbation effect of hip prostheses was significant and could not be predicted accurately by the PBC method for hip prostheses. The findings show that for accurate dose calculation the Monte Carlo-based TPS should be used in patients with hip prostheses.

  17. Experimental and Monte Carlo evaluation of Eclipse treatment planning system for effects on dose distribution of the hip prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Çatlı, Serap, E-mail: serapcatli@hotmail.com [Gazi University, Faculty of Sciences, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey); Tanır, Güneş [Gazi University, Faculty of Sciences, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey)

    2013-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of titanium, titanium alloy, and stainless steel hip prostheses on dose distribution based on the Monte Carlo simulation method, as well as the accuracy of the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) at 6 and 18 MV photon energies. In the present study the pencil beam convolution (PBC) method implemented in the Eclipse TPS was compared to the Monte Carlo method and ionization chamber measurements. The present findings show that if high-Z material is used in prosthesis, large dose changes can occur due to scattering. The variance in dose observed in the present study was dependent on material type, density, and atomic number, as well as photon energy; as photon energy increased back scattering decreased. The dose perturbation effect of hip prostheses was significant and could not be predicted accurately by the PBC method for hip prostheses. The findings show that for accurate dose calculation the Monte Carlo-based TPS should be used in patients with hip prostheses.

  18. Effective dose in individuals from exposure the patients treated with {sup 131}I using Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho Junior, Alberico B. de; Silva, Ademir X. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: ajunior@con.ufrj.br; Hunt, John G. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: john@ird.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    In this work, using the Visual Monte Carlo code and the voxel phantom FAX, elaborated similar scenes of irradiation to the treatments used in the nuclear medicine, with the intention of estimate the effective dose in individuals from exposure the patients treated with {sup 131}I. We considered often specific situations, such as doses to others while sleeping, using public or private transportation, or being in a cinema for a few hours. In the possible situations that has been considered, the value of the effective dose did not overcome 0.05 mSv, demonstrating that, for the considered parameters the patient could be release without receiving instructions from radioprotection. (author)

  19. The role of nuclear reactions in Monte Carlo calculations of absorbed and biological effective dose distributions in hadron therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Brons, S; Elsässer, T; Ferrari, A; Gadioli, E; Mairani, A; Parodi, K; Sala, P; Scholz, M; Sommerer, F

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo codes are rapidly spreading among hadron therapy community due to their sophisticated nuclear/electromagnetic models which allow an improved description of the complex mixed radiation field produced by nuclear reactions in therapeutic irradiation. In this contribution results obtained with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA are presented focusing on the production of secondary fragments in carbon ion interaction with water and on CT-based calculations of absorbed and biological effective dose for typical clinical situations. The results of the simulations are compared with the available experimental data and with the predictions of the GSI analytical treatment planning code TRiP.

  20. Model Selection in Kernel Ridge Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Exterkate, Peter

    Kernel ridge regression is gaining popularity as a data-rich nonlinear forecasting tool, which is applicable in many different contexts. This paper investigates the influence of the choice of kernel and the setting of tuning parameters on forecast accuracy. We review several popular kernels......, including polynomial kernels, the Gaussian kernel, and the Sinc kernel. We interpret the latter two kernels in terms of their smoothing properties, and we relate the tuning parameters associated to all these kernels to smoothness measures of the prediction function and to the signal-to-noise ratio. Based...... on these interpretations, we provide guidelines for selecting the tuning parameters from small grids using cross-validation. A Monte Carlo study confirms the practical usefulness of these rules of thumb. Finally, the flexible and smooth functional forms provided by the Gaussian and Sinc kernels makes them widely...

  1. Dosimetric measurements and Monte Carlo simulation for achieving uniform surface dose in pulsed electron beam irradiation facility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V C Petwal; J N Rao; Jishnu Dwivedi; V K Senecha; K V Subbaiah

    2010-03-01

    A prototype pulsed electron beam irradiation facility for radiation processing of food and medical products is being commissioned at our centre in Indore, India. Analysis of surface dose and uniformity for a pulsed beam facility is of crucial importance because it is influenced by various operating parameters such as beam current, pulse repetition rate (PRR), scanning current profile and frequency, scanning width and product conveying speed. A large number of experiments are required to determine the harmonized setting of these operating parameters for achieving uniform dose. Since there is no readily available tool to set these parameters, use of Monte Carlo methods and computational tools can prove to be the most viable and time saving technique to support the assessment of the dose distribution. In the present study, Monte Carlo code, MCNP, is used to simulate the transport of 10 MeV electron beam through various mediums coming into the beam path and generate an equivalent dose profile in a polystyrene phantom for stationary state. These results have been verified with experimentally measured dose profile, showing that results are in good agreement within 4%. The Monte Carlo simulation further has been used to optimize the overlapping between the successive pulses of a scan to achieve ± 5% dose uniformity along the scanning direction. A mathematical model, which uses the stationary state data, is developed to include the effect of conveyor speed. The algorithm of the model is discussed and the results are compared with the experimentally measured values, which show that the agreement is better than 15%. Finally, harmonized setting for operating parameters of the accelerator are derived to deliver uniform surface dose in the range of 1–13 kGy/pass.

  2. The calculation of dose from external photon exposures using reference human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods. Pt. 7. Organ doses due to parallel and environmental exposure geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zankl, M. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Drexler, G. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Petoussi-Henss, N. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Saito, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    This report presents a tabulation of organ and tissue equivalent dose as well as effective dose conversion coefficients, normalised to air kerma free in air, for occupational exposures and environmental exposures of the public to external photon radiation. For occupational exposures, whole-body irradiation with idealised geometries, i.e. broad parallel beams and fully isotropic radiation incidence, is considered. The directions of incidence for the parallel beams are anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left lateral, right lateral and a full 360 rotation around the body`s longitudinal axis. The influence of beam divergence on the body doses is also considered as well as the dependence of effective dose on the angle of radiation incidence. Regarding exposure of the public to environmental sources, three source geometries are considered: exposure from a radioactive cloud, from ground contamination and from the natural radionuclides distributed homogeneously in the ground. The precise angular and energy distributions of the gamma rays incident on the human body were taken into account. The organ dose conversion coefficients given in this catalogue were calculated using a Monte Carlo code simulating the photon transport in mathematical models of an adult male and an adult female, respectively. Conversion coefficients are given for the equivalent dose of 23 organs and tissues as well as for effective dose and the equivalent dose of the so-called `remainder`. The organ equivalent dose conversion coefficients are given separately for the adult male and female models and - as arithmetic mean of the conversion coefficients of both - for an average adult. Fitted data of the coefficients are presented in tables; the primary raw data as resulting from the Monte Carlo calculation are shown in figures together with the fitted data. (orig.)

  3. Development of 1-year-old computational phantom and calculation of organ doses during CT scans using Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuxi; Qiu, Rui; Gao, Linfeng; Ge, Chaoyong; Zheng, Junzheng; Xie, Wenzhang; Li, Junli

    2014-09-21

    With the rapidly growing number of CT examinations, the consequential radiation risk has aroused more and more attention. The average dose in each organ during CT scans can only be obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation with computational phantoms. Since children tend to have higher radiation sensitivity than adults, the radiation dose of pediatric CT examinations requires special attention and needs to be assessed accurately. So far, studies on organ doses from CT exposures for pediatric patients are still limited. In this work, a 1-year-old computational phantom was constructed. The body contour was obtained from the CT images of a 1-year-old physical phantom and the internal organs were deformed from an existing Chinese reference adult phantom. To ensure the organ locations in the 1-year-old computational phantom were consistent with those of the physical phantom, the organ locations in 1-year-old computational phantom were manually adjusted one by one, and the organ masses were adjusted to the corresponding Chinese reference values. Moreover, a CT scanner model was developed using the Monte Carlo technique and the 1-year-old computational phantom was applied to estimate organ doses derived from simulated CT exposures. As a result, a database including doses to 36 organs and tissues from 47 single axial scans was built. It has been verified by calculation that doses of axial scans are close to those of helical scans; therefore, this database could be applied to helical scans as well. Organ doses were calculated using the database and compared with those obtained from the measurements made in the physical phantom for helical scans. The differences between simulation and measurement were less than 25% for all organs. The result shows that the 1-year-old phantom developed in this work can be used to calculate organ doses in CT exposures, and the dose database provides a method for the estimation of 1-year-old patient doses in a variety of CT examinations.

  4. Measurements with a Ge detector and Monte Carlo computations of dose rate yields due to cosmic muons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouvas, A; Xanthos, S; Antonopoulos-Domis, M; Silva, J

    2003-02-01

    The present work shows how portable Ge detectors can be useful for measurements of the dose rate due to ionizing cosmic radiation. The methodology proposed converts the cosmic radiation induced background in a Ge crystal (energy range above 3 MeV) to the absorbed dose rate due to muons, which are responsible for 75% of the cosmic radiation dose rate at sea level. The key point is to observe in the high energy range (above 20 MeV) the broad muon peak resulting from the most probable energy loss of muons in the Ge detector. An energy shift of the muon peak was observed, as expected, for increasing dimensions of three Ge crystals (10%, 20%, and 70% efficiency). Taking into account the dimensions of the three detectors the location of the three muon peaks was reproduced by Monte Carlo computations using the GEANT code. The absorbed dose rate due to muons has been measured in 50 indoor and outdoor locations at Thessaloniki, the second largest town of Greece, with a portable Ge detector and converted to the absorbed dose rate due to muons in an ICRU sphere representing the human body by using a factor derived from Monte Carlo computations. The outdoor and indoor mean muon dose rate was 25 nGy h(-1) and 17.8 nGy h(-1), respectively. The shielding factor for the 40 indoor measurements ranges from 0.5 to 0.9 with a most probable value between 0.7-0.8.

  5. Benchmarking of the dose planning method (DPM) Monte Carlo code using electron beams from a racetrack microtron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, Indrin J; Moran, Jean M; McShan, Daniel L; Fraass, Benedick A; Wilderman, Scott J; Bielajew, Alex F

    2002-06-01

    A comprehensive set of measurements and calculations has been conducted to investigate the accuracy of the Dose Planning Method (DPM) Monte Carlo code for dose calculations from 10 and 50 MeV scanned electron beams produced from a racetrack microtron. Central axis depth dose measurements and a series of profile scans at various depths were acquired in a water phantom using a Scanditronix type RK ion chamber. Source spatial distributions for the Monte Carlo calculations were reconstructed from in-air ion chamber measurements carried out across the two-dimensional beam profile at 100 cm downstream from the source. The in-air spatial distributions were found to have full width at half maximum of 4.7 and 1.3 cm, at 100 cm from the source, for the 10 and 50 MeV beams, respectively. Energy spectra for the 10 and 50 MeV beams were determined by simulating the components of the microtron treatment head using the code MCNP4B. DPM calculations are on average within +/- 2% agreement with measurement for all depth dose and profile comparisons conducted in this study. The accuracy of the DPM code illustrated in this work suggests that DPM may be used as a valuable tool for electron beam dose calculations.

  6. Fluconazole dosing predictions in critically-ill patients receiving prolonged intermittent renal replacement therapy: a Monte Carlo simulation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharibian, Katherine N; Mueller, Bruce A

    2016-07-01

    Fluconazole is a renally-eliminated antifungal commonly used to treat Candida species infections. In critically-ill patients receiving prolonged intermittent renal replacement therapy (PIRRT), limited pharmacokinetic (PK) data are available to guide fluconazole dosing. We used previously-published fluconazole clearance data and PK data of critically-ill patients with acute kidney injury to develop a PK model with the goal of determining a therapeutic dosing regimen for critically-ill patients receiving PIRRT. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to create a virtual cohort of patients receiving different fluconazole dosing regimens. Plasma drug concentration-time profiles were evaluated on the probability of attaining a mean 24-hour area under the drug concentration-time curve to minimum inhibitory concentration ratio (AUC24h : MIC) of 100 during the initial 48 hours of antifungal therapy. At the susceptibility breakpoint of Candida albicans (2 mg/L), 93 - 96% of simulated subjects receiving PIRRT attained the pharmacodynamic target with a fluconazole 800-mg loading dose plus 400 mg twice daily (q12h or pre and post PIRRT) regimen. Monte Carlo simulations of a PK model of PIRRT provided a basis for the development of an informed fluconazole dosing recommendation when PK data was limited. This finding should be validated in the clinical setting.

  7. Local dose enhancement in radiation therapy: Monte Carlo simulation study; Reforco local de dose em radioterapia utilizando nanoparticulas: estudo por simulacao Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Laura E. da; Nicolucci, Patricia, E-mail: laura.emilia.fm@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras

    2014-04-15

    The development of nanotechnology has boosted the use of nanoparticles in radiation therapy in order to achieve greater therapeutic ratio between tumor and healthy tissues. Gold has been shown to be most suitable to this task due to the high biocompatibility and high atomic number, which contributes to a better in vivo distribution and for the local energy deposition. As a result, this study proposes to study, nanoparticle in the tumor cell. At a range of 11 nm from the nanoparticle surface, results have shown an absorbed dose 141 times higher for the medium with the gold nanoparticle compared to the water for an incident energy spectrum with maximum photon energy of 50 keV. It was also noted that when only scattered radiation is interacting with the gold nanoparticles, the dose was 134 times higher compared to enhanced local dose that remained significant even for scattered radiation. (author)

  8. Comparison between beta radiation dose distribution due to LDR and HDR ocular brachytherapy applicators using GATE Monte Carlo platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Laoues; Rachid, Khelifi; Ahmed, Sidi Moussa

    2016-08-01

    Eye applicators with 90Sr/90Y and 106Ru/106Rh beta-ray sources are generally used in brachytherapy for the treatment of eye diseases as uveal melanoma. Whenever, radiation is used in treatment, dosimetry is essential. However, knowledge of the exact dose distribution is a critical decision-making to the outcome of the treatment. The Monte Carlo technique provides a powerful tool for calculation of the dose and dose distributions which helps to predict and determine the doses from different shapes of various types of eye applicators more accurately. The aim of this work consisted in using the Monte Carlo GATE platform to calculate the 3D dose distribution on a mathematical model of the human eye according to international recommendations. Mathematical models were developed for four ophthalmic applicators, two HDR 90Sr applicators SIA.20 and SIA.6, and two LDR 106Ru applicators, a concave CCB model and a flat CCB model. In present work, considering a heterogeneous eye phantom and the chosen tumor, obtained results with the use of GATE for mean doses distributions in a phantom and according to international recommendations show a discrepancy with respect to those specified by the manufacturers. The QC of dosimetric parameters shows that contrarily to the other applicators, the SIA.20 applicator is consistent with recommendations. The GATE platform show that the SIA.20 applicator present better results, namely the dose delivered to critical structures were lower compared to those obtained for the other applicators, and the SIA.6 applicator, simulated with MCNPX generates higher lens doses than those generated by GATE.

  9. Clinical evaluation of a dose monitoring software tool based on Monte Carlo Simulation in assessment of eye lens doses for cranial CT scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guberina, Nika; Suntharalingam, Saravanabavaan; Nassenstein, Kai; Forsting, Michael; Theysohn, Jens; Wetter, Axel; Ringelstein, Adrian [University Hospital Essen, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    The aim of this study was to verify the results of a dose monitoring software tool based on Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) in assessment of eye lens doses for cranial CT scans. In cooperation with the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Neuherberg, Germany), phantom measurements were performed with thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD LiF:Mg,Ti) using cranial CT protocols: (I) CT angiography; (II) unenhanced, cranial CT scans with gantry angulation at a single and (III) without gantry angulation at a dual source CT scanner. Eye lens doses calculated by the dose monitoring tool based on MCS and assessed with TLDs were compared. Eye lens doses are summarized as follows: (I) CT angiography (a) MCS 7 mSv, (b) TLD 5 mSv; (II) unenhanced, cranial CT scan with gantry angulation, (c) MCS 45 mSv, (d) TLD 5 mSv; (III) unenhanced, cranial CT scan without gantry angulation (e) MCS 38 mSv, (f) TLD 35 mSv. Intermodality comparison shows an inaccurate calculation of eye lens doses in unenhanced cranial CT protocols at the single source CT scanner due to the disregard of gantry angulation. On the contrary, the dose monitoring tool showed an accurate calculation of eye lens doses at the dual source CT scanner without gantry angulation and for CT angiography examinations. The dose monitoring software tool based on MCS gave accurate estimates of eye lens doses in cranial CT protocols. However, knowledge of protocol and software specific influences is crucial for correct assessment of eye lens doses in routine clinical use. (orig.)

  10. Clinical comparison of dose calculation using the enhanced collapsed cone algorithm vs. a new Monte Carlo algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fotina, Irina; Kragl, Gabriele; Kroupa, Bernhard; Trausmuth, Robert; Georg, Dietmar [Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria). Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2011-07-15

    Comparison of the dosimetric accuracy of the enhanced collapsed cone (eCC) algorithm with the commercially available Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation for complex treatment techniques. A total of 8 intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and 2 stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) lung cases were calculated with eCC and MC algorithms with the treatment planning systems (TPS) Oncentra MasterPlan 3.2 (Nucletron) and Monaco 2.01 (Elekta/CMS). Fluence optimization as well as sequencing of IMRT plans was primarily performed using Monaco. Dose prediction errors were calculated using MC as reference. The dose-volume histrogram (DVH) analysis was complemented with 2D and 3D gamma evaluation. Both algorithms were compared to measurements using the Delta4 system (Scandidos). Recalculated with eCC IMRT plans resulted in lower planned target volume (PTV) coverage, as well as in lower organs-at-risk (OAR) doses up to 8%. Small deviations between MC and eCC in PTV dose (1-2%) were detected for IMRT cases, while larger deviations were observed for SBRT (up to 5%). Conformity indices of both calculations were similar; however, the homogeneity of the eCC calculated plans was slightly better. Delta4 measurements confirmed high dosimetric accuracy of both TPS. Mean dose prediction errors < 3% for PTV suggest that both algorithms enable highly accurate dose calculations under clinical conditions. However, users should be aware of slightly underestimated OAR doses using the eCC algorithm. (orig.)

  11. Influence of difference in cross-sectional dose profile in a CTDI phantom on X-ray CT dose estimation: a Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Tomonobu; Koyama, Shuji; Ida, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    The longitudinal dose profile in a computed tomography dose index (CTDI) phantom had been studied by many researchers. The cross-sectional dose profile in the CTDI phantom, however, has not been studied. It is also important to understand the cross-sectional dose profile in the CTDI phantom for dose estimation in X-ray CT. In this study, the cross-sectional dose profile in the CTDI phantom was calculated by use of a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method. A helical or a 320-detector-row cone-beam X-ray CT scanner was simulated. The cross-sectional dose profile in the CTDI phantom from surface to surface through the center point was calculated by MC simulation. The shape of the calculation region was a cylinder of 1-mm-diameter. The length of the cylinder was 23, 100, or 300 mm to represent various CT ionization chamber lengths. Detailed analyses of the energy depositions demonstrated that the cross-sectional dose profile was different in measurement methods and phantom sizes. In this study, we also focused on the validation of the weighting factor used in weighted CTDI (CTDI w ). As it stands now, the weighting factor used in CTDI w is (1/3, 2/3) for the (central, peripheral) axes. Our results showed that an equal weighting factor, which is (1/2, 1/2) for the (central, peripheral) axes, is more suitable to estimate the average cross-sectional dose when X-ray CT dose estimation is performed.

  12. Model selection in kernel ridge regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Exterkate, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Kernel ridge regression is a technique to perform ridge regression with a potentially infinite number of nonlinear transformations of the independent variables as regressors. This method is gaining popularity as a data-rich nonlinear forecasting tool, which is applicable in many different contexts....... The influence of the choice of kernel and the setting of tuning parameters on forecast accuracy is investigated. Several popular kernels are reviewed, including polynomial kernels, the Gaussian kernel, and the Sinc kernel. The latter two kernels are interpreted in terms of their smoothing properties......, and the tuning parameters associated to all these kernels are related to smoothness measures of the prediction function and to the signal-to-noise ratio. Based on these interpretations, guidelines are provided for selecting the tuning parameters from small grids using cross-validation. A Monte Carlo study...

  13. Evaluation of PENFAST - A fast Monte Carlo code for dose calculations in photon and electron radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, B.; Poumarede, B.; Tola, F.; Barthe, J. [CEA, LIST, Dept Technol Capteur et Signal, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the present study is to demonstrate the potential of accelerated dose calculations, using the fast Monte Carlo (MC) code referred to as PENFAST, rather than the conventional MC code PENELOPE, without losing accuracy in the computed dose. For this purpose, experimental measurements of dose distributions in homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms were compared with simulated results using both PENELOPE and PENFAST. The simulations and experiments were performed using a Saturne 43 linac operated at 12 MV (photons), and at 18 MeV (electrons). Pre-calculated phase space files (PSFs) were used as input data to both the PENELOPE and PENFAST dose simulations. Since depth-dose and dose profile comparisons between simulations and measurements in water were found to be in good agreement (within {+-} 1% to 1 mm), the PSF calculation is considered to have been validated. In addition, measured dose distributions were compared to simulated results in a set of clinically relevant, inhomogeneous phantoms, consisting of lung and bone heterogeneities in a water tank. In general, the PENFAST results agree to within a 1% to 1 mm difference with those produced by PENELOPE, and to within a 2% to 2 mm difference with measured values. Our study thus provides a pre-clinical validation of the PENFAST code. It also demonstrates that PENFAST provides accurate results for both photon and electron beams, equivalent to those obtained with PENELOPE. CPU time comparisons between both MC codes show that PENFAST is generally about 9-21 times faster than PENELOPE. (authors)

  14. Estimating radiation doses from multidetector CT using Monte Carlo simulations: effects of different size voxelized patient models on magnitudes of organ and effective dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMarco, J J; Cagnon, C H; Cody, D D; Stevens, D M; McCollough, C H; Zankl, M; Angel, E; McNitt-Gray, M F

    2007-05-07

    The purpose of this work is to examine the effects of patient size on radiation dose from CT scans. To perform these investigations, we used Monte Carlo simulation methods with detailed models of both patients and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanners. A family of three-dimensional, voxelized patient models previously developed and validated by the GSF was implemented as input files using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. These patient models represent a range of patient sizes and ages (8 weeks to 48 years) and have all radiosensitive organs previously identified and segmented, allowing the estimation of dose to any individual organ and calculation of patient effective dose. To estimate radiation dose, every voxel in each patient model was assigned both a specific organ index number and an elemental composition and mass density. Simulated CT scans of each voxelized patient model were performed using a previously developed MDCT source model that includes scanner specific spectra, including bowtie filter, scanner geometry and helical source path. The scan simulations in this work include a whole-body scan protocol and a thoracic CT scan protocol, each performed with fixed tube current. The whole-body scan simulation yielded a predictable decrease in effective dose as a function of increasing patient weight. Results from analysis of individual organs demonstrated similar trends, but with some individual variations. A comparison with a conventional dose estimation method using the ImPACT spreadsheet yielded an effective dose of 0.14 mSv mAs(-1) for the whole-body scan. This result is lower than the simulations on the voxelized model designated 'Irene' (0.15 mSv mAs(-1)) and higher than the models 'Donna' and 'Golem' (0.12 mSv mAs(-1)). For the thoracic scan protocol, the ImPACT spreadsheet estimates an effective dose of 0.037 mSv mAs(-1), which falls between the calculated values for Irene (0.042 mSv mAs(-1)) and Donna (0.031 mSv mAs(-1)) and is higher relative

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of the neutron spectral fluence and dose equivalent for use in shielding a proton therapy vault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuanshui; Newhauser, Wayne; Klein, Eric; Low, Daniel

    2009-11-21

    Neutron production is of principal concern when designing proton therapy vault shielding. Conventionally, neutron calculations are based on analytical methods, which do not accurately consider beam shaping components and nozzle shielding. The goal of this study was to calculate, using Monte Carlo modeling, the neutron spectral fluence and neutron dose equivalent generated by a realistic proton therapy nozzle and evaluate how these data could be used in shielding calculations. We modeled a contemporary passive scattering proton therapy nozzle in detail with the MCNPX simulation code. The neutron spectral fluence and dose equivalent at various locations in the treatment room were calculated and compared to those obtained from a thick iron target bombarded by parallel proton beams, the simplified geometry on which analytical methods are based. The neutron spectral fluence distributions were similar for both methods, with deeply penetrating high-energy neutrons (E > 10 MeV) being most prevalent along the beam central axis, and low-energy neutrons predominating the neutron spectral fluence in the lateral region. However, unlike the inverse square falloff used in conventional analytical methods, this study shows that the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose in the treatment room decreased with distance approximately following a power law, with an exponent of about -1.63 in the lateral region and -1.73 in the downstream region. Based on the simulated data according to the detailed nozzle modeling, we developed an empirical equation to estimate the neutron dose equivalent at any location and distance in the treatment vault, e.g. for cases in which detailed Monte Carlo modeling is not feasible. We applied the simulated neutron spectral fluence and dose equivalent to a shielding calculation as an example.

  16. SU-E-T-117: Dose to Organs Outside of CT Scan Range- Monte Carlo and Hybrid Phantom Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelletier, C; Jung, J [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Lee, C [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kim, J [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Lee, C [National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Epidemiological study of second cancer risk for cancer survivors often requires the dose to normal tissues located outside the anatomy covered by radiological imaging, which is usually limited to tumor and organs at risk. We have investigated the feasibility of using whole body computational human phantoms for estimating out-of-field organ doses for patients treated by Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT). Methods: Identical 7-field IMRT prostate plans were performed using X-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC), a radiotherapy-specific Monte Carlo transport code, on the computed tomography (CT) images of the torso of an adult male patient (175 cm height, 66 kg weight) and an adult male hybrid computational phantom with the equivalent body size. Dose to the liver, right lung, and left lung were calculated and compared. Results: Considerable differences are seen between the doses calculated by XVMC for the patient CT and the hybrid phantom. One major contributing factor is the treatment method, deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH), used for this patient. This leads to significant differences in the organ position relative to the treatment isocenter. The transverse distances from the treatment isocenter to the inferior border of the liver, left lung, and right lung are 19.5cm, 29.5cm, and 30.0cm, respectively for the patient CT, compared with 24.3cm, 36.6cm, and 39.1cm, respectively, for the hybrid phantom. When corrected for the distance, the mean doses calculated using the hybrid phantom are within 28% of those calculated using the patient CT. Conclusion: This study showed that mean dose to the organs located in the missing CT coverage can be reconstructed by using whole body computational human phantoms within reasonable dosimetric uncertainty, however appropriate corrections may be necessary if the patient is treated with a technique that will significantly deform the size or location of the organs relative to the hybrid phantom.

  17. Evaluation of dose-volume metrics for microbeam radiation therapy dose distributions in head phantoms of various sizes using Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Danielle; Siegbahn, E. Albert; Fallone, B. Gino; Serduc, Raphael; Warkentin, Brad

    2012-05-01

    This work evaluates four dose-volume metrics applied to microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) using simulated dosimetric data as input. We seek to improve upon the most frequently used MRT metric, the peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR), by analyzing MRT dose distributions from a more volumetric perspective. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate dose distributions in three cubic head phantoms: a 2 cm mouse head, an 8 cm cat head and a 16 cm dog head. The dose distribution was calculated for a 4 × 4 mm2 microbeam array in each phantom, as well as a 16 × 16 mm2 array in the 8 cm cat head, and a 32 × 32 mm2 array in the 16 cm dog head. Microbeam widths of 25, 50 and 75 µm and center-to-center spacings of 100, 200 and 400 µm were considered. The metrics calculated for each simulation were the conventional PVDR, the peak-to-mean valley dose ratio (PMVDR), the mean dose and the percentage volume below a threshold dose. The PVDR ranged between 3 and 230 for the 2 cm mouse phantom, and between 2 and 186 for the 16 cm dog phantom depending on geometry. The corresponding ranges for the PMVDR were much smaller, being 2-49 (mouse) and 2-46 (dog), and showed a slightly weaker dependence on phantom size and array size. The ratio of the PMVDR to the PVDR varied from 0.21 to 0.79 for the different collimation configurations, indicating a difference between the geometric dependence on outcome that would be predicted by these two metrics. For unidirectional irradiation, the mean lesion dose was 102%, 79% and 42% of the mean skin dose for the 2 cm mouse, 8 cm cat and 16 cm dog head phantoms, respectively. However, the mean lesion dose recovered to 83% of the mean skin dose in the 16 cm dog phantom in intersecting cross-firing regions. The percentage volume below a 10% dose threshold was highly dependent on geometry, with ranges for the different collimation configurations of 2-87% and 33-96% for the 2 cm mouse and 16 cm dog heads, respectively. The results of this study

  18. Assessment of ocular beta radiation dose distribution due to 106Ru/106Rh brachytherapy applicators using MCNPX Monte Carlo code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilseia Aparecida Barbosa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Melanoma at the choroid region is the most common primary cancer that affects the eye in adult patients. Concave ophthalmic applicators with 106Ru/106Rh beta sources are the more used for treatment of these eye lesions, mainly lesions with small and medium dimensions. The available treatment planning system for 106Ru applicators is based on dose distributions on a homogeneous water sphere eye model, resulting in a lack of data in the literature of dose distributions in the eye radiosensitive structures, information that may be crucial to improve the treatment planning process, aiming the maintenance of visual acuity. Methods: The Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used to calculate the dose distribution in a complete mathematical model of the human eye containing a choroid melanoma; considering the eye actual dimensions and its various component structures, due to an ophthalmic brachytherapy treatment, using 106Ru/106Rh beta-ray sources. Two possibilities were analyzed; a simple water eye and a heterogeneous eye considering all its structures. Two concave applicators, CCA and CCB manufactured by BEBIG and a complete mathematical model of the human eye were modeled using the MCNPX code. Results and Conclusion: For both eye models, namely water model and heterogeneous model, mean dose values simulated for the same eye regions are, in general, very similar, excepting for regions very distant from the applicator, where mean dose values are very low, uncertainties are higher and relative differences may reach 20.4%. For the tumor base and the eye structures closest to the applicator, such as sclera, choroid and retina, the maximum difference observed was 4%, presenting the heterogeneous model higher mean dose values. For the other eye regions, the higher doses were obtained when the homogeneous water eye model is taken into consideration. Mean dose distributions determined for the homogeneous water eye model are similar to those obtained for the

  19. A Monte Carlo study on the effect of the orbital bone to the radiation dose delivered to the eye lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratis, Andreas; Zhang, Guozhi; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Bogaerts, Ria; Bosmans, Hilde

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of backscatter radiation from the orbital bone and the intraorbital fat on the eye lens dose in the dental CBCT energy range. To this end we conducted three different yet interrelated studies; A preliminary simulation study was conducted to examine the impact of a bony layer situated underneath a soft tissue layer on the amount of backscatter radiation. We compared the Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) curves in soft tissue with and without the bone layer and we estimated the depth in tissue where the decrease in backscatter caused by the presence of the bone is noticeable. In a supplementary study, an eye voxel phantom was designed with the DOSxyznrc code. Simulations were performed exposing the phantom at different x-ray energies sequentially in air, in fat tissue and in realistic anatomy with the incident beam perpendicular to the phantom. Finally, a virtual head phantom was implemented into a validated hybrid Monte Carlo (MC) framework to simulate a large Field of View protocol of a real CBCT scanner and examine the influence of scattered dose to the eye lens during the whole rotation of the paired tube-detector system. The results indicated an increase in the dose to the lens due to the fatty tissue in the surrounding anatomy. There is a noticeable dose reduction close to the bone-tissue interface which weakens with increasing distance from the interface, such that the impact of the orbital bone in the eye lens dose becomes small.

  20. An OpenCL-based Monte Carlo dose calculation engine (oclMC) for coupled photon-electron transport

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Zhen; Folkerts, Michael; Qin, Nan; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method has been recognized the most accurate dose calculation method for radiotherapy. However, its extremely long computation time impedes clinical applications. Recently, a lot of efforts have been made to realize fast MC dose calculation on GPUs. Nonetheless, most of the GPU-based MC dose engines were developed in NVidia CUDA environment. This limits the code portability to other platforms, hindering the introduction of GPU-based MC simulations to clinical practice. The objective of this paper is to develop a fast cross-platform MC dose engine oclMC using OpenCL environment for external beam photon and electron radiotherapy in MeV energy range. Coupled photon-electron MC simulation was implemented with analogue simulations for photon transports and a Class II condensed history scheme for electron transports. To test the accuracy and efficiency of our dose engine oclMC, we compared dose calculation results of oclMC and gDPM, our previously developed GPU-based MC code, for a 15 MeV electron ...

  1. Comparison of dose estimates using the buildup-factor method and a Baryon transport code (BRYNTRN) with Monte Carlo results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Judy L.; Wilson, John W.; Nealy, John E.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1990-01-01

    Continuing efforts toward validating the buildup factor method and the BRYNTRN code, which use the deterministic approach in solving radiation transport problems and are the candidate engineering tools in space radiation shielding analyses, are presented. A simplified theory of proton buildup factors assuming no neutron coupling is derived to verify a previously chosen form for parameterizing the dose conversion factor that includes the secondary particle buildup effect. Estimates of dose in tissue made by the two deterministic approaches and the Monte Carlo method are intercompared for cases with various thicknesses of shields and various types of proton spectra. The results are found to be in reasonable agreement but with some overestimation by the buildup factor method when the effect of neutron production in the shield is significant. Future improvement to include neutron coupling in the buildup factor theory is suggested to alleviate this shortcoming. Impressive agreement for individual components of doses, such as those from the secondaries and heavy particle recoils, are obtained between BRYNTRN and Monte Carlo results.

  2. Investigation of optimal beam margins for stereotactic radiotherapy of lung-cancer using Monte Carlo dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, L; Wang, L; Li, J; Luo, W; Feigenberg, S J; Ma, C-M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States)

    2007-07-21

    This work investigated the selection of beam margins in lung-cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with 6 MV photon beams. Monte Carlo dose calculations were used to systematically and quantitatively study the dosimetric effects of beam margins for different lung densities (0.1, 0.15, 0.25, 0.35 and 0.5 g cm{sup -3}), planning target volumes (PTVs) (14.4, 22.1 and 55.3 cm{sup 3}) and numbers of beam angles (three, six and seven) in lung-cancer SBRT in order to search for optimal beam margins for various clinical situations. First, a large number of treatment plans were generated in a commercial treatment planning system, and then recalculated using Monte Carlo simulations. All the plans were normalized to ensure that 95% of the PTV at least receives the prescription dose and compared quantitatively. Based on these plans, the relationships between the beam margin and quantities such as the lung toxicity (quantified by V{sub 20}, the percentage volume of the two lungs receiving at least 20 Gy) and the maximum target (PTV) dose were established for different PTVs and lung densities. The impact of the number of beam angles on the relationship between V{sub 20} and the beam margin was assessed. Quantitative information about optimal beam margins for lung-cancer SBRT was obtained for clinical applications.

  3. Reconstruction of high-resolution 3D dose from matrix measurements : error detection capability of the COMPASS correction kernel method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godart, J.; Korevaar, E. W.; Visser, R.; Wauben, D. J. L.; van t Veld, Aart

    2011-01-01

    TheCOMPASS system (IBADosimetry) is a quality assurance (QA) tool which reconstructs 3D doses inside a phantom or a patient CT. The dose is predicted according to the RT plan with a correction derived from 2D measurements of a matrix detector. This correction method is necessary since a direct recon

  4. Electron dose distributions caused by the contact-type metallic eye shield: Studies using Monte Carlo and pencil beam algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sei-Kwon; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Hwang, Taejin; Park, Soah; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Jin Han, Tae; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Me-Yeon; Ju Kim, Kyoung, E-mail: kjkim@hallym.or.kr; Bae, Hoonsik

    2015-10-01

    A metallic contact eye shield has sometimes been used for eyelid treatment, but dose distribution has never been reported for a patient case. This study aimed to show the shield-incorporated CT-based dose distribution using the Pinnacle system and Monte Carlo (MC) calculation for 3 patient cases. For the artifact-free CT scan, an acrylic shield machined as the same size as that of the tungsten shield was used. For the MC calculation, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc were used for the 6-MeV electron beam of the Varian 21EX, in which information for the tungsten, stainless steel, and aluminum material for the eye shield was used. The same plan was generated on the Pinnacle system and both were compared. The use of the acrylic shield produced clear CT images, enabling delineation of the regions of interest, and yielded CT-based dose calculation for the metallic shield. Both the MC and the Pinnacle systems showed a similar dose distribution downstream of the eye shield, reflecting the blocking effect of the metallic eye shield. The major difference between the MC and the Pinnacle results was the target eyelid dose upstream of the shield such that the Pinnacle system underestimated the dose by 19 to 28% and 11 to 18% for the maximum and the mean doses, respectively. The pattern of dose difference between the MC and the Pinnacle systems was similar to that in the previous phantom study. In conclusion, the metallic eye shield was successfully incorporated into the CT-based planning, and the accurate dose calculation requires MC simulation.

  5. Generalized eMC implementation for Monte Carlo dose calculation of electron beams from different machine types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, Michael K.; Cygler, Joanna; Frei, Daniel; Volken, Werner; Neuenschwander, Hans; Born, Ernst J.; Manser, Peter

    2013-05-01

    The electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm available in the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems) is based on the macro MC method and uses a beam model applicable to Varian linear accelerators. This leads to limitations in accuracy if eMC is applied to non-Varian machines. In this work eMC is generalized to also allow accurate dose calculations for electron beams from Elekta and Siemens accelerators. First, changes made in the previous study to use eMC for low electron beam energies of Varian accelerators are applied. Then, a generalized beam model is developed using a main electron source and a main photon source representing electrons and photons from the scattering foil, respectively, an edge source of electrons, a transmission source of photons and a line source of electrons and photons representing the particles from the scrapers or inserts and head scatter radiation. Regarding the macro MC dose calculation algorithm, the transport code of the secondary particles is improved. The macro MC dose calculations are validated with corresponding dose calculations using EGSnrc in homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms. The validation of the generalized eMC is carried out by comparing calculated and measured dose distributions in water for Varian, Elekta and Siemens machines for a variety of beam energies, applicator sizes and SSDs. The comparisons are performed in units of cGy per MU. Overall, a general agreement between calculated and measured dose distributions for all machine types and all combinations of parameters investigated is found to be within 2% or 2 mm. The results of the dose comparisons suggest that the generalized eMC is now suitable to calculate dose distributions for Varian, Elekta and Siemens linear accelerators with sufficient accuracy in the range of the investigated combinations of beam energies, applicator sizes and SSDs.

  6. Generalized eMC implementation for Monte Carlo dose calculation of electron beams from different machine types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, Michael K; Cygler, Joanna; Frei, Daniel; Volken, Werner; Neuenschwander, Hans; Born, Ernst J; Manser, Peter

    2013-05-07

    The electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm available in the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems) is based on the macro MC method and uses a beam model applicable to Varian linear accelerators. This leads to limitations in accuracy if eMC is applied to non-Varian machines. In this work eMC is generalized to also allow accurate dose calculations for electron beams from Elekta and Siemens accelerators. First, changes made in the previous study to use eMC for low electron beam energies of Varian accelerators are applied. Then, a generalized beam model is developed using a main electron source and a main photon source representing electrons and photons from the scattering foil, respectively, an edge source of electrons, a transmission source of photons and a line source of electrons and photons representing the particles from the scrapers or inserts and head scatter radiation. Regarding the macro MC dose calculation algorithm, the transport code of the secondary particles is improved. The macro MC dose calculations are validated with corresponding dose calculations using EGSnrc in homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms. The validation of the generalized eMC is carried out by comparing calculated and measured dose distributions in water for Varian, Elekta and Siemens machines for a variety of beam energies, applicator sizes and SSDs. The comparisons are performed in units of cGy per MU. Overall, a general agreement between calculated and measured dose distributions for all machine types and all combinations of parameters investigated is found to be within 2% or 2 mm. The results of the dose comparisons suggest that the generalized eMC is now suitable to calculate dose distributions for Varian, Elekta and Siemens linear accelerators with sufficient accuracy in the range of the investigated combinations of beam energies, applicator sizes and SSDs.

  7. Criticality prompt gamma and neutron dose equations validated by Monte Carlo analyses and compared to known criticality accident doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochhalter, Eugene

    The United States (US) Department of Energy [DOE] and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission [NRC] have provided the nuclear industry with requirements, goals, and objectives for the preparation of safety analysis and the finalization of that safety analysis in the form of a documented safety analysis (DSA) and technical safety requirements (TSRs). The deterministic guidance provided by the NRC in Regulatory Guide (RG) 3.33 for calculating the prompt gamma and neutron doses from a criticality has a number of potential issues associated with the semi-empirical equations, which make these equations potentially out dated. The NRC guidance for estimating the prompt gamma and neutron doses to a facility worker due to an accidental criticality was withdrawn without newer deterministic guidance being issued. This research project determined the original basis for the RG prompt gamma and neutron equations, evaluated the potential issues associated with the RG 3.33 prompt gamma and neutron equations, and modified the RG 3.33 point source prompt gamma and neutron equations to calculate the doses for the selected set of criticality accidents. The criticality accidents addressed by this dissertation include: 1. U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241 point source criticality, 2. U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241 sphere source criticality, 3. Uranyl nitrate and plutonium nitrate solutions in a cylindrical process vessel and 4. Low level waste in 55-gallon and 30-gallon drums. The prompt gamma and neutron equation doses (RG 3.33/3.34/3.35) are compared to actual nuclear industry criticality accident worker doses to assess the conservatism of the RG equations. Finally, the RG 3.33 prompt gamma and neutron dose equations are compared to MCNP5 results to investigate consistency with respect to the modified prompt gamma and neutron dose equations and the representative dose estimates for each of the criticality configurations (point source, spherical source, and cylindrical source). Knowledge and accurate

  8. Monte Carlo calculations of monoenergetic electron depth dose distributions in LiF chips: Skin dose correction factors for beta rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, Y.S. [Ben Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheva (Israel); Hirning, C.R. [Ontario Hydro, Whitby (Canada); Yuen, P.; Wong, P. [Chalk River Labs., Ontario (Canada)

    1994-10-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have been carried out for monoenergetic electrons from 0.1 to 4 MeV irradiating LiF chips in both perpendicular and isotropic geometry. This enabled the calculation of skin dose correction factors (beta factors) for typical beta energy spectra as measured with a beta-ray spectrometer at CANDU nuclear generating stations. The correction factors were estimated by averaging the depth dose distributions for the monoenergetic electrons over the experimentally measured beta-ray spectra. The calculations illustrate the large uncertainty in beta factors arising from the unknown angular distribution of the beta-ray radiation field and uncertainties in the shape of the beta-ray spectra below 500 keV. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. SU-E-T-110: Development of An Independent, Monte Carlo, Dose Calculation, Quality Assurance Tool for Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faught, A [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX (United States); Davidson, S [University of Texas Medical Branch of Galveston, Galveston, TX (United States); Kry, S; Ibbott, G; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Fontenot, J [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Etzel, C [Consortium of Rheumatology Researchers of North America (CORRONA), Inc., Southborough, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a comprehensive end-to-end test for Varian's TrueBeam linear accelerator for head and neck IMRT using a custom phantom designed to utilize multiple dosimetry devices. Purpose: To commission a multiple-source Monte Carlo model of Elekta linear accelerator beams of nominal energies 6MV and 10MV. Methods: A three source, Monte Carlo model of Elekta 6 and 10MV therapeutic x-ray beams was developed. Energy spectra of two photon sources corresponding to primary photons created in the target and scattered photons originating in the linear accelerator head were determined by an optimization process that fit the relative fluence of 0.25 MeV energy bins to the product of Fatigue-Life and Fermi functions to match calculated percent depth dose (PDD) data with that measured in a water tank for a 10x10cm2 field. Off-axis effects were modeled by a 3rd degree polynomial used to describe the off-axis half-value layer as a function of off-axis angle and fitting the off-axis fluence to a piecewise linear function to match calculated dose profiles with measured dose profiles for a 40×40cm2 field. The model was validated by comparing calculated PDDs and dose profiles for field sizes ranging from 3×3cm2 to 30×30cm2 to those obtained from measurements. A benchmarking study compared calculated data to measurements for IMRT plans delivered to anthropomorphic phantoms. Results: Along the central axis of the beam 99.6% and 99.7% of all data passed the 2%/2mm gamma criterion for 6 and 10MV models, respectively. Dose profiles at depths of dmax, through 25cm agreed with measured data for 99.4% and 99.6% of data tested for 6 and 10MV models, respectively. A comparison of calculated dose to film measurement in a head and neck phantom showed an average of 85.3% and 90.5% of pixels passing a 3%/2mm gamma criterion for 6 and 10MV models respectively. Conclusion: A Monte Carlo multiple-source model for Elekta 6 and 10MV therapeutic x-ray beams has been developed as a

  10. Monte Carlo simulations of the dose from imaging with GE eXplore 120 micro-CT using GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretin, Florian; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Luxen, André; Phillips, Christophe; Plenevaux, Alain; Seret, Alain, E-mail: aseret@ulg.ac.be [Cyclotron Research Centre, University of Liège, Sart Tilman B30, Liège 4000 (Belgium)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Small animals are increasingly used as translational models in preclinical imaging studies involving microCT, during which the subjects can be exposed to large amounts of radiation. While the radiation levels are generally sublethal, studies have shown that low-level radiation can change physiological parameters in mice. In order to rule out any influence of radiation on the outcome of such experiments, or resulting deterministic effects in the subjects, the levels of radiation involved need to be addressed. The aim of this study was to investigate the radiation dose delivered by the GE eXplore 120 microCT non-invasively using Monte Carlo simulations in GATE and to compare results to previously obtained experimental values. Methods: Tungsten X-ray spectra were simulated at 70, 80, and 97 kVp using an analytical tool and their half-value layers were simulated for spectra validation against experimentally measured values of the physical X-ray tube. A Monte Carlo model of the microCT system was set up and four protocols that are regularly applied to live animal scanning were implemented. The computed tomography dose index (CTDI) inside a PMMA phantom was derived and multiple field of view acquisitions were simulated using the PMMA phantom, a representative mouse and rat. Results: Simulated half-value layers agreed with experimentally obtained results within a 7% error window. The CTDI ranged from 20 to 56 mGy and closely matched experimental values. Derived organ doses in mice reached 459 mGy in bones and up to 200 mGy in soft tissue organs using the highest energy protocol. Dose levels in rats were lower due to the increased mass of the animal compared to mice. The uncertainty of all dose simulations was below 14%. Conclusions: Monte Carlo simulations proved a valuable tool to investigate the 3D dose distribution in animals from microCT. Small animals, especially mice (due to their small volume), receive large amounts of radiation from the GE eXplore 120

  11. The collapsed cone algorithm for (192)Ir dosimetry using phantom-size adaptive multiple-scatter point kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedgren, Åsa Carlsson; Plamondon, Mathieu; Beaulieu, Luc

    2015-07-07

    The aim of this work was to investigate how dose distributions calculated with the collapsed cone (CC) algorithm depend on the size of the water phantom used in deriving the point kernel for multiple scatter. A research version of the CC algorithm equipped with a set of selectable point kernels for multiple-scatter dose that had initially been derived in water phantoms of various dimensions was used. The new point kernels were generated using EGSnrc in spherical water phantoms of radii 5 cm, 7.5 cm, 10 cm, 15 cm, 20 cm, 30 cm and 50 cm. Dose distributions derived with CC in water phantoms of different dimensions and in a CT-based clinical breast geometry were compared to Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using the Geant4-based brachytherapy specific MC code Algebra. Agreement with MC within 1% was obtained when the dimensions of the phantom used to derive the multiple-scatter kernel were similar to those of the calculation phantom. Doses are overestimated at phantom edges when kernels are derived in larger phantoms and underestimated when derived in smaller phantoms (by around 2% to 7% depending on distance from source and phantom dimensions). CC agrees well with MC in the high dose region of a breast implant and is superior to TG43 in determining skin doses for all multiple-scatter point kernel sizes. Increased agreement between CC and MC is achieved when the point kernel is comparable to breast dimensions. The investigated approximation in multiple scatter dose depends on the choice of point kernel in relation to phantom size and yields a significant fraction of the total dose only at distances of several centimeters from a source/implant which correspond to volumes of low doses. The current implementation of the CC algorithm utilizes a point kernel derived in a comparatively large (radius 20 cm) water phantom. A fixed point kernel leads to predictable behaviour of the algorithm with the worst case being a source/implant located well within a patient

  12. The collapsed cone algorithm for 192Ir dosimetry using phantom-size adaptive multiple-scatter point kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa; Plamondon, Mathieu; Beaulieu, Luc

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate how dose distributions calculated with the collapsed cone (CC) algorithm depend on the size of the water phantom used in deriving the point kernel for multiple scatter. A research version of the CC algorithm equipped with a set of selectable point kernels for multiple-scatter dose that had initially been derived in water phantoms of various dimensions was used. The new point kernels were generated using EGSnrc in spherical water phantoms of radii 5 cm, 7.5 cm, 10 cm, 15 cm, 20 cm, 30 cm and 50 cm. Dose distributions derived with CC in water phantoms of different dimensions and in a CT-based clinical breast geometry were compared to Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using the Geant4-based brachytherapy specific MC code Algebra. Agreement with MC within 1% was obtained when the dimensions of the phantom used to derive the multiple-scatter kernel were similar to those of the calculation phantom. Doses are overestimated at phantom edges when kernels are derived in larger phantoms and underestimated when derived in smaller phantoms (by around 2% to 7% depending on distance from source and phantom dimensions). CC agrees well with MC in the high dose region of a breast implant and is superior to TG43 in determining skin doses for all multiple-scatter point kernel sizes. Increased agreement between CC and MC is achieved when the point kernel is comparable to breast dimensions. The investigated approximation in multiple scatter dose depends on the choice of point kernel in relation to phantom size and yields a significant fraction of the total dose only at distances of several centimeters from a source/implant which correspond to volumes of low doses. The current implementation of the CC algorithm utilizes a point kernel derived in a comparatively large (radius 20 cm) water phantom. A fixed point kernel leads to predictable behaviour of the algorithm with the worst case being a source/implant located well within a patient

  13. TestDose: A nuclear medicine software based on Monte Carlo modeling for generating gamma camera acquisitions and dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Marie-Paule, E-mail: marie-paule.garcia@univ-brest.fr; Villoing, Daphnée [UMR 1037 INSERM/UPS, CRCT, 133 Route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse (France); McKay, Erin [St George Hospital, Gray Street, Kogarah, New South Wales 2217 (Australia); Ferrer, Ludovic [ICO René Gauducheau, Boulevard Jacques Monod, St Herblain 44805 (France); Cremonesi, Marta; Botta, Francesca; Ferrari, Mahila [European Institute of Oncology, Via Ripamonti 435, Milano 20141 (Italy); Bardiès, Manuel [UMR 1037 INSERM/UPS, CRCT, 133 Route de Narbonne, Toulouse 31062 (France)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: The TestDose platform was developed to generate scintigraphic imaging protocols and associated dosimetry by Monte Carlo modeling. TestDose is part of a broader project (www.dositest.com) whose aim is to identify the biases induced by different clinical dosimetry protocols. Methods: The TestDose software allows handling the whole pipeline from virtual patient generation to resulting planar and SPECT images and dosimetry calculations. The originality of their approach relies on the implementation of functional segmentation for the anthropomorphic model representing a virtual patient. Two anthropomorphic models are currently available: 4D XCAT and ICRP 110. A pharmacokinetic model describes the biodistribution of a given radiopharmaceutical in each defined compartment at various time-points. The Monte Carlo simulation toolkit GATE offers the possibility to accurately simulate scintigraphic images and absorbed doses in volumes of interest. The TestDose platform relies on GATE to reproduce precisely any imaging protocol and to provide reference dosimetry. For image generation, TestDose stores user’s imaging requirements and generates automatically command files used as input for GATE. Each compartment is simulated only once and the resulting output is weighted using pharmacokinetic data. Resulting compartment projections are aggregated to obtain the final image. For dosimetry computation, emission data are stored in the platform database and relevant GATE input files are generated for the virtual patient model and associated pharmacokinetics. Results: Two samples of software runs are given to demonstrate the potential of TestDose. A clinical imaging protocol for the Octreoscan™ therapeutical treatment was implemented using the 4D XCAT model. Whole-body “step and shoot” acquisitions at different times postinjection and one SPECT acquisition were generated within reasonable computation times. Based on the same Octreoscan™ kinetics, a dosimetry

  14. Quality control of the treatment planning systems dose calculations in external radiation therapy using the Penelope Monte Carlo code; Controle qualite des systemes de planification dosimetrique des traitements en radiotherapie externe au moyen du code Monte-Carlo Penelope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazy-Aubignac, L

    2007-09-15

    The treatment planning systems (T.P.S.) occupy a key position in the radiotherapy service: they realize the projected calculation of the dose distribution and the treatment duration. Traditionally, the quality control of the calculated distribution doses relies on their comparisons with dose distributions measured under the device of treatment. This thesis proposes to substitute these dosimetry measures to the profile of reference dosimetry calculations got by the Penelope Monte-Carlo code. The Monte-Carlo simulations give a broad choice of test configurations and allow to envisage a quality control of dosimetry aspects of T.P.S. without monopolizing the treatment devices. This quality control, based on the Monte-Carlo simulations has been tested on a clinical T.P.S. and has allowed to simplify the quality procedures of the T.P.S.. This quality control, in depth, more precise and simpler to implement could be generalized to every center of radiotherapy. (N.C.)

  15. A symmetric probabilistic γ-index for Monte Carlo dose comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Tilak R; Yepes, Pablo

    2014-08-21

    The γ-index is a widely used tool to compare two dose distributions, which combines both the dose difference and distance-to-agreement criteria into a single metric. The γ-index passing rate, defined as the percentage of dose points with γ-index value less than one, is often used as an agreement metric. However, the γ-index is not symmetric with respect to the choice of the reference and evaluation distributions. Moreover, the statistical fluctuations present in the dose distributions may have non-negligible effects on γ-passing rates. Fluctuations have opposite effects on the γ-passing rates depending whether they are present in the evaluation or the reference dose distributions. Those discrepancies are analyzed in the case of realistic clinical proton dose distributions. The concept of a probabilistic and symmetric γ-index is introduced to make more robust versus statistical fluctuations.

  16. Absorbed dose measurements in mammography using Monte Carlo method and ZrO{sub 2}+PTFE dosemeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran M, H. A.; Hernandez O, M. [Departamento de Investigacion en Polimeros y Materiales, Universidad de Sonora, Blvd. Luis Encinas y Rosales s/n, Col. Centro, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Salas L, M. A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Cipres 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Pinedo S, A.; Ventura M, J.; Chacon, F. [Hospital General de Zona No. 1, IMSS, Interior Alameda 45, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, IPN, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F.(Mexico)], e-mail: hduran20_1@hotmail.com

    2009-10-15

    Mammography test is a central tool for breast cancer diagnostic. In addition, programs are conducted periodically to detect the asymptomatic women in certain age groups; these programs have shown a reduction on breast cancer mortality. Early detection of breast cancer is achieved through a mammography, which contrasts the glandular and adipose tissue with a probable calcification. The parameters used for mammography are based on the thickness and density of the breast, their values depend on the voltage, current, focal spot and anode-filter combination. To achieve an image clear and a minimum dose must be chosen appropriate irradiation conditions. Risk associated with mammography should not be ignored. This study was performed in the General Hospital No. 1 IMSS in Zacatecas. Was used a glucose phantom and measured air Kerma at the entrance of the breast that was calculated using Monte Carlo methods and ZrO{sub 2}+PTFE thermoluminescent dosemeters, this calculation was completed with calculating the absorbed dose. (author)

  17. Proton Dose Assessment to the Human Eye Using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNPX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    objective of this project was to develop a simple MCNPX model of the human eye to approximate dose delivered from proton therapy. The calculated dose...computer code MCNPX that approximates dose delivered during proton therapy. The calculations considered proton interactions and secondary interactions...Volume Calculation The MCNPX code has limited ability to compute the volumes of defined cells. The dosimetric volumes in the outer wall of the eye are

  18. A GPU OpenCL based cross-platform Monte Carlo dose calculation engine (goMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhen; Shi, Feng; Folkerts, Michael; Qin, Nan; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun

    2015-09-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has been recognized as the most accurate dose calculation method for radiotherapy. However, the extremely long computation time impedes its clinical application. Recently, a lot of effort has been made to realize fast MC dose calculation on graphic processing units (GPUs). However, most of the GPU-based MC dose engines have been developed under NVidia’s CUDA environment. This limits the code portability to other platforms, hindering the introduction of GPU-based MC simulations to clinical practice. The objective of this paper is to develop a GPU OpenCL based cross-platform MC dose engine named goMC with coupled photon-electron simulation for external photon and electron radiotherapy in the MeV energy range. Compared to our previously developed GPU-based MC code named gDPM (Jia et al 2012 Phys. Med. Biol. 57 7783-97), goMC has two major differences. First, it was developed under the OpenCL environment for high code portability and hence could be run not only on different GPU cards but also on CPU platforms. Second, we adopted the electron transport model used in EGSnrc MC package and PENELOPE’s random hinge method in our new dose engine, instead of the dose planning method employed in gDPM. Dose distributions were calculated for a 15 MeV electron beam and a 6 MV photon beam in a homogenous water phantom, a water-bone-lung-water slab phantom and a half-slab phantom. Satisfactory agreement between the two MC dose engines goMC and gDPM was observed in all cases. The average dose differences in the regions that received a dose higher than 10% of the maximum dose were 0.48-0.53% for the electron beam cases and 0.15-0.17% for the photon beam cases. In terms of efficiency, goMC was ~4-16% slower than gDPM when running on the same NVidia TITAN card for all the cases we tested, due to both the different electron transport models and the different development environments. The code portability of our new dose engine goMC was validated by

  19. Typical exposure parameters, organ doses and effective doses for endovascular aortic aneurysm repair: Comparison of Monte Carlo simulations and direct measurements with an anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerth, Monika; Treitl, Karla Maria; Treitl, Marcus [Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Seidenbusch, Michael C. [Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Clinical Centre of the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Sadeghi-Azandaryani, Mojtaba [Clinical Centre of the County of Erding, Department of Vascular Surgery, Erding (Germany); Lechel, Ursula [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Department of Medical and Occupational Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Radiation exposure of patients during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) procedures ranks in the upper sector of medical exposure. Thus, estimation of radiation doses achieved during EVAR is of great importance. Organ doses (OD) and effective doses (ED) administered to 17 patients receiving EVAR were determined (1) from the exposure parameters by performing Monte Carlo simulations in mathematical phantoms and (2) by measurements with thermoluminescent dosimeters in a physical anthropomorphic phantom. The mean fluoroscopy time was 26 min, the mean dose area product was 24995 cGy cm2. The mean ED was 34.8 mSv, ODs up to 626 mSv were found. Whereas digital subtraction angiographies (DSA) and fluoroscopies each contributed about 50 % to the cumulative ED, the ED rates of DSAs were found to be ten times higher than those of fluoroscopies. Doubling of the field size caused an ED rate enhancement up to a factor of 3. EVAR procedures cause high radiation exposure levels that exceed the values published thus far. As a consequence, (1) DSAs should be only performed when necessary and with a low image rate, (2) fluoroscopies should be kept as short as possible, and (3) field sizes should be minimized. (orig.)

  20. A general method to derive tissue parameters for Monte Carlo dose calculation with multi-energy CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, Arthur; Bouchard, Hugo

    2016-11-21

    To develop a general method for human tissue characterization with dual- and multi-energy CT and evaluate its performance in determining elemental compositions and quantities relevant to radiotherapy Monte Carlo dose calculation. Ideal materials to describe human tissue are obtained applying principal component analysis on elemental weight and density data available in literature. The theory is adapted to elemental composition for solving tissue information from CT data. A novel stoichiometric calibration method is integrated to the technique to make it suitable for a clinical environment. The performance of the method is compared with two techniques known in literature using theoretical CT data. In determining elemental weights with dual-energy CT, the method is shown to be systematically superior to the water-lipid-protein material decomposition and comparable to the parameterization technique. In determining proton stopping powers and energy absorption coefficients with dual-energy CT, the method generally shows better accuracy and unbiased results. The generality of the method is demonstrated simulating multi-energy CT data to show the potential to extract more information with multiple energies. The method proposed in this paper shows good performance to determine elemental compositions from dual-energy CT data and physical quantities relevant to radiotherapy dose calculation. The method is particularly suitable for Monte Carlo calculations and shows promise in using more than two energies to characterize human tissue with CT.

  1. Treatment of patient-dependent beam modifiers in photon treatments by the Monte Carlo dose calculation code PEREGRINE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schach von Wittenau, A.E.; Cox, L.J.; Bergstrom, P.M. Jr.; Hornstein, S.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Mohan, R.; Libby, B.; Wu, Q. [Medical Coll. of Virginia, Richmond, VA (United States); Lovelock, D.M.J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    1997-03-01

    The goal of the PEREGRINE Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Project is to deliver a Monte Carlo package that is both accurate and sufficiently fast for routine clinical use. One of the operational requirements for photon-treatment plans is a fast, accurate method of describing the photon phase-space distribution at the surface of the patient. The open-field case is computationally the most tractable; we know, a priori, for a given machine and energy, the locations and compositions of the relevant accelerator components (i.e., target, primary collimator, flattening filter, and monitor chamber). Therefore, we can precalculate and store the expected photon distributions. For any open-field treatment plan, we then evaluate these existing photon phase-space distributions at the patient`s surface, and pass the obtained photons to the dose calculation routines within PEREGRINE. We neglect any effect of the intervening air column, including attenuation of the photons and production of contaminant electrons. In principle, for treatment plans requiring jaws, blocks, and wedges, we could precalculate and store photon phase-space distributions for various combinations of field sizes and wedges. This has the disadvantage that we would have to anticipate those combinations and that subsequently PEREGRINE would not be able to treat other plans. Therefore, PEREGRINE tracks photons through the patient-dependent beam modifiers. The geometric and physics methods used to do this are described here. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  2. A general method to derive tissue parameters for Monte Carlo dose calculation with multi-energy CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, Arthur; Bouchard, Hugo

    2016-11-01

    To develop a general method for human tissue characterization with dual- and multi-energy CT and evaluate its performance in determining elemental compositions and quantities relevant to radiotherapy Monte Carlo dose calculation. Ideal materials to describe human tissue are obtained applying principal component analysis on elemental weight and density data available in literature. The theory is adapted to elemental composition for solving tissue information from CT data. A novel stoichiometric calibration method is integrated to the technique to make it suitable for a clinical environment. The performance of the method is compared with two techniques known in literature using theoretical CT data. In determining elemental weights with dual-energy CT, the method is shown to be systematically superior to the water-lipid-protein material decomposition and comparable to the parameterization technique. In determining proton stopping powers and energy absorption coefficients with dual-energy CT, the method generally shows better accuracy and unbiased results. The generality of the method is demonstrated simulating multi-energy CT data to show the potential to extract more information with multiple energies. The method proposed in this paper shows good performance to determine elemental compositions from dual-energy CT data and physical quantities relevant to radiotherapy dose calculation. The method is particularly suitable for Monte Carlo calculations and shows promise in using more than two energies to characterize human tissue with CT.

  3. Calculating of Dose Distribution in Tongue Brachytherapy by Different Radioisotopes using Monte Carlo Simulation and Comparing by Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banafsheh Zeinali Rafsanjani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among different kinds of oral cavity cancers, the frequency of tongue cancer occurrence is more significant. Brachytherapy is the most common method to cure tongue cancers. Long sources are used in different techniques of tongue brachytherapy. The objective of this study is to asses the dose distribution around long sources, comparing different radioisotopes as brachytherapy sources, measuring the homogeneity of delivered dose to treatment volume and also comparing mandible dose and dose of tongue in the regions near the mandible with and without using shield. Material and Method: The Monte Carlo code MCNP4C was used for simulation. The accuracy of simulation was verified by comparing the results with experimental data. The sources like Ir-192, Cs-137, Ra-226, Au-198, In-111 and Ba-131 were simulated and the position of sources was determined by Paris system. Results: The percentage of mandible dose reduction with use of 2 mm Pb shield for the sources mentioned above were: 35.4%, 20.1%, 86.6%, 32.24%, 75.6%, and 36.8%. The tongue dose near the mandible with use of shied did not change significantly. The dose homogeneity from the most to least was obtained from these sources: Cs-137, Au-198, Ir-192, Ba-131, In-111 and Ra-226. Discussion and Conclusion: Ir-192 and Cs-137 were the best sources for tongue brachytherapy treatment but In-111 and Ra-226 were not suitable choices for tongue brachytherapy. The sources like Au-198 and Ba-131 had rather the same performance as Ir-192

  4. Dose enhancement in gold nanoparticle-aided radiotherapy for the therapeutic photon beams using Monte Carlo technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Ramesh Kakade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gold nanoparticle (GNP-aided radiation therapy (RT is useful to make the tumor more sensitive to radiation damage because of the enhancement in the dose inside the tumor region. Polymer gel dosimeter (PGD can be a good choice for the physical measurement of dose enhancement produced by GNP inside the gel. Materials and Methods: The present study uses EGSnrc Monte Carlo code to estimate dose enhancement factor (DEF due to the introduction of GNPs inside the PGD at different concentrations (7 and 18 mg Au/g of gel when irradiated by therapeutic X-rays of energy 100 kVp, 150 kVp, 6 MV, and 15 MV. The simulation was also carried out to quantify the dose enhancement in PAGAT gel and tumor for 100 kVp X-rays. Results: For 100 kVp X-rays, average DEF of 1.86 and 2.91 is observed in the PAGAT gel dosimeter with 7 and 18 mg Au/g of gel, respectively. Average DEF of 1.69 and 2.61 is recorded for 150 kVp X-rays with 7 and 18 mg Au/g of gel, respectively. No clinically meaningful DEF was observed for 6 and 15 MV photon beams. Furthermore, the dose enhancement within the PAGAT gel dosimeter and tumor closely matches with each other. Conclusion: The polymer gel dosimetry can be a suitable method of dose estimation and verification for clinical implementation of GNP-aided RT. GNP-aided RT has the potential of delivering high localized tumoricidal dose with significant sparing of normal structures when the treatment is delivered with low energy X-rays.

  5. Computer and Modernization%Low-dose CT Image Reconstruction Based on Adaptive Kernel Regression Method and Algebraic Reconstruction Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟志威

    2016-01-01

    针对稀疏角度投影数据CT图像重建问题,TV-ART算法将图像的梯度稀疏先验知识引入代数重建法( ART)中,对分段平滑的图像具有较好的重建效果。但是,该算法在边界重建时会产生阶梯效应,影响重建质量。因此,本文提出自适应核回归函数结合代数重建法的重建算法( LAKR-ART),不仅在边界重建时不会产生阶梯效应,而且对细节纹理重建具有更好的重建效果。最后对shepp-logan标准CT图像和实际CT头颅图像进行仿真实验,并与ART、TV-ART算法进行比较,实验结果表明本文算法有效。%To the problem of sparse angular projection data of CT image reconstruction, TV-ART algorithm introduces the gradient sparse prior knowledge of image to algebraic reconstruction, and the local smooth image gets a better reconstruction effect. How-ever, the algorithm generates step effect when the borders are reconstructed, affecting the quality of the reconstruction. Therefore, this paper proposes an adaptive kernel regression function combined with Algebraic Reconstruction Technique reconstruction algo-rithm ( LAKR-ART) , it does not produce the step effect on the border reconstruction, and has a better effect to detail reconstruc-tion. Finally we use the shepp-logan CT image and the actual CT image to make the simulation experiment, and compare with ART and TV-ART algorithm. The experimental results show the algorithm is of effectiveness.

  6. High-density dental implants and radiotherapy planning: evaluation of effects on dose distribution using pencil beam convolution algorithm and Monte Carlo method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çatli, Serap

    2015-09-08

    High atomic number and density of dental implants leads to major problems at providing an accurate dose distribution in radiotherapy and contouring tumors and organs caused by the artifact in head and neck tumors. The limits and deficiencies of the algorithms using in the treatment planning systems can lead to large errors in dose calculation, and this may adversely affect the patient's treatment. In the present study, four commercial dental implants were used: pure titanium, titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), amalgam, and crown. The effects of dental implants on dose distribution are determined with two methods: pencil beam convolution (PBC) algorithm and Monte Carlo code for 6 MV photon beam. The central axis depth doses were calculated on the phantom for a source-skin distance (SSD) of 100 cm and a 10 × 10 cm2 field using both of algorithms. The results of Monte Carlo method and Eclipse TPS were compared to each other and to those previously reported. In the present study, dose increases in tissue at a distance of 2 mm in front of the dental implants were seen due to the backscatter of electrons for dental implants at 6 MV using the Monte Carlo method. The Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) couldn't precisely account for the backscatter radiation caused by the dental prostheses. TPS underestimated the back scatter dose and overestimated the dose after the dental implants. The large errors found for TPS in this study are due to the limits and deficiencies of the algorithms. The accuracy of the PBC algorithm of Eclipse TPS was evaluated in comparison to Monte Carlo calculations in consideration of the recommendations of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group 65. From the comparisons of the TPS and Monte Carlo calculations, it is verified that the Monte Carlo simulation is a good approach to derive the dose distribution in heterogeneous media.

  7. High-density dental implants and radiotherapy planning: evaluation of effects on dose distribution using pencil beam convolution algorithm and Monte Carlo method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çatli, Serap

    2015-09-01

    High atomic number and density of dental implants leads to major problems at providing an accurate dose distribution in radiotherapy and contouring tumors and organs caused by the artifact in head and neck tumors. The limits and deficiencies of the algorithms using in the treatment planning systems can lead to large errors in dose calculation, and this may adversely affect the patient's treatment. In the present study, four commercial dental implants were used: pure titanium, titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), amalgam, and crown. The effects of dental implants on dose distribution are determined with two methods: pencil beam convolution (PBC) algorithm and Monte Carlo code for 6 MV photon beam. The central axis depth doses were calculated on the phantom for a source-skin distance (SSD) of 100 cm and a 10×10 cm2 field using both of algorithms. The results of Monte Carlo method and Eclipse TPS were compared to each other and to those previously reported. In the present study, dose increases in tissue at a distance of 2 mm in front of the dental implants were seen due to the backscatter of electrons for dental implants at 6 MV using the Monte Carlo method. The Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) couldn't precisely account for the backscatter radiation caused by the dental prostheses. TPS underestimated the back scatter dose and overestimated the dose after the dental implants. The large errors found for TPS in this study are due to the limits and deficiencies of the algorithms. The accuracy of the PBC algorithm of Eclipse TPS was evaluated in comparison to Monte Carlo calculations in consideration of the recommendations of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group 65. From the comparisons of the TPS and Monte Carlo calculations, it is verified that the Monte Carlo simulation is a good approach to derive the dose distribution in heterogeneous media. PACS numbers: 87.55.K.

  8. Modelling of HTR (High Temperature Reactor Pebble-Bed 10 MW to Determine Criticality as A Variations of Enrichment and Radius of the Fuel (Kernel With the Monte Carlo Code MCNP4C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammam Oktajianto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas-cooled nuclear reactor is a Generation IV reactor which has been receiving significant attention due to many desired characteristics such as inherent safety, modularity, relatively low cost, short construction period, and easy financing. High temperature reactor (HTR pebble-bed as one of type of gas-cooled reactor concept is getting attention. In HTR pebble-bed design, radius and enrichment of the fuel kernel are the key parameter that can be chosen freely to determine the desired value of criticality. This paper models HTR pebble-bed 10 MW and determines an effective of enrichment and radius of the fuel (Kernel to get criticality value of reactor. The TRISO particle coated fuel particle which was modelled explicitly and distributed in the fuelled region of the fuel pebbles using a Simple-Cubic (SC lattice. The pebble-bed balls and moderator balls distributed in the core zone using a Body-Centred Cubic lattice with assumption of a fresh fuel by the fuel enrichment was 7-17% at 1% range and the size of the fuel radius was 175-300 µm at 25 µm ranges. The geometrical model of the full reactor is obtained by using lattice and universe facilities provided by MCNP4C. The details of model are discussed with necessary simplifications. Criticality calculations were conducted by Monte Carlo transport code MCNP4C and continuous energy nuclear data library ENDF/B-VI. From calculation results can be concluded that an effective of enrichment and radius of fuel (Kernel to achieve a critical condition was the enrichment of 15-17% at a radius of 200 µm, the enrichment of 13-17% at a radius of 225 µm, the enrichments of 12-15% at radius of 250 µm, the enrichments of 11-14% at a radius of 275 µm and the enrichment of 10-13% at a radius of 300 µm, so that the effective of enrichments and radii of fuel (Kernel can be considered in the HTR 10 MW. Keywords—MCNP4C, HTR, enrichment, radius, criticality 

  9. Monte Carlo modeling of the Yttrium-90 nanospheres application in the liver radionuclide therapy and organs doses calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghavami Seyed Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the nano-scaled radionuclides in the radionuclide therapy significantly reduces the particles trapping in the organs vessels and avoids thrombosis formations. Additionally, uniform distribution in the target organ may be another benefit of the nanoradionuclides in the radionuclide therapy. Monte Carlo simulation was conducted to model a mathematical humanoid phantom and the liver cells of the simulated phantom were filled with the 90Y nanospheres. Healthy organs doses, fatal and nonfatal risks of the surrounding organs were estimated. The estimations and calculations were made in four different distribution patterns of the radionuclide seeds. Maximum doses and risks estimated for the surrounding organs were obtained in the high edge concentrated distribution model of the liver including the nanoradionuclides. For the dose equivalent, effective dose, fatal and non-fatal risks, the values obtained as 7.51E-03 Sv/Bq, 3.01E-01 Sv/Bq, and 9.16E-01 cases/104 persons for the bladder, colon, and kidney of the modeled phantom, respectively. The mentioned values were the maximum values among the studied modeled distributions. Maximum values of Normal Tissue Complication Probability for the healthy organs calculated as 5.9-8.9 %. Result of using nanoparticles of the 90Y provides promising dosimetric properties in MC simulation results considering non-toxicity reports for the radionuclide.

  10. Calculation of dose distribution in compressible breast tissues using finite element modeling, Monte Carlo simulation and thermoluminescence dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadyari, Parvin; Faghihi, Reza; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Lotfi, Mehrzad; Rahim Hematiyan, Mohammad; Koontz, Craig; Meigooni, Ali S.

    2015-12-01

    Compression is a technique to immobilize the target or improve the dose distribution within the treatment volume during different irradiation techniques such as AccuBoost® brachytherapy. However, there is no systematic method for determination of dose distribution for uncompressed tissue after irradiation under compression. In this study, the mechanical behavior of breast tissue between compressed and uncompressed states was investigated. With that, a novel method was developed to determine the dose distribution in uncompressed tissue after irradiation of compressed breast tissue. Dosimetry was performed using two different methods, namely, Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNP5 code and measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The displacement of the breast elements was simulated using a finite element model and calculated using ABAQUS software. From these results, the 3D dose distribution in uncompressed tissue was determined. The geometry of the model was constructed from magnetic resonance images of six different women volunteers. The mechanical properties were modeled by using the Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic material model. Experimental dosimetry was performed by placing the TLD chips into the polyvinyl alcohol breast equivalent phantom. The results determined that the nodal displacements, due to the gravitational force and the 60 Newton compression forces (with 43% contraction in the loading direction and 37% expansion in the orthogonal direction) were determined. Finally, a comparison of the experimental data and the simulated data showed agreement within 11.5%  ±  5.9%.

  11. Dose estimation in the crystalline lens of industrial radiography personnel using Monte Carlo Method; Estimativa de dose nos cristalinos de operadores de gamagrafia industrial usando o metodo de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Alexandre Roza de

    2014-07-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection, ICRP, in its publication 103, reviewed recent epidemiological evidence and indicated that, for the eye lens, the absorbed dose threshold for induction of late detriment is around 0.5 Gy. On this basis, on April 21, 2011, the ICRP recommended changes to the occupational dose limit in planned exposure situations, reducing the eye lens equivalent dose limit from 150 mSv to 20 mSv per year, on average, during the period of 5 years, with exposure not to exceed 50 mSv in a single year. This paper presents the dose estimation to eye lens, H{sub p}(10), effective dose and doses to important organs in the body, received by industrial gamma radiography workers, during planned or accidental exposure situations. The computer program Visual Monte Carlo was used and two relevant scenarios were postulated. The first is a planned exposure situation scenario where the operator is directly exposed to radiation during the operation. 12 radiographic exposures per day for 250 days per year, which leads to an exposure of 36,000 seconds or 10 hours per year were considered. The simulation was carried out using the following parameters: a {sup 192}Ir source with 1.0 TBq of activity, the source/operator distance varying from 5 m to 10 m at three different heights of 0.2 m, 1.0 m and 2.0 m. The eyes lens doses were estimated as being between 16.9 mSv/year and 66.9 mSv/year and for H{sub p}(10) the doses were between 17.7 mSv/year and 74.2 mSv/year. For the accidental exposure situation scenario, the same radionuclide and activity were used, but in this case the doses were calculated with and without a collimator. The heights above ground considered were 1.0 m, 1.5 m e 2.0 m, the source/operator distance was 40 cm and, the exposure time 74 seconds. The eyes lens doses, for 1.5 m, were 12.3 mGy and 0.28 mGy without and with a collimator, respectively. Three conclusions resulted from this work. The first was that the estimated doses show

  12. Calculated organ doses using Monte Carlo simulations in a reference male phantom undergoing HDR brachytherapy applied to localized prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candela-Juan, Cristian [Radioprotection Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, Jose [Radiotherapy Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Ballester, Facundo [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to obtain equivalent doses in radiosensitive organs (aside from the bladder and rectum) when applying high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy to a localized prostate carcinoma using {sup 60}Co or {sup 192}Ir sources. These data are compared with results in a water phantom and with expected values in an infinite water medium. A comparison with reported values from proton therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is also provided. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations in Geant4 were performed using a voxelized phantom described in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 110, which reproduces masses and shapes from an adult reference man defined in ICRP Publication 89. Point sources of {sup 60}Co or {sup 192}Ir with photon energy spectra corresponding to those exiting their capsules were placed in the center of the prostate, and equivalent doses per clinical absorbed dose in this target organ were obtained in several radiosensitive organs. Values were corrected to account for clinical circumstances with the source located at various positions with differing dwell times throughout the prostate. This was repeated for a homogeneous water phantom. Results: For the nearest organs considered (bladder, rectum, testes, small intestine, and colon), equivalent doses given by {sup 60}Co source were smaller (8%-19%) than from {sup 192}Ir. However, as the distance increases, the more penetrating gamma rays produced by {sup 60}Co deliver higher organ equivalent doses. The overall result is that effective dose per clinical absorbed dose from a {sup 60}Co source (11.1 mSv/Gy) is lower than from a {sup 192}Ir source (13.2 mSv/Gy). On the other hand, equivalent doses were the same in the tissue and the homogeneous water phantom for those soft tissues closer to the prostate than about 30 cm. As the distance increased, the differences of photoelectric effect in water and soft tissue, and appearance of other materials

  13. Simulation of dose deposition in stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy: a fast approach combining Monte Carlo and deterministic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smekens, F; Freud, N; Letang, J M; Babot, D [CNDRI (Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiations) Laboratory, INSA-Lyon, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Adam, J-F; Elleaume, H; Esteve, F [INSERM U-836, Equipe 6 ' Rayonnement Synchrotron et Recherche Medicale' , Institut des Neurosciences de Grenoble (France); Ferrero, C; Bravin, A [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)], E-mail: francois.smekens@insa-lyon.fr

    2009-08-07

    A hybrid approach, combining deterministic and Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, is proposed to compute the distribution of dose deposited during stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy treatment. The proposed approach divides the computation into two parts: (i) the dose deposited by primary radiation (coming directly from the incident x-ray beam) is calculated in a deterministic way using ray casting techniques and energy-absorption coefficient tables and (ii) the dose deposited by secondary radiation (Rayleigh and Compton scattering, fluorescence) is computed using a hybrid algorithm combining MC and deterministic calculations. In the MC part, a small number of particle histories are simulated. Every time a scattering or fluorescence event takes place, a splitting mechanism is applied, so that multiple secondary photons are generated with a reduced weight. The secondary events are further processed in a deterministic way, using ray casting techniques. The whole simulation, carried out within the framework of the Monte Carlo code Geant4, is shown to converge towards the same results as the full MC simulation. The speed of convergence is found to depend notably on the splitting multiplicity, which can easily be optimized. To assess the performance of the proposed algorithm, we compare it to state-of-the-art MC simulations, accelerated by the track length estimator technique (TLE), considering a clinically realistic test case. It is found that the hybrid approach is significantly faster than the MC/TLE method. The gain in speed in a test case was about 25 for a constant precision. Therefore, this method appears to be suitable for treatment planning applications.

  14. Monte Carlo dose calculations and radiobiological modelling: analysis of the effect of the statistical noise of the dose distribution on the probability of tumour control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffa, F M; Nahum, A E

    2000-10-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the influence of the statistical fluctuations of Monte Carlo (MC) dose distributions on the dose volume histograms (DVHs) and radiobiological models, in particular the Poisson model for tumour control probability (tcp). The MC matrix is characterized by a mean dose in each scoring voxel, d, and a statistical error on the mean dose, sigma(d); whilst the quantities d and sigma(d) depend on many statistical and physical parameters, here we consider only their dependence on the phantom voxel size and the number of histories from the radiation source. Dose distributions from high-energy photon beams have been analysed. It has been found that the DVH broadens when increasing the statistical noise of the dose distribution, and the tcp calculation systematically underestimates the real tumour control value, defined here as the value of tumour control when the statistical error of the dose distribution tends to zero. When increasing the number of energy deposition events, either by increasing the voxel dimensions or increasing the number of histories from the source, the DVH broadening decreases and tcp converges to the 'correct' value. It is shown that the underestimation of the tcp due to the noise in the dose distribution depends on the degree of heterogeneity of the radiobiological parameters over the population; in particular this error decreases with increasing the biological heterogeneity, whereas it becomes significant in the hypothesis of a radiosensitivity assay for single patients, or for subgroups of patients. It has been found, for example, that when the voxel dimension is changed from a cube with sides of 0.5 cm to a cube with sides of 0.25 cm (with a fixed number of histories of 10(8) from the source), the systematic error in the tcp calculation is about 75% in the homogeneous hypothesis, and it decreases to a minimum value of about 15% in a case of high radiobiological heterogeneity. The possibility of using the error

  15. Spectra and depth-dose deposition in a polymethylmethacrylate breast phantom obtained by experimental and Monte Carlo method; Espectros e deposicao de dose em profundidade em phantom de mama de polimetilmetacrilato: obtencao experimental e por metodo de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, Mariano G.; Pires, Evandro J.; Magalhaes, Luis A.; Almeida, Carlos E. de; Alves, Carlos F.E., E-mail: marianogd08@gmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. Ciencias Radiologicas; Albuquerque, Marcos A. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto Alberto Luiz Coimbra; Bernal, Mario A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin; Peixoto, Jose G. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-08-15

    This paper focuses on the obtainment, using experimental and Monte Carlo-simulated (MMC) methods, of the photon spectra at various depths and depth-dose deposition curves for x-rays beams used in mammography, obtained on a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) breast phantom. Spectra were obtained for 28 and 30 kV quality-beams and the corresponding average energy values (Emed) were calculated. For the experimental acquisition was used a Si-PIN photodiode spectrometer and for the MMC simulations the PENELOPE code was employed. The simulated and the experimental spectra show a very good agreement, which was corroborated by the low differences found between the Emed values. An increase in the Emed values and a strong attenuation of the beam through the depth of the PMMA phantom was also observed. (author)

  16. Tissue classifications in Monte Carlo simulations of patient dose for photon beam tumor treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Mu-Han [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Sec. 2, Kung Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chao, Tsi-Chian [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chung-Chi [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 5 Fu-Hsin Street, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Tung-Chieh Chang, Joseph [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 5 Fu-Hsin Street, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Tung, Chuan-Jong, E-mail: cjtung@mail.cgu.edu.t [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-21

    The purpose of this work was to study the calculated dose uncertainties induced by the material classification that determined the interaction cross-sections and the water-to-material stopping-power ratios. Calculations were made for a head- and neck-cancer patient treated with five intensity-modulated radiotherapy fields using 6 MV photon beams. The patient's CT images were reconstructed into two voxelized patient phantoms based on different CT-to-material classification schemes. Comparisons of the depth-dose curve of the anterior-to-posterior field and the dose-volume-histogram of the treatment plan were used to evaluate the dose uncertainties from such schemes. The results indicated that any misassignment of tissue materials could lead to a substantial dose difference, which would affect the treatment outcome. To assure an appropriate material assignment, it is desirable to have different conversion tables for various parts of the body. The assignment of stopping-power ratio should be based on the chemical composition and the density of the material.

  17. Dosimetric characterization and organ dose assessment in digital breast tomosynthesis: Measurements and Monte Carlo simulations using voxel phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Mariana, E-mail: marianabaptista@ctn.ist.utl.pt; Di Maria, Salvatore; Barros, Sílvia; Vaz, Pedro [Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, km 139,7, Bobadela LRS 2695-066 (Portugal); Figueira, Catarina [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Sarmento, Marta; Orvalho, Lurdes [Serviço de Imagiologia, Hospital da Luz, Avenida Lusíada, 100, Lisboa 1500-650 (Portugal)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Due to its capability to more accurately detect deep lesions inside the breast by removing the effect of overlying anatomy, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has the potential to replace the standard mammography technique in clinical screening exams. However, the European Guidelines for DBT dosimetry are still a work in progress and there are little data available on organ doses other than to the breast. It is, therefore, of great importance to assess the dosimetric performance of DBT with respect to the one obtained with standard digital mammography (DM) systems. The aim of this work is twofold: (i) to study the dosimetric properties of a combined DBT/DM system (MAMMOMAT Inspiration Siemens{sup ®}) for a tungsten/rhodium (W/Rh) anode/filter combination and (ii) to evaluate organs doses during a DBT examination. Methods: For the first task, measurements were performed in manual and automatic exposure control (AEC) modes, using two homogeneous breast phantoms: a PMMA slab phantom and a 4 cm thick breast-shaped rigid phantom, with 50% of glandular tissue in its composition. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended v.2.7.0. A MC model was implemented to mimic DM and DBT acquisitions for a wide range of x-ray spectra (24 –34 kV). This was used to calculate mean glandular dose (MGD) and to compute series of backscatter factors (BSFs) that could be inserted into the DBT dosimetric formalism proposed by Dance et al. Regarding the second aim of the study, the implemented MC model of the clinical equipment, together with a female voxel phantom (“Laura”), was used to calculate organ doses considering a typical DBT acquisition. Results were compared with a standard two-view mammography craniocaudal (CC) acquisition. Results: Considering the AEC mode, the acquisition of a single CC view results in a MGD ranging from 0.53 ± 0.07 mGy to 2.41 ± 0.31 mGy in DM mode and from 0.77 ± 0.11 mGy to 2.28 ± 0.32 mGy in DBT mode

  18. Assessment of the dose distribution inside a cardiac cath lab using TLD measurements and Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, M.; Teles, P.; Cardoso, G.; Vaz, P.

    2014-11-01

    Over the last decade, there was a substantial increase in the number of interventional cardiology procedures worldwide, and the corresponding ionizing radiation doses for both the medical staff and patients became a subject of concern. Interventional procedures in cardiology are normally very complex, resulting in long exposure times. Also, these interventions require the operator to work near the patient and, consequently, close to the primary X-ray beam. Moreover, due to the scattered radiation from the patient and the equipment, the medical staff is also exposed to a non-uniform radiation field that can lead to a significant exposure of sensitive body organs and tissues, such as the eye lens, the thyroid and the extremities. In order to better understand the spatial variation of the dose and dose rate distributions during an interventional cardiology procedure, the dose distribution around a C-arm fluoroscopic system, in operation in a cardiac cath lab at Portuguese Hospital, was estimated using both Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and dosimetric measurements. To model and simulate the cardiac cath lab, including the fluoroscopic equipment used to execute interventional procedures, the state-of-the-art MC radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.0 was used. Subsequently, Thermo-Luminescent Detector (TLD) measurements were performed, in order to validate and support the simulation results obtained for the cath lab model. The preliminary results presented in this study reveal that the cardiac cath lab model was successfully validated, taking into account the good agreement between MC calculations and TLD measurements. The simulated results for the isodose curves related to the C-arm fluoroscopic system are also consistent with the dosimetric information provided by the equipment manufacturer (Siemens). The adequacy of the implemented computational model used to simulate complex procedures and map dose distributions around the operator and the medical staff is discussed, in

  19. Estimation of tumour dose enhancement due to gold nanoparticles during typical radiation treatments: a preliminary Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, S H [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Unit 94, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2005-08-07

    A recent mice study demonstrated that gold nanoparticles could be safely administered and used to enhance the tumour dose during radiation therapy. The use of gold nanoparticles seems more promising than earlier methods because of the high atomic number of gold and because nanoparticles can more easily penetrate the tumour vasculature. However, to date, possible dose enhancement due to the use of gold nanoparticles has not been well quantified, especially for common radiation treatment situations. Therefore, the current preliminary study estimated this dose enhancement by Monte Carlo calculations for several phantom test cases representing radiation treatments with the following modalities: 140 kVp x-rays, 4 and 6 MV photon beams, and {sup 192}Ir gamma rays. The current study considered three levels of gold concentration within the tumour, two of which are based on the aforementioned mice study, and assumed either no gold or a single gold concentration level outside the tumour. The dose enhancement over the tumour volume considered for the 140 kVp x-ray case can be at least a factor of 2 at an achievable gold concentration of 7 mg Au/g tumour assuming no gold outside the tumour. The tumour dose enhancement for the cases involving the 4 and 6 MV photon beams based on the same assumption ranged from about 1% to 7%, depending on the amount of gold within the tumour and photon beam qualities. For the {sup 192}Ir cases, the dose enhancement within the tumour region ranged from 5% to 31%, depending on radial distance and gold concentration level within the tumour. For the 7 mg Au/g tumour cases, the loading of gold into surrounding normal tissue at 2 mg Au/g resulted in an increase in the normal tissue dose, up to 30%, negligible, and about 2% for the 140 kVp x-rays, 6 MV photon beam, and {sup 192}Ir gamma rays, respectively, while the magnitude of dose enhancement within the tumour was essentially unchanged. (note)

  20. Estimation of tumour dose enhancement due to gold nanoparticles during typical radiation treatments: a preliminary Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sang Hyun

    2005-08-07

    A recent mice study demonstrated that gold nanoparticles could be safely administered and used to enhance the tumour dose during radiation therapy. The use of gold nanoparticles seems more promising than earlier methods because of the high atomic number of gold and because nanoparticles can more easily penetrate the tumour vasculature. However, to date, possible dose enhancement due to the use of gold nanoparticles has not been well quantified, especially for common radiation treatment situations. Therefore, the current preliminary study estimated this dose enhancement by Monte Carlo calculations for several phantom test cases representing radiation treatments with the following modalities: 140 kVp x-rays, 4 and 6 MV photon beams, and 192Ir gamma rays. The current study considered three levels of gold concentration within the tumour, two of which are based on the aforementioned mice study, and assumed either no gold or a single gold concentration level outside the tumour. The dose enhancement over the tumour volume considered for the 140 kVp x-ray case can be at least a factor of 2 at an achievable gold concentration of 7 mg Au/g tumour assuming no gold outside the tumour. The tumour dose enhancement for the cases involving the 4 and 6 MV photon beams based on the same assumption ranged from about 1% to 7%, depending on the amount of gold within the tumour and photon beam qualities. For the 192Ir cases, the dose enhancement within the tumour region ranged from 5% to 31%, depending on radial distance and gold concentration level within the tumour. For the 7 mg Au/g tumour cases, the loading of gold into surrounding normal tissue at 2 mg Au/g resulted in an increase in the normal tissue dose, up to 30%, negligible, and about 2% for the 140 kVp x-rays, 6 MV photon beam, and 192Ir gamma rays, respectively, while the magnitude of dose enhancement within the tumour was essentially unchanged.

  1. An analysis of exposure dose on hands of radiation workers using a Monte Carlo simulation in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Dong Gun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences Cancer Center, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, SeSik; Kim, Jung Hoon; KIm, Chang Soo [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Workers in nuclear medicine have performed various tasks such as production, distribution, preparation and injection of radioisotope. This process could cause high radiation exposure to workers’ hand. The purpose of this study was to investigate shielding effect for r-rays of 140 and 511 keV by using Monte-Carlo simulation. As a result, it was effective, regardless of lead thickness for radiation shielding in 140 keV r-ray. However, it was effective in shielding material with thickness of more than only 1.1 mm in 511 keV r-ray. And also it doesn’t effective in less than 1.1 mm due to secondary scatter ray and exposure dose was rather increased. Consequently, energy of radionuclide and thickness of shielding materials should be considered to reduce radiation exposure.

  2. Monte Carlo derivation of filtered tungsten anode X-ray spectra for dose computation in digital mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paixao, L.; Oliveira, B. B.; Nogueira, M. do S. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, Post-graduation in Science and Technology of Radiations, Minerals and Materials, Pte. Antonio Carlos 6.627, Pampulha, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Viloria, C. [UFMG, Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Post-graduation in Nuclear Sciences and Techniques, Pte. Antonio Carlos 6.627, Pampulha, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Alves de O, M. [UFMG, Department of Anatomy and Imaging, Prof. Alfredo Balena 190, 30130-100 Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Araujo T, M. H., E-mail: lpr@cdtn.br [Dr Maria Helena Araujo Teixeira Clinic, Guajajaras 40, 30180-100 Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    It is widely accepted that the mean glandular dose (D{sub G}) for the glandular tissue is the more useful magnitude for characterizing the breast cancer risk. The procedure to estimate the D{sub G}, for being difficult to measure it directly in the breast, it is to make the use of conversion factors that relate incident air kerma (K{sub i}) at this dose. Generally, the conversion factors vary with the x-ray spectrum half-value layer and the breast composition and thickness. Several authors through computer simulations have calculated such factors by the Monte Carlo (Mc) method. Many spectral models for D{sub G} computer simulations purposes are available in the diagnostic range. One of the models available generates unfiltered spectra. In this work, the Monte Carlo EGSnrc code package with the C++ class library (eg spp) was employed to derive filtered tungsten x-ray spectra used in digital mammography systems. Filtered spectra for rhodium and aluminium filters were obtained for tube potentials between 26 and 32 kV. The half-value layer of simulated filtered spectra were compared with those obtained experimentally with a solid state detector Unfors model 8202031-H Xi R/F and Mam Detector Platinum and 8201023-C Xi Base unit Platinum Plus w m As in a Hologic Selenia Dimensions system using a Direct Radiography mode. Calculated half-value layer values showed good agreement compared to those obtained experimentally. These results show that the filtered tungsten anode x-ray spectra and the EGSnrc Mc code can be used for D{sub G} determination in mammography. (Author)

  3. A Monte Carlo study of I-125 prostate brachytherapy with gold nanoparticles: dose enhancement with simultaneous rectal dose sparing via radiation shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brivio, D.; Nguyen, P. L.; Sajo, E.; Ngwa, W.; Zygmanski, P.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate via Monte Carlo simulations a new 125I brachytherapy treatment technique for high-risk prostate cancer patients via injection of Au nanoparticle (AuNP) directly into the prostate. The purpose of using the nanoparticles is to increase the therapeutic index via two synergistic effects: enhanced energy deposition within the prostate and simultaneous shielding of organs at risk from radiation escaping from the prostate. Both uniform and non-uniform concentrations of AuNP are studied. The latter are modeled considering the possibility of AuNP diffusion after the injection using brachy needles. We study two extreme cases of coaxial AuNP concentrations: centered on brachy needles and centered half-way between them. Assuming uniform distribution of 30 mg g‑1 of AuNP within the prostate, we obtain a dose enhancement larger than a factor of 2 to the prostate. Non-uniform concentration of AuNP ranging from 10 mg g‑1 and 66 mg g‑1 were studied. The higher the concentration in a given region of the prostate the greater is the enhancement therein. We obtain the highest dose enhancement when the brachytherapy needles are coincident with AuNP injection needles but, at the same time, the regions in the tail are colder (average dose ratio of 0.7). The best enhancement uniformity is obtained with the seeds in the tail of the AuNP distribution. In both uniform and non-uniform cases the urethra and rectum receive less than 1/3 dose compared to an analog treatment without AuNP. Remarkably, employing AuNP not only significantly increases dose to the target but also decreases dose to the neighboring rectum and even urethra, which is embedded within the prostate. These are mutually interdependent effects as more enhancement leads to more shielding and vice-versa. Caution must be paid since cold spot or hot spots may be created if the AuNP concentration versus seed position is not properly distributed respect to the seed locations.

  4. SU-E-T-466: Implementation of An Extension Module for Dose Response Models in the TOPAS Monte Carlo Toolkit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos-Mendez, J; Faddegon, B [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Perl, J [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Schuemann, J; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Shin, J [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and verify an extension to TOPAS for calculation of dose response models (TCP/NTCP). TOPAS wraps and extends Geant4. Methods: The TOPAS DICOM interface was extended to include structure contours, for subsequent calculation of DVH’s and TCP/NTCP. The following dose response models were implemented: Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB), critical element (CE), population based critical volume (CV), parallel-serials, a sigmoid-based model of Niemierko for NTCP and TCP, and a Poisson-based model for TCP. For verification, results for the parallel-serial and Poisson models, with 6 MV x-ray dose distributions calculated with TOPAS and Pinnacle v9.2, were compared to data from the benchmark configuration of the AAPM Task Group 166 (TG166). We provide a benchmark configuration suitable for proton therapy along with results for the implementation of the Niemierko, CV and CE models. Results: The maximum difference in DVH calculated with Pinnacle and TOPAS was 2%. Differences between TG166 data and Monte Carlo calculations of up to 4.2%±6.1% were found for the parallel-serial model and up to 1.0%±0.7% for the Poisson model (including the uncertainty due to lack of knowledge of the point spacing in TG166). For CE, CV and Niemierko models, the discrepancies between the Pinnacle and TOPAS results are 74.5%, 34.8% and 52.1% when using 29.7 cGy point spacing, the differences being highly sensitive to dose spacing. On the other hand, with our proposed benchmark configuration, the largest differences were 12.05%±0.38%, 3.74%±1.6%, 1.57%±4.9% and 1.97%±4.6% for the CE, CV, Niemierko and LKB models, respectively. Conclusion: Several dose response models were successfully implemented with the extension module. Reference data was calculated for future benchmarking. Dose response calculated for the different models varied much more widely for the TG166 benchmark than for the proposed benchmark, which had much lower sensitivity to the choice of DVH dose points. This work

  5. Is wax equivalent to tissue in electron conformal therapy planning? A Monte Carlo study of material approximation introduced dose difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ray R; Feygelman, Vladimir; Harris, Eleanor R; Rao, Nikhil; Moros, Eduardo G; Zhang, Geoffrey G

    2013-01-07

    With CT-based Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations, material composition is often assigned based on the standard Hounsfield unit ranges. This is known as the density threshold method. In bolus electron conformal therapy (BolusECT), the bolus material, machineable wax, would be assigned as soft tissue and the electron density is assumed equivalent to soft tissue based on its Hounsfield unit. This study investigates the dose errors introduced by this material assignment. BEAMnrc was used to simulate electron beams from a Trilogy accelerator. SPRRZnrc was used to calculate stopping power ratios (SPR) of tissue to wax, SPR (tissue) (wax), and tissue to water, SPR(tissue) (water), for 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18 MeV electron beams, of which 12 and 15MeV beams are the most commonly used energies in BolusECT. DOSXYZnrc was applied in dose distribution calculations in a tissue phantom with either flat wax slabs of various thicknesses or a wedge-shaped bolus on top. Dose distribution for two clinical cases, a chest wall and a head and neck, were compared with the bolus material treated as wax or tissue. The SPR(tissue) (wax) values for 12 and 15MeV beams are between 0.935 and 0.945, while the SPR(tissue) (water) values are between 0.990 and 0.991. For a 12 MeV beam, the dose in tissue immediately under the bolus is overestimated by 2.5% for a 3 cm bolus thickness if the wax bolus is treated as tissue. For 15 MeV beams, the error is 1.4%. However, in both clinical cases the differences in the PTV DVH is negligible. Due to stopping power differences, dose differences of up to 2.5% are observed in MC simulations if the bolus material is misassigned as tissue in BolusECT dose calculations. However, for boluses thinner than 2 cm that are more likely encountered in practice, the error is within clinical tolerance.

  6. Monte Carlo calculations of the depth-dose distribution in skin contaminated by hot particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patau, J.-P. (Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France))

    1991-01-01

    Accurate computer programs were developed in order to calculate the spatial distribution of absorbed radiation doses in the skin, near high activity particles (''hot particles''). With a view to ascertaining the reliability of the codes the transport of beta particles was simulated in a complex configuration used for dosimetric measurements: spherical {sup 60}Co sources of 10-1000 {mu}m fastened to an aluminium support with a tissue-equivalent adhesive overlaid with 10 {mu}m thick aluminium foil. Behind it an infinite polystyrene medium including an extrapolation chamber was assumed. The exact energy spectrum of beta emission was sampled. Production and transport of secondary knock-on electrons were also simulated. Energy depositions in polystyrene were calculated with a high spatial resolution. Finally, depth-dose distributions were calculated for hot particles placed on the skin. The calculations will be continued for other radionuclides and for a configuration suited to TLD measurements. (author).

  7. Influence of thyroid volume reduction on absorbed dose in 131I therapy studied by using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaur, Rahman; Sikander, M. Mirza; Waheed, Arshed; Nasir, M. Mirza; Waheed, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    A simulation study has been performed to quantify the effect of volume reduction on the thyroid absorbed dose per decay and to investigate the variation of energy deposition per decay due to β- and γ-activity of 131I with volume/mass of thyroid, for water, ICRP- and ICRU-soft tissue taken as thyroid material. A Monte Carlo model of the thyroid, in the Geant4 radiation transport simulation toolkit was constructed to compute the β- and γ-absorbed dose in the simulated thyroid phantom for various values of its volume. The effect of the size and shape of the thyroid on energy deposition per decay has also been studied by using spherical, ellipsoidal and cylindrical models for the thyroid and varying its volume in 1-25 cm3 range. The relative differences of Geant4 results for different models with each other and MCNP results lie well below 1.870%. The maximum relative difference among the Geant4 estimated results for water with ICRP and ICRU soft tissues is not more than 0.225%. S-values for ellipsoidal, spherical and cylindrical thyroid models were estimated and the relative difference with published results lies within 3.095%. The absorbed fraction values for beta particles show a good agreement with published values within 2.105% deviation. The Geant4 based simulation results of absorbed fractions for gammas again show a good agreement with the corresponding MCNP and EGS4 results (±6.667%) but have 29.032% higher values than that of MIRD calculated values. Consistent with previous studies, the reduction of the thyroid volume is found to have a substantial effect on the absorbed dose. Geant4 simulations confirm dose dependence on the volume/mass of thyroid in agreement with MCNP and EGS4 computed values but are substantially different from MIRD8 data. Therefore, inclusion of size/mass dependence is indicated for 131I radiotherapy of the thyroid.

  8. Absorbed dose estimations of 131I for critical organs using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ziaur Rahman; Shakeel ur Rehman; Waheed Arshed; Nasir M Mirza; Abdul Rashid; Jahan Zeb

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the absorbed doses of critical organs of 131I using the MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) with the corresponding predictions made by GEANT4 simulations.S-values (mean absorbed dose rate per unit activity) and energy deposition per decay for critical organs of 131I for various ages,using standard cylindrical phantom comprising water and ICRP soft-tissue material,have also been estimated.In this study the effect of volume reduction of thyroid,during radiation therapy,on the calculation of absorbed dose is also being estimated using GEANT4.Photon specific energy deposition in the other organs of the neck,due to 131I decay in the thyroid organ,has also been estimated.The maximum relative difference of MIRD with the GEANT4 simulated results is 5.64% for an adult's critical organs of 131I.Excellent agreement was found between the results of water and ICRP soft tissue using the cylindrical model.S-values are tabulated for critical organs of 131I,using 1,5,10,15 and 18 years (adults) individuals.S-values for a cylindrical thyroid of different sizes,having 3.07% relative differences of GEANT4 with Siegel & Stabin results.Comparison of the experimentally measured values at 0.5 and 1 m away from neck of the ionization chamber with GEANT4 based Monte Carlo simulations results show good agreement.This study shows that GEANT4 code is an important tool for the internal dosimetry calculations.

  9. Investigation of the gold nanoparticles effects on the prostate dose distribution in brachytherapy: gel dosimetry and Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Bijan; Rahmani, Faezeh; Ebadi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In this work, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were embedded in the MAGIC-f polymer gel irradiated with the 192Ir brachytherapy sources. Material and methods At the first plexiglas phantom was made as the human pelvis. The GNPs were synthesized with 15 nm in diameter and 0.1 mM (0.0197 mg/ml) in concentration by using a chemical reduction method. Then, the MAGIC-f gel was synthesized. The fabricated gel was poured into the tubes located at the prostate (with and without the GNPs) locations of the phantom. The phantom was irradiated with 192Ir brachytherapy sources for prostate cancer. After 24 hours, the irradiated gels was read by using Siemens 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. Following the brachytherapy practices, the absolute doses at the reference points and isodose curves were extracted and compared by experimental measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Results The mean absorbed doses in the presence of the GNPs in prostate were 14% higher than the corresponding values without the GNPs in the brachytherapy. The gamma index analysis (between gel and MC) using 7%/7 mm was also applied to the data and a high pass rate achieved (91.7% and 86.4% for analysis with/without GNPs, respectively). Conclusions The real three-dimensional analysis shows the comparison of the dose-volume histograms measured for planning volumes and the expected one from the MC calculation. The results indicate that the polymer gel dosimetry method, which developed and used in this study, could be recommended as a reliable method for investigating the dose enhancement factor of GNPs in brachytherapy. PMID:27895684

  10. Deuterons at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Kyle; Parker, Donald E; Friedberg, Wallace

    2011-01-01

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult female and an adult male to deuterons ((2)H(+)) in the energy range 10 MeV-1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Coefficients were calculated using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilder™ 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms. Phantoms were modified to allow calculation of the effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Coefficients for the equivalent and effective dose incorporated a radiation weighting factor of 2. At 15 of 19 energies for which coefficients for the effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 1990 and 2007 recommendations differed by <3%. The greatest difference, 47%, occurred at 30 MeV.

  11. GPU-Accelerated Monte Carlo Electron Transport Methods: Development and Application for Radiation Dose Calculations Using Six GPU cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lin; Du, Xining; Liu, Tianyu; Xu, X. George

    2014-06-01

    An electron-photon coupled Monte Carlo code ARCHER - Accelerated Radiation-transport Computations in Heterogeneous EnviRonments - is being developed at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute as a software testbed for emerging heterogeneous high performance computers that utilize accelerators such as GPUs. This paper presents the preliminary code development and the testing involving radiation dose related problems. In particular, the paper discusses the electron transport simulations using the class-II condensed history method. The considered electron energy ranges from a few hundreds of keV to 30 MeV. For photon part, photoelectric effect, Compton scattering and pair production were modeled. Voxelized geometry was supported. A serial CPU code was first written in C++. The code was then transplanted to the GPU using the CUDA C 5.0 standards. The hardware involved a desktop PC with an Intel Xeon X5660 CPU and six NVIDIA Tesla™ M2090 GPUs. The code was tested for a case of 20 MeV electron beam incident perpendicularly on a water-aluminum-water phantom. The depth and later dose profiles were found to agree with results obtained from well tested MC codes. Using six GPU cards, 6x106 electron histories were simulated within 2 seconds. In comparison, the same case running the EGSnrc and MCNPX codes required 1645 seconds and 9213 seconds, respectively. On-going work continues to test the code for different medical applications such as radiotherapy and brachytherapy.

  12. Selected organ dose conversion coefficients for external photons calculated using ICRP adult voxel phantoms and Monte Carlo code FLUKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patni, H K; Nadar, M Y; Akar, D K; Bhati, S; Sarkar, P K

    2011-11-01

    The adult reference male and female computational voxel phantoms recommended by ICRP are adapted into the Monte Carlo transport code FLUKA. The FLUKA code is then utilised for computation of dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) expressed in absorbed dose per air kerma free-in-air for colon, lungs, stomach wall, breast, gonads, urinary bladder, oesophagus, liver and thyroid due to a broad parallel beam of mono-energetic photons impinging in anterior-posterior and posterior-anterior directions in the energy range of 15 keV-10 MeV. The computed DCCs of colon, lungs, stomach wall and breast are found to be in good agreement with the results published in ICRP publication 110. The present work thus validates the use of FLUKA code in computation of organ DCCs for photons using ICRP adult voxel phantoms. Further, the DCCs for gonads, urinary bladder, oesophagus, liver and thyroid are evaluated and compared with results published in ICRP 74 in the above-mentioned energy range and geometries. Significant differences in DCCs are observed for breast, testis and thyroid above 1 MeV, and for most of the organs at energies below 60 keV in comparison with the results published in ICRP 74. The DCCs of female voxel phantom were found to be higher in comparison with male phantom for almost all organs in both the geometries.

  13. Development of modern approach to absorbed dose assessment in radionuclide therapy, based on Monte Carlo method simulation of patient scintigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysak, Y. V.; Klimanov, V. A.; Narkevich, B. Ya

    2017-01-01

    One of the most difficult problems of modern radionuclide therapy (RNT) is control of the absorbed dose in pathological volume. This research presents new approach based on estimation of radiopharmaceutical (RP) accumulated activity value in tumor volume, based on planar scintigraphic images of the patient and calculated radiation transport using Monte Carlo method, including absorption and scattering in biological tissues of the patient, and elements of gamma camera itself. In our research, to obtain the data, we performed modeling scintigraphy of the vial with administered to the patient activity of RP in gamma camera, the vial was placed at the certain distance from the collimator, and the similar study was performed in identical geometry, with the same values of activity of radiopharmaceuticals in the pathological target in the body of the patient. For correct calculation results, adapted Fisher-Snyder human phantom was simulated in MCNP program. In the context of our technique, calculations were performed for different sizes of pathological targets and various tumors deeps inside patient’s body, using radiopharmaceuticals based on a mixed β-γ-radiating (131I, 177Lu), and clear β- emitting (89Sr, 90Y) therapeutic radionuclides. Presented method can be used for adequate implementing in clinical practice estimation of absorbed doses in the regions of interest on the basis of planar scintigraphy of the patient with sufficient accuracy.

  14. A Monte Carlo study of monoenergetic and polyenergetic normalized glandular dose (DgN) coefficients in mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, Antonio; Mettivier, Giovanni; Di Lillo, Francesca; Russo, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the influence of model assumptions in GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for the calculation of monoenergetic and polyenergetic normalized glandular dose coefficients (DgN) in mammography, focussing on the effect of the skin thickness and composition, of the role of compression paddles and of the bremsstrahlung processes. We showed that selecting a skin thickness of 4 mm instead of 1.45 mm produced DgN values with deviations from 9% to 32% for x-ray spectra routinely adopted in mammography. Consideration of the bremsstrahlung radiation had a weak influence on monoenergetic DgN. Simulations (in the range 8-40 kVp) which included consideration of bremsstrahlung radiation, a skin thickness of 1.45 mm and a 2 mm thick compression paddles produced polyenergetic DgN coefficients up to 19% higher than corresponding literature data. Adding a 2 mm thick adipose layer between the skin layer and the radiosensitive portion of the breast produces polyenergetic DgN values up to 15% higher than those routinely adopted. These findings provide a quantitative estimate of the influence of model parameters on the calculation of the mean glandular dose in mammography.

  15. CTC-ask: a new algorithm for conversion of CT numbers to tissue parameters for Monte Carlo dose calculations applying DICOM RS knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Rickard; Behrens, Claus F.

    2011-01-01

    One of the building blocks in Monte Carlo (MC) treatment planning is to convert patient CT data to MC compatible phantoms, consisting of density and media matrices. The resulting dose distribution is highly influenced by the accuracy of the conversion. Two major contributing factors are precise c...

  16. Verification measurements and clinical evaluation of the iPlan RT Monte Carlo dose algorithm for 6 MV photon energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petoukhova, A L; Van Wingerden, K; Wiggenraad, R G J; Van de Vaart, P J M; Van Egmond, J; Franken, E M; Van Santvoort, J P C, E-mail: a.petoukhova@mchaaglanden.n [Radiotherapy Centre West, PO Box 432, NL-2501 CK, The Hague (Netherlands)

    2010-08-21

    This study presents data for verification of the iPlan RT Monte Carlo (MC) dose algorithm (BrainLAB, Feldkirchen, Germany). MC calculations were compared with pencil beam (PB) calculations and verification measurements in phantoms with lung-equivalent material, air cavities or bone-equivalent material to mimic head and neck and thorax and in an Alderson anthropomorphic phantom. Dosimetric accuracy of MC for the micro-multileaf collimator (MLC) simulation was tested in a homogeneous phantom. All measurements were performed using an ionization chamber and Kodak EDR2 films with Novalis 6 MV photon beams. Dose distributions measured with film and calculated with MC in the homogeneous phantom are in excellent agreement for oval, C and squiggle-shaped fields and for a clinical IMRT plan. For a field with completely closed MLC, MC is much closer to the experimental result than the PB calculations. For fields larger than the dimensions of the inhomogeneities the MC calculations show excellent agreement (within 3%/1 mm) with the experimental data. MC calculations in the anthropomorphic phantom show good agreement with measurements for conformal beam plans and reasonable agreement for dynamic conformal arc and IMRT plans. For 6 head and neck and 15 lung patients a comparison of the MC plan with the PB plan was performed. Our results demonstrate that MC is able to accurately predict the dose in the presence of inhomogeneities typical for head and neck and thorax regions with reasonable calculation times (5-20 min). Lateral electron transport was well reproduced in MC calculations. We are planning to implement MC calculations for head and neck and lung cancer patients.

  17. A hybrid phase-space and histogram source model for GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townson, Reid W.; Zavgorodni, Sergei

    2014-12-01

    In GPU-based Monte Carlo simulations for radiotherapy dose calculation, source modelling from a phase-space source can be an efficiency bottleneck. Previously, this has been addressed using phase-space-let (PSL) sources, which provided significant efficiency enhancement. We propose that additional speed-up can be achieved through the use of a hybrid primary photon point source model combined with a secondary PSL source. A novel phase-space derived and histogram-based implementation of this model has been integrated into gDPM v3.0. Additionally, a simple method for approximately deriving target photon source characteristics from a phase-space that does not contain inheritable particle history variables (LATCH) has been demonstrated to succeed in selecting over 99% of the true target photons with only ~0.3% contamination (for a Varian 21EX 18 MV machine). The hybrid source model was tested using an array of open fields for various Varian 21EX and TrueBeam energies, and all cases achieved greater than 97% chi-test agreement (the mean was 99%) above the 2% isodose with 1% / 1 mm criteria. The root mean square deviations (RMSDs) were less than 1%, with a mean of 0.5%, and the source generation time was 4-5 times faster. A seven-field intensity modulated radiation therapy patient treatment achieved 95% chi-test agreement above the 10% isodose with 1% / 1 mm criteria, 99.8% for 2% / 2 mm, a RMSD of 0.8%, and source generation speed-up factor of 2.5. Presented as part of the International Workshop on Monte Carlo Techniques in Medical Physics

  18. SU-E-T-224: Is Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Method Necessary for Cyberknife Brain Treatment Planning?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L; Fourkal, E; Hayes, S; Jin, L; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the dosimetric difference resulted in using the pencil beam algorithm instead of Monte Carlo (MC) methods for tumors adjacent to the skull. Methods: We retrospectively calculated the dosimetric differences between RT and MC algorithms for brain tumors treated with CyberKnife located adjacent to the skull for 18 patients (total of 27 tumors). The median tumor sizes was 0.53-cc (range 0.018-cc to 26.2-cc). The absolute mean distance from the tumor to the skull was 2.11 mm (range - 17.0 mm to 9.2 mm). The dosimetric variables examined include the mean, maximum, and minimum doses to the target, the target coverage (TC) and conformality index. The MC calculation used the same MUs as the RT dose calculation without further normalization and 1% statistical uncertainty. The differences were analyzed by tumor size and distance from the skull. Results: The TC was generally reduced with the MC calculation (24 out of 27 cases). The average difference in TC between RT and MC was 3.3% (range 0.0% to 23.5%). When the TC was deemed unacceptable, the plans were re-normalized in order to increase the TC to 99%. This resulted in a 6.9% maximum change in the prescription isodose line. The maximum changes in the mean, maximum, and minimum doses were 5.4 %, 7.7%, and 8.4%, respectively, before re-normalization. When the TC was analyzed with regards to target size, it was found that the worst coverage occurred with the smaller targets (0.018-cc). When the TC was analyzed with regards to the distance to the skull, there was no correlation between proximity to the skull and TC between the RT and MC plans. Conclusions: For smaller targets (< 4.0-cc), MC should be used to re-evaluate the dose coverage after RT is used for the initial dose calculation in order to ensure target coverage.

  19. Two computational approaches for Monte Carlo based shutdown dose rate calculation with applications to the JET fusion machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrizzi, L.; Batistoni, P.; Migliori, S. [Associazione EURATOM ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Chen, Y.; Fischer, U.; Pereslavtsev, P. [Association FZK-EURATOM Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Loughlin, M. [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX (United Kingdom); Secco, A. [Nice Srl Via Serra 33 Camerano Casasco AT (Italy)

    2003-07-01

    In deuterium-deuterium (D-D) and deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion plasmas neutrons are produced causing activation of JET machine components. For safe operation and maintenance it is important to be able to predict the induced activation and the resulting shut down dose rates. This requires a suitable system of codes which is capable of simulating both the neutron induced material activation during operation and the decay gamma radiation transport after shut-down in the proper 3-D geometry. Two methodologies to calculate the dose rate in fusion devices have been developed recently and applied to fusion machines, both using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. FZK has developed a more classical approach, the rigorous 2-step (R2S) system in which MCNP is coupled to the FISPACT inventory code with an automated routing. ENEA, in collaboration with the ITER Team, has developed an alternative approach, the direct 1 step method (D1S). Neutron and decay gamma transport are handled in one single MCNP run, using an ad hoc cross section library. The intention was to tightly couple the neutron induced production of a radio-isotope and the emission of its decay gammas for an accurate spatial distribution and a reliable calculated statistical error. The two methods have been used by the two Associations to calculate the dose rate in five positions of JET machine, two inside the vacuum chamber and three outside, at cooling times between 1 second and 1 year after shutdown. The same MCNP model and irradiation conditions have been assumed. The exercise has been proposed and financed in the frame of the Fusion Technological Program of the JET machine. The scope is to supply the designers with the most reliable tool and data to calculate the dose rate on fusion machines. Results showed that there is a good agreement: the differences range between 5-35%. The next step to be considered in 2003 will be an exercise in which the comparison will be done with dose-rate data from JET taken during and

  20. Tritons at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Kyle; Parker, Donald E; Friedberg, Wallace

    2010-12-01

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult female and an adult male to tritons ((3)H(+)) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Coefficients were calculated using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilder™ 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms. Phantoms were modified to allow calculation of effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and calculation of gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. At 15 of the 19 energies for which coefficients for effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 2007 and 1990 recommendations differed by less than 3%. The greatest difference, 43%, occurred at 30 MeV.

  1. Helions at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Kyle; Parker, Donald E; Friedberg, Wallace

    2010-12-01

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent, for isotropic exposure of an adult male and an adult female to helions ((3)He(2+)) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Calculations were performed using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilder™ 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms modified to allow calculation of effective dose using tissues and tissue weighting factors from either the 1990 or 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. At 15 of the 19 energies for which coefficients for effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 2007 and 1990 recommendations differed by less than 2%. The greatest difference, 62%, occurred at 100 MeV.

  2. SU-E-T-35: An Investigation of the Accuracy of Cervical IMRT Dose Distribution Using 2D/3D Ionization Chamber Arrays System and Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y; Yang, J; Liu, H [Cangzhou People' s Hospital, Cangzhou, Hebei (China); Liu, D [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to compare the verification results of three solutions (2D/3D ionization chamber arrays measurement and Monte Carlo simulation), the results will help make a clinical decision as how to do our cervical IMRT verification. Methods: Seven cervical cases were planned with Pinnacle 8.0m to meet the clinical acceptance criteria. The plans were recalculated in the Matrixx and Delta4 phantom with the accurate plans parameters. The plans were also recalculated by Monte Carlo using leaf sequences and MUs for individual plans of every patient, Matrixx and Delta4 phantom. All plans of Matrixx and Delta4 phantom were delivered and measured. The dose distribution of iso slice, dose profiles, gamma maps of every beam were used to evaluate the agreement. Dose-volume histograms were also compared. Results: The dose distribution of iso slice and dose profiles from Pinnacle calculation were in agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation, Matrixx and Delta4 measurement. A 95.2%/91.3% gamma pass ratio was obtained between the Matrixx/Delta4 measurement and Pinnacle distributions within 3mm/3% gamma criteria. A 96.4%/95.6% gamma pass ratio was obtained between the Matrixx/Delta4 measurement and Monte Carlo simulation within 2mm/2% gamma criteria, almost 100% gamma pass ratio within 3mm/3% gamma criteria. The DVH plot have slightly differences between Pinnacle and Delta4 measurement as well as Pinnacle and Monte Carlo simulation, but have excellent agreement between Delta4 measurement and Monte Carlo simulation. Conclusion: It was shown that Matrixx/Delta4 and Monte Carlo simulation can be used very efficiently to verify cervical IMRT delivery. In terms of Gamma value the pass ratio of Matrixx was little higher, however, Delta4 showed more problem fields. The primary advantage of Delta4 is the fact it can measure true 3D dosimetry while Monte Carlo can simulate in patients CT images but not in phantom.

  3. Estimating statistical uncertainty of Monte Carlo efficiency-gain in the context of a correlated sampling Monte Carlo code for brachytherapy treatment planning with non-normal dose distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D; Sampson, Andrew J; Deniz, Daniel; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun; Williamson, Jeffrey; Malusek, Alexandr

    2012-01-01

    Correlated sampling Monte Carlo methods can shorten computing times in brachytherapy treatment planning. Monte Carlo efficiency is typically estimated via efficiency gain, defined as the reduction in computing time by correlated sampling relative to conventional Monte Carlo methods when equal statistical uncertainties have been achieved. The determination of the efficiency gain uncertainty arising from random effects, however, is not a straightforward task specially when the error distribution is non-normal. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the applicability of the F distribution and standardized uncertainty propagation methods (widely used in metrology to estimate uncertainty of physical measurements) for predicting confidence intervals about efficiency gain estimates derived from single Monte Carlo runs using fixed-collision correlated sampling in a simplified brachytherapy geometry. A bootstrap based algorithm was used to simulate the probability distribution of the efficiency gain estimates and the shortest 95% confidence interval was estimated from this distribution. It was found that the corresponding relative uncertainty was as large as 37% for this particular problem. The uncertainty propagation framework predicted confidence intervals reasonably well; however its main disadvantage was that uncertainties of input quantities had to be calculated in a separate run via a Monte Carlo method. The F distribution noticeably underestimated the confidence interval. These discrepancies were influenced by several photons with large statistical weights which made extremely large contributions to the scored absorbed dose difference. The mechanism of acquiring high statistical weights in the fixed-collision correlated sampling method was explained and a mitigation strategy was proposed.

  4. Estimating statistical uncertainty of Monte Carlo efficiency-gain in the context of a correlated sampling Monte Carlo code for brachytherapy treatment planning with non-normal dose distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D. [Department of Biostatistics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); Sampson, Andrew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); Deniz, Daniel; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun [Department of Radiation Physics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping University, SE 581 85 (Sweden); Williamson, Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); Malusek, Alexandr, E-mail: malusek@ujf.cas.cz [Department of Radiation Physics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping University, SE 581 85 (Sweden); Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR v.v.i., Na Truhlarce 39/64, 180 86 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-01-15

    Correlated sampling Monte Carlo methods can shorten computing times in brachytherapy treatment planning. Monte Carlo efficiency is typically estimated via efficiency gain, defined as the reduction in computing time by correlated sampling relative to conventional Monte Carlo methods when equal statistical uncertainties have been achieved. The determination of the efficiency gain uncertainty arising from random effects, however, is not a straightforward task specially when the error distribution is non-normal. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the applicability of the F distribution and standardized uncertainty propagation methods (widely used in metrology to estimate uncertainty of physical measurements) for predicting confidence intervals about efficiency gain estimates derived from single Monte Carlo runs using fixed-collision correlated sampling in a simplified brachytherapy geometry. A bootstrap based algorithm was used to simulate the probability distribution of the efficiency gain estimates and the shortest 95% confidence interval was estimated from this distribution. It was found that the corresponding relative uncertainty was as large as 37% for this particular problem. The uncertainty propagation framework predicted confidence intervals reasonably well; however its main disadvantage was that uncertainties of input quantities had to be calculated in a separate run via a Monte Carlo method. The F distribution noticeably underestimated the confidence interval. These discrepancies were influenced by several photons with large statistical weights which made extremely large contributions to the scored absorbed dose difference. The mechanism of acquiring high statistical weights in the fixed-collision correlated sampling method was explained and a mitigation strategy was proposed.

  5. Monte carlo simulation of pregnant female phantoms and dose assessment of fetus and pregnant female from diagnostics x-ray at abdomen examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, W. R.; Lee, C. S.; Lee, J. K. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    Mathematical phantoms of representing the adult female at 0,3,6 and 9 months of gestation were constructed, and organ doses and effective doses were calculated in standard irradiation environment and abdomen X-ray examination. Phantoms were based on the data set of ORNL and MCNP4B, a general-purposed Monte Carlo code was used for dose calculation. Firstly, organ doses and effective doses of pregnant female and fetus for 0.4 and 0.8MeV broad parallel beam incident from AP and PA direction were calculated. Then, the same calculations were performed in abdomen AP X-ray examination. As gestation period went by, effective doses of pregnant woman decreased because major organs were shielded by expanded uterus. Fetus of 9 month is lower than that of 6 month because of shielding effect of placement for AP irradiation.

  6. Retrospective study of the calculation of doses by Monte Carlo in extracranial stereotactic; Estudio retrospectivo del calculo de dosis mediante Monte Carlo en radioterapia estereotaxica extracraneal (SBRT) de pulmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucca Aparicio, D.; Perez Moreno, J. M.; Fernandez Leton, P.; Garcia Ruiz-Zorrilla, J.; Minambres Moro, A.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this work consists of the evaluation of those clinical parameters described in RTOG 0813 and 0915 RTOG protocols relevant applicable to PTV, lung tissue and healthy normal, of those patients treated in our institution since April 2008, calculated initially through Pencil Beam and recalculated currently using Monte Carlo is interesting remark that the RTOG 0813 Protocol replaces the previous RTOG 0236 which expressly mentioned do not make corrections by heterogeneity in the calculation of dose in lung lesions. (Author)

  7. Studies on the radial dose distribution for clinical electron beams of 9 and 16 MeV using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoriyaz, Helio; Siqueira, Paulo T.D.; Zevallos-Chavez, Juan Y. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: hyoriyaz@ipen.br; Furnari, Laura; Poli, Maria Esmeralda R. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas

    2005-07-01

    Radial dose distributions have been obtained for several electron beam field sizes through the Monte Carlo simulation. Measurements were performed by an ionization chamber in a 50x50x50 cm{sup 3} water phantom which is routinely used for calibration. Calculated and measured values were compared to adjust the input energy spectra used for the Monte Carlo simulation. The methodology presented here is part of the 'tuning procedure' for the construction of electron beam sources typically used for radiotherapy. (author)

  8. Dose calculations for a simplified Mammosite system with the Monte Carlo Penelope and MCNPX simulation codes; Calculos de dosis para un sistema Mammosite simplificado con los codigos de simulacion Monte Carlo PENELOPE y MCNPX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas C, E.L.; Varon T, C.F.; Pedraza N, R. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: elrc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2007-07-01

    The treatment of the breast cancer at early stages is of vital importance. For that, most of the investigations are dedicated to the early detection of the suffering and their treatment. As investigation consequence and clinical practice, in 2002 it was developed in U.S.A. an irradiation system of high dose rate known as Mammosite. In this work we carry out dose calculations for a simplified Mammosite system with the Monte Carlo Penelope simulation code and MCNPX, varying the concentration of the contrast material that it is used in the one. (Author)

  9. Photon beam convolution using polyenergetic energy deposition kernels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoban, P.W.; Murray, D.C.; Round, W.H. (Waikato Univ., Hamilton (New Zealand). Dept. of Physics)

    1994-04-01

    In photon beam convolution calculations where polyenergetic energy deposition kernels (EDKs) are used, the primary photon energy spectrum should be correctly accounted for in Monte Carlo generation of EDKs. This requires the probability of interaction, determined by the linear attenuation coefficient, [mu], to be taken into account when primary photon interactions are forced to occur at the EDK origin. The use of primary and scattered EDKs generated with a fixed photon spectrum can give rise to an error in the dose calculation due to neglecting the effects of beam hardening with depth. The proportion of primary photon energy that is transferred to secondary electrons increases with depth of interaction, due to the increase in the ratio [mu][sub ab]/[mu] as the beam hardens. Convolution depth-dose curves calculated using polyenergetic EDKs generated for the primary photon spectra which exist at depths of 0, 20 and 40 cm in water, show a fall-off which is too steep when compared with EGS4 Monte Carlo results. A beam hardening correction factor applied to primary and scattered 0 cm EDKs, based on the ratio of kerma to terma at each depth, gives primary, scattered and total dose in good agreement with Monte Carlo results. (Author).

  10. Radiation dose considerations by intra-individual Monte Carlo simulations in dual source spiral coronary computed tomography angiography with electrocardiogram-triggered tube current modulation and adaptive pitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Matthias S.; Kuettner, Axel; Lell, Michael M.; Wuest, Wolfgang; Scharf, Michael; Uder, Michael [University of Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Deak, Paul; Kalender, Willi A. [University of Erlangen, Department of Medical Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Keller, Andrea K.; Haeberle, Lothar [University of Erlangen, Department of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, Erlangen (Germany); Achenbach, Stephan; Seltmann, Martin [University of Erlangen, Department of Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate radiation dose levels in patients undergoing spiral coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) on a dual-source system in clinical routine. Coronary CTA was performed for 56 patients with electrocardiogram-triggered tube current modulation (TCM) and heart-rate (HR) dependent pitch adaptation. Individual Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed for dose assessment. Retrospective simulations with constant tube current (CTC) served as reference. Lung tissue was segmented and used for organ and effective dose (ED) calculation. Estimates for mean relative ED was 7.1 {+-} 2.1 mSv/100 mAs for TCM and 12.5 {+-} 5.3 mSv/100 mAs for CTC (P < 0.001). Relative dose reduction at low HR ({<=}60 bpm) was highest (49 {+-} 5%) compared to intermediate (60-70 bpm, 33 {+-} 12%) and high HR (>70 bpm, 29 {+-} 12%). However lowest ED is achieved at high HR (5.2 {+-} 1.5 mSv/100 mAs), compared with intermediate (6.7 {+-} 1.6 mSv/100 mAs) and low (8.3 {+-} 2.1 mSv/100 mAs) HR when automated pitch adaptation is applied. Radiation dose savings up to 52% are achievable by TCM at low and regular HR. However lowest ED is attained at high HR by pitch adaptation despite inferior radiation dose reduction by TCM. circle Monte Carlo simulations allow for individual radiation dose calculations. (orig.)

  11. Subsampling Realised Kernels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Hansen, Peter Reinhard; Lunde, Asger

    2011-01-01

    analysis, looking at the class of subsampled realised kernels and we derive the limit theory for this class of estimators. We find that subsampling is highly advantageous for estimators based on discontinuous kernels, such as the truncated kernel. For kinked kernels, such as the Bartlett kernel, we show...

  12. Comprehensive Evaluations of Cone-beam CT dose in Image-guided Radiation Therapy via GPU-based Monte Carlo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Montanari, Davide; Silvestri, Chiara; Graves, Yan J; Yan, Hao; Cervino, Laura; Rice, Roger; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2013-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) has been widely used for patient setup in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Radiation dose from CBCT scans has become a clinical concern. The purposes of this study are 1) to commission a GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation package gCTD for Varian On-Board Imaging (OBI) system and test the calculation accuracy, and 2) to quantitatively evaluate CBCT dose from the OBI system in typical IGRT scan protocols. We first conducted dose measurements in a water phantom. X-ray source model parameters used in gCTD are obtained through a commissioning process. gCTD accuracy is demonstrated by comparing calculations with measurements in water and in CTDI phantoms. 25 brain cancer patients are used to study dose in a standard-dose head protocol, and 25 prostate cancer patients are used to study dose in pelvis protocol and pelvis spotlight protocol. Mean dose to each organ is calculated. Mean dose to 2% voxels that have the highest dose is also computed to quantify the maximum dose. It is fo...

  13. The effect of voxel size on dose distribution in Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yani, Sitti; Dirgayussa, I. Gde E.; Rhani, Moh. Fadhillah; Haryanto, Freddy; Arif, Idam

    2015-09-01

    Recently, Monte Carlo (MC) calculation method has reported as the most accurate method of predicting dose distributions in radiotherapy. The MC code system (especially DOSXYZnrc) has been used to investigate the different voxel (volume elements) sizes effect on the accuracy of dose distributions. To investigate this effect on dosimetry parameters, calculations were made with three different voxel sizes. The effects were investigated with dose distribution calculations for seven voxel sizes: 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm3, 1 × 1 × 0.5 cm3, and 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm3. The 1 × 109 histories were simulated in order to get statistical uncertainties of 2%. This simulation takes about 9-10 hours to complete. Measurements are made with field sizes 10 × 10 cm2 for the 6 MV photon beams with Gaussian intensity distribution FWHM 0.1 cm and SSD 100.1 cm. MC simulated and measured dose distributions in a water phantom. The output of this simulation i.e. the percent depth dose and dose profile in dmax from the three sets of calculations are presented and comparisons are made with the experiment data from TTSH (Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore) in 0-5 cm depth. Dose that scored in voxels is a volume averaged estimate of the dose at the center of a voxel. The results in this study show that the difference between Monte Carlo simulation and experiment data depend on the voxel size both for percent depth dose (PDD) and profile dose. PDD scan on Z axis (depth) of water phantom, the big difference obtain in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm3 about 17%. In this study, the profile dose focused on high gradient dose area. Profile dose scan on Y axis and the big difference get in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm3 about 12%. This study demonstrated that the arrange voxel in Monte Carlo simulation becomes important.

  14. The effect of voxel size on dose distribution in Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yani, Sitti, E-mail: sitti.yani@s.itb.ac.id [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Division, Physics Department, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Akademi Kebidanan Pelita Ibu, Kendari (Indonesia); Dirgayussa, I Gde E.; Haryanto, Freddy; Arif, Idam [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Division, Physics Department, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Rhani, Moh. Fadhillah [Tan Tock Seng Hospital (Singapore)

    2015-09-30

    Recently, Monte Carlo (MC) calculation method has reported as the most accurate method of predicting dose distributions in radiotherapy. The MC code system (especially DOSXYZnrc) has been used to investigate the different voxel (volume elements) sizes effect on the accuracy of dose distributions. To investigate this effect on dosimetry parameters, calculations were made with three different voxel sizes. The effects were investigated with dose distribution calculations for seven voxel sizes: 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 × 1 × 0.5 cm{sup 3}, and 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm{sup 3}. The 1 × 10{sup 9} histories were simulated in order to get statistical uncertainties of 2%. This simulation takes about 9-10 hours to complete. Measurements are made with field sizes 10 × 10 cm2 for the 6 MV photon beams with Gaussian intensity distribution FWHM 0.1 cm and SSD 100.1 cm. MC simulated and measured dose distributions in a water phantom. The output of this simulation i.e. the percent depth dose and dose profile in d{sub max} from the three sets of calculations are presented and comparisons are made with the experiment data from TTSH (Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore) in 0-5 cm depth. Dose that scored in voxels is a volume averaged estimate of the dose at the center of a voxel. The results in this study show that the difference between Monte Carlo simulation and experiment data depend on the voxel size both for percent depth dose (PDD) and profile dose. PDD scan on Z axis (depth) of water phantom, the big difference obtain in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm{sup 3} about 17%. In this study, the profile dose focused on high gradient dose area. Profile dose scan on Y axis and the big difference get in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm{sup 3} about 12%. This study demonstrated that the arrange voxel in Monte Carlo simulation becomes important.

  15. Calculation of electron dose to target cells in a complex environment by Monte Carlo code ''CELLDOSE''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindie, Elif; Moretti, Jean-Luc [Hopital Saint-Louis, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Paris (France)]|[Universite Paris 7, Imagerie Moleculaire Diagnostique et Ciblage Therapeutique, Paris (France); Champion, Christophe [Universite Paul Verlaine, Laboratoire de Physique Moleculaire et des Collisions, Metz Institut de Physique, Metz (France); Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Ravasi, Laura [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DSV/I2BM/SHFJ/LIME, Orsay (France); Rubello, Domenico [Instituto Oncologico Veneto (IOV) - IRCCS, Department of Nuclear Medicine - PET Centre, Rovigo (Italy); Colas-Linhart, Nicole [Faculte de Medecine Xavier Bichat, Laboratoire de Biophysique, Paris (France)

    2009-01-15

    We used the Monte Carlo code ''CELLDOSE'' to assess the dose received by specific target cells from electron emissions in a complex environment. {sup 131}I in a simulated thyroid was used as a model. Thyroid follicles were represented by 170{mu}m diameter spherical units made of a lumen of 150{mu}m diameter containing colloidal matter and a peripheral layer of 10{mu}m thick thyroid cells. Neighbouring follicles are 4{mu}m apart. {sup 131}I was assumed to be homogeneously distributed in the lumen and absent in cells. We firstly assessed electron dose distribution in a single follicle. Then, we expanded the simulation by progressively adding neighbouring layers of follicles, so to reassess the electron dose to this single follicle implemented with the contribution of the added layers. Electron dose gradient around a point source showed that the {sup 131}I electron dose is close to zero after 2,100{mu}m. Therefore, we studied all contributions to the central follicle deriving from follicles within 12 orders of neighbourhood (15,624 follicles surrounding the central follicle). The dose to colloid of the single follicle was twice as high as the dose to thyroid cells. Even when all neighbours were taken into account, the dose in the central follicle remained heterogeneous. For a 1-Gy average dose to tissue, the dose to colloidal matter was 1.168 Gy, the dose to thyroid cells was 0.982 Gy, and the dose to the inter-follicular tissue was 0.895 Gy. Analysis of the different contributions to thyroid cell dose showed that 17.3% of the dose derived from the colloidal matter of their own follicle, while the remaining 82.7% was delivered by the surrounding follicles. On the basis of these data, it is shown that when different follicles contain different concentrations of {sup 131}I, the impact in terms of cell dose heterogeneity can be important. By means of {sup 131}I in the thyroid as a theoretical model, we showed how a Monte Carlo code can be used to map

  16. SU-E-T-632: Preliminary Study On Treating Nose Skin Using Energy and Intensity Modulated Electron Beams with Monte Carlo Based Dose Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, L; Eldib, A; Li, J; Price, R; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Uneven nose surfaces and air cavities underneath and the use of bolus present complexity and dose uncertainty when using a single electron energy beam to plan treatments of nose skin with a pencil beam-based planning system. This work demonstrates more accurate dose calculation and more optimal planning using energy and intensity modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) delivered with a pMLC. Methods: An in-house developed Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose calculation/optimization planning system was employed for treatment planning. Phase space data (6, 9, 12 and 15 MeV) were used as an input source for MC dose calculations for the linac. To reduce the scatter-caused penumbra, a short SSD (61 cm) was used. Our previous work demonstrates good agreement in percentage depth dose and off-axis dose between calculations and film measurement for various field sizes. A MERT plan was generated for treating the nose skin using a patient geometry and a dose volume histogram (DVH) was obtained. The work also shows the comparison of 2D dose distributions between a clinically used conventional single electron energy plan and the MERT plan. Results: The MERT plan resulted in improved target dose coverage as compared to the conventional plan, which demonstrated a target dose deficit at the field edge. The conventional plan showed higher dose normal tissue irradiation underneath the nose skin while the MERT plan resulted in improved conformity and thus reduces normal tissue dose. Conclusion: This preliminary work illustrates that MC-based MERT planning is a promising technique in treating nose skin, not only providing more accurate dose calculation, but also offering an improved target dose coverage and conformity. In addition, this technique may eliminate the necessity of bolus, which often produces dose delivery uncertainty due to the air gaps that may exist between the bolus and skin.

  17. Consequences of removing the flattening filter from linear accelerators in generating high dose rate photon beams for clinical applications: A Monte Carlo study verified by measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishmael Parsai, E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toledo, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States)]. E-mail: Ishmael.parsai@utoledo.edu; Pearson, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toledo, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Kvale, Thomas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    An Elekta SL-25 medical linear accelerator (Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK) has been modelled using Monte Carlo simulations with the photon flattening filter removed. It is hypothesized that intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments may be carried out after the removal of this component despite it's criticality to standard treatments. Measurements using a scanning water phantom were also performed after the flattening filter had been removed. Both simulated and measured beam profiles showed that dose on the central axis increased, with the Monte Carlo simulations showing an increase by a factor of 2.35 for 6 MV and 4.18 for 10 MV beams. A further consequence of removing the flattening filter was the softening of the photon energy spectrum leading to a steeper reduction in dose at depths greater than the depth of maximum dose. A comparison of the points at the field edge showed that dose was reduced at these points by as much as 5.8% for larger fields. In conclusion, the greater photon fluence is expected to result in shorter treatment times, while the reduction in dose outside of the treatment field is strongly suggestive of more accurate dose delivery to the target.

  18. Scintillating fiber based in-vivo dose monitoring system to the rectum in proton therapy of prostate cancer: A Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biniam Yohannes Tesfamicael

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To construct a dose monitoring system based on an endorectal balloon coupled to thin scintillating fibers to study the dose to the rectum in proton therapy of prostate cancer.Method: A Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit was used to simulate the proton therapy of prostate cancer, with an endorectal balloon and a set of scintillating fibers for immobilization and dosimetry measurements, respectively.Results: A linear response of the fibers to the dose delivered was observed to within less than 2%. Results obtained show that fibers close to the prostate recorded higher dose, with the closest fiber recording about one-third of the dose to the target. A 1/r2 (r is defined as center-to-center distance between the prostate and the fibers decrease was observed as one goes toward the frontal and distal regions. A very low dose was recorded by the fibers beneath the balloon which is a clear indication that the overall volume of the rectal wall that is exposed to a higher dose is relatively minimized. Further analysis showed a relatively linear relationship between the dose to the target and the dose to the top fibers (total 17, with a slope of (-0.07 ± 0.07 at large number of events per degree of rotation of the modulator wheel (i.e., dose.Conclusion: Thin (1 mm × 1 mm, long (1 m scintillating fibers were found to be ideal for real time in-vivo dose measurement to the rectum during proton therapy of prostate cancer. The linear response of the fibers to the dose delivered makes them good candidates as dosimeters. With thorough calibration and the ability to define a good correlation between the dose to the target and the dose to the fibers, such dosimeters can be used for real time dose verification to the target.-----------------------------------Cite this article as: Tesfamicael BY, Avery S, Gueye P, Lyons D, Mahesh M. Scintillating fiber based in-vivo dose monitoring system to the rectum in proton therapy of prostate cancer: A Geant4 Monte Carlo

  19. Study of the heterogeneities effect in the dose distributions of Leksell Gamma Knife (R), through Monte Carlo simulation; Estudio del efecto de las heterogeneidades en las distribuciones de dosis del Leksell GammaKnife (R), mediante simulacion Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas C, E.L. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Al-Dweri, F.M.O.; Lallena R, A.M. [Universidad de Granada, Granada (Spain)]. e-mail: elrc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2005-07-01

    In this work they are studied, by means of Monte Carlo simulation, the effects that take place in the dose profiles that are obtained with the Leksell Gamma Knife (R), when they are kept in account heterogeneities. The considered heterogeneities simulate the skull and the spaces of air that are in the head, like they can be the nasal breasts or the auditory conduits. The calculations were made using the Monte Carlo Penelope simulation code (v. 2003). The geometry of each one of the 201 sources that this instrument is composed, as well as of the corresponding channels of collimation of the Gamma Knife (R), it was described by means of a simplified model of geometry that has been recently studied. The obtained results when they are kept in mind the heterogeneities they present non worthless differences regarding those obtained when those are not considered. These differences are maximum in the proximities of the interfaces among different materials. (Author)

  20. Calculation of size specific dose estimates (SSDE) value at cylindrical phantom from CBCT Varian OBI v1.4 X-ray tube EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation based

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, M.; Pratama, D.; Anam, C.; Haryanto, F.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this research was to calculate Size Specific Dose Estimates (SSDE) generated by the varian OBI CBCT v1.4 X-ray tube working at 100 kV using EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo code used in this simulation was divided into two parts. Phase space file data resulted by the first part simulation became an input to the second part. This research was performed with varying phantom diameters of 5 to 35 cm and varying phantom lengths of 10 to 25 cm. Dose distribution data were used to calculate SSDE values using trapezoidal rule (trapz) function in a Matlab program. SSDE obtained from this calculation was compared to that in AAPM report and experimental data. It was obtained that the normalization of SSDE value for each phantom diameter was between 1.00 and 3.19. The normalization of SSDE value for each phantom length was between 0.96 and 1.07. The statistical error in this simulation was 4.98% for varying phantom diameters and 5.20% for varying phantom lengths. This study demonstrated the accuracy of the Monte Carlo technique in simulating the dose calculation. In the future, the influence of cylindrical phantom material to SSDE would be studied.

  1. Monte Carlo study of the impact of a magnetic field on the dose distribution in MRI-guided HDR brachytherapy using Ir-192

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beld, E.; Seevinck, P. R.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Viergever, M. A.; Moerland, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    In the process of developing a robotic MRI-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy treatment, the influence of the MRI scanner’s magnetic field on the dose distribution needs to be investigated. A magnetic field causes a deflection of electrons in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field, and it leads to less lateral scattering along the direction parallel with the magnetic field. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to determine the influence of the magnetic field on the electron behavior and on the total dose distribution around an Ir-192 source. Furthermore, the influence of air pockets being present near the source was studied. The Monte Carlo package Geant4 was utilized for the simulations. The simulated geometries consisted of a simplified point source inside a water phantom. Magnetic field strengths of 0 T, 1.5 T, 3 T, and 7 T were considered. The simulation results demonstrated that the dose distribution was nearly unaffected by the magnetic field for all investigated magnetic field strengths. Evidence was found that, from a dose perspective, the HDR prostate brachytherapy treatment using Ir-192 can be performed safely inside the MRI scanner. No need was found to account for the magnetic field during treatment planning. Nevertheless, the presence of air pockets in close vicinity to the source, particularly along the direction parallel with the magnetic field, appeared to be an important point for consideration.

  2. SU-E-T-235: Monte Carlo Analysis of the Dose Enhancement in the Scalp of Patients Due to Titanium Plate Backscatter During Post-Operative Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, M; Elson, H; Lamba, M [University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Wolf, E [Precision Radiotherapy, West Chester, OH (United States); Warnick, R [UC Health Physicians, West Chester, OH (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the clinically observed dose enhancement adjacent to cranial titanium fixation plates during post-operative radiotherapy. Methods: Irradiation of a titanium burr hole cover was simulated using Monte Carlo code MCNPX for a 6 MV photon spectrum to investigate backscatter dose enhancement due to increased production of secondary electrons within the titanium plate. The simulated plate was placed 3 mm deep in a water phantom, and dose deposition was tallied for 0.2 mm thick cells adjacent to the entrance and exit sides of the plate. These results were compared to a simulation excluding the presence of the titanium to calculate relative dose enhancement on the entrance and exit sides of the plate. To verify simulated results, two titanium burr hole covers (Synthes, Inc. and Biomet, Inc.) were irradiated with 6 MV photons in a solid water phantom containing GafChromic MD-55 film. The phantom was irradiated on a Varian 21EX linear accelerator at multiple gantry angles (0–180 degrees) to analyze the angular dependence of the backscattered radiation. Relative dose enhancement was quantified using computer software. Results: Monte Carlo simulations indicate a relative difference of 26.4% and 7.1% on the entrance and exit sides of the plate respectively. Film dosimetry results using a similar geometry indicate a relative difference of 13% and -10% on the entrance and exit sides of the plate respectively. Relative dose enhancement on the entrance side of the plate decreased with increasing gantry angle from 0 to 180 degrees. Conclusion: Film and simulation results demonstrate an increase in dose to structures immediately adjacent to cranial titanium fixation plates. Increased beam obliquity has shown to alleviate dose enhancement to some extent. These results are consistent with clinically observed effects.

  3. A 3D Monte Carlo Method for Estimation of Patient-specific Internal Organs Absorbed Dose for (99m)Tc-hynic-Tyr(3)-octreotide Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momennezhad, Mehdi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul; Parach, Ali Asghar; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Asl, Ruhollah Ghahraman

    2016-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-based tracers are easily available and more widely used than positron emission tomography (PET)-based tracers, and SPECT imaging still remains the most prevalent nuclear medicine imaging modality worldwide. The aim of this study is to implement an image-based Monte Carlo method for patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) absorbed dose calculation in patients after injection of (99m)Tc-hydrazinonicotinamide (hynic)-Tyr(3)-octreotide as a SPECT radiotracer. (99m)Tc patient-specific S values and the absorbed doses were calculated with GATE code for each source-target organ pair in four patients who were imaged for suspected neuroendocrine tumors. Each patient underwent multiple whole-body planar scans as well as SPECT imaging over a period of 1-24 h after intravenous injection of (99m)hynic-Tyr(3)-octreotide. The patient-specific S values calculated by GATE Monte Carlo code and the corresponding S values obtained by MIRDOSE program differed within 4.3% on an average for self-irradiation, and differed within 69.6% on an average for cross-irradiation. However, the agreement between total organ doses calculated by GATE code and MIRDOSE program for all patients was reasonably well (percentage difference was about 4.6% on an average). Normal and tumor absorbed doses calculated with GATE were slightly higher than those calculated with MIRDOSE program. The average ratio of GATE absorbed doses to MIRDOSE was 1.07 ± 0.11 (ranging from 0.94 to 1.36). According to the results, it is proposed that when cross-organ irradiation is dominant, a comprehensive approach such as GATE Monte Carlo dosimetry be used since it provides more reliable dosimetric results.

  4. SU-E-T-356: Accuracy of Eclipse Electron Macro Monte Carlo Dose Algorithm for Use in Bolus Electron Conformal Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carver, R [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Popple, R; Benhabib, S [UniversityAlabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United Kingdom); Antolak, J [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Sprunger, C [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Hogstrom, K [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of electron dose distribution calculated by the Varian Eclipse electron Monte Carlo (eMC) algorithm for use with recent commercially available bolus electron conformal therapy (ECT). Methods: eMC-calculated electron dose distributions for bolus ECT have been compared to those previously measured for cylindrical phantoms (retromolar trigone and nose), whose axial cross sections were based on the mid-PTV CT anatomy for each site. The phantoms consisted of SR4 muscle substitute, SR4 bone substitute, and air. The bolus ECT treatment plans were imported into the Eclipse treatment planning system and calculated using the maximum allowable histories (2×10{sup 9}), resulting in a statistical error of <0.2%. Smoothing was not used for these calculations. Differences between eMC-calculated and measured dose distributions were evaluated in terms of absolute dose difference as well as distance to agreement (DTA). Results: Results from the eMC for the retromolar trigone phantom showed 89% (41/46) of dose points within 3% dose difference or 3 mm DTA. There was an average dose difference of −0.12% with a standard deviation of 2.56%. Results for the nose phantom showed 95% (54/57) of dose points within 3% dose difference or 3 mm DTA. There was an average dose difference of 1.12% with a standard deviation of 3.03%. Dose calculation times for the retromolar trigone and nose treatment plans were 15 min and 22 min, respectively, using 16 processors (Intel Xeon E5-2690, 2.9 GHz) on a Varian Eclipse framework agent server (FAS). Results of this study were consistent with those previously reported for accuracy of the eMC electron dose algorithm and for the .decimal, Inc. pencil beam redefinition algorithm used to plan the bolus. Conclusion: These results show that the accuracy of the Eclipse eMC algorithm is suitable for clinical implementation of bolus ECT.

  5. Review of the dose-to-water energy dependence of alanine and lithium formate EPR dosimeters and LiF TL-dosimeters - Comparison with Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldeland, Einar, E-mail: einar.waldeland@oslo-universitetssykehus.no [Department of Medical Physics, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, P.O. Box 4953 Nydalen, N-0424 Oslo (Norway); Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Malinen, Eirik [Department of Medical Physics, Oslo University Hospital, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, P.O. Box 4953 Nydalen, N-0424 Oslo (Norway); Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway)

    2011-09-15

    The dose-to-water energy dependence may be defined as the dosimeter reading per absorbed dose to water for a given radiation beam relative to that for {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays. The purpose of this work was to review the literature on the dose-to-water energy dependence of lithium formate and alanine EPR dosimeters and LiF:Mg,Ti TL-dosimeters for clinical beam qualities and to compare the findings with Monte Carlo simulations. Monte Carlo simulations of the energy dependence of lithium formate and alanine EPR dosimeters and LiF:Mg,Ti TL-dosimeters were performed using the EGSnrc code. The following common clinical radiation qualities were applied: 4-24 MV photons, 4-20 MeV electrons, 50-200 kV{sub p} X-rays, {sup 192}Ir {gamma} rays, and {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays as the reference. All dosimeter materials showed measured and Monte Carlo simulated energy responses around unity for MV photons, electrons and {sup 192}Ir {gamma} rays, except LiF TL-dosimeters which showed an average underresponse of approximately 3% for electrons. For medium energy X-rays (50-200 kV{sub p}), LiF displayed an increasing overresponse with decreasing energy to a maximum of about 40% for 50 kV{sub p} X-rays. The two EPR dosimeter materials showed decreasing energy response with decreasing X-ray energy, but lithium formate was less dependent on energy than alanine. Comparisons between Monte Carlo simulations and measurements revealed some deviations for medium energy X-rays, which may be due to LET-effects caused by low energy electrons. In conclusion, lithium formate is the dosimeter material with the lowest energy dependence over a wide range of clinically relevant radiation qualities, which clearly is advantageous for accurate dosimetry.

  6. Fluence to absorbed dose, effective dose and gray equivalent conversion coefficients for iron nuclei from 10 MeV to 1 TeV, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Kyle; Parker, Donald E; Friedberg, Wallace

    2010-03-01

    Conversion coefficients have been calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult male and an adult female to (56)Fe(26+) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). The coefficients were calculated using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.A and BodyBuilder 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms modified to allow calculation of effective dose using tissues and tissue weighting factors from either the 1990 or 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Calculations using ICRP 2007 recommendations result in fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients that are almost identical at most energies to those calculated using ICRP 1990 recommendations.

  7. Alpha particles at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, effective dose, and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Kyle; Parker, Donald E; Friedberg, Wallace

    2010-03-01

    Conversion coefficients have been calculated for fluence to absorbed dose, fluence to effective dose and fluence to gray equivalent, for isotropic exposure to alpha particles in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). The coefficients were calculated using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.A and BodyBuilder 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms modified to allow calculation of effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Coefficients for effective dose are within 30 % of those calculated using ICRP 1990 recommendations.

  8. An Analytic Linear Accelerator Source Model for Monte Carlo dose calculations. II. Model Utilization in a GPU-based Monte Carlo Package and Automatic Source Commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Zhen; Li, Yongbao; Shi, Feng; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2015-01-01

    We recently built an analytical source model for GPU-based MC dose engine. In this paper, we present a sampling strategy to efficiently utilize this source model in GPU-based dose calculation. Our source model was based on a concept of phase-space-ring (PSR). This ring structure makes it effective to account for beam rotational symmetry, but not suitable for dose calculations due to rectangular jaw settings. Hence, we first convert PSR source model to its phase-space let (PSL) representation. Then in dose calculation, different types of sub-sources were separately sampled. Source sampling and particle transport were iterated. So that the particles being sampled and transported simultaneously are of same type and close in energy to alleviate GPU thread divergence. We also present an automatic commissioning approach to adjust the model for a good representation of a clinical linear accelerator . Weighting factors were introduced to adjust relative weights of PSRs, determined by solving a quadratic minimization ...

  9. Simulation of nanostructural evolution under irradiation in Fe-9%CrC alloys: An object kinetic Monte Carlo study of the effect of temperature and dose-rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chiapetto

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work explores the effects of both temperature and dose-rate on the nanostructural evolution under irradiation of the Fe-9%CrC alloy, model material for high-Cr ferritic/martensitic steels. Starting from an object kinetic Monte Carlo model validated at 563K, we investigate here the accumulation of radiation damage as a function of temperature and dose-rate, attempting to highlight its connection with low-temperature radiation-induced hardening. The results show that the defect cluster mobility becomes high enough to partially counteract the material hardening process only above ∼290°C, while high fluxes are responsible for higher densities of defects, so that an increase of the hardening process with increasing dose-rates may be expected.

  10. Monte Carlo modeling of a 6 and 18 MV Varian Clinac medical accelerator for in-field and out-of-field dose calculations: development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Bryan; Xu, X George

    2009-02-21

    There is a serious and growing concern about the increased risk of radiation-induced second cancers and late tissue injuries associated with radiation treatment. To better understand and to more accurately quantify non-target organ doses due to scatter and leakage radiation from medical accelerators, a detailed Monte Carlo model of the medical linear accelerator is needed. This paper describes the development and validation of a detailed accelerator model of the Varian Clinac operating at 6 and 18 MV beam energies. Over 100 accelerator components have been defined and integrated using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. A series of in-field and out-of-field dose validation studies were performed. In-field dose distributions calculated using the accelerator models were tuned to match measurement data that are considered the de facto 'gold standard' for the Varian Clinac accelerator provided by the manufacturer. Field sizes of 4 cm x 4 cm, 10 cm x 10 cm, 20 cm x 20 cm and 40 cm x 40 cm were considered. The local difference between calculated and measured dose on the percent depth dose curve was less than 2% for all locations. The local difference between calculated and measured dose on the dose profile curve was less than 2% in the plateau region and less than 2 mm in the penumbra region for all locations. Out-of-field dose profiles were calculated and compared to measurement data for both beam energies for field sizes of 4 cm x 4 cm, 10 cm x 10 cm and 20 cm x 20 cm. For all field sizes considered in this study, the average local difference between calculated and measured dose for the 6 and 18 MV beams was 14 and 16%, respectively. In addition, a method for determining neutron contamination in the 18 MV operating model was validated by comparing calculated in-air neutron fluence with reported calculations and measurements. The average difference between calculated and measured neutron fluence was 20%. As one of the most detailed accelerator models for both in-field and out

  11. SU-E-I-42: Normalized Embryo/fetus Doses for Fluoroscopically Guided Pacemaker Implantation Procedures Calculated Using a Monte Carlo Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damilakis, J; Stratakis, J; Solomou, G [University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is well known that pacemaker implantation is sometimes needed in pregnant patients with symptomatic bradycardia. To our knowledge, there is no reported experience regarding radiation doses to the unborn child resulting from fluoroscopy during pacemaker implantation. The purpose of the current study was to develop a method for estimating embryo/fetus dose from fluoroscopically guided pacemaker implantation procedures performed on pregnant patients during all trimesters of gestation. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was employed in this study. Three mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing the average pregnant patient at the first, second and third trimesters of gestation were generated using Bodybuilder software (White Rock science, White Rock, NM). The normalized embryo/fetus dose from the posteroanterior (PA), the 30° left-anterior oblique (LAO) and the 30° right-anterior oblique (RAO) projections were calculated for a wide range of kVp (50–120 kVp) and total filtration values (2.5–9.0 mm Al). Results: The results consist of radiation doses normalized to a) entrance skin dose (ESD) and b) dose area product (DAP) so that the dose to the unborn child from any fluoroscopic technique and x-ray device used can be calculated. ESD normalized doses ranged from 0.008 (PA, first trimester) to 2.519 μGy/mGy (RAO, third trimester). DAP normalized doses ranged from 0.051 (PA, first trimester) to 12.852 μGy/Gycm2 (RAO, third trimester). Conclusion: Embryo/fetus doses from fluoroscopically guided pacemaker implantation procedures performed on pregnant patients during all stages of gestation can be estimated using the method developed in this study. This study was supported by the Greek Ministry of Education and Religious Affairs, General Secretariat for Research and Technology, Operational Program ‘Education and Lifelong Learning’, ARISTIA (Research project: CONCERT)

  12. CELLDOSE: A Monte Carlo code to assess electron dose distribution - S values for {sup 131}I in spheres of various sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champion, C. [Univ Metz, Lab Phys Mol et Collis, Inst Phys, F-57078 Metz 3 (France); Zanotti-Fregonara, P. [Commissariat Energie Atom, DSV, I2BM, SHFJ, LIME, Orsay (France); Hindie, E [Hop St Louis, AP-HP, Paris (France); Hindie, E. [Imagerie Mol Diagnost et Ciblage Therapeut, Ecole Doctorale B2T, IUH, Paris, Univ Paris 07 (France)

    2008-07-01

    Monte Carlo simulation can be particularly suitable for modeling the microscopic distribution of energy received by normal tissues or cancer cells and for evaluating the relative merits of different radiopharmaceuticals. We used a new code, CELLDOSE, to assess electron dose for isolated spheres with radii varying from 2,500 {mu}m down to 0.05 {mu}m, in which {sup 131}I is homogeneously distributed. Methods: All electron emissions of {sup 131}I were considered,including the whole {beta}{sup -} {sup 131}I spectrum, 108 internal conversion electrons, and 21 Auger electrons. The Monte Carlo track-structure code used follows all electrons down to an energy threshold E-cutoff 7.4 eV. Results: Calculated S values were in good agreement with published analytic methods, lying in between reported results for all experimental points. Our S values were also close to other published data using a Monte Carlo code. Contrary to the latter published results, our results show that dose distribution inside spheres is not homogeneous, with the dose at the outmost layer being approximately half that at the center. The fraction of electron energy retained within the spheres decreased with decreasing radius (r): 87.1 % for r 2,500 {mu}m, 8.73% for r 50 {mu}m, and 1.18% for r 5 {mu}m. Thus, a radioiodine concentration that delivers a dose of 100 Gy to a micro-metastasis of 2,500 {mu}m radius would deliver 10 Gy in a cluster of 50 {mu}m and only 1.4 Gy in an isolated cell. The specific contribution from Auger electrons varied from 0.25% for the largest sphere up to 76.8% for the smallest sphere. Conclusion: The dose to a tumor cell will depend on its position in a metastasis. For the treatment of very small metastases, {sup 131}I may not be the isotope of choice. When trying to kill isolated cells or a small cluster of cells with {sup 131}I, it is important to get the iodine as close as possible to the nucleus to get the enhancement factor from Auger electrons. The Monte Carlo code

  13. SU-E-T-561: Monte Carlo-Based Organ Dose Reconstruction Using Pre-Contoured Human Model for Hodgkins Lymphoma Patients Treated by Cobalt-60 External Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J; Pelletier, C [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Lee, C [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kim, J [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Pyakuryal, A; Lee, C [National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Organ doses for the Hodgkin’s lymphoma patients treated with cobalt-60 radiation were estimated using an anthropomorphic model and Monte Carlo modeling. Methods: A cobalt-60 treatment unit modeled in the BEAMnrc Monte Carlo code was used to produce phase space data. The Monte Carlo simulation was verified with percent depth dose measurement in water at various field sizes. Radiation transport through the lung blocks were modeled by adjusting the weights of phase space data. We imported a precontoured adult female hybrid model and generated a treatment plan. The adjusted phase space data and the human model were imported to the XVMC Monte Carlo code for dose calculation. The organ mean doses were estimated and dose volume histograms were plotted. Results: The percent depth dose agreement between measurement and calculation in water phantom was within 2% for all field sizes. The mean organ doses of heart, left breast, right breast, and spleen for the selected case were 44.3, 24.1, 14.6 and 3.4 Gy, respectively with the midline prescription dose of 40.0 Gy. Conclusion: Organ doses were estimated for the patient group whose threedimensional images are not available. This development may open the door to more accurate dose reconstruction and estimates of uncertainties in secondary cancer risk for Hodgkin’s lymphoma patients. This work was partially supported by the intramural research program of the National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics.

  14. Effect of the normalized prescription isodose line on the magnitude of Monte Carlo vs. pencil beam target dose differences for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dandan; Zhang, Qinghui; Liang, Xiaoying; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Verma, Vivek; Wang, Shuo; Zhou, Sumin

    2016-07-08

    In lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) cases, the pencil beam (PB) dose calculation algorithm is known to overestimate target dose as compared to the more accurate Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm. We investigated whether changing the normalized prescription isodose line affected the magnitude of MC vs. PB target dose differences. Forty-eight patient plans and twenty virtual-tumor phantom plans were studied. For patient plans, four alternative plans prescribed to 60%, 70%, 80%, and 90% isodose lines were each created for 12 patients who previously received lung SBRT treatments. Using 6 MV dynamic conformal arcs, the plans were individually optimized to achieve similar dose coverage and conformity for all plans of the same patient, albeit at the different prescription levels. These plans, having used a PB algorithm, were all recalculated with MC to compare the target dose differences. The relative MC vs. PB target dose variations were investigated by comparing PTV D95, Dmean, and D5 loss at the four prescription levels. The MC-to-PB ratio of the plan heterogeneity index (HI) was also evaluated and compared among different isodose levels. To definitively demonstrate the cause of the isodose line dependence, a simulated phantom study was conducted using simple, spherical virtual tumors planned with uniform block margins. The tumor size and beam energy were also altered in the phantom study to investigate the interplay between these confounding factors and the isodose line effect. The magnitude of the target dose overestimation by PB was greater for higher prescription isodose levels. The MC vs. PB reduction in the target dose coverage indices, D95 and V100 of PTV, were found to monotonically increase with increasing isodose lines from 60% to 90%, resulting in more pronounced target dose coverage deficiency at higher isodose prescription levels. No isodose level-dependent trend was observed for the dose errors in the target mean or high dose indices, Dmean or D5. The

  15. Comparison of film measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of dose delivered with very high-energy electron beams in a polystyrene phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Liu, Michael; Palma, Bianey; Koong, Albert C.; Maxim, Peter G., E-mail: Peter.Maxim@Stanford.edu, E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu; Loo, Billy W., E-mail: Peter.Maxim@Stanford.edu, E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5847 (United States); Dunning, Michael; McCormick, Doug; Hemsing, Erik; Nelson, Janice; Jobe, Keith; Colby, Eric; Tantawi, Sami; Dolgashev, Valery [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To measure radiation dose in a water-equivalent medium from very high-energy electron (VHEE) beams and make comparisons to Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results. Methods: Dose in a polystyrene phantom delivered by an experimental VHEE beam line was measured with Gafchromic films for three 50 MeV and two 70 MeV Gaussian beams of 4.0–6.9 mm FWHM and compared to corresponding MC-simulated dose distributions. MC dose in the polystyrene phantom was calculated with the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc codes based on the experimental setup. Additionally, the effect of 2% beam energy measurement uncertainty and possible non-zero beam angular spread on MC dose distributions was evaluated. Results: MC simulated percentage depth dose (PDD) curves agreed with measurements within 4% for all beam sizes at both 50 and 70 MeV VHEE beams. Central axis PDD at 8 cm depth ranged from 14% to 19% for the 5.4–6.9 mm 50 MeV beams and it ranged from 14% to 18% for the 4.0–4.5 mm 70 MeV beams. MC simulated relative beam profiles of regularly shaped Gaussian beams evaluated at depths of 0.64 to 7.46 cm agreed with measurements to within 5%. A 2% beam energy uncertainty and 0.286° beam angular spread corresponded to a maximum 3.0% and 3.8% difference in depth dose curves of the 50 and 70 MeV electron beams, respectively. Absolute dose differences between MC simulations and film measurements of regularly shaped Gaussian beams were between 10% and 42%. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate that relative dose distributions for VHEE beams of 50–70 MeV can be measured with Gafchromic films and modeled with Monte Carlo simulations to an accuracy of 5%. The reported absolute dose differences likely caused by imperfect beam steering and subsequent charge loss revealed the importance of accurate VHEE beam control and diagnostics.

  16. Use of Monte Carlo simulation software for the calculation of the effective dose in cone beam Tomography; Uso del software de simulacion Monte Carlo para el calculo de la dosis efectiva en Tomografia de haz conico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes B, W. O., E-mail: wilsonottobatista@gmail.com [Instituto Federal da Bahia, Rua Emidio dos Santos s/n, Bardalho, 40301-015 Salvador, Bahia (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: In this study irradiation geometry applicable to PCXMC and the consequent calculation of effective dose in applications of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was developed. Two different CBCT equipment s for dental applications were evaluated: Care Stream Cs-9000 3-Dimensional and Gendex GXCB-500 tomographs. Each protocol initially was characterized by measuring the surface kerma input and the product air kerma-area, P{sub KA}. Then, technical parameters of each of the predetermined protocols and geometric conditions in the PCXMC software were introduced to obtain the values of effective dose. The calculated effective dose is within the range of 9.0 to 15.7 μSv for Cs 9000 3-D and in the range 44.5 to 89 mSv for GXCB-500 equipment. These values were compared with dosimetric results obtained using thermoluminescent dosimeters implanted in anthropomorphic mannequin and were considered consistent. The effective dose results are very sensitive to the radiation geometry (beam position); this represents a factor of fragility software usage, but on the other hand, turns out to be a very useful tool for quick conclusions regarding the optimization process of protocols. We can conclude that the use of Monte Carlo simulation software PCXMC is useful in the evaluation of test protocols of CBCT in dental applications. (Author)

  17. Differences in dose-volumetric data between the analytical anisotropic algorithm and the x-ray voxel Monte Carlo algorithm in stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mampuya, Wambaka Ange [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image–Applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Matsuo, Yukinori, E-mail: ymatsuo@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image–Applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Nakamura, Akira; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Miyabe, Yuki; Narabayashi, Masaru; Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image–Applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the differences in dose-volumetric data obtained using the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) vs the x-ray voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) algorithm for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Dose-volumetric data from 20 patients treated with SBRT for solitary lung cancer generated using the iPlan XVMC for the Novalis system consisting of a 6-MV linear accelerator and micro-multileaf collimators were recalculated with the AAA in Eclipse using the same monitor units and identical beam setup. The mean isocenter dose was 100.2% and 98.7% of the prescribed dose according to XVMC and AAA, respectively. Mean values of the maximal dose (D{sub max}), the minimal dose (D{sub min}), and dose received by 95% volume (D{sub 95}) for the planning target volume (PTV) with XVMC were 104.3%, 75.1%, and 86.2%, respectively. When recalculated with the AAA, those values were 100.8%, 77.1%, and 85.4%, respectively. Mean dose parameter values considered for the normal lung, namely the mean lung dose, V{sub 5}, and V{sub 20}, were 3.7 Gy, 19.4%, and 5.0% for XVMC and 3.6 Gy, 18.3%, and 4.7% for the AAA, respectively. All of these dose-volumetric differences between the 2 algorithms were within 5% of the prescribed dose. The effect of PTV size and tumor location, respectively, on the differences in dose parameters for the PTV between the AAA and XVMC was evaluated. A significant effect of the PTV on the difference in D{sub 95} between the AAA and XVMC was observed (p = 0.03). Differences in the marginal doses, namely D{sub min} and D{sub 95}, were statistically significant between peripherally and centrally located tumors (p = 0.04 and p = 0.02, respectively). Tumor location and volume might have an effect on the differences in dose-volumetric parameters. The differences between AAA and XVMC were considered to be within an acceptable range (<5 percentage points)

  18. Monte Carlo simulations of patient dose perturbations in rotational-type radiotherapy due to a transverse magnetic field: A tomotherapy investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y. M.; Geurts, M.; Smilowitz, J. B.; Bednarz, B. P., E-mail: bbednarz2@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53703 (United States); Sterpin, E. [Molecular Imaging, Radiotherapy and Oncology, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium 1348 (Belgium)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Several groups are exploring the integration of magnetic resonance (MR) image guidance with radiotherapy to reduce tumor position uncertainty during photon radiotherapy. The therapeutic gain from reducing tumor position uncertainty using intrafraction MR imaging during radiotherapy could be partially offset if the negative effects of magnetic field-induced dose perturbations are not appreciated or accounted for. The authors hypothesize that a more rotationally symmetric modality such as helical tomotherapy will permit a systematic mediation of these dose perturbations. This investigation offers a unique look at the dose perturbations due to homogeneous transverse magnetic field during the delivery of Tomotherapy{sup ®} Treatment System plans under varying degrees of rotational beamlet symmetry. Methods: The authors accurately reproduced treatment plan beamlet and patient configurations using the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. This code has a thoroughly benchmarked electromagnetic particle transport physics package well-suited for the radiotherapy energy regime. The three approved clinical treatment plans for this study were for a prostate, head and neck, and lung treatment. The dose heterogeneity index metric was used to quantify the effect of the dose perturbations to the target volumes. Results: The authors demonstrate the ability to reproduce the clinical dose–volume histograms (DVH) to within 4% dose agreement at each DVH point for the target volumes and most planning structures, and therefore, are able to confidently examine the effects of transverse magnetic fields on the plans. The authors investigated field strengths of 0.35, 0.7, 1, 1.5, and 3 T. Changes to the dose heterogeneity index of 0.1% were seen in the prostate and head and neck case, reflecting negligible dose perturbations to the target volumes, a change from 5.5% to 20.1% was observed with the lung case. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the effect of external magnetic fields can

  19. A Monte Carlo study of the relationship between the time structures of prompt gammas and the in-vivo radiation dose in proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Wook-Geun; Min, Chul Hee; Shin, Jae-Ik; Jeong, Jong Hwi; Lee, Se Byeong

    2015-07-01

    For in-vivo range verification in proton therapy, attempts have been made to measure the spatial distribution of the prompt gammas generated by the proton-induced interactions and to determine the proton dose distribution. However, the high energies of prompt gammas and background gammas are still problematic in measuring the distribution. In this study, we suggested a new method for determining the in-vivo range by utilizing the time structure of the prompt gammas formed during the rotation of a range modulation wheel (RMW) in passive scattering proton therapy. To validate the Monte Carlo code simulating the proton beam nozzle, we compared the axial percent depth doses (PDDs) with the measured PDDs for varying beam range from 4.73 to 24.01 cm. Also, we assessed the relationship between the proton dose rate and the time structure of the prompt gammas in a water phantom. The results of the PDD showed agreement within relative errors of 1.1% in the distal range and 2.9% in the modulation width. The average dose difference in the modulation was assessed as less than 1.3% by comparison with the measurements. The time structure of prompt gammas was well-matched, within 0.39 ms, with the proton dose rate, and this enabled an accurate prediction of the in-vivo range.

  20. Clinically applicable Monte Carlo-based biological dose optimization for the treatment of head and neck cancers with spot-scanning proton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Tseung, H Wan Chan; Kreofsky, C R; Ma, D; Beltran, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of fast Monte Carlo (MC) based inverse biological planning for the treatment of head and neck tumors in spot-scanning proton therapy. Methods: Recently, a fast and accurate Graphics Processor Unit (GPU)-based MC simulation of proton transport was developed and used as the dose calculation engine in a GPU-accelerated IMPT optimizer. Besides dose, the dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LETd) can be simultaneously scored, which makes biological dose (BD) optimization possible. To convert from LETd to BD, a linear relation was assumed. Using this novel optimizer, inverse biological planning was applied to 4 patients: 2 small and 1 large thyroid tumor targets, and 1 glioma case. To create these plans, constraints were placed to maintain the physical dose (PD) within 1.25 times the prescription while maximizing target BD. For comparison, conventional IMRT and IMPT plans were created for each case in Eclipse (Varian, Inc). The same critical structure PD constraints were use...

  1. Monte Carlo method studies and a comparative between GEANT4 tool kit and MCNPX to depth dose in medical physics; Estudos do metodo Monte Carlo e um comparativo entre a ferramenta GEANT4 e MCNPX para doses profundas em fisica medica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, Antonio H.M.; Lemke, Ney; Hormaza, Joel M.; Silva, Danilo A. da; Inocente, Guilherme F.; Pazianotto, Mauricio T., E-mail: ahmmagalhaes@gmail.co [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biociencias. Dept. de Fisica e Biofisica

    2009-07-01

    Knowing the depth dose at the central axis is fundamental for the accurate planning of medical treatment systems involving ionizing radiation. With the evolution of the informatics it is possible the utilization of various computational tools such as GEANT4 and the MCNPX, which use the Monte Carlo Method for simulation of such situations, This paper makes a comparative between the two tools for the this type of application

  2. Corrigendum to "Monte Carlo simulations of the secondary neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates from surface to suborbital altitudes and low Earth orbit".

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jaby, Samy

    2016-06-01

    A recent paper published in Life Sciences in Space Research (El-Jaby and Richardson, 2015) presented estimates of the secondary neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates, in air, from surface altitudes up to suborbital altitudes and low Earth orbit. These estimates were based on MCNPX (LANL, 2011) (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) radiation transport simulations of galactic cosmic radiation passing through Earth's atmosphere. During a recent review of the input decks used for these simulations, a systematic error was discovered that is addressed here. After reassessment, the neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates estimated are found to be 10 to 15% different, though, the essence of the conclusions drawn remains unchanged.

  3. Monte Carlo simulations to calculate energy doses in a cow after continuous ingestion of CS 137 and K 40; Monte-Carlo-Simulationen zur Berechnung der Energiedosis in einem Rind nach kontinuierlicher Aufnahme von CS 137 und K 40

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichl, E. [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Medizintechnik; Rabitsch, H. [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Arbeitsgebiet Strahlenphysik

    2009-07-01

    Currently ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection) develops a new recommendation to estimate the natural radiation exposure of an agreed set of animals and reference plants. For estimating effective dose in humans and animals, the incorporated activities of natural and artificial radionuclides in body tissues and contents of the digestive system have to be known. It was the aim of this investigation to calculate energy doses caused by Cs 137 and K 40 in the reproductive organs (uterus, ovaries) of a cow. During its whole lifetime from 1986 to 1992, the cow incorporated continuously Cs 137 which was due to the fallout following the Chernobyl accident. K 40 occurs naturally in the cow's fodder. The cow was born in a highly contaminated region of Styria, Austria, and was infertile since 1990. The activities of Cs 137 and K 40 in the cow's fodder and in tissues, organs and contents of the digestive system of the carcass were measured simultaneously with the help of semiconductor detectors. To calculate the specific absorbed fractions by means of the Monte Carlo code MCNP, an appropriate simulation model for the reproductive organs and their surrounding tissues was developed. The contents of rectum and urinary bladder account for the main part of the energy dose in the reproductive organs. Comparison of our results with data from other investigations showed, that lifetime accumulation of Cs 137 and K 40 was too low to cause radiation inferred infertility. (orig.)

  4. 基于GPU的蒙特卡洛放疗剂量并行计算%GPU-based Parallel Monte Carlo Simulation for Radiotherapy Dose Calculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甘旸谷; 黄斐增

    2012-01-01

    目的:蒙特卡洛模拟在放疗剂量计算领域被广泛视为最精确的计算方法,但对于日常的临床应用,其效率仍有较大提升需求和空间.方法:本文会呈现放疗剂量计算领域的最新成果-维持相同的粒子输运原理的同时,使用CUDA语言,利用显卡的GPU(Graphic Processing Unit)并行处理蒙特卡洛计算中的主要过程,计算光子剂量沉积.这样既可以保证不失去蒙卡模拟的精度,又可以极大地提高运算速度.结果:实践表明在使用NVIDIA GTX460 1G DDR5 plus INTEL i52300的硬件设备,在GPU上并行计算蒙特卡洛放疗剂量沉积时,计算100万个光子剂量沉积时加速因子达到116.6,处理1000万光子入射,加速因子可达127.5.结论:本文中利用显卡GPU运行CUDA语言对放疗剂量计算进行模拟,是一种可以大幅有效提高剂量计算效率方法.%Objective: Monte Carlo simulation is commonly considered to be the most accurate dose calculation method in radiotherapy. However, its efficiency still requires improvement for many routine clinical applications.Methods: This paper will present recent progresses in GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation. We utilizes the parallel computation ability of a GPU to achieve high efficiency, while maintaining the same particle transport physics as in the original Monte Carlo simulation code and therefore obtains the same level of simulation accuracy. Results: Our research results show that using an NVIDIA GTX460 GPU card against an INTEL i5 2300 in computing a one-million sample with all 336 processor cores working together,speed-up factors can be as high as 116.6,as for a ten-million situation,even obtain a result as high as 127.5. Conclusions:Using GPU and CUDA to process a Monte Carlo simulation can highly improve the efficiency of dose calculation.

  5. Comparison of depth-dose distributions of proton therapeutic beams calculated by means of logical detectors and ionization chamber modeled in Monte Carlo codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Robert; Konefał, Adam; Sokół, Maria; Orlef, Andrzej

    2016-08-01

    The success of proton therapy depends strongly on the precision of treatment planning. Dose distribution in biological tissue may be obtained from Monte Carlo simulations using various scientific codes making it possible to perform very accurate calculations. However, there are many factors affecting the accuracy of modeling. One of them is a structure of objects called bins registering a dose. In this work the influence of bin structure on the dose distributions was examined. The MCNPX code calculations of Bragg curve for the 60 MeV proton beam were done in two ways: using simple logical detectors being the volumes determined in water, and using a precise model of ionization chamber used in clinical dosimetry. The results of the simulations were verified experimentally in the water phantom with Marcus ionization chamber. The average local dose difference between the measured relative doses in the water phantom and those calculated by means of the logical detectors was 1.4% at first 25 mm, whereas in the full depth range this difference was 1.6% for the maximum uncertainty in the calculations less than 2.4% and for the maximum measuring error of 1%. In case of the relative doses calculated with the use of the ionization chamber model this average difference was somewhat greater, being 2.3% at depths up to 25 mm and 2.4% in the full range of depths for the maximum uncertainty in the calculations of 3%. In the dose calculations the ionization chamber model does not offer any additional advantages over the logical detectors. The results provided by both models are similar and in good agreement with the measurements, however, the logical detector approach is a more time-effective method.

  6. A Monte Carlo model for independent dose verification in IMRT and VMAT for the Varian Novalis TX with high definition MLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Vazquez Quino

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: With intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, the physician can prescribe, design and deliver optimized treatment plans that target the tumor and spare adjacent critical structures. The increased conformity of such plans often comes at the expenses of adding significant complexity to the delivery of the treatment. With volumetrically modulated arc therapy (VMAT, in addition to the modulation of the intensity of the radiation beam, other mechanical parameters such as gantry speed and dose rate are varied during treatment delivery. It is therefore imperative that we develop comprehensive and accurate methods to validate such complex delivery techniques prior to the commencement of the patient’s treatment. Methods: In this study, a Monte Carlo simulation was performed for the high definition multileaf collimator (HD-MLC of a Varian Novalis TX linac. Our simulation is based on the MCSIM code and provides a comprehensive model of the linac head. After validating the model in reference geometries, treatment plans for different anatomical sites were simulated and compared against the treatment planning system (TPS dose calculations. All simulations were performed in a cylindrical water phantom as opposed to the patient anatomy, to remove any complexities associated with density effects. Finally, a comparison through gamma analysis of dose plane between the simulation, the TPS and the measurements from the Matrixx array (IBA was conducted to verify the accuracy of our model against both the measurements and the TPS. Results: Gamma analysis of ten IMRT and ten VMAT cases for different anatomical sites was performed, using a 3%/3 mm passing criterion. The average passing rates were 97.5% and 94.3% for the IMRT and the VMAT plans respectively when comparing the MCSIM and TPS dose calculations. Conclusion: In the present work a Monte Carlo model of a Novalis TX linac which has been tested and benchmarked to produce phase-space files for the

  7. Robust Kernel (Cross-) Covariance Operators in Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Space toward Kernel Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, Md. Ashad; Fukumizu, Kenji; Wang, Yu-Ping

    2016-01-01

    To the best of our knowledge, there are no general well-founded robust methods for statistical unsupervised learning. Most of the unsupervised methods explicitly or implicitly depend on the kernel covariance operator (kernel CO) or kernel cross-covariance operator (kernel CCO). They are sensitive to contaminated data, even when using bounded positive definite kernels. First, we propose robust kernel covariance operator (robust kernel CO) and robust kernel crosscovariance operator (robust kern...

  8. A SHORTCUT FORMULA FOR THE 230-MeV PROTON-INDUCED NEUTRON DOSE EQUIVALENT IN CONCRETE AFTER A METAL SHIELD, DERIVED FROM MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS WITH MCNPX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taal, A; van der Kooij, A; Okx, W J C

    2016-11-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed with MCNPX to determine the neutron dose equivalent in thick concrete after a metal shield, a double-layered shielding configuration. In the simulations, a 230-MeV proton beam impinging on a copper target was used to produce the neutrons. For forward angles up to 30° with respect to the proton beam, it is found that the neutron dose equivalent in thick concrete after a metal layer can be expressed in a single formula. This single formula being the neutron dose equivalent formula for a single thick concrete shield enhanced with an additional exponential term. The exponent of this additional exponential term is related to the relative macroscopic neutron removal cross section of the metal with respect to the concrete. The single formula found fits MCNPX data for the neutron dose equivalent in thick concrete after layers of metal ranging from beryllium to lead. First attempts were made to make this shortcut formula applicable to alloys and compounds of metals.

  9. Nonextensive Entropic Kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Berg et al., 1984] has been used in a machine learning context by Cuturi and Vert [2005]. Definition 26 Let (X ,+) be a semigroup .2 A function ϕ : X...R is called pd (in the semigroup sense) if k : X × X → R, defined as k(x, y) = ϕ(x + y), is a pd kernel. Likewise, ϕ is called nd if k is a nd...kernel. Accordingly, these are called semigroup kernels. 7.3 Jensen-Shannon and Tsallis kernels The basic result that allows deriving pd kernels based on

  10. Organ S values and effective doses for family members exposed to adult patients following I-131 treatment: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Eun Young [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas 72205 (United States); Lee, Choonsik [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20852 (United States); Mcguire, Lynn; Brown, Tracy L. Y. [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, University of Arkansas Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas 72205 (United States); Bolch, Wesley E. [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To calculate organ S values (mGy/Bq-s) and effective doses per time-integrated activity (mSv/Bq-s) for pediatric and adult family members exposed to an adult male or female patient treated with I-131 using a series of hybrid computational phantoms coupled with a Monte Carlo radiation transport technique.Methods: A series of pediatric and adult hybrid computational phantoms were employed in the study. Three different exposure scenarios were considered: (1) standing face-to-face exposures between an adult patient and pediatric or adult family phantoms at five different separation distances; (2) an adult female patient holding her newborn child, and (3) a 1-yr-old child standing on the lap of an adult female patient. For the adult patient model, two different thyroid-related diseases were considered: hyperthyroidism and differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) with corresponding internal distributions of {sup 131}I. A general purpose Monte Carlo code, MCNPX v2.7, was used to perform the Monte Carlo radiation transport.Results: The S values show a strong dependency on age and organ location within the family phantoms at short distances. The S values and effective dose per time-integrated activity from the adult female patient phantom are relatively high at shorter distances and to younger family phantoms. At a distance of 1 m, effective doses per time-integrated activity are lower than those values based on the NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) by a factor of 2 for both adult male and female patient phantoms. The S values to target organs from the hyperthyroid-patient source distribution strongly depend on the height of the exposed family phantom, so that their values rapidly decrease with decreasing height of the family phantom. Active marrow of the 10-yr-old phantom shows the highest S values among family phantoms for the DTC-patient source distribution. In the exposure scenario of mother and baby, S values and effective doses per time-integrated activity to

  11. Approximate kernel competitive learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian-Sheng; Zheng, Wei-Shi; Lai, Jian-Huang

    2015-03-01

    Kernel competitive learning has been successfully used to achieve robust clustering. However, kernel competitive learning (KCL) is not scalable for large scale data processing, because (1) it has to calculate and store the full kernel matrix that is too large to be calculated and kept in the memory and (2) it cannot be computed in parallel. In this paper we develop a framework of approximate kernel competitive learning for processing large scale dataset. The proposed framework consists of two parts. First, it derives an approximate kernel competitive learning (AKCL), which learns kernel competitive learning in a subspace via sampling. We provide solid theoretical analysis on why the proposed approximation modelling would work for kernel competitive learning, and furthermore, we show that the computational complexity of AKCL is largely reduced. Second, we propose a pseudo-parallelled approximate kernel competitive learning (PAKCL) based on a set-based kernel competitive learning strategy, which overcomes the obstacle of using parallel programming in kernel competitive learning and significantly accelerates the approximate kernel competitive learning for large scale clustering. The empirical evaluation on publicly available datasets shows that the proposed AKCL and PAKCL can perform comparably as KCL, with a large reduction on computational cost. Also, the proposed methods achieve more effective clustering performance in terms of clustering precision against related approximate clustering approaches.

  12. A critical study of different Monte Carlo scoring methods of dose average linear-energy-transfer maps calculated in voxelized geometries irradiated with clinical proton beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Carabe, A

    2015-04-07

    We compare unrestricted dose average linear energy transfer (LET) maps calculated with three different Monte Carlo scoring methods in voxelized geometries irradiated with proton therapy beams with three different Monte Carlo scoring methods. Simulations were done with the Geant4 (Geometry ANd Tracking) toolkit. The first method corresponds to a step-by-step computation of LET which has been reported previously in the literature. We found that this scoring strategy is influenced by spurious high LET components, which relative contribution in the dose average LET calculations significantly increases as the voxel size becomes smaller. Dose average LET values calculated for primary protons in water with voxel size of 0.2 mm were a factor ~1.8 higher than those obtained with a size of 2.0 mm at the plateau region for a 160 MeV beam. Such high LET components are a consequence of proton steps in which the condensed-history algorithm determines an energy transfer to an electron of the material close to the maximum value, while the step length remains limited due to voxel boundary crossing. Two alternative methods were derived to overcome this problem. The second scores LET along the entire path described by each proton within the voxel. The third followed the same approach of the first method, but the LET was evaluated at each step from stopping power tables according to the proton kinetic energy value. We carried out microdosimetry calculations with the aim of deriving reference dose average LET values from microdosimetric quantities. Significant differences between the methods were reported either with pristine or spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBPs). The first method reported values systematically higher than the other two at depths proximal to SOBP by about 15% for a 5.9 cm wide SOBP and about 30% for a 11.0 cm one. At distal SOBP, the second method gave values about 15% lower than the others. Overall, we found that the third method gave the most consistent

  13. Behaviors of the percentage depth dose curves along the beam axis of a phantom filled with different clinical PTO objects, a Monte Carlo Geant4 study

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL Bakkali, Jaafar; EL Bardouni, Tarek; Safavi, Seyedmostafa; Mohammed, Maged; Saeed, Mroan

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work is to assess the capabilities of Monte Carlo Geant4 code to reproduce the real percentage depth dose (PDD) curves generated in phantoms which mimic three important clinical treatment situations that include lung slab, bone slab, bone-lung slab geometries. It is hoped that this work will lead us to a better understanding of dose distributions in an inhomogeneous medium, and to identify any limitations of dose calculation algorithm implemented in the Geant4 code. For this purpose, the PDD dosimetric functions associated to the three clinical situations described above, were compared to one produced in a homogeneous water phantom. Our results show, firstly, that the Geant4 simulation shows potential mistakes on the shape of the calculated PDD curve of the first physical test object (PTO), and it is obviously not able to successfully predict dose values in regions near to the boundaries between two different materials. This is, surely due to the electron transport algorithm and it is well-known as the artifacts at interface phenomenon. To deal with this issue, we have added and optimized the StepMax parameter to the dose calculation program; consequently the artifacts due to the electron transport were quasi disappeared. However, the Geant4 simulation becomes painfully slow when we attempt to completely resolve the electron artifact problems by considering a smaller value of an electron StepMax parameter. After electron transport optimization, our results demonstrate the medium-level capabilities of the Geant4 code to modeling dose distribution in clinical PTO objects.

  14. Effect of Gold Nanoparticles on Prostate Dose Distribution under Ir-192 Internal and 18 MV External Radiotherapy Procedures Using Gel Dosimetry and Monte Carlo Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosravi H.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gel polymers are considered as new dosimeters for determining radiotherapy dose distribution in three dimensions. Objective: The ability of a new formulation of MAGIC-f polymer gel was assessed by experimental measurement and Monte Carlo (MC method for studying the effect of gold nanoparticles (GNPs in prostate dose distributions under the internal Ir-192 and external 18MV radiotherapy practices. Method: A Plexiglas phantom was made representing human pelvis. The GNP shaving 15 nm in diameter and 0.1 mM concentration were synthesized using chemical reduction method. Then, a new formulation of MAGIC-f gel was synthesized. The fabricated gel was poured in the tubes located at the prostate (with and without the GNPs and bladder locations of the phantom. The phantom was irradiated to an Ir-192 source and 18 MV beam of a Varian linac separately based on common radiotherapy procedures used for prostate cancer. After 24 hours, the irradiated gels were read using a Siemens 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. The absolute doses at the reference points and isodose curves resulted from the experimental measurement of the gels and MC simulations following the internal and external radiotherapy practices were compared. Results: The mean absorbed doses measured with the gel in the presence of the GNPs in prostate were 15% and 8 % higher than the corresponding values without the GNPs under the internal and external radiation therapies, respectively. MC simulations also indicated a dose increase of 14 % and 7 % due to presence of the GNPs, for the same experimental internal and external radiotherapy practices, respectively. Conclusion: There was a good agreement between the dose enhancement factors (DEFs estimated with MC simulations and experiment gel measurements due to the GNPs. The results indicated that the polymer gel dosimetry method as developed and used in this study, can be recommended as a reliable method for investigating the DEF of GNPs in internal

  15. Development of virtual patient models for permanent implant brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations: interdependence of CT image artifact mitigation and tissue assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksys, N.; Xu, C.; Beaulieu, L.; Thomson, R. M.

    2015-08-01

    This work investigates and compares CT image metallic artifact reduction (MAR) methods and tissue assignment schemes (TAS) for the development of virtual patient models for permanent implant brachytherapy Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations. Four MAR techniques are investigated to mitigate seed artifacts from post-implant CT images of a homogeneous phantom and eight prostate patients: a raw sinogram approach using the original CT scanner data and three methods (simple threshold replacement (STR), 3D median filter, and virtual sinogram) requiring only the reconstructed CT image. Virtual patient models are developed using six TAS ranging from the AAPM-ESTRO-ABG TG-186 basic approach of assigning uniform density tissues (resulting in a model not dependent on MAR) to more complex models assigning prostate, calcification, and mixtures of prostate and calcification using CT-derived densities. The EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose is employed to calculate dose distributions. All four MAR methods eliminate bright seed spot artifacts, and the image-based methods provide comparable mitigation of artifacts compared with the raw sinogram approach. However, each MAR technique has limitations: STR is unable to mitigate low CT number artifacts, the median filter blurs the image which challenges the preservation of tissue heterogeneities, and both sinogram approaches introduce new streaks. Large local dose differences are generally due to differences in voxel tissue-type rather than mass density. The largest differences in target dose metrics (D90, V100, V150), over 50% lower compared to the other models, are when uncorrected CT images are used with TAS that consider calcifications. Metrics found using models which include calcifications are generally a few percent lower than prostate-only models. Generally, metrics from any MAR method and any TAS which considers calcifications agree within 6%. Overall, the studied MAR methods and TAS show promise for further retrospective MC dose

  16. Dosimetric comparison between three dimensional treatment planning system, Monte Carlo simulation and gel dosimetry in nasopharynx phantom for high dose rate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynab Fazli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: For the treatment of nasopharnx carcinoma (NPC using brachytherapy methods and high-energy photon sources are common techniques. In the common three dimensional (3D treatments planning, all of the computed tomography images are assumed homogeneous. This study presents the results of Monte Carlo calculations for non-homogeneous nasopharynx phantom, MAGICA normoxic gel dosimetry and 3D treatment planning system (TPS. Materials and Methods: The head phantom was designed with Plexiglas cylinder, head bone, and nasopharynx brachytherapy silicon applicator. For the simulations, version 5 of the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP5 was used. 3D treatment planning was performed in Flexiplan software. A normoxic radiosensitive polymer gel was fabricated under normal atmospheric conditions and poured into test tubes (for calibration curve and the head phantom. In addition, the head phantom was irradiated with Flexitron afterloader brachytherapy machine with 192 Ir source. To obtain calibration curves, 11 dosimeters were irradiated with dose range of 0-2000 cGy. Evaluations of dosimeters were performed on 1.5T scanner. Results: Two-dimensional iso-dose in coronal plan at distances of z = +0.3, –0.3 cm was calculated. There was a good accordance between 3D TPS and MCNP5 simulation and differences in various distances were between 2.4% and 6.1%. There was a predictable accordance between MAGICA gel dosimetry and MCNP5 simulation and differences in various distances were between 5.7% and 7.4%. Moreover, there was an acceptable accordance between MAGICA gel dosimetry and MCNP5 data and differences in various distances were between 5.2% and 9.4%. Conclusion: The sources of differences in this comparison are divided to calculations variation and practical errors that was added in experimental dosimetry. The result of quality assurance of nasopharynx high dose rate brachytherapy is consistent with international standards.

  17. Determination of absorbed dose distribution in water for COC ophthalmic applicator of {sup 106}Ru/{sup 106}Rh using Monte Carlo code-MCNPX; Determinacao da distribuicao de dose absorvida na agua para o aplicador oftalmico COC de {sup 106}Ru/{sup 106}Rh utilizando o codigo de Monte Carlo - MCNPX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Nilseia A.; Rosa, Luiz A. Ribeiro da, E-mail: nilseia@ird.gov.br, E-mail: lrosa@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ),Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Braz, Delson, E-mail: delson@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2014-07-01

    The COC ophthalmic applicators using beta radiation source of {sup 106}Ru/{sup 106}Rh are used in the treatment of intraocular tumors near the optic nerve. In this type of treatment is very important to know the dose distribution in order to provide the best possible delivery of prescribed dose to the tumor, preserves the optic nerve region extremely critical, that if damaged, can compromise the patient's visual acuity, and cause brain sequelae. These dose distributions are complex and doctors, who will have the responsibility on the therapy, only have the source calibration certificate provided by the manufacturer Eckert and Ziegler BEBIG GmbH. These certificates provide 10 absorbed dose values at water depth along the central axis applicator with the uncertainties of the order of 20% isodose and in a plane located 1 mm from the applicator surface. Thus, it is important to know with more detail and precision the dose distributions in water generated by such applicators. To this end, the Monte Carlo simulation was used using MCNPX code. Initially, was validated the simulation by comparing the obtained results to the central axis of the applicator with those provided by the certificate. The different percentages were lower than 5%, validating the used method. Lateral dose profile was calculated for 6 different depths in intervals of 1 mm and the dose rates in mGy.min{sup -1} for the same depths.

  18. Dosimetric verification and clinical evaluation of a new commercially available Monte Carlo-based dose algorithm for application in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fragoso, Margarida; Wen Ning; Kumar, Sanath; Liu Dezhi; Ryu, Samuel; Movsas, Benjamin; Munther, Ajlouni; Chetty, Indrin J, E-mail: ichetty1@hfhs.or [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2010-08-21

    Modern cancer treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), have greatly increased the demand for more accurate treatment planning (structure definition, dose calculation, etc) and dose delivery. The ability to use fast and accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose calculations within a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) in the clinical setting is now becoming more of a reality. This study describes the dosimetric verification and initial clinical evaluation of a new commercial MC-based photon beam dose calculation algorithm, within the iPlan v.4.1 TPS (BrainLAB AG, Feldkirchen, Germany). Experimental verification of the MC photon beam model was performed with film and ionization chambers in water phantoms and in heterogeneous solid-water slabs containing bone and lung-equivalent materials for a 6 MV photon beam from a Novalis (BrainLAB) linear accelerator (linac) with a micro-multileaf collimator (m{sub 3} MLC). The agreement between calculated and measured dose distributions in the water phantom verification tests was, on average, within 2%/1 mm (high dose/high gradient) and was within {+-}4%/2 mm in the heterogeneous slab geometries. Example treatment plans in the lung show significant differences between the MC and one-dimensional pencil beam (PB) algorithms within iPlan, especially for small lesions in the lung, where electronic disequilibrium effects are emphasized. Other user-specific features in the iPlan system, such as options to select dose to water or dose to medium, and the mean variance level, have been investigated. Timing results for typical lung treatment plans show the total computation time (including that for processing and I/O) to be less than 10 min for 1-2% mean variance (running on a single PC with 8 Intel Xeon X5355 CPUs, 2.66 GHz). Overall, the iPlan MC algorithm is demonstrated to be an accurate and efficient dose algorithm, incorporating robust tools for MC

  19. Comparison of depth-dose distributions of proton therapeutic beams calculated by means of logical detectors and ionization chamber modeled in Monte Carlo codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrzak, Robert [Department of Nuclear Physics and Its Applications, Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Konefał, Adam, E-mail: adam.konefal@us.edu.pl [Department of Nuclear Physics and Its Applications, Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Sokół, Maria; Orlef, Andrzej [Department of Medical Physics, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center, Institute of Oncology, Gliwice (Poland)

    2016-08-01

    The success of proton therapy depends strongly on the precision of treatment planning. Dose distribution in biological tissue may be obtained from Monte Carlo simulations using various scientific codes making it possible to perform very accurate calculations. However, there are many factors affecting the accuracy of modeling. One of them is a structure of objects called bins registering a dose. In this work the influence of bin structure on the dose distributions was examined. The MCNPX code calculations of Bragg curve for the 60 MeV proton beam were done in two ways: using simple logical detectors being the volumes determined in water, and using a precise model of ionization chamber used in clinical dosimetry. The results of the simulations were verified experimentally in the water phantom with Marcus ionization chamber. The average local dose difference between the measured relative doses in the water phantom and those calculated by means of the logical detectors was 1.4% at first 25 mm, whereas in the full depth range this difference was 1.6% for the maximum uncertainty in the calculations less than 2.4% and for the maximum measuring error of 1%. In case of the relative doses calculated with the use of the ionization chamber model this average difference was somewhat greater, being 2.3% at depths up to 25 mm and 2.4% in the full range of depths for the maximum uncertainty in the calculations of 3%. In the dose calculations the ionization chamber model does not offer any additional advantages over the logical detectors. The results provided by both models are similar and in good agreement with the measurements, however, the logical detector approach is a more time-effective method. - Highlights: • Influence of the bin structure on the proton dose distributions was examined for the MC simulations. • The considered relative proton dose distributions in water correspond to the clinical application. • MC simulations performed with the logical detectors and the

  20. An estimation of the percentage of dose in intraoral radiology exams using Monte Carlo simulation; Avaliacao do percentual de dose em exames de radiologia intra-oral usando simulacao Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonzoumet, S.P.J.; Braz, D.; Lopes, R.T. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (LIN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear. Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Anjos, M.J. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (LIN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear. Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Padilha, Lucas, E-mail: sielso@lin.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (HUCFF/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho

    2005-07-01

    In this work we used the EGS4 code in a simulated study of dose percentage in intraoral examination to 10 energy range to 140 keV. The simulation was carried out on a model consisting of different geometry (cheek, tooth and mouth cavity) under normal incidence X-ray beam over the surface of the various simulated materials. It was observed that for energy smaller than 30 keV most of the energy is deposited on the cheek. In 30 keV there is a point of maximum radiation absorption in the tooth (approximately 60% of the energy of the incident radiation is deposited on the tooth) in relation to other simulated materials. It means that in this energy there is a better contrast in the radiographic image of the tooth and a smaller dose on the cheek. In 40 keV the deposited energy in the tooth is roughly equal to the energy that is transmitted (to the radiographic film or buccal cavity) causing a degradation in the radiographic image and/or a higher dose in the oral cavity. For energies above 40 keV, the amount of energy transmitted (to the oral cavity and/or radiographic film) is higher than the energy deposited in other materials, i.e, it only contributes to increasing of dose in the regions close to the oral cavity and the radiographic image degradation. These results can provide important information for radiological procedures applied in dentistry where the image quality is a relevant factor to a dental evaluation needs as well as reducing dose in the oral cavity.

  1. Analysis of the track- and dose-averaged LET and LET spectra in proton therapy using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Fada; Peeler, Christopher; Taleei, Reza; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Ge, Shuaiping; Mirkovic, Dragan; Mohan, Radhe; Titt, Uwe, E-mail: UTitt@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Bronk, Lawrence [Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Geng, Changran [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016, China and Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Grosshans, David [Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The motivation of this study was to find and eliminate the cause of errors in dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LET) calculations from therapeutic protons in small targets, such as biological cell layers, calculated using the GEANT 4 Monte Carlo code. Furthermore, the purpose was also to provide a recommendation to select an appropriate LET quantity from GEANT 4 simulations to correlate with biological effectiveness of therapeutic protons. Methods: The authors developed a particle tracking step based strategy to calculate the average LET quantities (track-averaged LET, LET{sub t} and dose-averaged LET, LET{sub d}) using GEANT 4 for different tracking step size limits. A step size limit refers to the maximally allowable tracking step length. The authors investigated how the tracking step size limit influenced the calculated LET{sub t} and LET{sub d} of protons with six different step limits ranging from 1 to 500 μm in a water phantom irradiated by a 79.7-MeV clinical proton beam. In addition, the authors analyzed the detailed stochastic energy deposition information including fluence spectra and dose spectra of the energy-deposition-per-step of protons. As a reference, the authors also calculated the averaged LET and analyzed the LET spectra combining the Monte Carlo method and the deterministic method. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) calculations were performed to illustrate the impact of different LET calculation methods on the RBE-weighted dose. Results: Simulation results showed that the step limit effect was small for LET{sub t} but significant for LET{sub d}. This resulted from differences in the energy-deposition-per-step between the fluence spectra and dose spectra at different depths in the phantom. Using the Monte Carlo particle tracking method in GEANT 4 can result in incorrect LET{sub d} calculation results in the dose plateau region for small step limits. The erroneous LET{sub d} results can be attributed to the algorithm to

  2. Evaluation of the Effects of Inhomogeneities on Dose Profiles Using Polymer Gel Dosimeter and Monte Carlo Simulation in Gamma Knife

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayeb Allahverdi Pourfallah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Polymer gel dosimeters offer a practical solution to 3D dose verification for conventional radiotherapy as well as intensity-modulated and stereotactic radiotherapy. In this study, EGSnrc calculated and PAGAT polymer gel dosimeter measured dose profiles from single shot irradiation with 18 mm collimator of Gamma Knife in homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms were compared with each other. Materials and Methods The head phantom was a custom-built 16 cm diameter plexiglas sphere. Inside the phantom, there were two cubic cutouts for inserting the gel vials and inhomogeneities. Following irradiation with the Gamma Knife unit, the polymer gel dosimeters were scanned with a 1.5 T MRI scanner. For the purpose of simulation the simplified channel of 60Co source of Gamma Knife BEAMnrc and for extracting the 3D dose distribution in the phantom, DOSXYZnrc codes were used. Results Within high isodose levels (>80%, there are dose differences higher than 7%, especially between air inserted and PTFE inserted phantoms, which were obtained using both simulation and experiment. This means that these values exceed the acceptance criterion of conformal radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery (i.e., within some isodose levels, less than 93% of prescription dose are delivered to the target. Conclusion The discrepancies observed between the results obtained from heterogeneous and homogeneous phantoms suggest that Leksell Gamma Knife planning system (LGP predictions which assume the target as a homogeneous material must be corrected in order to take care of the air- and bone-tissue inhomogeneities.

  3. Reducing radiation dose to selected organs by selecting the tube start angle in MDCT helical scans: A Monte Carlo based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Di; Zankl, Maria; DeMarco, John J.; Cagnon, Chris H.; Angel, Erin; Turner, Adam C.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States); German Research Center for Environmental Health (GmbH), Institute of Radiation Protection, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Previous work has demonstrated that there are significant dose variations with a sinusoidal pattern on the peripheral of a CTDI 32 cm phantom or on the surface of an anthropomorphic phantom when helical CT scanning is performed, resulting in the creation of ''hot'' spots or ''cold'' spots. The purpose of this work was to perform preliminary investigations into the feasibility of exploiting these variations to reduce dose to selected radiosensitive organs solely by varying the tube start angle in CT scans. Methods: Radiation dose to several radiosensitive organs (including breasts, thyroid, uterus, gonads, and eye lenses) resulting from MDCT scans were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation methods on voxelized patient models, including GSF's Baby, Child, and Irene. Dose to fetus was also estimated using four pregnant female models based on CT images of the pregnant patients. Whole-body scans were simulated using 120 kVp, 300 mAs, both 28.8 and 40 mm nominal collimations, and pitch values of 1.5, 1.0, and 0.75 under a wide range of start angles (0 deg. - 340 deg. in 20 deg. increments). The relationship between tube start angle and organ dose was examined for each organ, and the potential dose reduction was calculated. Results: Some organs exhibit a strong dose variation, depending on the tube start angle. For small peripheral organs (e.g., the eye lenses of the Baby phantom at pitch 1.5 with 40 mm collimation), the minimum dose can be 41% lower than the maximum dose, depending on the tube start angle. In general, larger dose reductions occur for smaller peripheral organs in smaller patients when wider collimation is used. Pitch 1.5 and pitch 0.75 have different mechanisms of dose reduction. For pitch 1.5 scans, the dose is usually lowest when the tube start angle is such that the x-ray tube is posterior to the patient when it passes the longitudinal location of the organ. For pitch 0.75 scans, the dose is lowest

  4. Monte Carlo dose reconstruction in case of a radiological accident: application to the accident in Chile in December 2005; Reconstitution de dose par calcul Monte Carlo en cas d'accident radiologique: application a l'accident du Chili de decembre 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huet, C.; Clairand, I.; Trompier, F.; Bottollier-Depois, J.F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Dir. de la Radioprotection de l' Homme, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Bey, E. [Hopital d' Instruction des Armees Percy, 92 - Clamart (France)

    2007-10-15

    Following a radiological accident caused by a gamma-graphy source in Chile in December 2005 involving one victim, I.R.S.N. was contacted to perform the dosimetric reconstruction of the accident using numerical simulation. Tools developed in the laboratory, associating anthropomorphic mathematic or voxel phantoms with the Monte Carlo calculation code m.c.n.p.x., were used in order to determine the dose distribution on the left buttock and absorbed doses to critical organs. The dosimetric mapping show that the absorbed at the skin surface is very high (1900 Gy) but drops rapidly at deep. At a depth of 5 cm, it is 20 Gy. Calculations performed with a mathematical phantom indicate that average doses to the critical organs are relatively low. Moreover, possible bone marrow sites for puncture are identified. Based on the dosimetric mapping, an excision measuring 5 cm in depth by 10 cm in diameter was performed on the left buttock of the victim. (authors)

  5. TH-C-12A-10: Surface Dose Enhancement Using Novel Hybrid Electron and Photon Low-Z Therapy Beams: Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, C; Parsons, D [Dept of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Robar, J; Kelly, R [Dept of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Dept of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Nova Scotia Cancer Centre, Halifax, NS (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The introduction of the TrueBeam linac platform provides access to an in-air target assembly making it possible to apply novel treatments using multiple target designs. One such novel treatment uses multiple low-Z targets to enhance surface dose replacing the use of synthetic tissue equivalent material (bolus). This treatment technique will decrease the common dosimetric and set up errors prevalent in using physical treatment accessories like bolus. The groundwork for a novel treatment beam used to enhance surface dose to within 80-100% of the dose at dmax by utilizing low-Z (Carbon) targets of various percent CSDA range thickness operated at 2.5–4 MeV used in conjunction with a clinical 6 MV beam is presented herein. Methods: A standard Monte Carlo model of a Varian Clinac accelerator was developed to manufacturers specifications. Simulations were performed using Be, C, AL, and C, as potential low-Z targets, placed in the secondary target position. The results determined C to be the target material of choice. Simulations of 15, 30 and 60% CSDA range C beams were propagated through slab phantoms. The resulting PDDs were weighted and combined with a standard 6 MV treatment beam. Versions of the experimental targets were installed into a 2100C Clinac and the models were validated. Results: Carbon was shown to be the low-Z material of choice for this project. Using combinations of 15, 30, 60% CSDA beams operated at 2.5 and 4 MeV in combination with a standard 6 MV treatment beam the surface dose was shown to be enhanced to within 80–100% the dose at dmax. Conclusion: The modeled low-Z beams were successfully validated using machined versions of the targets. Water phantom measurements and slab phantom simulations show excellent correlation. Patient simulations are now underway to compare the use of bolus with the proposed novel beams. NSERC.

  6. SU-E-T-290: Secondary Dose Monitoring Using Scintillating Fibers in Proton Therapy of Prostate Cancer: A Geant4 Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesfamicael, B; Gueye, P; Lyons, D [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Avery, S [University of Pennsylvania, Sicklerville, NJ (United States); Mahesh, M [Johns Hopkins Univ, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To monitor the secondary dose distribution originating from a water phantom during proton therapy of prostate cancer using scintillating fibers. Methods: The Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit version 9.6.p02 was used to simulate prostate cancer proton therapy based treatments. Two cases were studied. In the first case, 8 × 8 = 64 equally spaced fibers inside three 4 × 4 × 2.54 cmm{sup 3} DuPont™ Delrin blocks were used to monitor the emission of secondary particles in the transverse (left and right) and distal regions relative to the beam direction. In the second case, a scintillating block with a thickness of 2.54 cm and equal vertical and longitudinal dimensions as the water phantom was used. Geometrical cuts were used to extract the energy deposited in each fiber and the scintillating block. Results: The transverse dose distributions from secondary particles in both cases agree within <5% and with a very good symmetry. The energy deposited not only gradually increases as one moves from the peripheral row fibers towards the center of the block (aligned with the center of the prostate) but also decreases as one goes from the frontal to distal region of the block. The ratio of the doses from the prostate to the ones in the middle two rows of fibers showed a linear relationship with a slope (−3.55±2.26) × 10−5 MeV per treatment Gy. The distal detectors recorded a very small energy deposited due to water attenuation. Conclusion: With a good calibration and the ability to define a good correlation between the dose to the external fibers and the prostate, such fibers can be used for real time dose verification to the target.

  7. A Monte Carlo Study of the Relationship between the Time Structures of Prompt Gammas and in vivo Radiation Dose in Proton Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, Wook-Geun; Shin, Jae-Ik; Jeong, Jong Hwi; Lee, Se Byeong

    2015-01-01

    For the in vivo range verification in proton therapy, it has been tried to measure the spatial distribution of the prompt gammas generated by the proton-induced interactions with the close relationship with the proton dose distribution. However, the high energy of the prompt gammas and background gammas are still problematic in measuring the distribution. In this study, we suggested a new method determining the in vivo range by utilizing the time structure of the prompt gammas formed with the rotation of a range modulation wheel (RMW) in the passive scattering proton therapy. To validate the Monte Carlo code simulating the proton beam nozzle, axial percent depth doses (PDDs) were compared with the measured PDDs with the varying beam range of 4.73-24.01 cm. And the relationship between the proton dose rate and the time structure of the prompt gammas was assessed and compared in the water phantom. The results of the PDD showed accurate agreement within the relative errors of 1.1% in the distal range and 2.9% in...

  8. Monte Carlo estimation of radiation dose in organs of female and male adult phantoms due to FDG-F18 absorbed in the lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belinato, Walmir; Santos, William S.; Silva, Rogério M. V.; Souza, Divanizia N.

    2014-03-01

    The determination of dose conversion factors (S values) for the radionuclide fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) absorbed in the lungs during a positron emission tomography (PET) procedure was calculated using the Monte Carlo method (MCNPX version 2.7.0). For the obtained dose conversion factors of interest, it was considered a uniform absorption of radiopharmaceutical by the lung of a healthy adult human. The spectrum of fluorine was introduced in the input data file for the simulation. The simulation took place in two adult phantoms of both sexes, based on polygon mesh surfaces called FASH and MASH with anatomy and posture according to ICRP 89. The S values for the 22 internal organs/tissues, chosen from ICRP No. 110, for the FASH and MASH phantoms were compared with the results obtained from a MIRD V phantoms called ADAM and EVA used by the Committee on Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD). We observed variation of more than 100% in S values due to structural anatomical differences in the internal organs of the MASH and FASH phantoms compared to the mathematical phantom.

  9. Monte Carlo estimation of radiation dose in organs of female and male adult phantoms due to FDG-F18 absorbed in the lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinato Walmir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The determination of dose conversion factors (S values for the radionuclide fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG absorbed in the lungs during a positron emission tomography (PET procedure was calculated using the Monte Carlo method (MCNPX version 2.7.0. For the obtained dose conversion factors of interest, it was considered a uniform absorption of radiopharmaceutical by the lung of a healthy adult human. The spectrum of fluorine was introduced in the input data file for the simulation. The simulation took place in two adult phantoms of both sexes, based on polygon mesh surfaces called FASH and MASH with anatomy and posture according to ICRP 89. The S values for the 22 internal organs/tissues, chosen from ICRP No. 110, for the FASH and MASH phantoms were compared with the results obtained from a MIRD V phantoms called ADAM and EVA used by the Committee on Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD. We observed variation of more than 100% in S values due to structural anatomical differences in the internal organs of the MASH and FASH phantoms compared to the mathematical phantom.

  10. Sci—Fri PM: Topics — 07: Monte Carlo Simulation of Primary Dose and PET Isotope Production for the TRIUMF Proton Therapy Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, C; Jirasek, A [University of Victoria (Australia); Blackmore, E; Hoehr, C; Schaffer, P; Trinczek, M [TRIUMF (Canada); Sossi, V [University of British Columbia (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Uveal melanoma is a rare and deadly tumour of the eye with primary metastases in the liver resulting in an 8% 2-year survival rate upon detection. Large growths, or those in close proximity to the optic nerve, pose a particular challenge to the commonly employed eye-sparing technique of eye-plaque brachytherapy. In these cases external beam charged particle therapy offers improved odds in avoiding catastrophic side effects such as neuropathy or blindness. Since 1995, the British Columbia Cancer Agency in partnership with the TRIUMF national laboratory have offered proton therapy in the treatment of difficult ocular tumors. Having seen 175 patients, yielding 80% globe preservation and 82% metastasis free survival as of 2010, this modality has proven to be highly effective. Despite this success, there have been few studies into the use of the world's largest cyclotron in patient care. Here we describe first efforts of modeling the TRIUMF dose delivery system using the FLUKA Monte Carlo package. Details on geometry, estimating beam parameters, measurement of primary dose and simulation of PET isotope production are discussed. Proton depth dose in both modulated and pristine beams is successfully simulated to sub-millimeter precision in range (within limits of measurement) and 2% agreement to measurement within in a treatment volume. With the goal of using PET signals for in vivo dosimetry (alignment), a first look at PET isotope depth distribution is presented — comparing favourably to a naive method of approximating simulated PET slice activity in a Lucite phantom.

  11. Simulation study on potential accuracy gains from dual energy CT tissue segmentation for low-energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Guillaume; Granton, Patrick V; Reniers, Brigitte; Ollers, Michel C; Beaulieu, Luc; Wildberger, Joachim E; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-10-07

    This work compares Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for (125)I and (103)Pd low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy sources performed in virtual phantoms containing a series of human soft tissues of interest for brachytherapy. The geometries are segmented (tissue type and density assignment) based on simulated single energy computed tomography (SECT) and dual energy (DECT) images, as well as the all-water TG-43 approach. Accuracy is evaluated by comparison to a reference MC dose calculation performed in the same phantoms, where each voxel's material properties are assigned with exactly known values. The objective is to assess potential dose calculation accuracy gains from DECT. A CT imaging simulation package, ImaSim, is used to generate CT images of calibration and dose calculation phantoms at 80, 120, and 140 kVp. From the high and low energy images electron density ρ(e) and atomic number Z are obtained using a DECT algorithm. Following a correction derived from scans of the calibration phantom, accuracy on Z and ρ(e) of ±1% is obtained for all soft tissues with atomic number Z ∊ [6,8] except lung. GEANT4 MC dose calculations based on DECT segmentation agreed with the reference within ±4% for (103)Pd, the most sensitive source to tissue misassignments. SECT segmentation with three tissue bins as well as the TG-43 approach showed inferior accuracy with errors of up to 20%. Using seven tissue bins in our SECT segmentation brought errors within ±10% for (103)Pd. In general (125)I dose calculations showed higher accuracy than (103)Pd. Simulated image noise was found to decrease DECT accuracy by 3-4%. Our findings suggest that DECT-based segmentation yields improved accuracy when compared to SECT segmentation with seven tissue bins in LDR brachytherapy dose calculation for the specific case of our non-anthropomorphic phantom. The validity of our conclusions for clinical geometry as well as the importance of image noise in the tissue segmentation procedure deserves

  12. Environmental dose rate heterogeneity of beta radiation and its implications for luminescence dating: Monte Carlo modelling and experimental validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nathan, R.P.; Thomas, P.J.; Jain, M.;

    2003-01-01

    simulations. It is concluded that the effect of beta, heterogeneity in complex environments for luminescence dating is two fold: (i) the infinite matrix dose rate is not universally applicable; its accuracy depends on the scale of the heterogeneity, and (ii) the interpretation of D-e distributions is complex...

  13. SU-E-T-519: Investigation of the CyberKnife MultiPlan Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Using EBT3 Film Absolute Dosimetry for Delivery in a Heterogeneous Thorax Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamberto, M; Chen, H; Huang, K; Mourtada, F [Christiana Care Hospital, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, Newark, DE (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To characterize the Cyberknife (CK) robotic system’s dosimetric accuracy of the delivery of MultiPlan’s Monte Carlo dose calculations using EBT3 radiochromic film inserted in a thorax phantom. Methods The CIRS XSight Lung Tracking (XLT) Phantom (model 10823) was used in this study with custom cut EBT3 film inserted in the horizontal (coronal) plane inside the lung tissue equivalent phantom. CK MultiPlan v3.5.3 with Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm (1.5 mm grid size, 2% statistical uncertainty) was used to calculate a clinical plan for a 25-mm lung tumor lesion, as contoured by the physician, and then imported onto the XLT phantom CT. Using the same film batch, the net OD to dose calibration curve was obtained using CK with the 60 mm fixed cone by delivering 0– 800 cGy. The test films (n=3) were irradiated using 325 cGy to the prescription point. Films were scanned 48 hours after irradiation using an Epson v700 scanner (48 bits color scan, extracted red channel only, 96 dpi). Percent absolute dose and relative isodose distribution difference relative to the planned dose were quantified using an in-house QA software program. Multiplan Monte Carlo dose calculation was validated using RCF dosimetry (EBT3) and gamma index criteria of 3%/3mm and 2%/2mm for absolute dose and relative isodose distribution measurement comparisons. Results EBT3 film measurements of the patient plans calculated with Monte Carlo in MultiPlan resulted in an absolute dose passing rate of 99.6±0.4% for the Gamma Index of 3%/3mm, 10% dose threshold, and 95.6±4.4% for 2%/2mm, 10% threshold criteria. The measured central axis absolute dose was within 1.2% (329.0±2.5 cGy) of the Monte Carlo planned dose (325.0±6.5 cGy) for that same point. Conclusion MultiPlan’s Monte Carlo dose calculation was validated using the EBT3 film absolute dosimetry for delivery in a heterogeneous thorax phantom.

  14. Optimized Kernel Entropy Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Verdiguier, Emma; Laparra, Valero; Jenssen, Robert; Gomez-Chova, Luis; Camps-Valls, Gustau

    2016-02-25

    This brief addresses two main issues of the standard kernel entropy component analysis (KECA) algorithm: the optimization of the kernel decomposition and the optimization of the Gaussian kernel parameter. KECA roughly reduces to a sorting of the importance of kernel eigenvectors by entropy instead of variance, as in the kernel principal components analysis. In this brief, we propose an extension of the KECA method, named optimized KECA (OKECA), that directly extracts the optimal features retaining most of the data entropy by means of compacting the information in very few features (often in just one or two). The proposed method produces features which have higher expressive power. In particular, it is based on the independent component analysis framework, and introduces an extra rotation to the eigen decomposition, which is optimized via gradient-ascent search. This maximum entropy preservation suggests that OKECA features are more efficient than KECA features for density estimation. In addition, a critical issue in both the methods is the selection of the kernel parameter, since it critically affects the resulting performance. Here, we analyze the most common kernel length-scale selection criteria. The results of both the methods are illustrated in different synthetic and real problems. Results show that OKECA returns projections with more expressive power than KECA, the most successful rule for estimating the kernel parameter is based on maximum likelihood, and OKECA is more robust to the selection of the length-scale parameter in kernel density estimation.

  15. Influence of 320-detector-row volume scanning and AAPM report 111 CT dosimetry metrics on size-specific dose estimate: a Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Tomonobu; Koyama, Shuji; Kinomura, Yutaka; Ida, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Masanao

    2016-09-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) task group 204 has recommended the use of size-dependent conversion factors to calculate size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) values from volume computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) values. However, these conversion factors do not consider the effects of 320-detector-row volume computed tomography (CT) examinations or the new CT dosimetry metrics proposed by AAPM task group 111. This study aims to investigate the influence of these examinations and metrics on the conversion factors reported by AAPM task group 204, using Monte Carlo simulations. Simulations were performed modelling a Toshiba Aquilion ONE CT scanner, in order to compute dose values in water for cylindrical phantoms with 8-40-cm diameters at 2-cm intervals for each scanning parameter (tube voltage, bow-tie filter, longitudinal beam width). Then, the conversion factors were obtained by applying exponential regression analysis between the dose values for a given phantom diameter and the phantom diameter combined with various scanning parameters. The conversion factors for each scanning method (helical, axial, or volume scanning) and CT dosimetry method (i.e., the CTDI100 method or the AAPM task group 111 method) were in agreement with those reported by AAPM task group 204, within a percentage error of 14.2 % for phantom diameters ≥11.2 cm. The results obtained in this study indicate that the conversion factors previously presented by AAPM task group 204 can be used to provide appropriate SSDE values for 320-detector-row volume CT examinations and the CT dosimetry metrics proposed by the AAPM task group 111.

  16. A gradient Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm for computing multivariate maximum likelihood estimates and posterior distributions: mixture dose-response assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruochen; Englehardt, James D; Li, Xiaoguang

    2012-02-01

    Multivariate probability distributions, such as may be used for mixture dose-response assessment, are typically highly parameterized and difficult to fit to available data. However, such distributions may be useful in analyzing the large electronic data sets becoming available, such as dose-response biomarker and genetic information. In this article, a new two-stage computational approach is introduced for estimating multivariate distributions and addressing parameter uncertainty. The proposed first stage comprises a gradient Markov chain Monte Carlo (GMCMC) technique to find Bayesian posterior mode estimates (PMEs) of parameters, equivalent to maximum likelihood estimates (MLEs) in the absence of subjective information. In the second stage, these estimates are used to initialize a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation, replacing the conventional burn-in period to allow convergent simulation of the full joint Bayesian posterior distribution and the corresponding unconditional multivariate distribution (not conditional on uncertain parameter values). When the distribution of parameter uncertainty is such a Bayesian posterior, the unconditional distribution is termed predictive. The method is demonstrated by finding conditional and unconditional versions of the recently proposed emergent dose-response function (DRF). Results are shown for the five-parameter common-mode and seven-parameter dissimilar-mode models, based on published data for eight benzene-toluene dose pairs. The common mode conditional DRF is obtained with a 21-fold reduction in data requirement versus MCMC. Example common-mode unconditional DRFs are then found using synthetic data, showing a 71% reduction in required data. The approach is further demonstrated for a PCB 126-PCB 153 mixture. Applicability is analyzed and discussed. Matlab(®) computer programs are provided.

  17. Absorbed dose at subcellular level by Monte Carlo simulation for a {sup 99m}Tc-peptide with nuclear internalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas C, E. L.; Ferro F, G. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Santos C, C. L., E-mail: leticia.rojas@inin.gob.m [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan esquina Paseo Colon s/n, Toluca 50120, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    The utility of radiolabeled peptides for the early and specific diagnosis of cancer is being investigated around the world. Recent investigations have demonstrated the specificity of {sup 99m}Tc-bombesin conjugates to target breast and prostate cancer cells. The novel idea of adding the Tat (49-57) peptide to the radiopharmaceutical in order to penetrate the cell nucleus is a new proposal for therapy at cellular level. {sup 99m}Tc radionuclide produces Auger energy of 0.9 keV/decay and internal conversion electron energy of 15.4 keV/decay, which represent 11.4% of the total {sup 99m}Tc energy released per decay. It is expected that the dose delivered at specific microscopic levels in cancer cells induce a therapeutic effect. The aim of this research was to assess in vitro internalization kinetics in breast and prostate cancer cells of {sup 99m}Tc-Tat(49-57)-bombesin and to evaluate the radiation absorbed dose at subcellular level simulating the electron transport. The pen main program from the 2006 version of the Penelope code was used to simulate and calculate the absorbed dose by Auger and internal conversion electron contribution in the membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus of Pc-3 prostate cancer and MCF7 and MDA human breast cancer cell lines. Nuclear data were obtained from the 2002 BNM-LNHB {sup 99m}Tc decay scheme. The spatial distribution of the absorbed doses to the membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus were calculated using a geometric model built from real images of cancer cells. The elemental cell composition was taken from the literature. The biokinetic data were obtained evaluating total disintegrations in each subcellular compartment by integration of the time-activity curves acquired from experimental data. Results showed that 61, 63 and 46% of total disintegrations per cell-bound {sup 99m}Tc-Tat-Bn activity unit occurred in the nucleus of Pc-3, MCF7 and MDA-MB231 respectively. {sup 99m}Tc--Tat-Bn absorbed doses were 1.78, 5.76 and 2.59 Gy/Bq in the nucleus of

  18. Monte Carlo design of a system for the detection of explosive materials and analysis of the dose; Diseno Monte Carlo de un sistema para la deteccion de materiales explosivos y analisis de la dosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez A, P. L.; Medina C, D.; Rodriguez I, J. L.; Salas L, M. A.; Vega C, H. R., E-mail: pabloyae_2@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    The problems associated with insecurity and terrorism have forced to designing systems for detecting nuclear materials, drugs and explosives that are installed on roads, ports and airports. Organic materials are composed of C, H, O and N; similarly the explosive materials are manufactured which can be distinguished by the concentration of these elements. Its elemental composition, particularly the concentration of hydrogen and oxygen, allow distinguish them from other organic substances. When these materials are irradiated with neutrons nuclear reactions (n, γ) are produced, where the emitted photons are ready gamma rays whose energy is characteristic of each element and its abundance allows estimating their concentration. The aim of this study was designed using Monte Carlo methods a system with neutron source, gamma rays detector and moderator able to distinguish the presence of Rdx and urea. In design were used as moderators: paraffin, light water, polyethylene and graphite; as detectors were used HPGe and the NaI(Tl). The design that showed the best performance was the moderator of light water and HPGe, with a source of {sup 241}AmBe. For this design, the values of ambient dose equivalent around the system were calculated. (Author)

  19. Differences among Monte Carlo codes in the calculations of voxel S values for radionuclide targeted therapy and analysis of their impact on absorbed dose evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacilio, M.; Lanconelli, N.; Lo Meo, S.; Betti, M.; Montani, L.; Torres Aroche, L. A.; Coca Perez, M. A. [Department of Medical Physics, Azienda Ospedaliera S. Camillo Forlanini, Piazza Forlanini 1, Rome 00151 (Italy); Department of Physics, Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna, Viale Berti-Pichat 6/2, Bologna 40127 (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, Azienda Ospedaliera S. Camillo Forlanini, Piazza Forlanini 1, Rome 00151 (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, Azienda Ospedaliera Sant' Andrea, Via di Grotarossa 1035, Rome 00189 (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, Center for Clinical Researches, Calle 34 North 4501, Havana 11300 (Cuba)

    2009-05-15

    Several updated Monte Carlo (MC) codes are available to perform calculations of voxel S values for radionuclide targeted therapy. The aim of this work is to analyze the differences in the calculations obtained by different MC codes and their impact on absorbed dose evaluations performed by voxel dosimetry. Voxel S values for monoenergetic sources (electrons and photons) and different radionuclides ({sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I, and {sup 188}Re) were calculated. Simulations were performed in soft tissue. Three general-purpose MC codes were employed for simulating radiation transport: MCNP4C, EGSnrc, and GEANT4. The data published by the MIRD Committee in Pamphlet No. 17, obtained with the EGS4 MC code, were also included in the comparisons. The impact of the differences (in terms of voxel S values) among the MC codes was also studied by convolution calculations of the absorbed dose in a volume of interest. For uniform activity distribution of a given radionuclide, dose calculations were performed on spherical and elliptical volumes, varying the mass from 1 to 500 g. For simulations with monochromatic sources, differences for self-irradiation voxel S values were mostly confined within 10% for both photons and electrons, but with electron energy less than 500 keV, the voxel S values referred to the first neighbor voxels showed large differences (up to 130%, with respect to EGSnrc) among the updated MC codes. For radionuclide simulations, noticeable differences arose in voxel S values, especially in the bremsstrahlung tails, or when a high contribution from electrons with energy of less than 500 keV is involved. In particular, for {sup 90}Y the updated codes showed a remarkable divergence in the bremsstrahlung region (up to about 90% in terms of voxel S values) with respect to the EGS4 code. Further, variations were observed up to about 30%, for small source-target voxel distances, when low-energy electrons cover an important part of the emission spectrum of the radionuclide

  20. Iterative software kernels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duff, I.

    1994-12-31

    This workshop focuses on kernels for iterative software packages. Specifically, the three speakers discuss various aspects of sparse BLAS kernels. Their topics are: `Current status of user lever sparse BLAS`; Current status of the sparse BLAS toolkit`; and `Adding matrix-matrix and matrix-matrix-matrix multiply to the sparse BLAS toolkit`.

  1. Regularization in kernel learning

    CERN Document Server

    Mendelson, Shahar; 10.1214/09-AOS728

    2010-01-01

    Under mild assumptions on the kernel, we obtain the best known error rates in a regularized learning scenario taking place in the corresponding reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS). The main novelty in the analysis is a proof that one can use a regularization term that grows significantly slower than the standard quadratic growth in the RKHS norm.

  2. Kernel Affine Projection Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José C. Príncipe

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The combination of the famed kernel trick and affine projection algorithms (APAs yields powerful nonlinear extensions, named collectively here, KAPA. This paper is a follow-up study of the recently introduced kernel least-mean-square algorithm (KLMS. KAPA inherits the simplicity and online nature of KLMS while reducing its gradient noise, boosting performance. More interestingly, it provides a unifying model for several neural network techniques, including kernel least-mean-square algorithms, kernel adaline, sliding-window kernel recursive-least squares (KRLS, and regularization networks. Therefore, many insights can be gained into the basic relations among them and the tradeoff between computation complexity and performance. Several simulations illustrate its wide applicability.

  3. Kernel Affine Projection Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weifeng; Príncipe, José C.

    2008-12-01

    The combination of the famed kernel trick and affine projection algorithms (APAs) yields powerful nonlinear extensions, named collectively here, KAPA. This paper is a follow-up study of the recently introduced kernel least-mean-square algorithm (KLMS). KAPA inherits the simplicity and online nature of KLMS while reducing its gradient noise, boosting performance. More interestingly, it provides a unifying model for several neural network techniques, including kernel least-mean-square algorithms, kernel adaline, sliding-window kernel recursive-least squares (KRLS), and regularization networks. Therefore, many insights can be gained into the basic relations among them and the tradeoff between computation complexity and performance. Several simulations illustrate its wide applicability.

  4. Adaptation of penelope Monte Carlo code system to the absorbed dose metrology: characterization of high energy photon beams and calculations of reference dosimeter correction factors; Adaptation du code Monte Carlo penelope pour la metrologie de la dose absorbee: caracterisation des faisceaux de photons X de haute energie et calcul de facteurs de correction de dosimetres de reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazurier, J

    1999-05-28

    This thesis has been performed in the framework of national reference setting-up for absorbed dose in water and high energy photon beam provided with the SATURNE-43 medical accelerator of the BNM-LPRI (acronym for National Bureau of Metrology and Primary standard laboratory of ionising radiation). The aim of this work has been to develop and validate different user codes, based on PENELOPE Monte Carlo code system, to determine the photon beam characteristics and calculate the correction factors of reference dosimeters such as Fricke dosimeters and graphite calorimeter. In the first step, the developed user codes have permitted the influence study of different components constituting the irradiation head. Variance reduction techniques have been used to reduce the calculation time. The phase space has been calculated for 6, 12 and 25 MV at the output surface level of the accelerator head, then used for calculating energy spectra and dose distributions in the reference water phantom. Results obtained have been compared with experimental measurements. The second step has been devoted to develop an user code allowing calculation correction factors associated with both BNM-LPRI's graphite and Fricke dosimeters thanks to a correlated sampling method starting with energy spectra obtained in the first step. Then the calculated correction factors have been compared with experimental and calculated results obtained with the Monte Carlo EGS4 code system. The good agreement, between experimental and calculated results, leads to validate simulations performed with the PENELOPE code system. (author)

  5. Estimation of radiation dose and risk to children undergoing cardiac catheterization for the treatment of a congenital heart disease using Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakoumakis, Emmanuel; Kostopoulou, Helen; Dimitriadis, Anastastios; Georgiou, Evaggelos [University of Athens, Medical Physics Department, Medical School, Athens (Greece); Makri, Triantafilia [' Agia Sofia' Hospital, Medical Physics Unit, Athens (Greece); Tsalafoutas, Ioannis [Anticancer-Oncology Hospital of Athens ' Agios Savvas' , Medical Physics Department, Athens (Greece)

    2013-03-15

    Children diagnosed with congenital heart disease often undergo cardiac catheterization for their treatment, which involves the use of ionizing radiation and therefore a risk of radiation-induced cancer. The purpose of this study was to calculate the effective and equivalent organ doses (H{sub T}) in those children and estimate the risk of exposure-induced death. Fifty-three children were divided into three groups: atrial septal defect (ASD), ventricular septal defect (VSD) and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). In all procedures, the exposure conditions and the dose-area product meters readings were recorded for each individual acquisition. Monte Carlo simulations were run using the PCXMC 2.0 code and mathematical phantoms simulating a child's anatomy. The H{sub T} values to all irradiated organs and the resulting E and risk of exposure-induced death values were calculated. The average dose-area product values were, respectively, 40 {+-} 12 Gy.cm{sup 2} for the ASD, 17.5 {+-} 0.7 Gy.cm{sup 2} for the VSD and 9.5 {+-} 1 Gy.cm{sup 2} for the PDA group. The average E values were 40 {+-} 12, 22 {+-} 2.5 and 17 {+-} 3.6 mSv for ASD, VSD and PDA groups, respectively. The respective estimated risk of exposure-induced death values per procedure were 0.109, 0.106 and 0.067%. Cardiac catheterizations in children involve a considerable risk for radiation-induced cancer that has to be further reduced. (orig.)

  6. Rotating and translating anthropomorphic head voxel models to establish an horizontal Frankfort plane for dental CBCT Monte Carlo simulations: a dose comparison study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratis, A.; Zhang, G.; Jacobs, R.; Bogaerts, R.; Bosmans, H.

    2016-12-01

    In order to carry out Monte Carlo (MC) dosimetry studies, voxel phantoms, modeling human anatomy, and organ-based segmentation of CT image data sets are applied to simulation frameworks. The resulting voxel phantoms preserve patient CT acquisition geometry; in the case of head voxel models built upon head CT images, the head support with which CT scanners are equipped introduces an inclination to the head, and hence to the head voxel model. In dental cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging, patients are always positioned in such a way that the Frankfort line is horizontal, implying that there is no head inclination. The orientation of the head is important, as it influences the distance of critical radiosensitive organs like the thyroid and the esophagus from the x-ray tube. This work aims to propose a procedure to adjust head voxel phantom orientation, and to investigate the impact of head inclination on organ doses in dental CBCT MC dosimetry studies. The female adult ICRP, and three in-house-built paediatric voxel phantoms were in this study. An EGSnrc MC framework was employed to simulate two commonly used protocols; a Morita Accuitomo 170 dental CBCT scanner (FOVs: 60  ×  60 mm2 and 80  ×  80 mm2, standard resolution), and a 3D Teeth protocol (FOV: 100  ×  90 mm2) in a Planmeca Promax 3D MAX scanner. Result analysis revealed large absorbed organ dose differences in radiosensitive organs between the original and the geometrically corrected voxel models of this study, ranging from  -45.6% to 39.3%. Therefore, accurate dental CBCT MC dose calculations require geometrical adjustments to be applied to head voxel models.

  7. Quantification of dose differences between two versions of Acuros XB algorithm compared to Monte Carlo simulations--the effect on clinical patient treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojala, Jarkko Juhani; Kapanen, Mika

    2015-11-08

    A commercialized implementation of linear Boltzmann transport equation solver, the Acuros XB algorithm (AXB), represents a class of most advanced type 'c' photon radiotherapy dose calculation algorithms. The purpose of the study was to quantify the effects of the modifications implemented in the more recent version 11 of the AXB (AXB11) compared to the first commercial implementation, version 10 of the AXB (AXB10), in various anatomical regions in clinical treatment planning. Both versions of the AXB were part of Varian's Eclipse clinical treatment planning system and treatment plans for 10 patients were created using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT). The plans were first created with the AXB10 and then recalculated with the AXB11 and full Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Considering the full MC simulations as reference, a DVH analysis for gross tumor and planning target volumes (GTV and PTV) and organs at risk was performed, and also 3D gamma agreement index (GAI) values within a 15% isodose region and for the PTV were determined. Although differences up to 12% in DVH analysis were seen between the MC simulations and the AXB, based on the results of this study no general conclusion can be drawn that the modifications made in the AXB11 compared to the AXB10 would imply that the dose calculation accuracy of the AXB10 would be inferior to the AXB11 in the clinical patient treatment planning. The only clear improvement with the AXB11 over the AXB10 is the dose calculation accuracy in air cavities. In general, no large deviations are present in the DVH analysis results between the two versions of the algorithm, and the results of 3D gamma analysis do not favor one or the other. Thus it may be concluded that the results of the comprehensive studies assessing the accuracy of the AXB10 may be extended to the AXB11.

  8. MO-E-17A-03: Monte Carlo CT Dose Calculation: A Comparison Between Experiment and Simulation Using ARCHER-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, T; Du, X; Su, L; Gao, Y; Ji, W; Xu, X [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Zhang, D; Shi, J; Liu, B; Kalra, M [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the CT doses derived from the experiments and GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, using a human cadaver and ATOM phantom. Methods: The cadaver of an 88-year old male and the ATOM phantom were scanned by a GE LightSpeed Pro 16 MDCT. For the cadaver study, the Thimble chambers (Model 10×5−0.6CT and 10×6−0.6CT) were used to measure the absorbed dose in different deep and superficial organs. Whole-body scans were first performed to construct a complete image database for MC simulations. Abdomen/pelvis helical scans were then conducted using 120/100 kVps, 300 mAs and a pitch factor of 1.375:1. For the ATOM phantom study, the OSL dosimeters were used and helical scans were performed using 120 kVp and x, y, z tube current modulation (TCM). For the MC simulations, sufficient particles were run in both cases such that the statistical errors of the results by ARCHER-CT were limited to 1%. Results: For the human cadaver scan, the doses to the stomach, liver, colon, left kidney, pancreas and urinary bladder were compared. The difference between experiments and simulations was within 19% for the 120 kVp and 25% for the 100 kVp. For the ATOM phantom scan, the doses to the lung, thyroid, esophagus, heart, stomach, liver, spleen, kidneys and thymus were compared. The difference was 39.2% for the esophagus, and within 16% for all other organs. Conclusion: In this study the experimental and simulated CT doses were compared. Their difference is primarily attributed to the systematic errors of the MC simulations, including the accuracy of the bowtie filter modeling, and the algorithm to generate voxelized phantom from DICOM images. The experimental error is considered small and may arise from the dosimeters. R01 grant (R01EB015478) from National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.

  9. Monte Carlo-Based Dose Calculation in Postprostatectomy Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Rankine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Step-and-shoot (S&S intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT using the XiO treatment planning system (TPS has been routinely used for patients receiving postprostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT. After installing the Monaco, a pilot study was undertaken with five patients to compare XiO with Monaco (V2.03 TPS for PPRT with respect to plan quality for S&S as well as volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT. Monaco S&S showed higher mean clinical target volume (CTV coverage (99.85% than both XiO S&S (97.98%, P = 0.04 and Monaco VMAT (99.44, P = 0.02. Rectal V60Gy volumes were lower for Monaco S&S compared to XiO (46.36% versus 58.06%, P = 0.001 and Monaco VMAT (46.36% versus 54.66%, P = 0.02. Rectal V60Gy volume was lowest for Monaco S&S and superior to XiO (mean 19.89% versus 31.25%, P = 0.02. Rectal V60Gy volumes were lower for Monaco VMAT compared to XiO (21.09% versus 31.25%, P = 0.02. Other organ-at-risk (OAR parameters were comparable between TPSs. Compared to XiO S&S, Monaco S&S plans had fewer segments (78.6 versus 116.8 segments, P = 0.02, lower total monitor units (MU (677.6 MU versus 770.7 MU, P = 0.01, and shorter beam-on times (5.7 min versus 7.6 min, P = 0.03. This pilot study suggests that Monaco S&S improves CTV coverage, OAR doses, and planning and treatment times for PPRT.

  10. Taking into account absorbed doses in tooth enamel due to internal irradiation of human body by radioactive cesium isotopes at analysis EPR dosimetry data: Calculation by Monte-Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borysheva, N. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Korolyov str., 4, Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation); Ivannikov, A. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Korolyov str., 4, Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: Ivannikov-Alexander@yandex.ru; Tikunov, D.; Orlenko, S.; Skvortsov, V.; Stepanenko, V. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Korolyov str., 4, Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation); Hoshi, M. [Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan)

    2007-07-15

    By Monte-Carlo simulation of ionizing particles transport, for a realistic mathematical phantom of a man supplemented by a dental region, absorbed doses in teeth enamel and whole body doses are calculated for cases of internal irradiation by {sup 137}Cs and {sup 134}Cs isotopes incorporated in the human body resulted from staying in radioactive contaminated territory. It is shown that dose in enamel constitutes (40{+-}4)% and (59{+-}6)% of whole body dose resulted from the decay of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 134}Cs isotopes, respectively. The results of calculations may be used for conversion of absorbed dose in enamel obtained by the tooth enamel EPR spectroscopy method to whole body dose for dosimetric investigation of population of territories contaminated by the radioactive cesium, which is specific for the Chernobyl accident.

  11. Kernels for structured data

    CERN Document Server

    Gärtner, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    This book provides a unique treatment of an important area of machine learning and answers the question of how kernel methods can be applied to structured data. Kernel methods are a class of state-of-the-art learning algorithms that exhibit excellent learning results in several application domains. Originally, kernel methods were developed with data in mind that can easily be embedded in a Euclidean vector space. Much real-world data does not have this property but is inherently structured. An example of such data, often consulted in the book, is the (2D) graph structure of molecules formed by

  12. Kernels in circulant digraphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lakshmi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A kernel $J$ of a digraph $D$ is an independent set of vertices of $D$ such that for every vertex $w,in,V(D,setminus,J$ there exists an arc from $w$ to a vertex in $J.$ In this paper, among other results, a characterization of $2$-regular circulant digraph having a kernel is obtained. This characterization is a partial solution to the following problem: Characterize circulant digraphs which have kernels; it appeared in the book {it Digraphs - theory, algorithms and applications}, Second Edition, Springer-Verlag, 2009, by J. Bang-Jensen and G. Gutin.

  13. Feasibility of using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation for IMRT dose calculations for the Novalis Tx with a HD-120 multi-leaf collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyunuk; Shin, Jungsuk; Chung, Kwangzoo; Han, Youngyih; Kim, Jinsung; Choi, Doo Ho

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an independent dose verification system by using a Monte Carlo (MC) calculation method for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) conducted by using a Varian Novalis Tx (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) equipped with a highdefinition multi-leaf collimator (HD-120 MLC). The Geant4 framework was used to implement a dose calculation system that accurately predicted the delivered dose. For this purpose, the Novalis Tx Linac head was modeled according to the specifications acquired from the manufacturer. Subsequently, MC simulations were performed by varying the mean energy, energy spread, and electron spot radius to determine optimum values of irradiation with 6-MV X-ray beams by using the Novalis Tx system. Computed percentage depth dose curves (PDDs) and lateral profiles were compared to the measurements obtained by using an ionization chamber (CC13). To validate the IMRT simulation by using the MC model we developed, we calculated a simple IMRT field and compared the result with the EBT3 film measurements in a water-equivalent solid phantom. Clinical cases, such as prostate cancer treatment plans, were then selected, and MC simulations were performed. The accuracy of the simulation was assessed against the EBT3 film measurements by using a gamma-index criterion. The optimal MC model parameters to specify the beam characteristics were a 6.8-MeV mean energy, a 0.5-MeV energy spread, and a 3-mm electron radius. The accuracy of these parameters was determined by comparison of MC simulations with measurements. The PDDs and the lateral profiles of the MC simulation deviated from the measurements by 1% and 2%, respectively, on average. The computed simple MLC fields agreed with the EBT3 measurements with a 95% passing rate with 3%/3-mm gamma-index criterion. Additionally, in applying our model to clinical IMRT plans, we found that the MC calculations and the EBT3 measurements agreed well with a passing rate of greater

  14. A portable secondary dose monitoring system using scintillating fibers for proton therapy of prostate cancer: A Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biniam Tesfamicael

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main purpose of this study was to monitor the secondary dose distribution originating from a water phantom during proton therapy of prostate cancer using scintillating fibers.Methods: The Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit version 9.6.p02 was used to simulate a proton therapy of prostate cancer. Two cases were studied. In the first case, 8 × 8 = 64 equally spaced fibers inside three 4 × 4 × 2.54 cm3 Delrin® blocks were used to monitor the emission of secondary particles in the transverse (left and right and distal regions relative to the beam direction. In the second case, a scintillating block with a thickness of 2.54 cm and equal vertical and longitudinal dimensions as the water phantom was used. Geometrical cuts were implemented to extract the energy deposited in each fiber and inside the scintillating block.Results: The transverse dose distributions from the detected secondary particles in both cases are symmetric and agree to within <3.6%. The energy deposited gradually increases as one moves from the peripheral row of fibers towards the center of the block (aligned with the center of the prostate by a factor of approximately 5. The energy deposited was also observed to decrease as one goes from the frontal to distal region of the block. The ratio of the energy deposited in the prostate to the energy deposited in the middle two rows of fibers showed a linear relationship with a slope of (-3.55±2.26 × 10-5 MeV per treatment Gy delivered. The distal detectors recorded a negligible amount of energy deposited due to higher attenuation of the secondary particles by the water in that direction.Conclusion: With a good calibration and with the ability to define a good correlation between the radiation flux recorded by the external fibers and the dose delivered to the prostate, such fibers can be used for real time dose verification to the target. The system was also observed to respond to the series of Bragg Peaks used to generate the

  15. MODELING LEACHING OF VIRUSES BY THE MONTE CARLO METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    A predictive screening model was developed for fate and transport of viruses in the unsaturated zone. A database of input parameters allowed Monte Carlo analysis with the model. The resulting kernel densities of predicted attenuation during percolation indicated very ...

  16. Locally linear approximation for Kernel methods : the Railway Kernel

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz, Alberto; González, Javier

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a new kernel, the Railway Kernel, that works properly for general (nonlinear) classification problems, with the interesting property that acts locally as a linear kernel. In this way, we avoid potential problems due to the use of a general purpose kernel, like the RBF kernel, as the high dimension of the induced feature space. As a consequence, following our methodology the number of support vectors is much lower and, therefore, the generalization capability of the pr...

  17. The effect of magnification on the image quality and the radiation dose in X-ray digital mammography: a Monte Carlo simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yu-Na; Kim, Hee-Joung; Park, Hye-Suk; Lee, Chang-Lae; Cho, Hyo-Min; Lee, Seung-Wan; Ryu, Hyun-Ju [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    There have been many efforts to advance the technology of X-ray digital mammography in order to enhance the early detection of breast pathology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate image quality and the radiation dose after magnifying X-ray digital mammography using the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE). In this study, we simulated a Monte Carlo model of an X-ray digital mammographic system, and we present a technique for magnification and discuss how it affects the image quality. The simulated X-ray digital mammographic system with GATE consists of an X-ray source, a compression paddle, a supporting plate, and an imaging plate (IP) of computed radiography (CR). The degree of magnification ranged from 1.0 to 2.0. We designed a semi-cylindrical phantom with a thickness of 45-mm and a radius of 50-mm in order to evaluate the image quality after magnification. The phantom was made of poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) and contained four spherical specks with diameters of 750, 500, 250, and 100-{mu}m to simulate microcalcifications. The simulation studies were performed with an X-ray energy spectrum calculated using the spectrum processor SRS-78. A combination of a molybdenum anode and a molybdenum filter (Mo/Mo) was used for the mammographic X-ray tubes. The effects of the degree of magnification were investigated in terms of both the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and the average glandular dose (AGD). The results show that the CNR increased as the degree of magnification increased and decreased as breast glandularity increased. The AGD showed only a minor increase with magnification. Based on the results, magnification of mammographic images can be used to obtain high image quality with an increased CNR. Our X-ray digital mammographic system model with GATE may be used as a basis for future studies on X-ray imaging characteristics.

  18. Linux Kernel in a Nutshell

    CERN Document Server

    Kroah-Hartman, Greg

    2009-01-01

    Linux Kernel in a Nutshell covers the entire range of kernel tasks, starting with downloading the source and making sure that the kernel is in sync with the versions of the tools you need. In addition to configuration and installation steps, the book offers reference material and discussions of related topics such as control of kernel options at runtime.

  19. On the dosimetric behaviour of photon dose calculation algorithms in the presence of simple geometric heterogeneities: comparison with Monte Carlo calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogliata, Antonella; Vanetti, Eugenio; Albers, Dirk

    2007-01-01

    with modified Batho correction; Nucletron Helax-TMS: the collapsed cone and the pencil beam with equivalent path length correction; CMS XiO: the multigrid superposition and the fast Fourier transform convolution; Philips Pinnacle: the collapsed cone. Monte Carlo simulations (MC) performed with the EGSnrc codes...... BEAMnrc and DOSxyznrc from NRCC in Ottawa were used as a benchmark. The study was carried out in simple geometrical water phantoms (rho = 1.00 g cm(-3)) with inserts of different densities simulating light lung tissue (rho = 0.035 g cm(-3)), normal lung (rho = 0.20 g cm(-3)) and cortical bone tissue (rho...... = 1.80 g cm(-3)). Experiments were performed for low- and high-energy photon beams (6 and 15 MV) and for square (13 x 13 cm2) and elongated rectangular (2.8 x 13 cm2) fields. Analysis was carried out on the basis of depth dose curves and transverse profiles at several depths. Assuming the MC data...

  20. Data-variant kernel analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Motai, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Describes and discusses the variants of kernel analysis methods for data types that have been intensely studied in recent years This book covers kernel analysis topics ranging from the fundamental theory of kernel functions to its applications. The book surveys the current status, popular trends, and developments in kernel analysis studies. The author discusses multiple kernel learning algorithms and how to choose the appropriate kernels during the learning phase. Data-Variant Kernel Analysis is a new pattern analysis framework for different types of data configurations. The chapters include

  1. Mixture Density Mercer Kernels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We present a method of generating Mercer Kernels from an ensemble of probabilistic mixture models, where each mixture model is generated from a Bayesian mixture...

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of the dose distribution around the {sup 125}I model 6711 seed as function of radius of the silver cylinder using the Penelope code; Simulacion por el Metodo de Monte Carlo de la distribucion de dosis alrededor de la semilla de {sup 125}I modelo 6711 en funcion del radio del cilindro de plata usando el codigo Penelope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nerio, U. [Universidad de Cordoba, Monteria (Colombia); Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Bogota (Colombia); Chica, L. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Paul, A. [Universite de la Mediterranee, Marseille (France)

    2004-07-01

    The Monte Carlo method is applied to find the dose rates distribution in tissue around {sup 125} I seeds model 6711 as a function of the silver cylinder radius, R{sub sc} (0.017, 0.021, 0.025, 0.029 and 0.033) cm are used as radius values. It is found here that the dose rate at any point within the tissue decreases as R{sub sc} increases. The relative difference of dose rate that produced by the standard R{sub sc} seed, is less than 5%, for seeds with Rsc between 0.017 and 0.033 cm. (author)

  3. SU-E-T-559: Monte Carlo Simulation of Cobalt-60 Teletherapy Unit Modeling In-Field and Out-Of-Field Doses for Applications in Computational Radiation Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petroccia, H; Bolch, W [J. Crayton Pruitt Family of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Li, Z; Mendenhall, N [Radiation Oncology, UF Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Mean organ doses from structures located in field and outside of field boundaries during radiotherapy treatment must be considered when looking at secondary effects. Treatment planning in patients with 40 years of follow-up does not include 3-D treatment planning images and did not estimate dose to structures out of the direct field. Therefore, it is of interest to correlate actual clinical events with doses received. Methods: Accurate models of radiotherapy machines combined with whole body computational phantoms using Monte Carlo methods allow for dose reconstructions intended for studies on late radiation effects. The Theratron-780 radiotherapy unit and anatomically realistic hybrid computational phantoms are modeled in the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX. The major components of the machine including the source capsule, lead in the unit-head, collimators (fixed/adjustable), and trimmer bars are simulated. The MCNPX transport code is used to compare calculated values in a water phantom with published data from BJR suppl. 25 for in-field doses and experimental data from AAPM Task Group No. 36 for out-of-field doses. Next, the validated cobalt-60 teletherapy model is combined with the UF/NCI Family of Reference Hybrid Computational Phantoms as a methodology for estimating organ doses. Results: The model of Theratron-780 has shown to be agree with percentage depth dose data within approximately 1% and for out of field doses the machine is shown to agree within 8.8%. Organ doses are reported for reference hybrid phantoms. Conclusion: Combining the UF/NCI Family of Reference Hybrid Computational Phantoms along with a validated model of the Theratron-780 allows for organ dose estimates of both in-field and out-of-field organs. By changing field size, position, and adding patient-specific blocking more complicated treatment set-ups can be recreated for patients treated historically, particularly those who lack both 2D/3D image sets.

  4. Remarks on kernel Bayes' rule

    OpenAIRE

    Johno, Hisashi; Nakamoto, Kazunori; Saigo, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Kernel Bayes' rule has been proposed as a nonparametric kernel-based method to realize Bayesian inference in reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces. However, we demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that the prediction result by kernel Bayes' rule is in some cases unnatural. We consider that this phenomenon is in part due to the fact that the assumptions in kernel Bayes' rule do not hold in general.

  5. Linearized Kernel Dictionary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golts, Alona; Elad, Michael

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present a new approach of incorporating kernels into dictionary learning. The kernel K-SVD algorithm (KKSVD), which has been introduced recently, shows an improvement in classification performance, with relation to its linear counterpart K-SVD. However, this algorithm requires the storage and handling of a very large kernel matrix, which leads to high computational cost, while also limiting its use to setups with small number of training examples. We address these problems by combining two ideas: first we approximate the kernel matrix using a cleverly sampled subset of its columns using the Nystr\\"{o}m method; secondly, as we wish to avoid using this matrix altogether, we decompose it by SVD to form new "virtual samples," on which any linear dictionary learning can be employed. Our method, termed "Linearized Kernel Dictionary Learning" (LKDL) can be seamlessly applied as a pre-processing stage on top of any efficient off-the-shelf dictionary learning scheme, effectively "kernelizing" it. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on several tasks of both supervised and unsupervised classification and show the efficiency of the proposed scheme, its easy integration and performance boosting properties.

  6. Investigation of practical approaches to evaluating cumulative dose for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) from standard CT dosimetry measurements: a Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhaimed, Abdullah; Martin, Colin J.; Sankaralingam, Marimuthu; Gentle, David J.

    2015-07-01

    A function called Gx(L) was introduced by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) Report-87 to facilitate measurement of cumulative dose for CT scans within long phantoms as recommended by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) TG-111. The Gx(L) function is equal to the ratio of the cumulative dose at the middle of a CT scan to the volume weighted CTDI (CTDIvol), and was investigated for conventional multi-slice CT scanners operating with a moving table. As the stationary table mode, which is the basis for cone beam CT (CBCT) scans, differs from that used for conventional CT scans, the aim of this study was to investigate the extension of the Gx(L) function to CBCT scans. An On-Board Imager (OBI) system integrated with a TrueBeam linac was simulated with Monte Carlo EGSnrc/BEAMnrc, and the absorbed dose was calculated within PMMA, polyethylene (PE), and water head and body phantoms using EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc, where the body PE body phantom emulated the ICRU/AAPM phantom. Beams of width 40-500 mm and beam qualities at tube potentials of 80-140 kV were studied. Application of a modified function of beam width (W) termed Gx(W), for which the cumulative dose for CBCT scans f (0) is normalized to the weighted CTDI (CTDIw) for a reference beam of width 40 mm, was investigated as a possible option. However, differences were found in Gx(W) with tube potential, especially for body phantoms, and these were considered to be due to differences in geometry between wide beams used for CBCT scans and those for conventional CT. Therefore, a modified function Gx(W)100 has been proposed, taking the form of values of f (0) at each position in a long phantom, normalized with respect to dose indices f 100(150)x measured with a 100 mm pencil ionization chamber within standard 150 mm PMMA phantoms, using the same scanning parameters, beam widths and positions within the phantom. f 100(150)x averages the dose resulting from

  7. Dose calculations in diagnostic radiology ICRP 110 voxelizados dummies by the method of Monte Carlo; Calculo de dosis en radiodiagnostico sobre los maniquies voxelizados ICRP 110 mediante el metodo de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvado, M.; Hernandez-Giron, I.; Morant, J. J.; Casanova, R.; Lopez, M.; Calzada, A.

    2011-07-01

    The optimization of the dose given in radiology scans, one of the three fundamental principles of radiation protection implies sufficiently precise knowledge of the dose distribution in organs with weighting factor for the calculation of effective dose in patients.

  8. Nonlinear Forecasting With Many Predictors Using Kernel Ridge Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Exterkate, Peter; Groenen, Patrick J.F.; Heij, Christiaan

    of the predictive regression model is based on a shrinkage estimator to avoid overfitting. We extend the kernel ridge regression methodology to enable its use for economic time-series forecasting, by including lags of the dependent variable or other individual variables as predictors, as typically desired......This paper puts forward kernel ridge regression as an approach for forecasting with many predictors that are related nonlinearly to the target variable. In kernel ridge regression, the observed predictor variables are mapped nonlinearly into a high-dimensional space, where estimation...... in macroeconomic and financial applications. Monte Carlo simulations as well as an empirical application to various key measures of real economic activity confirm that kernel ridge regression can produce more accurate forecasts than traditional linear and nonlinear methods for dealing with many predictors based...

  9. Experimental validation of Monte Carlo depth-dose calculations using radiochromic dye film dosimetry for a beta-gamma {sup 153}Sm radionuclide applied to the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarreal-Barajas, J.E.; Ferro-Flores, G.; Hernandez-Oviedo, O

    2002-07-01

    In this work we compare the Monte Carlo (MCNP4B) calculated beta-gamma depth-dose profile for a liquid {sup 153}Sm beta-gamma source used in radiation synovectomy with the experimental depth-dose distribution obtained using radiochromic dye film dosimetry. The calculated and experimental depth-dose distribution shows a very good agreement (within 5%) in the region where the dose deposition is dominated by the beta particle component (first 800 {mu}m depth on tissue-equivalent material). The agreement worsens, reaching a maximum deviation of 15%, at depths close to the maximum range of the beta particles. Finally the agreement improves for the region where the gamma component accounts for one-third of the total absorbed dose (depths >1 mm ). The possible contributions to these differences are discussed, as well as their relevance for the application of {sup 153}Sm in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. (author)

  10. Particle induced X-ray emission and ion dose distribution in a biological micro-beam: Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Syed Bilal, E-mail: ahmadsb@mcmaster.ca [TAB-104D, Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4K1 (Canada); Thompson, Jeroen E., E-mail: Jeroen.thompson@gmail.com [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4K1 (Canada); McNeill, Fiona E., E-mail: fmcneill@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4K1 (Canada); Byun, Soo Hyun, E-mail: soohyun@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4K1 (Canada); Prestwich, William V., E-mail: prestwic@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4K1 (Canada)

    2013-01-15

    The goal of a microbeam is to deliver a highly localized and small dose to the biological medium. This can be achieved by using a set of collimators that confine the charged particle beam to a very small spatial area of the order of microns in diameter. By using a system that combines an appropriate beam detection method that signals to a beam shut-down mechanism, a predetermined and counted number of energetic particles can be delivered to targeted biological cells. Since the shutter and the collimators block a significant proportion of the beam, there is a probability of the production of low energy X-rays and secondary electrons through interactions with the beam. There is little information in the biological microbeam literature on potential X-ray production. We therefore used Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the potential production of particle-induced X-rays and secondary electrons in the collimation system (which is predominantly made of tungsten) and the subsequent possible effects on the total absorbed dose delivered to the biological medium. We found, through the simulation, no evidence of the escape of X-rays or secondary electrons from the collimation system for proton energies up to 3 MeV as we found that the thickness of the collimators is sufficient to reabsorb all of the generated low energy X-rays and secondary electrons. However, if the proton energy exceeds 3 MeV our simulations suggest that 10 keV X-rays can escape the collimator and expose the overlying layer of cells and medium. If the proton energy is further increased to 4.5 MeV or beyond, the collimator can become a significant source of 10 keV and 59 keV X-rays. These additional radiation fields could have effects on cells and these results should be verified through experimental measurement. We suggest that researchers using biological microbeams at higher energies need to be aware that cells may be exposed to a mixed LET radiation field and be careful in their interpretation of

  11. SU-E-T-289: Scintillating Fiber Based In-Vivo Dose Monitoring System to the Rectum in Proton Therapy of Prostate Cancer: A Geant4 Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesfamicael, B; Gueye, P; Lyons, D [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Mahesh, M [Johns Hopkins Univ, Baltimore, MD (United States); Avery, S [University of Pennsylvania, Sicklerville, NJ (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To construct a dose monitoring system based on an endorectal balloon coupled to thin scintillating fibers to study the dose delivered to the rectum during prostate cancer proton therapy Methods: The Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit version 9.6p02 was used to simulate prostate cancer proton therapy treatments of an endorectal balloon (for immobilization of a 2.9 cm diameter prostate gland) and a set of 34 scintillating fibers symmetrically placed around the balloon and perpendicular to the proton beam direction (for dosimetry measurements) Results: A linear response of the fibers to the dose delivered was observed within <2%, a property that makes them good candidates for real time dosimetry. Results obtained show that the closest fiber recorded about 1/3 of the dose to the target with a 1/r{sup 2} decrease in the dose distribution as one goes toward the frontal and distal top fibers. Very low dose was recorded by the bottom fibers (about 45 times comparatively), which is a clear indication that the overall volume of the rectal wall that is exposed to a higher dose is relatively minimized. Further analysis indicated a simple scaling relationship between the dose to the prostate and the dose to the top fibers (a linear fit gave a slope of −0.07±0.07 MeV per treatment Gy) Conclusion: Thin (1 mm × 1 mm × 100 cm) long scintillating fibers were found to be ideal for real time in-vivo dose measurement to the rectum for prostate cancer proton therapy. The linear response of the fibers to the dose delivered makes them good candidates of dosimeters. With thorough calibration and the ability to define a good correlation between the dose to the target and the dose to the fibers, such dosimeters can be used for real time dose verification to the target.

  12. Contingent kernel density estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Fortmann-Roe

    Full Text Available Kernel density estimation is a widely used method for estimating a distribution based on a sample of points drawn from that distribution. Generally, in practice some form of error contaminates the sample of observed points. Such error can be the result of imprecise measurements or observation bias. Often this error is negligible and may be disregarded in analysis. In cases where the error is non-negligible, estimation methods should be adjusted to reduce resulting bias. Several modifications of kernel density estimation have been developed to address specific forms of errors. One form of error that has not yet been addressed is the case where observations are nominally placed at the centers of areas from which the points are assumed to have been drawn, where these areas are of varying sizes. In this scenario, the bias arises because the size of the error can vary among points and some subset of points can be known to have smaller error than another subset or the form of the error may change among points. This paper proposes a "contingent kernel density estimation" technique to address this form of error. This new technique adjusts the standard kernel on a point-by-point basis in an adaptive response to changing structure and magnitude of error. In this paper, equations for our contingent kernel technique are derived, the technique is validated using numerical simulations, and an example using the geographic locations of social networking users is worked to demonstrate the utility of the method.

  13. Protection of eye lens in computed tomography. Dose evaluation on an anthropomorphic phantom using thermo-luminescent dosimeters and Monte-Carlo simulations; Schutz der Augenlinse in der Computertomografie. Dosisevaluation an einem antropomorphen Phantom mittels Thermolumineszenzdosimetrie und Monte-Carlo-Simulationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keil, B.; Heverhagen, J.T.; Madsack, B.; Klose, K.J. [Klinik fuer Strahlendiagnostik, Philipps-Univ. Marburg (Germany); Wulff, J.; Schmitt, R.; Fiebich, M.; Zink, K. [Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz, Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg (Germany); Auvanis, D.; Danova, D. [Klinik fuer Strahlendiagnostik, Philipps-Univ. Marburg (Germany); Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz, Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg (Germany); Leppek, R. [Klinik fuer Strahlendiagnostik, Philipps-Univ. Marburg (Germany); Zentrum fuer Angewandte Radiologische Forschung, TransMit Giessen (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    Purpose: the lens of an eye is a particularly radiosensitive organ. This study investigates two different materials for eye shielding during CT scanning, i.e. a commercially available bismuth protector and a newly developed material for eye shielding, comprised of an alloy of Bi/Sb/Gd/W. Materials and methods: the radiation dose during head CT scanning was measured using thermoluminescence dosimeters and an anthropomorphic Alderson-RANDO phantom. A radiation dose reduction was compared to two shielding materials and to the condition without any eye shielding. The effect of gantry angulation that excludes the eyes from beam path was also investigated. Radiation dose measurements were validated using a Monte-Carlo simulation. For this simulation we used the EGSsnr code system, and a new application CTDOSPP was developed for simulation of the computed tomography examination. Eight radiologists evaluated the diagnostic quality of the images. Results: dose measurements and Monte-Carlo simulations are in good agreement. If the eye shields are placed in the primary beam path, bismuth eye shielding and the new material reduce the dose by up to 38% and 48%, respectively. Angling the gantry causes an 88% reduction in radiation dose. All shielding materials generate beam hardening artifacts located close to the protector, but the artifacts do not spread into the brain. (orig.)

  14. Multidimensional kernel estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Milosevic, Vukasin

    2015-01-01

    Kernel estimation is one of the non-parametric methods used for estimation of probability density function. Its first ROOT implementation, as part of RooFit package, has one major issue, its evaluation time is extremely slow making in almost unusable. The goal of this project was to create a new class (TKNDTree) which will follow the original idea of kernel estimation, greatly improve the evaluation time (using the TKTree class for storing the data and creating different user-controlled modes of evaluation) and add the interpolation option, for 2D case, with the help of the new Delaunnay2D class.

  15. Histogram-kernel Error and Its Application for Bin Width Selection in Histograms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-xiang Wang; Jian-fang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Histogram and kernel estimators are usually regarded as the two main classical data-based nonparametric tools to estimate the underlying density functions for some given data sets.In this paper we will integrate them and define a histogram-kernel error based on the integrated square error between histogram and binned kernel density estimator,and then exploit its asymptotic properties. Just as indicated in this paper,the histogram-kernel error only depends on the choice of bin width and the data for the given prior kernel densities.The asymptotic optimal bin width is derived by minimizing the mean histogram-kernel error.By comparing with Scott's optimal bin width formula for a histogram,a new method is proposed to construct the data-based histogram without knowledge of the underlying density function.Monte Carlo study is used to verify the usefulness of our method for different kinds of density functions and sample sizes.

  16. Adaptive metric kernel regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, Cyril; Larsen, Jan

    2000-01-01

    regression by minimising a cross-validation estimate of the generalisation error. This allows to automatically adjust the importance of different dimensions. The improvement in terms of modelling performance is illustrated on a variable selection task where the adaptive metric kernel clearly outperforms...

  17. Adaptive Metric Kernel Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, Cyril; Larsen, Jan

    1998-01-01

    by minimising a cross-validation estimate of the generalisation error. This allows one to automatically adjust the importance of different dimensions. The improvement in terms of modelling performance is illustrated on a variable selection task where the adaptive metric kernel clearly outperforms the standard...

  18. Multivariate realised kernels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Hansen, Peter Reinhard; Lunde, Asger

    2011-01-01

    We propose a multivariate realised kernel to estimate the ex-post covariation of log-prices. We show this new consistent estimator is guaranteed to be positive semi-definite and is robust to measurement error of certain types and can also handle non-synchronous trading. It is the first estimator...

  19. Kernel bundle EPDiff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Stefan Horst; Lauze, Francois Bernard; Nielsen, Mads

    2011-01-01

    In the LDDMM framework, optimal warps for image registration are found as end-points of critical paths for an energy functional, and the EPDiff equations describe the evolution along such paths. The Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Kernel Bundle Mapping (LDDKBM) extension of LDDMM allows scale space...

  20. On nonlinear Markov chain Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Andrieu, Christophe; Doucet, Arnaud; Del Moral, Pierre; 10.3150/10-BEJ307

    2011-01-01

    Let $\\mathscr{P}(E)$ be the space of probability measures on a measurable space $(E,\\mathcal{E})$. In this paper we introduce a class of nonlinear Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods for simulating from a probability measure $\\pi\\in\\mathscr{P}(E)$. Nonlinear Markov kernels (see [Feynman--Kac Formulae: Genealogical and Interacting Particle Systems with Applications (2004) Springer]) $K:\\mathscr{P}(E)\\times E\\rightarrow\\mathscr{P}(E)$ can be constructed to, in some sense, improve over MCMC methods. However, such nonlinear kernels cannot be simulated exactly, so approximations of the nonlinear kernels are constructed using auxiliary or potentially self-interacting chains. Several nonlinear kernels are presented and it is demonstrated that, under some conditions, the associated approximations exhibit a strong law of large numbers; our proof technique is via the Poisson equation and Foster--Lyapunov conditions. We investigate the performance of our approximations with some simulations.

  1. Viscosity kernel of molecular fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puscasu, Ruslan; Todd, Billy; Daivis, Peter

    2010-01-01

    , temperature, and chain length dependencies of the reciprocal and real-space viscosity kernels are presented. We find that the density has a major effect on the shape of the kernel. The temperature range and chain lengths considered here have by contrast less impact on the overall normalized shape. Functional...... forms that fit the wave-vector-dependent kernel data over a large density and wave-vector range have also been tested. Finally, a structural normalization of the kernels in physical space is considered. Overall, the real-space viscosity kernel has a width of roughly 3–6 atomic diameters, which means...

  2. Calculation of absorbed doses in sphere volumes around the Mammosite using the Monte Carlo simulation code MCNPX; Calculo de dosis absorbida en volumenes esfericos alrededor del Mammosite utilizando el codigo de simulacion Monte Carlo MCNPX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas C, E. L. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the changes observed in the absorbed doses in mammary gland tissue when irradiated with a equipment of high dose rate known as Mammosite and introducing material resources contrary to the tissue that constitutes the mammary gland. The modeling study is performed with the code MCNPX, 2005 version, the equipment and the mammary gland and calculating the absorbed doses in tissue when introduced small volumes of air or calcium in the system. (Author)

  3. Multiple Kernel Point Set Registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh Minh; Wu, Q M Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    The finite Gaussian mixture model with kernel correlation is a flexible tool that has recently received attention for point set registration. While there are many algorithms for point set registration presented in the literature, an important issue arising from these studies concerns the mapping of data with nonlinear relationships and the ability to select a suitable kernel. Kernel selection is crucial for effective point set registration. We focus here on multiple kernel point set registration. We make several contributions in this paper. First, each observation is modeled using the Student's t-distribution, which is heavily tailed and more robust than the Gaussian distribution. Second, by automatically adjusting the kernel weights, the proposed method allows us to prune the ineffective kernels. This makes the choice of kernels less crucial. After parameter learning, the kernel saliencies of the irrelevant kernels go to zero. Thus, the choice of kernels is less crucial and it is easy to include other kinds of kernels. Finally, we show empirically that our model outperforms state-of-the-art methods recently proposed in the literature.

  4. Calculation Monte Carlo equivalent dose to organs in a treatment of prostate with Brachytherapy of high rate; Calculo Monte Carlo de dosis equivalente a organos en un tratamiento de prostata con braquiterapia de alta tasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candela-Juan, C.; Vijande, J.; Granero, D.; Ballester, F.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Rivard, M. J.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain equivalent dose to radiosensitive organs when applies brachytherapy high dose (HDR) with sources of 60 Co or 192 Go to a localized carcinoma of the prostate. The results are compared with those reported in the literature on treatment with protons and intensity modulated (IMRT) radiation therapy. (Author)

  5. Evaluation of dose perturbation at the interface of two different density medium using GAFCHROMIC film EBT2 and Monte Carlo code EGSnrc for Co-60 beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Kumar Painuly

    2015-01-01

    Results and Discussion: We observed significant variation in dose for smaller fields. There is a dose build down in the backward region and a dose build up in the forward direction. In the region of electronic disequilibrium, dose reduction near interface (proximal end will have negative impact if target region is embedded there, on the contrary, it would be beneficial if there is normal tissue/critical organ adjacent to it.

  6. Dose Calculations for Lung Inhomogeneity in High-Energy Photon Beams and Small Beamlets: A Comparison between XiO and TiGRT Treatment Planning Systems and MCNPX Monte Carlo Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Mesbahi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Radiotherapy with small fields is used widely in newly developed techniques. Additionally, dose calculation accuracy of treatment planning systems in small fields plays a crucial role in treatment outcome. In the present study, dose calculation accuracy of two commercial treatment planning systems was evaluated against Monte Carlo method. Materials and Methods Siemens Once or linear accelerator was simulated, using MCNPX Monte Carlo code, according to manufacturer’s instructions. Three analytical algorithms for dose calculation including full scatter convolution (FSC in TiGRT, along with convolution and superposition in XiO system were evaluated for a small solid liver tumor. This solid tumor with a diameter of 1.8 cm was evaluated in a thorax phantom, and calculations were performed for different field sizes (1×1, 2×2, 3×3 and4×4 cm2. The results obtained in these treatment planning systems were compared with calculations by MC method (regarded as the most reliable method. Results For FSC and convolution algorithm, comparison with MC calculations indicated dose overestimations of up to 120%and 25% inside the lung and tumor, respectively in 1×1 cm2field size, using an 18 MV photon beam. Regarding superposition, a close agreement was seen with MC simulation in all studied field sizes. Conclusion The obtained results showed that FSC and convolution algorithm significantly overestimated doses of the lung and solid tumor; therefore, significant errors could arise in treatment plans of lung region, thus affecting the treatment outcomes. Therefore, use of MC-based methods and super position is recommended for lung treatments, using small fields and beamlets.

  7. Characterization by Monte Carlo of the dose after a glass shield lead for gamma ray; Caracterizacion por Monte Carlo de la dosis tras un blindaje de vidrio de plomo para rayos gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteve Sanchez, S.; Gil Conde, M.; Contreras Gonzalez, J. L.; Rosado, J.; Pazyi, V.

    2013-07-01

    When a gamma-ray beam crosses the border between two media characterized by atomic number very different is they produce effects on the distribution of doses near the border difficult to predict with simple models. The case of rays gamma affecting a lead glass is particularly interesting for its application to shielding of common use. interested in studying the importance of the residual dose after the shield. (Author)

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of ruthenium eye plaques with GEANT4: influence of multiple scattering algorithms, the spectrum and the geometry on depth dose profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, H.; Ebenau, M.; Spaan, B.; Eichmann, M.

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies show remarkable differences in the simulation of electron depth dose profiles of ruthenium eye plaques. We examined the influence of the scoring and simulation geometry, the source spectrum and the multiple scattering algorithm on the depth dose profile using GEANT4. The simulated absolute dose deposition agrees with absolute dose data from the manufacturer within the measurement uncertainty. Variations in the simulation geometry as well as the source spectrum have only a small influence on the depth dose profiles. However, the multiple scattering algorithms have the largest influence on the depth dose profiles. They deposit up to 20% less dose compared to the single scattering implementation. We recommend researchers who are interested in simulating low- to medium-energy electrons to examine their simulation under the influence of different multiple scattering settings. Since the simulation and scoring geometry as well as the exact physics settings are best described by the source code of the application, we made the code publicly available.

  9. Testing Monotonicity of Pricing Kernels

    OpenAIRE

    Timofeev, Roman

    2007-01-01

    In this master thesis a mechanism to test mononicity of empirical pricing kernels (EPK) is presented. By testing monotonicity of pricing kernel we can determine whether utility function is concave or not. Strictly decreasing pricing kernel corresponds to concave utility function while non-decreasing EPK means that utility function contains some non-concave regions. Risk averse behavior is usually described by concave utility function and considered to be a cornerstone of classical behavioral ...

  10. Estimation of children's radiation dose from cardiac catheterisations, performed for the diagnosis or the treatment of a congenital heart disease using TLD dosimetry and Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakoumakis, E N; Gialousis, G I; Papadopoulou, Despina; Makri, Triantafillia; Pappouli, Zografia; Yakoumakis, Nikolaos; Papagiannis, Panayotis; Georgiou, Evangelos [Medical Physics Department, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias Street, Athens 11527 (Greece)], E-mail: gialousis@med.uoa.gr

    2009-06-15

    Entrance surface radiation doses were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters for 98 children who were referred to a cardiology department for the diagnosis or the treatment of a congenital heart disease. Additionally, all the radiographic parameters were recorded and Monte Carlo simulations were performed for the estimation of entrance surface dose to effective dose conversion factors, in order to further calculate the effective dose for each child. For diagnostic catheterisations the values ranged from 0.16 to 14.44 mSv, with average 3.71 mSv, and for therapeutic catheterisations the values ranged from 0.38 to 25.01 mSv, with average value 5 mSv. Effective doses were estimated for diagnostic procedures and interventional procedures performed for the treatment of five different heart diseases: (a) atrial septal defect (ASD), (b) ventricular septal defect (VSD), (c) patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), (d) aorta coarctation and (e) pulmonary stenosis. The high levels of radiation exposure are, however, balanced with the advantages of cardiac catheterisations such as the avoidance of surgical closure and the necessity of shorter or even no hospitalisation.

  11. 7 CFR 51.1415 - Inedible kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inedible kernels. 51.1415 Section 51.1415 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Pecans in the Shell 1 Definitions § 51.1415 Inedible kernels. Inedible kernels means that the kernel or pieces of kernels are rancid, moldy, decayed, injured by insects or...

  12. 7 CFR 981.8 - Inedible kernel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inedible kernel. 981.8 Section 981.8 Agriculture... Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.8 Inedible kernel. Inedible kernel means a kernel, piece, or particle of almond kernel with any defect scored as serious damage, or damage due to mold, gum, shrivel,...

  13. 7 CFR 981.7 - Edible kernel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Edible kernel. 981.7 Section 981.7 Agriculture... Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.7 Edible kernel. Edible kernel means a kernel, piece, or particle of almond kernel that is not inedible....

  14. 7 CFR 981.408 - Inedible kernel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inedible kernel. 981.408 Section 981.408 Agriculture... Administrative Rules and Regulations § 981.408 Inedible kernel. Pursuant to § 981.8, the definition of inedible kernel is modified to mean a kernel, piece, or particle of almond kernel with any defect scored...

  15. Dose Optimization of IORT Model for Breast Cancer Based on Monte Carlo Algorithm%基于蒙卡算法的乳腺癌术中放疗模型的剂量学优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨波; 孔旭东; 魏贤顶; 孟东; 陈建江

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨蒙特卡罗算法在乳腺癌术中放疗(IORT)模型剂量学优化中的应用价值。方法采用MCTP的MCBEAM程序建立乳腺癌术中放疗模型,利用MCSIM程序对患者术前CT模拟术中影像模型进行剂量计算,分析其剂量学特点,并对靶区剂量进行优化。结果通过蒙卡计算,优化的乳腺癌术中放疗模型方案为:靶区表面添加2~3 mm等效材料,靶区后缘添加5 mm等效材料再加2 mm铅板,这可以使90%以上等剂量线包绕整个靶区,同时可以消除>110%的热点区域,肺最大剂量<1 Gy。结论蒙特卡罗算法在乳腺癌IORT模型剂量学优化中的应用能显著提高IORT靶区剂量的计算精度,优化剂量分布,值得临床推广。%ObjectiveToexplorethevalueofMonteCarloalgorithminthedoseoptimizationofIORTmodel forbreastcancer. MethodsTheIORTmodelforbreastcancerwasestablishedwithMCTPMCBEAM program. Then the dose calculation of the intraoperative image simulated by CT was conducted with MCBEAM program to analyze the dosimetric characteristics and optimize the target dose. ResuIts Based on Monte Carlo calculation, the optimization scheme of IORT model for breast cancer was designed as the follow:adding 2~3mmequivalentmaterialonthetargetsurfaceandadding 5mmequivalentmaterialand 2mm leadplateonthetrailingedgeofthetarget.Thustheentiretargetregioncanbesurroundedbymorethan 90%isodoselineandmorethan 110%hotregioncanbeeliminatedwhilethemaxiumdoseofthelungislessthan 1 Gy. ConcIusion The application of Monte Carlo algorithm in the dose optimization of IORT model for breast cancer can significantly improve the calculation precision of the target dose and optimize the dose distribution, which indicates that Monte Carlo algorithm is worth to be promoted in clinic.

  16. Effect of iodine contrast agent concentration on cerebrovascular dose for synchrotron radiation microangiography based on a simple mouse head model and a voxel mouse head phantom by Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Jing, Jia; Lu, Yi-Fan; Xie, Cong; Lin, Xiao-Jie; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Effective setting strategies using Monte Carlo simulation are presented to mitigate the irradiation damage in synchrotron radiation microangiography (SRA). A one-dimensional mouse head model and a segmented voxel phantom mouse head were simulated using the EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc code to investigate the dose enhancement effect of an iodine contrast agent irradiated by a monochromatic synchrotron radiation source. The influence of the iodine concentration, vessel width and depth, protection with and without the skull layer, and various incident X-ray energies were all simulated. The dose enhancement effect and the absolute dose based on the segmented voxel mouse head phantom were evaluated. The dose enhancement ratio depended little on the irradiation depth, but strongly and linearly increasing on iodine concentration. The protection given by the skull layer cannot be ignored in SRA because a 700 µm-thick skull can decrease the dose by 10%. The incident X-ray energy can affect the dose significantly. Compared with a dose of 33.2 keV for 50 mgI ml(-1), a dose of 32.7 keV decreased by 38%, whereas a dose of 33.7 keV increased by 69.2% and the variation strengthened more with enhanced iodine concentration. The segmented voxel mouse head phantom also showed that the average dose enhancement effect and the maximal voxel dose per photon depended little on the iodine voxel volume ratio but strongly on the iodine concentration. To decrease the damage caused by the dose in SRA, a high-Z contrast agent should be used as little as possible and irradiation of the injection site of the contrast agent should be avoided immediately after the injection. The fragile vessel containing iodine should avoid being closely irradiated. Avoiding irradiating through a thin (or no) skull region, or attaching a thin equivalent material on the outside for protection are better methods. An incident X-ray energy as low as possible should be used as long as the SRA image quality is ensured

  17. Monte Carlo studies on water and LiF cavity properties for dose-reporting quantities when using x-ray and brachytherapy sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares Lopes Branco, Isabela; Guimarães Antunes, Paula Cristina; Paiva Fonseca, Gabriel; Yoriyaz, Hélio

    2016-12-01

    Model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs) are the current tools to estimate dose in brachytherapy, which takes into account heterogeneous medium, therefore, departing from water-based formalism (TG-43). One aspect associated to MBCDA is the choice of dose specification medium since it offers two possibilities to report dose: (a) dose to medium in medium, D m,m; and (b) dose to water in medium, D w,m. The discussion about the preferable quantity to be reported is underway. The dose conversion factors, DCF, between dose to water in medium, D w,m, and dose to medium in medium, D m,m, is based on cavity theory and can be obtained using different approaches. When experimental dose verification is desired using, for example, thermoluminescent LiF dosimeters, as in in vivo dose measurements, a third quantity is obtained, which is the dose to LiF in medium, D LiF,m. In this case, DCF to convert from D LiF,m to D w,m or D m,m is necessary. The objective of this study is to estimate DCFs using different approaches, present in the literature, quantifying the differences between them. Also, dose in water and LiF cavities in different tissue media and respective conversion factors to be able to convert LiF-based dose measured values into dose in water or tissue were obtained. Simple cylindrical phantoms composed by different tissue equivalent materials (bone, lung, water and adipose) are modelled. The phantoms contain a radiation source and a cavity with 0.002 69 cm3 in size, which is a typical volume of a disc type LiF dosimeter. Three x-rays qualities with average energies ranging from 47 to 250 keV, and three brachytherapy sources, 60Co, 192Ir and 137Cs, are considered. Different cavity theory approaches for DCF calculations and different cavity/medium combinations have been considered in this study. DCF values for water/bone and LiF/bone cases have strong dependence with energy increasing as the photon energy increases. DCF values also increase with energy for

  18. Comparison of Two Accelerators for Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Calculations, NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPU and Intel Xeon Phi 5110p Coprocessor: A Case Study for X-ray CT Imaging Dose Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianyu; Xu, X. George; Carothers, Christopher D.

    2014-06-01

    Hardware accelerators are currently becoming increasingly important in boosting high performance computing sys- tems. In this study, we tested the performance of two accelerator models, NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPU and Intel Xeon Phi 5110p coprocessor, using a new Monte Carlo photon transport package called ARCHER-CT we have developed for fast CT imaging dose calculation. The package contains three code variants, ARCHER - CTCPU, ARCHER - CTGPU and ARCHER - CTCOP to run in parallel on the multi-core CPU, GPU and coprocessor architectures respectively. A detailed GE LightSpeed Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) scanner model and a family of voxel patient phantoms were included in the code to calculate absorbed dose to radiosensitive organs under specified scan protocols. The results from ARCHER agreed well with those from the production code Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). It was found that all the code variants were significantly faster than the parallel MCNPX running on 12 MPI processes, and that the GPU and coprocessor performed equally well, being 2.89~4.49 and 3.01~3.23 times faster than the parallel ARCHER - CTCPU running with 12 hyperthreads.

  19. A Monte Carlo approach to lung dose calculation in small fields used in intensity modulated radiation therapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Mesbahi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Our study showed that the dose reduction with small fields in the lung was very enormous. Thus, inaccurate prediction of absorbed dose inside lung and also lung soft-tissue interfaces with small photon beams may lead to critical consequences for treatment outcome.

  20. Monte Carlo study of the impact of a magnetic field on the dose distribution in MRI-guided HDR brachytherapy using Ir-192

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beld, E; Seevinck, P R; Lagendijk, J J W; Viergever, M A; Moerland, M A

    2016-01-01

    In the process of developing a robotic MRI-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy treatment, the influence of the MRI scanner's magnetic field on the dose distribution needs to be investigated. A magnetic field causes a deflection of electrons in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic f

  1. Kernel Phase and Kernel Amplitude in Fizeau Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Pope, Benjamin J S

    2016-01-01

    Kernel phase interferometry is an approach to high angular resolution imaging which enhances the performance of speckle imaging with adaptive optics. Kernel phases are self-calibrating observables that generalize the idea of closure phases from non-redundant arrays to telescopes with arbitrarily shaped pupils, by considering a matrix-based approximation to the diffraction problem. In this paper I discuss the recent history of kernel phase, in particular in the matrix-based study of sparse arrays, and propose an analogous generalization of the closure amplitude to kernel amplitudes. This new approach can self-calibrate throughput and scintillation errors in optical imaging, which extends the power of kernel phase-like methods to symmetric targets where amplitude and not phase calibration can be a significant limitation, and will enable further developments in high angular resolution astronomy.

  2. Multivariate realised kernels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole; Hansen, Peter Reinhard; Lunde, Asger

    which has these three properties which are all essential for empirical work in this area. We derive the large sample asymptotics of this estimator and assess its accuracy using a Monte Carlo study. We implement the estimator on some US equity data, comparing our results to previous work which has used...

  3. Global Polynomial Kernel Hazard Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiabu, Munir; Miranda, Maria Dolores Martínez; Nielsen, Jens Perch

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a new bias reducing method for kernel hazard estimation. The method is called global polynomial adjustment (GPA). It is a global correction which is applicable to any kernel hazard estimator. The estimator works well from a theoretical point of view as it asymptotically redu...

  4. Global Polynomial Kernel Hazard Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiabu, Munir; Miranda, Maria Dolores Martínez; Nielsen, Jens Perch;

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a new bias reducing method for kernel hazard estimation. The method is called global polynomial adjustment (GPA). It is a global correction which is applicable to any kernel hazard estimator. The estimator works well from a theoretical point of view as it asymptotically...

  5. Comparison beta absorbed dose from 203Hg, 166Ho and 177LU isotopes in cortex and medulla in tree part kidney and integrated kidney using Monte Carlo method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mirzaei

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Large quantities of radiopharmaceuticals prescribed for treatment and diagnosis are excreted through kidney. Therefore, radiation unwanted dose is created in kidney. As a result, exact calculation of prescribed medicine amount is important. In Mird pamphlet, 5 kidneys have considered in ellipsoidal shape that radiopharmaceutical is uniform distributed in them and gamma absorption fraction is calculated and recorded in the tables and the fraction of beta absorption is considered unit. While, kidney has internal organs and radioisotope is not uniform distributed in and beta absorbed fraction is not unit. Material and method: In this research, for the first time kidney is considered integrated shape and for the second time has been considered that it is consisted of three areas, pelvis, medulla and cortex. It is supposed that radiopharmaceutical is distributed in medulla. Then, beta absorbed dose is calculated in medulla and cortex using MCNPX code and is compared with integrated kidney results. Resuts: This research has been showed that beta absorbed dose from 203Hg, 166Ho and 177Lu isotopes in medulla is four times as much as dose in integrated kidney and beta dose in cortex is 0.004 to 0.012 times as much as beta dose in integrated kidney. Conclusion: Internal structure of kidney should be considered in simulation to achieve a more accurate prescribed dose. It is recommended that simulation results of three areas kidney are replaced with integrated kidney to prevent from renal toxicity.

  6. Kernel Generalized Noise Clustering Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xiao-hong; ZHOU Jian-jiang

    2007-01-01

    To deal with the nonlinear separable problem, the generalized noise clustering (GNC) algorithm is extended to a kernel generalized noise clustering (KGNC) model. Different from the fuzzy c-means (FCM) model and the GNC model which are based on Euclidean distance, the presented model is based on kernel-induced distance by using kernel method. By kernel method the input data are nonlinearly and implicitly mapped into a high-dimensional feature space, where the nonlinear pattern appears linear and the GNC algorithm is performed. It is unnecessary to calculate in high-dimensional feature space because the kernel function can do itjust in input space. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is verified by experiments on three data sets. It is concluded that the KGNC algorithm has better clustering accuracy than FCM and GNC in clustering data sets containing noisy data.

  7. Graph kernels between point clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Francis

    2007-01-01

    Point clouds are sets of points in two or three dimensions. Most kernel methods for learning on sets of points have not yet dealt with the specific geometrical invariances and practical constraints associated with point clouds in computer vision and graphics. In this paper, we present extensions of graph kernels for point clouds, which allow to use kernel methods for such ob jects as shapes, line drawings, or any three-dimensional point clouds. In order to design rich and numerically efficient kernels with as few free parameters as possible, we use kernels between covariance matrices and their factorizations on graphical models. We derive polynomial time dynamic programming recursions and present applications to recognition of handwritten digits and Chinese characters from few training examples.

  8. TU-EF-304-10: Efficient Multiscale Simulation of the Proton Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) for DNA Double Strand Break (DSB) Induction and Bio-Effective Dose in the FLUKA Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskvin, V; Tsiamas, P; Axente, M; Farr, J [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Stewart, R [University of Washington, Seattle, WA. (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: One of the more critical initiating events for reproductive cell death is the creation of a DNA double strand break (DSB). In this study, we present a computationally efficient way to determine spatial variations in the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of proton therapy beams within the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code. Methods: We used the independently tested Monte Carlo Damage Simulation (MCDS) developed by Stewart and colleagues (Radiat. Res. 176, 587–602 2011) to estimate the RBE for DSB induction of monoenergetic protons, tritium, deuterium, hellium-3, hellium-4 ions and delta-electrons. The dose-weighted (RBE) coefficients were incorporated into FLUKA to determine the equivalent {sup 6}°60Co γ-ray dose for representative proton beams incident on cells in an aerobic and anoxic environment. Results: We found that the proton beam RBE for DSB induction at the tip of the Bragg peak, including primary and secondary particles, is close to 1.2. Furthermore, the RBE increases laterally to the beam axis at the area of Bragg peak. At the distal edge, the RBE is in the range from 1.3–1.4 for cells irradiated under aerobic conditions and may be as large as 1.5–1.8 for cells irradiated under anoxic conditions. Across the plateau region, the recorded RBE for DSB induction is 1.02 for aerobic cells and 1.05 for cells irradiated under anoxic conditions. The contribution to total effective dose from secondary heavy ions decreases with depth and is higher at shallow depths (e.g., at the surface of the skin). Conclusion: Multiscale simulation of the RBE for DSB induction provides useful insights into spatial variations in proton RBE within pristine Bragg peaks. This methodology is potentially useful for the biological optimization of proton therapy for the treatment of cancer. The study highlights the need to incorporate spatial variations in proton RBE into proton therapy treatment plans.

  9. Dose optimization for dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography based on an energy-resolved photon-counting detector: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngjin; Lee, Seungwan; Kang, Sooncheol; Eom, Jisoo

    2017-03-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) has been used to decompose breast images and improve diagnostic accuracy for tumor detection. However, this technique causes an increase of radiation dose and an inaccuracy in material decomposition due to the limitations of conventional X-ray detectors. In this study, we simulated the dual-energy CEDM with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector (ERPCD) for reducing radiation dose and improving the quantitative accuracy of material decomposition images. The ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM was compared to the conventional dual-energy CEDM in terms of radiation dose and quantitative accuracy. The correlation between radiation dose and image quality was also evaluated for optimizing the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM technique. The results showed that the material decomposition errors of the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM were 0.56-0.67 times lower than those of the conventional dual-energy CEDM. The imaging performance of the proposed technique was optimized at the radiation dose of 1.09 mGy, which is a half of the MGD for a single view mammogram. It can be concluded that the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM with an optimal exposure level is able to improve the quality of material decomposition images as well as reduce radiation dose.

  10. Flexible kernel memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitri Nowicki

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a new model of associative memory, capable of both binary and continuous-valued inputs. Based on kernel theory, the memory model is on one hand a generalization of Radial Basis Function networks and, on the other, is in feature space, analogous to a Hopfield network. Attractors can be added, deleted, and updated on-line simply, without harming existing memories, and the number of attractors is independent of input dimension. Input vectors do not have to adhere to a fixed or bounded dimensionality; they can increase and decrease it without relearning previous memories. A memory consolidation process enables the network to generalize concepts and form clusters of input data, which outperforms many unsupervised clustering techniques; this process is demonstrated on handwritten digits from MNIST. Another process, reminiscent of memory reconsolidation is introduced, in which existing memories are refreshed and tuned with new inputs; this process is demonstrated on series of morphed faces.

  11. Flexible kernel memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, Dimitri; Siegelmann, Hava

    2010-06-11

    This paper introduces a new model of associative memory, capable of both binary and continuous-valued inputs. Based on kernel theory, the memory model is on one hand a generalization of Radial Basis Function networks and, on the other, is in feature space, analogous to a Hopfield network. Attractors can be added, deleted, and updated on-line simply, without harming existing memories, and the number of attractors is independent of input dimension. Input vectors do not have to adhere to a fixed or bounded dimensionality; they can increase and decrease it without relearning previous memories. A memory consolidation process enables the network to generalize concepts and form clusters of input data, which outperforms many unsupervised clustering techniques; this process is demonstrated on handwritten digits from MNIST. Another process, reminiscent of memory reconsolidation is introduced, in which existing memories are refreshed and tuned with new inputs; this process is demonstrated on series of morphed faces.

  12. Robotic intelligence kernel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruemmer, David J.

    2009-11-17

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller. The system controller executes a robot intelligence kernel (RIK) that includes a multi-level architecture and a dynamic autonomy structure. The multi-level architecture includes a robot behavior level for defining robot behaviors, that incorporate robot attributes and a cognitive level for defining conduct modules that blend an adaptive interaction between predefined decision functions and the robot behaviors. The dynamic autonomy structure is configured for modifying a transaction capacity between an operator intervention and a robot initiative and may include multiple levels with at least a teleoperation mode configured to maximize the operator intervention and minimize the robot initiative and an autonomous mode configured to minimize the operator intervention and maximize the robot initiative. Within the RIK at least the cognitive level includes the dynamic autonomy structure.

  13. Monte Carlo simulations of the secondary neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates from surface to suborbital altitudes and low Earth orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jaby, Samy; Richardson, Richard B

    2015-07-01

    Occupational exposures from ionizing radiation are currently regulated for airline travel (Earth orbit (∼300-400 km). Aircrew typically receive between 1 and 6 mSv of occupational dose annually, while aboard the International Space Station, the area radiation dose equivalent measured over just 168 days was 106 mSv at solar minimum conditions. It is anticipated that space tourism vehicles will reach suborbital altitudes of approximately 100 km and, therefore, the annual occupational dose to flight crew during repeated transits is expected to fall somewhere between those observed for aircrew and astronauts. Unfortunately, measurements of the radiation environment at the high altitudes reached by suborbital vehicles are sparse, and modelling efforts have been similarly limited. In this paper, preliminary MCNPX radiation transport code simulations are developed of the secondary neutron flux profile in air from surface altitudes up to low Earth orbit at solar minimum conditions and excluding the effects of spacecraft shielding. These secondary neutrons are produced by galactic cosmic radiation interacting with Earth's atmosphere and are among the sources of radiation that can pose a health risk. Associated estimates of the operational neutron ambient dose equivalent, used for radiation protection purposes, and the neutron effective dose equivalent that is typically used for estimates of stochastic health risks, are provided in air. Simulations show that the neutron radiation dose rates received at suborbital altitudes are comparable to those experienced by aircrew flying at 7 to 14 km. We also show that the total neutron dose rate tails off beyond the Pfotzer maximum on ascension from surface up to low Earth orbit.

  14. SU-E-T-579: On the Relative Sensitivity of Monte Carlo and Pencil Beam Dose Calculation Algorithms to CT Metal Artifacts in Volumetric-Modulated Arc Spine Radiosurgery (RS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, M; Lee, V; Leung, R; Lee, K; Law, G; Tung, S; Chan, M [Tuen Mun Hospital, Hong Kong, Hong Kong (S.A.R) (Hong Kong); Blanck, O [University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Kiel (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Investigating the relative sensitivity of Monte Carlo (MC) and Pencil Beam (PB) dose calculation algorithms to low-Z (titanium) metallic artifacts is important for accurate and consistent dose reporting in post¬operative spinal RS. Methods: Sensitivity analysis of MC and PB dose calculation algorithms on the Monaco v.3.3 treatment planning system (Elekta CMS, Maryland Heights, MO, USA) was performed using CT images reconstructed without (plain) and with Orthopedic Metal Artifact Reduction (OMAR; Philips Healthcare system, Cleveland, OH, USA). 6MV and 10MV volumetric-modulated arc (VMAT) RS plans were obtained for MC and PB on the plain and OMAR images (MC-plain/OMAR and PB-plain/OMAR). Results: Maximum differences in dose to 0.2cc (D0.2cc) of spinal cord and cord +2mm for 6MV and 10MV VMAT plans were 0.1Gy between MC-OMAR and MC-plain, and between PB-OMAR and PB-plain. Planning target volume (PTV) dose coverage changed by 0.1±0.7% and 0.2±0.3% for 6MV and 10MV from MC-OMAR to MC-plain, and by 0.1±0.1% for both 6MV and 10 MV from PB-OMAR to PB-plain, respectively. In no case for both MC and PB the D0.2cc to spinal cord was found to exceed the planned tolerance changing from OMAR to plain CT in dose calculations. Conclusion: Dosimetric impacts of metallic artifacts caused by low-Z metallic spinal hardware (mainly titanium alloy) are not clinically important in VMAT-based spine RS, without significant dependence on dose calculation methods (MC and PB) and photon energy ≥ 6MV. There is no need to use one algorithm instead of the other to reduce uncertainty for dose reporting. The dose calculation method that should be used in spine RS shall be consistent with the usual clinical practice.

  15. Brachytherapy source characterization for improved dose calculations using primary and scatter dose separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Kellie R; Tedgren, Asa K Carlsson; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2005-09-01

    In brachytherapy, tissue heterogeneities, source shielding, and finite patient/phantom extensions affect both the primary and scatter dose distributions. The primary dose is, due to the short range of secondary electrons, dependent only on the distribution of material located on the ray line between the source and dose deposition site. The scatter dose depends on both the direct irradiation pattern and the distribution of material in a large volume surrounding the point of interest, i.e., a much larger volume must be included in calculations to integrate many small dose contributions. It is therefore of interest to consider different methods for the primary and the scatter dose calculation to improve calculation accuracy with limited computer resources. The algorithms in present clinical use ignore these effects causing systematic dose errors in brachytherapy treatment planning. In this work we review a primary and scatter dose separation formalism (PSS) for brachytherapy source characterization to support separate calculation of the primary and scatter dose contributions. We show how the resulting source characterization data can be used to drive more accurate dose calculations using collapsed cone superposition for scatter dose calculations. Two types of source characterization data paths are used: a direct Monte Carlo simulation in water phantoms with subsequent parameterization of the results, and an alternative data path built on processing of AAPM TG43 formatted data to provide similar parameter sets. The latter path is motivated of the large amounts of data already existing in the TG43 format. We demonstrate the PSS methods using both data paths for a clinical 192Ir source. Results are shown for two geometries: a finite but homogeneous water phantom, and a half-slab consisting of water and air. The dose distributions are compared to results from full Monte Carlo simulations and we show significant improvement in scatter dose calculations when the collapsed

  16. The Rational Hybrid Monte Carlo Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, M A

    2006-01-01

    The past few years have seen considerable progress in algorithmic development for the generation of gauge fields including the effects of dynamical fermions. The Rational Hybrid Monte Carlo (RHMC) algorithm, where Hybrid Monte Carlo is performed using a rational approximation in place the usual inverse quark matrix kernel is one of these developments. This algorithm has been found to be extremely beneficial in many areas of lattice QCD (chiral fermions, finite temperature, Wilson fermions etc.). We review the algorithm and some of these benefits, and we compare against other recent algorithm developements. We conclude with an update of the Berlin wall plot comparing costs of all popular fermion formulations.

  17. The Rational Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Michael

    2006-12-01

    The past few years have seen considerable progress in algorithmic development for the generation of gauge fields including the effects of dynamical fermions. The Rational Hybrid Monte Carlo (RHMC) algorithm, where Hybrid Monte Carlo is performed using a rational approximation in place the usual inverse quark matrix kernel is one of these developments. This algorithm has been found to be extremely beneficial in many areas of lattice QCD (chiral fermions, finite temperature, Wilson fermions etc.). We review the algorithm and some of these benefits, and we compare against other recent algorithm developements. We conclude with an update of the Berlin wall plot comparing costs of all popular fermion formulations.

  18. A dosimetric study of a heterogeneous phantom for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy comparing Monte Carlo and pencil beam calculations to dose distributions measured with a 2-D diode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curley, Casey Michael

    Monte Carlo (MC) and Pencil Beam (PB) calculations are compared to their measured planar dose distributions using a 2-D diode array for lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT). The planar dose distributions were studied for two different phantom types: an in-house heterogeneous phantom and a homogeneous phantom. The motivation is to mimic the human anatomy during a lung SBRT treatment and incorporate heterogeneities into the pre-treatment Quality Assurance process, where measured and calculated planar dose distributions are compared before the radiation treatment. Individual and combined field dosimetry has been performed for both fixed gantry angle (anterior to posterior) and planned gantry angle delivery. A gamma analysis has been performed for all beam arrangements. The measurements were obtained using the 2-D diode array MapCHECK 2(TM). MC and PB calculations were performed using the BrainLAB iPlan RTRTM Dose software. The results suggest that with the heterogeneous phantom as a quality assurance device, the MC calculations result in closer agreements to the measured values, when using the planned gantry angle delivery method for composite beams. For the homogeneous phantom, the results suggest that the preferred delivery method is at the fixed anterior to posterior gantry angle. Furthermore, the MC and PB calculations do not show significant differences for dose difference and distance to agreement criteria 3%/3mm. However, PB calculations are in better agreement with the measured values for more stringent gamma criteria when considering individual beam whereas MC agreements are closer for composite beam measurements.

  19. Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation of absorbed dose and radiolysis yields enhancement from a gold nanoparticle under MeV proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, H.N., E-mail: tranngochoang@tdt.edu.vn [Division of Nuclear Physics, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Karamitros, M. [Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre-Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Ivanchenko, V.N. [Geant4 Associates International Ltd, Hebden Bridge (United Kingdom); Guatelli, S.; McKinnon, S. [Centre For Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong (Australia); Illawarra Health and Medical Research, University of Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Murakami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Okada, S. [Computing Research Center, High Energy Accelerator Organization, KEK, Tsukuba City (Japan); Bordage, M.C. [INSERM, UMR 1037, CRCT, F-31000 Toulouse (France); Univ. Toulouse III-Paul Sabatier, UMR 1037, CRCT, F-31000 Toulouse (France); Francis, Z. [Saint Joseph University, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Physics, Beirut (Lebanon); El Bitar, Z. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien/IN2P3/CNRS, Strasbourg (France); Bernal, M.A. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil); Shin, J.I. [Division of Heavy Ion Clinical Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, 75, Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S.B. [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, 323, Ilsan-ro, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Barberet, Ph. [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Tran, T.T. [VNUHCM-University of Science (Viet Nam); Brown, J.M.C. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-04-15

    Gold nanoparticles have been reported as a possible radio-sensitizer agent in radiation therapy due to their ability to increase energy deposition and subsequent direct damage to cells and DNA within their local vicinity. Moreover, this increase in energy deposition also results in an increase of the radiochemical yields. In this work we present, for the first time, an in silico investigation, based on the general purpose Monte Carlo simulation toolkit Geant4, into energy deposition and radical species production around a spherical gold nanoparticle 50 nm in diameter via proton irradiation. Simulations were preformed for incident proton energies ranging from 2 to 170 MeV, which are of interest for clinical proton therapy.

  20. Monte Carlo correction factors for a Farmer 0.6 cm{sup 3} ion chamber dose measurement in the build-up region of the 6 MV clinical beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, J [Departamento de Fisica de PartIculas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Sanchez-Doblado, F [Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, RadioFisica, Sevilla (Spain); Departamento de FisiologIa y BioFisica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Capote, R [International Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Terron, J A [Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, RadioFisica, Sevilla (Spain); Departamento de FisiologIa y BioFisica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Gomez, F [Departamento de Fisica de PartIculas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2006-03-21

    Reference dosimetry of photon fields is a well-established subject and currently available protocols (such as the IAEA TRS-398 and AAPM TG-51) provide methods for converting the ionization chamber (IC) reading into dose to water, provided reference conditions of charged particle equilibrium (CPE) are fulfilled. But these protocols cannot deal with the build-up region, where the lack of CPE limits the applicability of the cavity theorems and so the chamber correction factors become depth dependent. By explicitly including the IC geometry in the Monte Carlo simulations, depth-dependent dose correction factors are calculated for a PTW 30001 0.6 cm{sup 3} ion chamber in the build-up region of the 6 MV photon beam. The corrected percentage depth dose (PDD) agrees within 2% with that measured using the NACP 02 plane-parallel ion chamber in the build-up region at depths greater than 0.4 cm, where the Farmer chamber wall reaches the phantom surface.

  1. Mixture Density Mercer Kernels: A Method to Learn Kernels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper presents a method of generating Mercer Kernels from an ensemble of probabilistic mixture models, where each mixture model is generated from a Bayesian...

  2. 7 CFR 981.9 - Kernel weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Kernel weight. 981.9 Section 981.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Regulating Handling Definitions § 981.9 Kernel weight. Kernel weight means the weight of kernels,...

  3. (Pre)kernel catchers for cooperative games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Chih; Driessen, Theo

    1995-01-01

    The paper provides a new (pre)kernel catcher in that the relevant set always contains the (pre)kernel. This new (pre)kernel catcher gives rise to a better lower bound ɛ*** such that the kernel is included in strong ɛ-cores for all real numbers ɛ not smaller than the relevant bound ɛ***.

  4. 7 CFR 51.2295 - Half kernel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Half kernel. 51.2295 Section 51.2295 Agriculture... Standards for Shelled English Walnuts (Juglans Regia) Definitions § 51.2295 Half kernel. Half kernel means the separated half of a kernel with not more than one-eighth broken off....

  5. A kernel version of spatial factor analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2009-01-01

    . Schölkopf et al. introduce kernel PCA. Shawe-Taylor and Cristianini is an excellent reference for kernel methods in general. Bishop and Press et al. describe kernel methods among many other subjects. Nielsen and Canty use kernel PCA to detect change in univariate airborne digital camera images. The kernel...... version of PCA handles nonlinearities by implicitly transforming data into high (even infinite) dimensional feature space via the kernel function and then performing a linear analysis in that space. In this paper we shall apply kernel versions of PCA, maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) analysis...

  6. Kernel model-based diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The methods for computing the kemel consistency-based diagnoses and the kernel abductive diagnoses are only suited for the situation where part of the fault behavioral modes of the components are known. The characterization of the kernel model-based diagnosis based on the general causal theory is proposed, which can break through the limitation of the above methods when all behavioral modes of each component are known. Using this method, when observation subsets deduced logically are respectively assigned to the empty or the whole observation set, the kernel consistency-based diagnoses and the kernel abductive diagnoses can deal with all situations. The direct relationship between this diagnostic procedure and the prime implicants/implicates is proved, thus linking theoretical result with implementation.

  7. Kernel Rootkits Implement and Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xianghe; ZHANG Liancheng; LI Shuo

    2006-01-01

    Rootkits, which unnoticeably reside in your computer, stealthily carry on remote control and software eavesdropping, are a great threat to network and computer security. It' time to acquaint ourselves with their implement and detection. This article pays more attention to kernel rootkits, because they are more difficult to compose and to be identified than useland rootkits. The latest technologies used to write and detect kernel rootkits, along with their advantages and disadvantages, are present in this article.

  8. Notes on the gamma kernel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole E.

    The density function of the gamma distribution is used as shift kernel in Brownian semistationary processes modelling the timewise behaviour of the velocity in turbulent regimes. This report presents exact and asymptotic properties of the second order structure function under such a model......, and relates these to results of von Karmann and Horwath. But first it is shown that the gamma kernel is interpretable as a Green’s function....

  9. Phase space modulation method for EPID-based Monte Carlo dosimetry of IMRT and RapidArc plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Avery; Townson, Reid; Bush, Karl; Zavgorodni, Sergei, E-mail: szavgorodni@bccancer.bc.c

    2010-11-01

    Quality assurance for IMRT and VMAT require 3D evaluation of the dose distributions from the treatment planning system as compared to the distributions reconstructed from signals acquired during the plan delivery. This study presents the results of the dose reconstruction based on a novel method of Monte Carlo (MC) phase space modulation. Typically, in MC dose calculations the linear accelerator (linac) is modelled for each field in the plan and a phase space file (PSF) containing all relevant particle information is written for each field. Particles from the PSFs are then used in the dose calculation. This study investigates a method of omitting the modelling of the linac in cases where the treatment has been measured by an electronic portal imaging device. In this method each portal image is deconvolved using an empirically fit scatter kernel to obtain the primary photon fluence. The Phase Space Modulation (PSM) method consists of simulating the linac just once to create a large PSF for an open field and then modulating it using the delivered primary particle fluence. Reconstructed dose distributions in phantoms were produced using MC and the modulated PSFs. The kernel derived for this method accurately reproduced the dose distributions for 3x3, 10x10, and 15x15 cm{sup 2} field sizes (mean relative dose-difference along the beam central axis is under 1%). The method has been applied to IMRT pre-treatment verification of 10 patients (including one RapidArc{sup TM} case), mean dose in the structures of interest agreed with that calculated by MC directly within 1%, and 95% of the voxels passed 2%/2mm criteria.

  10. Monte Carlo techniques in radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Modern cancer treatment relies on Monte Carlo simulations to help radiotherapists and clinical physicists better understand and compute radiation dose from imaging devices as well as exploit four-dimensional imaging data. With Monte Carlo-based treatment planning tools now available from commercial vendors, a complete transition to Monte Carlo-based dose calculation methods in radiotherapy could likely take place in the next decade. Monte Carlo Techniques in Radiation Therapy explores the use of Monte Carlo methods for modeling various features of internal and external radiation sources, including light ion beams. The book-the first of its kind-addresses applications of the Monte Carlo particle transport simulation technique in radiation therapy, mainly focusing on external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. It presents the mathematical and technical aspects of the methods in particle transport simulations. The book also discusses the modeling of medical linacs and other irradiation devices; issues specific...

  11. 3D visualisation of the stochastic patterns of the radial dose in nano-volumes by a Monte Carlo simulation of HZE ion track structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2011-02-01

    The description of energy deposition by high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei is of importance for space radiation risk assessment and due to their use in hadrontherapy. Such ions deposit a large fraction of their energy within the so-called core of the track and a smaller proportion in the penumbra (or track periphery). We study the stochastic patterns of the radial dependence of energy deposition using Monte Carlo track structure codes RITRACKS and RETRACKS, that were used to simulate HZE tracks and calculate energy deposition in voxels of 40 nm. The simulation of a (56)Fe(26+) ion of 1 GeV u(-1) revealed zones of high-energy deposition which maybe found as far as a few millimetres away from the track core in some simulations. The calculation also showed that ∼43 % of the energy was deposited in the penumbra. These 3D stochastic simulations combined with a visualisation interface are a powerful tool for biophysicists which may be used to study radiation-induced biological effects such as double strand breaks and oxidative damage and the subsequent cellular and tissue damage processing and signalling.

  12. The validity of the kinetic collection equation revisited – Part 2: Simulations for the hydrodynamic kernel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Alfonso

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic collection equation (KCE has been widely used to describe the evolution of the average droplet spectrum due to the collection process that leads to the development of precipitation in warm clouds. This deterministic, integro-differential equation only has analytic solution for very simple kernels. For more realistic kernels, the KCE needs to be integrated numerically. In this study, the validity time of the KCE for the hydrodynamic kernel is estimated by a direct comparison of Monte Carlo simulations with numerical solutions of the KCE. The simulation results show that when the largest droplet becomes separated from the smooth spectrum, the total mass calculated from the numerical solution of the KCE is not conserved and, thus, the KCE is no longer valid. This result confirms the fact that for realistic kernels appropriate for precipitation development within warm clouds, the KCE can only be applied to the continuous portion of the mass distribution.

  13. Use of Monte Carlo Methods in brachytherapy; Uso del metodo de Monte Carlo en braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granero Cabanero, D.

    2015-07-01

    The Monte Carlo method has become a fundamental tool for brachytherapy dosimetry mainly because no difficulties associated with experimental dosimetry. In brachytherapy the main handicap of experimental dosimetry is the high dose gradient near the present sources making small uncertainties in the positioning of the detectors lead to large uncertainties in the dose. This presentation will review mainly the procedure for calculating dose distributions around a fountain using the Monte Carlo method showing the difficulties inherent in these calculations. In addition we will briefly review other applications of the method of Monte Carlo in brachytherapy dosimetry, as its use in advanced calculation algorithms, calculating barriers or obtaining dose applicators around. (Author)

  14. A fast GPU-based Monte Carlo simulation of proton transport with detailed modeling of non-elastic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Tseung, H Wan Chan; Beltran, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Very fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of proton transport have been implemented recently on GPUs. However, these usually use simplified models for non-elastic (NE) proton-nucleus interactions. Our primary goal is to build a GPU-based proton transport MC with detailed modeling of elastic and NE collisions. Methods: Using CUDA, we implemented GPU kernels for these tasks: (1) Simulation of spots from our scanning nozzle configurations, (2) Proton propagation through CT geometry, considering nuclear elastic scattering, multiple scattering, and energy loss straggling, (3) Modeling of the intranuclear cascade stage of NE interactions, (4) Nuclear evaporation simulation, and (5) Statistical error estimates on the dose. To validate our MC, we performed: (1) Secondary particle yield calculations in NE collisions, (2) Dose calculations in homogeneous phantoms, (3) Re-calculations of head and neck plans from a commercial treatment planning system (TPS), and compared with Geant4.9.6p2/TOPAS. Results: Yields, en...

  15. Dose reconstruction for real-time patient-specific dose estimation in CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Man, Bruno, E-mail: deman@ge.com; Yin, Zhye [Image Reconstruction Laboratory, GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309 (United States); Wu, Mingye [X-ray and CT Laboratory, GE Global Research, Shanghai 201203 (China); FitzGerald, Paul [Radiation Systems Laboratory, GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309 (United States); Kalra, Mannudeep [Divisions of Thoracic and Cardiac Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Many recent computed tomography (CT) dose reduction approaches belong to one of three categories: statistical reconstruction algorithms, efficient x-ray detectors, and optimized CT acquisition schemes with precise control over the x-ray distribution. The latter category could greatly benefit from fast and accurate methods for dose estimation, which would enable real-time patient-specific protocol optimization. Methods: The authors present a new method for volumetrically reconstructing absorbed dose on a per-voxel basis, directly from the actual CT images. The authors’ specific implementation combines a distance-driven pencil-beam approach to model the first-order x-ray interactions with a set of Gaussian convolution kernels to model the higher-order x-ray interactions. The authors performed a number of 3D simulation experiments comparing the proposed method to a Monte Carlo based ground truth. Results: The authors’ results indicate that the proposed approach offers a good trade-off between accuracy and computational efficiency. The images show a good qualitative correspondence to Monte Carlo estimates. Preliminary quantitative results show errors below 10%, except in bone regions, where the authors see a bigger model mismatch. The computational complexity is similar to that of a low-resolution filtered-backprojection algorithm. Conclusions: The authors present a method for analytic dose reconstruction in CT, similar to the techniques used in radiation therapy planning with megavoltage energies. Future work will include refinements of the proposed method to improve the accuracy as well as a more extensive validation study. The proposed method is not intended to replace methods that track individual x-ray photons, but the authors expect that it may prove useful in applications where real-time patient-specific dose estimation is required.

  16. ARCHER{sub RT} – A GPU-based and photon-electron coupled Monte Carlo dose computing engine for radiation therapy: Software development and application to helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Lin; Du, Xining; Liu, Tianyu; Ji, Wei; Xu, X. George, E-mail: xug2@rpi.edu [Nuclear Engineering Program, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Yang, Youming; Bednarz, Bryan [Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Sterpin, Edmond [Molecular Imaging, Radiotherapy and Oncology, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium 1348 (Belgium)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Using the graphical processing units (GPU) hardware technology, an extremely fast Monte Carlo (MC) code ARCHER{sub RT} is developed for radiation dose calculations in radiation therapy. This paper describes the detailed software development and testing for three clinical TomoTherapy® cases: the prostate, lung, and head and neck. Methods: To obtain clinically relevant dose distributions, phase space files (PSFs) created from optimized radiation therapy treatment plan fluence maps were used as the input to ARCHER{sub RT}. Patient-specific phantoms were constructed from patient CT images. Batch simulations were employed to facilitate the time-consuming task of loading large PSFs, and to improve the estimation of statistical uncertainty. Furthermore, two different Woodcock tracking algorithms were implemented and their relative performance was compared. The dose curves of an Elekta accelerator PSF incident on a homogeneous water phantom were benchmarked against DOSXYZnrc. For each of the treatment cases, dose volume histograms and isodose maps were produced from ARCHER{sub RT} and the general-purpose code, GEANT4. The gamma index analysis was performed to evaluate the similarity of voxel doses obtained from these two codes. The hardware accelerators used in this study are one NVIDIA K20 GPU, one NVIDIA K40 GPU, and six NVIDIA M2090 GPUs. In addition, to make a fairer comparison of the CPU and GPU performance, a multithreaded CPU code was developed using OpenMP and tested on an Intel E5-2620 CPU. Results: For the water phantom, the depth dose curve and dose profiles from ARCHER{sub RT} agree well with DOSXYZnrc. For clinical cases, results from ARCHER{sub RT} are compared with those from GEANT4 and good agreement is observed. Gamma index test is performed for voxels whose dose is greater than 10% of maximum dose. For 2%/2mm criteria, the passing rates for the prostate, lung case, and head and neck cases are 99.7%, 98.5%, and 97.2%, respectively. Due to

  17. Research on Radiation Doses Distribution Based on Monte Carlo Method%基于蒙特卡罗计算方法的辐射剂量分布研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘卓

    2011-01-01

    This article first introduces the basic theory of Monte Carlo method, and its use in nuclear physics experiments, especially in radiation doses calculation. Secondly, it introduces the basic knowledge and development of radiation metrology. And finally, it proves that EGSWIN is able to calculate the radiation doses in certain experiments, available to three kinds of sources including electron, photon and positive electron, with great simplicity and directness.%本文首先介绍蒙特卡罗方法的基本原理,及其在核物理实验,特别是辐射剂量计算等方面的应用;其次,介绍辐射计量学的基本知识和发展情况;最后,结合放射物理方面的知识,利用基于蒙特卡罗方法的EGSWIN软件,建立数学模型,并模拟计算电子束、光子束、正电子束在设定几何条件下的照射过程.

  18. Kernel versions of some orthogonal transformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    Kernel versions of orthogonal transformations such as principal components are based on a dual formulation also termed Q-mode analysis in which the data enter into the analysis via inner products in the Gram matrix only. In the kernel version the inner products of the original data are replaced...... by inner products between nonlinear mappings into higher dimensional feature space. Via kernel substitution also known as the kernel trick these inner products between the mappings are in turn replaced by a kernel function and all quantities needed in the analysis are expressed in terms of this kernel...... function. This means that we need not know the nonlinear mappings explicitly. Kernel principal component analysis (PCA) and kernel minimum noise fraction (MNF) analyses handle nonlinearities by implicitly transforming data into high (even infinite) dimensional feature space via the kernel function...

  19. An Approximate Approach to Automatic Kernel Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lizhong; Liao, Shizhong

    2016-02-02

    Kernel selection is a fundamental problem of kernel-based learning algorithms. In this paper, we propose an approximate approach to automatic kernel selection for regression from the perspective of kernel matrix approximation. We first introduce multilevel circulant matrices into automatic kernel selection, and develop two approximate kernel selection algorithms by exploiting the computational virtues of multilevel circulant matrices. The complexity of the proposed algorithms is quasi-linear in the number of data points. Then, we prove an approximation error bound to measure the effect of the approximation in kernel matrices by multilevel circulant matrices on the hypothesis and further show that the approximate hypothesis produced with multilevel circulant matrices converges to the accurate hypothesis produced with kernel matrices. Experimental evaluations on benchmark datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of approximate kernel selection.

  20. Dose Distribution of 125 I Source in Water by Means of Monte Carlo Simulation%125I粒子源在水中剂量分布的Monte Carlo模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅雪松; 张慧; 马玉刚; 赵广义; 周巍; 庞杨; 关世荣; 王雪航

    2011-01-01

    The dose distribution of 125 I source in water was studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations and thermo luminescent dosemeter (TLD) method, and the results were compared. The results show that when I source activity was 1.37 x107 Bq, the radial distances of 125 I source were 0.5,1.0,1.5 and 2 cm, the dose rates of 125 I with MCNP method were 11.7,3. 3,1.5,0. 8 mGy/h, TLD measurements were 12.2,3. 1,1.3, 0.7 mGy/h;125 I source radial dose rate decreased rapidly with increasing distance.%采用Monte Carlo方法和热释光剂量计(TLD)法研究125I粒子源在水中的剂量分布,并对计算结果进行比较.结果表明:当粒子源活度为1.3 × 107 Bq,粒子源的径向距离分别为0.5,1.0,1.5,2 cm时,用蒙特卡洛方法(MCNP)软件包计算粒子源剂量率分别为11.7,3.3,1.5,0.8 mGy/h,TLD法测量结果分别为12.2,3.1,1.3,0.7 mGy/h; 125I粒子源的径向剂量率随距离增加迅速下降.

  1. Kernel learning algorithms for face recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jun-Bao; Pan, Jeng-Shyang

    2013-01-01

    Kernel Learning Algorithms for Face Recognition covers the framework of kernel based face recognition. This book discusses the advanced kernel learning algorithms and its application on face recognition. This book also focuses on the theoretical deviation, the system framework and experiments involving kernel based face recognition. Included within are algorithms of kernel based face recognition, and also the feasibility of the kernel based face recognition method. This book provides researchers in pattern recognition and machine learning area with advanced face recognition methods and its new

  2. Model selection for Gaussian kernel PCA denoising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kasper Winther; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2012-01-01

    We propose kernel Parallel Analysis (kPA) for automatic kernel scale and model order selection in Gaussian kernel PCA. Parallel Analysis [1] is based on a permutation test for covariance and has previously been applied for model order selection in linear PCA, we here augment the procedure to also...... tune the Gaussian kernel scale of radial basis function based kernel PCA.We evaluate kPA for denoising of simulated data and the US Postal data set of handwritten digits. We find that kPA outperforms other heuristics to choose the model order and kernel scale in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR...

  3. Clinical evaluation of X-ray voxel Monte Carlo versus pencil beam-based dose calculation in stereotactic body radiotherapy of lung cancer under normal and deep inspiration breath hold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landoni, V; Borzì, G R; Strolin, S; Bruzzaniti, V; Soriani, A; D'Alessio, D; Ambesi, F; Di Grazia, A M; Strigari, L

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the differences between dose distributions calculated with the pencil beam (PB) and X-ray voxel Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms for patients with lung cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or HybridArc techniques. The 2 algorithms were compared in terms of dose-volume histograms, under normal and deep inspiration breath hold, and in terms of the tumor control probability (TCP). The dependence of the differences in tumor volume and location was investigated. Dosimetric validation was performed using Gafchromic EBT3 (International Specialty Products, ISP, Wayne, NJ). Forty-five Computed Tomography (CT) data sets were used for this study; 40 Gy at 8 Gy/fraction was prescribed with 5 noncoplanar 6-MV IMRT beams or 3 to 4 dynamic conformal arcs with 3 to 5 IMRT beams distributed per arc. The plans were first calculated with PB and then recalculated with MC. The difference between the mean tumor doses was approximately 10% ± 4%; these differences were even larger under deep inspiration breath hold. Differences between the mean tumor dose correlated with tumor volume and path length of the beams. The TCP values changed from 99.87% ± 0.24% to 96.78% ± 4.81% for both PB- and MC-calculated plans (P = .009). When a fraction of hypoxic cells was considered, the mean TCP values changed from 76.01% ± 5.83% to 34.78% ± 18.06% for the differently calculated plans (P < .0001). When the plans were renormalized to the same mean dose at the tumor, the mean TCP for oxic cells was 99.05% ± 1.59% and for hypoxic cells was 60.20% ± 9.53%. This study confirms that the MC algorithm adequately accounts for inhomogeneities. The inclusion of the MC in the process of IMRT optimization could represent a further step in the complex problem of determining the optimal treatment plan.

  4. Monte Carlo dose calculation based on the virtual source model with linear accelerator and its preliminary application in independent dose calculation for IMRT plans%基于直线加速器虚拟源模型的蒙特卡洛剂量计算及在IMRT独立验算中的初步应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐斌; 康盛伟; 王先良; 黎杰; 王培

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feasibility of the virtual source model in Monte Carlo dose calculation for clinical radiotherapy.Methods The Monte Carlo simulation was used to obtain the phase space files which recorded the physical properties of the particles emitted by a medical linear accelerator, and the information on the type, energy spectrum, and distribution of particles were extracted from these files and analyzed to establish the semi-empirical model of virtual two-photon source.The GMC dose calculation engine was used to obtain the 3 cm×3 cm, 5 cm×5 cm, 10 cm×10 cm, 20 cm×20 cm, and 30 cm×30 cm fields of radiotherapy and the results of Monte Carlo simulation of dose distribution in three-dimensional water phantom in 2 intensity-modulated radiotherapy ( IMRT) plans.These results were compared with the results of water phantom measurement or the results of Elekta Monaco planning system to verify the accuracy of Monte Carlo dose calculation based on a virtual source.Results As for the percentage depth-dose distribution curves of the central axis of the water phantom and the off-axis dose curves at different depths in the five fields for radiotherapy, the difference between the results of Monte Carlo simulation and the results of measurement was within 1%.As for the two IMRT plans, the three-dimensional passing rates of Monaco calculation results and Monte Carlo simulation results were 98.9%and 99.4%, respectively, for 3%/3 mm, and 95.1%and 95.4%, respectively, for 2%/2 mm.Conclusions Monte Carlo simulation based on the virtual source model can obtain accurate results of radiotherapy dose calculation.%目的:研究临床放疗蒙特卡洛剂量计算方法中虚拟源模型的可行性。方法通过蒙特卡洛方法模拟得到记录医用直线加速器机头出射粒子物理特性的相空间文件,分析提取相空间文件中粒子的种类、能谱及位置分布,建立半经验虚拟双光子源抽样模型。结合并

  5. Semi-Supervised Kernel PCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walder, Christian; Henao, Ricardo; Mørup, Morten

    We present three generalisations of Kernel Principal Components Analysis (KPCA) which incorporate knowledge of the class labels of a subset of the data points. The first, MV-KPCA, penalises within class variances similar to Fisher discriminant analysis. The second, LSKPCA is a hybrid of least...... squares regression and kernel PCA. The final LR-KPCA is an iteratively reweighted version of the previous which achieves a sigmoid loss function on the labeled points. We provide a theoretical risk bound as well as illustrative experiments on real and toy data sets....

  6. Congruence Kernels of Orthoimplication Algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Chajda

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstracting from certain properties of the implication operation in Boolean algebras leads to so-called orthoimplication algebras. These are in a natural one-to-one correspondence with families of compatible orthomodular lattices. It is proved that congruence kernels of orthoimplication algebras are in a natural one-to-one correspondence with families of compatible p-filters on the corresponding orthomodular lattices. Finally, it is proved that the lattice of all congruence kernels of an orthoimplication algebra is relatively pseudocomplemented and a simple description of the relative pseudocomplement is given.

  7. Bergman kernel on generalized exceptional Hua domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN; weipng(殷慰萍); ZHAO; zhengang(赵振刚)

    2002-01-01

    We have computed the Bergman kernel functions explicitly for two types of generalized exceptional Hua domains, and also studied the asymptotic behavior of the Bergman kernel function of exceptional Hua domain near boundary points, based on Appell's multivariable hypergeometric function.

  8. Information Geometry and Sequential Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Sim, Aaron; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the application of methods from information geometry to the sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) sampler. In particular the Riemannian manifold Metropolis-adjusted Langevin algorithm (mMALA) is adapted for the transition kernels in SMC. Similar to its function in Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, the mMALA is a fully adaptable kernel which allows for efficient sampling of high-dimensional and highly correlated parameter spaces. We set up the theoretical framework for its use in SMC with a focus on the application to the problem of sequential Bayesian inference for dynamical systems as modelled by sets of ordinary differential equations. In addition, we argue that defining the sequence of distributions on geodesics optimises the effective sample sizes in the SMC run. We illustrate the application of the methodology by inferring the parameters of simulated Lotka-Volterra and Fitzhugh-Nagumo models. In particular we demonstrate that compared to employing a standard adaptive random walk kernel, the SM...

  9. Random Feature Maps for Dot Product Kernels

    OpenAIRE

    Kar, Purushottam; Karnick, Harish

    2012-01-01

    Approximating non-linear kernels using feature maps has gained a lot of interest in recent years due to applications in reducing training and testing times of SVM classifiers and other kernel based learning algorithms. We extend this line of work and present low distortion embeddings for dot product kernels into linear Euclidean spaces. We base our results on a classical result in harmonic analysis characterizing all dot product kernels and use it to define randomized feature maps into explic...

  10. A kernel version of multivariate alteration detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Vestergaard, Jacob Schack

    2013-01-01

    Based on the established methods kernel canonical correlation analysis and multivariate alteration detection we introduce a kernel version of multivariate alteration detection. A case study with SPOT HRV data shows that the kMAD variates focus on extreme change observations.......Based on the established methods kernel canonical correlation analysis and multivariate alteration detection we introduce a kernel version of multivariate alteration detection. A case study with SPOT HRV data shows that the kMAD variates focus on extreme change observations....

  11. On the Diamond Bessel Heat Kernel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanchak Satsanit

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the heat equation in n dimensional by Diamond Bessel operator. We find the solution by method of convolution and Fourier transform in distribution theory and also obtain an interesting kernel related to the spectrum and the kernel which is called Bessel heat kernel.

  12. Local Observed-Score Kernel Equating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiberg, Marie; van der Linden, Wim J.; von Davier, Alina A.

    2014-01-01

    Three local observed-score kernel equating methods that integrate methods from the local equating and kernel equating frameworks are proposed. The new methods were compared with their earlier counterparts with respect to such measures as bias--as defined by Lord's criterion of equity--and percent relative error. The local kernel item response…

  13. Computations of Bergman Kernels on Hua Domains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷慰萍; 王安; 赵振刚; 赵晓霞; 管冰辛

    2001-01-01

    @@The Bergman kernel function plays an important ro1e in several complex variables.There exists the Bergman kernel function on any bounded domain in Cn. But we can get the Bergman kernel functions in explicit formulas for a few types of domains only,for example:the bounded homogeneous domains and the egg domain in some cases.

  14. Veto-Consensus Multiple Kernel Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Zhou; N. Hu; C.J. Spanos

    2016-01-01

    We propose Veto-Consensus Multiple Kernel Learning (VCMKL), a novel way of combining multiple kernels such that one class of samples is described by the logical intersection (consensus) of base kernelized decision rules, whereas the other classes by the union (veto) of their complements. The propose

  15. Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ding

    2007-06-05

    A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

  16. Accelerating the Original Profile Kernel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Hamp

    Full Text Available One of the most accurate multi-class protein classification systems continues to be the profile-based SVM kernel introduced by the Leslie group. Unfortunately, its CPU requirements render it too slow for practical applications of large-scale classification tasks. Here, we introduce several software improvements that enable significant acceleration. Using various non-redundant data sets, we demonstrate that our new implementation reaches a maximal speed-up as high as 14-fold for calculating the same kernel matrix. Some predictions are over 200 times faster and render the kernel as possibly the top contender in a low ratio of speed/performance. Additionally, we explain how to parallelize various computations and provide an integrative program that reduces creating a production-quality classifier to a single program call. The new implementation is available as a Debian package under a free academic license and does not depend on commercial software. For non-Debian based distributions, the source package ships with a traditional Makefile-based installer. Download and installation instructions can be found at https://rostlab.org/owiki/index.php/Fast_Profile_Kernel. Bugs and other issues may be reported at https://rostlab.org/bugzilla3/enter_bug.cgi?product=fastprofkernel.

  17. The Dynamic Kernel Scheduler-Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelmann, Andreas; Locans, Uldis; Suter, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    Emerging processor architectures such as GPUs and Intel MICs provide a huge performance potential for high performance computing. However developing software that uses these hardware accelerators introduces additional challenges for the developer. These challenges may include exposing increased parallelism, handling different hardware designs, and using multiple development frameworks in order to utilise devices from different vendors. The Dynamic Kernel Scheduler (DKS) is being developed in order to provide a software layer between the host application and different hardware accelerators. DKS handles the communication between the host and the device, schedules task execution, and provides a library of built-in algorithms. Algorithms available in the DKS library will be written in CUDA, OpenCL, and OpenMP. Depending on the available hardware, the DKS can select the appropriate implementation of the algorithm. The first DKS version was created using CUDA for the Nvidia GPUs and OpenMP for Intel MIC. DKS was further integrated into OPAL (Object-oriented Parallel Accelerator Library) in order to speed up a parallel FFT based Poisson solver and Monte Carlo simulations for particle-matter interaction used for proton therapy degrader modelling. DKS was also used together with Minuit2 for parameter fitting, where χ2 and max-log-likelihood functions were offloaded to the hardware accelerator. The concepts of the DKS, first results, and plans for the future will be shown in this paper.

  18. An Extreme Learning Machine Based on the Mixed Kernel Function of Triangular Kernel and Generalized Hermite Dirichlet Kernel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senyue Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the characteristics that the kernel function of extreme learning machine (ELM and its performance have a strong correlation, a novel extreme learning machine based on a generalized triangle Hermitian kernel function was proposed in this paper. First, the generalized triangle Hermitian kernel function was constructed by using the product of triangular kernel and generalized Hermite Dirichlet kernel, and the proposed kernel function was proved as a valid kernel function of extreme learning machine. Then, the learning methodology of the extreme learning machine based on the proposed kernel function was presented. The biggest advantage of the proposed kernel is its kernel parameter values only chosen in the natural numbers, which thus can greatly shorten the computational time of parameter optimization and retain more of its sample data structure information. Experiments were performed on a number of binary classification, multiclassification, and regression datasets from the UCI benchmark repository. The experiment results demonstrated that the robustness and generalization performance of the proposed method are outperformed compared to other extreme learning machines with different kernels. Furthermore, the learning speed of proposed method is faster than support vector machine (SVM methods.

  19. Calculus of spatial distribution of absorbed dose to cellular level by Monte Carlo simulation for a radio-labelled peptide with {sup 188}Re and with nuclear internalization : preliminary results; Calculo de la distribucion espacial de dosis absorbida a nivel celular por simulacion Monte Carlo para un peptido radiomarcado con {sup 188}Re y con internalizacion nuclear : resultados preliminares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas C, E. L. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Santos C, C. L. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan y Jesus Carranza, Toluca 50120, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)], e-mail: leticia.rojas@inin.gob.mx

    2009-10-15

    The {sup 188}Re is a radionuclide of radiation gamma emitter, useful in obtaining of gamma-graphic images, but it is also emitter of beta radiations and Auger electrons. A bio-molecule directed to a specific receptor of a cancer cell labeled with a emitter radionuclide of beta particles and Auger electrons, as the {sup 188}Re-Tat-Bombesin, it has the potential to be used in radiotherapy of molecular targets for its capacity to penetrate to cellular nucleus. In this system, the radiation dose is distributed in way located at microscopic levels in sub cellular specific places, where Auger emissions contributes of significant way in absorbed dose. The cellular dosimetry is realized in most of cases, using analytic or semi analytical methods, for example the cellular MIRD methodology. However, it is required to complement these calculations simulating the electrons transport and considering experimental bio kinetics data. Therefore, in this work preliminary results are presented of dosimetric calculation to sub cellular level for {sup 188}Re-Tat-Bombesin by Monte Carlo simulation, using the 2008 version of PENELOPE: PENEASY code. The spatial distribution of absorbed dose in membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus, was calculated with geometry of a cell of 10 {mu}m of diameter, a nucleus of 2 {mu}m of ratio and membrane of 0.2 {mu}m of thickness, considering elementary constitution for each cellular compartment proposal in literature. The total number of disintegrations at sub cellular level was evaluated integrating the activity in function of time starting from experimental bio kinetics data in mamma cancer cells MDA-MB231. The preliminary results show that 46.4% of total disintegrations for unit of captured activity by cell occurs in nucleus, 38.4% in membrane and 15.2% in cytoplasm. The due absorbed dose to Auger electrons for 1 Bq of {sup 188}Re located in cellular membrane were respectively of 1.32E-1 and 1.43E-1 Gy in cytoplasm and nucleus. (Author)

  20. Monte Carlo radiation transport in external beam radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Çeçen, Yiğit

    2013-01-01

    The use of Monte Carlo in radiation transport is an effective way to predict absorbed dose distributions. Monte Carlo modeling has contributed to a better understanding of photon and electron transport by radiotherapy physicists. The aim of this review is to introduce Monte Carlo as a powerful radiation transport tool. In this review, photon and electron transport algorithms for Monte Carlo techniques are investigated and a clinical linear accelerator model is studied for external beam radiot...

  1. Random Feature Maps for Dot Product Kernels

    CERN Document Server

    Kar, Purushottam

    2012-01-01

    Approximating non-linear kernels using feature maps has gained a lot of interest in recent years due to applications in reducing training and testing times of SVM classifiers and other kernel based learning algorithms. We extend this line of work and present low distortion embeddings for dot product kernels into linear Euclidean spaces. We base our results on a classical result in harmonic analysis characterizing all dot product kernels and use it to define randomized feature maps into explicit low dimensional Euclidean spaces in which the native dot product provides an approximation to the dot product kernel with high confidence.

  2. Testing Infrastructure for Operating System Kernel Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Maxwell; Karlsson, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Testing is an important part of system development, and to test effectively we require knowledge of the internal state of the system under test. Testing an operating system kernel is a challenge as it is the operating system that typically provides access to this internal state information. Multi......-core kernels pose an even greater challenge due to concurrency and their shared kernel state. In this paper, we present a testing framework that addresses these challenges by running the operating system in a virtual machine, and using virtual machine introspection to both communicate with the kernel...... and obtain information about the system. We have also developed an in-kernel testing API that we can use to develop a suite of unit tests in the kernel. We are using our framework for for the development of our own multi-core research kernel....

  3. Speech Enhancement Using Kernel and Normalized Kernel Affine Projection Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolimera Ravi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to investigate the speech signal enhancement using Kernel Affine ProjectionAlgorithm (KAPA and Normalized KAPA. The removal of background noise is very important in manyapplications like speech recognition, telephone conversations, hearing aids, forensic, etc. Kernel adaptivefilters shown good performance for removal of noise. If the evaluation of background noise is more slowlythan the speech, i.e., noise signal is more stationary than the speech, we can easily estimate the noiseduring the pauses in speech. Otherwise it is more difficult to estimate the noise which results indegradation of speech. In order to improve the quality and intelligibility of speech, unlike time andfrequency domains, we can process the signal in new domain like Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Space(RKHS for high dimensional to yield more powerful nonlinear extensions. For experiments, we have usedthe database of noisy speech corpus (NOIZEUS. From the results, we observed the removal noise in RKHShas great performance in signal to noise ratio values in comparison with conventional adaptive filters.

  4. Nonlinear Deep Kernel Learning for Image Annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiu, Mingyuan; Sahbi, Hichem

    2017-02-08

    Multiple kernel learning (MKL) is a widely used technique for kernel design. Its principle consists in learning, for a given support vector classifier, the most suitable convex (or sparse) linear combination of standard elementary kernels. However, these combinations are shallow and often powerless to capture the actual similarity between highly semantic data, especially for challenging classification tasks such as image annotation. In this paper, we redefine multiple kernels using deep multi-layer networks. In this new contribution, a deep multiple kernel is recursively defined as a multi-layered combination of nonlinear activation functions, each one involves a combination of several elementary or intermediate kernels, and results into a positive semi-definite deep kernel. We propose four different frameworks in order to learn the weights of these networks: supervised, unsupervised, kernel-based semisupervised and Laplacian-based semi-supervised. When plugged into support vector machines (SVMs), the resulting deep kernel networks show clear gain, compared to several shallow kernels for the task of image annotation. Extensive experiments and analysis on the challenging ImageCLEF photo annotation benchmark, the COREL5k database and the Banana dataset validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. 蒙特卡罗方法计算外照射所致红骨髓剂量方法的研究%Monte Carlo simulation methods of determining red bone marrow dose from external radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高佚名; 刘海宽; 顾乃谷; 吴锦海; 黄卫琴; 王凤仙; 王力; 苏旭

    2011-01-01

    Objective To provide evidence for a more reasonable method of determining red bone marrow dose by analyzing and comparing existing simulation methods.Methods By utilizing Monte Carlo simulation software MCNPX,the absorbed doses of red hone marrow of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)adult female voxel phantom were calculated throush 4 different methods:direct energy deposition.dose response function(DRF),King-Spiers factor method and mass-energy absorption coefficient (MEAC).The radiation sources were defined as infinite plate.sources with the energy ranging from 20 keV to 10 MeV.and 23 sources with different energies were simulated in total.The source was placed right next to the front of the RPI model to achieve a homogeneous anteroposterior radiation scenario.The results of different simulated photon energy sources through different methods were compared.Results When the photon energy was lower than 100 key,the direct energy deposition method gave the highest result while the MEAC and King-Spiers factor methods showed more reasonable results.When the photon energy was higher than 150 keV taking into account of the higher absorption ability of red bone marrow at highcr photon energy,the result of the King-Spiers factor method was larger than those of other methods.Conclusions The King-Spiers factor method might be the most reasonable method to estimate the red bone marrow dose from external radiation.%目的 对现有的红骨髓剂量模拟计算方法进行比较和分析.为确定更为合理的计算方法提供依据.方法 借助MCNPX蒙特卡罗模拟软件,模拟了能量20 keV~10 MeV的γ光子源,对Rensselaer理工学院(RPI)体素人体模型进行前后(AP)全身均匀照射,分别采用直接能量沉积法、剂量响应函数法(DRF)、King-Spiers因子法和质能吸收系数法(MEAC),进行红骨髓剂量的模拟计算.结果 在入射γ光子能量低于100 keV时,直接能量沉积法的结果最大,而质能吸收系数法和King

  6. Nonlinear projection trick in kernel methods: an alternative to the kernel trick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Nojun

    2013-12-01

    In kernel methods such as kernel principal component analysis (PCA) and support vector machines, the so called kernel trick is used to avoid direct calculations in a high (virtually infinite) dimensional kernel space. In this brief, based on the fact that the effective dimensionality of a kernel space is less than the number of training samples, we propose an alternative to the kernel trick that explicitly maps the input data into a reduced dimensional kernel space. This is easily obtained by the eigenvalue decomposition of the kernel matrix. The proposed method is named as the nonlinear projection trick in contrast to the kernel trick. With this technique, the applicability of the kernel methods is widened to arbitrary algorithms that do not use the dot product. The equivalence between the kernel trick and the nonlinear projection trick is shown for several conventional kernel methods. In addition, we extend PCA-L1, which uses L1-norm instead of L2-norm (or dot product), into a kernel version and show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  7. Theory of reproducing kernels and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Saitoh, Saburou

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a large extension of the general theory of reproducing kernels published by N. Aronszajn in 1950, with many concrete applications. In Chapter 1, many concrete reproducing kernels are first introduced with detailed information. Chapter 2 presents a general and global theory of reproducing kernels with basic applications in a self-contained way. Many fundamental operations among reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces are dealt with. Chapter 2 is the heart of this book. Chapter 3 is devoted to the Tikhonov regularization using the theory of reproducing kernels with applications to numerical and practical solutions of bounded linear operator equations. In Chapter 4, the numerical real inversion formulas of the Laplace transform are presented by applying the Tikhonov regularization, where the reproducing kernels play a key role in the results. Chapter 5 deals with ordinary differential equations; Chapter 6 includes many concrete results for various fundamental partial differential equations. In Chapt...

  8. Convergence of barycentric coordinates to barycentric kernels

    KAUST Repository

    Kosinka, Jiří

    2016-02-12

    We investigate the close correspondence between barycentric coordinates and barycentric kernels from the point of view of the limit process when finer and finer polygons converge to a smooth convex domain. We show that any barycentric kernel is the limit of a set of barycentric coordinates and prove that the convergence rate is quadratic. Our convergence analysis extends naturally to barycentric interpolants and mappings induced by barycentric coordinates and kernels. We verify our theoretical convergence results numerically on several examples.

  9. Kernel principal component analysis for change detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Morton, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    region acquired at two different time points. If change over time does not dominate the scene, the projection of the original two bands onto the second eigenvector will show change over time. In this paper a kernel version of PCA is used to carry out the analysis. Unlike ordinary PCA, kernel PCA...... with a Gaussian kernel successfully finds the change observations in a case where nonlinearities are introduced artificially....

  10. Tame Kernels of Pure Cubic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Yun CHENG

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we study the p-rank of the tame kernels of pure cubic fields.In particular,we prove that for a fixed positive integer m,there exist infinitely many pure cubic fields whose 3-rank of the tame kernel equal to m.As an application,we determine the 3-rank of their tame kernels for some special pure cubic fields.

  11. Kernel Factor Analysis Algorithm with Varimax

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Guoen; Jin Weidong; Zhang Gexiang

    2006-01-01

    Kernal factor analysis (KFA) with varimax was proposed by using Mercer kernel function which can map the data in the original space to a high-dimensional feature space, and was compared with the kernel principle component analysis (KPCA). The results show that the best error rate in handwritten digit recognition by kernel factor analysis with varimax (4.2%) was superior to KPCA (4.4%). The KFA with varimax could more accurately image handwritten digit recognition.

  12. A clinical study of lung cancer dose calculation accuracy by using Monte Carlo simulation%蒙特卡罗系统验证PBC和CCC算法精确度的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵艳群; 尹刚; 王先良; 王培; 祁国海; 吴大可; 肖明勇; 黎杰; 康盛伟

    2016-01-01

    目的 运用蒙特卡罗系统验证PBC、CCC算法在肺癌放疗计划时的精确度.方法 使用Oncentra Masterplan TPS对本院2012-2013年间收治的24例肺癌患者分别进行PBC、CCC计算.设计2个IMRT计划和2个3DCRT计划,将计划的DICOM-RT文件导入蒙特卡罗系统进行剂量重建.配对t检验差异.结果 4个计划中无论是IMRT还是3DCRT计划CCC、PBC计算的靶区平均剂量与蒙特卡罗计算值的差别均随靶体积减小而增大(P=0.00、0.00、0.00、0.00),且IMRT计划比3DCRT的大(P=0.00、0.01).IMRT计划中CCC计算的D98%、D95%、D90%、D50%、D2%与蒙特卡罗计算值差别逐渐减小(P=0.00、0.00、0.00、0.00、0.00),上述现象同样出现在PBC算法中,但CCC计算的3DCRT计划中的不显著(P=0.18、0.08、0.62、0.08,0.97).IMRT和3DCRT计划中,CCC算法高估了整个患侧肺剂量;PBC算法高估了患侧肺V20(P=0.00、0.00),低估了患侧肺V5(P=0.00、0.00),但3DCRT计划中V10值相近(P=0.47).结论 建议在肺癌放疗计划计算时使用精确度更高的算法而不使用PBC算法.蒙特卡罗比其他算法精度更高.%Objective To study the evaluate the PBC and CCC algorithms for lung cancer radiotherapy with the Monte Carlo (MC).Methods From 2012 to 2013 years,24 patients with lung cancer were studied.For each patient was designed four plans wiht Oncentra Masterplan TPS.Two IMRT plans and two 3DCRT plans were developed with the PBC and CCC algorithms.Then the DICOM-RT files of the plans were exported to the MC system for recalculate.The differences of results were analyzed by paired-t test.Results For 3DCRT and IMRT plans,the mean dose differences for GTV between CCC and MC,PBC and MC increased with the GTV volume decreasing (P =0.00,0.00,0.00,0.00),for IMRT plans the mean dose differences were found to be higher than that of 3DCRT plans (P=0.00,0.01).Comparison of DVHs,the differences became smaller gradually from Dgs,D95,D90,D50 to D2 (P=0

  13. Scientific opinion : Acute health risks related to the presence of cyanogenic glycosides in raw apricot kernels and products derived from raw apricot kernels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    2016-01-01

    Amygdalin is the major cyanogenic glycoside present in apricot kernels and is degraded to cyanide by chewing or grinding. Cyanide is of high acute toxicity in humans. The lethal dose is reported to be 0.5–3.5 mg/kg body weight (bw). An acute reference dose (ARfD) of 20 μg/kg bw was derived from an e

  14. Efficient classification for additive kernel SVMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Subhransu; Berg, Alexander C; Malik, Jitendra

    2013-01-01

    We show that a class of nonlinear kernel SVMs admits approximate classifiers with runtime and memory complexity that is independent of the number of support vectors. This class of kernels, which we refer to as additive kernels, includes widely used kernels for histogram-based image comparison like intersection and chi-squared kernels. Additive kernel SVMs can offer significant improvements in accuracy over linear SVMs on a wide variety of tasks while having the same runtime, making them practical for large-scale recognition or real-time detection tasks. We present experiments on a variety of datasets, including the INRIA person, Daimler-Chrysler pedestrians, UIUC Cars, Caltech-101, MNIST, and USPS digits, to demonstrate the effectiveness of our method for efficient evaluation of SVMs with additive kernels. Since its introduction, our method has become integral to various state-of-the-art systems for PASCAL VOC object detection/image classification, ImageNet Challenge, TRECVID, etc. The techniques we propose can also be applied to settings where evaluation of weighted additive kernels is required, which include kernelized versions of PCA, LDA, regression, k-means, as well as speeding up the inner loop of SVM classifier training algorithms.

  15. Dosimetry in radiotherapy and brachytherapy by Monte-Carlo GATE simulation on computing grid; Dosimetrie en radiotherapie et curietherapie par simulation Monte-Carlo GATE sur grille informatique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiam, Ch.O

    2007-10-15

    Accurate radiotherapy treatment requires the delivery of a precise dose to the tumour volume and a good knowledge of the dose deposit to the neighbouring zones. Computation of the treatments is usually carried out by a Treatment Planning System (T.P.S.) which needs to be precise and fast. The G.A.T.E. platform for Monte-Carlo simulation based on G.E.A.N.T.4 is an emerging tool for nuclear medicine application that provides functionalities for fast and reliable dosimetric calculations. In this thesis, we studied in parallel a validation of the G.A.T.E. platform for the modelling of electrons and photons low energy sources and the optimized use of grid infrastructures to reduce simulations computing time. G.A.T.E. was validated for the dose calculation of point kernels for mono-energetic electrons and compared with the results of other Monte-Carlo studies. A detailed study was made on the energy deposit during electrons transport in G.E.A.N.T.4. In order to validate G.A.T.E. for very low energy photons (<35 keV), three models of radioactive sources used in brachytherapy and containing iodine 125 (2301 of Best Medical International; Symmetra of Uro- Med/Bebig and 6711 of Amersham) were simulated. Our results were analyzed according to the recommendations of task group No43 of American Association of Physicists in Medicine (A.A.P.M.). They show a good agreement between G.A.T.E., the reference studies and A.A.P.M. recommended values. The use of Monte-Carlo simulations for a better definition of the dose deposited in the tumour volumes requires long computing time. In order to reduce it, we exploited E.G.E.E. grid infrastructure where simulations are distributed using innovative technologies taking into account the grid status. Time necessary for the computing of a radiotherapy planning simulation using electrons was reduced by a factor 30. A Web platform based on G.E.N.I.U.S. portal was developed to make easily available all the methods to submit and manage G

  16. Fission Matrix Capability for MCNP Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carney, Sean E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiedrowski, Brian C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martin, William R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-05

    In a Monte Carlo criticality calculation, before the tallying of quantities can begin, a converged fission source (the fundamental eigenvector of the fission kernel) is required. Tallies of interest may include powers, absorption rates, leakage rates, or the multiplication factor (the fundamental eigenvalue of the fission kernel, k{sub eff}). Just as in the power iteration method of linear algebra, if the dominance ratio (the ratio of the first and zeroth eigenvalues) is high, many iterations of neutron history simulations are required to isolate the fundamental mode of the problem. Optically large systems have large dominance ratios, and systems containing poor neutron communication between regions are also slow to converge. The fission matrix method, implemented into MCNP[1], addresses these problems. When Monte Carlo random walk from a source is executed, the fission kernel is stochastically applied to the source. Random numbers are used for: distances to collision, reaction types, scattering physics, fission reactions, etc. This method is used because the fission kernel is a complex, 7-dimensional operator that is not explicitly known. Deterministic methods use approximations/discretization in energy, space, and direction to the kernel. Consequently, they are faster. Monte Carlo directly simulates the physics, which necessitates the use of random sampling. Because of this statistical noise, common convergence acceleration methods used in deterministic methods do not work. In the fission matrix method, we are using the random walk information not only to build the next-iteration fission source, but also a spatially-averaged fission kernel. Just like in deterministic methods, this involves approximation and discretization. The approximation is the tallying of the spatially-discretized fission kernel with an incorrect fission source. We address this by making the spatial mesh fine enough that this error is negligible. As a consequence of discretization we get a

  17. Molecular hydrodynamics from memory kernels

    CERN Document Server

    Lesnicki, Dominika; Carof, Antoine; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The memory kernel for a tagged particle in a fluid, computed from molecular dynamics simulations, decays algebraically as $t^{-3/2}$. We show how the hydrodynamic Basset-Boussinesq force naturally emerges from this long-time tail and generalize the concept of hydrodynamic added mass. This mass term is negative in the present case of a molecular solute, at odds with incompressible hydrodynamics predictions. We finally discuss the various contributions to the friction, the associated time scales and the cross-over between the molecular and hydrodynamic regimes upon increasing the solute radius.

  18. Hilbertian kernels and spline functions

    CERN Document Server

    Atteia, M

    1992-01-01

    In this monograph, which is an extensive study of Hilbertian approximation, the emphasis is placed on spline functions theory. The origin of the book was an effort to show that spline theory parallels Hilbertian Kernel theory, not only for splines derived from minimization of a quadratic functional but more generally for splines considered as piecewise functions type. Being as far as possible self-contained, the book may be used as a reference, with information about developments in linear approximation, convex optimization, mechanics and partial differential equations.

  19. Application of Monte Carlo software in estimating patients' radiation dose during CCTA and confirmation by anthropomorphic phantom study%冠状动脉CT血管造影辐射剂量蒙特卡罗软件模拟计算及仿真体模验证

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘潇; 曾勇明; 彭盛坤; 郁仁强; 王杰; 孙静坤

    2014-01-01

    目的 应用蒙特卡罗(Monte Carlo)数学模型计算冠状动脉CT血管造影(CCTA)检查中患者的辐射剂量,并验证其准确性和有效性.方法 采用3组管电压(80、100、120 kV)对人体仿真体模行双源CT检查,使用数学模型软件(ImpactDose 2.0)模拟方法测量CCTA 3组管电压的患者器官吸收剂量并转换有效剂量,采用人体仿真体模置入热释光剂量计实验对数学模型模拟的结果进行验证.结果 除肺部以外,利用蒙特卡罗软件模拟计算的所有器官剂量值均小于利用仿真体模测量的;两种方法的相对误差在±50%以内.结论 利用蒙特卡罗软件模拟计算CCTA患者辐射剂量误差在可接受范围内,可用于估算CCTA检查辐射剂量水平.%Objective To evaluate the accuracy and efficiency of the Monte Carlo software in measuring the radiation dose to the patients who received the CCTA (Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography) examination.Methods A anthropomorphic chest phantom underwent CCTA using three scan parameters (tube voltage 80 kV,100 kV and 120 kV).Computer Software ImpactDose 2.0 was used to compute the chest organ dose on the basis of the three groups tube voltage CT scan characteristic,and the stimulation results of ImpactDose 2.0 software was verified by use of anthropomorphic phantom thermoluminescence dosimeter experiment method.Results For all the measured organs except for lung,the absorbed organ dose and effective dose of three groups of tube voltages of CCTA measured by the InpactDose 2.0 was lower than those as measured by anthropomorphic phantom study.The relative error of both methods was within ± 50%.Conclusions Monte Carlo software can be used to estimate the levels of radiation dose during CCTA examination with a tolerable error within the acceptable range.

  20. Differentiable Kernels in Generalized Matrix Learning Vector Quantization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kästner, M.; Nebel, D.; Riedel, M.; Biehl, M.; Villmann, T.

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper we investigate the application of differentiable kernel for generalized matrix learning vector quantization as an alternative kernel-based classifier, which additionally provides classification dependent data visualization. We show that the concept of differentiable kernels allo

  1. Filtering algorithms using shiftable kernels

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhury, Kunal Narayan

    2011-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated in [4][arxiv:1105.4204] that the non-linear bilateral filter \\cite{Tomasi} can be efficiently implemented using an O(1) or constant-time algorithm. At the heart of this algorithm was the idea of approximating the Gaussian range kernel of the bilateral filter using trigonometric functions. In this letter, we explain how the idea in [4] can be extended to few other linear and non-linear filters [18,21,2]. While some of these filters have received a lot of attention in recent years, they are known to be computationally intensive. To extend the idea in \\cite{Chaudhury2011}, we identify a central property of trigonometric functions, called shiftability, that allows us to exploit the redundancy inherent in the filtering operations. In particular, using shiftable kernels, we show how certain complex filtering can be reduced to simply that of computing the moving sum of a stack of images. Each image in the stack is obtained through an elementary pointwise transform of the input image. Thi...

  2. Kernel current source density method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potworowski, Jan; Jakuczun, Wit; Lȩski, Szymon; Wójcik, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Local field potentials (LFP), the low-frequency part of extracellular electrical recordings, are a measure of the neural activity reflecting dendritic processing of synaptic inputs to neuronal populations. To localize synaptic dynamics, it is convenient, whenever possible, to estimate the density of transmembrane current sources (CSD) generating the LFP. In this work, we propose a new framework, the kernel current source density method (kCSD), for nonparametric estimation of CSD from LFP recorded from arbitrarily distributed electrodes using kernel methods. We test specific implementations of this framework on model data measured with one-, two-, and three-dimensional multielectrode setups. We compare these methods with the traditional approach through numerical approximation of the Laplacian and with the recently developed inverse current source density methods (iCSD). We show that iCSD is a special case of kCSD. The proposed method opens up new experimental possibilities for CSD analysis from existing or new recordings on arbitrarily distributed electrodes (not necessarily on a grid), which can be obtained in extracellular recordings of single unit activity with multiple electrodes.

  3. Panel data specifications in nonparametric kernel regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czekaj, Tomasz Gerard; Henningsen, Arne

    parametric panel data estimators to analyse the production technology of Polish crop farms. The results of our nonparametric kernel regressions generally differ from the estimates of the parametric models but they only slightly depend on the choice of the kernel functions. Based on economic reasoning, we...

  4. Kernel parameter dependence in spatial factor analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2010-01-01

    feature space via the kernel function and then performing a linear analysis in that space. In this paper we shall apply a kernel version of maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) [7, 8] analysis to irregularly sampled stream sediment geochemistry data from South Greenland and illustrate the dependence...

  5. Improving the Bandwidth Selection in Kernel Equating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Björn; von Davier, Alina A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the current bandwidth selection methods in kernel equating and propose a method based on Silverman's rule of thumb for selecting the bandwidth parameters. In kernel equating, the bandwidth parameters have previously been obtained by minimizing a penalty function. This minimization process has been criticized by practitioners…

  6. Ranking Support Vector Machine with Kernel Approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Li, Rongchun; Dou, Yong; Liang, Zhengfa; Lv, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Learning to rank algorithm has become important in recent years due to its successful application in information retrieval, recommender system, and computational biology, and so forth. Ranking support vector machine (RankSVM) is one of the state-of-art ranking models and has been favorably used. Nonlinear RankSVM (RankSVM with nonlinear kernels) can give higher accuracy than linear RankSVM (RankSVM with a linear kernel) for complex nonlinear ranking problem. However, the learning methods for nonlinear RankSVM are still time-consuming because of the calculation of kernel matrix. In this paper, we propose a fast ranking algorithm based on kernel approximation to avoid computing the kernel matrix. We explore two types of kernel approximation methods, namely, the Nyström method and random Fourier features. Primal truncated Newton method is used to optimize the pairwise L2-loss (squared Hinge-loss) objective function of the ranking model after the nonlinear kernel approximation. Experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method gets a much faster training speed than kernel RankSVM and achieves comparable or better performance over state-of-the-art ranking algorithms.

  7. Generalized Derivative Based Kernelized Learning Vector Quantization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schleif, Frank-Michael; Villmann, Thomas; Hammer, Barbara; Schneider, Petra; Biehl, Michael; Fyfe, Colin; Tino, Peter; Charles, Darryl; Garcia-Osoro, Cesar; Yin, Hujun

    2010-01-01

    We derive a novel derivative based version of kernelized Generalized Learning Vector Quantization (KGLVQ) as an effective, easy to interpret, prototype based and kernelized classifier. It is called D-KGLVQ and we provide generalization error bounds, experimental results on real world data, showing t

  8. Quantitative Monte Carlo-based holmium-166 SPECT reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elschot, Mattijs; Smits, Maarten L. J.; Nijsen, Johannes F. W.; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Jong, Hugo W. A. M. de [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Viergever, Max A. [Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Quantitative imaging of the radionuclide distribution is of increasing interest for microsphere radioembolization (RE) of liver malignancies, to aid treatment planning and dosimetry. For this purpose, holmium-166 ({sup 166}Ho) microspheres have been developed, which can be visualized with a gamma camera. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate a new reconstruction method for quantitative {sup 166}Ho SPECT, including Monte Carlo-based modeling of photon contributions from the full energy spectrum.Methods: A fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulator was developed for simulation of {sup 166}Ho projection images and incorporated in a statistical reconstruction algorithm (SPECT-fMC). Photon scatter and attenuation for all photons sampled from the full {sup 166}Ho energy spectrum were modeled during reconstruction by Monte Carlo simulations. The energy- and distance-dependent collimator-detector response was modeled using precalculated convolution kernels. Phantom experiments were performed to quantitatively evaluate image contrast, image noise, count errors, and activity recovery coefficients (ARCs) of SPECT-fMC in comparison with those of an energy window-based method for correction of down-scattered high-energy photons (SPECT-DSW) and a previously presented hybrid method that combines MC simulation of photopeak scatter with energy window-based estimation of down-scattered high-energy contributions (SPECT-ppMC+DSW). Additionally, the impact of SPECT-fMC on whole-body recovered activities (A{sup est}) and estimated radiation absorbed doses was evaluated using clinical SPECT data of six {sup 166}Ho RE patients.Results: At the same noise level, SPECT-fMC images showed substantially higher contrast than SPECT-DSW and SPECT-ppMC+DSW in spheres ≥17 mm in diameter. The count error was reduced from 29% (SPECT-DSW) and 25% (SPECT-ppMC+DSW) to 12% (SPECT-fMC). ARCs in five spherical volumes of 1.96–106.21 ml were improved from 32%–63% (SPECT-DSW) and 50%–80

  9. Efficient Kernel-Based Ensemble Gaussian Mixture Filtering

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Bo

    2015-11-11

    We consider the Bayesian filtering problem for data assimilation following the kernel-based ensemble Gaussian-mixture filtering (EnGMF) approach introduced by Anderson and Anderson (1999). In this approach, the posterior distribution of the system state is propagated with the model using the ensemble Monte Carlo method, providing a forecast ensemble that is then used to construct a prior Gaussian-mixture (GM) based on the kernel density estimator. This results in two update steps: a Kalman filter (KF)-like update of the ensemble members and a particle filter (PF)-like update of the weights, followed by a resampling step to start a new forecast cycle. After formulating EnGMF for any observational operator, we analyze the influence of the bandwidth parameter of the kernel function on the covariance of the posterior distribution. We then focus on two aspects: i) the efficient implementation of EnGMF with (relatively) small ensembles, where we propose a new deterministic resampling strategy preserving the first two moments of the posterior GM to limit the sampling error; and ii) the analysis of the effect of the bandwidth parameter on contributions of KF and PF updates and on the weights variance. Numerical results using the Lorenz-96 model are presented to assess the behavior of EnGMF with deterministic resampling, study its sensitivity to different parameters and settings, and evaluate its performance against ensemble KFs. The proposed EnGMF approach with deterministic resampling suggests improved estimates in all tested scenarios, and is shown to require less localization and to be less sensitive to the choice of filtering parameters.

  10. A deterministic partial differential equation model for dose calculation in electron radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duclous, R; Dubroca, B [CELIA and IMB Laboratories, Bordeaux University, 33405 Talence (France); Frank, M, E-mail: duclous@celia.u-bordeaux1.f, E-mail: dubroca@celia.u-bordeaux1.f, E-mail: frank@mathcces.rwth-aachen.d [Department of Mathematics and Center for Computational Engineering Science, RWTH Aachen University, Schinkelstr. 2, 52062 Aachen (Germany)

    2010-07-07

    High-energy ionizing radiation is a prominent modality for the treatment of many cancers. The approaches to electron dose calculation can be categorized into semi-empirical models (e.g. Fermi-Eyges, convolution-superposition) and probabilistic methods (e.g. Monte Carlo). A third approach to dose calculation has only recently attracted attention in the medical physics community. This approach is based on the deterministic kinetic equations of radiative transfer. We derive a macroscopic partial differential equation model for electron transport in tissue. This model involves an angular closure in the phase space. It is exact for the free streaming and the isotropic regime. We solve it numerically by a newly developed HLLC scheme based on Berthon et al (2007 J. Sci. Comput. 31 347-89) that exactly preserves the key properties of the analytical solution on the discrete level. We discuss several test cases taken from the medical physics literature. A test case with an academic Henyey-Greenstein scattering kernel is considered. We compare our model to a benchmark discrete ordinate solution. A simplified model of electron interactions with tissue is employed to compute the dose of an electron beam in a water phantom, and a case of irradiation of the vertebral column. Here our model is compared to the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code. In the academic example, the fluences computed with the new model and a benchmark result differ by less than 1%. The depths at half maximum differ by less than 0.6%. In the two comparisons with Monte Carlo, our model gives qualitatively reasonable dose distributions. Due to the crude interaction model, these so far do not have the accuracy needed in clinical practice. However, the new model has a computational cost that is less than one-tenth of the cost of a Monte Carlo simulation. In addition, simulations can be set up in a similar way as a Monte Carlo simulation. If more detailed effects such as coupled electron-photon transport, bremsstrahlung

  11. A deterministic partial differential equation model for dose calculation in electron radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclous, R.; Dubroca, B.; Frank, M.

    2010-07-01

    High-energy ionizing radiation is a prominent modality for the treatment of many cancers. The approaches to electron dose calculation can be categorized into semi-empirical models (e.g. Fermi-Eyges, convolution-superposition) and probabilistic methods (e.g. Monte Carlo). A third approach to dose calculation has only recently attracted attention in the medical physics community. This approach is based on the deterministic kinetic equations of radiative transfer. We derive a macroscopic partial differential equation model for electron transport in tissue. This model involves an angular closure in the phase space. It is exact for the free streaming and the isotropic regime. We solve it numerically by a newly developed HLLC scheme based on Berthon et al (2007 J. Sci. Comput. 31 347-89) that exactly preserves the key properties of the analytical solution on the discrete level. We discuss several test cases taken from the medical physics literature. A test case with an academic Henyey-Greenstein scattering kernel is considered. We compare our model to a benchmark discrete ordinate solution. A simplified model of electron interactions with tissue is employed to compute the dose of an electron beam in a water phantom, and a case of irradiation of the vertebral column. Here our model is compared to the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code. In the academic example, the fluences computed with the new model and a benchmark result differ by less than 1%. The depths at half maximum differ by less than 0.6%. In the two comparisons with Monte Carlo, our model gives qualitatively reasonable dose distributions. Due to the crude interaction model, these so far do not have the accuracy needed in clinical practice. However, the new model has a computational cost that is less than one-tenth of the cost of a Monte Carlo simulation. In addition, simulations can be set up in a similar way as a Monte Carlo simulation. If more detailed effects such as coupled electron-photon transport, bremsstrahlung

  12. Extended Ensemble Monte Carlo

    OpenAIRE

    Iba, Yukito

    2000-01-01

    ``Extended Ensemble Monte Carlo''is a generic term that indicates a set of algorithms which are now popular in a variety of fields in physics and statistical information processing. Exchange Monte Carlo (Metropolis-Coupled Chain, Parallel Tempering), Simulated Tempering (Expanded Ensemble Monte Carlo), and Multicanonical Monte Carlo (Adaptive Umbrella Sampling) are typical members of this family. Here we give a cross-disciplinary survey of these algorithms with special emphasis on the great f...

  13. Kernel Model Applied in Kernel Direct Discriminant Analysis for the Recognition of Face with Nonlinear Variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A kernel-based discriminant analysis method called kernel direct discriminant analysis is employed, which combines the merit of direct linear discriminant analysis with that of kernel trick. In order to demonstrate its better robustness to the complex and nonlinear variations of real face images, such as illumination, facial expression, scale and pose variations, experiments are carried out on the Olivetti Research Laboratory, Yale and self-built face databases. The results indicate that in contrast to kernel principal component analysis and kernel linear discriminant analysis, the method can achieve lower (7%) error rate using only a very small set of features. Furthermore, a new corrected kernel model is proposed to improve the recognition performance. Experimental results confirm its superiority (1% in terms of recognition rate) to other polynomial kernel models.

  14. Parameter-Free Spectral Kernel Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Due to the growing ubiquity of unlabeled data, learning with unlabeled data is attracting increasing attention in machine learning. In this paper, we propose a novel semi-supervised kernel learning method which can seamlessly combine manifold structure of unlabeled data and Regularized Least-Squares (RLS) to learn a new kernel. Interestingly, the new kernel matrix can be obtained analytically with the use of spectral decomposition of graph Laplacian matrix. Hence, the proposed algorithm does not require any numerical optimization solvers. Moreover, by maximizing kernel target alignment on labeled data, we can also learn model parameters automatically with a closed-form solution. For a given graph Laplacian matrix, our proposed method does not need to tune any model parameter including the tradeoff parameter in RLS and the balance parameter for unlabeled data. Extensive experiments on ten benchmark datasets show that our proposed two-stage parameter-free spectral kernel learning algorithm can obtain comparable...

  15. A polygon-surface reference Korean male phantom (PSRK-Man) and its direct implementation in Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Hyeong; Jeong, Jong Hwi [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Bolch, Wesley E [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Cho, Kun-Woo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sung Bae, E-mail: chkim@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Physical Therapy, Kyungbuk College, Hyucheon 2-dong, Yeongju-si, Gyeongbuk 750-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-21

    Even though the hybrid phantom embodies both the anatomic reality of voxel phantoms and the deformability of stylized phantoms, it must be voxelized to be used in a Monte Carlo code for dose calculation or some imaging simulation, which incurs the inherent limitations of voxel phantoms. In the present study, a voxel phantom named VKH-Man (Visible Korean Human-Man), was converted to a polygon-surface phantom (PSRK-Man, Polygon-Surface Reference Korean-Man), which was then adjusted to the Reference Korean data. Subsequently, the PSRK-Man polygon phantom was directly, without any voxelization process, implemented in the Geant4 Monte Carlo code for dose calculations. The calculated dose values and computation time were then compared with those of HDRK-Man (High Definition Reference Korean-Man), a corresponding voxel phantom adjusted to the same Reference Korean data from the same VKH-Man voxel phantom. Our results showed that the calculated dose values of the PSRK-Man surface phantom agreed well with those of the HDRK-Man voxel phantom. The calculation speed for the PSRK-Man polygon phantom though was 70-150 times slower than that of the HDRK-Man voxel phantom; that speed, however, could be acceptable in some applications, in that direct use of the surface phantom PSRK-Man in Geant4 does not require a separate voxelization process. Computing speed can be enhanced, in future, either by optimizing the Monte Carlo transport kernel for the polygon surfaces or by using modern computing technologies such as grid computing and general-purpose computing on graphics processing units programming.

  16. Ideal regularization for learning kernels from labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Binbin; Lai, Jianhuang; Shen, Lixin

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a new form of regularization that is able to utilize the label information of a data set for learning kernels. The proposed regularization, referred to as ideal regularization, is a linear function of the kernel matrix to be learned. The ideal regularization allows us to develop efficient algorithms to exploit labels. Three applications of the ideal regularization are considered. Firstly, we use the ideal regularization to incorporate the labels into a standard kernel, making the resulting kernel more appropriate for learning tasks. Next, we employ the ideal regularization to learn a data-dependent kernel matrix from an initial kernel matrix (which contains prior similarity information, geometric structures, and labels of the data). Finally, we incorporate the ideal regularization to some state-of-the-art kernel learning problems. With this regularization, these learning problems can be formulated as simpler ones which permit more efficient solvers. Empirical results show that the ideal regularization exploits the labels effectively and efficiently.

  17. On a full Monte Carlo approach to quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellier, J. M.; Dimov, I.

    2016-12-01

    The Monte Carlo approach to numerical problems has shown to be remarkably efficient in performing very large computational tasks since it is an embarrassingly parallel technique. Additionally, Monte