WorldWideScience

Sample records for carlo collision modeling

  1. Recommended direct simulation Monte Carlo collision model parameters for modeling ionized air transport processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminathan-Gopalan, Krishnan; Stephani, Kelly A., E-mail: ksteph@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    A systematic approach for calibrating the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) collision model parameters to achieve consistency in the transport processes is presented. The DSMC collision cross section model parameters are calibrated for high temperature atmospheric conditions by matching the collision integrals from DSMC against ab initio based collision integrals that are currently employed in the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) and Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) high temperature computational fluid dynamics solvers. The DSMC parameter values are computed for the widely used Variable Hard Sphere (VHS) and the Variable Soft Sphere (VSS) models using the collision-specific pairing approach. The recommended best-fit VHS/VSS parameter values are provided over a temperature range of 1000-20 000 K for a thirteen-species ionized air mixture. Use of the VSS model is necessary to achieve consistency in transport processes of ionized gases. The agreement of the VSS model transport properties with the transport properties as determined by the ab initio collision integral fits was found to be within 6% in the entire temperature range, regardless of the composition of the mixture. The recommended model parameter values can be readily applied to any gas mixture involving binary collisional interactions between the chemical species presented for the specified temperature range.

  2. Modeling of molecular nitrogen collisions and dissociation processes for direct simulation Monte Carlo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Neal; Levin, Deborah A; van Duin, Adri C T; Zhu, Tong

    2014-12-21

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method typically used for simulating hypersonic Earth re-entry flows requires accurate total collision cross sections and reaction probabilities. However, total cross sections are often determined from extrapolations of relatively low-temperature viscosity data, so their reliability is unknown for the high temperatures observed in hypersonic flows. Existing DSMC reaction models accurately reproduce experimental equilibrium reaction rates, but the applicability of these rates to the strong thermal nonequilibrium observed in hypersonic shocks is unknown. For hypersonic flows, these modeling issues are particularly relevant for nitrogen, the dominant species of air. To rectify this deficiency, the Molecular Dynamics/Quasi-Classical Trajectories (MD/QCT) method is used to accurately compute collision and reaction cross sections for the N2(Σg+1)-N2(Σg+1) collision pair for conditions expected in hypersonic shocks using a new potential energy surface developed using a ReaxFF fit to recent advanced ab initio calculations. The MD/QCT-computed reaction probabilities were found to exhibit better physical behavior and predict less dissociation than the baseline total collision energy reaction model for strong nonequilibrium conditions expected in a shock. The MD/QCT reaction model compared well with computed equilibrium reaction rates and shock-tube data. In addition, the MD/QCT-computed total cross sections were found to agree well with established variable hard sphere total cross sections.

  3. Modeling of molecular nitrogen collisions and dissociation processes for direct simulation Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, Neal; Levin, Deborah A.; Duin, Adri C. T. van; Zhu, Tong

    2014-01-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method typically used for simulating hypersonic Earth re-entry flows requires accurate total collision cross sections and reaction probabilities. However, total cross sections are often determined from extrapolations of relatively low-temperature viscosity data, so their reliability is unknown for the high temperatures observed in hypersonic flows. Existing DSMC reaction models accurately reproduce experimental equilibrium reaction rates, but the applicability of these rates to the strong thermal nonequilibrium observed in hypersonic shocks is unknown. For hypersonic flows, these modeling issues are particularly relevant for nitrogen, the dominant species of air. To rectify this deficiency, the Molecular Dynamics/Quasi-Classical Trajectories (MD/QCT) method is used to accurately compute collision and reaction cross sections for the N 2 ( 1 Σ g + )-N 2 ( 1 Σ g + ) collision pair for conditions expected in hypersonic shocks using a new potential energy surface developed using a ReaxFF fit to recent advanced ab initio calculations. The MD/QCT-computed reaction probabilities were found to exhibit better physical behavior and predict less dissociation than the baseline total collision energy reaction model for strong nonequilibrium conditions expected in a shock. The MD/QCT reaction model compared well with computed equilibrium reaction rates and shock-tube data. In addition, the MD/QCT-computed total cross sections were found to agree well with established variable hard sphere total cross sections

  4. An accurate nonlinear Monte Carlo collision operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W.X.; Okamoto, M.; Nakajima, N.; Murakami, S.

    1995-03-01

    A three dimensional nonlinear Monte Carlo collision model is developed based on Coulomb binary collisions with the emphasis both on the accuracy and implementation efficiency. The operator of simple form fulfills particle number, momentum and energy conservation laws, and is equivalent to exact Fokker-Planck operator by correctly reproducing the friction coefficient and diffusion tensor, in addition, can effectively assure small-angle collisions with a binary scattering angle distributed in a limited range near zero. Two highly vectorizable algorithms are designed for its fast implementation. Various test simulations regarding relaxation processes, electrical conductivity, etc. are carried out in velocity space. The test results, which is in good agreement with theory, and timing results on vector computers show that it is practically applicable. The operator may be used for accurately simulating collisional transport problems in magnetized and unmagnetized plasmas. (author)

  5. A variable hard sphere-based phenomenological inelastic collision model for rarefied gas flow simulations by the direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasanth, P S; Kakkassery, Jose K; Vijayakumar, R, E-mail: y3df07@nitc.ac.in, E-mail: josekkakkassery@nitc.ac.in, E-mail: vijay@nitc.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology Calicut, Kozhikode - 673 601, Kerala (India)

    2012-04-01

    A modified phenomenological model is constructed for the simulation of rarefied flows of polyatomic non-polar gas molecules by the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. This variable hard sphere-based model employs a constant rotational collision number, but all its collisions are inelastic in nature and at the same time the correct macroscopic relaxation rate is maintained. In equilibrium conditions, there is equi-partition of energy between the rotational and translational modes and it satisfies the principle of reciprocity or detailed balancing. The present model is applicable for moderate temperatures at which the molecules are in their vibrational ground state. For verification, the model is applied to the DSMC simulations of the translational and rotational energy distributions in nitrogen gas at equilibrium and the results are compared with their corresponding Maxwellian distributions. Next, the Couette flow, the temperature jump and the Rayleigh flow are simulated; the viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients of nitrogen are numerically estimated and compared with experimentally measured values. The model is further applied to the simulation of the rotational relaxation of nitrogen through low- and high-Mach-number normal shock waves in a novel way. In all cases, the results are found to be in good agreement with theoretically expected and experimentally observed values. It is concluded that the inelastic collision of polyatomic molecules can be predicted well by employing the constructed variable hard sphere (VHS)-based collision model.

  6. Monte-Carlo simulation of heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenke, Bjoern; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2011-01-01

    We present Monte-Carlo simulations for heavy-ion collisions combining PYTHIA and the McGill-AMY formalism to describe the evolution of hard partons in a soft background, modelled using hydrodynamic simulations. MARTINI generates full event configurations in the high p T region that take into account thermal QCD and QED effects as well as effects of the evolving medium. This way it is possible to perform detailed quantitative comparisons with experimental observables.

  7. Report on the Oak Ridge workshop on Monte Carlo codes for relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awes, T.C.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1988-01-01

    In order to make detailed predictions for the case of purely hadronic matter, several Monte Carlo codes have been developed to describe relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. Although these various models build upon models of hadron-hadron interactions and have been fitted to reproduce hadron-hadron collision data, they have rather different pictures of the underlying hadron collision process and of subsequent particle production. Until now, the different Monte Carlo codes have, in general, been compared to different sets of experimental data, according to which results were readily available to the model builder or which Monte Carlo code was readily available to an experimental group. As a result, it has been difficult to draw firm conclusions about whether the observed deviations between experiments and calculations were due to deficiencies in the particular model, experimental discrepancies, or interesting effects beyond a simple superposition of nucleon-nucleon collisions. For this reason, it was decided that it would be productive to have a structured confrontation between the available experimental data and the many models of high-energy nuclear collisions in a manner in which it could be ensured that the computer codes were run correctly and the experimental acceptances were properly taken into account. With this purpose in mind, a Workshop on Monte Carlo Codes for Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions was organized at the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from September 12--23, 1988. This paper reviews this workshop. 11 refs., 6 figs

  8. The importance of an external circuit in a particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collisions model for a direct current planar magnetron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bultinck, E.; Kolev, I.; Bogaerts, A.; Depla, D.

    2008-01-01

    In modeling direct current (dc) discharges, such as dc magnetrons, a current-limiting device is often neglected. In this study, it is shown that an external circuit consisting of a voltage source and a resistor is inevitable in calculating the correct cathode current. Avoiding the external circuit can cause the current to converge (if at all) to a wrong volt-ampere regime. The importance of this external circuit is studied by comparing the results with those of a model without current-limiting device. For this purpose, a 2d3v particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collisions model was applied to calculate discharge characteristics, such as cathode potential and current, particle fluxes and densities, and potential distribution in the plasma. It is shown that the calculated cathode current is several orders of magnitude lower when an external circuit is omitted, leading to lower charged particle fluxes and densities, and a wider plasma sheath. Also, it was shown, that only simulations with external circuit can bring the cathode current into a certain plasma regime, which has its own typical properties. In this work, the normal and abnormal regimes were studied

  9. On the impact parameter probability distribution in atomic collisions for Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katardjiev, I.V.; Berg, S.; Nender, C.; Miteva, V.

    1992-01-01

    The collision statistics of ion-solid interactions in Monte Carlo simulations is discussed. The models for structureless targets are shown to be inadequate at low energies and a model for amorphous targets based on the short range ordering in amorphous solids is presented. This model clearly shows the correlation between successive collisions due to the amorphous target structure. It is shown that the new model approximates to a certain extent the collision statistics of the MARLOWE type of programs in the ''amorphous'' mode

  10. The impact of different Monte Carlo models on the cross section measurement of top-pair production at 7 TeV proton-proton collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, Claudius

    2010-09-01

    High energy proton-proton collisions lead to a large amount of secondary particles to be measured in a detector. A final state containing top quarks is of particular interest. But top quarks are only produced in a small fraction of the collisions. Hence, criteria must be defined to separate events containing top quarks from the background. From detectors, we record signals, for example hits in the tracker system or deposits in the calorimeters. In order to obtain the momentum of the particles, we apply algorithms to reconstruct tracks in space. More sophisticated algorithms are needed to identify the flavour of quarks, such as b-tagging. Several steps are needed to test these algorithms. Collision products of proton-proton events are generated using Monte Carlo techniques and their passage through the detector is simulated. After that, the algorithms are applied and the signal efficiency and the mistagging rate can be obtained. There are, however, many different approaches and algorithms realized in programs, so the question arises if the choice of the Monte Carlo generator influences the measured quantities. In this thesis, two commonly used Monte Carlo generators, SHERPA and MadGraph/MadEvent, are compared and the differences in the selection efficiency of semimuonic tt events are estimated. In addition, the distributions of kinematic variables are shown. A special chapter about the matching of matrix elements with parton showers is included. The main algorithms, CKKW for SHERPA and MLM for MadGraph/MadEvent, are introduced.

  11. The impact of different Monte Carlo models on the cross section measurement of top-pair production at 7 TeV proton-proton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Claudius

    2012-04-15

    High energy proton-proton collisions lead to a large amount of secondary particles to be measured in a detector. A final state containing top quarks is of particular interest. But top quarks are only produced in a small fraction of the collisions. Hence, criteria must be defined to separate events containing top quarks from the background. From detectors, we record signals, for example hits in the tracker system or deposits in the calorimeters. In order to obtain the momentum of the particles, we apply algorithms to reconstruct tracks in space. More sophisticated algorithms are needed to identify the flavour of quarks, such as b-tagging. Several steps are needed to test these algorithms. Collision products of proton-proton events are generated using Monte Carlo techniques and their passage through the detector is simulated. After that, the algorithms are applied and the signal efficiency and the mistagging rate can be obtained. There are, however, many different approaches and algorithms realized in programs, so the question arises if the choice of the Monte Carlo generator influences the measured quantities. In this thesis, two commonly used Monte Carlo generators, SHERPA and MadGraph/MadEvent, are compared and the differences in the selection efficiency of semimuonic tt events are estimated. In addition, the distributions of kinematic variables are shown. A special chapter about the matching of matrix elements with parton showers is included. The main algorithms, CKKW for SHERPA and MLM for MadGraph/MadEvent, are introduced.

  12. Monte Carlo event generator MCMHA for high energy hadron-nucleus collisions and intranuclear cascade interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iga, Y.; Hamatsu, R.; Yamazaki, S.

    1988-01-01

    The Monte Carlo event generator for high energy hadron-nucleus (h-A) collisions has been developed which is based on the multi-chain model. The concept of formation zone and the cascade interactions of secondary particles are properly taken into account in this Monte Carlo code. Comparing the results of this code with experimental data, the importance of intranuclear cascade interactions becomes very clear. (orig.)

  13. Sequential Monte Carlo simulation of collision risk in free flight air traffic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, H.A.P.; Bakker, G.; Krystul, J.; Everdij, M.H.C.; Klein Obbink, B.; Klompstra, M.B.

    2005-01-01

    Within HYBRIDGE a novel approach in speeding up Monte Carlo simulation of rare events has been developed. In the current report this method is extended for application to simulating collisions with a stochastic dynamical model of an air traffic operational concept. Subsequently this extended Monte

  14. Adaptive time-stepping Monte Carlo integration of Coulomb collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Särkimäki, K.; Hirvijoki, E.; Terävä, J.

    2018-01-01

    We report an accessible and robust tool for evaluating the effects of Coulomb collisions on a test particle in a plasma that obeys Maxwell-Jüttner statistics. The implementation is based on the Beliaev-Budker collision integral which allows both the test particle and the background plasma to be relativistic. The integration method supports adaptive time stepping, which is shown to greatly improve the computational efficiency. The Monte Carlo method is implemented for both the three-dimensional particle momentum space and the five-dimensional guiding center phase space. Detailed description is provided for both the physics and implementation of the operator. The focus is in adaptive integration of stochastic differential equations, which is an overlooked aspect among existing Monte Carlo implementations of Coulomb collision operators. We verify that our operator converges to known analytical results and demonstrate that careless implementation of the adaptive time step can lead to severely erroneous results. The operator is provided as a self-contained Fortran 95 module and can be included into existing orbit-following tools that trace either the full Larmor motion or the guiding center dynamics. The adaptive time-stepping algorithm is expected to be useful in situations where the collision frequencies vary greatly over the course of a simulation. Examples include the slowing-down of fusion products or other fast ions, and the Dreicer generation of runaway electrons as well as the generation of fast ions or electrons with ion or electron cyclotron resonance heating.

  15. Vocal Fold Collision Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granados, Alba; Brunskog, Jonas; Misztal, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    When vocal folds vibrate at normal speaking frequencies, collisions occurs. The numerics and formulations behind a position-based continuum model of contact is an active field of research in the contact mechanics community. In this paper, a frictionless three-dimensional finite element model...

  16. Composite quantum collision models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Salvatore; Ciccarello, Francesco; Palma, G. Massimo

    2017-09-01

    A collision model (CM) is a framework to describe open quantum dynamics. In its memoryless version, it models the reservoir R as consisting of a large collection of elementary ancillas: the dynamics of the open system S results from successive collisions of S with the ancillas of R . Here, we present a general formulation of memoryless composite CMs, where S is partitioned into the very open system under study S coupled to one or more auxiliary systems {Si} . Their composite dynamics occurs through internal S -{Si} collisions interspersed with external ones involving {Si} and the reservoir R . We show that important known instances of quantum non-Markovian dynamics of S —such as the emission of an atom into a reservoir featuring a Lorentzian, or multi-Lorentzian, spectral density or a qubit subject to random telegraph noise—can be mapped on to such memoryless composite CMs.

  17. Role of positive ions on the surface production of negative ions in a fusion plasma reactor type negative ion source--Insights from a three dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fubiani, G.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2013-11-01

    Results from a 3D self-consistent Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions (PIC MCC) model of a high power fusion-type negative ion source are presented for the first time. The model is used to calculate the plasma characteristics of the ITER prototype BATMAN ion source developed in Garching. Special emphasis is put on the production of negative ions on the plasma grid surface. The question of the relative roles of the impact of neutral hydrogen atoms and positive ions on the cesiated grid surface has attracted much attention recently and the 3D PIC MCC model is used to address this question. The results show that the production of negative ions by positive ion impact on the plasma grid is small with respect to the production by atomic hydrogen or deuterium bombardment (less than 10%).

  18. Role of positive ions on the surface production of negative ions in a fusion plasma reactor type negative ion source—Insights from a three dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fubiani, G.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Results from a 3D self-consistent Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions (PIC MCC) model of a high power fusion-type negative ion source are presented for the first time. The model is used to calculate the plasma characteristics of the ITER prototype BATMAN ion source developed in Garching. Special emphasis is put on the production of negative ions on the plasma grid surface. The question of the relative roles of the impact of neutral hydrogen atoms and positive ions on the cesiated grid surface has attracted much attention recently and the 3D PIC MCC model is used to address this question. The results show that the production of negative ions by positive ion impact on the plasma grid is small with respect to the production by atomic hydrogen or deuterium bombardment (less than 10%)

  19. Monte Carlo models: Quo vadimus?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    2001-01-01

    Coherence, multiple scattering and the interplay between soft and hard processes are discussed. These physics phenomena are essential for understanding the nuclear dependences of rapidity density and p{sub T} spectra in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The RHIC data have shown the onset of hard processes and indications of high p{sub T} spectra suppression due to parton energy loss. Within the pQCD parton model, the combination of azimuthal anisotropy ({nu}{sub 2}) and hadron spectra suppression at large p{sub T} can help one to determine the initial gluon density in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC.

  20. Monte Carlo models: Quo vadimus?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    2001-01-01

    Coherence, multiple scattering and the interplay between soft and hard processes are discussed. These physics phenomena are essential for understanding the nuclear dependences of rapidity density and p T spectra in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The RHIC data have shown the onset of hard processes and indications of high p T spectra suppression due to parton energy loss. Within the pQCD parton model, the combination of azimuthal anisotropy (ν 2 ) and hadron spectra suppression at large p T can help one to determine the initial gluon density in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC

  1. Radiation Modeling with Direct Simulation Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Ann B.; Hassan, H. A.

    1991-01-01

    Improvements in the modeling of radiation in low density shock waves with direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) are the subject of this study. A new scheme to determine the relaxation collision numbers for excitation of electronic states is proposed. This scheme attempts to move the DSMC programs toward a more detailed modeling of the physics and more reliance on available rate data. The new method is compared with the current modeling technique and both techniques are compared with available experimental data. The differences in the results are evaluated. The test case is based on experimental measurements from the AVCO-Everett Research Laboratory electric arc-driven shock tube of a normal shock wave in air at 10 km/s and .1 Torr. The new method agrees with the available data as well as the results from the earlier scheme and is more easily extrapolated to di erent ow conditions.

  2. Monte-Carlo simulation of heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenke, Bjoern; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Results from the Modular Algorithm for Relativistic Treatment of heavy IoN Interactions (MARTINI) are presented. This comprehensive event generator for the hard and penetrating probes in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions employs a time evolution model for the soft background, PYTHIA 8.1 and the McGill-AMY parton evolution scheme including radiative as well as elastic processes. It generates full event configurations in the high p T region, allowing to perform the same processing as with experimental data, such as multi-particle correlation analyses and full jet reconstruction. (author)

  3. Shell model Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonin, S.E.; Dean, D.J.; Langanke, K.

    1997-01-01

    We review quantum Monte Carlo methods for dealing with large shell model problems. These methods reduce the imaginary-time many-body evolution operator to a coherent superposition of one-body evolutions in fluctuating one-body fields; the resultant path integral is evaluated stochastically. We first discuss the motivation, formalism, and implementation of such Shell Model Monte Carlo (SMMC) methods. There then follows a sampler of results and insights obtained from a number of applications. These include the ground state and thermal properties of pf-shell nuclei, the thermal and rotational behavior of rare-earth and γ-soft nuclei, and the calculation of double beta-decay matrix elements. Finally, prospects for further progress in such calculations are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Shell model Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonin, S.E.

    1996-01-01

    We review quantum Monte Carlo methods for dealing with large shell model problems. These methods reduce the imaginary-time many-body evolution operator to a coherent superposition of one-body evolutions in fluctuating one-body fields; resultant path integral is evaluated stochastically. We first discuss the motivation, formalism, and implementation of such Shell Model Monte Carlo methods. There then follows a sampler of results and insights obtained from a number of applications. These include the ground state and thermal properties of pf-shell nuclei, thermal behavior of γ-soft nuclei, and calculation of double beta-decay matrix elements. Finally, prospects for further progress in such calculations are discussed. 87 refs

  5. WINHAC - the Monte Carlo event generator for single W-boson production in hadronic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Placzek, W.; Jadach, P.

    2009-01-01

    The charged-current Drell-Yan process, i.e. single W-boson production with leptonic decays in hadronic collisions, will play an important role in the experimental programme at the LHC. It will be used for improved measurements of some Standard Model parameters (such as the W-boson mass and widths, etc.), for better determination of the Higgs-boson mass limits, in '' new physics '' searches, as a '' standard candle '' process, etc. In order to achieve all these goals, precise theoretical predictions for this process in terms of a Monte Carlo event generator are indispensable. In this talk the Monte Carlo event generator WINHAC for the charged-current Drell-Yan process will be presented. It features higher-order QED corrections within the exclusive Yennie-Frautschi-Suura exponentiation scheme with the 1 st order electroweak corrections. It is interfaced with PYTHIA for QCD/QED initial-state parton shower as well as hadronization. It includes options for proton-proton, proton-antiproton and nucleus-nucleus collisions. Moreover, it allows for longitudinally and transversely polarized W-boson production. It has been cross-checked numerically to high precision against independent programs/calculations. Some numerical results from WINHAC will also be presented. Finally, interplay between QCD and electroweak effects will briefly be discussed. (author)

  6. Timesaving techniques for decision of electron-molecule collisions in Monte Carlo simulation of electrical discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, Hirotake; Mori, Naoki; Sakai, Yosuke; Suda, Yoshiyuki

    2007-01-01

    Techniques to reduce the computational load for determination of electron-molecule collisions in Monte Carlo simulations of electrical discharges have been presented. By enhancing the detection efficiency of the no-collision case in the decision scheme of the collisional events, we can decrease the frequency of access to time-consuming subroutines to calculate the electron collision cross sections of the gas molecules for obtaining the collision probability. A benchmark test and an estimation to evaluate the present techniques have shown a practical timesaving efficiency

  7. Monte Carlo simulation for ion-molecule collisions at intermediate velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadhane, U R; Mishra, P M; Rajput, J; Safvan, C P; Vig, S

    2015-01-01

    Electronic energy loss distribution estimation is done under local density distribution using Monte Carlo simulations. These results are used to compare the experimental results of proton-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and proton-nucleobase interactions at intermediate velocity collisions. (paper)

  8. Numerical heating in Particle-In-Cell simulations with Monte Carlo binary collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, E. Paulo; Mori, Warren; Fiuza, Frederico

    2017-10-01

    The binary Monte Carlo collision (BMCC) algorithm is a robust and popular method to include Coulomb collision effects in Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations of plasmas. While a number of works have focused on extending the validity of the model to different physical regimes of temperature and density, little attention has been given to the fundamental coupling between PIC and BMCC algorithms. Here, we show that the coupling between PIC and BMCC algorithms can give rise to (nonphysical) numerical heating of the system, that can be far greater than that observed when these algorithms operate independently. This deleterious numerical heating effect can significantly impact the evolution of the simulated system particularly for long simulation times. In this work, we describe the source of this numerical heating, and derive scaling laws for the numerical heating rates based on the numerical parameters of PIC-BMCC simulations. We compare our theoretical scalings with PIC-BMCC numerical experiments, and discuss strategies to minimize this parasitic effect. This work is supported by DOE FES under FWP 100237 and 100182.

  9. Restricted Collision List method for faster Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macrossan, Michael N., E-mail: m.macrossan@uq.edu.au

    2016-08-15

    The ‘Restricted Collision List’ (RCL) method for speeding up the calculation of DSMC Variable Soft Sphere collisions, with Borgnakke–Larsen (BL) energy exchange, is presented. The method cuts down considerably on the number of random collision parameters which must be calculated (deflection and azimuthal angles, and the BL energy exchange factors). A relatively short list of these parameters is generated and the parameters required in any cell are selected from this list. The list is regenerated at intervals approximately equal to the smallest mean collision time in the flow, and the chance of any particle re-using the same collision parameters in two successive collisions is negligible. The results using this method are indistinguishable from those obtained with standard DSMC. The CPU time saving depends on how much of a DSMC calculation is devoted to collisions and how much is devoted to other tasks, such as moving particles and calculating particle interactions with flow boundaries. For 1-dimensional calculations of flow in a tube, the new method saves 20% of the CPU time per collision for VSS scattering with no energy exchange. With RCL applied to rotational energy exchange, the CPU saving can be greater; for small values of the rotational collision number, for which most collisions involve some rotational energy exchange, the CPU may be reduced by 50% or more.

  10. Modelling seabird collision risk with off-shore wind farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateos, Maria; Arroyo, Gonzalo Munoz; Rosario, Jose Juan Alonso del

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Recent concern about the adverse effects of collision mortality of avian migrants at wind farms has highlighted the need to understand bird-wind turbine interactions. Here, a stochastic collision model, based on data of seabird behaviour collected on- site, is presented, as a flexible and easy to take tool to assess the collisions probabilities of off-shore wind farms in a pre-construction phase. The collision prediction model considering the wind farm area as a risk window has been constructed as a stochastic model for avian migrants, based on Monte Carlo simulation. The model calculates the probable number of birds collided per time unit. Migration volume, wind farm dimensions, vertical and horizontal distribution of the migratory passage, flight direction and avoidance rates, between other variables, are taken into account in different steps of the model as the input variables. In order to assess the weighted importance of these factors on collision probability predictions, collision probabilities obtained from the set of scenarios resulting from the different combinations of the input variables were modelled by using Generalised Additive Models. The application of this model to a hypothetical project for erecting a wind farm at the Strait of Gibraltar showed that collision probability, and consequently mortality rates, strongly depend on the values of the avoidance rates taken into account, and the distribution of birds into the different altitude layers. These parameters should be considered as priorities to be addressed in post-construction studies. (Author)

  11. Traffic simulation based ship collision probability modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goerlandt, Floris, E-mail: floris.goerlandt@tkk.f [Aalto University, School of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Mechanics, Marine Technology, P.O. Box 15300, FI-00076 AALTO, Espoo (Finland); Kujala, Pentti [Aalto University, School of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Mechanics, Marine Technology, P.O. Box 15300, FI-00076 AALTO, Espoo (Finland)

    2011-01-15

    Maritime traffic poses various risks in terms of human, environmental and economic loss. In a risk analysis of ship collisions, it is important to get a reasonable estimate for the probability of such accidents and the consequences they lead to. In this paper, a method is proposed to assess the probability of vessels colliding with each other. The method is capable of determining the expected number of accidents, the locations where and the time when they are most likely to occur, while providing input for models concerned with the expected consequences. At the basis of the collision detection algorithm lays an extensive time domain micro-simulation of vessel traffic in the given area. The Monte Carlo simulation technique is applied to obtain a meaningful prediction of the relevant factors of the collision events. Data obtained through the Automatic Identification System is analyzed in detail to obtain realistic input data for the traffic simulation: traffic routes, the number of vessels on each route, the ship departure times, main dimensions and sailing speed. The results obtained by the proposed method for the studied case of the Gulf of Finland are presented, showing reasonable agreement with registered accident and near-miss data.

  12. Comment on the classical-trajectory Monte Carlo method for ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that the procedure described by Olson and Salop for classical-trajectory Monte Carlo treatment of ion-atom collisions does not provide a uniform statistical distribution of all the parameters defining the initial conditions of a trajectory. Impact-ionization and charge-transfer cross sections for collisions of H + with H at H energies between 25 and 600 keV are recalculated eliminating this failing and compared with those obtained using the procedure of Olson and Salop and with experimental results

  13. Space Object Collision Probability via Monte Carlo on the Graphics Processing Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittaldev, Vivek; Russell, Ryan P.

    2017-09-01

    Fast and accurate collision probability computations are essential for protecting space assets. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is the most accurate but computationally intensive method. A Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) is used to parallelize the computation and reduce the overall runtime. Using MC techniques to compute the collision probability is common in literature as the benchmark. An optimized implementation on the GPU, however, is a challenging problem and is the main focus of the current work. The MC simulation takes samples from the uncertainty distributions of the Resident Space Objects (RSOs) at any time during a time window of interest and outputs the separations at closest approach. Therefore, any uncertainty propagation method may be used and the collision probability is automatically computed as a function of RSO collision radii. Integration using a fixed time step and a quartic interpolation after every Runge Kutta step ensures that no close approaches are missed. Two orders of magnitude speedups over a serial CPU implementation are shown, and speedups improve moderately with higher fidelity dynamics. The tool makes the MC approach tractable on a single workstation, and can be used as a final product, or for verifying surrogate and analytical collision probability methods.

  14. Collision models in quantum optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarello, Francesco

    2017-12-01

    Quantum collision models (CMs) provide advantageous case studies for investigating major issues in open quantum systems theory, and especially quantum non-Markovianity. After reviewing their general definition and distinctive features, we illustrate the emergence of a CM in a familiar quantum optics scenario. This task is carried out by highlighting the close connection between the well-known input-output formalism and CMs. Within this quantum optics framework, usual assumptions in the CMs' literature - such as considering a bath of noninteracting yet initially correlated ancillas - have a clear physical origin.

  15. The effects of particle recycling on the divertor plasma: A particle-in-cell with Monte Carlo collision simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mingyu; Sang, Chaofeng; Sun, Zhenyue; Hu, Wanpeng; Wang, Dezhen

    2018-05-01

    A Particle-In-Cell (PIC) with Monte Carlo Collision (MCC) model is applied to study the effects of particle recycling on divertor plasma in the present work. The simulation domain is the scrape-off layer of the tokamak in one-dimension along the magnetic field line. At the divertor plate, the reflected deuterium atoms (D) and thermally released deuterium molecules (D2) are considered. The collisions between the plasma particles (e and D+) and recycled neutral particles (D and D2) are described by the MCC method. It is found that the recycled neutral particles have a great impact on divertor plasma. The effects of different collisions on the plasma are simulated and discussed. Moreover, the impacts of target materials on the plasma are simulated by comparing the divertor with Carbon (C) and Tungsten (W) targets. The simulation results show that the energy and momentum losses of the C target are larger than those of the W target in the divertor region even without considering the impurity particles, whereas the W target has a more remarkable influence on the core plasma.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of Markov unreliability models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, E.E.; Boehm, F.

    1984-01-01

    A Monte Carlo method is formulated for the evaluation of the unrealibility of complex systems with known component failure and repair rates. The formulation is in terms of a Markov process allowing dependences between components to be modeled and computational efficiencies to be achieved in the Monte Carlo simulation. Two variance reduction techniques, forced transition and failure biasing, are employed to increase computational efficiency of the random walk procedure. For an example problem these result in improved computational efficiency by more than three orders of magnitudes over analog Monte Carlo. The method is generalized to treat problems with distributed failure and repair rate data, and a batching technique is introduced and shown to result in substantial increases in computational efficiency for an example problem. A method for separating the variance due to the data uncertainty from that due to the finite number of random walks is presented. (orig.)

  17. Shell model the Monte Carlo way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ormand, W.E.

    1995-01-01

    The formalism for the auxiliary-field Monte Carlo approach to the nuclear shell model is presented. The method is based on a linearization of the two-body part of the Hamiltonian in an imaginary-time propagator using the Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation. The foundation of the method, as applied to the nuclear many-body problem, is discussed. Topics presented in detail include: (1) the density-density formulation of the method, (2) computation of the overlaps, (3) the sign of the Monte Carlo weight function, (4) techniques for performing Monte Carlo sampling, and (5) the reconstruction of response functions from an imaginary-time auto-correlation function using MaxEnt techniques. Results obtained using schematic interactions, which have no sign problem, are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the method, while an extrapolation method for realistic Hamiltonians is presented. In addition, applications at finite temperature are outlined

  18. Shell model the Monte Carlo way

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormand, W.E.

    1995-03-01

    The formalism for the auxiliary-field Monte Carlo approach to the nuclear shell model is presented. The method is based on a linearization of the two-body part of the Hamiltonian in an imaginary-time propagator using the Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation. The foundation of the method, as applied to the nuclear many-body problem, is discussed. Topics presented in detail include: (1) the density-density formulation of the method, (2) computation of the overlaps, (3) the sign of the Monte Carlo weight function, (4) techniques for performing Monte Carlo sampling, and (5) the reconstruction of response functions from an imaginary-time auto-correlation function using MaxEnt techniques. Results obtained using schematic interactions, which have no sign problem, are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the method, while an extrapolation method for realistic Hamiltonians is presented. In addition, applications at finite temperature are outlined.

  19. The electron transport problem sampling by Monte Carlo individual collision technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androsenko, P.A.; Belousov, V.I.

    2005-01-01

    The problem of electron transport is of most interest in all fields of the modern science. To solve this problem the Monte Carlo sampling has to be used. The electron transport is characterized by a large number of individual interactions. To simulate electron transport the 'condensed history' technique may be used where a large number of collisions are grouped into a single step to be sampled randomly. Another kind of Monte Carlo sampling is the individual collision technique. In comparison with condensed history technique researcher has the incontestable advantages. For example one does not need to give parameters altered by condensed history technique like upper limit for electron energy, resolution, number of sub-steps etc. Also the condensed history technique may lose some very important tracks of electrons because of its limited nature by step parameters of particle movement and due to weakness of algorithms for example energy indexing algorithm. There are no these disadvantages in the individual collision technique. This report presents some sampling algorithms of new version BRAND code where above mentioned technique is used. All information on electrons was taken from Endf-6 files. They are the important part of BRAND. These files have not been processed but directly taken from electron information source. Four kinds of interaction like the elastic interaction, the Bremsstrahlung, the atomic excitation and the atomic electro-ionization were considered. In this report some results of sampling are presented after comparison with analogs. For example the endovascular radiotherapy problem (P2) of QUADOS2002 was presented in comparison with another techniques that are usually used. (authors)

  20. The electron transport problem sampling by Monte Carlo individual collision technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Androsenko, P.A.; Belousov, V.I. [Obninsk State Technical Univ. of Nuclear Power Engineering, Kaluga region (Russian Federation)

    2005-07-01

    The problem of electron transport is of most interest in all fields of the modern science. To solve this problem the Monte Carlo sampling has to be used. The electron transport is characterized by a large number of individual interactions. To simulate electron transport the 'condensed history' technique may be used where a large number of collisions are grouped into a single step to be sampled randomly. Another kind of Monte Carlo sampling is the individual collision technique. In comparison with condensed history technique researcher has the incontestable advantages. For example one does not need to give parameters altered by condensed history technique like upper limit for electron energy, resolution, number of sub-steps etc. Also the condensed history technique may lose some very important tracks of electrons because of its limited nature by step parameters of particle movement and due to weakness of algorithms for example energy indexing algorithm. There are no these disadvantages in the individual collision technique. This report presents some sampling algorithms of new version BRAND code where above mentioned technique is used. All information on electrons was taken from Endf-6 files. They are the important part of BRAND. These files have not been processed but directly taken from electron information source. Four kinds of interaction like the elastic interaction, the Bremsstrahlung, the atomic excitation and the atomic electro-ionization were considered. In this report some results of sampling are presented after comparison with analogs. For example the endovascular radiotherapy problem (P2) of QUADOS2002 was presented in comparison with another techniques that are usually used. (authors)

  1. Multi-level Monte Carlo Methods for Efficient Simulation of Coulomb Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketson, Lee

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the use of multi-level Monte Carlo (MLMC) schemes--originally introduced by Giles for financial applications--for the efficient simulation of Coulomb collisions in the Fokker-Planck limit. The scheme is based on a Langevin treatment of collisions, and reduces the computational cost of achieving a RMS error scaling as ɛ from O (ɛ-3) --for standard Langevin methods and binary collision algorithms--to the theoretically optimal scaling O (ɛ-2) for the Milstein discretization, and to O (ɛ-2 (logɛ)2) with the simpler Euler-Maruyama discretization. In practice, this speeds up simulation by factors up to 100. We summarize standard MLMC schemes, describe some tricks for achieving the optimal scaling, present results from a test problem, and discuss the method's range of applicability. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the University of California, Los Angeles, under grant DE-FG02-05ER25710, and by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. The integral first collision kernel method for gamma-ray skyshine analysis[Skyshine; Gamma-ray; First collision kernel; Monte Carlo calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheu, R.-D.; Chui, C.-S.; Jiang, S.-H. E-mail: shjiang@mx.nthu.edu.tw

    2003-12-01

    A simplified method, based on the integral of the first collision kernel, is presented for performing gamma-ray skyshine calculations for the collimated sources. The first collision kernels were calculated in air for a reference air density by use of the EGS4 Monte Carlo code. These kernels can be applied to other air densities by applying density corrections. The integral first collision kernel (IFCK) method has been used to calculate two of the ANSI/ANS skyshine benchmark problems and the results were compared with a number of other commonly used codes. Our results were generally in good agreement with others but only spend a small fraction of the computation time required by the Monte Carlo calculations. The scheme of the IFCK method for dealing with lots of source collimation geometry is also presented in this study.

  3. Monte Carlo modeling of Standard Model multi-boson production processes for √s = 13 TeV ATLAS analyses

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shu; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We present the Monte Carlo(MC) setup used by ATLAS to model multi-boson processes in √s = 13 TeV proton-proton collisions. The baseline Monte Carlo generators are compared with each other in key kinematic distributions of the processes under study. Sample normalization and systematic uncertainties are discussed.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of ion-neutral charge exchange collisions and grid erosion in an ion thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaohang; Ruyten, Wilhelmus M.; Keefer, Dennis

    1991-01-01

    A combined particle-in-cell (PIC)/Monte Carlo simulation model has been developed in which the PIC method is used to simulate the charge exchange collisions. It is noted that a number of features were reproduced correctly by this code, but that its assumption of two-dimensional axisymmetry for a single set of grid apertures precluded the reproduction of the most characteristic feature of actual test data; namely, the concentrated grid erosion at the geometric center of the hexagonal aperture array. The first results of a three-dimensional code, which takes into account the hexagonal symmetry of the grid, are presented. It is shown that, with this code, the experimentally observed erosion patterns are reproduced correctly, demonstrating explicitly the concentration of sputtering between apertures.

  5. Heat Source Characterization In A TREAT Fuel Particle Using Coupled Neutronics Binary Collision Monte-Carlo Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunert, Sebastian; Schwen, Daniel; Ghassemi, Pedram; Baker, Benjamin; Zabriskie, Adam; Ortensi, Javier; Wang, Yaqi; Gleicher, Frederick; DeHart, Mark; Martineau, Richard

    2017-04-01

    This work presents a multi-physics, multi-scale approach to modeling the Transient Test Reactor (TREAT) currently prepared for restart at the Idaho National Laboratory. TREAT fuel is made up of microscopic fuel grains (r ˜ 20µm) dispersed in a graphite matrix. The novelty of this work is in coupling a binary collision Monte-Carlo (BCMC) model to the Finite Element based code Moose for solving a microsopic heat-conduction problem whose driving source is provided by the BCMC model tracking fission fragment energy deposition. This microscopic model is driven by a transient, engineering scale neutronics model coupled to an adiabatic heating model. The macroscopic model provides local power densities and neutron energy spectra to the microscpic model. Currently, no feedback from the microscopic to the macroscopic model is considered. TREAT transient 15 is used to exemplify the capabilities of the multi-physics, multi-scale model, and it is found that the average fuel grain temperature differs from the average graphite temperature by 80 K despite the low-power transient. The large temperature difference has strong implications on the Doppler feedback a potential LEU TREAT core would see, and it underpins the need for multi-physics, multi-scale modeling of a TREAT LEU core.

  6. Higgs production enhancement in P-P collisions using Monte Carlo techniques at √s = 13 TeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleiman M.H.M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A precise estimation of the amount of enhancement in Higgs boson production through pp collisions at ultra-relativistic energies throughout promotion of the gluon distribution function inside the protons before the collision is presented here. The study is based mainly on the available Monte Carlo event generators (PYTHIA 8.2.9, SHERPA 2.1.0 running on PCs and CERNX-Machine, respectively, and using the extended invariant mass technique. Generated samples of 1000 events from PYTHIA 8.2.9 and SHERPA,2.1.0 at √s = 13 TeV are used in the investigation of the effect of replacing the parton distribution function (PDF on the Higgs production enhancement. The CTEQ66 and MSRTW2004nlo parton distribution functions are used alternatively on PYTHIA 8.2.9 and SHERPA 2.1.0 event generators in companion with the effects of allowing initial state and final state radiations (ISR and FSR to obtain evidence on the enhancement of the SM-Higgs production depending on the field theoretical model of SM. It is found that, the replacement of PDFs will lead to a significant change in the SM-Higgs production, and the effect of allowing or denying any of ISR or FSR is sound for the two event generators but may be unrealistic in PHYTIA 8.2.9.

  7. Higgs production enhancement in P-P collisions using Monte Carlo techniques at √s = 13 TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleiman, M. H. M.; Abdel-Aziz, S. S.; Sobhi, M. S. E.

    2017-06-01

    A precise estimation of the amount of enhancement in Higgs boson production through pp collisions at ultra-relativistic energies throughout promotion of the gluon distribution function inside the protons before the collision is presented here. The study is based mainly on the available Monte Carlo event generators (PYTHIA 8.2.9, SHERPA 2.1.0) running on PCs and CERNX-Machine, respectively, and using the extended invariant mass technique. Generated samples of 1000 events from PYTHIA 8.2.9 and SHERPA,2.1.0 at √s = 13 TeV are used in the investigation of the effect of replacing the parton distribution function (PDF) on the Higgs production enhancement. The CTEQ66 and MSRTW2004nlo parton distribution functions are used alternatively on PYTHIA 8.2.9 and SHERPA 2.1.0 event generators in companion with the effects of allowing initial state and final state radiations (ISR and FSR) to obtain evidence on the enhancement of the SM-Higgs production depending on the field theoretical model of SM. It is found that, the replacement of PDFs will lead to a significant change in the SM-Higgs production, and the effect of allowing or denying any of ISR or FSR is sound for the two event generators but may be unrealistic in PHYTIA 8.2.9.

  8. Mean transverse momenta correlations in hadron-hadron collisions in MC toy model with repulsing strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altsybeev, Igor

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, Monte-Carlo toy model with repulsing quark-gluon strings in hadron-hadron collisions is described. String repulsion creates transverse boosts for the string decay products, giving modifications of observables. As an example, long-range correlations between mean transverse momenta of particles in two observation windows are studied in MC toy simulation of the heavy-ion collisions

  9. Ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions in a multi-string model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, K.

    1987-01-01

    We present a model for ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions based on color string formation and subsequent independent string fragmentation. Strings are formed due to color exchange between quarks at each individual nucleon nucleon collision. The fragmentation is treated as in e + e - or lepton nucleon scattering. Calculation for pp, pA, and AA were carried out using the Monte Carlo code VENUS for Very Energetic Nuclear Scattering (version 1.0). 20 refs., 6 figs

  10. Collision of Physics and Software in the Monte Carlo Application Toolkit (MCATK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweezy, Jeremy Ed [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-21

    The topic is presented in a series of slides organized as follows: MCATK overview, development strategy, available algorithms, problem modeling (sources, geometry, data, tallies), parallelism, miscellaneous tools/features, example MCATK application, recent areas of research, and summary and future work. MCATK is a C++ component-based Monte Carlo neutron-gamma transport software library with continuous energy neutron and photon transport. Designed to build specialized applications and to provide new functionality in existing general-purpose Monte Carlo codes like MCNP, it reads ACE formatted nuclear data generated by NJOY. The motivation behind MCATK was to reduce costs. MCATK physics involves continuous energy neutron & gamma transport with multi-temperature treatment, static eigenvalue (keff and α) algorithms, time-dependent algorithm, and fission chain algorithms. MCATK geometry includes mesh geometries and solid body geometries. MCATK provides verified, unit-test Monte Carlo components, flexibility in Monte Carlo application development, and numerous tools such as geometry and cross section plotters.

  11. A collision model for safety evaluation of autonomous intelligent cruise control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touran, A; Brackstone, M A; McDonald, M

    1999-09-01

    This paper describes a general framework for safety evaluation of autonomous intelligent cruise control in rear-end collisions. Using data and specifications from prototype devices, two collision models are developed. One model considers a train of four cars, one of which is equipped with autonomous intelligent cruise control. This model considers the car in front and two cars following the equipped car. In the second model, none of the cars is equipped with the device. Each model can predict the possibility of rear-end collision between cars under various conditions by calculating the remaining distance between cars after the front car brakes. Comparing the two collision models allows one to evaluate the effectiveness of autonomous intelligent cruise control in preventing collisions. The models are then subjected to Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the probability of collision. Based on crash probabilities, an expected value is calculated for the number of cars involved in any collision. It is found that given the model assumptions, while equipping a car with autonomous intelligent cruise control can significantly reduce the probability of the collision with the car ahead, it may adversely affect the situation for the following cars.

  12. Monte Carlo methods and models in finance and insurance

    CERN Document Server

    Korn, Ralf; Kroisandt, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    Offering a unique balance between applications and calculations, Monte Carlo Methods and Models in Finance and Insurance incorporates the application background of finance and insurance with the theory and applications of Monte Carlo methods. It presents recent methods and algorithms, including the multilevel Monte Carlo method, the statistical Romberg method, and the Heath-Platen estimator, as well as recent financial and actuarial models, such as the Cheyette and dynamic mortality models. The authors separately discuss Monte Carlo techniques, stochastic process basics, and the theoretical background and intuition behind financial and actuarial mathematics, before bringing the topics together to apply the Monte Carlo methods to areas of finance and insurance. This allows for the easy identification of standard Monte Carlo tools and for a detailed focus on the main principles of financial and insurance mathematics. The book describes high-level Monte Carlo methods for standard simulation and the simulation of...

  13. Simple model of surface roughness for binary collision sputtering simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, Sloan J. [Institute of Solid-State Electronics, TU Wien, Floragasse 7, A-1040 Wien (Austria); Hobler, Gerhard, E-mail: gerhard.hobler@tuwien.ac.at [Institute of Solid-State Electronics, TU Wien, Floragasse 7, A-1040 Wien (Austria); Maciążek, Dawid; Postawa, Zbigniew [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Lojasiewicza 11, 30348 Kraków (Poland)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • A simple model of surface roughness is proposed. • Its key feature is a linearly varying target density at the surface. • The model can be used in 1D/2D/3D Monte Carlo binary collision simulations. • The model fits well experimental glancing incidence sputtering yield data. - Abstract: It has been shown that surface roughness can strongly influence the sputtering yield – especially at glancing incidence angles where the inclusion of surface roughness leads to an increase in sputtering yields. In this work, we propose a simple one-parameter model (the “density gradient model”) which imitates surface roughness effects. In the model, the target’s atomic density is assumed to vary linearly between the actual material density and zero. The layer width is the sole model parameter. The model has been implemented in the binary collision simulator IMSIL and has been evaluated against various geometric surface models for 5 keV Ga ions impinging an amorphous Si target. To aid the construction of a realistic rough surface topography, we have performed MD simulations of sequential 5 keV Ga impacts on an initially crystalline Si target. We show that our new model effectively reproduces the sputtering yield, with only minor variations in the energy and angular distributions of sputtered particles. The success of the density gradient model is attributed to a reduction of the reflection coefficient – leading to increased sputtering yields, similar in effect to surface roughness.

  14. Simple model of surface roughness for binary collision sputtering simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsey, Sloan J.; Hobler, Gerhard; Maciążek, Dawid; Postawa, Zbigniew

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A simple model of surface roughness is proposed. • Its key feature is a linearly varying target density at the surface. • The model can be used in 1D/2D/3D Monte Carlo binary collision simulations. • The model fits well experimental glancing incidence sputtering yield data. - Abstract: It has been shown that surface roughness can strongly influence the sputtering yield – especially at glancing incidence angles where the inclusion of surface roughness leads to an increase in sputtering yields. In this work, we propose a simple one-parameter model (the “density gradient model”) which imitates surface roughness effects. In the model, the target’s atomic density is assumed to vary linearly between the actual material density and zero. The layer width is the sole model parameter. The model has been implemented in the binary collision simulator IMSIL and has been evaluated against various geometric surface models for 5 keV Ga ions impinging an amorphous Si target. To aid the construction of a realistic rough surface topography, we have performed MD simulations of sequential 5 keV Ga impacts on an initially crystalline Si target. We show that our new model effectively reproduces the sputtering yield, with only minor variations in the energy and angular distributions of sputtered particles. The success of the density gradient model is attributed to a reduction of the reflection coefficient – leading to increased sputtering yields, similar in effect to surface roughness.

  15. Monte Carlo modelling of TRIGA research reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bakkari, B.; Nacir, B.; El Bardouni, T.; El Younoussi, C.; Merroun, O.; Htet, A.; Boulaich, Y.; Zoubair, M.; Boukhal, H.; Chakir, M.

    2010-10-01

    The Moroccan 2 MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at Centre des Etudes Nucléaires de la Maâmora (CENM) achieved initial criticality on May 2, 2007. The reactor is designed to effectively implement the various fields of basic nuclear research, manpower training, and production of radioisotopes for their use in agriculture, industry, and medicine. This study deals with the neutronic analysis of the 2-MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at CENM and validation of the results by comparisons with the experimental, operational, and available final safety analysis report (FSAR) values. The study was prepared in collaboration between the Laboratory of Radiation and Nuclear Systems (ERSN-LMR) from Faculty of Sciences of Tetuan (Morocco) and CENM. The 3-D continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP (version 5) was used to develop a versatile and accurate full model of the TRIGA core. The model represents in detailed all components of the core with literally no physical approximation. Continuous energy cross-section data from the more recent nuclear data evaluations (ENDF/B-VI.8, ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, and JENDL-3.3) as well as S( α, β) thermal neutron scattering functions distributed with the MCNP code were used. The cross-section libraries were generated by using the NJOY99 system updated to its more recent patch file "up259". The consistency and accuracy of both the Monte Carlo simulation and neutron transport physics were established by benchmarking the TRIGA experiments. Core excess reactivity, total and integral control rods worth as well as power peaking factors were used in the validation process. Results of calculations are analysed and discussed.

  16. Comparative analysis among deterministic and stochastic collision damage models for oil tanker and bulk carrier reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Campanile

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of collision damage models on oil tanker and bulk carrier reliability is investigated considering the IACS deterministic model against GOALDS/IMO database statistics for collision events, substantiating the probabilistic model. Statistical properties of hull girder residual strength are determined by Monte Carlo simulation, based on random generation of damage dimensions and a modified form of incremental-iterative method, to account for neutral axis rotation and equilibrium of horizontal bending moment, due to cross-section asymmetry after collision events. Reliability analysis is performed, to investigate the incidence of collision penetration depth and height statistical properties on hull girder sagging/hogging failure probabilities. Besides, the incidence of corrosion on hull girder residual strength and reliability is also discussed, focussing on gross, hull girder net and local net scantlings, respectively. The ISSC double hull oil tanker and single side bulk carrier, assumed as test cases in the ISSC 2012 report, are taken as reference ships.

  17. Monte-Carlo Simulation of Hard Probes in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenke, Bjoern; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Results from the Modular Algorithm for Relativistic Treatment of heavy IoN Interactions (MARTINI) are presented. This comprehensive event generator for the hard and penetrating probes in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions employs a time evolution model for the soft background, PYTHIA 8.1 and the McGill-AMY parton evolution scheme including radiative as well as elastic processes. It generates full event configurations in the high p T region, taking into account thermal QCD and QED effects as well as effects of the evolving medium.

  18. Model unspecific search in CMS. Treatment of insufficient Monte Carlo statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lieb, Jonas; Albert, Andreas; Duchardt, Deborah; Hebbeker, Thomas; Knutzen, Simon; Meyer, Arnd; Pook, Tobias; Roemer, Jonas [III. Physikalisches Institut A, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In 2015, the CMS detector recorded proton-proton collisions at an unprecedented center of mass energy of √(s)=13 TeV. The Model Unspecific Search in CMS (MUSiC) offers an analysis approach of these data which is complementary to dedicated analyses: By taking all produced final states into consideration, MUSiC is sensitive to indicators of new physics appearing in final states that are usually not investigated. In a two step process, MUSiC first classifies events according to their physics content and then searches kinematic distributions for the most significant deviations between Monte Carlo simulations and observed data. Such a general approach introduces its own set of challenges. One of them is the treatment of situations with insufficient Monte Carlo statistics. Complementing introductory presentations on the MUSiC event selection and classification, this talk will present a method of dealing with the issue of low Monte Carlo statistics.

  19. Tracking in full Monte Carlo detector simulations of 500 GeV e+e- collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronan, M.T.

    2000-01-01

    In full Monte Carlo simulation models of future Linear Collider detectors, charged tracks are reconstructed from 3D space points in central tracking detectors. The track reconstruction software is being developed for detailed physics studies that take realistic detector resolution and background modeling into account. At this stage of the analysis, reference tracking efficiency and resolutions for ideal detector conditions are presented. High performance detectors are being designed to carry out precision studies of e + e - annihilation events in the energy range of 500 GeV to 1.5 TeV. Physics processes under study include Higgs mass and branching ratio measurements, measurement of possible manifestations of Supersymmetry (SUSY), precision Electro-Weak (EW) studies and searches for new phenomena beyond their current expectations. The relatively-low background machine environment at future Linear Colliders will allow precise measurements if proper consideration is given to the effects of the backgrounds on these studies. In current North American design studies, full Monte Carlo detector simulation and analysis is being used to allow detector optimization taking into account realistic models of machine backgrounds. In this paper the design of tracking software that is being developed for full detector reconstruction is discussed. In this study, charged tracks are found from simulated space point hits allowing for the straight-forward addition of background hits and for the accounting of missing information. The status of the software development effort is quantified by some reference performance measures, which will be modified by future work to include background effects

  20. Fan Affinity Laws from a Collision Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Shayak

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a fan is usually estimated using hydrodynamical considerations. The calculations are long and involved and the results are expressed in terms of three affinity laws. In this paper we use kinetic theory to attack this problem. A hard sphere collision model is used, and subsequently a correction to account for the flow behaviour…

  1. Heavy ion collision evolution modeling with ECHO-QGP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolando, V.; Inghirami, G.; Beraudo, A.; Del Zanna, L.; Becattini, F.; Chandra, V.; De Pace, A.; Nardi, M.

    2014-11-01

    We present a numerical code modeling the evolution of the medium formed in relativistic heavy ion collisions, ECHO-QGP. The code solves relativistic hydrodynamics in (3 + 1)D, with dissipative terms included within the framework of Israel-Stewart theory; it can work both in Minkowskian and in Bjorken coordinates. Initial conditions are provided through an implementation of the Glauber model (both Optical and Monte Carlo), while freezeout and particle generation are based on the Cooper-Frye prescription. The code is validated against several test problems and shows remarkable stability and accuracy with the combination of a conservative (shock-capturing) approach and the high-order methods employed. In particular it beautifully agrees with the semi-analytic solution known as Gubser flow, both in the ideal and in the viscous Israel-Stewart case, up to very large times and without any ad hoc tuning of the algorithm.

  2. Modeling collisions in circumstellar debris disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvold, Erika

    2015-10-01

    Observations of resolved debris disks show a spectacular variety of features and asymmetries, including inner cavities and gaps, inclined secondary disks or warps, and eccentric, sharp-edged rings. Embedded exoplanets could create many of these features via gravitational perturbations, which sculpt the disk directly and by generating planetesimal collisions. In this thesis, I present the Superparticle Model/Algorithm for Collisions in Kuiper belts and debris disks (SMACK), a new method for simultaneously modeling, in 3-D, the collisional and dynamical evolution of planetesimals in a debris disk with planets. SMACK can simulate azimuthal asymmetries and how these asymmetries evolve over time. I show that SMACK is stable to numerical viscosity and numerical heating over 107 yr, and that it can reproduce analytic models of disk evolution. As an example of the algorithm's capabilities, I use SMACK to model the evolution of a debris ring containing a planet on an eccentric orbit and demonstrate that differential precession creates a spiral structure as the ring evolves, but collisions subsequently break up the spiral, leaving a narrower eccentric ring. To demonstrate SMACK's utility in studying debris disk physics, I apply SMACK to simulate a planet on a circular orbit near a ring of planetesimals that are experiencing destructive collisions. Previous simulations of a planet opening a gap in a collisionless debris disk have found that the width of the gap scales as the planet mass to the 2/7th power (alpha = 2/7). I find that gap sizes in a collisional disk still obey a power law scaling with planet mass, but that the index alpha of the power law depends on the age of the system t relative to the collisional timescale t coll of the disk by alpha = 0.32(t/ tcoll)-0.04, with inferred planet masses up to five times smaller than those predicted by the classical gap law. The increased gap sizes likely stem from the interaction between collisions and the mean motion

  3. A numerical 4D Collision Risk Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Pal; Culloch, Ross; Lieber, Lilian; Kregting, Louise

    2017-04-01

    With the growing number of marine renewable energy (MRE) devices being installed across the world, some concern has been raised about the possibility of harming mobile, marine fauna by collision. Although physical contact between a MRE device and an organism has not been reported to date, these novel sub-sea structures pose a challenge for accurately estimating collision risks as part of environmental impact assessments. Even if the animal motion is simplified to linear translation, ignoring likely evasive behaviour, the mathematical problem of establishing an impact probability is not trivial. We present a numerical algorithm to obtain such probability distributions using transient, four-dimensional simulations of a novel marine renewable device concept, Deep Green, Minesto's power plant and hereafter referred to as the 'kite' that flies in a figure-of-eight configuration. Simulations were carried out altering several configurations including kite depth, kite speed and kite trajectory while keeping the speed of the moving object constant. Since the kite assembly is defined as two parts in the model, a tether (attached to the seabed) and the kite, collision risk of each part is reported independently. By comparing the number of collisions with the number of collision-free simulations, a probability of impact for each simulated position in the cross- section of the area is considered. Results suggest that close to the bottom, where the tether amplitude is small, the path is always blocked and the impact probability is 100% as expected. However, higher up in the water column, the collision probability is twice as high in the mid line, where the tether passes twice per period than at the extremes of its trajectory. The collision probability distribution is much more complex in the upper end of the water column, where the kite and tether can simultaneously collide with the object. Results demonstrate the viability of such models, which can also incorporate empirical

  4. METHES: A Monte Carlo collision code for the simulation of electron transport in low temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabie, M.; Franck, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    We present a freely available MATLAB code for the simulation of electron transport in arbitrary gas mixtures in the presence of uniform electric fields. For steady-state electron transport, the program provides the transport coefficients, reaction rates and the electron energy distribution function. The program uses established Monte Carlo techniques and is compatible with the electron scattering cross section files from the open-access Plasma Data Exchange Project LXCat. The code is written in object-oriented design, allowing the tracing and visualization of the spatiotemporal evolution of electron swarms and the temporal development of the mean energy and the electron number due to attachment and/or ionization processes. We benchmark our code with well-known model gases as well as the real gases argon, N2, O2, CF4, SF6 and mixtures of N2 and O2.

  5. Longitudinal functional principal component modelling via Stochastic Approximation Monte Carlo

    KAUST Repository

    Martinez, Josue G.; Liang, Faming; Zhou, Lan; Carroll, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    model averaging using a Bayesian formulation. A relatively straightforward reversible jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo formulation has poor mixing properties and in simulated data often becomes trapped at the wrong number of principal components. In order

  6. forecasting with nonlinear time series model: a monte-carlo

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PUBLICATIONS1

    Carlo method of forecasting using a special nonlinear time series model, called logistic smooth transition ... We illustrate this new method using some simulation ..... in MATLAB 7.5.0. ... process (DGP) using the logistic smooth transi-.

  7. Firetube model and hadron-hadron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazareth, R.A.M.S.; Kodama, T.; Portes Junior, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    A new version of the fire tube model is developed to describe hadron-hadron collisions at ultrarelativistic energies. Several improvements are introduced in order to include the longitudinal expansion of intermediate fireballs, which remedies the overestimates of the transverse momenta in the previous version. It is found that, within a wide range of incident energies, the model describes well the experimental data for the single particle rapidity distribution, two-body correlations in the pseudo-rapidity, transverse momentum spectra of pions and kaons, the leading particle spectra and the K/π ratio. (author)

  8. Studies of Monte Carlo Modelling of Jets at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Kar, Deepak; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The predictions of different Monte Carlo generators for QCD jet production, both in multijets and for jets produced in association with other objects, are presented. Recent improvements in showering Monte Carlos provide new tools for assessing systematic uncertainties associated with these jets.  Studies of the dependence of physical observables on the choice of shower tune parameters and new prescriptions for assessing systematic uncertainties associated with the choice of shower model and tune are presented.

  9. Monte Carlo modelling for neutron guide losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cser, L.; Rosta, L.; Toeroek, Gy.

    1989-09-01

    In modern research reactors, neutron guides are commonly used for beam conducting. The neutron guide is a well polished or equivalently smooth glass tube covered inside by sputtered or evaporated film of natural Ni or 58 Ni isotope where the neutrons are totally reflected. A Monte Carlo calculation was carried out to establish the real efficiency and the spectral as well as spatial distribution of the neutron beam at the end of a glass mirror guide. The losses caused by mechanical inaccuracy and mirror quality were considered and the effects due to the geometrical arrangement were analyzed. (author) 2 refs.; 2 figs

  10. Microscopic model of nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, B.G.

    1986-04-01

    The collision of two nuclei is treated as a collection of collisions between the nucleons of the projectile and those of the target nucleus. The primary projectile fragments contain only those nucleons that did not undergo a collision. The inclusive and coincidence cross sections result from the decay of the excited primary fragments. 15 refs., 5 figs

  11. Large solid angle tracking of Monte Carlo events of heavy ion collisions in TPC magnetic spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindenbaum, S.J.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.; Asoka-Kumar, P.P.V.; Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The BNL/CCNY collaboration has for some time had as its goal the development and use of ≅ 4π solid angle magnetic spectrometer tracking of charged particles produced in heavy ion collision experiments at AGS, and eventually RHIC. (orig./HSI)

  12. Aspects of perturbative QCD in Monte Carlo shower models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschalk, T.D.

    1986-01-01

    The perturbative QCD content of Monte Carlo models for high energy hadron-hadron scattering is examined. Particular attention is given to the recently developed backwards evolution formalism for initial state parton showers, and the merging of parton shower evolution with hard scattering cross sections. Shower estimates of K-factors are discussed, and a simple scheme is presented for incorporating 2 → QCD cross sections into shower model calculations without double counting. Additional issues in the development of hard scattering Monte Carlo models are summarized. 69 references, 20 figures

  13. Automatic modeling for the Monte Carlo transport code Geant4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie Fanzhi; Hu Liqin; Wang Guozhong; Wang Dianxi; Wu Yican; Wang Dong; Long Pengcheng; FDS Team

    2015-01-01

    Geant4 is a widely used Monte Carlo transport simulation package. Its geometry models could be described in Geometry Description Markup Language (GDML), but it is time-consuming and error-prone to describe the geometry models manually. This study implemented the conversion between computer-aided design (CAD) geometry models and GDML models. This method has been Studied based on Multi-Physics Coupling Analysis Modeling Program (MCAM). The tests, including FDS-Ⅱ model, demonstrated its accuracy and feasibility. (authors)

  14. Monte Carlo event generators in atomic collisions: A new tool to tackle the few-body dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciappina, M. F.; Kirchner, T.; Schulz, M.

    2010-04-01

    We present a set of routines to produce theoretical event files, for both single and double ionization of atoms by ion impact, based on a Monte Carlo event generator (MCEG) scheme. Such event files are the theoretical counterpart of the data obtained from a kinematically complete experiment; i.e. they contain the momentum components of all collision fragments for a large number of ionization events. Among the advantages of working with theoretical event files is the possibility to incorporate the conditions present in a real experiment, such as the uncertainties in the measured quantities. Additionally, by manipulating them it is possible to generate any type of cross sections, specially those that are usually too complicated to compute with conventional methods due to a lack of symmetry. Consequently, the numerical effort of such calculations is dramatically reduced. We show examples for both single and double ionization, with special emphasis on a new data analysis tool, called four-body Dalitz plots, developed very recently. Program summaryProgram title: MCEG Catalogue identifier: AEFV_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFV_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2695 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 18 501 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77 with parallelization directives using scripting Computer: Single machines using Linux and Linux servers/clusters (with cores with any clock speed, cache memory and bits in a word) Operating system: Linux (any version and flavor) and FORTRAN 77 compilers Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes RAM: 64-128 kBytes (the codes are very cpu intensive) Classification: 2.6 Nature of problem: The code deals with single and double

  15. Monte Carlo simulation models of breeding-population advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.N. King; G.R. Johnson

    1993-01-01

    Five generations of population improvement were modeled using Monte Carlo simulations. The model was designed to address questions that are important to the development of an advanced generation breeding population. Specifically we addressed the effects on both gain and effective population size of different mating schemes when creating a recombinant population for...

  16. A fully-implicit Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collision code for the simulation of inductively coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, S.; Nishida, K.; Onai, M.; Lettry, J.; Tran, M. Q.; Hatayama, A.

    2017-12-01

    We present a fully-implicit electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo collision code, called NINJA, written for the simulation of inductively coupled plasmas. NINJA employs a kinetic enslaved Jacobian-Free Newton Krylov method to solve self-consistently the interaction between the electromagnetic field generated by the radio-frequency coil and the plasma response. The simulated plasma includes a kinetic description of charged and neutral species as well as the collision processes between them. The algorithm allows simulations with cell sizes much larger than the Debye length and time steps in excess of the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition whilst preserving the conservation of the total energy. The code is applied to the simulation of the plasma discharge of the Linac4 H- ion source at CERN. Simulation results of plasma density, temperature and EEDF are discussed and compared with optical emission spectroscopy measurements. A systematic study of the energy conservation as a function of the numerical parameters is presented.

  17. A classical statistical model of heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.; Teichert, J.

    1980-01-01

    The use of the computer code TRAJEC which represents the numerical realization of a classical statistical model for heavy ion collisions is described. The code calculates the results of a classical friction model as well as various multi-differential cross sections for heavy ion collisions. INPUT and OUTPUT information of the code are described. Two examples of data sets are given [ru

  18. Towards a Revised Monte Carlo Neutral Particle Surface Interaction Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stotler, D.P.

    2005-01-01

    The components of the neutral- and plasma-surface interaction model used in the Monte Carlo neutral transport code DEGAS 2 are reviewed. The idealized surfaces and processes handled by that model are inadequate for accurately simulating neutral transport behavior in present day and future fusion devices. We identify some of the physical processes missing from the model, such as mixed materials and implanted hydrogen, and make some suggestions for improving the model

  19. Comparison of models of high energy nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyulassy, M.

    1978-01-01

    The treatment of high energy nuclear reaction models covers goals of such collisions, the choice of theoretical framework, the zoo of models (p inclusive), light composites, models versus experiment, conclusions drawn, needed experiments, and pion production. 30 diagrams

  20. Calibration and Monte Carlo modelling of neutron long counters

    CERN Document Server

    Tagziria, H

    2000-01-01

    The Monte Carlo technique has become a very powerful tool in radiation transport as full advantage is taken of enhanced cross-section data, more powerful computers and statistical techniques, together with better characterisation of neutron and photon source spectra. At the National Physical Laboratory, calculations using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP-4B have been combined with accurate measurements to characterise two long counters routinely used to standardise monoenergetic neutron fields. New and more accurate response function curves have been produced for both long counters. A novel approach using Monte Carlo methods has been developed, validated and used to model the response function of the counters and determine more accurately their effective centres, which have always been difficult to establish experimentally. Calculations and measurements agree well, especially for the De Pangher long counter for which details of the design and constructional material are well known. The sensitivit...

  1. Profit Forecast Model Using Monte Carlo Simulation in Excel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petru BALOGH

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Profit forecast is very important for any company. The purpose of this study is to provide a method to estimate the profit and the probability of obtaining the expected profit. Monte Carlo methods are stochastic techniques–meaning they are based on the use of random numbers and probability statistics to investigate problems. Monte Carlo simulation furnishes the decision-maker with a range of possible outcomes and the probabilities they will occur for any choice of action. Our example of Monte Carlo simulation in Excel will be a simplified profit forecast model. Each step of the analysis will be described in detail. The input data for the case presented: the number of leads per month, the percentage of leads that result in sales, , the cost of a single lead, the profit per sale and fixed cost, allow obtaining profit and associated probabilities of achieving.

  2. Monte Carlo investigation of the one-dimensional Potts model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karma, A.S.; Nolan, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    Monte Carlo results are presented for a variety of one-dimensional dynamical q-state Potts models. Our calculations confirm the expected universal value z = 2 for the dynamic scaling exponent. Our results also indicate that an increase in q at fixed correlation length drives the dynamics into the scaling regime

  3. A novel Monte Carlo approach to hybrid local volatility models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.W. van der Stoep (Anton); L.A. Grzelak (Lech Aleksander); C.W. Oosterlee (Cornelis)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractWe present in a Monte Carlo simulation framework, a novel approach for the evaluation of hybrid local volatility [Risk, 1994, 7, 18–20], [Int. J. Theor. Appl. Finance, 1998, 1, 61–110] models. In particular, we consider the stochastic local volatility model—see e.g. Lipton et al. [Quant.

  4. Yet another Monte Carlo study of the Schwinger model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sogo, K.; Kimura, N.

    1986-01-01

    Some methodological improvements are introduced in the quantum Monte Carlo simulation of the 1 + 1 dimensional quantum electrodynamics (the Schwinger model). Properties at finite temperatures are investigated, concentrating on the existence of the chirality transition and of the deconfinement transition. (author)

  5. Reservoir Modeling Combining Geostatistics with Markov Chain Monte Carlo Inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zunino, Andrea; Lange, Katrine; Melnikova, Yulia

    2014-01-01

    We present a study on the inversion of seismic reflection data generated from a synthetic reservoir model. Our aim is to invert directly for rock facies and porosity of the target reservoir zone. We solve this inverse problem using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (McMC) method to handle the nonlinear...

  6. Yet another Monte Carlo study of the Schwinger model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sogo, K.; Kimura, N.

    1986-03-01

    Some methodological improvements are introduced in the quantum Monte Carlo simulation of the 1 + 1 dimensional quantum electrodynamics (the Schwinger model). Properties at finite temperatures are investigated, concentrating on the existence of the chirality transition and of the deconfinement transition. (author)

  7. Monte Carlo calculation of collisions of directionally-incident electrons on highly excited hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Kazuki; Fujimoto, Takasi

    2001-01-01

    We treat classically the n-, l- and m r -changing transitions and ionization. Excitation cross sections against the final state energy continue smoothly to the 'ionization cross sections'. The steady state populations determined by elastic collisions among the degenerate states in the same n level show higher populations in the m 1 =0 states, suggesting positive polarizations of Lyman lines emitted from plasmas having directional electrons. For ionization, the two outgoing electrons have large relative angles, suggesting reduced three body recombination rates for these plasmas. (author)

  8. Automatic modeling for the monte carlo transport TRIPOLI code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Junjun; Zeng Qin; Wu Yican; Wang Guozhong; FDS Team

    2010-01-01

    TRIPOLI, developed by CEA, France, is Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code. It has been widely applied to nuclear physics, shielding design, evaluation of nuclear safety. However, it is time-consuming and error-prone to manually describe the TRIPOLI input file. This paper implemented bi-directional conversion between CAD model and TRIPOLI model. Its feasibility and efficiency have been demonstrated by several benchmarking examples. (authors)

  9. Strangeness production in hadronic and nuclear collisions in the dual parton model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capella, A.; Tran Thanh Van, J.; Ranft, J.

    1993-01-01

    Λ, antiΛ and K s 0 production is studied in a Monte Carlo Dual Parton model for hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions with a SU(3) symmetric sea for chain formation (chain ends) but strangeness suppression in the chain fragmentation. Additionally, (qq)-(antiqantiq) production from the sea was introduced into the chain formation process with the same probability as for the q → qq branching within the chain decay process. This together with the popcorn mechanism of diquark fragmentation result in a new central component of hyperon production, which was not present in previous versions of the model. With these assumptions rapidity distributions and multiplicity ratios for strange particles in hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions are compared to a comprehensive collection of experimental data. 5 figs., 2 tabs., 15 refs

  10. Models of high energy nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1978-06-01

    The discussion covers nuclear collisions at relativistic energies including classes of high energy nucleus--nucleus collisions, and the kinetics of a central collision; and the asymptotic hadron spectrum including known and unknown hadrons, the relevance of the spectrum and the means of its study, thermodynamics of hadronic matter, examples of hadronic spectra, the temperature, composition of the initial fireball and its expansion, isoergic expansion with no pre-freezeout radiation, isentropic expansion of the fireball, the quasi-dynamical expansion, and finally antinuclei, hypernuclei, and the quark phase. 28 references

  11. Elementary Statistical Models for Vector Collision-Sequence Interference Effects with Poisson-Distributed Collision Times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    In a recent paper (Lewis, 2008) a class of models suitable for application to collision-sequence interference was introduced. In these models velocities are assumed to be completely randomized in each collision. The distribution of velocities was assumed to be Gaussian. The integrated induced dipole moment μk, for vector interference, or the scalar modulation μk, for scalar interference, was assumed to be a function of the impulse (integrated force) fk, or its magnitude fk, experienced by the molecule in a collision. For most of (Lewis, 2008) it was assumed that μk fk and μk fk, but it proved to be possible to extend the models, so that the magnitude of the induced dipole moment is equal to an arbitrary power or sum of powers of the intermolecular force. This allows estimates of the in filling of the interference dip by the dis proportionality of the induced dipole moment and force. One particular such model, using data from (Herman and Lewis, 2006), leads to the most realistic estimate for the in filling of the vector interference dip yet obtained. In (Lewis, 2008) the drastic assumption was made that collision times occurred at equal intervals. In the present paper that assumption is removed: the collision times are taken to form a Poisson process. This is much more realistic than the equal-intervals assumption. The interference dip is found to be a Lorentzian in this model

  12. Monte Carlo Euler approximations of HJM term structure financial models

    KAUST Repository

    Björk, Tomas

    2012-11-22

    We present Monte Carlo-Euler methods for a weak approximation problem related to the Heath-Jarrow-Morton (HJM) term structure model, based on Itô stochastic differential equations in infinite dimensional spaces, and prove strong and weak error convergence estimates. The weak error estimates are based on stochastic flows and discrete dual backward problems, and they can be used to identify different error contributions arising from time and maturity discretization as well as the classical statistical error due to finite sampling. Explicit formulas for efficient computation of sharp error approximation are included. Due to the structure of the HJM models considered here, the computational effort devoted to the error estimates is low compared to the work to compute Monte Carlo solutions to the HJM model. Numerical examples with known exact solution are included in order to show the behavior of the estimates. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  13. Monte Carlo Euler approximations of HJM term structure financial models

    KAUST Repository

    Bjö rk, Tomas; Szepessy, Anders; Tempone, Raul; Zouraris, Georgios E.

    2012-01-01

    We present Monte Carlo-Euler methods for a weak approximation problem related to the Heath-Jarrow-Morton (HJM) term structure model, based on Itô stochastic differential equations in infinite dimensional spaces, and prove strong and weak error convergence estimates. The weak error estimates are based on stochastic flows and discrete dual backward problems, and they can be used to identify different error contributions arising from time and maturity discretization as well as the classical statistical error due to finite sampling. Explicit formulas for efficient computation of sharp error approximation are included. Due to the structure of the HJM models considered here, the computational effort devoted to the error estimates is low compared to the work to compute Monte Carlo solutions to the HJM model. Numerical examples with known exact solution are included in order to show the behavior of the estimates. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  14. Monte-Carlo simulations on the antineutrino detection in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zude, E.

    1991-09-01

    Aim of the present thesis was to study, how far a large-area neutron detector with high efficiency operated at the Corporation for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt can also by applied for experiments on the sub-threshold antineutron production in heavy ion reactions for the study of the equation of state of highly excited nuclear matter. The experimental part consisted in the partition at the construction, the taking into operation, and the calibration measurements of the target-detector system, as well at the experiments with the LAND detector for the study of the Coulomb excitation of 136 Xe projectiles in the reaction 136 Xe+ 208 Pb at 700 respectively 800 MeV/u. Studies on the suppression of neutron events against antineutron events in the data acquisition in a typical SIS/LAND experiment on the antineutron production in heavy ion collisions were performed. The possibilities available on the level of the hardware trigger for the suppression of (multiple) neutron events were studied. Thereby resulted a reachable suppression factor of ≅ 10 -3 . Studies on the off-line analysis of antineutron events exhibited problems, which base on the high matter density in the detector. (orig./HSI) [de

  15. Strangeness production in hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions in the dual parton model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehring, H.; Ranft, J.; Capella, A.; Tran Thanh Van, J.

    1993-01-01

    Λ, bar Λ, and K S 0 production is studied in a Monte Carlo dual parton model for hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions with an SU(3) symmetric sea for chain formation (chain ends) but strangeness suppression in the chain fragmentation process. Additionally, (qq)-(bar q bar q) production from the sea was introduced into the chain formation process with the same probability as for the q→qq branching within the chain decay process. With these assumptions, multiplicity ratios and Feynman-x distributions for strange particles in h-h and multiplicity ratios in heavy ion collisions are reasonably well reproduced

  16. Modelling of the Internal Mechanics in Ship Collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paik, Jeom Kee; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    A method for analysis of the structural damage due to ship collisions is developed. The method is based on the idealized structural unit method (ISUM). Longitudinal/transverse webs which connect the outer and the inner hulls are modelled by rectangular plate units. The responses are determined...... on the stiffness and the strength is considered as well. In order to include the coupling effects between local and global failure of the structure, the usual non-linear finite-element technique is applied. In order to deal with the gap and contact conditions between the striking and the struck ships, gap......-skin plated structures in collision/grounding situations with the present solutions. As an illustrative example the procedure has been used for analyses of a side collision of a double-hull tanker. Several factors affecting ship collision response, namely the collision speed and the scantlings/ arrangements...

  17. Modeling and simulation of cars in frontal collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deac, S. C.; Perescu, A.; Simoiu, D.; Nyaguly, E.; Crâştiu, I.; Bereteu, L.

    2018-01-01

    Protection of cars, mainly drivers and passengers in a collision are very important issues worldwide. Statistics given by “World Health Organization” are alarming rate of increase in the number of road accidents, most claiming with serious injury, human and material loss. For these reasons has been a continuous development of protection systems, especially car causing three quarters of all accidents. Mathematical modeling and simulation of a car behavior during a frontal collision leads to new solutions in the development of protective systems. This paper presents several structural models of a vehicle during a frontal collision and its behavior is analyzed by numerical simulation using Simulink.

  18. Monte Carlo Modelling of Mammograms : Development and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spyrou, G; Panayiotakis, G [Univercity of Patras, School of Medicine, Medical Physics Department, 265 00 Patras (Greece); Bakas, A [Technological Educational Institution of Athens, Department of Radiography, 122 10 Athens (Greece); Tzanakos, G [University of Athens, Department of Physics, Divission of Nuclear and Particle Physics, 157 71 Athens (Greece)

    1999-12-31

    A software package using Monte Carlo methods has been developed for the simulation of x-ray mammography. A simplified geometry of the mammographic apparatus has been considered along with the software phantom of compressed breast. This phantom may contain inhomogeneities of various compositions and sizes at any point. Using this model one can produce simulated mammograms. Results that demonstrate the validity of this simulation are presented. (authors) 16 refs, 4 figs

  19. GPU based Monte Carlo for PET image reconstruction: detector modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Légrády; Cserkaszky, Á; Lantos, J.; Patay, G.; Bükki, T.

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) calculations and Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) are almost like the dedicated hardware designed for the specific task given the similarities between visible light transport and neutral particle trajectories. A GPU based MC gamma transport code has been developed for Positron Emission Tomography iterative image reconstruction calculating the projection from unknowns to data at each iteration step taking into account the full physics of the system. This paper describes the simplified scintillation detector modeling and its effect on convergence. (author)

  20. Monte Carlo Modelling of Mammograms : Development and Validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spyrou, G.; Panayiotakis, G.; Bakas, A.; Tzanakos, G.

    1998-01-01

    A software package using Monte Carlo methods has been developed for the simulation of x-ray mammography. A simplified geometry of the mammographic apparatus has been considered along with the software phantom of compressed breast. This phantom may contain inhomogeneities of various compositions and sizes at any point. Using this model one can produce simulated mammograms. Results that demonstrate the validity of this simulation are presented. (authors)

  1. Some remarks on the statistical model of heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, V.

    2003-01-01

    This contribution is an attempt to assess what can be learned from the remarkable success of this statistical model in describing ratios of particle abundances in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions

  2. Toy model for pion production in nucleon-nucleon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanhart, C.; Miller, G. A.; Myhrer, F.; Sato, T.; Kolck, U. van

    2001-01-01

    We develop a toy model for pion production in nucleon-nucleon collisions that reproduces some of the features of the chiral Lagrangian calculations. We calculate the production amplitude and examine some common approximations

  3. Modelling of a collision between two smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, V. L. B.; Sasaki, D. G. G.

    2016-09-01

    In the predominant approach in physics textbooks, the collision between particles is treated as a black box, where no physical quantity can be measured. This approach becomes even more evident in experimental classes where collisions are the simplest and most common way of applying the theorem of conservation of linear momentum in the asymptotic behavior. In this paper we develop and analyse an experiment on collisions using only two smartphones. The experimental setup is amazingly simple; the two devices are aligned on a horizontal table of lacquered wood, in order to slide more easily. At the edge of one of them a piece of common sponge is glued using double-sided tape. By using a free smartphone application, the values generated by the accelerometer of the two devices in full motion are measured and tabulated. Through numerical iteration, the speed graphs of the smartphones before, during, and after the collision are obtained. The main conclusions were: (i) the demonstration of the feasibility of using smartphones as an alternative to air tracks and electronic sensors employed in a teaching lab, (ii) the possibility of investigating the collision itself, its characteristics and effects; this is the great advantage of the use of smartphones over traditional experiments, (iii) the compatibility of the results with the impulse-momentum theorem, within the margin of uncertainty.

  4. Quantum Monte Carlo Simulation of Frustrated Kondo Lattice Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Toshihiro; Assaad, Fakher F.; Grover, Tarun

    2018-03-01

    The absence of the negative sign problem in quantum Monte Carlo simulations of spin and fermion systems has different origins. World-line based algorithms for spins require positivity of matrix elements whereas auxiliary field approaches for fermions depend on symmetries such as particle-hole symmetry. For negative-sign-free spin and fermionic systems, we show that one can formulate a negative-sign-free auxiliary field quantum Monte Carlo algorithm that allows Kondo coupling of fermions with the spins. Using this general approach, we study a half-filled Kondo lattice model on the honeycomb lattice with geometric frustration. In addition to the conventional Kondo insulator and antiferromagnetically ordered phases, we find a partial Kondo screened state where spins are selectively screened so as to alleviate frustration, and the lattice rotation symmetry is broken nematically.

  5. Monte Carlo Numerical Models for Nuclear Logging Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusheng Li

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear logging is one of most important logging services provided by many oil service companies. The main parameters of interest are formation porosity, bulk density, and natural radiation. Other services are also provided from using complex nuclear logging tools, such as formation lithology/mineralogy, etc. Some parameters can be measured by using neutron logging tools and some can only be measured by using a gamma ray tool. To understand the response of nuclear logging tools, the neutron transport/diffusion theory and photon diffusion theory are needed. Unfortunately, for most cases there are no analytical answers if complex tool geometry is involved. For many years, Monte Carlo numerical models have been used by nuclear scientists in the well logging industry to address these challenges. The models have been widely employed in the optimization of nuclear logging tool design, and the development of interpretation methods for nuclear logs. They have also been used to predict the response of nuclear logging systems for forward simulation problems. In this case, the system parameters including geometry, materials and nuclear sources, etc., are pre-defined and the transportation and interactions of nuclear particles (such as neutrons, photons and/or electrons in the regions of interest are simulated according to detailed nuclear physics theory and their nuclear cross-section data (probability of interacting. Then the deposited energies of particles entering the detectors are recorded and tallied and the tool responses to such a scenario are generated. A general-purpose code named Monte Carlo N– Particle (MCNP has been the industry-standard for some time. In this paper, we briefly introduce the fundamental principles of Monte Carlo numerical modeling and review the physics of MCNP. Some of the latest developments of Monte Carlo Models are also reviewed. A variety of examples are presented to illustrate the uses of Monte Carlo numerical models

  6. APPLICATION OF BAYESIAN MONTE CARLO ANALYSIS TO A LAGRANGIAN PHOTOCHEMICAL AIR QUALITY MODEL. (R824792)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uncertainties in ozone concentrations predicted with a Lagrangian photochemical air quality model have been estimated using Bayesian Monte Carlo (BMC) analysis. Bayesian Monte Carlo analysis provides a means of combining subjective "prior" uncertainty estimates developed ...

  7. Monte Carlo modeling of human tooth optical coherence tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Boya; Meng, Zhuo; Wang, Longzhi; Liu, Tiegen

    2013-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo model for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of human tooth. The model is implemented by combining the simulation of a Gaussian beam with simulation for photon propagation in a two-layer human tooth model with non-parallel surfaces through a Monte Carlo method. The geometry and the optical parameters of the human tooth model are chosen on the basis of the experimental OCT images. The results show that the simulated OCT images are qualitatively consistent with the experimental ones. Using the model, we demonstrate the following: firstly, two types of photons contribute to the information of morphological features and noise in the OCT image of a human tooth, respectively. Secondly, the critical imaging depth of the tooth model is obtained, and it is found to decrease significantly with increasing mineral loss, simulated as different enamel scattering coefficients. Finally, the best focus position is located below and close to the dental surface by analysis of the effect of focus positions on the OCT signal and critical imaging depth. We anticipate that this modeling will become a powerful and accurate tool for a preliminary numerical study of the OCT technique on diseases of dental hard tissue in human teeth. (paper)

  8. Avian collision risk models for wind energy impact assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masden, E.A., E-mail: elizabeth.masden@uhi.ac.uk [Environmental Research Institute, North Highland College-UHI, University of the Highlands and Islands, Ormlie Road, Thurso, Caithness KW14 7EE (United Kingdom); Cook, A.S.C.P. [British Trust for Ornithology, The Nunnery, Thetford IP24 2PU (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-15

    With the increasing global development of wind energy, collision risk models (CRMs) are routinely used to assess the potential impacts of wind turbines on birds. We reviewed and compared the avian collision risk models currently available in the scientific literature, exploring aspects such as the calculation of a collision probability, inclusion of stationary components e.g. the tower, angle of approach and uncertainty. 10 models were cited in the literature and of these, all included a probability of collision of a single bird colliding with a wind turbine during passage through the rotor swept area, and the majority included a measure of the number of birds at risk. 7 out of the 10 models calculated the probability of birds colliding, whilst the remainder used a constant. We identified four approaches to calculate the probability of collision and these were used by others. 6 of the 10 models were deterministic and included the most frequently used models in the UK, with only 4 including variation or uncertainty in some way, the most recent using Bayesian methods. Despite their appeal, CRMs have their limitations and can be ‘data hungry’ as well as assuming much about bird movement and behaviour. As data become available, these assumptions should be tested to ensure that CRMs are functioning to adequately answer the questions posed by the wind energy sector. - Highlights: • We highlighted ten models available to assess avian collision risk. • Only 4 of the models included variability or uncertainty. • Collision risk models have limitations and can be ‘data hungry’. • It is vital that the most appropriate model is used for a given task.

  9. Avian collision risk models for wind energy impact assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masden, E.A.; Cook, A.S.C.P.

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing global development of wind energy, collision risk models (CRMs) are routinely used to assess the potential impacts of wind turbines on birds. We reviewed and compared the avian collision risk models currently available in the scientific literature, exploring aspects such as the calculation of a collision probability, inclusion of stationary components e.g. the tower, angle of approach and uncertainty. 10 models were cited in the literature and of these, all included a probability of collision of a single bird colliding with a wind turbine during passage through the rotor swept area, and the majority included a measure of the number of birds at risk. 7 out of the 10 models calculated the probability of birds colliding, whilst the remainder used a constant. We identified four approaches to calculate the probability of collision and these were used by others. 6 of the 10 models were deterministic and included the most frequently used models in the UK, with only 4 including variation or uncertainty in some way, the most recent using Bayesian methods. Despite their appeal, CRMs have their limitations and can be ‘data hungry’ as well as assuming much about bird movement and behaviour. As data become available, these assumptions should be tested to ensure that CRMs are functioning to adequately answer the questions posed by the wind energy sector. - Highlights: • We highlighted ten models available to assess avian collision risk. • Only 4 of the models included variability or uncertainty. • Collision risk models have limitations and can be ‘data hungry’. • It is vital that the most appropriate model is used for a given task.

  10. Skin fluorescence model based on the Monte Carlo technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churmakov, Dmitry Y.; Meglinski, Igor V.; Piletsky, Sergey A.; Greenhalgh, Douglas A.

    2003-10-01

    The novel Monte Carlo technique of simulation of spatial fluorescence distribution within the human skin is presented. The computational model of skin takes into account spatial distribution of fluorophores following the collagen fibers packing, whereas in epidermis and stratum corneum the distribution of fluorophores assumed to be homogeneous. The results of simulation suggest that distribution of auto-fluorescence is significantly suppressed in the NIR spectral region, while fluorescence of sensor layer embedded in epidermis is localized at the adjusted depth. The model is also able to simulate the skin fluorescence spectra.

  11. A monte carlo simulation model for the steady-state plasma in the scrape-off layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W.X.; Okamoto, M.; Nakajima, N.; Murakami, S.; Ohyabu, N.

    1995-12-01

    A new Monte Carlo simulation model for the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma is proposed to investigate a feasibility of so-called 'high temperature divertor operation'. In the model, Coulomb collision effect is accurately described by a nonlinear Monte Carlo collision operator; a conductive heat flux into the SOL is effectively modelled via randomly exchanging the source particles and SOL particles; secondary electrons are included. The steady state of the SOL plasma, which satisfies particle and energy balances and the neutrality constraint, is determined in terms of total particle and heat fluxes across the separatrix, the edge plasma temperature, the secondary electron emission rate, and the SOL size. The model gives gross features of the SOL such as plasma temperatures and densities, the total sheath potential drop, and the sheath energy transmission factor. The simulations are performed for collisional SOL plasma to confirm the validity of the proposed model. It is found that the potential drop and the electron energy transmission factor are in close agreement with theoretical predictions. The present model can provide primarily useful information for collisionless SOL plasma which is difficult to be understood analytically. (author)

  12. Characterization of an Ar/O2 magnetron plasma by a multi-species Monte Carlo model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bultinck, E; Bogaerts, A

    2011-01-01

    A combined Monte Carlo (MC)/analytical surface model is developed to study the plasma processes occurring during the reactive sputter deposition of TiO x thin films. This model describes the important plasma species with a MC approach (i.e. electrons, Ar + ions, O 2 + ions, fast Ar atoms and sputtered Ti atoms). The deposition of the TiO x film is treated by an analytical surface model. The implementation of our so-called multi-species MC model is presented, and some typical calculation results are shown, such as densities, fluxes, energies and collision rates. The advantages and disadvantages of the multi-species MC model are illustrated by a comparison with a particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collisions (PIC/MCC) model. Disadvantages include the fact that certain input values and assumptions are needed. However, when these are accounted for, the results are in good agreement with the PIC/MCC simulations, and the calculation time has drastically decreased, which enables us to simulate large and complicated reactor geometries. To illustrate this, the effect of larger target-substrate distances on the film properties is investigated. It is shown that a stoichiometric film is deposited at all investigated target-substrate distances (24, 40, 60 and 80 mm). Moreover, a larger target-substrate distance promotes film uniformity, but the deposition rate is much lower.

  13. Conditional Monte Carlo randomization tests for regression models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhat, Parwen; Rosenberger, William F; Diao, Guoqing

    2014-08-15

    We discuss the computation of randomization tests for clinical trials of two treatments when the primary outcome is based on a regression model. We begin by revisiting the seminal paper of Gail, Tan, and Piantadosi (1988), and then describe a method based on Monte Carlo generation of randomization sequences. The tests based on this Monte Carlo procedure are design based, in that they incorporate the particular randomization procedure used. We discuss permuted block designs, complete randomization, and biased coin designs. We also use a new technique by Plamadeala and Rosenberger (2012) for simple computation of conditional randomization tests. Like Gail, Tan, and Piantadosi, we focus on residuals from generalized linear models and martingale residuals from survival models. Such techniques do not apply to longitudinal data analysis, and we introduce a method for computation of randomization tests based on the predicted rate of change from a generalized linear mixed model when outcomes are longitudinal. We show, by simulation, that these randomization tests preserve the size and power well under model misspecification. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Development of self-learning Monte Carlo technique for more efficient modeling of nuclear logging measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zazula, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The self-learning Monte Carlo technique has been implemented to the commonly used general purpose neutron transport code MORSE, in order to enhance sampling of the particle histories that contribute to a detector response. The parameters of all the biasing techniques available in MORSE, i.e. of splitting, Russian roulette, source and collision outgoing energy importance sampling, path length transformation and additional biasing of the source angular distribution are optimized. The learning process is iteratively performed after each batch of particles, by retrieving the data concerning the subset of histories that passed the detector region and energy range in the previous batches. This procedure has been tested on two sample problems in nuclear geophysics, where an unoptimized Monte Carlo calculation is particularly inefficient. The results are encouraging, although the presented method does not directly minimize the variance and the convergence of our algorithm is restricted by the statistics of successful histories from previous random walk. Further applications for modeling of the nuclear logging measurements seem to be promising. 11 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs. (author)

  15. Binary collisions in popovici’s photogravitational model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mioc V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of bodies under the combined action of the gravitational attraction and the radiative repelling force has large and deep implications in astronomy. In the 1920s, the Romanian astronomer Constantin Popovici proposed a modified photogravitational law (considered by other scientists too. This paper deals with the collisions of the two-body problem associated with Popovici’s model. Resorting to McGehee-type transformations of the second kind, we obtain regular equations of motion and define the collision manifold. The flow on this boundary manifold is wholly described. This allows to point out some important qualitative features of the collisional motion: existence of the black-hole effect, gradientlikeness of the flow on the collision manifold, regularizability of collisions under certain conditions. Some questions, coming from the comparison of Levi-Civita’s regularizing transformations and McGehee’s ones, are formulated.

  16. Vectorized Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, F.B.

    1981-01-01

    Examination of the global algorithms and local kernels of conventional general-purpose Monte Carlo codes shows that multigroup Monte Carlo methods have sufficient structure to permit efficient vectorization. A structured multigroup Monte Carlo algorithm for vector computers is developed in which many particle events are treated at once on a cell-by-cell basis. Vectorization of kernels for tracking and variance reduction is described, and a new method for discrete sampling is developed to facilitate the vectorization of collision analysis. To demonstrate the potential of the new method, a vectorized Monte Carlo code for multigroup radiation transport analysis was developed. This code incorporates many features of conventional general-purpose production codes, including general geometry, splitting and Russian roulette, survival biasing, variance estimation via batching, a number of cutoffs, and generalized tallies of collision, tracklength, and surface crossing estimators with response functions. Predictions of vectorized performance characteristics for the CYBER-205 were made using emulated coding and a dynamic model of vector instruction timing. Computation rates were examined for a variety of test problems to determine sensitivities to batch size and vector lengths. Significant speedups are predicted for even a few hundred particles per batch, and asymptotic speedups by about 40 over equivalent Amdahl 470V/8 scalar codes arepredicted for a few thousand particles per batch. The principal conclusion is that vectorization of a general-purpose multigroup Monte Carlo code is well worth the significant effort required for stylized coding and major algorithmic changes

  17. Monte Carlo technique for very large ising models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalle, C.; Winkelmann, V.

    1982-08-01

    Rebbi's multispin coding technique is improved and applied to the kinetic Ising model with size 600*600*600. We give the central part of our computer program (for a CDC Cyber 76), which will be helpful also in a simulation of smaller systems, and describe the other tricks necessary to go to large lattices. The magnetization M at T=1.4* T c is found to decay asymptotically as exp(-t/2.90) if t is measured in Monte Carlo steps per spin, and M( t = 0) = 1 initially.

  18. Novel extrapolation method in the Monte Carlo shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Noritaka; Abe, Takashi; Utsuno, Yutaka; Mizusaki, Takahiro; Otsuka, Takaharu; Honma, Michio

    2010-01-01

    We propose an extrapolation method utilizing energy variance in the Monte Carlo shell model to estimate the energy eigenvalue and observables accurately. We derive a formula for the energy variance with deformed Slater determinants, which enables us to calculate the energy variance efficiently. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated for the full pf-shell calculation of 56 Ni, and the applicability of the method to a system beyond the current limit of exact diagonalization is shown for the pf+g 9/2 -shell calculation of 64 Ge.

  19. Shell-model Monte Carlo studies of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    The pair content and structure of nuclei near N = Z are described in the frwnework of shell-model Monte Carlo (SMMC) calculations. Results include the enhancement of J=0 T=1 proton-neutron pairing at N=Z nuclei, and the maxked difference of thermal properties between even-even and odd-odd N=Z nuclei. Additionally, a study of the rotational properties of the T=1 (ground state), and T=0 band mixing seen in 74 Rb is presented

  20. A Monte Carlo-based model for simulation of digital chest tomo-synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullman, G.; Dance, D. R.; Sandborg, M.; Carlsson, G. A.; Svalkvist, A.; Baath, M.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to calculate synthetic digital chest tomo-synthesis projections using a computer simulation model based on the Monte Carlo method. An anthropomorphic chest phantom was scanned in a computed tomography scanner, segmented and included in the computer model to allow for simulation of realistic high-resolution X-ray images. The input parameters to the model were adapted to correspond to the VolumeRAD chest tomo-synthesis system from GE Healthcare. Sixty tomo-synthesis projections were calculated with projection angles ranging from + 15 to -15 deg. The images from primary photons were calculated using an analytical model of the anti-scatter grid and a pre-calculated detector response function. The contributions from scattered photons were calculated using an in-house Monte Carlo-based model employing a number of variance reduction techniques such as the collision density estimator. Tomographic section images were reconstructed by transferring the simulated projections into the VolumeRAD system. The reconstruction was performed for three types of images using: (i) noise-free primary projections, (ii) primary projections including contributions from scattered photons and (iii) projections as in (ii) with added correlated noise. The simulated section images were compared with corresponding section images from projections taken with the real, anthropomorphic phantom from which the digital voxel phantom was originally created. The present article describes a work in progress aiming towards developing a model intended for optimisation of chest tomo-synthesis, allowing for simulation of both existing and future chest tomo-synthesis systems. (authors)

  1. A particle-in-cell method for modeling small angle Coulomb collisions in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, S.E.

    1989-01-01

    We propose a computational method to self-consistently model small angle collisional effects. This method may be added to standard Particle-In-Cell (PIC) plasma simulations to include collisions, or as an alternative to solving the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation using finite difference methods. The distribution function is represented by a large number of particles. The particle velocities change due to the drag force, and the diffusion in velocity is represented by a random process. This is similar to previous Monte-Carlo methods except we calculate the drag force and diffusion tensor self- consistently. The particles are weighted to a grid in velocity space and associated ''Poisson equations'' are solved for the Rosenbluth potentials. The motivation is to avoid the very time consuming method of Coulomb scattering pair by pair. First the approximation for small angle Coulomb collisions is discussed. Next, the FP-PIC collision method is outlined. Then we show a test of the particle advance modeling an electron beam scattering off a fixed ion background. 4 refs

  2. An ab initio chemical reaction model for the direct simulation Monte Carlo study of non-equilibrium nitrogen flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankodi, T K; Bhandarkar, U V; Puranik, B P

    2017-08-28

    A new ab initio based chemical model for a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) study suitable for simulating rarefied flows with a high degree of non-equilibrium is presented. To this end, Collision Induced Dissociation (CID) cross sections for N 2 +N 2 →N 2 +2N are calculated and published using a global complete active space self-consistent field-complete active space second order perturbation theory N 4 potential energy surface and quasi-classical trajectory algorithm for high energy collisions (up to 30 eV). CID cross sections are calculated for only a selected set of ro-vibrational combinations of the two nitrogen molecules, and a fitting scheme based on spectroscopic weights is presented to interpolate the CID cross section for all possible ro-vibrational combinations. The new chemical model is validated by calculating equilibrium reaction rate coefficients that can be compared well with existing shock tube and computational results. High-enthalpy hypersonic nitrogen flows around a cylinder in the transition flow regime are simulated using DSMC to compare the predictions of the current ab initio based chemical model with the prevailing phenomenological model (the total collision energy model). The differences in the predictions are discussed.

  3. Monte Carlo modeling of the Fastscan whole body counter response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, H.R.; Waller, E.J.

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) was used to make a model of the Fastscan for the purpose of calibration. Two models were made one for the Pickering Nuclear Site, and one for the Darlington Nuclear Site. Once these models were benchmarked and found to be in good agreement, simulations were run to study the effect different sized phantoms had on the detected response, and the shielding effect of torso fat was not negligible. Simulations into the nature of a source being positioned externally on the anterior or posterior of a person were also conducted to determine a ratio that could be used to determine if a source is externally or internally placed. (author)

  4. Geometric branching model of high-energy hadron-hadron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.

    1988-01-01

    A phenomenological model is proposed to describe collisions between hadrons at high energies. In the context of the eikonal formalism, the model consists of two components: soft and hard. The former only involves the production of particles with small transverse momenta; the latter is characterized by jet production. Geometrical scaling is taken as an essential input to describe the geometrical properties of hadrons as extended objects on the one hand, and on the other to define the soft component in both regions below and above the jet threshold. A stochastical Furry branching process is adopted as the mechanism of soft particle production, while the jet fragmentation and gluon initial-state bremsstrahlung are for the production of hadrons in hard collisions. Impact parameter and virtuality are smeared to describe the statistical averaging effects of hadron-hadron collisions. Many otherwise separated issues, ranging from elastic scattering to parton decay function, are connected together in the framework of this model. The descriptions of many prominent features of hadronic collisions are in good agreement with the observed experimental data at all available energies. Multiplicity distributions at all energies are discussed as a major issue in this paper. KNO scaling is achieved for energies within ISR range. The emergence of jets is found to be responsible not only for the violation of both geometrical scaling and KNO scaling, but also for the continuous broadening of the multiplicity distribution with ever increasing energy. It is also shown that the geometrical size of a hadron reaches an asymptote in the energy region of CERN-SppS. A Monte Carlo version of the model for soft production is constructed

  5. Hydrodynamic modelling for relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    model, to describe the microscopic evolution and decoupling of the hadronic ... progress on hydrodynamic modelling, investigation on the flow data and the ... and to describe and predict the soft particle physics in relativistic heavy-ion collisions [4]. It is based on the conservation laws of energy, momentum and net charge ...

  6. A Mathematical Model for Analysis on Ships Collision Avoidance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study develops a mathematical model for analysis on collision avoidance of ships. The obtained model provides information on the quantitative effect of the ship's engine's response and the applied reversing force on separation distance and stopping abilities of the ships. Appropriate evasive maneuvers require the ...

  7. Modeling granular phosphor screens by Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaparinos, Panagiotis F.; Kandarakis, Ioannis S.; Cavouras, Dionisis A.; Delis, Harry B.; Panayiotakis, George S.

    2006-01-01

    The intrinsic phosphor properties are of significant importance for the performance of phosphor screens used in medical imaging systems. In previous analytical-theoretical and Monte Carlo studies on granular phosphor materials, values of optical properties, and light interaction cross sections were found by fitting to experimental data. These values were then employed for the assessment of phosphor screen imaging performance. However, it was found that, depending on the experimental technique and fitting methodology, the optical parameters of a specific phosphor material varied within a wide range of values, i.e., variations of light scattering with respect to light absorption coefficients were often observed for the same phosphor material. In this study, x-ray and light transport within granular phosphor materials was studied by developing a computational model using Monte Carlo methods. The model was based on the intrinsic physical characteristics of the phosphor. Input values required to feed the model can be easily obtained from tabulated data. The complex refractive index was introduced and microscopic probabilities for light interactions were produced, using Mie scattering theory. Model validation was carried out by comparing model results on x-ray and light parameters (x-ray absorption, statistical fluctuations in the x-ray to light conversion process, number of emitted light photons, output light spatial distribution) with previous published experimental data on Gd 2 O 2 S:Tb phosphor material (Kodak Min-R screen). Results showed the dependence of the modulation transfer function (MTF) on phosphor grain size and material packing density. It was predicted that granular Gd 2 O 2 S:Tb screens of high packing density and small grain size may exhibit considerably better resolution and light emission properties than the conventional Gd 2 O 2 S:Tb screens, under similar conditions (x-ray incident energy, screen thickness)

  8. Preliminary validation of a Monte Carlo model for IMRT fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, Tracy; Lye, Jessica; Mohammadi, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Full text: A Monte Carlo model of an Elekta linac, validated for medium to large (10-30 cm) symmetric fields, has been investigated for small, irregular and asymmetric fields suitable for IMRT treatments. The model has been validated with field segments using radiochromic film in solid water. The modelled positions of the multileaf collimator (MLC) leaves have been validated using EBT film, In the model, electrons with a narrow energy spectrum are incident on the target and all components of the linac head are included. The MLC is modelled using the EGSnrc MLCE component module. For the validation, a number of single complex IMRT segments with dimensions approximately 1-8 cm were delivered to film in solid water (see Fig, I), The same segments were modelled using EGSnrc by adjusting the MLC leaf positions in the model validated for 10 cm symmetric fields. Dose distributions along the centre of each MLC leaf as determined by both methods were compared. A picket fence test was also performed to confirm the MLC leaf positions. 95% of the points in the modelled dose distribution along the leaf axis agree with the film measurement to within 1%/1 mm for dose difference and distance to agreement. Areas of most deviation occur in the penumbra region. A system has been developed to calculate the MLC leaf positions in the model for any planned field size.

  9. Estimating Model Probabilities using Thermodynamic Markov Chain Monte Carlo Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, M.; Liu, P.; Beerli, P.; Lu, D.; Hill, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods are widely used to evaluate model probability for quantifying model uncertainty. In a general procedure, MCMC simulations are first conducted for each individual model, and MCMC parameter samples are then used to approximate marginal likelihood of the model by calculating the geometric mean of the joint likelihood of the model and its parameters. It has been found the method of evaluating geometric mean suffers from the numerical problem of low convergence rate. A simple test case shows that even millions of MCMC samples are insufficient to yield accurate estimation of the marginal likelihood. To resolve this problem, a thermodynamic method is used to have multiple MCMC runs with different values of a heating coefficient between zero and one. When the heating coefficient is zero, the MCMC run is equivalent to a random walk MC in the prior parameter space; when the heating coefficient is one, the MCMC run is the conventional one. For a simple case with analytical form of the marginal likelihood, the thermodynamic method yields more accurate estimate than the method of using geometric mean. This is also demonstrated for a case of groundwater modeling with consideration of four alternative models postulated based on different conceptualization of a confining layer. This groundwater example shows that model probabilities estimated using the thermodynamic method are more reasonable than those obtained using the geometric method. The thermodynamic method is general, and can be used for a wide range of environmental problem for model uncertainty quantification.

  10. Longitudinal functional principal component modelling via Stochastic Approximation Monte Carlo

    KAUST Repository

    Martinez, Josue G.

    2010-06-01

    The authors consider the analysis of hierarchical longitudinal functional data based upon a functional principal components approach. In contrast to standard frequentist approaches to selecting the number of principal components, the authors do model averaging using a Bayesian formulation. A relatively straightforward reversible jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo formulation has poor mixing properties and in simulated data often becomes trapped at the wrong number of principal components. In order to overcome this, the authors show how to apply Stochastic Approximation Monte Carlo (SAMC) to this problem, a method that has the potential to explore the entire space and does not become trapped in local extrema. The combination of reversible jump methods and SAMC in hierarchical longitudinal functional data is simplified by a polar coordinate representation of the principal components. The approach is easy to implement and does well in simulated data in determining the distribution of the number of principal components, and in terms of its frequentist estimation properties. Empirical applications are also presented.

  11. Modeling Dynamic Objects in Monte Carlo Particle Transport Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yegin, G.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the Multi-Geometry geometry modeling technique was improved in order to handle moving objects in a Monte Carlo particle transport calculation. In the Multi-Geometry technique, the geometry is a superposition of objects not surfaces. By using this feature, we developed a new algorithm which allows a user to make enable or disable geometry elements during particle transport. A disabled object can be ignored at a certain stage of a calculation and switching among identical copies of the same object located adjacent poins during a particle simulation corresponds to the movement of that object in space. We called this powerfull feature as Dynamic Multi-Geometry technique (DMG) which is used for the first time in Brachy Dose Monte Carlo code to simulate HDR brachytherapy treatment systems. Our results showed that having disabled objects in a geometry does not effect calculated dose values. This technique is also suitable to be used in other areas such as IMRT treatment planning systems

  12. Monte Carlo modelling of Schottky diode for rectenna simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernuchon, E.; Aniel, F.; Zerounian, N.; Grimault-Jacquin, A. S.

    2017-09-01

    Before designing a detector circuit, the electrical parameters extraction of the Schottky diode is a critical step. This article is based on a Monte-Carlo (MC) solver of the Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) including different transport mechanisms at the metal-semiconductor contact such as image force effect or tunneling. The weight of tunneling and thermionic current is quantified according to different degrees of tunneling modelling. The I-V characteristic highlights the dependence of the ideality factor and the current saturation with bias. Harmonic Balance (HB) simulation on a rectifier circuit within Advanced Design System (ADS) software shows that considering non-linear ideality factor and saturation current for the electrical model of the Schottky diode does not seem essential. Indeed, bias independent values extracted in forward regime on I-V curve are sufficient. However, the non-linear series resistance extracted from a small signal analysis (SSA) strongly influences the conversion efficiency at low input powers.

  13. Shell model Monte Carlo investigation of rare earth nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J. A.; Koonin, S. E.; Dean, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    We utilize the shell model Monte Carlo method to study the structure of rare earth nuclei. This work demonstrates the first systematic full oscillator shell with intruder calculations in such heavy nuclei. Exact solutions of a pairing plus quadrupole Hamiltonian are compared with the static path approximation in several dysprosium isotopes from A=152 to 162, including the odd mass A=153. Some comparisons are also made with Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov results from Baranger and Kumar. Basic properties of these nuclei at various temperatures and spin are explored. These include energy, deformation, moments of inertia, pairing channel strengths, band crossing, and evolution of shell model occupation numbers. Exact level densities are also calculated and, in the case of 162 Dy, compared with experimental data. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  14. A mathematical model of bird collisions with wind turbine rotors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    When a bird flies through the disk swept out by the blades of a wind turbine rotor, the probability of collision depends on the motions and dimensions of the bird and the blades. The collision model in this paper predicts the probability for birds that glide upwind, downwind, an across the wind past simple one-dimensional blades represented by straight lines, and upwind and downwind past more realistic three-dimensional blades with chord and twist. Probabilities vary over the surface of the disk, and in most cases, the tip of the blade is less likely to collide with a bird than parts of the blade nearer the hub. The mean probability may be found by integration over the disk area. The collision model identifies the rotor characteristics that could be altered to make turbines safer for birds

  15. Discrete Velocity Models for Polyatomic Molecules Without Nonphysical Collision Invariants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhoff, Niclas

    2018-05-01

    An important aspect of constructing discrete velocity models (DVMs) for the Boltzmann equation is to obtain the right number of collision invariants. Unlike for the Boltzmann equation, for DVMs there can appear extra collision invariants, so called spurious collision invariants, in plus to the physical ones. A DVM with only physical collision invariants, and hence, without spurious ones, is called normal. The construction of such normal DVMs has been studied a lot in the literature for single species, but also for binary mixtures and recently extensively for multicomponent mixtures. In this paper, we address ways of constructing normal DVMs for polyatomic molecules (here represented by that each molecule has an internal energy, to account for non-translational energies, which can change during collisions), under the assumption that the set of allowed internal energies are finite. We present general algorithms for constructing such models, but we also give concrete examples of such constructions. This approach can also be combined with similar constructions of multicomponent mixtures to obtain multicomponent mixtures with polyatomic molecules, which is also briefly outlined. Then also, chemical reactions can be added.

  16. Monte Carlo model of diagnostic X-ray dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrutchinsky, Arkady; Kutsen, Semion; Gatskevich, George

    2008-01-01

    Full text: A Monte Carlo simulation of absorbed dose distribution in patient's tissues is often used in a dosimetry assessment of X-ray examinations. The results of such simulations in Belarus are presented in the report based on an anthropomorphic tissue-equivalent Rando-like physical phantom. The phantom corresponds to an adult 173 cm high and of 73 kg and consists of a torso and a head made of tissue-equivalent plastics which model soft (muscular), bone, and lung tissues. It consists of 39 layers (each 25 mm thick), including 10 head and neck ones, 16 chest and 13 pelvis ones. A tomographic model of the phantom has been developed from its CT-scan images with a voxel size of 0.88 x 0.88 x 4 mm 3 . A necessary pixelization in Mathematics-based in-house program was carried out for the phantom to be used in the radiation transport code MCNP-4b. The final voxel size of 14.2 x 14.2 x 8 mm 3 was used for the reasonable computer consuming calculations of absorbed dose in tissues and organs in various diagnostic X-ray examinations. MCNP point detectors allocated through body slices obtained as a result of the pixelization were used to calculate the absorbed dose. X-ray spectra generated by the empirical TASMIP model were verified on the X-ray units MEVASIM and SIREGRAPH CF. Absorbed dose distributions in the phantom volume were determined by the corresponding Monte Carlo simulations with a set of point detectors. Doses in organs of the adult phantom computed from the absorbed dose distributions by another Mathematics-based in-house program were estimated for 22 standard organs for various standard X-ray examinations. The results of Monte Carlo simulations were compared with the results of direct measurements of the absorbed dose in the phantom on the X-ray unit SIREGRAPH CF with the calibrated thermo-luminescent dosimeter DTU-01. The measurements were carried out in specified locations of different layers in heart, lungs, liver, pancreas, and stomach at high voltage of

  17. Time-based collision risk modeling for air traffic management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Alan E.

    Since the emergence of commercial aviation in the early part of last century, economic forces have driven a steadily increasing demand for air transportation. Increasing density of aircraft operating in a finite volume of airspace is accompanied by a corresponding increase in the risk of collision, and in response to a growing number of incidents and accidents involving collisions between aircraft, governments worldwide have developed air traffic control systems and procedures to mitigate this risk. The objective of any collision risk management system is to project conflicts and provide operators with sufficient opportunity to recognize potential collisions and take necessary actions to avoid them. It is therefore the assertion of this research that the currency of collision risk management is time. Future Air Traffic Management Systems are being designed around the foundational principle of four dimensional trajectory based operations, a method that replaces legacy first-come, first-served sequencing priorities with time-based reservations throughout the airspace system. This research will demonstrate that if aircraft are to be sequenced in four dimensions, they must also be separated in four dimensions. In order to separate aircraft in four dimensions, time must emerge as the primary tool by which air traffic is managed. A functional relationship exists between the time-based performance of aircraft, the interval between aircraft scheduled to cross some three dimensional point in space, and the risk of collision. This research models that relationship and presents two key findings. First, a method is developed by which the ability of an aircraft to meet a required time of arrival may be expressed as a robust standard for both industry and operations. Second, a method by which airspace system capacity may be increased while maintaining an acceptable level of collision risk is presented and demonstrated for the purpose of formulating recommendations for procedures

  18. Abstract ID: 240 A probabilistic-based nuclear reaction model for Monte Carlo ion transport in particle therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria Jose, Gonzalez Torres; Jürgen, Henniger

    2018-01-01

    In order to expand the Monte Carlo transport program AMOS to particle therapy applications, the ion module is being developed in the radiation physics group (ASP) at the TU Dresden. This module simulates the three main interactions of ions in matter for the therapy energy range: elastic scattering, inelastic collisions and nuclear reactions. The simulation of the elastic scattering is based on the Binary Collision Approximation and the inelastic collisions on the Bethe-Bloch theory. The nuclear reactions, which are the focus of the module, are implemented according to a probabilistic-based model developed in the group. The developed model uses probability density functions to sample the occurrence of a nuclear reaction given the initial energy of the projectile particle as well as the energy at which this reaction will take place. The particle is transported until the reaction energy is reached and then the nuclear reaction is simulated. This approach allows a fast evaluation of the nuclear reactions. The theory and application of the proposed model will be addressed in this presentation. The results of the simulation of a proton beam colliding with tissue will also be presented. Copyright © 2017.

  19. Collision prediction models using multivariate Poisson-lognormal regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Basyouny, Karim; Sayed, Tarek

    2009-07-01

    This paper advocates the use of multivariate Poisson-lognormal (MVPLN) regression to develop models for collision count data. The MVPLN approach presents an opportunity to incorporate the correlations across collision severity levels and their influence on safety analyses. The paper introduces a new multivariate hazardous location identification technique, which generalizes the univariate posterior probability of excess that has been commonly proposed and applied in the literature. In addition, the paper presents an alternative approach for quantifying the effect of the multivariate structure on the precision of expected collision frequency. The MVPLN approach is compared with the independent (separate) univariate Poisson-lognormal (PLN) models with respect to model inference, goodness-of-fit, identification of hot spots and precision of expected collision frequency. The MVPLN is modeled using the WinBUGS platform which facilitates computation of posterior distributions as well as providing a goodness-of-fit measure for model comparisons. The results indicate that the estimates of the extra Poisson variation parameters were considerably smaller under MVPLN leading to higher precision. The improvement in precision is due mainly to the fact that MVPLN accounts for the correlation between the latent variables representing property damage only (PDO) and injuries plus fatalities (I+F). This correlation was estimated at 0.758, which is highly significant, suggesting that higher PDO rates are associated with higher I+F rates, as the collision likelihood for both types is likely to rise due to similar deficiencies in roadway design and/or other unobserved factors. In terms of goodness-of-fit, the MVPLN model provided a superior fit than the independent univariate models. The multivariate hazardous location identification results demonstrated that some hazardous locations could be overlooked if the analysis was restricted to the univariate models.

  20. Modelling a gamma irradiation process using the Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Gabriela A.; Pereira, Marcio T., E-mail: gas@cdtn.br, E-mail: mtp@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In gamma irradiation service it is of great importance the evaluation of absorbed dose in order to guarantee the service quality. When physical structure and human resources are not available for performing dosimetry in each product irradiated, the appliance of mathematic models may be a solution. Through this, the prediction of the delivered dose in a specific product, irradiated in a specific position and during a certain period of time becomes possible, if validated with dosimetry tests. At the gamma irradiation facility of CDTN, equipped with a Cobalt-60 source, the Monte Carlo method was applied to perform simulations of products irradiations and the results were compared with Fricke dosimeters irradiated under the same conditions of the simulations. The first obtained results showed applicability of this method, with a linear relation between simulation and experimental results. (author)

  1. Monte Carlo Modeling of Crystal Channeling at High Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Schoofs, Philippe; Cerutti, Francesco

    Charged particles entering a crystal close to some preferred direction can be trapped in the electromagnetic potential well existing between consecutive planes or strings of atoms. This channeling effect can be used to extract beam particles if the crystal is bent beforehand. Crystal channeling is becoming a reliable and efficient technique for collimating beams and removing halo particles. At CERN, the installation of silicon crystals in the LHC is under scrutiny by the UA9 collaboration with the goal of investigating if they are a viable option for the collimation system upgrade. This thesis describes a new Monte Carlo model of planar channeling which has been developed from scratch in order to be implemented in the FLUKA code simulating particle transport and interactions. Crystal channels are described through the concept of continuous potential taking into account thermal motion of the lattice atoms and using Moliere screening function. The energy of the particle transverse motion determines whether or n...

  2. Modelling a gamma irradiation process using the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Gabriela A.; Pereira, Marcio T.

    2011-01-01

    In gamma irradiation service it is of great importance the evaluation of absorbed dose in order to guarantee the service quality. When physical structure and human resources are not available for performing dosimetry in each product irradiated, the appliance of mathematic models may be a solution. Through this, the prediction of the delivered dose in a specific product, irradiated in a specific position and during a certain period of time becomes possible, if validated with dosimetry tests. At the gamma irradiation facility of CDTN, equipped with a Cobalt-60 source, the Monte Carlo method was applied to perform simulations of products irradiations and the results were compared with Fricke dosimeters irradiated under the same conditions of the simulations. The first obtained results showed applicability of this method, with a linear relation between simulation and experimental results. (author)

  3. A Monte Carlo Simulation Framework for Testing Cosmological Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heymann Y.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We tested alternative cosmologies using Monte Carlo simulations based on the sam- pling method of the zCosmos galactic survey. The survey encompasses a collection of observable galaxies with respective redshifts that have been obtained for a given spec- troscopic area of the sky. Using a cosmological model, we can convert the redshifts into light-travel times and, by slicing the survey into small redshift buckets, compute a curve of galactic density over time. Because foreground galaxies obstruct the images of more distant galaxies, we simulated the theoretical galactic density curve using an average galactic radius. By comparing the galactic density curves of the simulations with that of the survey, we could assess the cosmologies. We applied the test to the expanding-universe cosmology of de Sitter and to a dichotomous cosmology.

  4. Transport models for relativistic heavy-ion collisions at Relativistic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    While the free-streaming of particles in the kinetic theory drive the system out of equi- ... For collisions at RHIC and LHC, a transport model may involve four main com- ...... Further, there are many important conceptual issues such as imple-.

  5. Pseudo potentials and model potentials in atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, O.; Jouin, H.; Fuentealba, P.

    1988-01-01

    In this work, it is discussed the main differences between the use of pseudo-potentials and model potentials in collision problems . It is shown the potential energy curves for distinct systems obtained with both kinds of potentials. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  6. Ensemble bayesian model averaging using markov chain Monte Carlo sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrugt, Jasper A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Diks, Cees G H [NON LANL; Clark, Martyn P [NON LANL

    2008-01-01

    Bayesian model averaging (BMA) has recently been proposed as a statistical method to calibrate forecast ensembles from numerical weather models. Successful implementation of BMA however, requires accurate estimates of the weights and variances of the individual competing models in the ensemble. In their seminal paper (Raftery etal. Mon Weather Rev 133: 1155-1174, 2(05)) has recommended the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm for BMA model training, even though global convergence of this algorithm cannot be guaranteed. In this paper, we compare the performance of the EM algorithm and the recently developed Differential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM) Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm for estimating the BMA weights and variances. Simulation experiments using 48-hour ensemble data of surface temperature and multi-model stream-flow forecasts show that both methods produce similar results, and that their performance is unaffected by the length of the training data set. However, MCMC simulation with DREAM is capable of efficiently handling a wide variety of BMA predictive distributions, and provides useful information about the uncertainty associated with the estimated BMA weights and variances.

  7. The multistring model VENUS for ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, K.

    1988-02-01

    The event generator VENUS is based on a multistring model for heavy ion collisions at ultrarelativistic energies. The model is a straightforward extension of a successful model for soft proton-proton scattering, the latter one being consistent with e/sup /plus//e/sup /minus// annihilation and deep inelastic lepton scattering. Comparisons of VENUS results with pA and recent AA data alow some statements about intranuclear cascading. 18 refs., 7 figs

  8. LPM-Effect in Monte Carlo Models of Radiative Energy Loss

    CERN Document Server

    Zapp, Korinna C; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2009-01-01

    Extending the use of Monte Carlo (MC) event generators to jets in nuclear collisions requires a probabilistic implementation of the non-abelian LPM effect. We demonstrate that a local, probabilistic MC implementation based on the concept of formation times can account fully for the LPM-effect. The main features of the analytically known eikonal and collinear approximation can be reproduced, but we show how going beyond this approximation can lead to qualitatively different results.

  9. Monte Carlo simulations of lattice models for single polymer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping

    2014-10-01

    Single linear polymer chains in dilute solutions under good solvent conditions are studied by Monte Carlo simulations with the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method up to the chain length N ˜ O(10^4). Based on the standard simple cubic lattice model (SCLM) with fixed bond length and the bond fluctuation model (BFM) with bond lengths in a range between 2 and sqrt{10}, we investigate the conformations of polymer chains described by self-avoiding walks on the simple cubic lattice, and by random walks and non-reversible random walks in the absence of excluded volume interactions. In addition to flexible chains, we also extend our study to semiflexible chains for different stiffness controlled by a bending potential. The persistence lengths of chains extracted from the orientational correlations are estimated for all cases. We show that chains based on the BFM are more flexible than those based on the SCLM for a fixed bending energy. The microscopic differences between these two lattice models are discussed and the theoretical predictions of scaling laws given in the literature are checked and verified. Our simulations clarify that a different mapping ratio between the coarse-grained models and the atomistically realistic description of polymers is required in a coarse-graining approach due to the different crossovers to the asymptotic behavior.

  10. Monte Carlo simulations of lattice models for single polymer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Single linear polymer chains in dilute solutions under good solvent conditions are studied by Monte Carlo simulations with the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method up to the chain length N∼O(10 4 ). Based on the standard simple cubic lattice model (SCLM) with fixed bond length and the bond fluctuation model (BFM) with bond lengths in a range between 2 and √(10), we investigate the conformations of polymer chains described by self-avoiding walks on the simple cubic lattice, and by random walks and non-reversible random walks in the absence of excluded volume interactions. In addition to flexible chains, we also extend our study to semiflexible chains for different stiffness controlled by a bending potential. The persistence lengths of chains extracted from the orientational correlations are estimated for all cases. We show that chains based on the BFM are more flexible than those based on the SCLM for a fixed bending energy. The microscopic differences between these two lattice models are discussed and the theoretical predictions of scaling laws given in the literature are checked and verified. Our simulations clarify that a different mapping ratio between the coarse-grained models and the atomistically realistic description of polymers is required in a coarse-graining approach due to the different crossovers to the asymptotic behavior

  11. Detailed resonance absorption calculations with the Monte Carlo code MCNP and collision probability version of the slowing down code ROLAIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruijf, W.J.M. de; Janssen, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    Very accurate Mote Carlo calculations with Monte Carlo Code have been performed to serve as reference for benchmark calculations on resonance absorption by U 238 in a typical PWR pin-cell geometry. Calculations with the energy-pointwise slowing down code calculates the resonance absorption accurately. Calculations with the multigroup discrete ordinates code XSDRN show that accurate results can only be achieved with a very fine energy mesh. (authors). 9 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  12. NASA Lewis Launch Collision Probability Model Developed and Analyzed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollenbacher, Gary; Guptill, James D

    1999-01-01

    There are nearly 10,000 tracked objects orbiting the earth. These objects encompass manned objects, active and decommissioned satellites, spent rocket bodies, and debris. They range from a few centimeters across to the size of the MIR space station. Anytime a new satellite is launched, the launch vehicle with its payload attached passes through an area of space in which these objects orbit. Although the population density of these objects is low, there always is a small but finite probability of collision between the launch vehicle and one or more of these space objects. Even though the probability of collision is very low, for some payloads even this small risk is unacceptable. To mitigate the small risk of collision associated with launching at an arbitrary time within the daily launch window, NASA performs a prelaunch mission assurance Collision Avoidance Analysis (or COLA). For the COLA of the Cassini spacecraft, the NASA Lewis Research Center conducted an in-house development and analysis of a model for launch collision probability. The model allows a minimum clearance criteria to be used with the COLA analysis to ensure an acceptably low probability of collision. If, for any given liftoff time, the nominal launch vehicle trajectory would pass a space object with less than the minimum required clearance, launch would not be attempted at that time. The model assumes that the nominal positions of the orbiting objects and of the launch vehicle can be predicted as a function of time, and therefore, that any tracked object that comes within close proximity of the launch vehicle can be identified. For any such pair, these nominal positions can be used to calculate a nominal miss distance. The actual miss distances may differ substantially from the nominal miss distance, due, in part, to the statistical uncertainty of the knowledge of the objects positions. The model further assumes that these position uncertainties can be described with position covariance matrices

  13. Monte Carlo Modeling the UCN τ Magneto-Gravitational Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, A. T.; UCNτ Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The current uncertainty in our knowledge of the free neutron lifetime is dominated by the nearly 4 σ discrepancy between complementary ``beam'' and ``bottle'' measurement techniques. An incomplete assessment of systematic effects is the most likely explanation for this difference and must be addressed in order to realize the potential of both approaches. The UCN τ collaboration has constructed a large-volume magneto-gravitational trap that eliminates the material interactions which complicated the interpretation of previous bottle experiments. This is accomplished using permanent NdFeB magnets in a bowl-shaped Halbach array to confine polarized UCN from the sides and below and the earth's gravitational field to trap them from above. New in situ detectors that count surviving UCN provide a means of empirically assessing residual systematic effects. The interpretation of that data, and its implication for experimental configurations with enhanced precision, can be bolstered by Monte Carlo models of the current experiment which provide the capability for stable tracking of trapped UCN and detailed modeling of their polarization. Work to develop such models and their comparison with data acquired during our first extensive set of systematics studies will be discussed.

  14. Monte Carlo modelling of large scale NORM sources using MCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, J D

    2013-12-01

    The representative Monte Carlo modelling of large scale planar sources (for comparison to external environmental radiation fields) is undertaken using substantial diameter and thin profile planar cylindrical sources. The relative impact of source extent, soil thickness and sky-shine are investigated to guide decisions relating to representative geometries. In addition, the impact of source to detector distance on the nature of the detector response, for a range of source sizes, has been investigated. These investigations, using an MCNP based model, indicate a soil cylinder of greater than 20 m diameter and of no less than 50 cm depth/height, combined with a 20 m deep sky section above the soil cylinder, are needed to representatively model the semi-infinite plane of uniformly distributed NORM sources. Initial investigation of the effect of detector placement indicate that smaller source sizes may be used to achieve a representative response at shorter source to detector distances. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Multiple-collision model for pion production in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vary, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    A simple model for pion production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is developed based on nucleon-nucleon data, nuclear density distribution, and the assumption of straight-line trajectories. Multiplicity distributions for total pion production and for negative-pion production are predicted for 40 Ar incident on a Pb 3 O 4 target at 1.8 GeV/nucleon. Production through intermediate baryon resonances reduces the high-multiplicity region but insufficiently to yield agreement with data. This implies the need for a coherent production mechanism

  16. Image based Monte Carlo modeling for computational phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, M.; Wang, W.; Zhao, K.; Fan, Y.; Long, P.; Wu, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Full text of the publication follows. The evaluation on the effects of ionizing radiation and the risk of radiation exposure on human body has been becoming one of the most important issues for radiation protection and radiotherapy fields, which is helpful to avoid unnecessary radiation and decrease harm to human body. In order to accurately evaluate the dose on human body, it is necessary to construct more realistic computational phantom. However, manual description and verification of the models for Monte Carlo (MC) simulation are very tedious, error-prone and time-consuming. In addition, it is difficult to locate and fix the geometry error, and difficult to describe material information and assign it to cells. MCAM (CAD/Image-based Automatic Modeling Program for Neutronics and Radiation Transport Simulation) was developed as an interface program to achieve both CAD- and image-based automatic modeling. The advanced version (Version 6) of MCAM can achieve automatic conversion from CT/segmented sectioned images to computational phantoms such as MCNP models. Imaged-based automatic modeling program(MCAM6.0) has been tested by several medical images and sectioned images. And it has been applied in the construction of Rad-HUMAN. Following manual segmentation and 3D reconstruction, a whole-body computational phantom of Chinese adult female called Rad-HUMAN was created by using MCAM6.0 from sectioned images of a Chinese visible human dataset. Rad-HUMAN contains 46 organs/tissues, which faithfully represented the average anatomical characteristics of the Chinese female. The dose conversion coefficients (Dt/Ka) from kerma free-in-air to absorbed dose of Rad-HUMAN were calculated. Rad-HUMAN can be applied to predict and evaluate dose distributions in the Treatment Plan System (TPS), as well as radiation exposure for human body in radiation protection. (authors)

  17. Mesoscopic kinetic Monte Carlo modeling of organic photovoltaic device characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimber, Robin G. E.; Wright, Edward N.; O'Kane, Simon E. J.; Walker, Alison B.; Blakesley, James C.

    2012-12-01

    Measured mobility and current-voltage characteristics of single layer and photovoltaic (PV) devices composed of poly{9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-bis[N,N'-(4-butylphenyl)]bis(N,N'-phenyl-1,4-phenylene)diamine} (PFB) and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) have been reproduced by a mesoscopic model employing the kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) approach. Our aim is to show how to avoid the uncertainties common in electrical transport models arising from the need to fit a large number of parameters when little information is available, for example, a single current-voltage curve. Here, simulation parameters are derived from a series of measurements using a self-consistent “building-blocks” approach, starting from data on the simplest systems. We found that site energies show disorder and that correlations in the site energies and a distribution of deep traps must be included in order to reproduce measured charge mobility-field curves at low charge densities in bulk PFB and F8BT. The parameter set from the mobility-field curves reproduces the unipolar current in single layers of PFB and F8BT and allows us to deduce charge injection barriers. Finally, by combining these disorder descriptions and injection barriers with an optical model, the external quantum efficiency and current densities of blend and bilayer organic PV devices can be successfully reproduced across a voltage range encompassing reverse and forward bias, with the recombination rate the only parameter to be fitted, found to be 1×107 s-1. These findings demonstrate an approach that removes some of the arbitrariness present in transport models of organic devices, which validates the KMC as an accurate description of organic optoelectronic systems, and provides information on the microscopic origins of the device behavior.

  18. Investigation of a Monte Carlo model for chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, R.N.; Turner, J.E.; Stabin, M.G.

    1998-01-01

    Monte Carlo computer simulations are in use at a number of laboratories for calculating time-dependent yields, which can be compared with experiments in the radiolysis of water. We report here on calculations to investigate the validity and consistency of the procedures used for simulating chemical reactions in our code, RADLYS. Model calculations were performed of the rate constants themselves. The rates thus determined showed an expected rapid decline over the first few hundred ps and a very gradual decline thereafter out to the termination of the calculations at 4.5 ns. Results are reported for different initial concentrations and numbers of reactive species. Generally, the calculated rate constants are smallest when the initial concentrations of the reactants are largest. It is found that inhomogeneities that quickly develop in the initial random spatial distribution of reactants persist in time as a result of subsequent chemical reactions, and thus conditions may poorly approximate those assumed from diffusion theory. We also investigated the reaction of a single species of one type placed among a large number of randomly distributed species of another type with which it could react. The distribution of survival times of the single species was calculated by using three different combinations of the diffusion constants for the two species, as is sometimes discussed in diffusion theory. The three methods gave virtually identical results. (orig.)

  19. Monte Carlo Modeling Electronuclear Processes in Cascade Subcritical Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Bznuni, S A; Zhamkochyan, V M; Polyanskii, A A; Sosnin, A N; Khudaverdian, A G

    2000-01-01

    Accelerator driven subcritical cascade reactor composed of the main thermal neutron reactor constructed analogous to the core of the VVER-1000 reactor and a booster-reactor, which is constructed similar to the core of the BN-350 fast breeder reactor, is taken as a model example. It is shown by means of Monte Carlo calculations that such system is a safe energy source (k_{eff}=0.94-0.98) and it is capable of transmuting produced radioactive wastes (neutron flux density in the thermal zone is PHI^{max} (r,z)=10^{14} n/(cm^{-2} s^{-1}), neutron flux in the fast zone is respectively equal PHI^{max} (r,z)=2.25 cdot 10^{15} n/(cm^{-2} s^{-1}) if the beam current of the proton accelerator is k_{eff}=0.98 and I=5.3 mA). Suggested configuration of the "cascade" reactor system essentially reduces the requirements on the proton accelerator current.

  20. Monte Carlo modeling of ion chamber performance using MCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, J D

    2012-12-01

    Ion Chambers have a generally flat energy response with some deviations at very low (2 MeV) energies. Some improvements in the low energy response can be achieved through use of high atomic number gases, such as argon and xenon, and higher chamber pressures. This work looks at the energy response of high pressure xenon-filled ion chambers using the MCNP Monte Carlo package to develop geometric models of a commercially available high pressure ion chamber (HPIC). The use of the F6 tally as an estimator of the energy deposited in a region of interest per unit mass, and the underlying assumptions associated with its use are described. The effect of gas composition, chamber gas pressure, chamber wall thickness, and chamber holder wall thicknesses on energy response are investigated and reported. The predicted energy response curve for the HPIC was found to be similar to that reported by other investigators. These investigations indicate that improvements to flatten the overall energy response of the HPIC down to 70 keV could be achieved through use of 3 mm-thick stainless steel walls for the ion chamber.

  1. A Monte Carlo Simulation approach for the modeling of free-molecule squeeze-film damping of flexible microresonators

    KAUST Repository

    Leung, Roger

    2010-03-31

    Squeeze-film damping on microresonators is a significant damping source even when the surrounding gas is highly rarefied. This article presents a general modeling approach based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for the prediction of squeeze-film damping on resonators in the freemolecule regime. The generality of the approach is demonstrated in its capability of simulating resonators of any shape and with any accommodation coefficient. The approach is validated using both the analytical results of the free-space damping and the experimental data of the squeeze-film damping on a clamped-clamped plate resonator oscillating at its first flexure mode. The effect of oscillation modes on the quality factor of the resonator has also been studied and semi-analytical approximate models for the squeeze-film damping with diffuse collisions have been developed.

  2. A model for high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, W.D.

    1978-01-01

    A model is developed for high-energy heavy-ion collisions that treats the variation across the overlap region of the target and projectile in the amount of energy and momentum that is deposited. The expression for calculating any observable takes the form of a sum over a series of terms, each one of which consists of a geometric, a kinematic, and a statistical factor. The geometrical factors for a number of target projectile systems are tabulated. (Auth.)

  3. Comparison of models of high energy heavy ion collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyulassy, M.

    1977-01-01

    Some of the main theoretical developments on heavy ion collisions at energies (0.1 to 2.0) GeV/nuc are reviewed. The fireball, firestreak, hydrodynamic (1-fluid, 2-fluids), ''row on row'', hard sphere and intranuclear cascades, and classical equations of motion models are discussed in detail. Results are compared to each other and to measured Ne + U → p + X reactions

  4. On an efficient multiple time step Monte Carlo simulation of the SABR model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leitao Rodriguez, A.; Grzelak, L.A.; Oosterlee, C.W.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we will present a multiple time step Monte Carlo simulation technique for pricing options under the Stochastic Alpha Beta Rho model. The proposed method is an extension of the one time step Monte Carlo method that we proposed in an accompanying paper Leitao et al. [Appl. Math.

  5. Sensor Fusion Based Model for Collision Free Mobile Robot Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasri, Marwah; Elleithy, Khaled; Alajlan, Abrar

    2015-01-01

    Autonomous mobile robots have become a very popular and interesting topic in the last decade. Each of them are equipped with various types of sensors such as GPS, camera, infrared and ultrasonic sensors. These sensors are used to observe the surrounding environment. However, these sensors sometimes fail and have inaccurate readings. Therefore, the integration of sensor fusion will help to solve this dilemma and enhance the overall performance. This paper presents a collision free mobile robot navigation based on the fuzzy logic fusion model. Eight distance sensors and a range finder camera are used for the collision avoidance approach where three ground sensors are used for the line or path following approach. The fuzzy system is composed of nine inputs which are the eight distance sensors and the camera, two outputs which are the left and right velocities of the mobile robot’s wheels, and 24 fuzzy rules for the robot’s movement. Webots Pro simulator is used for modeling the environment and the robot. The proposed methodology, which includes the collision avoidance based on fuzzy logic fusion model and line following robot, has been implemented and tested through simulation and real time experiments. Various scenarios have been presented with static and dynamic obstacles using one robot and two robots while avoiding obstacles in different shapes and sizes. PMID:26712766

  6. Sensor Fusion Based Model for Collision Free Mobile Robot Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwah Almasri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous mobile robots have become a very popular and interesting topic in the last decade. Each of them are equipped with various types of sensors such as GPS, camera, infrared and ultrasonic sensors. These sensors are used to observe the surrounding environment. However, these sensors sometimes fail and have inaccurate readings. Therefore, the integration of sensor fusion will help to solve this dilemma and enhance the overall performance. This paper presents a collision free mobile robot navigation based on the fuzzy logic fusion model. Eight distance sensors and a range finder camera are used for the collision avoidance approach where three ground sensors are used for the line or path following approach. The fuzzy system is composed of nine inputs which are the eight distance sensors and the camera, two outputs which are the left and right velocities of the mobile robot’s wheels, and 24 fuzzy rules for the robot’s movement. Webots Pro simulator is used for modeling the environment and the robot. The proposed methodology, which includes the collision avoidance based on fuzzy logic fusion model and line following robot, has been implemented and tested through simulation and real time experiments. Various scenarios have been presented with static and dynamic obstacles using one robot and two robots while avoiding obstacles in different shapes and sizes.

  7. Thin sheet numerical modelling of continental collision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jimenez-Munt, I.; Garcia-Gastellanos, D.; Fernandez, M.

    2005-01-01

    We study the effects of incorporating surface mass transport and the gravitational potential energy of both crust and lithospheric mantle to the viscous thin sheet approach. Recent 2D (cross-section) numerical models show that surface erosion and sediment transport can play a major role in shaping

  8. A Monte Carlo reflectance model for soil surfaces with three-dimensional structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, K. D.; Smith, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    A Monte Carlo soil reflectance model has been developed to study the effect of macroscopic surface irregularities larger than the wavelength of incident flux. The model treats incoherent multiple scattering from Lambertian facets distributed on a periodic surface. Resulting bidirectional reflectance distribution functions are non-Lambertian and compare well with experimental trends reported in the literature. Examples showing the coupling of the Monte Carlo soil model to an adding bidirectional canopy of reflectance model are also given.

  9. Molecular dynamics and binary collisions modeling of the primary damage state of collision cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Singh, B.N.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the spectral dependence of defect production and microstructure evolution for the development of fission-fusion correlations. Quantitative information on defect production in cascades in copper obtained from recent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is compared to defect production information determined earlier with a model based on the binary collision approximation (BCA). The total numbers of residual defects, the fractions of them that are mobile, and the sizes of immobile clusters compare favorably, especially when the termination conditions of the two simulations are taken into account. A strategy is laid out for integrating the details of the cascade quenching phase determined by MD into a BCA-based model that is practical for simulating much higher energies and longer times than MD alone can achieve. The extraction of collisional phase information from MD simulations and the correspondence of MD and BCA versions of the collisional phase demonstrated at low energy

  10. Molecular dynamics and binary collision modeling of the primary damage state of collision cascades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Singh, B.N.

    1992-01-01

    Quantitative information on defect production in cascades in copper obtained from recent molecular dynamics simulations is compared to defect production information determined earlier with a model based on the binary collision approximation (BCA). The total numbers of residual defects......, the fractions of them that are mobile, and the sizes of immobile clusters compare favorably, especially when the termination conditions of the two simulations are taken into account. A strategy is laid out for integrating the details of the cascade quenching phase determined by MD into a BCA-based model...... that is practical for simulating much higher energies and longer times than MD alone can achieve. The extraction of collisional phase information from MD simulations and the correspondence of MD and BCA versions of the collisional phase is demonstrated at low energy....

  11. A collision model in plasma particle simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yanyun; Chang Wenwei; Yin Yan; Yue Zongwu; Cao Lihua; Liu Daqing

    2000-01-01

    In order to offset the collisional effects reduced by using finite-size particles, β particle clouds are used in particle simulation codes (β is the ratio of charge or mass of modeling particles to real ones). The method of impulse approximation (strait line orbit approximation) is used to analyze the scattering cross section of β particle clouds plasmas. The authors can obtain the relation of the value of a and β and scattering cross section (a is the radius of β particle cloud). By using this relation the authors can determine the value of a and β so that the collisional effects of the modeling system is correspondent with the real one. The authors can also adjust the values of a and β so that the authors can enhance or reduce the collisional effects fictitiously. The results of simulation are in good agreement with the theoretical ones

  12. Quark model and high energy collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyiri, J.; Kobrinsky, M.N.

    1982-06-01

    The aim of the present review is to show that the additive quark model describes well not only the static features of hadrons but also the interaction processes at high energies. Considerations of the hadron-hadron and hadron-nucleus interactions and of the hadron production in multiparticle production processes suggest serious arguments in favour of the nucleus-like hadron structure and show the possibility to apply the rules of quark statistics to the description of the secondary particle production. (author)

  13. Artificial neural network modelling in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-dahshan, E.; Radi, A.; El-Bakry, M.Y.; El Mashad, M.

    2008-01-01

    The neural network (NN) model and parton two fireball model (PTFM) have been used to study the pseudo-rapidity distribution of the shower particles for C 12, O 16, Si 28 and S 32 on nuclear emulsion. The trained NN shows a better fitting with experimental data than the PTFM calculations. The NN is then used to predict the distributions that are not present in the training set and matched them effectively. The NN simulation results prove a strong presence modeling in heavy ion collisions

  14. Quark model and high energy collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Anisovich, V V; Nyíri, J; Shabelski, Yu M

    2004-01-01

    This is an updated version of the book published in 1985. QCD-motivated, it gives a detailed description of hadron structure and soft interactions in the additive quark model, where hadrons are regarded as composite systems of dressed quarks. In the past decade it has become clear that nonperturbative QCD, responsible for soft hadronic processes, may differ rather drastically from perturbative QCD. The understanding of nonperturbative QCD requires a detailed investigation of the experiments and the theoretical approaches. Bearing this in mind, the book has been rewritten paying special attenti

  15. Review of Monte Carlo methods for particle multiplicity evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Armesto-Pérez, Nestor

    2005-01-01

    I present a brief review of the existing models for particle multiplicity evaluation in heavy ion collisions which are at our disposal in the form of Monte Carlo simulators. Models are classified according to the physical mechanisms with which they try to describe the different stages of a high-energy collision between heavy nuclei. A comparison of predictions, as available at the beginning of year 2000, for multiplicities in central AuAu collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and PbPb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is provided.

  16. Review of Monte Carlo methods for particle multiplicity evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armesto, Nestor

    2005-01-01

    I present a brief review of the existing models for particle multiplicity evaluation in heavy ion collisions which are at our disposal in the form of Monte Carlo simulators. Models are classified according to the physical mechanisms with which they try to describe the different stages of a high-energy collision between heavy nuclei. A comparison of predictions, as available at the beginning of year 2000, for multiplicities in central AuAu collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and PbPb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is provided

  17. Interactive collision detection for deformable models using streaming AABBs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Kim, Young J

    2007-01-01

    We present an interactive and accurate collision detection algorithm for deformable, polygonal objects based on the streaming computational model. Our algorithm can detect all possible pairwise primitive-level intersections between two severely deforming models at highly interactive rates. In our streaming computational model, we consider a set of axis aligned bounding boxes (AABBs) that bound each of the given deformable objects as an input stream and perform massively-parallel pairwise, overlapping tests onto the incoming streams. As a result, we are able to prevent performance stalls in the streaming pipeline that can be caused by expensive indexing mechanism required by bounding volume hierarchy-based streaming algorithms. At runtime, as the underlying models deform over time, we employ a novel, streaming algorithm to update the geometric changes in the AABB streams. Moreover, in order to get only the computed result (i.e., collision results between AABBs) without reading back the entire output streams, we propose a streaming en/decoding strategy that can be performed in a hierarchical fashion. After determining overlapped AABBs, we perform a primitive-level (e.g., triangle) intersection checking on a serial computational model such as CPUs. We implemented the entire pipeline of our algorithm using off-the-shelf graphics processors (GPUs), such as nVIDIA GeForce 7800 GTX, for streaming computations, and Intel Dual Core 3.4G processors for serial computations. We benchmarked our algorithm with different models of varying complexities, ranging from 15K up to 50K triangles, under various deformation motions, and the timings were obtained as 30 approximately 100 FPS depending on the complexity of models and their relative configurations. Finally, we made comparisons with a well-known GPU-based collision detection algorithm, CULLIDE [4] and observed about three times performance improvement over the earlier approach. We also made comparisons with a SW-based AABB

  18. Sky-Radiance Models for Monte Carlo Radiative Transfer Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, I.; Dalimonte, D.; Santos, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Photon-tracing can be initialized through sky-radiance (Lsky) distribution models when executing Monte Carlo simulations for ocean color studies. To be effective, the Lsky model should: 1) properly represent sky-radiance features of interest; 2) require low computing time; and 3) depend on a limited number of input parameters. The present study verifies the satisfiability of these prerequisite by comparing results from different Lsky formulations. Specifically, two Lsky models were considered as reference cases because of their different approach among solutions presented in the literature. The first model, developed by the Harrisson and Coombes (HC), is based on a parametric expression where the sun geometry is the unique input. The HC model is one of the sky-radiance analytical distribution applied in state-of-art simulations for ocean optics. The coefficients of the HC model were set upon broad-band field measurements and the result is a model that requires a few implementation steps. The second model, implemented by Zibordi and Voss (ZV), is based on physical expressions that accounts for the optical thickness of permanent gases, aerosol, ozone and water vapour at specific wavelengths. Inter-comparisons between normalized ^LskyZV and ^LskyHC (i.e., with unitary scalar irradiance) are discussed by means of individual polar maps and percent difference between sky-radiance distributions. Sky-radiance cross-sections are presented as well. Considered cases include different sun zenith values and wavelengths (i.e., λ=413, 490 and 665 nm, corresponding to selected center-bands of the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer MERIS). Results have shown a significant convergence between ^LskyHC and ^LskyZV at 665 nm. Differences between models increase with the sun zenith and mostly with wavelength. For Instance, relative differences up to 50% between ^ L skyHC and ^ LskyZV can be observed in the antisolar region for λ=665 nm and θ*=45°. The effects of these

  19. Utility of Monte Carlo Modelling for Holdup Measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belian, Anthony P.; Russo, P. A. (Phyllis A.); Weier, Dennis R. (Dennis Ray),

    2005-01-01

    Non-destructive assay (NDA) measurements performed to locate and quantify holdup in the Oak Ridge K25 enrichment cascade used neutron totals counting and low-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. This facility housed the gaseous diffusion process for enrichment of uranium, in the form of UF{sub 6} gas, from {approx} 20% to 93%. Inventory of {sup 235}U inventory in K-25 is all holdup. These buildings have been slated for decontaminatino and decommissioning. The NDA measurements establish the inventory quantities and will be used to assure criticality safety and meet criteria for waste analysis and transportation. The tendency to err on the side of conservatism for the sake of criticality safety in specifying total NDA uncertainty argues, in the interests of safety and costs, for obtaining the best possible value of uncertainty at the conservative confidence level for each item of process equipment. Variable deposit distribution is a complex systematic effect (i.e., determined by multiple independent variables) on the portable NDA results for very large and bulk converters that contributes greatly to total uncertainty for holdup in converters measured by gamma or neutron NDA methods. Because the magnitudes of complex systematic effects are difficult to estimate, computational tools are important for evaluating those that are large. Motivated by very large discrepancies between gamma and neutron measurements of high-mass converters with gamma results tending to dominate, the Monte Carlo code MCNP has been used to determine the systematic effects of deposit distribution on gamma and neutron results for {sup 235}U holdup mass in converters. This paper details the numerical methodology used to evaluate large systematic effects unique to each measurement type, validates the methodology by comparison with measurements, and discusses how modeling tools can supplement the calibration of instruments used for holdup measurements by providing realistic values at well

  20. 3-D Numerical Modelling of Oblique Continental Collisions with ASPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatun, L.; Pysklywec, R.

    2017-12-01

    Among the fundamental types of tectonic plate boundaries, continent-continent collision is least well understood. Deformation of the upper and middle crustal layers can be inferred from surface structures and geophysical imaging, but the fate of lower crustal rocks and mantle lithosphere is not well resolved. Previous research suggests that shortening of mantle lithosphere generally may be occurring by either: 1) a distributed thickening with a formation of a Raleigh-Tailor (RT) type instability (possibly accompanied with lithospheric folding); or 2) plate-like subduction, which can be one- or two-sided, with or without delamination and slab break-off; a combination of both could be taking place too. 3-D features of the orogens such as along-trench material transfer, bounding subduction zones can influence the evolution of the collision zone significantly. The current study was inspired by South Island of New Zealand - a young collision system where a block of continental crust is being shortened by the relative Australian-Pacific plate motion. The collision segment of the plate boundary is relatively small ( 800 km), and is bounded by oppositely verging subduction zones to the North and South. Here, we present results of 3-D forward numerical modelling of continental collision to investigate some of these processes. To conduct the simulations, we used ASPECT - a highly parallel community-developed code based on the Finite Element method. Model setup for three different sets of models featured 2-D vertical across strike, 3-D with periodic front and back walls, and 3-D with open front and back walls, with velocities prescribed on the left and right faces. We explored the importance of values of convergent velocity, strike-slip velocity and their ratio, which defines the resulting velocity direction relative to the plate boundary (obliquity). We found that higher strike-slip motion promotes strain localization, weakens the lithosphere close to the plate boundary and

  1. Modeling of Ship Collision Risk Index Based on Complex Plane and Its Realization

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoqin Xu; Xiaoqiao Geng; Yuanqiao Wen

    2016-01-01

    Ship collision risk index is the basic and important concept in the domain of ship collision avoidance. In this paper, the advantages and deficiencies of the various calculation methods of ship collision risk index are pointed out. Then the ship collision risk model based on complex plane, which can well make up for the deficiencies of the widely-used evaluation model proposed by Kearon.J and Liu ruru is proposed. On this basis, the calculation method of collision risk index under the encount...

  2. Modeling of helium bubble nucleation and growth in austenitic stainless steels using an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Backer, A.; Adjanor, G.; Domain, C.; Lescoat, M.L.; Jublot-Leclerc, S.; Fortuna, F.; Gentils, A.; Ortiz, C.J.; Souidi, A.; Becquart, C.S.

    2015-01-01

    Implantation of 10 keV helium in 316L steel thin foils was performed in JANNuS-Orsay facility and modeled using a multiscale approach. Density Functional Theory (DFT) atomistic calculations [1] were used to obtain the properties of He and He-vacancy clusters, and the Binary Collision Approximation based code MARLOWE was applied to determine the damage and He-ion depth profiles as in [2,3]. The processes involved in the homogeneous He bubble nucleation and growth were defined and implemented in the Object Kinetic Monte Carlo code LAKIMOCA [4]. In particular as the He to dpa ratio was high, self-trapping of He clusters and the trap mutation of He-vacancy clusters had to be taken into account. With this multiscale approach, the formation of bubbles was modeled up to nanometer-scale size, where bubbles can be observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy. Their densities and sizes were studied as functions of fluence (up to 5 × 10 19 He/m 2 ) at two temperatures (473 and 723 K) and for different sample thicknesses (25–250 nm). It appears that the damage is not only due to the collision cascades but is also strongly controlled by the He accumulation in pressurized bubbles. Comparison with experimental data is discussed and sensible agreement is achieved

  3. Modeling of helium bubble nucleation and growth in austenitic stainless steels using an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Backer, A., E-mail: andree.debacker@ccfe.ac.uk [UMET, UMR 8207, Université Lille 1, Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); CCFE, Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); Adjanor, G.; Domain, C.; Lescoat, M.L. [EDF R& D, MMC Centre des Renardières, Moret-sur-Loing (France); Jublot-Leclerc, S.; Fortuna, F.; Gentils, A. [CSNSM, Univ Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France); Ortiz, C.J. [CIEMAT, Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión por Confinamiento Magnético, Madrid (Spain); Souidi, A. [Université Dr. Tahar Moulay de Saida, Saida (Algeria); Becquart, C.S. [UMET, UMR 8207, Université Lille 1, Villeneuve d’Ascq (France)

    2015-06-01

    Implantation of 10 keV helium in 316L steel thin foils was performed in JANNuS-Orsay facility and modeled using a multiscale approach. Density Functional Theory (DFT) atomistic calculations [1] were used to obtain the properties of He and He-vacancy clusters, and the Binary Collision Approximation based code MARLOWE was applied to determine the damage and He-ion depth profiles as in [2,3]. The processes involved in the homogeneous He bubble nucleation and growth were defined and implemented in the Object Kinetic Monte Carlo code LAKIMOCA [4]. In particular as the He to dpa ratio was high, self-trapping of He clusters and the trap mutation of He-vacancy clusters had to be taken into account. With this multiscale approach, the formation of bubbles was modeled up to nanometer-scale size, where bubbles can be observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy. Their densities and sizes were studied as functions of fluence (up to 5 × 10{sup 19} He/m{sup 2}) at two temperatures (473 and 723 K) and for different sample thicknesses (25–250 nm). It appears that the damage is not only due to the collision cascades but is also strongly controlled by the He accumulation in pressurized bubbles. Comparison with experimental data is discussed and sensible agreement is achieved.

  4. Particle production at large transverse momentum and hard collision models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranft, G.; Ranft, J.

    1977-04-01

    The majority of the presently available experimental data is consistent with hard scattering models. Therefore the hard scattering model seems to be well established. There is good evidence for jets in large transverse momentum reactions as predicted by these models. The overall picture is however not yet well enough understood. We mention only the empirical hard scattering cross section introduced in most of the models, the lack of a deep theoretical understanding of the interplay between quark confinement and jet production, and the fact that we are not yet able to discriminate conclusively between the many proposed hard scattering models. The status of different hard collision models discussed in this paper is summarized. (author)

  5. Incorporation of human factors into ship collision risk models focusing on human centred design aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotiralis, P.; Ventikos, N.P.; Hamann, R.; Golyshev, P.; Teixeira, A.P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an approach that more adequately incorporates human factor considerations into quantitative risk analysis of ship operation. The focus is on the collision accident category, which is one of the main risk contributors in ship operation. The approach is based on the development of a Bayesian Network (BN) model that integrates elements from the Technique for Retrospective and Predictive Analysis of Cognitive Errors (TRACEr) and focuses on the calculation of the collision accident probability due to human error. The model takes into account the human performance in normal, abnormal and critical operational conditions and implements specific tasks derived from the analysis of the task errors leading to the collision accident category. A sensitivity analysis is performed to identify the most important contributors to human performance and ship collision. Finally, the model developed is applied to assess the collision risk of a feeder operating in Dover strait using the collision probability estimated by the developed BN model and an Event tree model for calculation of human, economic and environmental risks. - Highlights: • A collision risk model for the incorporation of human factors into quantitative risk analysis is proposed. • The model takes into account the human performance in different operational conditions leading to the collision. • The most important contributors to human performance and ship collision are identified. • The model developed is applied to assess the collision risk of a feeder operating in Dover strait.

  6. Monte Carlo study of superconductivity in the three-band Emery model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frick, M.; Pattnaik, P.C.; Morgenstern, I.; Newns, D.M.; von der Linden, W.

    1990-01-01

    We have examined the three-band Hubbard model for the copper oxide planes in high-temperature superconductors using the projector quantum Monte Carlo method. We find no evidence for s-wave superconductivity

  7. Simplest Validation of the HIJING Monte Carlo Model

    CERN Document Server

    Uzhinsky, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    Fulfillment of the energy-momentum conservation law, as well as the charge, baryon and lepton number conservation is checked for the HIJING Monte Carlo program in $pp$-interactions at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 200, 5500, and 14000 GeV. It is shown that the energy is conserved quite well. The transverse momentum is not conserved, the deviation from zero is at the level of 1--2 GeV/c, and it is connected with the hard jet production. The deviation is absent for soft interactions. Charge, baryon and lepton numbers are conserved. Azimuthal symmetry of the Monte Carlo events is studied, too. It is shown that there is a small signature of a "flow". The situation with the symmetry gets worse for nucleus-nucleus interactions.

  8. A Simple Model of Wings in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Parikh, Aditya

    2015-01-01

    We create a simple model of heavy ion collisions independent of any generators as a way of investigating a possible source of the wings seen in data. As a first test, we reproduce a standard correlations plot to verify the integrity of the model. We then proceed to test whether an η dependent v2 could be a source of the wings and take projections along multiple Δφ intervals and compare with data. Other variations of the model are tested by having dN/dφ and v2 depend on η as well as including pions and protons into the model to make it more realistic. Comparisons with data seem to indicate that an η dependent v2 is not the main source of the wings.

  9. Application of MCAM in generating Monte Carlo model for ITER port limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Lei; Li Ying; Ding Aiping; Zeng Qin; Huang Chenyu; Wu Yican

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of the pre-processing and conversion functions supplied by MCAM (Monte-Carlo Particle Transport Calculated Automatic Modeling System), this paper performed the generation of ITER Port Limiter MC (Monte-Carlo) calculation model from the CAD engineering model. The result was validated by using reverse function of MCAM and MCNP PLOT 2D cross-section drawing program. the successful application of MCAM to ITER Port Limiter demonstrates that MCAM is capable of dramatically increasing the efficiency and accuracy to generate MC calculation models from CAD engineering models with complex geometry comparing with the traditional manual modeling method. (authors)

  10. Inelastic collisions of medium energy atomic elements. Qualitative model of energy losses during collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovit, A.N.

    2006-01-01

    A new approach to the theoretical description of energy losses of atomic particle of medium energy during their interaction with the substance is proposed. The corner-stone of this approach is the supposition that all of the collision processes have inelastic nature during particle movement through the substance, while the calculation of the atomic particles braking is based on the law of their dispersion and the laws of energy and momentum conservation at the inelastic collisions. It is shown that inelastic atomic collision there are three dispersion zones for the only potential interaction with different laws, which characterize energy losses. The application conditions of this approach are determined [ru

  11. Pushing the limits of Monte Carlo simulations for the three-dimensional Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrenberg, Alan M.; Xu, Jiahao; Landau, David P.

    2018-04-01

    While the three-dimensional Ising model has defied analytic solution, various numerical methods like Monte Carlo, Monte Carlo renormalization group, and series expansion have provided precise information about the phase transition. Using Monte Carlo simulation that employs the Wolff cluster flipping algorithm with both 32-bit and 53-bit random number generators and data analysis with histogram reweighting and quadruple precision arithmetic, we have investigated the critical behavior of the simple cubic Ising Model, with lattice sizes ranging from 163 to 10243. By analyzing data with cross correlations between various thermodynamic quantities obtained from the same data pool, e.g., logarithmic derivatives of magnetization and derivatives of magnetization cumulants, we have obtained the critical inverse temperature Kc=0.221 654 626 (5 ) and the critical exponent of the correlation length ν =0.629 912 (86 ) with precision that exceeds all previous Monte Carlo estimates.

  12. Modeling defect production in high energy collision cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Singh, B.N.

    1993-01-01

    A multi-model approach roach (MMA) to simulating defect production processes at the atomic scale is described that incorporates molecular dynamics (MD), binary collision approximation (BCA) calculations and stochastic annealing simulations. The central hypothesis of the MMA is that the simple, fast computer codes capable of simulating large numbers of high energy cascades (e.g., BCA codes) can be made to yield the correct defect configurations when their parameters are calibrated using the results of the more physically realistic MD simulations. The calibration procedure is investigated using results of MD simulations of 25 keV cascades in copper. The configurations of point defects are extracted from the MD cascade simulations at the end of the collisional phase, similar to the information obtained with a binary collision model. The MD collisional phase defect configurations are used as input to the ALSOME annealing simulation code, and values of the ALSOME quenching parameters are determined that yield the best fit to the post-quenching defect configurations of the MD simulations

  13. Single nucleon-nucleon collision model for subthreshold pion production in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellini, V.; Di Toro, M.; Bonasera, A.

    1985-01-01

    We show that inclusive experimental data on subthreshold pion production in 12 C + 12 C and 16 O + 12 C collisions can be reproduced using a first chance Nucleon-Nucleon (NN) collision mechanism. Pauli blocking effects are extremely important while π-resorption can be safely neglected for these light systems. We apply our method at various beam energies. The possible importance of collective dynamical effects around the physical threshold is finally suggested

  14. Insight into collision zone dynamics from topography: numerical modelling results and observations

    OpenAIRE

    A. D. Bottrill; J. van Hunen; M. B. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic models of subduction and continental collision are used to predict dynamic topography changes on the overriding plate. The modelling results show a distinct evolution of topography on the overriding plate, during subduction, continental collision and slab break-off. A prominent topographic feature is a temporary (few Myrs) deepening in the area of the back arc-basin after initial collision. This collisional mantle dynamic basin (CMDB) is caused by slab steepening drawing material away...

  15. Improving system modeling accuracy with Monte Carlo codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.S.

    1996-01-01

    The use of computer codes based on Monte Carlo methods to perform criticality calculations has become common-place. Although results frequently published in the literature report calculated k eff values to four decimal places, people who use the codes in their everyday work say that they only believe the first two decimal places of any result. The lack of confidence in the computed k eff values may be due to the tendency of the reported standard deviation to underestimate errors associated with the Monte Carlo process. The standard deviation as reported by the codes is the standard deviation of the mean of the k eff values for individual generations in the computer simulation, not the standard deviation of the computed k eff value compared with the physical system. A more subtle problem with the standard deviation of the mean as reported by the codes is that all the k eff values from the separate generations are not statistically independent since the k eff of a given generation is a function of k eff of the previous generation, which is ultimately based on the starting source. To produce a standard deviation that is more representative of the physical system, statistically independent values of k eff are needed

  16. Proton nucleus collisions in the Landau hydrodynamical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, B.

    1976-01-01

    The dependence upon energy and the atomic number A for the multiplicities and the angular distributions of the relativistic secondaries is computed according to the hydrodynamic model for proton-nucleus collisions. Some different ways of converting the dependence upon tunnellength in nuclear matter into A dependence are discussed and a phenomenological model employed to exhibit the correlations to the fragmentation of the nucleus. The treatment is valid for arbitrary values of the velocity of sound c 0 in nuclear matter inside the range 0.2 0 0 around c 0 approximately 0.5 is preferred in a comparison to the presently available experimental data. This is the same range of values of the parameter for which the best agreement between theory and experiment occurs in the ISR range. (Auth.)

  17. Phenomenological studies of hadronic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Zijl, M.

    1987-04-01

    Several aspects of hadronic collisions are studied in a phenomenological framework. A Monte Carlo model for initial state parton showers, using a backwards evolution scheme, is presented. Comparisons with experimental data and analytical calculations are made. The consequence of using different fragmentation model on the determination of α s is also investigated. It is found that the different fragmentation models lead to the reconstruction of significantly α s values. Finally the possibility of having several independent parton-parton interactions in a hadron-hadron collision is studied. A model is developed, which takes into account the effects of variable impact parameters. This is implemented in a Monte Carlo computer program and extensive comparisons with experimental data are carried out. There is clear evidence in favour of multiple interactions with variable impact parameters. (author)

  18. Evolution of metastable state molecules N2(A3Σu+) in a nanosecond pulsed discharge: A particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collisions simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Liang; Sun Jizhong; Feng Chunlei; Bai Jing; Ding Hongbin

    2012-01-01

    A particle-in-cell plus Monte Carlo collisions method has been employed to investigate the nitrogen discharge driven by a nanosecond pulse power source. To assess whether the production of the metastable state N 2 (A 3 Σ u + ) can be efficiently enhanced in a nanosecond pulsed discharge, the evolutions of metastable state N 2 (A 3 Σ u + ) density and electron energy distribution function have been examined in detail. The simulation results indicate that the ultra short pulse can modulate the electron energy effectively: during the early pulse-on time, high energy electrons give rise to quick electron avalanche and rapid growth of the metastable state N 2 (A 3 Σ u + ) density. It is estimated that for a single pulse with amplitude of -9 kV and pulse width 30 ns, the metastable state N 2 (A 3 Σ u + ) density can achieve a value in the order of 10 9 cm -3 . The N 2 (A 3 Σ u + ) density at such a value could be easily detected by laser-based experimental methods.

  19. Evolution of metastable state molecules N2(A3 Σu+) in a nanosecond pulsed discharge: A particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collisions simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Sun, Jizhong; Feng, Chunlei; Bai, Jing; Ding, Hongbin

    2012-01-01

    A particle-in-cell plus Monte Carlo collisions method has been employed to investigate the nitrogen discharge driven by a nanosecond pulse power source. To assess whether the production of the metastable state N2(A3 Σu+) can be efficiently enhanced in a nanosecond pulsed discharge, the evolutions of metastable state N2(A3 Σu+) density and electron energy distribution function have been examined in detail. The simulation results indicate that the ultra short pulse can modulate the electron energy effectively: during the early pulse-on time, high energy electrons give rise to quick electron avalanche and rapid growth of the metastable state N2(A3 Σu+) density. It is estimated that for a single pulse with amplitude of -9 kV and pulse width 30 ns, the metastable state N2(A3 Σu+) density can achieve a value in the order of 109 cm-3. The N2(A3 Σu+) density at such a value could be easily detected by laser-based experimental methods.

  20. Simple model of surface roughness for binary collision sputtering simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Sloan J.; Hobler, Gerhard; Maciążek, Dawid; Postawa, Zbigniew

    2017-02-01

    It has been shown that surface roughness can strongly influence the sputtering yield - especially at glancing incidence angles where the inclusion of surface roughness leads to an increase in sputtering yields. In this work, we propose a simple one-parameter model (the "density gradient model") which imitates surface roughness effects. In the model, the target's atomic density is assumed to vary linearly between the actual material density and zero. The layer width is the sole model parameter. The model has been implemented in the binary collision simulator IMSIL and has been evaluated against various geometric surface models for 5 keV Ga ions impinging an amorphous Si target. To aid the construction of a realistic rough surface topography, we have performed MD simulations of sequential 5 keV Ga impacts on an initially crystalline Si target. We show that our new model effectively reproduces the sputtering yield, with only minor variations in the energy and angular distributions of sputtered particles. The success of the density gradient model is attributed to a reduction of the reflection coefficient - leading to increased sputtering yields, similar in effect to surface roughness.

  1. Exploring uncertainty in glacier mass balance modelling with Monte Carlo simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machguth, H.; Purves, R.S.; Oerlemans, J.; Hoelzle, M.; Paul, F.

    2008-01-01

    By means of Monte Carlo simulations we calculated uncertainty in modelled cumulative mass balance over 400 days at one particular point on the tongue of Morteratsch Glacier, Switzerland, using a glacier energy balance model of intermediate complexity. Before uncertainty assessment, the model was

  2. Microscopic imaging through turbid media Monte Carlo modeling and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Min; Deng, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a systematic introduction to the principles of microscopic imaging through tissue-like turbid media in terms of Monte-Carlo simulation. It describes various gating mechanisms based on the physical differences between the unscattered and scattered photons and method for microscopic image reconstruction, using the concept of the effective point spread function. Imaging an object embedded in a turbid medium is a challenging problem in physics as well as in biophotonics. A turbid medium surrounding an object under inspection causes multiple scattering, which degrades the contrast, resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. Biological tissues are typically turbid media. Microscopic imaging through a tissue-like turbid medium can provide higher resolution than transillumination imaging in which no objective is used. This book serves as a valuable reference for engineers and scientists working on microscopy of tissue turbid media.

  3. Basic Modelling principles and Validation of Software for Prediction of Collision Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    2000-01-01

    This report describes basic modelling principles, the theoretical background and validation examples for the collision damage prediction module in the ISESO stand-alone software.......This report describes basic modelling principles, the theoretical background and validation examples for the collision damage prediction module in the ISESO stand-alone software....

  4. Implementation of a Monte Carlo based inverse planning model for clinical IMRT with MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Tongming Tony

    2003-01-01

    Inaccurate dose calculations and limitations of optimization algorithms in inverse planning introduce systematic and convergence errors to treatment plans. This work was to implement a Monte Carlo based inverse planning model for clinical IMRT aiming to minimize the aforementioned errors. The strategy was to precalculate the dose matrices of beamlets in a Monte Carlo based method followed by the optimization of beamlet intensities. The MCNP 4B (Monte Carlo N-Particle version 4B) code was modified to implement selective particle transport and dose tallying in voxels and efficient estimation of statistical uncertainties. The resulting performance gain was over eleven thousand times. Due to concurrent calculation of multiple beamlets of individual ports, hundreds of beamlets in an IMRT plan could be calculated within a practical length of time. A finite-sized point source model provided a simple and accurate modeling of treatment beams. The dose matrix calculations were validated through measurements in phantoms. Agreements were better than 1.5% or 0.2 cm. The beamlet intensities were optimized using a parallel platform based optimization algorithm that was capable of escape from local minima and preventing premature convergence. The Monte Carlo based inverse planning model was applied to clinical cases. The feasibility and capability of Monte Carlo based inverse planning for clinical IMRT was demonstrated. Systematic errors in treatment plans of a commercial inverse planning system were assessed in comparison with the Monte Carlo based calculations. Discrepancies in tumor doses and critical structure doses were up to 12% and 17%, respectively. The clinical importance of Monte Carlo based inverse planning for IMRT was demonstrated

  5. Importance estimation in Monte Carlo modelling of neutron and photon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickael, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    The estimation of neutron and photon importance in a three-dimensional geometry is achieved using a coupled Monte Carlo and diffusion theory calculation. The parameters required for the solution of the multigroup adjoint diffusion equation are estimated from an analog Monte Carlo simulation of the system under investigation. The solution of the adjoint diffusion equation is then used as an estimate of the particle importance in the actual simulation. This approach provides an automated and efficient variance reduction method for Monte Carlo simulations. The technique has been successfully applied to Monte Carlo simulation of neutron and coupled neutron-photon transport in the nuclear well-logging field. The results show that the importance maps obtained in a few minutes of computer time using this technique are in good agreement with Monte Carlo generated importance maps that require prohibitive computing times. The application of this method to Monte Carlo modelling of the response of neutron porosity and pulsed neutron instruments has resulted in major reductions in computation time. (Author)

  6. Modelling of electron contamination in clinical photon beams for Monte Carlo dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J; Li, J S; Qin, L; Xiong, W; Ma, C-M

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to model electron contamination in clinical photon beams and to commission the source model using measured data for Monte Carlo treatment planning. In this work, a planar source is used to represent the contaminant electrons at a plane above the upper jaws. The source size depends on the dimensions of the field size at the isocentre. The energy spectra of the contaminant electrons are predetermined using Monte Carlo simulations for photon beams from different clinical accelerators. A 'random creep' method is employed to derive the weight of the electron contamination source by matching Monte Carlo calculated monoenergetic photon and electron percent depth-dose (PDD) curves with measured PDD curves. We have integrated this electron contamination source into a previously developed multiple source model and validated the model for photon beams from Siemens PRIMUS accelerators. The EGS4 based Monte Carlo user code BEAM and MCSIM were used for linac head simulation and dose calculation. The Monte Carlo calculated dose distributions were compared with measured data. Our results showed good agreement (less than 2% or 2 mm) for 6, 10 and 18 MV photon beams

  7. Automatic modeling for the Monte Carlo transport code Geant4 in MCAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie Fanzhi; Hu Liqin; Wang Guozhong; Wang Dianxi; Wu Yican; Wang Dong; Long Pengcheng; FDS Team

    2014-01-01

    Geant4 is a widely used Monte Carlo transport simulation package. Its geometry models could be described in geometry description markup language (GDML), but it is time-consuming and error-prone to describe the geometry models manually. This study implemented the conversion between computer-aided design (CAD) geometry models and GDML models. The conversion program was integrated into Multi-Physics Coupling Analysis Modeling Program (MCAM). The tests, including FDS-Ⅱ model, demonstrated its accuracy and feasibility. (authors)

  8. R and D on automatic modeling methods for Monte Carlo codes FLUKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dianxi; Hu Liqin; Wang Guozhong; Zhao Zijia; Nie Fanzhi; Wu Yican; Long Pengcheng

    2013-01-01

    FLUKA is a fully integrated particle physics Monte Carlo simulation package. It is necessary to create the geometry models before calculation. However, it is time- consuming and error-prone to describe the geometry models manually. This study developed an automatic modeling method which could automatically convert computer-aided design (CAD) geometry models into FLUKA models. The conversion program was integrated into CAD/image-based automatic modeling program for nuclear and radiation transport simulation (MCAM). Its correctness has been demonstrated. (authors)

  9. Modelling early stages of relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruggieri M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we model early time dynamics of relativistic heavy ion collisions by an initial color-electric field which then decays to a plasma by the Schwinger mechanism. The dynamics of the many particles system produced by the decay is described by relativistic kinetic theory, taking into account the backreaction on the color field by solving self-consistently the kinetic and the field equations. Our main results concern isotropization and thermalization for a 1+1D expanding geometry. In case of small η/s (η/s ≲ 0.3 we find τisotropization ≈ 0.8 fm/c and τthermalization ≈ 1 fm/c in agreement with the common lore of hydrodynamics.

  10. CAD-based Monte Carlo automatic modeling method based on primitive solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Dong; Song, Jing; Yu, Shengpeng; Long, Pengcheng; Wang, Yongliang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We develop a method which bi-convert between CAD model and primitive solid. • This method was improved from convert method between CAD model and half space. • This method was test by ITER model and validated the correctness and efficiency. • This method was integrated in SuperMC which could model for SuperMC and Geant4. - Abstract: Monte Carlo method has been widely used in nuclear design and analysis, where geometries are described with primitive solids. However, it is time consuming and error prone to describe a primitive solid geometry, especially for a complicated model. To reuse the abundant existed CAD models and conveniently model with CAD modeling tools, an automatic modeling method for accurate prompt modeling between CAD model and primitive solid is needed. An automatic modeling method for Monte Carlo geometry described by primitive solid was developed which could bi-convert between CAD model and Monte Carlo geometry represented by primitive solids. While converting from CAD model to primitive solid model, the CAD model was decomposed into several convex solid sets, and then corresponding primitive solids were generated and exported. While converting from primitive solid model to the CAD model, the basic primitive solids were created and related operation was done. This method was integrated in the SuperMC and was benchmarked with ITER benchmark model. The correctness and efficiency of this method were demonstrated.

  11. Comparison of string models for heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, K.

    1990-01-01

    An important method to explore new domains in physics is to compare new results with extrapolations from known areas. For heavy ion collision this can be done with string models, which extrapolate from light to heavy systems and which also may be used to extrapolate to higher energies. That does not mean that these string models are only background models, one may easily implement new ideas on top of the known aspects, providing much more reliable models than those formed from scratch. All the models to be considered in this paper have in common that they consist of three independent building blocks: (a) geometry, (b) string formation and (c) string fragmentation. The geometry aspect is treated quite similar in all models: nucleons are distributed inside each nucleus according to some standard parameterization of nuclear densities. The nuclei move through each other on a straight line trajectory, with all the nucleon positions being fixed. Whenever a projectile and a target nucleon come close, they interact. Such an interaction results in string formation. In the last step these strings decay into observable hadrons according to some string fragmentation procedure. The three building blocks are independent, so one can combine different methods in an arbitrary manner. Therefore rather than treating the models one after the other, the author discusses the procedures for string formation and string fragmentation as used by the models. He considers string models in a very general sense, so he includes models where the authors never use the word string, but which may be most naturally interpreted as string models and show strong similarities with real string models. Although very important he does not discuss - for time and space reasons - recent developments concerning secondary scattering

  12. A Monte Carlo study on event-by-event transverse momentum fluctuation at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Mingmei

    2005-01-01

    The experimental observation on the multiplicity dependence of event-by-event transverse momentum fluctuation in relativistic heavy ion collisions is studied using Monte Carlo simulation. It is found that the Monte Carlo generator HIJING is unable to describe the experimental phenomenon well. A simple Monte Carlo model is proposed, which can recover the data and thus shed some light on the dynamical origin of the multiplicity dependence of event-by-event transverse momentum fluctuation. (authors)

  13. Modeling Vehicle Collision Angle in Traffic Crashes Based on Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengchao Lyu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In road traffic accidents, the analysis of a vehicle’s collision angle plays a key role in identifying a traffic accident’s form and cause. However, because accurate estimation of vehicle collision angle involves many factors, it is difficult to accurately determine it in cases in which less physical evidence is available and there is a lack of monitoring. This paper establishes the mathematical relation model between collision angle, deformation, and normal vector in the collision region according to the equations of particle deformation and force in Hooke’s law of classical mechanics. At the same time, the surface reconstruction method suitable for a normal vector solution is studied. Finally, the estimation model of vehicle collision angle is presented. In order to verify the correctness of the model, verification of multi-angle collision experiments and sensitivity analysis of laser scanning precision for the angle have been carried out using three-dimensional (3D data obtained by a 3D laser scanner in the collision deformation zone. Under the conditions with which the model has been defined, validation results show that the collision angle is a result of the weighted synthesis of the normal vector of the collision point and the weight value is the deformation of the collision point corresponding to normal vectors. These conclusions prove the applicability of the model. The collision angle model proposed in this paper can be used as the theoretical basis for traffic accident identification and cause analysis. It can also be used as a theoretical reference for the study of the impact deformation of elastic materials.

  14. NRMC - A GPU code for N-Reverse Monte Carlo modeling of fluids in confined media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Gil, Vicente; Noya, Eva G.; Lomba, Enrique

    2017-08-01

    NRMC is a parallel code for performing N-Reverse Monte Carlo modeling of fluids in confined media [V. Sánchez-Gil, E.G. Noya, E. Lomba, J. Chem. Phys. 140 (2014) 024504]. This method is an extension of the usual Reverse Monte Carlo method to obtain structural models of confined fluids compatible with experimental diffraction patterns, specifically designed to overcome the problem of slow diffusion that can appear under conditions of tight confinement. Most of the computational time in N-Reverse Monte Carlo modeling is spent in the evaluation of the structure factor for each trial configuration, a calculation that can be easily parallelized. Implementation of the structure factor evaluation in NVIDIA® CUDA so that the code can be run on GPUs leads to a speed up of up to two orders of magnitude.

  15. A rigorous test for a new conceptual model for collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peixoto, E.M.A.; Mu-Tao, L.

    1979-01-01

    A rigorous theoretical foundation for the previously proposed model is formulated and applied to electron scattering by H 2 in the gas phase. An rigorous treatment of the interaction potential between the incident electron and the Hydrogen molecule is carried out to calculate Differential Cross Sections for 1 KeV electrons, using Glauber's approximation Wang's molecular wave function for the ground electronic state of H 2 . Moreover, it is shown for the first time that, when adequately done, the omission of two center terms does not adversely influence the results of molecular calculations. It is shown that the new model is far superior to the Independent Atom Model (or Independent Particle Model). The accuracy and simplicity of the new model suggest that it may be fruitfully applied to the description of other collision phenomena (e.g., in molecular beam experiments and nuclear physics). A new techniques is presented for calculations involving two center integrals within the frame work of the Glauber's approximation for scattering. (Author) [pt

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of diblock copolymer microphases by means of a 'fast' off-lattice model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besold, Gerhard; Hassager, O.; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1999-01-01

    We present a mesoscopic off-lattice model for the simulation of diblock copolymer melts by Monte Carlo techniques. A single copolymer molecule is modeled as a discrete Edwards chain consisting of two blocks with vertices of type A and B, respectively. The volume interaction is formulated in terms...

  17. Modelling of the RA-1 reactor using a Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinteiro, Guillermo F.; Calabrese, Carlos R.

    2000-01-01

    It was carried out for the first time, a model of the Argentine RA-1 reactor using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. This model was validated using data for experimental neutron and gamma measurements at different energy ranges and locations. In addition, the resulting fluxes were compared with the data obtained using a 3D diffusion code. (author)

  18. Parameter uncertainty and model predictions: a review of Monte Carlo results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, R.H.; O'Neill, R.V.

    1979-01-01

    Studies of parameter variability by Monte Carlo analysis are reviewed using repeated simulations of the model with randomly selected parameter values. At the beginning of each simulation, parameter values are chosen from specific frequency distributions. This process is continued for a number of iterations sufficient to converge on an estimate of the frequency distribution of the output variables. The purpose was to explore the general properties of error propagaton in models. Testing the implicit assumptions of analytical methods and pointing out counter-intuitive results produced by the Monte Carlo approach are additional points covered

  19. Monte Carlo Simulations of Compressible Ising Models: Do We Understand Them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, D. P.; Dünweg, B.; Laradji, M.; Tavazza, F.; Adler, J.; Cannavaccioulo, L.; Zhu, X.

    Extensive Monte Carlo simulations have begun to shed light on our understanding of phase transitions and universality classes for compressible Ising models. A comprehensive analysis of a Landau-Ginsburg-Wilson hamiltonian for systems with elastic degrees of freedom resulted in the prediction that there should be four distinct cases that would have different behavior, depending upon symmetries and thermodynamic constraints. We shall provide an account of the results of careful Monte Carlo simulations for a simple compressible Ising model that can be suitably modified so as to replicate all four cases.

  20. Empirical Analysis of Stochastic Volatility Model by Hybrid Monte Carlo Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaishi, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    The stochastic volatility model is one of volatility models which infer latent volatility of asset returns. The Bayesian inference of the stochastic volatility (SV) model is performed by the hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) algorithm which is superior to other Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods in sampling volatility variables. We perform the HMC simulations of the SV model for two liquid stock returns traded on the Tokyo Stock Exchange and measure the volatilities of those stock returns. Then we calculate the accuracy of the volatility measurement using the realized volatility as a proxy of the true volatility and compare the SV model with the GARCH model which is one of other volatility models. Using the accuracy calculated with the realized volatility we find that empirically the SV model performs better than the GARCH model.

  1. A collision dynamics model of a multi-level train

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-05

    In train collisions, multi-level rail passenger vehicles can deform in modes that are different from the behavior of single level cars. The deformation in single level cars usually occurs at the front end during a collision. In one particular inciden...

  2. Modeling of Ship Collision Risk Index Based on Complex Plane and Its Realization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqin Xu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ship collision risk index is the basic and important concept in the domain of ship collision avoidance. In this paper, the advantages and deficiencies of the various calculation methods of ship collision risk index are pointed out. Then the ship collision risk model based on complex plane, which can well make up for the deficiencies of the widely-used evaluation model proposed by Kearon.J and Liu ruru is proposed. On this basis, the calculation method of collision risk index under the encountering situation of multi-ships is constructed, then the three-dimensional image and spatial curve of the risk index are figured out. Finally, single chip microcomputer is used to realize the model. And attaching this single chip microcomputer to ARPA is helpful to the decision-making of the marine navigators.

  3. Statistical model predictions for p+p and Pb+Pb collisions at LHC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraus, I.; Cleymans, J.; Oeschler, H.; Redlich, K.; Wheaton, S.

    2009-01-01

    Particle production in p+p and central collisions at LHC is discussed in the context of the statistical thermal model. For heavy-ion collisions, predictions of various particle ratios are presented. The sensitivity of several ratios on the temperature and the baryon chemical potential is studied in

  4. Accelerated Monte Carlo system reliability analysis through machine-learning-based surrogate models of network connectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, R.E.; Song, J.; Work, D.B.

    2017-01-01

    The two-terminal reliability problem in system reliability analysis is known to be computationally intractable for large infrastructure graphs. Monte Carlo techniques can estimate the probability of a disconnection between two points in a network by selecting a representative sample of network component failure realizations and determining the source-terminal connectivity of each realization. To reduce the runtime required for the Monte Carlo approximation, this article proposes an approximate framework in which the connectivity check of each sample is estimated using a machine-learning-based classifier. The framework is implemented using both a support vector machine (SVM) and a logistic regression based surrogate model. Numerical experiments are performed on the California gas distribution network using the epicenter and magnitude of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake as well as randomly-generated earthquakes. It is shown that the SVM and logistic regression surrogate models are able to predict network connectivity with accuracies of 99% for both methods, and are 1–2 orders of magnitude faster than using a Monte Carlo method with an exact connectivity check. - Highlights: • Surrogate models of network connectivity are developed by machine-learning algorithms. • Developed surrogate models can reduce the runtime required for Monte Carlo simulations. • Support vector machine and logistic regressions are employed to develop surrogate models. • Numerical example of California gas distribution network demonstrate the proposed approach. • The developed models have accuracies 99%, and are 1–2 orders of magnitude faster than MCS.

  5. Modeling and Analysis of Ultrarelativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, William; Pratt, Scott

    2014-09-01

    High-energy collisions of heavy ions, such as gold, copper, or uranium serve as an important means of studying quantum chromodynamic matter. When relativistic nuclei collide, a hot, energetic fireball of dissociated partonic matter is created; this super-hadronic matter is believed to be the quark gluon plasma (QGP), which is theorized to have comprised the universe immediately following the big bang. As the fireball expands and cools, it reaches freeze-out temperatures, and quarks hadronize into baryons and mesons. To characterize this super-hadronic matter, one can use balance functions, a means of studying correlations due to local charge conservation. In particular, the simple model used in this research assumed two waves of localized charge-anticharge production, with an abrupt transition from the QGP stage to hadronization. Balance functions were constructed as the sum of these two charge production components, and four parameters were manipulated to match the model's output with experimental data taken from the STAR Collaboration at RHIC. Results show that the chemical composition of the super-hadronic matter are consistent with that of a thermally equilibrated QGP. High-energy collisions of heavy ions, such as gold, copper, or uranium serve as an important means of studying quantum chromodynamic matter. When relativistic nuclei collide, a hot, energetic fireball of dissociated partonic matter is created; this super-hadronic matter is believed to be the quark gluon plasma (QGP), which is theorized to have comprised the universe immediately following the big bang. As the fireball expands and cools, it reaches freeze-out temperatures, and quarks hadronize into baryons and mesons. To characterize this super-hadronic matter, one can use balance functions, a means of studying correlations due to local charge conservation. In particular, the simple model used in this research assumed two waves of localized charge-anticharge production, with an abrupt transition

  6. Account of the effect of nuclear collision cascades in model of radiation damage of RPV steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevorkyan, Yu.R.; Nikolaev, Yu.A.

    1997-01-01

    A kinetic model is proposed for describing the effect of collision cascades in model of radiation damage of reactor pressure vessel steels. This is a closed system of equations which can be solved only by numerical methods in general case

  7. Modelling of the RA-1 reactor using a Monte Carlo code; Modelado del reactor RA-1 utilizando un codigo Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinteiro, Guillermo F; Calabrese, Carlos R [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, General San Martin (Argentina). Dept. de Reactores y Centrales Nucleares

    2000-07-01

    It was carried out for the first time, a model of the Argentine RA-1 reactor using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. This model was validated using data for experimental neutron and gamma measurements at different energy ranges and locations. In addition, the resulting fluxes were compared with the data obtained using a 3D diffusion code. (author)

  8. Converting boundary representation solid models to half-space representation models for Monte Carlo analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J. E.; Eddy, M. J.; Sutton, T. M.; Altomari, T. J.

    2007-01-01

    Solid modeling computer software systems provide for the design of three-dimensional solid models used in the design and analysis of physical components. The current state-of-the-art in solid modeling representation uses a boundary representation format in which geometry and topology are used to form three-dimensional boundaries of the solid. The geometry representation used in these systems is cubic B-spline curves and surfaces - a network of cubic B-spline functions in three-dimensional Cartesian coordinate space. Many Monte Carlo codes, however, use a geometry representation in which geometry units are specified by intersections and unions of half-spaces. This paper describes an algorithm for converting from a boundary representation to a half-space representation. (authors)

  9. A Monte Carlo Investigation of the Box-Cox Model and a Nonlinear Least Squares Alternative.

    OpenAIRE

    Showalter, Mark H

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports a Monte Carlo study of the Box-Cox model and a nonlinear least squares alternative. Key results include the following: the transformation parameter in the Box-Cox model appears to be inconsistently estimated in the presence of conditional heteroskedasticity; the constant term in both the Box-Cox and the nonlinear least squares models is poorly estimated in small samples; conditional mean forecasts tend to underestimate their true value in the Box-Cox model when the transfor...

  10. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods in directed graphical models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbjerre, Malene

    Directed graphical models present data possessing a complex dependence structure, and MCMC methods are computer-intensive simulation techniques to approximate high-dimensional intractable integrals, which emerge in such models with incomplete data. MCMC computations in directed graphical models h...

  11. Numerical simulation of binary collisions using a modified surface tension model with particle method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Zhongguo; Xi Guang; Chen Xi

    2009-01-01

    The binary collision of liquid droplets is of both practical importance and fundamental value in computational fluid mechanics. We present a modified surface tension model within the moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method, and carry out two-dimensional simulations to investigate the mechanisms of coalescence and separation of the droplets during binary collision. The modified surface tension model improves accuracy and convergence. A mechanism map is established for various possible deformation pathways encountered during binary collision, as the impact speed is varied; a new pathway is reported when the collision speed is critical. In addition, eccentric collisions are simulated and the effect of the rotation of coalesced particle is explored. The results qualitatively agree with experiments and the numerical protocol may find applications in studying free surface flows and interface deformation

  12. A quantal toy model for heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassing, W.

    1987-01-01

    A one-dimensional toy model of moving finite boxes is analysed with respect to quantal phenomena associated with heavy-ion dynamics at low and intermediate energies. Special attention is payed to the relation between energy and momentum of the nucleons inside and outside the time-dependent mean field. A Wigner transformation of the one-body density matrix in space and time allows for a unique comparison with classical phase-space dynamics. It is found that high momentum components of the nuclear groundstate wave function approximately become on-shell during the heavy-ion reaction. This leads to the emission of energetic nucleons which do not appear classically. It is furthermore shown, that the low lying eigenstates of the dinuclear system for fixed time are only partly occupied throughout the reaction at intermediate energies. This opens up final phase space for nucleons after producing e.g. a pion or energetic photon. Through the present model does not allow for a reliable calculation of double differential nucleon spectra, pion or photon cross sections, it transparently shows the peculiar features of quantum dynamics in heavy-ion collisions. (orig.)

  13. Non-Markovianity in the collision model with environmental block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jiasen; Yu, Chang-shui

    2018-05-01

    We present an extended collision model to simulate the dynamics of an open quantum system. In our model, the unit to represent the environment is, instead of a single particle, a block which consists of a number of environment particles. The introduced blocks enable us to study the effects of different strategies of system–environment interactions and states of the blocks on the non-Markovianities. We demonstrate our idea in the Gaussian channels of an all-optical system and derive a necessary and sufficient condition of non-Markovianity for such channels. Moreover, we show the equivalence of our criterion to the non-Markovian quantum jump in the simulation of the pure damping process of a single-mode field. We also show that the non-Markovianity of the channel working in the strategy that the system collides with environmental particles in each block in a certain order will be affected by the size of the block and the embedded entanglement and the effects of heating and squeezing the vacuum environmental state will quantitatively enhance the non-Markovianity.

  14. Quasi-Monte Carlo methods: applications to modeling of light transport in tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Steven A.

    1996-05-01

    Monte Carlo modeling of light propagation can accurately predict the distribution of light in scattering materials. A drawback of Monte Carlo methods is that they converge inversely with the square root of the number of iterations. Theoretical considerations suggest that convergence which scales inversely with the first power of the number of iterations is possible. We have previously shown that one can obtain at least a portion of that improvement by using van der Corput sequences in place of a conventional pseudo-random number generator. Here, we present our further analysis, and show that quasi-Monte Carlo methods do have limited applicability to light scattering problems. We also discuss potential improvements which may increase the applicability.

  15. A Monte Carlo modeling alternative for the API Gamma Ray Calibration Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galford, J.E.

    2017-01-01

    The gamma ray pit at the API Calibration Facility, located on the University of Houston campus, defines the API unit for natural gamma ray logs used throughout the petroleum logging industry. Future use of the facility is uncertain. An alternative method is proposed to preserve the gamma ray API unit definition as an industry standard by using Monte Carlo modeling to obtain accurate counting rate-to-API unit conversion factors for gross-counting and spectral gamma ray tool designs. - Highlights: • A Monte Carlo alternative is proposed to replace empirical calibration procedures. • The proposed Monte Carlo alternative preserves the original API unit definition. • MCNP source and materials descriptions are provided for the API gamma ray pit. • Simulated results are presented for several wireline logging tool designs. • The proposed method can be adapted for use with logging-while-drilling tools.

  16. Confronting uncertainty in model-based geostatistics using Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minasny, B.; Vrugt, J.A.; McBratney, A.B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper demonstrates for the first time the use of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation for parameter inference in model-based soil geostatistics. We implemented the recently developed DiffeRential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM) algorithm to jointly summarize the posterior

  17. Monte Carlo study of the phase diagram for the two-dimensional Z(4) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carneiro, G.M.; Pol, M.E.; Zagury, N.

    1982-05-01

    The phase diagram of the two-dimensional Z(4) model on a square lattice is determined using a Monte Carlo method. The results of this simulation confirm the general features of the phase diagram predicted theoretically for the ferromagnetic case, and show the existence of a new phase with perpendicular order. (Author) [pt

  18. Hamiltonian Monte Carlo study of (1+1)-dimensional models with restricted supersymmetry on the lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranft, J.; Schiller, A.

    1984-01-01

    Lattice versions with restricted suppersymmetry of simple (1+1)-dimensional supersymmetric models are numerically studied using a local hamiltonian Monte Carlo method. The pattern of supersymmetry breaking closely follows the expectations of Bartels and Bronzan obtain in an alternative lattice formulation. (orig.)

  19. Derivation of a Monte Carlo method for modeling heterodyne detection in optical coherence tomography systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tycho, Andreas; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Andersen, Peter E.

    2002-01-01

    A Monte Carlo (MC) method for modeling optical coherence tomography (OCT) measurements of a diffusely reflecting discontinuity emb edded in a scattering medium is presented. For the first time to the authors' knowledge it is shown analytically that the applicability of an MC approach to this opti...

  20. Treatment of input uncertainty in hydrologic modeling: Doing hydrology backward with Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrugt, J.A.; Braak, ter C.J.F.; Clark, M.P.; Hyman, J.M.; Robinson, B.A.

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing consensus in the hydrologic literature that an appropriate framework for streamflow forecasting and simulation should include explicit recognition of forcing and parameter and model structural error. This paper presents a novel Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampler, entitled

  1. SKIRT: The design of a suite of input models for Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baes, M.; Camps, P.

    2015-09-01

    The Monte Carlo method is the most popular technique to perform radiative transfer simulations in a general 3D geometry. The algorithms behind and acceleration techniques for Monte Carlo radiative transfer are discussed extensively in the literature, and many different Monte Carlo codes are publicly available. On the contrary, the design of a suite of components that can be used for the distribution of sources and sinks in radiative transfer codes has received very little attention. The availability of such models, with different degrees of complexity, has many benefits. For example, they can serve as toy models to test new physical ingredients, or as parameterised models for inverse radiative transfer fitting. For 3D Monte Carlo codes, this requires algorithms to efficiently generate random positions from 3D density distributions. We describe the design of a flexible suite of components for the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code SKIRT. The design is based on a combination of basic building blocks (which can be either analytical toy models or numerical models defined on grids or a set of particles) and the extensive use of decorators that combine and alter these building blocks to more complex structures. For a number of decorators, e.g. those that add spiral structure or clumpiness, we provide a detailed description of the algorithms that can be used to generate random positions. Advantages of this decorator-based design include code transparency, the avoidance of code duplication, and an increase in code maintainability. Moreover, since decorators can be chained without problems, very complex models can easily be constructed out of simple building blocks. Finally, based on a number of test simulations, we demonstrate that our design using customised random position generators is superior to a simpler design based on a generic black-box random position generator.

  2. A measurement-based generalized source model for Monte Carlo dose simulations of CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Liu, Ransheng; Yang, Chengwen; Zhou, Li; Zhai, Hezheng; Deng, Jun

    2017-03-07

    The goal of this study is to develop a generalized source model for accurate Monte Carlo dose simulations of CT scans based solely on the measurement data without a priori knowledge of scanner specifications. The proposed generalized source model consists of an extended circular source located at x-ray target level with its energy spectrum, source distribution and fluence distribution derived from a set of measurement data conveniently available in the clinic. Specifically, the central axis percent depth dose (PDD) curves measured in water and the cone output factors measured in air were used to derive the energy spectrum and the source distribution respectively with a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The in-air film measurement of fan-beam dose profiles at fixed gantry was back-projected to generate the fluence distribution of the source model. A benchmarked Monte Carlo user code was used to simulate the dose distributions in water with the developed source model as beam input. The feasibility and accuracy of the proposed source model was tested on a GE LightSpeed and a Philips Brilliance Big Bore multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanners available in our clinic. In general, the Monte Carlo simulations of the PDDs in water and dose profiles along lateral and longitudinal directions agreed with the measurements within 4%/1 mm for both CT scanners. The absolute dose comparison using two CTDI phantoms (16 cm and 32 cm in diameters) indicated a better than 5% agreement between the Monte Carlo-simulated and the ion chamber-measured doses at a variety of locations for the two scanners. Overall, this study demonstrated that a generalized source model can be constructed based only on a set of measurement data and used for accurate Monte Carlo dose simulations of patients' CT scans, which would facilitate patient-specific CT organ dose estimation and cancer risk management in the diagnostic and therapeutic radiology.

  3. A measurement-based generalized source model for Monte Carlo dose simulations of CT scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Liu, Ransheng; Yang, Chengwen; Zhou, Li; Zhai, Hezheng; Deng, Jun

    2017-03-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a generalized source model for accurate Monte Carlo dose simulations of CT scans based solely on the measurement data without a priori knowledge of scanner specifications. The proposed generalized source model consists of an extended circular source located at x-ray target level with its energy spectrum, source distribution and fluence distribution derived from a set of measurement data conveniently available in the clinic. Specifically, the central axis percent depth dose (PDD) curves measured in water and the cone output factors measured in air were used to derive the energy spectrum and the source distribution respectively with a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The in-air film measurement of fan-beam dose profiles at fixed gantry was back-projected to generate the fluence distribution of the source model. A benchmarked Monte Carlo user code was used to simulate the dose distributions in water with the developed source model as beam input. The feasibility and accuracy of the proposed source model was tested on a GE LightSpeed and a Philips Brilliance Big Bore multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanners available in our clinic. In general, the Monte Carlo simulations of the PDDs in water and dose profiles along lateral and longitudinal directions agreed with the measurements within 4%/1 mm for both CT scanners. The absolute dose comparison using two CTDI phantoms (16 cm and 32 cm in diameters) indicated a better than 5% agreement between the Monte Carlo-simulated and the ion chamber-measured doses at a variety of locations for the two scanners. Overall, this study demonstrated that a generalized source model can be constructed based only on a set of measurement data and used for accurate Monte Carlo dose simulations of patients’ CT scans, which would facilitate patient-specific CT organ dose estimation and cancer risk management in the diagnostic and therapeutic radiology.

  4. forecasting with nonlinear time series model: a monte-carlo

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PUBLICATIONS1

    erated recursively up to any step greater than one. For nonlinear time series model, point forecast for step one can be done easily like in the linear case but forecast for a step greater than or equal to ..... London. Franses, P. H. (1998). Time series models for business and Economic forecasting, Cam- bridge University press.

  5. Model unspecific search for new physics in pp collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhotra, Shivali

    2013-01-01

    The model-independent analysis systematically scans the data taken by Compact Muon Solenoid - CMS detector for deviations from the Standard Model (SM) predictions. This approach is sensitive to a variety of models for new physics due to the minimal theoretical bias i.e. without assumptions on specific models of new physics and covering a large phase space. Possible causes of the significant deviations could be insufficient understanding of the collision event generation or detector simulation, or indeed genuine new physics in the data. Thus the output of MUSiC must be seen as only the first, but important step in the potential discovery of new physics. To get the distinctive final states, events with at least one electron or muon are classified according to their content of reconstructed objects (muons, electrons, photons, jets and missing transverse energy) and sorted into event classes. A broad scan of three kinematic distributions (scalar sum of the transverse momentum, invariant mass of reconstructed objects and missing transverse energy) in those event classes is performed by identifying deviations from SM expectations, accounting for systematic uncertainties. A scanning algorithm determines the regions in the considered distributions where the measured data deviates most from the SM predictions. This search is sensitive to an excess as well as a deficit in the comparison of data and SM background. This approach has been applied to the CMS data and we have obtained the preliminary results. I will talk about the details of the analysis techniques, its implementation in analyzing CMS data, results obtained and the discussion on the discrepancy observed

  6. Modeling of Inelastic Collisions in a Multifluid Plasma: Excitation and Deexcitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-31

    DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Modeling of Inelastic Collisions in a Multifluid Plasma: Excitation and 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...describe here a model for inelastic collisions for electronic excitation and deexcitation processes in a general, multifluid plasma. The model is derived... Excitation and Deexcitationa) Hai P. Le1, b) and Jean-Luc Cambier2, c) 1)Department of Mathematics, University of California, Los Angeles, California

  7. Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis of an Eulerian large-scale air pollution model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimov, I.; Georgieva, R.; Ostromsky, Tz.

    2012-01-01

    Variance-based approaches for global sensitivity analysis have been applied and analyzed to study the sensitivity of air pollutant concentrations according to variations of rates of chemical reactions. The Unified Danish Eulerian Model has been used as a mathematical model simulating a remote transport of air pollutants. Various Monte Carlo algorithms for numerical integration have been applied to compute Sobol's global sensitivity indices. A newly developed Monte Carlo algorithm based on Sobol's quasi-random points MCA-MSS has been applied for numerical integration. It has been compared with some existing approaches, namely Sobol's ΛΠ τ sequences, an adaptive Monte Carlo algorithm, the plain Monte Carlo algorithm, as well as, eFAST and Sobol's sensitivity approaches both implemented in SIMLAB software. The analysis and numerical results show advantages of MCA-MSS for relatively small sensitivity indices in terms of accuracy and efficiency. Practical guidelines on the estimation of Sobol's global sensitivity indices in the presence of computational difficulties have been provided. - Highlights: ► Variance-based global sensitivity analysis is performed for the air pollution model UNI-DEM. ► The main effect of input parameters dominates over higher-order interactions. ► Ozone concentrations are influenced mostly by variability of three chemical reactions rates. ► The newly developed MCA-MSS for multidimensional integration is compared with other approaches. ► More precise approaches like MCA-MSS should be applied when the needed accuracy has not been achieved.

  8. Perturbation analysis for Monte Carlo continuous cross section models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Chris B.; Abdel-Khalik, Hany S.

    2011-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis, including both its forward and adjoint applications, collectively referred to hereinafter as Perturbation Analysis (PA), is an essential tool to complete Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) and Data Assimilation (DA). PA-assisted UQ and DA have traditionally been carried out for reactor analysis problems using deterministic as opposed to stochastic models for radiation transport. This is because PA requires many model executions to quantify how variations in input data, primarily cross sections, affect variations in model's responses, e.g. detectors readings, flux distribution, multiplication factor, etc. Although stochastic models are often sought for their higher accuracy, their repeated execution is at best computationally expensive and in reality intractable for typical reactor analysis problems involving many input data and output responses. Deterministic methods however achieve computational efficiency needed to carry out the PA analysis by reducing problem dimensionality via various spatial and energy homogenization assumptions. This however introduces modeling error components into the PA results which propagate to the following UQ and DA analyses. The introduced errors are problem specific and therefore are expected to limit the applicability of UQ and DA analyses to reactor systems that satisfy the introduced assumptions. This manuscript introduces a new method to complete PA employing a continuous cross section stochastic model and performed in a computationally efficient manner. If successful, the modeling error components introduced by deterministic methods could be eliminated, thereby allowing for wider applicability of DA and UQ results. Two MCNP models demonstrate the application of the new method - a Critical Pu Sphere (Jezebel), a Pu Fast Metal Array (Russian BR-1). The PA is completed for reaction rate densities, reaction rate ratios, and the multiplication factor. (author)

  9. Human-robot collision detection under modeling uncertainty using frequency boundary of manipulator dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Byung Jin; Koo, Ja Choon; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Moon, Hyung Pil [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    This paper presents the development and experimental evaluation of a collision detection method for robotic manipulators sharing a workspace with humans. Fast and robust collision detection is important for guaranteeing safety and preventing false alarms. The main cause of a false alarm is modeling error. We use the characteristic of the maximum frequency boundary of the manipulator's dynamic model. The tendency of the frequency boundary's location in the frequency domain is applied to the collision detection algorithm using a band pass filter (band designed disturbance observer, BdDOB) with changing frequency windows. Thanks to the band pass filter, which considers the frequency boundary of the dynamic model, our collision detection algorithm can extract the collision caused by the disturbance from the mixed estimation signal. As a result, the collision was successfully detected under the usage conditions of faulty sensors and uncertain model data. The experimental result of a collision between a 7-DOF serial manipulator and a human body is reported.

  10. Absorbed dose in fibrotic microenvironment models employing Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambrano Ramírez, O.D.; Rojas Calderón, E.L.; Azorín Vega, E.P.; Ferro Flores, G.; Martínez Caballero, E.

    2015-01-01

    The presence or absence of fibrosis and yet more, the multimeric and multivalent nature of the radiopharmaceutical have recently been reported to have an effect on the radiation absorbed dose in tumor microenvironment models. Fibroblast and myofibroblast cells produce the extracellular matrix by the secretion of proteins which provide structural and biochemical support to cells. The reactive and reparative mechanisms triggered during the inflammatory process causes the production and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, the abnormal excessive growth of the connective tissue leads to fibrosis. In this work, microenvironment (either not fibrotic or fibrotic) models composed of seven spheres representing cancer cells of 10 μm in diameter each with a 5 μm diameter inner sphere (cell nucleus) were created in two distinct radiation transport codes (PENELOPE and MCNP). The purpose of creating these models was to determine the radiation absorbed dose in the nucleus of cancer cells, based on previously reported radiopharmaceutical retain (by HeLa cells) percentages of the 177 Lu-Tyr 3 -octreotate (monomeric) and 177 Lu-Tyr 3 -octreotate-AuNP (multimeric) radiopharmaceuticals. A comparison in the results between the PENELOPE and MCNP was done. We found a good agreement in the results of the codes. The percent difference between the increase percentages of the absorbed dose in the not fibrotic model with respect to the fibrotic model of the codes PENELOPE and MCNP was found to be under 1% for both radiopharmaceuticals. (authors)

  11. A Cross-Domain Survey of Metrics for Modelling and Evaluating Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy A. Marvel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a brief survey of the metrics for measuring probability, degree, and severity of collisions as applied to autonomous and intelligent systems. Though not exhaustive, this survey evaluates the state-of-the-art of collision metrics, and assesses which are likely to aid in the establishment and support of autonomous system collision modelling. The survey includes metrics for 1 robot arms; 2 mobile robot platforms; 3 nonholonomic physical systems such as ground vehicles, aircraft, and naval vessels, and; 4 virtual and mathematical models.

  12. Modeling activities in air traffic control systems: antecedents and consequences of a mid-air collision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Paulo Victor R; Ferreira, Bemildo

    2012-01-01

    In this article we present a model of some functions and activities of the Brazilian Air traffic Control System (ATS) in the period in which occurred a mid-air collision between flight GLO1907, a commercial aircraft Boeing 737-800, and flight N600XL, an executive jet EMBRAER E-145, to investigate key resilience characteristics of the ATM. Modeling in some detail activities during the collision and related them to overall behavior and antecedents that stress the organization uncover some drift into failure mechanisms that erode safety defenses provided by the Air Navigation Service Provider (ANSP), enabling a mid-air collision to be happen.

  13. Sequential Markov chain Monte Carlo filter with simultaneous model selection for electrocardiogram signal modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edla, Shwetha; Kovvali, Narayan; Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia

    2012-01-01

    Constructing statistical models of electrocardiogram (ECG) signals, whose parameters can be used for automated disease classification, is of great importance in precluding manual annotation and providing prompt diagnosis of cardiac diseases. ECG signals consist of several segments with different morphologies (namely the P wave, QRS complex and the T wave) in a single heart beat, which can vary across individuals and diseases. Also, existing statistical ECG models exhibit a reliance upon obtaining a priori information from the ECG data by using preprocessing algorithms to initialize the filter parameters, or to define the user-specified model parameters. In this paper, we propose an ECG modeling technique using the sequential Markov chain Monte Carlo (SMCMC) filter that can perform simultaneous model selection, by adaptively choosing from different representations depending upon the nature of the data. Our results demonstrate the ability of the algorithm to track various types of ECG morphologies, including intermittently occurring ECG beats. In addition, we use the estimated model parameters as the feature set to classify between ECG signals with normal sinus rhythm and four different types of arrhythmia.

  14. Adaptable three-dimensional Monte Carlo modeling of imaged blood vessels in skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefer, T. Joshua; Barton, Jennifer K.; Chan, Eric K.; Ducros, Mathieu G.; Sorg, Brian S.; Milner, Thomas E.; Nelson, J. Stuart; Welch, Ashley J.

    1997-06-01

    In order to reach a higher level of accuracy in simulation of port wine stain treatment, we propose to discard the typical layered geometry and cylindrical blood vessel assumptions made in optical models and use imaging techniques to define actual tissue geometry. Two main additions to the typical 3D, weighted photon, variable step size Monte Carlo routine were necessary to achieve this goal. First, optical low coherence reflectometry (OLCR) images of rat skin were used to specify a 3D material array, with each entry assigned a label to represent the type of tissue in that particular voxel. Second, the Monte Carlo algorithm was altered so that when a photon crosses into a new voxel, the remaining path length is recalculated using the new optical properties, as specified by the material array. The model has shown good agreement with data from the literature. Monte Carlo simulations using OLCR images of asymmetrically curved blood vessels show various effects such as shading, scattering-induced peaks at vessel surfaces, and directionality-induced gradients in energy deposition. In conclusion, this augmentation of the Monte Carlo method can accurately simulate light transport for a wide variety of nonhomogeneous tissue geometries.

  15. The structure of liquid water by polarized neutron diffraction and reverse Monte Carlo modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temleitner, László; Pusztai, László; Schweika, Werner

    2007-08-22

    The coherent static structure factor of water has been investigated by polarized neutron diffraction. Polarization analysis allows us to separate the huge incoherent scattering background from hydrogen and to obtain high quality data of the coherent scattering from four different mixtures of liquid H(2)O and D(2)O. The information obtained by the variation of the scattering contrast confines the configurational space of water and is used by the reverse Monte Carlo technique to model the total structure factors. Structural characteristics have been calculated directly from the resulting sets of particle coordinates. Consistency with existing partial pair correlation functions, derived without the application of polarized neutrons, was checked by incorporating them into our reverse Monte Carlo calculations. We also performed Monte Carlo simulations of a hard sphere system, which provides an accurate estimate of the information content of the measured data. It is shown that the present combination of polarized neutron scattering and reverse Monte Carlo structural modelling is a promising approach towards a detailed understanding of the microscopic structure of water.

  16. Modelling the IRSN's radio-photo-luminescent dosimeter using the MCPNX Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocine, N.; Donadille, L.; Huet, Ch.; Itie, Ch.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report the modelling of the new radio-photo-luminescent (RPL) dosimeter of the IRSN using the MCPNX Monte Carlo code. The Hp(10) and Hp(0, 07) dose equivalents are computed for different irradiation configurations involving photonic beams (gamma and X) defined according to the ISO 4037-1 standard. Results are compared to experimental measurements performed on the RPL dosimeter. The agreement is good and the model is thus validated

  17. Monte Carlo based toy model for fission process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurniadi, R.; Waris, A.; Viridi, S.

    2014-01-01

    There are many models and calculation techniques to obtain visible image of fission yield process. In particular, fission yield can be calculated by using two calculations approach, namely macroscopic approach and microscopic approach. This work proposes another calculation approach in which the nucleus is treated as a toy model. Hence, the fission process does not represent real fission process in nature completely. The toy model is formed by Gaussian distribution of random number that randomizes distance like the distance between particle and central point. The scission process is started by smashing compound nucleus central point into two parts that are left central and right central points. These three points have different Gaussian distribution parameters such as mean (μ CN , μ L , μ R ), and standard deviation (σ CN , σ L , σ R ). By overlaying of three distributions, the number of particles (N L , N R ) that are trapped by central points can be obtained. This process is iterated until (N L , N R ) become constant numbers. Smashing process is repeated by changing σ L and σ R , randomly

  18. From many body wee partons dynamics to perfect fluid: a standard model for heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venugopalan, R.

    2010-07-22

    We discuss a standard model of heavy ion collisions that has emerged both from experimental results of the RHIC program and associated theoretical developments. We comment briefly on the impact of early results of the LHC program on this picture. We consider how this standard model of heavy ion collisions could be solidified or falsified in future experiments at RHIC, the LHC and a future Electro-Ion Collider.

  19. Semiclassical calculation for collision induced dissociation. II. Morse oscillator model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusinek, I.; Roberts, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    A recently developed semiclassical procedure for calculating collision induced dissociation probabilities P/sup diss/ is applied to the collinear collision between a particle and a Morse oscillator diatomic. The particle--diatom interaction is described with a repulsive exponential potential function. P/sup diss/ is reported for a system of three identical particles, as a function of collision energy E/sub t/ and initial vibrational state of the diatomic n 1 . The results are compared with the previously reported values for the collision between a particle and a truncated harmonic oscillator. The two studies show similar features, namely: (a) there is an oscillatory structure in the P/sup diss/ energy profiles, which is directly related to n 1 ; (b) P/sup diss/ becomes noticeable (> or approx. =10 -3 ) for E/sub t/ values appreciably higher than the energetic threshold; (c) vibrational enhancement (inhibition) of collision induced dissociation persists at low (high) energies; and (d) good agreement between the classical and semiclassical results is found above the classical dynamic threshold. Finally, the convergence of P/sup diss/ for increasing box length is shown to be rapid and satisfactory

  20. Monte Carlo Analysis of Reservoir Models Using Seismic Data and Geostatistical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunino, A.; Mosegaard, K.; Lange, K.; Melnikova, Y.; Hansen, T. M.

    2013-12-01

    We present a study on the analysis of petroleum reservoir models consistent with seismic data and geostatistical constraints performed on a synthetic reservoir model. Our aim is to invert directly for structure and rock bulk properties of the target reservoir zone. To infer the rock facies, porosity and oil saturation seismology alone is not sufficient but a rock physics model must be taken into account, which links the unknown properties to the elastic parameters. We then combine a rock physics model with a simple convolutional approach for seismic waves to invert the "measured" seismograms. To solve this inverse problem, we employ a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, because it offers the possibility to handle non-linearity, complex and multi-step forward models and provides realistic estimates of uncertainties. However, for large data sets the MCMC method may be impractical because of a very high computational demand. To face this challenge one strategy is to feed the algorithm with realistic models, hence relying on proper prior information. To address this problem, we utilize an algorithm drawn from geostatistics to generate geologically plausible models which represent samples of the prior distribution. The geostatistical algorithm learns the multiple-point statistics from prototype models (in the form of training images), then generates thousands of different models which are accepted or rejected by a Metropolis sampler. To further reduce the computation time we parallelize the software and run it on multi-core machines. The solution of the inverse problem is then represented by a collection of reservoir models in terms of facies, porosity and oil saturation, which constitute samples of the posterior distribution. We are finally able to produce probability maps of the properties we are interested in by performing statistical analysis on the collection of solutions.

  1. Monte Carlo simulations of a model for opinion formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordogna, C. M.; Albano, E. V.

    2007-04-01

    A model for opinion formation based on the Theory of Social Impact is presented and studied by means of numerical simulations. Individuals with two states of opinion are impacted due to social interactions with: i) members of the society, ii) a strong leader with a well-defined opinion and iii) the mass media that could either support or compete with the leader. Due to that competition, the average opinion of the social group exhibits phase-transition like behaviour between different states of opinion.

  2. Strain in the mesoscale kinetic Monte Carlo model for sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Tikare, V.

    2014-01-01

    anisotropic strains for homogeneous powder compacts with aspect ratios different from unity. It is shown that the line direction biases shrinkage strains in proportion the compact dimension aspect ratios. A new algorithm that corrects this bias in strains is proposed; the direction for collapsing the column...... densification by vacancy annihilation removes an isolated pore site at a grain boundary and collapses a column of sites extending from the vacancy to the surface of sintering compact, through the center of mass of the nearest grain. Using this algorithm, the existing published kMC models are shown to produce...

  3. Plasma non-uniformity in a symmetric radiofrequency capacitively-coupled reactor with dielectric side-wall: a two dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yue; Booth, Jean-Paul; Chabert, Pascal

    2018-02-01

    A Cartesian-coordinate two-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision (PIC/MCC) plasma simulation code is presented, including a new treatment of charge balance at dielectric boundaries. It is used to simulate an Ar plasma in a symmetric radiofrequency capacitively-coupled parallel-plate reactor with a thick (3.5 cm) dielectric side-wall. The reactor size (12 cm electrode width, 2.5 cm electrode spacing) and frequency (15 MHz) are such that electromagnetic effects can be ignored. The dielectric side-wall effectively shields the plasma from the enhanced electric field at the powered-grounded electrode junction, which has previously been shown to produce locally enhanced plasma density (Dalvie et al 1993 Appl. Phys. Lett. 62 3207-9 Overzet and Hopkins 1993 Appl. Phys. Lett. 63 2484-6 Boeuf and Pitchford 1995 Phys. Rev. E 51 1376-90). Nevertheless, enhanced electron heating is observed in a region adjacent to the dielectric boundary, leading to maxima in ionization rate, plasma density and ion flux to the electrodes in this region, and not at the reactor centre as would otherwise be expected. The axially-integrated electron power deposition peaks closer to the dielectric edge than the electron density. The electron heating components are derived from the PIC/MCC simulations and show that this enhanced electron heating results from increased Ohmic heating in the axial direction as the electron density decreases towards the side-wall. We investigated the validity of different analytical formulas to estimate the Ohmic heating by comparing them to the PIC results. The widespread assumption that a time-averaged momentum transfer frequency, v m , can be used to estimate the momentum change can cause large errors, since it neglects both phase and amplitude information. Furthermore, the classical relationship between the total electron current and the electric field must be used with caution, particularly close to the dielectric edge where the (neglected

  4. New model for mines and transportation tunnels external dose calculation using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allam, Kh. A.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a new methodology is developed based on Monte Carlo simulation for tunnels and mines external dose calculation. Tunnels external dose evaluation model of a cylindrical shape of finite thickness with an entrance and with or without exit. A photon transportation model was applied for exposure dose calculations. A new software based on Monte Carlo solution was designed and programmed using Delphi programming language. The variation of external dose due to radioactive nuclei in a mine tunnel and the corresponding experimental data lies in the range 7.3 19.9%. The variation of specific external dose rate with position in, tunnel building material density and composition were studied. The given new model has more flexible for real external dose in any cylindrical tunnel structure calculations. (authors)

  5. Setup of HDRK-Man voxel model in Geant4 Monte Carlo code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jong Hwi; Cho, Sung Koo; Kim, Chan Hyeong [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sang Hyoun [Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kun Woo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Many different voxel models, developed using tomographic images of human body, are used in various fields including both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation fields. Recently a high-quality voxel model/ named HDRK-Man, was constructed at Hanyang University and used to calculate the dose conversion coefficients (DCC) values for external photon and neutron beams using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The objective of the present study is to set up the HDRK-Man model in Geant4 in order to use it in more advanced calculations such as 4-D Monte Carlo simulations and space dosimetry studies involving very high energy particles. To that end, the HDRK-Man was ported to Geant4 and used to calculate the DCC values for external photon beams. The calculated values were then compared with the results of the MCNPX code. In addition, a computational Linux cluster was built to improve the computing speed in Geant4.

  6. Randomly dispersed particle fuel model in the PSG Monte Carlo neutron transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leppaenen, J.

    2007-01-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels are composed of thousands of microscopic fuel particles, randomly dispersed in a graphite matrix. The modelling of such geometry is complicated, especially using continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes, which are unable to apply any deterministic corrections in the calculation. This paper presents the geometry routine developed for modelling randomly dispersed particle fuels using the PSG Monte Carlo reactor physics code. The model is based on the delta-tracking method, and it takes into account the spatial self-shielding effects and the random dispersion of the fuel particles. The calculation routine is validated by comparing the results to reference MCNP4C calculations using uranium and plutonium based fuels. (authors)

  7. Flat-histogram methods in quantum Monte Carlo simulations: Application to the t-J model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamantis, Nikolaos G.; Manousakis, Efstratios

    2016-01-01

    We discuss that flat-histogram techniques can be appropriately applied in the sampling of quantum Monte Carlo simulation in order to improve the statistical quality of the results at long imaginary time or low excitation energy. Typical imaginary-time correlation functions calculated in quantum Monte Carlo are subject to exponentially growing errors as the range of imaginary time grows and this smears the information on the low energy excitations. We show that we can extract the low energy physics by modifying the Monte Carlo sampling technique to one in which configurations which contribute to making the histogram of certain quantities flat are promoted. We apply the diagrammatic Monte Carlo (diag-MC) method to the motion of a single hole in the t-J model and we show that the implementation of flat-histogram techniques allows us to calculate the Green's function in a wide range of imaginary-time. In addition, we show that applying the flat-histogram technique alleviates the “sign”-problem associated with the simulation of the single-hole Green's function at long imaginary time. (paper)

  8. Environmental dose rate heterogeneity of beta radiation and its implications for luminescence dating: Monte Carlo modelling and experimental validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nathan, R.P.; Thomas, P.J.; Jain, M.

    2003-01-01

    and identify the likely size of these effects on D-e distributions. The study employs the MCNP 4C Monte Carlo electron/photon transport model, supported by an experimental validation of the code in several case studies. We find good agreement between the experimental measurements and the Monte Carlo...

  9. A vectorized Monte Carlo code for modeling photon transport in SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.F.; Floyd, C.E. Jr.; Jaszczak, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    A vectorized Monte Carlo computer code has been developed for modeling photon transport in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The code models photon transport in a uniform attenuating region and photon detection by a gamma camera. It is adapted from a history-based Monte Carlo code in which photon history data are stored in scalar variables and photon histories are computed sequentially. The vectorized code is written in FORTRAN77 and uses an event-based algorithm in which photon history data are stored in arrays and photon history computations are performed within DO loops. The indices of the DO loops range over the number of photon histories, and these loops may take advantage of the vector processing unit of our Stellar GS1000 computer for pipelined computations. Without the use of the vector processor the event-based code is faster than the history-based code because of numerical optimization performed during conversion to the event-based algorithm. When only the detection of unscattered photons is modeled, the event-based code executes 5.1 times faster with the use of the vector processor than without; when the detection of scattered and unscattered photons is modeled the speed increase is a factor of 2.9. Vectorization is a valuable way to increase the performance of Monte Carlo code for modeling photon transport in SPECT

  10. An analytical model for backscattered luminance in fog: comparisons with Monte Carlo computations and experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taillade, Frédéric; Dumont, Eric; Belin, Etienne

    2008-01-01

    We propose an analytical model for backscattered luminance in fog and derive an expression for the visibility signal-to-noise ratio as a function of meteorological visibility distance. The model uses single scattering processes. It is based on the Mie theory and the geometry of the optical device (emitter and receiver). In particular, we present an overlap function and take the phase function of fog into account. The results of the backscattered luminance obtained with our analytical model are compared to simulations made using the Monte Carlo method based on multiple scattering processes. An excellent agreement is found in that the discrepancy between the results is smaller than the Monte Carlo standard uncertainties. If we take no account of the geometry of the optical device, the results of the model-estimated backscattered luminance differ from the simulations by a factor 20. We also conclude that the signal-to-noise ratio computed with the Monte Carlo method and our analytical model is in good agreement with experimental results since the mean difference between the calculations and experimental measurements is smaller than the experimental uncertainty

  11. Three-dimensional computer simulation at vehicle collision using dynamic model. Application to various collision types; Rikigaku model ni yoru jidosha shototsuji no sanjigen kyodo simulation. Shushu no shototsu keitai eno tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, M; Morisawa, M [Musashi Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Sato, T [Keio University, Tokyo (Japan); Kobayashi, K [Molex-Japan Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The past study of safety at vehicle collision pays attention to phenomena within the short time from starting collision, and the behavior of rollover is studied separating from that at collision. Most simulations of traffic accident are two-dimensional simulations. Therefore, it is indispensable for vehicle design to the analyze three-dimensional and continuous behavior from crash till stopping. Accordingly, in this study, the three-dimensional behavior of two vehicles at collision was simulated by computer using dynamic models. Then, by comparison of the calculated results with real vehicles` collision test data, it was confirmed that dynamic model of this study was reliable. 10 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Monte Carlo modeling of ion beam induced secondary electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, U., E-mail: uhuh@vols.utk.edu [Biochemistry & Cellular & Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0840 (United States); Cho, W. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2100 (United States); Joy, D.C. [Biochemistry & Cellular & Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0840 (United States); Center for Nanophase Materials Science, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Ion induced secondary electrons (iSE) can produce high-resolution images ranging from a few eV to 100 keV over a wide range of materials. The interpretation of such images requires knowledge of the secondary electron yields (iSE δ) for each of the elements and materials present and as a function of the incident beam energy. Experimental data for helium ions are currently limited to 40 elements and six compounds while other ions are not well represented. To overcome this limitation, we propose a simple procedure based on the comprehensive work of Berger et al. Here we show that between the energy range of 10–100 keV the Berger et al. data for elements and compounds can be accurately represented by a single universal curve. The agreement between the limited experimental data that is available and the predictive model is good, and has been found to provide reliable yield data for a wide range of elements and compounds. - Highlights: • The Universal ASTAR Yield Curve was derived from data recently published by NIST. • IONiSE incorporated with the Curve will predict iSE yield for elements and compounds. • This approach can also handle other ion beams by changing basic scattering profile.

  13. Model of Optimal Collision Avoidance Manoeuvre on the Basis of Electronic Data Collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelenko Švetak

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The results of the data analyses show that accidents mostlyinclude damages to the ship's hull and collisions. Generally allaccidents of ships can be divided into two basic categories.First, accidents in which measures for damage control shouldbe taken immediately, and second, those which require a littlemore patient reaction. The very fact that collisions belong to thefirst category provided the incentive for writing the current paper.The proposed model of optimal collision avoidance manoeuvreof ships on the basis of electronic data collection wasmade by means of the navigation simulator NTPRO- 1000,Transas manufacturer, Russian Federation.

  14. Large-scale model-based assessment of deer-vehicle collision risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Hothorn

    Full Text Available Ungulates, in particular the Central European roe deer Capreolus capreolus and the North American white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus, are economically and ecologically important. The two species are risk factors for deer-vehicle collisions and as browsers of palatable trees have implications for forest regeneration. However, no large-scale management systems for ungulates have been implemented, mainly because of the high efforts and costs associated with attempts to estimate population sizes of free-living ungulates living in a complex landscape. Attempts to directly estimate population sizes of deer are problematic owing to poor data quality and lack of spatial representation on larger scales. We used data on >74,000 deer-vehicle collisions observed in 2006 and 2009 in Bavaria, Germany, to model the local risk of deer-vehicle collisions and to investigate the relationship between deer-vehicle collisions and both environmental conditions and browsing intensities. An innovative modelling approach for the number of deer-vehicle collisions, which allows nonlinear environment-deer relationships and assessment of spatial heterogeneity, was the basis for estimating the local risk of collisions for specific road types on the scale of Bavarian municipalities. Based on this risk model, we propose a new "deer-vehicle collision index" for deer management. We show that the risk of deer-vehicle collisions is positively correlated to browsing intensity and to harvest numbers. Overall, our results demonstrate that the number of deer-vehicle collisions can be predicted with high precision on the scale of municipalities. In the densely populated and intensively used landscapes of Central Europe and North America, a model-based risk assessment for deer-vehicle collisions provides a cost-efficient instrument for deer management on the landscape scale. The measures derived from our model provide valuable information for planning road protection and defining

  15. A sequential Monte Carlo model of the combined GB gas and electricity network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudry, Modassar; Wu, Jianzhong; Jenkins, Nick

    2013-01-01

    A Monte Carlo model of the combined GB gas and electricity network was developed to determine the reliability of the energy infrastructure. The model integrates the gas and electricity network into a single sequential Monte Carlo simulation. The model minimises the combined costs of the gas and electricity network, these include gas supplies, gas storage operation and electricity generation. The Monte Carlo model calculates reliability indices such as loss of load probability and expected energy unserved for the combined gas and electricity network. The intention of this tool is to facilitate reliability analysis of integrated energy systems. Applications of this tool are demonstrated through a case study that quantifies the impact on the reliability of the GB gas and electricity network given uncertainties such as wind variability, gas supply availability and outages to energy infrastructure assets. Analysis is performed over a typical midwinter week on a hypothesised GB gas and electricity network in 2020 that meets European renewable energy targets. The efficacy of doubling GB gas storage capacity on the reliability of the energy system is assessed. The results highlight the value of greater gas storage facilities in enhancing the reliability of the GB energy system given various energy uncertainties. -- Highlights: •A Monte Carlo model of the combined GB gas and electricity network was developed. •Reliability indices are calculated for the combined GB gas and electricity system. •The efficacy of doubling GB gas storage capacity on reliability of the energy system is assessed. •Integrated reliability indices could be used to assess the impact of investment in energy assets

  16. Microstructure evolution of irradiated tungsten: Crystal effects in He and H implantation as modelled in the Binary Collision Approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, M.; Ortiz, C.J.; Becquart, C.S.; Domain, C.; Sarkar, U.; Debacker, A.

    2010-01-01

    It is important to develop an understanding of the evolution of W microstructure the conditions the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) as well as the DEMOnstration Power Plan (DEMO), and modelling techniques can be very helpful. In this paper, the Binary Collision Approximation of Molecular Dynamics as implemented in the Marlowe code is used to model the slowing down of atomic helium and hydrogen on tungsten in the 1-100 keV range. The computed helium and Frenkel Pairs (FP) distributions are then used as input for the simulation of isochronal annealing experiments with an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) model. Parameterisation is discussed in a companion paper to this one. To model inelastic energy losses beyond the Lindhard regime, a new module has been implemented in the Marlowe code which is presented here, along with a discussion on various parameters of the model important in the modelling of channelled trajectories. For a given total inelastic stopping cross section, large differences in low energy channelling ranges are identified depending on whether inelastic energy loss is considered to be purely continuous or to also occur during the atomic collisions. In polycrystals, the channelling probability is shown to be significant over the whole range of slowing down energies considered. Channelling together with short replacement sequences has the effect of reducing the FP production efficiency by more than a factor two in polycrystalline as compared with an hypothetical structureless tungsten. This has a crucial effect on the helium isochronal desorption spectra predicted by the OKMC simulations. Those predicted with structureless tungsten are at variance with experiment, due to the overestimation of He trapping on the radiation induced defects.

  17. Microstructure evolution of irradiated tungsten: Crystal effects in He and H implantation as modelled in the Binary Collision Approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, M., E-mail: mhou@ulb.ac.b [Physique des Solides Irradies et des Nanostructures CP234, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Bd du Triomphe, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Ortiz, C.J. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico, CIEMAT, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Becquart, C.S. [Unite Materiaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Universite de Lille 1, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Domain, C. [EDF-R and D Departement MMC, Les Renardieres, F-77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France); Sarkar, U. [Physics Department, Assam University, Silchar (India); Debacker, A. [Unite Materiaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Universite de Lille 1, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2010-08-15

    It is important to develop an understanding of the evolution of W microstructure the conditions the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) as well as the DEMOnstration Power Plan (DEMO), and modelling techniques can be very helpful. In this paper, the Binary Collision Approximation of Molecular Dynamics as implemented in the Marlowe code is used to model the slowing down of atomic helium and hydrogen on tungsten in the 1-100 keV range. The computed helium and Frenkel Pairs (FP) distributions are then used as input for the simulation of isochronal annealing experiments with an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) model. Parameterisation is discussed in a companion paper to this one. To model inelastic energy losses beyond the Lindhard regime, a new module has been implemented in the Marlowe code which is presented here, along with a discussion on various parameters of the model important in the modelling of channelled trajectories. For a given total inelastic stopping cross section, large differences in low energy channelling ranges are identified depending on whether inelastic energy loss is considered to be purely continuous or to also occur during the atomic collisions. In polycrystals, the channelling probability is shown to be significant over the whole range of slowing down energies considered. Channelling together with short replacement sequences has the effect of reducing the FP production efficiency by more than a factor two in polycrystalline as compared with an hypothetical structureless tungsten. This has a crucial effect on the helium isochronal desorption spectra predicted by the OKMC simulations. Those predicted with structureless tungsten are at variance with experiment, due to the overestimation of He trapping on the radiation induced defects.

  18. Theoretical and practical study of the variance and efficiency of a Monte Carlo calculation due to Russian roulette

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogenboom, J. E.

    2004-01-01

    Although Russian roulette is applied very often in Monte Carlo calculations, not much literature exists on its quantitative influence on the variance and efficiency of a Monte Carlo calculation. Elaborating on the work of Lux and Koblinger using moment equations, new relevant equations are derived to calculate the variance of a Monte Carlo simulation using Russian roulette. To demonstrate its practical application the theory is applied to a simplified transport model resulting in explicit analytical expressions for the variance of a Monte Carlo calculation and for the expected number of collisions per history. From these expressions numerical results are shown and compared with actual Monte Carlo calculations, showing an excellent agreement. By considering the number of collisions in a Monte Carlo calculation as a measure of the CPU time, also the efficiency of the Russian roulette can be studied. It opens the way for further investigations, including optimization of Russian roulette parameters. (authors)

  19. Experimental validation of a Monte Carlo proton therapy nozzle model incorporating magnetically steered protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S W; Polf, J; Archambault, L; Beddar, S; Bues, M; Ciangaru, G; Smith, A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to validate the accuracy of a Monte Carlo calculation model of a proton magnetic beam scanning delivery nozzle developed using the Geant4 toolkit. The Monte Carlo model was used to produce depth dose and lateral profiles, which were compared to data measured in the clinical scanning treatment nozzle at several energies. Comparisons were also made between measured and simulated off-axis profiles to test the accuracy of the model's magnetic steering. Comparison of the 80% distal dose fall-off values for the measured and simulated depth dose profiles agreed to within 1 mm for the beam energies evaluated. Agreement of the full width at half maximum values for the measured and simulated lateral fluence profiles was within 1.3 mm for all energies. The position of measured and simulated spot positions for the magnetically steered beams agreed to within 0.7 mm of each other. Based on these results, we found that the Geant4 Monte Carlo model of the beam scanning nozzle has the ability to accurately predict depth dose profiles, lateral profiles perpendicular to the beam axis and magnetic steering of a proton beam during beam scanning proton therapy.

  20. Monte Carlo evaluation of path integral for the nuclear shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, G.H.

    1993-01-01

    The authors present a path-integral formulation of the nuclear shell model using auxillary fields; the path-integral is evaluated by Monte Carlo methods. The method scales favorably with valence-nucleon number and shell-model basis: full-basis calculations are demonstrated up to the rare-earth region, which cannot be treated by other methods. Observables are calculated for the ground state and in a thermal ensemble. Dynamical correlations are obtained, from which strength functions are extracted through the Maximum Entropy method. Examples in the s-d shell, where exact diagonalization can be carried out, compared well with exact results. The open-quotes sign problemclose quotes generic to quantum Monte Carlo calculations is found to be absent in the attractive pairing-plus-multipole interactions. The formulation is general for interacting fermion systems and is well suited for parallel computation. The authors have implemented it on the Intel Touchstone Delta System, achieving better than 99% parallelization

  1. MONTE CARLO ANALYSES OF THE YALINA THERMAL FACILITY WITH SERPENT STEREOLITHOGRAPHY GEOMETRY MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the YALINA Thermal subcritical assembly of Belarus using two different Monte Carlo transport programs, SERPENT and MCNP. The MCNP model is based on combinatorial geometry and universes hierarchy, while the SERPENT model is based on Stereolithography geometry. The latter consists of unstructured triangulated surfaces defined by the normal and vertices. This geometry format is used by 3D printers and it has been created by: the CUBIT software, MATLAB scripts, and C coding. All the Monte Carlo simulations have been performed using the ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data library. Both MCNP and SERPENT share the same geometry specifications, which describe the facility details without using any material homogenization. Three different configurations have been studied with different number of fuel rods. The three fuel configurations use 216, 245, or 280 fuel rods, respectively. The numerical simulations show that the agreement between SERPENT and MCNP results is within few tens of pcms.

  2. Use of Monte Carlo modeling approach for evaluating risk and environmental compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higley, K.A.; Strenge, D.L.

    1988-09-01

    Evaluating compliance with environmental regulations, specifically those regulations that pertain to human exposure, can be a difficult task. Historically, maximum individual or worst-case exposures have been calculated as a basis for evaluating risk or compliance with such regulations. However, these calculations may significantly overestimate exposure and may not provide a clear understanding of the uncertainty in the analysis. The use of Monte Carlo modeling techniques can provide a better understanding of the potential range of exposures and the likelihood of high (worst-case) exposures. This paper compares the results of standard exposure estimation techniques with the Monte Carlo modeling approach. The authors discuss the potential application of this approach for demonstrating regulatory compliance, along with the strengths and weaknesses of the approach. Suggestions on implementing this method as a routine tool in exposure and risk analyses are also presented. 16 refs., 5 tabs

  3. Implementation of a Monte Carlo method to model photon conversion for solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canizo, C. del; Tobias, I.; Perez-Bedmar, J.; Pan, A.C.; Luque, A.

    2008-01-01

    A physical model describing different photon conversion mechanisms is presented in the context of photovoltaic applications. To solve the resulting system of equations, a Monte Carlo ray-tracing model is implemented, which takes into account the coupling of the photon transport phenomena to the non-linear rate equations describing luminescence. It also separates the generation of rays from the two very different sources of photons involved (the sun and the luminescence centers). The Monte Carlo simulator presented in this paper is proposed as a tool to help in the evaluation of candidate materials for up- and down-conversion. Some application examples are presented, exploring the range of values that the most relevant parameters describing the converter should have in order to give significant gain in photocurrent

  4. Characteristics of particle production in high energy nuclear collisions a model-based analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Guptaroy, P; Bhattacharya, S; Bhattacharya, D P

    2002-01-01

    The present work pertains to the production of some very important negatively charged secondaries in lead-lead and gold-gold collisions at AGS, SPS and RHIC energies. We would like to examine here the role of the particular version of sequential chain model (SCM), which was applied widely in the past in analysing data on various high-energy hadronic collisions, in explaining now the latest findings on the features of particle production in the relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The agreement between the model of our choice and the measured data is found to be modestly satisfactory in cases of the most prominent and abundantly produced varieties of the secondaries in the above-stated two nuclear collisions. (25 refs).

  5. Diffractive ''semioptical'' model for nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barashenkov, V.S.; Musulmanbekov, Zh.Zh.

    1979-01-01

    Diffraction Glauber theory for nucleus-nucleus collisions is considered in approximation when the initial nucleus interacts as a whole with nucleons of the target nucleus. Such an approach, being intermediate between precise Glauber theory and its optical limit, essentially simplifies numerical calculations and gives a good agreement with experiments as well. (author)

  6. Testing Lorentz Invariance Emergence in the Ising Model using Monte Carlo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Dias Astros, Maria Isabel

    2017-01-01

    In the context of the Lorentz invariance as an emergent phenomenon at low energy scales to study quantum gravity a system composed by two 3D interacting Ising models (one with an anisotropy in one direction) was proposed. Two Monte Carlo simulations were run: one for the 2D Ising model and one for the target model. In both cases the observables (energy, magnetization, heat capacity and magnetic susceptibility) were computed for different lattice sizes and a Binder cumulant introduced in order to estimate the critical temperature of the systems. Moreover, the correlation function was calculated for the 2D Ising model.

  7. Monte Carlo study of radiation-induced demagnetization using the two-dimensional Ising model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samin, Adib; Cao, Lei

    2015-01-01

    A simple radiation-damage model based on the Ising model for magnets is proposed to study the effects of radiation on the magnetism of permanent magnets. The model is studied in two dimensions using a Monte Carlo simulation, and it accounts for the radiation through the introduction of a localized heat pulse. The model exhibits qualitative agreement with experimental results, and it clearly elucidates the role that the coercivity and the radiation particle’s energy play in the process. A more quantitative agreement with experiment will entail accounting for the long-range dipole–dipole interactions and the crystalline anisotropy.

  8. Monte Carlo study of radiation-induced demagnetization using the two-dimensional Ising model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samin, Adib; Cao, Lei

    2015-10-01

    A simple radiation-damage model based on the Ising model for magnets is proposed to study the effects of radiation on the magnetism of permanent magnets. The model is studied in two dimensions using a Monte Carlo simulation, and it accounts for the radiation through the introduction of a localized heat pulse. The model exhibits qualitative agreement with experimental results, and it clearly elucidates the role that the coercivity and the radiation particle’s energy play in the process. A more quantitative agreement with experiment will entail accounting for the long-range dipole–dipole interactions and the crystalline anisotropy.

  9. Particle Markov Chain Monte Carlo Techniques of Unobserved Component Time Series Models Using Ox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nonejad, Nima

    This paper details Particle Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques for analysis of unobserved component time series models using several economic data sets. PMCMC combines the particle filter with the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Overall PMCMC provides a very compelling, computationally fast...... and efficient framework for estimation. These advantages are used to for instance estimate stochastic volatility models with leverage effect or with Student-t distributed errors. We also model changing time series characteristics of the US inflation rate by considering a heteroskedastic ARFIMA model where...

  10. Monte Carlo modeling of neutron imaging at the SINQ spallation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebenhaft, J.R.; Lehmann, E.H.; Pitcher, E.J.; McKinney, G.W.

    2003-01-01

    Modeling of the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source (SINQ) has been used to demonstrate the neutron radiography capability of the newly released MPI-version of the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. A detailed MCNPX model was developed of SINQ and its associated neutron transmission radiography (NEUTRA) facility. Preliminary validation of the model was performed by comparing the calculated and measured neutron fluxes in the NEUTRA beam line, and a simulated radiography image was generated for a sample consisting of steel tubes containing different materials. This paper describes the SINQ facility, provides details of the MCNPX model, and presents preliminary results of the neutron imaging. (authors)

  11. State-to-state models of vibrational relaxation in Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblapenko, G. P.; Kashkovsky, A. V.; Bondar, Ye A.

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, the application of state-to-state models of vibrational energy exchanges to the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) is considered. A state-to-state model for VT transitions of vibrational energy in nitrogen and oxygen, based on the application of the inverse Laplace transform to results of quasiclassical trajectory calculations (QCT) of vibrational energy transitions, along with the Forced Harmonic Oscillator (FHO) state-to-state model is implemented in DSMC code and applied to flows around blunt bodies. Comparisons are made with the widely used Larsen-Borgnakke model and the in uence of multi-quantum VT transitions is assessed.

  12. Optical roughness BRDF model for reverse Monte Carlo simulation of real material thermal radiation transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Peiran; Eri, Qitai; Wang, Qiang

    2014-04-10

    Optical roughness was introduced into the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model to simulate the reflectance characteristics of thermal radiation. The optical roughness BRDF model stemmed from the influence of surface roughness and wavelength on the ray reflectance calculation. This model was adopted to simulate real metal emissivity. The reverse Monte Carlo method was used to display the distribution of reflectance rays. The numerical simulations showed that the optical roughness BRDF model can calculate the wavelength effect on emissivity and simulate the real metal emissivity variance with incidence angles.

  13. Topological excitations and Monte-Carlo simulation of the Abelian-Higgs model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranft, J.

    1981-01-01

    The phase structure and topological excitations, in particular the magnetic monopole current density, are investigated in a Monte-Carlo simulation of the lattice version of the four-dimensional Abelian-Higgs model. The monopole current density is found to be large in the confinement phase and rapidly decreasing in the Coulomb and Higgs phases. This result supports the view that confinement is neglected with the condensation of monopole-antimonopole pairs

  14. Computer simulation of stochastic processes through model-sampling (Monte Carlo) techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, C W.

    1969-03-01

    A simple Monte Carlo simulation program is outlined which can be used for the investigation of random-walk problems, for example in diffusion, or the movement of tracers in the blood circulation. The results given by the simulation are compared with those predicted by well-established theory, and it is shown how the model can be expanded to deal with drift, and with reflexion from or adsorption at a boundary.

  15. Extrapolation method in the Monte Carlo Shell Model and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Noritaka; Abe, Takashi; Utsuno, Yutaka; Mizusaki, Takahiro; Otsuka, Takaharu; Honma, Michio

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate how the energy-variance extrapolation method works using the sequence of the approximated wave functions obtained by the Monte Carlo Shell Model (MCSM), taking 56 Ni with pf-shell as an example. The extrapolation method is shown to work well even in the case that the MCSM shows slow convergence, such as 72 Ge with f5pg9-shell. The structure of 72 Se is also studied including the discussion of the shape-coexistence phenomenon.

  16. Monte Carlo and analytical model predictions of leakage neutron exposures from passively scattered proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez-Andújar, Angélica; Zhang, Rui; Newhauser, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Stray neutron radiation is of concern after radiation therapy, especially in children, because of the high risk it might carry for secondary cancers. Several previous studies predicted the stray neutron exposure from proton therapy, mostly using Monte Carlo simulations. Promising attempts to develop analytical models have also been reported, but these were limited to only a few proton beam energies. The purpose of this study was to develop an analytical model to predict leakage neutron equivalent dose from passively scattered proton beams in the 100-250-MeV interval.Methods: To develop and validate the analytical model, the authors used values of equivalent dose per therapeutic absorbed dose (H/D) predicted with Monte Carlo simulations. The authors also characterized the behavior of the mean neutron radiation-weighting factor, w R , as a function of depth in a water phantom and distance from the beam central axis.Results: The simulated and analytical predictions agreed well. On average, the percentage difference between the analytical model and the Monte Carlo simulations was 10% for the energies and positions studied. The authors found that w R was highest at the shallowest depth and decreased with depth until around 10 cm, where it started to increase slowly with depth. This was consistent among all energies.Conclusion: Simple analytical methods are promising alternatives to complex and slow Monte Carlo simulations to predict H/D values. The authors' results also provide improved understanding of the behavior of w R which strongly depends on depth, but is nearly independent of lateral distance from the beam central axis

  17. Offsetting the difficulties of the molecular model of atomic collisions in the intermediate velocity range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1991-01-01

    To offset the defective behavior of the molecular method of atomic collisions at intermediate energies, we propose a method to approximate the probability flux towards continuum and discrete states not included in the molecular basis. We check the degree of accuracy and limitations of the method for a model case where transition probabilities can be calculated exactly. An application to the benchmark case of He + +H + collisions is also presented, and yields complementary information on the properties of this approach

  18. Inelasticity in hadron-nucleus collisions in the geometrical two-chain model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wibig, T.; Sobczynska, D.

    1995-01-01

    Two features of great importance registered in experiments on hadron-nucleus collisions are the decreased inelasticity and multiplicity in intranucleus collisions. In this paper we show that such behaviour is a natural consequence of the geometrical two-chain model of multi-particle production processes: only the forward-going chain can undergo secondary interactions in the nucleus. A quantitative comparison with the data is presented. (author)

  19. Systematic vacuum study of the ITER model cryopump by test particle Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xueli; Haas, Horst; Day, Christian [Institute for Technical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The primary pumping systems on the ITER torus are based on eight tailor-made cryogenic pumps because not any standard commercial vacuum pump can meet the ITER working criteria. This kind of cryopump can provide high pumping speed, especially for light gases, by the cryosorption on activated charcoal at 4.5 K. In this paper we will present the systematic Monte Carlo simulation results of the model pump in a reduced scale by ProVac3D, a new Test Particle Monte Carlo simulation program developed by KIT. The simulation model has included the most important mechanical structures such as sixteen cryogenic panels working at 4.5 K, the 80 K radiation shield envelope with baffles, the pump housing, inlet valve and the TIMO (Test facility for the ITER Model Pump) test facility. Three typical gas species, i.e., deuterium, protium and helium are simulated. The pumping characteristics have been obtained. The result is in good agreement with the experiment data up to the gas throughput of 1000 sccm, which marks the limit for free molecular flow. This means that ProVac3D is a useful tool in the design of the prototype cryopump of ITER. Meanwhile, the capture factors at different critical positions are calculated. They can be used as the important input parameters for a follow-up Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulation for higher gas throughput.

  20. Continuous energy Monte Carlo calculations for randomly distributed spherical fuels based on statistical geometry model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Isao [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan); Mori, Takamasa; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Itakura, Hirofumi

    1996-03-01

    The method to calculate neutronics parameters of a core composed of randomly distributed spherical fuels has been developed based on a statistical geometry model with a continuous energy Monte Carlo method. This method was implemented in a general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP, and a new code MCNP-CFP had been developed. This paper describes the model and method how to use it and the validation results. In the Monte Carlo calculation, the location of a spherical fuel is sampled probabilistically along the particle flight path from the spatial probability distribution of spherical fuels, called nearest neighbor distribution (NND). This sampling method was validated through the following two comparisons: (1) Calculations of inventory of coated fuel particles (CFPs) in a fuel compact by both track length estimator and direct evaluation method, and (2) Criticality calculations for ordered packed geometries. This method was also confined by applying to an analysis of the critical assembly experiment at VHTRC. The method established in the present study is quite unique so as to a probabilistic model of the geometry with a great number of spherical fuels distributed randomly. Realizing the speed-up by vector or parallel computations in future, it is expected to be widely used in calculation of a nuclear reactor core, especially HTGR cores. (author).

  1. Learning of state-space models with highly informative observations: A tempered sequential Monte Carlo solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Andreas; Schön, Thomas B.; Lindsten, Fredrik

    2018-05-01

    Probabilistic (or Bayesian) modeling and learning offers interesting possibilities for systematic representation of uncertainty using probability theory. However, probabilistic learning often leads to computationally challenging problems. Some problems of this type that were previously intractable can now be solved on standard personal computers thanks to recent advances in Monte Carlo methods. In particular, for learning of unknown parameters in nonlinear state-space models, methods based on the particle filter (a Monte Carlo method) have proven very useful. A notoriously challenging problem, however, still occurs when the observations in the state-space model are highly informative, i.e. when there is very little or no measurement noise present, relative to the amount of process noise. The particle filter will then struggle in estimating one of the basic components for probabilistic learning, namely the likelihood p (data | parameters). To this end we suggest an algorithm which initially assumes that there is substantial amount of artificial measurement noise present. The variance of this noise is sequentially decreased in an adaptive fashion such that we, in the end, recover the original problem or possibly a very close approximation of it. The main component in our algorithm is a sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) sampler, which gives our proposed method a clear resemblance to the SMC2 method. Another natural link is also made to the ideas underlying the approximate Bayesian computation (ABC). We illustrate it with numerical examples, and in particular show promising results for a challenging Wiener-Hammerstein benchmark problem.

  2. Monte Carlo tests of the Rasch model based on scalability coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Karl Bang; Kreiner, Svend

    2010-01-01

    that summarizes the number of Guttman errors in the data matrix. These coefficients are shown to yield efficient tests of the Rasch model using p-values computed using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. The power of the tests of unequal item discrimination, and their ability to distinguish between local dependence......For item responses fitting the Rasch model, the assumptions underlying the Mokken model of double monotonicity are met. This makes non-parametric item response theory a natural starting-point for Rasch item analysis. This paper studies scalability coefficients based on Loevinger's H coefficient...

  3. Monte Carlo tools for Beyond the Standard Model Physics , April 14-16

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger...[], Simon; Christensen, Christian Holm; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing

    2011-01-01

    This workshop aims to gather together theorists and experimentalists interested in developing and using Monte Carlo tools for Beyond the Standard Model Physics in an attempt to be prepared for the analysis of data focusing on the Large Hadron Collider. Since a large number of excellent tools....... To identify promising models (or processes) for which the tools have not yet been constructed and start filling up these gaps. To propose ways to streamline the process of going from models to events, i.e. to make the process more user-friendly so that more people can get involved and perform serious collider...

  4. Modeling Replenishment of Ultrathin Liquid Perfluoro polyether Z Films on Solid Surfaces Using Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayeed, M.S.; Kato, T.

    2014-01-01

    Applying the reptation algorithm to a simplified perfluoro polyether Z off-lattice polymer model an NVT Monte Carlo simulation has been performed. Bulk condition has been simulated first to compare the average radius of gyration with the bulk experimental results. Then the model is tested for its ability to describe dynamics. After this, it is applied to observe the replenishment of nano scale ultrathin liquid films on solid flat carbon surfaces. The replenishment rate for trenches of different widths (8, 12, and 16 nms for several molecular weights) between two films of perfluoro polyether Z from the Monte Carlo simulation is compared to that obtained solving the diffusion equation using the experimental diffusion coefficients of Ma et al. (1999), with room condition in both cases. Replenishment per Monte Carlo cycle seems to be a constant multiple of replenishment per second at least up to 2 nm replenished film thickness of the trenches over the carbon surface. Considerable good agreement has been achieved here between the experimental results and the dynamics of molecules using reptation moves in the ultrathin liquid films on solid surfaces.

  5. Neural network model for proton-proton collision at high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Bakry, M.Y.; El-Metwally, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    Developments in artificial intelligence (AI) techniques and their applications to physics have made it feasible to develop and implement new modeling techniques for high-energy interactions. In particular, AI techniques of artificial neural networks (ANN) have recently been used to design and implement more effective models. The primary purpose of this paper is to model the proton-proton (p-p) collision using the ANN technique. Following a review of the conventional techniques and an introduction to the neural network, the paper presents simulation test results using an p-p based ANN model trained with experimental data. The p-p based ANN model calculates the multiplicity distribution of charged particles and the inelastic cross section of the p-p collision at high energies. The results amply demonstrate the feasibility of such new technique in extracting the collision features and prove its effectiveness

  6. Automatic mesh adaptivity for hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic neutronics modeling of difficult shielding problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Wilson, Paul P.H.; Sawan, Mohamed E.; Mosher, Scott W.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Wagner, John C.; Evans, Thomas M.; Grove, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    The CADIS and FW-CADIS hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques dramatically increase the efficiency of neutronics modeling, but their use in the accurate design analysis of very large and geometrically complex nuclear systems has been limited by the large number of processors and memory requirements for their preliminary deterministic calculations and final Monte Carlo calculation. Three mesh adaptivity algorithms were developed to reduce the memory requirements of CADIS and FW-CADIS without sacrificing their efficiency improvement. First, a macromaterial approach enhances the fidelity of the deterministic models without changing the mesh. Second, a deterministic mesh refinement algorithm generates meshes that capture as much geometric detail as possible without exceeding a specified maximum number of mesh elements. Finally, a weight window coarsening algorithm decouples the weight window mesh and energy bins from the mesh and energy group structure of the deterministic calculations in order to remove the memory constraint of the weight window map from the deterministic mesh resolution. The three algorithms were used to enhance an FW-CADIS calculation of the prompt dose rate throughout the ITER experimental facility. Using these algorithms resulted in a 23.3% increase in the number of mesh tally elements in which the dose rates were calculated in a 10-day Monte Carlo calculation and, additionally, increased the efficiency of the Monte Carlo simulation by a factor of at least 3.4. The three algorithms enabled this difficult calculation to be accurately solved using an FW-CADIS simulation on a regular computer cluster, eliminating the need for a world-class super computer

  7. Realistic modelling of jets in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Clint; Schenke, Björn; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The reconstruction of jets in heavy-ion collisions provides insight into the dynamics of hard partons in media. Unlike the spectrum of single hadrons, the spectrum of jets is highly sensitive to q -hat ⊥ , as well as being sensitive to partonic energy loss and radiative processes. We use martini, an event generator, to study how finite-temperature processes at leading order affect dijets

  8. Colour rope model for extreme relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biro, T.S.; Nielsen, H.B.; Knoll, J.

    1984-04-01

    Our goal is to investigate the possible cumulative effects of the colour fields of the observable meson multiplicity distribution in the central rapidity region in extreme relativistic heavy ion collisions. In the first Chapter we overview the space-time picture of the string formation in a central heavy ion collision. We take into account trivial geometrical factors in a straight line geometry. In the second Chapter we consider the colour chargation process of heavy ions as a random walk. We calculate the expectation value and the relative standard deviation of the total effective charge square. In the third Chapter we consider the stochastic decay of a K-fold string-rope to mesons by the Schwinger-mechanism. We calculate the expected lifetime of a K-fold string and the time for the first quark antiquark pair creation. In the fourth Chapter we deal with the meson production of a K-fold rope relative to that of a single string and hence we look for a scaling between A + A and p + p collisions. (orig./HSI)

  9. A rear-end collision risk assessment model based on drivers' collision avoidance process under influences of cell phone use and gender-A driving simulator based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomeng; Yan, Xuedong; Wu, Jiawei; Radwan, Essam; Zhang, Yuting

    2016-12-01

    Driver's collision avoidance performance has a direct link to the collision risk and crash severity. Previous studies demonstrated that the distracted driving, such as using a cell phone while driving, disrupted the driver's performance on road. This study aimed to investigate the manner and extent to which cell phone use and driver's gender affected driving performance and collision risk in a rear-end collision avoidance process. Forty-two licensed drivers completed the driving simulation experiment in three phone use conditions: no phone use, hands-free, and hand-held, in which the drivers drove in a car-following situation with potential rear-end collision risks caused by the leading vehicle's sudden deceleration. Based on the experiment data, a rear-end collision risk assessment model was developed to assess the influence of cell phone use and driver's gender. The cell phone use and driver's gender were found to be significant factors that affected the braking performances in the rear-end collision avoidance process, including the brake reaction time, the deceleration adjusting time and the maximum deceleration rate. The minimum headway distance between the leading vehicle and the simulator during the rear-end collision avoidance process was the final output variable, which could be used to measure the rear-end collision risk and judge whether a collision occurred. The results showed that although cell phone use drivers took some compensatory behaviors in the collision avoidance process to reduce the mental workload, the collision risk in cell phone use conditions was still higher than that without the phone use. More importantly, the results proved that the hands-free condition did not eliminate the safety problem associated with distracted driving because it impaired the driving performance in the same way as much as the use of hand-held phones. In addition, the gender effect indicated that although female drivers had longer reaction time than male drivers in

  10. Model of the humanoid body for self collision detection based on elliptical capsules

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dube, C

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available . The humanoid body is modeled using elliptical capsules, while the moving segments, i.e. arms and legs, of the humanoid are modeled using circular capsules. This collision detection model provides a good fit to the humanoid body shape while being simple...

  11. A Monte Carlo Simulation approach for the modeling of free-molecule squeeze-film damping of flexible microresonators

    KAUST Repository

    Leung, Roger; Cheung, Howard; Gang, Hong; Ye, Wenjing

    2010-01-01

    Squeeze-film damping on microresonators is a significant damping source even when the surrounding gas is highly rarefied. This article presents a general modeling approach based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for the prediction of squeeze

  12. Bayesian Monte Carlo and Maximum Likelihood Approach for Uncertainty Estimation and Risk Management: Application to Lake Oxygen Recovery Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Model uncertainty estimation and risk assessment is essential to environmental management and informed decision making on pollution mitigation strategies. In this study, we apply a probabilistic methodology, which combines Bayesian Monte Carlo simulation and Maximum Likelihood e...

  13. Modeling dose-rate on/over the surface of cylindrical radio-models using Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Xuefu; Ma Guoxue; Wen Fuping; Wang Zhongqi; Wang Chaohui; Zhang Jiyun; Huang Qingbo; Zhang Jiaqiu; Wang Xinxing; Wang Jun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models, which belong to the Metrology Station of Radio-Geological Survey of CNNC. Methods: The dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models were modeled using the famous Monte Carlo code-MCNP. The dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models were measured by a high gas pressurized ionization chamber dose-rate meter, respectively. The values of dose-rate modeled using MCNP code were compared with those obtained by authors in the present experimental measurement, and with those obtained by other workers previously. Some factors causing the discrepancy between the data obtained by authors using MCNP code and the data obtained using other methods are discussed in this paper. Results: The data of dose-rates on/over the surface of 10 cylindrical radio-models, obtained using MCNP code, were in good agreement with those obtained by other workers using the theoretical method. They were within the discrepancy of ±5% in general, and the maximum discrepancy was less than 10%. Conclusions: As if each factor needed for the Monte Carlo code is correct, the dose-rates on/over the surface of cylindrical radio-models modeled using the Monte Carlo code are correct with an uncertainty of 3%

  14. Modeling of driver's collision avoidance maneuver based on controller switching model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hae; Hayakawa, Soichiro; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Koji; Okuma, Shigeru; Tsuchida, Nuio; Shimizu, Masayuki; Kido, Shigeyuki

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents a modeling strategy of human driving behavior based on the controller switching model focusing on the driver's collision avoidance maneuver. The driving data are collected by using the three-dimensional (3-D) driving simulator based on the CAVE Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE), which provides stereoscopic immersive virtual environment. In our modeling, the control scenario of the human driver, that is, the mapping from the driver's sensory information to the operation of the driver such as acceleration, braking, and steering, is expressed by Piecewise Polynomial (PWP) model. Since the PWP model includes both continuous behaviors given by polynomials and discrete logical conditions, it can be regarded as a class of Hybrid Dynamical System (HDS). The identification problem for the PWP model is formulated as the Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) by transforming the switching conditions into binary variables. From the obtained results, it is found that the driver appropriately switches the "control law" according to the sensory information. In addition, the driving characteristics of the beginner driver and the expert driver are compared and discussed. These results enable us to capture not only the physical meaning of the driving skill but the decision-making aspect (switching conditions) in the driver's collision avoidance maneuver as well.

  15. Monte Carlo Studies of Phase Separation in Compressible 2-dim Ising Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, S. J.; Landau, D. P.

    2006-03-01

    Using high resolution Monte Carlo simulations, we study time-dependent domain growth in compressible 2-dim ferromagnetic (s=1/2) Ising models with continuous spin positions and spin-exchange moves [1]. Spins interact with slightly modified Lennard-Jones potentials, and we consider a model with no lattice mismatch and one with 4% mismatch. For comparison, we repeat calculations for the rigid Ising model [2]. For all models, large systems (512^2) and long times (10^ 6 MCS) are examined over multiple runs, and the growth exponent is measured in the asymptotic scaling regime. For the rigid model and the compressible model with no lattice mismatch, the growth exponent is consistent with the theoretically expected value of 1/3 [1] for Model B type growth. However, we find that non-zero lattice mismatch has a significant and unexpected effect on the growth behavior.Supported by the NSF.[1] D.P. Landau and K. Binder, A Guide to Monte Carlo Simulations in Statistical Physics, second ed. (Cambridge University Press, New York, 2005).[2] J. Amar, F. Sullivan, and R.D. Mountain, Phys. Rev. B 37, 196 (1988).

  16. History and future perspectives of the Monte Carlo shell model -from Alphleet to K computer-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Noritaka; Otsuka, Takaharu; Utsuno, Yutaka; Mizusaki, Takahiro; Honma, Michio; Abe, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    We report a history of the developments of the Monte Carlo shell model (MCSM). The MCSM was proposed in order to perform large-scale shell-model calculations which direct diagonalization method cannot reach. Since 1999 PC clusters were introduced for parallel computation of the MCSM. Since 2011 we participated the High Performance Computing Infrastructure Strategic Program and developed a new MCSM code for current massively parallel computers such as K computer. We discuss future perspectives concerning a new framework and parallel computation of the MCSM by incorporating conjugate gradient method and energy-variance extrapolation

  17. Monte Carlo modelling of the Belgian materials testing reactor BR2: present status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verboomen, B.; Aoust, Th.; Raedt, Ch. de; Beeckmans de West-Meerbeeck, A.

    2001-01-01

    A very detailed 3-D MCNP-4B model of the BR2 reactor was developed to perform all neutron and gamma calculations needed for the design of new experimental irradiation rigs. The Monte Carlo model of BR2 includes the nearly exact geometrical representation of fuel elements (now with their axially varying burn-up), of partially inserted control and regulating rods, of experimental devices and of radioisotope production rigs. The multiple level-geometry possibilities of MCNP-4B are fully exploited to obtain sufficiently flexible tools to cope with the very changing core loading. (orig.)

  18. Quantum Monte Carlo simulation for S=1 Heisenberg model with uniaxial anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Mitsuaki; Batista, Cristian; Kawashima, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    We perform quantum Monte Carlo simulations for S=1 Heisenberg model with an uniaxial anisotropy. The system exhibits a phase transition as we vary the anisotropy and a long range order appears at a finite temperature when the exchange interaction J is comparable to the uniaxial anisotropy D. We investigate quantum critical phenomena of this model and obtain the line of the phase transition which approaches a power-law with logarithmic corrections at low temperature. We derive the form of logarithmic corrections analytically and compare it to our simulation results

  19. Monte Carlo simulations of the NJL model near the nonzero temperature phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strouthos, Costas; Christofi, Stavros

    2005-01-01

    We present results from numerical simulations of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with an SU(2)xSU(2) chiral symmetry and N c = 4,8, and 16 quark colors at nonzero temperature. We performed the simulations by utilizing the hybrid Monte Carlo and hybrid Molecular Dynamics algorithms. We show that the model undergoes a second order phase transition. The critical exponents measured are consistent with the classical 3d O(4) universality class and hence in accordance with the dimensional reduction scenario. We also show that the Ginzburg region is suppressed by a factor of 1/N c in accordance with previous analytical predictions. (author)

  20. Modeling of the YALINA booster facility by the Monte Carlo code MONK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.; Kondev, F.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Serafimovich, I.; Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Routkovskaya, C.

    2007-01-01

    The YALINA-Booster facility has been modeled according to the benchmark specifications defined for the IAEA activity without any geometrical homogenization using the Monte Carlo codes MONK and MCNP/MCNPX/MCB. The MONK model perfectly matches the MCNP one. The computational analyses have been extended through the MCB code, which is an extension of the MCNP code with burnup capability because of its additional feature for analyzing source driven multiplying assemblies. The main neutronics arameters of the YALINA-Booster facility were calculated using these computer codes with different nuclear data libraries based on ENDF/B-VI-0, -6, JEF-2.2, and JEF-3.1.

  1. Modeling the cathode region of noble gas mixture discharges using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donko, Z.; Janossy, M.

    1992-10-01

    A model of the cathode dark space of DC glow discharges was developed in order to study the effects caused by mixing small amounts (≤2%) of other noble gases (Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe) to He. The motion of charged particles was described by Monte Carlo simulation. Several discharge parameters (electron and ion energy distribution functions, electron and ion current densities, reduced ionization coefficients, and current density-voltage characteristics) were obtained. Small amounts of admixtures were found to modify significantly the discharge parameters. Current density-voltage characteristics obtained from the model showed good agreement with experimental data. (author) 40 refs.; 14 figs

  2. Bayesian estimation of realized stochastic volatility model by Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaishi, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    The hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm (HMCA) is applied for Bayesian parameter estimation of the realized stochastic volatility (RSV) model. Using the 2nd order minimum norm integrator (2MNI) for the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in the HMCA, we find that the 2MNI is more efficient than the conventional leapfrog integrator. We also find that the autocorrelation time of the volatility variables sampled by the HMCA is very short. Thus it is concluded that the HMCA with the 2MNI is an efficient algorithm for parameter estimations of the RSV model

  3. Design and evaluation of a Monte Carlo based model of an orthovoltage treatment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penchev, Petar; Maeder, Ulf; Fiebich, Martin; Zink, Klemens; University Hospital Marburg

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a flexible framework of an orthovoltage treatment system capable of calculating and visualizing dose distributions in different phantoms and CT datasets. The framework provides a complete set of various filters, applicators and X-ray energies and therefore can be adapted to varying studies or be used for educational purposes. A dedicated user friendly graphical interface was developed allowing for easy setup of the simulation parameters and visualization of the results. For the Monte Carlo simulations the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code package was used. Building the geometry was accomplished with the help of the EGSnrc C++ class library. The deposited dose was calculated according to the KERMA approximation using the track-length estimator. The validation against measurements showed a good agreement within 4-5% deviation, down to depths of 20% of the depth dose maximum. Furthermore, to show its capabilities, the validated model was used to calculate the dose distribution on two CT datasets. Typical Monte Carlo calculation time for these simulations was about 10 minutes achieving an average statistical uncertainty of 2% on a standard PC. However, this calculation time depends strongly on the used CT dataset, tube potential, filter material/thickness and applicator size.

  4. Electron collisions in the trapped gyro-Landau fluid transport model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, G. M.; Kinsey, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Accurately modeling electron collisions in the trapped gyro-Landau fluid (TGLF) equations has been a major challenge. Insights gained from numerically solving the gyrokinetic equation have lead to a significant improvement of the low order TGLF model. The theoretical motivation and verification of this model with the velocity-space gyrokinetic code GYRO[J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] will be presented. The improvement in the fidelity of TGLF to GYRO is shown to also lead to better prediction of experimental temperature profiles by TGLF for a dedicated collision frequency scan.

  5. Using a collision model to design safer wind turbine rotors for birds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    A mathematical model for collisions between birds and propeller-type turbine rotors identifies the variables that can be manipulated to reduce the probability that birds will collide with the rotor. This study defines a safety index--the clearance power density--that allows rotors of different sizes and designs to be compared in terms of the amount of wind energy converted to electrical energy per bird collision. The collision model accounts for variations in wind speed during the year and shows that for model rotors with simple, one-dimensional blades, the safety index increases in proportion to rotor diameter, and variable speed rotors have higher safety indexes than constant speed rotors. The safety index can also be increased by enlarging the region near the center of the rotor hub where the blades move slowly enough for birds to avoid them. Painting the blades to make them more visible might have this effect. Model rotors with practical designs can have safety indexes an order of magnitude higher than those for model rotors typical of the constant speeds rotors in common use today. This finding suggests that redesigned rotors could have collision rates with birds perhaps an order of magnitude lower than today's rotors, with no reduction in the production of wind power. The empirical data that exist for collisions between raptors, such as hawks and eagles, and rotors are consistent with the model: the numbers of raptor carcasses found beneath large variable speed rotors, relative to the numbers found under small constant speed rotors, are in the proportions predicted by the collision model rather than in proportion to the areas swept by the rotor blades. However, uncontrolled variables associated with these data prevent a stronger claim of support for the model

  6. Comparison of nonstationary generalized logistic models based on Monte Carlo simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the evidences of climate change have been observed in hydrologic data such as rainfall and flow data. The time-dependent characteristics of statistics in hydrologic data are widely defined as nonstationarity. Therefore, various nonstationary GEV and generalized Pareto models have been suggested for frequency analysis of nonstationary annual maximum and POT (peak-over-threshold data, respectively. However, the alternative models are required for nonstatinoary frequency analysis because of analyzing the complex characteristics of nonstationary data based on climate change. This study proposed the nonstationary generalized logistic model including time-dependent parameters. The parameters of proposed model are estimated using the method of maximum likelihood based on the Newton-Raphson method. In addition, the proposed model is compared by Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the characteristics of models and applicability.

  7. MONTE CARLO SIMULATION MODEL OF ENERGETIC PROTON TRANSPORT THROUGH SELF-GENERATED ALFVEN WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afanasiev, A.; Vainio, R., E-mail: alexandr.afanasiev@helsinki.fi [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-08-15

    A new Monte Carlo simulation model for the transport of energetic protons through self-generated Alfven waves is presented. The key point of the model is that, unlike the previous ones, it employs the full form (i.e., includes the dependence on the pitch-angle cosine) of the resonance condition governing the scattering of particles off Alfven waves-the process that approximates the wave-particle interactions in the framework of quasilinear theory. This allows us to model the wave-particle interactions in weak turbulence more adequately, in particular, to implement anisotropic particle scattering instead of isotropic scattering, which the previous Monte Carlo models were based on. The developed model is applied to study the transport of flare-accelerated protons in an open magnetic flux tube. Simulation results for the transport of monoenergetic protons through the spectrum of Alfven waves reveal that the anisotropic scattering leads to spatially more distributed wave growth than isotropic scattering. This result can have important implications for diffusive shock acceleration, e.g., affect the scattering mean free path of the accelerated particles in and the size of the foreshock region.

  8. A new moving strategy for the sequential Monte Carlo approach in optimizing the hydrological model parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Gaofeng; Li, Xin; Ma, Jinzhu; Wang, Yunquan; Liu, Shaomin; Huang, Chunlin; Zhang, Kun; Hu, Xiaoli

    2018-04-01

    Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) samplers have become increasing popular for estimating the posterior parameter distribution with the non-linear dependency structures and multiple modes often present in hydrological models. However, the explorative capabilities and efficiency of the sampler depends strongly on the efficiency in the move step of SMC sampler. In this paper we presented a new SMC sampler entitled the Particle Evolution Metropolis Sequential Monte Carlo (PEM-SMC) algorithm, which is well suited to handle unknown static parameters of hydrologic model. The PEM-SMC sampler is inspired by the works of Liang and Wong (2001) and operates by incorporating the strengths of the genetic algorithm, differential evolution algorithm and Metropolis-Hasting algorithm into the framework of SMC. We also prove that the sampler admits the target distribution to be a stationary distribution. Two case studies including a multi-dimensional bimodal normal distribution and a conceptual rainfall-runoff hydrologic model by only considering parameter uncertainty and simultaneously considering parameter and input uncertainty show that PEM-SMC sampler is generally superior to other popular SMC algorithms in handling the high dimensional problems. The study also indicated that it may be important to account for model structural uncertainty by using multiplier different hydrological models in the SMC framework in future study.

  9. Monte Carlo Modelling of Single-Crystal Diffuse Scattering from Intermetallics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren J. Goossens

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Single-crystal diffuse scattering (SCDS reveals detailed structural insights into materials. In particular, it is sensitive to two-body correlations, whereas traditional Bragg peak-based methods are sensitive to single-body correlations. This means that diffuse scattering is sensitive to ordering that persists for just a few unit cells: nanoscale order, sometimes referred to as “local structure”, which is often crucial for understanding a material and its function. Metals and alloys were early candidates for SCDS studies because of the availability of large single crystals. While great progress has been made in areas like ab initio modelling and molecular dynamics, a place remains for Monte Carlo modelling of model crystals because of its ability to model very large systems; important when correlations are relatively long (though still finite in range. This paper briefly outlines, and gives examples of, some Monte Carlo methods appropriate for the modelling of SCDS from metallic compounds, and considers data collection as well as analysis. Even if the interest in the material is driven primarily by magnetism or transport behaviour, an understanding of the local structure can underpin such studies and give an indication of nanoscale inhomogeneity.

  10. The Physical Models and Statistical Procedures Used in the RACER Monte Carlo Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, T.M.; Brown, F.B.; Bischoff, F.G.; MacMillan, D.B.; Ellis, C.L.; Ward, J.T.; Ballinger, C.T.; Kelly, D.J.; Schindler, L.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the MCV (Monte Carlo - Vectorized)Monte Carlo neutron transport code [Brown, 1982, 1983; Brown and Mendelson, 1984a]. MCV is a module in the RACER system of codes that is used for Monte Carlo reactor physics analysis. The MCV module contains all of the neutron transport and statistical analysis functions of the system, while other modules perform various input-related functions such as geometry description, material assignment, output edit specification, etc. MCV is very closely related to the 05R neutron Monte Carlo code [Irving et al., 1965] developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 05R evolved into the 05RR module of the STEMB system, which was the forerunner of the RACER system. Much of the overall logic and physics treatment of 05RR has been retained and, indeed, the original verification of MCV was achieved through comparison with STEMB results. MCV has been designed to be very computationally efficient [Brown, 1981, Brown and Martin, 1984b; Brown, 1986]. It was originally programmed to make use of vector-computing architectures such as those of the CDC Cyber- 205 and Cray X-MP. MCV was the first full-scale production Monte Carlo code to effectively utilize vector-processing capabilities. Subsequently, MCV was modified to utilize both distributed-memory [Sutton and Brown, 1994] and shared memory parallelism. The code has been compiled and run on platforms ranging from 32-bit UNIX workstations to clusters of 64-bit vector-parallel supercomputers. The computational efficiency of the code allows the analyst to perform calculations using many more neutron histories than is practical with most other Monte Carlo codes, thereby yielding results with smaller statistical uncertainties. MCV also utilizes variance reduction techniques such as survival biasing, splitting, and rouletting to permit additional reduction in uncertainties. While a general-purpose neutron Monte Carlo code, MCV is optimized for reactor physics calculations. It has the

  11. Insight into collision zone dynamics from topography: numerical modelling results and observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Bottrill

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic models of subduction and continental collision are used to predict dynamic topography changes on the overriding plate. The modelling results show a distinct evolution of topography on the overriding plate, during subduction, continental collision and slab break-off. A prominent topographic feature is a temporary (few Myrs basin on the overriding plate after initial collision. This "collisional mantle dynamic basin" (CMDB is caused by slab steepening drawing, material away from the base of the overriding plate. Also, during this initial collision phase, surface uplift is predicted on the overriding plate between the suture zone and the CMDB, due to the subduction of buoyant continental material and its isostatic compensation. After slab detachment, redistribution of stresses and underplating of the overriding plate cause the uplift to spread further into the overriding plate. This topographic evolution fits the stratigraphy found on the overriding plate of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone in Iran and south east Turkey. The sedimentary record from the overriding plate contains Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene marine carbonates deposited between terrestrial clastic sedimentary rocks, in units such as the Qom Formation and its lateral equivalents. This stratigraphy shows that during the Late Oligocene–Early Miocene the surface of the overriding plate sank below sea level before rising back above sea level, without major compressional deformation recorded in the same area. Our modelled topography changes fit well with this observed uplift and subsidence.

  12. Mathematical Model for Collision-Coalescence Among Inclusions in the Bloom Continuous Caster with M-EMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hong; Jiang, Jimin; Yang, Bin; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Hongwei; Wang, Weixian; Dong, Guiwen

    2018-04-01

    Mathematical simulation is an effective tool to analyze the fluid flow and the inclusion behavior in the bloom continuous caster with mold electromagnetic stirring (M-EMS). The mathematical model is applied to the modeling of magnetic field, flow field, and inclusion field. Due to the introduction of Archimedes force, the collision mechanism and inclusion's slipping velocity should be modified in the inclusion mass and population conservation model. Numerically predicted magnetic field, flow field, and the inclusion spatial distribution conform to the experimental results in the existing literature. Lorentz force plays an important role in the fluid flow, and Archimedes force plays an important role in the inclusion distribution in the continuous caster. Due to Brownian collision, Stokes collision, Archimedes collision, and turbulent collision, the coalescence among inclusions occurs in the bloom continuous caster with M-EMS. Among the four types of collisions, turbulent collision occurs most frequently, followed by Archimedes collision and Stokes collision. The frequency of Brownian collision is several orders of magnitudes smaller and is therefore negligible. The inclusion volume concentration, number density, and characteristic radius exhibit a U-shape in the continuous caster without M-EMS. However, with M-EMS, they exhibit an inverted U-shape.

  13. Statistical modeling of competitive threshold collision-induced dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, M. T.; Armentrout, P. B.

    1998-08-01

    Collision-induced dissociation of (R1OH)Li+(R2OH) with xenon is studied using guided ion beam mass spectrometry. R1OH and R2OH include the following molecules: water, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, and 1-butanol. In all cases, the primary products formed correspond to endothermic loss of one of the neutral alcohols, with minor products that include those formed by ligand exchange and loss of both ligands. The cross-section thresholds are interpreted to yield 0 and 298 K bond energies for (R1OH)Li+-R2OH and relative Li+ binding affinities of the R1OH and R2OH ligands after accounting for the effects of multiple ion-molecule collisions, internal energy of the reactant ions, and dissociation lifetimes. We introduce a means to simultaneously analyze the cross sections for these competitive dissociations using statistical theories to predict the energy dependent branching ratio. Thermochemistry in good agreement with previous work is obtained in all cases. In essence, this statistical approach provides a detailed means of correcting for the "competitive shift" inherent in multichannel processes.

  14. Optimizing Availability of a Framework in Series Configuration Utilizing Markov Model and Monte Carlo Simulation Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Ahmed Siddiqui

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This research work is aimed at optimizing the availability of a framework comprising of two units linked together in series configuration utilizing Markov Model and Monte Carlo (MC Simulation techniques. In this article, effort has been made to develop a maintenance model that incorporates three distinct states for each unit, while taking into account their different levels of deterioration. Calculations are carried out using the proposed model for two distinct cases of corrective repair, namely perfect and imperfect repairs, with as well as without opportunistic maintenance. Initially, results are accomplished using an analytical technique i.e., Markov Model. Validation of the results achieved is later carried out with the help of MC Simulation. In addition, MC Simulation based codes also work well for the frameworks that follow non-exponential failure and repair rates, and thus overcome the limitations offered by the Markov Model.

  15. Monte Carlo based statistical power analysis for mediation models: methods and software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiyong

    2014-12-01

    The existing literature on statistical power analysis for mediation models often assumes data normality and is based on a less powerful Sobel test instead of the more powerful bootstrap test. This study proposes to estimate statistical power to detect mediation effects on the basis of the bootstrap method through Monte Carlo simulation. Nonnormal data with excessive skewness and kurtosis are allowed in the proposed method. A free R package called bmem is developed to conduct the power analysis discussed in this study. Four examples, including a simple mediation model, a multiple-mediator model with a latent mediator, a multiple-group mediation model, and a longitudinal mediation model, are provided to illustrate the proposed method.

  16. New-generation Monte Carlo shell model for the K computer era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Noritaka; Abe, Takashi; Yoshida, Tooru; Otsuka, Takaharu; Tsunoda, Yusuke; Utsuno, Yutaka; Mizusaki, Takahiro; Honma, Michio

    2012-01-01

    We present a newly enhanced version of the Monte Carlo shell-model (MCSM) method by incorporating the conjugate gradient method and energy-variance extrapolation. This new method enables us to perform large-scale shell-model calculations that the direct diagonalization method cannot reach. This new-generation framework of the MCSM provides us with a powerful tool to perform very advanced large-scale shell-model calculations on current massively parallel computers such as the K computer. We discuss the validity of this method in ab initio calculations of light nuclei, and propose a new method to describe the intrinsic wave function in terms of the shell-model picture. We also apply this new MCSM to the study of neutron-rich Cr and Ni isotopes using conventional shell-model calculations with an inert 40 Ca core and discuss how the magicity of N = 28, 40, 50 remains or is broken. (author)

  17. DUAL STATE-PARAMETER UPDATING SCHEME ON A CONCEPTUAL HYDROLOGIC MODEL USING SEQUENTIAL MONTE CARLO FILTERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Seong Jin; Tachikawa, Yasuto; Shiiba, Michiharu; Kim, Sunmin

    Applications of data assimilation techniques have been widely used to improve upon the predictability of hydrologic modeling. Among various data assimilation techniques, sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) filters, known as "particle filters" provide the capability to handle non-linear and non-Gaussian state-space models. This paper proposes a dual state-parameter updating scheme (DUS) based on SMC methods to estimate both state and parameter variables of a hydrologic model. We introduce a kernel smoothing method for the robust estimation of uncertain model parameters in the DUS. The applicability of the dual updating scheme is illustrated using the implementation of the storage function model on a middle-sized Japanese catchment. We also compare performance results of DUS combined with various SMC methods, such as SIR, ASIR and RPF.

  18. A Monte Carlo model for 3D grain evolution during welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Theron M.; Mitchell, John A.; Tikare, Veena

    2017-09-01

    Welding is one of the most wide-spread processes used in metal joining. However, there are currently no open-source software implementations for the simulation of microstructural evolution during a weld pass. Here we describe a Potts Monte Carlo based model implemented in the SPPARKS kinetic Monte Carlo computational framework. The model simulates melting, solidification and solid-state microstructural evolution of material in the fusion and heat-affected zones of a weld. The model does not simulate thermal behavior, but rather utilizes user input parameters to specify weld pool and heat-affect zone properties. Weld pool shapes are specified by Bézier curves, which allow for the specification of a wide range of pool shapes. Pool shapes can range from narrow and deep to wide and shallow representing different fluid flow conditions within the pool. Surrounding temperature gradients are calculated with the aide of a closest point projection algorithm. The model also allows simulation of pulsed power welding through time-dependent variation of the weld pool size. Example simulation results and comparisons with laboratory weld observations demonstrate microstructural variation with weld speed, pool shape, and pulsed-power.

  19. Monte Carlo simulation as a tool to predict blasting fragmentation based on the Kuz Ram model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Mario A.; Ficarazzo, Francesco

    2006-04-01

    Rock fragmentation is considered the most important aspect of production blasting because of its direct effects on the costs of drilling and blasting and on the economics of the subsequent operations of loading, hauling and crushing. Over the past three decades, significant progress has been made in the development of new technologies for blasting applications. These technologies include increasingly sophisticated computer models for blast design and blast performance prediction. Rock fragmentation depends on many variables such as rock mass properties, site geology, in situ fracturing and blasting parameters and as such has no complete theoretical solution for its prediction. However, empirical models for the estimation of size distribution of rock fragments have been developed. In this study, a blast fragmentation Monte Carlo-based simulator, based on the Kuz-Ram fragmentation model, has been developed to predict the entire fragmentation size distribution, taking into account intact and joints rock properties, the type and properties of explosives and the drilling pattern. Results produced by this simulator were quite favorable when compared with real fragmentation data obtained from a blast quarry. It is anticipated that the use of Monte Carlo simulation will increase our understanding of the effects of rock mass and explosive properties on the rock fragmentation by blasting, as well as increase our confidence in these empirical models. This understanding will translate into improvements in blasting operations, its corresponding costs and the overall economics of open pit mines and rock quarries.

  20. Fission yield calculation using toy model based on Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jubaidah; Kurniadi, Rizal

    2015-01-01

    Toy model is a new approximation in predicting fission yield distribution. Toy model assumes nucleus as an elastic toy consist of marbles. The number of marbles represents the number of nucleons, A. This toy nucleus is able to imitate the real nucleus properties. In this research, the toy nucleons are only influenced by central force. A heavy toy nucleus induced by a toy nucleon will be split into two fragments. These two fission fragments are called fission yield. In this research, energy entanglement is neglected. Fission process in toy model is illustrated by two Gaussian curves intersecting each other. There are five Gaussian parameters used in this research. They are scission point of the two curves (R c ), mean of left curve (μ L ) and mean of right curve (μ R ), deviation of left curve (σ L ) and deviation of right curve (σ R ). The fission yields distribution is analyses based on Monte Carlo simulation. The result shows that variation in σ or µ can significanly move the average frequency of asymmetry fission yields. This also varies the range of fission yields distribution probability. In addition, variation in iteration coefficient only change the frequency of fission yields. Monte Carlo simulation for fission yield calculation using toy model successfully indicates the same tendency with experiment results, where average of light fission yield is in the range of 90

  1. Fission yield calculation using toy model based on Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubaidah, E-mail: jubaidah@student.itb.ac.id [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Division, Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology. Jl. Ganesa No. 10 Bandung – West Java, Indonesia 40132 (Indonesia); Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science – State University of Medan. Jl. Willem Iskandar Pasar V Medan Estate – North Sumatera, Indonesia 20221 (Indonesia); Kurniadi, Rizal, E-mail: rijalk@fi.itb.ac.id [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Division, Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology. Jl. Ganesa No. 10 Bandung – West Java, Indonesia 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    Toy model is a new approximation in predicting fission yield distribution. Toy model assumes nucleus as an elastic toy consist of marbles. The number of marbles represents the number of nucleons, A. This toy nucleus is able to imitate the real nucleus properties. In this research, the toy nucleons are only influenced by central force. A heavy toy nucleus induced by a toy nucleon will be split into two fragments. These two fission fragments are called fission yield. In this research, energy entanglement is neglected. Fission process in toy model is illustrated by two Gaussian curves intersecting each other. There are five Gaussian parameters used in this research. They are scission point of the two curves (R{sub c}), mean of left curve (μ{sub L}) and mean of right curve (μ{sub R}), deviation of left curve (σ{sub L}) and deviation of right curve (σ{sub R}). The fission yields distribution is analyses based on Monte Carlo simulation. The result shows that variation in σ or µ can significanly move the average frequency of asymmetry fission yields. This also varies the range of fission yields distribution probability. In addition, variation in iteration coefficient only change the frequency of fission yields. Monte Carlo simulation for fission yield calculation using toy model successfully indicates the same tendency with experiment results, where average of light fission yield is in the range of 90

  2. Anisotropic flow fluctuations in hydro-inspired freeze-out model for relativistic heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Bravina, L V; Korotkikh, V L; Lokhtin, I P; Malinina, L V; Nazarova, E N; Petrushanko, S V; Snigirev, A M; Zabrodin, E E

    2015-01-01

    The possible mechanisms contributing to anisotropic flow fluctuations in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed. The LHC data on event-by-event harmonic flow coefficients measured in PbPb collisions at center-of-mass energy 2.76 TeV per nucleon pair are analyzed and interpreted within the HYDJET++ model. To compare the model results with the experimental data the unfolding procedure is employed. It is shown that HYDJET++ correctly reproduces dynamical fluctuations of elliptic and triangular flows and related to it eccentricity fluctuations of the initial state.

  3. Monte Carlo modeling of Io’s [OI] 6300 Å and [SII] 6716 Å auroral emission in eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C.; Miki, K.; Goldstein, D. B.; Stapelfeldt, K.; Varghese, P. L.; Trafton, L. M.; Evans, R. W.

    2010-06-01

    We present a Monte Carlo (MC) model of [OI] 6300 Å and [SII] 6716 Å emission from Io entering eclipse. The simulation accounts for the 3-D distribution of SO 2, O, SO, S, and O 2 in Io's atmosphere, several volcanic plumes, and the magnetic field around Io. Thermal electrons from the jovian plasma torus are input along the simulation domain boundaries and move along the magnetic field lines distorted by Io, occasionally participating in collisions with neutrals. We find that the atmospheric asymmetry resulting from varying degrees of atmospheric collapse across Io (due to eclipse ingress) and the presence of volcanoes contributes significantly to the unique morphology of the [OI] 6300 Å emission. The [OI] radiation lifetime of ˜134 s limits the emission to regions that have a sufficiently low neutral density so that intermolecular collisions are rare. We find that at low altitudes (typically Pele, Prometheus, etc.) the number density is large enough (>4 × 10 9 cm -3) to collisionally quench nearly all (>95%) of the excited oxygen for reasonable quenching efficiencies. Upstream (relative to the plasma flow), Io's perturbation of the jovian magnetic field mirrors electrons with high pitch angles, while downstream collisions can trap the electrons. This magnetic field perturbation is one of the main physical mechanisms that results in the upstream/downstream brightness asymmetry in [OI] emission seen in the observation by Trauger et al. (Trauger, J.T., Stapelfeldt, K.R., Ballester, G.E., Clarke, J.I., 1997. HST observations of [OI] emissions from Io in eclipse. AAS-DPS Abstract (1997DPS29.1802T)). There are two other main causes for the observed brightness asymmetry. First, the observation's viewing geometry of the wake spot crosses the dayside atmosphere and therefore the wake's observational field of view includes higher oxygen column density than the upstream side. Second, the phased entry into eclipse results in less atmospheric collapse and thus higher

  4. Studies on top-quark Monte Carlo modelling for Top2016

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This note summarises recent studies on Monte Carlo simulation setups of top-quark pair production used by the ATLAS experiment and presents a new method to deal with interference effects for the $Wt$ single-top-quark production which is compared against previous techniques. The main focus for the top-quark pair production is on the improvement of the modelling of the Powheg generator interfaced to the Pythia8 and Herwig7 shower generators. The studies are done using unfolded data at centre-of-mass energies of 7, 8, and 13 TeV.

  5. A study of potential energy curves from the model space quantum Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtsuka, Yuhki; Ten-no, Seiichiro, E-mail: tenno@cs.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Computational Sciences, Graduate School of System Informatics, Kobe University, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2015-12-07

    We report on the first application of the model space quantum Monte Carlo (MSQMC) to potential energy curves (PECs) for the excited states of C{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} to validate the applicability of the method. A parallel MSQMC code is implemented with the initiator approximation to enable efficient sampling. The PECs of MSQMC for various excited and ionized states are compared with those from the Rydberg-Klein-Rees and full configuration interaction methods. The results indicate the usefulness of MSQMC for precise PECs in a wide range obviating problems concerning quasi-degeneracy.

  6. A Monte Carlo modeling alternative for the API Gamma Ray Calibration Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galford, J E

    2017-04-01

    The gamma ray pit at the API Calibration Facility, located on the University of Houston campus, defines the API unit for natural gamma ray logs used throughout the petroleum logging industry. Future use of the facility is uncertain. An alternative method is proposed to preserve the gamma ray API unit definition as an industry standard by using Monte Carlo modeling to obtain accurate counting rate-to-API unit conversion factors for gross-counting and spectral gamma ray tool designs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Statistical Model Predictions for p+p and Pb+Pb Collisions at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kraus, I; Oeschler, H; Redlich, K; Wheaton, S

    2009-01-01

    Particle production in p+p and central Pb+Pb collisions at LHC is discussed in the context of the statistical thermal model. For heavy-ion collisions, predictions of various particle ratios are presented. The sensitivity of several ratios on the temperature and the baryon chemical potential is studied in detail, and some of them, which are particularly appropriate to determine the chemical freeze-out point experimentally, are indicated. Considering elementary interactions on the other hand, we focus on strangeness production and its possible suppression. Extrapolating the thermal parameters to LHC energy, we present predictions of the statistical model for particle yields in p+p collisions. We quantify the strangeness suppression by the correlation volume parameter and discuss its influence on particle production. We propose observables that can provide deeper insight into the mechanism of strangeness production and suppression at LHC.

  8. Constituent quark model for nuclear stopping in high energy nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, T.K.; Maruyama, M.; Takagi, F.

    1997-01-01

    We study nuclear stopping in high energy nuclear collisions using the constituent quark model. It is assumed that wounded nucleons with a different number of interacted quarks hadronize in different ways. The probabilities of having such wounded nucleons are evaluated for proton-proton, proton-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions. After examining our model in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions and fixing the hadronization functions, it is extended to nucleus-nucleus collisions. It is used to calculate the rapidity distribution and the rapidity shift of final-state protons in nucleus-nucleus collisions. The computed results are in good agreement with the experimental data on 32 S+ 32 S at E lab =200A GeV and 208 Pb+ 208 Pb at E lab =160A GeV. Theoretical predictions are also given for proton rapidity distribution in 197 Au+ 197 Au at √(s)=200A GeV (BNL-RHIC). We predict that the nearly baryon-free region will appear in the midrapidity region and the rapidity shift is left-angle Δy right-angle=2.24

  9. Modelling of scintillator based flat-panel detectors with Monte-Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reims, N; Sukowski, F; Uhlmann, N

    2011-01-01

    Scintillator based flat panel detectors are state of the art in the field of industrial X-ray imaging applications. Choosing the proper system and setup parameters for the vast range of different applications can be a time consuming task, especially when developing new detector systems. Since the system behaviour cannot always be foreseen easily, Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations are keys to gain further knowledge of system components and their behaviour for different imaging conditions. In this work we used two Monte-Carlo based models to examine an indirect converting flat panel detector, specifically the Hamamatsu C9312SK. We focused on the signal generation in the scintillation layer and its influence on the spatial resolution of the whole system. The models differ significantly in their level of complexity. The first model gives a global description of the detector based on different parameters characterizing the spatial resolution. With relatively small effort a simulation model can be developed which equates the real detector regarding signal transfer. The second model allows a more detailed insight of the system. It is based on the well established cascade theory, i.e. describing the detector as a cascade of elemental gain and scattering stages, which represent the built in components and their signal transfer behaviour. In comparison to the first model the influence of single components especially the important light spread behaviour in the scintillator can be analysed in a more differentiated way. Although the implementation of the second model is more time consuming both models have in common that a relatively small amount of system manufacturer parameters are needed. The results of both models were in good agreement with the measured parameters of the real system.

  10. Particle rejuvenation of Rao-Blackwellized sequential Monte Carlo smoothers for conditionally linear and Gaussian models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc Minh; Corff, Sylvain Le; Moulines, Éric

    2017-12-01

    This paper focuses on sequential Monte Carlo approximations of smoothing distributions in conditionally linear and Gaussian state spaces. To reduce Monte Carlo variance of smoothers, it is typical in these models to use Rao-Blackwellization: particle approximation is used to sample sequences of hidden regimes while the Gaussian states are explicitly integrated conditional on the sequence of regimes and observations, using variants of the Kalman filter/smoother. The first successful attempt to use Rao-Blackwellization for smoothing extends the Bryson-Frazier smoother for Gaussian linear state space models using the generalized two-filter formula together with Kalman filters/smoothers. More recently, a forward-backward decomposition of smoothing distributions mimicking the Rauch-Tung-Striebel smoother for the regimes combined with backward Kalman updates has been introduced. This paper investigates the benefit of introducing additional rejuvenation steps in all these algorithms to sample at each time instant new regimes conditional on the forward and backward particles. This defines particle-based approximations of the smoothing distributions whose support is not restricted to the set of particles sampled in the forward or backward filter. These procedures are applied to commodity markets which are described using a two-factor model based on the spot price and a convenience yield for crude oil data.

  11. Iterative optimisation of Monte Carlo detector models using measurements and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzocchi, O., E-mail: olaf@marzocchi.net [European Patent Office, Rijswijk (Netherlands); Leone, D., E-mail: debora.leone@kit.edu [Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-04-11

    This work proposes a new technique to optimise the Monte Carlo models of radiation detectors, offering the advantage of a significantly lower user effort and therefore an improved work efficiency compared to the prior techniques. The method consists of four steps, two of which are iterative and suitable for automation using scripting languages. The four steps consist in the acquisition in the laboratory of measurement data to be used as reference; the modification of a previously available detector model; the simulation of a tentative model of the detector to obtain the coefficients of a set of linear equations; the solution of the system of equations and the update of the detector model. Steps three and four can be repeated for more accurate results. This method avoids the “try and fail” approach typical of the prior techniques.

  12. Multi-chain Markov chain Monte Carlo methods for computationally expensive models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, M.; Ray, J.; Ren, H.; Hou, Z.; Bao, J.

    2017-12-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods are used to infer model parameters from observational data. The parameters are inferred as probability densities, thus capturing estimation error due to sparsity of the data, and the shortcomings of the model. Multiple communicating chains executing the MCMC method have the potential to explore the parameter space better, and conceivably accelerate the convergence to the final distribution. We present results from tests conducted with the multi-chain method to show how the acceleration occurs i.e., for loose convergence tolerances, the multiple chains do not make much of a difference. The ensemble of chains also seems to have the ability to accelerate the convergence of a few chains that might start from suboptimal starting points. Finally, we show the performance of the chains in the estimation of O(10) parameters using computationally expensive forward models such as the Community Land Model, where the sampling burden is distributed over multiple chains.

  13. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo model of pulsed-laser treatment of cutaneous vascular lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanič, Matija; Majaron, Boris

    2011-12-01

    We present a three-dimensional Monte Carlo model of optical transport in skin with a novel approach to treatment of side boundaries of the volume of interest. This represents an effective way to overcome the inherent limitations of ``escape'' and ``mirror'' boundary conditions and enables high-resolution modeling of skin inclusions with complex geometries and arbitrary irradiation patterns. The optical model correctly reproduces measured values of diffuse reflectance for normal skin. When coupled with a sophisticated model of thermal transport and tissue coagulation kinetics, it also reproduces realistic values of radiant exposure thresholds for epidermal injury and for photocoagulation of port wine stain blood vessels in various skin phototypes, with or without application of cryogen spray cooling.

  14. Collectivity in heavy nuclei in the shell model Monte Carlo approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Özen, C.; Alhassid, Y.; Nakada, H.

    2014-01-01

    The microscopic description of collectivity in heavy nuclei in the framework of the configuration-interaction shell model has been a major challenge. The size of the model space required for the description of heavy nuclei prohibits the use of conventional diagonalization methods. We have overcome this difficulty by using the shell model Monte Carlo (SMMC) method, which can treat model spaces that are many orders of magnitude larger than those that can be treated by conventional methods. We identify a thermal observable that can distinguish between vibrational and rotational collectivity and use it to describe the crossover from vibrational to rotational collectivity in families of even-even rare-earth isotopes. We calculate the state densities in these nuclei and find them to be in close agreement with experimental data. We also calculate the collective enhancement factors of the corresponding level densities and find that their decay with excitation energy is correlated with the pairing and shape phase transitions. (author)

  15. Calibration of a gamma spectrometer for natural radioactivity measurement. Experimental measurements and Monte Carlo modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtine, Fabien

    2007-03-01

    The thesis proceeded in the context of dating by thermoluminescence. This method requires laboratory measurements of the natural radioactivity. For that purpose, we have been using a germanium spectrometer. To refine the calibration of this one, we modelled it by using a Monte-Carlo computer code: Geant4. We developed a geometrical model which takes into account the presence of inactive zones and zones of poor charge-collection within the germanium crystal. The parameters of the model were adjusted by comparison with experimental results obtained with a source of 137 Cs. It appeared that the form of the inactive zones is less simple than is presented in the specialized literature. This model was widened to the case of a more complex source, with cascade effect and angular correlations between photons: the 60 Co. Lastly, applied to extended sources, it gave correct results and allowed us to validate the simulation of matrix effect. (author)

  16. High-Performance Computer Modeling of the Cosmos-Iridium Collision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, S; Cook, K; Fasenfest, B; Jefferson, D; Jiang, M; Leek, J; Levatin, J; Nikolaev, S; Pertica, A; Phillion, D; Springer, K; De Vries, W

    2009-08-28

    This paper describes the application of a new, integrated modeling and simulation framework, encompassing the space situational awareness (SSA) enterprise, to the recent Cosmos-Iridium collision. This framework is based on a flexible, scalable architecture to enable efficient simulation of the current SSA enterprise, and to accommodate future advancements in SSA systems. In particular, the code is designed to take advantage of massively parallel, high-performance computer systems available, for example, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We will describe the application of this framework to the recent collision of the Cosmos and Iridium satellites, including (1) detailed hydrodynamic modeling of the satellite collision and resulting debris generation, (2) orbital propagation of the simulated debris and analysis of the increased risk to other satellites (3) calculation of the radar and optical signatures of the simulated debris and modeling of debris detection with space surveillance radar and optical systems (4) determination of simulated debris orbits from modeled space surveillance observations and analysis of the resulting orbital accuracy, (5) comparison of these modeling and simulation results with Space Surveillance Network observations. We will also discuss the use of this integrated modeling and simulation framework to analyze the risks and consequences of future satellite collisions and to assess strategies for mitigating or avoiding future incidents, including the addition of new sensor systems, used in conjunction with the Space Surveillance Network, for improving space situational awareness.

  17. Pion production in relativistic collisions of nuclear drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, C.T.; Wilson, J.R.; McAbee, T.L.; Zingman, J.A.

    1988-09-01

    In a continuation of the long-standing effort of the nuclear physics community to model atomic nuclei as droplets of a specialized nuclear fluid, we have developed a hydrodynamic model for simulating the collisions of heavy nuclei at relativistic speeds. Our model couples ideal relativistic hydrodynamics with a new Monte Carlo treatment of dynamic pion production and tracking. The collective flow for low-energy (200 MeV/N) collisions predicted by this model compares favorably with results from earlier hydrodynamic calculations which used quite different numerical techniques. Our pion predictions at these lower energies appear to differ, however, from the experimental data on pion multiplicities. In this case of ultra-relativistic (200 GeV/N) collisions, our hydrodynamic model has produced baryonic matter distributions which are in reasonable agreement with recent experimental data. These results may shed some light on the sensitivity of relativistic collision data to the nuclear equation of state. 20 refs., 12 figs

  18. Clinical Management and Burden of Prostate Cancer: A Markov Monte Carlo Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Chiranjeev; Aprikian, Armen; Cury, Fabio; Chevalier, Simone; Dragomir, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common non-skin cancer among men in developed countries. Several novel treatments have been adopted by healthcare systems to manage PCa. Most of the observational studies and randomized trials on PCa have concurrently evaluated fewer treatments over short follow-up. Further, preceding decision analytic models on PCa management have not evaluated various contemporary management options. Therefore, a contemporary decision analytic model was necessary to address limitations to the literature by synthesizing the evidence on novel treatments thereby forecasting short and long-term clinical outcomes. Objectives To develop and validate a Markov Monte Carlo model for the contemporary clinical management of PCa, and to assess the clinical burden of the disease from diagnosis to end-of-life. Methods A Markov Monte Carlo model was developed to simulate the management of PCa in men 65 years and older from diagnosis to end-of-life. Health states modeled were: risk at diagnosis, active surveillance, active treatment, PCa recurrence, PCa recurrence free, metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer, overall and PCa death. Treatment trajectories were based on state transition probabilities derived from the literature. Validation and sensitivity analyses assessed the accuracy and robustness of model predicted outcomes. Results Validation indicated model predicted rates were comparable to observed rates in the published literature. The simulated distribution of clinical outcomes for the base case was consistent with sensitivity analyses. Predicted rate of clinical outcomes and mortality varied across risk groups. Life expectancy and health adjusted life expectancy predicted for the simulated cohort was 20.9 years (95%CI 20.5–21.3) and 18.2 years (95% CI 17.9–18.5), respectively. Conclusion Study findings indicated contemporary management strategies improved survival and quality of life in patients with PCa. This model could be used

  19. The First 24 Years of Reverse Monte Carlo Modelling, Budapest, Hungary, 20-22 September 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, David A.; Pusztai, László

    2013-11-01

    This special issue contains a collection of papers reflecting the content of the fifth workshop on reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) methods, held in a hotel on the banks of the Danube in the Budapest suburbs in the autumn of 2012. Over fifty participants gathered to hear talks and discuss a broad range of science based on the RMC technique in very convivial surroundings. Reverse Monte Carlo modelling is a method for producing three-dimensional disordered structural models in quantitative agreement with experimental data. The method was developed in the late 1980s and has since achieved wide acceptance within the scientific community [1], producing an average of over 90 papers and 1200 citations per year over the last five years. It is particularly suitable for the study of the structures of liquid and amorphous materials, as well as the structural analysis of disordered crystalline systems. The principal experimental data that are modelled are obtained from total x-ray or neutron scattering experiments, using the reciprocal space structure factor and/or the real space pair distribution function (PDF). Additional data might be included from extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS), Bragg peak intensities or indeed any measured data that can be calculated from a three-dimensional atomistic model. It is this use of total scattering (diffuse and Bragg), rather than just the Bragg peak intensities more commonly used for crystalline structure analysis, which enables RMC modelling to probe the often important deviations from the average crystal structure, to probe the structures of poorly crystalline or nanocrystalline materials, and the local structures of non-crystalline materials where only diffuse scattering is observed. This flexibility across various condensed matter structure-types has made the RMC method very attractive in a wide range of disciplines, as borne out in the contents of this special issue. It is however important to point out that since

  20. TDHF-motivated macroscopic model for heavy ion collisions: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biedermann, M.; Reif, R.; Maedler, P.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed investigation of Bertshc's classical TDHF-motivated model for the description of heavy ion collisions is performed. The model agrees well with TDHF and phenomenological models which include deformation degrees of freedom as well as with experimental data. Some quantitative deviations from experiment and/or TDHF can be removed to a large extent if the standard model parameters are considered as adjustable parameters in physically reasonable regions of variation

  1. Quasi Monte Carlo methods for optimization models of the energy industry with pricing and load processes; Quasi-Monte Carlo Methoden fuer Optimierungsmodelle der Energiewirtschaft mit Preis- und Last-Prozessen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leoevey, H.; Roemisch, W. [Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    We discuss progress in quasi Monte Carlo methods for numerical calculation integrals or expected values and justify why these methods are more efficient than the classic Monte Carlo methods. Quasi Monte Carlo methods are found to be particularly efficient if the integrands have a low effective dimension. That's why We also discuss the concept of effective dimension and prove on the example of a stochastic Optimization model of the energy industry that such models can posses a low effective dimension. Modern quasi Monte Carlo methods are therefore for such models very promising. [German] Wir diskutieren Fortschritte bei Quasi-Monte Carlo Methoden zur numerischen Berechnung von Integralen bzw. Erwartungswerten und begruenden warum diese Methoden effizienter sind als die klassischen Monte Carlo Methoden. Quasi-Monte Carlo Methoden erweisen sich als besonders effizient, falls die Integranden eine geringe effektive Dimension besitzen. Deshalb diskutieren wir auch den Begriff effektive Dimension und weisen am Beispiel eines stochastischen Optimierungsmodell aus der Energiewirtschaft nach, dass solche Modelle eine niedrige effektive Dimension besitzen koennen. Moderne Quasi-Monte Carlo Methoden sind deshalb fuer solche Modelle sehr erfolgversprechend.

  2. Monte Carlo study of particle production in diffractive proton-proton collisions at √(s) = 13 TeV with the very forward detector combined with central information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Qi-Dong [Nagoya University, Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya (Japan); Itow, Yoshitaka; Sako, Takashi [Nagoya University, Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya (Japan); Nagoya University, Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute, Nagoya (Japan); Menjo, Hiroaki [Nagoya University, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Very forward (VF) detectors in hadron colliders, having unique sensitivity to diffractive processes, can be a powerful tool for studying diffractive dissociation by combining them with central detectors. Several Monte Carlo simulation samples in p-p collisions at √(s) = 13 TeV were analyzed, and different nondiffractive and diffractive contributions were clarified through differential cross sections of forward neutral particles. Diffraction selection criteria in the VF-triggered-event samples were determined by using the central track information. The corresponding selection applicable in real experiments has ∼ 100% purity and 30-70% efficiency. Consequently, the central information enables classification of the forward productions into diffraction and nondiffraction categories; in particular, most of the surviving events from the selection belong to low-mass diffraction events at log{sub 10}(ξ{sub x}) < -5.5. Therefore, the combined method can uniquely access the low-mass diffraction regime experimentally. (orig.)

  3. A probabilistic model for hydrokinetic turbine collision risks: exploring impacts on fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammar, Linus; Eggertsen, Linda; Andersson, Sandra; Ehnberg, Jimmy; Arvidsson, Rickard; Gullström, Martin; Molander, Sverker

    2015-01-01

    A variety of hydrokinetic turbines are currently under development for power generation in rivers, tidal straits and ocean currents. Because some of these turbines are large, with rapidly moving rotor blades, the risk of collision with aquatic animals has been brought to attention. The behavior and fate of animals that approach such large hydrokinetic turbines have not yet been monitored at any detail. In this paper, we conduct a synthesis of the current knowledge and understanding of hydrokinetic turbine collision risks. The outcome is a generic fault tree based probabilistic model suitable for estimating population-level ecological risks. New video-based data on fish behavior in strong currents are provided and models describing fish avoidance behaviors are presented. The findings indicate low risk for small-sized fish. However, at large turbines (≥5 m), bigger fish seem to have high probability of collision, mostly because rotor detection and avoidance is difficult in low visibility. Risks can therefore be substantial for vulnerable populations of large-sized fish, which thrive in strong currents. The suggested collision risk model can be applied to different turbine designs and at a variety of locations as basis for case-specific risk assessments. The structure of the model facilitates successive model validation, refinement and application to other organism groups such as marine mammals.

  4. A probabilistic model for hydrokinetic turbine collision risks: exploring impacts on fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linus Hammar

    Full Text Available A variety of hydrokinetic turbines are currently under development for power generation in rivers, tidal straits and ocean currents. Because some of these turbines are large, with rapidly moving rotor blades, the risk of collision with aquatic animals has been brought to attention. The behavior and fate of animals that approach such large hydrokinetic turbines have not yet been monitored at any detail. In this paper, we conduct a synthesis of the current knowledge and understanding of hydrokinetic turbine collision risks. The outcome is a generic fault tree based probabilistic model suitable for estimating population-level ecological risks. New video-based data on fish behavior in strong currents are provided and models describing fish avoidance behaviors are presented. The findings indicate low risk for small-sized fish. However, at large turbines (≥5 m, bigger fish seem to have high probability of collision, mostly because rotor detection and avoidance is difficult in low visibility. Risks can therefore be substantial for vulnerable populations of large-sized fish, which thrive in strong currents. The suggested collision risk model can be applied to different turbine designs and at a variety of locations as basis for case-specific risk assessments. The structure of the model facilitates successive model validation, refinement and application to other organism groups such as marine mammals.

  5. Parameter sensitivity and uncertainty of the forest carbon flux model FORUG : a Monte Carlo analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbeeck, H.; Samson, R.; Lemeur, R. [Ghent Univ., Ghent (Belgium). Laboratory of Plant Ecology; Verdonck, F. [Ghent Univ., Ghent (Belgium). Dept. of Applied Mathematics, Biometrics and Process Control

    2006-06-15

    The FORUG model is a multi-layer process-based model that simulates carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and water exchange between forest stands and the atmosphere. The main model outputs are net ecosystem exchange (NEE), total ecosystem respiration (TER), gross primary production (GPP) and evapotranspiration. This study used a sensitivity analysis to identify the parameters contributing to NEE uncertainty in the FORUG model. The aim was to determine if it is necessary to estimate the uncertainty of all parameters of a model to determine overall output uncertainty. Data used in the study were the meteorological and flux data of beech trees in Hesse. The Monte Carlo method was used to rank sensitivity and uncertainty parameters in combination with a multiple linear regression. Simulations were run in which parameters were assigned probability distributions and the effect of variance in the parameters on the output distribution was assessed. The uncertainty of the output for NEE was estimated. Based on the arbitrary uncertainty of 10 key parameters, a standard deviation of 0.88 Mg C per year per NEE was found, which was equal to 24 per cent of the mean value of NEE. The sensitivity analysis showed that the overall output uncertainty of the FORUG model could be determined by accounting for only a few key parameters, which were identified as corresponding to critical parameters in the literature. It was concluded that the 10 most important parameters determined more than 90 per cent of the output uncertainty. High ranking parameters included soil respiration; photosynthesis; and crown architecture. It was concluded that the Monte Carlo technique is a useful tool for ranking the uncertainty of parameters of process-based forest flux models. 48 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  6. Fast Monte Carlo-simulator with full collimator and detector response modelling for SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohlberg, A.O.; Kajaste, M.T.

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC)-simulations have proved to be a valuable tool in studying single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-reconstruction algorithms. Despite their popularity, the use of Monte Carlo-simulations is still often limited by their large computation demand. This is especially true in situations where full collimator and detector modelling with septal penetration, scatter and X-ray fluorescence needs to be included. This paper presents a rapid and simple MC-simulator, which can effectively reduce the computation times. The simulator was built on the convolution-based forced detection principle, which can markedly lower the number of simulated photons. Full collimator and detector response look-up tables are pre-simulated and then later used in the actual MC-simulations to model the system response. The developed simulator was validated by comparing it against 123 I point source measurements made with a clinical gamma camera system and against 99m Tc software phantom simulations made with the SIMIND MC-package. The results showed good agreement between the new simulator, measurements and the SIMIND-package. The new simulator provided near noise-free projection data in approximately 1.5 min per projection with 99m Tc, which was less than one-tenth of SIMIND's time. The developed MC-simulator can markedly decrease the simulation time without sacrificing image quality. (author)

  7. Kinetic Monte-Carlo modeling of hydrogen retention and re-emission from Tore Supra deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, A.; Schneider, R.; Warrier, M.; Roubin, P.; Martin, C.; Richou, M.

    2009-01-01

    A multi-scale model has been developed to study the reactive-diffusive transport of hydrogen in porous graphite [A. Rai, R. Schneider, M. Warrier, J. Nucl. Mater. (submitted for publication). http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jnucmat.2007.08.013.]. The deposits found on the leading edge of the neutralizer of Tore Supra are multi-scale in nature, consisting of micropores with typical size lower than 2 nm (∼11%), mesopores (∼5%) and macropores with a typical size more than 50 nm [C. Martin, M. Richou, W. Sakaily, B. Pegourie, C. Brosset, P. Roubin, J. Nucl. Mater. 363-365 (2007) 1251]. Kinetic Monte-Carlo (KMC) has been used to study the hydrogen transport at meso-scales. Recombination rate and the diffusion coefficient calculated at the meso-scale was used as an input to scale up and analyze the hydrogen transport at macro-scale. A combination of KMC and MCD (Monte-Carlo diffusion) method was used at macro-scales. Flux dependence of hydrogen recycling has been studied. The retention and re-emission analysis of the model has been extended to study the chemical erosion process based on the Kueppers-Hopf cycle [M. Wittmann, J. Kueppers, J. Nucl. Mater. 227 (1996) 186].

  8. Criticality assessment for prismatic high temperature reactors by fuel stochastic Monte Carlo modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakova, Jitka [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Roslagstullsbacken 21, S-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: jitka.zakova@neutron.kth.se; Talamo, Alberto [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, ANL, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: alby@anl.gov

    2008-05-15

    Modeling of prismatic high temperature reactors requires a high precision description due to the triple heterogeneity of the core and also to the random distribution of fuel particles inside the fuel pins. On the latter issue, even with the most advanced Monte Carlo techniques, some approximation often arises while assessing the criticality level: first, a regular lattice of TRISO particles inside the fuel pins and, second, the cutting of TRISO particles by the fuel boundaries. We utilized two of the most accurate Monte Codes: MONK and MCNP, which are both used for licensing nuclear power plants in United Kingdom and in the USA, respectively, to evaluate the influence of the two previous approximations on estimating the criticality level of the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor. The two codes exactly shared the same geometry and nuclear data library, ENDF/B, and only modeled different lattices of TRISO particles inside the fuel pins. More precisely, we investigated the difference between a regular lattice that cuts TRISO particles and a random lattice that axially repeats a region containing over 3000 non-cut particles. We have found that both Monte Carlo codes provide similar excesses of reactivity, provided that they share the same approximations.

  9. Study on Quantification for Multi-unit Seismic PSA Model using Monte Carlo Sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Kyemin; Han, Sang Hoon; Jang, Seung-cheol; Park, Jin Hee; Lim, Ho-Gon; Yang, Joon Eon; Heo, Gyunyoung

    2015-01-01

    In existing PSA, frequency for accident sequences occurred in single-unit has been estimated. While multi-unit PSA has to consider various combinations because accident sequence in each units can be different. However, it is difficult to quantify all of combination between inter-units using traditional method such as Minimal Cut Upper Bound (MCUB). For this reason, we used Monte Carlo sampling as a method to quantify multi-unit PSA model. In this paper, Monte Carlo method was used to quantify multi-unit PSA model. The advantage of this method is to consider all of combinations by the increase of number of unit and to calculate nearly exact value compared to other method. However, it is difficult to get detailed information such as minimal cut sets and accident sequence. To solve partially this problem, FTeMC was modified. In multi-unit PSA, quantification for both internal and external multi-unit accidents is the significant issue. Although our result above mentioned was one of the case studies to check application of method suggested in this paper, it is expected that this method can be used in practical assessment for multi-unit risk

  10. Monte Carlo modeling of time-resolved fluorescence for depth-selective interrogation of layered tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefer, T Joshua; Wang, Quanzeng; Drezek, Rebekah A

    2011-11-01

    Computational approaches for simulation of light-tissue interactions have provided extensive insight into biophotonic procedures for diagnosis and therapy. However, few studies have addressed simulation of time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) in tissue and none have combined Monte Carlo simulations with standard TRF processing algorithms to elucidate approaches for cancer detection in layered biological tissue. In this study, we investigate how illumination-collection parameters (e.g., collection angle and source-detector separation) influence the ability to measure fluorophore lifetime and tissue layer thickness. Decay curves are simulated with a Monte Carlo TRF light propagation model. Multi-exponential iterative deconvolution is used to determine lifetimes and fractional signal contributions. The ability to detect changes in mucosal thickness is optimized by probes that selectively interrogate regions superficial to the mucosal-submucosal boundary. Optimal accuracy in simultaneous determination of lifetimes in both layers is achieved when each layer contributes 40-60% of the signal. These results indicate that depth-selective approaches to TRF have the potential to enhance disease detection in layered biological tissue and that modeling can play an important role in probe design optimization. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  11. Nonlinear Monte Carlo model of superdiffusive shock acceleration with magnetic field amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, Andrei M.; Ellison, Donald C.; Osipov, Sergei M.

    2017-03-01

    Fast collisionless shocks in cosmic plasmas convert their kinetic energy flow into the hot downstream thermal plasma with a substantial fraction of energy going into a broad spectrum of superthermal charged particles and magnetic fluctuations. The superthermal particles can penetrate into the shock upstream region producing an extended shock precursor. The cold upstream plasma flow is decelerated by the force provided by the superthermal particle pressure gradient. In high Mach number collisionless shocks, efficient particle acceleration is likely coupled with turbulent magnetic field amplification (MFA) generated by the anisotropic distribution of accelerated particles. This anisotropy is determined by fast particle transport, making the problem strongly nonlinear and multiscale. Here, we present a nonlinear Monte Carlo model of collisionless shock structure with superdiffusive propagation of high-energy Fermi accelerated particles coupled to particle acceleration and MFA, which affords a consistent description of strong shocks. A distinctive feature of the Monte Carlo technique is that it includes the full angular anisotropy of the particle distribution at all precursor positions. The model reveals that the superdiffusive transport of energetic particles (i.e., Lévy-walk propagation) generates a strong quadruple anisotropy in the precursor particle distribution. The resultant pressure anisotropy of the high-energy particles produces a nonresonant mirror-type instability that amplifies compressible wave modes with wavelengths longer than the gyroradii of the highest-energy protons produced by the shock.

  12. Transport appraisal and Monte Carlo simulation by use of the CBA-DK model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salling, Kim Bang; Leleur, Steen

    2011-01-01

    calculation, where risk analysis is carried out using Monte Carlo simulation. Special emphasis has been placed on the separation between inherent randomness in the modeling system and lack of knowledge. These two concepts have been defined in terms of variability (ontological uncertainty) and uncertainty......This paper presents the Danish CBA-DK software model for assessment of transport infrastructure projects. The assessment model is based on both a deterministic calculation following the cost-benefit analysis (CBA) methodology in a Danish manual from the Ministry of Transport and on a stochastic...... (epistemic uncertainty). After a short introduction to deterministic calculation resulting in some evaluation criteria a more comprehensive evaluation of the stochastic calculation is made. Especially, the risk analysis part of CBA-DK, with considerations about which probability distributions should be used...

  13. Kinetic Monte Carlo modeling of chemical reactions coupled with heat transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castonguay, Thomas C; Wang, Feng

    2008-03-28

    In this paper, we describe two types of effective events for describing heat transfer in a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation that may involve stochastic chemical reactions. Simulations employing these events are referred to as KMC-TBT and KMC-PHE. In KMC-TBT, heat transfer is modeled as the stochastic transfer of "thermal bits" between adjacent grid points. In KMC-PHE, heat transfer is modeled by integrating the Poisson heat equation for a short time. Either approach is capable of capturing the time dependent system behavior exactly. Both KMC-PHE and KMC-TBT are validated by simulating pure heat transfer in a rod and a square and modeling a heated desorption problem where exact numerical results are available. KMC-PHE is much faster than KMC-TBT and is used to study the endothermic desorption of a lattice gas. Interesting findings from this study are reported.

  14. Dynamic Value at Risk: A Comparative Study Between Heteroscedastic Models and Monte Carlo Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Lamartine Távora Junior

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to analyze the risk management of a portfolio composed by Petrobras PN, Telemar PN and Vale do Rio Doce PNA stocks. It was verified if the modeling of Value-at-Risk (VaR through the place Monte Carlo simulation with volatility of GARCH family is supported by hypothesis of efficient market. The results have shown that the statistic evaluation in inferior to dynamics, evidencing that the dynamic analysis supplies support to the hypothesis of efficient market of the Brazilian share holding market, in opposition of some empirical evidences. Also, it was verified that the GARCH models of volatility is enough to accommodate the variations of the shareholding Brazilian market, since the model is capable to accommodate the great dynamic of the Brazilian market.

  15. Clinical trial optimization: Monte Carlo simulation Markov model for planning clinical trials recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ismail; Rovira, Joan; Casanovas, Josep

    2007-05-01

    The patient recruitment process of clinical trials is an essential element which needs to be designed properly. In this paper we describe different simulation models under continuous and discrete time assumptions for the design of recruitment in clinical trials. The results of hypothetical examples of clinical trial recruitments are presented. The recruitment time is calculated and the number of recruited patients is quantified for a given time and probability of recruitment. The expected delay and the effective recruitment durations are estimated using both continuous and discrete time modeling. The proposed type of Monte Carlo simulation Markov models will enable optimization of the recruitment process and the estimation and the calibration of its parameters to aid the proposed clinical trials. A continuous time simulation may minimize the duration of the recruitment and, consequently, the total duration of the trial.

  16. Monte Carlo impurity transport modeling in the DIII-D transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, T.E.; Finkenthal, D.F.

    1998-04-01

    A description of the carbon transport and sputtering physics contained in the Monte Carlo Impurity (MCI) transport code is given. Examples of statistically significant carbon transport pathways are examined using MCI's unique tracking visualizer and a mechanism for enhanced carbon accumulation on the high field side of the divertor chamber is discussed. Comparisons between carbon emissions calculated with MCI and those measured in the DIII-D tokamak are described. Good qualitative agreement is found between 2D carbon emission patterns calculated with MCI and experimentally measured carbon patterns. While uncertainties in the sputtering physics, atomic data, and transport models have made quantitative comparisons with experiments more difficult, recent results using a physics based model for physical and chemical sputtering has yielded simulations with about 50% of the total carbon radiation measured in the divertor. These results and plans for future improvement in the physics models and atomic data are discussed

  17. Uncertainty assessment of integrated distributed hydrological models using GLUE with Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blasone, Roberta-Serena; Madsen, Henrik; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2008-01-01

    uncertainty estimation (GLUE) procedure based on Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling is applied in order to improve the performance of the methodology in estimating parameters and posterior output distributions. The description of the spatial variations of the hydrological processes is accounted for by defining......In recent years, there has been an increase in the application of distributed, physically-based and integrated hydrological models. Many questions regarding how to properly calibrate and validate distributed models and assess the uncertainty of the estimated parameters and the spatially......-site validation must complement the usual time validation. In this study, we develop, through an application, a comprehensive framework for multi-criteria calibration and uncertainty assessment of distributed physically-based, integrated hydrological models. A revised version of the generalized likelihood...

  18. Monte Carlo modelling of germanium crystals that are tilted and have rounded front edges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparro, Joel; Hult, Mikael; Johnston, Peter N.; Tagziria, Hamid

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-ray detection efficiencies and cascade summing effects in germanium detectors are often calculated using Monte Carlo codes based on a computer model of the detection system. Such a model can never fully replicate reality and it is important to understand how various parameters affect the results. This work concentrates on quantifying two issues, namely (i) the effect of having a Ge-crystal that is tilted inside the cryostat and (ii) the effect of having a model of a Ge-crystal with rounded edges (bulletization). The effect of the tilting is very small (in the order of per mille) when the tilting angles are within a realistic range. The effect of the rounded edges is, however, relatively large (5-10% or higher) particularly for gamma-ray energies below 100 keV

  19. Monte Carlo modelling of germanium crystals that are tilted and have rounded front edges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparro, Joel [EC-JRC-IRMM, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Hult, Mikael [EC-JRC-IRMM, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium)], E-mail: mikael.hult@ec.europa.eu; Johnston, Peter N. [Applied Physics, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, GPO Box 2476V, Melbourne 3001 (Australia); Tagziria, Hamid [EC-JRC-IPSC, Institute for the Protection and the Security of the Citizen, Via E. Fermi 1, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See,) (Italy)

    2008-09-01

    Gamma-ray detection efficiencies and cascade summing effects in germanium detectors are often calculated using Monte Carlo codes based on a computer model of the detection system. Such a model can never fully replicate reality and it is important to understand how various parameters affect the results. This work concentrates on quantifying two issues, namely (i) the effect of having a Ge-crystal that is tilted inside the cryostat and (ii) the effect of having a model of a Ge-crystal with rounded edges (bulletization). The effect of the tilting is very small (in the order of per mille) when the tilting angles are within a realistic range. The effect of the rounded edges is, however, relatively large (5-10% or higher) particularly for gamma-ray energies below 100 keV.

  20. Monte Carlo modeling of fiber-scintillator flow-cell radiation detector geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucker, T.L.; Ross, H.H.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville; Schweitzer, G.K.

    1988-01-01

    A Monte Carlo computer calculation is described which models the geometric efficiency of a fiber-scintillator flow-cell radiation detector designed to detect radiolabeled compounds in liquid chromatography eluates. By using special mathematical techniques, an efficiency prediction with a precision of 1% is obtained after generating only 1000 random events. Good agreement is seen between predicted and experimental efficiency except for very low energy beta emission where the geometric limitation on efficiency is overcome by pulse height limitations which the model does not consider. The modeling results show that in the test system, the detection efficiency for low energy beta emitters is limited primarily by light generation and collection rather than geometry. (orig.)

  1. Modelling phase separation in Fe-Cr system using different atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castin, N.; Bonny, G.; Terentyev, D.; Lavrentiev, M.Yu.; Nguyen-Manh, D.

    2011-01-01

    Atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (AKMC) simulations were performed to study α-α' phase separation in Fe-Cr alloys. Two different energy models and two approaches to estimate the local vacancy migration barriers were used. The energy models considered are a two-band model Fe-Cr potential and a cluster expansion, both fitted to ab initio data. The classical Kang-Weinberg decomposition, based on the total energy change of the system, and an Artificial Neural Network (ANN), employed as a regression tool were used to predict the local vacancy migration barriers 'on the fly'. The results are compared with experimental thermal annealing data and differences between the applied AKMC approaches are discussed. The ability of the ANN regression method to accurately predict migration barriers not present in the training list is also addressed by performing cross-check calculations using the nudged elastic band method.

  2. Fermi-level effects in semiconductor processing: A modeling scheme for atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Bragado, I.; Castrillo, P.; Jaraiz, M.; Pinacho, R.; Rubio, J. E.; Barbolla, J.; Moroz, V.

    2005-09-01

    Atomistic process simulation is expected to play an important role for the development of next generations of integrated circuits. This work describes an approach for modeling electric charge effects in a three-dimensional atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo process simulator. The proposed model has been applied to the diffusion of electrically active boron and arsenic atoms in silicon. Several key aspects of the underlying physical mechanisms are discussed: (i) the use of the local Debye length to smooth out the atomistic point-charge distribution, (ii) algorithms to correctly update the charge state in a physically accurate and computationally efficient way, and (iii) an efficient implementation of the drift of charged particles in an electric field. High-concentration effects such as band-gap narrowing and degenerate statistics are also taken into account. The efficiency, accuracy, and relevance of the model are discussed.

  3. Non statistical Monte-Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, B.

    1985-04-01

    We have shown that the transport equation can be solved with particles, like the Monte-Carlo method, but without random numbers. In the Monte-Carlo method, particles are created from the source, and are followed from collision to collision until either they are absorbed or they leave the spatial domain. In our method, particles are created from the original source, with a variable weight taking into account both collision and absorption. These particles are followed until they leave the spatial domain, and we use them to determine a first collision source. Another set of particles is then created from this first collision source, and tracked to determine a second collision source, and so on. This process introduces an approximation which does not exist in the Monte-Carlo method. However, we have analyzed the effect of this approximation, and shown that it can be limited. Our method is deterministic, gives reproducible results. Furthermore, when extra accuracy is needed in some region, it is easier to get more particles to go there. It has the same kind of applications: rather problems where streaming is dominant than collision dominated problems

  4. Double pendulum model for a tennis stroke including a collision process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Sun-Hyun

    2015-10-01

    By means of adding a collision process between the ball and racket in the double pendulum model, we analyzed the tennis stroke. The ball and the racket system may be accelerated during the collision time; thus, the speed of the rebound ball does not simply depend on the angular velocity of the racket. A higher angular velocity sometimes gives a lower rebound ball speed. We numerically showed that the proper time-lagged racket rotation increased the speed of the rebound ball by 20%. We also showed that the elbow should move in the proper direction in order to add the angular velocity of the racket.

  5. Scaling of multiplicity distribution in hadron collisions and diffractive-excitation like models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buras, A.J.; Dethlefsen, J.M.; Koba, Z.

    1974-01-01

    Multiplicity distribution of secondary particles in inelastic hadron collision at high energy is studied in the semiclassical impact parameter representation. The scaling function is shown to consist of two factors: one geometrical and the other dynamical. We propose a specific choice of these factors, which describe satisfactorily the elastic scattering, the ratio of elastic to total cross-section and the simple scaling behaviour of multiplicity distribution in p-p collisions. Two versions of diffractive-excitation like models (global and local excitation) are presented as interpretation of our choice of dynamical factor. (author)

  6. A model of fast radio bursts: collisions between episodic magnetic blobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long-Biao; Huang, Yong-Feng; Geng, Jin-Jun; Li, Bing

    2018-06-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are bright radio pulses from the sky with millisecond durations and Jansky-level flux densities. Their origins are still largely uncertain. Here we suggest a new model for FRBs. We argue that the collision of a white dwarf with a black hole can generate a transient accretion disk, from which powerful episodicmagnetic blobs will be launched. The collision between two consecutive magnetic blobs can result in a catastrophic magnetic reconnection, which releases a large amount of free magnetic energy and forms a forward shock. The shock propagates through the cold magnetized plasma within the blob in the collision region, radiating through the synchrotron maser mechanism, which is responsible for a non-repeating FRB signal. Our calculations show that the theoretical energetics, radiation frequency, duration timescale and event rate can be very consistent with the observational characteristics of FRBs.

  7. Using a Monte Carlo model to predict dosimetric properties of small radiotherapy photon fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Alison J. D.; Nahum, Alan E.; Fenwick, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Accurate characterization of small-field dosimetry requires measurements to be made with precisely aligned specialized detectors and is thus time consuming and error prone. This work explores measurement differences between detectors by using a Monte Carlo model matched to large-field data to predict properties of smaller fields. Measurements made with a variety of detectors have been compared with calculated results to assess their validity and explore reasons for differences. Unshielded diodes are expected to produce some of the most useful data, as their small sensitive cross sections give good resolution whilst their energy dependence is shown to vary little with depth in a 15 MV linac beam. Their response is shown to be constant with field size over the range 1-10 cm, with a correction of 3% needed for a field size of 0.5 cm. BEAMnrc has been used to create a 15 MV beam model, matched to dosimetric data for square fields larger than 3 cm, and producing small-field profiles and percentage depth doses (PDDs) that agree well with unshielded diode data for field sizes down to 0.5 cm. For fields sizes of 1.5 cm and above, little detector-to-detector variation exists in measured output factors, however for a 0.5 cm field a relative spread of 18% is seen between output factors measured with different detectors--values measured with the diamond and pinpoint detectors lying below that of the unshielded diode, with the shielded diode value being higher. Relative to the corrected unshielded diode measurement, the Monte Carlo modeled output factor is 4.5% low, a discrepancy that is probably due to the focal spot fluence profile and source occlusion modeling. The large-field Monte Carlo model can, therefore, currently be used to predict small-field profiles and PDDs measured with an unshielded diode. However, determination of output factors for the smallest fields requires a more detailed model of focal spot fluence and source occlusion.

  8. Full modelling of the MOSAIC animal PET system based on the GATE Monte Carlo simulation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merheb, C; Petegnief, Y; Talbot, J N

    2007-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) systems dedicated to animal imaging are now widely used for biological studies. The scanner performance strongly depends on the design and the characteristics of the system. Many parameters must be optimized like the dimensions and type of crystals, geometry and field-of-view (FOV), sampling, electronics, lightguide, shielding, etc. Monte Carlo modelling is a powerful tool to study the effect of each of these parameters on the basis of realistic simulated data. Performance assessment in terms of spatial resolution, count rates, scatter fraction and sensitivity is an important prerequisite before the model can be used instead of real data for a reliable description of the system response function or for optimization of reconstruction algorithms. The aim of this study is to model the performance of the Philips Mosaic(TM) animal PET system using a comprehensive PET simulation code in order to understand and describe the origin of important factors that influence image quality. We use GATE, a Monte Carlo simulation toolkit for a realistic description of the ring PET model, the detectors, shielding, cap, electronic processing and dead times. We incorporate new features to adjust signal processing to the Anger logic underlying the Mosaic(TM) system. Special attention was paid to dead time and energy spectra descriptions. Sorting of simulated events in a list mode format similar to the system outputs was developed to compare experimental and simulated sensitivity and scatter fractions for different energy thresholds using various models of phantoms describing rat and mouse geometries. Count rates were compared for both cylindrical homogeneous phantoms. Simulated spatial resolution was fitted to experimental data for 18 F point sources at different locations within the FOV with an analytical blurring function for electronic processing effects. Simulated and measured sensitivities differed by less than 3%, while scatter fractions agreed

  9. Variability of orogenic magmatism during Mediterranean-style continental collisions : A numerical modelling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrić, N.; Vogt, K.; Matenco, L.; Cvetković, V.; Cloetingh, S.; Gerya, T.

    The relationship between magma generation and the tectonic evolution of orogens during subduction and subsequent collision requires self-consistent numerical modelling approaches predicting volumes and compositions of the produced magmatic rocks. Here, we use a 2D magmatic-thermomechanical numerical

  10. Application of a distorted wave model to electron capture in atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deco, G.R.; Martinez, A.E.; Rivarola, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    In this work, it is presented the CDW-EIS approximation applied to the description of processes of electron capture in ion-atom collisions. Differential and total cross sections are compared to results obtained by other theoretical models, as well as, to experimental data. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  11. Towards social autonomous vehicles: Efficient collision avoidance scheme using Richardson's arms race model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Faisal; Niazi, Muaz A

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of a social autonomous agent to conceptualize such Autonomous Vehicles (AVs), which interacts with other AVs using social manners similar to human behavior. The presented AVs also have the capability of predicting intentions, i.e. mentalizing and copying the actions of each other, i.e. mirroring. Exploratory Agent Based Modeling (EABM) level of the Cognitive Agent Based Computing (CABC) framework has been utilized to design the proposed social agent. Furthermore, to emulate the functionality of mentalizing and mirroring modules of proposed social agent, a tailored mathematical model of the Richardson's arms race model has also been presented. The performance of the proposed social agent has been validated at two levels-firstly it has been simulated using NetLogo, a standard agent-based modeling tool and also, at a practical level using a prototype AV. The simulation results have confirmed that the proposed social agent-based collision avoidance strategy is 78.52% more efficient than Random walk based collision avoidance strategy in congested flock-like topologies. Whereas practical results have confirmed that the proposed scheme can avoid rear end and lateral collisions with the efficiency of 99.876% as compared with the IEEE 802.11n-based existing state of the art mirroring neuron-based collision avoidance scheme.

  12. Towards social autonomous vehicles: Efficient collision avoidance scheme using Richardson’s arms race model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Muaz A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of a social autonomous agent to conceptualize such Autonomous Vehicles (AVs), which interacts with other AVs using social manners similar to human behavior. The presented AVs also have the capability of predicting intentions, i.e. mentalizing and copying the actions of each other, i.e. mirroring. Exploratory Agent Based Modeling (EABM) level of the Cognitive Agent Based Computing (CABC) framework has been utilized to design the proposed social agent. Furthermore, to emulate the functionality of mentalizing and mirroring modules of proposed social agent, a tailored mathematical model of the Richardson’s arms race model has also been presented. The performance of the proposed social agent has been validated at two levels–firstly it has been simulated using NetLogo, a standard agent-based modeling tool and also, at a practical level using a prototype AV. The simulation results have confirmed that the proposed social agent-based collision avoidance strategy is 78.52% more efficient than Random walk based collision avoidance strategy in congested flock-like topologies. Whereas practical results have confirmed that the proposed scheme can avoid rear end and lateral collisions with the efficiency of 99.876% as compared with the IEEE 802.11n-based existing state of the art mirroring neuron-based collision avoidance scheme. PMID:29040294

  13. A numerical strategy for finite element modeling of frictionless asymmetric vocal fold collision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granados, Alba; Misztal, Marek Krzysztof; Brunskog, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    . Theoretical background and numerical analysis of the finite-element position-based contact model are presented, along with validation. A novel contact detection mechanism capable to detect collision in asymmetric oscillations is developed. The effect of inexact contact constraint enforcement on vocal fold...

  14. Recombination model and baryon production by pp and πp collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasugi, E.; Tata, X.

    1979-12-01

    The recombination model predictions for baryon production, using modified Kuti-Weisskopf structure functions, are in good agreement with the pp and πp collision data. The indistinguishability of sea quarks naturally accounts for the difference in the p and anti p spectra in the pion fragmentation region. 4 figures, 2 tables

  15. Towards social autonomous vehicles: Efficient collision avoidance scheme using Richardson's arms race model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Riaz

    Full Text Available This paper presents the concept of a social autonomous agent to conceptualize such Autonomous Vehicles (AVs, which interacts with other AVs using social manners similar to human behavior. The presented AVs also have the capability of predicting intentions, i.e. mentalizing and copying the actions of each other, i.e. mirroring. Exploratory Agent Based Modeling (EABM level of the Cognitive Agent Based Computing (CABC framework has been utilized to design the proposed social agent. Furthermore, to emulate the functionality of mentalizing and mirroring modules of proposed social agent, a tailored mathematical model of the Richardson's arms race model has also been presented. The performance of the proposed social agent has been validated at two levels-firstly it has been simulated using NetLogo, a standard agent-based modeling tool and also, at a practical level using a prototype AV. The simulation results have confirmed that the proposed social agent-based collision avoidance strategy is 78.52% more efficient than Random walk based collision avoidance strategy in congested flock-like topologies. Whereas practical results have confirmed that the proposed scheme can avoid rear end and lateral collisions with the efficiency of 99.876% as compared with the IEEE 802.11n-based existing state of the art mirroring neuron-based collision avoidance scheme.

  16. Convex-based void filling method for CAD-based Monte Carlo geometry modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Shengpeng; Cheng, Mengyun; Song, Jing; Long, Pengcheng; Hu, Liqin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a new void filling method named CVF for CAD based MC geometry modeling. • We describe convex based void description based and quality-based space subdivision. • The results showed improvements provided by CVF for both modeling and MC calculation efficiency. - Abstract: CAD based automatic geometry modeling tools have been widely applied to generate Monte Carlo (MC) calculation geometry for complex systems according to CAD models. Automatic void filling is one of the main functions in the CAD based MC geometry modeling tools, because the void space between parts in CAD models is traditionally not modeled while MC codes such as MCNP need all the problem space to be described. A dedicated void filling method, named Convex-based Void Filling (CVF), is proposed in this study for efficient void filling and concise void descriptions. The method subdivides all the problem space into disjointed regions using Quality based Subdivision (QS) and describes the void space in each region with complementary descriptions of the convex volumes intersecting with that region. It has been implemented in SuperMC/MCAM, the Multiple-Physics Coupling Analysis Modeling Program, and tested on International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Alite model. The results showed that the new method reduced both automatic modeling time and MC calculation time

  17. Open heavy flavor and other hard probes in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Uphoff, Jan

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis hard probes are studied in the partonic transport model BAMPS (Boltzmann Approach to MultiParton Scatterings). Employing Monte Carlo techniques, this model describes the 3+1 dimensional evolution of the quark gluon plasma phase in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions by propagating all particles in space and time and carrying out their collisions according to the Boltzmann equation. Since hard probes are produced in hard processes with a large momentum transfer, the value of...

  18. Study of proton-nucleus collisions at high energies based on the hydrodynamical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, N.; Weiner, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    We study proton-nucleus collisions at high energies using the one-dimensional hydrodynamical model of Landau with special emphasis on the effect of the size of the target nucleus and of the magnitude of velocity of sound of excited hadronic matter. We convert a collision problem of a proton and a nucleus with a spherical shape into that of a proton and a one-dimensional nuclear tunnel whose length is determined from the average impact parameter. By extending the methods developed by Milekhin and Emelyanov, we obtain the solutions of the hydrodynamical equations of proton-nucleus collisions for arbitrary target tunnel length and arbitrary velocity of sound. The connection between these solutions and observable physical quantities is established as in the work of Cooper, Frye, and Schonberg. Extensive numerical analyses are made at E/sub lab/ = 200 GeV and for the velocity of sound u = 1/√3 of a relativistic ideal Bose gas and u = 1/(7.5)/sup 1/2/ of an interacting Bose gas. In order to compare proton-nucleus collisions with proton-proton collisions, all the analyses are made in the equal-velocity frame. We find the following results. (1) In comparing the number of secondary particles produced in p-A collisions N/sub p/A with those in p-p collisions N/sub p/p, while most of the excess of N/sub p/A over N/sub p/p is concentrated in the backward rapidity region, there exists also an increase of N/sub p/A with A in the forward rapidity region. This result is at variance with the predictions of the energy-flux-cascade model and of the coherent-production model. (2) The excess energies are contained exclusively in the backward region. We also find evidence for new phenomena in proton-nucleus collisions. (3) The existence of an asymmetry of average energies of secondary particles between forward and backward regions, in particular, >> for larger nuclear targets. Thus, energetic particles are predominantly produced in the backward region

  19. Interference pattern in the collision of structures in the Bose-Einstein condensate dark matter model: Comparison with fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, J. A; Guzman, F. S.

    2011-01-01

    In order to explore nonlinear effects on the distribution of matter during collisions within the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) dark matter model driven by the Schroedinger-Poisson system of equations, we study the head-on collision of structures and focus on the interference pattern formation in the density of matter during the collision process. We explore the possibility that the collision of two structures of fluid matter modeled with an ideal gas equation of state also forms interference patterns and found a negative result. Given that a fluid is the most common flavor of dark matter models, we conclude that one fingerprint of the BEC dark matter model is the pattern formation in the density during a collision of structures.

  20. Charge distributions and correlations in fragmentation models for soft hadron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, E.A. de

    1984-01-01

    Data on charge distributions and charge correlations in pp and meson-proton interactions at PS and SPS energies are successfully compared with the Lund fragmentation model for low-psub(T) hadron collisions. It is argued that local conservation of quantum numbers and resonance production, as implemented in fragmentation models, are sufficient ingredients to explain most of the available experimental results at these energies. No necessity is found for dual-sheet contributions considered in DTU-based parton models. (orig.)

  1. A virtual source method for Monte Carlo simulation of Gamma Knife Model C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Yong Kyun [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hyun Tai [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The Monte Carlo simulation method has been used for dosimetry of radiation treatment. Monte Carlo simulation is the method that determines paths and dosimetry of particles using random number. Recently, owing to the ability of fast processing of the computers, it is possible to treat a patient more precisely. However, it is necessary to increase the simulation time to improve the efficiency of accuracy uncertainty. When generating the particles from the cobalt source in a simulation, there are many particles cut off. So it takes time to simulate more accurately. For the efficiency, we generated the virtual source that has the phase space distribution which acquired a single gamma knife channel. We performed the simulation using the virtual sources on the 201 channel and compared the measurement with the simulation using virtual sources and real sources. A virtual source file was generated to reduce the simulation time of a Gamma Knife Model C. Simulations with a virtual source executed about 50 times faster than the original source code and there was no statistically significant difference in simulated results.

  2. A virtual source method for Monte Carlo simulation of Gamma Knife Model C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Yong Kyun; Chung, Hyun Tai

    2016-01-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation method has been used for dosimetry of radiation treatment. Monte Carlo simulation is the method that determines paths and dosimetry of particles using random number. Recently, owing to the ability of fast processing of the computers, it is possible to treat a patient more precisely. However, it is necessary to increase the simulation time to improve the efficiency of accuracy uncertainty. When generating the particles from the cobalt source in a simulation, there are many particles cut off. So it takes time to simulate more accurately. For the efficiency, we generated the virtual source that has the phase space distribution which acquired a single gamma knife channel. We performed the simulation using the virtual sources on the 201 channel and compared the measurement with the simulation using virtual sources and real sources. A virtual source file was generated to reduce the simulation time of a Gamma Knife Model C. Simulations with a virtual source executed about 50 times faster than the original source code and there was no statistically significant difference in simulated results

  3. Monte Carlo climate change forecasts with a global coupled ocean-atmosphere model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cubasch, U.; Santer, B.D.; Hegerl, G.; Hoeck, H.; Maier-Reimer, E.; Mikolajwicz, U.; Stoessel, A.; Voss, R.

    1992-01-01

    The Monte Carlo approach, which has increasingly been used during the last decade in the field of extended range weather forecasting, has been applied for climate change experiments. Four integrations with a global coupled ocean-atmosphere model have been started from different initial conditions, but with the same greenhouse gas forcing according to the IPCC scenario A. All experiments have been run for a period of 50 years. The results indicate that the time evolution of the global mean warming depends strongly on the initial state of the climate system. It can vary between 6 and 31 years. The Monte Carlo approach delivers information about both the mean response and the statistical significance of the response. While the individual members of the ensemble show a considerable variation in the climate change pattern of temperature after 50 years, the ensemble mean climate change pattern closely resembles the pattern obtained in a 100 year integration and is, at least over most of the land areas, statistically significant. The ensemble averaged sea-level change due to thermal expansion is significant in the global mean and locally over wide regions of the Pacific. The hydrological cycle is also significantly enhanced in the global mean, but locally the changes in precipitation and soil moisture are masked by the variability of the experiments. (orig.)

  4. A three-dimensional self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo model: application to Ag(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latz, Andreas; Brendel, Lothar; Wolf, Dietrich E

    2012-01-01

    The reliability of kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations depends on accurate transition rates. The self-learning KMC method (Trushin et al 2005 Phys. Rev. B 72 115401) combines the accuracy of rates calculated from a realistic potential with the efficiency of a rate catalog, using a pattern recognition scheme. This work expands the original two-dimensional method to three dimensions. The concomitant huge increase in the number of rate calculations on the fly needed can be avoided by setting up an initial database, containing exact activation energies calculated for processes gathered from a simpler KMC model. To provide two representative examples, the model is applied to the diffusion of Ag monolayer islands on Ag(111), and the homoepitaxial growth of Ag on Ag(111) at low temperatures.

  5. Monte Carlo method for critical systems in infinite volume: The planar Ising model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdeiro, Victor; Doyon, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we propose a Monte Carlo method for generating finite-domain marginals of critical distributions of statistical models in infinite volume. The algorithm corrects the problem of the long-range effects of boundaries associated to generating critical distributions on finite lattices. It uses the advantage of scale invariance combined with ideas of the renormalization group in order to construct a type of "holographic" boundary condition that encodes the presence of an infinite volume beyond it. We check the quality of the distribution obtained in the case of the planar Ising model by comparing various observables with their infinite-plane prediction. We accurately reproduce planar two-, three-, and four-point of spin and energy operators. We also define a lattice stress-energy tensor, and numerically obtain the associated conformal Ward identities and the Ising central charge.

  6. Development of numerical models for Monte Carlo simulations of Th-Pb fuel assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oettingen Mikołaj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The thorium-uranium fuel cycle is a promising alternative against uranium-plutonium fuel cycle, but it demands many advanced research before starting its industrial application in commercial nuclear reactors. The paper presents the development of the thorium-lead (Th-Pb fuel assembly numerical models for the integral irradiation experiments. The Th-Pb assembly consists of a hexagonal array of ThO2 fuel rods and metallic Pb rods. The design of the assembly allows different combinations of rods for various types of irradiations and experimental measurements. The numerical model of the Th-Pb assembly was designed for the numerical simulations with the continuous energy Monte Carlo Burnup code (MCB implemented on the supercomputer Prometheus of the Academic Computer Centre Cyfronet AGH.

  7. Hybrid transport and diffusion modeling using electron thermal transport Monte Carlo SNB in DRACO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenhall, Jeffrey; Moses, Gregory

    2017-10-01

    The iSNB (implicit Schurtz Nicolai Busquet) multigroup diffusion electron thermal transport method is adapted into an Electron Thermal Transport Monte Carlo (ETTMC) transport method to better model angular and long mean free path non-local effects. Previously, the ETTMC model had been implemented in the 2D DRACO multiphysics code and found to produce consistent results with the iSNB method. Current work is focused on a hybridization of the computationally slower but higher fidelity ETTMC transport method with the computationally faster iSNB diffusion method in order to maximize computational efficiency. Furthermore, effects on the energy distribution of the heat flux divergence are studied. Work to date on the hybrid method will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories and the Univ. of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  8. Measurement and Monte Carlo modeling of the spatial response of scintillation screens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistrui-Maximean, S.A. [CNDRI (NDT using Ionizing Radiation) Laboratory, INSA-Lyon, 69621 Villeurbanne (France)], E-mail: spistrui@gmail.com; Letang, J.M. [CNDRI (NDT using Ionizing Radiation) Laboratory, INSA-Lyon, 69621 Villeurbanne (France)], E-mail: jean-michel.letang@insa-lyon.fr; Freud, N. [CNDRI (NDT using Ionizing Radiation) Laboratory, INSA-Lyon, 69621 Villeurbanne (France); Koch, A. [Thales Electron Devices, 38430 Moirans (France); Walenta, A.H. [Detectors and Electronics Department, FB Physik, Siegen University, 57068 Siegen (Germany); Montarou, G. [Corpuscular Physics Laboratory, Blaise Pascal University, 63177 Aubiere (France); Babot, D. [CNDRI (NDT using Ionizing Radiation) Laboratory, INSA-Lyon, 69621 Villeurbanne (France)

    2007-11-01

    In this article, we propose a detailed protocol to carry out measurements of the spatial response of scintillation screens and to assess the agreement with simulated results. The experimental measurements have been carried out using a practical implementation of the slit method. A Monte Carlo simulation model of scintillator screens, implemented with the toolkit Geant4, has been used to study the influence of the acquisition setup parameters and to compare with the experimental results. An algorithm of global stochastic optimization based on a localized random search method has been implemented to adjust the optical parameters (optical scattering and absorption coefficients). The algorithm has been tested for different X-ray tube voltages (40, 70 and 100 kV). A satisfactory convergence between the results simulated with the optimized model and the experimental measurements is obtained.

  9. Solving the master equation without kinetic Monte Carlo: Tensor train approximations for a CO oxidation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelß, Patrick; Matera, Sebastian; Schütte, Christof

    2016-01-01

    In multiscale modeling of heterogeneous catalytic processes, one crucial point is the solution of a Markovian master equation describing the stochastic reaction kinetics. Usually, this is too high-dimensional to be solved with standard numerical techniques and one has to rely on sampling approaches based on the kinetic Monte Carlo method. In this study we break the curse of dimensionality for the direct solution of the Markovian master equation by exploiting the Tensor Train Format for this purpose. The performance of the approach is demonstrated on a first principles based, reduced model for the CO oxidation on the RuO 2 (110) surface. We investigate the complexity for increasing system size and for various reaction conditions. The advantage over the stochastic simulation approach is illustrated by a problem with increased stiffness.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of a statistical mechanical model of multiple protein sequence alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Akira R

    2017-01-01

    A grand canonical Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm is presented for studying the lattice gas model (LGM) of multiple protein sequence alignment, which coherently combines long-range interactions and variable-length insertions. MC simulations are used for both parameter optimization of the model and production runs to explore the sequence subspace around a given protein family. In this Note, I describe the details of the MC algorithm as well as some preliminary results of MC simulations with various temperatures and chemical potentials, and compare them with the mean-field approximation. The existence of a two-state transition in the sequence space is suggested for the SH3 domain family, and inappropriateness of the mean-field approximation for the LGM is demonstrated.

  11. Solving the master equation without kinetic Monte Carlo: Tensor train approximations for a CO oxidation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelß, Patrick; Matera, Sebastian; Schütte, Christof

    2016-06-01

    In multiscale modeling of heterogeneous catalytic processes, one crucial point is the solution of a Markovian master equation describing the stochastic reaction kinetics. Usually, this is too high-dimensional to be solved with standard numerical techniques and one has to rely on sampling approaches based on the kinetic Monte Carlo method. In this study we break the curse of dimensionality for the direct solution of the Markovian master equation by exploiting the Tensor Train Format for this purpose. The performance of the approach is demonstrated on a first principles based, reduced model for the CO oxidation on the RuO2(110) surface. We investigate the complexity for increasing system size and for various reaction conditions. The advantage over the stochastic simulation approach is illustrated by a problem with increased stiffness.

  12. Solving the master equation without kinetic Monte Carlo: Tensor train approximations for a CO oxidation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelß, Patrick, E-mail: p.gelss@fu-berlin.de; Matera, Sebastian, E-mail: matera@math.fu-berlin.de; Schütte, Christof, E-mail: schuette@mi.fu-berlin.de

    2016-06-01

    In multiscale modeling of heterogeneous catalytic processes, one crucial point is the solution of a Markovian master equation describing the stochastic reaction kinetics. Usually, this is too high-dimensional to be solved with standard numerical techniques and one has to rely on sampling approaches based on the kinetic Monte Carlo method. In this study we break the curse of dimensionality for the direct solution of the Markovian master equation by exploiting the Tensor Train Format for this purpose. The performance of the approach is demonstrated on a first principles based, reduced model for the CO oxidation on the RuO{sub 2}(110) surface. We investigate the complexity for increasing system size and for various reaction conditions. The advantage over the stochastic simulation approach is illustrated by a problem with increased stiffness.

  13. The SGHWR version of the Monte Carlo code W-MONTE. Part 1. The theoretical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, F.R.

    1976-03-01

    W-MONTE provides a multi-group model of neutron transport in the exact geometry of a reactor lattice using Monte Carlo methods. It is currently restricted to uniform axial properties. Material data is normally obtained from a preliminary WIMS lattice calculation in the transport group structure. The SGHWR version has been required for analysis of zero energy experiments and special aspects of power reactor lattices, such as the unmoderated lattice region above the moderator when drained to dump height. Neutron transport is modelled for a uniform infinite lattice, simultaneously treating the cases of no leakage, radial leakage or axial leakage only, and the combined effects of radial and axial leakage. Multigroup neutron balance edits are incorporated for the separate effects of radial and axial leakage to facilitate the analysis of leakage and to provide effective diffusion theory parameters for core representation in reactor cores. (author)

  14. Density-based Monte Carlo filter and its applications in nonlinear stochastic differential equation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guanghui; Wan, Jianping; Chen, Hui

    2013-02-01

    Nonlinear stochastic differential equation models with unobservable state variables are now widely used in analysis of PK/PD data. Unobservable state variables are usually estimated with extended Kalman filter (EKF), and the unknown pharmacokinetic parameters are usually estimated by maximum likelihood estimator. However, EKF is inadequate for nonlinear PK/PD models, and MLE is known to be biased downwards. A density-based Monte Carlo filter (DMF) is proposed to estimate the unobservable state variables, and a simulation-based M estimator is proposed to estimate the unknown parameters in this paper, where a genetic algorithm is designed to search the optimal values of pharmacokinetic parameters. The performances of EKF and DMF are compared through simulations for discrete time and continuous time systems respectively, and it is found that the results based on DMF are more accurate than those given by EKF with respect to mean absolute error. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. 4M Overturned Pyramid (MOP) Model Utilization: Case Studies on Collision in Indonesian and Japanese Maritime Traffic Systems (MTS)

    OpenAIRE

    Wanginingastuti Mutmainnah; Masao Furusho

    2016-01-01

    4M Overturned Pyramid (MOP) model is a new model, proposed by authors, to characterized MTS which is adopting epidemiological model that determines causes of accidents, including not only active failures but also latent failures and barriers. This model is still being developed. One of utilization of MOP model is characterizing accidents in MTS, i.e. collision in Indonesia and Japan that is written in this paper. The aim of this paper is to show the characteristics of ship collision accidents...

  16. Trending in Probability of Collision Measurements via a Bayesian Zero-Inflated Beta Mixed Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Jonathon; Hejduk, Matt; Stamey, James

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the performance of a generalized linear mixed model in predicting the Probabilities of Collision (Pc) for conjunction events. Specifically, we apply this model to the log(sub 10) transformation of these probabilities and argue that this transformation yields values that can be considered bounded in practice. Additionally, this bounded random variable, after scaling, is zero-inflated. Consequently, we model these values using the zero-inflated Beta distribution, and utilize the Bayesian paradigm and the mixed model framework to borrow information from past and current events. This provides a natural way to model the data and provides a basis for answering questions of interest, such as what is the likelihood of observing a probability of collision equal to the effective value of zero on a subsequent observation.

  17. Advanced modeling in positron emission tomography using Monte Carlo simulations for improving reconstruction and quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stute, Simon

    2010-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a medical imaging technique that plays a major role in oncology, especially using "1"8F-Fluoro-Deoxyglucose. However, PET images suffer from a modest spatial resolution and from high noise. As a result, there is still no consensus on how tumor metabolically active volume and tumor uptake should be characterized. In the meantime, research groups keep producing new methods for such characterizations that need to be assessed. A Monte Carlo simulation based method has been developed to produce simulated PET images of patients suffering from cancer, indistinguishable from clinical images, and for which all parameters are known. The method uses high resolution PET images from patient acquisitions, from which the physiological heterogeneous activity distribution can be modeled. It was shown that the performance of quantification methods on such highly realistic simulated images are significantly lower and more variable than using simple phantom studies. Fourteen different quantification methods were also compared in realistic conditions using a group of such simulated patients. In addition, the proposed method was extended to simulate serial PET scans in the context of patient monitoring, including a modeling of the tumor changes, as well as the variability over time of non-tumoral physiological activity distribution. Monte Carlo simulations were also used to study the detection probability inside the crystals of the tomograph. A model of the crystal response was derived and included in the system matrix involved in tomographic reconstruction. The resulting reconstruction method was compared with other sophisticated methods for modeling the detector response in the image space, proposed in the literature. We demonstrated the superiority of the proposed method over equivalent approaches on simulated data, and illustrated its robustness on clinical data. For a same noise level, it is possible to reconstruct PET images offering a

  18. William, a voxel model of child anatomy from tomographic images for Monte Carlo dosimetry calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caon, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Medical imaging provides two-dimensional pictures of the human internal anatomy from which may be constructed a three-dimensional model of organs and tissues suitable for calculation of dose from radiation. Diagnostic CT provides the greatest exposure to radiation per examination and the frequency of CT examination is high. Esti mates of dose from diagnostic radiography are still determined from data derived from geometric models (rather than anatomical models), models scaled from adult bodies (rather than bodies of children) and CT scanner hardware that is no longer used. The aim of anatomical modelling is to produce a mathematical representation of internal anatomy that has organs of realistic size, shape and positioning. The organs and tissues are represented by a great many cuboidal volumes (voxels). The conversion of medical images to voxels is called segmentation and on completion every pixel in an image is assigned to a tissue or organ. Segmentation is time consuming. An image processing pack age is used to identify organ boundaries in each image. Thirty to forty tomographic voxel models of anatomy have been reported in the literature. Each model is of an individual, or a composite from several individuals. Images of children are particularly scarce. So there remains a need for more paediatric anatomical models. I am working on segmenting ''William'' who is 368 PET-CT images from head to toe of a seven year old boy. William will be used for Monte Carlo dose calculations of dose from CT examination using a simulated modern CT scanner.

  19. Bayesian calibration of terrestrial ecosystem models: a study of advanced Markov chain Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dan; Ricciuto, Daniel; Walker, Anthony; Safta, Cosmin; Munger, William

    2017-09-01

    Calibration of terrestrial ecosystem models is important but challenging. Bayesian inference implemented by Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling provides a comprehensive framework to estimate model parameters and associated uncertainties using their posterior distributions. The effectiveness and efficiency of the method strongly depend on the MCMC algorithm used. In this work, a differential evolution adaptive Metropolis (DREAM) algorithm is used to estimate posterior distributions of 21 parameters for the data assimilation linked ecosystem carbon (DALEC) model using 14 years of daily net ecosystem exchange data collected at the Harvard Forest Environmental Measurement Site eddy-flux tower. The calibration of DREAM results in a better model fit and predictive performance compared to the popular adaptive Metropolis (AM) scheme. Moreover, DREAM indicates that two parameters controlling autumn phenology have multiple modes in their posterior distributions while AM only identifies one mode. The application suggests that DREAM is very suitable to calibrate complex terrestrial ecosystem models, where the uncertain parameter size is usually large and existence of local optima is always a concern. In addition, this effort justifies the assumptions of the error model used in Bayesian calibration according to the residual analysis. The result indicates that a heteroscedastic, correlated, Gaussian error model is appropriate for the problem, and the consequent constructed likelihood function can alleviate the underestimation of parameter uncertainty that is usually caused by using uncorrelated error models.

  20. Collision risk in white-tailed eagles. Modelling kernel-based collision risk using satellite telemetry data in Smoela wind-power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Roel; Nygaard, Torgeir; Dahl, Espen Lie; Reitan, Ole; Bevanger, Kjetil

    2011-05-15

    Large soaring birds of prey, such as the white-tailed eagle, are recognized to be perhaps the most vulnerable bird group regarding risk of collisions with turbines in wind-power plants. Their mortalities have called for methods capable of modelling collision risks in connection with the planning of new wind-power developments. The so-called 'Band model' estimates collision risk based on the number of birds flying through the rotor swept zone and the probability of being hit by the passing rotor blades. In the calculations for the expected collision mortality a correction factor for avoidance behaviour is included. The overarching objective of this study was to use satellite telemetry data and recorded mortality to back-calculate the correction factor for white-tailed eagles. The Smoela wind-power plant consists of 68 turbines, over an area of approximately 18 km2. Since autumn 2006 the number of collisions has been recorded on a weekly basis. The analyses were based on satellite telemetry data from 28 white-tailed eagles equipped with backpack transmitters since 2005. The correction factor (i.e. 'avoidance rate') including uncertainty levels used within the Band collision risk model for white-tailed eagles was 99% (94-100%) for spring and 100% for the other seasons. The year-round estimate, irrespective of season, was 98% (95-99%). Although the year-round estimate was similar, the correction factor for spring was higher than the correction factor of 95% derived earlier from vantage point data. The satellite telemetry data may provide an alternative way to provide insight into relative risk among seasons, and help identify periods or areas with increased risk either in a pre- or post construction situation. (Author)

  1. SU-E-T-754: Three-Dimensional Patient Modeling Using Photogrammetry for Collision Avoidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popple, R; Cardan, R [Univ Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate photogrammetry for creating a three-dimensional patient model. Methods: A mannequin was configured on the couch of a CT scanner to simulate a patient setup using an indexed positioning device. A CT fiducial was placed on the indexed CT table-overlay at the reference index position. Two dimensional photogrammetry targets were placed on the table in known positions. A digital SLR camera was used to obtain 27 images from different positions around the CT table. The images were imported into a commercial photogrammetry package and a 3D model constructed. Each photogrammetry target was identified on 2 to 5 images. The CT DICOM metadata and the position of the CT fiducial were used to calculate the coordinates of the photogrammetry targets in the CT image frame of reference. The coordinates were transferred to the photogrammetry software to orient the 3D model. The mannequin setup was transferred to the treatment couch of a linear accelerator and positioned at isocenter using in-room lasers. The treatment couch coordinates were noted and compared with prediction. The collision free regions were measured over the full range of gantry and table motion and were compared with predictions obtained using a general purpose polygon interference algorithm. Results: The reconstructed 3D model consisted of 180000 triangles. The difference between the predicted and measured couch positions were 5 mm, 1 mm, and 1 mm for longitudinal, lateral, and vertical, respectively. The collision prediction tested 64620 gantry table combinations in 11.1 seconds. The accuracy was 96.5%, with false positive and negative results occurring at the boundaries of the collision space. Conclusion: Photogrammetry can be used as a tool for collision avoidance during treatment planning. The results indicate that a buffer zone is necessary to avoid false negatives at the boundary of the collision-free zone. Testing with human patients is underway. Research partially supported by a grant

  2. Interacting gluon model for hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions in the central rapidity region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, G.N.; Navarra, F.S.; Plumer, M.; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, California 94720); Vourdas, A.; Weiner, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    The interacting gluon model developed to describe the inelasticity distribution in hadron-nucleon collisions has been generalized and applied to hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions. Leading particle spectra and energy distributions in hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions are calculated

  3. Implementation of 3D models in the Monte Carlo code MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Vivaldo; Millian, Felix M.; Guevara, Maria Victoria M.; Garcia, Fermin; Sena, Isaac; Menezes, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    On the area of numerical dosimetry Applied to medical physics, the scientific community focuses on the elaboration of new hybrids models based on 3D models. But different steps of the process of simulation with 3D models needed improvement and optimization in order to expedite the calculations and accuracy using this methodology. This project was developed with the aim of optimize the process of introduction of 3D models within the simulation code of radiation transport by Monte Carlo (MCNP). The fast implementation of these models on the simulation code allows the estimation of the dose deposited on the patient organs on a more personalized way, increasing the accuracy with this on the estimates and reducing the risks to health, caused by ionizing radiations. The introduction o these models within the MCNP was made through a input file, that was constructed through a sequence of images, bi-dimensional in the 3D model, generated using the program '3DSMAX', imported by the program 'TOMO M C' and thus, introduced as INPUT FILE of the MCNP code. (author)

  4. Monte Carlo Simulation Of The Portfolio-Balance Model Of Exchange Rates: Finite Sample Properties Of The GMM Estimator

    OpenAIRE

    Hong-Ghi Min

    2011-01-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulation of the Portfolio-balance model of the exchange rates, we report finite sample properties of the GMM estimator for testing over-identifying restrictions in the simultaneous equations model. F-form of Sargans statistic performs better than its chi-squared form while Hansens GMM statistic has the smallest bias.

  5. Recovery of Graded Response Model Parameters: A Comparison of Marginal Maximum Likelihood and Markov Chain Monte Carlo Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieftenbeld, Vincent; Natesan, Prathiba

    2012-01-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods enable a fully Bayesian approach to parameter estimation of item response models. In this simulation study, the authors compared the recovery of graded response model parameters using marginal maximum likelihood (MML) and Gibbs sampling (MCMC) under various latent trait distributions, test lengths, and…

  6. One group neutron flux at a point in a cylindrical reactor cell calculated by Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocic, A [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1974-01-15

    Mean values of the neutron flux over material regions and the neutron flux at space points in a cylindrical annular cell (one group model) have been calculated by Monte Carlo. The results are compared with those obtained by an improved collision probability method (author)

  7. SMACK: A New Algorithm for Modeling Collisions and Dynamics of Planetesimals in Debris Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvold, Erika Rose; Kuchner, Marc J.; Rein, Hanno; Pan, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    We present the Superparticle Model/Algorithm for Collisions in Kuiper belts and debris disks (SMACK), a new method for simultaneously modeling, in 3-D, the collisional and dynamical evolution of planetesimals in a debris disk with planets. SMACK can simulate azimuthal asymmetries and how these asymmetries evolve over time. We show that SMACK is stable to numerical viscosity and numerical heating over 10(exp 7) yr, and that it can reproduce analytic models of disk evolution. We use SMACK to model the evolution of a debris ring containing a planet on an eccentric orbit. Differential precession creates a spiral structure as the ring evolves, but collisions subsequently break up the spiral, leaving a narrower eccentric ring.

  8. Inclusion of the diffuseness in the schematic model of heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marta, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    The schematic model of central heavy ion collisions developed by Swiatecki includes the Coulomb and surface contributions to the potential energy of the system and one-body dissipation. This model is extended by considering the diffuseness of the nuclear surface; this has the implication that we must consider the proximity forces in the dynamics of the collisions. For the sake of simplicity we work with symmetrical systems. The results of the model studied are compared with experimental data and with other theoretical calculations. We conclude that the detailed consideration of the diffuseness of the nuclear surfaces does not substantially change the results of the schematic model for sharp surfaces in which the diffuseness is considered only through the parameters. (author) [pt

  9. Model-Based Estimation of Collision Risks of Predatory Birds with Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Eichhorn

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of renewable energies, such as wind power, is a promising way of mitigating climate change. Because of the risk of collision with rotor blades, wind turbines have negative effects on local bird populations, particularly on raptors such as the Red Kite (Milvus milvus. Appropriate assessment tools for these effects have been lacking. To close this gap, we have developed an agent-based, spatially explicit model that simulates the foraging behavior of the Red Kite around its aerie in a landscape consisting of different land-use types. We determined the collision risk of the Red Kite with the turbine as a function of the distance between the wind turbine and the aerie and other parameters. The impact function comprises the synergistic effects of species-specific foraging behavior and landscape structure. The collision risk declines exponentially with increasing distance. The strength of this decline depends on the raptor's foraging behavior, its ability to avoid wind turbines, and the mean wind speed in the region. The collision risks, which are estimated by the simulation model, are in the range of values observed in the field. The derived impact function shows that the collision risk can be described as an aggregated function of distance between the wind turbine and the raptor's aerie. This allows an easy and rapid assessment of the ecological impacts of (existing or planned wind turbines in relation to their spatial location. Furthermore, it implies that minimum buffer zones for different landscapes can be determined in a defensible way. This modeling approach can be extended to other bird species with central-place foraging behavior. It provides a helpful tool for landscape planning aimed at minimizing the impacts of wind power on biodiversity.

  10. Monte Carlo Techniques for the Comprehensive Modeling of Isotopic Inventories in Future Nuclear Systems and Fuel Cycles. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul P.H. Wilson

    2005-01-01

    The development of Monte Carlo techniques for isotopic inventory analysis has been explored in order to facilitate the modeling of systems with flowing streams of material through varying neutron irradiation environments. This represents a novel application of Monte Carlo methods to a field that has traditionally relied on deterministic solutions to systems of first-order differential equations. The Monte Carlo techniques were based largely on the known modeling techniques of Monte Carlo radiation transport, but with important differences, particularly in the area of variance reduction and efficiency measurement. The software that was developed to implement and test these methods now provides a basis for validating approximate modeling techniques that are available to deterministic methodologies. The Monte Carlo methods have been shown to be effective in reproducing the solutions of simple problems that are possible using both stochastic and deterministic methods. The Monte Carlo methods are also effective for tracking flows of materials through complex systems including the ability to model removal of individual elements or isotopes in the system. Computational performance is best for flows that have characteristic times that are large fractions of the system lifetime. As the characteristic times become short, leading to thousands or millions of passes through the system, the computational performance drops significantly. Further research is underway to determine modeling techniques to improve performance within this range of problems. This report describes the technical development of Monte Carlo techniques for isotopic inventory analysis. The primary motivation for this solution methodology is the ability to model systems of flowing material being exposed to varying and stochastically varying radiation environments. The methodology was developed in three stages: analog methods which model each atom with true reaction probabilities (Section 2), non-analog methods

  11. Dynamic Monte-Carlo modeling of hydrogen retention and chemical erosion from Tore Supra deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, A.; Schneider, R.; Warrier, M.; Roubin, P.; Martin, C.

    2009-01-01

    A multi-scale model has been developed to study the hydrogen retention [A. Rai, R. Schneider, M. Warrier, J. Nucl. Mater. 374 (2008) 304] and chemical erosion of porous graphite. To model the chemical erosion process due to thermal hydrogen ions, Kueppers cycle [J. Kueppers, Surf. Sci. Rep. 22 (1995) 249; M. Wittmann, J. Kueppers, J. Nucl. Mater. 227 (1996) 186] has been introduced. The model is applied to study hydrogen transport in deposits collected from the leading edge of neutralizers of Tore Supra. The effect of internal structure on chemical erosion is studied. The MD study [E. Salonen et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 290-293 (2001) 144] shows that the experimentally observed decrease of erosion yield at higher fluxes is due to the decrease of carbon collision cross-section at a surface due to shielding by hydrogen atom already present on the surface. Inspired by this study, a simple multi-scale model is developed to describe the flux dependence of chemical erosion. The idea is to use the local chemistry effect from the Kueppers model to calculate the hydrocarbon molecule formation process and then to find the release probability of the produced hydrocarbon based on the purely geometrical constraints. The model represents quite well the trends in experimental data.

  12. ICF target 2D modeling using Monte Carlo SNB electron thermal transport in DRACO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenhall, Jeffrey; Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory

    2016-10-01

    The iSNB (implicit Schurtz Nicolai Busquet multigroup diffusion electron thermal transport method is adapted into a Monte Carlo (MC) transport method to better model angular and long mean free path non-local effects. The MC model was first implemented in the 1D LILAC code to verify consistency with the iSNB model. Implementation of the MC SNB model in the 2D DRACO code enables higher fidelity non-local thermal transport modeling in 2D implosions such as polar drive experiments on NIF. The final step is to optimize the MC model by hybridizing it with a MC version of the iSNB diffusion method. The hybrid method will combine the efficiency of a diffusion method in intermediate mean free path regions with the accuracy of a transport method in long mean free path regions allowing for improved computational efficiency while maintaining accuracy. Work to date on the method will be presented. This work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories and the Univ. of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  13. Dynamic connectivity algorithms for Monte Carlo simulations of the random-cluster model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elçi, Eren Metin; Weigel, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We review Sweeny's algorithm for Monte Carlo simulations of the random cluster model. Straightforward implementations suffer from the problem of computational critical slowing down, where the computational effort per edge operation scales with a power of the system size. By using a tailored dynamic connectivity algorithm we are able to perform all operations with a poly-logarithmic computational effort. This approach is shown to be efficient in keeping online connectivity information and is of use for a number of applications also beyond cluster-update simulations, for instance in monitoring droplet shape transitions. As the handling of the relevant data structures is non-trivial, we provide a Python module with a full implementation for future reference.

  14. 3D Monte Carlo model with direct photon flux recording for optimal optogenetic light delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Younghoon; Kim, Dongmok; Lee, Jihoon; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang

    2017-02-01

    Configuring the light power emitted from the optical fiber is an essential first step in planning in-vivo optogenetic experiments. However, diffusion theory, which was adopted for optogenetic research, precluded accurate estimates of light intensity in the semi-diffusive region where the primary locus of the stimulation is located. We present a 3D Monte Carlo model that provides an accurate and direct solution for light distribution in this region. Our method directly records the photon trajectory in the separate volumetric grid planes for the near-source recording efficiency gain, and it incorporates a 3D brain mesh to support both homogeneous and heterogeneous brain tissue. We investigated the light emitted from optical fibers in brain tissue in 3D, and we applied the results to design optimal light delivery parameters for precise optogenetic manipulation by considering the fiber output power, wavelength, fiber-to-target distance, and the area of neural tissue activation.

  15. Constrained-path quantum Monte Carlo approach for non-yrast states within the shell model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnard, J. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); LPC Caen, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3, Caen (France); Juillet, O. [LPC Caen, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3, Caen (France)

    2016-04-15

    The present paper intends to present an extension of the constrained-path quantum Monte Carlo approach allowing to reconstruct non-yrast states in order to reach the complete spectroscopy of nuclei within the interacting shell model. As in the yrast case studied in a previous work, the formalism involves a variational symmetry-restored wave function assuming two central roles. First, it guides the underlying Brownian motion to improve the efficiency of the sampling. Second, it constrains the stochastic paths according to the phaseless approximation to control sign or phase problems that usually plague fermionic QMC simulations. Proof-of-principle results in the sd valence space are reported. They prove the ability of the scheme to offer remarkably accurate binding energies for both even- and odd-mass nuclei irrespective of the considered interaction. (orig.)

  16. New software library of geometrical primitives for modelling of solids used in Monte Carlo detector simulations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    We present our effort for the creation of a new software library of geometrical primitives, which are used for solid modelling in Monte Carlo detector simulations. We plan to replace and unify current geometrical primitive classes in the CERN software projects Geant4 and ROOT with this library. Each solid is represented by a C++ class with methods suited for measuring distances of particles from the surface of a solid and for determination as to whether the particles are located inside, outside or on the surface of the solid. We use numerical tolerance for determining whether the particles are located on the surface. The class methods also contain basic support for visualization. We use dedicated test suites for validation of the shape codes. These include also special performance and numerical value comparison tests for help with analysis of possible candidates of class methods as well as to verify that our new implementation proposals were designed and implemented properly. Currently, bridge classes are u...

  17. Monte Carlo based geometrical model for efficiency calculation of an n-type HPGe detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla Cabal, Fatima, E-mail: fpadilla@instec.c [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, ' Quinta de los Molinos' Ave. Salvador Allende, esq. Luaces, Plaza de la Revolucion, Ciudad de la Habana, CP 10400 (Cuba); Lopez-Pino, Neivy; Luis Bernal-Castillo, Jose; Martinez-Palenzuela, Yisel; Aguilar-Mena, Jimmy; D' Alessandro, Katia; Arbelo, Yuniesky; Corrales, Yasser; Diaz, Oscar [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, ' Quinta de los Molinos' Ave. Salvador Allende, esq. Luaces, Plaza de la Revolucion, Ciudad de la Habana, CP 10400 (Cuba)

    2010-12-15

    A procedure to optimize the geometrical model of an n-type detector is described. Sixteen lines from seven point sources ({sup 241}Am, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 22}Na, {sup 60}Co, {sup 57}Co, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 152}Eu) placed at three different source-to-detector distances (10, 20 and 30 cm) were used to calibrate a low-background gamma spectrometer between 26 and 1408 keV. Direct Monte Carlo techniques using the MCNPX 2.6 and GEANT 4 9.2 codes, and a semi-empirical procedure were performed to obtain theoretical efficiency curves. Since discrepancies were found between experimental and calculated data using the manufacturer parameters of the detector, a detail study of the crystal dimensions and the geometrical configuration is carried out. The relative deviation with experimental data decreases from a mean value of 18-4%, after the parameters were optimized.

  18. Monte Carlo evidence for the gluon-chain model of QCD string formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greensite, J.; San Francisco State Univ., CA

    1988-08-01

    The Monte Carlo method is used to calculate the overlaps string vertical stroken gluons>, where Ψ string [A] is the Yang-Mills wavefunctional due to a static quark-antiquark pair, and vertical stroken gluons > are orthogonal trial states containing n=0, 1, or 2 gluon operators multiplying the true ground state. The calculation is carried out for SU(2) lattice gauge theory in Coulomb gauge, in D=4 dimensions. It is found that the string state is dominated, at small qanti q separations, by the vacuum ('no-gluon') state, at larger separations by the 1-gluon state, and, at the largest separations attempted, the 2-gluon state begins to dominate. This behavior is in qualitative agreement with the gluon-chain model, which is a large-N colors motivated theory of QCD string formation. (orig.)

  19. Calibration of lung counter using a CT model of Torso phantom and Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Binquan; Ma Jizeng; Yang Duanjie; Liu Liye; Cheng Jianping

    2006-01-01

    Tomography image of a Torso phantom was obtained from CT-Scan. The Torso phantom represents the trunk of an adult man that is 170 cm high and weight of 65 kg. After these images were segmented, cropped, and resized, a 3-dimension voxel phantom was created. The voxel phantom includes more than 2 million voxels, which size was 2.73 mm x 2.73 mm x 3 mm. This model could be used for the calibration of lung counter with Monte Carlo method. On the assumption that radioactive material was homogeneously distributed throughout the lung, counting efficiencies of a HPGe detector in different positions were calculated as Adipose Mass fraction (AMF) was different in the soft tissue in chest. The results showed that counting efficiencies of the lung counter changed up to 67% for 17.5 keV γ ray and 20% for 25 keV γ ray when AMF changed from 0 to 40%. (authors)

  20. MBR Monte Carlo Simulation in PYTHIA8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesielski, R.

    We present the MBR (Minimum Bias Rockefeller) Monte Carlo simulation of (anti)proton-proton interactions and its implementation in the PYTHIA8 event generator. We discuss the total, elastic, and total-inelastic cross sections, and three contributions from diffraction dissociation processes that contribute to the latter: single diffraction, double diffraction, and central diffraction or double-Pomeron exchange. The event generation follows a renormalized-Regge-theory model, successfully tested using CDF data. Based on the MBR-enhanced PYTHIA8 simulation, we present cross-section predictions for the LHC and beyond, up to collision energies of 50 TeV.

  1. A Monte Carlo calculation model of electronic portal imaging device for transit dosimetry through heterogeneous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jihyung; Jung, Jae Won, E-mail: jungj@ecu.edu [Department of Physics, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27858 (United States); Kim, Jong Oh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States); Yeo, Inhwan [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a fast Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation model of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based on its effective atomic number modeling in the XVMC code. Methods: A previously developed EPID model, based on the XVMC code by density scaling of EPID structures, was modified by additionally considering effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) of each structure and adopting a phase space file from the EGSnrc code. The model was tested under various homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms and field sizes by comparing the calculations in the model with measurements in EPID. In order to better evaluate the model, the performance of the XVMC code was separately tested by comparing calculated dose to water with ion chamber (IC) array measurement in the plane of EPID. Results: In the EPID plane, calculated dose to water by the code showed agreement with IC measurements within 1.8%. The difference was averaged across the in-field regions of the acquired profiles for all field sizes and phantoms. The maximum point difference was 2.8%, affected by proximity of the maximum points to penumbra and MC noise. The EPID model showed agreement with measured EPID images within 1.3%. The maximum point difference was 1.9%. The difference dropped from the higher value of the code by employing the calibration that is dependent on field sizes and thicknesses for the conversion of calculated images to measured images. Thanks to the Z{sub eff} correction, the EPID model showed a linear trend of the calibration factors unlike those of the density-only-scaled model. The phase space file from the EGSnrc code sharpened penumbra profiles significantly, improving agreement of calculated profiles with measured profiles. Conclusions: Demonstrating high accuracy, the EPID model with the associated calibration system may be used for in vivo dosimetry of radiation therapy. Through this study, a MC model of EPID has been developed, and their performance has been rigorously

  2. Combined Monte Carlo and path-integral method for simulated library of time-resolved reflectance curves from layered tissue models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert H.; Vishwanath, Karthik; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2009-02-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are considered the "gold standard" for mathematical description of photon transport in tissue, but they can require large computation times. Therefore, it is important to develop simple and efficient methods for accelerating MC simulations, especially when a large "library" of related simulations is needed. A semi-analytical method involving MC simulations and a path-integral (PI) based scaling technique generated time-resolved reflectance curves from layered tissue models. First, a zero-absorption MC simulation was run for a tissue model with fixed scattering properties in each layer. Then, a closed-form expression for the average classical path of a photon in tissue was used to determine the percentage of time that the photon spent in each layer, to create a weighted Beer-Lambert factor to scale the time-resolved reflectance of the simulated zero-absorption tissue model. This method is a unique alternative to other scaling techniques in that it does not require the path length or number of collisions of each photon to be stored during the initial simulation. Effects of various layer thicknesses and absorption and scattering coefficients on the accuracy of the method will be discussed.

  3. Modeling chiral criticality and its consequences for heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almási, Gábor András, E-mail: g.almasi@gsi.de [Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Friman, Bengt, E-mail: b.friman@gsi.de [Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute (EMMI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Redlich, Krzysztof, E-mail: krzysztof.redlich@ift.uni.wroc.pl [ExtreMe Matter Institute (EMMI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); University of Wrocław - Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, PL-50-204 Wrocław (Poland); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    We explore the critical fluctuations near the chiral critical endpoint (CEP) in a chiral effective model and discuss possible signals of the CEP, recently explored experimentally in nuclear collision. Particular attention is paid to the dependence of such signals on the location of the phase boundary and the CEP relative to the chemical freeze-out conditions in nuclear collisions. We argue that in effective models, standard freeze-out fits to heavy-ion data should not be used directly. Instead, the relevant quantities should be examined on lines in the phase diagram that are defined self-consistently, within the framework of the model. We discuss possible choices for such an approach.

  4. Modeling chiral criticality and its consequences for heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almasi, Gabor [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Friman, Bengt [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute (EMMI), Darmstadt (Germany); Redlich, Krzysztof [ExtreMe Matter Institute (EMMI), Darmstadt (Germany); University of Wroclaw, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Wroclaw (Poland); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-07-01

    We explore the critical fluctuations near the chiral critical endpoint (CEP), which belongs to the Z(2) universality class, in a chiral effective model and discuss possible signals of the CEP, recently explored in nuclear collision experiments. Particular attention is attributed to the dependence of such signals on the location of the phase boundary and the CEP relative to the hypothetical freeze-out conditions in nuclear collisions. We argue that in effective models freeze-out fits to heavy-ion results should not be used directly, and relevant quantities should be investigated on lines of the phase diagram, that are defined self-consistently in the framework of the model. We discuss possible choices for such an approach. Additionally we discuss the effect of the repulsive vector interaction of quarks on the location of the CEP and on the structure of the baryon number cumulant ratios.

  5. Development of a Monte Carlo multiple source model for inclusion in a dose calculation auditing tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faught, Austin M; Davidson, Scott E; Fontenot, Jonas; Kry, Stephen F; Etzel, Carol; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Followill, David S

    2017-09-01

    The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston (IROC-H) (formerly the Radiological Physics Center) has reported varying levels of agreement in their anthropomorphic phantom audits. There is reason to believe one source of error in this observed disagreement is the accuracy of the dose calculation algorithms and heterogeneity corrections used. To audit this component of the radiotherapy treatment process, an independent dose calculation tool is needed. Monte Carlo multiple source models for Elekta 6 MV and 10 MV therapeutic x-ray beams were commissioned based on measurement of central axis depth dose data for a 10 × 10 cm 2 field size and dose profiles for a 40 × 40 cm 2 field size. The models were validated against open field measurements consisting of depth dose data and dose profiles for field sizes ranging from 3 × 3 cm 2 to 30 × 30 cm 2 . The models were then benchmarked against measurements in IROC-H's anthropomorphic head and neck and lung phantoms. Validation results showed 97.9% and 96.8% of depth dose data passed a ±2% Van Dyk criterion for 6 MV and 10 MV models respectively. Dose profile comparisons showed an average agreement using a ±2%/2 mm criterion of 98.0% and 99.0% for 6 MV and 10 MV models respectively. Phantom plan comparisons were evaluated using ±3%/2 mm gamma criterion, and averaged passing rates between Monte Carlo and measurements were 87.4% and 89.9% for 6 MV and 10 MV models respectively. Accurate multiple source models for Elekta 6 MV and 10 MV x-ray beams have been developed for inclusion in an independent dose calculation tool for use in clinical trial audits. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  6. Study of Monte Carlo Simulation Method for Methane Phase Diagram Prediction using Two Different Potential Models

    KAUST Repository

    Kadoura, Ahmad

    2011-06-06

    Lennard‐Jones (L‐J) and Buckingham exponential‐6 (exp‐6) potential models were used to produce isotherms for methane at temperatures below and above critical one. Molecular simulation approach, particularly Monte Carlo simulations, were employed to create these isotherms working with both canonical and Gibbs ensembles. Experiments in canonical ensemble with each model were conducted to estimate pressures at a range of temperatures above methane critical temperature. Results were collected and compared to experimental data existing in literature; both models showed an elegant agreement with the experimental data. In parallel, experiments below critical temperature were run in Gibbs ensemble using L‐J model only. Upon comparing results with experimental ones, a good fit was obtained with small deviations. The work was further developed by adding some statistical studies in order to achieve better understanding and interpretation to the estimated quantities by the simulation. Methane phase diagrams were successfully reproduced by an efficient molecular simulation technique with different potential models. This relatively simple demonstration shows how powerful molecular simulation methods could be, hence further applications on more complicated systems are considered. Prediction of phase behavior of elemental sulfur in sour natural gases has been an interesting and challenging field in oil and gas industry. Determination of elemental sulfur solubility conditions helps avoiding all kinds of problems caused by its dissolution in gas production and transportation processes. For this purpose, further enhancement to the methods used is to be considered in order to successfully simulate elemental sulfur phase behavior in sour natural gases mixtures.

  7. Unified description of pf-shell nuclei by the Monte Carlo shell model calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizusaki, Takahiro; Otsuka, Takaharu [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Honma, Michio

    1998-03-01

    The attempts to solve shell model by new methods are briefed. The shell model calculation by quantum Monte Carlo diagonalization which was proposed by the authors is a more practical method, and it became to be known that it can solve the problem with sufficiently good accuracy. As to the treatment of angular momentum, in the method of the authors, deformed Slater determinant is used as the basis, therefore, for making angular momentum into the peculiar state, projected operator is used. The space determined dynamically is treated mainly stochastically, and the energy of the multibody by the basis formed as the result is evaluated and selectively adopted. The symmetry is discussed, and the method of decomposing shell model space into dynamically determined space and the product of spin and isospin spaces was devised. The calculation processes are shown with the example of {sup 50}Mn nuclei. The calculation of the level structure of {sup 48}Cr with known exact energy can be done with the accuracy of peculiar absolute energy value within 200 keV. {sup 56}Ni nuclei are the self-conjugate nuclei of Z=N=28. The results of the shell model calculation of {sup 56}Ni nucleus structure by using the interactions of nuclear models are reported. (K.I.)

  8. Semiclassical model of atomic collisions: stopping and capture of the heavy charged particles and exotic atom formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, W.A.

    2000-01-01

    The semiclassical model of atomic collisions, especially in different areas of the maximum stopping, when proton collides at the velocity of the boron order velocity, providing as the result for interactions of many bodies with an electron target, enabling application of the model with high degree of confidence to a clearly expressed experimental problem, such the antiproton capture on helium, is presented. The semiclassical collision model and stopping energy are considered. The stopping and capture of negatively-charged particles are investigated. The capture and angular moments of antiprotons, captures at the end of the collision cascade, are presented [ru

  9. Modelling and Analysis of a Collision Avoidance Protocol using SPIN and UPPAAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Arne; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Jensen, Henrik Ejersbo

    1997-01-01

    , the modelling of the media becomes ackward due to the lack of broadcast communication in the PROMELA language. On the other hand we find it easy to model the timed aspects using the UPPAAL tool. Especially, the notion of committed locations supports the modelling of broadcast communication. However......This paper compares the tools SPIN and UPPAAL by modelling and verifying a Collision Avoidance Protocol for an Ethernet-like medium. We find that SPIN is well suited for modelling the untimed aspects of the protocol processes and for expressing the relevant (untimed) properties. However...

  10. A numerical strategy for finite element modeling of frictionless asymmetric vocal fold collision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, Alba; Misztal, Marek Krzysztof; Brunskog, Jonas; Visseq, Vincent; Erleben, Kenny

    2017-02-01

    Analysis of voice pathologies may require vocal fold models that include relevant features such as vocal fold asymmetric collision. The present study numerically addresses the problem of frictionless asymmetric collision in a self-sustained three-dimensional continuum model of the vocal folds. Theoretical background and numerical analysis of the finite-element position-based contact model are presented, along with validation. A novel contact detection mechanism capable to detect collision in asymmetric oscillations is developed. The effect of inexact contact constraint enforcement on vocal fold dynamics is examined by different variational methods for inequality constrained minimization problems, namely, the Lagrange multiplier method and the penalty method. In contrast to the penalty solution, which is related to classical spring-like contact forces, numerical examples show that the parameter-independent Lagrange multiplier solution is more robust and accurate in the estimation of dynamical and mechanical features at vocal fold contact. Furthermore, special attention is paid to the temporal integration schemes in relation to the contact problem, the results suggesting an advantage of highly diffusive schemes. Finally, vocal fold contact enforcement is shown to affect asymmetric oscillations. The present model may be adapted to existing vocal fold models, which may contribute to a better understanding of the effect of the nonlinear contact phenomenon on phonation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Development of collision dynamics models to estimate the results of full-scale rail vehicle impact tests : Tufts University Master's Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-01

    In an effort to study occupant survivability in train collisions, analyses and tests were conducted to understand and improve the crashworthiness of rail vehicles. A collision dynamics model was developed in order to estimate the rigid body motion of...

  12. Introduction to fluid model for RHIC heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muraya, Shin

    2007-01-01

    An introductory review of the fluid model which has been looked upon as the promising phenomenological model for the heavy ion scattering experiments at RHIC is presented here. Subjects are especially focused on the fundamental assumptions of the model and the decision process of the phenomenological parameters considering newcomers to hadron physics. Introduction of thermodynamical quantities, 1+1 dimension model, time-space evolution of fluid, correspondence of fluid to particles, initial condition, boundary condition and comparison of the equation of state of fluid model and that of hadron model are described. Limitation of fluid picture and the validity of the model are discussed finally. It is summarized that the present fluid model does not predict much about results in advance but gives interpretation after the event, nevertheless it reproduces much of the experimental results in natural form. It is expected that the parameter of the fluid model is to be used as the intermediate theory to relate experimental results with theory. (S. Funahashi)

  13. Modeling a secular trend by Monte Carlo simulation of height biased migration in a spatial network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Detlef

    2017-04-01

    Background: In a recent Monte Carlo simulation, the clustering of body height of Swiss military conscripts within a spatial network with characteristic features of the natural Swiss geography was investigated. In this study I examined the effect of migration of tall individuals into network hubs on the dynamics of body height within the whole spatial network. The aim of this study was to simulate height trends. Material and methods: Three networks were used for modeling, a regular rectangular fishing net like network, a real world example based on the geographic map of Switzerland, and a random network. All networks contained between 144 and 148 districts and between 265-307 road connections. Around 100,000 agents were initially released with average height of 170 cm, and height standard deviation of 6.5 cm. The simulation was started with the a priori assumption that height variation within a district is limited and also depends on height of neighboring districts (community effect on height). In addition to a neighborhood influence factor, which simulates a community effect, body height dependent migration of conscripts between adjacent districts in each Monte Carlo simulation was used to re-calculate next generation body heights. In order to determine the direction of migration for taller individuals, various centrality measures for the evaluation of district importance within the spatial network were applied. Taller individuals were favored to migrate more into network hubs, backward migration using the same number of individuals was random, not biased towards body height. Network hubs were defined by the importance of a district within the spatial network. The importance of a district was evaluated by various centrality measures. In the null model there were no road connections, height information could not be delivered between the districts. Results: Due to the favored migration of tall individuals into network hubs, average body height of the hubs, and later

  14. Development of a randomized 3D cell model for Monte Carlo microdosimetry simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglass, Michael; Bezak, Eva; Penfold, Scott [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, North Terrace, Adelaide 5005, South Australia (Australia) and Department of Medical Physics, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide 5000, South Australia (Australia)

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: The objective of the current work was to develop an algorithm for growing a macroscopic tumor volume from individual randomized quasi-realistic cells. The major physical and chemical components of the cell need to be modeled. It is intended to import the tumor volume into GEANT4 (and potentially other Monte Carlo packages) to simulate ionization events within the cell regions. Methods: A MATLAB Copyright-Sign code was developed to produce a tumor coordinate system consisting of individual ellipsoidal cells randomized in their spatial coordinates, sizes, and rotations. An eigenvalue method using a mathematical equation to represent individual cells was used to detect overlapping cells. GEANT4 code was then developed to import the coordinate system into GEANT4 and populate it with individual cells of varying sizes and composed of the membrane, cytoplasm, reticulum, nucleus, and nucleolus. Each region is composed of chemically realistic materials. Results: The in-house developed MATLAB Copyright-Sign code was able to grow semi-realistic cell distributions ({approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} cells in 1 cm{sup 3}) in under 36 h. The cell distribution can be used in any number of Monte Carlo particle tracking toolkits including GEANT4, which has been demonstrated in this work. Conclusions: Using the cell distribution and GEANT4, the authors were able to simulate ionization events in the individual cell components resulting from 80 keV gamma radiation (the code is applicable to other particles and a wide range of energies). This virtual microdosimetry tool will allow for a more complete picture of cell damage to be developed.

  15. A Monte Carlo risk assessment model for acrylamide formation in French fries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Enda; Butler, Francis; Gormley, Ronan; Brunton, Nigel

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study is to estimate the likely human exposure to the group 2a carcinogen, acrylamide, from French fries by Irish consumers by developing a quantitative risk assessment model using Monte Carlo simulation techniques. Various stages in the French-fry-making process were modeled from initial potato harvest, storage, and processing procedures. The model was developed in Microsoft Excel with the @Risk add-on package. The model was run for 10,000 iterations using Latin hypercube sampling. The simulated mean acrylamide level in French fries was calculated to be 317 microg/kg. It was found that females are exposed to smaller levels of acrylamide than males (mean exposure of 0.20 microg/kg bw/day and 0.27 microg/kg bw/day, respectively). Although the carcinogenic potency of acrylamide is not well known, the simulated probability of exceeding the average chronic human dietary intake of 1 microg/kg bw/day (as suggested by WHO) was 0.054 and 0.029 for males and females, respectively. A sensitivity analysis highlighted the importance of the selection of appropriate cultivars with known low reducing sugar levels for French fry production. Strict control of cooking conditions (correlation coefficient of 0.42 and 0.35 for frying time and temperature, respectively) and blanching procedures (correlation coefficient -0.25) were also found to be important in ensuring minimal acrylamide formation.

  16. Monte Carlo modeling of a conventional X-ray computed tomography scanner for gel dosimetry purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, Homa; Mesbahi, Asghar; Nazarpoor, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Our purpose in the current study was to model an X-ray CT scanner with the Monte Carlo (MC) method for gel dosimetry. In this study, a conventional CT scanner with one array detector was modeled with use of the MCNPX MC code. The MC calculated photon fluence in detector arrays was used for image reconstruction of a simple water phantom as well as polyacrylamide polymer gel (PAG) used for radiation therapy. Image reconstruction was performed with the filtered back-projection method with a Hann filter and the Spline interpolation method. Using MC results, we obtained the dose-response curve for images of irradiated gel at different absorbed doses. A spatial resolution of about 2 mm was found for our simulated MC model. The MC-based CT images of the PAG gel showed a reliable increase in the CT number with increasing absorbed dose for the studied gel. Also, our results showed that the current MC model of a CT scanner can be used for further studies on the parameters that influence the usability and reliability of results, such as the photon energy spectra and exposure techniques in X-ray CT gel dosimetry.

  17. Assessing the convergence of LHS Monte Carlo simulations of wastewater treatment models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Lorenzo; Claeys, Filip; Nopens, Ingmar; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation appears to be the only currently adopted tool to estimate global sensitivities and uncertainties in wastewater treatment modelling. Such models are highly complex, dynamic and non-linear, requiring long computation times, especially in the scope of MC simulation, due to the large number of simulations usually required. However, no stopping rule to decide on the number of simulations required to achieve a given confidence in the MC simulation results has been adopted so far in the field. In this work, a pragmatic method is proposed to minimize the computation time by using a combination of several criteria. It makes no use of prior knowledge about the model, is very simple, intuitive and can be automated: all convenient features in engineering applications. A case study is used to show an application of the method, and the results indicate that the required number of simulations strongly depends on the model output(s) selected, and on the type and desired accuracy of the analysis conducted. Hence, no prior indication is available regarding the necessary number of MC simulations, but the proposed method is capable of dealing with these variations and stopping the calculations after convergence is reached.

  18. 3D Monte Carlo model of optical transport in laser-irradiated cutaneous vascular malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majaron, Boris; Milanič, Matija; Jia, Wangcun; Nelson, J. S.

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional Monte Carlo (MC) model of optical transport in skin and applied it to analysis of port wine stain treatment with sequential laser irradiation and intermittent cryogen spray cooling. Our MC model extends the approaches of the popular multi-layer model by Wang et al.1 to three dimensions, thus allowing treatment of skin inclusions with more complex geometries and arbitrary irradiation patterns. To overcome the obvious drawbacks of either "escape" or "mirror" boundary conditions at the lateral boundaries of the finely discretized volume of interest (VOI), photons exiting the VOI are propagated in laterally infinite tissue layers with appropriate optical properties, until they loose all their energy, escape into the air, or return to the VOI, but the energy deposition outside of the VOI is not computed and recorded. After discussing the selection of tissue parameters, we apply the model to analysis of blood photocoagulation and collateral thermal damage in treatment of port wine stain (PWS) lesions with sequential laser irradiation and intermittent cryogen spray cooling.

  19. EURADOS intercomparison exercise on Monte Carlo modelling of a medical linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccia, Barbara; Le Roy, Maïwenn; Blideanu, Valentin; Andenna, Claudio; Arun, Chairmadurai; Czarnecki, Damian; El Bardouni, Tarek; Gschwind, Régine; Huot, Nicolas; Martin, Eric; Zink, Klemens; Zoubair, Mariam; Price, Robert; de Carlan, Loïc

    2017-01-01

    In radiotherapy, Monte Carlo (MC) methods are considered a gold standard to calculate accurate dose distributions, particularly in heterogeneous tissues. EURADOS organized an international comparison with six participants applying different MC models to a real medical linear accelerator and to one homogeneous and four heterogeneous dosimetric phantoms. The aim of this exercise was to identify, by comparison of different MC models with a complete experimental dataset, critical aspects useful for MC users to build and calibrate a simulation and perform a dosimetric analysis. Results show on average a good agreement between simulated and experimental data. However, some significant differences have been observed especially in presence of heterogeneities. Moreover, the results are critically dependent on the different choices of the initial electron source parameters. This intercomparison allowed the participants to identify some critical issues in MC modelling of a medical linear accelerator. Therefore, the complete experimental dataset assembled for this intercomparison will be available to all the MC users, thus providing them an opportunity to build and calibrate a model for a real medical linear accelerator.

  20. Kinetic Monte Carlo Potts Model for Simulating a High Burnup Structure in UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jae-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ho

    2008-01-01

    A Potts model, based on the kinetic Monte Carlo method, was originally developed for magnetic domain evolutions, but it was also proposed as a model for a grain growth in polycrystals due to similarities between Potts domain structures and grain structures. It has modeled various microstructural phenomena such as grain growths, a recrystallization, a sintering, and so on. A high burnup structure (HBS) is observed in the periphery of a high burnup UO 2 fuel. Although its formation mechanism is not clearly understood yet, its characteristics are well recognized: The HBS microstructure consists of very small grains and large bubbles instead of original as-sintered grains. A threshold burnup for the HBS is observed at a local burnup 60-80 Gwd/tM, and the threshold temperature is 1000-1200 .deg. C. Concerning a energy stability, the HBS can be created if the system energy of the HBS is lower than that of the original structure in an irradiated UO 2 . In this paper, a Potts model was implemented for simulating the HBS by calculating system energies, and the simulation results were compared with the HBS characteristics mentioned above

  1. An analysis of urban collisions using an artificial intelligence model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussone, L; Ferrari, A; Oneta, M

    1999-11-01

    Traditional studies on road accidents estimate the effect of variables (such as vehicular flows, road geometry, vehicular characteristics), and the calculation of the number of accidents. A descriptive statistical analysis of the accidents (those used in the model) over the period 1992-1995 is proposed. The paper describes an alternative method based on the use of artificial neural networks (ANN) in order to work out a model that relates to the analysis of vehicular accidents in Milan. The degree of danger of urban intersections using different scenarios is quantified by the ANN model. Methodology is the first result, which allows us to tackle the modelling of urban vehicular accidents by the innovative use of ANN. Other results deal with model outputs: intersection complexity may determine a higher accident index depending on the regulation of intersection. The highest index for running over of pedestrian occurs at non-signalised intersections at night-time.

  2. The development and verification of a highly accurate collision prediction model for automated noncoplanar plan delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Tran, Angelia; Nguyen, Dan; Cao, Minsong; Ruan, Dan; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Significant dosimetric benefits had been previously demonstrated in highly noncoplanar treatment plans. In this study, the authors developed and verified an individualized collision model for the purpose of delivering highly noncoplanar radiotherapy and tested the feasibility of total delivery automation with Varian TrueBeam developer mode. Methods: A hand-held 3D scanner was used to capture the surfaces of an anthropomorphic phantom and a human subject, which were positioned with a computer-aided design model of a TrueBeam machine to create a detailed virtual geometrical collision model. The collision model included gantry, collimator, and couch motion degrees of freedom. The accuracy of the 3D scanner was validated by scanning a rigid cubical phantom with known dimensions. The collision model was then validated by generating 300 linear accelerator orientations corresponding to 300 gantry-to-couch and gantry-to-phantom distances, and comparing the corresponding distance measurements to their corresponding models. The linear accelerator orientations reflected uniformly sampled noncoplanar beam angles to the head, lung, and prostate. The distance discrepancies between measurements on the physical and virtual systems were used to estimate treatment-site-specific safety buffer distances with 0.1%, 0.01%, and 0.001% probability of collision between the gantry and couch or phantom. Plans containing 20 noncoplanar beams to the brain, lung, and prostate optimized via an in-house noncoplanar radiotherapy platform were converted into XML script for automated delivery and the entire delivery was recorded and timed to demonstrate the feasibility of automated delivery. Results: The 3D scanner measured the dimension of the 14 cm cubic phantom within 0.5 mm. The maximal absolute discrepancy between machine and model measurements for gantry-to-couch and gantry-to-phantom was 0.95 and 2.97 cm, respectively. The reduced accuracy of gantry-to-phantom measurements was

  3. The development and verification of a highly accurate collision prediction model for automated noncoplanar plan delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Tran, Angelia; Nguyen, Dan; Cao, Minsong; Ruan, Dan; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Significant dosimetric benefits had been previously demonstrated in highly noncoplanar treatment plans. In this study, the authors developed and verified an individualized collision model for the purpose of delivering highly noncoplanar radiotherapy and tested the feasibility of total delivery automation with Varian TrueBeam developer mode. Methods: A hand-held 3D scanner was used to capture the surfaces of an anthropomorphic phantom and a human subject, which were positioned with a computer-aided design model of a TrueBeam machine to create a detailed virtual geometrical collision model. The collision model included gantry, collimator, and couch motion degrees of freedom. The accuracy of the 3D scanner was validated by scanning a rigid cubical phantom with known dimensions. The collision model was then validated by generating 300 linear accelerator orientations corresponding to 300 gantry-to-couch and gantry-to-phantom distances, and comparing the corresponding distance measurements to their corresponding models. The linear accelerator orientations reflected uniformly sampled noncoplanar beam angles to the head, lung, and prostate. The distance discrepancies between measurements on the physical and virtual systems were used to estimate treatment-site-specific safety buffer distances with 0.1%, 0.01%, and 0.001% probability of collision between the gantry and couch or phantom. Plans containing 20 noncoplanar beams to the brain, lung, and prostate optimized via an in-house noncoplanar radiotherapy platform were converted into XML script for automated delivery and the entire delivery was recorded and timed to demonstrate the feasibility of automated delivery. Results: The 3D scanner measured the dimension of the 14 cm cubic phantom within 0.5 mm. The maximal absolute discrepancy between machine and model measurements for gantry-to-couch and gantry-to-phantom was 0.95 and 2.97 cm, respectively. The reduced accuracy of gantry-to-phantom measurements was

  4. The development and verification of a highly accurate collision prediction model for automated noncoplanar plan delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Victoria Y; Tran, Angelia; Nguyen, Dan; Cao, Minsong; Ruan, Dan; Low, Daniel A; Sheng, Ke

    2015-11-01

    Significant dosimetric benefits had been previously demonstrated in highly noncoplanar treatment plans. In this study, the authors developed and verified an individualized collision model for the purpose of delivering highly noncoplanar radiotherapy and tested the feasibility of total delivery automation with Varian TrueBeam developer mode. A hand-held 3D scanner was used to capture the surfaces of an anthropomorphic phantom and a human subject, which were positioned with a computer-aided design model of a TrueBeam machine to create a detailed virtual geometrical collision model. The collision model included gantry, collimator, and couch motion degrees of freedom. The accuracy of the 3D scanner was validated by scanning a rigid cubical phantom with known dimensions. The collision model was then validated by generating 300 linear accelerator orientations corresponding to 300 gantry-to-couch and gantry-to-phantom distances, and comparing the corresponding distance measurements to their corresponding models. The linear accelerator orientations reflected uniformly sampled noncoplanar beam angles to the head, lung, and prostate. The distance discrepancies between measurements on the physical and virtual systems were used to estimate treatment-site-specific safety buffer distances with 0.1%, 0.01%, and 0.001% probability of collision between the gantry and couch or phantom. Plans containing 20 noncoplanar beams to the brain, lung, and prostate optimized via an in-house noncoplanar radiotherapy platform were converted into XML script for automated delivery and the entire delivery was recorded and timed to demonstrate the feasibility of automated delivery. The 3D scanner measured the dimension of the 14 cm cubic phantom within 0.5 mm. The maximal absolute discrepancy between machine and model measurements for gantry-to-couch and gantry-to-phantom was 0.95 and 2.97 cm, respectively. The reduced accuracy of gantry-to-phantom measurements was attributed to phantom setup

  5. Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Application of the Three Dimensional Forced Harmonic Oscillator Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-07

    NUMBER (Include area code) 07 December 2017 Journal Article 24 February 2017 - 31 December 2017 Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Application of the...is proposed. The implementation employs precalculated lookup tables for transition probabilities and is suitable for the direct simulation Monte Carlo...method. It takes into account the microscopic reversibility between the excitation and deexcitation processes , and it satisfies the detailed balance

  6. Uncertainties in models of tropospheric ozone based on Monte Carlo analysis: Tropospheric ozone burdens, atmospheric lifetimes and surface distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derwent, Richard G.; Parrish, David D.; Galbally, Ian E.; Stevenson, David S.; Doherty, Ruth M.; Naik, Vaishali; Young, Paul J.

    2018-05-01

    Recognising that global tropospheric ozone models have many uncertain input parameters, an attempt has been made to employ Monte Carlo sampling to quantify the uncertainties in model output that arise from global tropospheric ozone precursor emissions and from ozone production and destruction in a global Lagrangian chemistry-transport model. Ninety eight quasi-randomly Monte Carlo sampled model runs were completed and the uncertainties were quantified in tropospheric burdens and lifetimes of ozone, carbon monoxide and methane, together with the surface distribution and seasonal cycle in ozone. The results have shown a satisfactory degree of convergence and provide a first estimate of the likely uncertainties in tropospheric ozone model outputs. There are likely to be diminishing returns in carrying out many more Monte Carlo runs in order to refine further these outputs. Uncertainties due to model formulation were separately addressed using the results from 14 Atmospheric Chemistry Coupled Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) chemistry-climate models. The 95% confidence ranges surrounding the ACCMIP model burdens and lifetimes for ozone, carbon monoxide and methane were somewhat smaller than for the Monte Carlo estimates. This reflected the situation where the ACCMIP models used harmonised emissions data and differed only in their meteorological data and model formulations whereas a conscious effort was made to describe the uncertainties in the ozone precursor emissions and in the kinetic and photochemical data in the Monte Carlo runs. Attention was focussed on the model predictions of the ozone seasonal cycles at three marine boundary layer stations: Mace Head, Ireland, Trinidad Head, California and Cape Grim, Tasmania. Despite comprehensively addressing the uncertainties due to global emissions and ozone sources and sinks, none of the Monte Carlo runs were able to generate seasonal cycles that matched the observations at all three MBL stations. Although

  7. An open source Bayesian Monte Carlo isotope mixing model with applications in Earth surface processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Carli A.; Aciego, Sarah M.; Hetland, Eric A.

    2015-05-01

    The implementation of isotopic tracers as constraints on source contributions has become increasingly relevant to understanding Earth surface processes. Interpretation of these isotopic tracers has become more accessible with the development of Bayesian Monte Carlo (BMC) mixing models, which allow uncertainty in mixing end-members and provide methodology for systems with multicomponent mixing. This study presents an open source multiple isotope BMC mixing model that is applicable to Earth surface environments with sources exhibiting distinct end-member isotopic signatures. Our model is first applied to new δ18O and δD measurements from the Athabasca Glacier, which showed expected seasonal melt evolution trends and vigorously assessed the statistical relevance of the resulting fraction estimations. To highlight the broad applicability of our model to a variety of Earth surface environments and relevant isotopic systems, we expand our model to two additional case studies: deriving melt sources from δ18O, δD, and 222Rn measurements of Greenland Ice Sheet bulk water samples and assessing nutrient sources from ɛNd and 87Sr/86Sr measurements of Hawaiian soil cores. The model produces results for the Greenland Ice Sheet and Hawaiian soil data sets that are consistent with the originally published fractional contribution estimates. The advantage of this method is that it quantifies the error induced by variability in the end-member compositions, unrealized by the models previously applied to the above case studies. Results from all three case studies demonstrate the broad applicability of this statistical BMC isotopic mixing model for estimating source contribution fractions in a variety of Earth surface systems.

  8. Creating high-resolution digital elevation model using thin plate spline interpolation and Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohjola, J.; Turunen, J.; Lipping, T.

    2009-07-01

    In this report creation of the digital elevation model of Olkiluoto area incorporating a large area of seabed is described. The modeled area covers 960 square kilometers and the apparent resolution of the created elevation model was specified to be 2.5 x 2.5 meters. Various elevation data like contour lines and irregular elevation measurements were used as source data in the process. The precision and reliability of the available source data varied largely. Digital elevation model (DEM) comprises a representation of the elevation of the surface of the earth in particular area in digital format. DEM is an essential component of geographic information systems designed for the analysis and visualization of the location-related data. DEM is most often represented either in raster or Triangulated Irregular Network (TIN) format. After testing several methods the thin plate spline interpolation was found to be best suited for the creation of the elevation model. The thin plate spline method gave the smallest error in the test where certain amount of points was removed from the data and the resulting model looked most natural. In addition to the elevation data the confidence interval at each point of the new model was required. The Monte Carlo simulation method was selected for this purpose. The source data points were assigned probability distributions according to what was known about their measurement procedure and from these distributions 1 000 (20 000 in the first version) values were drawn for each data point. Each point of the newly created DEM had thus as many realizations. The resulting high resolution DEM will be used in modeling the effects of land uplift and evolution of the landscape in the time range of 10 000 years from the present. This time range comes from the requirements set for the spent nuclear fuel repository site. (orig.)

  9. Satellite Collision Modeling with Physics-Based Hydrocodes: Debris Generation Predictions of the Iridium-Cosmos Collision Event and Other Impact Events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Springer, H.K.; Miller, W.O.; Levatin, J.L.; Pertica, A.J.; Olivier, S.S.

    2010-01-01

    Satellite collision debris poses risks to existing space assets and future space missions. Predictive models of debris generated from these hypervelocity collisions are critical for developing accurate space situational awareness tools and effective mitigation strategies. Hypervelocity collisions involve complex phenomenon that spans several time- and length-scales. We have developed a satellite collision debris modeling approach consisting of a Lagrangian hydrocode enriched with smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH), advanced material failure models, detailed satellite mesh models, and massively parallel computers. These computational studies enable us to investigate the influence of satellite center-of-mass (CM) overlap and orientation, relative velocity, and material composition on the size, velocity, and material type distributions of collision debris. We have applied our debris modeling capability to the recent Iridium 33-Cosmos 2251 collision event. While the relative velocity was well understood in this event, the degree of satellite CM overlap and orientation was ill-defined. In our simulations, we varied the collision CM overlap and orientation of the satellites from nearly maximum overlap to partial overlap on the outermost extents of the satellites (i.e, solar panels and gravity boom). As expected, we found that with increased satellite overlap, the overall debris cloud mass and momentum (transfer) increases, the average debris size decreases, and the debris velocity increases. The largest predicted debris can also provide insight into which satellite components were further removed from the impact location. A significant fraction of the momentum transfer is imparted to the smallest debris (< 1-5mm, dependent on mesh resolution), especially in large CM overlap simulations. While the inclusion of the smallest debris is critical to enforcing mass and momentum conservation in hydrocode simulations, there seems to be relatively little interest in their

  10. Shell-model Monte Carlo simulations of the BCS-BEC crossover in few-fermion systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas; Mølmer, Klaus; Özen, C.

    2009-01-01

    We study a trapped system of fermions with a zero-range two-body interaction using the shell-model Monte Carlo method, providing ab initio results for the low particle number limit where mean-field theory is not applicable. We present results for the N-body energies as function of interaction...

  11. EURADOS intercomparison on measurements and Monte Carlo modelling for the assessment of Americium in a USTUR leg phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, M. A.; Broggio, D.; Capello, K.; Cardenas-Mendez, E.; El-Faramawy, N.; Franck, D.; James, A. C.; Kramer, G. H.; Lacerenza, G.; Lynch, T. P.; Navarro, J. F.; Navarro, T.; Perez, B.; Ruehm, W.; Tolmachev, S. Y.; Weitzenegger, E.

    2011-01-01

    A collaboration of the EURADOS working group on 'Internal Dosimetry' and the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) has taken place to carry out an intercomparison on measurements and Monte Carlo modelling determining americium deposited in the bone of a USTUR leg phantom. Preliminary results and conclusions of this intercomparison exercise are presented here. (authors)

  12. Monte Carlo simulations with Symanzik's improved actions in the lattice 0(3) non-linear sigma-model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, B.; Montvay, I.; Meyer, S.

    1983-10-01

    The scaling properties of the lattice 0(3) non-linear delta-model are studied. The mass-gap, energy-momentum dispersion, correlation functions are measured by numerical Monte Carlo methods. Symanzik's tree-level and 1-loop improved actions are compared to the standard (nearest neigbour) action. (orig.)

  13. Transfer-Matrix Monte Carlo Estimates of Critical Points in the Simple Cubic Ising, Planar and Heisenberg Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nightingale, M.P.; Blöte, H.W.J.

    1996-01-01

    The principle and the efficiency of the Monte Carlo transfer-matrix algorithm are discussed. Enhancements of this algorithm are illustrated by applications to several phase transitions in lattice spin models. We demonstrate how the statistical noise can be reduced considerably by a similarity

  14. A Monte Carlo study of time-aggregation in continuous-time and discrete-time parametric hazard models.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, ter F.; Wedel, M.

    1998-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of time aggregation in discrete and continuous-time hazard models. A Monte Carlo study is conducted in which data are generated according to various continuous and discrete-time processes, and aggregated into daily, weekly and monthly intervals. These data are

  15. Modeling of the 3RS tau protein with self-consistent field method and Monte Carlo simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leermakers, F.A.M.; Jho, Y.S.; Zhulina, E.B.

    2010-01-01

    Using a model with amino acid resolution of the 196 aa N-terminus of the 3RS tau protein, we performed both a Monte Carlo study and a complementary self-consistent field (SCF) analysis to obtain detailed information on conformational properties of these moieties near a charged plane (mimicking the

  16. Kinetic Monte Carlo modeling of the efficiency roll-off in a multilayer white organic light-emitting device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesta, M.; van Eersel, H.; Coehoorn, R.; Bobbert, P.A.

    2016-01-01

    Triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) and triplet-polaron quenching (TPQ) in organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) lead to a roll-off of the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) with increasing current density J. We employ a kinetic Monte Carlo modeling study to analyze the measured IQE and color balance

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of OLS and linear mixed model inference of phenotypic effects on gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    Self-contained tests estimate and test the association between a phenotype and mean expression level in a gene set defined a priori . Many self-contained gene set analysis methods have been developed but the performance of these methods for phenotypes that are continuous rather than discrete and with multiple nuisance covariates has not been well studied. Here, I use Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the performance of both novel and previously published (and readily available via R) methods for inferring effects of a continuous predictor on mean expression in the presence of nuisance covariates. The motivating data are a high-profile dataset which was used to show opposing effects of hedonic and eudaimonic well-being (or happiness) on the mean expression level of a set of genes that has been correlated with social adversity (the CTRA gene set). The original analysis of these data used a linear model (GLS) of fixed effects with correlated error to infer effects of Hedonia and Eudaimonia on mean CTRA expression. The standardized effects of Hedonia and Eudaimonia on CTRA gene set expression estimated by GLS were compared to estimates using multivariate (OLS) linear models and generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. The OLS estimates were tested using O'Brien's OLS test, Anderson's permutation [Formula: see text]-test, two permutation F -tests (including GlobalAncova), and a rotation z -test (Roast). The GEE estimates were tested using a Wald test with robust standard errors. The performance (Type I, II, S, and M errors) of all tests was investigated using a Monte Carlo simulation of data explicitly modeled on the re-analyzed dataset. GLS estimates are inconsistent between data sets, and, in each dataset, at least one coefficient is large and highly statistically significant. By contrast, effects estimated by OLS or GEE are very small, especially relative to the standard errors. Bootstrap and permutation GLS distributions suggest that the GLS results in

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of OLS and linear mixed model inference of phenotypic effects on gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A. Walker

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Self-contained tests estimate and test the association between a phenotype and mean expression level in a gene set defined a priori. Many self-contained gene set analysis methods have been developed but the performance of these methods for phenotypes that are continuous rather than discrete and with multiple nuisance covariates has not been well studied. Here, I use Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the performance of both novel and previously published (and readily available via R methods for inferring effects of a continuous predictor on mean expression in the presence of nuisance covariates. The motivating data are a high-profile dataset which was used to show opposing effects of hedonic and eudaimonic well-being (or happiness on the mean expression level of a set of genes that has been correlated with social adversity (the CTRA gene set. The original analysis of these data used a linear model (GLS of fixed effects with correlated error to infer effects of Hedonia and Eudaimonia on mean CTRA expression. Methods The standardized effects of Hedonia and Eudaimonia on CTRA gene set expression estimated by GLS were compared to estimates using multivariate (OLS linear models and generalized estimating equation (GEE models. The OLS estimates were tested using O’Brien’s OLS test, Anderson’s permutation ${r}_{F}^{2}$ r F 2 -test, two permutation F-tests (including GlobalAncova, and a rotation z-test (Roast. The GEE estimates were tested using a Wald test with robust standard errors. The performance (Type I, II, S, and M errors of all tests was investigated using a Monte Carlo simulation of data explicitly modeled on the re-analyzed dataset. Results GLS estimates are inconsistent between data sets, and, in each dataset, at least one coefficient is large and highly statistically significant. By contrast, effects estimated by OLS or GEE are very small, especially relative to the standard errors. Bootstrap and permutation GLS

  19. Correlations in simple multi-string models of pp collisions at ISR energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugovoj, V.V.; Chudakov, V.M.

    1989-01-01

    Simple statistical simulation algorithms are suggested for formation and breaking of a few quark-gluon strings in inelastic pp collisions. Theoretical multiplicity distributions, semi-inclusive quasirapidity spectra, forward-backward correlations of charged secondaries and seagull effect agree well with the experimental data at ISR energies. In the framework of the model, the semi-inclusive two-particle correlations of quasirapidities depend upon the fraction of the spherical chains. The seagull effect is qualitatively interpretated

  20. Simple quantal model for collision-induced dissociation: An Airy basis calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, P.M.; Sridharan, S.

    1982-01-01

    New matrix elements for the Airy continuum basis are employed to find quantum mechanical dissociation probabilities for the the forced Morse oscillator. The calculations performed illustrate the ease with which the continuously infinite Airy basis can be manipulated, and they illustrate the transition from vibrational enhancement to vibrational inhibition of diatomic breakup. The forced Morse oscillator model thus reproduces the behavior of more complicated collinear collision-induced dissociation systems

  1. Simple kinetic theory model of reactive collisions. IV. Laboratory fixed orientational cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, G.T.

    1987-01-01

    The differential orientational cross section, obtainable from molecular beam experiments on aligned molecules, is calculated using the line-of-normals model for reactive collisions involving hard convex bodies. By means of kinetic theory methods, the dependence of the cross section on the angle of attack γ 0 is expressed in a Legendre function expansion. Each of the Legendre expansion coefficients is given by an integral over the molecule-fixed cross section and functions of the orientation dependent threshold energy

  2. Macroscopic damping model for zero degree energy distribution in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Chongshou; Wang Chengshing

    1993-01-01

    A macroscopic damping model is proposed to calculate the zero degree energy distribution in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. The main features of the measured distributions are reproduced, good agreement is obtained in the middle energy region while overestimation results on the high energy side. The average energy loss coefficient of incident nucleons, varying in the reasonable region 0.2-0.6, depends on beam energy and target size

  3. Multiresolution Modeling of Semidilute Polymer Solutions: Coarse-Graining Using Wavelet-Accelerated Monte Carlo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Agarwal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a hierarchical coarse-graining framework for modeling semidilute polymer solutions, based on the wavelet-accelerated Monte Carlo (WAMC method. This framework forms a hierarchy of resolutions to model polymers at length scales that cannot be reached via atomistic or even standard coarse-grained simulations. Previously, it was applied to simulations examining the structure of individual polymer chains in solution using up to four levels of coarse-graining (Ismail et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2005, 122, 234901 and Ismail et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2005, 122, 234902, recovering the correct scaling behavior in the coarse-grained representation. In the present work, we extend this method to the study of polymer solutions, deriving the bonded and non-bonded potentials between coarse-grained superatoms from the single chain statistics. A universal scaling function is obtained, which does not require recalculation of the potentials as the scale of the system is changed. To model semi-dilute polymer solutions, we assume the intermolecular potential between the coarse-grained beads to be equal to the non-bonded potential, which is a reasonable approximation in the case of semidilute systems. Thus, a minimal input of microscopic data is required for simulating the systems at the mesoscopic scale. We show that coarse-grained polymer solutions can reproduce results obtained from the more detailed atomistic system without a significant loss of accuracy.

  4. Study on quantification method based on Monte Carlo sampling for multiunit probabilistic safety assessment models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Kye Min [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sang Hoon; Park, Jin Hee; Lim, Ho Gon; Yang, Joon Yang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Gyun Young [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In Korea, many nuclear power plants operate at a single site based on geographical characteristics, but the population density near the sites is higher than that in other countries. Thus, multiunit accidents are a more important consideration than in other countries and should be addressed appropriately. Currently, there are many issues related to a multiunit probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). One of them is the quantification of a multiunit PSA model. A traditional PSA uses a Boolean manipulation of the fault tree in terms of the minimal cut set. However, such methods have some limitations when rare event approximations cannot be used effectively or a very small truncation limit should be applied to identify accident sequence combinations for a multiunit site. In particular, it is well known that seismic risk in terms of core damage frequency can be overestimated because there are many events that have a high failure probability. In this study, we propose a quantification method based on a Monte Carlo approach for a multiunit PSA model. This method can consider all possible accident sequence combinations in a multiunit site and calculate a more exact value for events that have a high failure probability. An example model for six identical units at a site was also developed and quantified to confirm the applicability of the proposed method.

  5. Mathematical modeling, analysis and Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation of Ebola epidemics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulu, Thomas Wetere; Tian, Boping; Wu, Zunyou

    Ebola virus infection is a severe infectious disease with the highest case fatality rate which become the global public health treat now. What makes the disease the worst of all is no specific effective treatment available, its dynamics is not much researched and understood. In this article a new mathematical model incorporating both vaccination and quarantine to study the dynamics of Ebola epidemic has been developed and comprehensively analyzed. The existence as well as uniqueness of the solution to the model is also verified and the basic reproduction number is calculated. Besides, stability conditions are also checked and finally simulation is done using both Euler method and one of the top ten most influential algorithm known as Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. Different rates of vaccination to predict the effect of vaccination on the infected individual over time and that of quarantine are discussed. The results show that quarantine and vaccination are very effective ways to control Ebola epidemic. From our study it was also seen that there is less possibility of an individual for getting Ebola virus for the second time if they survived his/her first infection. Last but not least real data has been fitted to the model, showing that it can used to predict the dynamic of Ebola epidemic.

  6. Modeling Monte Carlo of multileaf collimators using the code GEANT4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Alex C.H.; Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: oliveira.ach@yahoo.com, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Luciano S.; Vieira, Jose W., E-mail: lusoulima@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Radiotherapy uses various techniques and equipment for local treatment of cancer. The equipment most often used in radiotherapy to the patient irradiation is linear accelerator (Linac). Among the many algorithms developed for evaluation of dose distributions in radiotherapy planning, the algorithms based on Monte Carlo (MC) methods have proven to be very promising in terms of accuracy by providing more realistic results. The MC simulations for applications in radiotherapy are divided into two parts. In the first, the simulation of the production of the radiation beam by the Linac is performed and then the phase space is generated. The phase space contains information such as energy, position, direction, etc. of millions of particles (photons, electrons, positrons). In the second part the simulation of the transport of particles (sampled phase space) in certain configurations of irradiation field is performed to assess the dose distribution in the patient (or phantom). Accurate modeling of the Linac head is of particular interest in the calculation of dose distributions for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), where complex intensity distributions are delivered using a multileaf collimator (MLC). The objective of this work is to describe a methodology for modeling MC of MLCs using code Geant4. To exemplify this methodology, the Varian Millennium 120-leaf MLC was modeled, whose physical description is available in BEAMnrc Users Manual (20 11). The dosimetric characteristics (i.e., penumbra, leakage, and tongue-and-groove effect) of this MLC were evaluated. The results agreed with data published in the literature concerning the same MLC. (author)

  7. Monte Carlo Uncertainty Quantification Using Quasi-1D SRM Ballistic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Viganò

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Compactness, reliability, readiness, and construction simplicity of solid rocket motors make them very appealing for commercial launcher missions and embarked systems. Solid propulsion grants high thrust-to-weight ratio, high volumetric specific impulse, and a Technology Readiness Level of 9. However, solid rocket systems are missing any throttling capability at run-time, since pressure-time evolution is defined at the design phase. This lack of mission flexibility makes their missions sensitive to deviations of performance from nominal behavior. For this reason, the reliability of predictions and reproducibility of performances represent a primary goal in this field. This paper presents an analysis of SRM performance uncertainties throughout the implementation of a quasi-1D numerical model of motor internal ballistics based on Shapiro’s equations. The code is coupled with a Monte Carlo algorithm to evaluate statistics and propagation of some peculiar uncertainties from design data to rocker performance parameters. The model has been set for the reproduction of a small-scale rocket motor, discussing a set of parametric investigations on uncertainty propagation across the ballistic model.

  8. Benchmarking the MCNP code for Monte Carlo modelling of an in vivo neutron activation analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natto, S A; Lewis, D G; Ryde, S J

    1998-01-01

    The Monte Carlo computer code MCNP (version 4A) has been used to develop a personal computer-based model of the Swansea in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) system. The model included specification of the neutron source (252Cf), collimators, reflectors and shielding. The MCNP model was 'benchmarked' against fast neutron and thermal neutron fluence data obtained experimentally from the IVNAA system. The Swansea system allows two irradiation geometries using 'short' and 'long' collimators, which provide alternative dose rates for IVNAA. The data presented here relate to the short collimator, although results of similar accuracy were obtained using the long collimator. The fast neutron fluence was measured in air at a series of depths inside the collimator. The measurements agreed with the MCNP simulation within the statistical uncertainty (5-10%) of the calculations. The thermal neutron fluence was measured and calculated inside the cuboidal water phantom. The depth of maximum thermal fluence was 3.2 cm (measured) and 3.0 cm (calculated). The width of the 50% thermal fluence level across the phantom at its mid-depth was found to be the same by both MCNP and experiment. This benchmarking exercise has given us a high degree of confidence in MCNP as a tool for the design of IVNAA systems.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of atomic short range order and cluster formation in two dimensional model alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas T, J.; Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Lima; Manrique C, E.; Torres T, E.

    2002-01-01

    Using monte Carlo simulation have been carried out an atomistic description of the structure and ordering processes in the system Cu-Au in a two-dimensional model. The ABV model of the alloy is a system of N atoms A and B, located in rigid lattice with some vacant sites. In the model we assume pair wise interactions between nearest neighbors with constant ordering energy J = 0,03 eV. The dynamics was introduced by means of a vacancy that exchanges of place with any atom of its neighbors. The simulations were carried out in a square lattice with 1024 and 4096 particles, using periodic boundary conditions to avoid border effects. We calculate the first two parameters of short range order of Warren-Cowley as function of the concentration and temperature. It was also studied the probabilities of formation of different atomic clusters that consist of 9 atoms as function of the concentration of the alloy and temperatures in a wide range of values. In some regions of temperature and concentration it was observed compositional and thermal polymorphism

  10. A Monte Carlo approach to constraining uncertainties in modelled downhole gravity gradiometry applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Samuel J.; O'Neill, Craig; Lackie, Mark A.

    2017-06-01

    Gravity gradiometry has a long legacy, with airborne/marine applications as well as surface applications receiving renewed recent interest. Recent instrumental advances has led to the emergence of downhole gravity gradiometry applications that have the potential for greater resolving power than borehole gravity alone. This has promise in both the petroleum and geosequestration industries; however, the effect of inherent uncertainties in the ability of downhole gravity gradiometry to resolve a subsurface signal is unknown. Here, we utilise the open source modelling package, Fatiando a Terra, to model both the gravity and gravity gradiometry responses of a subsurface body. We use a Monte Carlo approach to vary the geological structure and reference densities of the model within preset distributions. We then perform 100 000 simulations to constrain the mean response of the buried body as well as uncertainties in these results. We varied our modelled borehole to be either centred on the anomaly, adjacent to the anomaly (in the x-direction), and 2500 m distant to the anomaly (also in the x-direction). We demonstrate that gravity gradiometry is able to resolve a reservoir-scale modelled subsurface density variation up to 2500 m away, and that certain gravity gradient components (Gzz, Gxz, and Gxx) are particularly sensitive to this variation in gravity/gradiometry above the level of uncertainty in the model. The responses provided by downhole gravity gradiometry modelling clearly demonstrate a technique that can be utilised in determining a buried density contrast, which will be of particular use in the emerging industry of CO2 geosequestration. The results also provide a strong benchmark for the development of newly emerging prototype downhole gravity gradiometers.

  11. Galilean invariance in the exponential model of atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    del Pozo, A.; Riera, A.; Yaez, M.

    1986-01-01

    Using the X/sup n/ + (1s 2 )+He/sup 2+/ colliding systems as specific examples, we study the origin dependence of results in the application of the two-state exponential model, and we show the relevance of polarization effects in that study. Our analysis shows that polarization effects of the He + (1s) orbital due to interaction with X/sup (//sup n//sup +1)+/ ion in the exit channel yield a very small contribution to the energy difference and render the dynamical coupling so strongly origin dependent that it invalidates the basic premises of the model. Further study, incorporating translation factors in the formalism, is needed

  12. Exclusive observables from a statistical simulation of energetic nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fai, G.

    1983-01-01

    Exclusive observables are calculated in the framework of a statistical model for medium-energy nuclear collisions. The collision system is divided into a few (participant/spectator) sources, that are assumed to disassemble independently. Sufficiently excited sources explode into pions, nucleons, and composite, possibly particle unstable, nuclei. The different final states compete according to their microcanonical weight. Less excited sources, and the unstable explosion products, deexcite via light-particle evaporation. The model has been implemented as a Monte Carlo computer code that is sufficiently efficient to permit generation of large event samples. Some illustrative applications are discussed. (author)

  13. A kinetic model of droplet heating and evaporation: Effects of inelastic collisions and a non-unity evaporation coefficient

    KAUST Repository

    Sazhin, Sergei S.; Xie, Jianfei; Shishkova, Irina N.; Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid; Heikal, Morgan Raymond

    2013-01-01

    The previously developed kinetic model for droplet heating and evaporation into a high pressure air is generalised to take into account the combined effects of inelastic collisions between molecules in the kinetic region, a non-unity evaporation

  14. Propagation of uncertainty in nasal spray in vitro performance models using Monte Carlo simulation: Part II. Error propagation during product performance modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Changning; Doub, William H; Kauffman, John F

    2010-08-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were applied to investigate the propagation of uncertainty in both input variables and response measurements on model prediction for nasal spray product performance design of experiment (DOE) models in the first part of this study, with an initial assumption that the models perfectly represent the relationship between input variables and the measured responses. In this article, we discard the initial assumption, and extended the Monte Carlo simulation study to examine the influence of both input variable variation and product performance measurement variation on the uncertainty in DOE model coefficients. The Monte Carlo simulations presented in this article illustrate the importance of careful error propagation during product performance modeling. Our results show that the error estimates based on Monte Carlo simulation result in smaller model coefficient standard deviations than those from regression methods. This suggests that the estimated standard deviations from regression may overestimate the uncertainties in the model coefficients. Monte Carlo simulations provide a simple software solution to understand the propagation of uncertainty in complex DOE models so that design space can be specified with statistically meaningful confidence levels. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  15. Large Eddy Simulation of Wall-Bounded Turbulent Flows with the Lattice Boltzmann Method: Effect of Collision Model, SGS Model and Grid Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Aniruddhe; Akhavan, Rayhaneh

    2017-11-01

    Effect of collision model, subgrid-scale model and grid resolution in Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of wall-bounded turbulent flows with the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) is investigated in turbulent channel flow. The Single Relaxation Time (SRT) collision model is found to be more accurate than Multi-Relaxation Time (MRT) collision model in well-resolved LES. Accurate LES requires grid resolutions of Δ+ LBM requires either grid-embedding in the near-wall region, with grid resolutions comparable to DNS, or a wall model. Results of LES with grid-embedding and wall models will be discussed.

  16. Monte Carlo modeling of small photon fields: Quantifying the impact of focal spot size on source occlusion and output factors, and exploring miniphantom design for small-field measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Alison J. D.; Nahum, Alan E.; Fenwick, John D.

    2009-01-01

    The accuracy with which Monte Carlo models of photon beams generated by linear accelerators (linacs) can describe small-field dose distributions depends on the modeled width of the electron beam profile incident on the linac target. It is known that the electron focal spot width affects penumbra and cross-field profiles; here, the authors explore the extent to which source occlusion reduces linac output for smaller fields and larger spot sizes. A BEAMnrc Monte Carlo linac model has been used to investigate the variation in penumbra widths and small-field output factors with electron spot size. A formalism is developed separating head scatter factors into source occlusion and flattening filter factors. Differences between head scatter factors defined in terms of in-air energy fluence, collision kerma, and terma are explored using Monte Carlo calculations. Estimates of changes in kerma-based source occlusion and flattening filter factors with field size and focal spot width are obtained by calculating doses deposited in a narrow 2 mm wide virtual ''milliphantom'' geometry. The impact of focal spot size on phantom scatter is also explored. Modeled electron spot sizes of 0.4-0.7 mm FWHM generate acceptable matches to measured penumbra widths. However the 0.5 cm field output factor is quite sensitive to electron spot width, the measured output only being matched by calculations for a 0.7 mm spot width. Because the spectra of the unscattered primary (Ψ Π ) and head-scattered (Ψ Σ ) photon energy fluences differ, miniphantom-based collision kerma measurements do not scale precisely with total in-air energy fluence Ψ=(Ψ Π +Ψ Σ ) but with (Ψ Π +1.2Ψ Σ ). For most field sizes, on-axis collision kerma is independent of the focal spot size; but for a 0.5 cm field size and 1.0 mm spot width, it is reduced by around 7% mostly due to source occlusion. The phantom scatter factor of the 0.5 cm field also shows some spot size dependence, decreasing by 6% (relative) as

  17. Monte Carlo modeling of Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor in adiabatic equilibrium state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanisz, Przemysław, E-mail: pstanisz@agh.edu.pl; Oettingen, Mikołaj, E-mail: moettin@agh.edu.pl; Cetnar, Jerzy, E-mail: cetnar@mail.ftj.agh.edu.pl

    2016-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We present the Monte Carlo modeling of the LFR in the adiabatic equilibrium state. • We assess the adiabatic equilibrium fuel composition using the MCB code. • We define the self-adjusting process of breeding gain by the control rod operation. • The designed LFR can work in the adiabatic cycle with zero fuel breeding. - Abstract: Nuclear power would appear to be the only energy source able to satisfy the global energy demand while also achieving a significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Moreover, it can provide a stable and secure source of electricity, and plays an important role in many European countries. However, nuclear power generation from its birth has been doomed by the legacy of radioactive nuclear waste. In addition, the looming decrease in the available resources of fissile U235 may influence the future sustainability of nuclear energy. The integrated solution to both problems is not trivial, and postulates the introduction of a closed-fuel cycle strategy based on breeder reactors. The perfect choice of a novel reactor system fulfilling both requirements is the Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor operating in the adiabatic equilibrium state. In such a state, the reactor converts depleted or natural uranium into plutonium while consuming any self-generated minor actinides and transferring only fission products as waste. We present the preliminary design of a Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor operating in the adiabatic equilibrium state with the Monte Carlo Continuous Energy Burnup Code – MCB. As a reference reactor model we apply the core design developed initially under the framework of the European Lead-cooled SYstem (ELSY) project and refined in the follow-up Lead-cooled European Advanced DEmonstration Reactor (LEADER) project. The major objective of the study is to show to what extent the constraints of the adiabatic cycle are maintained and to indicate the phase space for further improvements. The analysis

  18. Monte Carlo modelling of damage to haemopoietic stem cells from internally deposited alpha-emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utteridge, T.D.; University of South Australia, Pooraka, SA; Charlton, D.E.; Turner, M.S.; Beddoe, A.H.; Leong, A. S-Y.; Milios, J.; Fazzalari, N.; To, L.B.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Monte Carlo modelling of alpha particle radiation dose to haemopoietic stem cells from radon decay in human marrow fat cells was undertaken following Richardson et al's (Brit J Radiol, 64, 608-624, 1991) proposition that such exposure could induce leukaemia, and epidemiological observations that uranium miners have not developed an excess of leukaemia (Tomasek L. et al, Lancet, 341, 919-923, 1993). The dose to haemopoietic stem cells from alpha emitting radiopharmaceuticals proposed for radiotherapy is also important in risk assessment. Haemopoietic stem cells (presumed to be the targets for leukaemia) were identified as CD34+CD38- mononuclear cells (Terstappen LWMM et al, Blood, 77, 1218-1227, 1991) and their diameters measured using image analysis. The distribution of stem cell distances from fat cells was also measured. The model was used with Monte Carlo treatment of the alpha particle flux from radon and its short lived decay products to estimate (a) the dose and LET distributions for the three stem cell diameters; (b) the number of passages per hit; and (c) stem cell survival. The stem cell population exhibited a trimodal distribution, with mean diameters of 5.7, 11.6 and 14.8 μm; a trimodal distribution has previously been identified in mice (Visser J et al, Exper Hematol Today, 21-27, 1977). At 40% fat in a human lumbar vertebra 3 section, approximately half the stem cells were located on, or very close to the edge, of fat cells in marrow sections. This agrees with the predicted distribution of distances between fat and stem cells obtained using a 3-D model with randomly distributed stem cells. At an air activity of 20 Bq m -3 (ie the UK average indoor radon concentration used by Richardson et al mentioned above) about 0.1 stem cells per person-year were hit and survived; at 100 Bq m -3 about 1 stem cell per person-year was hit and survived. Across the range of radon concentrations encountered in residential and underground miner exposures

  19. A Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Model Of Thermal Escape From Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert E.; Tucker, O. J.

    2008-09-01

    Recent analysis of density profiles vs. altitude from the Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) on Cassini (Waite et al. 2005) suggest Titan could have loss a significant amount of atmosphere in 4 Gyr at present escape rates (e.g., Johnson 2008). Strobel 2008 applied a slow hydrodynamic escape model to Titan's atmosphere using solar heating below the exobase to drive upward thermal conduction and power escape. However, near the exobase continuum models become problematic as a result of the increasing rarefaction in the atmosphere. The microscopic nature of DSMC is directly suitable to model atmosphere flow in nominal exobase region (e.g., Michael et. al. 2005). Our Preliminary DSMC models have shown no evidence for slow hydrodynamic escape of N2 and CH4 from Titan's atmosphere using boundary conditions normalized to the atmospheric properties in Strobel (2008). In this paper we use a 1D radial Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) model of heating in Titan's upper atmosphere to estimate the escape rate as a function of the Jean's parameter. In this way we can test under what conditions the suggested deviations from Jeans escape would occur. In addition, we will be able to extract the necessary energy deposition to power the heavy molecule loss rates suggested in recent models (Strobel 2008; Yelle et. al. 2008). Michael, M. Johnson, R.E. 2005 Energy Deposition of pickup ions and heating of Titan's atmosphere. Planat. Sp. Sci. 53, 1510-1514 Johnson, R.E., "Sputtering and Heating of Titan's Upper Atmosphere", Proc Royal Soc. (London) (2008) Strobel, D.F. 2008 Titan's hydrodynamically escaping atmosphere. Icarus 193, 588-594 Yelle, R.V., J. Cui and I. C.F. Muller-Wodarg 2008 Methane Escape from Titan's Atmosphere. J. Geophys. Res in press Waite, J.H., Jr., Niemann, H.B., Yelle, R.V. et al. 2005 Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer Results from the First Flyby of Titan. Science 308, 982-986

  20. Restricted primitive model for electrical double layers: modified HNC theory of density profiles and Monte Carlo study of differential capacitance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballone, P.; Pastore, G.; Tosi, M.P.

    1986-02-01

    Interfacial properties of an ionic fluid next to a uniformly charged planar wall are studied in the restricted primitive model by both theoretical and Monte Carlo methods. The system is a 1:1 fluid of equisized charged hard spheres in a state appropriate to 1M aqueous electrolyte solutions. The interfacial density profiles of counterions and coions are evaluated by extending the hypernetted chain approximation (HNC) to include the leading bridge diagrams for the wall-ion correlations. The theoretical results compare well with those of grand canonical Monte Carlo computations of Torrie and Valleau over the whole range of surface charge density considered by these authors, thus resolving the earlier disagreement between statistical mechanical theories and simulation data at large charge densities. In view of the importance of the model as a testing ground for theories of the diffuse layer, the Monte Carlo calculations are tested by considering alternative choices for the basic simulation cell and are extended so as to allow an evaluation of the differential capacitance of the model interface by two independent methods. These involve numerical differentiation of the mean potential drop as a function of the surface charge density or alternatively an appropriate use of a fluctuation theory formula for the capacitance. The results of these two Monte Carlo approaches consistently indicate an initially smooth increase of the diffuse layer capacitance followed by structure at large charge densities, this behaviour being connected with layering of counterions as already revealed in the density profiles reported by Torrie and Valleau. (author)