WorldWideScience

Sample records for carlo dose kernel

  1. Primary and scattering contributions to beta scaled dose point kernels by means of Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valente, Mauro; Botta, Francesca; Pedroli, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Beta-emitters have proved to be appropriate for radioimmunotherapy. The dosimetric characterization of each radionuclide has to be carefully investigated. One usual and practical dosimetric approach is the calculation of dose distribution from a unit point source emitting particles according to any radionuclide of interest, which is known as dose point kernel. Absorbed dose distributions are due to primary and radiation scattering contributions. This work presented a method capable of performing dose distributions for nuclear medicine dosimetry by means of Monte Carlo methods. Dedicated subroutines have been developed in order to separately compute primary and scattering contributions to the total absorbed dose, performing particle transport up to 1 keV or least. Preliminarily, the suitability of the calculation method has been satisfactory, being tested for monoenergetic sources, and it was further applied to the characterization of different beta-minus radionuclides of nuclear medicine interests for radioimmunotherapy. (author)

  2. Evaluating the Application of Tissue-Specific Dose Kernels Instead of Water Dose Kernels in Internal Dosimetry : A Monte Carlo Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moghadam, Maryam Khazaee; Asl, Alireza Kamali; Geramifar, Parham; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to evaluate the application of tissue-specific dose kernels instead of water dose kernels to improve the accuracy of patient-specific dosimetry by taking tissue heterogeneities into consideration. Materials and Methods: Tissue-specific dose point kernels (DPKs) and

  3. A comparison study for dose calculation in radiation therapy: pencil beam Kernel based vs. Monte Carlo simulation vs. measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Suh, Tae-Suk; Lee, Hyoung-Koo; Choe, Bo-Young [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hoi-Nam; Yoon, Sei-Chul [Kangnam St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Accurate dose calculation in radiation treatment planning is most important for successful treatment. Since human body is composed of various materials and not an ideal shape, it is not easy to calculate the accurate effective dose in the patients. Many methods have been proposed to solve inhomogeneity and surface contour problems. Monte Carlo simulations are regarded as the most accurate method, but it is not appropriate for routine planning because it takes so much time. Pencil beam kernel based convolution/superposition methods were also proposed to correct those effects. Nowadays, many commercial treatment planning systems have adopted this algorithm as a dose calculation engine. The purpose of this study is to verify the accuracy of the dose calculated from pencil beam kernel based treatment planning system comparing to Monte Carlo simulations and measurements especially in inhomogeneous region. Home-made inhomogeneous phantom, Helax-TMS ver. 6.0 and Monte Carlo code BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc were used in this study. In homogeneous media, the accuracy was acceptable but in inhomogeneous media, the errors were more significant. However in general clinical situation, pencil beam kernel based convolution algorithm is thought to be a valuable tool to calculate the dose.

  4. Dose point kernel simulation for monoenergetic electrons and radionuclides using Monte Carlo techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J; Liu, Y L; Chang, S J; Chao, M M; Tsai, S Y; Huang, D E

    2012-11-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has been commonly used in the dose evaluation of radiation accidents and for medical purposes. The accuracy of simulated results is affected by the particle-tracking algorithm, cross-sectional database, random number generator and statistical error. The differences among MC simulation software packages must be validated. This study simulated the dose point kernel (DPK) and the cellular S-values of monoenergetic electrons ranging from 0.01 to 2 MeV and the radionuclides of (90)Y, (177)Lu and (103 m)Rh, using Fluktuierende Kaskade (FLUKA) and MC N-Particle Transport Code Version 5 (MCNP5). A 6-μm-radius cell model consisting of the cell surface, cytoplasm and cell nucleus was constructed for cellular S-value calculation. The mean absolute percentage errors (MAPEs) of the scaled DPKs, simulated using FLUKA and MCNP5, were 7.92, 9.64, 4.62, 3.71 and 3.84 % for 0.01, 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 2 MeV, respectively. For the three radionuclides, the MAPEs of the scaled DPKs were within 5 %. The maximum deviations of S(N←N), S(N←Cy) and S(N←CS) for the electron energy larger than 10 keV were 6.63, 6.77 and 5.24 %, respectively. The deviations for the self-absorbed S-values and cross-dose S-values of the three radionuclides were within 4 %. On the basis of the results of this study, it was concluded that the simulation results are consistent between FLUKA and MCNP5. However, there is a minor inconsistency for low energy range. The DPK and the cellular S-value should be used as the quality assurance tools before the MC simulation results are adopted as the gold standard.

  5. SU-E-T-154: Calculation of Tissue Dose Point Kernels Using GATE Monte Carlo Simulation Toolkit to Compare with Water Dose Point Kernel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khazaee, M [shahid beheshti university, Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asl, A Kamali [Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran., Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Geramifar, P [Shariati Hospital, Tehran, Iran., Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: the objective of this study was to assess utilizing water dose point kernel (DPK)instead of tissue dose point kernels in convolution algorithms.to the best of our knowledge, in providing 3D distribution of absorbed dose from a 3D distribution of the activity, the human body is considered equivalent to water. as a Result tissue variations are not considered in patient specific dosimetry. Methods: In this study Gate v7.0 was used to calculate tissue dose point kernel. the beta emitter radionuclides which have taken into consideration in this simulation include Y-90, Lu-177 and P-32 which are commonly used in nuclear medicine. the comparison has been performed for dose point kernels of adipose, bone, breast, heart, intestine, kidney, liver, lung and spleen versus water dose point kernel. Results: In order to validate the simulation the Result of 90Y DPK in water were compared with published results of Papadimitroulas et al (Med. Phys., 2012). The results represented that the mean differences between water DPK and other soft tissues DPKs range between 0.6 % and 1.96% for 90Y, except for lung and bone, where the observed discrepancies are 6.3% and 12.19% respectively. The range of DPK difference for 32P is between 1.74% for breast and 18.85% for bone. For 177Lu, the highest difference belongs to bone which is equal to 16.91%. For other soft tissues the least discrepancy is observed in kidney with 1.68%. Conclusion: In all tissues except for lung and bone, the results of GATE for dose point kernel were comparable to water dose point kernel which demonstrates the appropriateness of applying water dose point kernel instead of soft tissues in the field of nuclear medicine.

  6. SU-E-T-154: Calculation of Tissue Dose Point Kernels Using GATE Monte Carlo Simulation Toolkit to Compare with Water Dose Point Kernel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khazaee, M; Asl, A Kamali; Geramifar, P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: the objective of this study was to assess utilizing water dose point kernel (DPK)instead of tissue dose point kernels in convolution algorithms.to the best of our knowledge, in providing 3D distribution of absorbed dose from a 3D distribution of the activity, the human body is considered equivalent to water. as a Result tissue variations are not considered in patient specific dosimetry. Methods: In this study Gate v7.0 was used to calculate tissue dose point kernel. the beta emitter radionuclides which have taken into consideration in this simulation include Y-90, Lu-177 and P-32 which are commonly used in nuclear medicine. the comparison has been performed for dose point kernels of adipose, bone, breast, heart, intestine, kidney, liver, lung and spleen versus water dose point kernel. Results: In order to validate the simulation the Result of 90Y DPK in water were compared with published results of Papadimitroulas et al (Med. Phys., 2012). The results represented that the mean differences between water DPK and other soft tissues DPKs range between 0.6 % and 1.96% for 90Y, except for lung and bone, where the observed discrepancies are 6.3% and 12.19% respectively. The range of DPK difference for 32P is between 1.74% for breast and 18.85% for bone. For 177Lu, the highest difference belongs to bone which is equal to 16.91%. For other soft tissues the least discrepancy is observed in kidney with 1.68%. Conclusion: In all tissues except for lung and bone, the results of GATE for dose point kernel were comparable to water dose point kernel which demonstrates the appropriateness of applying water dose point kernel instead of soft tissues in the field of nuclear medicine

  7. Primary and scattering contributions to beta scaled dose point kernels by means of Monte Carlo simulations; Contribuicoes primaria e espalhada para dosimetria beta calculadas pelo dose point kernels empregando simulacoes pelo Metodo Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente, Mauro [CONICET - Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas de La Republica Argentina (Conicet), Buenos Aires, AR (Brazil); Botta, Francesca; Pedroli, Guido [European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Medical Physics Department; Perez, Pedro, E-mail: valente@famaf.unc.edu.ar [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Cordoba (Argentina). Fac. de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica (FaMAF)

    2012-07-01

    Beta-emitters have proved to be appropriate for radioimmunotherapy. The dosimetric characterization of each radionuclide has to be carefully investigated. One usual and practical dosimetric approach is the calculation of dose distribution from a unit point source emitting particles according to any radionuclide of interest, which is known as dose point kernel. Absorbed dose distributions are due to primary and radiation scattering contributions. This work presented a method capable of performing dose distributions for nuclear medicine dosimetry by means of Monte Carlo methods. Dedicated subroutines have been developed in order to separately compute primary and scattering contributions to the total absorbed dose, performing particle transport up to 1 keV or least. Preliminarily, the suitability of the calculation method has been satisfactory, being tested for monoenergetic sources, and it was further applied to the characterization of different beta-minus radionuclides of nuclear medicine interests for radioimmunotherapy. (author)

  8. Calculation of electron and isotopes dose point kernels with FLUKA Monte Carlo code for dosimetry in nuclear medicine therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Mairani, A; Valente, M; Battistoni, G; Botta, F; Pedroli, G; Ferrari, A; Cremonesi, M; Di Dia, A; Ferrari, M; Fasso, A

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The calculation of patient-specific dose distribution can be achieved by Monte Carlo simulations or by analytical methods. In this study, FLUKA Monte Carlo code has been considered for use in nuclear medicine dosimetry. Up to now, FLUKA has mainly been dedicated to other fields, namely high energy physics, radiation protection, and hadrontherapy. When first employing a Monte Carlo code for nuclear medicine dosimetry, its results concerning electron transport at energies typical of nuclear medicine applications need to be verified. This is commonly achieved by means of calculation of a representative parameter and comparison with reference data. Dose point kernel (DPK), quantifying the energy deposition all around a point isotropic source, is often the one. Methods: FLUKA DPKS have been calculated in both water and compact bone for monoenergetic electrons (10-3 MeV) and for beta emitting isotopes commonly used for therapy ((89)Sr, (90)Y, (131)I, (153)Sm, (177)Lu, (186)Re, and (188)Re). Point isotropic...

  9. Calculation of electron and isotopes dose point kernels with FLUKA Monte Carlo code for dosimetry in nuclear medicine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, F; Mairani, A; Battistoni, G; Cremonesi, M; Di Dia, A; Fassò, A; Ferrari, A; Ferrari, M; Paganelli, G; Pedroli, G; Valente, M

    2011-07-01

    The calculation of patient-specific dose distribution can be achieved by Monte Carlo simulations or by analytical methods. In this study, FLUKA Monte Carlo code has been considered for use in nuclear medicine dosimetry. Up to now, FLUKA has mainly been dedicated to other fields, namely high energy physics, radiation protection, and hadrontherapy. When first employing a Monte Carlo code for nuclear medicine dosimetry, its results concerning electron transport at energies typical of nuclear medicine applications need to be verified. This is commonly achieved by means of calculation of a representative parameter and comparison with reference data. Dose point kernel (DPK), quantifying the energy deposition all around a point isotropic source, is often the one. FLUKA DPKS have been calculated in both water and compact bone for monoenergetic electrons (10-3 MeV) and for beta emitting isotopes commonly used for therapy (89Sr, 90Y, 131I 153Sm, 177Lu, 186Re, and 188Re). Point isotropic sources have been simulated at the center of a water (bone) sphere, and deposed energy has been tallied in concentric shells. FLUKA outcomes have been compared to PENELOPE v.2008 results, calculated in this study as well. Moreover, in case of monoenergetic electrons in water, comparison with the data from the literature (ETRAN, GEANT4, MCNPX) has been done. Maximum percentage differences within 0.8.RCSDA and 0.9.RCSDA for monoenergetic electrons (RCSDA being the continuous slowing down approximation range) and within 0.8.X90 and 0.9.X90 for isotopes (X90 being the radius of the sphere in which 90% of the emitted energy is absorbed) have been computed, together with the average percentage difference within 0.9.RCSDA and 0.9.X90 for electrons and isotopes, respectively. Concerning monoenergetic electrons, within 0.8.RCSDA (where 90%-97% of the particle energy is deposed), FLUKA and PENELOPE agree mostly within 7%, except for 10 and 20 keV electrons (12% in water, 8.3% in bone). The

  10. Relationship between attenuation coefficients and dose-spread kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    Dose-spread kernels can be used to calculate the dose distribution in a photon beam by convolving the kernel with the primary fluence distribution. The theoretical relationships between various types and components of dose-spread kernels relative to photon attenuation coefficients are explored. These relations can be valuable as checks on the conservation of energy by dose-spread kernels calculated by analytic or Monte Carlo methods

  11. Radiation transport simulation in gamma irradiator systems using E G S 4 Monte Carlo code and dose mapping calculations based on point kernel technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisali, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    A series of computer codes based on point kernel technique and also Monte Carlo method have been developed. These codes perform radiation transport calculations for irradiator systems having cartesian, cylindrical and mixed geometries. The monte Carlo calculations, the computer code 'EGS4' has been applied to a radiation processing type problem. This code has been acompanied by a specific user code. The set of codes developed include: GCELLS, DOSMAPM, DOSMAPC2 which simulate the radiation transport in gamma irradiator systems having cylinderical, cartesian, and mixed geometries, respectively. The program 'DOSMAP3' based on point kernel technique, has been also developed for dose rate mapping calculations in carrier type gamma irradiators. Another computer program 'CYLDETM' as a user code for EGS4 has been also developed to simulate dose variations near the interface of heterogeneous media in gamma irradiator systems. In addition a system of computer codes 'PRODMIX' has been developed which calculates the absorbed dose in the products with different densities. validation studies of the calculated results versus experimental dosimetry has been performed and good agreement has been obtained

  12. Comparison of electron dose-point kernels in water generated by the Monte Carlo codes, PENELOPE, GEANT4, MCNPX, and ETRAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uusijärvi, Helena; Chouin, Nicolas; Bernhardt, Peter; Ferrer, Ludovic; Bardiès, Manuel; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2009-08-01

    Point kernels describe the energy deposited at a certain distance from an isotropic point source and are useful for nuclear medicine dosimetry. They can be used for absorbed-dose calculations for sources of various shapes and are also a useful tool when comparing different Monte Carlo (MC) codes. The aim of this study was to compare point kernels calculated by using the mixed MC code, PENELOPE (v. 2006), with point kernels calculated by using the condensed-history MC codes, ETRAN, GEANT4 (v. 8.2), and MCNPX (v. 2.5.0). Point kernels for electrons with initial energies of 10, 100, 500, and 1 MeV were simulated with PENELOPE. Spherical shells were placed around an isotropic point source at distances from 0 to 1.2 times the continuous-slowing-down-approximation range (R(CSDA)). Detailed (event-by-event) simulations were performed for electrons with initial energies of less than 1 MeV. For 1-MeV electrons, multiple scattering was included for energy losses less than 10 keV. Energy losses greater than 10 keV were simulated in a detailed way. The point kernels generated were used to calculate cellular S-values for monoenergetic electron sources. The point kernels obtained by using PENELOPE and ETRAN were also used to calculate cellular S-values for the high-energy beta-emitter, 90Y, the medium-energy beta-emitter, 177Lu, and the low-energy electron emitter, 103mRh. These S-values were also compared with the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) cellular S-values. The greatest differences between the point kernels (mean difference calculated for distances, electrons was 1.4%, 2.5%, and 6.9% for ETRAN, GEANT4, and MCNPX, respectively, compared to PENELOPE, if omitting the S-values when the activity was distributed on the cell surface for 10-keV electrons. The largest difference between the cellular S-values for the radionuclides, between PENELOPE and ETRAN, was seen for 177Lu (1.2%). There were large differences between the MIRD cellular S-values and those obtained from

  13. Dose point kernels for beta-emitting radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prestwich, W.V.; Chan, L.B.; Kwok, C.S.; Wilson, B.

    1986-01-01

    Knowledge of the dose point kernel corresponding to a specific radionuclide is required to calculate the spatial dose distribution produced in a homogeneous medium by a distributed source. Dose point kernels for commonly used radionuclides have been calculated previously using as a basis monoenergetic dose point kernels derived by numerical integration of a model transport equation. The treatment neglects fluctuations in energy deposition, an effect which has been later incorporated in dose point kernels calculated using Monte Carlo methods. This work describes new calculations of dose point kernels using the Monte Carlo results as a basis. An analytic representation of the monoenergetic dose point kernels has been developed. This provides a convenient method both for calculating the dose point kernel associated with a given beta spectrum and for incorporating the effect of internal conversion. An algebraic expression for allowed beta spectra has been accomplished through an extension of the Bethe-Bacher approximation, and tested against the exact expression. Simplified expression for first-forbidden shape factors have also been developed. A comparison of the calculated dose point kernel for 32 P with experimental data indicates good agreement with a significant improvement over the earlier results in this respect. An analytic representation of the dose point kernel associated with the spectrum of a single beta group has been formulated. 9 references, 16 figures, 3 tables

  14. Analytical equations for CT dose profiles derived using a scatter kernel of Monte Carlo parentage with broad applicability to CT dosimetry problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Robert L.; Boone, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Knowledge of the complete axial dose profile f(z), including its long scatter tails, provides the most complete (and flexible) description of the accumulated dose in CT scanning. The CTDI paradigm (including CTDI vol ) requires shift-invariance along z (identical dose profiles spaced at equal intervals), and is therefore inapplicable to many of the new and complex shift-variant scan protocols, e.g., high dose perfusion studies using variable (or zero) pitch. In this work, a convolution-based beam model developed by Dixon et al.[Med. Phys. 32, 3712-3728, (2005)] updated with a scatter LSF kernel (or DSF) derived from a Monte Carlo simulation by Boone [Med. Phys. 36, 4547-4554 (2009)] is used to create an analytical equation for the axial dose profile f(z) in a cylindrical phantom. Using f(z), equations are derived which provide the analytical description of conventional (axial and helical) dose, demonstrating its physical underpinnings; and likewise for the peak axial dose f(0) appropriate to stationary phantom cone beam CT, (SCBCT). The methodology can also be applied to dose calculations in shift-variant scan protocols. This paper is an extension of our recent work Dixon and Boone [Med. Phys. 37, 2703-2718 (2010)], which dealt only with the properties of the peak dose f(0), its relationship to CTDI, and its appropriateness to SCBCT. Methods: The experimental beam profile data f(z) of Mori et al.[Med. Phys. 32, 1061-1069 (2005)] from a 256 channel prototype cone beam scanner for beam widths (apertures) ranging from a = 28 to 138 mm are used to corroborate the theoretical axial profiles in a 32 cm PMMA body phantom. Results: The theoretical functions f(z) closely-matched the central axis experimental profile data 11 for all apertures (a = 28 -138 mm). Integration of f(z) likewise yields analytical equations for all the (CTDI-based) dosimetric quantities of conventional CT (including CTDI L itself) in addition to the peak dose f(0) relevant to SCBCT

  15. Calculation of radiation dose rate above water layer of Interim Spent Fuel Storage Jaslovske Bohunice by the point Kernels (VISIPLAN) and Monte Carlo (MCNP4C) methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavik, O.; Kucharova, D.; Listjak, M.; Fueloep, M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate maximal dose rate (DR) of gamma radiation above different configurations of reservoirs with spent nuclear fuel with cooling period 1.8 year and to compare by buildup factor method (Visiplan) and Monte Carlo simulations and to appreciate influence of scattered photons in the case of calculation of fully filled fuel transfer storage (FTS). On the ground of performed accounts it was shown, that relative contributions of photons from adjacent reservoirs are in the case buildup factor method (Visiplan) similar to Monte Carlo simulations. It means, that Visiplan can be used also for valuation of contributions of of dose rates from neighbouring reservoirs. It was shown, that calculations of DR by Visiplan are conservatively overestimated for this source of radiation and thickness of shielding approximately 2.6 - 3 times. Also following these calculations resulted, that by storage of reservoirs with cooling period 1.8 years in FTS is not needed any additional protection measures for workers against primal safety report. Calculated DR also above fully filled FTS by these reservoirs in Jaslovske Bohunice is very low on the level 0.03 μSv/h. (authors)

  16. Calculation of radiation dose rate above water layer of Interim Spent Fuel Storage Jaslovske Bohunice by the point Kernels (VISIPLAN) and Monte Carlo (MCNP4C) methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavik, O.; Kucharova, D.; Listjak, M.; Fueloep, M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate maximal dose rate (DR) of gamma radiation above different configurations of reservoirs with spent nuclear fuel with cooling period 1.8 year and to compare by buildup factor method (Visiplan) and Monte Carlo simulations and to appreciate influence of scattered photons in the case of calculation of fully filled fuel transfer storage (FTS). On the ground of performed accounts it was shown, that relative contributions of photons from adjacent reservoirs are in the case buildup factor method (Visiplan) similar to Monte Carlo simulations. It means, that Visiplan can be used also for valuation of contributions of of dose rates from neighbouring reservoirs. It was shown, that calculations of DR by Visiplan are conservatively overestimated for this source of radiation and thickness of shielding approximately 2.6 - 3 times. Also following these calculations resulted, that by storage of reservoirs with cooling period 1.8 years in FTS is not needed any additional protection measures for workers against primal safety report. Calculated DR also above fully filled FTS by these reservoirs in Jaslovske Bohunice is very low on the level 0.03 μSv/h. (authors)

  17. Monte Carlo evaluation of a photon pencil kernel algorithm applied to fast neutron therapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderberg, Jonas; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2003-10-01

    When dedicated software is lacking, treatment planning for fast neutron therapy is sometimes performed using dose calculation algorithms designed for photon beam therapy. In this work Monte Carlo derived neutron pencil kernels in water were parametrized using the photon dose algorithm implemented in the Nucletron TMS (treatment management system) treatment planning system. A rectangular fast-neutron fluence spectrum with energies 0-40 MeV (resembling a polyethylene filtered p(41)+ Be spectrum) was used. Central axis depth doses and lateral dose distributions were calculated and compared with the corresponding dose distributions from Monte Carlo calculations for homogeneous water and heterogeneous slab phantoms. All absorbed doses were normalized to the reference dose at 10 cm depth for a field of radius 5.6 cm in a 30 × 40 × 20 cm3 water test phantom. Agreement to within 7% was found in both the lateral and the depth dose distributions. The deviations could be explained as due to differences in size between the test phantom and that used in deriving the pencil kernel (radius 200 cm, thickness 50 cm). In the heterogeneous phantom, the TMS, with a directly applied neutron pencil kernel, and Monte Carlo calculated absorbed doses agree approximately for muscle but show large deviations for media such as adipose or bone. For the latter media, agreement was substantially improved by correcting the absorbed doses calculated in TMS with the neutron kerma factor ratio and the stopping power ratio between tissue and water. The multipurpose Monte Carlo code FLUKA was used both in calculating the pencil kernel and in direct calculations of absorbed dose in the phantom.

  18. Calculation of dose point kernels for five radionuclides used in radio-immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okigaki, S.; Ito, A.; Uchida, I.; Tomaru, T.

    1994-01-01

    With the recent interest in radioimmunotherapy, attention has been given to calculation of dose distribution from beta rays and monoenergetic electrons in tissue. Dose distribution around a point source of a beta ray emitting radioisotope is referred to as a beta dose point kernel. Beta dose point kernels for five radionuclides such as 131 I, 186 Re, 32 P, 188 Re, and 90 Y appropriate for radioimmunotherapy are calculated by Monte Carlo method using the EGS4 code system. Present results were compared with the published data of experiments and other calculations. Accuracy and precisions of beta dose point kernels are discussed. (author)

  19. Point kernels and superposition methods for scatter dose calculations in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, A.K.

    2000-01-01

    Point kernels have been generated and applied for calculation of scatter dose distributions around monoenergetic point sources for photon energies ranging from 28 to 662 keV. Three different approaches for dose calculations have been compared: a single-kernel superposition method, a single-kernel superposition method where the point kernels are approximated as isotropic and a novel 'successive-scattering' superposition method for improved modelling of the dose from multiply scattered photons. An extended version of the EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used for generating the kernels and for benchmarking the absorbed dose distributions calculated with the superposition methods. It is shown that dose calculation by superposition at and below 100 keV can be simplified by using isotropic point kernels. Compared to the assumption of full in-scattering made by algorithms currently in clinical use, the single-kernel superposition method improves dose calculations in a half-phantom consisting of air and water. Further improvements are obtained using the successive-scattering superposition method, which reduces the overestimates of dose close to the phantom surface usually associated with kernel superposition methods at brachytherapy photon energies. It is also shown that scatter dose point kernels can be parametrized to biexponential functions, making them suitable for use with an effective implementation of the collapsed cone superposition algorithm. (author)

  20. Considerations on absorbed dose estimates based on different β-dose point kernels in internal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Isao; Yamada, Yasuhiko; Yamashita, Takashi; Okigaki, Shigeyasu; Oyamada, Hiyoshimaru; Ito, Akira.

    1995-01-01

    In radiotherapy with radiopharmaceuticals, more accurate estimates of the three-dimensional (3-D) distribution of absorbed dose is important in specifying the activity to be administered to patients to deliver a prescribed absorbed dose to target volumes without exceeding the toxicity limit of normal tissues in the body. A calculation algorithm for the purpose has already been developed by the authors. An accurate 3-D distribution of absorbed dose based on the algorithm is given by convolution of the 3-D dose matrix for a unit cubic voxel containing unit cumulated activity, which is obtained by transforming a dose point kernel into a 3-D cubic dose matrix, with the 3-D cumulated activity distribution given by the same voxel size. However, beta-dose point kernels affecting accurate estimates of the 3-D absorbed dose distribution have been different among the investigators. The purpose of this study is to elucidate how different beta-dose point kernels in water influence on the estimates of the absorbed dose distribution due to the dose point kernel convolution method by the authors. Computer simulations were performed using the MIRD thyroid and lung phantoms under assumption of uniform activity distribution of 32 P. Using beta-dose point kernels derived from Monte Carlo simulations (EGS-4 or ACCEPT computer code), the differences among their point kernels gave little differences for the mean and maximum absorbed dose estimates for the MIRD phantoms used. In the estimates of mean and maximum absorbed doses calculated using different cubic voxel sizes (4x4x4 mm and 8x8x8 mm) for the MIRD thyroid phantom, the maximum absorbed doses for the 4x4x4 mm-voxel were estimated approximately 7% greater than the cases of the 8x8x8 mm-voxel. They were found in every beta-dose point kernel used in this study. On the other hand, the percentage difference of the mean absorbed doses in the both voxel sizes for each beta-dose point kernel was less than approximately 0.6%. (author)

  1. Dose calculation methods in photon beam therapy using energy deposition kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahnesjoe, A.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of calculating accurate dose distributions in treatment planning of megavoltage photon radiation therapy has been studied. New dose calculation algorithms using energy deposition kernels have been developed. The kernels describe the transfer of energy by secondary particles from a primary photon interaction site to its surroundings. Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport have been used for derivation of kernels for primary photon energies form 0.1 MeV to 50 MeV. The trade off between accuracy and calculational speed has been addressed by the development of two algorithms; one point oriented with low computional overhead for interactive use and one for fast and accurate calculation of dose distributions in a 3-dimensional lattice. The latter algorithm models secondary particle transport in heterogeneous tissue by scaling energy deposition kernels with the electron density of the tissue. The accuracy of the methods has been tested using full Monte Carlo simulations for different geometries, and found to be superior to conventional algorithms based on scaling of broad beam dose distributions. Methods have also been developed for characterization of clinical photon beams in entities appropriate for kernel based calculation models. By approximating the spectrum as laterally invariant, an effective spectrum and dose distribution for contaminating charge particles are derived form depth dose distributions measured in water, using analytical constraints. The spectrum is used to calculate kernels by superposition of monoenergetic kernels. The lateral energy fluence distribution is determined by deconvolving measured lateral dose distributions by a corresponding pencil beam kernel. Dose distributions for contaminating photons are described using two different methods, one for estimation of the dose outside of the collimated beam, and the other for calibration of output factors derived from kernel based dose calculations. (au)

  2. Investigation of tilted dose kernels for portal dose prediction in a-Si electronic portal imagers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chytyk, K.; McCurdy, B. M. C.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of beam divergence on dose calculation via Monte Carlo generated dose kernels was investigated in an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID). The flat-panel detector was simulated in EGSnrc with an additional 3.0 cm water buildup. The model included details of the detector's imaging cassette and the front cover upstream of it. To approximate the effect of the EPID's rear housing, a 2.1 cm air gap and 1.0 cm water slab were introduced into the simulation as equivalent backscatter material. Dose kernels were generated with an incident pencil beam of monoenergetic photons of energy 0.1, 2, 6, and 18 MeV. The orientation of the incident pencil beam was varied from 0 deg. to 14 deg. in 2 deg. increments. Dose was scored in the phosphor layer of the detector in both cylindrical (at 0 deg. ) and Cartesian (at 0 deg. -14 deg.) geometries. To reduce statistical fluctuations in the Cartesian geometry simulations at large radial distances from the incident pencil beam, the voxels were first averaged bilaterally about the pencil beam and then combined into concentric square rings of voxels. Profiles of the EPID dose kernels displayed increasing asymmetry with increasing angle and energy. A comparison of the superposition (tilted kernels) and convolution (parallel kernels) dose calculation methods via the χ-comparison test (a derivative of the γ-evaluation) in worst-case-scenario geometries demonstrated an agreement between the two methods within 0.0784 cm (one pixel width) distance-to-agreement and up to a 1.8% dose difference. More clinically typical field sizes and source-to-detector distances were also tested, yielding at most a 1.0% dose difference and the same distance-to-agreement. Therefore, the assumption of parallel dose kernels has less than a 1.8% dosimetric effect in extreme cases and less than a 1.0% dosimetric effect in most clinically relevant situations and should be suitable for most clinical dosimetric applications. The

  3. Generation of gamma-ray streaming kernels through cylindrical ducts via Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Su

    1992-02-01

    Since radiation streaming through penetrations is often the critical consideration in protection against exposure of personnel in a nuclear facility, it has been of great concern in radiation shielding design and analysis. Several methods have been developed and applied to the analysis of the radiation streaming in the past such as ray analysis method, single scattering method, albedo method, and Monte Carlo method. But they may be used for order-of-magnitude calculations and where sufficient margin is available, except for the Monte Carlo method which is accurate but requires a lot of computing time. This study developed a Monte Carlo method and constructed a data library of solutions using the Monte Carlo method for radiation streaming through a straight cylindrical duct in concrete walls of a broad, mono-directional, monoenergetic gamma-ray beam of unit intensity. The solution named as plane streaming kernel is the average dose rate at duct outlet and was evaluated for 20 source energies from 0 to 10 MeV, 36 source incident angles from 0 to 70 degrees, 5 duct radii from 10 to 30 cm, and 16 wall thicknesses from 0 to 100 cm. It was demonstrated that average dose rate due to an isotropic point source at arbitrary positions can be well approximated using the plane streaming kernel with acceptable error. Thus, the library of the plane streaming kernels can be used for the accurate and efficient analysis of radiation streaming through a straight cylindrical duct in concrete walls due to arbitrary distributions of gamma-ray sources

  4. Biasing anisotropic scattering kernels for deep-penetration Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, L.L.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    The exponential transform is often used to improve the efficiency of deep-penetration Monte Carlo calculations. This technique is usually implemented by biasing the distance-to-collision kernel of the transport equation, but leaving the scattering kernel unchanged. Dwivedi obtained significant improvements in efficiency by biasing an isotropic scattering kernel as well as the distance-to-collision kernel. This idea is extended to anisotropic scattering, particularly the highly forward Klein-Nishina scattering of gamma rays

  5. Validation of a dose-point kernel convolution technique for internal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giap, H.B.; Macey, D.J.; Bayouth, J.E.; Boyer, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to validate a dose-point kernel convolution technique that provides a three-dimensional (3D) distribution of absorbed dose from a 3D distribution of the radionuclide 131 I. A dose-point kernel for the penetrating radiations was calculated by a Monte Carlo simulation and cast in a 3D rectangular matrix. This matrix was convolved with the 3D activity map furnished by quantitative single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) to provide a 3D distribution of absorbed dose. The convolution calculation was performed using a 3D fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique, which takes less than 40 s for a 128 x 128 x 16 matrix on an Intel 486 DX2 (66 MHz) personal computer. The calculated photon absorbed dose was compared with values measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDS) inserted along the diameter of a 22 cm diameter annular source of 131 I. The mean and standard deviation of the percentage difference between the measurements and the calculations were equal to -1% and 3.6% respectively. This convolution method was also used to calculate the 3D dose distribution in an Alderson abdominal phantom containing a liver, a spleen, and a spherical tumour volume loaded with various concentrations of 131 I. By averaging the dose calculated throughout the liver, spleen, and tumour the dose-point kernel approach was compared with values derived using the MIRD formalism, and found to agree to better than 15%. (author)

  6. Monte Carlo dose distributions for radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perucha, M.; Leal, A.; Rincon, M.; Carrasco, E.

    2001-01-01

    The precision of Radiosurgery Treatment planning systems is limited by the approximations of their algorithms and by their dosimetrical input data. This fact is especially important in small fields. However, the Monte Carlo methods is an accurate alternative as it considers every aspect of particle transport. In this work an acoustic neurinoma is studied by comparing the dose distribution of both a planning system and Monte Carlo. Relative shifts have been measured and furthermore, Dose-Volume Histograms have been calculated for target and adjacent organs at risk. (orig.)

  7. Application of Electron Dose Kernels to account for heterogeneities in voxelized phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Basheer, A. K.; Sjoden, G. E.; Ghita, M.; Bolch, W.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present work on the application of the Electron Dose Kernel discrete ordinates method (EDK-S N ) to compute doses and account for material heterogeneities using high energy external photon beam irradiations in voxelized human phantoms. EDKs are pre-computed using photon pencil 'beamlets' that lead to dose delivery in tissue using highly converged Monte Carlo. Coupling the EDKs to accumulate dose scaled by integral photon fluences computed using S N methods in dose driving voxels (DDVs) allows for the full charged particle physics computed dose to be accumulated throughout the voxelized phantom, and is the basis of the EDK-S N method, which is fully parallelized. For material heterogeneities, a density scaling correction factor is required to yield good agreement. In a fully voxelized phantom, all doses were in agreement with those determined by independent Monte Carlo computations. We are continuing to expand upon the development of this robust approach for rapid and accurate determination of whole body and out of field organ doses due to high energy x-ray beams. (authors)

  8. The Monte Carlo applied for calculation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peixoto, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is showed for the calculation of absorbed dose. The trajectory of the photon is traced simulating sucessive interaction between the photon and the substance that consist the human body simulator. The energy deposition in each interaction of the simulator organ or tissue per photon is also calculated. (C.G.C.) [pt

  9. Suitability of point kernel dose calculation techniques in brachytherapy treatment planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshminarayanan Thilagam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachytherapy treatment planning system (TPS is necessary to estimate the dose to target volume and organ at risk (OAR. TPS is always recommended to account for the effect of tissue, applicator and shielding material heterogeneities exist in applicators. However, most brachytherapy TPS software packages estimate the absorbed dose at a point, taking care of only the contributions of individual sources and the source distribution, neglecting the dose perturbations arising from the applicator design and construction. There are some degrees of uncertainties in dose rate estimations under realistic clinical conditions. In this regard, an attempt is made to explore the suitability of point kernels for brachytherapy dose rate calculations and develop new interactive brachytherapy package, named as BrachyTPS, to suit the clinical conditions. BrachyTPS is an interactive point kernel code package developed to perform independent dose rate calculations by taking into account the effect of these heterogeneities, using two regions build up factors, proposed by Kalos. The primary aim of this study is to validate the developed point kernel code package integrated with treatment planning computational systems against the Monte Carlo (MC results. In the present work, three brachytherapy applicators commonly used in the treatment of uterine cervical carcinoma, namely (i Board of Radiation Isotope and Technology (BRIT low dose rate (LDR applicator and (ii Fletcher Green type LDR applicator (iii Fletcher Williamson high dose rate (HDR applicator, are studied to test the accuracy of the software. Dose rates computed using the developed code are compared with the relevant results of the MC simulations. Further, attempts are also made to study the dose rate distribution around the commercially available shielded vaginal applicator set (Nucletron. The percentage deviations of BrachyTPS computed dose rate values from the MC results are observed to be within plus/minus 5

  10. The integral first collision kernel method for gamma-ray skyshine analysis[Skyshine; Gamma-ray; First collision kernel; Monte Carlo calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheu, R.-D.; Chui, C.-S.; Jiang, S.-H. E-mail: shjiang@mx.nthu.edu.tw

    2003-12-01

    A simplified method, based on the integral of the first collision kernel, is presented for performing gamma-ray skyshine calculations for the collimated sources. The first collision kernels were calculated in air for a reference air density by use of the EGS4 Monte Carlo code. These kernels can be applied to other air densities by applying density corrections. The integral first collision kernel (IFCK) method has been used to calculate two of the ANSI/ANS skyshine benchmark problems and the results were compared with a number of other commonly used codes. Our results were generally in good agreement with others but only spend a small fraction of the computation time required by the Monte Carlo calculations. The scheme of the IFCK method for dealing with lots of source collimation geometry is also presented in this study.

  11. Spent Fuel Pool Dose Rate Calculations Using Point Kernel and Hybrid Deterministic-Stochastic Shielding Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matijevic, M.; Grgic, D.; Jecmenica, R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents comparison of the Krsko Power Plant simplified Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) dose rates using different computational shielding methodologies. The analysis was performed to estimate limiting gamma dose rates on wall mounted level instrumentation in case of significant loss of cooling water. The SFP was represented with simple homogenized cylinders (point kernel and Monte Carlo (MC)) or cuboids (MC) using uranium, iron, water, and dry-air as bulk region materials. The pool is divided on the old and new section where the old one has three additional subsections representing fuel assemblies (FAs) with different burnup/cooling time (60 days, 1 year and 5 years). The new section represents the FAs with the cooling time of 10 years. The time dependent fuel assembly isotopic composition was calculated using ORIGEN2 code applied to the depletion of one of the fuel assemblies present in the pool (AC-29). The source used in Microshield calculation is based on imported isotopic activities. The time dependent photon spectra with total source intensity from Microshield multigroup point kernel calculations was then prepared for two hybrid deterministic-stochastic sequences. One is based on SCALE/MAVRIC (Monaco and Denovo) methodology and another uses Monte Carlo code MCNP6.1.1b and ADVANTG3.0.1. code. Even though this model is a fairly simple one, the layers of shielding materials are thick enough to pose a significant shielding problem for MC method without the use of effective variance reduction (VR) technique. For that purpose the ADVANTG code was used to generate VR parameters (SB cards in SDEF and WWINP file) for MCNP fixed-source calculation using continuous energy transport. ADVATNG employs a deterministic forward-adjoint transport solver Denovo which implements CADIS/FW-CADIS methodology. Denovo implements a structured, Cartesian-grid SN solver based on the Koch-Baker-Alcouffe parallel transport sweep algorithm across x-y domain blocks. This was first

  12. Pencil kernel correction and residual error estimation for quality-index-based dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyholm, Tufve; Olofsson, Joergen; Ahnesjoe, Anders; Georg, Dietmar; Karlsson, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    Experimental data from 593 photon beams were used to quantify the errors in dose calculations using a previously published pencil kernel model. A correction of the kernel was derived in order to remove the observed systematic errors. The remaining residual error for individual beams was modelled through uncertainty associated with the kernel model. The methods were tested against an independent set of measurements. No significant systematic error was observed in the calculations using the derived correction of the kernel and the remaining random errors were found to be adequately predicted by the proposed method

  13. Absorbed dose kernel and self-shielding calculations for a novel radiopaque glass microsphere for transarterial radioembolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Cody; Mawko, George; Archambault, John Paul; Lewandowski, Robert; Liu, David; Kehoe, Sharon; Boyd, Daniel; Abraham, Robert; Syme, Alasdair

    2018-02-01

    Radiopaque microspheres may provide intraprocedural and postprocedural feedback during transarterial radioembolization (TARE). Furthermore, the potential to use higher resolution x-ray imaging techniques as opposed to nuclear medicine imaging suggests that significant improvements in the accuracy and precision of radiation dosimetry calculations could be realized for this type of therapy. This study investigates the absorbed dose kernel for novel radiopaque microspheres including contributions of both short and long-lived contaminant radionuclides while concurrently quantifying the self-shielding of the glass network. Monte Carlo simulations using EGSnrc were performed to determine the dose kernels for all monoenergetic electron emissions and all beta spectra for radionuclides reported in a neutron activation study of the microspheres. Simulations were benchmarked against an accepted 90 Y dose point kernel. Self-shielding was quantified for the microspheres by simulating an isotropically emitting, uniformly distributed source, in glass and in water. The ratio of the absorbed doses was scored as a function of distance from a microsphere. The absorbed dose kernel for the microspheres was calculated for (a) two bead formulations following (b) two different durations of neutron activation, at (c) various time points following activation. Self-shielding varies with time postremoval from the reactor. At early time points, it is less pronounced due to the higher energies of the emissions. It is on the order of 0.4-2.8% at a radial distance of 5.43 mm with increased size from 10 to 50 μm in diameter during the time that the microspheres would be administered to a patient. At long time points, self-shielding is more pronounced and can reach values in excess of 20% near the end of the range of the emissions. Absorbed dose kernels for 90 Y, 90m Y, 85m Sr, 85 Sr, 87m Sr, 89 Sr, 70 Ga, 72 Ga, and 31 Si are presented and used to determine an overall kernel for the

  14. Evaluation of the influence of double and triple Gaussian proton kernel models on accuracy of dose calculations for spot scanning technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Shusuke; Takayanagi, Taisuke; Fujii, Yusuke; Fujimoto, Rintaro; Fujitaka, Shinichiro; Umezawa, Masumi; Nagamine, Yoshihiko; Hosaka, Masahiro; Yasui, Keisuke; Omachi, Chihiro; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-03-01

    The main purpose in this study was to present the results of beam modeling and how the authors systematically investigated the influence of double and triple Gaussian proton kernel models on the accuracy of dose calculations for spot scanning technique. The accuracy of calculations was important for treatment planning software (TPS) because the energy, spot position, and absolute dose had to be determined by TPS for the spot scanning technique. The dose distribution was calculated by convolving in-air fluence with the dose kernel. The dose kernel was the in-water 3D dose distribution of an infinitesimal pencil beam and consisted of an integral depth dose (IDD) and a lateral distribution. Accurate modeling of the low-dose region was important for spot scanning technique because the dose distribution was formed by cumulating hundreds or thousands of delivered beams. The authors employed a double Gaussian function as the in-air fluence model of an individual beam. Double and triple Gaussian kernel models were also prepared for comparison. The parameters of the kernel lateral model were derived by fitting a simulated in-water lateral dose profile induced by an infinitesimal proton beam, whose emittance was zero, at various depths using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The fitted parameters were interpolated as a function of depth in water and stored as a separate look-up table. These stored parameters for each energy and depth in water were acquired from the look-up table when incorporating them into the TPS. The modeling process for the in-air fluence and IDD was based on the method proposed in the literature. These were derived using MC simulation and measured data. The authors compared the measured and calculated absolute doses at the center of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) under various volumetric irradiation conditions to systematically investigate the influence of the two types of kernel models on the dose calculations. The authors investigated the difference

  15. Adaptive anisotropic diffusion filtering of Monte Carlo dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Binhe; Jeraj, Robert; Bao Shanglian; Mackie, Thomas R

    2003-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is the most accurate method for radiotherapy dose calculations, if used correctly. However, any Monte Carlo dose calculation is burdened with statistical noise. In this paper, denoising of Monte Carlo dose distributions with a three-dimensional adaptive anisotropic diffusion method was investigated. The standard anisotropic diffusion method was extended by changing the filtering parameters adaptively according to the local statistical noise. Smoothing of dose distributions with different noise levels in an inhomogeneous phantom, a conventional and an IMRT treatment case is shown. The resultant dose distributions were analysed using several evaluating criteria. It is shown that the adaptive anisotropic diffusion method can reduce statistical noise significantly (two to five times, corresponding to the reduction of simulation time by a factor of up to 20), while preserving important gradients of the dose distribution well. The choice of free parameters of the method was found to be fairly robust

  16. Accurate convolution/superposition for multi-resolution dose calculation using cumulative tabulated kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Weiguo; Olivera, Gustavo H; Chen Mingli; Reckwerdt, Paul J; Mackie, Thomas R

    2005-01-01

    Convolution/superposition (C/S) is regarded as the standard dose calculation method in most modern radiotherapy treatment planning systems. Different implementations of C/S could result in significantly different dose distributions. This paper addresses two major implementation issues associated with collapsed cone C/S: one is how to utilize the tabulated kernels instead of analytical parametrizations and the other is how to deal with voxel size effects. Three methods that utilize the tabulated kernels are presented in this paper. These methods differ in the effective kernels used: the differential kernel (DK), the cumulative kernel (CK) or the cumulative-cumulative kernel (CCK). They result in slightly different computation times but significantly different voxel size effects. Both simulated and real multi-resolution dose calculations are presented. For simulation tests, we use arbitrary kernels and various voxel sizes with a homogeneous phantom, and assume forward energy transportation only. Simulations with voxel size up to 1 cm show that the CCK algorithm has errors within 0.1% of the maximum gold standard dose. Real dose calculations use a heterogeneous slab phantom, both the 'broad' (5 x 5 cm 2 ) and the 'narrow' (1.2 x 1.2 cm 2 ) tomotherapy beams. Various voxel sizes (0.5 mm, 1 mm, 2 mm, 4 mm and 8 mm) are used for dose calculations. The results show that all three algorithms have negligible difference (0.1%) for the dose calculation in the fine resolution (0.5 mm voxels). But differences become significant when the voxel size increases. As for the DK or CK algorithm in the broad (narrow) beam dose calculation, the dose differences between the 0.5 mm voxels and the voxels up to 8 mm (4 mm) are around 10% (7%) of the maximum dose. As for the broad (narrow) beam dose calculation using the CCK algorithm, the dose differences between the 0.5 mm voxels and the voxels up to 8 mm (4 mm) are around 1% of the maximum dose. Among all three methods, the CCK algorithm

  17. Monte Carlo dose calibration in CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Poonam; Ramasubramanian, V.; Subbaiah, K.V.; Thayalan, K.

    2008-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) scanner is a high radiation imaging modality compared to radiography. The dose from a CT examination can vary greatly depending on the particular CT scanner used, the area of the body examined, and the operating parameters of the scan. CT is a major contributor to collective effective dose in diagnostic radiology. Apart from the clinical benefits, the widespread use of multislice scanner is increasing radiation level to patient in comparison with conventional CT scanner. So, it becomes necessary to increase awareness about the CT scanner. (author)

  18. Monte Carlo systems used for treatment planning and dose verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brualla, Lorenzo [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, NCTeam, Strahlenklinik, Essen (Germany); Rodriguez, Miguel [Centro Medico Paitilla, Balboa (Panama); Lallena, Antonio M. [Universidad de Granada, Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Granada (Spain)

    2017-04-15

    General-purpose radiation transport Monte Carlo codes have been used for estimation of the absorbed dose distribution in external photon and electron beam radiotherapy patients since several decades. Results obtained with these codes are usually more accurate than those provided by treatment planning systems based on non-stochastic methods. Traditionally, absorbed dose computations based on general-purpose Monte Carlo codes have been used only for research, owing to the difficulties associated with setting up a simulation and the long computation time required. To take advantage of radiation transport Monte Carlo codes applied to routine clinical practice, researchers and private companies have developed treatment planning and dose verification systems that are partly or fully based on fast Monte Carlo algorithms. This review presents a comprehensive list of the currently existing Monte Carlo systems that can be used to calculate or verify an external photon and electron beam radiotherapy treatment plan. Particular attention is given to those systems that are distributed, either freely or commercially, and that do not require programming tasks from the end user. These systems are compared in terms of features and the simulation time required to compute a set of benchmark calculations. (orig.) [German] Seit mehreren Jahrzehnten werden allgemein anwendbare Monte-Carlo-Codes zur Simulation des Strahlungstransports benutzt, um die Verteilung der absorbierten Dosis in der perkutanen Strahlentherapie mit Photonen und Elektronen zu evaluieren. Die damit erzielten Ergebnisse sind meist akkurater als solche, die mit nichtstochastischen Methoden herkoemmlicher Bestrahlungsplanungssysteme erzielt werden koennen. Wegen des damit verbundenen Arbeitsaufwands und der langen Dauer der Berechnungen wurden Monte-Carlo-Simulationen von Dosisverteilungen in der konventionellen Strahlentherapie in der Vergangenheit im Wesentlichen in der Forschung eingesetzt. Im Bemuehen, Monte-Carlo

  19. DOSE COEFFICIENTS FOR LIVER CHEMOEMBOLISATION PROCEDURES USING MONTE CARLO CODE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavasilis, E; Dimitriadis, A; Gonis, H; Pappas, P; Georgiou, E; Yakoumakis, E

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study is the estimation of radiation burden during liver chemoembolisation procedures. Organ dose and effective dose conversion factors, normalised to dose-area product (DAP), were estimated for chemoembolisation procedures using a Monte Carlo transport code in conjunction with an adult mathematical phantom. Exposure data from 32 patients were used to determine the exposure projections for the simulations. Equivalent organ (H T ) and effective (E) doses were estimated using individual DAP values. The organs receiving the highest amount of doses during these exams were lumbar spine, liver and kidneys. The mean effective dose conversion factor was 1.4 Sv Gy -1 m -2 Dose conversion factors can be useful for patient-specific radiation burden during chemoembolisation procedures. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Neutron dose rate analysis on HTGR-10 reactor using Monte Carlo code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwoto; Adrial, H.; Hamzah, A.; Zuhair; Bakhri, S.; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    The HTGR-10 reactor is cylinder-shaped core fuelled with kernel TRISO coated fuel particles in the spherical pebble with helium cooling system. The outlet helium gas coolant temperature outputted from the reactor core is designed to 700 °C. One advantage HTGR type reactor is capable of co-generation, as an addition to generating electricity, the reactor was designed to produce heat at high temperature can be used for other processes. The spherical fuel pebble contains 8335 TRISO UO2 kernel coated particles with enrichment of 10% and 17% are dispersed in a graphite matrix. The main purpose of this study was to analysis the distribution of neutron dose rates generated from HTGR-10 reactors. The calculation and analysis result of neutron dose rate in the HTGR-10 reactor core was performed using Monte Carlo MCNP5v1.6 code. The problems of double heterogeneity in kernel fuel coated particles TRISO and spherical fuel pebble in the HTGR-10 core are modelled well with MCNP5v1.6 code. The neutron flux to dose conversion factors taken from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP-74) was used to determine the dose rate that passes through the active core, reflectors, core barrel, reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and a biological shield. The calculated results of neutron dose rate with MCNP5v1.6 code using a conversion factor of ICRP-74 (2009) for radiation workers in the radial direction on the outside of the RPV (radial position = 220 cm from the center of the patio HTGR-10) provides the respective value of 9.22E-4 μSv/h and 9.58E-4 μSv/h for enrichment 10% and 17%, respectively. The calculated values of neutron dose rates are compliant with BAPETEN Chairman’s Regulation Number 4 Year 2013 on Radiation Protection and Safety in Nuclear Energy Utilization which sets the limit value for the average effective dose for radiation workers 20 mSv/year or 10μSv/h. Thus the protection and safety for radiation workers to be safe from the radiation source has

  1. 3D calculation of absorbed dose for 131I-targeted radiotherapy: A Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeedzadeh, E.; Sarkar, S.; Abbaspour Tehrani-Fard, A.; Ay, M. R.; Khosravi, H. R.; Loudos, G.

    2008-01-01

    Various methods, such as those developed by the Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine or employing dose point kernels, have been applied to the radiation dosimetry of 131 I radionuclide therapy. However, studies have not shown a strong relationship between tumour absorbed dose and its overall therapeutic response, probably due in part to inaccuracies in activity and dose estimation. In the current study, the GATE Monte Carlo computer code was used to facilitate voxel-level radiation dosimetry for organ activities measured in an. 131 I-treated thyroid cancer patient. This approach allows incorporation of the size, shape and composition of organs (in the current study, in the Zubal anthropomorphic phantom) and intra-organ and intra-tumour inhomogeneities in the activity distributions. The total activities of the tumours and their heterogeneous distributions were measured from the SPECT images to calculate the dose maps. For investigating the effect of activity distribution on dose distribution, a hypothetical homogeneous distribution of the same total activity was considered in the tumours. It was observed that the tumour mean absorbed dose rates per unit cumulated activity were 0.65 E-5 and 0.61 E-5 mGY MBq -1 s -1 for the uniform and non-uniform distributions in the tumour, respectively, which do not differ considerably. However, the dose-volume histograms (DVH) show that the tumour non-uniform activity distribution decreases the absorbed dose to portions of the tumour volume. In such a case, it can be misleading to quote the mean or maximum absorbed dose, because overall response is likely limited by the tumour volume that receives low (i.e. non-cytocidal) doses. Three-dimensional radiation dosimetry, and calculation of tumour DVHs, may lead to the derivation of clinically reliable dose-response relationships and therefore may ultimately improve treatment planning as well as response assessment for radionuclide

  2. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-03: GPU Accelerated Monte Carlo Technique for Fast Concurrent Image and Dose Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becchetti, M; Tian, X; Segars, P; Samei, E [Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Me, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an accurate and fast Monte Carlo (MC) method of simulating CT that is capable of correlating dose with image quality using voxelized phantoms. Methods: A realistic voxelized phantom based on patient CT data, XCAT, was used with a GPU accelerated MC code for helical MDCT. Simulations were done with both uniform density organs and with textured organs. The organ doses were validated using previous experimentally validated simulations of the same phantom under the same conditions. Images acquired by tracking photons through the phantom with MC require lengthy computation times due to the large number of photon histories necessary for accurate representation of noise. A substantial speed up of the process was attained by using a low number of photon histories with kernel denoising of the projections from the scattered photons. These FBP reconstructed images were validated against those that were acquired in simulations using many photon histories by ensuring a minimal normalized root mean square error. Results: Organ doses simulated in the XCAT phantom are within 10% of the reference values. Corresponding images attained using projection kernel smoothing were attained with 3 orders of magnitude less computation time compared to a reference simulation using many photon histories. Conclusion: Combining GPU acceleration with kernel denoising of scattered photon projections in MC simulations allows organ dose and corresponding image quality to be attained with reasonable accuracy and substantially reduced computation time than is possible with standard simulation approaches.

  3. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-03: GPU Accelerated Monte Carlo Technique for Fast Concurrent Image and Dose Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becchetti, M; Tian, X; Segars, P; Samei, E

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an accurate and fast Monte Carlo (MC) method of simulating CT that is capable of correlating dose with image quality using voxelized phantoms. Methods: A realistic voxelized phantom based on patient CT data, XCAT, was used with a GPU accelerated MC code for helical MDCT. Simulations were done with both uniform density organs and with textured organs. The organ doses were validated using previous experimentally validated simulations of the same phantom under the same conditions. Images acquired by tracking photons through the phantom with MC require lengthy computation times due to the large number of photon histories necessary for accurate representation of noise. A substantial speed up of the process was attained by using a low number of photon histories with kernel denoising of the projections from the scattered photons. These FBP reconstructed images were validated against those that were acquired in simulations using many photon histories by ensuring a minimal normalized root mean square error. Results: Organ doses simulated in the XCAT phantom are within 10% of the reference values. Corresponding images attained using projection kernel smoothing were attained with 3 orders of magnitude less computation time compared to a reference simulation using many photon histories. Conclusion: Combining GPU acceleration with kernel denoising of scattered photon projections in MC simulations allows organ dose and corresponding image quality to be attained with reasonable accuracy and substantially reduced computation time than is possible with standard simulation approaches

  4. Monte Carlo estimation of the absorbed dose in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Woo; Youn, Han Bean; Kim, Ho Kyung [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this study is to devise an algorithm calculating absorbed dose distributions of patients based on Monte Carlo (MC) methods, and which includes the dose estimations due to primary and secondary (scattered) x-ray photons. Assessment of patient dose in computed tomography (CT) at the population level has become a subject of public attention and concern, and ultimate CT quality assurance and dose optimization have the goal of reducing radiation-induced cancer risks in the examined population. However, the conventional CT dose index (CTDI) concept is not a surrogate of risk but it has rather been designed to measure an average central dose. In addition, the CTDI or the dose-length product has showed troubles for helical CT with a wider beam collimation. Simple algorithms to estimate a patient specific CT dose based on the MCNP output data have been introduced. For numerical chest and head phantoms, the spatial dose distributions were calculated. The results were reasonable. The estimated dose distribution map can be readily converted into the effective dose. The important list for further studies includes the validation of the models with the experimental measurements and the acceleration of algorithms.

  5. Fast dose kernel interpolation using Fourier transform with application to permanent prostate brachytherapy dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Derek; Sloboda, Ron S

    2014-05-01

    Boyer and Mok proposed a fast calculation method employing the Fourier transform (FT), for which calculation time is independent of the number of seeds but seed placement is restricted to calculation grid points. Here an interpolation method is described enabling unrestricted seed placement while preserving the computational efficiency of the original method. The Iodine-125 seed dose kernel was sampled and selected values were modified to optimize interpolation accuracy for clinically relevant doses. For each seed, the kernel was shifted to the nearest grid point via convolution with a unit impulse, implemented in the Fourier domain. The remaining fractional shift was performed using a piecewise third-order Lagrange filter. Implementation of the interpolation method greatly improved FT-based dose calculation accuracy. The dose distribution was accurate to within 2% beyond 3 mm from each seed. Isodose contours were indistinguishable from explicit TG-43 calculation. Dose-volume metric errors were negligible. Computation time for the FT interpolation method was essentially the same as Boyer's method. A FT interpolation method for permanent prostate brachytherapy TG-43 dose calculation was developed which expands upon Boyer's original method and enables unrestricted seed placement. The proposed method substantially improves the clinically relevant dose accuracy with negligible additional computation cost, preserving the efficiency of the original method.

  6. Patient dose in image guided radiotherapy: Monte Carlo study of the CBCT dose contribution

    OpenAIRE

    Leotta, Salvatore; Amato, Ernesto; Settineri, Nicola; Basile, Emilia; Italiano, Antonio; Auditore, Lucrezia; Santacaterina, Anna; Pergolizzi, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    Image Guided RadioTherapy (IGRT) is a technique whose diffusion is growing thanks to the well-recognized gain in accuracy of dose delivery. However, multiple Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scans add dose to patients, and its contribution has to be assessed and minimized. Aim of our work was to evaluate, through Monte Carlo simulations, organ doses in IGRT due to CBCT and therapeutic MV irradiation in head-neck, thorax and pelvis districts. We developed a Monte Carlo simulation in GAMOS ...

  7. SU-E-T-209: Independent Dose Calculation in FFF Modulated Fields with Pencil Beam Kernels Obtained by Deconvolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azcona, J; Burguete, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain the pencil beam kernels that characterize a megavoltage photon beam generated in a FFF linac by experimental measurements, and to apply them for dose calculation in modulated fields. Methods: Several Kodak EDR2 radiographic films were irradiated with a 10 MV FFF photon beam from a Varian True Beam (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) linac, at the depths of 5, 10, 15, and 20cm in polystyrene (RW3 water equivalent phantom, PTW Freiburg, Germany). The irradiation field was a 50 mm diameter circular field, collimated with a lead block. Measured dose leads to the kernel characterization, assuming that the energy fluence exiting the linac head and further collimated is originated on a point source. The three-dimensional kernel was obtained by deconvolution at each depth using the Hankel transform. A correction on the low dose part of the kernel was performed to reproduce accurately the experimental output factors. The kernels were used to calculate modulated dose distributions in six modulated fields and compared through the gamma index to their absolute dose measured by film in the RW3 phantom. Results: The resulting kernels properly characterize the global beam penumbra. The output factor-based correction was carried out adding the amount of signal necessary to reproduce the experimental output factor in steps of 2mm, starting at a radius of 4mm. There the kernel signal was in all cases below 10% of its maximum value. With this correction, the number of points that pass the gamma index criteria (3%, 3mm) in the modulated fields for all cases are at least 99.6% of the total number of points. Conclusion: A system for independent dose calculations in modulated fields from FFF beams has been developed. Pencil beam kernels were obtained and their ability to accurately calculate dose in homogeneous media was demonstrated

  8. Modelling lateral beam quality variations in pencil kernel based photon dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyholm, T; Olofsson, J; Ahnesjoe, A; Karlsson, M

    2006-01-01

    Standard treatment machines for external radiotherapy are designed to yield flat dose distributions at a representative treatment depth. The common method to reach this goal is to use a flattening filter to decrease the fluence in the centre of the beam. A side effect of this filtering is that the average energy of the beam is generally lower at a distance from the central axis, a phenomenon commonly referred to as off-axis softening. The off-axis softening results in a relative change in beam quality that is almost independent of machine brand and model. Central axis dose calculations using pencil beam kernels show no drastic loss in accuracy when the off-axis beam quality variations are neglected. However, for dose calculated at off-axis positions the effect should be considered, otherwise errors of several per cent can be introduced. This work proposes a method to explicitly include the effect of off-axis softening in pencil kernel based photon dose calculations for arbitrary positions in a radiation field. Variations of pencil kernel values are modelled through a generic relation between half value layer (HVL) thickness and off-axis position for standard treatment machines. The pencil kernel integration for dose calculation is performed through sampling of energy fluence and beam quality in sectors of concentric circles around the calculation point. The method is fully based on generic data and therefore does not require any specific measurements for characterization of the off-axis softening effect, provided that the machine performance is in agreement with the assumed HVL variations. The model is verified versus profile measurements at different depths and through a model self-consistency check, using the dose calculation model to estimate HVL values at off-axis positions. A comparison between calculated and measured profiles at different depths showed a maximum relative error of 4% without explicit modelling of off-axis softening. The maximum relative error

  9. A Monte Carlo dose calculation tool for radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Li, J.S.; Pawlicki, T.; Jiang, S.B.; Deng, J.; Lee, M.C.; Koumrian, T.; Luxton, M.; Brain, S.

    2002-01-01

    A Monte Carlo user code, MCDOSE, has been developed for radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) dose calculations. MCDOSE is designed as a dose calculation module suitable for adaptation to host RTP systems. MCDOSE can be used for both conventional photon/electron beam calculation and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning. MCDOSE uses a multiple-source model to reconstruct the treatment beam phase space. Based on Monte Carlo simulated or measured beam data acquired during commissioning, source-model parameters are adjusted through an automated procedure. Beam modifiers such as jaws, physical and dynamic wedges, compensators, blocks, electron cut-outs and bolus are simulated by MCDOSE together with a 3D rectilinear patient geometry model built from CT data. Dose distributions calculated using MCDOSE agreed well with those calculated by the EGS4/DOSXYZ code using different beam set-ups and beam modifiers. Heterogeneity correction factors for layered-lung or layered-bone phantoms as calculated by both codes were consistent with measured data to within 1%. The effect of energy cut-offs for particle transport was investigated. Variance reduction techniques were implemented in MCDOSE to achieve a speedup factor of 10-30 compared to DOSXYZ. (author)

  10. Monte Carlo dose calculation of microbeam in a lung phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Company, F.Z.; Mino, C.; Mino, F.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Recent advances in synchrotron generated X-ray beams with high fluence rate permit investigation of the application of an array of closely spaced, parallel or converging microplanar beams in radiotherapy. The proposed techniques takes advantage of the hypothesised repair mechanism of capillary cells between alternate microbeam zones, which regenerates the lethally irradiated endothelial cells. The lateral and depth doses of 100 keV microplanar beams are investigated for different beam dimensions and spacings in a tissue, lung and tissue/lung/tissue phantom. The EGS4 Monte Carlo code is used to calculate dose profiles at different depth and bundles of beams (up to 20x20cm square cross section). The maximum dose on the beam axis (peak) and the minimum interbeam dose (valley) are compared at different depths, bundles, heights, widths and beam spacings. Relatively high peak to valley ratios are observed in the lung region, suggesting an ideal environment for microbeam radiotherapy. For a single field, the ratio at the tissue/lung interface will set the maximum dose to the target volume. However, in clinical application, several fields would be involved allowing much greater doses to be applied for the elimination of cancer cells. We conclude therefore that multifield microbeam therapy has the potential to achieve useful therapeutic ratios for the treatment of lung cancer

  11. Low-energy electron dose-point kernel simulations using new physics models implemented in Geant4-DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordes, Julien, E-mail: julien.bordes@inserm.fr [CRCT, UMR 1037 INSERM, Université Paul Sabatier, F-31037 Toulouse (France); UMR 1037, CRCT, Université Toulouse III-Paul Sabatier, F-31037 (France); Incerti, Sébastien, E-mail: incerti@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Université de Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Lampe, Nathanael, E-mail: nathanael.lampe@gmail.com [Université de Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Bardiès, Manuel, E-mail: manuel.bardies@inserm.fr [CRCT, UMR 1037 INSERM, Université Paul Sabatier, F-31037 Toulouse (France); UMR 1037, CRCT, Université Toulouse III-Paul Sabatier, F-31037 (France); Bordage, Marie-Claude, E-mail: marie-claude.bordage@inserm.fr [CRCT, UMR 1037 INSERM, Université Paul Sabatier, F-31037 Toulouse (France); UMR 1037, CRCT, Université Toulouse III-Paul Sabatier, F-31037 (France)

    2017-05-01

    When low-energy electrons, such as Auger electrons, interact with liquid water, they induce highly localized ionizing energy depositions over ranges comparable to cell diameters. Monte Carlo track structure (MCTS) codes are suitable tools for performing dosimetry at this level. One of the main MCTS codes, Geant4-DNA, is equipped with only two sets of cross section models for low-energy electron interactions in liquid water (“option 2” and its improved version, “option 4”). To provide Geant4-DNA users with new alternative physics models, a set of cross sections, extracted from CPA100 MCTS code, have been added to Geant4-DNA. This new version is hereafter referred to as “Geant4-DNA-CPA100”. In this study, “Geant4-DNA-CPA100” was used to calculate low-energy electron dose-point kernels (DPKs) between 1 keV and 200 keV. Such kernels represent the radial energy deposited by an isotropic point source, a parameter that is useful for dosimetry calculations in nuclear medicine. In order to assess the influence of different physics models on DPK calculations, DPKs were calculated using the existing Geant4-DNA models (“option 2” and “option 4”), newly integrated CPA100 models, and the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code used in step-by-step mode for monoenergetic electrons. Additionally, a comparison was performed of two sets of DPKs that were simulated with “Geant4-DNA-CPA100” – the first set using Geant4′s default settings, and the second using CPA100′s original code default settings. A maximum difference of 9.4% was found between the Geant4-DNA-CPA100 and PENELOPE DPKs. Between the two Geant4-DNA existing models, slight differences, between 1 keV and 10 keV were observed. It was highlighted that the DPKs simulated with the two Geant4-DNA’s existing models were always broader than those generated with “Geant4-DNA-CPA100”. The discrepancies observed between the DPKs generated using Geant4-DNA’s existing models and “Geant4-DNA-CPA100” were

  12. ORANGE: a Monte Carlo dose engine for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, W van der; Hogenbirk, A; Marck, S C van der

    2005-01-01

    This study presents data for the verification of ORANGE, a fast MCNP-based dose engine for radiotherapy treatment planning. In order to verify the new algorithm, it has been benchmarked against DOSXYZ and against measurements. For the benchmarking, first calculations have been done using the ICCR-XIII benchmark. Next, calculations have been done with DOSXYZ and ORANGE in five different phantoms (one homogeneous, two with bone equivalent inserts and two with lung equivalent inserts). The calculations have been done with two mono-energetic photon beams (2 MeV and 6 MeV) and two mono-energetic electron beams (10 MeV and 20 MeV). Comparison of the calculated data (from DOSXYZ and ORANGE) against measurements was possible for a realistic 10 MV photon beam and a realistic 15 MeV electron beam in a homogeneous phantom only. For the comparison of the calculated dose distributions and dose distributions against measurements, the concept of the confidence limit (CL) has been used. This concept reduces the difference between two data sets to a single number, which gives the deviation for 90% of the dose distributions. Using this concept, it was found that ORANGE was always within the statistical bandwidth with DOSXYZ and the measurements. The ICCR-XIII benchmark showed that ORANGE is seven times faster than DOSXYZ, a result comparable with other accelerated Monte Carlo dose systems when no variance reduction is used. As shown for XVMC, using variance reduction techniques has the potential for further acceleration. Using modern computer hardware, this brings the total calculation time for a dose distribution with 1.5% (statistical) accuracy within the clinical range (less then 10 min). This means that ORANGE can be a candidate for a dose engine in radiotherapy treatment planning

  13. Monte Carlo calculations of patient doses from dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, S.J.; Pujol, A.; Chen, T.S.; Malcolm, A.W.

    1984-01-01

    A Monte Carlo computer program has been developed to calculate patient dose from diagnostic radiologic procedures. Input data include patient anatomy as serial CT scans at 1-cm intervals from a typical cadaver, beam spectrum, and projection geometry. The program tracks single photons, accounting for photoelectric effect, coherent (using atomic form factors) and incoherent (using scatter functions) scatter. Inhomogeneities (bone, teeth, muscle, fat, lung, air cavities, etc.) are accounted for as they are encountered. Dose is accumulated in a three-dimensional array of voxels, corresponding to the CT input. Output consists of isodose curves, doses to specific organs, and effective dose equivalent, H/sub E/, as defined by ICRP. Initial results, from dental bite-wing projections using 90-kVp, half-wave rectified dental spectra, have produced H/sub E/ values ranging from 3 to 17 microsieverts (0.3-1.7 mrem) per image, depending on image receptor and projection geometry. The probability of stochastic effect is estimated by ICRP as 10/sup -2//Sv, or about 10/sup -7/ to 10/sup -8/ per image

  14. Monte Carlo simulation for radiation dose in children radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, Hitalo R.; Tomal, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The dosimetry in pediatric radiology is essential due to the higher risk that children have in comparison to adults. The focus of this study is to present how the dose varies depending on the depth in a 10 year old and a newborn, for this purpose simulations are made using the Monte Carlo method. Potential differences were considered 70 and 90 kVp for the 10 year old and 70 and 80 kVp for the newborn. The results show that in both cases, the dose at the skin surface is larger for smaller potential value, however, it decreases faster for larger potential values. Another observation made is that because the newborn is less thick the ratio between the initial dose and the final is lower compared to the case of a 10 year old, showing that it is possible to make an image using a smaller entrance dose in the skin, keeping the same level of exposure at the detector. (author)

  15. Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm on a distributed system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvie, Stephane; Dominoni, Matteo; Marini, Piergiorgio; Stasi, Michele; Pia, Maria Grazia; Scielzo, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    The main goal of modern radiotherapy, such as 3D conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy is to deliver a high dose to the target volume sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. The accuracy of dose calculation in a treatment planning system is therefore a critical issue. Among many algorithms developed over the last years, those based on Monte Carlo proven to be very promising in terms of accuracy. The most severe obstacle in application to clinical practice is the high time necessary for calculations. We have studied a high performance network of Personal Computer as a realistic alternative to a high-costs dedicated parallel hardware to be used routinely as instruments of evaluation of treatment plans. We set-up a Beowulf Cluster, configured with 4 nodes connected with low-cost network and installed MC code Geant4 to describe our irradiation facility. The MC, once parallelised, was run on the Beowulf Cluster. The first run of the full simulation showed that the time required for calculation decreased linearly increasing the number of distributed processes. The good scalability trend allows both statistically significant accuracy and good time performances. The scalability of the Beowulf Cluster system offers a new instrument for dose calculation that could be applied in clinical practice. These would be a good support particularly in high challenging prescription that needs good calculation accuracy in zones of high dose gradient and great dishomogeneities

  16. Absorbed dose evaluation of Auger electron-emitting radionuclides: impact of input decay spectra on dose point kernels and S-values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzone, Nadia; Lee, Boon Q; Fernández-Varea, José M; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Stuchbery, Andrew E; Kibédi, Tibor; Vallis, Katherine A

    2017-03-21

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of decay data provided by the newly developed stochastic atomic relaxation model BrIccEmis on dose point kernels (DPKs - radial dose distribution around a unit point source) and S-values (absorbed dose per unit cumulated activity) of 14 Auger electron (AE) emitting radionuclides, namely 67 Ga, 80m Br, 89 Zr, 90 Nb, 99m Tc, 111 In, 117m Sn, 119 Sb, 123 I, 124 I, 125 I, 135 La, 195m Pt and 201 Tl. Radiation spectra were based on the nuclear decay data from the medical internal radiation dose (MIRD) RADTABS program and the BrIccEmis code, assuming both an isolated-atom and condensed-phase approach. DPKs were simulated with the PENELOPE Monte Carlo (MC) code using event-by-event electron and photon transport. S-values for concentric spherical cells of various sizes were derived from these DPKs using appropriate geometric reduction factors. The number of Auger and Coster-Kronig (CK) electrons and x-ray photons released per nuclear decay (yield) from MIRD-RADTABS were consistently higher than those calculated using BrIccEmis. DPKs for the electron spectra from BrIccEmis were considerably different from MIRD-RADTABS in the first few hundred nanometres from a point source where most of the Auger electrons are stopped. S-values were, however, not significantly impacted as the differences in DPKs in the sub-micrometre dimension were quickly diminished in larger dimensions. Overestimation in the total AE energy output by MIRD-RADTABS leads to higher predicted energy deposition by AE emitting radionuclides, especially in the immediate vicinity of the decaying radionuclides. This should be taken into account when MIRD-RADTABS data are used to simulate biological damage at nanoscale dimensions.

  17. Monte Carlo dose calculations for phantoms with hip prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazalova, M; Verhaegen, F; Coolens, C; Childs, P; Cury, F; Beaulieu, L

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) images of patients with hip prostheses are severely degraded by metal streaking artefacts. The low image quality makes organ contouring more difficult and can result in large dose calculation errors when Monte Carlo (MC) techniques are used. In this work, the extent of streaking artefacts produced by three common hip prosthesis materials (Ti-alloy, stainless steel, and Co-Cr-Mo alloy) was studied. The prostheses were tested in a hypothetical prostate treatment with five 18 MV photon beams. The dose distributions for unilateral and bilateral prosthesis phantoms were calculated with the EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc MC code. This was done in three phantom geometries: in the exact geometry, in the original CT geometry, and in an artefact-corrected geometry. The artefact-corrected geometry was created using a modified filtered back-projection correction technique. It was found that unilateral prosthesis phantoms do not show large dose calculation errors, as long as the beams miss the artefact-affected volume. This is possible to achieve in the case of unilateral prosthesis phantoms (except for the Co-Cr-Mo prosthesis which gives a 3% error) but not in the case of bilateral prosthesis phantoms. The largest dose discrepancies were obtained for the bilateral Co-Cr-Mo hip prosthesis phantom, up to 11% in some voxels within the prostate. The artefact correction algorithm worked well for all phantoms and resulted in dose calculation errors below 2%. In conclusion, a MC treatment plan should include an artefact correction algorithm when treating patients with hip prostheses

  18. A Monte Carlo estimation of effective dose in chest tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabol, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The recent introduction of digital tomosynthesis imaging into routine clinical use has enabled the acquisition of volumetric patient data within a standard radiographic examination. Tomosynthesis requires the acquisition of multiple projection views, requiring additional dose compared to a standard projection examination. Knowledge of the effective dose is needed to make an appropriate decision between standard projection, tomosynthesis, and CT for thoracic x-ray examinations. In this article, the effective dose to the patient of chest tomosynthesis is calculated and compared to a standard radiographic examination and to values published for thoracic CT. Methods: Radiographic technique data for posterior-anterior (PA) and left lateral (LAT) radiographic chest examinations of medium-sized adults was obtained from clinical sites. From these data, the average incident air kerma for the standard views was determined. A commercially available tomosynthesis system was used to define the acquisition technique and geometry for each projection view. Using Monte Carlo techniques, the effective dose of the PA, LAT, and each tomosynthesis projection view was calculated. The effective dose for all projections of the tomosynthesis sweep was summed and compared to the calculated PA and LAT values and to the published values for thoracic CT. Results: The average incident air kerma for the PA and left lateral clinical radiographic examinations were found to be 0.10 and 0.40 mGy, respectively. The effective dose for the PA view of a patient of the size of an average adult male was determined to be 0.017 mSv (ICRP 60) [0.018 mSv (ICRP 103)]. For the left lateral view of the same sized patient, the effective dose was determined to be 0.039 mSv (ICRP 60) [0.050 mSv (ICRP 103)]. The cumulative mA s for a tomosynthesis examination is recommended to be ten times the mA s of the PA image. With this technique, the effective dose for an average tomosynthesis examination was

  19. Development of virtual CT DICOM images of patients with tumors: application for TPS and Monte Carlo dose evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milian, F. M.; Attili, A.; Russo, G; Marchetto, F.; Cirio, R.; Bourhaleb, F.

    2013-01-01

    A novel procedure for the generation of a realistic virtual Computed Tomography (CT) image of a patient, using the advanced Boundary RE Presentation (BREP)-based model MASH, has been implemented. This method can be used in radiotherapy assessment. It is shown that it is possible to introduce an artificial cancer, which can be modeled using mesh surfaces. The use of virtual CT images based on BREP models presents several advantages with respect to CT images of actual patients, such as automation, control and flexibility. As an example, two artificial cases, namely a brain and a prostate cancer, were created through the generation of images and tumor/organ contours. As a secondary objective, the described methodology has been used to generate input files for treatment planning system (TPS) and Monte Carlo code dose evaluation. In this paper, we consider treatment plans generated assuming a dose delivery via an active proton beam scanning performed with the INFN-IBA TPS kernel. Additionally, Monte Carlo simulations of the two treatment plans were carried out with GATE/GEANT4. The work demonstrates the feasibility of the approach based on the BREP modeling to produce virtual CT images. In conclusion, this study highlights the benefits in using digital phantom model capable of representing different anatomical structures and varying tumors across different patients. These models could be useful for assessing radiotherapy treatment planning systems (TPS) and computer simulations for the evaluation of the adsorbed dose. (author)

  20. Patient dose in image guided radiotherapy: Monte Carlo study of the CBCT dose contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Leotta

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Image Guided RadioTherapy (IGRT is a technique whose diffusion is growing thanks to the well-recognized gain in accuracy of dose delivery. However, multiple Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT scans add dose to patients, and its contribution has to be assessed and minimized. Aim of our work was to evaluate, through Monte Carlo simulations, organ doses in IGRT due to CBCT and therapeutic MV irradiation in head-neck, thorax and pelvis districts. We developed a Monte Carlo simulation in GAMOS (Geant4-based Architecture for Medicine-Oriented Simulations, reproducing an Elekta Synergy medical linac operating at 6 and 10 MV photon energy, and we set up a scalable anthropomorphic model. After a validation by comparison with the experimental quality indexes, we evaluated the average doses to all organs and tissues belonging to the model for the three cases of irradiated district. Scattered radiation in therapy is larger than that diffused by CBCT by one to two orders of magnitude.

  1. Dose Calculation Accuracy of the Monte Carlo Algorithm for CyberKnife Compared with Other Commercially Available Dose Calculation Algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Subhash; Ott, Joseph; Williams, Jamone; Dickow, Danny

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithms have the potential for greater accuracy than traditional model-based algorithms. This enhanced accuracy is particularly evident in regions of lateral scatter disequilibrium, which can develop during treatments incorporating small field sizes and low-density tissue. A heterogeneous slab phantom was used to evaluate the accuracy of several commercially available dose calculation algorithms, including Monte Carlo dose calculation for CyberKnife, Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm and Pencil Beam convolution for the Eclipse planning system, and convolution-superposition for the Xio planning system. The phantom accommodated slabs of varying density; comparisons between planned and measured dose distributions were accomplished with radiochromic film. The Monte Carlo algorithm provided the most accurate comparison between planned and measured dose distributions. In each phantom irradiation, the Monte Carlo predictions resulted in gamma analysis comparisons >97%, using acceptance criteria of 3% dose and 3-mm distance to agreement. In general, the gamma analysis comparisons for the other algorithms were <95%. The Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm for CyberKnife provides more accurate dose distribution calculations in regions of lateral electron disequilibrium than commercially available model-based algorithms. This is primarily because of the ability of Monte Carlo algorithms to implicitly account for tissue heterogeneities, density scaling functions; and/or effective depth correction factors are not required.

  2. Clinical implementation of full Monte Carlo dose calculation in proton beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganetti, Harald; Jiang, Hongyu; Parodi, Katia; Slopsema, Roelf; Engelsman, Martijn

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this work was to facilitate the clinical use of Monte Carlo proton dose calculation to support routine treatment planning and delivery. The Monte Carlo code Geant4 was used to simulate the treatment head setup, including a time-dependent simulation of modulator wheels (for broad beam modulation) and magnetic field settings (for beam scanning). Any patient-field-specific setup can be modeled according to the treatment control system of the facility. The code was benchmarked against phantom measurements. Using a simulation of the ionization chamber reading in the treatment head allows the Monte Carlo dose to be specified in absolute units (Gy per ionization chamber reading). Next, the capability of reading CT data information was implemented into the Monte Carlo code to model patient anatomy. To allow time-efficient dose calculation, the standard Geant4 tracking algorithm was modified. Finally, a software link of the Monte Carlo dose engine to the patient database and the commercial planning system was established to allow data exchange, thus completing the implementation of the proton Monte Carlo dose calculation engine ('DoC++'). Monte Carlo re-calculated plans are a valuable tool to revisit decisions in the planning process. Identification of clinically significant differences between Monte Carlo and pencil-beam-based dose calculations may also drive improvements of current pencil-beam methods. As an example, four patients (29 fields in total) with tumors in the head and neck regions were analyzed. Differences between the pencil-beam algorithm and Monte Carlo were identified in particular near the end of range, both due to dose degradation and overall differences in range prediction due to bony anatomy in the beam path. Further, the Monte Carlo reports dose-to-tissue as compared to dose-to-water by the planning system. Our implementation is tailored to a specific Monte Carlo code and the treatment planning system XiO (Computerized Medical Systems Inc

  3. Monte Carlo calculation of ''skyshine'' neutron dose from ALS [Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moin-Vasiri, M.

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics on ''skyshine'' neutron dose from ALS: Sources of radiation; ALS modeling for skyshine calculations; MORSE Monte-Carlo; Implementation of MORSE; Results of skyshine calculations from storage ring; and Comparison of MORSE shielding calculations

  4. A point-kernel shielding code for calculations of neutron and secondary gamma-ray 1cm dose equivalents: PKN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotegawa, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shun-ichi

    1991-09-01

    A point-kernel integral technique code, PKN, and the related data library have been developed to calculate neutron and secondary gamma-ray dose equivalents in water, concrete and iron shields for neutron sources in 3-dimensional geometry. The comparison between calculational results of the present code and those of the 1-dimensional transport code ANISN = JR, and the 2-dimensional transport code DOT4.2 showed a sufficient accuracy, and the availability of the PKN code has been confirmed. (author)

  5. Evaluation of absorbed radiation dose in mammography using Monte Carlo simulation; Avaliacao da dose absorvida em mamografia usando simulacao Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Bruno L.; Tomal, Alessandra [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin

    2016-07-01

    Mammography is the main tool for breast cancer diagnosis, and it is based on the use of X-rays to obtain images. However, the glandular tissue present within the breast is highly sensitive to ionizing radiation, and therefore requires strict quality control in order to minimize the absorbed dose. The quantification of the absorbed dose in the breast tissue can be done by using Monte Carlo simulation, which allows a detailed study of the deposition of energy in different regions of the breast. Besides, the results obtained from the simulation can be associated with experimental data and provide values of dose interest, such as the dose deposited in glandular tissue. (author)

  6. A simplified computer code based on point Kernel theory for calculating radiation dose in packages of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    A study on radiation dose control in packages of radioactive waste from nuclear facilities, hospitals and industries, such as sources of Ra-226, Co-60, Ir-192 and Cs-137, is presented. The MAPA and MAPAM computer codes, based on point Kernel theory for calculating doses of several source-shielding type configurations, aiming to assure the safe transport conditions for these sources, was developed. The validation of the code for point sources, using the values provided by NCRP, for the thickness of lead and concrete shieldings, limiting the dose at 100 Mrem/hr for several distances from the source to the detector, was carried out. The validation for non point sources was carried out, measuring experimentally radiation dose from packages developed by Brazilian CNEN/S.P. for removing the sources. (M.C.K.) [pt

  7. Monte Carlo calculation of received dose from ingestion and inhalation of natural uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trobok, M.; Zupunski, Lj.; Spasic-Jokic, V.; Gordanic, V.; Sovilj, P.

    2009-01-01

    For the purpose of this study eighty samples are taken from the area Bela Crkva and Vrsac. The activity of radionuclide in the soil is determined by gamma- ray spectrometry. Monte Carlo method is used to calculate effective dose received by population resulting from the inhalation and ingestion of natural uranium. The estimated doses were compared with the legally prescribed levels. (author) [sr

  8. New model for mines and transportation tunnels external dose calculation using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allam, Kh. A.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a new methodology is developed based on Monte Carlo simulation for tunnels and mines external dose calculation. Tunnels external dose evaluation model of a cylindrical shape of finite thickness with an entrance and with or without exit. A photon transportation model was applied for exposure dose calculations. A new software based on Monte Carlo solution was designed and programmed using Delphi programming language. The variation of external dose due to radioactive nuclei in a mine tunnel and the corresponding experimental data lies in the range 7.3 19.9%. The variation of specific external dose rate with position in, tunnel building material density and composition were studied. The given new model has more flexible for real external dose in any cylindrical tunnel structure calculations. (authors)

  9. A measurement-based generalized source model for Monte Carlo dose simulations of CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Liu, Ransheng; Yang, Chengwen; Zhou, Li; Zhai, Hezheng; Deng, Jun

    2017-03-07

    The goal of this study is to develop a generalized source model for accurate Monte Carlo dose simulations of CT scans based solely on the measurement data without a priori knowledge of scanner specifications. The proposed generalized source model consists of an extended circular source located at x-ray target level with its energy spectrum, source distribution and fluence distribution derived from a set of measurement data conveniently available in the clinic. Specifically, the central axis percent depth dose (PDD) curves measured in water and the cone output factors measured in air were used to derive the energy spectrum and the source distribution respectively with a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The in-air film measurement of fan-beam dose profiles at fixed gantry was back-projected to generate the fluence distribution of the source model. A benchmarked Monte Carlo user code was used to simulate the dose distributions in water with the developed source model as beam input. The feasibility and accuracy of the proposed source model was tested on a GE LightSpeed and a Philips Brilliance Big Bore multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanners available in our clinic. In general, the Monte Carlo simulations of the PDDs in water and dose profiles along lateral and longitudinal directions agreed with the measurements within 4%/1 mm for both CT scanners. The absolute dose comparison using two CTDI phantoms (16 cm and 32 cm in diameters) indicated a better than 5% agreement between the Monte Carlo-simulated and the ion chamber-measured doses at a variety of locations for the two scanners. Overall, this study demonstrated that a generalized source model can be constructed based only on a set of measurement data and used for accurate Monte Carlo dose simulations of patients' CT scans, which would facilitate patient-specific CT organ dose estimation and cancer risk management in the diagnostic and therapeutic radiology.

  10. A measurement-based generalized source model for Monte Carlo dose simulations of CT scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Liu, Ransheng; Yang, Chengwen; Zhou, Li; Zhai, Hezheng; Deng, Jun

    2017-03-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a generalized source model for accurate Monte Carlo dose simulations of CT scans based solely on the measurement data without a priori knowledge of scanner specifications. The proposed generalized source model consists of an extended circular source located at x-ray target level with its energy spectrum, source distribution and fluence distribution derived from a set of measurement data conveniently available in the clinic. Specifically, the central axis percent depth dose (PDD) curves measured in water and the cone output factors measured in air were used to derive the energy spectrum and the source distribution respectively with a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The in-air film measurement of fan-beam dose profiles at fixed gantry was back-projected to generate the fluence distribution of the source model. A benchmarked Monte Carlo user code was used to simulate the dose distributions in water with the developed source model as beam input. The feasibility and accuracy of the proposed source model was tested on a GE LightSpeed and a Philips Brilliance Big Bore multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanners available in our clinic. In general, the Monte Carlo simulations of the PDDs in water and dose profiles along lateral and longitudinal directions agreed with the measurements within 4%/1 mm for both CT scanners. The absolute dose comparison using two CTDI phantoms (16 cm and 32 cm in diameters) indicated a better than 5% agreement between the Monte Carlo-simulated and the ion chamber-measured doses at a variety of locations for the two scanners. Overall, this study demonstrated that a generalized source model can be constructed based only on a set of measurement data and used for accurate Monte Carlo dose simulations of patients’ CT scans, which would facilitate patient-specific CT organ dose estimation and cancer risk management in the diagnostic and therapeutic radiology.

  11. Novel hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic technique for shutdown dose rate analyses of fusion energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Peterson, Joshua L.; Grove, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Develop the novel Multi-Step CADIS (MS-CADIS) hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic method for multi-step shielding analyses. •Accurately calculate shutdown dose rates using full-scale Monte Carlo models of fusion energy systems. •Demonstrate the dramatic efficiency improvement of the MS-CADIS method for the rigorous two step calculations of the shutdown dose rate in fusion reactors. -- Abstract: The rigorous 2-step (R2S) computational system uses three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport simulations to calculate the shutdown dose rate (SDDR) in fusion reactors. Accurate full-scale R2S calculations are impractical in fusion reactors because they require calculating space- and energy-dependent neutron fluxes everywhere inside the reactor. The use of global Monte Carlo variance reduction techniques was suggested for accelerating the R2S neutron transport calculation. However, the prohibitive computational costs of these approaches, which increase with the problem size and amount of shielding materials, inhibit their ability to accurately predict the SDDR in fusion energy systems using full-scale modeling of an entire fusion plant. This paper describes a novel hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic methodology that uses the Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) method but focuses on multi-step shielding calculations. The Multi-Step CADIS (MS-CADIS) methodology speeds up the R2S neutron Monte Carlo calculation using an importance function that represents the neutron importance to the final SDDR. Using a simplified example, preliminary results showed that the use of MS-CADIS enhanced the efficiency of the neutron Monte Carlo simulation of an SDDR calculation by a factor of 550 compared to standard global variance reduction techniques, and that the efficiency enhancement compared to analog Monte Carlo is higher than a factor of 10,000

  12. Local dose enhancement in radiation therapy: Monte Carlo simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Laura E. da; Nicolucci, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The development of nanotechnology has boosted the use of nanoparticles in radiation therapy in order to achieve greater therapeutic ratio between tumor and healthy tissues. Gold has been shown to be most suitable to this task due to the high biocompatibility and high atomic number, which contributes to a better in vivo distribution and for the local energy deposition. As a result, this study proposes to study, nanoparticle in the tumor cell. At a range of 11 nm from the nanoparticle surface, results have shown an absorbed dose 141 times higher for the medium with the gold nanoparticle compared to the water for an incident energy spectrum with maximum photon energy of 50 keV. It was also noted that when only scattered radiation is interacting with the gold nanoparticles, the dose was 134 times higher compared to enhanced local dose that remained significant even for scattered radiation. (author)

  13. Scattered dose to thyroid from prophylactic cranial irradiation during childhood: a Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John; Varveris, Haris; Kachris, Stefanos; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the scattered dose to thyroid from prophylactic cranial irradiation during childhood. The MCNP transport code and mathematical phantoms representing the average individual at ages 3, 5, 10, 15 and 18 years old were employed to simulate cranial radiotherapy using two lateral opposed fields. The mean radiation dose received by the thyroid gland was calculated. A 10 cm thick lead block placed on the patient's couch to shield the thyroid was simulated by MCNP code. The Monte Carlo model was validated by measuring the scattered dose to the unshielded and shielded thyroid using three different humanoid phantoms and thermoluminescense dosimetry. For a cranial dose of 18 Gy, the thyroid dose obtained by Monte Carlo calculations varied from 47 to 79 cGy depending upon the age of the child. Appropriate placement of the couch block resulted in a thyroid dose reduction by 39 to 54%. Thyroid dose values at all possible positions of the radiosensitive gland with respect to the inferior field edge at five different patient ages were found. The mean difference between Monte Carlo results and thyroid dose measurements was 9.6%. (note)

  14. Generation of point isotropic source dose buildup factor data for the PFBR special concretes in a form compatible for usage in point kernel computer code QAD-CGGP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radhakrishnan, G.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Around the PFBR (Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor) reactor assembly, in the peripheral shields special concretes of density 2.4 g/cm 3 and 3.6 g/cm 3 are to be used in complex geometrical shapes. Point-kernel computer code like QAD-CGGP, written for complex shield geometry comes in handy for the shield design optimization of peripheral shields. QAD-CGGP requires data base for the buildup factor data and it contains only ordinary concrete of density 2.3 g/cm 3 . In order to extend the data base for the PFBR special concretes, point isotropic source dose buildup factors have been generated by Monte Carlo method using the computer code MCNP-4A. For the above mentioned special concretes, buildup factor data have been generated in the energy range 0.5 MeV to 10.0 MeV with the thickness ranging from 1 mean free paths (mfp) to 40 mfp. Capo's formula fit of the buildup factor data compatible with QAD-CGGP has been attempted

  15. Experimental validation of Monte Carlo calculations for organ dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalcintas, M.G.; Eckerman, K.F.; Warner, G.G.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of validating estimates of absorbed dose due to photon energy deposition is examined. The computational approaches used for the estimation of the photon energy deposition is examined. The limited data for validation of these approaches is discussed and suggestions made as to how better validation information might be obtained

  16. Modelling of electron contamination in clinical photon beams for Monte Carlo dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J; Li, J S; Qin, L; Xiong, W; Ma, C-M

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to model electron contamination in clinical photon beams and to commission the source model using measured data for Monte Carlo treatment planning. In this work, a planar source is used to represent the contaminant electrons at a plane above the upper jaws. The source size depends on the dimensions of the field size at the isocentre. The energy spectra of the contaminant electrons are predetermined using Monte Carlo simulations for photon beams from different clinical accelerators. A 'random creep' method is employed to derive the weight of the electron contamination source by matching Monte Carlo calculated monoenergetic photon and electron percent depth-dose (PDD) curves with measured PDD curves. We have integrated this electron contamination source into a previously developed multiple source model and validated the model for photon beams from Siemens PRIMUS accelerators. The EGS4 based Monte Carlo user code BEAM and MCSIM were used for linac head simulation and dose calculation. The Monte Carlo calculated dose distributions were compared with measured data. Our results showed good agreement (less than 2% or 2 mm) for 6, 10 and 18 MV photon beams

  17. Absorbed dose in fibrotic microenvironment models employing Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambrano Ramírez, O.D.; Rojas Calderón, E.L.; Azorín Vega, E.P.; Ferro Flores, G.; Martínez Caballero, E.

    2015-01-01

    The presence or absence of fibrosis and yet more, the multimeric and multivalent nature of the radiopharmaceutical have recently been reported to have an effect on the radiation absorbed dose in tumor microenvironment models. Fibroblast and myofibroblast cells produce the extracellular matrix by the secretion of proteins which provide structural and biochemical support to cells. The reactive and reparative mechanisms triggered during the inflammatory process causes the production and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, the abnormal excessive growth of the connective tissue leads to fibrosis. In this work, microenvironment (either not fibrotic or fibrotic) models composed of seven spheres representing cancer cells of 10 μm in diameter each with a 5 μm diameter inner sphere (cell nucleus) were created in two distinct radiation transport codes (PENELOPE and MCNP). The purpose of creating these models was to determine the radiation absorbed dose in the nucleus of cancer cells, based on previously reported radiopharmaceutical retain (by HeLa cells) percentages of the 177 Lu-Tyr 3 -octreotate (monomeric) and 177 Lu-Tyr 3 -octreotate-AuNP (multimeric) radiopharmaceuticals. A comparison in the results between the PENELOPE and MCNP was done. We found a good agreement in the results of the codes. The percent difference between the increase percentages of the absorbed dose in the not fibrotic model with respect to the fibrotic model of the codes PENELOPE and MCNP was found to be under 1% for both radiopharmaceuticals. (authors)

  18. Monte-Carlo Method Python Library for dose distribution Calculation in Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randriantsizafy, R D; Ramanandraibe, M J [Madagascar Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires, Antananarivo (Madagascar); Raboanary, R [Institut of astro and High-Energy Physics Madagascar, University of Antananarivo, Antananarivo (Madagascar)

    2007-07-01

    The Cs-137 Brachytherapy treatment is performed in Madagascar since 2005. Time treatment calculation for prescribed dose is made manually. Monte-Carlo Method Python library written at Madagascar INSTN is experimentally used to calculate the dose distribution on the tumour and around it. The first validation of the code was done by comparing the library curves with the Nucletron company curves. To reduce the duration of the calculation, a Grid of PC's is set up with listner patch run on each PC. The library will be used to modelize the dose distribution in the CT scan patient picture for individual and better accuracy time calculation for a prescribed dose.

  19. Monte-Carlo Method Python Library for dose distribution Calculation in Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randriantsizafy, R.D.; Ramanandraibe, M.J.; Raboanary, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Cs-137 Brachytherapy treatment is performed in Madagascar since 2005. Time treatment calculation for prescribed dose is made manually. Monte-Carlo Method Python library written at Madagascar INSTN is experimentally used to calculate the dose distribution on the tumour and around it. The first validation of the code was done by comparing the library curves with the Nucletron company curves. To reduce the duration of the calculation, a Grid of PC's is set up with listner patch run on each PC. The library will be used to modelize the dose distribution in the CT scan patient picture for individual and better accuracy time calculation for a prescribed dose.

  20. Towards the elimination of Monte Carlo statistical fluctuation from dose volume histograms for radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sempau, J.; Bielajew, A.F.

    2000-01-01

    The Monte Carlo calculation of dose for radiotherapy treatment planning purposes introduces unavoidable statistical noise into the prediction of dose in a given volume element (voxel). When the doses in these voxels are summed to produce dose volume histograms (DVHs), this noise translates into a broadening of differential DVHs and correspondingly flatter DVHs. A brute force approach would entail calculating dose for long periods of time - enough to ensure that the DVHs had converged. In this paper we introduce an approach for deconvolving the statistical noise from DVHs, thereby obtaining estimates for converged DVHs obtained about 100 times faster than the brute force approach described above. There are two important implications of this work: (a) decisions based upon DVHs may be made much more economically using the new approach and (b) inverse treatment planning or optimization methods may employ Monte Carlo dose calculations at all stages of the iterative procedure since the prohibitive cost of Monte Carlo calculations at the intermediate calculation steps can be practically eliminated. (author)

  1. Gamma irradiator dose mapping: a Monte Carlo simulation and experimental measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Rogerio R.; Ribeiro, Mariana A.; Grynberg, Suely E.; Ferreira, Andrea V.; Meira-Belo, Luiz Claudio; Sousa, Romulo V.; Sebastiao, Rita de C.O.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma irradiator facilities can be used in a wide range of applications such as biological and chemical researches, food treatment and sterilization of medical devices and products. Dose mapping must be performed in these equipment in order to establish plant operational parameters, as dose uniformity, source utilization efficiency and maximum and minimum dose positions. The isodoses curves are generally measured using dosimeters distributed throughout the device, and this procedure often consume a large amount of dosimeters, irradiation time and manpower. However, a detailed curve doses identification of the irradiation facility can be performed using Monte Carlo simulation, which reduces significantly the monitoring with dosimeters. The present work evaluates the absorbed dose in the CDTN/CNEN Gammacell Irradiation Facility, using the Monte Carlo N-particles (MCNP) code. The Gammacell 220, serial number 39, was produced by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and was loaded with sources of 60 Co. Dose measurements using TLD and Fricke dosimeters were also performed to validate the calculations. The good agreement of the results shows that Monte Carlo simulations can be used as a predictive tool of irradiation planning for the CDTN/CNEN Gamma Cell Irradiator. (author)

  2. SU-E-T-329: Dosimetric Impact of Implementing Metal Artifact Reduction Methods and Metal Energy Deposition Kernels for Photon Dose Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J; Followill, D; Howell, R; Liu, X; Mirkovic, D; Stingo, F; Kry, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate two strategies for reducing dose calculation errors near metal implants: use of CT metal artifact reduction methods and implementation of metal-based energy deposition kernels in the convolution/superposition (C/S) method. Methods: Radiochromic film was used to measure the dose upstream and downstream of titanium and Cerrobend implants. To assess the dosimetric impact of metal artifact reduction methods, dose calculations were performed using baseline, uncorrected images and metal artifact reduction Methods: Philips O-MAR, GE’s monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI imaging with metal artifact reduction software applied (MARs).To assess the impact of metal kernels, titanium and silver kernels were implemented into a commercial collapsed cone C/S algorithm. Results: The CT artifact reduction methods were more successful for titanium than Cerrobend. Interestingly, for beams traversing the metal implant, we found that errors in the dimensions of the metal in the CT images were more important for dose calculation accuracy than reduction of imaging artifacts. The MARs algorithm caused a distortion in the shape of the titanium implant that substantially worsened the calculation accuracy. In comparison to water kernel dose calculations, metal kernels resulted in better modeling of the increased backscatter dose at the upstream interface but decreased accuracy directly downstream of the metal. We also found that the success of metal kernels was dependent on dose grid size, with smaller calculation voxels giving better accuracy. Conclusion: Our study yielded mixed results, with neither the metal artifact reduction methods nor the metal kernels being globally effective at improving dose calculation accuracy. However, some successes were observed. The MARs algorithm decreased errors downstream of Cerrobend by a factor of two, and metal kernels resulted in more accurate backscatter dose upstream of metals. Thus

  3. Problems following hippocampal irradiation in interventional radiologists - doses and potential effect:a Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cumak, V.; Morgun, A.; Bakhanova, O.; Loganovs'kij, K.; Loganovs'ka, T.; Marazziti, D.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating radiation exposure of hippocampus in interventional medical professionals irradiated in the operating room, and to compare doses in the hippocampus with the effective dose (protection quantity), as well as with the doses measured by individual dosimeter, in order to estimate probability of reaching levels of radiation induced cognitive and other neuropsychiatric alterations during their working career, through a Monte Carlo simulation. The results showed that cranial irradiation was very heterogeneous and depended on the projection: doses of left and right hippocampi may be different up to a factor of 2.5; under certain conditions, the dose of the left hippocampus may be twice the effective dose, estimated by conventional double dosimetry algorithm. The professional span doses of the irradiated hippocampus may overcome the threshold able to provoke possible cognitive and emotional-behavioral impairment. Therefore, in-depth studies of the effects of brain irradiation in occupationally exposed interventional medical personnel appear urgently needed and crucial

  4. Effects of physics change in Monte Carlo code on electron pencil beam dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toutaoui, Abdelkader; Khelassi-Toutaoui, Nadia; Brahimi, Zakia; Chami, Ahmed Chafik

    2012-01-01

    Pencil beam algorithms used in computerized electron beam dose planning are usually described using the small angle multiple scattering theory. Alternatively, the pencil beams can be generated by Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport. In a previous work, the 4th version of the Electron Gamma Shower (EGS) Monte Carlo code was used to obtain dose distributions from monoenergetic electron pencil beam, with incident energy between 1 MeV and 50 MeV, interacting at the surface of a large cylindrical homogeneous water phantom. In 2000, a new version of this Monte Carlo code has been made available by the National Research Council of Canada (NRC), which includes various improvements in its electron-transport algorithms. In the present work, we were interested to see if the new physics in this version produces pencil beam dose distributions very different from those calculated with oldest one. The purpose of this study is to quantify as well as to understand these differences. We have compared a series of pencil beam dose distributions scored in cylindrical geometry, for electron energies between 1 MeV and 50 MeV calculated with two versions of the Electron Gamma Shower Monte Carlo Code. Data calculated and compared include isodose distributions, radial dose distributions and fractions of energy deposition. Our results for radial dose distributions show agreement within 10% between doses calculated by the two codes for voxels closer to the pencil beam central axis, while the differences are up to 30% for longer distances. For fractions of energy deposition, the results of the EGS4 are in good agreement (within 2%) with those calculated by EGSnrc at shallow depths for all energies, whereas a slightly worse agreement (15%) is observed at deeper distances. These differences may be mainly attributed to the different multiple scattering for electron transport adopted in these two codes and the inclusion of spin effect, which produces an increase of the effective range of

  5. SU-F-T-672: A Novel Kernel-Based Dose Engine for KeV Photon Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhart, M; Fast, M F; Nill, S; Oelfke, U [The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Mimicking state-of-the-art patient radiotherapy with high precision irradiators for small animals allows advanced dose-effect studies and radiobiological investigations. One example is the implementation of pre-clinical IMRT-like irradiations, which requires the development of inverse planning for keV photon beams. As a first step, we present a novel kernel-based dose calculation engine for keV x-rays with explicit consideration of energy and material dependencies. Methods: We follow a superposition-convolution approach adapted to keV x-rays, based on previously published work on micro-beam therapy. In small animal radiotherapy, we assume local energy deposition at the photon interaction point, since the electron ranges in tissue are of the same order of magnitude as the voxel size. This allows us to use photon-only kernel sets generated by MC simulations, which are pre-calculated for six energy windows and ten base materials. We validate our stand-alone dose engine against Geant4 MC simulations for various beam configurations in water, slab phantoms with bone and lung inserts, and on a mouse CT with (0.275mm)3 voxels. Results: We observe good agreement for all cases. For field sizes of 1mm{sup 2} to 1cm{sup 2} in water, the depth dose curves agree within 1% (mean), with the largest deviations in the first voxel (4%) and at depths>5cm (<2.5%). The out-of-field doses at 1cm depth agree within 8% (mean) for all but the smallest field size. In slab geometries, the mean agreement was within 3%, with maximum deviations of 8% at water-bone interfaces. The γ-index (1mm/1%) passing rate for a single-field mouse irradiation is 71%. Conclusion: The presented dose engine yields an accurate representation of keV-photon doses suitable for inverse treatment planning for IMRT. It has the potential to become a significantly faster yet sufficiently accurate alternative to full MC simulations. Further investigations will focus on energy sampling as well as calculation

  6. Study of dose distribution in dental radiology using the Monte Carlo Simulation; Estudo da distribuicao de dose em radiologia odontologica usando simulacao Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonzoumet, S P.J.; Braz, D; Lopes, R T [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, COPPE/UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Anjos, M J [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, COPPE/UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Barroso, R C.S. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2003-11-15

    Full text: The purpose of this study was to study the absorbed dose in mouth due to scattering in teeth in dental radiography using the monte carlo simulation. The Electron Gamma Shower (EGS-4) system of computer codes was used, which is a general purpose package for monte carlo simulation of the coupled transport of electrons and photons in an arbitrary geometry for particles with energies above a few keV up to several TeV. In the case of a X ray dental the low energy photons beam, are removed of the spectrum by the filtration. These low energy photons beam do not contribute in the obtaining of the radiographic image, but they will be contribute in the dose to the patient, however when the incident radiation crosses the tooth it generates a scattering radiation that contributes in the dose received by the patient in the oral cavity (cheek, tooth and oral cavity). Dental radiography is one of the largest single groups of radiographic examination accounting for 32% of radiographs taken in the Brazil. A number of relatively recent improvements in technology, equipment and techniques have the potential to reduce patient radiation dose and improve image quality. To optimize radiation protection all reasonable means should be employed to minimize the dose of each exposure. Dentists therefore need to keep up to date with changes in techniques and equipment and modify their own practice. In preliminary analysis could be notice that the energy below the 30 keV (low energy) is deposited in the cheek. To 30 keV photons there is the maximum absorbed energy in the tooth (about 60%). In 40 keV could be notice that deposited energy is same to teeth and cheek, but up to 40 keV just a small part of energy is deposited, e.g., the great part of energy is transmitted to the inner mouth (oral cavity). (orig.)

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of dose enhancement effect of X-ray at Au/Si interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhengxin; He Chengfa; Lu Wu; Guo Qi; Yu Xin; Zhang Lei; Deng Wei; Zheng Qiwen; ARKIN Abulim

    2013-01-01

    Background: The dose enhancement factor of X-ray was found in 1970s, because of its bad damage to electronic devices. Purpose: This paper is mainly to calculate the dose-enhancement factor at Au/Si interfaces. Methods: The gradient distribution of dose with X-rays has been studied at and near the interface of Au/Si by Monte-Carlo simulation of particle transportation. The mechanism of dose enhancement is discussed based on the principles of interaction of photon with matter. A 3D Au/Si model has been established by MCNP5 program and the dose-enhancement factors of different thicknesses Au/Si interfaces were calculated by Monte Carlo method. Results: The calculated results demonstrate that there exists a stronger dose-enhancement in the Si side near the interface when the energy of X-ray is 30-300 keV. Conclusions: When the thickness of Au is 0-10 μm, dose-enhancement factor of X-ray increases along with the increase of the thickness of Au, when the thickness of Au exceeds 10 μm, dose-enhancement factor of X-ray decreases along with the increase of the thickness of Au. (authors)

  8. Monte Carlo calculation of dose rate conversion factors for external exposure to photon emitters in soil

    CERN Document Server

    Clouvas, A; Antonopoulos-Domis, M; Silva, J

    2000-01-01

    The dose rate conversion factors D/sub CF/ (absorbed dose rate in air per unit activity per unit of soil mass, nGy h/sup -1/ per Bq kg/sup -1/) are calculated 1 m above ground for photon emitters of natural radionuclides uniformly distributed in the soil. Three Monte Carlo codes are used: 1) The MCNP code of Los Alamos; 2) The GEANT code of CERN; and 3) a Monte Carlo code developed in the Nuclear Technology Laboratory of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. The accuracy of the Monte Carlo results is tested by the comparison of the unscattered flux obtained by the three Monte Carlo codes with an independent straightforward calculation. All codes and particularly the MCNP calculate accurately the absorbed dose rate in air due to the unscattered radiation. For the total radiation (unscattered plus scattered) the D/sub CF/ values calculated from the three codes are in very good agreement between them. The comparison between these results and the results deduced previously by other authors indicates a good ag...

  9. Monte Carlo characterisation of the Dose Magnifying Glass for proton therapy quality assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, A. H.; Guatelli, S.; Petesecca, M.; Jackson, M.; Rozenfeld, A. B.

    2017-01-01

    A Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation study was carried out to characterise a novel silicon strip detector, the Dose Magnifying Glass (DMG), for use in proton therapy Quality Assurance. We investigated the possibility to use DMG to determine the energy of the incident proton beam. The advantages of DMG are quick response, easy operation and high spatial resolution. In this work we theoretically proved that DMG can be used for QA in the determination of the energy of the incident proton beam, for ocular and prostate cancer therapy. The study was performed by means of Monte Carlo simulations Experimental measurements are currently on their way to confirm the results of this simulation study.

  10. SU-F-T-122: 4Dand 5D Proton Dose Evaluation with Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titt, U; Mirkovic, D; Yepes, P; Liu, A; Peeler, C; Randenyia, S; Mohan, R [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We evaluated uncertainties in therapeutic proton doses of a lung treatment, taking into account intra-fractional geometry changes, such as breathing, and inter-fractional changes, such as tumor shrinkage and weight loss. Methods: A Monte Carlo study was performed using four dimensional CT image sets (4DCTs) and weekly repeat imaging (5DCTs) to compute fixed RBE (1.1) and variable RBE weighted dose in an actual lung treatment geometry. The MC2 Monte Carlo system was employed to simulate proton energy deposition and LET distributions according to a thoracic cancer treatment plan developed with a 3D-CT in a commercial treatment planning system, as well as in each of the phases of 4DCT sets which were recorded weekly throughout the course of the treatment. A cumulative dose distribution in relevant structures was computed and compared to the predictions of the treatment planning system. Results: Using the Monte Carlo method, dose deposition estimates with the lowest possible uncertainties were produced. Comparison with treatment planning predictions indicates that significant uncertainties may be associated with therapeutic lung dose prediction from treatment planning systems, depending on the magnitude of inter- and intra-fractional geometry changes. Conclusion: As this is just a case study, a more systematic investigation accounting for a cohort of patients is warranted; however, this is less practical because Monte Carlo simulations of such cases require enormous computational resources. Hence our study and any future case studies may serve as validation/benchmarking data for faster dose prediction engines, such as the track repeating algorithm, FDC.

  11. Effective dose in individuals from exposure the patients treated with 131I using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Junior, Alberico B. de; Silva, Ademir X.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, using the Visual Monte Carlo code and the voxel phantom FAX, elaborated similar scenes of irradiation to the treatments used in the nuclear medicine, with the intention of estimate the effective dose in individuals from exposure the patients treated with 131 I. We considered often specific situations, such as doses to others while sleeping, using public or private transportation, or being in a cinema for a few hours. In the possible situations that has been considered, the value of the effective dose did not overcome 0.05 mSv, demonstrating that, for the considered parameters the patient could be release without receiving instructions from radioprotection. (author)

  12. SU-E-J-60: Efficient Monte Carlo Dose Calculation On CPU-GPU Heterogeneous Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, K; Chen, D. Z; Hu, X. S [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN (United States); Zhou, B [Altera Corp., San Jose, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is well-known that the performance of GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation implementations is bounded by memory bandwidth. One major cause of this bottleneck is the random memory writing patterns in dose deposition, which leads to several memory efficiency issues on GPU such as un-coalesced writing and atomic operations. We propose a new method to alleviate such issues on CPU-GPU heterogeneous systems, which achieves overall performance improvement for Monte Carlo dose calculation. Methods: Dose deposition is to accumulate dose into the voxels of a dose volume along the trajectories of radiation rays. Our idea is to partition this procedure into the following three steps, which are fine-tuned for CPU or GPU: (1) each GPU thread writes dose results with location information to a buffer on GPU memory, which achieves fully-coalesced and atomic-free memory transactions; (2) the dose results in the buffer are transferred to CPU memory; (3) the dose volume is constructed from the dose buffer on CPU. We organize the processing of all radiation rays into streams. Since the steps within a stream use different hardware resources (i.e., GPU, DMA, CPU), we can overlap the execution of these steps for different streams by pipelining. Results: We evaluated our method using a Monte Carlo Convolution Superposition (MCCS) program and tested our implementation for various clinical cases on a heterogeneous system containing an Intel i7 quad-core CPU and an NVIDIA TITAN GPU. Comparing with a straightforward MCCS implementation on the same system (using both CPU and GPU for radiation ray tracing), our method gained 2-5X speedup without losing dose calculation accuracy. Conclusion: The results show that our new method improves the effective memory bandwidth and overall performance for MCCS on the CPU-GPU systems. Our proposed method can also be applied to accelerate other Monte Carlo dose calculation approaches. This research was supported in part by NSF under Grants CCF

  13. SU-E-T-202: Impact of Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Algorithm On Prostate SBRT Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venencia, C; Garrigo, E; Cardenas, J; Castro Pena, P [Instituto de Radioterapia - Fundacion Marie Curie, Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to quantify the dosimetric impact of using Monte Carlo algorithm on pre calculated SBRT prostate treatment with pencil beam dose calculation algorithm. Methods: A 6MV photon beam produced by a Novalis TX (BrainLAB-Varian) linear accelerator equipped with HDMLC was used. Treatment plans were done using 9 fields with Iplanv4.5 (BrainLAB) and dynamic IMRT modality. Institutional SBRT protocol uses a total dose to the prostate of 40Gy in 5 fractions, every other day. Dose calculation is done by pencil beam (2mm dose resolution), heterogeneity correction and dose volume constraint (UCLA) for PTV D95%=40Gy and D98%>39.2Gy, Rectum V20Gy<50%, V32Gy<20%, V36Gy<10% and V40Gy<5%, Bladder V20Gy<40% and V40Gy<10%, femoral heads V16Gy<5%, penile bulb V25Gy<3cc, urethra and overlap region between PTV and PRV Rectum Dmax<42Gy. 10 SBRT treatments plans were selected and recalculated using Monte Carlo with 2mm spatial resolution and mean variance of 2%. DVH comparisons between plans were done. Results: The average difference between PTV doses constraints were within 2%. However 3 plans have differences higher than 3% which does not meet the D98% criteria (>39.2Gy) and should have been renormalized. Dose volume constraint differences for rectum, bladder, femoral heads and penile bulb were les than 2% and within tolerances. Urethra region and overlapping between PTV and PRV Rectum shows increment of dose in all plans. The average difference for urethra region was 2.1% with a maximum of 7.8% and for the overlapping region 2.5% with a maximum of 8.7%. Conclusion: Monte Carlo dose calculation on dynamic IMRT treatments could affects on plan normalization. Dose increment in critical region of urethra and PTV overlapping region with PTV could have clinical consequences which need to be studied. The use of Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm is limited because inverse planning dose optimization use only pencil beam.

  14. Comparison of internal dose estimates obtained using organ-level, voxel S value, and Monte Carlo techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Joshua, E-mail: grimes.joshua@mayo.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver V5Z 1L8 (Canada); Celler, Anna [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver V5Z 1L8 (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The authors’ objective was to compare internal dose estimates obtained using the Organ Level Dose Assessment with Exponential Modeling (OLINDA/EXM) software, the voxel S value technique, and Monte Carlo simulation. Monte Carlo dose estimates were used as the reference standard to assess the impact of patient-specific anatomy on the final dose estimate. Methods: Six patients injected with{sup 99m}Tc-hydrazinonicotinamide-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide were included in this study. A hybrid planar/SPECT imaging protocol was used to estimate {sup 99m}Tc time-integrated activity coefficients (TIACs) for kidneys, liver, spleen, and tumors. Additionally, TIACs were predicted for {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, and {sup 90}Y assuming the same biological half-lives as the {sup 99m}Tc labeled tracer. The TIACs were used as input for OLINDA/EXM for organ-level dose calculation and voxel level dosimetry was performed using the voxel S value method and Monte Carlo simulation. Dose estimates for {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, and {sup 90}Y distributions were evaluated by comparing (i) organ-level S values corresponding to each method, (ii) total tumor and organ doses, (iii) differences in right and left kidney doses, and (iv) voxelized dose distributions calculated by Monte Carlo and the voxel S value technique. Results: The S values for all investigated radionuclides used by OLINDA/EXM and the corresponding patient-specific S values calculated by Monte Carlo agreed within 2.3% on average for self-irradiation, and differed by as much as 105% for cross-organ irradiation. Total organ doses calculated by OLINDA/EXM and the voxel S value technique agreed with Monte Carlo results within approximately ±7%. Differences between right and left kidney doses determined by Monte Carlo were as high as 73%. Comparison of the Monte Carlo and voxel S value dose distributions showed that each method produced similar dose volume histograms with a minimum dose covering 90% of the volume (D90

  15. Monte Carlo Calculations of Dose to Medium and Dose to Water for Carbon Ion Beams in Various Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.; Jäkel, Oliver

    treatment plans. Here, we quantisize the effect of dose to water vs. dose to medium for a series of typical target materials found in medical physics. 2     Material and Methods The Monte Carlo code FLUKA [Battistioni et al. 2007] is used to simulate the particle fluence spectrum in a series of target...... for water. This represents the case that our “detector” is an infinitesimal small non-perturbing entity made of water, where charged particle equilibrium can be assumed following the Bragg-Gray cavity theory. Dw and Dm are calculated for typical materials such as bone, brain, lung and soft-tissues using...

  16. Monte Carlo MCNP-4B-based absorbed dose distribution estimates for patient-specific dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoriyaz, H; Stabin, M G; dos Santos, A

    2001-04-01

    This study was intended to verify the capability of the Monte Carlo MCNP-4B code to evaluate spatial dose distribution based on information gathered from CT or SPECT. A new three-dimensional (3D) dose calculation approach for internal emitter use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) was developed using the Monte Carlo MCNP-4B code as the photon and electron transport engine. It was shown that the MCNP-4B computer code can be used with voxel-based anatomic and physiologic data to provide 3D dose distributions. This study showed that the MCNP-4B code can be used to develop a treatment planning system that will provide such information in a time manner, if dose reporting is suitably optimized. If each organ is divided into small regions where the average energy deposition is calculated with a typical volume of 0.4 cm(3), regional dose distributions can be provided with reasonable central processing unit times (on the order of 12-24 h on a 200-MHz personal computer or modest workstation). Further efforts to provide semiautomated region identification (segmentation) and improvement of marrow dose calculations are needed to supply a complete system for RIT. It is envisioned that all such efforts will continue to develop and that internal dose calculations may soon be brought to a similar level of accuracy, detail, and robustness as is commonly expected in external dose treatment planning. For this study we developed a code with a user-friendly interface that works on several nuclear medicine imaging platforms and provides timely patient-specific dose information to the physician and medical physicist. Future therapy with internal emitters should use a 3D dose calculation approach, which represents a significant advance over dose information provided by the standard geometric phantoms used for more than 20 y (which permit reporting of only average organ doses for certain standardized individuals)

  17. Monte Carlo calculations for doses in organs and tissues to oral radiography; Calculo de Monte Carlo para doses em orgaos e tecidos para radiologia oral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampaio, E V.M.

    1986-12-31

    Using the MIRD 5 phantom and Monte Carlo technique, organ doses in patients undergoing external dental examination were calculated taking into account the different x-ray beam geometries and the various possible positions of x-ray source with regard to the head of the patient. It was necessary to introduce in the original computer program a new source description specific for dental examinations. To have a realistic evaluation of organ doses during dental examination it was necessary to introduce a new region in the phantom heat which characterizes the teeth and salivary glands. The attenuation of the x-ray beam by the lead shield of the radiographic film was also introduced in the calculation. (author).

  18. Development and validation of Monte Carlo dose computations for contrast-enhanced stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vautrin, M.

    2011-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy (SSRT) is an innovative technique based on localized dose-enhancement effects obtained by reinforced photoelectric absorption in the tumor. Medium energy monochromatic X-rays (50 - 100 keV) are used for irradiating tumors previously loaded with a high-Z element. Clinical trials of SSRT are being prepared at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), an iodinated contrast agent will be used. In order to compute the energy deposited in the patient (dose), a dedicated treatment planning system (TPS) has been developed for the clinical trials, based on the ISOgray TPS. This work focuses on the SSRT specific modifications of the TPS, especially to the PENELOPE-based Monte Carlo dose engine. The TPS uses a dedicated Monte Carlo simulation of medium energy polarized photons to compute the deposited energy in the patient. Simulations are performed considering the synchrotron source, the modeled beamline geometry and finally the patient. Specific materials were also implemented in the voxelized geometry of the patient, to consider iodine concentrations in the tumor. The computation process has been optimized and parallelized. Finally a specific computation of absolute doses and associated irradiation times (instead of monitor units) was implemented. The dedicated TPS was validated with depth dose curves, dose profiles and absolute dose measurements performed at the ESRF in a water tank and solid water phantoms with or without bone slabs. (author) [fr

  19. Comparison of ONETRAN calculations of electron beam dose profiles with Monte Carlo and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garth, J.C.; Woolf, S.

    1987-01-01

    Electron beam dose profiles have been calculated using a multigroup, discrete ordinates solution of the Spencer-Lewis electron transport equation. This was accomplished by introducing electron transport cross-sections into the ONETRAN code in a simple manner. The authors' purpose is to ''benchmark'' this electron transport model and to demonstrate its accuracy and capabilities over the energy range from 30 keV to 20 MeV. Many of their results are compared with the extensive measurements and TIGER Monte Carlo data. In general the ONETRAN results are smoother, agree with TIGER within the statistical error of the Monte Carlo histograms and require about one tenth the running time of Monte Carlo

  20. 3D dose distribution calculation in a voxelized human phantom by means of Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abella, V.; Miro, R.; Juste, B.; Verdu, G.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to provide the reconstruction of a real human voxelized phantom by means of a MatLab program and the simulation of the irradiation of such phantom with the photon beam generated in a Theratron 780 (MDS Nordion) 60 Co radiotherapy unit, by using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle), version 5. The project results in 3D dose mapping calculations inside the voxelized antropomorphic head phantom. The program provides the voxelization by first processing the CT slices; the process follows a two-dimensional pixel and material identification algorithm on each slice and three-dimensional interpolation in order to describe the phantom geometry via small cubic cells, resulting in an MCNP input deck format output. Dose rates are calculated by using the MCNP5 tool FMESH, superimposed mesh tally, which gives the track length estimation of the particle flux in units of particles/cm 2 . Furthermore, the particle flux is converted into dose by using the conversion coefficients extracted from the NIST Physical Reference Data. The voxelization using a three-dimensional interpolation technique in combination with the use of the FMESH tool of the MCNP Monte Carlo code offers an optimal simulation which results in 3D dose mapping calculations inside anthropomorphic phantoms. This tool is very useful in radiation treatment assessments, in which voxelized phantoms are widely utilized.

  1. Comparison of EGS4 and MCNP Monte Carlo codes when calculating radiotherapy depth doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, P A; Lewis, D G; Al-Affan, I A; Smith, C W

    1998-05-01

    The Monte Carlo codes EGS4 and MCNP have been compared when calculating radiotherapy depth doses in water. The aims of the work were to study (i) the differences between calculated depth doses in water for a range of monoenergetic photon energies and (ii) the relative efficiency of the two codes for different electron transport energy cut-offs. The depth doses from the two codes agree with each other within the statistical uncertainties of the calculations (1-2%). The relative depth doses also agree with data tabulated in the British Journal of Radiology Supplement 25. A discrepancy in the dose build-up region may by attributed to the different electron transport algorithims used by EGS4 and MCNP. This discrepancy is considerably reduced when the improved electron transport routines are used in the latest (4B) version of MCNP. Timing calculations show that EGS4 is at least 50% faster than MCNP for the geometries used in the simulations.

  2. Monte Carlo Calculated Effective Dose to Teenage Girls from Computed Tomography Examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caon, M.; Bibbo, G.; Pattison, J.

    2000-01-01

    Effective doses from CT to paediatric patients are not common in the literature. This article reports some effective doses to teenage girls from CT examinations. The voxel computational model ADELAIDE, representative of a 14-year-old girl, was scaled in size by ±5% to represent also 11-12-year-old and 16-year-old girls. The EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the effective dose from chest, abdomen and whole torso CT examinations to the three version of ADELAIDE using a 120 kV spectrum. For the whole torso CT examination, in order of increasing model size, the effective doses were 9.0, 8.2 and 7.8 mSv per 100 mA.s. Data are presented that allow the estimation of effective dose from CT examinations of the torso for girls between the ages of 11 and 16. (author)

  3. Monte Carlo assessment of the dose rates produced by spent fuel from CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantazi, Doina; Mateescu, Silvia; Stanciu, Marcela

    2003-01-01

    One of the technical measures considered for biological protection is radiation shielding. The implementation process of a spent fuel intermediate storage system at Cernavoda NPP includes an evolution in computation methods related to shielding evaluation: from using simpler computer codes, like MicroShield and QAD, to systems of codes, like SCALE (which contains few independent modules) and the multipurpose and multi-particles transport code MCNP, based on Monte Carlo method. The Monte Carlo assessment of the dose rates produced by CANDU type spent fuel, during its handling for the intermediate storage, is the main objective of this paper. The work had two main features: -establishing of geometrical models according to description mode used in code MCNP, capable to account for the specific characteristics of CANDU nuclear fuel; - confirming the correctness of proposed models, by comparing MCNP results and the related results obtained with other computer codes for shielding evaluation and dose rates calculations. (authors)

  4. Radiation doses in volume-of-interest breast computed tomography—A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Chao-Jen, E-mail: cjlai3711@gmail.com; Zhong, Yuncheng; Yi, Ying; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C. [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030-4009 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Cone beam breast computed tomography (breast CT) with true three-dimensional, nearly isotropic spatial resolution has been developed and investigated over the past decade to overcome the problem of lesions overlapping with breast anatomical structures on two-dimensional mammographic images. However, the ability of breast CT to detect small objects, such as tissue structure edges and small calcifications, is limited. To resolve this problem, the authors proposed and developed a volume-of-interest (VOI) breast CT technique to image a small VOI using a higher radiation dose to improve that region’s visibility. In this study, the authors performed Monte Carlo simulations to estimate average breast dose and average glandular dose (AGD) for the VOI breast CT technique. Methods: Electron–Gamma-Shower system code-based Monte Carlo codes were used to simulate breast CT. The Monte Carlo codes estimated were validated using physical measurements of air kerma ratios and point doses in phantoms with an ion chamber and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. The validated full cone x-ray source was then collimated to simulate half cone beam x-rays to image digital pendant-geometry, hemi-ellipsoidal, homogeneous breast phantoms and to estimate breast doses with full field scans. 13-cm in diameter, 10-cm long hemi-ellipsoidal homogeneous phantoms were used to simulate median breasts. Breast compositions of 25% and 50% volumetric glandular fractions (VGFs) were used to investigate the influence on breast dose. The simulated half cone beam x-rays were then collimated to a narrow x-ray beam with an area of 2.5 × 2.5 cm{sup 2} field of view at the isocenter plane and to perform VOI field scans. The Monte Carlo results for the full field scans and the VOI field scans were then used to estimate the AGD for the VOI breast CT technique. Results: The ratios of air kerma ratios and dose measurement results from the Monte Carlo simulation to those from the physical

  5. Dose perturbation in the presence of metallic implants: treatment planning system versus Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieslander, Elinore; Knoeoes, Tommy

    2003-01-01

    An increasing number of patients receiving radiation therapy have metallic implants such as hip prostheses. Therefore, beams are normally set up to avoid irradiation through the implant; however, this cannot always be accomplished. In such situations, knowledge of the accuracy of the used treatment planning system (TPS) is required. Two algorithms, the pencil beam (PB) and the collapsed cone (CC), are implemented in the studied TPS. Comparisons are made with Monte Carlo simulations for 6 and 18 MV. The studied materials are steel, CoCrMo, Orthinox(a stainless steel alloy and registered trademark of Stryker Corporation), TiAlV and Ti. Monte Carlo simulated depth dose curves and dose profiles are compared to CC and PB calculated data. The CC algorithm shows overall a better agreement with Monte Carlo than the PB algorithm. Thus, it is recommended to use the CC algorithm to get the most accurate dose calculation both for the planning target volume and for tissues adjacent to the implants when beams are set up to pass through implants

  6. Dose calculations for a simplified Mammosite system with the Monte Carlo Penelope and MCNPX simulation codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas C, E.L.; Varon T, C.F.; Pedraza N, R.

    2007-01-01

    The treatment of the breast cancer at early stages is of vital importance. For that, most of the investigations are dedicated to the early detection of the suffering and their treatment. As investigation consequence and clinical practice, in 2002 it was developed in U.S.A. an irradiation system of high dose rate known as Mammosite. In this work we carry out dose calculations for a simplified Mammosite system with the Monte Carlo Penelope simulation code and MCNPX, varying the concentration of the contrast material that it is used in the one. (Author)

  7. Applying graphics processor units to Monte Carlo dose calculation in radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhtiari M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the potential in using of using a graphics processor unit (GPU for Monte-Carlo (MC-based radiation dose calculations. The percent depth dose (PDD of photons in a medium with known absorption and scattering coefficients is computed using a MC simulation running on both a standard CPU and a GPU. We demonstrate that the GPU′s capability for massive parallel processing provides a significant acceleration in the MC calculation, and offers a significant advantage for distributed stochastic simulations on a single computer. Harnessing this potential of GPUs will help in the early adoption of MC for routine planning in a clinical environment.

  8. Evaluation of radiation dose to patients in intraoral dental radiography using Monte Carlo Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Il; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Oh, Seung Chul; Song, Ji Young

    2016-01-01

    The use of dental radiographic examinations is common although radiation dose resulting from the dental radiography is relatively small. Therefore, it is required to evaluate radiation dose from the dental radiography for radiation safety purpose. The objectives of the present study were to develop dosimetry method for intraoral dental radiography using a Monte Carlo method based radiation transport code and to calculate organ doses and effective doses of patients from different types of intraoral radiographies. Radiological properties of dental radiography equipment were characterized for the evaluation of patient radiation dose. The properties including x-ray energy spectrum were simulated using MCNP code. Organ doses and effective doses to patients were calculated by MCNP simulation with computational adult phantoms. At the typical equipment settings (60 kVp, 7 mA, and 0.12 sec), the entrance air kerma was 1.79 mGy and the measured half value layer was 1.82 mm. The half value layer calculated by MCNP simulation was well agreed with the measurement values. Effective doses from intraoral radiographies ranged from 1 μSv for maxilla premolar to 3 μSv for maxilla incisor. Oral cavity layer (23⁓82 μSv) and salivary glands (10⁓68 μSv) received relatively high radiation dose. Thyroid also received high radiation dose (3⁓47 μSv) for examinations. The developed dosimetry method and evaluated radiation doses in this study can be utilized for policy making, patient dose management, and development of low-dose equipment. In addition, this study can ultimately contribute to decrease radiation dose to patients for radiation safety

  9. Evaluation of radiation dose to patients in intraoral dental radiography using Monte Carlo Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Il; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Oh, Seung Chul; Song, Ji Young [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    The use of dental radiographic examinations is common although radiation dose resulting from the dental radiography is relatively small. Therefore, it is required to evaluate radiation dose from the dental radiography for radiation safety purpose. The objectives of the present study were to develop dosimetry method for intraoral dental radiography using a Monte Carlo method based radiation transport code and to calculate organ doses and effective doses of patients from different types of intraoral radiographies. Radiological properties of dental radiography equipment were characterized for the evaluation of patient radiation dose. The properties including x-ray energy spectrum were simulated using MCNP code. Organ doses and effective doses to patients were calculated by MCNP simulation with computational adult phantoms. At the typical equipment settings (60 kVp, 7 mA, and 0.12 sec), the entrance air kerma was 1.79 mGy and the measured half value layer was 1.82 mm. The half value layer calculated by MCNP simulation was well agreed with the measurement values. Effective doses from intraoral radiographies ranged from 1 μSv for maxilla premolar to 3 μSv for maxilla incisor. Oral cavity layer (23⁓82 μSv) and salivary glands (10⁓68 μSv) received relatively high radiation dose. Thyroid also received high radiation dose (3⁓47 μSv) for examinations. The developed dosimetry method and evaluated radiation doses in this study can be utilized for policy making, patient dose management, and development of low-dose equipment. In addition, this study can ultimately contribute to decrease radiation dose to patients for radiation safety.

  10. Evaluation of heterogeneity dose distributions for Stereotactic Radiotherapy (SRT: comparison of commercially available Monte Carlo dose calculation with other algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Wataru

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to compare dose distributions from three different algorithms with the x-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC calculations, in actual computed tomography (CT scans for use in stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT of small lung cancers. Methods Slow CT scan of 20 patients was performed and the internal target volume (ITV was delineated on Pinnacle3. All plans were first calculated with a scatter homogeneous mode (SHM which is compatible with Clarkson algorithm using Pinnacle3 treatment planning system (TPS. The planned dose was 48 Gy in 4 fractions. In a second step, the CT images, structures and beam data were exported to other treatment planning systems (TPSs. Collapsed cone convolution (CCC from Pinnacle3, superposition (SP from XiO, and XVMC from Monaco were used for recalculating. The dose distributions and the Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs were compared with each other. Results The phantom test revealed that all algorithms could reproduce the measured data within 1% except for the SHM with inhomogeneous phantom. For the patient study, the SHM greatly overestimated the isocenter (IC doses and the minimal dose received by 95% of the PTV (PTV95 compared to XVMC. The differences in mean doses were 2.96 Gy (6.17% for IC and 5.02 Gy (11.18% for PTV95. The DVH's and dose distributions with CCC and SP were in agreement with those obtained by XVMC. The average differences in IC doses between CCC and XVMC, and SP and XVMC were -1.14% (p = 0.17, and -2.67% (p = 0.0036, respectively. Conclusions Our work clearly confirms that the actual practice of relying solely on a Clarkson algorithm may be inappropriate for SRT planning. Meanwhile, CCC and SP were close to XVMC simulations and actual dose distributions obtained in lung SRT.

  11. Dose distribution close to metal implants in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery: A Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Joel Y.C.; Yu, K.N.; Chan, Josie F.K.; Ho, Robert T.K.; Yu, C.P.

    2003-01-01

    Materials with high atomic numbers favor the occurrence of the photoelectric effect when they are irradiated with gamma rays. Therefore, the photoelectric effects of metal implants within the target regions in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery are worth studying. In the present work, Monte Carlo simulations using EGS4 were employed to investigate the resulting dose enhancements. A dose enhancement as high as 10% was observed close to a platinum implant along the x and y axes, while no significant dose enhancements were observed for silver, stainless steel 301, and titanium ones. A dose enhancement as high as 20% was observed close to the platinum implant along the z axis at the superior position of the metal-phantom interface and was 10% higher for other metal implants

  12. Fast dose planning Monte Carlo simulations in inhomogeneous phantoms submerged in uniform, static magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanez, R.; Dempsey, J. F.

    2007-01-01

    We present studies in support of the development of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) device for the treatment of cancer patients. Fast and accurate computation of the absorbed ionizing radiation dose delivered in the presence of the MRI magnetic field are required for clinical implementation. The fast Monte Carlo simulation code DPM, optimized for radiotherapy treatment planning, is modified to simulate absorbed doses in uniform, static magnetic fields, and benchmarked against PENELOPE. Simulations of dose deposition in inhomogeneous phantoms in which a low density material is sandwiched in water shows that a lower MRI field strength (0.3 T) is to prefer in order to avoid dose build-up near material boundaries. (authors)

  13. Monte Carlo dose calculations for BNCT treatment of diffuse human lung tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altieri, S.; Bortolussi, S.; Bruschi, P.

    2006-01-01

    In order to test the possibility to apply BNCT in the core of diffuse lung tumours, dose distribution calculations were made. The simulations were performed with the Monte Carlo code MCNP.4c2, using the male computational phantom Adam, version 07/94. Volumes of interest were voxelized for the tally requests, and results were obtained for tissues with and without Boron. Different collimated neutron sources were tested in order to establish the proper energies, as well as single and multiple beams to maximize neutron flux uniformity inside the target organs. Flux and dose distributions are reported. The use of two opposite epithermal neutron collimated beams insures good levels of dose homogeneity inside the lungs, with a substantially lower radiation dose delivered to surrounding structures. (author)

  14. Monte Carlo investigation of the low-dose envelope from scanned proton pencil beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawakuchi, Gabriel O; Titt, Uwe; Mirkovic, Dragan; Ciangaru, George; Zhu, X Ronald; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael T; Mohan, Radhe

    2010-01-01

    Scanned proton pencil beams carry a low-dose envelope that extends several centimeters from the individual beam's central axis. Thus, the total delivered dose depends on the size of the target volume and the corresponding number and intensity of beams necessary to cover the target volume uniformly. This dependence must be considered in dose calculation algorithms used by treatment planning systems. In this work, we investigated the sources of particles contributing to the low-dose envelope using the Monte Carlo technique. We used a validated model of our institution's scanning beam line to determine the contributions to the low-dose envelope from secondary particles created in a water phantom and particles scattered in beam line components. Our results suggested that, for high-energy beams, secondary particles produced by nuclear interactions in the water phantom are the major contributors to the low-dose envelope. For low-energy beams, the low-dose envelope is dominated by particles undergoing multiple Coulomb scattering in the beam line components and water phantom. Clearly, in the latter situation, the low-dose envelope depends directly on beam line design features. Finally, we investigated the dosimetric consequences of the low-dose envelope. Our results showed that if not modeled properly the low-dose envelope may cause clinically relevant dose disturbance in the target volume. This work suggested that this low-dose envelope is beam line specific for low-energy beams, should be thoroughly experimentally characterized and validated during commissioning of the treatment planning system, and therefore is of great concern for accurate delivery of proton scanning beam doses.

  15. Independent Monte-Carlo dose calculation for MLC based CyberKnife radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackeprang, P.-H.; Vuong, D.; Volken, W.; Henzen, D.; Schmidhalter, D.; Malthaner, M.; Mueller, S.; Frei, D.; Stampanoni, M. F. M.; Dal Pra, A.; Aebersold, D. M.; Fix, M. K.; Manser, P.

    2018-01-01

    This work aims to develop, implement and validate a Monte Carlo (MC)-based independent dose calculation (IDC) framework to perform patient-specific quality assurance (QA) for multi-leaf collimator (MLC)-based CyberKnife® (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) treatment plans. The IDC framework uses an XML-format treatment plan as exported from the treatment planning system (TPS) and DICOM format patient CT data, an MC beam model using phase spaces, CyberKnife MLC beam modifier transport using the EGS++ class library, a beam sampling and coordinate transformation engine and dose scoring using DOSXYZnrc. The framework is validated against dose profiles and depth dose curves of single beams with varying field sizes in a water tank in units of cGy/Monitor Unit and against a 2D dose distribution of a full prostate treatment plan measured with Gafchromic EBT3 (Ashland Advanced Materials, Bridgewater, NJ) film in a homogeneous water-equivalent slab phantom. The film measurement is compared to IDC results by gamma analysis using 2% (global)/2 mm criteria. Further, the dose distribution of the clinical treatment plan in the patient CT is compared to TPS calculation by gamma analysis using the same criteria. Dose profiles from IDC calculation in a homogeneous water phantom agree within 2.3% of the global max dose or 1 mm distance to agreement to measurements for all except the smallest field size. Comparing the film measurement to calculated dose, 99.9% of all voxels pass gamma analysis, comparing dose calculated by the IDC framework to TPS calculated dose for the clinical prostate plan shows 99.0% passing rate. IDC calculated dose is found to be up to 5.6% lower than dose calculated by the TPS in this case near metal fiducial markers. An MC-based modular IDC framework was successfully developed, implemented and validated against measurements and is now available to perform patient-specific QA by IDC.

  16. Monte Carlo-based dose reconstruction in a rat model for scattered ionizing radiation investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, Charles; Ghasroddashti, Esmaeel; Kovalchuk, Anna; Kolb, Bryan; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2013-09-01

    In radiation biology, rats are often irradiated, but the precise dose distributions are often lacking, particularly in areas that receive scatter radiation. We used a non-dedicated set of resources to calculate detailed dose distributions, including doses to peripheral organs well outside of the primary field, in common rat exposure settings. We conducted a detailed dose reconstruction in a rat through an analog to the conventional human treatment planning process. The process consisted of: (i) Characterizing source properties of an X-ray irradiator system, (ii) acquiring a computed tomography (CT) scan of a rat model, and (iii) using a Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation engine to generate the dose distribution within the rat model. We considered cranial and liver irradiation scenarios where the rest of the body was protected by a lead shield. Organs of interest were the brain, liver and gonads. The study also included paired scenarios where the dose to adjacent, shielded rats was determined as a potential control for analysis of bystander effects. We established the precise doses and dose distributions delivered to the peripheral organs in single and paired rats. Mean doses to non-targeted organs in irradiated rats ranged from 0.03-0.1% of the reference platform dose. Mean doses to the adjacent rat peripheral organs were consistent to within 10% those of the directly irradiated rat. This work provided details of dose distributions in rat models under common irradiation conditions and established an effective scenario for delivering only scattered radiation consistent with that in a directly irradiated rat.

  17. Evaluation of equivalent doses in 18F PET/CT using the Monte Carlo method with MCNPX code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belinato, Walmir; Santos, William Souza; Perini, Ana Paula; Neves, Lucio Pereira; Souza, Divanizia N.

    2017-01-01

    The present work used the Monte Carlo method (MMC), specifically the Monte Carlo NParticle - MCNPX, to simulate the interaction of radiation involving photons and particles, such as positrons and electrons, with virtual adult anthropomorphic simulators on PET / CT scans and to determine absorbed and equivalent doses in adult male and female patients

  18. Evaluation of a new commercial Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm for electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervoort, Eric J; Tchistiakova, Ekaterina; La Russa, Daniel J; Cygler, Joanna E

    2014-02-01

    In this report the authors present the validation of a Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm (XiO EMC from Elekta Software) for electron beams. Calculated and measured dose distributions were compared for homogeneous water phantoms and for a 3D heterogeneous phantom meant to approximate the geometry of a trachea and spine. Comparisons of measurements and calculated data were performed using 2D and 3D gamma index dose comparison metrics. Measured outputs agree with calculated values within estimated uncertainties for standard and extended SSDs for open applicators, and for cutouts, with the exception of the 17 MeV electron beam at extended SSD for cutout sizes smaller than 5 × 5 cm(2). Good agreement was obtained between calculated and experimental depth dose curves and dose profiles (minimum number of measurements that pass a 2%/2 mm agreement 2D gamma index criteria for any applicator or energy was 97%). Dose calculations in a heterogeneous phantom agree with radiochromic film measurements (>98% of pixels pass a 3 dimensional 3%/2 mm γ-criteria) provided that the steep dose gradient in the depth direction is considered. Clinically acceptable agreement (at the 2%/2 mm level) between the measurements and calculated data for measurements in water are obtained for this dose calculation algorithm. Radiochromic film is a useful tool to evaluate the accuracy of electron MC treatment planning systems in heterogeneous media.

  19. Monte Carlo calculations of lung dose in ORNL phantom for boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstic, D.; Markovic, V.M.; Jovanovic, Z.; Milenkovic, B.; Nikezic, D.; Atanackovic, J.

    2014-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate dose for possible treatment of cancers by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The computational model of male Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) phantom was used to simulate tumours in the lung. Calculations have been performed by means of the MCNP5/X code. In this simulation, two opposite neutron beams were considered, in order to obtain uniform neutron flux distribution inside the lung. The obtained results indicate that the lung cancer could be treated by BNCT under the assumptions of calculations. The difference in evaluated dose in cancer and normal lung tissue suggests that BNCT could be applied for the treatment of cancers. The difference in exposure of cancer and healthy tissue can be observed, so the healthy tissue can be spared from damage. An absorbed dose ratio of metastatic tissue-to-the healthy tissue was ∼5. Absorbed dose to all other organs was low when compared with the lung dose. Absorbed dose depth distribution shows that BNC therapy can be very useful in the treatments for tumour. The ratio of the tumour absorbed dose and irradiated healthy tissue absorbed dose was also ∼5. It was seen that an elliptical neutron field was better irradiation choice. (authors)

  20. Point kernel technique for calculating dose rates due to cobalt-60 hot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornhill, M.J.; McCarthy, J.T.; Morrissette, R.R.; Leach, B.N.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on a computer code called BETA that has been developed by health physicists at the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station which accounts for the mass and size of hot particles of Cobalt-60, and therefore corrects the Loevinger-based dose calculation for self-absorption

  1. A clinical study of lung cancer dose calculation accuracy with Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanqun; Qi, Guohai; Yin, Gang; Wang, Xianliang; Wang, Pei; Li, Jian; Xiao, Mingyong; Li, Jie; Kang, Shengwei; Liao, Xiongfei

    2014-12-16

    The accuracy of dose calculation is crucial to the quality of treatment planning and, consequently, to the dose delivered to patients undergoing radiation therapy. Current general calculation algorithms such as Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC) and Collapsed Cone Convolution (CCC) have shortcomings in regard to severe inhomogeneities, particularly in those regions where charged particle equilibrium does not hold. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the PBC and CCC algorithms in lung cancer radiotherapy using Monte Carlo (MC) technology. Four treatment plans were designed using Oncentra Masterplan TPS for each patient. Two intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were developed using the PBC and CCC algorithms, and two three-dimensional conformal therapy (3DCRT) plans were developed using the PBC and CCC algorithms. The DICOM-RT files of the treatment plans were exported to the Monte Carlo system to recalculate. The dose distributions of GTV, PTV and ipsilateral lung calculated by the TPS and MC were compared. For 3DCRT and IMRT plans, the mean dose differences for GTV between the CCC and MC increased with decreasing of the GTV volume. For IMRT, the mean dose differences were found to be higher than that of 3DCRT. The CCC algorithm overestimated the GTV mean dose by approximately 3% for IMRT. For 3DCRT plans, when the volume of the GTV was greater than 100 cm(3), the mean doses calculated by CCC and MC almost have no difference. PBC shows large deviations from the MC algorithm. For the dose to the ipsilateral lung, the CCC algorithm overestimated the dose to the entire lung, and the PBC algorithm overestimated V20 but underestimated V5; the difference in V10 was not statistically significant. PBC substantially overestimates the dose to the tumour, but the CCC is similar to the MC simulation. It is recommended that the treatment plans for lung cancer be developed using an advanced dose calculation algorithm other than PBC. MC can accurately

  2. HDRMC, an accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculator for high dose rate brachytherapy with CT-compatible applicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chibani, Omar, E-mail: omar.chibani@fccc.edu; C-M Ma, Charlie [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To present a new accelerated Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The new code (HDRMC) accounts for both tissue and nontissue heterogeneities (applicator and contrast medium). Methods: HDRMC uses a fast ray-tracing technique and detailed physics algorithms to transport photons through a 3D mesh of voxels representing the patient anatomy with applicator and contrast medium included. A precalculated phase space file for the{sup 192}Ir source is used as source term. HDRM is calibrated to calculated absolute dose for real plans. A postprocessing technique is used to include the exact density and composition of nontissue heterogeneities in the 3D phantom. Dwell positions and angular orientations of the source are reconstructed using data from the treatment planning system (TPS). Structure contours are also imported from the TPS to recalculate dose-volume histograms. Results: HDRMC was first benchmarked against the MCNP5 code for a single source in homogenous water and for a loaded gynecologic applicator in water. The accuracy of the voxel-based applicator model used in HDRMC was also verified by comparing 3D dose distributions and dose-volume parameters obtained using 1-mm{sup 3} versus 2-mm{sup 3} phantom resolutions. HDRMC can calculate the 3D dose distribution for a typical HDR cervix case with 2-mm resolution in 5 min on a single CPU. Examples of heterogeneity effects for two clinical cases (cervix and esophagus) were demonstrated using HDRMC. The neglect of tissue heterogeneity for the esophageal case leads to the overestimate of CTV D90, CTV D100, and spinal cord maximum dose by 3.2%, 3.9%, and 3.6%, respectively. Conclusions: A fast Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations which does not require a prebuilt applicator model is developed for those HDR brachytherapy treatments that use CT-compatible applicators. Tissue and nontissue heterogeneities should be taken into account in modern HDR

  3. SU-F-T-370: A Fast Monte Carlo Dose Engine for Gamma Knife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, T; Zhou, L [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Li, Y [Beihang University, Beijing, Beijing (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a fast Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm for Gamma Knife. Methods: To make the simulation more efficient, we implemented the track repeating technique on GPU. We first use EGSnrc to pre-calculate the photon and secondary electron tracks in water from two mono-energy photons of 60Co. The total photon mean free paths for different materials and energies are obtained from NIST. During simulation, each entire photon track was first loaded to shared memory for each block, the incident original photon was then splitted to Nthread sub-photons, each thread transport one sub-photon, the Russian roulette technique was applied for scattered and bremsstrahlung photons. The resultant electrons from photon interactions are simulated by repeating the recorded electron tracks. The electron step length is stretched/shrunk proportionally based on the local density and stopping power ratios of the local material. Energy deposition in a voxel is proportional to the fraction of the equivalent step length in that voxel. To evaluate its accuracy, dose deposition in a 300mm*300mm*300mm water phantom is calculated, and compared to EGSnrc results. Results: Both PDD and OAR showed great agreements (within 0.5%) between our dose engine result and the EGSnrc result. It only takes less than 1 min for every simulation, being reduced up to ∼40 times compared to EGSnrc simulations. Conclusion: We have successfully developed a fast Monte Carlo dose engine for Gamma Knife.

  4. Determining dose rate with a semiconductor detector - Monte Carlo calculations of the detector response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordenfors, C

    1999-02-01

    To determine dose rate in a gamma radiation field, based on measurements with a semiconductor detector, it is necessary to know how the detector effects the field. This work aims to describe this effect with Monte Carlo simulations and calculations, that is to identify the detector response function. This is done for a germanium gamma detector. The detector is normally used in the in-situ measurements that is carried out regularly at the department. After the response function is determined it is used to reconstruct a spectrum from an in-situ measurement, a so called unfolding. This is done to be able to calculate fluence rate and dose rate directly from a measured (and unfolded) spectrum. The Monte Carlo code used in this work is EGS4 developed mainly at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. It is a widely used code package to simulate particle transport. The results of this work indicates that the method could be used as-is since the accuracy of this method compares to other methods already in use to measure dose rate. Bearing in mind that this method provides the nuclide specific dose it is useful, in radiation protection, since knowing what the relations between different nuclides are and how they change is very important when estimating the risks

  5. Modification and validation of an analytical source model for external beam radiotherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Scott E., E-mail: sedavids@utmb.edu [Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas 77555 (United States); Cui, Jing [Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90033 (United States); Kry, Stephen; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Followill, David S. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Vicic, Milos [Department of Applied Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade 11000 (Serbia); White, R. Allen [Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: A dose calculation tool, which combines the accuracy of the dose planning method (DPM) Monte Carlo code and the versatility of a practical analytical multisource model, which was previously reported has been improved and validated for the Varian 6 and 10 MV linear accelerators (linacs). The calculation tool can be used to calculate doses in advanced clinical application studies. One shortcoming of current clinical trials that report dose from patient plans is the lack of a standardized dose calculation methodology. Because commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs) have their own dose calculation algorithms and the clinical trial participant who uses these systems is responsible for commissioning the beam model, variation exists in the reported calculated dose distributions. Today’s modern linac is manufactured to tight specifications so that variability within a linac model is quite low. The expectation is that a single dose calculation tool for a specific linac model can be used to accurately recalculate dose from patient plans that have been submitted to the clinical trial community from any institution. The calculation tool would provide for a more meaningful outcome analysis. Methods: The analytical source model was described by a primary point source, a secondary extra-focal source, and a contaminant electron source. Off-axis energy softening and fluence effects were also included. The additions of hyperbolic functions have been incorporated into the model to correct for the changes in output and in electron contamination with field size. A multileaf collimator (MLC) model is included to facilitate phantom and patient dose calculations. An offset to the MLC leaf positions was used to correct for the rudimentary assumed primary point source. Results: Dose calculations of the depth dose and profiles for field sizes 4 × 4 to 40 × 40 cm agree with measurement within 2% of the maximum dose or 2 mm distance to agreement (DTA) for 95% of the data

  6. Organ doses for reference pediatric and adolescent patients undergoing computed tomography estimated by Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Long, Daniel J.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To establish an organ dose database for pediatric and adolescent reference individuals undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations by using Monte Carlo simulation. The data will permit rapid estimates of organ and effective doses for patients of different age, gender, examination type, and CT scanner model. Methods: The Monte Carlo simulation model of a Siemens Sensation 16 CT scanner previously published was employed as a base CT scanner model. A set of absorbed doses for 33 organs/tissues normalized to the product of 100 mAs and CTDI vol (mGy/100 mAs mGy) was established by coupling the CT scanner model with age-dependent reference pediatric hybrid phantoms. A series of single axial scans from the top of head to the feet of the phantoms was performed at a slice thickness of 10 mm, and at tube potentials of 80, 100, and 120 kVp. Using the established CTDI vol - and 100 mAs-normalized dose matrix, organ doses for different pediatric phantoms undergoing head, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and chest-abdomen-pelvis (CAP) scans with the Siemens Sensation 16 scanner were estimated and analyzed. The results were then compared with the values obtained from three independent published methods: CT-Expo software, organ dose for abdominal CT scan derived empirically from patient abdominal circumference, and effective dose per dose-length product (DLP). Results: Organ and effective doses were calculated and normalized to 100 mAs and CTDI vol for different CT examinations. At the same technical setting, dose to the organs, which were entirely included in the CT beam coverage, were higher by from 40 to 80% for newborn phantoms compared to those of 15-year phantoms. An increase of tube potential from 80 to 120 kVp resulted in 2.5-2.9-fold greater brain dose for head scans. The results from this study were compared with three different published studies and/or techniques. First, organ doses were compared to those given by CT-Expo which revealed dose differences up to

  7. Monte Carlo characterisation of the Dose Magnifying Glass for proton therapy quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, A H; Guatelli, S; Petesecca, M; Jackson, M; Rozenfeld, A B

    2017-01-01

    A Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation study was carried out to characterise a novel silicon strip detector, the Dose Magnifying Glass (DMG), for use in proton therapy Quality Assurance. We investigated the possibility to use DMG to determine the energy of the incident proton beam. The advantages of DMG are quick response, easy operation and high spatial resolution. In this work we theoretically proved that DMG can be used for QA in the determination of the energy of the incident proton beam, for ocular and prostate cancer therapy. The study was performed by means of Monte Carlo simulations Experimental measurements are currently on their way to confirm the results of this simulation study. (paper)

  8. SU-F-SPS-09: Parallel MC Kernel Calculations for VMAT Plan Improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, S; French, S; Nazareth, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Adding kernels (small perturbations in leaf positions) to the existing apertures of VMAT control points may improve plan quality. We investigate the calculation of kernel doses using a parallelized Monte Carlo (MC) method. Methods: A clinical prostate VMAT DICOM plan was exported from Eclipse. An arbitrary control point and leaf were chosen, and a modified MLC file was created, corresponding to the leaf position offset by 0.5cm. The additional dose produced by this 0.5 cm × 0.5 cm kernel was calculated using the DOSXYZnrc component module of BEAMnrc. A range of particle history counts were run (varying from 3 × 10"6 to 3 × 10"7); each job was split among 1, 10, or 100 parallel processes. A particle count of 3 × 10"6 was established as the lower range because it provided the minimal accuracy level. Results: As expected, an increase in particle counts linearly increases run time. For the lowest particle count, the time varied from 30 hours for the single-processor run, to 0.30 hours for the 100-processor run. Conclusion: Parallel processing of MC calculations in the EGS framework significantly decreases time necessary for each kernel dose calculation. Particle counts lower than 1 × 10"6 have too large of an error to output accurate dose for a Monte Carlo kernel calculation. Future work will investigate increasing the number of parallel processes and optimizing run times for multiple kernel calculations.

  9. A Monte Carlo Study of dose enhancement according to the enhancement agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Chang Soo [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Chul Hwan [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Dose enhancement effects at megavoltage (MV) X and γ-ray energies, and the effects of different energy levels on incident energy, dose enhancement agents, and concentrations were analyzed using Monte Carlo simulations. Gold, gadolinium, Iodine, and iron oxide (Fe2O3) were compared as dose enhancement agents. For incident energy, 4, 6, 10 and 15 MV X-ray spectra produced by a linear accelerator and a Co60 γ-ray were used. The dose enhancement factor (DEF) was calculated using an ICRU Slab phantom for concentrations of 7, 18, and 30 mg/g. The DEF was higher at higher concentrations of dose enhancement agents and at lower incident energies. The calculated DEF ranged from 1.035 to 1.079, and dose enhancement effects were highest for iron oxide, followed by iodine, gadolinium, and gold. Thus, this study contributes to improving the therapeutic ratio by delivering larger doses of radiation to tumor volume, and provides data to support further in vivo and in vitro studies.

  10. Dose-image quality study in digital chest radiography using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, S.C.A.; Souza, E.M.; Silva, A.X.; Lopes, R.T.; Yoriyaz, H.

    2008-01-01

    One of the main preoccupations of diagnostic radiology is to guarantee a good image-sparing dose to the patient. In the present study, Monte Carlo simulations, with MCNPX code, coupled with an adult voxel female model (FAX) were performed to investigate how image quality and dose in digital chest radiography vary with tube voltage (80-150 kV) using air-gap technique and a computed radiography system. Calculated quantities were normalized to a fixed value of entrance skin exposure (ESE) of 0.0136 R. The results of the present analysis show that the image quality for chest radiography with imaging plate is improved and the dose reduced at lower tube voltage

  11. The calculation of dose from external photon exposures using reference human phantoms and Monte-Carlo methods. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, R.; Zankl, M.; Williams, G.; Drexler, G.

    1982-12-01

    By the help of a Monte-Carlo program the dose that single organs, organ groups and bigger or smaller parts of body would receive on an average, caused by an irradiation definitely fixed by the geometry of irradiation and photon energy, can be determined. Thus the phantom in connection with the Monte-Carlo program can be used for several considerations as for example - calculation of dose from occupational exposures - calculation of dose from diagnostic procedures - calculation of dose from radiotherapy procedures. (orig.)

  12. SU-E-T-238: Monte Carlo Estimation of Cerenkov Dose for Photo-Dynamic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chibani, O; Price, R; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Eldib, A [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University Cairo (Egypt); Mora, G [de Lisboa, Codex, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Estimation of Cerenkov dose from high-energy megavoltage photon and electron beams in tissue and its impact on the radiosensitization using Protoporphyrine IX (PpIX) for tumor targeting enhancement in radiotherapy. Methods: The GEPTS Monte Carlo code is used to generate dose distributions from 18MV Varian photon beam and generic high-energy (45-MV) photon and (45-MeV) electron beams in a voxel-based tissueequivalent phantom. In addition to calculating the ionization dose, the code scores Cerenkov energy released in the wavelength range 375–425 nm corresponding to the pick of the PpIX absorption spectrum (Fig. 1) using the Frank-Tamm formula. Results: The simulations shows that the produced Cerenkov dose suitable for activating PpIX is 4000 to 5500 times lower than the overall radiation dose for all considered beams (18MV, 45 MV and 45 MeV). These results were contradictory to the recent experimental studies by Axelsson et al. (Med. Phys. 38 (2011) p 4127), where Cerenkov dose was reported to be only two orders of magnitude lower than the radiation dose. Note that our simulation results can be corroborated by a simple model where the Frank and Tamm formula is applied for electrons with 2 MeV/cm stopping power generating Cerenkov photons in the 375–425 nm range and assuming these photons have less than 1mm penetration in tissue. Conclusion: The Cerenkov dose generated by high-energy photon and electron beams may produce minimal clinical effect in comparison with the photon fluence (or dose) commonly used for photo-dynamic therapy. At the present time, it is unclear whether Cerenkov radiation is a significant contributor to the recently observed tumor regression for patients receiving radiotherapy and PpIX versus patients receiving radiotherapy only. The ongoing study will include animal experimentation and investigation of dose rate effects on PpIX response.

  13. A Monte Carlo study of macroscopic and microscopic dose descriptors for kilovoltage cellular dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, P. A. K.; Thomson, Rowan M.

    2017-02-01

    This work investigates how doses to cellular targets depend on cell morphology, as well as relations between cellular doses and doses to bulk tissues and water. Multicellular models of five healthy and cancerous soft tissues are developed based on typical values of cell compartment sizes, elemental compositions and number densities found in the literature. Cells are modelled as two concentric spheres with nucleus and cytoplasm compartments. Monte Carlo simulations are used to calculate the absorbed dose to the nucleus and cytoplasm for incident photon energies of 20-370 keV, relevant for brachytherapy, diagnostic radiology, and out-of-field radiation in higher-energy external beam radiotherapy. Simulations involving cell clusters, single cells and single nuclear cavities are carried out for cell radii between 5 and 10~μ m, and nuclear radii between 2 and 9~μ m. Seven nucleus and cytoplasm elemental compositions representative of animal cells are considered. The presence of a cytoplasm, extracellular matrix and surrounding cells can affect the nuclear dose by up to 13 % . Differences in cell and nucleus size can affect dose to the nucleus (cytoplasm) of the central cell in a cluster of 13 cells by up to 13 % (8 % ). Furthermore, the results of this study demonstrate that neither water nor bulk tissue are reliable substitutes for subcellular targets for incident photon energies  <50 keV: nuclear (cytoplasm) doses differ from dose-to-medium by up to 32 % (18 % ), and from dose-to-water by up to 21 % (8 % ). The largest differences between dose descriptors are seen for the lowest incident photon energies; differences are less than 3 % for energies ≥slant 90 keV. The sensitivity of results with regard to the parameters of the microscopic tissue structure model and cell model geometry, and the importance of the nucleus and cytoplasm as targets for radiation-induced cell death emphasize the importance of accurate models for cellular dosimetry studies.

  14. Study of the IMRT interplay effect using a 4DCT Monte Carlo dose calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Michael D; Abdellatif, Ady; Chen, Jeff; Wong, Eugene

    2012-04-21

    Respiratory motion may lead to dose errors when treating thoracic and abdominal tumours with radiotherapy. The interplay between complex multileaf collimator patterns and patient respiratory motion could result in unintuitive dose changes. We have developed a treatment reconstruction simulation computer code that accounts for interplay effects by combining multileaf collimator controller log files, respiratory trace log files, 4DCT images and a Monte Carlo dose calculator. Two three-dimensional (3D) IMRT step-and-shoot plans, a concave target and integrated boost were delivered to a 1D rigid motion phantom. Three sets of experiments were performed with 100%, 50% and 25% duty cycle gating. The log files were collected, and five simulation types were performed on each data set: continuous isocentre shift, discrete isocentre shift, 4DCT, 4DCT delivery average and 4DCT plan average. Analysis was performed using 3D gamma analysis with passing criteria of 2%, 2 mm. The simulation framework was able to demonstrate that a single fraction of the integrated boost plan was more sensitive to interplay effects than the concave target. Gating was shown to reduce the interplay effects. We have developed a 4DCT Monte Carlo simulation method that accounts for IMRT interplay effects with respiratory motion by utilizing delivery log files.

  15. Comparison of measured and Monte Carlo calculated dose distributions from circular collimators for radiosurgical beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esnaashari, K. N.; Allahverdi, M.; Gharaati, H.; Shahriari, M.

    2007-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is an important clinical tool for the treatment of small lesions in the brain, including benign conditions, malignant and localized metastatic tumors. A dosimetry study was performed for Elekta 'Synergy S' as a dedicated Stereotactic radiosurgery unit, capable of generating circular radiation fields with diameters of 1-5 cm at iso centre using the BEAM/EGS4 Monte Carlo code. Materials and Methods: The linear accelerator Elekta Synergy S equipped with a set of 5 circular collimators from 10 mm to 50 mm in diameter at iso centre distance was used. The cones were inserted in a base plate mounted on the collimator linac head. A PinPoint chamber and Wellhofer water tank chamber were selected for clinical dosimetry of 6 MV photon beams. The results of simulations using the Monte Carlo system BEAM/EGS4 to model the beam geometry were compared with dose measurements. Results: An excellent agreement was found between Monte Carlo calculated and measured percentage depth dose and lateral dose profiles which were performed in water phantom for circular cones with 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 cm in diameter. The comparison between calculation and measurements showed up to 0.5 % or 1 m m difference for all field sizes. The penumbra (80-20%) results at 5 cm depth in water phantom and SSD=95 ranged from 1.5 to 2.1 mm for circular collimators with diameter 1 to 5 cm. Conclusion: This study showed that BEAMnrc code has been accurate in modeling Synergy S linear accelerator equipped with circular collimators

  16. Doses determination in UCCA treatments with LDR brachytherapy using Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benites R, J. L.; Vega C, H. R.

    2017-10-01

    Using Monte Carlo methods, with the code MCNP5, a gynecological mannequin and a vaginal cylinder were modeled. The spatial distribution of absorbed dose rate in uterine cervical cancer (UCCA) treatments was determined under the modality of manual brachytherapy of low dose rate (B-LDR). The design of the model included the gynecological liquid water mannequin, a vaginal cylinder applicator of Lucite (PMMA) with hemisphere termination. The applicator was formed by a vaginal cylinder 10.3 cm long and 2 cm in diameter. This cylinder was mounted on a stainless steel tube 15.2 cm long by 0.6 cm in diameter. A linear array of four radioactive sources of Cesium 137 was inserted into the tube. 13 water cells of 0.5 cm in diameter were modeled around the vaginal cylinder and the absorbed dose was calculated in these. The distribution of the fluence of gamma photons in the mesh was calculated. It was found that the distribution of the absorbed dose is symmetric for cells located in the upper and lower part of the vaginal cylinder. The values of the absorbed dose rate were estimated for the date of manufacture of the sources. This result allows the use of the law of radioactive decay to determine the dose rate at any date of a gynecological treatment of B-LDR. (Author)

  17. Application of the Monte Carlo method to estimate doses in a radioactive waste drum environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodenas, J.; Garcia, T.; Burgos, M.C.; Felipe, A.; Sanchez-Mayoral, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    During refuelling operation in a Nuclear Power Plant, filtration is used to remove non-soluble radionuclides contained in the water from reactor pool. Filter cartridges accumulate a high radioactivity, so that they are usually placed into a drum. When the operation ends up, the drum is filled with concrete and stored along with other drums containing radioactive wastes. Operators working in the refuelling plant near these radwaste drums can receive high dose rates. Therefore, it is convenient to estimate those doses to prevent risks in order to apply ALARA criterion for dose reduction to workers. The Monte Carlo method has been applied, using MCNP 4B code, to simulate the drum containing contaminated filters and estimate doses produced in the drum environment. In the paper, an analysis of the results obtained with the MCNP code has been performed. Thus, the influence on the evaluated doses of distance from drum and interposed shielding barriers has been studied. The source term has also been analysed to check the importance of the isotope composition. Two different geometric models have been considered in order to simplify calculations. Results have been compared with dose measurements in plant in order to validate the calculation procedure. This work has been developed at the Nuclear Engineering Department of the Polytechnic University of Valencia in collaboration with IBERINCO in the frame of an RD project sponsored by IBERINCO

  18. Postimplant Dosimetry Using a Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Engine: A New Clinical Standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrier, Jean-Francois; D'Amours, Michel; Verhaegen, Frank; Reniers, Brigitte; Martin, Andre-Guy; Vigneault, Eric; Beaulieu, Luc

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To use the Monte Carlo (MC) method as a dose calculation engine for postimplant dosimetry. To compare the results with clinically approved data for a sample of 28 patients. Two effects not taken into account by the clinical calculation, interseed attenuation and tissue composition, are being specifically investigated. Methods and Materials: An automated MC program was developed. The dose distributions were calculated for the target volume and organs at risk (OAR) for 28 patients. Additional MC techniques were developed to focus specifically on the interseed attenuation and tissue effects. Results: For the clinical target volume (CTV) D 90 parameter, the mean difference between the clinical technique and the complete MC method is 10.7 Gy, with cases reaching up to 17 Gy. For all cases, the clinical technique overestimates the deposited dose in the CTV. This overestimation is mainly from a combination of two effects: the interseed attenuation (average, 6.8 Gy) and tissue composition (average, 4.1 Gy). The deposited dose in the OARs is also overestimated in the clinical calculation. Conclusions: The clinical technique systematically overestimates the deposited dose in the prostate and in the OARs. To reduce this systematic inaccuracy, the MC method should be considered in establishing a new standard for clinical postimplant dosimetry and dose-outcome studies in a near future

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of secondary neutron dose for scanning proton therapy using FLUKA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaeyeong Lee

    Full Text Available Proton therapy is a rapidly progressing field for cancer treatment. Globally, many proton therapy facilities are being commissioned or under construction. Secondary neutrons are an important issue during the commissioning process of a proton therapy facility. The purpose of this study is to model and validate scanning nozzles of proton therapy at Samsung Medical Center (SMC by Monte Carlo simulation for beam commissioning. After the commissioning, a secondary neutron ambient dose from proton scanning nozzle (Gantry 1 was simulated and measured. This simulation was performed to evaluate beam properties such as percent depth dose curve, Bragg peak, and distal fall-off, so that they could be verified with measured data. Using the validated beam nozzle, the secondary neutron ambient dose was simulated and then compared with the measured ambient dose from Gantry 1. We calculated secondary neutron dose at several different points. We demonstrated the validity modeling a proton scanning nozzle system to evaluate various parameters using FLUKA. The measured secondary neutron ambient dose showed a similar tendency with the simulation result. This work will increase the knowledge necessary for the development of radiation safety technology in medical particle accelerators.

  20. Monte Carlo 20 and 45 MeV Bremsstrahlung and dose-reduction calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goosman, D.R.

    1984-08-14

    The SANDYL electron-photon coupled Monte Carlo code has been compared with previously published experimental bremsstrahlung data at 20.9 MeV electron energy. The code was then used to calculate forward-directed spectra, angular distributions and dose-reduction factors for three practical configurations. These are: 20 MeV electrons incident on 1 mm of W + 59 mm of Be, 45 MeV electrons of 1 mm of W and 45 MeV electrons on 1 mm of W + 147 mm of Be. The application of these results to flash radiography is discussed. 7 references, 12 figures, 1 table.

  1. Monte Carlo 20 and 45 MeV Bremsstrahlung and dose-reduction calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goosman, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The SANDYL electron-photon coupled Monte Carlo code has been compared with previously published experimental bremsstrahlung data at 20.9 MeV electron energy. The code was then used to calculate forward-directed spectra, angular distributions and dose-reduction factors for three practical configurations. These are: 20 MeV electrons incident on 1 mm of W + 59 mm of Be, 45 MeV electrons of 1 mm of W and 45 MeV electrons on 1 mm of W + 147 mm of Be. The application of these results to flash radiography is discussed. 7 references, 12 figures, 1 table

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of dose calculation in voxel and geometric phantoms using GEANT4 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Maximiano C.; Santos, Denison de S.; Queiroz Filho, Pedro P. de; Silva, Rosana de S. e; Begalli, Marcia

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation techniques have become a valuable tool for scientific purposes. In radiation protection many quantities are obtained by means of the simulation of particles passing through human body models, also known as phantoms, allowing the calculation of doses deposited in an individual's organs exposed to ionizing radiation. These information are very useful from the medical viewpoint, as they are used in the planning of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy treatments. The goal of this work is the implementation of a voxel phantom and a geometrical phantom in the framework of the Geant4 tool kit, aiming at a future use of this code by professionals in the medical area. (author)

  3. Image quality and dose assessment in digital breast tomosynthesis: A Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista, M.; Di Maria, S.; Oliveira, N.; Matela, N.; Janeiro, L.; Almeida, P.; Vaz, P.

    2014-01-01

    Mammography is considered a standard technique for the early detection of breast cancer. However, its sensitivity is limited essentially due to the issue of the overlapping breast tissue. This limitation can be partially overcome, with a relatively new technique, called digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). For this technique, optimization of acquisition parameters which maximize image quality, whilst complying with the ALARA principle, continues to be an area of considerable research. The aim of this work was to study the best quantum energies that optimize the image quality with the lowest achievable dose in DBT and compare these results with the digital mammography (DM) ones. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the state-of-the-art computer program MCNPX 2.7.0 in order to generate several 2D cranio-caudal (CC) projections obtained during an acquisition of a standard DBT examination. Moreover, glandular absorbed doses and photon flux calculations, for each projection image, were performed. A homogeneous breast computational phantom with 50%/50% glandular/adipose tissue composition was used and two compressed breast thicknesses were evaluated: 4 cm and 8 cm. The simulated projection images were afterwards reconstructed with an algebraic reconstruction tool and the signal difference to noise ratio (SDNR) was calculated in order to evaluate the image quality in DBT and DM. Finally, a thorough comparison between the results obtained in terms of SDNR and dose assessment in DBT and DM was performed. - Highlights: • Optimization of the image quality in digital breast tomosynthesis. • Calculation of photon energies that maximize the signal difference to noise ratio. • Projections images and dose calculations through the Monte Carlo (MC) method. • Tumor masses and microcalcifications included in the MC model. • A dose saving of about 30% can be reached if optimal photon energies are used

  4. Photon dose estimation from ultraintense laser–solid interactions and shielding calculation with Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Bo; Qiu, Rui; Li, JunLi; Lu, Wei; Wu, Zhen; Li, Chunyan

    2017-01-01

    When a strong laser beam irradiates a solid target, a hot plasma is produced and high-energy electrons are usually generated (the so-called “hot electrons”). These energetic electrons subsequently generate hard X-rays in the solid target through the Bremsstrahlung process. To date, only limited studies have been conducted on this laser-induced radiological protection issue. In this study, extensive literature reviews on the physics and properties of hot electrons have been conducted. On the basis of these information, the photon dose generated by the interaction between hot electrons and a solid target was simulated with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. With some reasonable assumptions, the calculated dose can be regarded as the upper boundary of the experimental results over the laser intensity ranging from 10 19 to 10 21 W/cm 2 . Furthermore, an equation to estimate the photon dose generated from ultraintense laser–solid interactions based on the normalized laser intensity is derived. The shielding effects of common materials including concrete and lead were also studied for the laser-driven X-ray source. The dose transmission curves and tenth-value layers (TVLs) in concrete and lead were calculated through Monte Carlo simulations. These results could be used to perform a preliminary and fast radiation safety assessment for the X-rays generated from ultraintense laser–solid interactions. - Highlights: • The laser–driven X-ray ionizing radiation source was analyzed in this study. • An equation to estimate the photon dose based on the laser intensity is given. • The shielding effects of concrete and lead were studied for this new X-ray source. • The aim of this study is to analyze and mitigate the laser–driven X-ray hazard.

  5. Application of Monte Carlo method for dose calculation in thyroid follicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Frank Sinatra Gomes da

    2008-02-01

    The Monte Carlo method is an important tool to simulate radioactive particles interaction with biologic medium. The principal advantage of the method when compared with deterministic methods is the ability to simulate a complex geometry. Several computational codes use the Monte Carlo method to simulate the particles transport and they have the capacity to simulate energy deposition in models of organs and/or tissues, as well models of cells of human body. Thus, the calculation of the absorbed dose to thyroid's follicles (compound of colloid and follicles' cells) have a fundamental importance to dosimetry, because these cells are radiosensitive due to ionizing radiation exposition, in particular, exposition due to radioisotopes of iodine, because a great amount of radioiodine may be released into the environment in case of a nuclear accidents. In this case, the goal of this work was use the code of particles transport MNCP4C to calculate absorbed doses in models of thyroid's follicles, for Auger electrons, internal conversion electrons and beta particles, by iodine-131 and short-lived iodines (131, 132, 133, 134 e 135), with diameters varying from 30 to 500 μm. The results obtained from simulation with the MCNP4C code shown an average percentage of the 25% of total absorbed dose by colloid to iodine- 131 and 75% to short-lived iodine's. For follicular cells, this percentage was of 13% to iodine-131 and 87% to short-lived iodine's. The contributions from particles with low energies, like Auger and internal conversion electrons should not be neglected, to assessment the absorbed dose in cellular level. Agglomerative hierarchical clustering was used to compare doses obtained by codes MCNP4C, EPOTRAN, EGS4 and by deterministic methods. (author)

  6. Correction of CT artifacts and its influence on Monte Carlo dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazalova, Magdalena; Beaulieu, Luc; Palefsky, Steven; Verhaegen, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) images of patients having metallic implants or dental fillings exhibit severe streaking artifacts. These artifacts may disallow tumor and organ delineation and compromise dose calculation outcomes in radiotherapy. We used a sinogram interpolation metal streaking artifact correction algorithm on several phantoms of exact-known compositions and on a prostate patient with two hip prostheses. We compared original CT images and artifact-corrected images of both. To evaluate the effect of the artifact correction on dose calculations, we performed Monte Carlo dose calculation in the EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc code. For the phantoms, we performed calculations in the exact geometry, in the original CT geometry and in the artifact-corrected geometry for photon and electron beams. The maximum errors in 6 MV photon beam dose calculation were found to exceed 25% in original CT images when the standard DOSXYZnrc/CTCREATE calibration is used but less than 2% in artifact-corrected images when an extended calibration is used. The extended calibration includes an extra calibration point for a metal. The patient dose volume histograms of a hypothetical target irradiated by five 18 MV photon beams in a hypothetical treatment differ significantly in the original CT geometry and in the artifact-corrected geometry. This was found to be mostly due to miss-assignment of tissue voxels to air due to metal artifacts. We also developed a simple Monte Carlo model for a CT scanner and we simulated the contribution of scatter and beam hardening to metal streaking artifacts. We found that whereas beam hardening has a minor effect on metal artifacts, scatter is an important cause of these artifacts

  7. Environmental dose rate assessment of ITER using the Monte Carlo method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimian Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to radiation is one of the main sources of risk to staff employed in reactor facilities. The staff of a tokamak is exposed to a wide range of neutrons and photons around the tokamak hall. The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER is a nuclear fusion engineering project and the most advanced experimental tokamak in the world. From the radiobiological point of view, ITER dose rates assessment is particularly important. The aim of this study is the assessment of the amount of radiation in ITER during its normal operation in a radial direction from the plasma chamber to the tokamak hall. To achieve this goal, the ITER system and its components were simulated by the Monte Carlo method using the MCNPX 2.6.0 code. Furthermore, the equivalent dose rates of some radiosensitive organs of the human body were calculated by using the medical internal radiation dose phantom. Our study is based on the deuterium-tritium plasma burning by 14.1 MeV neutron production and also photon radiation due to neutron activation. As our results show, the total equivalent dose rate on the outside of the bioshield wall of the tokamak hall is about 1 mSv per year, which is less than the annual occupational dose rate limit during the normal operation of ITER. Also, equivalent dose rates of radiosensitive organs have shown that the maximum dose rate belongs to the kidney. The data may help calculate how long the staff can stay in such an environment, before the equivalent dose rates reach the whole-body dose limits.

  8. Dose measurement using radiochromic lms and Monte Carlo simulation for hadron-therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahra, N.

    2010-06-01

    Because of the increase in dose at the end of the range of ions, dose delivery during patient treatment with hadron-therapy should be controlled with high precision. Monte Carlo codes are now considered mandatory for validation of clinical treatment planning and as a new tool for dosimetry of ion beams. In this work, we aimed to calculate the absorbed dose using Monte Carlo simulation Geant4/Gate. The effect on the dose calculation accuracy of different Geant4 parameters has been studied for mono-energetic carbon ion beams of 300 MeV/u in water. The parameters are: the production threshold of secondary particles and the maximum step limiter of the particle track. Tolerated criterion were chosen to meet the precision required in radiotherapy in term of value and dose localisation (2%, 2 mm respectively) and to obtain the best compromise on dose distribution and computational time. We propose here the values of parameters in order to satisfy the precision required. In the second part of this work, we study the response of radiochromic films MD-v2-55 for quality control in proton and carbon ion beams. We have particularly observed and studied the quenching effect of dosimetric films for high LET (≥20 keV/μm) irradiation in homogeneous and heterogeneous media. This effect is due to the high ionization density around the track of the particle. We have developed a method to predict the response of radiochromic films taking into account the saturation effect. This model is called the RADIS model for 'Radiochromic films Dosimetry for Ions using Simulations'. It is based on the response of films under photon irradiations and the saturation of films due to high linear energy deposit calculated by Monte Carlo. Different beams were used in this study and aimed to validate the model for hadron-therapy applications: carbon ions, protons and photons at different energies. Experiments were performed at Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL), Proton therapy center of

  9. Development of a Monte Carlo multiple source model for inclusion in a dose calculation auditing tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faught, Austin M; Davidson, Scott E; Fontenot, Jonas; Kry, Stephen F; Etzel, Carol; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Followill, David S

    2017-09-01

    The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston (IROC-H) (formerly the Radiological Physics Center) has reported varying levels of agreement in their anthropomorphic phantom audits. There is reason to believe one source of error in this observed disagreement is the accuracy of the dose calculation algorithms and heterogeneity corrections used. To audit this component of the radiotherapy treatment process, an independent dose calculation tool is needed. Monte Carlo multiple source models for Elekta 6 MV and 10 MV therapeutic x-ray beams were commissioned based on measurement of central axis depth dose data for a 10 × 10 cm 2 field size and dose profiles for a 40 × 40 cm 2 field size. The models were validated against open field measurements consisting of depth dose data and dose profiles for field sizes ranging from 3 × 3 cm 2 to 30 × 30 cm 2 . The models were then benchmarked against measurements in IROC-H's anthropomorphic head and neck and lung phantoms. Validation results showed 97.9% and 96.8% of depth dose data passed a ±2% Van Dyk criterion for 6 MV and 10 MV models respectively. Dose profile comparisons showed an average agreement using a ±2%/2 mm criterion of 98.0% and 99.0% for 6 MV and 10 MV models respectively. Phantom plan comparisons were evaluated using ±3%/2 mm gamma criterion, and averaged passing rates between Monte Carlo and measurements were 87.4% and 89.9% for 6 MV and 10 MV models respectively. Accurate multiple source models for Elekta 6 MV and 10 MV x-ray beams have been developed for inclusion in an independent dose calculation tool for use in clinical trial audits. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  10. Monte Carlo Dosimetry of the 60Co BEBIG High Dose Rate for Brachytherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Tourinho Campos

    Full Text Available The use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy is currently a widespread practice worldwide. The most common isotope source is 192Ir, but 60Co is also becoming available for HDR. One of main advantages of 60Co compared to 192Ir is the economic and practical benefit because of its longer half-live, which is 5.27 years. Recently, Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG, Germany, introduced a new afterloading brachytherapy machine (MultiSource®; it has the option to use either the 60Co or 192Ir HDR source. The source for the Monte Carlo calculations is the new 60Co source (model Co0.A86, which is referred to as the new BEBIG 60Co HDR source and is a modified version of the 60Co source (model GK60M21, which is also from BEBIG.The purpose of this work is to obtain the dosimetry parameters in accordance with the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism with Monte Carlo calculations regarding the BEBIG 60Co high-dose-rate brachytherapy to investigate the required treatment-planning parameters. The geometric design and material details of the source was provided by the manufacturer and was used to define the Monte Carlo geometry. To validate the source geometry, a few dosimetry parameters had to be calculated according to the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism. The dosimetry studies included the calculation of the air kerma strength Sk, collision kerma in water along the transverse axis with an unbounded phantom, dose rate constant and radial dose function. The Monte Carlo code system that was used was EGSnrc with a new cavity code, which is a part of EGS++ that allows calculating the radial dose function around the source. The spectrum to simulate 60Co was composed of two photon energies, 1.17 and 1.33 MeV. Only the gamma part of the spectrum was used; the contribution of the electrons to the dose is negligible because of the full absorption by the stainless-steel wall around the metallic 60Co. The XCOM photon cross-section library was used in subsequent simulations, and the photoelectric effect, pair

  11. Estimation of skyshine dose from turbine building of BWR plant using Monte Carlo code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuji, Nemoto; Toshihisa, Tsukiyama; Shigeki, Nemezawa [Hitachi. Ltd., Saiwai-cho, Hitachi (Japan); Tadashi, Yamasaki; Hidetsugu, Okada [Chubu Electric Power Company, Inc., Odaka-cho, Midori-ku Nagoya (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    The Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP) was adopted to calculate the skyshine dose from the turbine building of a BWR plant for obtaining precise estimations at the site boundary. In MCNP calculation, the equipment and piping arranged on the operating floor of the turbine building were considered and modeled in detail. The inner and outer walls of the turbine building, the shielding materials around the high-pressure turbine, and the piping connected from the moisture separator to the low-pressure turbine were all considered. A three-step study was conducted to estimate the applicability of MCNP code. The first step is confirming the propriety of calculation models. The atmospheric relief diaphragms, which are installed on top of the low-pressure turbine exhaust hood, are not considered in the calculation model. There was little difference between the skyshine dose distributions that were considered when using and not using the atmospheric relief diaphragms. The calculated dose rates agreed well with the measurements taken around the turbine. The second step is estimating the dose rates on the outer roof surface of the turbine building. This calculation was made to confirm the dose distribution of gamma-rays on the turbine roof before being scattered into the air. The calculated dose rates agreed well with the measured data. The third step is making a final confirmation by comparing the calculations and measurements of skyshine dose rates around the turbine building. The source terms of the main steam system are based on the measured activity data of N-16 and C-15. As a conclusion, we were able to calculate reasonable skyshine dose rates by using MCNP code. (authors)

  12. Monte Carlo dosimetry of the IRAsource high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarabiasl, Akbar; Ayoobian, Navid; Jabbari, Iraj; Poorbaygi, Hossein; Javanshir, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a common method for cancer treatment in clinical brachytherapy. Because of the different source designs, there is a need for specific dosimetry data set for each HDR model. The purpose of this study is to obtain detailed dose rate distributions in water phantom for a first prototype HDR 192 Ir brachytherapy source model, IRAsource, and compare with the other published works. In this study, Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP version 4C) code was used to simulate the dose rate distributions around the HDR source. A full set of dosimetry parameters reported by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43U1 was evaluated. Also, the absorbed dose rate distributions in water, were obtained in an along-away look-up table. The dose rate constant, Λ, of the IRAsource was evaluated to be equal to 1.112 ± 0.005 cGy h −1 U −1 . The results of dosimetry parameters are presented in tabulated and graphical formats and compared with those reported from other commercially available HDR 192 Ir sources, which are in good agreement. This justifies the use of specific data sets for this new source. The results obtained in this study can be used as input data in the conventional treatment planning systems.

  13. An improved Monte Carlo (MC) dose simulation for charged particle cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, C. K. [Advanced Medical and Dental Institute, AMDI, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia and School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kota Bharu (Malaysia); Kamil, W. A. [Advanced Medical and Dental Institute, AMDI, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia and Radiology Department, Hospital USM, Kota Bharu (Malaysia); Shuaib, I. L. [Advanced Medical and Dental Institute, AMDI, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang (Malaysia); Matsufuji, Naruhiro [Research Centre of Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, NIRS, Chiba (Japan)

    2014-02-12

    Heavy-particle therapy such as carbon ion therapy are more popular nowadays because of the nature characteristics of charged particle and almost no side effect to patients. An effective treatment is achieved with high precision of dose calculation, in this research work, Geant4 based Monte Carlo simulation method has been used to calculate the radiation transport and dose distribution. The simulation have the same setting with the treatment room in Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator, HIMAC. The carbon ion beam at the isocentric gantry nozzle for the therapeutic energy of 290 MeV/u was simulated, experimental work was carried out in National Institute of Radiological Sciences, NIRS, Chiba, Japan by using the HIMAC to confirm the accuracy and qualities dose distribution by MC methods. The Geant4 based simulated dose distribution were verified with measurements for Bragg peak and spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) respectively. The verification of results shows that the Bragg peak depth-dose and SOBP distributions in simulation has good agreement with measurements. In overall, the study showed that Geant4 based can be fully applied in the heavy-ion therapy field for simulation, further works need to be carry on to refine and improve the Geant4 MC simulations.

  14. The denoising of Monte Carlo dose distributions using convolution superposition calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naqa, I; Cui, J; Lindsay, P; Olivera, G; Deasy, J O

    2007-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations can be accurate but are also computationally intensive. In contrast, convolution superposition (CS) offers faster and smoother results but by making approximations. We investigated MC denoising techniques, which use available convolution superposition results and new noise filtering methods to guide and accelerate MC calculations. Two main approaches were developed to combine CS information with MC denoising. In the first approach, the denoising result is iteratively updated by adding the denoised residual difference between the result and the MC image. Multi-scale methods were used (wavelets or contourlets) for denoising the residual. The iterations are initialized by the CS data. In the second approach, we used a frequency splitting technique by quadrature filtering to combine low frequency components derived from MC simulations with high frequency components derived from CS components. The rationale is to take the scattering tails as well as dose levels in the high-dose region from the MC calculations, which presumably more accurately incorporates scatter; high-frequency details are taken from CS calculations. 3D Butterworth filters were used to design the quadrature filters. The methods were demonstrated using anonymized clinical lung and head and neck cases. The MC dose distributions were calculated by the open-source dose planning method MC code with varying noise levels. Our results indicate that the frequency-splitting technique for incorporating CS-guided MC denoising is promising in terms of computational efficiency and noise reduction. (note)

  15. NOTE: The denoising of Monte Carlo dose distributions using convolution superposition calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Naqa, I.; Cui, J.; Lindsay, P.; Olivera, G.; Deasy, J. O.

    2007-09-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations can be accurate but are also computationally intensive. In contrast, convolution superposition (CS) offers faster and smoother results but by making approximations. We investigated MC denoising techniques, which use available convolution superposition results and new noise filtering methods to guide and accelerate MC calculations. Two main approaches were developed to combine CS information with MC denoising. In the first approach, the denoising result is iteratively updated by adding the denoised residual difference between the result and the MC image. Multi-scale methods were used (wavelets or contourlets) for denoising the residual. The iterations are initialized by the CS data. In the second approach, we used a frequency splitting technique by quadrature filtering to combine low frequency components derived from MC simulations with high frequency components derived from CS components. The rationale is to take the scattering tails as well as dose levels in the high-dose region from the MC calculations, which presumably more accurately incorporates scatter; high-frequency details are taken from CS calculations. 3D Butterworth filters were used to design the quadrature filters. The methods were demonstrated using anonymized clinical lung and head and neck cases. The MC dose distributions were calculated by the open-source dose planning method MC code with varying noise levels. Our results indicate that the frequency-splitting technique for incorporating CS-guided MC denoising is promising in terms of computational efficiency and noise reduction.

  16. An improved Monte Carlo (MC) dose simulation for charged particle cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, C. K.; Kamil, W. A.; Shuaib, I. L.; Matsufuji, Naruhiro

    2014-01-01

    Heavy-particle therapy such as carbon ion therapy are more popular nowadays because of the nature characteristics of charged particle and almost no side effect to patients. An effective treatment is achieved with high precision of dose calculation, in this research work, Geant4 based Monte Carlo simulation method has been used to calculate the radiation transport and dose distribution. The simulation have the same setting with the treatment room in Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator, HIMAC. The carbon ion beam at the isocentric gantry nozzle for the therapeutic energy of 290 MeV/u was simulated, experimental work was carried out in National Institute of Radiological Sciences, NIRS, Chiba, Japan by using the HIMAC to confirm the accuracy and qualities dose distribution by MC methods. The Geant4 based simulated dose distribution were verified with measurements for Bragg peak and spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) respectively. The verification of results shows that the Bragg peak depth-dose and SOBP distributions in simulation has good agreement with measurements. In overall, the study showed that Geant4 based can be fully applied in the heavy-ion therapy field for simulation, further works need to be carry on to refine and improve the Geant4 MC simulations

  17. An improved Monte Carlo (MC) dose simulation for charged particle cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, C.K.; Kamil, W.A.; Shuaib, I.L.; Ying, C.K.; Kamil, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: Heavy-particle therapy such as carbon ion therapy are more popular nowadays because of the nature characteristics of charged particle and almost no side effect to patients. An effective treatment is achieved with high precision of dose calculation, in this research work, Geant4 based Monte Carlo simulation method has been used to calculate the radiation transport and dose distribution. The simulation have the same setting with the treatment room in Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator, HIMAC. The carbon ion beam at the isocentric gantry nozzle for the therapeutic energy of 290 MeV/u was simulated, experimental work was carried out in National Institute of Radiological Sciences, NIRS, Chiba, Japan by using the HIMAC to confirm the accuracy and qualities dose distribution by MC methods. The Geant4 based simulated dose distribution were verified with measurements for Bragg peak and spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) respectively. The verification of results shows that the Bragg peak depth-dose and SOBP distributions in simulation has good agreement with measurements. In overall, the study showed that Geant4 based can be fully applied in the heavy ion therapy field for simulation, further works need to be carry on to refine and improve the Geant4 MC simulations. (author)

  18. Effective dose evaluation of NORM-added consumer products using Monte Carlo simulations and the ICRP computational human phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Cheol; Yoo, Do Hyeon; Testa, Mauro; Shin, Wook-Geun; Choi, Hyun Joon; Ha, Wi-Ho; Yoo, Jaeryong; Yoon, Seokwon; Min, Chul Hee

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential hazard of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) added consumer products. Using the Monte Carlo method, the radioactive products were simulated with ICRP reference phantom and the organ doses were calculated with the usage scenario. Finally, the annual effective doses were evaluated as lower than the public dose limit of 1 mSv y"−"1 for 44 products. It was demonstrated that NORM-added consumer products could be quantitatively assessed for the safety regulation. - Highlights: • Consumer products considered that NORM would be included should be regulated. • 44 products were collected and its gamma activities were measured with HPGe detector. • Through Monte Carlo simulation, organ equivalent doses and effective doses on human phantom were calculated. • All annual effective doses for the products were evaluated as lower than dose limit for the public.

  19. Monte Carlo calculations for doses in organs and tissues to oral radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampaio, E.V.M.

    1985-01-01

    Using the MIRD 5 phantom and Monte Carlo technique, organ doses in patients undergoing external dental examination were calculated taking into account the different x-ray beam geometries and the various possible positions of x-ray source with regard to the head of the patient. It was necessary to introduce in the original computer program a new source description specific for dental examinations. To have a realistic evaluation of organ doses during dental examination it was necessary to introduce a new region in the phantom heat which characterizes the teeth and salivary glands. The attenuation of the x-ray beam by the lead shield of the radiographic film was also introduced in the calculation. (author)

  20. Absorbed dose measurements in mammography using Monte Carlo method and ZrO2+PTFE dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran M, H. A.; Hernandez O, M.; Salas L, M. A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R.; Pinedo S, A.; Ventura M, J.; Chacon, F.; Rivera M, T.

    2009-10-01

    Mammography test is a central tool for breast cancer diagnostic. In addition, programs are conducted periodically to detect the asymptomatic women in certain age groups; these programs have shown a reduction on breast cancer mortality. Early detection of breast cancer is achieved through a mammography, which contrasts the glandular and adipose tissue with a probable calcification. The parameters used for mammography are based on the thickness and density of the breast, their values depend on the voltage, current, focal spot and anode-filter combination. To achieve an image clear and a minimum dose must be chosen appropriate irradiation conditions. Risk associated with mammography should not be ignored. This study was performed in the General Hospital No. 1 IMSS in Zacatecas. Was used a glucose phantom and measured air Kerma at the entrance of the breast that was calculated using Monte Carlo methods and ZrO 2 +PTFE thermoluminescent dosemeters, this calculation was completed with calculating the absorbed dose. (author)

  1. Characterization of 60Co dose distribution using BEAMnrc Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abuissa, M. I. M.

    2012-12-01

    In this study BEAMnrc based on EGSnrc as Monte Carlo code has been used for modeling and simulating 6 0C o machine in radioisotope centre of Khartoum (RICK), Two fields size ( 5 cm x 5 cm and 35 cm x 35 cm), were been studied, to define the characterization of 6 0C o machine and to investigate the effect of increasing the surface to skin distance (SSD) on the 6 0C o machine properties, e.g.; beam profile and percentage depth dose (Pdd). For the narrow field size there is a small change observed in the curves representing beam profile and the percentage depth dose when increasing the distance by 5 cm, for the wide fi ld size there relatively clear different in curves. The study results been compared with other previous studies and clear consistence observed. (Author)

  2. Dosimetric control of radiotherapy treatments by Monte Carlo simulation of transmitted portal dose image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badel, Jean-Noel

    2009-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the dosimetric control of radiotherapy treatments by using amorphous silicon digital portal imagery. In a first part, the author reports the analysis of the dosimetric abilities of the imager (iViewGT) which is used in the radiotherapy department. The stability of the imager response on a short and on a long term has been studied. A relationship between the image grey level and the dose has been established for a reference irradiation field. The influence of irradiation parameters on the grey level variation with respect to the dose has been assessed. The obtained results show the possibility to use this system for dosimetry provided that a precise calibration is performed while taking the most influencing irradiation parameters into account, i.e. photon beam nominal energy, field size, and patient thickness. The author reports the development of a Monte Carlo simulation to model the imager response. It models the accelerator head by a generalized source point. Space and energy distributions of photons are calculated. This modelling can also be applied to the calculation of dose distribution within a patient, or to study physical interactions in the accelerator head. Then, the author explores a new approach to dose portal image prediction within the frame of an in vivo dosimetric control. He computes the image transmitted through the patient by Monte Carlo simulation, and measures the portal image of the irradiation field without the patient. Validation experiments are reported, and problems to be solved are highlighted (computation time, improvement of the collimator simulation) [fr

  3. Dose estimation of patients in CT examinations using EGS4 Monte-Carlo simulation of voxel phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahane, K.; Kai, M.; Kusama, T.; Saito, K.

    2002-01-01

    A voxel phantom based on CT images of one Japanese male have developed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Dose calculations of patients in X-ray CT examinations were performed using the voxel phantom and EGS4 Monte-Carlo simulation code. The organ doses of the patients were estimated

  4. Dose estimation of patients in CT examinations using EGS4 Monte-Carlo simulation of voxel phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akahane, K.; Kai, M.; Kusama, T. [Oita Univ., of Nursing and Health Sciences, Oita-Ken (Japan); Saito, K. [JAERI, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    A voxel phantom based on CT images of one Japanese male have developed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Dose calculations of patients in X-ray CT examinations were performed using the voxel phantom and EGS4 Monte-Carlo simulation code. The organ doses of the patients were estimated.

  5. Application of the Monte Carlo integration method in calculations of dose distributions in HDR-Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltas, D; Geramani, K N; Ioannidis, G T; Kolotas, C; Zamboglou, N [Strahlenklinik, Stadtische Kliniken Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Giannouli, S [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    1999-12-31

    Source anisotropy is a very important factor in brachytherapy quality assurance of high dose rate HDR Ir 192 afterloading stepping sources. If anisotropy is not taken into account then doses received by a brachytherapy patient in certain directions can be in error by a clinically significant amount. Experimental measurements of anisotropy are very labour intensive. We have shown that within acceptable limits of accuracy, Monte Carlo integration (MCI) of a modified Sievert integral (3D generalisation) can provide the necessary data within a much shorter time scale than can experiments. Hence MCI can be used for routine quality assurance schedules whenever a new design of HDR or PDR Ir 192 is used for brachytherapy afterloading. Our MCI calculation results are comparable with published experimental data and Monte Carlo simulation data for microSelectron and VariSource Ir 192 sources. We have shown not only that MCI offers advantages over alternative numerical integration methods, but also that treating filtration coefficients as radial distance-dependent functions improves Sievert integral accuracy at low energies. This paper also provides anisotropy data for three new Ir 192 sources, one for microSelectron-HDR and two for the microSelectron-PDR, for which data currently is not available. The information we have obtained in this study can be incorporated into clinical practice.

  6. Correlation between CT numbers and tissue parameters needed for Monte Carlo simulations of clinical dose distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Wilfried; Bortfeld, Thomas; Schlegel, Wolfgang

    2000-02-01

    We describe a new method to convert CT numbers into mass density and elemental weights of tissues required as input for dose calculations with Monte Carlo codes such as EGS4. As a first step, we calculate the CT numbers for 71 human tissues. To reduce the effort for the necessary fits of the CT numbers to mass density and elemental weights, we establish four sections on the CT number scale, each confined by selected tissues. Within each section, the mass density and elemental weights of the selected tissues are interpolated. For this purpose, functional relationships between the CT number and each of the tissue parameters, valid for media which are composed of only two components in varying proportions, are derived. Compared with conventional data fits, no loss of accuracy is accepted when using the interpolation functions. Assuming plausible values for the deviations of calculated and measured CT numbers, the mass density can be determined with an accuracy better than 0.04 g cm-3 . The weights of phosphorus and calcium can be determined with maximum uncertainties of 1 or 2.3 percentage points (pp) respectively. Similar values can be achieved for hydrogen (0.8 pp) and nitrogen (3 pp). For carbon and oxygen weights, errors up to 14 pp can occur. The influence of the elemental weights on the results of Monte Carlo dose calculations is investigated and discussed.

  7. Model Selection in Kernel Ridge Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Exterkate, Peter

    Kernel ridge regression is gaining popularity as a data-rich nonlinear forecasting tool, which is applicable in many different contexts. This paper investigates the influence of the choice of kernel and the setting of tuning parameters on forecast accuracy. We review several popular kernels......, including polynomial kernels, the Gaussian kernel, and the Sinc kernel. We interpret the latter two kernels in terms of their smoothing properties, and we relate the tuning parameters associated to all these kernels to smoothness measures of the prediction function and to the signal-to-noise ratio. Based...... on these interpretations, we provide guidelines for selecting the tuning parameters from small grids using cross-validation. A Monte Carlo study confirms the practical usefulness of these rules of thumb. Finally, the flexible and smooth functional forms provided by the Gaussian and Sinc kernels makes them widely...

  8. Monte Carlo dose calculation improvements for low energy electron beams using eMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fix, Michael K; Frei, Daniel; Volken, Werner; Born, Ernst J; Manser, Peter; Neuenschwander, Hans

    2010-01-01

    The electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm in Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems) is based on the macro MC method and is able to predict dose distributions for high energy electron beams with high accuracy. However, there are limitations for low energy electron beams. This work aims to improve the accuracy of the dose calculation using eMC for 4 and 6 MeV electron beams of Varian linear accelerators. Improvements implemented into the eMC include (1) improved determination of the initial electron energy spectrum by increased resolution of mono-energetic depth dose curves used during beam configuration; (2) inclusion of all the scrapers of the applicator in the beam model; (3) reduction of the maximum size of the sphere to be selected within the macro MC transport when the energy of the incident electron is below certain thresholds. The impact of these changes in eMC is investigated by comparing calculated dose distributions for 4 and 6 MeV electron beams at source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 and 110 cm with applicators ranging from 6 x 6 to 25 x 25 cm 2 of a Varian Clinac 2300C/D with the corresponding measurements. Dose differences between calculated and measured absolute depth dose curves are reduced from 6% to less than 1.5% for both energies and all applicators considered at SSD of 100 cm. Using the original eMC implementation, absolute dose profiles at depths of 1 cm, d max and R50 in water lead to dose differences of up to 8% for applicators larger than 15 x 15 cm 2 at SSD 100 cm. Those differences are now reduced to less than 2% for all dose profiles investigated when the improved version of eMC is used. At SSD of 110 cm the dose difference for the original eMC version is even more pronounced and can be larger than 10%. Those differences are reduced to within 2% or 2 mm with the improved version of eMC. In this work several enhancements were made in the eMC algorithm leading to significant improvements in the accuracy of the dose calculation

  9. Monte Carlo dose calculation improvements for low energy electron beams using eMC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, Michael K; Frei, Daniel; Volken, Werner; Neuenschwander, Hans; Born, Ernst J; Manser, Peter

    2010-08-21

    The electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm in Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems) is based on the macro MC method and is able to predict dose distributions for high energy electron beams with high accuracy. However, there are limitations for low energy electron beams. This work aims to improve the accuracy of the dose calculation using eMC for 4 and 6 MeV electron beams of Varian linear accelerators. Improvements implemented into the eMC include (1) improved determination of the initial electron energy spectrum by increased resolution of mono-energetic depth dose curves used during beam configuration; (2) inclusion of all the scrapers of the applicator in the beam model; (3) reduction of the maximum size of the sphere to be selected within the macro MC transport when the energy of the incident electron is below certain thresholds. The impact of these changes in eMC is investigated by comparing calculated dose distributions for 4 and 6 MeV electron beams at source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 and 110 cm with applicators ranging from 6 x 6 to 25 x 25 cm(2) of a Varian Clinac 2300C/D with the corresponding measurements. Dose differences between calculated and measured absolute depth dose curves are reduced from 6% to less than 1.5% for both energies and all applicators considered at SSD of 100 cm. Using the original eMC implementation, absolute dose profiles at depths of 1 cm, d(max) and R50 in water lead to dose differences of up to 8% for applicators larger than 15 x 15 cm(2) at SSD 100 cm. Those differences are now reduced to less than 2% for all dose profiles investigated when the improved version of eMC is used. At SSD of 110 cm the dose difference for the original eMC version is even more pronounced and can be larger than 10%. Those differences are reduced to within 2% or 2 mm with the improved version of eMC. In this work several enhancements were made in the eMC algorithm leading to significant improvements in the accuracy of the dose

  10. Suitability of new anode materials in mammography: Dose and subject contrast considerations using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delis, H.; Spyrou, G.; Costaridou, L.; Tzanakos, G.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2006-01-01

    Mammography is the technique with the highest sensitivity and specificity, for the early detection of nonpalpable lesions associated with breast cancer. As screening mammography refers to asymptomatic women, the task of optimization between the image quality and the radiation dose is critical. A way toward optimization could be the introduction of new anode materials. A method for producing the x-ray spectra of different anode/filter combinations is proposed. The performance of several mammographic spectra, produced by both existing and theoretical anode materials, is evaluated, with respect to their dose and subject contrast characteristics, using a Monte Carlo simulation.The mammographic performance is evaluated utilizing a properly designed mathematical phantom with embedded inhomogeneities, irradiated with different spectra, based on combinations of conventional and new (Ru, Ag) anode materials, with several filters (Mo, Rh, Ru, Ag, Nb, Al). An earlier developed and validated Monte Carlo model, for deriving both image and dose characteristics in mammography, was utilized and overall performance results were derived in terms of subject contrast to dose ratio and squared subject contrast to dose ratio. Results demonstrate that soft spectra, mainly produced from Mo, Rh, and Ru anodes and filtered with k-edge filters, provide increased subject contrast for inhomogeneities of both small size, simulating microcalcifications and low density, simulating masses. The harder spectra (W and Ag anode) come short in the discrimination task but demonstrate improved performance when considering the dose delivered to the breast tissue. As far as the overall performance is concerned, new theoretical spectra demonstrate a noticeable good performance that is similar, and in some cases better compared to commonly used systems, stressing the possibility of introducing new materials in mammographic practice as a possible contribution to its optimization task. In the overall

  11. Correction for FDG PET dose extravasations: Monte Carlo validation and quantitative evaluation of patient studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva-Rodríguez, Jesús, E-mail: jesus.silva.rodriguez@sergas.es; Aguiar, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.aguiar.fernandez@sergas.es [Fundación Ramón Domínguez, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782, Galicia (Spain); Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, Instituto de Investigación Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Sánchez, Manuel; Mosquera, Javier; Luna-Vega, Víctor [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Complexo Hospitalario Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782, Galicia (Spain); Cortés, Julia; Garrido, Miguel [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia, Spain and Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, Instituto de Investigación Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Pombar, Miguel [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Ruibal, Álvaro [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Complexo Hospitalario Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782, Galicia (Spain); Grupo de Imaxe Molecular, Instituto de Investigación Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, 15706, Galicia (Spain); Fundación Tejerina, 28003, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Current procedure guidelines for whole body [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) state that studies with visible dose extravasations should be rejected for quantification protocols. Our work is focused on the development and validation of methods for estimating extravasated doses in order to correct standard uptake value (SUV) values for this effect in clinical routine. Methods: One thousand three hundred sixty-seven consecutive whole body FDG-PET studies were visually inspected looking for extravasation cases. Two methods for estimating the extravasated dose were proposed and validated in different scenarios using Monte Carlo simulations. All visible extravasations were retrospectively evaluated using a manual ROI based method. In addition, the 50 patients with higher extravasated doses were also evaluated using a threshold-based method. Results: Simulation studies showed that the proposed methods for estimating extravasated doses allow us to compensate the impact of extravasations on SUV values with an error below 5%. The quantitative evaluation of patient studies revealed that paravenous injection is a relatively frequent effect (18%) with a small fraction of patients presenting considerable extravasations ranging from 1% to a maximum of 22% of the injected dose. A criterion based on the extravasated volume and maximum concentration was established in order to identify this fraction of patients that might be corrected for paravenous injection effect. Conclusions: The authors propose the use of a manual ROI based method for estimating the effectively administered FDG dose and then correct SUV quantification in those patients fulfilling the proposed criterion.

  12. TU-AB-BRC-12: Optimized Parallel MonteCarlo Dose Calculations for Secondary MU Checks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, S; Nazareth, D [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Bellor, M [Lockheed Martin, Manassas, VA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Secondary MU checks are an important tool used during a physics review of a treatment plan. Commercial software packages offer varying degrees of theoretical dose calculation accuracy, depending on the modality involved. Dose calculations of VMAT plans are especially prone to error due to the large approximations involved. Monte Carlo (MC) methods are not commonly used due to their long run times. We investigated two methods to increase the computational efficiency of MC dose simulations with the BEAMnrc code. Distributed computing resources, along with optimized code compilation, will allow for accurate and efficient VMAT dose calculations. Methods: The BEAMnrc package was installed on a high performance computing cluster accessible to our clinic. MATLAB and PYTHON scripts were developed to convert a clinical VMAT DICOM plan into BEAMnrc input files. The BEAMnrc installation was optimized by running the VMAT simulations through profiling tools which indicated the behavior of the constituent routines in the code, e.g. the bremsstrahlung splitting routine, and the specified random number generator. This information aided in determining the most efficient compiling parallel configuration for the specific CPU’s available on our cluster, resulting in the fastest VMAT simulation times. Our method was evaluated with calculations involving 10{sup 8} – 10{sup 9} particle histories which are sufficient to verify patient dose using VMAT. Results: Parallelization allowed the calculation of patient dose on the order of 10 – 15 hours with 100 parallel jobs. Due to the compiler optimization process, further speed increases of 23% were achieved when compared with the open-source compiler BEAMnrc packages. Conclusion: Analysis of the BEAMnrc code allowed us to optimize the compiler configuration for VMAT dose calculations. In future work, the optimized MC code, in conjunction with the parallel processing capabilities of BEAMnrc, will be applied to provide accurate

  13. Monte Carlo skin dose simulation in intraoperative radiotherapy of breast cancer using spherical applicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, F.; Ung, N. M.; Khandaker, M. U.; Mahdiraji, G. A.; Saad, M.; Malik, R. Abdul; Bustam, A. Z.; Zaili, Z.; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    The relatively new treatment modality electronic intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) is gaining popularity, irradiation being obtained within a surgically produced cavity being delivered via a low-energy x-ray source and spherical applicators, primarily for early stage breast cancer. Due to the spatially dramatic dose-rate fall off with radial distance from the source and effects related to changes in the beam quality of the low keV photon spectra, dosimetric account of the Intrabeam system is rather complex. Skin dose monitoring in IORT is important due to the high dose prescription per treatment fraction. In this study, modeling of the x-ray source and related applicators were performed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code. The dosimetric characteristics of the model were validated against measured data obtained using an ionization chamber and EBT3 film as dosimeters. By using a simulated breast phantom, absorbed doses to the skin for different combinations of applicator size (1.5-5 cm) and treatment depth (0.5-3 cm) were calculated. Simulation results showed overdosing of the skin (>30% of prescribed dose) at a treatment depth of 0.5 cm using applicator sizes larger than 1.5 cm. Skin doses were significantly increased with applicator size, insofar as delivering 12 Gy (60% of the prescribed dose) to skin for the largest sized applicator (5 cm diameter) and treatment depth of 0.5 cm. It is concluded that the recommended 0.5-1 cm distance between the skin and applicator surface does not guarantee skin safety and skin dose is generally more significant in cases with the larger applicators. Highlights: • Intrabeam x-ray source and spherical applicators were simulated and skin dose was calculated. • Skin dose for constant skin to applicator distance strongly depends on applicator size. • Use of larger applicators generally results in higher skin dose. • The recommended 0.5-1 cm skin to applicator distance does not guarantee skin

  14. SU-E-T-36: A GPU-Accelerated Monte-Carlo Dose Calculation Platform and Its Application Toward Validating a ViewRay Beam Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y; Mazur, T; Green, O; Hu, Y; Wooten, H; Yang, D; Zhao, T; Mutic, S; Li, H [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To build a fast, accurate and easily-deployable research platform for Monte-Carlo dose calculations. We port the dose calculation engine PENELOPE to C++, and accelerate calculations using GPU acceleration. Simulations of a Co-60 beam model provided by ViewRay demonstrate the capabilities of the platform. Methods: We built software that incorporates a beam model interface, CT-phantom model, GPU-accelerated PENELOPE engine, and GUI front-end. We rewrote the PENELOPE kernel in C++ (from Fortran) and accelerated the code on a GPU. We seamlessly integrated a Co-60 beam model (obtained from ViewRay) into our platform. Simulations of various field sizes and SSDs using a homogeneous water phantom generated PDDs, dose profiles, and output factors that were compared to experiment data. Results: With GPU acceleration using a dated graphics card (Nvidia Tesla C2050), a highly accurate simulation – including 100*100*100 grid, 3×3×3 mm3 voxels, <1% uncertainty, and 4.2×4.2 cm2 field size – runs 24 times faster (20 minutes versus 8 hours) than when parallelizing on 8 threads across a new CPU (Intel i7-4770). Simulated PDDs, profiles and output ratios for the commercial system agree well with experiment data measured using radiographic film or ionization chamber. Based on our analysis, this beam model is precise enough for general applications. Conclusions: Using a beam model for a Co-60 system provided by ViewRay, we evaluate a dose calculation platform that we developed. Comparison to measurements demonstrates the promise of our software for use as a research platform for dose calculations, with applications including quality assurance and treatment plan verification.

  15. SU-E-T-36: A GPU-Accelerated Monte-Carlo Dose Calculation Platform and Its Application Toward Validating a ViewRay Beam Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y; Mazur, T; Green, O; Hu, Y; Wooten, H; Yang, D; Zhao, T; Mutic, S; Li, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To build a fast, accurate and easily-deployable research platform for Monte-Carlo dose calculations. We port the dose calculation engine PENELOPE to C++, and accelerate calculations using GPU acceleration. Simulations of a Co-60 beam model provided by ViewRay demonstrate the capabilities of the platform. Methods: We built software that incorporates a beam model interface, CT-phantom model, GPU-accelerated PENELOPE engine, and GUI front-end. We rewrote the PENELOPE kernel in C++ (from Fortran) and accelerated the code on a GPU. We seamlessly integrated a Co-60 beam model (obtained from ViewRay) into our platform. Simulations of various field sizes and SSDs using a homogeneous water phantom generated PDDs, dose profiles, and output factors that were compared to experiment data. Results: With GPU acceleration using a dated graphics card (Nvidia Tesla C2050), a highly accurate simulation – including 100*100*100 grid, 3×3×3 mm3 voxels, <1% uncertainty, and 4.2×4.2 cm2 field size – runs 24 times faster (20 minutes versus 8 hours) than when parallelizing on 8 threads across a new CPU (Intel i7-4770). Simulated PDDs, profiles and output ratios for the commercial system agree well with experiment data measured using radiographic film or ionization chamber. Based on our analysis, this beam model is precise enough for general applications. Conclusions: Using a beam model for a Co-60 system provided by ViewRay, we evaluate a dose calculation platform that we developed. Comparison to measurements demonstrates the promise of our software for use as a research platform for dose calculations, with applications including quality assurance and treatment plan verification

  16. On the use of Monte Carlo-derived dosimetric data in the estimation of patient dose from CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the applicability and appropriateness of Monte Carlo-derived normalized data to provide accurate estimations of patient dose from computed tomography (CT) exposures. Monte Carlo methodology and mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms were used to simulate standard patient CT examinations of the head, thorax, abdomen, and trunk performed on a multislice CT scanner. Phantoms were generated to simulate the average adult individual and two individuals with different body sizes. Normalized dose values for all radiosensitive organs and normalized effective dose values were calculated for standard axial and spiral CT examinations. Discrepancies in CT dosimetry using Monte Carlo-derived coefficients originating from the use of: (a) Conversion coefficients derived for axial CT exposures, (b) a mathematical anthropomorphic phantom of standard body size to derive conversion coefficients, and (c) data derived for a specific CT scanner to estimate patient dose from CT examinations performed on a different scanner, were separately evaluated. The percentage differences between the normalized organ dose values derived for contiguous axial scans and the corresponding values derived for spiral scans with pitch=1 and the same total scanning length were up to 10%, while the corresponding percentage differences in normalized effective dose values were less than 0.7% for all standard CT examinations. The normalized organ dose values for standard spiral CT examinations with pitch 0.5-1.5 were found to differ from the corresponding values derived for contiguous axial scans divided by the pitch, by less than 14% while the corresponding percentage differences in normalized effective dose values were less than 1% for all standard CT examinations. Normalized effective dose values for the standard contiguous axial CT examinations derived by Monte Carlo simulation were found to considerably decrease with increasing body size of the mathematical phantom

  17. Dose rate evaluation of body phantom behind ITER bio-shield wall using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beheshti, A.; Jabbari, I.; Karimian, A.; Abdi, M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most critical risks to humans in reactors environment is radiation exposure. Around the tokamak hall personnel are exposed to a wide range of particles, including neutrons and photons. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a nuclear fusion research and engineering project, which is the most advanced experimental tokamak nuclear fusion reactor. Dose rates assessment and photon radiation due to the neutron activation of the solid structures in ITER is important from the radiological point of view. Therefore, the dosimetry considered in this case is based on the Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasma burning with neutrons production rate at 14.1 MeV. The aim of this study is assessment the amount of radiation behind bio-shield wall that a human received during normal operation of ITER by considering neutron activation and delay gammas. To achieve the aim, the ITER system and its components were simulated by Monte Carlo method. Also to increase the accuracy and precision of the absorbed dose assessment a body phantom were considered in the simulation. The results of this research showed that total dose rates level near the outside of bio-shield wall of the tokamak hall is less than ten percent of the annual occupational dose limits during normal operation of ITER and It is possible to learn how long human beings can remain in that environment before the body absorbs dangerous levels of radiation. (authors)

  18. Use of Monte Carlo simulation software for calculating effective dose in cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes B, W. O., E-mail: wilsonottobatista@gmail.com [Instituto Federal da Bahia, Rua Emidio dos Santos s/n, Barbalho 40301-015, Salvador de Bahia (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    This study aimed to develop a geometry of irradiation applicable to the software PCXMC and the consequent calculation of effective dose in applications of the Computed Tomography Cone Beam (CBCT). We evaluated two different CBCT equipment s for dental applications: Care stream Cs 9000 3-dimensional tomograph; i-CAT and GENDEX GXCB-500. Initially characterize each protocol measuring the surface kerma input and the product kerma air-area, P{sub KA}, with solid state detectors RADCAL and PTW transmission chamber. Then we introduce the technical parameters of each preset protocols and geometric conditions in the PCXMC software to obtain the values of effective dose. The calculated effective dose is within the range of 9.0 to 15.7 μSv for 3-dimensional computer 9000 Cs; within the range 44.5 to 89 μSv for GXCB-500 equipment and in the range of 62-111 μSv for equipment Classical i-CAT. These values were compared with results obtained dosimetry using TLD implanted in anthropomorphic phantom and are considered consistent. Os effective dose results are very sensitive to the geometry of radiation (beam position in mathematical phantom). This factor translates to a factor of fragility software usage. But it is very useful to get quick answers to regarding process optimization tool conclusions protocols. We conclude that use software PCXMC Monte Carlo simulation is useful assessment protocols for CBCT tests in dental applications. (Author)

  19. Fast CPU-based Monte Carlo simulation for radiotherapy dose calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegenhein, Peter; Pirner, Sven; Kamerling, Cornelis Ph; Oelfke, Uwe

    2015-08-01

    Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations are considered to be the most accurate method for calculating dose distributions in radiotherapy. Its clinical application, however, still is limited by the long runtimes conventional implementations of MC algorithms require to deliver sufficiently accurate results on high resolution imaging data. In order to overcome this obstacle we developed the software-package PhiMC, which is capable of computing precise dose distributions in a sub-minute time-frame by leveraging the potential of modern many- and multi-core CPU-based computers. PhiMC is based on the well verified dose planning method (DPM). We could demonstrate that PhiMC delivers dose distributions which are in excellent agreement to DPM. The multi-core implementation of PhiMC scales well between different computer architectures and achieves a speed-up of up to 37× compared to the original DPM code executed on a modern system. Furthermore, we could show that our CPU-based implementation on a modern workstation is between 1.25× and 1.95× faster than a well-known GPU implementation of the same simulation method on a NVIDIA Tesla C2050. Since CPUs work on several hundreds of GB RAM the typical GPU memory limitation does not apply for our implementation and high resolution clinical plans can be calculated.

  20. Advanced local dose rate calculations with the Monte Carlo code MCNP for plutonium nitrate storage containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quade, U.

    1994-01-01

    Neutron- und Gamma dose rate calculations were performed for the storage containers filled with plutonium nitrate of the MOX fabrication facility of Siemens. For the particle transport calculations the Monte Carlo Code MCNP 4.2 was used. The calculated results were compared with experimental dose rate measurements. It can be stated that the choice of the code system was appropriate since all aspects of the many facettes of the problem were well reproduced in the calculations. The position dependency as well as the influence of the shieldings, the reflections and the mutual influences of the sources were well described by the calculations for the gamma and for the neutron dose rates. However, good agreement with the experimental results on the gamma dose rates could only be reached when the lead shielding of the detector was integrated into the geometry modelling of the calculations. For some few cases of thick shieldings and soft gamma ray sources the statistics of the calculational results were not sufficient. In such cases more elaborate variance reduction methods must be applied in future calculations. Thus the MCNP code in connection with NGSRC has been proven as an effective tool for the solution of this type of problems. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Monte Carlo Estimation of Absorbed Dose Distributions Obtained from Heterogeneous 106Ru Eye Plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, Francisco J; Eichmann, Marion; Flühs, Dirk; Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Brualla, Lorenzo

    2017-09-01

    The distribution of the emitter substance in 106 Ru eye plaques is usually assumed to be homogeneous for treatment planning purposes. However, this distribution is never homogeneous, and it widely differs from plaque to plaque due to manufacturing factors. By Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport, we study the absorbed dose distribution obtained from the specific CCA1364 and CCB1256 106 Ru plaques, whose actual emitter distributions were measured. The idealized, homogeneous CCA and CCB plaques are also simulated. The largest discrepancy in depth dose distribution observed between the heterogeneous and the homogeneous plaques was 7.9 and 23.7% for the CCA and CCB plaques, respectively. In terms of isodose lines, the line referring to 100% of the reference dose penetrates 0.2 and 1.8 mm deeper in the case of heterogeneous CCA and CCB plaques, respectively, with respect to the homogeneous counterpart. The observed differences in absorbed dose distributions obtained from heterogeneous and homogeneous plaques are clinically irrelevant if the plaques are used with a lateral safety margin of at least 2 mm. However, these differences may be relevant if the plaques are used in eccentric positioning.

  2. Moving from organ dose to microdosimetry: contribution of the Monte Carlo simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Champion

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available When living cells are irradiated by charged particles, a wide variety of interactions occurs that leads to a deep modification of the biological material. To understand the fine structure of the microscopic distribution of the energy deposits, Monte Carlo event-by-event simulations are particularly suitable. However, the development of these track structure codes needs accurate interaction cross sections for all the electronic processes: ionization, excitation, Positronium formation (for incident positrons and even elastic scattering. Under these conditions, we have recently developed a Monte Carlo code for electrons and positrons in water, this latter being commonly used to simulate the biological medium. All the processes are studied in detail via theoretical differential and total cross sections calculated by using partial wave methods. Comparisons with existing theoretical and experimental data show very good agreements. Moreover, this kind of detailed description allows one access to a useful microdosimetry, which can be coupled to a geometrical modelling of the target organ and then provide a detailed dose calculation at the nanometric scale.Quando células vivas são irradiadas por partículas carregadas, ocorre uma grande variedade de interações, o que leva a uma modificação profunda do material biológico. Para entender a delicada estrutura da distribuição microscópica dos depósitos de energia, as simulações de Monte Carlo são particularmente adequadas. Entretanto, o desenvolvimento destes códigos necessitam de amostras representativa de interações perfeitas para todos os processos eletrônicos: ionização, excitação, formação de positrônico (para pósitrons incidentes e mesmo espalhamento elástico. Nessas condições, nós desenvolvemos recentemente um código Monte Carlo para elétrons e pósitrons em água usada posteriormente para simular o meio biológico. Todos os processos são estudados detalhadamente via se

  3. The difference of scoring dose to water or tissues in Monte Carlo dose calculations for low energy brachytherapy photon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-03-01

    The goal of this work is to compare D(m,m) (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in medium) and D(w,m) (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in water) obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a subset of human tissues of interest in low energy photon brachytherapy. Using low dose rate seeds and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the authors quantify the large cavity theory conversion factors required. The authors also assess whether ap plying large cavity theory utilizing the sources' initial photon spectra and average photon energy induces errors related to spatial spectral variations. First, ideal spherical geometries were investigated, followed by clinical brachytherapy LDR seed implants for breast and prostate cancer patients. Two types of dose calculations are performed with the GEANT4 MC code. (1) For several human tissues, dose profiles are obtained in spherical geometries centered on four types of low energy brachytherapy sources: 125I, 103Pd, and 131Cs seeds, as well as an EBS operating at 50 kV. Ratios of D(w,m) over D(m,m) are evaluated in the 0-6 cm range. In addition to mean tissue composition, compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean are also studied. (2) Four clinical breast (using 103Pd) and prostate (using 125I) brachytherapy seed implants are considered. MC dose calculations are performed based on postimplant CT scans using prostate and breast tissue compositions. PTV D90 values are compared for D(w,m) and D(m,m). (1) Differences (D(w,m)/D(m,m)-1) of -3% to 70% are observed for the investigated tissues. For a given tissue, D(w,m)/D(m,m) is similar for all sources within 4% and does not vary more than 2% with distance due to very moderate spectral shifts. Variations of tissue composition about the assumed mean composition influence the conversion factors up to 38%. (2) The ratio of D90(w,m) over D90(m,m) for clinical implants matches D(w,m)/D(m,m) at 1 cm from the single point sources, Given

  4. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jan T. M.; Shrimpton, Paul C.

    2016-07-01

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990’s. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10’s of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners.

  5. SU-F-T-575: Verification of a Monte-Carlo Small Field SRS/SBRT Dose Calculation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudhyadhom, A; McGuinness, C; Descovich, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a methodology for validation of a Monte-Carlo dose calculation model for robotic small field SRS/SBRT deliveries. Methods: In a robotic treatment planning system, a Monte-Carlo model was iteratively optimized to match with beam data. A two-part analysis was developed to verify this model. 1) The Monte-Carlo model was validated in a simulated water phantom versus a Ray-Tracing calculation on a single beam collimator-by-collimator calculation. 2) The Monte-Carlo model was validated to be accurate in the most challenging situation, lung, by acquiring in-phantom measurements. A plan was created and delivered in a CIRS lung phantom with film insert. Separately, plans were delivered in an in-house created lung phantom with a PinPoint chamber insert within a lung simulating material. For medium to large collimator sizes, a single beam was delivered to the phantom. For small size collimators (10, 12.5, and 15mm), a robotically delivered plan was created to generate a uniform dose field of irradiation over a 2×2cm 2 area. Results: Dose differences in simulated water between Ray-Tracing and Monte-Carlo were all within 1% at dmax and deeper. Maximum dose differences occurred prior to dmax but were all within 3%. Film measurements in a lung phantom show high correspondence of over 95% gamma at the 2%/2mm level for Monte-Carlo. Ion chamber measurements for collimator sizes of 12.5mm and above were within 3% of Monte-Carlo calculated values. Uniform irradiation involving the 10mm collimator resulted in a dose difference of ∼8% for both Monte-Carlo and Ray-Tracing indicating that there may be limitations with the dose calculation. Conclusion: We have developed a methodology to validate a Monte-Carlo model by verifying that it matches in water and, separately, that it corresponds well in lung simulating materials. The Monte-Carlo model and algorithm tested may have more limited accuracy for 10mm fields and smaller.

  6. Calculation of dose distribution for 252Cf fission neutron source in tissue equivalent phantoms using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Gang; Guo Yong; Luo Yisheng; Zhang Wenzhong

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To provide useful parameters for neutron radiotherapy, the author presents results of a Monte Carlo simulation study investigating the dosimetric characteristics of linear 252 Cf fission neutron sources. Methods: A 252 Cf fission source and tissue equivalent phantom were modeled. The dose of neutron and gamma radiations were calculated using Monte Carlo Code. Results: The dose of neutron and gamma at several positions for 252 Cf in the phantom made of equivalent materials to water, blood, muscle, skin, bone and lung were calculated. Conclusion: The results by Monte Carlo methods were compared with the data by measurement and references. According to the calculation, the method using water phantom to simulate local tissues such as muscle, blood and skin is reasonable for the calculation and measurements of dose distribution for 252 Cf

  7. Evaluation of an electron Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm for treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberland, Eve; Beaulieu, Luc; Lachance, Bernard

    2015-05-08

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of the electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm included in a commercial treatment planning system and compare its performance against an electron pencil beam algorithm. Several tests were performed to explore the system's behavior in simple geometries and in configurations encountered in clinical practice. The first series of tests were executed in a homogeneous water phantom, where experimental measurements and eMC-calculated dose distributions were compared for various combinations of energy and applicator. More specifically, we compared beam profiles and depth-dose curves at different source-to-surface distances (SSDs) and gantry angles, by using dose difference and distance to agreement. Also, we compared output factors, we studied the effects of algorithm input parameters, which are the random number generator seed, as well as the calculation grid size, and we performed a calculation time evaluation. Three different inhomogeneous solid phantoms were built, using high- and low-density materials inserts, to clinically simulate relevant heterogeneity conditions: a small air cylinder within a homogeneous phantom, a lung phantom, and a chest wall phantom. We also used an anthropomorphic phantom to perform comparison of eMC calculations to measurements. Finally, we proceeded with an evaluation of the eMC algorithm on a clinical case of nose cancer. In all mentioned cases, measurements, carried out by means of XV-2 films, radiographic films or EBT2 Gafchromic films. were used to compare eMC calculations with dose distributions obtained from an electron pencil beam algorithm. eMC calculations in the water phantom were accurate. Discrepancies for depth-dose curves and beam profiles were under 2.5% and 2 mm. Dose calculations with eMC for the small air cylinder and the lung phantom agreed within 2% and 4%, respectively. eMC calculations for the chest wall phantom and the anthropomorphic phantom also

  8. Monte Carlo method for dose calculation due to oral X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loureiro, Eduardo Cesar de Miranda

    1998-06-01

    The increasing utilization of oral X-rays, especially in youngsters and children, calls for the assessment of equivalent doses in their organs and tissues. With this purpose, a Monte Carlo code was adapted to simulate an X-ray source irradiating phantoms of the MIRD-5 type with different ages (10, 15 and 40 years old) to calculate the conversion coefficients which transform the exposure at skin to equivalent doses at several organs and tissues of interest. In order to check the computer program, simulations were performed for adult patients using the original code (ADAM.FOR developed at the GSF-Germany) and the adapted program (MCDRO.PAS). Good agreement between results obtained with both codes was observed. Irradiations of the incisive, canine and molar teeth were simulated. The conversion factors were calculated for the following organs and tissues: thyroid, active bone narrow (head and whole body), bone (facial skeleton, cranium and whole body), skin (head and whole body) and crystalline. Based on the obtained results, it follows that the younger the patient and the larger the field area, the higher the dose in assessed organs and tissues. The variation of the source-skin distance does not change the conversion coefficients. On the other hand, the increase in the voltage applied to the X-ray tube causes an increase in the calculated conversion coefficients. (author)

  9. Application of a Monte Carlo linac model in routine verifications of dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares Rosales, H. M.; Alfonso Laguardia, R.; Lara Mas, E.; Popescu, T.

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of some parameters of interest in Radiotherapy Medical Physics based on an experimentally validated Monte Carlo model of an Elekta Precise lineal accelerator, was performed for 6 and 15 Mv photon beams. The simulations were performed using the EGSnrc code. As reference for simulations, the optimal beam parameters values (energy and FWHM) previously obtained were used. Deposited dose calculations in water phantoms were done, on typical complex geometries commonly are used in acceptance and quality control tests, such as irregular and asymmetric fields. Parameters such as MLC scatter, maximum opening or closing position, and the separation between them were analyzed from calculations in water. Similarly simulations were performed on phantoms obtained from CT studies of real patients, making comparisons of the dose distribution calculated with EGSnrc and the dose distribution obtained from the computerized treatment planning systems (TPS) used in routine clinical plans. All the results showed a great agreement with measurements, finding all of them within tolerance limits. These results allowed the possibility of using the developed model as a robust verification tool for validating calculations in very complex situation, where the accuracy of the available TPS could be questionable. (Author)

  10. Poster - 20: Detector selection for commissioning of a Monte Carlo based electron dose calculation algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anusionwu, Princess [Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg Canada (Canada); Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg Canada (Canada); Alpuche Aviles, Jorge E. [Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg Canada (Canada); Pistorius, Stephen [Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg Canada (Canada); Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg Canada (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Objective: Commissioning of a Monte Carlo based electron dose calculation algorithm requires percentage depth doses (PDDs) and beam profiles which can be measured with multiple detectors. Electron dosimetry is commonly performed with cylindrical chambers but parallel plate chambers and diodes can also be used. The purpose of this study was to determine the most appropriate detector to perform the commissioning measurements. Methods: PDDs and beam profiles were measured for beams with energies ranging from 6 MeV to 15 MeV and field sizes ranging from 6 cm × 6 cm to 40 cm × 40 cm. Detectors used included diodes, cylindrical and parallel plate ionization chambers. Beam profiles were measured in water (100 cm source to surface distance) and in air (95 cm source to detector distance). Results: PDDs for the cylindrical chambers were shallower (1.3 mm averaged over all energies and field sizes) than those measured with the parallel plate chambers and diodes. Surface doses measured with the diode and cylindrical chamber were on average larger by 1.6 % and 3% respectively than those of the parallel plate chamber. Profiles measured with a diode resulted in penumbra values smaller than those measured with the cylindrical chamber by 2 mm. Conclusion: The diode was selected as the most appropriate detector since PDDs agreed with those measured with parallel plate chambers (typically recommended for low energies) and results in sharper profiles. Unlike ion chambers, no corrections are needed to measure PDDs, making it more convenient to use.

  11. Monte Carlo simulated dose to the human body due to neutrons emitted in laser-fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gileadi, A.E.; Cohen, M.O.

    1977-01-01

    Considering a point neutron source located at a given distance from the human body, modeled by a 'standard reference man' phantom, neutron doses to the whole body, as well as to selected organs thereof, are determined, using the SAM-CE system, a Monte Carlo computer code, written in Fortran and designed to solve time, space and energy dependent neutron and gamma ray transport equations in complex three-dimensional geometrice. Collision density, energy deposition and dose are treated in the SAM-CE system as flux functionals. A special feature of SAM-CE is its use of the 'Combinatorial Geometry' technique which affords the user geometric capabilities exceeding those available with other commonly used geometric packages. All neutron and gamma ray cross section data, as well as gamma ray production data, are derived from the ENDF libraries. Both resolved and unresolved resonance parameters from ENDF neutron data files are treated automatically and extremely precise and detailed descriptions of cross section behavior is permitted. Such treatment avoids the ambiguities usually associated with multi-group codes, which use flux-averaged cross sections based on assumed flux distributions which may or may not be appropriate. The 'standard reference man', a heterogeneous phantom, uses simple geometric forms to approximate the shape and dimensions of the human body. Materials composition of each subregion representing a certain 'organ' is given. Typical values of neutron doses to the whole body and to selected 'organs' of interest are presented

  12. Dose estimation in the crystalline lens of industrial radiography personnel using Monte Carlo Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Alexandre Roza de

    2014-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection, ICRP, in its publication 103, reviewed recent epidemiological evidence and indicated that, for the eye lens, the absorbed dose threshold for induction of late detriment is around 0.5 Gy. On this basis, on April 21, 2011, the ICRP recommended changes to the occupational dose limit in planned exposure situations, reducing the eye lens equivalent dose limit from 150 mSv to 20 mSv per year, on average, during the period of 5 years, with exposure not to exceed 50 mSv in a single year. This paper presents the dose estimation to eye lens, H p (10), effective dose and doses to important organs in the body, received by industrial gamma radiography workers, during planned or accidental exposure situations. The computer program Visual Monte Carlo was used and two relevant scenarios were postulated. The first is a planned exposure situation scenario where the operator is directly exposed to radiation during the operation. 12 radiographic exposures per day for 250 days per year, which leads to an exposure of 36,000 seconds or 10 hours per year were considered. The simulation was carried out using the following parameters: a 192 Ir source with 1.0 TBq of activity, the source/operator distance varying from 5 m to 10 m at three different heights of 0.2 m, 1.0 m and 2.0 m. The eyes lens doses were estimated as being between 16.9 mSv/year and 66.9 mSv/year and for H p (10) the doses were between 17.7 mSv/year and 74.2 mSv/year. For the accidental exposure situation scenario, the same radionuclide and activity were used, but in this case the doses were calculated with and without a collimator. The heights above ground considered were 1.0 m, 1.5 m e 2.0 m, the source/operator distance was 40 cm and, the exposure time 74 seconds. The eyes lens doses, for 1.5 m, were 12.3 mGy and 0.28 mGy without and with a collimator, respectively. Three conclusions resulted from this work. The first was that the estimated doses show that the new

  13. A single-source photon source model of a linear accelerator for Monte Carlo dose calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwankwo, Obioma; Glatting, Gerhard; Wenz, Frederik; Fleckenstein, Jens

    2017-01-01

    To introduce a new method of deriving a virtual source model (VSM) of a linear accelerator photon beam from a phase space file (PSF) for Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation. A PSF of a 6 MV photon beam was generated by simulating the interactions of primary electrons with the relevant geometries of a Synergy linear accelerator (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) and recording the particles that reach a plane 16 cm downstream the electron source. Probability distribution functions (PDFs) for particle positions and energies were derived from the analysis of the PSF. These PDFs were implemented in the VSM using inverse transform sampling. To model particle directions, the phase space plane was divided into a regular square grid. Each element of the grid corresponds to an area of 1 mm2 in the phase space plane. The average direction cosines, Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC) between photon energies and their direction cosines, as well as the PCC between the direction cosines were calculated for each grid element. Weighted polynomial surfaces were then fitted to these 2D data. The weights are used to correct for heteroscedasticity across the phase space bins. The directions of the particles created by the VSM were calculated from these fitted functions. The VSM was validated against the PSF by comparing the doses calculated by the two methods for different square field sizes. The comparisons were performed with profile and gamma analyses. The doses calculated with the PSF and VSM agree to within 3% /1 mm (>95% pixel pass rate) for the evaluated fields. A new method of deriving a virtual photon source model of a linear accelerator from a PSF file for MC dose calculation was developed. Validation results show that the doses calculated with the VSM and the PSF agree to within 3% /1 mm.

  14. A single-source photon source model of a linear accelerator for Monte Carlo dose calculation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obioma Nwankwo

    Full Text Available To introduce a new method of deriving a virtual source model (VSM of a linear accelerator photon beam from a phase space file (PSF for Monte Carlo (MC dose calculation.A PSF of a 6 MV photon beam was generated by simulating the interactions of primary electrons with the relevant geometries of a Synergy linear accelerator (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden and recording the particles that reach a plane 16 cm downstream the electron source. Probability distribution functions (PDFs for particle positions and energies were derived from the analysis of the PSF. These PDFs were implemented in the VSM using inverse transform sampling. To model particle directions, the phase space plane was divided into a regular square grid. Each element of the grid corresponds to an area of 1 mm2 in the phase space plane. The average direction cosines, Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC between photon energies and their direction cosines, as well as the PCC between the direction cosines were calculated for each grid element. Weighted polynomial surfaces were then fitted to these 2D data. The weights are used to correct for heteroscedasticity across the phase space bins. The directions of the particles created by the VSM were calculated from these fitted functions. The VSM was validated against the PSF by comparing the doses calculated by the two methods for different square field sizes. The comparisons were performed with profile and gamma analyses.The doses calculated with the PSF and VSM agree to within 3% /1 mm (>95% pixel pass rate for the evaluated fields.A new method of deriving a virtual photon source model of a linear accelerator from a PSF file for MC dose calculation was developed. Validation results show that the doses calculated with the VSM and the PSF agree to within 3% /1 mm.

  15. Study of the parameters affecting operator doses in interventional radiology using Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koukorava, C.; Carinou, E.; Ferrari, P.; Krim, S.; Struelens, L.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements performed within the ORAMED project helped to evaluate the dose levels to the operators’ hands, wrists, legs and eye lenses, during several types of interventional radiology (IR) and cardiology (IC) procedures, and also to determine the parameters that affect the doses. However, the study of the effect of each parameter separately, was possible only through Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, as in clinical practice many of those parameters change simultaneously. The influence of the protective equipment, the beam projections, the beam quality, the field size and the position of the operator according to the position of access of the catheter was investigated, using anthropomorphic phantoms in setups that represent realistic IR/IC procedures. The proper use of protective shields was found to be the most important way of reducing extremity and eye lens exposure during such examinations. Ceiling suspended shields can reduce the doses to the eye lenses up to 97%, but they can also reduce hand doses about 70% when placed correctly. The highest exposure to the operator is observed for left anterior oblique (LAO) and cranial projections. Additionally, for overcouch irradiations the eyes and the hands are about 6 times more exposed compared to the cases where the tube is below the operating table. For the lateral LAO projection, placing the ceiling suspended shield at the left side of the operator is twice more effective for the protection of the eyes compared to the cases where it is placed above the patient. Finally, beam collimation was found to play an important role in the reduction of the hands and wrists doses, especially when the operator is close to the irradiation field.

  16. The use of tetrahedral mesh geometries in Monte Carlo simulation of applicator based brachytherapy dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Landry, Guillaume; White, Shane; Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank; D’Amours, Michel; Beaulieu, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Accounting for brachytherapy applicator attenuation is part of the recommendations from the recent report of AAPM Task Group 186. To do so, model based dose calculation algorithms require accurate modelling of the applicator geometry. This can be non-trivial in the case of irregularly shaped applicators such as the Fletcher Williamson gynaecological applicator or balloon applicators with possibly irregular shapes employed in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) performed using electronic brachytherapy sources (EBS). While many of these applicators can be modelled using constructive solid geometry (CSG), the latter may be difficult and time-consuming. Alternatively, these complex geometries can be modelled using tessellated geometries such as tetrahedral meshes (mesh geometries (MG)). Recent versions of Monte Carlo (MC) codes Geant4 and MCNP6 allow for the use of MG. The goal of this work was to model a series of applicators relevant to brachytherapy using MG. Applicators designed for 192 Ir sources and 50 kV EBS were studied; a shielded vaginal applicator, a shielded Fletcher Williamson applicator and an APBI balloon applicator. All applicators were modelled in Geant4 and MCNP6 using MG and CSG for dose calculations. CSG derived dose distributions were considered as reference and used to validate MG models by comparing dose distribution ratios. In general agreement within 1% for the dose calculations was observed for all applicators between MG and CSG and between codes when considering volumes inside the 25% isodose surface. When compared to CSG, MG required longer computation times by a factor of at least 2 for MC simulations using the same code. MCNP6 calculation times were more than ten times shorter than Geant4 in some cases. In conclusion we presented methods allowing for high fidelity modelling with results equivalent to CSG. To the best of our knowledge MG offers the most accurate representation of an irregular APBI balloon applicator. (paper)

  17. Fetal doses to pregnant patients from CT with tube current modulation calculated using Monte Carlo simulations and realistic phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, J.; George Xu, X.; Caracappa, P. F.; Liu, B.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the radiation dose to the fetus using retrospective tube current modulation (TCM) data selected from archived clinical records. This paper describes the calculation of fetal doses using retrospective TCM data and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Three TCM schemes were adopted for use with three pregnant patient phantoms. MC simulations were used to model CT scanners, TCM schemes and pregnant patients. Comparisons between organ doses from TCM schemes and those from non-TCM schemes show that these three TCM schemes reduced fetal doses by 14, 18 and 25 %, respectively. These organ doses were also compared with those from ImPACT calculation. It is found that the difference between the calculated fetal dose and the ImPACT reported dose is as high as 46 %. This work demonstrates methods to study organ doses from various TCM protocols and potential ways to improve the accuracy of CT dose calculation for pregnant patients. (authors)

  18. Monte-Carlo calculation of irradiation dose content beyond shielding of high-energy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Frolov, V.V.

    1975-01-01

    The MARS programme, designed for calculating the three-dimensional internuclear cascade in defence of the accelerators by the Monte Carlo method, is described. The methods used to reduce the dispersion and the system of semi-empirical formulas made it possible to exceed the parameters of the existing programmes. By means of a synthesis of the results, registered by MARS and HAMLET programmes, the dosage fields for homogeneous and heterogeneous defence were evaluated. The results of the calculated absorbed and equivalent dose behind the barrier, irradiated by a proton beam, having the energy of Esub(o)=1/1000 GeV are exposed. The dependence of the high- and low-energy neutron, proton, pion, kaon, muonium and γ-quantum dosage on the initial energy and thickness, on the material and the composition of the defence is investigated

  19. Monte Carlo dose calculation using a cell processor based PlayStation 3 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, James C L; Lam, Phil; Jaffray, David A

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the performance of the EGSnrc computer code coupled with a Cell-based hardware in Monte Carlo simulation of radiation dose in radiotherapy. Performance evaluations of two processor-intensive functions namely, HOWNEAR and RANMAR G ET in the EGSnrc code were carried out basing on the 20-80 rule (Pareto principle). The execution speeds of the two functions were measured by the profiler gprof specifying the number of executions and total time spent on the functions. A testing architecture designed for Cell processor was implemented in the evaluation using a PlayStation3 (PS3) system. The evaluation results show that the algorithms examined are readily parallelizable on the Cell platform, provided that an architectural change of the EGSnrc was made. However, as the EGSnrc performance was limited by the PowerPC Processing Element in the PS3, PC coupled with graphics processing units or GPCPU may provide a more viable avenue for acceleration.

  20. Monte Carlo dose calculation using a cell processor based PlayStation 3 system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, James C. L.; Lam, Phil; Jaffray, David A.

    2012-02-01

    This study investigates the performance of the EGSnrc computer code coupled with a Cell-based hardware in Monte Carlo simulation of radiation dose in radiotherapy. Performance evaluations of two processor-intensive functions namely, HOWNEAR and RANMAR_GET in the EGSnrc code were carried out basing on the 20-80 rule (Pareto principle). The execution speeds of the two functions were measured by the profiler gprof specifying the number of executions and total time spent on the functions. A testing architecture designed for Cell processor was implemented in the evaluation using a PlayStation3 (PS3) system. The evaluation results show that the algorithms examined are readily parallelizable on the Cell platform, provided that an architectural change of the EGSnrc was made. However, as the EGSnrc performance was limited by the PowerPC Processing Element in the PS3, PC coupled with graphics processing units or GPCPU may provide a more viable avenue for acceleration.

  1. GATE Monte Carlo simulation of dose distribution using MapReduce in a cloud computing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangchuan; Tang, Yuguo; Gao, Xin

    2017-12-01

    The GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform has good application prospects of treatment planning and quality assurance. However, accurate dose calculation using GATE is time consuming. The purpose of this study is to implement a novel cloud computing method for accurate GATE Monte Carlo simulation of dose distribution using MapReduce. An Amazon Machine Image installed with Hadoop and GATE is created to set up Hadoop clusters on Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2). Macros, the input files for GATE, are split into a number of self-contained sub-macros. Through Hadoop Streaming, the sub-macros are executed by GATE in Map tasks and the sub-results are aggregated into final outputs in Reduce tasks. As an evaluation, GATE simulations were performed in a cubical water phantom for X-ray photons of 6 and 18 MeV. The parallel simulation on the cloud computing platform is as accurate as the single-threaded simulation on a local server and the simulation correctness is not affected by the failure of some worker nodes. The cloud-based simulation time is approximately inversely proportional to the number of worker nodes. For the simulation of 10 million photons on a cluster with 64 worker nodes, time decreases of 41× and 32× were achieved compared to the single worker node case and the single-threaded case, respectively. The test of Hadoop's fault tolerance showed that the simulation correctness was not affected by the failure of some worker nodes. The results verify that the proposed method provides a feasible cloud computing solution for GATE.

  2. Shielding calculations and collective dose estimations with the point-kernel-code VISIPLAN registered for the example of the project ZENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehlke, S.; Niegoth, H.

    2012-01-01

    In the nuclear power plant Leibstadt (KKL) during the next year large components will be dismantled and stored for final disposal within the interim storage facility ZENT at the NPP site. Before construction of ZENT appropriate estimations of the local dose rate inside and outside the building and the collective dose for the normal operation have to be performed. The shielding calculations are based on the properties of the stored components and radiation sources and on the concepts for working place requirements. The installation of control and monitoring areas will depend on these calculations. For the determination of the shielding potential of concrete walls and steel doors with the defined boundary conditions point-kernel codes like MICROSHIELd registered are used. Complex problems cannot be modeled with this code. Therefore the point-kernel code VISIPLAN registered was developed for the determination of the local dose distribution functions in 3D models. The possibility of motion sequence inputs allows an optimization of collective dose estimations for the operational phases of a nuclear facility.

  3. Experimental verification of lung dose with radiochromic film: comparison with Monte Carlo simulations and commercially available treatment planning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paelinck, L; Reynaert, N; Thierens, H; Neve, W De; Wagter, C de

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the absorbed dose in and around lung tissue by performing radiochromic film measurements, Monte Carlo simulations and calculations with superposition convolution algorithms. We considered a layered polystyrene phantom of 12 x 12 x 12 cm 3 containing a central cavity of 6 x 6 x 6 cm 3 filled with Gammex RMI lung-equivalent material. Two field configurations were investigated, a small 1 x 10 cm 2 field and a larger 10 x 10 cm 2 field. First, we performed Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the influence of radiochromic film itself on the measured dose distribution when the film intersects a lung-equivalent region and is oriented parallel to the central beam axis. To that end, the film and the lung-equivalent materials were modelled in detail, taking into account their specific composition. Next, measurements were performed with the film oriented both parallel and perpendicular to the central beam axis to verify the results of our Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, we digitized the phantom in two commercially available treatment planning systems, Helax-TMS version 6.1A and Pinnacle version 6.2b, and calculated the absorbed dose in the phantom with their incorporated superposition convolution algorithms to compare with the Monte Carlo simulations. Comparing Monte Carlo simulations with measurements reveals that radiochromic film is a reliable dosimeter in and around lung-equivalent regions when the film is positioned perpendicular to the central beam axis. Radiochromic film is also able to predict the absorbed dose accurately when the film is positioned parallel to the central beam axis through the lung-equivalent region. However, attention must be paid when the film is not positioned along the central beam axis, in which case the film gradually attenuates the beam and decreases the dose measured behind the cavity. This underdosage disappears by offsetting the film a few centimetres. We find deviations of about 3.6% between

  4. Experimental verification of lung dose with radiochromic film: comparison with Monte Carlo simulations and commercially available treatment planning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paelinck, L.; Reynaert, N.; Thierens, H.; DeNeve, W.; DeWagter, C.

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the absorbed dose in and around lung tissue by performing radiochromic film measurements, Monte Carlo simulations and calculations with superposition convolution algorithms. We considered a layered polystyrene phantom of 12 × 12 × 12 cm3 containing a central cavity of 6 × 6 × 6 cm3 filled with Gammex RMI lung-equivalent material. Two field configurations were investigated, a small 1 × 10 cm2 field and a larger 10 × 10 cm2 field. First, we performed Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the influence of radiochromic film itself on the measured dose distribution when the film intersects a lung-equivalent region and is oriented parallel to the central beam axis. To that end, the film and the lung-equivalent materials were modelled in detail, taking into account their specific composition. Next, measurements were performed with the film oriented both parallel and perpendicular to the central beam axis to verify the results of our Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, we digitized the phantom in two commercially available treatment planning systems, Helax-TMS version 6.1A and Pinnacle version 6.2b, and calculated the absorbed dose in the phantom with their incorporated superposition convolution algorithms to compare with the Monte Carlo simulations. Comparing Monte Carlo simulations with measurements reveals that radiochromic film is a reliable dosimeter in and around lung-equivalent regions when the film is positioned perpendicular to the central beam axis. Radiochromic film is also able to predict the absorbed dose accurately when the film is positioned parallel to the central beam axis through the lung-equivalent region. However, attention must be paid when the film is not positioned along the central beam axis, in which case the film gradually attenuates the beam and decreases the dose measured behind the cavity. This underdosage disappears by offsetting the film a few centimetres. We find deviations of about 3.6% between

  5. Head-and-neck IMRT treatments assessed with a Monte Carlo dose calculation engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seco, J; Adams, E; Bidmead, M; Partridge, M; Verhaegen, F

    2005-01-01

    IMRT is frequently used in the head-and-neck region, which contains materials of widely differing densities (soft tissue, bone, air-cavities). Conventional methods of dose computation for these complex, inhomogeneous IMRT cases involve significant approximations. In the present work, a methodology for the development, commissioning and implementation of a Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation engine for intensity modulated radiotherapy (MC-IMRT) is proposed which can be used by radiotherapy centres interested in developing MC-IMRT capabilities for research or clinical evaluations. The method proposes three levels for developing, commissioning and maintaining a MC-IMRT dose calculation engine: (a) development of a MC model of the linear accelerator, (b) validation of MC model for IMRT and (c) periodic quality assurance (QA) of the MC-IMRT system. The first step, level (a), in developing an MC-IMRT system is to build a model of the linac that correctly predicts standard open field measurements for percentage depth-dose and off-axis ratios. Validation of MC-IMRT, level (b), can be performed in a rando phantom and in a homogeneous water equivalent phantom. Ultimately, periodic quality assurance of the MC-IMRT system is needed to verify the MC-IMRT dose calculation system, level (c). Once the MC-IMRT dose calculation system is commissioned it can be applied to more complex clinical IMRT treatments. The MC-IMRT system implemented at the Royal Marsden Hospital was used for IMRT calculations for a patient undergoing treatment for primary disease with nodal involvement in the head-and-neck region (primary treated to 65 Gy and nodes to 54 Gy), while sparing the spinal cord, brain stem and parotid glands. Preliminary MC results predict a decrease of approximately 1-2 Gy in the median dose of both the primary tumour and nodal volumes (compared with both pencil beam and collapsed cone). This is possibly due to the large air-cavity (the larynx of the patient) situated in the centre

  6. Radioactivity determination of sealed pure beta-sources by surface dose measurements and Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Heon [Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seongmoon [Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kanghyuk; Son, Kwang-Jae; Lee, Jun Sig [Hanaro Applications Research, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ye, Sung-Joon, E-mail: sye@snu.ac.kr [Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Center for Convergence Research on Robotics, Advance Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-21

    This study aims to determine the activity of a sealed pure beta-source by measuring the surface dose rate using an extrapolation chamber. A conversion factor (cGy s{sup −1} Bq{sup −1}), which was defined as the ratio of surface dose rate to activity, can be calculated by Monte Carlo simulations of the extrapolation chamber measurement. To validate this hypothesis the certified activities of two standard pure beta-sources of Sr/Y-90 and Si/P-32 were compared with those determined by this method. In addition, a sealed test source of Sr/Y-90 was manufactured by the HANARO reactor group of KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) and used to further validate this method. The measured surface dose rates of the Sr/Y-90 and Si/P-32 standard sources were 4.615×10{sup −5} cGy s{sup −1} and 2.259×10{sup −5} cGy s{sup −1}, respectively. The calculated conversion factors of the two sources were 1.213×10{sup −8} cGy s{sup −1} Bq{sup −1} and 1.071×10{sup −8} cGy s{sup −1} Bq{sup −1}, respectively. Therefore, the activity of the standard Sr/Y-90 source was determined to be 3.995 kBq, which was 2.0% less than the certified value (4.077 kBq). For Si/P-32 the determined activity was 2.102 kBq, which was 6.6% larger than the certified activity (1.971 kBq). The activity of the Sr/Y-90 test source was determined to be 4.166 kBq, while the apparent activity reported by KAERI was 5.803 kBq. This large difference might be due to evaporation and diffusion of the source liquid during preparation and uncertainty in the amount of weighed aliquot of source liquid. The overall uncertainty involved in this method was determined to be 7.3%. We demonstrated that the activity of a sealed pure beta-source could be conveniently determined by complementary combination of measuring the surface dose rate and Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Development and verification of an analytical algorithm to predict absorbed dose distributions in ocular proton therapy using Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, Nicholas C; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2010-01-01

    Proton beam radiotherapy is an effective and non-invasive treatment for uveal melanoma. Recent research efforts have focused on improving the dosimetric accuracy of treatment planning and overcoming the present limitation of relative analytical dose calculations. Monte Carlo algorithms have been shown to accurately predict dose per monitor unit (D/MU) values, but this has yet to be shown for analytical algorithms dedicated to ocular proton therapy, which are typically less computationally expensive than Monte Carlo algorithms. The objective of this study was to determine if an analytical method could predict absolute dose distributions and D/MU values for a variety of treatment fields like those used in ocular proton therapy. To accomplish this objective, we used a previously validated Monte Carlo model of an ocular nozzle to develop an analytical algorithm to predict three-dimensional distributions of D/MU values from pristine Bragg peaks and therapeutically useful spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBPs). Results demonstrated generally good agreement between the analytical and Monte Carlo absolute dose calculations. While agreement in the proximal region decreased for beams with less penetrating Bragg peaks compared with the open-beam condition, the difference was shown to be largely attributable to edge-scattered protons. A method for including this effect in any future analytical algorithm was proposed. Comparisons of D/MU values showed typical agreement to within 0.5%. We conclude that analytical algorithms can be employed to accurately predict absolute proton dose distributions delivered by an ocular nozzle.

  8. Model selection in kernel ridge regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Exterkate, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Kernel ridge regression is a technique to perform ridge regression with a potentially infinite number of nonlinear transformations of the independent variables as regressors. This method is gaining popularity as a data-rich nonlinear forecasting tool, which is applicable in many different contexts....... The influence of the choice of kernel and the setting of tuning parameters on forecast accuracy is investigated. Several popular kernels are reviewed, including polynomial kernels, the Gaussian kernel, and the Sinc kernel. The latter two kernels are interpreted in terms of their smoothing properties......, and the tuning parameters associated to all these kernels are related to smoothness measures of the prediction function and to the signal-to-noise ratio. Based on these interpretations, guidelines are provided for selecting the tuning parameters from small grids using cross-validation. A Monte Carlo study...

  9. Sensitivity of low energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Murrer, Lars; Lutgens, Ludy; Bloemen-Van Gurp, Esther; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, de l' Universite Laval, CHUQ, Pavillon L' Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands) and Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to assess the sensitivity of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition for a range of low photon energy brachytherapy sources: {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, {sup 131}Cs, and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS). The low energy photons emitted by these sources make the dosimetry sensitive to variations in tissue atomic number due to the dominance of the photoelectric effect. This work reports dose to a small mass of water in medium D{sub w,m} as opposed to dose to a small mass of medium in medium D{sub m,m}. Methods: Mean adipose, mammary gland, and breast tissues (as uniform mixture of the aforementioned tissues) are investigated as well as compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean. Prostate mean compositions from three different literature sources are also investigated. Three sets of MC simulations are performed with the GEANT4 code: (1) Dose calculations for idealized TG-43-like spherical geometries using point sources. Radial dose profiles obtained in different media are compared to assess the influence of compositional uncertainties. (2) Dose calculations for four clinical prostate LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 125}I seeds (Model 2301, Best Medical, Springfield, VA). The effect of varying the prostate composition in the planning target volume (PTV) is investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. (3) Dose calculations for four clinical breast LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 103}Pd seeds (Model 2335, Best Medical). The effects of varying the adipose/gland ratio in the PTV and of varying the elemental composition of adipose and gland within one standard deviation of the assumed mean composition are investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. For (2) and (3), the influence of using the mass density from CT scans instead of unit mass density is also assessed. Results: Results from simulation (1) show that variations

  10. Impact of thermoplastic mask on X-ray surface dose calculated with Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yanqun; Li Jie; Wu Liping; Wang Pei; Lang Jinyi; Wu Dake; Xiao Mingyong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To calculate the effects of thermoplastic mask on X-ray surface dose. Methods: The BEAMnrc Monte Carlo Code system, designed especially for computer simulation of radioactive sources, was performed to evaluate the effects of thermoplastic mask on X-ray surface dose.Thermoplastic mask came from our center with a material density of 1.12 g/cm 2 . The masks without holes, with holes size of 0.1 cm x 0.1 cm, and with holes size of 0. 1 cm x 0.2 cm, and masks with different depth (0.12 cm and 0.24 cm) were evaluated separately. For those with holes, the material width between adjacent holes was 0.1 cm. Virtual masks with a material density of 1.38 g/cm 3 without holes with two different depths were also evaluated. Results: Thermoplastic mask affected X-rays surface dose. When using a thermoplastic mask with the depth of 0.24 cm without holes, the surface dose was 74. 9% and 57.0% for those with the density of 1.38 g/cm 3 and 1.12 g/cm 3 respectively. When focusing on the masks with the density of 1.12 g/cm 3 , the surface dose was 41.2% for those with 0.12 cm depth without holes; 57.0% for those with 0. 24 cm depth without holes; 44.5% for those with 0.24 cm depth with holes size of 0.1 cm x 0.2 cm;and 54.1% for those with 0.24 cm depths with holes size of 0.1 cm x 0.1 cm.Conclusions: Using thermoplastic mask during the radiation increases patient surface dose. The severity is relative to the hole size and the depth of thermoplastic mask. The surface dose change should be considered in radiation planning to avoid severe skin reaction. (authors)

  11. Target dose conversion modeling from pencil beam (PB) to Monte Carlo (MC) for lung SBRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Dandan; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Qinghui; Liang, Xiaoying; Zhen, Weining; Lin, Chi; Verma, Vivek; Wang, Shuo; Wahl, Andrew; Lei, Yu; Zhou, Sumin; Zhang, Chi

    2016-01-01

    A challenge preventing routine clinical implementation of Monte Carlo (MC)-based lung SBRT is the difficulty of reinterpreting historical outcome data calculated with inaccurate dose algorithms, because the target dose was found to decrease to varying degrees when recalculated with MC. The large variability was previously found to be affected by factors such as tumour size, location, and lung density, usually through sub-group comparisons. We hereby conducted a pilot study to systematically and quantitatively analyze these patient factors and explore accurate target dose conversion models, so that large-scale historical outcome data can be correlated with more accurate MC dose without recalculation. Twenty-one patients that underwent SBRT for early-stage lung cancer were replanned with 6MV 360° dynamic conformal arcs using pencil-beam (PB) and recalculated with MC. The percent D95 difference (PB-MC) was calculated for the PTV and GTV. Using single linear regression, this difference was correlated with the following quantitative patient indices: maximum tumour diameter (MaxD); PTV and GTV volumes; minimum distance from tumour to soft tissue (dmin); and mean density and standard deviation of the PTV, GTV, PTV margin, lung, and 2 mm, 15 mm, 50 mm shells outside the PTV. Multiple linear regression and artificial neural network (ANN) were employed to model multiple factors and improve dose conversion accuracy. Single linear regression with PTV D95 deficiency identified the strongest correlation on mean-density (location) indices, weaker on lung density, and the weakest on size indices, with the following R 2 values in decreasing orders: shell2mm (0.71), PTV (0.68), PTV margin (0.65), shell15mm (0.62), shell50mm (0.49), lung (0.40), dmin (0.22), GTV (0.19), MaxD (0.17), PTV volume (0.15), and GTV volume (0.08). A multiple linear regression model yielded the significance factor of 3.0E-7 using two independent features: mean density of shell2mm (P = 1.6E-7) and PTV volume

  12. Fitting and benchmarking of Monte Carlo output parameters for iridium-192 high dose rate brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acquah, F.G.

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy, the use of radioactive sources for the treatment of tumours is an important tool in radiation oncology. Accurate calculations of dose delivered to malignant and normal tissues are the main responsibility of the Medical Physics staff. With the use of Treatment Planning System (TPS) computers now becoming a standard practice in the Radiation Oncology Departments, Independent calculations to certify the results of these commercial TPSs are important part of a good quality management system for brachytherapy implants. There are inherent errors in the dose distributions produced by these TPSs due to its failure to account for heterogeneity in the calculation algorithms and Monte Carlo (MC) method seems to be the panacea for these corrections. In this study, a fit functional form using MC output parameters was performed to reduce dose calculation uncertainty using the Matlab software curve fitting applications. This includes the modification of the AAPM TG-43 parameters to accommodate the new developments for a rapid brachytherapy dose rate calculation. Analytical computations were performed to hybridize the anisotropy function, F(r,θ) and radial dose function, g(r) into a single new function f(r,θ) for the Nucletron microSelectron High Dose Rate 'new or v2' (mHDRv2) 192 Ir brachytherapy source. In order to minimize computation time and to improve the accuracy of manual calculations, the dosimetry function f(r,θ) used fewer parameters and formulas for the fit. Using MC outputs as the standard, the percentage errors for the fits were calculated and used to evaluate the average and maximum uncertainties. Dose rate deviation between the MC data and fit were also quantified as errors(E), which showed minimal values. These results showed that the dosimetry parameters from this study as compared to those of MC outputs parameters were in good agreement and better than the results obtained from literature. The work confirms a lot of promise in building robust

  13. Towards real-time photon Monte Carlo dose calculation in the cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegenhein, Peter; Kozin, Igor N.; Kamerling, Cornelis Ph; Oelfke, Uwe

    2017-06-01

    Near real-time application of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation in clinic and research is hindered by the long computational runtimes of established software. Currently, fast MC software solutions are available utilising accelerators such as graphical processing units (GPUs) or clusters based on central processing units (CPUs). Both platforms are expensive in terms of purchase costs and maintenance and, in case of the GPU, provide only limited scalability. In this work we propose a cloud-based MC solution, which offers high scalability of accurate photon dose calculations. The MC simulations run on a private virtual supercomputer that is formed in the cloud. Computational resources can be provisioned dynamically at low cost without upfront investment in expensive hardware. A client-server software solution has been developed which controls the simulations and transports data to and from the cloud efficiently and securely. The client application integrates seamlessly into a treatment planning system. It runs the MC simulation workflow automatically and securely exchanges simulation data with the server side application that controls the virtual supercomputer. Advanced encryption standards were used to add an additional security layer, which encrypts and decrypts patient data on-the-fly at the processor register level. We could show that our cloud-based MC framework enables near real-time dose computation. It delivers excellent linear scaling for high-resolution datasets with absolute runtimes of 1.1 seconds to 10.9 seconds for simulating a clinical prostate and liver case up to 1% statistical uncertainty. The computation runtimes include the transportation of data to and from the cloud as well as process scheduling and synchronisation overhead. Cloud-based MC simulations offer a fast, affordable and easily accessible alternative for near real-time accurate dose calculations to currently used GPU or cluster solutions.

  14. Modeling dose-rate on/over the surface of cylindrical radio-models using Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Xuefu; Ma Guoxue; Wen Fuping; Wang Zhongqi; Wang Chaohui; Zhang Jiyun; Huang Qingbo; Zhang Jiaqiu; Wang Xinxing; Wang Jun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models, which belong to the Metrology Station of Radio-Geological Survey of CNNC. Methods: The dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models were modeled using the famous Monte Carlo code-MCNP. The dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models were measured by a high gas pressurized ionization chamber dose-rate meter, respectively. The values of dose-rate modeled using MCNP code were compared with those obtained by authors in the present experimental measurement, and with those obtained by other workers previously. Some factors causing the discrepancy between the data obtained by authors using MCNP code and the data obtained using other methods are discussed in this paper. Results: The data of dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models, obtained using MCNP code, were in good agreement with those obtained by other workers using the theoretical method. They were within the discrepancy of ±5% in general, and the maximum discrepancy was less than 10%. Conclusions: As if each factor needed for the Monte Carlo code is correct, the dose-rates on/over the surface of cylindrical radio-models modeled using the Monte Carlo code are correct with an uncertainty of 3%

  15. Monte Carlo dose calculations of beta-emitting sources for intravascular brachytherapy: a comparison between EGS4, EGSnrc, and MCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R; Li, X A

    2001-02-01

    The dose parameters for the beta-particle emitting 90Sr/90Y source for intravascular brachytherapy (IVBT) have been calculated by different investigators. At a distant distance from the source, noticeable differences are seen in these parameters calculated using different Monte Carlo codes. The purpose of this work is to quantify as well as to understand these differences. We have compared a series of calculations using an EGS4, an EGSnrc, and the MCNP Monte Carlo codes. Data calculated and compared include the depth dose curve for a broad parallel beam of electrons, and radial dose distributions for point electron sources (monoenergetic or polyenergetic) and for a real 90Sr/90Y source. For the 90Sr/90Y source, the doses at the reference position (2 mm radial distance) calculated by the three code agree within 2%. However, the differences between the dose calculated by the three codes can be over 20% in the radial distance range interested in IVBT. The difference increases with radial distance from source, and reaches 30% at the tail of dose curve. These differences may be partially attributed to the different multiple scattering theories and Monte Carlo models for electron transport adopted in these three codes. Doses calculated by the EGSnrc code are more accurate than those by the EGS4. The two calculations agree within 5% for radial distance <6 mm.

  16. Automatic commissioning of a GPU-based Monte Carlo radiation dose calculation code for photon radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B; Graves, Yan Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is commonly considered as the most accurate method for radiation dose calculations. Commissioning of a beam model in the MC code against a clinical linear accelerator beam is of crucial importance for its clinical implementation. In this paper, we propose an automatic commissioning method for our GPU-based MC dose engine, gDPM. gDPM utilizes a beam model based on a concept of phase-space-let (PSL). A PSL contains a group of particles that are of the same type and close in space and energy. A set of generic PSLs was generated by splitting a reference phase-space file. Each PSL was associated with a weighting factor, and in dose calculations the particle carried a weight corresponding to the PSL where it was from. Dose for each PSL in water was pre-computed, and hence the dose in water for a whole beam under a given set of PSL weighting factors was the weighted sum of the PSL doses. At the commissioning stage, an optimization problem was solved to adjust the PSL weights in order to minimize the difference between the calculated dose and measured one. Symmetry and smoothness regularizations were utilized to uniquely determine the solution. An augmented Lagrangian method was employed to solve the optimization problem. To validate our method, a phase-space file of a Varian TrueBeam 6 MV beam was used to generate the PSLs for 6 MV beams. In a simulation study, we commissioned a Siemens 6 MV beam on which a set of field-dependent phase-space files was available. The dose data of this desired beam for different open fields and a small off-axis open field were obtained by calculating doses using these phase-space files. The 3D γ-index test passing rate within the regions with dose above 10% of d max dose for those open fields tested was improved averagely from 70.56 to 99.36% for 2%/2 mm criteria and from 32.22 to 89.65% for 1%/1 mm criteria. We also tested our commissioning method on a six-field head-and-neck cancer IMRT plan. The

  17. Dose to drivers during drive-through cargo scanning using GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Rogerio S.; Gomes, Joana D'Arc R.L.; Costa, Mara Lucia L.

    2013-01-01

    The use of radiation technologies to perform screening for cargo containers has been increased due to security issues, mainly, as a consequence of the United States (US) legislation which requires, from 2013, the scanning of all intermodal cargo containers which arrive at US ports. Currently, systems to cargo inspections, using accelerator-driven high energy X-rays, between 4 and 9 MeV, are available for scanning operations. It is expected that, in the future, the use of these systems will be widely spread on roads, ports and airports in Brazil. However, in order to improve the productivity and reduce the costs of acquisition, operation and maintenance these systems require that the driver drives its vehicle through irradiation area, in a situation where members of the public (the truck drivers) enter in controlled area and are deliberately exposed to high-energy beam. Some manufacturers justifies this procedure arguing that the drivers are exposed briefly, and only to the scattered beam, since there are safety systems in order to avoid that the drivers are exposed to direct beam. In this work, it is presented the preliminary results of Monte Carlo simulations concerning the dose of drivers during scanning operations, including the dose due to a failure of safety system, producing an exposure of drivers to the direct beam, as well as, an analysis of the justification of practice, mainly related to the drive-through operational procedure. (author)

  18. PCXMC. A PC-based Monte Carlo program for calculating patient doses in medical x-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapiovaara, M.; Lakkisto, M.; Servomaa, A.

    1997-02-01

    The report describes PCXMC, a Monte Carlo program for calculating patients' organ doses and the effective dose in medical x-ray examinations. The organs considered are: the active bone marrow, adrenals, brain, breasts, colon (upper and lower large intestine), gall bladder, heats, kidneys, liver, lungs, muscle, oesophagus, ovaries, pancreas, skeleton, skin, small intestine, spleen, stomach, testes, thymes, thyroid, urinary bladder, and uterus. (42 refs.)

  19. Imprecision of dose predictions for radionuclides released to the environment: an application of a Monte Carlo simulation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, G; Hoffman, F O

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation of the imprecision in dose predictions for radionuclides has been performed using correct dose assessment models and knowledge of model parameter value uncertainties. The propagation of parameter uncertainties is demonstrated using a Monte Carlo technique for elemental iodine 131 transported via the pasture-cow-milk-child pathway. Results indicated that when site-specific information is unavailable, the imprecision inherent in the predictions for this pathway is potentially large. (3 graphs, 25 references, 5 tables)

  20. A GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation code for photon transport in a voxel phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellezzo, M.; Do Nascimento, E.; Yoriyaz, H.

    2014-08-01

    As the most accurate method to estimate absorbed dose in radiotherapy, Monte Carlo method has been widely used in radiotherapy treatment planning. Nevertheless, its efficiency can be improved for clinical routine applications. In this paper, we present the CUBMC code, a GPU-based Mc photon transport algorithm for dose calculation under the Compute Unified Device Architecture platform. The simulation of physical events is based on the algorithm used in Penelope, and the cross section table used is the one generated by the Material routine, als present in Penelope code. Photons are transported in voxel-based geometries with different compositions. To demonstrate the capabilities of the algorithm developed in the present work four 128 x 128 x 128 voxel phantoms have been considered. One of them is composed by a homogeneous water-based media, the second is composed by bone, the third is composed by lung and the fourth is composed by a heterogeneous bone and vacuum geometry. Simulations were done considering a 6 MeV monoenergetic photon point source. There are two distinct approaches that were used for transport simulation. The first of them forces the photon to stop at every voxel frontier, the second one is the Woodcock method, where the photon stop in the frontier will be considered depending on the material changing across the photon travel line. Dose calculations using these methods are compared for validation with Penelope and MCNP5 codes. Speed-up factors are compared using a NVidia GTX 560-Ti GPU card against a 2.27 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. (Author)

  1. Monte Carlo determination of dose in crystalline and thyroid during chest tomography examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quispe H, B.; Pena V, J. D.; Waldo B, G.; Leon M, M.; Ceron R, P.; Vallejo H, A.; Sosa A, M.; Vega C, H. R.

    2017-10-01

    Computed tomography is a diagnostic imaging method that deposits higher doses than other radio diagnosis methods. The knowledge of the spectrum of X-rays is important, since is in direct function with the dose absorbed by the patient. In this work we estimated the spectrum of X-rays, produced during the interaction of monoenergetic electrons of 130 KeV with Tungsten white, in order to determine their energetic characteristics at 50 cm from the focal point. The study was done using Monte Carlo methods with the code MCNP5 where the X-ray tube of a Siemens SOMATOM Perspective tomograph of the General Regional Hospital of Leon, Mexico was modeled. In the calculations, 3 x 10 8 stories were used and a relative uncertainty of less than 0.1% was obtained. Also, a neck manikin with thyroid, thorax and head that included the eye, the table and gantry with 70 cm opening of the tomography was modeled. The X-ray spectrum calculated with a cut thickness of 10 mm limited by Pb collimators was used as the source term. The radiological service routine scanning protocol was used for chest computed tomography; the step-by-step or instant trigger method was simulated by moving the manikin coordinates for each cut and 360 degree continuous rotation movement. 36 positions of the X-ray tube were used in steps of 10 degrees. The radiation dispersed in the thorax deposits a dose of 2.063 mGy in crystalline and 252 mGy in thyroid. (Author)

  2. A GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation code for photon transport in a voxel phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellezzo, M.; Do Nascimento, E.; Yoriyaz, H., E-mail: mbellezzo@gmail.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    As the most accurate method to estimate absorbed dose in radiotherapy, Monte Carlo method has been widely used in radiotherapy treatment planning. Nevertheless, its efficiency can be improved for clinical routine applications. In this paper, we present the CUBMC code, a GPU-based Mc photon transport algorithm for dose calculation under the Compute Unified Device Architecture platform. The simulation of physical events is based on the algorithm used in Penelope, and the cross section table used is the one generated by the Material routine, als present in Penelope code. Photons are transported in voxel-based geometries with different compositions. To demonstrate the capabilities of the algorithm developed in the present work four 128 x 128 x 128 voxel phantoms have been considered. One of them is composed by a homogeneous water-based media, the second is composed by bone, the third is composed by lung and the fourth is composed by a heterogeneous bone and vacuum geometry. Simulations were done considering a 6 MeV monoenergetic photon point source. There are two distinct approaches that were used for transport simulation. The first of them forces the photon to stop at every voxel frontier, the second one is the Woodcock method, where the photon stop in the frontier will be considered depending on the material changing across the photon travel line. Dose calculations using these methods are compared for validation with Penelope and MCNP5 codes. Speed-up factors are compared using a NVidia GTX 560-Ti GPU card against a 2.27 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. (Author)

  3. The calculation of dose from photon exposures using reference human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods. Pt. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petoussi, N.; Zankl, M.; Williams, G.; Veit, R.; Drexler, G.

    1987-01-01

    There has been some evidence that cervical cancer patients who were treated by radiotherapy, had an increased incidence of second primary cancers noticeable 15 years or more after the radiotherapy. The data suggested that high dose pelvic irradiation was associated with increase in cancers of the bladder, kidneys, rectum, ovaries, corpus uteri, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma but not leukemia (Kleinerman et al., 1982, Morton 1973). The aim of the present work is to estimate the absorbed dose, due to radiotherapy treatment for cervival cancer, to various organs and tissues in the body. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to calculate the organ absorbed doses resulting from intracavitary sources such as ovoids and applicators filled or loaded with radium, Co-60 and Cs-137. For that purpose a routine which simulates an internal source was constructed and added to the existing Monte Carlo code (GSF-Bericht S-885, Kramer et al.). Calculations were also made for external beam therapy. Various anterior, posterior and lateral fields were applied, resulting from megavoltage, Co-60 and Cs-137 therapy machines. The calculated organ doses are tabulated in three different ways: as organ dose per air Kerma in the reference field, according to the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU Report No 38, 1985); as organ dose per surface dose and as organ dose per tissue dose at Point B. (orig.)

  4. A Monte Carlo model for mean glandular dose evaluation in spot compression mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, Antonio; Dance, David R; van Engen, Ruben E; Young, Kenneth C; Russo, Paolo; Di Lillo, Francesca; Mettivier, Giovanni; Bliznakova, Kristina; Fei, Baowei; Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2017-07-01

    To characterize the dependence of normalized glandular dose (DgN) on various breast model and image acquisition parameters during spot compression mammography and other partial breast irradiation conditions, and evaluate alternative previously proposed dose-related metrics for this breast imaging modality. Using Monte Carlo simulations with both simple homogeneous breast models and patient-specific breasts, three different dose-related metrics for spot compression mammography were compared: the standard DgN, the normalized glandular dose to only the directly irradiated portion of the breast (DgNv), and the DgN obtained by the product of the DgN for full field irradiation and the ratio of the mid-height area of the irradiated breast to the entire breast area (DgN M ). How these metrics vary with field-of-view size, spot area thickness, x-ray energy, spot area and position, breast shape and size, and system geometry was characterized for the simple breast model and a comparison of the simple model results to those with patient-specific breasts was also performed. The DgN in spot compression mammography can vary considerably with breast area. However, the difference in breast thickness between the spot compressed area and the uncompressed area does not introduce a variation in DgN. As long as the spot compressed area is completely within the breast area and only the compressed breast portion is directly irradiated, its position and size does not introduce a variation in DgN for the homogeneous breast model. As expected, DgN is lower than DgNv for all partial breast irradiation areas, especially when considering spot compression areas within the clinically used range. DgN M underestimates DgN by 6.7% for a W/Rh spectrum at 28 kVp and for a 9 × 9 cm 2 compression paddle. As part of the development of a new breast dosimetry model, a task undertaken by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the European Federation of Organizations of Medical Physics

  5. SU-F-T-371: Development of a Linac Monte Carlo Model to Calculate Surface Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prajapati, S; Yan, Y; Gifford, K [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To generate and validate a linac Monte Carlo (MC) model for surface dose prediction. Methods: BEAMnrc V4-2.4.0 was used to model 6 and 18 MV photon beams for a commercially available linac. DOSXYZnrc V4-2.4.0 calculated 3D dose distributions in water. Percent depth dose (PDD) and beam profiles were extracted for comparison to measured data. Surface dose and at depths in the buildup region was measured with radiochromic film at 100 cm SSD for 4 × 4 cm{sup 2} and 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} collimator settings for open and MLC collimated fields. For the 6 MV beam, films were placed at depths ranging from 0.015 cm to 2 cm and for 18 MV, 0.015 cm to 3.5 cm in Solid Water™. Films were calibrated for both photon energies at their respective dmax. PDDs and profiles were extracted from the film and compared to the MC data. The MC model was adjusted to match measured PDD and profiles. Results: For the 6 MV beam, the mean error(ME) in PDD between film and MC for open fields was 1.9%, whereas it was 2.4% for MLC. For the 18 MV beam, the ME in PDD for open fields was 2% and was 3.5% for MLC. For the 6 MV beam, the average root mean square(RMS) deviation for the central 80% of the beam profile for open fields was 1.5%, whereas it was 1.6% for MLC. For the 18 MV beam, the maximum RMS for open fields was 3%, and was 3.1% for MLC. Conclusion: The MC model of a linac agreed to within 4% of film measurements for depths ranging from the surface to dmax. Therefore, the MC linac model can predict surface dose for clinical applications. Future work will focus on adjusting the linac MC model to reduce RMS error and improve accuracy.

  6. SU-E-T-467: Implementation of Monte Carlo Dose Calculation for a Multileaf Collimator Equipped Robotic Radiotherapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, JS; Fan, J; Ma, C-M [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To improve the treatment efficiency and capabilities for full-body treatment, a robotic radiosurgery system has equipped with a multileaf collimator (MLC) to extend its accuracy and precision to radiation therapy. To model the MLC and include it in the Monte Carlo patient dose calculation is the goal of this work. Methods: The radiation source and the MLC were carefully modeled to consider the effects of the source size, collimator scattering, leaf transmission and leaf end shape. A source model was built based on the output factors, percentage depth dose curves and lateral dose profiles measured in a water phantom. MLC leaf shape, leaf end design and leaf tilt for minimizing the interleaf leakage and their effects on beam fluence and energy spectrum were all considered in the calculation. Transmission/leakage was added to the fluence based on the transmission factors of the leaf and the leaf end. The transmitted photon energy was tuned to consider the beam hardening effects. The calculated results with the Monte Carlo implementation was compared with measurements in homogeneous water phantom and inhomogeneous phantoms with slab lung or bone material for 4 square fields and 9 irregularly shaped fields. Results: The calculated output factors are compared with the measured ones and the difference is within 1% for different field sizes. The calculated dose distributions in the phantoms show good agreement with measurements using diode detector and films. The dose difference is within 2% inside the field and the distance to agreement is within 2mm in the penumbra region. The gamma passing rate is more than 95% with 2%/2mm criteria for all the test cases. Conclusion: Implementation of Monte Carlo dose calculation for a MLC equipped robotic radiosurgery system is completed successfully. The accuracy of Monte Carlo dose calculation with MLC is clinically acceptable. This work was supported by Accuray Inc.

  7. SU-E-T-467: Implementation of Monte Carlo Dose Calculation for a Multileaf Collimator Equipped Robotic Radiotherapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, JS; Fan, J; Ma, C-M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the treatment efficiency and capabilities for full-body treatment, a robotic radiosurgery system has equipped with a multileaf collimator (MLC) to extend its accuracy and precision to radiation therapy. To model the MLC and include it in the Monte Carlo patient dose calculation is the goal of this work. Methods: The radiation source and the MLC were carefully modeled to consider the effects of the source size, collimator scattering, leaf transmission and leaf end shape. A source model was built based on the output factors, percentage depth dose curves and lateral dose profiles measured in a water phantom. MLC leaf shape, leaf end design and leaf tilt for minimizing the interleaf leakage and their effects on beam fluence and energy spectrum were all considered in the calculation. Transmission/leakage was added to the fluence based on the transmission factors of the leaf and the leaf end. The transmitted photon energy was tuned to consider the beam hardening effects. The calculated results with the Monte Carlo implementation was compared with measurements in homogeneous water phantom and inhomogeneous phantoms with slab lung or bone material for 4 square fields and 9 irregularly shaped fields. Results: The calculated output factors are compared with the measured ones and the difference is within 1% for different field sizes. The calculated dose distributions in the phantoms show good agreement with measurements using diode detector and films. The dose difference is within 2% inside the field and the distance to agreement is within 2mm in the penumbra region. The gamma passing rate is more than 95% with 2%/2mm criteria for all the test cases. Conclusion: Implementation of Monte Carlo dose calculation for a MLC equipped robotic radiosurgery system is completed successfully. The accuracy of Monte Carlo dose calculation with MLC is clinically acceptable. This work was supported by Accuray Inc

  8. Doses determination in UCCA treatments with LDR brachytherapy using Monte Carlo methods; Determinacion de dosis en tratamientos de CaCU con braquiterapia LDR usando metodos Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benites R, J. L. [Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Nayarit, Comite de Investigacion, Calz. de la Cruz 118 sur, 63000 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: neutronesrapidos@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2017-10-15

    Using Monte Carlo methods, with the code MCNP5, a gynecological mannequin and a vaginal cylinder were modeled. The spatial distribution of absorbed dose rate in uterine cervical cancer (UCCA) treatments was determined under the modality of manual brachytherapy of low dose rate (B-LDR). The design of the model included the gynecological liquid water mannequin, a vaginal cylinder applicator of Lucite (PMMA) with hemisphere termination. The applicator was formed by a vaginal cylinder 10.3 cm long and 2 cm in diameter. This cylinder was mounted on a stainless steel tube 15.2 cm long by 0.6 cm in diameter. A linear array of four radioactive sources of Cesium 137 was inserted into the tube. 13 water cells of 0.5 cm in diameter were modeled around the vaginal cylinder and the absorbed dose was calculated in these. The distribution of the fluence of gamma photons in the mesh was calculated. It was found that the distribution of the absorbed dose is symmetric for cells located in the upper and lower part of the vaginal cylinder. The values of the absorbed dose rate were estimated for the date of manufacture of the sources. This result allows the use of the law of radioactive decay to determine the dose rate at any date of a gynecological treatment of B-LDR. (Author)

  9. TH-A-19A-06: Site-Specific Comparison of Analytical and Monte Carlo Based Dose Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuemann, J; Grassberger, C; Paganetti, H; Dowdell, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of complex patient geometries on the capability of analytical dose calculation algorithms to accurately predict dose distributions and to verify currently used uncertainty margins in proton therapy. Methods: Dose distributions predicted by an analytical pencilbeam algorithm were compared with Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) using TOPAS. 79 complete patient treatment plans were investigated for 7 disease sites (liver, prostate, breast, medulloblastoma spine and whole brain, lung and head and neck). A total of 508 individual passively scattered treatment fields were analyzed for field specific properties. Comparisons based on target coverage indices (EUD, D95, D90 and D50) were performed. Range differences were estimated for the distal position of the 90% dose level (R90) and the 50% dose level (R50). Two-dimensional distal dose surfaces were calculated and the root mean square differences (RMSD), average range difference (ARD) and average distal dose degradation (ADD), the distance between the distal position of the 80% and 20% dose levels (R80- R20), were analyzed. Results: We found target coverage indices calculated by TOPAS to generally be around 1–2% lower than predicted by the analytical algorithm. Differences in R90 predicted by TOPAS and the planning system can be larger than currently applied range margins in proton therapy for small regions distal to the target volume. We estimate new site-specific range margins (R90) for analytical dose calculations considering total range uncertainties and uncertainties from dose calculation alone based on the RMSD. Our results demonstrate that a reduction of currently used uncertainty margins is feasible for liver, prostate and whole brain fields even without introducing MC dose calculations. Conclusion: Analytical dose calculation algorithms predict dose distributions within clinical limits for more homogeneous patients sites (liver, prostate, whole brain). However, we recommend

  10. TH-A-19A-06: Site-Specific Comparison of Analytical and Monte Carlo Based Dose Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuemann, J; Grassberger, C; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Dowdell, S [Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District, Wollongong (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of complex patient geometries on the capability of analytical dose calculation algorithms to accurately predict dose distributions and to verify currently used uncertainty margins in proton therapy. Methods: Dose distributions predicted by an analytical pencilbeam algorithm were compared with Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) using TOPAS. 79 complete patient treatment plans were investigated for 7 disease sites (liver, prostate, breast, medulloblastoma spine and whole brain, lung and head and neck). A total of 508 individual passively scattered treatment fields were analyzed for field specific properties. Comparisons based on target coverage indices (EUD, D95, D90 and D50) were performed. Range differences were estimated for the distal position of the 90% dose level (R90) and the 50% dose level (R50). Two-dimensional distal dose surfaces were calculated and the root mean square differences (RMSD), average range difference (ARD) and average distal dose degradation (ADD), the distance between the distal position of the 80% and 20% dose levels (R80- R20), were analyzed. Results: We found target coverage indices calculated by TOPAS to generally be around 1–2% lower than predicted by the analytical algorithm. Differences in R90 predicted by TOPAS and the planning system can be larger than currently applied range margins in proton therapy for small regions distal to the target volume. We estimate new site-specific range margins (R90) for analytical dose calculations considering total range uncertainties and uncertainties from dose calculation alone based on the RMSD. Our results demonstrate that a reduction of currently used uncertainty margins is feasible for liver, prostate and whole brain fields even without introducing MC dose calculations. Conclusion: Analytical dose calculation algorithms predict dose distributions within clinical limits for more homogeneous patients sites (liver, prostate, whole brain). However, we recommend

  11. DEEP code to calculate dose equivalents in human phantom for external photon exposure by Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    1991-01-01

    The present report describes a computer code DEEP which calculates the organ dose equivalents and the effective dose equivalent for external photon exposure by the Monte Carlo method. MORSE-CG, Monte Carlo radiation transport code, is incorporated into the DEEP code to simulate photon transport phenomena in and around a human body. The code treats an anthropomorphic phantom represented by mathematical formulae and user has a choice for the phantom sex: male, female and unisex. The phantom can wear personal dosimeters on it and user can specify their location and dimension. This document includes instruction and sample problem for the code as well as the general description of dose calculation, human phantom and computer code. (author)

  12. Real time Monte Carlo simulation for evaluation of patient doses involved in radiological examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulea, D.; Cosma, C.

    2006-01-01

    In order to apply the Monte Carlo simulation technique for usual radiological examinations we developed a Pc program, 'IradMed', written entirely in Java. The main purpose of this program is to compute the organ doses and the effective dose of patients, which are exposed at a X-ray beam having photon energies in 10 to 150 keV radiodiagnostic range. Three major radiological procedures are considered, namely mammography, radiography and CT. The fluoroscopy implies an irregular geometry and therefore it is neglected. Nevertheless, a gross estimation of patient doses can be made taking into account the fluoroscopy as being composed of several radiographic examinations applied in different anatomical regions. The interactions between radiation and matter are well-known, and the accuracy of the calculation is limited by the accuracy of the anatomical model used to describe actual patients and by characterisation of the radiation field applied. In this version of IradMed, it is assumed that the absorbed dose is equal with kerma for all tissues. No procedure has been used to take account of the finite range of the secondary electrons that are produced by photoelectric or Compton interactions. These ranges are small compared with the dimensions of the organs, and the absorbed dose will not change abruptly with distance except at boundary where composition and density change. However these boundary effects would have little effect in the determination of the average doses to almost all organs, except the active bone marrow which is treated separately. Another justification for this kerma approximation is the fact that the sum of all electron energies that exit the organ is statistically equal with the sum of all electron energies that enter in that particular organ. In this version of program, it is considered the following interactions: the Rayleigh scattering, the Compton scattering and the photoelectric effect. The Compton scattering is modeled by several methods which

  13. Real time Monte Carlo simulation for evaluation of patient doses involved in radiological examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulea, D [Institute of Public Health ' Prof.Dr.Iuliu Moldovan' , Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cosma, C [Babes-Bolyai Univ., Faculty of Physics, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    In order to apply the Monte Carlo simulation technique for usual radiological examinations we developed a Pc program, 'IradMed', written entirely in Java. The main purpose of this program is to compute the organ doses and the effective dose of patients, which are exposed at a X-ray beam having photon energies in 10 to 150 keV radiodiagnostic range. Three major radiological procedures are considered, namely mammography, radiography and CT. The fluoroscopy implies an irregular geometry and therefore it is neglected. Nevertheless, a gross estimation of patient doses can be made taking into account the fluoroscopy as being composed of several radiographic examinations applied in different anatomical regions. The interactions between radiation and matter are well-known, and the accuracy of the calculation is limited by the accuracy of the anatomical model used to describe actual patients and by characterisation of the radiation field applied. In this version of IradMed, it is assumed that the absorbed dose is equal with kerma for all tissues. No procedure has been used to take account of the finite range of the secondary electrons that are produced by photoelectric or Compton interactions. These ranges are small compared with the dimensions of the organs, and the absorbed dose will not change abruptly with distance except at boundary where composition and density change. However these boundary effects would have little effect in the determination of the average doses to almost all organs, except the active bone marrow which is treated separately. Another justification for this kerma approximation is the fact that the sum of all electron energies that exit the organ is statistically equal with the sum of all electron energies that enter in that particular organ. In this version of program, it is considered the following interactions: the Rayleigh scattering, the Compton scattering and the photoelectric effect. The Compton scattering is modeled by several methods which

  14. Fast patient-specific Monte Carlo brachytherapy dose calculations via the correlated sampling variance reduction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampson, Andrew; Le Yi; Williamson, Jeffrey F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate potential of correlated sampling Monte Carlo (CMC) simulation to improve the calculation efficiency for permanent seed brachytherapy (PSB) implants without loss of accuracy. Methods: CMC was implemented within an in-house MC code family (PTRAN) and used to compute 3D dose distributions for two patient cases: a clinical PSB postimplant prostate CT imaging study and a simulated post lumpectomy breast PSB implant planned on a screening dedicated breast cone-beam CT patient exam. CMC tallies the dose difference, {Delta}D, between highly correlated histories in homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries. The heterogeneous geometry histories were derived from photon collisions sampled in a geometrically identical but purely homogeneous medium geometry, by altering their particle weights to correct for bias. The prostate case consisted of 78 Model-6711 {sup 125}I seeds. The breast case consisted of 87 Model-200 {sup 103}Pd seeds embedded around a simulated lumpectomy cavity. Systematic and random errors in CMC were unfolded using low-uncertainty uncorrelated MC (UMC) as the benchmark. CMC efficiency gains, relative to UMC, were computed for all voxels, and the mean was classified in regions that received minimum doses greater than 20%, 50%, and 90% of D{sub 90}, as well as for various anatomical regions. Results: Systematic errors in CMC relative to UMC were less than 0.6% for 99% of the voxels and 0.04% for 100% of the voxels for the prostate and breast cases, respectively. For a 1 x 1 x 1 mm{sup 3} dose grid, efficiency gains were realized in all structures with 38.1- and 59.8-fold average gains within the prostate and breast clinical target volumes (CTVs), respectively. Greater than 99% of the voxels within the prostate and breast CTVs experienced an efficiency gain. Additionally, it was shown that efficiency losses were confined to low dose regions while the largest gains were located where little difference exists between the homogeneous and

  15. Real time Monte Carlo simulation for evaluation of patient doses involved in radiological examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulea, D. [Institute of Public Health ' Prof.Dr.Iuliu Moldovan' , Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cosma, C. [Babes-Bolyai Univ., Faculty of Physics, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    In order to apply the Monte Carlo simulation technique for usual radiological examinations we developed a Pc program, 'IradMed', written entirely in Java. The main purpose of this program is to compute the organ doses and the effective dose of patients, which are exposed at a X-ray beam having photon energies in 10 to 150 keV radiodiagnostic range. Three major radiological procedures are considered, namely mammography, radiography and CT. The fluoroscopy implies an irregular geometry and therefore it is neglected. Nevertheless, a gross estimation of patient doses can be made taking into account the fluoroscopy as being composed of several radiographic examinations applied in different anatomical regions. The interactions between radiation and matter are well-known, and the accuracy of the calculation is limited by the accuracy of the anatomical model used to describe actual patients and by characterisation of the radiation field applied. In this version of IradMed, it is assumed that the absorbed dose is equal with kerma for all tissues. No procedure has been used to take account of the finite range of the secondary electrons that are produced by photoelectric or Compton interactions. These ranges are small compared with the dimensions of the organs, and the absorbed dose will not change abruptly with distance except at boundary where composition and density change. However these boundary effects would have little effect in the determination of the average doses to almost all organs, except the active bone marrow which is treated separately. Another justification for this kerma approximation is the fact that the sum of all electron energies that exit the organ is statistically equal with the sum of all electron energies that enter in that particular organ. In this version of program, it is considered the following interactions: the Rayleigh scattering, the Compton scattering and the photoelectric effect. The Compton scattering is modeled by several

  16. Benchmarking and validation of a Geant4-SHADOW Monte Carlo simulation for dose calculations in microbeam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Iwan; Guatelli, Susanna; Fournier, Pauline; Crosbie, Jeffrey C; Sanchez Del Rio, Manuel; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Lerch, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a synchrotron-based radiotherapy modality that uses high-intensity beams of spatially fractionated radiation to treat tumours. The rapid evolution of MRT towards clinical trials demands accurate treatment planning systems (TPS), as well as independent tools for the verification of TPS calculated dose distributions in order to ensure patient safety and treatment efficacy. Monte Carlo computer simulation represents the most accurate method of dose calculation in patient geometries and is best suited for the purpose of TPS verification. A Monte Carlo model of the ID17 biomedical beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility has been developed, including recent modifications, using the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit interfaced with the SHADOW X-ray optics and ray-tracing libraries. The code was benchmarked by simulating dose profiles in water-equivalent phantoms subject to irradiation by broad-beam (without spatial fractionation) and microbeam (with spatial fractionation) fields, and comparing against those calculated with a previous model of the beamline developed using the PENELOPE code. Validation against additional experimental dose profiles in water-equivalent phantoms subject to broad-beam irradiation was also performed. Good agreement between codes was observed, with the exception of out-of-field doses and toward the field edge for larger field sizes. Microbeam results showed good agreement between both codes and experimental results within uncertainties. Results of the experimental validation showed agreement for different beamline configurations. The asymmetry in the out-of-field dose profiles due to polarization effects was also investigated, yielding important information for the treatment planning process in MRT. This work represents an important step in the development of a Monte Carlo-based independent verification tool for treatment planning in MRT.

  17. Effective dose evaluation of NORM-added consumer products using Monte Carlo simulations and the ICRP computational human phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Cheol; Yoo, Do Hyeon; Testa, Mauro; Shin, Wook-Geun; Choi, Hyun Joon; Ha, Wi-Ho; Yoo, Jaeryong; Yoon, Seokwon; Min, Chul Hee

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential hazard of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) added consumer products. Using the Monte Carlo method, the radioactive products were simulated with ICRP reference phantom and the organ doses were calculated with the usage scenario. Finally, the annual effective doses were evaluated as lower than the public dose limit of 1mSv y(-1) for 44 products. It was demonstrated that NORM-added consumer products could be quantitatively assessed for the safety regulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effective dose in individuals from exposure the patients treated with {sup 131}I using Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho Junior, Alberico B. de; Silva, Ademir X. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: ajunior@con.ufrj.br; Hunt, John G. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: john@ird.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    In this work, using the Visual Monte Carlo code and the voxel phantom FAX, elaborated similar scenes of irradiation to the treatments used in the nuclear medicine, with the intention of estimate the effective dose in individuals from exposure the patients treated with {sup 131}I. We considered often specific situations, such as doses to others while sleeping, using public or private transportation, or being in a cinema for a few hours. In the possible situations that has been considered, the value of the effective dose did not overcome 0.05 mSv, demonstrating that, for the considered parameters the patient could be release without receiving instructions from radioprotection. (author)

  19. Monte Carlo simulation on hard X-ray dose produced in interaction between high intensity laser and solid target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Bo; Qiu Rui; Li Junli; Zhang Hui

    2014-01-01

    The X-ray dose produced in the interaction between high intensity laser and solid target was studied by simulation using Monte Carlo code. Compared with experimental results, the calculation model was verified. The calculation model was used to study the effect on X-ray dose with different electron temperatures, target materials (including Au, Cu and PE) and thicknesses. The results indicate that the X-ray dose is mainly determined by the electron temperature, and will be affected by the target parameters. X-ray dose of Au is about 1.2 times that of Cu, and is about 5 times that of PE (polyethylene). In addition, compared with other target thickness, when target thickness is the mean range of electron in the target, X-ray dose is relatively large. These results will provide references on evaluating the ionizing radiation dose for laser devices. (authors)

  20. Estimation of absorbed doses from paediatric cone-beam CT scans: MOSFET measurements and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangroh; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Toncheva, Greta; Frush, Donald P; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a dose estimation tool with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. A 5-y-old paediatric anthropomorphic phantom was computed tomography (CT) scanned to create a voxelised phantom and used as an input for the abdominal cone-beam CT in a BEAMnrc/EGSnrc MC system. An X-ray tube model of the Varian On-Board Imager((R)) was built in the MC system. To validate the model, the absorbed doses at each organ location for standard-dose and low-dose modes were measured in the physical phantom with MOSFET detectors; effective doses were also calculated. In the results, the MC simulations were comparable to the MOSFET measurements. This voxelised phantom approach could produce a more accurate dose estimation than the stylised phantom method. This model can be easily applied to multi-detector CT dosimetry.

  1. Monte Carlo dose calculation using a cell processor based PlayStation 3 system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, James C L; Lam, Phil; Jaffray, David A, E-mail: james.chow@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto and Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2012-02-09

    This study investigates the performance of the EGSnrc computer code coupled with a Cell-based hardware in Monte Carlo simulation of radiation dose in radiotherapy. Performance evaluations of two processor-intensive functions namely, HOWNEAR and RANMAR{sub G}ET in the EGSnrc code were carried out basing on the 20-80 rule (Pareto principle). The execution speeds of the two functions were measured by the profiler gprof specifying the number of executions and total time spent on the functions. A testing architecture designed for Cell processor was implemented in the evaluation using a PlayStation3 (PS3) system. The evaluation results show that the algorithms examined are readily parallelizable on the Cell platform, provided that an architectural change of the EGSnrc was made. However, as the EGSnrc performance was limited by the PowerPC Processing Element in the PS3, PC coupled with graphics processing units or GPCPU may provide a more viable avenue for acceleration.

  2. Monte Carlo derivation of filtered tungsten anode X-ray spectra for dose computation in digital mammography*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paixão, Lucas; Oliveira, Bruno Beraldo; Viloria, Carolina; de Oliveira, Marcio Alves; Teixeira, Maria Helena Araújo; Nogueira, Maria do Socorro

    2015-01-01

    Objective Derive filtered tungsten X-ray spectra used in digital mammography systems by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Materials and Methods Filtered spectra for rhodium filter were obtained for tube potentials between 26 and 32 kV. The half-value layer (HVL) of simulated filtered spectra were compared with those obtained experimentally with a solid state detector Unfors model 8202031-H Xi R/F & MAM Detector Platinum and 8201023-C Xi Base unit Platinum Plus w mAs in a Hologic Selenia Dimensions system using a direct radiography mode. Results Calculated HVL values showed good agreement as compared with those obtained experimentally. The greatest relative difference between the Monte Carlo calculated HVL values and experimental HVL values was 4%. Conclusion The results show that the filtered tungsten anode X-ray spectra and the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code can be used for mean glandular dose determination in mammography. PMID:26811553

  3. Monte Carlo derivation of filtered tungsten anode X-ray spectra for dose computation in digital mammography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Paixão

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: Derive filtered tungsten X-ray spectra used in digital mammography systems by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Materials and Methods: Filtered spectra for rhodium filter were obtained for tube potentials between 26 and 32 kV. The half-value layer (HVL of simulated filtered spectra were compared with those obtained experimentally with a solid state detector Unfors model 8202031-H Xi R/F & MAM Detector Platinum and 8201023-C Xi Base unit Platinum Plus w mAs in a Hologic Selenia Dimensions system using a direct radiography mode. Results: Calculated HVL values showed good agreement as compared with those obtained experimentally. The greatest relative difference between the Monte Carlo calculated HVL values and experimental HVL values was 4%. Conclusion: The results show that the filtered tungsten anode X-ray spectra and the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code can be used for mean glandular dose determination in mammography.

  4. Relationships of clinical protocols and reconstruction kernels with image quality and radiation dose in a 128-slice CT scanner: Study with an anthropomorphic and water phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Jijo; Krauss, B.; Banckwitz, R.; Maentele, W.; Bauer, R.W.; Vogl, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    Research highlights: ► Clinical protocol, reconstruction kernel, reconstructed slice thickness, phantom diameter or the density of material it contains directly affects the image quality of DSCT. ► Dual energy protocol shows the lowest DLP compared to all other protocols examined. ► Dual-energy fused images show excellent image quality and the noise is same as that of single- or high-pitch mode protocol images. ► Advanced CT technology improves image quality and considerably reduce radiation dose. ► An important finding is the comparatively higher DLP of the dual-source high-pitch protocol compared to other single- or dual-energy protocols. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the relationship of scanning parameters (clinical protocols), reconstruction kernels and slice thickness with image quality and radiation dose in a DSCT. Materials and methods: The chest of an anthropomorphic phantom was scanned on a DSCT scanner (Siemens Somatom Definition flash) using different clinical protocols, including single- and dual-energy modes. Four scan protocols were investigated: 1) single-source 120 kV, 110 mA s, 2) single-source 100 kV, 180 mA s, 3) high-pitch 120 kV, 130 mA s and 4) dual-energy with 100/Sn140 kV, eff.mA s 89, 76. The automatic exposure control was switched off for all the scans and the CTDIvol selected was in between 7.12 and 7.37 mGy. The raw data were reconstructed using the reconstruction kernels B31f, B80f and B70f, and slice thicknesses were 1.0 mm and 5.0 mm. Finally, the same parameters and procedures were used for the scanning of water phantom. Friedman test and Wilcoxon-Matched-Pair test were used for statistical analysis. Results: The DLP based on the given CTDIvol values showed significantly lower exposure for protocol 4, when compared to protocol 1 (percent difference 5.18%), protocol 2 (percent diff. 4.51%), and protocol 3 (percent diff. 8.81%). The highest change in Hounsfield Units was observed with dual

  5. Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis of dose estimates in radiochromic film dosimetry with single-channel and multichannel algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Sánchez, Juan Antonio; Ruiz-Morales, Carmen; González-López, Antonio

    2018-03-01

    To provide a multi-stage model to calculate uncertainty in radiochromic film dosimetry with Monte-Carlo techniques. This new approach is applied to single-channel and multichannel algorithms. Two lots of Gafchromic EBT3 are exposed in two different Varian linacs. They are read with an EPSON V800 flatbed scanner. The Monte-Carlo techniques in uncertainty analysis provide a numerical representation of the probability density functions of the output magnitudes. From this numerical representation, traditional parameters of uncertainty analysis as the standard deviations and bias are calculated. Moreover, these numerical representations are used to investigate the shape of the probability density functions of the output magnitudes. Also, another calibration film is read in four EPSON scanners (two V800 and two 10000XL) and the uncertainty analysis is carried out with the four images. The dose estimates of single-channel and multichannel algorithms show a Gaussian behavior and low bias. The multichannel algorithms lead to less uncertainty in the final dose estimates when the EPSON V800 is employed as reading device. In the case of the EPSON 10000XL, the single-channel algorithms provide less uncertainty in the dose estimates for doses higher than four Gy. A multi-stage model has been presented. With the aid of this model and the use of the Monte-Carlo techniques, the uncertainty of dose estimates for single-channel and multichannel algorithms are estimated. The application of the model together with Monte-Carlo techniques leads to a complete characterization of the uncertainties in radiochromic film dosimetry. Copyright © 2018 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. SimDoseCT: dose reporting software based on Monte Carlo simulation for a 320 detector-row cone-beam CT scanner and ICRP computational adult phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, Maria; Joemai, Raoul M. S.; Geleijns, Jacob; Molina, Diego; Salvadó, Marçal

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to develop and test software for assessing and reporting doses for standard patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations in a 320 detector-row cone-beam scanner. The software, called SimDoseCT, is based on the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation code, which was developed to calculate organ doses and effective doses in ICRP anthropomorphic adult reference computational phantoms for acquisitions with the Aquilion ONE CT scanner (Toshiba). MC simulation was validated by comparing CTDI measurements within standard CT dose phantoms with results from simulation under the same conditions. SimDoseCT consists of a graphical user interface connected to a MySQL database, which contains the look-up-tables that were generated with MC simulations for volumetric acquisitions at different scan positions along the phantom using any tube voltage, bow tie filter, focal spot and nine different beam widths. Two different methods were developed to estimate organ doses and effective doses from acquisitions using other available beam widths in the scanner. A correction factor was used to estimate doses in helical acquisitions. Hence, the user can select any available protocol in the Aquilion ONE scanner for a standard adult male or female and obtain the dose results through the software interface. Agreement within 9% between CTDI measurements and simulations allowed the validation of the MC program. Additionally, the algorithm for dose reporting in SimDoseCT was validated by comparing dose results from this tool with those obtained from MC simulations for three volumetric acquisitions (head, thorax and abdomen). The comparison was repeated using eight different collimations and also for another collimation in a helical abdomen examination. The results showed differences of 0.1 mSv or less for absolute dose in most organs and also in the effective dose calculation. The software provides a suitable tool for dose assessment in standard adult patients undergoing CT

  7. Calculation of organ doses from environmental gamma rays using human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Petoussi, N.; Zankl, M.; Veit, R.; Jacob, P.; Drexler, G.

    1990-01-01

    Organ doses from environmental γ-rays (U-238, Th-232, K-40) were calculated using Monte Carlo methods for three typical sources of a semi-infinite volume source in the air, an infinite plane source in the ground and a volume source in the ground. γ-ray fields in the natural environment were simulated rigourously without approximations or simplifications in the intermediate steps except for the disturbance of the radiation field by the human body which was neglected. Organ doses were calculated for four anthropomorphic phantoms representing a baby, a child, a female and a male adult. The dose of a fetus is given by the dose to the uterus of the adult female. Air kerma and dose conversion factors normalised to air kerma and to source intensity are given for monoenergetic sources and for the natural radionuclides. (orig./HP)

  8. OEDIPE, a software for personalized Monte Carlo dosimetry and treatment planning optimization in nuclear medicine: absorbed dose and biologically effective dose considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitguillaume, A.; Broggio, D.; Franck, D.; Desbree, A.; Bernardini, M.; Labriolle Vaylet, C. de

    2014-01-01

    For targeted radionuclide therapies, treatment planning usually consists of the administration of standard activities without accounting for the patient-specific activity distribution, pharmacokinetics and dosimetry to organs at risk. The OEDIPE software is a user-friendly interface which has an automation level suitable for performing personalized Monte Carlo 3D dosimetry for diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclide administrations. Mean absorbed doses to regions of interest (ROIs), isodose curves superimposed on a personalized anatomical model of the patient and dose-volume histograms can be extracted from the absorbed dose 3D distribution. Moreover, to account for the differences in radiosensitivity between tumoral and healthy tissues, additional functionalities have been implemented to calculate the 3D distribution of the biologically effective dose (BED), mean BEDs to ROIs, isoBED curves and BED-volume histograms along with the Equivalent Uniform Biologically Effective Dose (EUD) to ROIs. Finally, optimization tools are available for treatment planning optimization using either the absorbed dose or BED distributions. These tools enable one to calculate the maximal injectable activity which meets tolerance criteria to organs at risk for a chosen fractionation protocol. This paper describes the functionalities available in the latest version of the OEDIPE software to perform personalized Monte Carlo dosimetry and treatment planning optimization in targeted radionuclide therapies. (authors)

  9. Modelling of HTR (High Temperature Reactor Pebble-Bed 10 MW to Determine Criticality as A Variations of Enrichment and Radius of the Fuel (Kernel With the Monte Carlo Code MCNP4C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammam Oktajianto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas-cooled nuclear reactor is a Generation IV reactor which has been receiving significant attention due to many desired characteristics such as inherent safety, modularity, relatively low cost, short construction period, and easy financing. High temperature reactor (HTR pebble-bed as one of type of gas-cooled reactor concept is getting attention. In HTR pebble-bed design, radius and enrichment of the fuel kernel are the key parameter that can be chosen freely to determine the desired value of criticality. This paper models HTR pebble-bed 10 MW and determines an effective of enrichment and radius of the fuel (Kernel to get criticality value of reactor. The TRISO particle coated fuel particle which was modelled explicitly and distributed in the fuelled region of the fuel pebbles using a Simple-Cubic (SC lattice. The pebble-bed balls and moderator balls distributed in the core zone using a Body-Centred Cubic lattice with assumption of a fresh fuel by the fuel enrichment was 7-17% at 1% range and the size of the fuel radius was 175-300 µm at 25 µm ranges. The geometrical model of the full reactor is obtained by using lattice and universe facilities provided by MCNP4C. The details of model are discussed with necessary simplifications. Criticality calculations were conducted by Monte Carlo transport code MCNP4C and continuous energy nuclear data library ENDF/B-VI. From calculation results can be concluded that an effective of enrichment and radius of fuel (Kernel to achieve a critical condition was the enrichment of 15-17% at a radius of 200 µm, the enrichment of 13-17% at a radius of 225 µm, the enrichments of 12-15% at radius of 250 µm, the enrichments of 11-14% at a radius of 275 µm and the enrichment of 10-13% at a radius of 300 µm, so that the effective of enrichments and radii of fuel (Kernel can be considered in the HTR 10 MW. Keywords—MCNP4C, HTR, enrichment, radius, criticality 

  10. The collapsed cone algorithm for (192)Ir dosimetry using phantom-size adaptive multiple-scatter point kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedgren, Åsa Carlsson; Plamondon, Mathieu; Beaulieu, Luc

    2015-07-07

    The aim of this work was to investigate how dose distributions calculated with the collapsed cone (CC) algorithm depend on the size of the water phantom used in deriving the point kernel for multiple scatter. A research version of the CC algorithm equipped with a set of selectable point kernels for multiple-scatter dose that had initially been derived in water phantoms of various dimensions was used. The new point kernels were generated using EGSnrc in spherical water phantoms of radii 5 cm, 7.5 cm, 10 cm, 15 cm, 20 cm, 30 cm and 50 cm. Dose distributions derived with CC in water phantoms of different dimensions and in a CT-based clinical breast geometry were compared to Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using the Geant4-based brachytherapy specific MC code Algebra. Agreement with MC within 1% was obtained when the dimensions of the phantom used to derive the multiple-scatter kernel were similar to those of the calculation phantom. Doses are overestimated at phantom edges when kernels are derived in larger phantoms and underestimated when derived in smaller phantoms (by around 2% to 7% depending on distance from source and phantom dimensions). CC agrees well with MC in the high dose region of a breast implant and is superior to TG43 in determining skin doses for all multiple-scatter point kernel sizes. Increased agreement between CC and MC is achieved when the point kernel is comparable to breast dimensions. The investigated approximation in multiple scatter dose depends on the choice of point kernel in relation to phantom size and yields a significant fraction of the total dose only at distances of several centimeters from a source/implant which correspond to volumes of low doses. The current implementation of the CC algorithm utilizes a point kernel derived in a comparatively large (radius 20 cm) water phantom. A fixed point kernel leads to predictable behaviour of the algorithm with the worst case being a source/implant located well within a patient

  11. The validation of organ dose calculations using voxel phantoms and Monte Carlo methods applied to point and water immersion sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, J G; da Silva, F C A; Mauricio, C L P; dos Santos, D S

    2004-01-01

    The Monte Carlo program 'Visual Monte Carlo-dose calculation' (VMC-dc) uses a voxel phantom to simulate the body organs and tissues, transports photons through this phantom and reports the absorbed dose received by each organ and tissue relevant to the calculation of effective dose as defined in ICRP Publication 60. This paper shows the validation of VMC-dc by comparison with EGSnrc and with a physical phantom containing TLDs. The validation of VMC-dc by comparison with EGSnrc was made for a collimated beam of 0.662 MeV photons irradiating a cube of water. For the validation by comparison with the physical phantom, the case considered was a whole body irradiation with a point 137Cs source placed at a distance of 1 m from the thorax of an Alderson-RANDO phantom. The validation results show good agreement for the doses obtained using VMC-dc and EGSnrc calculations, and from VMC-dc and TLD measurements. The program VMC-dc was then applied to the calculation of doses due to immersion in water containing gamma emitters. The dose conversion coefficients for water immersion are compared with their equivalents in the literature.

  12. The validation of organ dose calculations using voxel phantoms and Monte Carlo methods applied to point and water immersion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J. G.; Da Silva, F. C. A.; Mauricio, C. L. P.; Dos Santos, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    The Monte Carlo program 'Visual Monte Carlo-dose calculation' (VMC-dc) uses a voxel phantom to simulate the body organs and tissues, transports photons through this phantom and reports the absorbed dose received by each organ and tissue relevant to the calculation of effective dose as defined in ICRP Publication 60. This paper shows the validation of VMC-dc by comparison with EGSnrc and with a physical phantom containing TLDs. The validation of VMC-dc by comparison with EGSnrc was made for a collimated beam of 0.662 MeV photons irradiating a cube of water. For the validation by comparison with the physical phantom, the case considered was a whole body irradiation with a point 137 Cs source placed at a distance of 1 m from the thorax of an Alderson-RANDO phantom. The validation results show good agreement for the doses obtained using VMC-dc and EGSnrc calculations, and from VMC-dc and TLD measurements. The program VMC-dc was then applied to the calculation of doses due to immersion in water containing gamma emitters. The dose conversion coefficients for water immersion are compared with their equivalents in the literature. (authors)

  13. Evaluation of the effect of patient dose from cone beam computed tomography on prostate IMRT using Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, James C L; Leung, Michael K K; Islam, Mohammad K; Norrlinger, Bernhard D; Jaffray, David A

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of the patient dose due to the kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) in a prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The dose distributions for the five prostate IMRTs were calculated using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. To calculate the patient dose from CBCT, phase-space beams of a CBCT head based on the ELEKTA x-ray volume imaging system were generated using the Monte Carlo BEAMnr code for 100, 120, 130, and 140 kVp energies. An in-house graphical user interface called DOSCTP (DOSXYZnrc-based) developed using MATLAB was used to calculate the dose distributions due to a 360 degrees photon arc from the CBCT beam with the same patient CT image sets as used in Pinnacle. The two calculated dose distributions were added together by setting the CBCT doses equal to 1%, 1.5%, 2%, and 2.5% of the prescription dose of the prostate IMRT. The prostate plan and the summed dose distributions were then processed in the CERR platform to determine the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the regions of interest. Moreover, dose profiles along the x- and y-axes crossing the isocenter with and without addition of the CBCT dose were determined. It was found that the added doses due to CBCT are most significant at the femur heads. Higher doses were found at the bones for a relatively low energy CBCT beam such as 100 kVp. Apart from the bones, the CBCT dose was observed to be most concentrated on the anterior and posterior side of the patient anatomy. Analysis of the DVHs for the prostate and other critical tissues showed that they vary only slightly with the added CBCT dose at different beam energies. On the other hand, the changes of the DVHs for the femur heads due to the CBCT dose and beam energy were more significant than those of rectal and bladder wall. By analyzing the vertical and horizontal dose profiles crossing the femur heads and isocenter, with and without the CBCT dose equal to 2% of the

  14. Evaluation of the effect of patient dose from cone beam computed tomography on prostate IMRT using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, James C. L.; Leung, Michael K. K.; Islam, Mohammad K.; Norrlinger, Bernhard D.; Jaffray, David A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of the patient dose due to the kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) in a prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The dose distributions for the five prostate IMRTs were calculated using the Pinnacle3 treatment planning system. To calculate the patient dose from CBCT, phase-space beams of a CBCT head based on the ELEKTA x-ray volume imaging system were generated using the Monte Carlo BEAMnrc code for 100, 120, 130, and 140 kVp energies. An in-house graphical user interface called DOSCTP (DOSXYZnrc-based) developed using MATLAB was used to calculate the dose distributions due to a 360 deg. photon arc from the CBCT beam with the same patient CT image sets as used in Pinnacle3. The two calculated dose distributions were added together by setting the CBCT doses equal to 1%, 1.5%, 2%, and 2.5% of the prescription dose of the prostate IMRT. The prostate plan and the summed dose distributions were then processed in the CERR platform to determine the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the regions of interest. Moreover, dose profiles along the x- and y-axes crossing the isocenter with and without addition of the CBCT dose were determined. It was found that the added doses due to CBCT are most significant at the femur heads. Higher doses were found at the bones for a relatively low energy CBCT beam such as 100 kVp. Apart from the bones, the CBCT dose was observed to be most concentrated on the anterior and posterior side of the patient anatomy. Analysis of the DVHs for the prostate and other critical tissues showed that they vary only slightly with the added CBCT dose at different beam energies. On the other hand, the changes of the DVHs for the femur heads due to the CBCT dose and beam energy were more significant than those of rectal and bladder wall. By analyzing the vertical and horizontal dose profiles crossing the femur heads and isocenter, with and without the CBCT dose equal to 2% of the

  15. Development of 1-year-old computational phantom and calculation of organ doses during CT scans using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Yuxi; Qiu, Rui; Ge, Chaoyong; Xie, Wenzhang; Li, Junli; Gao, Linfeng; Zheng, Junzheng

    2014-01-01

    With the rapidly growing number of CT examinations, the consequential radiation risk has aroused more and more attention. The average dose in each organ during CT scans can only be obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation with computational phantoms. Since children tend to have higher radiation sensitivity than adults, the radiation dose of pediatric CT examinations requires special attention and needs to be assessed accurately. So far, studies on organ doses from CT exposures for pediatric patients are still limited. In this work, a 1-year-old computational phantom was constructed. The body contour was obtained from the CT images of a 1-year-old physical phantom and the internal organs were deformed from an existing Chinese reference adult phantom. To ensure the organ locations in the 1-year-old computational phantom were consistent with those of the physical phantom, the organ locations in 1-year-old computational phantom were manually adjusted one by one, and the organ masses were adjusted to the corresponding Chinese reference values. Moreover, a CT scanner model was developed using the Monte Carlo technique and the 1-year-old computational phantom was applied to estimate organ doses derived from simulated CT exposures. As a result, a database including doses to 36 organs and tissues from 47 single axial scans was built. It has been verified by calculation that doses of axial scans are close to those of helical scans; therefore, this database could be applied to helical scans as well. Organ doses were calculated using the database and compared with those obtained from the measurements made in the physical phantom for helical scans. The differences between simulation and measurement were less than 25% for all organs. The result shows that the 1-year-old phantom developed in this work can be used to calculate organ doses in CT exposures, and the dose database provides a method for the estimation of 1-year-old patient doses in a variety of CT examinations. (paper)

  16. Establishing an individual dosing system for patients undergoing interventional transcatheter arterial embolization: Radiochromic film and Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Hui-Yu; Lai, Pei-Ling; Li, Yang-Ying; Tyan, Yeu-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Less invasive imaging-guided vascular interventions with fluoroscopy and digital subtraction angiography have recently become widespread and have been successfully used for treating various diseases. However, interventional fluoroscopy procedures may present deterministic and stochastic radiation risks. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the Food and Drug Administration have requested identifying procedures that may involve patient doses greater than the recommended thresholds. In this study, radiochromic dosimetric media, known as self-developing films, and measurement-based Monte Carlo simulations were used to establish an interventional radiology dosing system for individual patients undergoing interventional transcatheter arterial embolization. The peak skin dose, evaluated from the entrance surface dose distribution, was 21% less than the cumulated dose reported from the console. A 3D dose map incorporated into CT images was established. The organ doses and effective doses for individual patients were evaluated using this dosing system. This system could be applied very well to other fluoroscopic or interventional procedures for patient dose management.

  17. Monte Carlo simulations of adult and pediatric computed tomography exams: Validation studies of organ doses with physical phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Daniel J.; Lee, Choonsik; Tien, Christopher; Fisher, Ryan; Hoerner, Matthew R.; Hintenlang, David; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To validate the accuracy of a Monte Carlo source model of the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 CT scanner using organ doses measured in physical anthropomorphic phantoms. Methods: The x-ray output of the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 multidetector CT scanner was simulated within the Monte Carlo radiation transport code, MCNPX version 2.6. The resulting source model was able to perform various simulated axial and helical computed tomographic (CT) scans of varying scan parameters, including beam energy, filtration, pitch, and beam collimation. Two custom-built anthropomorphic phantoms were used to take dose measurements on the CT scanner: an adult male and a 9-month-old. The adult male is a physical replica of University of Florida reference adult male hybrid computational phantom, while the 9-month-old is a replica of University of Florida Series B 9-month-old voxel computational phantom. Each phantom underwent a series of axial and helical CT scans, during which organ doses were measured using fiber-optic coupled plastic scintillator dosimeters developed at University of Florida. The physical setup was reproduced and simulated in MCNPX using the CT source model and the computational phantoms upon which the anthropomorphic phantoms were constructed. Average organ doses were then calculated based upon these MCNPX results. Results: For all CT scans, good agreement was seen between measured and simulated organ doses. For the adult male, the percent differences were within 16% for axial scans, and within 18% for helical scans. For the 9-month-old, the percent differences were all within 15% for both the axial and helical scans. These results are comparable to previously published validation studies using GE scanners and commercially available anthropomorphic phantoms. Conclusions: Overall results of this study show that the Monte Carlo source model can be used to accurately and reliably calculate organ doses for patients undergoing a variety of axial or helical CT

  18. The calculation of dose from external photon exposures using reference human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods. Pt. 7. Organ doses due to parallel and environmental exposure geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zankl, M. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Drexler, G. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Petoussi-Henss, N. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Saito, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    This report presents a tabulation of organ and tissue equivalent dose as well as effective dose conversion coefficients, normalised to air kerma free in air, for occupational exposures and environmental exposures of the public to external photon radiation. For occupational exposures, whole-body irradiation with idealised geometries, i.e. broad parallel beams and fully isotropic radiation incidence, is considered. The directions of incidence for the parallel beams are anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left lateral, right lateral and a full 360 rotation around the body`s longitudinal axis. The influence of beam divergence on the body doses is also considered as well as the dependence of effective dose on the angle of radiation incidence. Regarding exposure of the public to environmental sources, three source geometries are considered: exposure from a radioactive cloud, from ground contamination and from the natural radionuclides distributed homogeneously in the ground. The precise angular and energy distributions of the gamma rays incident on the human body were taken into account. The organ dose conversion coefficients given in this catalogue were calculated using a Monte Carlo code simulating the photon transport in mathematical models of an adult male and an adult female, respectively. Conversion coefficients are given for the equivalent dose of 23 organs and tissues as well as for effective dose and the equivalent dose of the so-called `remainder`. The organ equivalent dose conversion coefficients are given separately for the adult male and female models and - as arithmetic mean of the conversion coefficients of both - for an average adult. Fitted data of the coefficients are presented in tables; the primary raw data as resulting from the Monte Carlo calculation are shown in figures together with the fitted data. (orig.)

  19. The calculation of dose from external photon exposures using reference human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods. Pt. 7. Organ doses due to parallel and environmental exposure geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zankl, M.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents a tabulation of organ and tissue equivalent dose as well as effective dose conversion coefficients, normalised to air kerma free in air, for occupational exposures and environmental exposures of the public to external photon radiation. For occupational exposures, whole-body irradiation with idealised geometries, i.e. broad parallel beams and fully isotropic radiation incidence, is considered. The directions of incidence for the parallel beams are anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left lateral, right lateral and a full 360 rotation around the body's longitudinal axis. The influence of beam divergence on the body doses is also considered as well as the dependence of effective dose on the angle of radiation incidence. Regarding exposure of the public to environmental sources, three source geometries are considered: exposure from a radioactive cloud, from ground contamination and from the natural radionuclides distributed homogeneously in the ground. The precise angular and energy distributions of the gamma rays incident on the human body were taken into account. The organ dose conversion coefficients given in this catalogue were calculated using a Monte Carlo code simulating the photon transport in mathematical models of an adult male and an adult female, respectively. Conversion coefficients are given for the equivalent dose of 23 organs and tissues as well as for effective dose and the equivalent dose of the so-called 'remainder'. The organ equivalent dose conversion coefficients are given separately for the adult male and female models and - as arithmetic mean of the conversion coefficients of both - for an average adult. Fitted data of the coefficients are presented in tables; the primary raw data as resulting from the Monte Carlo calculation are shown in figures together with the fitted data. (orig.)

  20. Adapted Prescription Dose for Monte Carlo Algorithm in Lung SBRT: Clinical Outcome on 205 Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Emmanuel Bibault

    Full Text Available SBRT is the standard of care for inoperable patients with early-stage lung cancer without lymph node involvement. Excellent local control rates have been reported in a large number of series. However, prescription doses and calculation algorithms vary to a great extent between studies, even if most teams prescribe to the D95 of the PTV. Type A algorithms are known to produce dosimetric discrepancies in heterogeneous tissues such as lungs. This study was performed to present a Monte Carlo (MC prescription dose for NSCLC adapted to lesion size and location and compare the clinical outcomes of two cohorts of patients treated with a standard prescription dose calculated by a type A algorithm or the proposed MC protocol.Patients were treated from January 2011 to April 2013 with a type B algorithm (MC prescription with 54 Gy in three fractions for peripheral lesions with a diameter under 30 mm, 60 Gy in 3 fractions for lesions with a diameter over 30 mm, and 55 Gy in five fractions for central lesions. Clinical outcome was compared to a series of 121 patients treated with a type A algorithm (TA with three fractions of 20 Gy for peripheral lesions and 60 Gy in five fractions for central lesions prescribed to the PTV D95 until January 2011. All treatment plans were recalculated with both algorithms for this study. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was calculated for GTV and PTV. Local control, overall survival and toxicity were compared between the two groups.205 patients with 214 lesions were included in the study. Among these, 93 lesions were treated with MC and 121 were treated with TA. Overall survival rates were 86% and 94% at one and two years, respectively. Local control rates were 79% and 93% at one and two years respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups for overall survival (p = 0.785 or local control (p = 0.934. Fifty-six patients (27% developed grade I lung fibrosis without clinical consequences. GTV size

  1. Monte Carlo simulation for the estimation of the glandular breast dose for a digital breast tomosynthesis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Leonardo; Braz, Delson; Goncalves Magalhaes, Luis Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a screening and diagnostic modality that acquires images of the breast at multiple angles during a short scan. The Selenia Dimensions (Hologic, Bedford, Mass) DBT system can perform both full-field digital mammography and DBT. The system acquires 15 projections over a 15 deg. angular range (from -7.5 deg. to +7.5 deg.). An important factor in determining the optimal imaging technique for breast tomosynthesis is the radiation dose. In breast imaging, the radiation dose of concern is that deposited in the glandular tissue of the breast because this is the tissue that has a risk of developing cancer. The concept of the normalised mean glandular dose (DgN) has been introduced as the metric for the dose in breast imaging. The DgN is difficult to measure. The Monte Carlo techniques offer an alternative method for a realistic estimation of the radiation dose. The purpose of this work was to use the Monte Carlo code MCNPX technique to generate monoenergetic glandular dose data for estimating the breast tissue dose in tomosynthesis for arbitrary spectra as well as to observe the deposited radiation dose by projection on the glandular portion of the breast in a Selenia Dimensions DBT system. A Monte Carlo simulation of the system was developed to compute the DgN in a craniocaudal view. Monoenergetic X-ray beams from 10 to 49 keV in 1-keV increments were used. The simulation utilised the assumption of a homogeneous breast composition and three compositions (0 % glandular, 50 % glandular and 100 % glandular). The glandular and adipose tissue compositions were specified according ICRU Report 44. A skin layer of 4 mm was assumed to encapsulate the breast on all surfaces. The breast size was varied using the chest wall-to-nipple distance (CND) and compressed breast thickness (t). In this work, the authors assumed a CND of 5 cm and the thicknesses ranged from 2 to 8 cm, in steps of 2 cm. The fractional energy absorption increases (up to 44

  2. Multivariate realised kernels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Hansen, Peter Reinhard; Lunde, Asger

    2011-01-01

    We propose a multivariate realised kernel to estimate the ex-post covariation of log-prices. We show this new consistent estimator is guaranteed to be positive semi-definite and is robust to measurement error of certain types and can also handle non-synchronous trading. It is the first estimator...... which has these three properties which are all essential for empirical work in this area. We derive the large sample asymptotics of this estimator and assess its accuracy using a Monte Carlo study. We implement the estimator on some US equity data, comparing our results to previous work which has used...

  3. Measurement of dose rates and Monte Carlo analysis of neutrons in a spent-fuel shipping vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueki, K.; Namito, Y.; Fuse, T.

    1986-01-01

    On-board experiments were carried out in a spent-fuel shipping vessel, the Pacific Swan, in which 13 casks of TN-12A and Excellox 3 were loaded in five holds, and neutron and gamma-ray dose rates were measured on the hatch covers of the holds. Before shipping those casks, dose rates were also measured on the cask surfaces, one by one, to eliminate radiation from other casks. The Monte Carlo coupling technique was employed successfully to analyze the measured neutron dose rate distributions in the spent-fuel shipping vessel. Through this study, the Monte Carlo coupling code system, MORSE-CG/CASK-VESSEL, on which the MORSE-CG code was based, was established. The agreement between the measured and the calculated neutron dose rates on the TN-12A cask surface was quite satisfactory. The calculated neutron dose rates agreed with the measured values within a factor of 1.5 on the hold 3 hatch cover and within a factor of 2 on the hold 5 hatch cover in which the concrete shield was fixed in the Pacific Swan

  4. The calculation of dose from external photon exposures using reference human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods. Pt. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zankl, M.; Panzer, W.; Drexler, G.

    1991-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a technique which offers a high diagnostic capability; however, the dose to the patient is high compared to conventional radiography. This report provides a catalogue of organ doses resulting from CT examinations. The organ doses were calculated for the type of CT scanners most commonly used in the FRG and for three different radiation qualities. For the dose calculations, the patients were represented by the adult mathematical phantoms Adam and Eva. The radiation transport in the body was simulated using a Monte Carlo method. The doses were calculated as conversion factors of mean organ doses per air kerma free in air on the axis of rotation. Mean organ dose conversion factors are given per organ and per single CT slice of 1 cm width. The mean dose to an organ resulting from a particular CT examination can be estimated by summing up the contribution to the organ dose from each relevant slice. In order to facilitate the selection of the appropriate slices, a table is given which relates the mathematical phantoms' coordinates to certain anatomical landmarks in the human body. (orig.)

  5. Summary and recommendations of a National Cancer Institute workshop on issues limiting the clinical use of Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithms for megavoltage external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraass, Benedick A.; Smathers, James; Deye, James

    2003-01-01

    Due to the significant interest in Monte Carlo dose calculations for external beam megavoltage radiation therapy from both the research and commercial communities, a workshop was held in October 2001 to assess the status of this computational method with regard to use for clinical treatment planning. The Radiation Research Program of the National Cancer Institute, in conjunction with the Nuclear Data and Analysis Group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, gathered a group of experts in clinical radiation therapy treatment planning and Monte Carlo dose calculations, and examined issues involved in clinical implementation of Monte Carlo dose calculation methods in clinical radiotherapy. The workshop examined the current status of Monte Carlo algorithms, the rationale for using Monte Carlo, algorithmic concerns, clinical issues, and verification methodologies. Based on these discussions, the workshop developed recommendations for future NCI-funded research and development efforts. This paper briefly summarizes the issues presented at the workshop and the recommendations developed by the group

  6. Imprecision of dose predictions for radionuclides released to the environment: an application of a Monte Carlo simulation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, G; Hoffman, F O

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation of the imprecision in dose predictions has been performed using current dose assessment models and present knowledge of the variability or uncertainty in model parameter values. The propagation of parameter uncertainties is demonstrated using a Monte Carlo technique for elemental /sup 131/I transported via the pasture-cow-milk-child pathway. The results indicate that when site-specific information is not available the imprecision inherent in the predictions for this pathway is potentially large. Generally, the 99th percentile in thyroid dose for children was predicted to be approximately an order of magnitude greater than the median value. The potential consequences of the imprecision in dose for radiation protection purposes are discussed.

  7. The calculation of dose from external photon exposures using reference human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods. Pt. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, G.; Zankl, M.; Drexler, G.

    1984-12-01

    This report considers the contribution from scattered radiation to the dose to organs and tissues which lie outside the useful therapy beams. The results presented are the product of Monte Carlo studies used to determine the tissue doses due to internal scattering of the useful beams only. General cases are calculated in which central target volumes in the trunk are treated with 10 x 14 cm 2 and 14 x 14 cm 2 fields from 200 kV, Co-60, 8 MV and 25 MV therapy equipment. Target volumes in the neck are considered to be treated with 5 x 5 cm 2 fields. Different treatment plans are calculated including rotational therapy. Also two specific cases are more fully analysed, namely for Ankylosing Spondylitis and central abdomen malignant disease in the region of the head of the pancreas. The calculated organ doses are presented in tables as a percentage of the target volume dose. (orig.)

  8. A Monte-Carlo simulation framework for joint optimisation of image quality and patient dose in digital paediatric radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menser, Bernd; Manke, Dirk; Mentrup, Detlef; Neitzel, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    In paediatric radiography, according to the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) principle, the imaging task should be performed with the lowest possible radiation dose. This paper describes a Monte-Carlo simulation framework for dose optimisation of imaging parameters in digital paediatric radiography. Patient models with high spatial resolution and organ segmentation enable the simultaneous evaluation of image quality and patient dose on the same simulated radiographic examination. The accuracy of the image simulation is analysed by comparing simulated and acquired images of technical phantoms. As a first application example, the framework is applied to optimise tube voltage and pre-filtration in newborn chest radiography. At equal patient dose, the highest CNR is obtained with low-kV settings in combination with copper filtration. (authors)

  9. Local dose enhancement in radiation therapy: Monte Carlo simulation study; Reforco local de dose em radioterapia utilizando nanoparticulas: estudo por simulacao Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Laura E. da; Nicolucci, Patricia, E-mail: laura.emilia.fm@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras

    2014-04-15

    The development of nanotechnology has boosted the use of nanoparticles in radiation therapy in order to achieve greater therapeutic ratio between tumor and healthy tissues. Gold has been shown to be most suitable to this task due to the high biocompatibility and high atomic number, which contributes to a better in vivo distribution and for the local energy deposition. As a result, this study proposes to study, nanoparticle in the tumor cell. At a range of 11 nm from the nanoparticle surface, results have shown an absorbed dose 141 times higher for the medium with the gold nanoparticle compared to the water for an incident energy spectrum with maximum photon energy of 50 keV. It was also noted that when only scattered radiation is interacting with the gold nanoparticles, the dose was 134 times higher compared to enhanced local dose that remained significant even for scattered radiation. (author)

  10. Comparison between beta radiation dose distribution due to LDR and HDR ocular brachytherapy applicators using GATE Monte Carlo platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Laoues; Rachid, Khelifi; Ahmed, Sidi Moussa

    2016-08-01

    Eye applicators with 90Sr/90Y and 106Ru/106Rh beta-ray sources are generally used in brachytherapy for the treatment of eye diseases as uveal melanoma. Whenever, radiation is used in treatment, dosimetry is essential. However, knowledge of the exact dose distribution is a critical decision-making to the outcome of the treatment. The Monte Carlo technique provides a powerful tool for calculation of the dose and dose distributions which helps to predict and determine the doses from different shapes of various types of eye applicators more accurately. The aim of this work consisted in using the Monte Carlo GATE platform to calculate the 3D dose distribution on a mathematical model of the human eye according to international recommendations. Mathematical models were developed for four ophthalmic applicators, two HDR 90Sr applicators SIA.20 and SIA.6, and two LDR 106Ru applicators, a concave CCB model and a flat CCB model. In present work, considering a heterogeneous eye phantom and the chosen tumor, obtained results with the use of GATE for mean doses distributions in a phantom and according to international recommendations show a discrepancy with respect to those specified by the manufacturers. The QC of dosimetric parameters shows that contrarily to the other applicators, the SIA.20 applicator is consistent with recommendations. The GATE platform show that the SIA.20 applicator present better results, namely the dose delivered to critical structures were lower compared to those obtained for the other applicators, and the SIA.6 applicator, simulated with MCNPX generates higher lens doses than those generated by GATE. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. TU-F-CAMPUS-T-05: A Cloud-Based Monte Carlo Dose Calculation for Electron Cutout Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, T; Bush, K [Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: For electron cutouts of smaller sizes, it is necessary to verify electron cutout factors due to perturbations in electron scattering. Often, this requires a physical measurement using a small ion chamber, diode, or film. The purpose of this study is to develop a fast Monte Carlo based dose calculation framework that requires only a smart phone photograph of the cutout and specification of the SSD and energy to determine the electron cutout factor, with the ultimate goal of making this cloud-based calculation widely available to the medical physics community. Methods: The algorithm uses a pattern recognition technique to identify the corners of the cutout in the photograph as shown in Figure 1. It then corrects for variations in perspective, scaling, and translation of the photograph introduced by the user’s positioning of the camera. Blob detection is used to identify the portions of the cutout which comprise the aperture and the portions which are cutout material. This information is then used define physical densities of the voxels used in the Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm as shown in Figure 2, and select a particle source from a pre-computed library of phase-spaces scored above the cutout. The electron cutout factor is obtained by taking a ratio of the maximum dose delivered with the cutout in place to the dose delivered under calibration/reference conditions. Results: The algorithm has been shown to successfully identify all necessary features of the electron cutout to perform the calculation. Subsequent testing will be performed to compare the Monte Carlo results with a physical measurement. Conclusion: A simple, cloud-based method of calculating electron cutout factors could eliminate the need for physical measurements and substantially reduce the time required to properly assure accurate dose delivery.

  12. Estimation of computed tomography dose index in cone beam computed tomography: MOSFET measurements and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangroh; Yoshizumi, Terry; Toncheva, Greta; Yoo, Sua; Yin, Fang-Fang; Frush, Donald

    2010-05-01

    To address the lack of accurate dose estimation method in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), we performed point dose metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. A Varian On-Board Imager (OBI) was employed to measure point doses in the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) CT phantoms with MOSFETs for standard and low dose modes. A MC model of the OBI x-ray tube was developed using BEAMnrc/EGSnrc MC system and validated by the half value layer, x-ray spectrum and lateral and depth dose profiles. We compared the weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) between MOSFET measurements and MC simulations. The CTDIw was found to be 8.39 cGy for the head scan and 4.58 cGy for the body scan from the MOSFET measurements in standard dose mode, and 1.89 cGy for the head and 1.11 cGy for the body in low dose mode, respectively. The CTDIw from MC compared well to the MOSFET measurements within 5% differences. In conclusion, a MC model for Varian CBCT has been established and this approach may be easily extended from the CBCT geometry to multi-detector CT geometry.

  13. Verification of the VEF photon beam model for dose calculations by the voxel-Monte-Carlo-algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriesen, S.; Fippel, M.

    2005-01-01

    The VEF linac head model (VEF, virtual energy fluence) was developed at the University of Tuebingen to determine the primary fluence for calculations of dose distributions in patients by the Voxel-Monte-Carlo-Algorithm (XVMC). This analytical model can be fitted to any therapy accelerator head by measuring only a few basic dose data; therefore, time-consuming Monte-Carlo simulations of the linac head become unnecessary. The aim of the present study was the verification of the VEF model by means of water-phantom measurements, as well as the comparison of this system with a common analytical linac head model of a commercial planning system (TMS, formerly HELAX or MDS Nordion, respectively). The results show that both the VEF and the TMS models can very well simulate the primary fluence. However, the VEF model proved superior in the simulations of scattered radiation and in the calculations of strongly irregular MLC fields. Thus, an accurate and clinically practicable tool for the determination of the primary fluence for Monte-Carlo-Simulations with photons was established, especially for the use in IMRT planning. (orig.)

  14. [Verification of the VEF photon beam model for dose calculations by the Voxel-Monte-Carlo-Algorithm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriesen, Stephan; Fippel, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    The VEF linac head model (VEF, virtual energy fluence) was developed at the University of Tübingen to determine the primary fluence for calculations of dose distributions in patients by the Voxel-Monte-Carlo-Algorithm (XVMC). This analytical model can be fitted to any therapy accelerator head by measuring only a few basic dose data; therefore, time-consuming Monte-Carlo simulations of the linac head become unnecessary. The aim of the present study was the verification of the VEF model by means of water-phantom measurements, as well as the comparison of this system with a common analytical linac head model of a commercial planning system (TMS, formerly HELAX or MDS Nordion, respectively). The results show that both the VEF and the TMS models can very well simulate the primary fluence. However, the VEF model proved superior in the simulations of scattered radiation and in the calculations of strongly irregular MLC fields. Thus, an accurate and clinically practicable tool for the determination of the primary fluence for Monte-Carlo-Simulations with photons was established, especially for the use in IMRT planning.

  15. TU-F-18A-03: Improving Tissue Segmentation for Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Using DECT Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di, Salvio A; Bedwani, S; Carrier, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a new segmentation technique using dual energy CT (DECT) to overcome limitations related to segmentation from a standard Hounsfield unit (HU) to electron density (ED) calibration curve. Both methods are compared with a Monte Carlo analysis of dose distribution. Methods: DECT allows a direct calculation of both ED and effective atomic number (EAN) within a given voxel. The EAN is here defined as a function of the total electron cross-section of a medium. These values can be effectively acquired using a calibrated method from scans at two different energies. A prior stoichiometric calibration on a Gammex RMI phantom allows us to find the parameters to calculate EAN and ED within a voxel. Scans from a Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash dual source system provided the data for our study. A Monte Carlo analysis compares dose distribution simulated by dosxyz-nrc, considering a head phantom defined by both segmentation techniques. Results: Results from depth dose and dose profile calculations show that materials with different atomic compositions but similar EAN present differences of less than 1%. Therefore, it is possible to define a short list of basis materials from which density can be adapted to imitate interaction behavior of any tissue. Comparison of the dose distributions on both segmentations shows a difference of 50% in dose in areas surrounding bone at low energy. Conclusion: The presented segmentation technique allows a more accurate medium definition in each voxel, especially in areas of tissue transition. Since the behavior of human tissues is highly sensitive at low energies, this reduces the errors on calculated dose distribution. This method could be further developed to optimize the tissue characterization based on anatomic site

  16. TU-F-18A-03: Improving Tissue Segmentation for Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Using DECT Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di, Salvio A; Bedwani, S; Carrier, J [CHUM - Notre-Dame, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a new segmentation technique using dual energy CT (DECT) to overcome limitations related to segmentation from a standard Hounsfield unit (HU) to electron density (ED) calibration curve. Both methods are compared with a Monte Carlo analysis of dose distribution. Methods: DECT allows a direct calculation of both ED and effective atomic number (EAN) within a given voxel. The EAN is here defined as a function of the total electron cross-section of a medium. These values can be effectively acquired using a calibrated method from scans at two different energies. A prior stoichiometric calibration on a Gammex RMI phantom allows us to find the parameters to calculate EAN and ED within a voxel. Scans from a Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash dual source system provided the data for our study. A Monte Carlo analysis compares dose distribution simulated by dosxyz-nrc, considering a head phantom defined by both segmentation techniques. Results: Results from depth dose and dose profile calculations show that materials with different atomic compositions but similar EAN present differences of less than 1%. Therefore, it is possible to define a short list of basis materials from which density can be adapted to imitate interaction behavior of any tissue. Comparison of the dose distributions on both segmentations shows a difference of 50% in dose in areas surrounding bone at low energy. Conclusion: The presented segmentation technique allows a more accurate medium definition in each voxel, especially in areas of tissue transition. Since the behavior of human tissues is highly sensitive at low energies, this reduces the errors on calculated dose distribution. This method could be further developed to optimize the tissue characterization based on anatomic site.

  17. Experimental verification of a commercial Monte Carlo-based dose calculation module for high-energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuenzler, Thomas; Fotina, Irina; Stock, Markus; Georg, Dietmar

    2009-01-01

    The dosimetric performance of a Monte Carlo algorithm as implemented in a commercial treatment planning system (iPlan, BrainLAB) was investigated. After commissioning and basic beam data tests in homogenous phantoms, a variety of single regular beams and clinical field arrangements were tested in heterogeneous conditions (conformal therapy, arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy including simultaneous integrated boosts). More specifically, a cork phantom containing a concave-shaped target was designed to challenge the Monte Carlo algorithm in more complex treatment cases. All test irradiations were performed on an Elekta linac providing 6, 10 and 18 MV photon beams. Absolute and relative dose measurements were performed with ion chambers and near tissue equivalent radiochromic films which were placed within a transverse plane of the cork phantom. For simple fields, a 1D gamma (γ) procedure with a 2% dose difference and a 2 mm distance to agreement (DTA) was applied to depth dose curves, as well as to inplane and crossplane profiles. The average gamma value was 0.21 for all energies of simple test cases. For depth dose curves in asymmetric beams similar gamma results as for symmetric beams were obtained. Simple regular fields showed excellent absolute dosimetric agreement to measurement values with a dose difference of 0.1% ± 0.9% (1 standard deviation) at the dose prescription point. A more detailed analysis at tissue interfaces revealed dose discrepancies of 2.9% for an 18 MV energy 10 x 10 cm 2 field at the first density interface from tissue to lung equivalent material. Small fields (2 x 2 cm 2 ) have their largest discrepancy in the re-build-up at the second interface (from lung to tissue equivalent material), with a local dose difference of about 9% and a DTA of 1.1 mm for 18 MV. Conformal field arrangements, arc therapy, as well as IMRT beams and simultaneous integrated boosts were in good agreement with absolute dose measurements in the

  18. Clinical evaluation of a dose monitoring software tool based on Monte Carlo Simulation in assessment of eye lens doses for cranial CT scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guberina, Nika; Suntharalingam, Saravanabavaan; Nassenstein, Kai; Forsting, Michael; Theysohn, Jens; Wetter, Axel; Ringelstein, Adrian [University Hospital Essen, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    The aim of this study was to verify the results of a dose monitoring software tool based on Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) in assessment of eye lens doses for cranial CT scans. In cooperation with the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Neuherberg, Germany), phantom measurements were performed with thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD LiF:Mg,Ti) using cranial CT protocols: (I) CT angiography; (II) unenhanced, cranial CT scans with gantry angulation at a single and (III) without gantry angulation at a dual source CT scanner. Eye lens doses calculated by the dose monitoring tool based on MCS and assessed with TLDs were compared. Eye lens doses are summarized as follows: (I) CT angiography (a) MCS 7 mSv, (b) TLD 5 mSv; (II) unenhanced, cranial CT scan with gantry angulation, (c) MCS 45 mSv, (d) TLD 5 mSv; (III) unenhanced, cranial CT scan without gantry angulation (e) MCS 38 mSv, (f) TLD 35 mSv. Intermodality comparison shows an inaccurate calculation of eye lens doses in unenhanced cranial CT protocols at the single source CT scanner due to the disregard of gantry angulation. On the contrary, the dose monitoring tool showed an accurate calculation of eye lens doses at the dual source CT scanner without gantry angulation and for CT angiography examinations. The dose monitoring software tool based on MCS gave accurate estimates of eye lens doses in cranial CT protocols. However, knowledge of protocol and software specific influences is crucial for correct assessment of eye lens doses in routine clinical use. (orig.)

  19. Clinical evaluation of a dose monitoring software tool based on Monte Carlo Simulation in assessment of eye lens doses for cranial CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guberina, Nika; Suntharalingam, Saravanabavaan; Nassenstein, Kai; Forsting, Michael; Theysohn, Jens; Wetter, Axel; Ringelstein, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the results of a dose monitoring software tool based on Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) in assessment of eye lens doses for cranial CT scans. In cooperation with the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Neuherberg, Germany), phantom measurements were performed with thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD LiF:Mg,Ti) using cranial CT protocols: (I) CT angiography; (II) unenhanced, cranial CT scans with gantry angulation at a single and (III) without gantry angulation at a dual source CT scanner. Eye lens doses calculated by the dose monitoring tool based on MCS and assessed with TLDs were compared. Eye lens doses are summarized as follows: (I) CT angiography (a) MCS 7 mSv, (b) TLD 5 mSv; (II) unenhanced, cranial CT scan with gantry angulation, (c) MCS 45 mSv, (d) TLD 5 mSv; (III) unenhanced, cranial CT scan without gantry angulation (e) MCS 38 mSv, (f) TLD 35 mSv. Intermodality comparison shows an inaccurate calculation of eye lens doses in unenhanced cranial CT protocols at the single source CT scanner due to the disregard of gantry angulation. On the contrary, the dose monitoring tool showed an accurate calculation of eye lens doses at the dual source CT scanner without gantry angulation and for CT angiography examinations. The dose monitoring software tool based on MCS gave accurate estimates of eye lens doses in cranial CT protocols. However, knowledge of protocol and software specific influences is crucial for correct assessment of eye lens doses in routine clinical use. (orig.)

  20. Study of the heterogeneities effect in the dose distributions of Leksell Gamma Knife (R), through Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas C, E.L.; Al-Dweri, F.M.O.; Lallena R, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    In this work they are studied, by means of Monte Carlo simulation, the effects that take place in the dose profiles that are obtained with the Leksell Gamma Knife (R), when they are kept in account heterogeneities. The considered heterogeneities simulate the skull and the spaces of air that are in the head, like they can be the nasal breasts or the auditory conduits. The calculations were made using the Monte Carlo Penelope simulation code (v. 2003). The geometry of each one of the 201 sources that this instrument is composed, as well as of the corresponding channels of collimation of the Gamma Knife (R), it was described by means of a simplified model of geometry that has been recently studied. The obtained results when they are kept in mind the heterogeneities they present non worthless differences regarding those obtained when those are not considered. These differences are maximum in the proximities of the interfaces among different materials. (Author)

  1. CELLDOSE: A Monte Carlo code to assess electron dose distribution - S values for 131I in spheres of various sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champion, C.; Zanotti-Fregonara, P.; Hindie, E; Hindie, E.

    2008-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation can be particularly suitable for modeling the microscopic distribution of energy received by normal tissues or cancer cells and for evaluating the relative merits of different radiopharmaceuticals. We used a new code, CELLDOSE, to assess electron dose for isolated spheres with radii varying from 2,500 μm down to 0.05 μm, in which 131 I is homogeneously distributed. Methods: All electron emissions of 131 I were considered,including the whole β - 131 I spectrum, 108 internal conversion electrons, and 21 Auger electrons. The Monte Carlo track-structure code used follows all electrons down to an energy threshold E-cutoff 7.4 eV. Results: Calculated S values were in good agreement with published analytic methods, lying in between reported results for all experimental points. Our S values were also close to other published data using a Monte Carlo code. Contrary to the latter published results, our results show that dose distribution inside spheres is not homogeneous, with the dose at the outmost layer being approximately half that at the center. The fraction of electron energy retained within the spheres decreased with decreasing radius (r): 87.1 % for r 2,500 μm, 8.73% for r 50 μm, and 1.18% for r 5 μm. Thus, a radioiodine concentration that delivers a dose of 100 Gy to a micro-metastasis of 2,500 μm radius would deliver 10 Gy in a cluster of 50 μm and only 1.4 Gy in an isolated cell. The specific contribution from Auger electrons varied from 0.25% for the largest sphere up to 76.8% for the smallest sphere. Conclusion: The dose to a tumor cell will depend on its position in a metastasis. For the treatment of very small metastases, 131 I may not be the isotope of choice. When trying to kill isolated cells or a small cluster of cells with 131 I, it is important to get the iodine as close as possible to the nucleus to get the enhancement factor from Auger electrons. The Monte Carlo code CELLDOSE can be used to assess the electron map deposit

  2. Changes in dose with segmentation of breast tissues in Monte Carlo calculations for low-energy brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, J. G. H.; Thomson, R. M.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of various breast tissue segmentation models in Monte Carlo dose calculations for low-energy brachytherapy. Methods: The EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose is used to perform Monte Carlo simulations of a breast brachytherapy treatment using TheraSeed Pd-103 seeds with various breast tissue segmentation models. Models used include a phantom where voxels are randomly assigned to be gland or adipose (randomly segmented), a phantom where a single tissue of averaged gland and adipose is present (averaged tissue), and a realistically segmented phantom created from previously published numerical phantoms. Radiation transport in averaged tissue while scoring in gland along with other combinations is investigated. The inclusion of calcifications in the breast is also studied in averaged tissue and randomly segmented phantoms. Results: In randomly segmented and averaged tissue phantoms, the photon energy fluence is approximately the same; however, differences occur in the dose volume histograms (DVHs) as a result of scoring in the different tissues (gland and adipose versus averaged tissue), whose mass energy absorption coefficients differ by 30%. A realistically segmented phantom is shown to significantly change the photon energy fluence compared to that in averaged tissue or randomly segmented phantoms. Despite this, resulting DVHs for the entire treatment volume agree reasonably because fluence differences are compensated by dose scoring differences. DVHs for the dose to only the gland voxels in a realistically segmented phantom do not agree with those for dose to gland in an averaged tissue phantom. Calcifications affect photon energy fluence to such a degree that the differences in fluence are not compensated for (as they are in the no calcification case) by dose scoring in averaged tissue phantoms. Conclusions: For low-energy brachytherapy, if photon transport and dose scoring both occur in an averaged tissue, the resulting DVH for the entire

  3. Changes in dose with segmentation of breast tissues in Monte Carlo calculations for low-energy brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, J. G. H.; Thomson, R. M.; Rogers, D. W. O. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of various breast tissue segmentation models in Monte Carlo dose calculations for low-energy brachytherapy. Methods: The EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose is used to perform Monte Carlo simulations of a breast brachytherapy treatment using TheraSeed Pd-103 seeds with various breast tissue segmentation models. Models used include a phantom where voxels are randomly assigned to be gland or adipose (randomly segmented), a phantom where a single tissue of averaged gland and adipose is present (averaged tissue), and a realistically segmented phantom created from previously published numerical phantoms. Radiation transport in averaged tissue while scoring in gland along with other combinations is investigated. The inclusion of calcifications in the breast is also studied in averaged tissue and randomly segmented phantoms. Results: In randomly segmented and averaged tissue phantoms, the photon energy fluence is approximately the same; however, differences occur in the dose volume histograms (DVHs) as a result of scoring in the different tissues (gland and adipose versus averaged tissue), whose mass energy absorption coefficients differ by 30%. A realistically segmented phantom is shown to significantly change the photon energy fluence compared to that in averaged tissue or randomly segmented phantoms. Despite this, resulting DVHs for the entire treatment volume agree reasonably because fluence differences are compensated by dose scoring differences. DVHs for the dose to only the gland voxels in a realistically segmented phantom do not agree with those for dose to gland in an averaged tissue phantom. Calcifications affect photon energy fluence to such a degree that the differences in fluence are not compensated for (as they are in the no calcification case) by dose scoring in averaged tissue phantoms. Conclusions: For low-energy brachytherapy, if photon transport and dose scoring both occur in an averaged tissue, the resulting DVH for the entire

  4. Electron Irradiation of Conjunctival Lymphoma-Monte Carlo Simulation of the Minute Dose Distribution and Technique Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brualla, Lorenzo, E-mail: lorenzo.brualla@uni-due.de [NCTeam, Strahlenklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Essen (Germany); Zaragoza, Francisco J.; Sempau, Josep [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Wittig, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Giessen and Marburg, Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Sauerwein, Wolfgang [NCTeam, Strahlenklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Essen (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy is the only conservative curative approach for Stage I non-Hodgkin lymphomas of the conjunctiva. The target volume is geometrically complex because it includes the eyeball and lid conjunctiva. Furthermore, the target volume is adjacent to radiosensitive structures, including the lens, lacrimal glands, cornea, retina, and papilla. The radiotherapy planning and optimization requires accurate calculation of the dose in these anatomical structures that are much smaller than the structures traditionally considered in radiotherapy. Neither conventional treatment planning systems nor dosimetric measurements can reliably determine the dose distribution in these small irradiated volumes. Methods and Materials: The Monte Carlo simulations of a Varian Clinac 2100 C/D and human eye were performed using the PENELOPE and PENEASYLINAC codes. Dose distributions and dose volume histograms were calculated for the bulbar conjunctiva, cornea, lens, retina, papilla, lacrimal gland, and anterior and posterior hemispheres. Results: The simulated results allow choosing the most adequate treatment setup configuration, which is an electron beam energy of 6 MeV with additional bolus and collimation by a cerrobend block with a central cylindrical hole of 3.0 cm diameter and central cylindrical rod of 1.0 cm diameter. Conclusions: Monte Carlo simulation is a useful method to calculate the minute dose distribution in ocular tissue and to optimize the electron irradiation technique in highly critical structures. Using a voxelized eye phantom based on patient computed tomography images, the dose distribution can be estimated with a standard statistical uncertainty of less than 2.4% in 3 min using a computing cluster with 30 cores, which makes this planning technique clinically relevant.

  5. Assessment of influence of OSL dosimeters in the skin dose in radiotherapy: study for Monte Carlo simulation; Avaliacao da influencia de dosimetros OSL na dose na pele em radioterapia: estudo por simulacao Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuch, Franciely F.; Nicolucci, Patricia, E-mail: franschuch@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeiraoo Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    The interest in optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimetry materials is growing due to its potential use in quality control in Radiotherapy. The use of these dosimeters for in vivo dosimetry, however, may influence the dose to the skin and deeper tissues in the patient. The goal of this study is to evaluate the influence of the OSL Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} material in dose deposited in the skin and deep in Radiotherapy. Monte Carlo simulation is used to evaluate this purpose when OSL dosimeters of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are positioned on the skin surface of the patient. Percentage depth dose curves for clinical beams of 6 and 10 MV were simulated with and without the presence of the dosimeter on the surface of a water phantom. The results showed a decrease of doses in regions close to the surface of the skin. In the build-up region, the maximum decreases of dose produced by the presence of the dosimeters were 52,5% and 47,5% for the 6 and 10 MV beams, respectively. After the build-up region, there are not significant changes in the doses for any of the used beams. The differences of doses found are due to the influence of the dosimetric material on the relative fluence of electrons near the end surface of the dosimeter. Thus, the results showed that the presence of the dosimetric material on the surface interferes on the skin dose. However, these dosimeters do not cause dose variations in depths of clinical interest, allowing its application in routine in vivo dosimetry in Radiotherapy. (author)

  6. Evaluation of the new electron-transport algorithm in MCNP6.1 for the simulation of dose point kernel in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Rodolphe; Bourgois, Laurent

    2017-12-01

    In this work, the calculation of specific dose distribution in water is evaluated in MCNP6.1 with the regular condensed history algorithm the "detailed electron energy-loss straggling logic" and the new electrons transport algorithm proposed the "single event algorithm". Dose Point Kernel (DPK) is calculated with monoenergetic electrons of 50, 100, 500, 1000 and 3000 keV for different scoring cells dimensions. A comparison between MCNP6 results and well-validated codes for electron-dosimetry, i.e., EGSnrc or Penelope, is performed. When the detailed electron energy-loss straggling logic is used with default setting (down to the cut-off energy 1 keV), we infer that the depth of the dose peak increases with decreasing thickness of the scoring cell, largely due to combined step-size and boundary crossing artifacts. This finding is less prominent for 500 keV, 1 MeV and 3 MeV dose profile. With an appropriate number of sub-steps (ESTEP value in MCNP6), the dose-peak shift is almost complete absent to 50 keV and 100 keV electrons. However, the dose-peak is more prominent compared to EGSnrc and the absorbed dose tends to be underestimated at greater depths, meaning that boundaries crossing artifact are still occurring while step-size artifacts are greatly reduced. When the single-event mode is used for the whole transport, we observe the good agreement of reference and calculated profile for 50 and 100 keV electrons. Remaining artifacts are fully vanished, showing a possible transport treatment for energies less than a hundred of keV and accordance with reference for whatever scoring cell dimension, even if the single event method initially intended to support electron transport at energies below 1 keV. Conversely, results for 500 keV, 1 MeV and 3 MeV undergo a dramatic discrepancy with reference curves. These poor results and so the current unreliability of the method is for a part due to inappropriate elastic cross section treatment from the ENDF/B-VI.8 library in those

  7. The Monte Carlo SRNA-VOX code for 3D proton dose distribution in voxelized geometry using CT data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilic, Radovan D; Spasic-Jokic, Vesna; Belicev, Petar; Dragovic, Milos

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the SRNA Monte Carlo package for proton transport simulations in complex geometry and different material compositions. The SRNA package was developed for 3D dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry and it was based on the theory of multiple scattering. The decay of proton induced compound nuclei was simulated by the Russian MSDM model and our own using ICRU 63 data. The developed package consists of two codes: the SRNA-2KG, which simulates proton transport in combinatorial geometry and the SRNA-VOX, which uses the voxelized geometry using the CT data and conversion of the Hounsfield's data to tissue elemental composition. Transition probabilities for both codes are prepared by the SRNADAT code. The simulation of the proton beam characterization by multi-layer Faraday cup, spatial distribution of positron emitters obtained by the SRNA-2KG code and intercomparison of computational codes in radiation dosimetry, indicate immediate application of the Monte Carlo techniques in clinical practice. In this paper, we briefly present the physical model implemented in the SRNA package, the ISTAR proton dose planning software, as well as the results of the numerical experiments with proton beams to obtain 3D dose distribution in the eye and breast tumour

  8. Monte Carlo evaluation of hand and finger doses due to exposure to 18F in PET procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessanha, Paula R.; Queiroz Filho, Pedro P.; Santos, Denison S.; Mauricio, Claudia L.P.

    2011-01-01

    The increasing number of PET procedures performed in nuclear medicine, and, consequently, of workers handling radiopharmaceuticals, is a potential hazard in radiation protection. It is then necessary to evaluate the doses of workers employed in the practice of PET. In this work, the Geant4 Monte Carlo code was used to evaluate doses to fingers and hands of those workers. A geometric phantom, representing the hand of the professional inserted in the clinical procedure, was implemented in the simulation code, with dimensions of a standard man's forearm, which in this case will assess the exposure of the extremities. The geometric phantom is designed so that a simple definition of joint angles configures the fingers, allowing investigations into alternative configurations. Thus, it was possible the placement of the phantom fingers, to simulate all forms of manipulation of a syringe, and subsequently obtain exposure data, relating to the administration procedure of the PET radiopharmaceutical to the patient. The simulation was validated by the irradiation of a REMAB R hand phantom, consisting of a human skeleton hand covered by a tenite II shell, which can be filled with water. Air Kerma values were obtained from the beam dosimetry, which was done with a calibrated ionization chamber. The reading of TLD's, placed on certain points of the surface of the phantom, were compared with the values obtained in the Monte Carlo simulation. After validation of the program, we obtained dose values for the PET procedure, simulating syringes with and without shielding. (author)

  9. Assessment of ocular beta radiation dose distribution due to 106Ru/106Rh brachytherapy applicators using MCNPX Monte Carlo code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilseia Aparecida Barbosa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Melanoma at the choroid region is the most common primary cancer that affects the eye in adult patients. Concave ophthalmic applicators with 106Ru/106Rh beta sources are the more used for treatment of these eye lesions, mainly lesions with small and medium dimensions. The available treatment planning system for 106Ru applicators is based on dose distributions on a homogeneous water sphere eye model, resulting in a lack of data in the literature of dose distributions in the eye radiosensitive structures, information that may be crucial to improve the treatment planning process, aiming the maintenance of visual acuity. Methods: The Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used to calculate the dose distribution in a complete mathematical model of the human eye containing a choroid melanoma; considering the eye actual dimensions and its various component structures, due to an ophthalmic brachytherapy treatment, using 106Ru/106Rh beta-ray sources. Two possibilities were analyzed; a simple water eye and a heterogeneous eye considering all its structures. Two concave applicators, CCA and CCB manufactured by BEBIG and a complete mathematical model of the human eye were modeled using the MCNPX code. Results and Conclusion: For both eye models, namely water model and heterogeneous model, mean dose values simulated for the same eye regions are, in general, very similar, excepting for regions very distant from the applicator, where mean dose values are very low, uncertainties are higher and relative differences may reach 20.4%. For the tumor base and the eye structures closest to the applicator, such as sclera, choroid and retina, the maximum difference observed was 4%, presenting the heterogeneous model higher mean dose values. For the other eye regions, the higher doses were obtained when the homogeneous water eye model is taken into consideration. Mean dose distributions determined for the homogeneous water eye model are similar to those obtained for the

  10. Monte Carlo determination of dose in crystalline and thyroid during chest tomography examinations; Determinacion Monte Carlo de dosis en cristalino y tiroides durante examenes de tomografia de torax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quispe H, B.; Pena V, J. D.; Waldo B, G.; Leon M, M.; Ceron R, P.; Vallejo H, A.; Sosa A, M. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Campus Leon, Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias, Loma del Bosque 103, Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: b.quispehuillcara@ugto.mx [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98060 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2017-10-15

    Computed tomography is a diagnostic imaging method that deposits higher doses than other radio diagnosis methods. The knowledge of the spectrum of X-rays is important, since is in direct function with the dose absorbed by the patient. In this work we estimated the spectrum of X-rays, produced during the interaction of monoenergetic electrons of 130 KeV with Tungsten white, in order to determine their energetic characteristics at 50 cm from the focal point. The study was done using Monte Carlo methods with the code MCNP5 where the X-ray tube of a Siemens SOMATOM Perspective tomograph of the General Regional Hospital of Leon, Mexico was modeled. In the calculations, 3 x 10{sup 8} stories were used and a relative uncertainty of less than 0.1% was obtained. Also, a neck manikin with thyroid, thorax and head that included the eye, the table and gantry with 70 cm opening of the tomography was modeled. The X-ray spectrum calculated with a cut thickness of 10 mm limited by Pb collimators was used as the source term. The radiological service routine scanning protocol was used for chest computed tomography; the step-by-step or instant trigger method was simulated by moving the manikin coordinates for each cut and 360 degree continuous rotation movement. 36 positions of the X-ray tube were used in steps of 10 degrees. The radiation dispersed in the thorax deposits a dose of 2.063 mGy in crystalline and 252 mGy in thyroid. (Author)

  11. On the use of Gafchromic EBT3 films for validating a commercial electron Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, EuJin; Lydon, Jenny; Kron, Tomas

    2015-03-07

    This study aims to investigate the effects of oblique incidence, small field size and inhomogeneous media on the electron dose distribution, and to compare calculated (Elekta/CMS XiO) and measured results. All comparisons were done in terms of absolute dose. A new measuring method was developed for high resolution, absolute dose measurement of non-standard beams using Gafchromic® EBT3 film. A portable U-shaped holder was designed and constructed to hold EBT3 films vertically in a reproducible setup submerged in a water phantom. The experimental film method was verified with ionisation chamber measurements and agreed to within 2% or 1 mm. Agreement between XiO electron Monte Carlo (eMC) and EBT3 was within 2% or 2 mm for most standard fields and 3% or 3 mm for the non-standard fields. Larger differences were seen in the build-up region where XiO eMC overestimates dose by up to 10% for obliquely incident fields and underestimates the dose for small circular fields by up to 5% when compared to measurement. Calculations with inhomogeneous media mimicking ribs, lung and skull tissue placed at the side of the film in water agreed with measurement to within 3% or 3 mm. Gafchromic film in water proved to be a convenient high spatial resolution method to verify dose distributions from electrons in non-standard conditions including irradiation in inhomogeneous media.

  12. The calculation of dose from external photon exposures using reference human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drexler, G.; Panzer, W.; Widenmann, L.; Williams, G.; Zankl, M.

    1984-03-01

    This report gives tables of conversion factors for the calculation of organ doses from technical parameters of typical radiographic techniques. These conversion factors were calculated using a male and a female mathematical human phantom and an efficient Monte Carlo programme that determines the mean organ doses from the energy deposited in each organ. Each diagnostic X-ray examination is studied using three X-ray spectra resulting from three different high tension values. The conversion factors per unit entrance air dose in free air are given for sixteen organs and for the entrance and exit surface skin doses. The tables are actually valid only for the given parameters such as phantom dimensions, source-to-skin distance, projection and X-ray quality. This, of course, gives rise to some uncertainty when dealing with the individual technique and patient. The uncertainty in organ dose of adult patients, however, should not be very large, if the calculation is based on a similar geometry, and before all, on the actually administered entrance air dose in the selected high tension range according to the patient parameters. (orig.)

  13. Development of PC based Monte Carlo simulations for the calculation of scanner-specific normalized organ doses from CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, J. T. M.; Shrimpton, P. C.; Zankl, M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the simulation of contemporary computed tomography (CT) scanners using Monte Carlo calculation methods to derive normalized organ doses, which enable hospital physicists to estimate typical organ and effective doses for CT examinations. The hardware used in a small PC-cluster at the Health Protection Agency (HPA) for these calculations is described. Investigations concerning optimization of software, including the radiation transport codes MCNP5 and MCNPX, and the Intel and PGI FORTRAN compilers, are presented in relation to results and calculation speed. Differences in approach for modelling the X-ray source are described and their influences are analysed. Comparisons with previously published calculations at HPA from the early 1990's proved satisfactory for the purposes of quality assurance and are presented in terms of organ dose ratios for whole body exposure and differences in organ location. Influences on normalized effective dose are discussed in relation to choice of cross section library, CT scanner technology (contemporary multi slice versus single slice), definition for effective dose (1990 and 2007 versions) and anthropomorphic phantom (mathematical and voxel). The results illustrate the practical need for the updated scanner-specific dose coefficients presently being calculated at HPA, in order to facilitate improved dosimetry for contemporary CT practice. (authors)

  14. WE-EF-BRA-02: A Monte Carlo Study of Macroscopic and Microscopic Dose Descriptors for Kilovoltage Cellular Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, P; Thomson, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how doses to cellular (microscopic) targets depend on cell morphology, and how cellular doses relate to doses to bulk tissues and water for 20 to 370 keV photon sources using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: Simulation geometries involve cell clusters, single cells, and single nuclear cavities embedded in various healthy and cancerous bulk tissue phantoms. A variety of nucleus and cytoplasm elemental compositions are investigated. Cell and nucleus radii range from 5 to 10 microns and 2 to 9 microns, respectively. Doses to water and bulk tissue cavities are compared to nucleus and cytoplasm doses. Results: Variations in cell dose with simulation geometry are most pronounced for lower energy sources. Nuclear doses are sensitive to the surrounding geometry: the nuclear dose in a multicell model differs from the dose to a cavity of nuclear medium in an otherwise homogeneous bulk tissue phantom by more than 7% at 20 keV. Nuclear doses vary with cell size by up to 20% at 20 keV, with 10% differences persisting up to 90 keV. Bulk tissue and water cavity doses differ from cellular doses by up to 16%. MC results are compared to cavity theory predictions; large and small cavity theories qualitatively predict nuclear doses for energies below and above 50 keV, respectively. Burlin’s (1969) intermediate cavity theory best predicts MC results with an average discrepancy of 4%. Conclusion: Cellular doses vary as a function of source energy, subcellular compartment size, elemental composition, and tissue morphology. Neither water nor bulk tissue is an appropriate surrogate for subcellular targets in radiation dosimetry. The influence of microscopic inhomogeneities in the surrounding environment on the nuclear dose and the importance of the nucleus as a target for radiation-induced cell death emphasizes the potential importance of cellular dosimetry for understanding radiation effects. Funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

  15. A Monte Carlo simulation framework for electron beam dose calculations using Varian phase space files for TrueBeam Linacs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Anna; Sawkey, Daren; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Qiuwen

    2015-05-01

    To develop a framework for accurate electron Monte Carlo dose calculation. In this study, comprehensive validations of vendor provided electron beam phase space files for Varian TrueBeam Linacs against measurement data are presented. In this framework, the Monte Carlo generated phase space files were provided by the vendor and used as input to the downstream plan-specific simulations including jaws, electron applicators, and water phantom computed in the EGSnrc environment. The phase space files were generated based on open field commissioning data. A subset of electron energies of 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV and open and collimated field sizes 3 × 3, 4 × 4, 5 × 5, 6 × 6, 10 × 10, 15 × 15, 20 × 20, and 25 × 25 cm(2) were evaluated. Measurements acquired with a CC13 cylindrical ionization chamber and electron diode detector and simulations from this framework were compared for a water phantom geometry. The evaluation metrics include percent depth dose, orthogonal and diagonal profiles at depths R100, R50, Rp, and Rp+ for standard and extended source-to-surface distances (SSD), as well as cone and cut-out output factors. Agreement for the percent depth dose and orthogonal profiles between measurement and Monte Carlo was generally within 2% or 1 mm. The largest discrepancies were observed within depths of 5 mm from phantom surface. Differences in field size, penumbra, and flatness for the orthogonal profiles at depths R100, R50, and Rp were within 1 mm, 1 mm, and 2%, respectively. Orthogonal profiles at SSDs of 100 and 120 cm showed the same level of agreement. Cone and cut-out output factors agreed well with maximum differences within 2.5% for 6 MeV and 1% for all other energies. Cone output factors at extended SSDs of 105, 110, 115, and 120 cm exhibited similar levels of agreement. We have presented a Monte Carlo simulation framework for electron beam dose calculations for Varian TrueBeam Linacs. Electron beam energies of 6 to 20 MeV for open and collimated

  16. Quality control of the treatment planning systems dose calculations in external radiation therapy using the Penelope Monte Carlo code; Controle qualite des systemes de planification dosimetrique des traitements en radiotherapie externe au moyen du code Monte-Carlo Penelope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazy-Aubignac, L

    2007-09-15

    The treatment planning systems (T.P.S.) occupy a key position in the radiotherapy service: they realize the projected calculation of the dose distribution and the treatment duration. Traditionally, the quality control of the calculated distribution doses relies on their comparisons with dose distributions measured under the device of treatment. This thesis proposes to substitute these dosimetry measures to the profile of reference dosimetry calculations got by the Penelope Monte-Carlo code. The Monte-Carlo simulations give a broad choice of test configurations and allow to envisage a quality control of dosimetry aspects of T.P.S. without monopolizing the treatment devices. This quality control, based on the Monte-Carlo simulations has been tested on a clinical T.P.S. and has allowed to simplify the quality procedures of the T.P.S.. This quality control, in depth, more precise and simpler to implement could be generalized to every center of radiotherapy. (N.C.)

  17. Entrance surface dose distribution and organ dose assessment for cone-beam computed tomography using measurements and Monte Carlo simulations with voxel phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, M.; Di Maria, S.; Vieira, S.; Vaz, P.

    2017-11-01

    Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) enables high-resolution volumetric scanning of the bone and soft tissue anatomy under investigation at the treatment accelerator. This technique is extensively used in Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) for pre-treatment verification of patient position and target volume localization. When employed daily and several times per patient, CBCT imaging may lead to high cumulative imaging doses to the healthy tissues surrounding the exposed organs. This work aims at (1) evaluating the dose distribution during a CBCT scan and (2) calculating the organ doses involved in this image guiding procedure for clinically available scanning protocols. Both Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and measurements were performed. To model and simulate the kV imaging system mounted on a linear accelerator (Edge™, Varian Medical Systems) the state-of-the-art MC radiation transport program MCNPX 2.7.0 was used. In order to validate the simulation results, measurements of the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) were performed, using standard PMMA head and body phantoms, with 150 mm length and a standard pencil ionizing chamber (IC) 100 mm long. Measurements for head and pelvis scanning protocols, usually adopted in clinical environment were acquired, using two acquisition modes (full-fan and half fan). To calculate the organ doses, the implemented MC model of the CBCT scanner together with a male voxel phantom ("Golem") was used. The good agreement between the MCNPX simulations and the CTDIw measurements (differences up to 17%) presented in this work reveals that the CBCT MC model was successfully validated, taking into account the several uncertainties. The adequacy of the computational model to map dose distributions during a CBCT scan is discussed in order to identify ways to reduce the total CBCT imaging dose. The organ dose assessment highlights the need to evaluate the therapeutic and the CBCT imaging doses, in a more balanced approach, and the

  18. Generalized eMC implementation for Monte Carlo dose calculation of electron beams from different machine types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, Michael K; Cygler, Joanna; Frei, Daniel; Volken, Werner; Neuenschwander, Hans; Born, Ernst J; Manser, Peter

    2013-05-07

    The electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm available in the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems) is based on the macro MC method and uses a beam model applicable to Varian linear accelerators. This leads to limitations in accuracy if eMC is applied to non-Varian machines. In this work eMC is generalized to also allow accurate dose calculations for electron beams from Elekta and Siemens accelerators. First, changes made in the previous study to use eMC for low electron beam energies of Varian accelerators are applied. Then, a generalized beam model is developed using a main electron source and a main photon source representing electrons and photons from the scattering foil, respectively, an edge source of electrons, a transmission source of photons and a line source of electrons and photons representing the particles from the scrapers or inserts and head scatter radiation. Regarding the macro MC dose calculation algorithm, the transport code of the secondary particles is improved. The macro MC dose calculations are validated with corresponding dose calculations using EGSnrc in homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms. The validation of the generalized eMC is carried out by comparing calculated and measured dose distributions in water for Varian, Elekta and Siemens machines for a variety of beam energies, applicator sizes and SSDs. The comparisons are performed in units of cGy per MU. Overall, a general agreement between calculated and measured dose distributions for all machine types and all combinations of parameters investigated is found to be within 2% or 2 mm. The results of the dose comparisons suggest that the generalized eMC is now suitable to calculate dose distributions for Varian, Elekta and Siemens linear accelerators with sufficient accuracy in the range of the investigated combinations of beam energies, applicator sizes and SSDs.

  19. Electron dose distributions caused by the contact-type metallic eye shield: Studies using Monte Carlo and pencil beam algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sei-Kwon; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Hwang, Taejin; Park, Soah; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Han, Tae Jin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Me-Yeon; Kim, Kyoung Ju; Bae, Hoonsik

    2015-01-01

    A metallic contact eye shield has sometimes been used for eyelid treatment, but dose distribution has never been reported for a patient case. This study aimed to show the shield-incorporated CT-based dose distribution using the Pinnacle system and Monte Carlo (MC) calculation for 3 patient cases. For the artifact-free CT scan, an acrylic shield machined as the same size as that of the tungsten shield was used. For the MC calculation, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc were used for the 6-MeV electron beam of the Varian 21EX, in which information for the tungsten, stainless steel, and aluminum material for the eye shield was used. The same plan was generated on the Pinnacle system and both were compared. The use of the acrylic shield produced clear CT images, enabling delineation of the regions of interest, and yielded CT-based dose calculation for the metallic shield. Both the MC and the Pinnacle systems showed a similar dose distribution downstream of the eye shield, reflecting the blocking effect of the metallic eye shield. The major difference between the MC and the Pinnacle results was the target eyelid dose upstream of the shield such that the Pinnacle system underestimated the dose by 19 to 28% and 11 to 18% for the maximum and the mean doses, respectively. The pattern of dose difference between the MC and the Pinnacle systems was similar to that in the previous phantom study. In conclusion, the metallic eye shield was successfully incorporated into the CT-based planning, and the accurate dose calculation requires MC simulation. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Monte Carlo Study on the Effect of Various Neutron Capturers on Dose Distribution in Brachytherapy with 252Cf Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoozabadi M. M.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: In neutron interaction with matter and reduction of neutron energy due to multiple scatterings to the thermal energy range, increasing the probability of thermal neutron capture by neutron captures makes dose enhancement in the tumors loaded with these materials. Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate dose distribution in the presence of 10B, 157Gd and 33S neutron capturers and to determine the effect of these materials on dose enhancement rate for 252Cf brachytherapy source. Methods: Neutron-ray flux and energy spectra, neutron and gamma dose rates and dose enhancement factor (DEF are determined in the absence and presence of 10B, 157Gd and 33S using Monte Carlo simulation. Results: The difference in the thermal neutron flux rate in the presence of 10B and 157Gd is significant, while the flux changes in the fast and epithermal energy ranges are insensible. The dose enhancement factor has increased with increasing distance from the source and reached its maximum amount equal to 258.3 and 476.1 cGy/h/µg for 157Gd and 10B, respectively at about 8 cm distance from the source center. DEF for 33S is equal to one. Conclusion: Results show that the magnitude of dose augmentation in tumors containing 10B and 157Gd in brachytherapy with 252Cf source will depend not only on the capture product dose level, but also on the tumor distance from the source. 33S makes dose enhancement under specific conditions that these conditions depend on the neutron energy spectra of source, the 33S concentration in tumor and tumor distance from the source.

  1. Electron dose distributions caused by the contact-type metallic eye shield: Studies using Monte Carlo and pencil beam algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sei-Kwon; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Hwang, Taejin; Park, Soah; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Jin Han, Tae; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Me-Yeon; Ju Kim, Kyoung, E-mail: kjkim@hallym.or.kr; Bae, Hoonsik

    2015-10-01

    A metallic contact eye shield has sometimes been used for eyelid treatment, but dose distribution has never been reported for a patient case. This study aimed to show the shield-incorporated CT-based dose distribution using the Pinnacle system and Monte Carlo (MC) calculation for 3 patient cases. For the artifact-free CT scan, an acrylic shield machined as the same size as that of the tungsten shield was used. For the MC calculation, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc were used for the 6-MeV electron beam of the Varian 21EX, in which information for the tungsten, stainless steel, and aluminum material for the eye shield was used. The same plan was generated on the Pinnacle system and both were compared. The use of the acrylic shield produced clear CT images, enabling delineation of the regions of interest, and yielded CT-based dose calculation for the metallic shield. Both the MC and the Pinnacle systems showed a similar dose distribution downstream of the eye shield, reflecting the blocking effect of the metallic eye shield. The major difference between the MC and the Pinnacle results was the target eyelid dose upstream of the shield such that the Pinnacle system underestimated the dose by 19 to 28% and 11 to 18% for the maximum and the mean doses, respectively. The pattern of dose difference between the MC and the Pinnacle systems was similar to that in the previous phantom study. In conclusion, the metallic eye shield was successfully incorporated into the CT-based planning, and the accurate dose calculation requires MC simulation.

  2. Estimation of the effects of a lead vest on dose reduction for radiation workers using Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young-khi, Lim; Byoung-il, Lee; Jeong-in, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In the field of medical diagnosis or treatments using radiations, lead vests or aprons are widely used to protect the patients or workers from unwanted irradiation. Also, in nuclear power plants, it is recommended that the workers should wear a lead vest to reduce the dose for working in high radiation area. Generally, personal dosimeters were used to estimate the doses of workers but these cannot give the absolute values. So, measured values should be modified by comparing the reference conditions with conversion factors. Many trials to estimate the doses of workers with lead shield using two or more dosimeters at different locations were done but these had limitations. Through this study the personal dose with/without a lead vest and the effectiveness were evaluated by Monte Carlo methods. A lead vest which had been used at several nuclear sites was modelled with MIRD-V and typical Korean voxel phantom using MCNP-5 transport code. Organ doses were calculated in AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT irradiation geometry for several parallel photon beams. Also irradiation experiments were carried out using real typical Korean phantom with the lead vest and the results were compared with those calculated by simulations. In most cases, the lead vest decreases the organ doses about 30%. For low energy, the lead vest is very effective to reduce the dose but it is not so good for high energy photon shielding. For thyroids, the doses to high energy photons increased by 5% on the contrary. This study may be applied to the better design of personal shielding and dose estimation procedures for practical use. (author)

  3. SU-E-T-110: Development of An Independent, Monte Carlo, Dose Calculation, Quality Assurance Tool for Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faught, A [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX (United States); Davidson, S [University of Texas Medical Branch of Galveston, Galveston, TX (United States); Kry, S; Ibbott, G; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Fontenot, J [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Etzel, C [Consortium of Rheumatology Researchers of North America (CORRONA), Inc., Southborough, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a comprehensive end-to-end test for Varian's TrueBeam linear accelerator for head and neck IMRT using a custom phantom designed to utilize multiple dosimetry devices. Purpose: To commission a multiple-source Monte Carlo model of Elekta linear accelerator beams of nominal energies 6MV and 10MV. Methods: A three source, Monte Carlo model of Elekta 6 and 10MV therapeutic x-ray beams was developed. Energy spectra of two photon sources corresponding to primary photons created in the target and scattered photons originating in the linear accelerator head were determined by an optimization process that fit the relative fluence of 0.25 MeV energy bins to the product of Fatigue-Life and Fermi functions to match calculated percent depth dose (PDD) data with that measured in a water tank for a 10x10cm2 field. Off-axis effects were modeled by a 3rd degree polynomial used to describe the off-axis half-value layer as a function of off-axis angle and fitting the off-axis fluence to a piecewise linear function to match calculated dose profiles with measured dose profiles for a 40×40cm2 field. The model was validated by comparing calculated PDDs and dose profiles for field sizes ranging from 3×3cm2 to 30×30cm2 to those obtained from measurements. A benchmarking study compared calculated data to measurements for IMRT plans delivered to anthropomorphic phantoms. Results: Along the central axis of the beam 99.6% and 99.7% of all data passed the 2%/2mm gamma criterion for 6 and 10MV models, respectively. Dose profiles at depths of dmax, through 25cm agreed with measured data for 99.4% and 99.6% of data tested for 6 and 10MV models, respectively. A comparison of calculated dose to film measurement in a head and neck phantom showed an average of 85.3% and 90.5% of pixels passing a 3%/2mm gamma criterion for 6 and 10MV models respectively. Conclusion: A Monte Carlo multiple-source model for Elekta 6 and 10MV therapeutic x-ray beams has been developed as a

  4. Monte Carlo simulations of the dose from imaging with GE eXplore 120 micro-CT using GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretin, Florian; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Luxen, André; Phillips, Christophe; Plenevaux, Alain; Seret, Alain, E-mail: aseret@ulg.ac.be [Cyclotron Research Centre, University of Liège, Sart Tilman B30, Liège 4000 (Belgium)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Small animals are increasingly used as translational models in preclinical imaging studies involving microCT, during which the subjects can be exposed to large amounts of radiation. While the radiation levels are generally sublethal, studies have shown that low-level radiation can change physiological parameters in mice. In order to rule out any influence of radiation on the outcome of such experiments, or resulting deterministic effects in the subjects, the levels of radiation involved need to be addressed. The aim of this study was to investigate the radiation dose delivered by the GE eXplore 120 microCT non-invasively using Monte Carlo simulations in GATE and to compare results to previously obtained experimental values. Methods: Tungsten X-ray spectra were simulated at 70, 80, and 97 kVp using an analytical tool and their half-value layers were simulated for spectra validation against experimentally measured values of the physical X-ray tube. A Monte Carlo model of the microCT system was set up and four protocols that are regularly applied to live animal scanning were implemented. The computed tomography dose index (CTDI) inside a PMMA phantom was derived and multiple field of view acquisitions were simulated using the PMMA phantom, a representative mouse and rat. Results: Simulated half-value layers agreed with experimentally obtained results within a 7% error window. The CTDI ranged from 20 to 56 mGy and closely matched experimental values. Derived organ doses in mice reached 459 mGy in bones and up to 200 mGy in soft tissue organs using the highest energy protocol. Dose levels in rats were lower due to the increased mass of the animal compared to mice. The uncertainty of all dose simulations was below 14%. Conclusions: Monte Carlo simulations proved a valuable tool to investigate the 3D dose distribution in animals from microCT. Small animals, especially mice (due to their small volume), receive large amounts of radiation from the GE eXplore 120

  5. Comparison of absorbed dose in the cervix carcinoma therapy by brachytherapy of high dose rate using the conventional planning and Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Aneli Oliveira da

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to compare the doses received for patients submitted to brachytherapy High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy, a method of treatment of the cervix carcinoma, performed in the planning system PLATO BPS with the doses obtained by Monte Carlo simulation using the radiation transport code MCNP 5 and one female anthropomorphic phantom based on voxel, the FAX. The implementation of HDR brachytherapy treatment for the cervix carcinoma consists of the insertion of an intrauterine probe and an intravaginal probe (ring or ovoid) and then two radiographs are obtained, anteroposterior (AP) and lateral (LAT) to confirm the position of the applicators in the patient and to allow the treatment planning and the determination of the absorbed dose at points of interest: rectum, bladder, sigmoid and point A, which corresponds anatomically to the crossings of the uterine arteries with ureters The absorbed doses obtained with the code MCNP 5, with the exception of the absorbed dose in the rectum and sigmoid for the simulation considering a point source of 192 Ir, are lower than the absorbed doses from PLATO BPS calculations because the MCNP 5 considers the chemical compositions and densities of FAX body, not considering the medium as water. When considering the Monte Carlo simulation for a source with dimensions equal to that used in the brachytherapy irradiator used in this study, the values of calculated absorbed dose to the bladder, to the rectum, to the right point A and to the left point A were respectively lower than those determined by the treatment planning system in 33.29, 5.01, 22.93 and 19.04%. These values are almost all larger than the maximum acceptable deviation between patient planned and administered doses (5 %). With regard to the rectum and bladder, which are organs that must be protected, the present results are in favor of the radiological protection of patients. The point A, that is on the isodose of 100%, used to tumor treatment, the results indicate

  6. Dose enhancement in radiotherapy of small lung tumors using inline magnetic fields: A Monte Carlo based planning study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oborn, B. M., E-mail: brad.oborn@gmail.com [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, NSW 2500, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Ge, Y. [Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Hardcastle, N. [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia); Metcalfe, P. E. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong NSW 2500, Australia and Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW 2170 (Australia); Keall, P. J. [Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW 2170 (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To report on significant dose enhancement effects caused by magnetic fields aligned parallel to 6 MV photon beam radiotherapy of small lung tumors. Findings are applicable to future inline MRI-guided radiotherapy systems. Methods: A total of eight clinical lung tumor cases were recalculated using Monte Carlo methods, and external magnetic fields of 0.5, 1.0, and 3 T were included to observe the impact on dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and gross tumor volume (GTV). Three plans were 6 MV 3D-CRT plans while 6 were 6 MV IMRT. The GTV’s ranged from 0.8 to 16 cm{sup 3}, while the PTV’s ranged from 1 to 59 cm{sup 3}. In addition, the dose changes in a 30 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom were investigated for small beams. The central 20 cm of this phantom contained either water or lung density insert. Results: For single beams, an inline magnetic field of 1 T has a small impact in lung dose distributions by reducing the lateral scatter of secondary electrons, resulting in a small dose increase along the beam. Superposition of multiple small beams leads to significant dose enhancements. Clinically, this process occurs in the lung tissue typically surrounding the GTV, resulting in increases to the D{sub 98%} (PTV). Two isolated tumors with very small PTVs (3 and 6 cm{sup 3}) showed increases in D{sub 98%} of 23% and 22%. Larger PTVs of 13, 26, and 59 cm{sup 3} had increases of 9%, 6%, and 4%, describing a natural fall-off in enhancement with increasing PTV size. However, three PTVs bounded to the lung wall showed no significant increase, due to lack of dose enhancement in the denser PTV volume. In general, at 0.5 T, the GTV mean dose enhancement is around 60% lower than that at 1 T, while at 3 T, it is 5%–60% higher than 1 T. Conclusions: Monte Carlo methods have described significant and predictable dose enhancement effects in small lung tumor plans for 6 MV radiotherapy when an external inline magnetic field is included. Results of this study

  7. A photon source model based on particle transport in a parameterized accelerator structure for Monte Carlo dose calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizawa, Yoshiki; Dobashi, Suguru; Kadoya, Noriyuki; Ito, Kengo; Chiba, Takahito; Takayama, Yoshiki; Sato, Kiyokazu; Takeda, Ken

    2018-05-17

    An accurate source model of a medical linear accelerator is essential for Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations. This study aims to propose an analytical photon source model based on particle transport in parameterized accelerator structures, focusing on a more realistic determination of linac photon spectra compared to existing approaches. We designed the primary and secondary photon sources based on the photons attenuated and scattered by a parameterized flattening filter. The primary photons were derived by attenuating bremsstrahlung photons based on the path length in the filter. Conversely, the secondary photons were derived from the decrement of the primary photons in the attenuation process. This design facilitates these sources to share the free parameters of the filter shape and be related to each other through the photon interaction in the filter. We introduced two other parameters of the primary photon source to describe the particle fluence in penumbral regions. All the parameters are optimized based on calculated dose curves in water using the pencil-beam-based algorithm. To verify the modeling accuracy, we compared the proposed model with the phase space data (PSD) of the Varian TrueBeam 6 and 15 MV accelerators in terms of the beam characteristics and the dose distributions. The EGS5 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the dose distributions associated with the optimized model and reference PSD in a homogeneous water phantom and a heterogeneous lung phantom. We calculated the percentage of points passing 1D and 2D gamma analysis with 1%/1 mm criteria for the dose curves and lateral dose distributions, respectively. The optimized model accurately reproduced the spectral curves of the reference PSD both on- and off-axis. The depth dose and lateral dose profiles of the optimized model also showed good agreement with those of the reference PSD. The passing rates of the 1D gamma analysis with 1%/1 mm criteria between the model and PSD were 100% for 4

  8. Validating a virtual source model based in Monte Carlo Method for profiles and percent deep doses calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Nero, Renata Aline; Yoriyaz, Hélio [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nakandakari, Marcos Vinicius Nakaoka, E-mail: hyoriyaz@ipen.br, E-mail: marcos.sake@gmail.com [Hospital Beneficência Portuguesa de São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The Monte Carlo method for radiation transport data has been adapted for medical physics application. More specifically, it has received more attention in clinical treatment planning with the development of more efficient computer simulation techniques. In linear accelerator modeling by the Monte Carlo method, the phase space data file (phsp) is used a lot. However, to obtain precision in the results, it is necessary detailed information about the accelerator's head and commonly the supplier does not provide all the necessary data. An alternative to the phsp is the Virtual Source Model (VSM). This alternative approach presents many advantages for the clinical Monte Carlo application. This is the most efficient method for particle generation and can provide an accuracy similar when the phsp is used. This research propose a VSM simulation with the use of a Virtual Flattening Filter (VFF) for profiles and percent deep doses calculation. Two different sizes of open fields (40 x 40 cm² and 40√2 x 40√2 cm²) were used and two different source to surface distance (SSD) were applied: the standard 100 cm and custom SSD of 370 cm, which is applied in radiotherapy treatments of total body irradiation. The data generated by the simulation was analyzed and compared with experimental data to validate the VSM. This current model is easy to build and test. (author)

  9. Evaluation of dose-volume metrics for microbeam radiation therapy dose distributions in head phantoms of various sizes using Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Danielle; Siegbahn, E. Albert; Fallone, B. Gino; Serduc, Raphael; Warkentin, Brad

    2012-05-01

    This work evaluates four dose-volume metrics applied to microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) using simulated dosimetric data as input. We seek to improve upon the most frequently used MRT metric, the peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR), by analyzing MRT dose distributions from a more volumetric perspective. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate dose distributions in three cubic head phantoms: a 2 cm mouse head, an 8 cm cat head and a 16 cm dog head. The dose distribution was calculated for a 4 × 4 mm2 microbeam array in each phantom, as well as a 16 × 16 mm2 array in the 8 cm cat head, and a 32 × 32 mm2 array in the 16 cm dog head. Microbeam widths of 25, 50 and 75 µm and center-to-center spacings of 100, 200 and 400 µm were considered. The metrics calculated for each simulation were the conventional PVDR, the peak-to-mean valley dose ratio (PMVDR), the mean dose and the percentage volume below a threshold dose. The PVDR ranged between 3 and 230 for the 2 cm mouse phantom, and between 2 and 186 for the 16 cm dog phantom depending on geometry. The corresponding ranges for the PMVDR were much smaller, being 2-49 (mouse) and 2-46 (dog), and showed a slightly weaker dependence on phantom size and array size. The ratio of the PMVDR to the PVDR varied from 0.21 to 0.79 for the different collimation configurations, indicating a difference between the geometric dependence on outcome that would be predicted by these two metrics. For unidirectional irradiation, the mean lesion dose was 102%, 79% and 42% of the mean skin dose for the 2 cm mouse, 8 cm cat and 16 cm dog head phantoms, respectively. However, the mean lesion dose recovered to 83% of the mean skin dose in the 16 cm dog phantom in intersecting cross-firing regions. The percentage volume below a 10% dose threshold was highly dependent on geometry, with ranges for the different collimation configurations of 2-87% and 33-96% for the 2 cm mouse and 16 cm dog heads, respectively. The results of this study

  10. Evaluation of dose-volume metrics for microbeam radiation therapy dose distributions in head phantoms of various sizes using Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Danielle; Fallone, B Gino; Warkentin, Brad; Siegbahn, E Albert; Serduc, Raphael

    2012-01-01

    This work evaluates four dose-volume metrics applied to microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) using simulated dosimetric data as input. We seek to improve upon the most frequently used MRT metric, the peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR), by analyzing MRT dose distributions from a more volumetric perspective. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate dose distributions in three cubic head phantoms: a 2 cm mouse head, an 8 cm cat head and a 16 cm dog head. The dose distribution was calculated for a 4 × 4 mm 2 microbeam array in each phantom, as well as a 16 × 16 mm 2 array in the 8 cm cat head, and a 32 × 32 mm 2 array in the 16 cm dog head. Microbeam widths of 25, 50 and 75 µm and center-to-center spacings of 100, 200 and 400 µm were considered. The metrics calculated for each simulation were the conventional PVDR, the peak-to-mean valley dose ratio (PMVDR), the mean dose and the percentage volume below a threshold dose. The PVDR ranged between 3 and 230 for the 2 cm mouse phantom, and between 2 and 186 for the 16 cm dog phantom depending on geometry. The corresponding ranges for the PMVDR were much smaller, being 2–49 (mouse) and 2–46 (dog), and showed a slightly weaker dependence on phantom size and array size. The ratio of the PMVDR to the PVDR varied from 0.21 to 0.79 for the different collimation configurations, indicating a difference between the geometric dependence on outcome that would be predicted by these two metrics. For unidirectional irradiation, the mean lesion dose was 102%, 79% and 42% of the mean skin dose for the 2 cm mouse, 8 cm cat and 16 cm dog head phantoms, respectively. However, the mean lesion dose recovered to 83% of the mean skin dose in the 16 cm dog phantom in intersecting cross-firing regions. The percentage volume below a 10% dose threshold was highly dependent on geometry, with ranges for the different collimation configurations of 2–87% and 33–96% for the 2 cm mouse and 16 cm dog heads, respectively. The results of this

  11. MO-FG-202-08: Real-Time Monte Carlo-Based Treatment Dose Reconstruction and Monitoring for Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Z; Shi, F; Gu, X; Tan, J; Hassan-Rezaeian, N; Jiang, S; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Graves, Y [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This proof-of-concept study is to develop a real-time Monte Carlo (MC) based treatment-dose reconstruction and monitoring system for radiotherapy, especially for the treatments with complicated delivery, to catch treatment delivery errors at the earliest possible opportunity and interrupt the treatment only when an unacceptable dosimetric deviation from our expectation occurs. Methods: First an offline scheme is launched to pre-calculate the expected dose from the treatment plan, used as ground truth for real-time monitoring later. Then an online scheme with three concurrent threads is launched while treatment delivering, to reconstruct and monitor the patient dose in a temporally resolved fashion in real-time. Thread T1 acquires machine status every 20 ms to calculate and accumulate fluence map (FM). Once our accumulation threshold is reached, T1 transfers the FM to T2 for dose reconstruction ad starts to accumulate a new FM. A GPU-based MC dose calculation is performed on T2 when MC dose engine is ready and a new FM is available. The reconstructed instantaneous dose is directed to T3 for dose accumulation and real-time visualization. Multiple dose metrics (e.g. maximum and mean dose for targets and organs) are calculated from the current accumulated dose and compared with the pre-calculated expected values. Once the discrepancies go beyond our tolerance, an error message will be send to interrupt the treatment delivery. Results: A VMAT Head-and-neck patient case was used to test the performance of our system. Real-time machine status acquisition was simulated here. The differences between the actual dose metrics and the expected ones were 0.06%–0.36%, indicating an accurate delivery. ∼10Hz frequency of dose reconstruction and monitoring was achieved, with 287.94s online computation time compared to 287.84s treatment delivery time. Conclusion: Our study has demonstrated the feasibility of computing a dose distribution in a temporally resolved fashion

  12. The dose distribution of low dose rate Cs-137 in intracavitary brachytherapy: comparison of Monte Carlo simulation, treatment planning calculation and polymer gel measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragoso, M; Love, P A; Verhaegen, F; Nalder, C; Bidmead, A M; Leach, M; Webb, S

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the dose distribution delivered by low dose rate Cs-137 brachytherapy sources was investigated using Monte Carlo (MC) techniques and polymer gel dosimetry. The results obtained were compared with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). The 20 mm and the 30 mm diameter Selectron vaginal applicator set (Nucletron) were used for this study. A homogeneous and a heterogeneous-with an air cavity-polymer gel phantom was used to measure the dose distribution from these sources. The same geometrical set-up was used for the MC calculations. Beyond the applicator tip, differences in dose as large as 20% were found between the MC and TPS. This is attributed to the presence of stainless steel in the applicator and source set, which are not considered by the TPS calculations. Beyond the air cavity, differences in dose of around 5% were noted, due to the TPS assuming a homogeneous water medium. The polymer gel results were in good agreement with the MC calculations for all the cases investigated

  13. SU-F-T-74: Experimental Validation of Monaco Electron Monte Carlo Dose Calculation for Small Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varadhan; Way, S; Arentsen, L; Gerbi, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To verify experimentally the accuracy of Monaco (Elekta) electron Monte Carlo (eMC) algorithm to calculate small field size depth doses, monitor units and isodose distributions. Methods: Beam modeling of eMC algorithm was performed for electron energies of 6, 9, 12 15 and 18 Mev for a Elekta Infinity Linac and all available ( 6, 10, 14 20 and 25 cone) applicator sizes. Electron cutouts of incrementally smaller field sizes (20, 40, 60 and 80% blocked from open cone) were fabricated. Dose calculation was performed using a grid size smaller than one-tenth of the R_8_0_–_2_0 electron distal falloff distance and number of particle histories was set at 500,000 per cm"2. Percent depth dose scans and beam profiles at dmax, d_9_0 and d_8_0 depths were measured for each cutout and energy with Wellhoffer (IBA) Blue Phantom"2 scanning system and compared against eMC calculated doses. Results: The measured dose and output factors of incrementally reduced cutout sizes (to 3cm diameter) agreed with eMC calculated doses within ± 2.5%. The profile comparisons at dmax, d_9_0 and d_8_0 depths and percent depth doses at reduced field sizes agreed within 2.5% or 2mm. Conclusion: Our results indicate that the Monaco eMC algorithm can accurately predict depth doses, isodose distributions, and monitor units in homogeneous water phantom for field sizes as small as 3.0 cm diameter for energies in the 6 to 18 MeV range at 100 cm SSD. Consequently, the old rule of thumb to approximate limiting cutout size for an electron field determined by the lateral scatter equilibrium (E (MeV)/2.5 in centimeters of water) does not apply to Monaco eMC algorithm.

  14. SU-F-T-74: Experimental Validation of Monaco Electron Monte Carlo Dose Calculation for Small Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varadhan [Minneapolis Radiation Oncology, Fridley, MN (United States); Way, S [Minneapolis Radiation Oncology, Robbinsdale, MN (United States); Arentsen, L; Gerbi, B [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To verify experimentally the accuracy of Monaco (Elekta) electron Monte Carlo (eMC) algorithm to calculate small field size depth doses, monitor units and isodose distributions. Methods: Beam modeling of eMC algorithm was performed for electron energies of 6, 9, 12 15 and 18 Mev for a Elekta Infinity Linac and all available ( 6, 10, 14 20 and 25 cone) applicator sizes. Electron cutouts of incrementally smaller field sizes (20, 40, 60 and 80% blocked from open cone) were fabricated. Dose calculation was performed using a grid size smaller than one-tenth of the R{sub 80–20} electron distal falloff distance and number of particle histories was set at 500,000 per cm{sup 2}. Percent depth dose scans and beam profiles at dmax, d{sub 90} and d{sub 80} depths were measured for each cutout and energy with Wellhoffer (IBA) Blue Phantom{sup 2} scanning system and compared against eMC calculated doses. Results: The measured dose and output factors of incrementally reduced cutout sizes (to 3cm diameter) agreed with eMC calculated doses within ± 2.5%. The profile comparisons at dmax, d{sub 90} and d{sub 80} depths and percent depth doses at reduced field sizes agreed within 2.5% or 2mm. Conclusion: Our results indicate that the Monaco eMC algorithm can accurately predict depth doses, isodose distributions, and monitor units in homogeneous water phantom for field sizes as small as 3.0 cm diameter for energies in the 6 to 18 MeV range at 100 cm SSD. Consequently, the old rule of thumb to approximate limiting cutout size for an electron field determined by the lateral scatter equilibrium (E (MeV)/2.5 in centimeters of water) does not apply to Monaco eMC algorithm.

  15. Monte Carlo simulations to assess the effects of tube current modulation on breast dose for multidetector CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angel, Erin; Yaghmai, Nazanin; Jude, Cecilia Matilda; DeMarco, John J; Cagnon, Christopher H; Goldin, Jonathan G; McNitt-Gray, Michael F; Primak, Andrew N; McCollough, Cynthia H; Stevens, Donna M; Cody, Dianna D

    2009-01-01

    Tube current modulation was designed to reduce radiation dose in CT imaging while maintaining overall image quality. This study aims to develop a method for evaluating the effects of tube current modulation (TCM) on organ dose in CT exams of actual patient anatomy. This method was validated by simulating a TCM and a fixed tube current chest CT exam on 30 voxelized patient models and estimating the radiation dose to each patient's glandular breast tissue. This new method for estimating organ dose was compared with other conventional estimates of dose reduction. Thirty detailed voxelized models of patient anatomy were created based on image data from female patients who had previously undergone clinically indicated CT scans including the chest area. As an indicator of patient size, the perimeter of the patient was measured on the image containing at least one nipple using a semi-automated technique. The breasts were contoured on each image set by a radiologist and glandular tissue was semi-automatically segmented from this region. Previously validated Monte Carlo models of two multidetector CT scanners were used, taking into account details about the source spectra, filtration, collimation and geometry of the scanner. TCM data were obtained from each patient's clinical scan and factored into the model to simulate the effects of TCM. For each patient model, two exams were simulated: a fixed tube current chest CT and a tube current modulated chest CT. X-ray photons were transported through the anatomy of the voxelized patient models, and radiation dose was tallied in the glandular breast tissue. The resulting doses from the tube current modulated simulations were compared to the results obtained from simulations performed using a fixed mA value. The average radiation dose to the glandular breast tissue from a fixed tube current scan across all patient models was 19 mGy. The average reduction in breast dose using the tube current modulated scan was 17%. Results were

  16. Assessment of physician and patient (child and adult) equivalent doses during renal angiography by Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimian, A.; Nikparvar, B.; Jabbari, I.

    2014-01-01

    Renal angiography is one of the medical imaging methods in which patient and physician receive high equivalent doses due to long duration of fluoroscopy. In this research, equivalent doses of some radiosensitive tissues of patient (adult and child) and physician during renal angiography have been calculated by using adult and child Oak Ridge National Laboratory phantoms and Monte Carlo method (MCNPX). The results showed, in angiography of right kidney in a child and adult patient, that gall bladder with the amounts of 2.32 and 0.35 mSv, respectively, has received the most equivalent dose. About the physician, left hand, left eye and thymus absorbed the most amounts of doses, means 0.020 mSv. In addition, equivalent doses of the physician's lens eye, thyroid and knees were 0.023, 0.007 and 7.9 - 4 mSv, respectively. Although these values are less than the reported thresholds by ICRP 103, it should be noted that these amounts are related to one examination. (authors)

  17. TestDose: A nuclear medicine software based on Monte Carlo modeling for generating gamma camera acquisitions and dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Marie-Paule, E-mail: marie-paule.garcia@univ-brest.fr; Villoing, Daphnée [UMR 1037 INSERM/UPS, CRCT, 133 Route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse (France); McKay, Erin [St George Hospital, Gray Street, Kogarah, New South Wales 2217 (Australia); Ferrer, Ludovic [ICO René Gauducheau, Boulevard Jacques Monod, St Herblain 44805 (France); Cremonesi, Marta; Botta, Francesca; Ferrari, Mahila [European Institute of Oncology, Via Ripamonti 435, Milano 20141 (Italy); Bardiès, Manuel [UMR 1037 INSERM/UPS, CRCT, 133 Route de Narbonne, Toulouse 31062 (France)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: The TestDose platform was developed to generate scintigraphic imaging protocols and associated dosimetry by Monte Carlo modeling. TestDose is part of a broader project (www.dositest.com) whose aim is to identify the biases induced by different clinical dosimetry protocols. Methods: The TestDose software allows handling the whole pipeline from virtual patient generation to resulting planar and SPECT images and dosimetry calculations. The originality of their approach relies on the implementation of functional segmentation for the anthropomorphic model representing a virtual patient. Two anthropomorphic models are currently available: 4D XCAT and ICRP 110. A pharmacokinetic model describes the biodistribution of a given radiopharmaceutical in each defined compartment at various time-points. The Monte Carlo simulation toolkit GATE offers the possibility to accurately simulate scintigraphic images and absorbed doses in volumes of interest. The TestDose platform relies on GATE to reproduce precisely any imaging protocol and to provide reference dosimetry. For image generation, TestDose stores user’s imaging requirements and generates automatically command files used as input for GATE. Each compartment is simulated only once and the resulting output is weighted using pharmacokinetic data. Resulting compartment projections are aggregated to obtain the final image. For dosimetry computation, emission data are stored in the platform database and relevant GATE input files are generated for the virtual patient model and associated pharmacokinetics. Results: Two samples of software runs are given to demonstrate the potential of TestDose. A clinical imaging protocol for the Octreoscan™ therapeutical treatment was implemented using the 4D XCAT model. Whole-body “step and shoot” acquisitions at different times postinjection and one SPECT acquisition were generated within reasonable computation times. Based on the same Octreoscan™ kinetics, a dosimetry

  18. A new Monte Carlo program for calculations of dose distributions within tissue equivalent phantoms irradiated from π--meson beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przybilla, G.

    1980-11-01

    The present paper reports on the structure and first results from a new Monte Carlo programme for calculations of energy distributions within tissue equivalent phantoms irradiated from π - -beams. Each pion or generated secondary particle is transported until to the complete loss of its kinetic energy taking into account pion processes like multiple Coulomb scattering, pion reactions in flight and absorption of stopped pions. The code uses mainly data from experiments, and physical models have been added only in cases of lacking data. Depth dose curves for a pensil beam of 170 MeV/c within a water phantom are discussed as a function of various parameters. Isodose contours are plotted resulting from a convolution of an extended beam profile and the dose distribution of a pencil beams. (orig.) [de

  19. A GPU OpenCL based cross-platform Monte Carlo dose calculation engine (goMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhen; Shi, Feng; Folkerts, Michael; Qin, Nan; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun

    2015-09-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has been recognized as the most accurate dose calculation method for radiotherapy. However, the extremely long computation time impedes its clinical application. Recently, a lot of effort has been made to realize fast MC dose calculation on graphic processing units (GPUs). However, most of the GPU-based MC dose engines have been developed under NVidia’s CUDA environment. This limits the code portability to other platforms, hindering the introduction of GPU-based MC simulations to clinical practice. The objective of this paper is to develop a GPU OpenCL based cross-platform MC dose engine named goMC with coupled photon-electron simulation for external photon and electron radiotherapy in the MeV energy range. Compared to our previously developed GPU-based MC code named gDPM (Jia et al 2012 Phys. Med. Biol. 57 7783-97), goMC has two major differences. First, it was developed under the OpenCL environment for high code portability and hence could be run not only on different GPU cards but also on CPU platforms. Second, we adopted the electron transport model used in EGSnrc MC package and PENELOPE’s random hinge method in our new dose engine, instead of the dose planning method employed in gDPM. Dose distributions were calculated for a 15 MeV electron beam and a 6 MV photon beam in a homogenous water phantom, a water-bone-lung-water slab phantom and a half-slab phantom. Satisfactory agreement between the two MC dose engines goMC and gDPM was observed in all cases. The average dose differences in the regions that received a dose higher than 10% of the maximum dose were 0.48-0.53% for the electron beam cases and 0.15-0.17% for the photon beam cases. In terms of efficiency, goMC was ~4-16% slower than gDPM when running on the same NVidia TITAN card for all the cases we tested, due to both the different electron transport models and the different development environments. The code portability of our new dose engine goMC was validated by

  20. A GPU OpenCL based cross-platform Monte Carlo dose calculation engine (goMC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhen; Shi, Feng; Folkerts, Michael; Qin, Nan; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2015-10-07

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has been recognized as the most accurate dose calculation method for radiotherapy. However, the extremely long computation time impedes its clinical application. Recently, a lot of effort has been made to realize fast MC dose calculation on graphic processing units (GPUs). However, most of the GPU-based MC dose engines have been developed under NVidia's CUDA environment. This limits the code portability to other platforms, hindering the introduction of GPU-based MC simulations to clinical practice. The objective of this paper is to develop a GPU OpenCL based cross-platform MC dose engine named goMC with coupled photon-electron simulation for external photon and electron radiotherapy in the MeV energy range. Compared to our previously developed GPU-based MC code named gDPM (Jia et al 2012 Phys. Med. Biol. 57 7783-97), goMC has two major differences. First, it was developed under the OpenCL environment for high code portability and hence could be run not only on different GPU cards but also on CPU platforms. Second, we adopted the electron transport model used in EGSnrc MC package and PENELOPE's random hinge method in our new dose engine, instead of the dose planning method employed in gDPM. Dose distributions were calculated for a 15 MeV electron beam and a 6 MV photon beam in a homogenous water phantom, a water-bone-lung-water slab phantom and a half-slab phantom. Satisfactory agreement between the two MC dose engines goMC and gDPM was observed in all cases. The average dose differences in the regions that received a dose higher than 10% of the maximum dose were 0.48-0.53% for the electron beam cases and 0.15-0.17% for the photon beam cases. In terms of efficiency, goMC was ~4-16% slower than gDPM when running on the same NVidia TITAN card for all the cases we tested, due to both the different electron transport models and the different development environments. The code portability of our new dose engine goMC was validated by

  1. A GPU OpenCL based cross-platform Monte Carlo dose calculation engine (goMC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Zhen; Shi, Feng; Folkerts, Michael; Qin, Nan; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has been recognized as the most accurate dose calculation method for radiotherapy. However, the extremely long computation time impedes its clinical application. Recently, a lot of effort has been made to realize fast MC dose calculation on graphic processing units (GPUs). However, most of the GPU-based MC dose engines have been developed under NVidia’s CUDA environment. This limits the code portability to other platforms, hindering the introduction of GPU-based MC simulations to clinical practice. The objective of this paper is to develop a GPU OpenCL based cross-platform MC dose engine named goMC with coupled photon–electron simulation for external photon and electron radiotherapy in the MeV energy range. Compared to our previously developed GPU-based MC code named gDPM (Jia et al 2012 Phys. Med. Biol. 57 7783–97), goMC has two major differences. First, it was developed under the OpenCL environment for high code portability and hence could be run not only on different GPU cards but also on CPU platforms. Second, we adopted the electron transport model used in EGSnrc MC package and PENELOPE’s random hinge method in our new dose engine, instead of the dose planning method employed in gDPM. Dose distributions were calculated for a 15 MeV electron beam and a 6 MV photon beam in a homogenous water phantom, a water-bone-lung-water slab phantom and a half-slab phantom. Satisfactory agreement between the two MC dose engines goMC and gDPM was observed in all cases. The average dose differences in the regions that received a dose higher than 10% of the maximum dose were 0.48–0.53% for the electron beam cases and 0.15–0.17% for the photon beam cases. In terms of efficiency, goMC was ∼4–16% slower than gDPM when running on the same NVidia TITAN card for all the cases we tested, due to both the different electron transport models and the different development environments. The code portability of our new dose engine goMC was

  2. Evaluation of dose equivalent to the people accompanying patients in diagnostic radiology using MCNP4C Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehdizadeh, S.; Faghihi, R.; Sina, S.; Zehtabian, M.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: X rays used in diagnostic radiology contribute a major share to population doses from man-made sources of radiation. In some branches of radiology, it is necessary that another person stay in the imaging room and immobilize the patient to carry out radiological operation. ICRP 70 recommends that this should be done by parents or accompanying nursing or ancillary personnel and not in any case by radiation workers. Methods: Dose measurements were made previously using standard methods employing LiF TLD-100 dosimeters. A TLD card was installed on the main trunk of the body of the accompanying people where the maximum dose was probable. In this research the general purpose Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code (MCNP4C) is used to calculate the equivalent dose to the people accompanying patients exposed to radiation scattered from the patient (Without protective clothing). To do the simulations, all components of the geometry are placed within an air-filled box. Two homogeneous water phantoms are used to simulate the patient and the accompanying person. The accompanying person leans against the table at one side of the patient. Finally in case of source specification, only the focus of the X-ray tube is modelled, i.e. as a standard MCNP point source emitting a cone of photons. Photon stopping material is used as a collimator model to reduce the circular cross section of the cone to a rectangle. The X-ray spectra to be used in the MCNP simulations are generated with spectrum generator software, taking the X-ray voltage and all filtration applied in the clinic as input parameters. These calculations are done for different patient sizes and for different radiological operations. Results: In case of TL dosimetry, for a group of 100 examinations, the dose equivalents ranged from 0.01 μsv to 0.13 msv with the average of 0.05 msv. The results are seen to be in close agreement with Monte Carlo simulations

  3. Calculating of Dose Distribution in Tongue Brachytherapy by Different Radioisotopes using Monte Carlo Simulation and Comparing by Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banafsheh Zeinali Rafsanjani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among different kinds of oral cavity cancers, the frequency of tongue cancer occurrence is more significant. Brachytherapy is the most common method to cure tongue cancers. Long sources are used in different techniques of tongue brachytherapy. The objective of this study is to asses the dose distribution around long sources, comparing different radioisotopes as brachytherapy sources, measuring the homogeneity of delivered dose to treatment volume and also comparing mandible dose and dose of tongue in the regions near the mandible with and without using shield. Material and Method: The Monte Carlo code MCNP4C was used for simulation. The accuracy of simulation was verified by comparing the results with experimental data. The sources like Ir-192, Cs-137, Ra-226, Au-198, In-111 and Ba-131 were simulated and the position of sources was determined by Paris system. Results: The percentage of mandible dose reduction with use of 2 mm Pb shield for the sources mentioned above were: 35.4%, 20.1%, 86.6%, 32.24%, 75.6%, and 36.8%. The tongue dose near the mandible with use of shied did not change significantly. The dose homogeneity from the most to least was obtained from these sources: Cs-137, Au-198, Ir-192, Ba-131, In-111 and Ra-226. Discussion and Conclusion: Ir-192 and Cs-137 were the best sources for tongue brachytherapy treatment but In-111 and Ra-226 were not suitable choices for tongue brachytherapy. The sources like Au-198 and Ba-131 had rather the same performance as Ir-192

  4. Evaluation of equivalent doses in {sup 18}F PET/CT using the Monte Carlo method with MCNPX code; Avaliação de doses equivalentes em PET/CT com {sup 18}F utilizando o Método Monte Carlo com código MCNPX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belinato, Walmir [Instituto Federal de Bahia (IFBA), Vitória da Conquista, BA (Brazil); Santos, William Souza; Perini, Ana Paula; Neves, Lucio Pereira [Universidade Federal de Uberlândia (UFU), Uberlândia, MG (Brazil). Instituto de Física; Caldas, Linda V. E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Souza, Divanizia N. [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The present work used the Monte Carlo method (MMC), specifically the Monte Carlo NParticle - MCNPX, to simulate the interaction of radiation involving photons and particles, such as positrons and electrons, with virtual adult anthropomorphic simulators on PET / CT scans and to determine absorbed and equivalent doses in adult male and female patients.

  5. Estimation of staff doses in complex radiological examinations using a Monte Carlo computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhavere, F.

    2007-01-01

    The protection of medical personnel in interventional radiology is an important issue of radiological protection. The irradiation of the worker is largely non-uniform, and a large part of his body is shielded by a lead apron. The estimation of effective dose (E) under these conditions is difficult and several approaches are used to estimate effective dose involving such a protective apron. This study presents a summary from an extensive series of simulations to determine scatter-dose distribution around the patient and staff effective dose from personal dosimeter readings. The influence of different parameters (like beam energy and size, patient size, irradiated region, worker position and orientation) on the staff doses has been determined. Published algorithms that combine readings of an unshielded and a shielded dosimeter to estimate effective dose have been applied and a new algorithm, that gives more accurate dose estimates for a wide range of situations was proposed. A computational approach was used to determine the dose distribution in the worker's body. The radiation transport and energy deposition was simulated using the MCNP4B code. The human bodies of the patient and radiologist were generated with the Body Builder anthropomorphic model-generating tool. The radiologist is protected with a lead apron (0.5 mm lead equivalent in the front and 0.25 mm lead equivalent in the back and sides) and a thyroid collar (0.35 mm lead equivalent). The lower-arms of the worker were folded to simulate the arms position during clinical examinations. This realistic situation of the folded arms affects the effective dose to the worker. Depending on the worker position and orientation (and of course the beam energy), the difference can go up to 25 percent. A total of 12 Hp(10) dosimeters were positioned above and under the lead apron at the neck, chest and waist levels. Extra dosimeters for the skin dose were positioned at the forehead, the forearms and the front surface of

  6. Commissioning and Validation of the First Monte Carlo Based Dose Calculation Algorithm Commercial Treatment Planning System in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Hernandez-Bojorquez, M.; Galvan de la Cruz, O. O.; Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents the beam data commissioning and dose calculation validation of the first Monte Carlo (MC) based treatment planning system (TPS) installed in Mexico. According to the manufacturer specifications, the beam data commissioning needed for this model includes: several in-air and water profiles, depth dose curves, head-scatter factors and output factors (6x6, 12x12, 18x18, 24x24, 42x42, 60x60, 80x80 and 100x100 mm 2 ). Radiographic and radiochromic films, diode and ionization chambers were used for data acquisition. MC dose calculations in a water phantom were used to validate the MC simulations using comparisons with measured data. Gamma index criteria 2%/2 mm were used to evaluate the accuracy of MC calculations. MC calculated data show an excellent agreement for field sizes from 18x18 to 100x100 mm 2 . Gamma analysis shows that in average, 95% and 100% of the data passes the gamma index criteria for these fields, respectively. For smaller fields (12x12 and 6x6 mm 2 ) only 92% of the data meet the criteria. Total scatter factors show a good agreement ( 2 ) that show a error of 4.7%. MC dose calculations are accurate and precise for clinical treatment planning up to a field size of 18x18 mm 2 . Special care must be taken for smaller fields.

  7. Calculation of dose distribution in compressible breast tissues using finite element modeling, Monte Carlo simulation and thermoluminescence dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadyari, Parvin; Faghihi, Reza; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Lotfi, Mehrzad; Rahim Hematiyan, Mohammad; Koontz, Craig; Meigooni, Ali S.

    2015-12-01

    Compression is a technique to immobilize the target or improve the dose distribution within the treatment volume during different irradiation techniques such as AccuBoost® brachytherapy. However, there is no systematic method for determination of dose distribution for uncompressed tissue after irradiation under compression. In this study, the mechanical behavior of breast tissue between compressed and uncompressed states was investigated. With that, a novel method was developed to determine the dose distribution in uncompressed tissue after irradiation of compressed breast tissue. Dosimetry was performed using two different methods, namely, Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNP5 code and measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The displacement of the breast elements was simulated using a finite element model and calculated using ABAQUS software. From these results, the 3D dose distribution in uncompressed tissue was determined. The geometry of the model was constructed from magnetic resonance images of six different women volunteers. The mechanical properties were modeled by using the Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic material model. Experimental dosimetry was performed by placing the TLD chips into the polyvinyl alcohol breast equivalent phantom. The results determined that the nodal displacements, due to the gravitational force and the 60 Newton compression forces (with 43% contraction in the loading direction and 37% expansion in the orthogonal direction) were determined. Finally, a comparison of the experimental data and the simulated data showed agreement within 11.5%  ±  5.9%.

  8. Calculation of dose distribution in compressible breast tissues using finite element modeling, Monte Carlo simulation and thermoluminescence dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadyari, Parvin; Faghihi, Reza; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Lotfi, Mehrzad; Hematiyan, Mohammad Rahim; Koontz, Craig; Meigooni, Ali S

    2015-01-01

    Compression is a technique to immobilize the target or improve the dose distribution within the treatment volume during different irradiation techniques such as AccuBoost ® brachytherapy. However, there is no systematic method for determination of dose distribution for uncompressed tissue after irradiation under compression. In this study, the mechanical behavior of breast tissue between compressed and uncompressed states was investigated. With that, a novel method was developed to determine the dose distribution in uncompressed tissue after irradiation of compressed breast tissue. Dosimetry was performed using two different methods, namely, Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNP5 code and measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The displacement of the breast elements was simulated using a finite element model and calculated using ABAQUS software. From these results, the 3D dose distribution in uncompressed tissue was determined. The geometry of the model was constructed from magnetic resonance images of six different women volunteers. The mechanical properties were modeled by using the Mooney–Rivlin hyperelastic material model. Experimental dosimetry was performed by placing the TLD chips into the polyvinyl alcohol breast equivalent phantom. The results determined that the nodal displacements, due to the gravitational force and the 60 Newton compression forces (with 43% contraction in the loading direction and 37% expansion in the orthogonal direction) were determined. Finally, a comparison of the experimental data and the simulated data showed agreement within 11.5%  ±  5.9%. (paper)

  9. Use of Monte Carlo simulation software for the calculation of the effective dose in cone beam Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes B, W. O.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: In this study irradiation geometry applicable to PCXMC and the consequent calculation of effective dose in applications of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was developed. Two different CBCT equipment s for dental applications were evaluated: Care Stream Cs-9000 3-Dimensional and Gendex GXCB-500 tomographs. Each protocol initially was characterized by measuring the surface kerma input and the product air kerma-area, P KA . Then, technical parameters of each of the predetermined protocols and geometric conditions in the PCXMC software were introduced to obtain the values of effective dose. The calculated effective dose is within the range of 9.0 to 15.7 μSv for Cs 9000 3-D and in the range 44.5 to 89 mSv for GXCB-500 equipment. These values were compared with dosimetric results obtained using thermoluminescent dosimeters implanted in anthropomorphic mannequin and were considered consistent. The effective dose results are very sensitive to the radiation geometry (beam position); this represents a factor of fragility software usage, but on the other hand, turns out to be a very useful tool for quick conclusions regarding the optimization process of protocols. We can conclude that the use of Monte Carlo simulation software PCXMC is useful in the evaluation of test protocols of CBCT in dental applications. (Author)

  10. Determination of the distal dose edge in a human phantom by measuring the prompt gamma distribution: a Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Chul Hee; Lee, Han Rim; Yeom, Yeon Su; Cho, Sung Koo; Kim, Chan Hyeong [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    The close relationship between the proton dose distribution and the distribution of prompt gammas generated by proton-induced nuclear interactions along the path of protons in a water phantom was demonstrated by means of both Monte Carlo simulations and limited experiments. In order to test the clinical applicability of the method for determining the distal dose edge in a human body, a human voxel model, constructed based on a body-composition-approximated physical phantom, was used, after which the MCNPX code was used to analyze the energy spectra and the prompt gamma yields from the major elements composing the human voxel model; finally, the prompt gamma distribution, generated from the voxel model and measured by using an array-type prompt gamma detection system, was calculated and compared with the proton dose distribution. According to the results, effective prompt gammas were produced mainly by oxygen, and the specific energy of the prompt gammas, allowing for selective measurement, was found to be 4.44 MeV. The results also show that the distal dose edge in the human phantom, despite the heterogeneous composition and the complicated shape, can be determined by measuring the prompt gamma distribution with an array-type detection system.

  11. Monte Carlo simulations for dose enhancement in cancer treatment using bismuth oxide nanoparticles implanted in brain soft tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Eslam; Djouider, Fathi; Banoqitah, Essam

    2018-03-26

    The objective of this work is to study the dosimetric performances of bismuth oxide nanoparticles implanted in tumors in cancer radiotherapy. GEANT4 based Monte Carlo numerical simulations were performed to assess dose enhancement distributions in and around a 1 × 1 × 1 cm 3 tumor implanted with different concentrations of bismuth oxide and irradiated with low energies 125 I, 131 Cs, and 103 Pd radioactive sources. Dose contributions were considered from photoelectrons, Auger electrons, and characteristic X-rays. Our results show the dose enhancement increased with increasing both bismuth oxide concentration in the target and photon energy. A dose enhancement factor up to 18.55 was obtained for a concentration of 70 mg/g of bismuth oxide in the tumor when irradiated with 131 Cs source. This study showed that bismuth oxide nanoparticles are innovative agents that could be potentially applicable to in vivo cancer radiotherapy due to the fact that they induce a highly localized energy deposition within the tumor.

  12. Simulation of dose deposition in stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy: a fast approach combining Monte Carlo and deterministic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smekens, F; Freud, N; Letang, J M; Babot, D [CNDRI (Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiations) Laboratory, INSA-Lyon, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Adam, J-F; Elleaume, H; Esteve, F [INSERM U-836, Equipe 6 ' Rayonnement Synchrotron et Recherche Medicale' , Institut des Neurosciences de Grenoble (France); Ferrero, C; Bravin, A [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)], E-mail: francois.smekens@insa-lyon.fr

    2009-08-07

    A hybrid approach, combining deterministic and Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, is proposed to compute the distribution of dose deposited during stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy treatment. The proposed approach divides the computation into two parts: (i) the dose deposited by primary radiation (coming directly from the incident x-ray beam) is calculated in a deterministic way using ray casting techniques and energy-absorption coefficient tables and (ii) the dose deposited by secondary radiation (Rayleigh and Compton scattering, fluorescence) is computed using a hybrid algorithm combining MC and deterministic calculations. In the MC part, a small number of particle histories are simulated. Every time a scattering or fluorescence event takes place, a splitting mechanism is applied, so that multiple secondary photons are generated with a reduced weight. The secondary events are further processed in a deterministic way, using ray casting techniques. The whole simulation, carried out within the framework of the Monte Carlo code Geant4, is shown to converge towards the same results as the full MC simulation. The speed of convergence is found to depend notably on the splitting multiplicity, which can easily be optimized. To assess the performance of the proposed algorithm, we compare it to state-of-the-art MC simulations, accelerated by the track length estimator technique (TLE), considering a clinically realistic test case. It is found that the hybrid approach is significantly faster than the MC/TLE method. The gain in speed in a test case was about 25 for a constant precision. Therefore, this method appears to be suitable for treatment planning applications.

  13. Assessment of fusion facility dose rate map using mesh adaptivity enhancements of hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Wilson, Paul P.; Sawan, Mohamed E.; Mosher, Scott W.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Grove, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Calculate the prompt dose rate everywhere throughout the entire fusion energy facility. •Utilize FW-CADIS to accurately perform difficult neutronics calculations for fusion energy systems. •Develop three mesh adaptivity algorithms to enhance FW-CADIS efficiency in fusion-neutronics calculations. -- Abstract: Three mesh adaptivity algorithms were developed to facilitate and expedite the use of the CADIS and FW-CADIS hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques in accurate full-scale neutronics simulations of fusion energy systems with immense sizes and complicated geometries. First, a macromaterial approach enhances the fidelity of the deterministic models without changing the mesh. Second, a deterministic mesh refinement algorithm generates meshes that capture as much geometric detail as possible without exceeding a specified maximum number of mesh elements. Finally, a weight window coarsening algorithm decouples the weight window mesh and energy bins from the mesh and energy group structure of the deterministic calculations in order to remove the memory constraint of the weight window map from the deterministic mesh resolution. The three algorithms were used to enhance an FW-CADIS calculation of the prompt dose rate throughout the ITER experimental facility and resulted in a 23.3% increase in the number of mesh tally elements in which the dose rates were calculated in a 10-day Monte Carlo calculation. Additionally, because of the significant increase in the efficiency of FW-CADIS simulations, the three algorithms enabled this difficult calculation to be accurately solved on a regular computer cluster, eliminating the need for a world-class super computer

  14. Calculation of primary and secondary dose in proton therapy of brain tumors using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghbel Esfahani, F.; Alamatsaz, M.; Karimian, A.

    2012-01-01

    High-energy beams of protons offer significant advantages for the treatment of deep-seated local tumors. Their physical depth-dose distribution in tissue is characterized by a small entrance dose and a distinct maximum - Bragg peak - near the end of range with a sharp falloff at the distal edge. Therefore, research must be done to investigate the possible negative and positive effects of using proton therapy as a treatment modality. In proton therapy, protons do account for the vast majority of dose. However, when protons travel through matter, secondary particles are created by the interactions of protons and matter en route to and within the patient. It is believed that secondary dose can lead to secondary cancer, especially in pediatric cases. Therefore, the focus of this work is determining both primary and secondary dose. Dose calculations were performed by MCNPX in tumoral and healthy parts of brain. The brain tumor has a 10 mm diameter and is located 16 cm under the skin surface. The brain was simulated by a cylindrical water phantom with the dimensions of 19 x 19cm 2 (length x diameter), with 0.5 cm thickness of plexiglass (C 4 H 6 O 2 ). Then beam characteristics were investigated to ensure the accuracy of the model. Simulations were initially validated with against packages such as SRIM/TRIM. Dose calculations were performed using different configurations to evaluate depth-dose profiles and dose 2D distributions.The results of the simulation show that the best proton energy interval, to cover completely the brain tumor, is from 152 to 154 MeV. (authors)

  15. Monte Carlo simulation study on dose enhancement by gold nanoparticles in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sungkoo; Jeong, Jonghwi; Kim, Chanhyeong; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2010-01-01

    Radiation dose enhancement by injection of a high atomic number (Z) material into tumor volumes has been studied for various radiation sources and different concentrations of gold nanoparticles. Brachytherapy employs low energy photons of less than ∼0.5 MeV, which indeed is the optimal energy range for radiation dose enhancement by introduction of high-Z material. The present study uses the MCNPX TM code to estimate the dose enhancement by gold nanoparticles for the four common brachytherapy sources ( 137 Cs, 192 Ir, 125 I, and 103 Pd). Additionally, cisplatin (H 6 Cl 2 N 2 Pt), a platinum-based chemotherapeutic drug, was used to evaluate the dose enhancement. The simulated source models were evaluated with reference to the calculated TG-43 parameter values. The dose enhancement in the tumor region due to the gold nanoparticles and cisplatin was evaluated according to the dose enhancement factor (DEF). The maximum values of the average DEFs were found to be 1.03, 1.11, 3.43, and 2.17 for the 137 Cs, 192 Ir, 125 I, and 103 Pd sources, respectively. The dose enhancement values for the low-energy sources were significantly higher than those for the high-energy sources. The dose enhancement due to cisplatin was calculated by using the same approach and was found to be comparable to that of the gold nanoparticles. The maximum value of the average DEF for cisplatin was 1.12 for the 5% concentration level in water and a 192 Ir source. We confirmed that cisplatin could be applied to cancer therapy that combines chemotherapeutic drugs with radiation therapy. The results presented herein will be used to study dose enhancement in tumor regions using various radiation modalities with high atomic number materials.

  16. SU-E-T-256: Development of a Monte Carlo-Based Dose-Calculation System in a Cloud Environment for IMRT and VMAT Dosimetric Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Y [Tokai University School of Medicine, Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are techniques that are widely used for treating cancer due to better target coverage and critical structure sparing. The increasing complexity of IMRT and VMAT plans leads to decreases in dose calculation accuracy. Monte Carlo simulations are the most accurate method for the determination of dose distributions in patients. However, the simulation settings for modeling an accurate treatment head are very complex and time consuming. The purpose of this work is to report our implementation of a simple Monte Carlo simulation system in a cloud-computing environment for dosimetric verification of IMRT and VMAT plans. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations of a Varian Clinac linear accelerator were performed using the BEAMnrc code, and dose distributions were calculated using the DOSXYZnrc code. Input files for the simulations were automatically generated from DICOM RT files by the developed web application. We therefore must only upload the DICOM RT files through the web interface, and the simulations are run in the cloud. The calculated dose distributions were exported to RT Dose files that can be downloaded through the web interface. The accuracy of the calculated dose distribution was verified by dose measurements. Results: IMRT and VMAT simulations were performed and good agreement results were observed for measured and MC dose comparison. Gamma analysis with a 3% dose and 3 mm DTA criteria shows a mean gamma index value of 95% for the studied cases. Conclusion: A Monte Carlo-based dose calculation system has been successfully implemented in a cloud environment. The developed system can be used for independent dose verification of IMRT and VMAT plans in routine clinical practice. The system will also be helpful for improving accuracy in beam modeling and dose calculation in treatment planning systems. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25861057.

  17. SU-E-T-256: Development of a Monte Carlo-Based Dose-Calculation System in a Cloud Environment for IMRT and VMAT Dosimetric Verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are techniques that are widely used for treating cancer due to better target coverage and critical structure sparing. The increasing complexity of IMRT and VMAT plans leads to decreases in dose calculation accuracy. Monte Carlo simulations are the most accurate method for the determination of dose distributions in patients. However, the simulation settings for modeling an accurate treatment head are very complex and time consuming. The purpose of this work is to report our implementation of a simple Monte Carlo simulation system in a cloud-computing environment for dosimetric verification of IMRT and VMAT plans. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations of a Varian Clinac linear accelerator were performed using the BEAMnrc code, and dose distributions were calculated using the DOSXYZnrc code. Input files for the simulations were automatically generated from DICOM RT files by the developed web application. We therefore must only upload the DICOM RT files through the web interface, and the simulations are run in the cloud. The calculated dose distributions were exported to RT Dose files that can be downloaded through the web interface. The accuracy of the calculated dose distribution was verified by dose measurements. Results: IMRT and VMAT simulations were performed and good agreement results were observed for measured and MC dose comparison. Gamma analysis with a 3% dose and 3 mm DTA criteria shows a mean gamma index value of 95% for the studied cases. Conclusion: A Monte Carlo-based dose calculation system has been successfully implemented in a cloud environment. The developed system can be used for independent dose verification of IMRT and VMAT plans in routine clinical practice. The system will also be helpful for improving accuracy in beam modeling and dose calculation in treatment planning systems. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25861057

  18. Dose attenuation effect of hip prostheses in a 9-MV photon beam. Commercial treatment planning system versus Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesbahi, A.; Nejad, F.S.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric effect of various hip prostheses on pelvis lateral fields treated by a 9-MV photon beam using Monte Carlo (MC) and effective path-length (EPL) methods. The head of the Neptun 10 pc linac was simulated using the MCNP4C MC code. The accuracy of the MC model was evaluated using measured dosimetric features including depth dose values and dose profiles in a water phantom. The Alfard treatment planning system (TPS) was used for EPL calculations. A virtual water phantom with dimensions of 30 x 30 x 30 cm 3 and a cube with dimensions of 4 x 4 x 4 cm 3 made of various metals centered in 12 cm depth was used for MC and EPL calculations. Various materials including titanium, Co-Cr-Mo, and steel alloys were used as hip prostheses. Our results showed significant attenuation in absorbed dose for points after and inside the prostheses. Attenuations of 32%, 54% and 55% were seen for titanium, Co-Cr-Mo, and steel alloys, respectively, at a distance of 5 cm from the prosthesis. Considerable dose increase (up to 18%) was found at the water-prosthesis interface due to back-scattered electrons using the MC method. The results of EPL calculations for the titanium implant were comparable to the MC calculations. This method, however, was not able to predict the interface effect or calculate accurately the absorbed dose in the presence of the Co-Cr-Mo and steel prostheses. The dose perturbation effect of hip prostheses is significant and cannot be predicted accurately by the EPL method for Co-Cr-Mo or steel prostheses. The use of MC-based TPS is recommended for treatments requiring fields passing through hip prostheses. (author)

  19. Efficiency of radiation protection equipment in interventional radiology: a systematic Monte Carlo study of eye lens and whole body doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koukorava, C; Farah, J; Clairand, I; Donadille, L; Struelens, L; Vanhavere, F; Dimitriou, P

    2014-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations were used to investigate the efficiency of radiation protection equipment in reducing eye and whole body doses during fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures. Eye lens doses were determined considering different models of eyewear with various shapes, sizes and lead thickness. The origin of scattered radiation reaching the eyes was also assessed to explain the variation in the protection efficiency of the different eyewear models with exposure conditions. The work also investigates the variation of eye and whole body doses with ceiling-suspended shields of various shapes and positioning. For all simulations, a broad spectrum of configurations typical for most interventional procedures was considered. Calculations showed that ‘wrap around’ glasses are the most efficient eyewear models reducing, on average, the dose by 74% and 21% for the left and right eyes respectively. The air gap between the glasses and the eyes was found to be the primary source of scattered radiation reaching the eyes. The ceiling-suspended screens were more efficient when positioned close to the patient’s skin and to the x-ray field. With the use of such shields, the H p (10) values recorded at the collar, chest and waist level and the H p (3) values for both eyes were reduced on average by 47%, 37%, 20% and 56% respectively. Finally, simulations proved that beam quality and lead thickness have little influence on eye dose while beam projection, the position and head orientation of the operator as well as the distance between the image detector and the patient are key parameters affecting eye and whole body doses. (paper)

  20. Use of Monte Carlo Simulations to Determine Optimal Carbapenem Dosing in Critically Ill Patients Receiving Prolonged Intermittent Renal Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Susan J; Kays, Michael B; Mueller, Bruce A

    2016-10-01

    Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analyses with Monte Carlo simulations (MCSs) can be used to integrate prior information on model parameters into a new renal replacement therapy (RRT) to develop optimal drug dosing when pharmacokinetic trials are not feasible. This study used MCSs to determine initial doripenem, imipenem, meropenem, and ertapenem dosing regimens for critically ill patients receiving prolonged intermittent RRT (PIRRT). Published body weights and pharmacokinetic parameter estimates (nonrenal clearance, free fraction, volume of distribution, extraction coefficients) with variability were used to develop a pharmacokinetic model. MCS of 5000 patients evaluated multiple regimens in 4 different PIRRT effluent/duration combinations (4 L/h × 10 hours or 5 L/h × 8 hours in hemodialysis or hemofiltration) occurring at the beginning or 14-16 hours after drug infusion. The probability of target attainment (PTA) was calculated using ≥40% free serum concentrations above 4 times the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for the first 48 hours. Optimal doses were defined as the smallest daily dose achieving ≥90% PTA in all PIRRT combinations. At the MIC of 2 mg/L for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, optimal doses were doripenem 750 mg every 8 hours, imipenem 1 g every 8 hours or 750 mg every 6 hours, and meropenem 1 g every 12 hours or 1 g pre- and post-PIRRT. Ertapenem 500 mg followed by 500 mg post-PIRRT was optimal at the MIC of 1 mg/L for Streptococcus pneumoniae. Incorporating data from critically ill patients receiving RRT into MCS resulted in markedly different carbapenem dosing regimens in PIRRT from those recommended for conventional RRTs because of the unique drug clearance characteristics of PIRRT. These results warrant clinical validation. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  1. Monte Carlo dose calculations in homogeneous media and at interfaces: a comparison between GEPTS, EGSnrc, MCNP, and measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibani, Omar; Li, X Allen

    2002-05-01

    Three Monte Carlo photon/electron transport codes (GEPTS, EGSnrc, and MCNP) are bench-marked against dose measurements in homogeneous (both low- and high-Z) media as well as at interfaces. A brief overview on physical models used by each code for photon and electron (positron) transport is given. Absolute calorimetric dose measurements for 0.5 and 1 MeV electron beams incident on homogeneous and multilayer media are compared with the predictions of the three codes. Comparison with dose measurements in two-layer media exposed to a 60Co gamma source is also performed. In addition, comparisons between the codes (including the EGS4 code) are done for (a) 0.05 to 10 MeV electron beams and positron point sources in lead, (b) high-energy photons (10 and 20 MeV) irradiating a multilayer phantom (water/steel/air), and (c) simulation of a 90Sr/90Y brachytherapy source. A good agreement is observed between the calorimetric electron dose measurements and predictions of GEPTS and EGSnrc in both homogeneous and multilayer media. MCNP outputs are found to be dependent on the energy-indexing method (Default/ITS style). This dependence is significant in homogeneous media as well as at interfaces. MCNP(ITS) fits more closely the experimental data than MCNP(DEF), except for the case of Be. At low energy (0.05 and 0.1 MeV), MCNP(ITS) dose distributions in lead show higher maximums in comparison with GEPTS and EGSnrc. EGS4 produces too penetrating electron-dose distributions in high-Z media, especially at low energy (MCNP results depend significantly on the electron energy-indexing method.

  2. Monte Carlo method for dose calculation due to oral X-rays; Coeficientes de conversao para calculo de doses devidos a radiografias odontologicas utilizando o metodo de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, Eduardo Cesar de Miranda

    1998-06-01

    The increasing utilization of oral X-rays, especially in youngsters and children, calls for the assessment of equivalent doses in their organs and tissues. With this purpose, a Monte Carlo code was adapted to simulate an X-ray source irradiating phantoms of the MIRD-5 type with different ages (10, 15 and 40 years old) to calculate the conversion coefficients which transform the exposure at skin to equivalent doses at several organs and tissues of interest. In order to check the computer program, simulations were performed for adult patients using the original code (ADAM.FOR developed at the GSF-Germany) and the adapted program (MCDRO.PAS). Good agreement between results obtained with both codes was observed. Irradiations of the incisive, canine and molar teeth were simulated. The conversion factors were calculated for the following organs and tissues: thyroid, active bone narrow (head and whole body), bone (facial skeleton, cranium and whole body), skin (head and whole body) and crystalline. Based on the obtained results, it follows that the younger the patient and the larger the field area, the higher the dose in assessed organs and tissues. The variation of the source-skin distance does not change the conversion coefficients. On the other hand, the increase in the voltage applied to the X-ray tube causes an increase in the calculated conversion coefficients. (author)

  3. Spectra and depth-dose deposition in a polymethylmethacrylate breast phantom obtained by experimental and Monte Carlo method; Espectros e deposicao de dose em profundidade em phantom de mama de polimetilmetacrilato: obtencao experimental e por metodo de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, Mariano G.; Pires, Evandro J.; Magalhaes, Luis A.; Almeida, Carlos E. de; Alves, Carlos F.E., E-mail: marianogd08@gmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. Ciencias Radiologicas; Albuquerque, Marcos A. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto Alberto Luiz Coimbra; Bernal, Mario A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin; Peixoto, Jose G. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-08-15

    This paper focuses on the obtainment, using experimental and Monte Carlo-simulated (MMC) methods, of the photon spectra at various depths and depth-dose deposition curves for x-rays beams used in mammography, obtained on a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) breast phantom. Spectra were obtained for 28 and 30 kV quality-beams and the corresponding average energy values (Emed) were calculated. For the experimental acquisition was used a Si-PIN photodiode spectrometer and for the MMC simulations the PENELOPE code was employed. The simulated and the experimental spectra show a very good agreement, which was corroborated by the low differences found between the Emed values. An increase in the Emed values and a strong attenuation of the beam through the depth of the PMMA phantom was also observed. (author)

  4. Calculated organ doses using Monte Carlo simulations in a reference male phantom undergoing HDR brachytherapy applied to localized prostate carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candela-Juan, Cristian; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo; Rivard, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to obtain equivalent doses in radiosensitive organs (aside from the bladder and rectum) when applying high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy to a localized prostate carcinoma using 60 Co or 192 Ir sources. These data are compared with results in a water phantom and with expected values in an infinite water medium. A comparison with reported values from proton therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is also provided. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations in Geant4 were performed using a voxelized phantom described in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 110, which reproduces masses and shapes from an adult reference man defined in ICRP Publication 89. Point sources of 60 Co or 192 Ir with photon energy spectra corresponding to those exiting their capsules were placed in the center of the prostate, and equivalent doses per clinical absorbed dose in this target organ were obtained in several radiosensitive organs. Values were corrected to account for clinical circumstances with the source located at various positions with differing dwell times throughout the prostate. This was repeated for a homogeneous water phantom. Results: For the nearest organs considered (bladder, rectum, testes, small intestine, and colon), equivalent doses given by 60 Co source were smaller (8%–19%) than from 192 Ir. However, as the distance increases, the more penetrating gamma rays produced by 60 Co deliver higher organ equivalent doses. The overall result is that effective dose per clinical absorbed dose from a 60 Co source (11.1 mSv/Gy) is lower than from a 192 Ir source (13.2 mSv/Gy). On the other hand, equivalent doses were the same in the tissue and the homogeneous water phantom for those soft tissues closer to the prostate than about 30 cm. As the distance increased, the differences of photoelectric effect in water and soft tissue, and appearance of other materials such as air, bone, or lungs, produced

  5. Applicability of dose conversion coefficients of ICRP 74 to Asian adult males: Monte Carlo simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lee, Choonik; Lee, Jai-Ki

    2007-01-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reported comprehensive dose conversion coefficients for adult population, which is exposed to external photon sources in the Publication 74. However, those quantities were calculated from so-called stylized (or mathematical) phantoms composed of simplified mathematical surface equations so that the discrepancy between the phantoms and real human anatomy has been investigated by several authors using Caucasian-based voxel phantoms. To address anatomical and racial limitations of the stylized phantoms, several Asian-based voxel phantoms have been developed by Korean and Japanese investigators, independently. In the current study, photon dose conversion coefficients of ICRP 74 were compared with those from a total of five Asian-based male voxel phantoms, whose body dimensions were almost identical. Those of representative radio-sensitive organs (testes, red bone marrow, colon, lungs, and stomach), and effective dose conversion coefficients were obtained for comparison. Even though organ doses for testes, colon and lungs, and effective doses from ICRP 74 agreed well with those from Asian voxel phantoms within 10%, absorbed doses for red bone marrow and stomach showed significant discrepancies up to 30% which was mainly attributed to difference of phantom description between stylized and voxel phantoms. This study showed that the ICRP 74 dosimetry data, which have been reported to be unrealistic compared to those from Caucasian-based voxel phantoms, are also not appropriate for Asian population

  6. Photon beam convolution using polyenergetic energy deposition kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoban, P.W.; Murray, D.C.; Round, W.H.

    1994-01-01

    In photon beam convolution calculations where polyenergetic energy deposition kernels (EDKs) are used, the primary photon energy spectrum should be correctly accounted for in Monte Carlo generation of EDKs. This requires the probability of interaction, determined by the linear attenuation coefficient, μ, to be taken into account when primary photon interactions are forced to occur at the EDK origin. The use of primary and scattered EDKs generated with a fixed photon spectrum can give rise to an error in the dose calculation due to neglecting the effects of beam hardening with depth. The proportion of primary photon energy that is transferred to secondary electrons increases with depth of interaction, due to the increase in the ratio μ ab /μ as the beam hardens. Convolution depth-dose curves calculated using polyenergetic EDKs generated for the primary photon spectra which exist at depths of 0, 20 and 40 cm in water, show a fall-off which is too steep when compared with EGS4 Monte Carlo results. A beam hardening correction factor applied to primary and scattered 0 cm EDKs, based on the ratio of kerma to terma at each depth, gives primary, scattered and total dose in good agreement with Monte Carlo results. (Author)

  7. 3D dose imaging for arc therapy techniques by means of Fricke gel dosimetry and dedicated Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valente, Mauro; Castellano, Gustavo; Sosa, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Radiotherapy is one of the most effective techniques for tumour treatment and control. During the last years, significant developments were performed regarding both irradiation technology and techniques. However, accurate 3D dosimetric techniques are nowadays not commercially available. Due to their intrinsic characteristics, traditional dosimetric techniques like ionisation chamber, film dosimetry or TLD do not offer proper continuous 3D dose mapping. The possibility of using ferrous sulphate (Fricke) dosimeters suitably fixed to a gel matrix, along with dedicated optical analysis methods, based on light transmission measurements for 3D absorbed dose imaging in tissue-equivalent materials, has become great interest in radiotherapy. Since Gore et al. showed in 1984 that the oxidation of ferrous ions to ferric ions still happen even when fixing the ferrous sulphate solution to a gelatine matrix, important efforts have been dedicated in developing and improving real continuous 3D dosimetric systems based on Fricke solution. The purpose of this work is to investigate the capability and suitability of Fricke gel dosimetry for arc therapy irradiations. The dosimetric system is mainly composed by Fricke gel dosimeters, suitably shaped in form of thin layers and optically analysed by means of visible light transmission measurements, acquiring sample images just before and after irradiation by means of a commercial flatbed-like scanner. Image acquisition, conversion to matrices and further analysis are accomplished by means of dedicated developed software, which includes suitable algorithms for optical density differences calculation and corresponding absorbed dose conversion. Dedicated subroutines allow 3D dose imaging reconstruction from single layer information, by means of computer tomography-like algorithms. Also, dedicated Monte Carlo (PENELOPE) subroutines have been adapted in order to achieve accurate simulation of arc therapy irradiation techniques

  8. SU-F-T-155: Validation of a Commercial Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Algorithm for Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, J; Wong, T [SCCA Proton Therapy Center, Seattle, WA (United States); St James, S; Stewart, R; Bloch, C [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Traneus, E [Raysearch Laboratories AB, Stockholm. (Sweden)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Compare proton pencil beam scanning dose measurements to GATE/GEANT4 (GMC) and RayStation™ Monte Carlo (RMC) simulations. Methods: Proton pencil beam models of the IBA gantry at the Seattle Proton Therapy Center were developed in the GMC code system and a research build of the RMC. For RMC, a preliminary beam model that does not account for upstream halo was used. Depth dose and lateral profiles are compared for the RMC, GMC and a RayStation™ pencil beam dose (RPB) model for three spread out Bragg peaks (SOBPs) in homogenous water phantom. SOBP comparisons were also made among the three models for a phantom with a (i) 2 cm bone and a (ii) 0.5 cm titanium insert. Results: Measurements and GMC estimates of R80 range agree to within 1 mm, and the mean point-to-point dose difference is within 1.2% for all integrated depth dose (IDD) profiles. The dose differences at the peak are 1 to 2%. All of the simulated spot sigmas are within 0.15 mm of the measured values. For the three SOBPs considered, the maximum R80 deviation from measurement for GMC was −0.35 mm, RMC 0.5 mm, and RPB −0.1 mm. The minimum gamma pass using the 3%/3mm criterion for all the profiles was 94%. The dose comparison for heterogeneous inserts in low dose gradient regions showed dose differences greater than 10% at the distal edge of interface between RPB and GMC. The RMC showed improvement and agreed with GMC to within 7%. Conclusion: The RPB dosimetry show clinically significant differences (> 10%) from GMC and RMC estimates. The RMC algorithm is superior to the RPB dosimetry in heterogeneous media. We suspect modelling of the beam’s halo may be responsible for a portion of the remaining discrepancy and that RayStation will reduce this discrepancy as they finalize the release. Erik Traneus is employed as a Research Scientist at RaySearch Laboratories. The research build of the RayStation TPS used in the study was made available to the SCCA free of charge. RaySearch did not provide

  9. A Monte Carlo evaluation of RapidArc dose calculations for oropharynx radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, I M; Ansbacher, W; Zavgorodni, S; Popescu, C; Beckham, W A

    2008-01-01

    RapidArc(TM), recently released by Varian Medical Systems, is a novel extension of IMRT in which an optimized 3D dose distribution may be delivered in a single gantry rotation of 360 deg. or less. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA), the sole algorithm for photon dose calculations of RapidArc(TM) treatment plans. The clinical site chosen was oropharynx and the associated nodes involved. The VIMC-Arc system, which utilizes BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc for particle transport through the linac head and patient CT phantom, was used as a benchmarking tool. As part of this study, the dose for a single static aperture, typical for RapidArc(TM) delivery, was calculated by the AAA, MC and compared with the film. This film measurement confirmed MC modeling of the beam aperture in water. It also demonstrated that the AAA dosimetric error can be as high as 12% near isolated leaf edges and up to 5% at the leaf end. The composite effect of these errors in a full RapidArc(TM) calculation in water involving a C-shaped target and the associated organ at risk produced a 1.5% overprediction of the mean target dose. In our cohort of six patients, the AAA was found, on average, to overestimate the PTV60 coverage at the 95% level in the presence of air cavities by 1.0% (SD = 1.1%). Removing the air cavities from the target volumes reduced these differences by about a factor of 2. The dose to critical structures was also overestimated by the AAA. The mean dose to the spinal cord was higher by 1.8% (SD = 0.8%), while the effective maximum dose (D 2% ) was only 0.2% higher (SD = 0.6%). The mean dose to the parotid glands was overestimated by ∼9%. This study has shown that the accuracy of the AAA for RapidArc(TM) dose calculations, performed at a resolution of 2.5 mm or better, is adequate for clinical use.

  10. Dosimetric characterization and organ dose assessment in digital breast tomosynthesis: Measurements and Monte Carlo simulations using voxel phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Mariana, E-mail: marianabaptista@ctn.ist.utl.pt; Di Maria, Salvatore; Barros, Sílvia; Vaz, Pedro [Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, km 139,7, Bobadela LRS 2695-066 (Portugal); Figueira, Catarina [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Sarmento, Marta; Orvalho, Lurdes [Serviço de Imagiologia, Hospital da Luz, Avenida Lusíada, 100, Lisboa 1500-650 (Portugal)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Due to its capability to more accurately detect deep lesions inside the breast by removing the effect of overlying anatomy, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has the potential to replace the standard mammography technique in clinical screening exams. However, the European Guidelines for DBT dosimetry are still a work in progress and there are little data available on organ doses other than to the breast. It is, therefore, of great importance to assess the dosimetric performance of DBT with respect to the one obtained with standard digital mammography (DM) systems. The aim of this work is twofold: (i) to study the dosimetric properties of a combined DBT/DM system (MAMMOMAT Inspiration Siemens{sup ®}) for a tungsten/rhodium (W/Rh) anode/filter combination and (ii) to evaluate organs doses during a DBT examination. Methods: For the first task, measurements were performed in manual and automatic exposure control (AEC) modes, using two homogeneous breast phantoms: a PMMA slab phantom and a 4 cm thick breast-shaped rigid phantom, with 50% of glandular tissue in its composition. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended v.2.7.0. A MC model was implemented to mimic DM and DBT acquisitions for a wide range of x-ray spectra (24 –34 kV). This was used to calculate mean glandular dose (MGD) and to compute series of backscatter factors (BSFs) that could be inserted into the DBT dosimetric formalism proposed by Dance et al. Regarding the second aim of the study, the implemented MC model of the clinical equipment, together with a female voxel phantom (“Laura”), was used to calculate organ doses considering a typical DBT acquisition. Results were compared with a standard two-view mammography craniocaudal (CC) acquisition. Results: Considering the AEC mode, the acquisition of a single CC view results in a MGD ranging from 0.53 ± 0.07 mGy to 2.41 ± 0.31 mGy in DM mode and from 0.77 ± 0.11 mGy to 2.28 ± 0.32 mGy in DBT mode

  11. Tissue classifications in Monte Carlo simulations of patient dose for photon beam tumor treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mu-Han; Chao, Tsi-Chian; Lee, Chung-Chi; Tung-Chieh Chang, Joseph; Tung, Chuan-Jong

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the calculated dose uncertainties induced by the material classification that determined the interaction cross-sections and the water-to-material stopping-power ratios. Calculations were made for a head- and neck-cancer patient treated with five intensity-modulated radiotherapy fields using 6 MV photon beams. The patient's CT images were reconstructed into two voxelized patient phantoms based on different CT-to-material classification schemes. Comparisons of the depth-dose curve of the anterior-to-posterior field and the dose-volume-histogram of the treatment plan were used to evaluate the dose uncertainties from such schemes. The results indicated that any misassignment of tissue materials could lead to a substantial dose difference, which would affect the treatment outcome. To assure an appropriate material assignment, it is desirable to have different conversion tables for various parts of the body. The assignment of stopping-power ratio should be based on the chemical composition and the density of the material.

  12. Tissue classifications in Monte Carlo simulations of patient dose for photon beam tumor treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Mu-Han; Chao, Tsi-Chian; Lee, Chung-Chi; Tung-Chieh Chang, Joseph; Tung, Chuan-Jong

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the calculated dose uncertainties induced by the material classification that determined the interaction cross-sections and the water-to-material stopping-power ratios. Calculations were made for a head- and neck-cancer patient treated with five intensity-modulated radiotherapy fields using 6 MV photon beams. The patient's CT images were reconstructed into two voxelized patient phantoms based on different CT-to-material classification schemes. Comparisons of the depth-dose curve of the anterior-to-posterior field and the dose-volume-histogram of the treatment plan were used to evaluate the dose uncertainties from such schemes. The results indicated that any misassignment of tissue materials could lead to a substantial dose difference, which would affect the treatment outcome. To assure an appropriate material assignment, it is desirable to have different conversion tables for various parts of the body. The assignment of stopping-power ratio should be based on the chemical composition and the density of the material.

  13. Converging stereotactic radiotherapy using kilovoltage X-rays: experimental irradiation of normal rabbit lung and dose-volume analysis with Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Takatsugu; Kunieda, Etsuo; Deloar, Hossain M; Tsunoo, Takanori; Seki, Satoshi; Oku, Yohei; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Ogawa, Eileen N; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Kameyama, Kaori; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-10-01

    To validate the feasibility of developing a radiotherapy unit with kilovoltage X-rays through actual irradiation of live rabbit lungs, and to explore the practical issues anticipated in future clinical application to humans through Monte Carlo dose simulation. A converging stereotactic irradiation unit was developed, consisting of a modified diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scanner. A tiny cylindrical volume in 13 normal rabbit lungs was individually irradiated with single fractional absorbed doses of 15, 30, 45, and 60 Gy. Observational CT scanning of the whole lung was performed every 2 weeks for 30 weeks after irradiation. After 30 weeks, histopathologic specimens of the lungs were examined. Dose distribution was simulated using the Monte Carlo method, and dose-volume histograms were calculated according to the data. A trial estimation of the effect of respiratory movement on dose distribution was made. A localized hypodense change and subsequent reticular opacity around the planning target volume (PTV) were observed in CT images of rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk showed a focused dose distribution to the target and sufficient dose lowering in the organs at risk. Our estimate of the dose distribution, taking respiratory movement into account, revealed dose reduction in the PTV. A converging stereotactic irradiation unit using kilovoltage X-rays was able to generate a focused radiobiologic reaction in rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histogram analysis and estimated sagittal dose distribution, considering respiratory movement, clarified the characteristics of the irradiation received from this type of unit.

  14. Multigroup and coupled forward-adjoint Monte Carlo calculation efficiencies for secondary neutron doses from proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsey IV, Charles T.; Prinja, Anil K.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluate the Monte Carlo calculation efficiency for multigroup transport relative to continuous energy transport using the MCNPX code system to evaluate secondary neutron doses from a proton beam. We consider both fully forward simulation and application of a midway forward adjoint coupling method to the problem. Previously we developed tools for building coupled multigroup proton/neutron cross section libraries and showed consistent results for continuous energy and multigroup proton/neutron transport calculations. We observed that forward multigroup transport could be more efficient than continuous energy. Here we quantify solution efficiency differences for a secondary radiation dose problem characteristic of proton beam therapy problems. We begin by comparing figures of merit for forward multigroup and continuous energy MCNPX transport and find that multigroup is 30 times more efficient. Next we evaluate efficiency gains for coupling out-of-beam adjoint solutions with forward in-beam solutions. We use a variation of a midway forward-adjoint coupling method developed by others for neutral particle transport. Our implementation makes use of the surface source feature in MCNPX and we use spherical harmonic expansions for coupling in angle rather than solid angle binning. The adjoint out-of-beam transport for organs of concern in a phantom or patient can be coupled with numerous forward, continuous energy or multigroup, in-beam perturbations of a therapy beam line configuration. Out-of-beam dose solutions are provided without repeating out-of-beam transport. (author)

  15. Two Dimensional Verification of the Dose Distribution of Gamma Knife Model C using Monte Carlo Simulation with a Virtual Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Yong-Kyun; Lee, Cheol Ho; Son, Jaebum; Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Dong Geon; Choi, Joonbum; Jang, Jae Yeong [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hyun-Tai [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Gamma Knife model C contains 201 {sup 60}Co sources located on a spherical surface, so that each beam is concentrated on the center of the sphere. In the last work, we simulated the Gamma Knife model C through Monte Carlo simulation code using Geant4. Instead of 201 multi-collimation system, we made one single collimation system that collects source parameter passing through the collimator helmet. Using the virtual source, we drastically reduced the simulation time to transport 201 gamma circle beams to the target. Gamma index has been widely used to compare two dose distributions in cancer radiotherapy. Gamma index pass rates were compared in two calculated results using the virtual source method and the original method and measured results obtained using radiocrhomic films. A virtual source method significantly reduces simulation time of a Gamma Knife Model C and provides equivalent absorbed dose distributions as that of the original method showing Gamma Index pass rate close to 100% under 1mm/3% criteria. On the other hand, it gives a little narrow dose distribution compared to the film measurement showing Gamma Index pass rate of 94%. More accurate and sophisticated examination on the accuracy of the simulation and film measurement is necessary.

  16. Monte Carlo Method in the calculate of conversion coefficients for dose in children's organs and tissues subjected to dentistric radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loureiro, E.C.M.; Khoury, H.; Lima, F.R.A.

    1998-01-01

    The increasing utilization of oral X-rays, specially in youngsters and children, prompts the assessment of equivalent doses in their organs and tissues. With this purpose, Monte Carlo code was adopted to simulate an X-ray source irradiating phantoms of the MIRD-5 type with different ages (10, 15 and 40 years old) to calculate the conversion coefficients which transform the exposure at skin to equivalent doses at several organs and tissues of interest. In order to check the computer program, simulations were performed for adult patients using the original code (ADAM,FOR developed by GSF Germany) and the adapted program (MCDRO,PAS). Good agreement between results obtained by both programs was observed. Applications to incisive, canine and molar teeth were simulated. The conversion factors were calculated for the following organs and tissues: thyroid, active bone marrow (head and whole body), bone (facial skeleton, cranium and whole body), skin (head and whole body) and crystalline. Based on the obtained results, it follows that the younger the patient and the langer the field area, the higher the doses in assessed organs and tissues

  17. Application of the Monte Carlo method to estimate doses due to neutron activation of different materials in a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ródenas, José

    2017-11-01

    All materials exposed to some neutron flux can be activated independently of the kind of the neutron source. In this study, a nuclear reactor has been considered as neutron source. In particular, the activation of control rods in a BWR is studied to obtain the doses produced around the storage pool for irradiated fuel of the plant when control rods are withdrawn from the reactor and installed into this pool. It is very important to calculate these doses because they can affect to plant workers in the area. The MCNP code based on the Monte Carlo method has been applied to simulate activation reactions produced in the control rods inserted into the reactor. Obtained activities are introduced as input into another MC model to estimate doses produced by them. The comparison of simulation results with experimental measurements allows the validation of developed models. The developed MC models have been also applied to simulate the activation of other materials, such as components of a stainless steel sample introduced into a training reactors. These models, once validated, can be applied to other situations and materials where a neutron flux can be found, not only nuclear reactors. For instance, activation analysis with an Am-Be source, neutrography techniques in both medical applications and non-destructive analysis of materials, civil engineering applications using a Troxler, analysis of materials in decommissioning of nuclear power plants, etc.

  18. SU-F-T-619: Dose Evaluation of Specific Patient Plans Based On Monte Carlo Algorithm for a CyberKnife Stereotactic Radiosurgery System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piao, J [PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); PLA 302 Hospital, Beijing (China); Xu, S [PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Wu, Z; Liu, Y [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Li, Y [Beihang University, Beijing (China); Qu, B [PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China); Duan, X [PLA 302 Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study will use Monte Carlo to simulate the Cyberknife system, and intend to develop the third-party tool to evaluate the dose verification of specific patient plans in TPS. Methods: By simulating the treatment head using the BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc software, the comparison between the calculated and measured data will be done to determine the beam parameters. The dose distribution calculated in the Raytracing, Monte Carlo algorithms of TPS (Multiplan Ver4.0.2) and in-house Monte Carlo simulation method for 30 patient plans, which included 10 head, lung and liver cases in each, were analyzed. The γ analysis with the combined 3mm/3% criteria would be introduced to quantitatively evaluate the difference of the accuracy between three algorithms. Results: More than 90% of the global error points were less than 2% for the comparison of the PDD and OAR curves after determining the mean energy and FWHM.The relative ideal Monte Carlo beam model had been established. Based on the quantitative evaluation of dose accuracy for three algorithms, the results of γ analysis shows that the passing rates (84.88±9.67% for head,98.83±1.05% for liver,98.26±1.87% for lung) of PTV in 30 plans between Monte Carlo simulation and TPS Monte Carlo algorithms were good. And the passing rates (95.93±3.12%,99.84±0.33% in each) of PTV in head and liver plans between Monte Carlo simulation and TPS Ray-tracing algorithms were also good. But the difference of DVHs in lung plans between Monte Carlo simulation and Ray-tracing algorithms was obvious, and the passing rate (51.263±38.964%) of γ criteria was not good. It is feasible that Monte Carlo simulation was used for verifying the dose distribution of patient plans. Conclusion: Monte Carlo simulation algorithm developed in the CyberKnife system of this study can be used as a reference tool for the third-party tool, which plays an important role in dose verification of patient plans. This work was supported in part by the grant

  19. Monte Carlo dosimetric characterization of the Flexisource Co-60 high-dose-rate brachytherapy source using PENELOPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansa, Julio F; Guerrero, Rafael; Torres, Javier; Lallena, Antonio M

    60 Co sources have been commercialized as an alternative to 192 Ir sources for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. One of them is the Flexisource Co-60 HDR source manufactured by Elekta. The only available dosimetric characterization of this source is that of Vijande et al. [J Contemp Brachytherapy 2012; 4:34-44], whose results were not included in the AAPM/ESTRO consensus document. In that work, the dosimetric quantities were calculated as averages of the results obtained with the Geant4 and PENELOPE Monte Carlo (MC) codes, though for other sources, significant differences have been quoted between the values obtained with these two codes. The aim of this work is to perform the dosimetric characterization of the Flexisource Co-60 HDR source using PENELOPE. The MC simulation code PENELOPE (v. 2014) has been used. Following the recommendations of the AAPM/ESTRO report, the radial dose function, the anisotropy function, the air-kerma strength, the dose rate constant, and the absorbed dose rate in water have been calculated. The results we have obtained exceed those of Vijande et al. In particular, the absorbed dose rate constant is ∼0.85% larger. A similar difference is also found in the other dosimetric quantities. The effect of the electrons emitted in the decay of 60 Co, usually neglected in this kind of simulations, is significant up to the distances of 0.25 cm from the source. The systematic and significant differences we have found between PENELOPE results and the average values found by Vijande et al. point out that the dosimetric characterizations carried out with the various MC codes should be provided independently. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. MAGIK: a Monte Carlo system for computing induced residual activation dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barish, J.; Gabriel, T.A.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.

    1979-08-01

    The photon dose rate from the induced activity produced by sustained bombardment of materials by neutrons and charged particles may present a significant radiation hazard. To minimize this hazard, the material configuration must be so designed that the photon dose rate decays to an acceptable level soon after the source beam is turned off. MAGIK calculates the time-independent photon dose rates that result from activities produced by nucleon-nucleus and meson-nucleus collisions over a wide range of energies. The system has been used both for high-energy accelerator studies and for fusion reactor studies. In the MAGIK system the lengthy photon transport calculations are carried out independent of time, and the time dependence is introduced in the final program, thereby permitting study of various operating scenarios with a minimum computing cost

  1. Dose rate determinations in the Portuguese Gamma Irradiation Facility: Monte Carlo simulations and measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.; Salgado, J.; Ferro de Carvalho, A.

    2000-01-01

    A simulation study of the Portuguese Gamma Irradiation Facility, UTR, has been carried out using the MCNP code. The work focused on the optimisation of the dose distribution inside the irradiation cell, dose calculations inside irradiated samples and dose calculations in critical points for protection purposes. Calculations were carried out at points inside and outside the irradiation cell, where different behaviour was expected (distance from the source, radiation absorption and scattering in irradiator structure and walls). The contributions from source, irradiator structure, sample material, carriers, walls, ceiling and floor to the photon spectra and air kerma at those points are reported and discussed. Air kerma measurements were also carried out using an ionisation chamber. Good agreement was found between experimental and calculated air kermas. (author)

  2. Monte Carlo estimation of the dose and heating of cobalt adjuster rods irradiated in the CANDU 6 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gugiu, D.; Dumitrache, I.

    2005-01-01

    The present work is a part of a more complex project related to the replacement of the original stainless steel adjuster rods with cobalt assemblies in the CANDU 6 reactor core. The 60 Co produced by 59 Co irradiation could be used extensively in medicine and industry. The paper will mainly describe some of the reactor physics and safety requirements that must be carried into practice for the Co adjuster rods. The computations related to the neutronic equivalence of the stainless steel adjusters with the Co adjuster assemblies, as well as the estimations of the activity and heating of the irradiated cobalt rods, are performed using the Monte Carlo codes MCNP5 and MONTEBURNS 2.1. The activity values are used to evaluate the dose at the surface of the device designed to transport the cobalt adjusters. (authors)

  3. An analysis of exposure dose on hands of radiation workers using a Monte Carlo simulation in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Dong Gun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences Cancer Center, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, SeSik; Kim, Jung Hoon; KIm, Chang Soo [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Workers in nuclear medicine have performed various tasks such as production, distribution, preparation and injection of radioisotope. This process could cause high radiation exposure to workers’ hand. The purpose of this study was to investigate shielding effect for r-rays of 140 and 511 keV by using Monte-Carlo simulation. As a result, it was effective, regardless of lead thickness for radiation shielding in 140 keV r-ray. However, it was effective in shielding material with thickness of more than only 1.1 mm in 511 keV r-ray. And also it doesn’t effective in less than 1.1 mm due to secondary scatter ray and exposure dose was rather increased. Consequently, energy of radionuclide and thickness of shielding materials should be considered to reduce radiation exposure.

  4. Photon activation therapy: a Monte Carlo study on dose enhancement by various sources and activation media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhshabadi, Mahdi; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Meigooni, Ali Soleimani

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, a number of brachytherapy sources and activation media were simulated using MCNPX code and the results were analyzed based on the dose enhancement factor values. Furthermore, two new brachytherapy sources ( 131 Cs and a hypothetical 170 Tm) were evaluated for their application in photon activation therapy (PAT). 125 I, 103 Pd, 131 Cs and hypothetical 170 Tm brachytherapy sources were simulated in water and their dose rate constant and the radial dose functions were compared with previously published data. The sources were then simulated in a soft tissue phantom which was composed of Ag, I, Pt or Au as activation media uniformly distributed in the tumour volume. These simulations were performed using the MCNPX code, and dose enhancement factor (DEF) was obtained for 7, 18 and 30 mg/ml concentrations of the activation media. Each source, activation medium and concentration was evaluated separately in a separate simulation. The calculated dose rate constant and radial dose functions were in agreement with the published data for the aforementioned sources. The maximum DEF was found to be 5.58 for a combination of the 170 Tm source with 30 mg/ml concentration of I. The DEFs for 131 Cs and 170 Tm sources for all the four activation media were higher than those for other sources and activation media. From this point of view, these two sources can be more useful in photon activation therapy with photon emitter sources. Furthermore, 131 Cs and 170 Tm brachytherapy sources can be proposed as new options for use in the field of PAT.

  5. Monte Carlo derivation of filtered tungsten anode X-ray spectra for dose computation in digital mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paixao, L.; Oliveira, B. B.; Nogueira, M. do S. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, Post-graduation in Science and Technology of Radiations, Minerals and Materials, Pte. Antonio Carlos 6.627, Pampulha, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Viloria, C. [UFMG, Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Post-graduation in Nuclear Sciences and Techniques, Pte. Antonio Carlos 6.627, Pampulha, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Alves de O, M. [UFMG, Department of Anatomy and Imaging, Prof. Alfredo Balena 190, 30130-100 Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Araujo T, M. H., E-mail: lpr@cdtn.br [Dr Maria Helena Araujo Teixeira Clinic, Guajajaras 40, 30180-100 Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    It is widely accepted that the mean glandular dose (D{sub G}) for the glandular tissue is the more useful magnitude for characterizing the breast cancer risk. The procedure to estimate the D{sub G}, for being difficult to measure it directly in the breast, it is to make the use of conversion factors that relate incident air kerma (K{sub i}) at this dose. Generally, the conversion factors vary with the x-ray spectrum half-value layer and the breast composition and thickness. Several authors through computer simulations have calculated such factors by the Monte Carlo (Mc) method. Many spectral models for D{sub G} computer simulations purposes are available in the diagnostic range. One of the models available generates unfiltered spectra. In this work, the Monte Carlo EGSnrc code package with the C++ class library (eg spp) was employed to derive filtered tungsten x-ray spectra used in digital mammography systems. Filtered spectra for rhodium and aluminium filters were obtained for tube potentials between 26 and 32 kV. The half-value layer of simulated filtered spectra were compared with those obtained experimentally with a solid state detector Unfors model 8202031-H Xi R/F and Mam Detector Platinum and 8201023-C Xi Base unit Platinum Plus w m As in a Hologic Selenia Dimensions system using a Direct Radiography mode. Calculated half-value layer values showed good agreement compared to those obtained experimentally. These results show that the filtered tungsten anode x-ray spectra and the EGSnrc Mc code can be used for D{sub G} determination in mammography. (Author)

  6. Monte Carlo derivation of filtered tungsten anode X-ray spectra for dose computation in digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paixao, L.; Oliveira, B. B.; Nogueira, M. do S.; Viloria, C.; Alves de O, M.; Araujo T, M. H.

    2014-08-01

    It is widely accepted that the mean glandular dose (D G ) for the glandular tissue is the more useful magnitude for characterizing the breast cancer risk. The procedure to estimate the D G , for being difficult to measure it directly in the breast, it is to make the use of conversion factors that relate incident air kerma (K i ) at this dose. Generally, the conversion factors vary with the x-ray spectrum half-value layer and the breast composition and thickness. Several authors through computer simulations have calculated such factors by the Monte Carlo (Mc) method. Many spectral models for D G computer simulations purposes are available in the diagnostic range. One of the models available generates unfiltered spectra. In this work, the Monte Carlo EGSnrc code package with the C++ class library (eg spp) was employed to derive filtered tungsten x-ray spectra used in digital mammography systems. Filtered spectra for rhodium and aluminium filters were obtained for tube potentials between 26 and 32 kV. The half-value layer of simulated filtered spectra were compared with those obtained experimentally with a solid state detector Unfors model 8202031-H Xi R/F and Mam Detector Platinum and 8201023-C Xi Base unit Platinum Plus w m As in a Hologic Selenia Dimensions system using a Direct Radiography mode. Calculated half-value layer values showed good agreement compared to those obtained experimentally. These results show that the filtered tungsten anode x-ray spectra and the EGSnrc Mc code can be used for D G determination in mammography. (Author)

  7. Monte Carlo dose calculations and radiobiological modelling: analysis of the effect of the statistical noise of the dose distribution on the probability of tumour control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffa, Francesca M.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the influence of the statistical fluctuations of Monte Carlo (MC) dose distributions on the dose volume histograms (DVHs) and radiobiological models, in particular the Poisson model for tumour control probability (tcp). The MC matrix is characterized by a mean dose in each scoring voxel, d, and a statistical error on the mean dose, σ d ; whilst the quantities d and σ d depend on many statistical and physical parameters, here we consider only their dependence on the phantom voxel size and the number of histories from the radiation source. Dose distributions from high-energy photon beams have been analysed. It has been found that the DVH broadens when increasing the statistical noise of the dose distribution, and the tcp calculation systematically underestimates the real tumour control value, defined here as the value of tumour control when the statistical error of the dose distribution tends to zero. When increasing the number of energy deposition events, either by increasing the voxel dimensions or increasing the number of histories from the source, the DVH broadening decreases and tcp converges to the 'correct' value. It is shown that the underestimation of the tcp due to the noise in the dose distribution depends on the degree of heterogeneity of the radiobiological parameters over the population; in particular this error decreases with increasing the biological heterogeneity, whereas it becomes significant in the hypothesis of a radiosensitivity assay for single patients, or for subgroups of patients. It has been found, for example, that when the voxel dimension is changed from a cube with sides of 0.5 cm to a cube with sides of 0.25 cm (with a fixed number of histories of 10 8 from the source), the systematic error in the tcp calculation is about 75% in the homogeneous hypothesis, and it decreases to a minimum value of about 15% in a case of high radiobiological heterogeneity. The possibility of using the error on the

  8. Monte Carlo based estimation of organ and effective doses to patients undergoing hysterosalpingography and retrograde urethrography fluoroscopy procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngaile, J. E.; Msaki, P. K.; Kazema, R. R.

    2018-04-01

    Contrast investigations of hysterosalpingography (HSG) and retrograde urethrography (RUG) fluoroscopy procedures remain the dominant diagnostic tools for the investigation of infertility in females and urethral strictures in males, respectively, owing to the scarcity and high cost of services of alternative diagnostic technologies. In light of the radiological risks associated with contrast based investigations of the genitourinary tract systems, there is a need to assess the magnitude of radiation burden imparted to patients undergoing HSG and RUG fluoroscopy procedures in Tanzania. The air kerma area product (KAP), fluoroscopy time, number of images, organ dose and effective dose to patients undergoing HSG and RUG procedures were obtained from four hospitals. The KAP was measured using a flat transmission ionization chamber, while the organ and effective doses were estimated using the knowledge of the patient characteristics, patient related exposure parameters, geometry of examination, KAP and Monte Carlo calculations (PCXMC). The median values of KAP for the HSG and RUG were 2.2 Gy cm2 and 3.3 Gy cm2, respectively. The median organ doses in the present study for the ovaries, urinary bladder and uterus for the HSG procedures, were 1.0 mGy, 4.0 mGy and 1.6 mGy, respectively, while for urinary bladder and testes of the RUG were 3.4 mGy and 5.9 mGy, respectively. The median values of effective doses for the HSG and RUG procedures were 0.65 mSv and 0.59 mSv, respectively. The median values of effective dose per hospital for the HSG and RUG procedures had a range of 1.6-2.8 mSv and 1.9-5.6 mSv, respectively, while the overall differences between individual effective doses across the four hospitals varied by factors of up to 22.0 and 46.7, respectively for the HSG and RUG procedures. The proposed diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for the HSG and RUG were for KAP 2.8 Gy cm2 and 3.9 Gy cm2, for fluoroscopy time 0.8 min and 0.9 min, and for number of images 5 and 4

  9. Estimation of tumour dose enhancement due to gold nanoparticles during typical radiation treatments: a preliminary Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, S H

    2005-01-01

    A recent mice study demonstrated that gold nanoparticles could be safely administered and used to enhance the tumour dose during radiation therapy. The use of gold nanoparticles seems more promising than earlier methods because of the high atomic number of gold and because nanoparticles can more easily penetrate the tumour vasculature. However, to date, possible dose enhancement due to the use of gold nanoparticles has not been well quantified, especially for common radiation treatment situations. Therefore, the current preliminary study estimated this dose enhancement by Monte Carlo calculations for several phantom test cases representing radiation treatments with the following modalities: 140 kVp x-rays, 4 and 6 MV photon beams, and 192 Ir gamma rays. The current study considered three levels of gold concentration within the tumour, two of which are based on the aforementioned mice study, and assumed either no gold or a single gold concentration level outside the tumour. The dose enhancement over the tumour volume considered for the 140 kVp x-ray case can be at least a factor of 2 at an achievable gold concentration of 7 mg Au/g tumour assuming no gold outside the tumour. The tumour dose enhancement for the cases involving the 4 and 6 MV photon beams based on the same assumption ranged from about 1% to 7%, depending on the amount of gold within the tumour and photon beam qualities. For the 192 Ir cases, the dose enhancement within the tumour region ranged from 5% to 31%, depending on radial distance and gold concentration level within the tumour. For the 7 mg Au/g tumour cases, the loading of gold into surrounding normal tissue at 2 mg Au/g resulted in an increase in the normal tissue dose, up to 30%, negligible, and about 2% for the 140 kVp x-rays, 6 MV photon beam, and 192 Ir gamma rays, respectively, while the magnitude of dose enhancement within the tumour was essentially unchanged. (note)

  10. Skin dose in longitudinal and transverse linac-MRIs using Monte Carlo and realistic 3D MRI field models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyvanloo, A; Burke, B; Warkentin, B; Tadic, T; Rathee, S; Kirkby, C; Santos, D M; Fallone, B G

    2012-10-01

    The magnetic fields of linac-MR systems modify the path of contaminant electrons in photon beams, which alters patient skin dose. To accurately quantify the magnitude of changes in skin dose, the authors use Monte Carlo calculations that incorporate realistic 3D magnetic field models of longitudinal and transverse linac-MR systems. Finite element method (FEM) is used to generate complete 3D magnetic field maps for 0.56 T longitudinal and transverse linac-MR magnet assemblies, as well as for representative 0.5 and 1.0 T Helmholtz MRI systems. EGSnrc simulations implementing these 3D magnetic fields are performed. The geometry for the BEAMnrc simulations incorporates the Varian 600C 6 MV linac, magnet poles, the yoke, and the magnetic shields of the linac-MRIs. Resulting phase-space files are used to calculate the central axis percent depth-doses in a water phantom and 2D skin dose distributions for 70 μm entrance and exit layers using DOSXYZnrc. For comparison, skin doses are also calculated in the absence of magnetic field, and using a 1D magnetic field with an unrealistically large fringe field. The effects of photon field size, air gap (longitudinal configuration), and angle of obliquity (transverse configuration) are also investigated. Realistic modeling of the 3D magnetic fields shows that fringe fields decay rapidly and have a very small magnitude at the linac head. As a result, longitudinal linac-MR systems mostly confine contaminant electrons that are generated in the air gap and have an insignificant effect on electrons produced further upstream. The increase in the skin dose for the longitudinal configuration compared to the zero B-field case varies from ∼1% to ∼14% for air gaps of 5-31 cm, respectively. (All dose changes are reported as a % of D(max).) The increase is also field-size dependent, ranging from ∼3% at 20 × 20 cm(2) to ∼11% at 5 × 5 cm(2). The small changes in skin dose are in contrast to significant increases that are

  11. A scatter model for fast neutron beams using convolution of diffusion kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyers, M.F.; Horton, J.L.; Boyer, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    A new model is proposed to calculate dose distributions in materials irradiated with fast neutron beams. Scattered neutrons are transported away from the point of production within the irradiated material in the forward, lateral and backward directions, while recoil protons are transported in the forward and lateral directions. The calculation of dose distributions, such as for radiotherapy planning, is accomplished by convolving a primary attenuation distribution with a diffusion kernel. The primary attenuation distribution may be quickly calculated for any given set of beam and material conditions as it describes only the magnitude and distribution of first interaction sites. The calculation of energy diffusion kernels is very time consuming but must be calculated only once for a given energy. Energy diffusion distributions shown in this paper have been calculated using a Monte Carlo type of program. To decrease beam calculation time, convolutions are performed using a Fast Fourier Transform technique. (author)

  12. An estimation of the percentage of dose in intraoral radiology exams using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonzoumet, S.P.J.; Braz, D.; Lopes, R.T.; Anjos, M.J.; Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro; Padilha, Lucas

    2005-01-01

    In this work we used the EGS4 code in a simulated study of dose percentage in intraoral examination to 10 energy range to 140 keV. The simulation was carried out on a model consisting of different geometry (cheek, tooth and mouth cavity) under normal incidence X-ray beam over the surface of the various simulated materials. It was observed that for energy smaller than 30 keV most of the energy is deposited on the cheek. In 30 keV there is a point of maximum radiation absorption in the tooth (approximately 60% of the energy of the incident radiation is deposited on the tooth) in relation to other simulated materials. It means that in this energy there is a better contrast in the radiographic image of the tooth and a smaller dose on the cheek. In 40 keV the deposited energy in the tooth is roughly equal to the energy that is transmitted (to the radiographic film or buccal cavity) causing a degradation in the radiographic image and/or a higher dose in the oral cavity. For energies above 40 keV, the amount of energy transmitted (to the oral cavity and/or radiographic film) is higher than the energy deposited in other materials, i.e, it only contributes to increasing of dose in the regions close to the oral cavity and the radiographic image degradation. These results can provide important information for radiological procedures applied in dentistry where the image quality is a relevant factor to a dental evaluation needs as well as reducing dose in the oral cavity.

  13. Applying the reciprocal dose principle to heterogeneous phantoms: practical experience from Monte Carlo studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, M.; Williams, L.R.

    1983-01-01

    The reciprocity theorem states that for any pair of regions in a uniform isotropic or uniform scatterless model, the specific fraction (PHI) is independent of which region is designated source and which is designated target. Although the conditions of these models are not met by phantoms heterogeneous in tissue composition and density, calculations with a Monte Carlo radiation transport code show that in many cases the reciprocal PHIs from photon radiation are approximately equal. This 'reciprocity principle' is valid within a factor of 2(Snyder) or about 20% (Mayneord and Clarke), except when one of the organs in the pair considered is the skeleton, where the reciprocal PHIs may differ by as much as a factor of 4. The principle holds within at least 10% when both organs are of near-unit-density. When one of the organs is near the tissue-vacuum boundary (skin, breasts, or testes), reciprocal PHIs may differ by as much as 10% or so at energies where scattering is marked. When one of the organs is the lungs or the whole body, a comparable error may occur at some energies. (author)

  14. Improvements in pencil beam scanning proton therapy dose calculation accuracy in brain tumor cases with a commercial Monte Carlo algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widesott, Lamberto; Lorentini, Stefano; Fracchiolla, Francesco; Farace, Paolo; Schwarz, Marco

    2018-05-04

    validation of a commercial Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm (RayStation ver6.0.024) for the treatment of brain tumours with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy, comparing it via measurements and analytical calculations in clinically realistic scenarios. Methods: For the measurements a 2D ion chamber array detector (MatriXX PT)) was placed underneath the following targets: 1) anthropomorphic head phantom (with two different thickness) and 2) a biological sample (i.e. half lamb's head). In addition, we compared the MC dose engine vs. the RayStation pencil beam (PB) algorithm clinically implemented so far, in critical conditions such as superficial targets (i.e. in need of range shifter), different air gaps and gantry angles to simulate both orthogonal and tangential beam arrangements. For every plan the PB and MC dose calculation were compared to measurements using a gamma analysis metrics (3%, 3mm). Results: regarding the head phantom the gamma passing rate (GPR) was always >96% and on average > 99% for the MC algorithm; PB algorithm had a GPR ≤90% for all the delivery configurations with single slab (apart 95 % GPR from gantry 0° and small air gap) and in case of two slabs of the head phantom the GPR was >95% only in case of small air gaps for all the three (0°, 45°,and 70°) simulated beam gantry angles. Overall the PB algorithm tends to overestimate the dose to the target (up to 25%) and underestimate the dose to the organ at risk (up to 30%). We found similar results (but a bit worse for PB algorithm) for the two targets of the lamb's head where only two beam gantry angles were simulated. Conclusions: our results suggest that in PBS proton therapy range shifter (RS) need to be used with extreme caution when planning the treatment with an analytical algorithm due to potentially great discrepancies between the planned dose and the dose delivered to the patients, also in case of brain tumours where this issue could be underestimated. Our results also

  15. SU-F-I-53: Coded Aperture Coherent Scatter Spectral Imaging of the Breast: A Monte Carlo Evaluation of Absorbed Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, R [Durham, NC (United States); Lakshmanan, M; Fong, G; Kapadia, A [Carl E Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Durham, NC (United States); Greenberg, J [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Coherent scatter based imaging has shown improved contrast and molecular specificity over conventional digital mammography however the biological risks have not been quantified due to a lack of accurate information on absorbed dose. This study intends to characterize the dose distribution and average glandular dose from coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging of the breast. The dose deposited in the breast from this new diagnostic imaging modality has not yet been quantitatively evaluated. Here, various digitized anthropomorphic phantoms are tested in a Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the absorbed dose distribution and average glandular dose using clinically feasible scan protocols. Methods: Geant4 Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation software is used to replicate the coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging system. Energy sensitive, photon counting detectors are used to characterize the x-ray beam spectra for various imaging protocols. This input spectra is cross-validated with the results from XSPECT, a commercially available application that yields x-ray tube specific spectra for the operating parameters employed. XSPECT is also used to determine the appropriate number of photons emitted per mAs of tube current at a given kVp tube potential. With the implementation of the XCAT digital anthropomorphic breast phantom library, a variety of breast sizes with differing anatomical structure are evaluated. Simulations were performed with and without compression of the breast for dose comparison. Results: Through the Monte Carlo evaluation of a diverse population of breast types imaged under real-world scan conditions, a clinically relevant average glandular dose for this new imaging modality is extrapolated. Conclusion: With access to the physical coherent scatter imaging system used in the simulation, the results of this Monte Carlo study may be used to directly influence the future development of the modality to keep breast dose to

  16. An evaluation of calculation parameters in the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc Monte Carlo codes and their effect on surface dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung-Ha; Hill, Robin; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2012-01-01

    The Monte Carlo (MC) method has proven invaluable for radiation transport simulations to accurately determine radiation doses and is widely considered a reliable computational measure that can substitute a physical experiment where direct measurements are not possible or feasible. In the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc MC codes, there are several user-specified parameters and customized transport algorithms, which may affect the calculation results. In order to fully utilize the MC methods available in these codes, it is essential to understand all these options and to use them appropriately. In this study, the effects of the electron transport algorithms in EGSnrc/BEAMnrc, which are often a trade-off between calculation accuracy and efficiency, were investigated in the buildup region of a homogeneous water phantom and also in a heterogeneous phantom using the DOSRZnrc user code. The algorithms and parameters investigated include: boundary crossing algorithm (BCA), skin depth, electron step algorithm (ESA), global electron cutoff energy (ECUT) and electron production cutoff energy (AE). The variations in calculated buildup doses were found to be larger than 10% for different user-specified transport parameters. We found that using BCA = EXACT gave the best results in terms of accuracy and efficiency in calculating buildup doses using DOSRZnrc. In addition, using the ESA = PRESTA-I option was found to be the best way of reducing the total calculation time without losing accuracy in the results at high energies (few keV ∼ MeV). We also found that although choosing a higher ECUT/AE value in the beam modelling can dramatically improve computation efficiency, there is a significant trade-off in surface dose uncertainty. Our study demonstrates that a careful choice of user-specified transport parameters is required when conducting similar MC calculations. (note)

  17. SU-E-T-556: Monte Carlo Generated Dose Distributions for Orbital Irradiation Using a Single Anterior-Posterior Electron Beam and a Hanging Lens Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duwel, D; Lamba, M; Elson, H; Kumar, N

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Various cancers of the eye are successfully treated with radiotherapy utilizing one anterior-posterior (A/P) beam that encompasses the entire content of the orbit. In such cases, a hanging lens shield can be used to spare dose to the radiosensitive lens of the eye to prevent cataracts. Methods: This research focused on Monte Carlo characterization of dose distributions resulting from a single A-P field to the orbit with a hanging shield in place. Monte Carlo codes were developed which calculated dose distributions for various electron radiation energies, hanging lens shield radii, shield heights above the eye, and beam spoiler configurations. Film dosimetry was used to benchmark the coding to ensure it was calculating relative dose accurately. Results: The Monte Carlo dose calculations indicated that lateral and depth dose profiles are insensitive to changes in shield height and electron beam energy. Dose deposition was sensitive to shield radius and beam spoiler composition and height above the eye. Conclusion: The use of a single A/P electron beam to treat cancers of the eye while maintaining adequate lens sparing is feasible. Shield radius should be customized to have the same radius as the patient’s lens. A beam spoiler should be used if it is desired to substantially dose the eye tissues lying posterior to the lens in the shadow of the lens shield. The compromise between lens sparing and dose to diseased tissues surrounding the lens can be modulated by varying the beam spoiler thickness, spoiler material composition, and spoiler height above the eye. The sparing ratio is a metric that can be used to evaluate the compromise between lens sparing and dose to surrounding tissues. The higher the ratio, the more dose received by the tissues immediately posterior to the lens relative to the dose received by the lens

  18. A voxel-based mouse for internal dose calculations using Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar, A; Lisbona, A; Thedrez, P; Sai Maurel, C; Le Forestier, D; Barbet, J; Bardies, M

    2007-02-21

    Murine models are useful for targeted radiotherapy pre-clinical experiments. These models can help to assess the potential interest of new radiopharmaceuticals. In this study, we developed a voxel-based mouse for dosimetric estimates. A female nude mouse (30 g) was frozen and cut into slices. High-resolution digital photographs were taken directly on the frozen block after each section. Images were segmented manually. Monoenergetic photon or electron sources were simulated using the MCNP4c2 Monte Carlo code for each source organ, in order to give tables of S-factors (in Gy Bq-1 s-1) for all target organs. Results obtained from monoenergetic particles were then used to generate S-factors for several radionuclides of potential interest in targeted radiotherapy. Thirteen source and 25 target regions were considered in this study. For each source region, 16 photon and 16 electron energies were simulated. Absorbed fractions, specific absorbed fractions and S-factors were calculated for 16 radionuclides of interest for targeted radiotherapy. The results obtained generally agree well with data published previously. For electron energies ranging from 0.1 to 2.5 MeV, the self-absorbed fraction varies from 0.98 to 0.376 for the liver, and from 0.89 to 0.04 for the thyroid. Electrons cannot be considered as 'non-penetrating' radiation for energies above 0.5 MeV for mouse organs. This observation can be generalized to radionuclides: for example, the beta self-absorbed fraction for the thyroid was 0.616 for I-131; absorbed fractions for Y-90 for left kidney-to-left kidney and for left kidney-to-spleen were 0.486 and 0.058, respectively. Our voxel-based mouse allowed us to generate a dosimetric database for use in preclinical targeted radiotherapy experiments.

  19. GPU - Accelerated Monte Carlo electron transport methods: development and application for radiation dose calculations using 6 GPU cards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, L.; Du, X.; Liu, T.; Xu, X. G.

    2013-01-01

    An electron-photon coupled Monte Carlo code ARCHER - Accelerated Radiation-transport Computations in Heterogeneous EnviRonments - is being developed at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute as a software test-bed for emerging heterogeneous high performance computers that utilize accelerators such as GPUs (Graphics Processing Units). This paper presents the preliminary code development and the testing involving radiation dose related problems. In particular, the paper discusses the electron transport simulations using the class-II condensed history method. The considered electron energy ranges from a few hundreds of keV to 30 MeV. As for photon part, photoelectric effect, Compton scattering and pair production were simulated. Voxelized geometry was supported. A serial CPU (Central Processing Unit)code was first written in C++. The code was then transplanted to the GPU using the CUDA C 5.0 standards. The hardware involved a desktop PC with an Intel Xeon X5660 CPU and six NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPUs. The code was tested for a case of 20 MeV electron beam incident perpendicularly on a water-aluminum-water phantom. The depth and later dose profiles were found to agree with results obtained from well tested MC codes. Using six GPU cards, 6*10 6 electron histories were simulated within 2 seconds. In comparison, the same case running the EGSnrc and MCNPX codes required 1645 seconds and 9213 seconds, respectively. On-going work continues to test the code for different medical applications such as radiotherapy and brachytherapy. (authors)

  20. Electron absorbed dose comparison between MCNP5 and Penelope Monte Carlo code for microdosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cintra, Felipe B. de; Yoriyaz, Helio

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to compare electron absorbed dose results between two widespread used codes in international scientific community: MCNP5 and Penelope-2003. Individual water spheres with masses between 10 -9 g up to 10 -3 g immersed in an infinite water medium (density of 1g/cm 3 ) and monoenergetic electron sources with energy from 0.002 MeV to 0.1 MeV have been considered. The absorbed dose in the spheres was evaluated by both codes and the relative differences have been quantified. The results shown that Penelope gives, in general, higher results that, in some cases saturate or reach a maximum point and then rapidly drops. Particularly, for the 40 keV electron source we have done additional tests in three different scenarios: more points in the region of lower masses to a better definition of the curve behavior; MCNP used 200 substeps and Penelope was set to a full detail history methodology, and almost same parameters of case B but with the density of exterior medium increased to 10 g/cm 3 . The three cases show the influence of the backscattering that contribute with an important fraction of absorbed dose, finally we can infer a range of reliability to use the codes in this kind of simulations: both codes can calculate close results for up to 10 -4 g.Even though MCNP5 uses the condensed history method, if simulation parameters are chosen carefully it can reproduce results very close to those obtained using detailed history mode. In some cases, the use of higher number of electron substeps causes significant differences in the result. (author)

  1. Reduced Variance using ADVANTG in Monte Carlo Calculations of Dose Coefficients to Stylized Phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Mauritius; Bellamy, Michael; Eckerman, Keith; Hertel, Nolan

    2017-09-01

    The estimation of dose coefficients of external radiation sources to the organs in phantoms becomes increasingly difficult for lower photon source energies. This study focus on the estimation of photon emitters around the phantom. The computer time needed to calculate a result within a certain precision can be lowered by several orders of magnitude using ADVANTG compared to a standard run. Using ADVANTG which employs the DENOVO adjoint calculation package enables the user to create a fully populated set of weight windows and source biasing instructions for an MCNP calculation.

  2. Comparison of absorbed dose in the cervix carcinoma therapy by brachytherapy of high dose rate using the conventional planning and Monte Carlo simulation; Comparacao da dose absorvida no tratamento do cancer ginecologico por braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose utilizando o planejamento convencional do tratamento e simulacao de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Aneli Oliveira da

    2010-07-01

    This study aims to compare the doses received for patients submitted to brachytherapy High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy, a method of treatment of the cervix carcinoma, performed in the planning system PLATO BPS with the doses obtained by Monte Carlo simulation using the radiation transport code MCNP 5 and one female anthropomorphic phantom based on voxel, the FAX. The implementation of HDR brachytherapy treatment for the cervix carcinoma consists of the insertion of an intrauterine probe and an intravaginal probe (ring or ovoid) and then two radiographs are obtained, anteroposterior (AP) and lateral (LAT) to confirm the position of the applicators in the patient and to allow the treatment planning and the determination of the absorbed dose at points of interest: rectum, bladder, sigmoid and point A, which corresponds anatomically to the crossings of the uterine arteries with ureters The absorbed doses obtained with the code MCNP 5, with the exception of the absorbed dose in the rectum and sigmoid for the simulation considering a point source of {sup 192}Ir, are lower than the absorbed doses from PLATO BPS calculations because the MCNP 5 considers the chemical compositions and densities of FAX body, not considering the medium as water. When considering the Monte Carlo simulation for a source with dimensions equal to that used in the brachytherapy irradiator used in this study, the values of calculated absorbed dose to the bladder, to the rectum, to the right point A and to the left point A were respectively lower than those determined by the treatment planning system in 33.29, 5.01, 22.93 and 19.04%. These values are almost all larger than the maximum acceptable deviation between patient planned and administered doses (5 %). With regard to the rectum and bladder, which are organs that must be protected, the present results are in favor of the radiological protection of patients. The point A, that is on the isodose of 100%, used to tumor treatment, the results

  3. Experimental verification by means of thermoluminescent dosimetry of the distribution dose absorbed in water for a 137Cs Amersham CDCS-M-3 source, Monte Carlo simulated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragoso Valdez, F. R.; Alvarez Romero, J. T.

    2001-01-01

    It verifies, in a experimental way, the Monte Carlo simulation results (PENELOPE algorithm) for the water absorbed dose distribution, imparted by a 1 37 Cs - Amersham source (model CDCS-M-3). The feigned results are expressed in terms of the functions Α(r,z), g(r) and F(r,Θ) according to the recommendations of the AAPM TG 43 [es

  4. Estimation of the dose deposited by electron beams in radiotherapy in voxelised phantoms using the Monte Carlo simulation platform GATE based on GEANT4 in a grid environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrot, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy treatment planning requires accurate determination of absorbed dose in the patient. Monte Carlo simulation is the most accurate method for solving the transport problem of particles in matter. This thesis is the first study dealing with the validation of the Monte Carlo simulation platform GATE (GEANT4 Application for Tomographic Emission), based on GEANT4 (Geometry And Tracking) libraries, for the computation of absorbed dose deposited by electron beams. This thesis aims at demonstrating that GATE/GEANT4 calculations are able to reach treatment planning requirements in situations where analytical algorithms are not satisfactory. The goal is to prove that GATE/GEANT4 is useful for treatment planning using electrons and competes with well validated Monte Carlo codes. This is demonstrated by the simulations with GATE/GEANT4 of realistic electron beams and electron sources used for external radiation therapy or targeted radiation therapy. The computed absorbed dose distributions are in agreement with experimental measurements and/or calculations from other Monte Carlo codes. Furthermore, guidelines are proposed to fix the physics parameters of the GATE/GEANT4 simulations in order to ensure the accuracy of absorbed dose calculations according to radiation therapy requirements. (author)

  5. Monte Carlo simulation to study the doses in an accelerator BNCT treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burlon, Alejandro A.; Valda, Alejandro A.; Somacal, Hector R.; Kreiner, Andres J.; Minsky, Daniel M.

    2003-01-01

    In this work the 7 Li(p, n) 7 Be reaction has been studied as a neutron source for accelerator-based BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy). In order to optimize the design of the neutron production target and the beam shaping assembly, extensive MCNP simulations have been performed. These simulations include a thick Li metal target, a whole-body phantom, a moderator-reflector assembly (Al/AlF 3 as moderator and graphite as reflector) and the treatment room. The doses were evaluated for two proton bombarding energies of 1.92 MeV (near to the threshold of the reaction) and 2.3 MeV (near to the resonance of the reaction) and for three Al/ALF 3 moderator thicknesses (18, 26 and 34 cm). To assess the doses, a comparison using a Tumor Control Probability (TCP) model was done. In a second instance, the effect of the specific skin radiosensitivity (an RBE of 2.5 for the 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction) and a 10 B uptake of 17 ppm was considered for the scalp. Finally, the simulations show the advantage of irradiating with near-resonance-energy protons (2.3 MeV) because of the high neutron yield at this energy, leading to the lowest treatment times. Moreover, the 26 cm Al/AlF 3 moderator has shown the best performance among the studied cases. (author)

  6. Direct Monte Carlo dose calculation using polygon-surface computational human model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jong Hwi; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Yeom, Yeon Su; Cho, Sungkoo; Chung, Min Suk; Cho, Kun-Woo

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, a voxel-type computational human model was converted to a polygon-surface model, after which it was imported directly to the Geant4 code without using a voxelization process, that is, without converting back to a voxel model. The original voxel model was also imported to the Geant4 code, in order to compare the calculated dose values and the computational speed. The average polygon size of the polygon-surface model was ∼0.5 cm 2 , whereas the voxel resolution of the voxel model was 1.981 × 1.981 × 2.0854 mm 3 . The results showed a good agreement between the calculated dose values of the two models. The polygon-surface model was, however, slower than the voxel model by a factor of 6–9 for the photon energies and irradiation geometries considered in the present study, which nonetheless is considered acceptable, considering that direct use of the polygon-surface model does not require a separate voxelization process. (author)

  7. Superficial dose distribution in breast for tangential radiation treatment, Monte Carlo evaluation of Eclipse algorithms in case of phantom and patient geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakarova, Roumiana; Gustafsson, Magnus; Bäck, Anna; Drugge, Ninni; Palm, Åsa; Lindberg, Andreas; Berglund, Mattias

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to examine experimentally and by the Monte Carlo method the accuracy of the Eclipse Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC) and Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) algorithms in the superficial region (0–2 cm) of the breast for tangential photon beams in a phantom case as well as in a number of patient geometries. The aim is also to identify differences in how the patient computer tomography data are handled by the treatment planning system and in the Monte Carlo simulations in order to reduce influences of these effects on the evaluation. Materials and methods: Measurements by thermoluminescent dosimeters and gafchromic film are performed for six MV tangential irradiation of the cylindrical solid water phantom. Tangential treatment of seven patients is investigated considering open beams. Dose distributions are obtained by the Eclipse PBC and AAA algorithms. Monte Carlo calculations are carried out by BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc code package. Calculations are performed with a calculation grid of 1.25 × 1.25 × 5 mm 3 for PBC and 2 × 2 × 5 mm 3 for AAA and Monte Carlo, respectively. Dose comparison is performed in both dose and spatial domains by the normalized dose difference method. Results: Experimental profiles from the surface toward the geometrical center of the cylindrical phantom are obtained at the beam entrance and exit as well as laterally. Full dose is received beyond 2 mm in the lateral superficial region and beyond 7 mm at the beam entrance. Good agreement between experimental, Monte Carlo and AAA data is obtained, whereas PBC is seen to underestimate the entrance dose the first 3–4 mm and the lateral dose by more than 5% up to 8 mm depth. In the patient cases considered, AAA and Monte Carlo show agreement within 3% dose and 4 mm spatial tolerance. PBC systematically underestimates the dose at the breast apex. The dimensions of region out of tolerance vary with the local breast shape. Different interpretations of patient

  8. SU-E-T-244: Designing Low-Z Targets To Enhance Surface Dose: A Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, R [Nova Scotia Cancer Centre, Halifax, NS (Canada); Robar, J [Capital District Health Authority, Halifax, NS (Canada); Parsons, D [Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Recent developments in The Varian Truebeam linac platform allows for the introduction of low-Z targets into the beam line for the imaging purposes. We have proposed using a low-Z target for radiation therapy purposes to enhance the surface dose during radiation treatment. The target arm of the Varian Truebeam accelerator consists of multiple targets with are linearly translated into the beam line. We have designed two Low-Z targets made of carbon: 1) a step target consisting of three steps of 15%, 30% and 60% CSDA range for 2.5 MeV electrons Figure 1a; 2) and a ramp target, an incline plane 2cm long with thicknesses ranging from 0% to 60% CSDA range, Figure 1b. The purpose of this work will determine the spectral characteristics of these target designs and determine if they have practical clinical applications for enhancing surface dose. Methods: To calculate the spectral characteristics of these targets, a standard Monte Carlo model of a Varian Clinac accelerator was used. Simulations were performed with a carbon step target, and a carbon ramp target, located at the same position as the electron foil in the rotating carousel. Simulations were carried out using a 2.5 MeV electron beam. Results: The step target design produced spectral characteristics which were similar to spectral model using a single disk target of the same thickness. The ramp target provides a means to have positional variation of the spectral components of the beam, however, the electron component as 60% CSDA us much broader than the step target. Conclusion: The carbon step-target provides a spectral distribution which is similar to a carbon disk of comparable thickness. The spectral distribution from the ramp-target can be modified as a function of position to provide a wide range of low energy electrons for surface dose enhancement.

  9. Use of the GEANT4 Monte Carlo to determine three-dimensional dose factors for radionuclide dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amato, Ernesto, E-mail: eamato@unime.it [University of Messina, Department of Biomedical Sciences and of Morphologic and Functional Imaging, Section of Radiological Sciences (Italy); Italiano, Antonio [INFN – Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Messina (Italy); Minutoli, Fabio; Baldari, Sergio [University of Messina, Department of Biomedical Sciences and of Morphologic and Functional Imaging, Section of Radiological Sciences (Italy)

    2013-04-21

    The voxel-level dosimetry is the most simple and common approach to internal dosimetry of nonuniform distributions of activity within the human body. Aim of this work was to obtain the dose “S” factors (mGy/MBqs) at the voxel level for eight beta and beta–gamma emitting radionuclides commonly used in nuclear medicine diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. We developed a Monte Carlo simulation in GEANT4 of a region of soft tissue as defined by the ICRP, divided into 11×11×11 cubic voxels, 3 mm in side. The simulation used the parameterizations of the electromagnetic interaction optimized for low energy (EEDL, EPDL). The decay of each radionuclide ({sup 32}P, {sup 90}Y, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 131}I, {sup 153}Sm, {sup 186}Re, {sup 188}Re) were simulated homogeneously distributed within the central voxel (0,0,0), and the energy deposited in the surrounding voxels was mediated on the 8 octants of the three dimensional space, for reasons of symmetry. The results obtained were compared with those available in the literature. While the iodine deviations remain within 16%, for phosphorus, a pure beta emitter, the agreement is very good for self-dose (0,0,0) and good for the dose to first neighbors, while differences are observed ranging from −60% to +100% for voxels far distant from the source. The existence of significant differences in the percentage calculation of the voxel S factors, especially for pure beta emitters such as {sup 32}P or {sup 90}Y, has already been highlighted by other authors. These data can usefully extend the dosimetric approach based on the voxel to other radionuclides not covered in the available literature.

  10. Use of the GEANT4 Monte Carlo to determine three-dimensional dose factors for radionuclide dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, Ernesto; Italiano, Antonio; Minutoli, Fabio; Baldari, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The voxel-level dosimetry is the most simple and common approach to internal dosimetry of nonuniform distributions of activity within the human body. Aim of this work was to obtain the dose “S” factors (mGy/MBqs) at the voxel level for eight beta and beta–gamma emitting radionuclides commonly used in nuclear medicine diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. We developed a Monte Carlo simulation in GEANT4 of a region of soft tissue as defined by the ICRP, divided into 11×11×11 cubic voxels, 3 mm in side. The simulation used the parameterizations of the electromagnetic interaction optimized for low energy (EEDL, EPDL). The decay of each radionuclide ( 32 P, 90 Y, 99m Tc, 177 Lu, 131 I, 153 Sm, 186 Re, 188 Re) were simulated homogeneously distributed within the central voxel (0,0,0), and the energy deposited in the surrounding voxels was mediated on the 8 octants of the three dimensional space, for reasons of symmetry. The results obtained were compared with those available in the literature. While the iodine deviations remain within 16%, for phosphorus, a pure beta emitter, the agreement is very good for self-dose (0,0,0) and good for the dose to first neighbors, while differences are observed ranging from −60% to +100% for voxels far distant from the source. The existence of significant differences in the percentage calculation of the voxel S factors, especially for pure beta emitters such as 32 P or 90 Y, has already been highlighted by other authors. These data can usefully extend the dosimetric approach based on the voxel to other radionuclides not covered in the available literature

  11. Use of Monte Carlo Methods in the modeling of the dose/INAK distribution of natural radioactive sources: First studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, Luis R.A.; Vieira, Jose W.; Amaral, Romilton dos S.; Santos Junior, Jose A. dos; Silva, Arykerne N.C. da; Silva, Alberto A. da; Damascena, Kennedy F.; Santos Junior, Otavio P.; Medeiros, Nilson V.S.; Santos, Josineide M.N. dos, E-mail: jaraujo@ufpe.br, E-mail: romilton@ufpe.br, E-mail: kennedy.eng.ambiental@gmail.com, E-mail: nvsmedeiros@gmail.com, E-mail: josineide.santos@ufpe.br, E-mail: arykerne.silva@ufpe.br, E-mail: luis.rodrigo@vitoria.ifpe.edu.br, E-mail: otavio.santos@vitoria.ifpe.edu.br, E-mail: s, E-mail: jose.wilson@recife.ifpe.edu.br, E-mail: alberto.silva@barreiros.ifpe.edu.br, E-mail: jose.wilson59@uol.com.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), PE (Brazil); Universidade de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    One of the means of exposure that the world population is subjected to daily is natural radiation, which covers exposure to sources of cosmic origin and terrestrial origin, which accounts for about 84.1% of all exposure due to natural radiation. Some research groups have been estimating the distribution of the dose by the radiosensitive organs and tissues of people submitted to gamma radiation using Computational Exposure Models (MCE). The MCE is composed, fundamentally, of an anthropomorphic simulator (phantom), a Monte Carlo code and a radioactive source algorithm. The Group of Computational Dosimetry and Embedded Systems (DCSE), together with the group of Radioecology (RAE), have been developing a variety of MCEs to simulate exposure to natural environmental gamma radiation. Such models estimate the dose distribution absorbed by the organs and tissues radiosensitive to ionizing radiation from a flat portion of the ground in which photons emerge from within a circle of radius r, reaching a person in an orthostatic position and centered on the circumference. We investigated in this work the exposure of an individual by a radioactive cloud of gamma emission of Potassium-40, which emits a photon characteristic of energy 1461 keV. It was optimized the number of histories to obtain Dose/Kerma values in the air, with low dispersion and viable computational time for the available PCs, statistically validating the results. To do so, was adapted the MCE MSTA, composed by the MASH (Male Adult meSH) phantom in an orthostatic position coupled to the EGSnrc, with the planar source algorithm. (author)

  12. DPM, a fast, accurate Monte Carlo code optimized for photon and electron radiotherapy treatment planning dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sempau, Josep; Wilderman, Scott J.; Bielajew, Alex F.

    2000-01-01

    A new Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm, the 'dose planning method' (DPM), and its associated computer program for simulating the transport of electrons and photons in radiotherapy class problems employing primary electron beams, is presented. DPM is intended to be a high-accuracy MC alternative to the current generation of treatment planning codes which rely on analytical algorithms based on an approximate solution of the photon/electron Boltzmann transport equation. For primary electron beams, DPM is capable of computing 3D dose distributions (in 1 mm 3 voxels) which agree to within 1% in dose maximum with widely used and exhaustively benchmarked general-purpose public-domain MC codes in only a fraction of the CPU time. A representative problem, the simulation of 1 million 10 MeV electrons impinging upon a water phantom of 128 3 voxels of 1 mm on a side, can be performed by DPM in roughly 3 min on a modern desktop workstation. DPM achieves this performance by employing transport mechanics and electron multiple scattering distribution functions which have been derived to permit long transport steps (of the order of 5 mm) which can cross heterogeneity boundaries. The underlying algorithm is a 'mixed' class simulation scheme, with differential cross sections for hard inelastic collisions and bremsstrahlung events described in an approximate manner to simplify their sampling. The continuous energy loss approximation is employed for energy losses below some predefined thresholds, and photon transport (including Compton, photoelectric absorption and pair production) is simulated in an analogue manner. The δ-scattering method (Woodcock tracking) is adopted to minimize the computational costs of transporting photons across voxels. (author)

  13. Dosimetric evaluation of a commercial proton spot scanning Monte-Carlo dose algorithm: comparisons against measurements and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Jatinder; Maes, Dominic; Egan, Alexander; Bowen, Stephen R; St James, Sara; Janson, Martin; Wong, Tony; Bloch, Charles

    2017-09-12

    RaySearch Americas Inc. (NY) has introduced a commercial Monte Carlo dose algorithm (RS-MC) for routine clinical use in proton spot scanning. In this report, we provide a validation of this algorithm against phantom measurements and simulations in the GATE software package. We also compared the performance of the RayStation analytical algorithm (RS-PBA) against the RS-MC algorithm. A beam model (G-MC) for a spot scanning gantry at our proton center was implemented in the GATE software package. The model was validated against measurements in a water phantom and was used for benchmarking the RS-MC. Validation of the RS-MC was performed in a water phantom by measuring depth doses and profiles for three spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) beams with normal incidence, an SOBP with oblique incidence, and an SOBP with a range shifter and large air gap. The RS-MC was also validated against measurements and simulations in heterogeneous phantoms created by placing lung or bone slabs in a water phantom. Lateral dose profiles near the distal end of the beam were measured with a microDiamond detector and compared to the G-MC simulations, RS-MC and RS-PBA. Finally, the RS-MC and RS-PBA were validated against measured dose distributions in an Alderson-Rando (AR) phantom. Measurements were made using Gafchromic film in the AR phantom and compared to doses using the RS-PBA and RS-MC algorithms. For SOBP depth doses in a water phantom, all three algorithms matched the measurements to within  ±3% at all points and a range within 1 mm. The RS-PBA algorithm showed up to a 10% difference in dose at the entrance for the beam with a range shifter and  >30 cm air gap, while the RS-MC and G-MC were always within 3% of the measurement. For an oblique beam incident at 45°, the RS-PBA algorithm showed up to 6% local dose differences and broadening of distal fall-off by 5 mm. Both the RS-MC and G-MC accurately predicted the depth dose to within  ±3% and distal fall-off to within 2

  14. Dosimetric evaluation of a commercial proton spot scanning Monte-Carlo dose algorithm: comparisons against measurements and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Jatinder; Maes, Dominic; Egan, Alexander; Bowen, Stephen R.; St. James, Sara; Janson, Martin; Wong, Tony; Bloch, Charles

    2017-10-01

    RaySearch Americas Inc. (NY) has introduced a commercial Monte Carlo dose algorithm (RS-MC) for routine clinical use in proton spot scanning. In this report, we provide a validation of this algorithm against phantom measurements and simulations in the GATE software package. We also compared the performance of the RayStation analytical algorithm (RS-PBA) against the RS-MC algorithm. A beam model (G-MC) for a spot scanning gantry at our proton center was implemented in the GATE software package. The model was validated against measurements in a water phantom and was used for benchmarking the RS-MC. Validation of the RS-MC was performed in a water phantom by measuring depth doses and profiles for three spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) beams with normal incidence, an SOBP with oblique incidence, and an SOBP with a range shifter and large air gap. The RS-MC was also validated against measurements and simulations in heterogeneous phantoms created by placing lung or bone slabs in a water phantom. Lateral dose profiles near the distal end of the beam were measured with a microDiamond detector and compared to the G-MC simulations, RS-MC and RS-PBA. Finally, the RS-MC and RS-PBA were validated against measured dose distributions in an Alderson-Rando (AR) phantom. Measurements were made using Gafchromic film in the AR phantom and compared to doses using the RS-PBA and RS-MC algorithms. For SOBP depth doses in a water phantom, all three algorithms matched the measurements to within  ±3% at all points and a range within 1 mm. The RS-PBA algorithm showed up to a 10% difference in dose at the entrance for the beam with a range shifter and  >30 cm air gap, while the RS-MC and G-MC were always within 3% of the measurement. For an oblique beam incident at 45°, the RS-PBA algorithm showed up to 6% local dose differences and broadening of distal fall-off by 5 mm. Both the RS-MC and G-MC accurately predicted the depth dose to within  ±3% and distal fall-off to within 2

  15. Improved tissue assignment using dual-energy computed tomography in low-dose rate prostate brachytherapy for Monte Carlo dose calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Côté, Nicolas [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, Pavillon Roger-Gaudry (D-428), 2900 Boulevard Édouard-Montpetit, Montréal, Québec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Bedwani, Stéphane [Département de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM), 1560 Rue Sherbrooke Est, Montréal, Québec H2L 4M1 (Canada); Carrier, Jean-François, E-mail: jean-francois.carrier.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, Pavillon Roger-Gaudry (D-428), 2900 Boulevard Édouard-Montpetit, Montréal, Québec H3T 1J4, Canada and Département de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM), 1560 Rue Sherbrooke Est, Montréal, Québec H2L 4M1 (Canada)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: An improvement in tissue assignment for low-dose rate brachytherapy (LDRB) patients using more accurate Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation was accomplished with a metallic artifact reduction (MAR) method specific to dual-energy computed tomography (DECT). Methods: The proposed MAR algorithm followed a four-step procedure. The first step involved applying a weighted blend of both DECT scans (I {sub H/L}) to generate a new image (I {sub Mix}). This action minimized Hounsfield unit (HU) variations surrounding the brachytherapy seeds. In the second step, the mean HU of the prostate in I {sub Mix} was calculated and shifted toward the mean HU of the two original DECT images (I {sub H/L}). The third step involved smoothing the newly shifted I {sub Mix} and the two original I {sub H/L}, followed by a subtraction of both, generating an image that represented the metallic artifact (I {sub A,(H/L)}) of reduced noise levels. The final step consisted of subtracting the original I {sub H/L} from the newly generated I {sub A,(H/L)} and obtaining a final image corrected for metallic artifacts. Following the completion of the algorithm, a DECT stoichiometric method was used to extract the relative electronic density (ρ{sub e}) and effective atomic number (Z {sub eff}) at each voxel of the corrected scans. Tissue assignment could then be determined with these two newly acquired physical parameters. Each voxel was assigned the tissue bearing the closest resemblance in terms of ρ{sub e} and Z {sub eff}, comparing with values from the ICRU 42 database. A MC study was then performed to compare the dosimetric impacts of alternative MAR algorithms. Results: An improvement in tissue assignment was observed with the DECT MAR algorithm, compared to the single-energy computed tomography (SECT) approach. In a phantom study, tissue misassignment was found to reach 0.05% of voxels using the DECT approach, compared with 0.40% using the SECT method. Comparison of the DECT and SECT D

  16. Monte Carlo dose characterization of a new 90Sr/90Y source with balloon for intravascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ruqing; Li, X. Allen; Lobdell, John

    2003-01-01

    Beta emitting source wires or seeds have been adopted in clinical practice of intravascular brachytherapy for coronary vessels. Due to the limitation of penetration depth, this type of source is normally not applicable to treat vessels with large diameter, e.g., peripheral vessel. In the effort to extend application of its beta source for peripheral vessels, Novoste has recently developed a new catheter-based system, the Corona trade mark sign 90 Sr/ 90 Y system. It is a source train of 6 cm length and is jacketed by a balloon. The existence of the balloon increases the penetration of the beta particles and maintains the source within a location away from the vessel wall. Using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo system, we have calculated the two-dimensional (2-D) dose rate distribution of the Corona trade mark sign system in water for a balloon diameter of 5 mm. The dose rates on the transverse axis obtained in this study are in good agreement with calibration results of the National Institute of Standards and Technology for the same system for balloon diameters of 5 and 8 mm. Features of the 2-D dose field were studied in detail. The dose parameters based on AAPM TG-60 protocol were derived. For a balloon diameter of 5 mm, the dose rate at the reference point (defined as r 0 =4.5 mm, 2 mm from the balloon surface) is found to be 0.010 28 Gy min -1 mCi -1 . A new formalism for a better characterization of this long source is presented. Calculations were also performed for other balloon diameters. The dosimetry for this source is compared with a 192 Ir source, commonly used for peripheral arteries. In conclusion, we have performed a detailed dosimetric characterization for a new beta source for peripheral vessels. Our study shows that, from dosimetric point of view, the Corona trade mark sign system can be used for the treatment of an artery with a large diameter, e.g., peripheral vessel

  17. FEM design and simulation of a short, 10 MV, S-band Linac with Monte Carlo dose simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baillie, Devin; Aubin, J. St.; Steciw, S.; Fallone, B. G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Current commercial 10 MV Linac waveguides are 1.5 m. The authors’ current 6 MV linear accelerator–magnetic resonance imager (Linac–MR) system fits in typical radiotherapy vaults. To allow 10 MV treatments with the Linac–MR and still fit within typical vaults, the authors design a 10 MV Linac with an accelerator waveguide of the same length (27.5 cm) as current 6 MV Linacs. Methods: The first design stage is to design a cavity such that a specific experimental measurement for breakdown is applicable to the cavity. This is accomplished through the use of finite element method (FEM) simulations to match published shunt impedance, Q factor, and ratio of peak to mean-axial electric field strength from an electric breakdown study. A full waveguide is then designed and tuned in FEM simulations based on this cavity design. Electron trajectories are computed through the resulting radio frequency fields, and the waveguide geometry is modified by shifting the first coupling cavity in order to optimize the electron beam properties until the energy spread and mean energy closely match values published for an emulated 10 MV Linac. Finally, Monte Carlo dose simulations are used to compare the resulting photon beam depth dose profile and penumbra with that produced by the emulated 10 MV Linac. Results: The shunt impedance, Q factor, and ratio of peak to mean-axial electric field strength are all matched to within 0.1%. A first coupling cavity shift of 1.45 mm produces an energy spectrum width of 0.347 MeV, very close to the published value for the emulated 10 MV of 0.315 MeV, and a mean energy of 10.53 MeV, nearly identical to the published 10.5 MeV for the emulated 10 MV Linac. The depth dose profile produced by their new Linac is within 1% of that produced by the emulated 10 MV spectrum for all depths greater than 1.5 cm. The penumbra produced is 11% narrower, as measured from 80% to 20% of the central axis dose. Conclusions: The authors have successfully

  18. Two computational approaches for Monte Carlo based shutdown dose rate calculation with applications to the JET fusion machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrizzi, L.; Batistoni, P.; Migliori, S. [Associazione EURATOM ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Chen, Y.; Fischer, U.; Pereslavtsev, P. [Association FZK-EURATOM Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Loughlin, M. [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX (United Kingdom); Secco, A. [Nice Srl Via Serra 33 Camerano Casasco AT (Italy)

    2003-07-01

    In deuterium-deuterium (D-D) and deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion plasmas neutrons are produced causing activation of JET machine components. For safe operation and maintenance it is important to be able to predict the induced activation and the resulting shut down dose rates. This requires a suitable system of codes which is capable of simulating both the neutron induced material activation during operation and the decay gamma radiation transport after shut-down in the proper 3-D geometry. Two methodologies to calculate the dose rate in fusion devices have been developed recently and applied to fusion machines, both using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. FZK has developed a more classical approach, the rigorous 2-step (R2S) system in which MCNP is coupled to the FISPACT inventory code with an automated routing. ENEA, in collaboration with the ITER Team, has developed an alternative approach, the direct 1 step method (D1S). Neutron and decay gamma transport are handled in one single MCNP run, using an ad hoc cross section library. The intention was to tightly couple the neutron induced production of a radio-isotope and the emission of its decay gammas for an accurate spatial distribution and a reliable calculated statistical error. The two methods have been used by the two Associations to calculate the dose rate in five positions of JET machine, two inside the vacuum chamber and three outside, at cooling times between 1 second and 1 year after shutdown. The same MCNP model and irradiation conditions have been assumed. The exercise has been proposed and financed in the frame of the Fusion Technological Program of the JET machine. The scope is to supply the designers with the most reliable tool and data to calculate the dose rate on fusion machines. Results showed that there is a good agreement: the differences range between 5-35%. The next step to be considered in 2003 will be an exercise in which the comparison will be done with dose-rate data from JET taken during and

  19. Two computational approaches for Monte Carlo based shutdown dose rate calculation with applications to the JET fusion machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrizzi, L.; Batistoni, P.; Migliori, S.; Chen, Y.; Fischer, U.; Pereslavtsev, P.; Loughlin, M.; Secco, A.

    2003-01-01

    In deuterium-deuterium (D-D) and deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion plasmas neutrons are produced causing activation of JET machine components. For safe operation and maintenance it is important to be able to predict the induced activation and the resulting shut down dose rates. This requires a suitable system of codes which is capable of simulating both the neutron induced material activation during operation and the decay gamma radiation transport after shut-down in the proper 3-D geometry. Two methodologies to calculate the dose rate in fusion devices have been developed recently and applied to fusion machines, both using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. FZK has developed a more classical approach, the rigorous 2-step (R2S) system in which MCNP is coupled to the FISPACT inventory code with an automated routing. ENEA, in collaboration with the ITER Team, has developed an alternative approach, the direct 1 step method (D1S). Neutron and decay gamma transport are handled in one single MCNP run, using an ad hoc cross section library. The intention was to tightly couple the neutron induced production of a radio-isotope and the emission of its decay gammas for an accurate spatial distribution and a reliable calculated statistical error. The two methods have been used by the two Associations to calculate the dose rate in five positions of JET machine, two inside the vacuum chamber and three outside, at cooling times between 1 second and 1 year after shutdown. The same MCNP model and irradiation conditions have been assumed. The exercise has been proposed and financed in the frame of the Fusion Technological Program of the JET machine. The scope is to supply the designers with the most reliable tool and data to calculate the dose rate on fusion machines. Results showed that there is a good agreement: the differences range between 5-35%. The next step to be considered in 2003 will be an exercise in which the comparison will be done with dose-rate data from JET taken during and

  20. Shielding calculations and collective dose estimations with the point-kernel-code VISIPLAN {sup registered} for the example of the project ZENT; Abschirmberechnungen und Kollektivdosisabschaetzungen mit dem Punkt-Kern-Code VISIPLAN {sup registered} am Beispiel des Projektes ZENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehlke, S.; Niegoth, H. [STEAG Energy Services GmbH, Essen (Germany). Nuclear Technologies; Stalder, I. [Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt AG, Leibstadt (Switzerland)

    2012-11-01

    In the nuclear power plant Leibstadt (KKL) during the next year large components will be dismantled and stored for final disposal within the interim storage facility ZENT at the NPP site. Before construction of ZENT appropriate estimations of the local dose rate inside and outside the building and the collective dose for the normal operation have to be performed. The shielding calculations are based on the properties of the stored components and radiation sources and on the concepts for working place requirements. The installation of control and monitoring areas will depend on these calculations. For the determination of the shielding potential of concrete walls and steel doors with the defined boundary conditions point-kernel codes like MICROSHIELd {sup registered} are used. Complex problems cannot be modeled with this code. Therefore the point-kernel code VISIPLAN {sup registered} was developed for the determination of the local dose distribution functions in 3D models. The possibility of motion sequence inputs allows an optimization of collective dose estimations for the operational phases of a nuclear facility.

  1. Deuterons at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: Conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, K.; Parker, D. E.; Friedberg, W.

    2011-01-01

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult female and an adult male to deuterons ( 2 H + ) in the energy range 10 MeV -1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Coefficients were calculated using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilder TM 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms. Phantoms were modified to allow calculation of the effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Coefficients for the equivalent and effective dose incorporated a radiation weighting factor of 2. At 15 of 19 energies for which coefficients for the effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 1990 and 2007 recommendations differed by < 3 %. The greatest difference, 47 %, occurred at 30 MeV. (authors)

  2. Dose calculations for a simplified Mammosite system with the Monte Carlo Penelope and MCNPX simulation codes; Calculos de dosis para un sistema Mammosite simplificado con los codigos de simulacion Monte Carlo PENELOPE y MCNPX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas C, E.L.; Varon T, C.F.; Pedraza N, R. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: elrc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2007-07-01

    The treatment of the breast cancer at early stages is of vital importance. For that, most of the investigations are dedicated to the early detection of the suffering and their treatment. As investigation consequence and clinical practice, in 2002 it was developed in U.S.A. an irradiation system of high dose rate known as Mammosite. In this work we carry out dose calculations for a simplified Mammosite system with the Monte Carlo Penelope simulation code and MCNPX, varying the concentration of the contrast material that it is used in the one. (Author)

  3. Accuracy and Radiation Dose of CT-Based Attenuation Correction for Small Animal PET: A Monte Carlo Simulation Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Chan, Kai-Chieh

    2013-06-01

    -Small animal PET allows qualitative assessment and quantitative measurement of biochemical processes in vivo, but the accuracy and reproducibility of imaging results can be affected by several parameters. The first aim of this study was to investigate the performance of different CT-based attenuation correction strategies and assess the resulting impact on PET images. The absorbed dose in different tissues caused by scanning procedures was also discussed to minimize biologic damage generated by radiation exposure due to PET/CT scanning. A small animal PET/CT system was modeled based on Monte Carlo simulation to generate imaging results and dose distribution. Three energy mapping methods, including the bilinear scaling method, the dual-energy method and the hybrid method which combines the kVp conversion and the dual-energy method, were investigated comparatively through assessing the accuracy of estimating linear attenuation coefficient at 511 keV and the bias introduced into PET quantification results due to CT-based attenuation correction. Our results showed that the hybrid method outperformed the bilinear scaling method, while the dual-energy method achieved the highest accuracy among the three energy mapping methods. Overall, the accuracy of PET quantification results have similar trend as that for the estimation of linear attenuation coefficients, whereas the differences between the three methods are more obvious in the estimation of linear attenuation coefficients than in the PET quantification results. With regards to radiation exposure from CT, the absorbed dose ranged between 7.29-45.58 mGy for 50-kVp scan and between 6.61-39.28 mGy for 80-kVp scan. For 18 F radioactivity concentration of 1.86x10 5 Bq/ml, the PET absorbed dose was around 24 cGy for tumor with a target-to-background ratio of 8. The radiation levels for CT scans are not lethal to the animal, but concurrent use of PET in longitudinal study can increase the risk of biological effects. The

  4. An investigation of entrance surface dose calculations for diagnostic radiology using Monte Carlo simulations and radiotherapy dosimetry formalisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omrane, L Ben; Verhaegen, F; Chahed, N; Mtimet, S

    2003-01-01

    Our aim in this work was to investigate the methodology used in the determination of the entrance surface dose (ESD) in diagnostic radiology. In kV x-rays for low-energy photons (tube potential up to 160 kV, HVL: 1-8 mm Al), the ESD is based on the use of the ratio of mass-energy absorption coefficients and backscatter factors. A full simulation of the photon and electron transport in a kilovoltage x-ray unit, using the Monte Carlo code BEAM/EGS4, was performed to obtain an accurate beam phase space for use in dose calculation. The modelled phase space was experimentally validated for the beam qualities (measured HVL: 3.3 mm Al-2.2 mm Cu) and showed good agreement between calculated and measured HVLs, air kerma and relative dose distributions. We have computed the conversion factors from air kerma to water or soft tissue absorbed dose at the surface of a phantom for beam qualities (HVL: 3.3-8.35 mm Al). The same model was also used to calculate the ESD in water and in soft tissue for the low-energy photon range considered. The results show that the numerical differences between the air kerma and the water kerma based backscatter factors are insignificant. The same conclusion was reached for the (μ en /ρ) ratios, for soft tissue to air, evaluated using either the primary photon spectra or the spectra at the surface of a phantom. Furthermore, the good agreement obtained for the computation of the conversion factors with a full BEAM/EGS4 model confirms the previous studies which are based on different sources for the spectral distribution and different beam geometries (pencil beam or point source assumptions). On the other hand, the ESD in water or soft tissue is well described either with the B air or the B w formalism. Conversion factors from air kerma to ESD in these media are proposed in this work for several beam qualities in diagnostic radiology

  5. Validation of a virtual source model of medical linac for Monte Carlo dose calculation using multi-threaded Geant4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboulbanine, Zakaria; El Khayati, Naïma

    2018-04-01

    The use of phase space in medical linear accelerator Monte Carlo (MC) simulations significantly improves the execution time and leads to results comparable to those obtained from full calculations. The classical representation of phase space stores directly the information of millions of particles, producing bulky files. This paper presents a virtual source model (VSM) based on a reconstruction algorithm, taking as input a compressed file of roughly 800 kb derived from phase space data freely available in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) database. This VSM includes two main components; primary and scattered particle sources, with a specific reconstruction method developed for each. Energy spectra and other relevant variables were extracted from IAEA phase space and stored in the input description data file for both sources. The VSM was validated for three photon beams: Elekta Precise 6 MV/10 MV and a Varian TrueBeam 6 MV. Extensive calculations in water and comparisons between dose distributions of the VSM and IAEA phase space were performed to estimate the VSM precision. The Geant4 MC toolkit in multi-threaded mode (Geant4-[mt]) was used for fast dose calculations and optimized memory use. Four field configurations were chosen for dose calculation validation to test field size and symmetry effects, , , and for squared fields, and for an asymmetric rectangular field. Good agreement in terms of formalism, for 3%/3 mm and 2%/3 mm criteria, for each evaluated radiation field and photon beam was obtained within a computation time of 60 h on a single WorkStation for a 3 mm voxel matrix. Analyzing the VSM’s precision in high dose gradient regions, using the distance to agreement concept (DTA), showed also satisfactory results. In all investigated cases, the mean DTA was less than 1 mm in build-up and penumbra regions. In regards to calculation efficiency, the event processing speed is six times faster using Geant4-[mt] compared to sequential

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of the dose distribution around the 125I model 6711 seed as function of radius of the silver cylinder using the Penelope code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nerio, U.; Chica, L.; Paul, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is applied to find the dose rates distribution in tissue around 125 I seeds model 6711 as a function of the silver cylinder radius, R sc (0.017, 0.021, 0.025, 0.029 and 0.033) cm are used as radius values. It is found here that the dose rate at any point within the tissue decreases as R sc increases. The relative difference of dose rate that produced by the standard R sc seed, is less than 5%, for seeds with Rsc between 0.017 and 0.033 cm. (author)

  7. Calculation of equivalent dose index for electrons from 5,0 to 22,0 MeV by the Monte Carlo method