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Sample records for caries-affected primary tooth

  1. Micro-tensile bond strength of sound and caries-affected primary tooth dentin measured with original designed jig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Yumiko; Kawada, Eiji; Ushigome, Toshiaki; Oda, Yutaka; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin

    2006-05-01

    To measure the micro-tensile bond strength (MTBS) on sound and caries-affected primary tooth dentin using an original designed jig that was developed for making symmetric and uniformly-sized specimens for the micro-tensile strength testing. The MTBS of dumbbell-shaped specimens and matchstick-shaped specimens were measured. Dumbbell-shaped specimens: The occlusal surfaces of 15 sound primary molars were ground with a water-cooled air turbine using a diamond bur. The adhesive systems and resin-based composites were Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil AP-X (SE group) and Single Bond and Z250 (SB group). Matchstick-shaped specimens: Sixteen primary molars (5 sound and 11 carious) were used. The occlusal surfaces of sound teeth were ground with a water-cooled air turbine using a diamond bur. Infected dentin was determined by a caries detecting dye solution and removed with a round-shaped steel bur under water-cooling and with a hand instrument. SE was applied. Data was statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD at p < 0.05. The MTBSs (MPa) for the dumbbell-shaped specimens were 8.9 +/- 7.0 in the SE group and 10.3 +/- 5.8 in the SB group and that for the matchstick-shaped specimens were 9.0 +/- 6.3 in the sound-SE group and 9.2 +/- 5.8 in the carious-SE group. No significant difference was observed among them. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Physico-mechanical properties determination using microscale homotopic measurements: Application to sound and caries-affected primary tooth dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangos, Orestes; Misra, Anil; Spencer, Paulette; Bohaty, Brenda; Katz, J. Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    Microscale elastic moduli, composition and density have rarely been determined at the same location for biological materials. In this paper, we have performed homotopic measurements to determine the physico-mechanical properties of a second primary molar specimen exhibiting sound and caries-affected regions. A microscale acoustic impedance map of a section through this sample was acquired using scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM). Scanning electron microscopy was then used to obtain mineral mass fraction of the same section using backscattered images. Careful calibration of each method was performed to reduce system effects and obtain accurate data. Resorption, demineralization and hypermineralization mechanisms were considered in order to derive relationships between measured mineral mass fraction and material mass density. As a result, microscale mass density was determined at the same lateral resolution and location as the SAM data. The mass density and the acoustic impedance were combined to find the microscale elastic modulus and study the relationship between microscale composition and mechanical properties. PMID:19059013

  3. Hardness and elasticity of caries-affected and sound primary tooth dentin bonded with 4-META one-step self-etch adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Yumiko; Tay, Franklin R.; Miyakoshi, Shoichi; Pashley, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the quality of the interface of sound and carious primary tooth dentin bonded with two 4-META one-step self-etch adhesives. Methods Twelve sound and twelve carious primary molars were bonded with AQ Bond Plus (AQBP; Sun Medical) or Hybrid Bond (HB; Sun Medical) and restored with Clearfil Protect Liner F (Kuraray Medical Inc.). After 24 hours of water immersion, the teeth were sectioned and polished. Resin-dentin interfaces were measured with a nano-indentation tester and hardness and Young’s modulus were calculated. Data were analyzed using one-way or two-ways ANOVA and Fisher’s PLSD test with α=0.05. Resin-dentin interfaces were also observed with SEM and TEM. Ammoniacal silver nitrate was used as a tracer for TEM observation. Results Hardness and Young’s modulus of the interfacial dentin were significantly lower than the underlying intact dentin except for the carious-AQBP group. However, there was no significant difference of hardness and Young's moduli of the interfacial dentin among all groups. TEM revealed extensive interfacial nanoleakage in sound dentin bonded with either AQBP or HB. For the carious teeth, nanoleakage was absent in the hybrid layers bonded with the two adhesives. However, extensive silver deposits were identified from the subsurface, porous caries-affected dentin. PMID:18795517

  4. Effect of caries removal techniques on the bond strength of adhesives to caries-affected primary dentin in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, E; Sirinkaraarslan, E; Yegin, Z; Cebe, M A; Tosun, G

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this in vitro study is to evaluate the effects of three different caries removal techniques on the microtensile bond strength of adhesive materials to caries-affected dentin. Thirty primary molar teeth were used. The teeth were randomly divided into three groups according to the caries removal technique employed: conventional steel bur (group 1); Er:YAG laser (group 2); chemomechanical method (group 3). Each group was divided into two subgroups according to bonding agents: one-step self-etch adhesive and etch-and-rinse adhesive. The teeth were restored with composite resin. Vertical sticks were obtained and subjected to tensile stress. Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey's test and an independent samples t-test. The values for the laser groups were significantly lower than those of the bur groups for both bonding agents (p 0.05). Bur and chemomechanical techniques in primary teeth were found more successful. Similar results were found according to the adhesives used for each caries removal techniques.

  5. Supplemental tooth in primary dentition

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan, Ravi Prakash Sasankoti; Verma, Sankalp; Singh, Udita; Agarwal, Neha

    2014-01-01

    An extra tooth causing numerical excess in dentition is described as supernumerary tooth, and the resultant condition is termed as hyperdontia. Hyperdontia is more commonly seen in the permanent dentition than primary one. Supernumerary tooth which resembles tooth shape and supplements for occlusion is called as supplemental tooth. We present a case with supplemental tooth in primary dentition.

  6. Supplemental tooth in primary dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Ravi Prakash Sasankoti; Verma, Sankalp; Singh, Udita; Agarwal, Neha

    2014-06-09

    An extra tooth causing numerical excess in dentition is described as supernumerary tooth, and the resultant condition is termed as hyperdontia. Hyperdontia is more commonly seen in the permanent dentition than primary one. Supernumerary tooth which resembles tooth shape and supplements for occlusion is called as supplemental tooth. We present a case with supplemental tooth in primary dentition. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  7. Primary culprit for tooth loss!!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuvvula, Sailavanya; Chava, Vijay Kumar; Nuvvula, Sivakumar

    2016-01-01

    In order to facilitate planning for dental health services and to progress strategies to continue the reduction in tooth loss, it is important to identify the factors that result in such loss. therefore the aim of the study is to investigate the major cause for tooth extraction. to examine whether the major reason for tooth extraction is dental caries or periodontal disease. The study is carried out among the dental practitioners in our district. A questionnaire containing 10 items was distributed to the dental practitioners, which included age, gender, no of teeth indicated for extraction, the reason for extraction, and the periodontal parameters that are involved with the extracted tooth and were requested to complete the form on every extraction they were to undertake. the study form was collected at the end of the study period and data was subjected to statistical analysis. A total of 502 patients were enrolled during the study period, and a total of 1055 teeth were extracted for several reasons. we found that 51.14%extractions are due to dental caries in case of 20-30years age groups, which is more when compared to tooth loss due to periodontal diseases in this age group. whereas in case of >40years of age group periodontal diseases account for 54.11%, and dental caries accounts for only 29.11%. Showing more teeth were lost due to periodontal disease. therefore we concluded that, caries is the dominant reason for extraction in patients with 20-30 years of age while periodontal disease accounts for the majority of tooth extraction in patients older than 40 years.

  8. Salivary Microbiome Diversity in Caries-Free and Caries-Affected Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shan; Gao, Xiaoli; Jin, Lijian; Lo, Edward C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries (tooth decay) is an infectious disease. Its etiology is not fully understood from the microbiological perspective. This study characterizes the diversity of microbial flora in the saliva of children with and without dental caries. Children (3–4 years old) with caries (n = 20) and without caries (n = 20) were recruited. Unstimulated saliva (2 mL) was collected from each child and the total microbial genomic DNA was extracted. DNA amplicons of the V3-V4 hypervariable region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene were generated and subjected to Illumina Miseq sequencing. A total of 17 phyla, 26 classes, 40 orders, 80 families, 151 genera, and 310 bacterial species were represented in the saliva samples. There was no significant difference in the microbiome diversity between caries-affected and caries-free children (p > 0.05). The relative abundance of several species (Rothia dentocariosa, Actinomyces graevenitzii, Veillonella sp. oral taxon 780, Prevotella salivae, and Streptococcus mutans) was higher in the caries-affected group than in the caries-free group (p caries-free children than in caries-affected children (p caries-free and caries-affected children were similar. Salivary counts of certain bacteria such as R. dentocariosa and F. periodonticum may be useful for screening/assessing children’s risk of developing caries. PMID:27898021

  9. Microtensile Bond Strength of Three Simplified Adhesive Systems to Caries-affected Dentin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, Johannes; Purwanta, Kenny; Dogan, Nilgun; Kleverlaan, Cees J.; Feilzer, Albert J.

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine the microtensile bond strength of three different simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin. Materials and Methods: Fifteen extracted human molars with primary carious lesions were ground flat until dentin was exposed. Soft

  10. Microtensile bond strength of three simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.; Purwanta, K.; Dogan, N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine the microtensile bond strength of three different simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin. Materials and Methods: Fifteen extracted human molars with primary carious lesions were ground flat until dentin was exposed. Soft

  11. A report of an impacted primary maxillary central incisor tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthonappa, Robert P; Ongtengco, Kristine L; King, Nigel M

    2013-10-01

    Primary tooth impaction is a rare phenomenon when compared to permanent teeth impaction. The purpose of this report is to present a 5-year-old Chinese girl who exhibited impaction of tooth 51, its unusual consequence on the permanent successor tooth and its comprehensive management. Her parents revealed that at 6 months of age, the patient had fallen from her bed and struck her face on the floor; however, there were no teeth present in the oral cavity. The intraoral examinations identified a bony-like projection on the buccal aspect of the alveolus in the 51 region. Radiographic examination revealed that tooth 51 exhibited an unfavourable orientation, with the crown directed towards the palate. Therefore, the impacted tooth 51 was surgically removed, and two years later tooth 11 erupted into the oral cavity with an indentation on its incisal aspect, which resembled the crown of the primary teeth, thus giving the appearance of a tooth within a tooth or 'dens in dente'. Subsequently, enameloplasty and composite resin build-up was performed on tooth 11 for aesthetic reasons. It is very unusual to have the clinical crowns of both primary and permanent teeth in such close proximity within the alveolar bone, and the present case is a good example to emphasize that trauma to the primary teeth is of considerable importance due to the close proximity of the primary teeth to permanent tooth germs. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Microleakage in different primary tooth restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Wen-Yu

    2016-04-01

    Microleakage may cause tooth sensitivity, secondary caries, discoloration and even failure of the restoration. In order to overcome these potential problems, materials that are able to bind to the tooth structure have been developed, such as composite resin and glass ionomer cement. The purpose of the study was to compare microleakage arising from amalgam (Am), composite resin (CR), glass ionomer (GI), Ketac-Silver (KS), and GI filling with banding (GI+B) when these materials are used for class II restoration of a primary molar. Fifty primary molars were collected and class II cavities were prepared on each tooth. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups (Am, CR, GI, KS, and GI+B), each of which received a different material as part of the restoration. The restored teeth then underwent 100 cycles of thermocycling that consisted of 55°C for 30 seconds, 19°C for 20 seconds, and 5°C for 30 seconds. The teeth were then immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin solution for 24 hours. Afterwards, the teeth were embedded and sectioned mesiodistally through the center of each restoration. Dye penetration associated with the occlusal and cervical margins of each restoration was then assessed. Cervical leakage was greater than occlusal leakage in the CR, GI and KS groups (p < 0.05). When leakage on occlusal margin was examined, however, the Am group showed greater leakage than the CR, GI, and GI+B groups (p < 0.05). When leakage on the cervical margin was examined, the Am group showed greater leakage than the GI and GI+B groups, while the KS group showed greater leakage than the GI+B group (p < 0.05). Restorations using GI and GI+B indicated that these materials performed better than the other materials in this study overall. However, none of the materials were entirely devoid of leakage. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  13. Effects of Er:YAG laser on bond strength of self-etching adhesives to caries-affected dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuturk, Alp Erdin; Ozmen, Bilal; Cortcu, Murat; Tokay, Ugur; Tosun, Gul; Erhan Sari, Mustafa

    2014-04-01

    The erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser may be effective the bond strength of adhesive systems on dentine surfaces, the chemical composition and aggressiveness of adhesive systems in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the Er:YAG laser system with the bonding ability of two different self-etching adhesives to caries-affected dentine in primary molars. Ninety mid-coronal flat dentine surfaces obtained from sound and caries-affected human primary dentine were treated with an Er:YAG laser or a bur. The prepared surfaces were restored with an adhesive system (Xeno V; Clearfil S³) and a compomer (Dyract Extra). The restored teeth were sectioned with a low-speed saw and 162 samples were obtained. The bond strength of the adhesive systems was tested using the micro-tensile test method. The data were statistically analyzed. A restored tooth in each group was processed for scanning electron microscopy evaluation. The values of the highest bond strength were obtained from the Clearfil S³-Er:YAG laser-sound dentine group in all groups. (24.57 ± 7.27 MPa) (P > 0.05). The values of the lowest bond strength were obtained from the Xeno V-Er:YAG laser-sound dentine group in all groups (11.01 ± 3.89 MPa). It was determined that the Clearfil S³ increased the bond strength on the surface applied with Er:YAG laser according to the Xeno V. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Impacted Primary Tooth and Tooth Agenesis: A Case Report of Monozygotic Twins

    OpenAIRE

    Zengin, A. Zeynep; Sumer, A. Pinar; Karaarslan, Emine

    2008-01-01

    In the present report, a case of 19 year-old monozygotic twin brothers with similar tooth agenesis and impacted primary teeth is presented. Both twins (HDH, DHH) had agenesis of ten and eleven teeth (respectively), third molars excluded, consistent with oligodontia and both had four impacted primary teeth and the permanent successors of all these primary teeth were congenitally missing. The occurrence of similarly located tooth agenesis and primary impacted teeth in monozygotic twins may sugg...

  15. Management of premature primary tooth loss in the child patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Clarice S

    2013-08-01

    Premature loss of primary teeth can result in a loss of arch length and have a negative effect on occlusion and alignment, often increasing the need for orthodontic treatment. Use of space maintainers can reduce the severity of problems such as crowding, ectopic eruption, tooth impaction and poor molar relationship. This article presents a review of the consequences of premature tooth loss and discusses the appliances commonly used for space maintenance.

  16. Is tooth wear in the primary dentition predictive of tooth wear in the permanent dentition? Report from a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, M A; Whelton, H P; Shirodaria, S C; O'Mullane, D M; Cronin, M S

    2010-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of tooth wear in the permanent dentition of a sample of 12-year-old school children and establish whether an association exists between tooth wear recorded now and tooth wear recorded in their primary dentition at age five. A prospective cohort study. At follow-up to a previous study complete data were available for 123 children; fieldwork was conducted in the child's primary school. Measurement of tooth wear used a scoring system modified from the Smith and Knight Tooth Wear Index (TWI). Tooth wear which had progressed to dentine was assessed on the occlusal surfaces of the four first permanent molars, the labial, lingual/palatal and incisal surfaces of the six upper and six lower anterior teeth; a total of 40 scoreable surfaces. Demographic data were collected from the parents, and a questionnaire on oral hygiene habits, diet and behaviours was completed by each child. In total 38% (n = 47) of subjects had tooth wear, if incisor teeth only were included, 33% (n = 40) had tooth wear and similarly if the occlusal surfaces of molar teeth only were included 10% (n = 12) had signs of tooth wear. Gender was significantly associated with tooth wear: males had more tooth wear. The presence of tooth wear with dentine exposed in the primary dentition was significantly associated with tooth wear on the occlusal surfaces of the first permanent molars. Males had more tooth wear than females. An association existed between tooth wear recorded at age 5 and molar tooth wear recorded at age 12. Tooth wear is a lifelong cumulative process and should be recorded in both the primary and permanent dentitions.

  17. Is tooth wear in the primary dentition predictive of tooth wear in the permanent dentition? Report from a longitudinal study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harding, M A

    2010-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of tooth wear in the permanent dentition of a sample of 12-year-old school children and establish whether an association exists between tooth wear recorded now and tooth wear recorded in their primary dentition at age five.

  18. Pyogenic granuloma subsequent to apical fenestration of a primary tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiló, Luz; Bagán, José V

    2002-05-01

    The authors present two case reports of patients exhibiting pyogenic granulomas in the maxillary labial mucosa, which were related to an apical fenestration of a primary incisor. Several researchers have reported that the gingival wound and surrounding inflammatory tissue typically heal spontaneously after extraction of a fenestrated primary tooth. However, in the cases presented here, the gingival lesion did not heal after the fenestrated teeth were extracted. After extracting fenestrated teeth, clinicians need to examine the labial area at a follow-up appointment to ensure that the gingival hyperplasia heals properly. The authors suggest performing curettage of the surrounding abnormal tissue at the time of the tooth extraction.

  19. Avulsion and replantation of a primary incisor tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Lara T; Chandler, Nicholas P; Drummond, Bernadette K

    2013-12-01

    Avulsion of a primary tooth is a serious dental trauma, and the guidelines of the International Association of Dental Traumatology and textbooks in paediatric dentistry do not recommend replantation. Such management can result in severe damage to the supporting structures, and together with avulsion itself is commonly associated with developmental disturbances of the permanent tooth. We report the case of replantation in a 9-month-old child with a successful outcome, in a unique situation where conditions were optimal and careful long-term follow up was possible. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Cytologic effects of primary tooth endodontic filling materials

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Hung, Chi-Jr; Chen, Yi-Jyun; Chien, Hung-Chih; Kao, Chia-Tze

    2009-01-01

    Primary tooth endodontic filling materials should be bio-compatible with periodontal tissue. The purpose of this study was to analyze the biologic effects of different endodontic filling materials for primary teeth on a human osteosarcoma cell line (U2OS). Materials and methods: Experimental groups comprised different mixes of endodontic filling materials: zinc oxide-eugenol (ZnOE) + formocresol (FC); calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2] + FC; Ca(OH)2 + iodoform + deionized water; Ca(OH)2 + iodofor...

  1. Management of crown root fracture in primary 'double tooth': a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Nitesh; Pandey, Ramesh Kumar; Jindal, Garima

    2011-02-01

    The term 'double tooth' is used to describe two developmental dental anomalies of shape: gemination and fusion. Traumatic episodes involving a fused or geminated primary tooth are rare. This report describes an unusual case of crown root fracture in a primary double tooth. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Mature orbital teratoma with an ectopic tooth and primary anophthalmos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Bhavna; Chauhan, Kanchan; Kashyap, Seema

    2013-02-01

    To describe the clinicopathologic features and management of an unusual case of orbital teratoma. A 7-year-old girl presented with a history of an orbital mass since birth. CT scan showed a large mass lesion involving the right orbit, with absence of the eyeball. An ectopic tooth was identified within the tumor. Lid-sparing exenteration surgery was performed. Histopathologic examination of the excised mass showed presence of elements from all three germ layers, consistent with a diagnosis of mature orbital teratoma. Normal ocular structures were not identified on histopathology. At one year follow-up, there was no tumor recurrence. We report an extremely rare and interesting case of a mature orbital teratoma, which was associated with primary anophthalmos and an ectopic tooth.

  3. Does Timing of Eruption in First Primary Tooth Correlate with that of First Permanent Tooth? A 9-year Cohort Study

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    Hamidreza Poureslami

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Predicting the teeth eruption time is a valuable tool in pediatric dentistry since it can affects scheduling dental and orthodontic treatments. This study investigated the relationship between the eruption time of first primary and permanent teeth and the variation in the eruption time considering socioeconomic status (SES in a 9-year population- based cohort study. Materials and methods. 307 subjects were examined at bimonthly intervals during the first and second years of life and then at six-month intervals until the eruption of first permanent tooth. Eruption times of primary and permanent tooth were recorded for each child. A modified form of Kuppuswamy’s scale was used to assess the SES. Results. Among 267 subjects completed all follow-ups, the eruption time for first primary and permanent teeth indicated a direct strong correlation; in that one month delayed or early eruption of first primary tooth resulted in 4.21 months delayed or early eruption of first appearing permanent tooth (r = 0.91, n = 267, P <0.001. No significant correlation was observed between the eruption time of first primary and first permanent teeth and SES (P = 0.67, P = 0.75, respectively. Conclusion. The eruption timing for the first primary tooth had a correlation with the first permanent tooth eruption tim-ing, while SES did not have any influence on eruption times.

  4. Does Timing of Eruption in First Primary Tooth Correlate with that of First Permanent Tooth? A 9-years Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poureslami, Hamidreza; Asl Aminabadi, Naser; Sighari Deljavan, Alireza; Erfanparast, Leila; Sohrabi, Azin; Jamali, Zahra; Ghertasi Oskouei, Sina; Hazem, Kameliya; Shirazi, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Predicting the teeth eruption time is a valuable tool in pediatric dentistry since it can affects scheduling dental and orthodontic treatments. This study investigated the relationship between the eruption time of first primary and permanent teeth and the variation in the eruption time considering socioeconomic status (SES) in a 9-year population- based cohort study. Materials and methods . 307 subjects were examined at bimonthly intervals during the first and second years of life and then at six-month intervals until the eruption of first permanent tooth. Eruption times of primary and permanent tooth were recorded for each child. A modified form of Kuppuswamy's scale was used to assess the SES. Results. Among 267 subjects completed all follow-ups, the eruption time for first primary and permanent teeth indicated a direct strong correlation; in that one month delayed or early eruption of firstprimary tooth resulted in 4.21 months delayed or early eruption of first appearing permanent tooth (r = 0.91, n = 267, P eruption time of first primary and first permanent teeth and SES (P = 0.67, P = 0.75, respectively). Conclusion. The eruption timing for the first primary tooth had a correlation with the first permanent tooth eruption tim-ing, while SES did not have any influence on eruption times.

  5. Does Timing of Eruption in First Primary Tooth Correlate with that of First Permanent Tooth? A 9-years Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poureslami, Hamidreza; Asl Aminabadi, Naser; Sighari Deljavan, Alireza; Erfanparast, Leila; Sohrabi, Azin; Jamali, Zahra; Ghertasi Oskouei, Sina; Hazem, Kameliya; Shirazi, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Predicting the teeth eruption time is a valuable tool in pediatric dentistry since it can affects scheduling dental and orthodontic treatments. This study investigated the relationship between the eruption time of first primary and permanent teeth and the variation in the eruption time considering socioeconomic status (SES) in a 9-year population- based cohort study. Materials and methods. 307 subjects were examined at bimonthly intervals during the first and second years of life and then at six-month intervals until the eruption of first permanent tooth. Eruption times of primary and permanent tooth were recorded for each child. A modified form of Kuppuswamy’s scale was used to assess the SES. Results. Among 267 subjects completed all follow-ups, the eruption time for first primary and permanent teeth indicated a direct strong correlation; in that one month delayed or early eruption of firstprimary tooth resulted in 4.21 months delayed or early eruption of first appearing permanent tooth (r = 0.91, n = 267, P permanent teeth and SES (P = 0.67, P = 0.75, respectively). Conclusion. The eruption timing for the first primary tooth had a correlation with the first permanent tooth eruption tim-ing, while SES did not have any influence on eruption times. PMID:26236432

  6. Treatment of an avulsed maxillary permanent central incisor by autotransplantation of a primary canine tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sönmez, D; Dalci, K; Tunç, E Sen

    2008-07-01

    To present a case in which an avulsed permanent maxillary central incisor was replaced by autotransplantation of a primary canine tooth. The present case describes transplantation of a primary canine tooth into the space left by an avulsed permanent maxillary central incisor after a delay of several days. After root canal treatment, the primary canine tooth was extracted and placed into the prepared socket. To provide better adaptation of the donor tooth, the recipient alveolar site was remodeled using surgical burs. Semi-rigid splinting was maintained for 15 days. The crown of the primary canine was reshaped with composite resin and with an interim prosthesis, preventing movement of the lateral incisor tooth into the space of the transplanted canine. After 24-month follow-up the autotransplanted primary canine showed ankylosis but the tooth was in an acceptable state. The use of permanent tooth autotransplantation has been well documented. However a literature search revealed only one case report on the autotransplantation of primary teeth. Long term results of primary tooth autotransplantation are scarce but the procedure in this case report could be considered as a temporary space maintainer for the treatment of a patient with a lost permanent incisor under 10 years of age. Success of primary tooth autotransplantation may be affected by several factors, such as case selection, extra oral time, surgical and endodontic procedures.

  7. Remineralization of primary tooth enamel from individuals with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Takuma; Shibata, Munenori; Tsuboi, Shinji; Nakagaki, Haruo; Fukuta, Osamu; Kusabe, Yoshitaka; Inukai, Junko

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the characteristics of primary tooth enamel of Down syndrome patients (DSPs). We examined 9 primary teeth of Down syndrome children and 11 primary teeth of normally developed children to investigate the remineralization processes of enamel by transverse microradiography and X ray micro analyzer (XMA). Mineral loss, lesion depth, maximum mineral value, minimum mineral value, depth of maximum mineral value, and depth of minimum mineral value were used to analyze transverse microradiography (TMR). In addition, we calculated the percentage of enamel remineralization. All the parameters in the 2 groups showed marked recovery. The results indicated that the Down syndrome group was significantly remineralized the same way as the control group. According to the comparison of mineral content distribution by XMA, the content distribution of magnesium was different between the 2 groups. While recovery through remineralization of primary teeth was similar between Down syndrome children and normally developed children, the mechanism of remineralization process may be different between the 2 groups; consequently, magnesium may be considered as one of the factors affecting recovery.

  8. Tooth wear and associated risk factors in a sample of Australian primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, A; Brearley Messer, L

    2013-06-01

    Anecdotally, tooth wear is increasing, perhaps attributable to diet. The irreversible surface loss may result in sensitivity and loss of form and function. Little data exist on the prevalence of tooth wear in Australian children. This study investigated consumption of potentially erosive foods and drinks, examining the prevalence, distribution of tooth wear and associations in a sample of children. Parents of 350, 6-12-year-olds reported their child's oral hygiene, dietary intake, medical and dental histories; 154 children (subsample) were examined. Associations were studied with single and multivariable analyses. Tooth wear was parentally reported for 17% (59 children of the study population) and observed in 66% (102 of the subsample), particularly affecting primary teeth. Significant risk factors for parentally reported tooth wear were: consuming 2-4 cups soft drink/day (OR = 9.52), citrus flavoured sweets/gums ≥1/day (5.10), citrus fruits 1-2/wk (4.28); tooth grinding (5.32); medical condition present (2.48); male gender (2.80). Drinking 2-4 cups fruit juice/day was a significant risk factor for both parentally reported (3.23) and observed tooth wear (3.97). Tooth wear appeared under-reported as some parents were unaware their child's teeth were affected. Significant risk factors for tooth wear were identifiable from children's histories. Risk factors should be addressed early so that tooth wear in the primary dentition does not affect permanent teeth. © 2013 Australian Dental Association.

  9. Esthetic management of a primary double tooth using a silicone putty guide: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ravi; Chaudhry, Kalpna; Yeluri, Ramakrishna; Munshi, Autar Krishen

    2013-03-01

    The term double tooth is often used to describe fusion and gemination. The development of isolated large or joined teeth is not rare, but the literature is confusing when the appropriate terminology is presented. The objective of this paper is to present a case of a primary double tooth in a 5-year-old girl with a history of trauma. The tooth was endodontically treated and esthetic management was carried out using a silicone putty guide.

  10. The relationship between tooth wear in the primary and permanent dentitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales-Peres, S H C; Sales-Peres, A C; Marsicano, J A; Carvalho, C A P; Carvalho, F S; Lauris, J R P; Sales-Peres, A

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the relationship between tooth wear in primary and permanent dentition in 7 to 10-year-old school children, in 2007. An epidemiological cross-sectional survey was conducted by trained, calibrated examiners, using the dental wear index (DWI). The cluster sample consisted of 764 children (382 boys, 382 girls) attending 4 public schools selected in different regions of the city. The DWI was proposed to evaluate primary and permanent teeth, coded as letters and numbers, respectively. Data were collected via clinical examinations performed outdoors under natural light, following the WHO recommendations and using a dental mirror and probe. Proportions and confidence intervals were used to describe the prevalence of dental wear. The Mann-Whitney and the Odds Ratio (OR) tests were used to compare the tooth wear prevalence between primary and permanent teeth according to surface (p tooth wear. The tooth wear was mostly seen on the occlusal/incisal surfaces (47%), involving enamel or enamel-dentine. Tooth wear in primary teeth was found in canines and molars (93%) and in permanent teeth in molars (34%). There was significant difference between primary and permanent teeth (p primary teeth was greater in boys than in girls (p = 0.02) but not in permanent teeth. The results suggest that 7 to 10-year-old children with tooth wear in primary teeth had more chances of developing tooth wear in permanent dentition. However, the findings of this study are not conclusive as the associations described are not causal.

  11. Timing of emergence of the first primary tooth in preterm and full-term infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavičin, Ivana Savić; Dumančić, Jelena; Badel, Tomislav; Vodanović, Marin

    2016-01-01

    Variations in the timing of emergence of primary teeth are under strong genetic control, but there is also a significant contribution from external factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of preterm birth, birth weight and length, and feeding practices during the first 6 months of life on the timing of emergence of the first primary tooth. Data on pregnancy duration, birth weight and length, feeding practice, time of emergence and first emerged primary tooth were collected by electronic questionnaires. The study included 409 parents and 592 children of both genders. The sample was divided into two groups according to pregnancy duration (53cm), and four groups by birth weight (3500g). Data were analyzed considering chronological and postmenstrual age-which is the gestational age plus the infant's chronological age at the month of emergence of the first primary tooth. The mean time of first primary tooth emergence was 7.55±2.67 months when chronological age was considered. The first emerged tooth in most cases was a lower incisor (82.33%). There was a statistically significant difference in the timing of the first tooth emergence between preterm and full-term groups when chronological age was considered (ptooth differed significantly when feeding, weight, and length groups (pprimary tooth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Hippo pathway/Yap regulates primary enamel knot and dental cusp patterning in tooth morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuk-Jae Edward; Li, Liwen; Jung, Han-Sung

    2015-11-01

    The shape of an individual tooth crown is primarily determined by the number and arrangement of its cusps, i.e., cusp patterning. Enamel knots that appear in the enamel organ during tooth morphogenesis have been suggested to play important roles in cusp patterning. Animal model studies have shown that the Hippo pathway effector Yap has a critical function in tooth morphogenesis. However, the role of the Hippo pathway/Yap in cusp patterning has not been well documented and its specific roles in tooth morphogenesis remain unclear. Here, we provide evidence that Yap is a key mediator in tooth cusp patterning. We demonstrate a correlation between Yap localization and cell proliferation in developing tooth germs. We also show that, between the cap stage and bell stage, Yap is crucial for the suppression of the primary enamel knot and for the patterning of secondary enamel knots, which are the future cusp regions. When Yap expression is stage-specifically knocked down during the cap stage, the activity of the primary enamel knot persists into the bell-stage tooth germ, leading to ectopic cusp formation. Our data reveal the importance of the Hippo pathway/Yap in enamel knots and in the proper patterning of tooth cusps.

  13. Association between Fever and Primary Tooth Eruption: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Nemezio, Mariana; Mh De Oliveira, Katharina; C Romualdo, Priscilla; M Queiroz, Alexandra; Wg Paula-E-Silva, Francisco; Ab Silva, Raquel; C Küchler, Erika

    2017-01-01

    To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to establish if fever is associated with primary tooth eruption. Literature searches involved Pubmed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, Scopus and Cochrane. The potentially relevant studies had the full text analyzed. Only studies concerning fever during eruption period of primary tooth in humans were included. Papers in non-English language, and papers that included syndromic patients or patients with any disease were excluded. The meta-analyses were performed with Review Manager (version 5.3). Only studies that reported the results as dichotomous data were analyzed with Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test in meta-analysis function of Review Manager 5.3. The fixed-effects model was used to evaluate the association between tooth eruption and fever. Search identified 83 potential studies. After exclusion of the duplicated studies, or were not related to the criteria of inclusion only 6 studies were selected for the systematic review. In the overall meta-analysis, no association was found [OR = 1.32 (0.88-1.96)] between fever and primary tooth eruption. However, in the subgroup analysis, when the method used to measure fever was the rectal temperature there was an association [OR = 2.82 (1.55-5.14)] between fever and primary tooth eruption. There are few suitable studies in the literature regarding the association between primary tooth eruption and fever. However, our study found an association between fever and primary tooth eruption only when rectal temperature was performed. Nemezio MA, De Oliveira KMH, Romualdo PC, Queiroz AM, Paula-e-Silva FWG, Silva RAB, Kuchler EC. Association between Fever and Primary Tooth Eruption: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(3):293-298.

  14. Apical fenestration and ectopic eruption - effects from trauma to primary tooth: a clinical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triches, Thaisa Cezária; Paula, Leonardo Koerich; Filho, Marcos Ximenes; Bolan, Michele

    2011-02-01

    The study describes a multidisciplinary treatment of fenestration in the apical of a primary maxillary right central incisor due a trauma and also its sequel, an ectopic eruption of the permanent maxillary right central incisor, on 7-year-old boy. Clinically, the primary tooth had an enamel and dentin fracture with no pulp exposure. There was an apical fenestration in the vestibular region, and the permanent tooth had an ectopic palatal eruption. The primary tooth was extracted, and for the physiological reposition of the permanent tooth, which was crossed with its antagonist, a Haas appliance was used for the rapid expansion of the maxilla for a period of 9 days. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Primary tooth emergence in Australian children: timing, sequence and patterns of asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodroffe, S; Mihailidis, S; Hughes, T; Bockmann, M; Seow, W K; Gotjamanos, T; Townsend, G

    2010-09-01

    Information on the timing and sequence of human tooth emergence is valuable when analysing human growth and development, predicting the age of individuals, and for understanding the effects of genetic and environmental influences on growth processes. This paper provides updated data on the timing and sequence of primary tooth emergence in Australian children for both clinicians and researchers. Twins were recruited from around Australia with data collected through parental recording of twins' primary tooth emergence. One twin from each pair was then randomly selected to enable the calculation of descriptive statistics for timing, sequence and asymmetry in tooth emergence. The first and last primary teeth emerged, on average, at 8.6 months and 27.9 months, respectively, with teeth emerging in the order: central incisor, lateral incisor, first molar, canine, second molar. Left-side antimeric teeth were more likely to emerge before their right-side counterparts but this was not statistically significant. At least 35% of all antimeric pairs had emerged within two weeks of each other, serving as a useful guideline for assessing symmetrical versus asymmetrical development. Primary tooth emergence in Australian twins is occurring later than reported previously for Australian singletons but is consistent with findings for singletons in other ethnic groups. The most common sequence of primary tooth emergence appears to be consistent in twins and singletons and has not changed over time.

  16. Comparison of normal permanent and primary dentition sagittal tooth-crown inclinations of Japanese females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Emi; Saitoh, Issei; Hayasaki, Haruaki; Iwase, Yoko; Kubota, Naoko; Takemoto, Yoshihiko; Yamasaki, Youichi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the characteristics of permanent and primary tooth-crown inclinations. Landmark points from cephalograms and dental casts of two groups; 23 women (mean 20.3 +/- 3.3 years) and 11 girls (mean 5.2 +/- 0.1 years) were digitized, and the coordinates were integrated and transformed to a standardized plane. The 3-dimensional crown inclinations were projected on the sagittal plane, and the angles between the tooth vectors and the FH plane were calculated. An independent-group t-test was used to test for group differences of each tooth inclination, and correlation coefficients were generated for the inclination angles among the permanent and primary teeth. Most maxillary tooth-crown inclinations showed significant age-related differences, while only the second premolar and primary second molar differed significantly in the mandible. The maxillary molars were parallel to the corresponding mandibular molars and correlated with each other, but the primary molars were not. Significant correlations were found between inclinations of most permanent teeth, but not the primary teeth. Maxillary tooth-crown inclinations change during growth, but tooth-crown inclinations of the mandibular teeth do not.

  17. [The role of pulp in the root resorption of primary teeth without permanent tooth germs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bi-chen; Yang, Jie; Zhao, Yu-ming; Ge, Li-hong

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the role of pulp in the root resorption of primary teeth without permanent tooth germs. The animal model without permanent tooth germs was established by surgery in Beagle dog. The root resorption was observed by taking periapical radiographs periodically. The samples of mandibular bone and pulp at different resorption stages were collected. The distribution of odontoclasts and the activating factor was analyzed by histological staining and semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The role of pulp in the root resorption of primary teeth was tested by early pulpectomy. In the root resorption of primary molars without permanent teeth germs, a large number of odontoclasts were present on the pulpal surface of the root canal. Semi-quantification RT-PCR showed that the ratios of the expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) mRNA and β-actin in the pulp of permanent teeth and primary teeth without permanent teeth germ during different periods of root resorption are 0.1314, 0.1901, 0.2111 and 0.6058 (P > 0.05). The root resorption of primary teeth without permanent teeth germs in test groups was about 5 weeks later than that of control group. The pulp of primary tooth played an important role in the root resorption of primary tooth without permanent tooth germ.

  18. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Multiple Loci Associated with Primary Tooth Development during Infancy

    OpenAIRE

    Pillas, Demetris; Hoggart, Clive J.; Evans, David M.; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Sipil?, Kirsi; L?hdesm?ki, Raija; Millwood, Iona Y.; Kaakinen, Marika; Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan; Blane, David; Charoen, Pimphen; Sovio, Ulla; Pouta, Anneli; Freimer, Nelson; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa

    2010-01-01

    Author Summary Genome-wide association studies have been used to identify genetic variants conferring susceptibility to diseases, intermediate phenotypes, and physiological traits such as height, hair color, and age at menarche. Here we analyze the NFBC1966 and ALSPAC birth cohorts to investigate the genetic determinants of a key developmental process: primary tooth development. The prospective nature of our studies allows us to exploit accurate measurements of age at first tooth eruption and...

  19. Primary double tooth with partial anodontia of permanent dentition: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Prasad Rao, V. Arun; Reddy, N.Venugopal; Krishnakumar, R.; Sugumaran, D.K.; Mohan, G.; Senthil Eagappan, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    Dental anomalies of number and forms may occur in the primary and permanent dentition. Various terms have been used to describe dental twinning anomalies: gemination, fusion, concrescence, double teeth, cojoined teeth, twinned teeth, geminifusion and vicinifusion. Double tooth is a term used to describe connate tooth and includes both dental fusion and gemination. The phenomenon of gemination occurs when two teeth develop from one single bud leading to a larger...

  20. Clinical and SEM characterization of prolonged retention of a primary tooth with pulpectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Faria, Patricia; Alcantara, Carlos Eduardo Pinto; Mesquita, Ana Terezinha; Marques, Leandro Silva; Ramos-Jorge, Maria Leticia

    2013-01-01

    Root canal filling with zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) paste following primary tooth pulpectomy is a common practice in pediatric dentistry. This material offers high clinical and radiographic success rates. In some cases, however, it is not resorbed along with the root of the primary tooth. The aim of this study was to describe a case of prolonged retention of a primary maxillary incisor that was subjected to pulpectomy and filled with ZOE paste in order to characterize the aspects of root resorption using scanning electron microscopy.

  1. Comparison of the tooth brushing habits of primary school age children and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbek, Ceren Damla; Eser, Didem; Bektas-Kayhan, Kivanc; Unur, Meral

    2015-01-01

    As they grow, children develop their attitude and behavior related to tooth brushing by taking their parents' oral-dental health behavior as an example. The purpose of this study was to assess whether there was a similarity in tooth brushing between primary school-age children and their parents presenting to the Department of Oral, Dental and Jaw Diseases and Surgery and the Department of Pedodontics, School of Dental Medicine, Istanbul University. The study included 126 children and their parents, as totally 252 subjects. The data on oral hygiene of the subjects were obtained using a questionnaire form including questions on the qualitative-quantitative tooth brushing habits of the children and their parents and the socio-demographic characteristics of their families. In most of the cases, there was a similarity between children and their parents in terms of the frequency of dentist visits, the therapy they underwent in their last dentist visit, the cause of caries, the frequency of tooth brushing, the material used for oral hygiene, the duration of tooth brushing, method of tooth brushing, and tooth sites most brushed, which showed a significant association between children and their parents (p<0.01). Correct knowledge given to the children by their families will positively affect the oral-dental health of the children. Thus, firstly, correct knowledge should be given to the parents so that they can successfully carry out their responsibility in being the correct model for their children in oral-dental health.

  2. Concentration of formocresol used by pediatric dentists in primary tooth pulpotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Sílvia R A; McWhorter, Alton G; Seale, N Sue

    2002-01-01

    Diluted formocresol is the most widely recommended primary tooth pulpotomy medicament, but it is not commercially available. This investigation surveyed practicing pediatric dentists about the concentration of formocresol that they use to perform pulpotomies and, if they use diluted formocresol, where they obtain it. Eight-hundred-and-six surveys were sent to a randomly selected sample of practicing pediatric dentists, and 422 were returned for a 52% response rate. Eighty-four percent of the respondents use formocresol for their primary tooth pulpotomies. Of those, 69% use full strength, 27% use diluted and 4% don't know. Sources of diluted formocresol for those who use the diluted form include: 34% who buy it that way, 58% who dilute it themselves and 8% who have the pharmacy dilute it. The majority of pediatric dentists who use formocresol for primary tooth pulpotomies use a full strength formulation.

  3. Digital Radiography for Determination of Primary Tooth Length: In Vivo and Ex Vivo Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria D. Basso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Methods for determining the root canal length of the primary tooth should yield accurate and reproducible results. In vitro studies show some limitations, which do not allow their findings to be directly transferred to a clinical situation. Aim. To compare the accuracy of radiographic tooth length obtained from in vivo digital radiograph with that obtained from ex vivo digital radiograph. Method. Direct digital radiographs of 20 upper primary incisors were performed in teeth (2/3 radicular resorption that were radiographed by an intraoral sensor, according to the long-cone technique. Teeth were extracted, measured, and mounted in a resin block, and then radiographic template was used to standardise the sensor-target distance (30 cm. The apparent tooth length (APTL was obtained from the computer screen by means of an electronic ruler accompanying the digital radiography software (CDR 2.0, whereas the actual tooth length (ACTL was obtained by means of a digital calliper following extraction. Data were compared to the ACTL by variance analysis and Pearson’s correlation test. Results. The values for APTL obtained from in vivo radiography were slightly underestimated, whereas those values obtained from ex vivo were slightly overestimated. No significance was observed (P≤0.48 between APTL and ACTL. Conclusion. The length of primary teeth estimated by in vivo and ex vivo comparisons using digital radiography was found to be similar to the actual tooth length.

  4. Digital radiography for determination of primary tooth length: in vivo and ex vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Maria D; Jeremias, Fabiano; Cordeiro, Rita C L; Santos-Pinto, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Methods for determining the root canal length of the primary tooth should yield accurate and reproducible results. In vitro studies show some limitations, which do not allow their findings to be directly transferred to a clinical situation. To compare the accuracy of radiographic tooth length obtained from in vivo digital radiograph with that obtained from ex vivo digital radiograph. Direct digital radiographs of 20 upper primary incisors were performed in teeth (2/3 radicular resorption) that were radiographed by an intraoral sensor, according to the long-cone technique. Teeth were extracted, measured, and mounted in a resin block, and then radiographic template was used to standardise the sensor-target distance (30 cm). The apparent tooth length (APTL) was obtained from the computer screen by means of an electronic ruler accompanying the digital radiography software (CDR 2.0), whereas the actual tooth length (ACTL) was obtained by means of a digital calliper following extraction. Data were compared to the ACTL by variance analysis and Pearson's correlation test. The values for APTL obtained from in vivo radiography were slightly underestimated, whereas those values obtained from ex vivo were slightly overestimated. No significance was observed (P ≤ 0.48) between APTL and ACTL. The length of primary teeth estimated by in vivo and ex vivo comparisons using digital radiography was found to be similar to the actual tooth length.

  5. Fused primary first mandibular macromolar with a unique relation to its permanent successors: A rare tooth anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhindsa, Abhishek; Garg, Shalini; Damle, S G; Opal, Shireen; Singh, Tavleen

    2013-04-01

    Dental anomalies of number and forms may occur in the primary and permanent dentition. Various terms have been used to describe dental twinning anomalies: Germination, fusion, concrescence, double teeth, conjoined teeth, twinned teeth, geminifusion, and vicinifusion. Fused tooth is a developmental anomaly that is seen more frequently in the primary than the permanent dentition. Double tooth involving deciduous anterior teeth is found mostly in the mandible. Very few cases of nonsyndromic double primary molar have been reported in the literature. The succeeding permanent tooth is often found missing congenitally in the same region. This article reports a very rare unilateral occurrence of an anomalous, primary mandibular first macromolar formed by fusion with a dysmorphic premolar like supernumerary tooth in deciduous dentition period. Instead of agenesis of succedaneous tooth, the double tooth has been succeeded by normally developing mandibular first premolar in the same region.

  6. Signs and Symptoms of Primary Tooth Eruption: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massignan, Carla; Cardoso, Mariane; Porporatti, André Luís; Aydinoz, Secil; Canto, Graziela De Luca; Mezzomo, Luis Andre Mendonça; Bolan, Michele

    2016-03-01

    Symptoms associated with the primary tooth eruption have been extensively studied but it is still controversial. To assess the occurrence of local and systemic signs and symptoms during primary tooth eruption. Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences, PubMed, ProQuest, Scopus, and Web of Science were searched. A partial gray literature search was taken by using Google Scholar and the reference lists of the included studies were scanned. Observational studies assessing the association of eruption of primary teeth with local and systemic signs and symptoms in children aged 0 to 36 months were included. Two authors independently collected the information from the selected articles. Information was crosschecked and confirmed for its accuracy. A total of 1179 articles were identified, and after a 2-phase selection, 16 studies were included. Overall prevalence of signs and symptoms occurring during primary tooth eruption in children between 0 and 36 months was 70.5% (total sample = 3506). Gingival irritation (86.81%), irritability (68.19%), and drooling (55.72%) were the most frequent ones. Different general symptoms were considered among studies. Some studies presented lack of confounding factors, no clear definition of the diagnostics methods, use of subjective measures and long intervals between examinations. There is evidence of the occurrence of signs and symptoms during primary tooth eruption. For body temperature analyses, eruption could lead to a rise in temperature, but it was not characterized as fever. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Patterns of soft drink consumption and primary tooth extractions in Queensland children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, P J; Gkolia, P P; Johnson, H L; Thomas, A R

    2010-12-01

    The authors examined the association of patterns of soft drink consumption and primary tooth extractions in Queensland children aged 12 years or less. Data were gathered through the Child Health Surveys conducted by Queensland Health in 2003 and 2008. The analysis allowed for various demographic characteristics using logistic regression analysis. The data in both surveys showed an increased risk of tooth extraction in children who had a greater frequency and amount of soft drink consumption, and those that consumed soft drink between meals. In 2008, the percentage of children that had soft drink daily or several times a week had decreased, with an increase in those that never had soft drink. To reduce the risk of primary tooth extraction due to decay, this paper recommends the continuing moderation of soft drink consumption frequency and the consumption of soft drinks with, rather than between, meals. © 2010 Australian Dental Association.

  8. Primary cilia regulate Shh activity in the control of molar tooth number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohazama, Atsushi; Haycraft, Courtney J; Seppala, Maisa; Blackburn, James; Ghafoor, Sarah; Cobourne, Martyn; Martinelli, David C; Fan, Chen-Ming; Peterkova, Renata; Lesot, Herve; Yoder, Bradley K; Sharpe, Paul T

    2009-03-01

    Primary cilia mediate Hh signalling and mutations in their protein components affect Hh activity. We show that in mice mutant for a cilia intraflagellar transport (IFT) protein, IFT88/polaris, Shh activity is increased in the toothless diastema mesenchyme of the embryonic jaw primordia. This results in the formation of ectopic teeth in the diastema, mesial to the first molars. This phenotype is specific to loss of polaris activity in the mesenchyme since loss of Polaris in the epithelium has no detrimental affect on tooth development. To further confirm that upregulation of Shh activity is responsible for the ectopic tooth formation, we analysed mice mutant for Gas1, a Shh protein antagonist in diastema mesenchyme. Gas1 mutants also had ectopic diastema teeth and accompanying increased Shh activity. In this context, therefore, primary cilia exert a specific negative regulatory effect on Shh activity that functions to repress tooth formation and thus determine tooth number. Strikingly, the ectopic teeth adopt a size and shape characteristic of premolars, a tooth type that was lost in mice around 50-100 million years ago.

  9. Effect of computerized delivery intraligamental injection in primary molars on their corresponding permanent tooth buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, Malka; Blumer, Sigalit; Eli, Ilana

    2010-07-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of developmental disturbances in permanent teeth in which buds were exposed to intraligamental injection (ILI) delivered by a computer controlled local anaesthetic delivery (C-CLAD). The study population consisted of 78 children (age 4.1-12.8 years) who received ILI-C-CLAD to 166 primary molars. A structured form was designed to include information regarding age at treatment, gender, type of treated tooth, tooth location, type of dental treatment, and type of developmental disturbance(s) present in the associated permanent tooth. Teeth, which received regular anaesthesia or were not anaesthetized by local anaesthesia, served as controls. Five children had developmental defects. In C-CLAD-ILI exposed teeth, one child had two hypomaturation defects. The corresponding primary teeth were extracted. No defects were found on the control side. In two children, hypoplastic defects were found only in the control teeth (one in each child). One suffered from a dentoalveolar abscess in the corresponding primary tooth. Diffuse hypomaturation defects were found in two children on both the C-CLAD-ILI exposed and control sides. In the primary dentition, C-CLAD-ILI does not increase the danger of developmental disturbances to the underlying permanent dental bud.

  10. Duplication of a permanent maxillary incisor root caused by trauma to the predecessor primary tooth: clinical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, T; Lenzi, M; Simões, M; Campos, V

    2011-07-01

    This report describes a permanent maxillary incisor tooth with two roots possibly caused by trauma to the predecessor primary tooth. Diagnosis, aetiology, clinical implications and endodontic and aesthetic treatment of an incisor tooth with two roots are presented. Diagnosis, early intervention by a multidisciplinary team and clinical and radiographic examination of patients who suffer trauma to primary teeth are of importance to minimize or avoid damage to successor teeth. • A possible sequelae of trauma to a primary tooth is root duplication in the permanent tooth. • Root duplication is a rare anomaly that has its diagnosis based on the radiographic examination. • Careful diagnosis and follow-up are necessary to prevent future complications related to the successor tooth. © 2011 International Endodontic Journal.

  11. Primary tooth size asymmetry in twins and singletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, T; Harila, V; Ollikkala, A; Alvesalo, L

    2016-08-01

    To explore asymmetry values of antimeric deciduous tooth crown dimensions in three types of twins: monozygotic (MZ), dizygotic same-sex (DZ) and opposite-sex (OS) vs. single-born controls. Mesiodistal and labio-lingual crown dimensions of second deciduous molars and mesiodistal canine and first molar crown dimensions of 2159 children at 6-12 years of age were evaluated, originating from the US cross-sectional Collaborative Perinatal Study from the 1970s, including altogether MZ (n = 28), DZ same-sex (n = 33) and OS (n = 39) pairs. Single born (n = 1959) were used as controls. Dental casts were measured for comparison of variance relationships calculated from antimeric teeth, exhibiting fluctuating (FA), and directional (DA) asymmetry using anova. Significant differences appeared in MZ and OS girls in DA of deciduous canines, which gain size in the first and second trimester, and deciduous second molars, which finally stop crown growth during the early post-natal period. Significantly, increased FA values appeared for lower deciduous canines and second molars, indicating greatest environmental stress in OS girls, MZ girls and DZ boys. Twin girls had more fluctuating and directional crown asymmetry than twin boys, but in some dimensions, the twins were more symmetric than controls. Transmembrane hormonal influence between opposite-sex twins, and late gestational stress factors, caused by placental malfunction and/or monochorionicity, may be involved in asymmetric growth of antimers, during critical periods of crown size gain. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The effects of periradicular inflamation and infection on a primary tooth and permanent successor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Mabel Mariela Rodriguez; Rocha, Maria Jose de Carvalho

    2005-01-01

    Primary teeth and the permanent successors must be understood as interdependent units, where each one of them interacts with and depends on each other. Pulpal inflammation/infection of a primary tooth and the spread of this condition over the periradicular tissues can lead to alterations in the dental germ of the permanent successor and to the surrounding structures if no therapy is done, i.e. endodontics or extraction. This work will present cases of permanent teeth that showed alteration in eruption and / or in development, as a consequence of inflammation / infection of the preceding primary teeth, such as: hypoplasia, morphological alteration on the dental crown or total arrest of. radicular formation. The teeth analysed in this study belong to patients who attended the Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina Children's Dentistry Clinic. The earlier these lesions are diagnosed, the less were the destructive effects and the consequences on the primary tooth/permanent germ unit.

  13. Diagnosis and Management of Hidden Caries in a Primary Molar Tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gera, Arwa; Zilberman, Uri

    2017-01-01

    Hidden caries is a dentinal lesion beneath the dentinoenamel junction, visible on radiographs. A single report described this lesion in primary dentition. This case report describes a case of hidden caries in a mandibular second primary molar, misdiagnosed as malignant swelling. A 3-year-old white girl was referred to the Department of Pediatric Dentistry with a chief complaint of pain and extraoral swelling on the right side of the mandible for the last 3 months. She was earlier referred to the surgical department for biopsy of the lesion. Radiographic and computed tomography scan examination showed a periapical lesion with buccal plate resorption and radiolucency beneath the enamel on the mesial part of tooth 85. The tooth was extracted, and follow-up of 2 years showed normal development of tooth 45. The main problem is early detection and treatment, since the outer surface of enamel may appear intact on tactile examination. Gera A, Zilberman U. Diagnosis and Management of Hidden Caries in a Primary Molar Tooth. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(1):99-102.

  14. Developmental changes in primary cilia in the mouse tooth germ and oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisamoto, Meri; Goto, Marie; Muto, Mami; Nio-Kobayashi, Junko; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilium, a sensory apparatus, functions as both a chemical and mechanical sensor to receive environmental stimuli. The present study focused on the primary cilia in the epithelialmesenchymal interaction during tooth development. We examined the localization and direction of projection of primary cilia in the tooth germ and oral cavity of mice by immunohistochemical observation. Adenylyl cyclase 3 (ACIII)-immunolabeled cilia were visible in the inner/outer enamel epithelium of molars at the fetal stage and then conspicuously developed in the odontoblast layer postnatally. The primary cilia in ameloblasts and odontoblasts-shown by the double staining of acetylated tubulin and γ-tubulin-were regularly arranged from postnatal Day12, projecting apart from each other. The periodontal ligament possessed ACIII-positive cilia, which gathered on both sides of the dentin/cement and alveolar bone in postnatal days. In the oral cavity, numerous long primary cilia immunoreactive for ACIII were condensed at subepithelial stromal cells in the oral processes in fetuses, while postnatally a small number of short cilia were dispersed throughout the stroma of the oral cavity. These findings suggest that the primary cilia showing stage- and regionspecific morphology are involved in the epithelial-mesenchymal interaction during tooth development via mechano- and/or chemoreception for growth factors.

  15. Tooth Surface Level Caries Progression in the Primary Dentition among Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Amid I; Lim, Sungwoo; Tellez, Marisol

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe primary tooth surface level caries progression, over 2 years, based on the severity of the caries lesions. Data were collected from 790 low-income African-American preschool children in Detroit, Mich., USA. The caregivers of the children (aged 0-5 years) completed interviews and the dyad of child-caregiver completed dental examinations in 2002-2004 (baseline) and in 2004-2005 (follow-up). Caries were measured using the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS). The caries status of tooth surfaces was classified into initial (ICDAS 1-2), moderate (ICDAS 3-4) and extensive (ICDAS 5-6) stages. Counts of tooth surfaces with progression, by baseline caries severity level, were used to compute rate ratios (RRs) relative to sound stages. RRs were also computed for type of tooth surfaces and frequency of intake of soda consumption at baseline. After adjusting for confounders, caries progression was more likely to occur in tooth surfaces with any baseline caries relative to sound surfaces. For surfaces with initial caries, the rate of progression to moderate caries was 9.6 times higher than that of sound surfaces. Surfaces with initial and moderate caries progressed to extensive caries 6.1 and 20.6 times, respectively, relative to sound surfaces. Baseline soda consumption was not associated with the RR of caries progression. In conclusion, the staging of caries identifies different progression risks and significant emphasis should be placed on secondary prevention of initial lesions as well as on primary prevention. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Individual variation in tooth-size/ arch-length changes from the primary to permanent dentitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, Samir E; Jakobsen, Jane R

    2006-01-01

    To determine the individual variation in the maxillary and mandibular tooth-size/arch-length relationships after the complete eruption of the primary dentition (mean age, 4.0 years) and at the time of eruption of the second permanent molars (mean age, 13.3 years). Records of 32 males and 27 females were evaluated. Each subject had a clinically acceptable occlusion; that is, a normal molar and canine relationship at the time of eruption of the primary and permanent teeth. In addition, each subject had a complete set of data at the 2 stages of dental development. These selection criteria limited the number of subjects in this investigation to 59. The mesiodistal diameter of all primary teeth and their permanent successors, as well as various dental arch length parameters were measured in the primary and permanent dentitions. A total of 60 parameters were measured or calculated. The findings from the present investigation indicated that of the total sample of 59 male and female subjects observed on a longitudinal basis, 29 (49%) maintained their relative tooth-size/arch-length relationship ranking in the 2 dentitions, while 30 (51%) changed to either a more favorable or less favorable relationship in the permanent dentition. The cases with the lower ranking of tooth-size/arch-length relationship in the primary dentition, 50% maintained their relatively lower rank in the permanent dentition, while the other 50% changed to a relatively more favorable rank in the permanent dentition. There is a similar probability for maintaining the same ranking in the primary and permanent dentitions in the mandibular arch (51%), as in the maxillary arch (49%). The clinical implications of the findings are discussed.

  17. Endodontic treatment and esthetic management of a primary double tooth with direct composite using silicone buildup guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinaya Kumar Kulkarni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gemination and fusion are morphological dental anomalies, characterized by the formation of a clinically wide tooth. Gemination occurs when one tooth bud tries to divide, while fusion occurs if two buds unite. The terms double teeth, double formation, conjoined teeth, geminifusion, vicinifusion and dental twinning are often used to describe fusion and gemination. Double teeth are associated with clinical problems such as poor esthetics, spacing problems and caries susceptibility. Management of such cases requires a comprehensive knowledge of the clinical entity as well as the problems associated with it. This report presents a case of primary double tooth in a 6-year-old boy involving maxillary left central incisor. The anomalous tooth was carious and pulpally involved. This was treated conservatively by endodontic treatment and esthetic rehabilitation was done with direct composite restoration using a silicone buildup guide. The treated tooth was followed up until exfoliation.

  18. Success Rate of Formocresol Pulpotomy versus Mineral Trioxide Aggregate in Human Primary Molar Tooth

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    S E Jabbarifar

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In spite of long time and broad use of formaldehyde derivates (Fixation agent in primary tooth pulp treatment, There is some concerns about these derivates such as variability, inconsistency success rate, mutagenicity, cytotoxicity, alergenicity, and some other potential health hazards of them. Therefore other alternative pulpotomy procedures like Bioactive glass (BAG, Glutaraldehyde (2%, Hydroxyappetite (HA, Bone dried freezed (BDF, ferric sulfate (15%, laser, Electrosurgery (ES, Bone Morphogenic proteins (BMP, recombinant protein-1 (RP1, and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA have been compared. The purpose of this clinical trial is to assess radiographic and clinical success rate of Formocresol (FC pulpotomy in compare with MTA in human primary molar teeth. Methods: 64 molars were pulpotomized equally and randomly with mineral trioxide Aggregate and Formocresol. Prior to trial, we defined a case as failure, when one or more of the events such as external root resorption, internal root resorption, periapical and furca lucency, pain, swelling, mobility, dental abscess, or early extraction appeared. Every treated tooth was defined as successful, if any noted evident was not shown. Results: Totally, 60 teeth treatment (92.2 percent were successful and 7.8 percent were failed. Failure and success rates for MTA group were 6.3 and 93.7 percent, respectively. Failure and success rates in FC group were 8.4 and 90.2 percent respectively. The difference between MTA and FC treatment methods was not significant (Fisher Exact test. Conclusion: Findings of this study show that mineral trioxide aggregate can be an alternative procedure for FC pulpotomy of primary tooth. Keywords: Mineral trioxide aggregate, formocresol, pulpotomy, success and failure rate.

  19. Prevalence of primary tooth traumatic injuries among children in a large industrial centre of Russian Federation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeeva, I; Sarapultseva, M; Sarapultsev, A

    2014-10-01

    Recently, the number of children seeking dental care for traumatic tooth injuries has increased substantially. This study was aimed at assessing the prevalence of primary tooth traumatic injuries (PTTI) in the paediatric populace of Ekaterinburg, a large industrial centre of the Russian Federation. Following ethical approval, an epidemiological investigation of primary dentition was conducted, evaluating 1,149 children aged 6-72 months (males 586/1,149, 51%; females 563/1,149, 49%). The average age of subjects overall was 43.9 ± 17.7 months (males 45.1 ± 17.9 months; females 42.6 ± 17.4 months). The prevalence of PTTI among paediatric residents of this region was 9.75%, with uncomplicated crown fracture (36.9%) as the chief primary dental injury. Dental visits attributable to PTTI were most frequent in the age group of 25-36 months, which clearly constitutes the period of greatest vulnerability. The findings of this study suggest that PTTI is a critical issue in children, requiring programmes that address preventive dental care and adhere to established medical treatment standards.

  20. Nanoindentation hardness of intertubular dentin in sound, demineralized and natural caries-affected dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joves, Gerardo José; Inoue, Go; Sadr, Alireza; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanical properties of intertubular dentin in sound, natural caries-affected (NCAD) and artificial caries-affected dentin (ACAD) using nanoindentation. Non-caries molars and caries molars with International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS II) score 5 at the occlusal site were used and caries was excavated using a spoon excavator, a round bur at low speed without water and a dye solution as guidance to detect the infected tissue. Specimens with remaining dentin thickness (RDT) >2mm were selected. ACAD teeth were created from sound teeth over 7 days in a demineralizing solution. Specimens were embedded into plastic rings with acrylic resin and then sagittal mesial-distal sectioned from crown to the long axis of the root under cooling water using a low-speed diamond blade. The surface of interest was fine polished sequentially. Hardness measurement was performed within an axial depth of 1000μm with at least of 320 indentations on each sample. Mann-Whitney U Test was used to compare the hardness as the variable among different dentin types (SOUND, NCAD and ACAD) at each dentin depth level. There was no significant difference in nanohardness between NCAD and ACAD up to a depth of 130μm (p>0.05). NCAD consistently showed lower hardness. ACAD showed no significant difference in hardness with SOUND dentin beyond 190μm (phardness; however the long-term effects of caries beneath the lesion extend deeply through intertubular dentin. Sound dentin at deep areas (close to the pulp chamber) is considered to be soft. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Can Caries-Affected Dentin be Completely Remine-ralized by Guided Tissue Remineralization?

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    Jing Mao

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To date, there is no evidence that conventional remineralization techniques us-ing calcium and phosphate ion-containing media will completely remineralize carious lesions in regions where remnant apatite seed crystallites are absent. Conversely, guided tissue remineralization using biomimetic analogs of dentin matrix proteins is successful in remineralizing thin layers of completely demineralized dentin. The hypothesis: Conventional remineralization strategy depends on epitaxial growth over existing apatite crystallites. If there are no or few crystallites, there will be no remineralization. Guided tissue remineralization uses biomimetic analogs of dentin matrix proteins to introduce sequestered amorphous calcium phosphate nanoprecur-sors into the internal water compartments of collagen fibrils. Attachment of templating analogs of matrix phosphoproteins to the colla-gen fibrils further guided the nucleation and growth of apatite crystallites within the fibril. Such a strategy is independent of apatite seed crystallites. Our hypothesis is that 250-300 microns thick artificial carious lesions can be completely remineralized in vitro by guide tissue remineralization but not by conventional remineralization techniques.Evaluation of the hypothesis: Validation of the hypothesis will address the critical barrier to progress in remineralization of caries-affected dentin and shift existing paradigms by providing a novel method of remineralization based on a nanotechnology-based bottom-up approach. This will also generate important information to support the translation of the proof-of-concept biomimetic strategy into a clinically-relevant delivery system for remineralizing caries-affected dentin created by micro-organisms in the oral cavity.

  2. Evaluation of micro-tensile bond strength of caries-affected human dentine after three different caries removal techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirin Karaarslan, E; Yildiz, E; Cebe, M A; Yegin, Z; Ozturk, B

    2012-10-01

    This study evaluated the effect that different techniques for removing dental caries had on the strength of the microtensile bond to caries-affected human dentine created by three bonding agents. Forty-five human molar teeth containing carious lesions were randomly divided into three groups according to the technique that would be used to remove the caries: a conventional bur, an Er:YAG laser or a chemo-mechanical Carisolv(®) gel (n=15). Next, each of the three removal-technique groups was divided into three subgroups according to the bonding agents that would be used: Clearfil(®) SE Bond, G-Bond(®), or Adper(®) Single Bond 2 (n=5). Three 1mm(2) stick-shaped microtensile specimens from each tooth were prepared with a slow-speed diamond saw sectioning machine fitted with a diamond-rim blade (n=15 specimens). For each removal technique one dentine sample was analysed using scanning electron microscopy. There were statistically significant differences in the resulting tensile strength of the bond among the techniques used to remove the caries and there were also statistically significant differences in the strength of the bond among the adhesive systems used. The etch-and-rinse adhesive system was the most affected by the technique used to remove the caries; of the three techniques tested, the chemo-mechanical removal technique worked best with the two-step self etch adhesive system. The bond strength values of the etch-and-rinse adhesive system were affected by the caries removal techniques used in the present study. However, in the one- and two-step self etch adhesive systems, bond strength values were not affected by the caries removal techniques applied. While a chemo-mechanical caries removal technique, similar to Carisolv(®), may be suggested with self etch adhesive systems, in caries removal techniques with laser, etch-and-rinse systems might be preferred. Caries removal methods may lead to differences in the characteristics of dentine surface. Dentine

  3. Comparison of Amount of Primary Tooth Reduction Required for Anterior and Posterior Zirconia and Stainless Steel Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Larkin; Wells, Martha H; Harris, Edward F; Lou, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    To determine if aggressiveness of primary tooth preparation varied among different brands of zirconia and stainless steel (SSC) crowns. One hundred primary typodont teeth were divided into five groups (10 posterior and 10 anterior) and assigned to: Cheng Crowns (CC); EZ Pedo (EZP); Kinder Krowns (KKZ); NuSmile (NSZ); and SSC. Teeth were prepared, and assigned crowns were fitted. Teeth were weighed prior to and after preparation. Weight changes served as a surrogate measure of tooth reduction. Analysis of variance showed a significant difference in tooth reduction among brand/type for both the anterior and posterior. Tukey's honest significant difference test (HSD), when applied to anterior data, revealed that SSCs required significantly less tooth removal compared to the composite of the four zirconia brands, which showed no significant difference among them. Tukey's HSD test, applied to posterior data, revealed that CC required significantly greater removal of crown structure, while EZP, KKZ, and NSZ were statistically equivalent, and SSCs required significantly less removal. Zirconia crowns required more tooth reduction than stainless steel crowns for primary anterior and posterior teeth. Tooth reduction for anterior zirconia crowns was equivalent among brands. For posterior teeth, reduction for three brands (EZ Pedo, Kinder Krowns, NuSmile) did not differ, while Cheng Crowns required more reduction.

  4. Effect of fluoride pretreatment on primary and permanent tooth surfaces by acid-etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Samjin; Cheong, Youjin; Lee, Gi-Ja; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2010-01-01

    This study observed the effect of fluoride application on a 37% phosphoric acid etching for 20 s of the enamel surfaces of primary and permanent teeth based on a clinical protocol employed in dental hospitals, through atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Enamel samples were prepared from 84 exfoliated and noncarious teeth. Primary (groups 1-4) and permanent (groups 5-8) tooth samples were assigned randomly to one of eight groups based on the timing of acid-etching with 37% phosphoric acid after an acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) treatment. Groups 1 and 5 received no fluoride application. Groups 2-4 and 6-8 were pretreated with fluoride and received acid-etching 2 weeks later (groups 2 and 6), 1 week later (groups 3 and 7), and immediately (groups 4 and 8). The acid-etching process led to a significant increase in roughness (pprimary and permanent tooth surface roughness (p<0.005). An acid-etching procedure 2 weeks after performing an APF pretreatment might be recommended to obtain the maximum enamel adhesion of a resin composite. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Influence of metabolic-linked early life factors on the eruption timing of the first primary tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Un Lam, Carolina; Hsu, Chin-Ying Stephen; Yee, Robert; Koh, David; Lee, Yung Seng; Chong, Mary Foong-Fong; Cai, Meijin; Kwek, Kenneth; Saw, Seang Mei; Godfrey, Keith; Gluckman, Peter; Chong, Yap Seng

    2016-11-01

    Early eruption of permanent teeth has been associated with childhood obesity and diabetes mellitus, suggesting links between tooth eruption and metabolic conditions. This longitudinal study aimed to identify pre-, peri- and postnatal factors with metabolic consequences during infancy that may affect the eruption timing of the first primary tooth (ETFT) in children from an ethnically heterogeneous population residing within the same community. Participants were recruited (n = 1033) through the GUSTO (Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes) birth cohort (n = 1237). Oral examinations were performed at 3-month intervals from 6 to 18 months of age. Crude and adjusted analyses, with generalized linear modelling, were conducted to link ETFT to potential determinants occurring during pregnancy, delivery/birth and early infancy. Overall mean eruption age of the first primary tooth was 8.5 (SD 2.6) months. Earlier tooth eruption was significantly associated with infant's rate of weight gain during the first 3 months of life and increased maternal childbearing age. Compared to their Chinese counterparts, Malay and Indian children experienced significantly delayed tooth eruption by 1.2 and 1.7 months, respectively. Infant weight gain from birth to 3 months, ethnicity and maternal childbearing age were significant determinants of first tooth eruption timing. Early life influences can affect primary tooth development, possibly via metabolic pathways. Timing of tooth eruption is linked to general growth and metabolic function. Therefore, it has potential in forecasting oral and systemic conditions such as caries and obesity.

  6. Evaluation of Survival Time of Tooth Color Dental Materials in Primary Anterior Teeth

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    Taraneh Movahhed

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In restorative dentistry, selecting the proper material is an important factor for clinical success. The objective of this study was clinical evaluation of survival time of three tooth color materials in primary anterior teeth. Methods: In this interventional clinical trial study, 94 deciduous anterior teeth (36 teeth in boys, 58 teeth in girls belonging to 3-5 year old children in Pediatric Department of Mashhad Faculty of Dentistry, Iran were selected. Selective dental materials included compoglass, glass-ionomer Fuji II LC, and composite resin. The data were analyzed with Kaplan–Meyer and Log rank test. Results: compoglass had the highest survival time in comparison with composite and glass-ionomer. Nine months retention rate for teeth restored with compoglass, composite resin and glass-ionomer were estimated: 95%, 21%, and 12.5%, respectively. Conclusion: Compoglass can be a suitable material for anterior primary teeth restoration.

  7. Evaluation of Survival Time of Tooth Color Dental Materials in Primary Anterior Teeth

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    Behjat-Al-Molook Ajami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In restorative dentistry, selecting the proper material is an important factor for clinical success. The objective of this study was clinical evaluation of survival time of three tooth color materials in primary anterior teeth. Methods: In this interventional clinical trial study, 94 deciduous anterior teeth (36 teeth in boys, 58 teeth in girls belonging to 3-5 year old children in Pediatric Department of Mashhad Faculty of Dentistry, Iran were selected. Selective dental materials included compoglass, glass-ionomer Fuji II LC, and composite resin. The data were analyzed with Kaplan–Meyer and Log rank test. Results: compoglass had the highest survival time in comparison with composite and glass-ionomer. Nine months retention rate for teeth restored with compoglass, composite resin and glass-ionomer were estimated: 95%, 21%, and 12.5%, respectively. Conclusion: Compoglass can be a suitable material for anterior primary teeth restoration

  8. Signs and symptoms associated with primary tooth eruption: a clinical trial of nonpharmacological remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarpour, Mahtab; Soltanimehr, Elham; Eskandarian, Taherh

    2015-07-28

    To evaluate disturbances in primary tooth eruption and their management with nonpharmacological remedies. In this nonrandomized clinical trial, 270 children aged between 8 and 36 months were selected and divided into 5 groups with 54 children initially enrolled in each group. The children were seen during an 8-day period during tooth eruption. At each appointment data were recorded from oral examination, tympanic temperature measurement and a questionnaire. The five methods used as remedies to reduce teething symptoms were: 1) cuddle therapy, 2) ice, 3) rubbing the gums, 4) teething rings and 5) food for chewing. Teething symptoms, the type of erupted tooth, symptoms of recovery and the mother's satisfaction with treatment were evaluated. Two hundred and fifty four children (mean age 16 ± 7.2 months) completed the study. The most frequent teething symptoms were drooling (92%), sleep disturbances (82.3%) and irritability (75.6%). These symptoms were more pronounced in low birth weight children (p > 0.05). Canine eruption led to more loss of appetite than incisor (p = 0.033) or molars eruption (p = 0.014). Low grade increases in body temperature were observed only on the day of eruption (36.70 ± 0.39 °C), when body temperature was significantly different compared to the day before and the day after eruption (both p < 0.001). There was no significant correlation between fever as reported by mothers and temperature readings obtained by the investigators. The most favorable results for time to recovery and the mother's satisfaction were seen when teething rings were used, followed by cuddle therapy and rubbing the gums. There was no association between teething and symptoms such as fever or diarrhea. Low birth weight children may have more teething symptoms. Teething rings, cuddle therapy and rubbing the gums were the most effective methods to reduce symptoms. Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials: code IRCT201211127402N3.

  9. Meta-analysis of the prevalence of tooth wear in primary dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corica, A; Caprioglio, A

    2014-12-01

    To conduct a meta-analysis of all the studies published in literature over the past three decades on the prevalence of dental erosion in preschool children. The Pubmed data base revealed only one systematic review on the prevalence of tooth wear in children up to 5 years old. The search included works published from January 1982 to September 2012, using the following combinations of keywords: 1) "dental erosion" AND "children"; 2) "dental erosion in primary dentition"; 3) "dental" AND "attrition" AND "prevalence". The inclusion criteria for papers on tooth wear were the deciduous dentition observed only on the palatal and buccal sides with the distinction of erosion, attrition and abrasion. We took into consideration only randomized control trials. We excluded articles not written in English, case reports, historical and forensic studies, in vitro and in vivo studies. In case of doubt and/or when an abstract was not available, the full text copy of the article was examined. The first search on Pubmed revealed 29 articles, the same found in the study of Kreulen [2010], however we selected only multicentric studies focused on children of age below 5 years old, in which only the primary dentition (D) and only anterior teeth (incisors) were considered. Both forest plot and scatter plot showed the prevalence of dental erosion in primary dentition, and that older children had a more severe dental erosion. Dental erosion should be considered a paediatric dentistry pathological entity as well as dental caries, and it can be related to more severe systemic diseases such as Gastroesophageal reflux disease. In addition, taking care of these little patients is important because they might suffer persentiveness, and also pulpal pathology caused by the typical structure of deciduous teeth, where the pulp cavity is wide and close to the dentine and the enamel.

  10. Effect of foods and drinks on primary tooth enamel after erosive challenge with hydrochloric acid

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    Késsia Suênia Fidelis de MESQUITA-GUIMARÃES

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of industrialised foods and drinks on primary tooth enamel previously eroded with hydrochloric acid (HCl. The crowns of one hundred two specimens were subjected to an erosive challenge with HCl and randomly divided into six groups (n = 17: Chocolate Milk (Toddynho® - Pepsico - negative control; Petit Suisse Yogurt (Danoninho® - Danone; Strawberry Yogurt (Vigor; Apple puree (Nestlé; Fermented Milk (Yakult® - Yakult; and Home Squeezed Style Orange Juice (del Valle - positive control. The 28-day immersion cycles for the test products were performed twice daily and were interspersed with exposure of the test substrate to artificial saliva. Measurements of enamel surface microhardness (SMH were performed initially, after immersion in HCl and at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of experimentation. A two-way ANOVA, according to a split-plot design, followed by the sum of squares decomposition and Tukey’s test, revealed a significant effect for the interaction between Foods and Drinks and Length of Exposure (p < 0.00001. Orange juice resulted in greater mineral loss of enamel after 28 days. None of the test products was associated with recovery of tooth enamel microhardness.

  11. Effect of foods and drinks on primary tooth enamel after erosive challenge with hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita-Guimarães, Késsia Suênia Fidelis de; Scatena, Camila; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; Rodrigues-Júnior, Antonio Luiz; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of industrialised foods and drinks on primary tooth enamel previously eroded with hydrochloric acid (HCl). The crowns of one hundred two specimens were subjected to an erosive challenge with HCl and randomly divided into six groups (n = 17): Chocolate Milk (Toddynho® - Pepsico) - negative control; Petit Suisse Yogurt (Danoninho® - Danone); Strawberry Yogurt (Vigor); Apple puree (Nestlé); Fermented Milk (Yakult® - Yakult); and Home Squeezed Style Orange Juice (del Valle) - positive control. The 28-day immersion cycles for the test products were performed twice daily and were interspersed with exposure of the test substrate to artificial saliva. Measurements of enamel surface microhardness (SMH) were performed initially, after immersion in HCl and at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of experimentation. A two-way ANOVA, according to a split-plot design, followed by the sum of squares decomposition and Tukey's test, revealed a significant effect for the interaction between Foods and Drinks and Length of Exposure (p < 0.00001). Orange juice resulted in greater mineral loss of enamel after 28 days. None of the test products was associated with recovery of tooth enamel microhardness.

  12. Calcium and magnesium levels in primary tooth enamel and genetic variation in enamel formation genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halusic, Alina M; Sepich, Victoria R; Shirley, Daniel C; Granjeiro, José M; Costa, Marcelo C; Küchler, Erika C; Vieira, Alexandre R

    2014-01-01

    Evidence exists that a genetic component in caries susceptibility is related to variation in enamel formation genes. The purpose of this study was to explore the trends of demineralization and remineralization of teeth from individuals whose genotypes for selected genes (ENAM, MMP20, TUFT, TFIP, and AMBN) are known. In this study, primary baseline teeth (20) were exposed to an artificial caries solution, followed by a remineralizing solution. Biopsies of each tooth category (baseline, carious, and fluoridated) were completed via an acid wash solution. Concentrations of magnesium and calcium were measured using an optical emission spectrometer instrument. Allele and genotype frequencies for calcium and magnesium levels were compared between each tooth category. To help interpret the results, we also calculated odds ratios. Calcium levels exceeded magnesium levels in each sample. In addition, mineral concentration varied among samples. Associations could be seen between genetic variation in ENAM (P=.0003 baseline values for calcium, P<.001 baseline values for magnesium, P<.04 artificial caries values for magnesium) and AMBN (P<.02 artificial caries values for calcium) with mineral concentration. Our results suggest that genetic variation of enamel formation genes may influence calcium and magnesium concentrations of teeth and impact the development of caries.

  13. The association between primary tooth emergence and anthropometric measures in young adults: findings from a large prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Evans, David M; Tobias, Jonathan H

    2014-01-01

    Cross sectional studies suggest a link may exist between tooth emergence and obesity. To explore this relationship, we aimed to evaluate the prospective associations between primary tooth emergence and anthropometric measures in young adults. Multivariable linear regression was used to analyse relationships between primary tooth emergence, and anthropometric measures measured at 17.8 years, in 2977 participants (1362 males and 1615 females) from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). In minimally adjusted models, 'quintiles of number of paired teeth' (assessed by questionnaire at 15 months) was positively associated with height [change in height (cm) per quintile increase in 'number of paired teeth' (β) = 0.35 (95%CI: 0.18, 0.52) P = 0.0001] and weight [ratio of geometric mean weight per quintile increase in 'number of paired teeth' (RGM) = 1.015 (95%CI: 1.010, 1.019) PPrimary tooth emergence is associated with subsequent fat mass, suggesting these could share common constitutive factors, and that early primary tooth emergence may represent a hitherto unrecognised risk factor for the development of obesity in later life.

  14. The effect of caries excavation methods on the bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives to caries affected dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, V; Singla, M; Yadav, S; Yadav, H

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of chemomechanical caries removal and conventional caries excavation on the microtensile bond strength of three different dentine adhesive systems. Thirty extracted human mandibular molars with radiographic signs of dental caries extending up to the middle third of dentine were sectioned longitudinally through the centre of the carious lesion in a buccolingual direction to yield two sections. One half of each tooth was excavated by tungsten carbide bur and the other half was chemomechanically treated with Carisolv(®) . Three dentine bonding systems: an etch-and-rinse single bottle adhesive (Single Bond, 3M ESPE); a two bottle, two-step self-etch bonding system (One Coat Self Etching Bond, Coltene Whaledent); and a single-step, single bottle self-etch adhesive (Adper Easy Bond Self-Etch Adhesive, 3M ESPE) were applied and composite build-up was done. The specimens were tested for microtensile bond strength. Data were analysed using two-way analysis of variance and pair-wise multiple comparisons were done using the Holm-Sidak method. The etch-and-rinse adhesive and two bottle self-etch system showed significantly higher bond strength than the single bottle self-etch system. Caries excavation method had no influence on bond strength values. Carisolv(®) did not affect the microtensile bond strength values of different adhesive systems tested to the caries affected dentine. © 2013 Australian Dental Association.

  15. Association of physical properties and maintenance of sterility of primary teeth in human tooth bank

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    Nitika Bajaj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was carried out to evaluate the sterility and structural integrity of stored primary teeth in artificial saliva over a storage period of 12 weeks (3 months in human tooth bank (HTB. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 freshly extracted teeth were taken and were categorized into four groups of 20 each. The samples were stored at 4°C for 12 weeks (3 months in the refrigerator. During their storage time of 3 months, they were repetitively evaluated for their sterility, enamel hardness, calcium and phosphate solubility and color stability at regular intervals of 3 weeks. Observations and Results: That teeth stored in artificial saliva maintained their sterility throughout the storage time of 12 weeks, but changes in their physical and chemical properties occurred with an increase in storage time. Conclusion: Storage time not more than 9 weeks is recommended for deciduous teeth to be stored in artificial saliva in a HTB.

  16. Effect of ammonium hexafluorosilicate application for arresting caries treatment on demineralized primary tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Yumiko; Tadokoro, Katsumi; Otani, Hideji; Hidaka, Kiyoshi; Inoue, Takashi; Miyazaki, Masashi; Tay, Franklin R

    2013-01-01

    Ammonium hexafluorosilicate (AHF) has been applied to arrest caries without discoloration. The purpose of this study was to observe structural and elemental changes of demineralized and AHF applied primary tooth enamel. Enamel from the labial surface of 20 primary canines was divided into an unground side and ground side at the center of the tooth, and demineralized with 35% phosphoric acid for 6 min. The teeth were divided into 4 groups according to a 3-min application of AHF and 1 week of soaking in artificial saliva, as follows: group A (neither AHF nor saliva), group B (only saliva), group C (only AHF), and group D (AHF and saliva), and then subdivided according to whether the enamel was ground or unground. Specimens were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS). The data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD test at α = 0.05. In groups A and B, prism structures were seen, however, in groups C and D, enamel surfaces were covered with spherical particles. Ca/P ratio was significantly higher in groups C and D than in groups A and B. There was no significant difference between ground and unground enamel in the content of any element. The values for F, Na, Mg and Si persents and Ca/P ratio were significantly higher for the enamel surface than for points 10-30 µm beneath the surface. Results of this study suggest the possibility that AHF treatment arrests caries, although further study will be required to confirm this result.

  17. Microhardness of composite resin cured through different primary tooth thicknesses with different light intensities and curing times: In vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhari, Fatemeh; Ajami, Behjatolmolok; Moazzami, Saied Mostafa; Baghaee, Bahareh; Hafez, Bahareh

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of increased exposure time and light intensity on microhardness of cured composite through different thicknesses of tooth structure in primary teeth. One hundred and seventy cylindrical resin composite specimens were prepared. All specimens were divided into 17 experimental and control groups. "Light-emitting diode" light curing unit (LCU) applied directly or through 1, 2, and 3 mm thicknesses tooth slices for experimental groups. The irradiation protocols were 25 and 50 s at 650 mW/cm(2) and 15 and 30 s at 1100 mW/cm(2). The "quartz-tungsten-halogen" LCU (400 mW/cm(2)) for 40 s was used in control group. Microhardness was measured by the Vickers hardness test. Indirectly cured specimens and those cured through a 1 mm thick tooth structure, an increase in intensity caused hardness drop. In the specimens cured through 2 and 3 mm thick tooth structures, increased intensity and/or exposure time did not show any appropriate changes on microhardness. Irradiation through a 1.0 mm thick tooth slice resulted in reduced microhardness although it was still within the clinically acceptable level. The hardness values of the specimens cured through 2 or 3 mm thick tooth slices fell below the clinically acceptable level even after doubling the exposure time and/or light intensity.

  18. Genome-wide association study of primary tooth eruption identifies pleiotropic loci associated with height and craniofacial distances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Hoggart, Clive J; Paternoster, Lavinia

    2013-01-01

    Twin and family studies indicate that the timing of primary tooth eruption is highly heritable, with estimates typically exceeding 80%. To identify variants involved in primary tooth eruption, we performed a population-based genome-wide association study of 'age at first tooth' and 'number of teeth......' using 5998 and 6609 individuals, respectively, from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) and 5403 individuals from the 1966 Northern Finland Birth Cohort (NFBC1966). We tested 2 446 724 SNPs imputed in both studies. Analyses were controlled for the effect of gestational age, sex...... and age of measurement. Results from the two studies were combined using fixed effects inverse variance meta-analysis. We identified a total of 15 independent loci, with 10 loci reaching genome-wide significance (P

  19. Nanostructural effect of acid-etching and fluoride application on human primary and permanent tooth enamels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, Youjin; Choi, Samjin; Kim, So Jung; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the nanostructural effects of fluoride application and the acid-etching time with respect to the time elapsed after fluoride application on the primary and permanent tooth enamel layers using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). 192 non-carious teeth were assigned to sixteen experimental groups (n = 12) including primary (1 to 8) and permanent (9 to 16) teeth, based on the timing of acid-etching with 37% phosphoric acid after an acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) pre-treatment. The APF pre-treatment led to a decrease in surface roughness in both the primary and permanent teeth. After the APF treatment, the roughness in both primary and permanent teeth increased with the time elapsed. An acid-etching time of 40 s led to increased nanostructural changes in the enamel surfaces compared to the conventional acid-etching time of 20 s. This acid-etching process led to a higher roughness changes in the primary teeth than in the permanent teeth. To obtain proper enamel adhesion of a sealant after APF pre-treatment, it is important to apply acid-etching two weeks after pre-treatment. In addition, the acid-etching time should be prolonged to apply etching more quickly than two weeks, regardless of the primary and permanent teeth. Highlights: ► APF pre-treatment led to decreased surface roughness in the enamel. ► After APF treatment, the more roughness increased with increasing time elapsed. ► Acid-etching should be performed two weeks after fluoride application.

  20. Nanostructural effect of acid-etching and fluoride application on human primary and permanent tooth enamels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Youjin [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Healthcare Industry Research Institute, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Samjin [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Healthcare Industry Research Institute, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Orthodontics, College of Dental Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, So Jung [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, College of Dental Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hun-Kuk, E-mail: sigmoidus@khu.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Healthcare Industry Research Institute, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Program of Medical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    This study examined the nanostructural effects of fluoride application and the acid-etching time with respect to the time elapsed after fluoride application on the primary and permanent tooth enamel layers using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). 192 non-carious teeth were assigned to sixteen experimental groups (n = 12) including primary (1 to 8) and permanent (9 to 16) teeth, based on the timing of acid-etching with 37% phosphoric acid after an acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) pre-treatment. The APF pre-treatment led to a decrease in surface roughness in both the primary and permanent teeth. After the APF treatment, the roughness in both primary and permanent teeth increased with the time elapsed. An acid-etching time of 40 s led to increased nanostructural changes in the enamel surfaces compared to the conventional acid-etching time of 20 s. This acid-etching process led to a higher roughness changes in the primary teeth than in the permanent teeth. To obtain proper enamel adhesion of a sealant after APF pre-treatment, it is important to apply acid-etching two weeks after pre-treatment. In addition, the acid-etching time should be prolonged to apply etching more quickly than two weeks, regardless of the primary and permanent teeth. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer APF pre-treatment led to decreased surface roughness in the enamel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer After APF treatment, the more roughness increased with increasing time elapsed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acid-etching should be performed two weeks after fluoride application.

  1. Genome-wide association study of primary tooth eruption identifies pleiotropic loci associated with height and craniofacial distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Hoggart, Clive J; Paternoster, Lavinia; Kemp, John P; Prokopenko, Inga; Horikoshi, Momoko; Wright, Victoria J; Tobias, Jon H; Richmond, Stephen; Zhurov, Alexei I; Toma, Arshed M; Pouta, Anneli; Taanila, Anja; Sipila, Kirsi; Lähdesmäki, Raija; Pillas, Demetris; Geller, Frank; Feenstra, Bjarke; Melbye, Mads; Nohr, Ellen A; Ring, Susan M; St Pourcain, Beate; Timpson, Nicholas J; Davey Smith, George; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Evans, David M

    2013-09-15

    Twin and family studies indicate that the timing of primary tooth eruption is highly heritable, with estimates typically exceeding 80%. To identify variants involved in primary tooth eruption, we performed a population-based genome-wide association study of 'age at first tooth' and 'number of teeth' using 5998 and 6609 individuals, respectively, from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) and 5403 individuals from the 1966 Northern Finland Birth Cohort (NFBC1966). We tested 2 446 724 SNPs imputed in both studies. Analyses were controlled for the effect of gestational age, sex and age of measurement. Results from the two studies were combined using fixed effects inverse variance meta-analysis. We identified a total of 15 independent loci, with 10 loci reaching genome-wide significance (P tooth' and 11 loci for 'number of teeth'. Together, these associations explain 6.06% of the variation in 'age of first tooth' and 4.76% of the variation in 'number of teeth'. The identified loci included eight previously unidentified loci, some containing genes known to play a role in tooth and other developmental pathways, including an SNP in the protein-coding region of BMP4 (rs17563, P = 9.080 × 10(-17)). Three of these loci, containing the genes HMGA2, AJUBA and ADK, also showed evidence of association with craniofacial distances, particularly those indexing facial width. Our results suggest that the genome-wide association approach is a powerful strategy for detecting variants involved in tooth eruption, and potentially craniofacial growth and more generally organ development.

  2. Effect of green tea extract on bonding durability of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system to caries-affected dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina CARVALHO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective Green tea extract has been advocated as a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP inhibitor; however, its effect on bond durability to caries-affected dentin has never been reported. Thus, the aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of two MMP inhibitors (2% chlorhexidine and 2% green tea extract, applied after acid etching, on bond durability of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system to caries-affected dentin. Material and Methods Occlusal enamel was removed from third molars to expose the dentin surface, and the molars were submitted to a caries induction protocol for 15 days. After removal of infected dentin, specimens were conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid (15 seconds and randomly divided into three groups, according to the type of dentin pretreatment (n=10: NT: no treatment; GT: 2% green tea extract; CLX: 2% chlorhexidine. The etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA was applied according to the manufacturer's instructions, and composite resin restorations were built on the dentin. After 24 hours, at 37°C, the resin-tooth blocks were sectioned perpendicularly to the adhesive interface in the form of sticks (0.8 mm2 of adhesive area and randomly subdivided into two groups according to when they were to be submitted to microtensile bond strength (μTBS testing: immediately or 6 months after storage in distilled water. Data were reported in MPa and submitted to two-way ANOVA for completely randomized blocks, followed by Tukey’s test (α=0.05. Results After 24 hours, there was no significant difference in the μTBS of the groups. After 6 months, the GT group had significantly higher μTBS values. Conclusion It was concluded that the application of 2% green tea extract was able to increase bond durability of the etch-and-rinse system to dentin. Neither the application of chlorhexidine nor non-treatment (NT - control had any effect on bond strength after water storage.

  3. A randomized trial of mineral trioxide aggregate cements in primary tooth pulpotomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Berna; Ataç, Atila S; Cehreli, Zafer C; Uysal, Serdar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the outcome of primary tooth pulpotomies using two different white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) cements and calcium hydroxide (CH). Primary molars (N=139) from three- to nine-year-old children were randomly assigned to be treated using either ProRoot MTA (N=46), MTA Angelus (N=45), or CH paste (N=48) as pulpotomy medicaments. All pulpotomized teeth received a Class I amalgam as a final restoration. Recall examinations were carried out at one, three, six, 12, 18, and 24 months. The 24-month cumulative clinical success rates for ProRoot MTA, MTA Angelus, and CH were approximately 98 percent, 96 percent, and 77 percent, respectively. The cumulative radiographic success rates for ProRoot MTA, MTA Angelus, and CH were approximately 98 percent, 91 percent, and 45 percent, respectively. For all parameters evaluated, the MTA cements showed similar clinical and radiographic outcomes (P>.05), which were significantly better than those of CH (P.05). ProRoot MTA and MTA Angelus showed similar and favorable success rates as pulpotomy materials in primary molars.

  4. Tooth Loss and Survival Analysis after Traumatic Injuries in Primary Dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galovic Jelena

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the treatment options, survival rate of traumatized primary teeth and evaluate the factors influencing the outcome. Material and Methods: The sample consisted of all dental trauma cases treated over a 14 years period at the Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Dental Clinic of Vojvodina, Novi Sad. Criteria for inclusion in this study were: dental trauma to primary teeth and age in the moment of injury up to seven years. Dental trauma records were analyzed in order to obtain the following: gender and age of the child at the time of trauma, type of trauma, as well as the type and timing of treatment received. After data analysis a survival rate of traumatized primary teeth was evaluated. Results: The study was designed as retrospective and it included 225 children, with 346 traumatized primary teeth. The occurrence of trauma was higher in male patients (60,4% and in children up to 4 years of age. Luxations were more frequent (72.8% compared to isolated teeth fractures (20.8%, while the two types of injury combined were rare (6,3%. One year following dental trauma 231 teeth (0.67% developed complications. Falls were the main cause of trauma (68.9% and the presence of more than one traumatized tooth was frequent. A percentage of 48.8 children received dental care during first 24 h after the injury. Conclusions: Survival of injured primary teeth is relatively low, regardless of trauma type, time interval between injury and treatment and the type of provided treatment.

  5. Premature primary tooth eruption in cognitive/motor-delayed ADNP-mutated children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozes, I; Van Dijck, A; Hacohen-Kleiman, G; Grigg, I; Karmon, G; Giladi, E; Eger, M; Gabet, Y; Pasmanik-Chor, M; Cappuyns, E; Elpeleg, O; Kooy, R F; Bedrosian-Sermone, S

    2017-02-21

    A major flaw in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) management is late diagnosis. Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) is a most frequent de novo mutated ASD-related gene. Functionally, ADNP protects nerve cells against electrical blockade. In mice, complete Adnp deficiency results in dysregulation of over 400 genes and failure to form a brain. Adnp haploinsufficiency results in cognitive and social deficiencies coupled to sex- and age-dependent deficits in the key microtubule and ion channel pathways. Here, collaborating with parents/caregivers globally, we discovered premature tooth eruption as a potential early diagnostic biomarker for ADNP mutation. The parents of 44/54 ADNP-mutated children reported an almost full erupted dentition by 1 year of age, including molars and only 10 of the children had teeth within the normal developmental time range. Looking at Adnp-deficient mice, by computed tomography, showed significantly smaller dental sacs and tooth buds at 5 days of age in the deficient mice compared to littermate controls. There was only trending at 2 days, implicating age-dependent dysregulation of teething in Adnp-deficient mice. Allen Atlas analysis showed Adnp expression in the jaw area. RNA sequencing (RNAseq) and gene array analysis of human ADNP-mutated lymphoblastoids, whole-mouse embryos and mouse brains identified dysregulation of bone/nervous system-controlling genes resulting from ADNP mutation/deficiency (for example, BMP1 and BMP4). AKAP6, discovered here as a major gene regulated by ADNP, also links cognition and bone maintenance. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that early primary (deciduous) teething is related to the ADNP syndrome, providing for early/simple diagnosis and paving the path to early intervention/specialized treatment plan.

  6. Use of a disclosed plaque visualization technique improved the self-performed, tooth brushing ability of primary schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chounchaisithi, Napa; Santiwong, Busayarat; Sutthavong, Sirikarn; Asvanit, Pompun

    2014-02-01

    Disclosing agents have a long history of use as an aid in children's tooth brushing instruction. However, their benefit when used to improve self-performed tooth brushing ability without any tooth brushing instruction has not been investigated. To evaluate the effect of disclosed plaque visualization on improving the self-performed, tooth brushing ability of primary school children. A cluster-randomized, crossover study was conducted in Nakhon Nayok province, Thailand. A total of 122 second-grade schoolchildren, aged 8-10 years old, from 12 schools were randomly divided into 2 groups. The first group was assigned to brush with disclosed plaque visualization, while the other group brushed without disclosed plaque visualization. One month later the groups switched procedures. Tooth brushing ability was evaluated by the subjects' reduction in patient hygiene performance (PHP) scores. The data were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance, with significance set at pbrushing ability in all areas of the mouth (pteeth, mandibular teeth, buccal surfaces, and areas adjacent to the gingival margin (pbrushing ability, and could be used in school-based oral health promotion programs.

  7. Does Timing of Eruption in First Primary Tooth Correlate with that of First Permanent Tooth? A 9-year Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hamidreza Poureslami; Naser Asl Aminabadi; Alireza Sighari Deljavan; Leila Erfanparast; Azin Sohrabi; Zahra Jamali; Sina Ghertasi Oskouei; Kameliya Hazem; Sajjad Shirazi

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Predicting the teeth eruption time is a valuable tool in pediatric dentistry since it can affects scheduling dental and orthodontic treatments. This study investigated the relationship between the eruption time of first primary and permanent teeth and the variation in the eruption time considering socioeconomic status (SES) in a 9-year population- based cohort study. Materials and methods . 307 subjects were examined at bimonthly intervals during the first and second year...

  8. Genome-wide association study of primary tooth eruption identifies pleiotropic loci associated with height and craniofacial distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Hoggart, Clive J.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Kemp, John P.; Prokopenko, Inga; Horikoshi, Momoko; Wright, Victoria J.; Tobias, Jon H.; Richmond, Stephen; Zhurov, Alexei I.; Toma, Arshed M.; Pouta, Anneli; Taanila, Anja; Sipila, Kirsi; Lähdesmäki, Raija; Pillas, Demetris; Geller, Frank; Feenstra, Bjarke; Melbye, Mads; Nohr, Ellen A.; Ring, Susan M.; St Pourcain, Beate; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Davey Smith, George; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Evans, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Twin and family studies indicate that the timing of primary tooth eruption is highly heritable, with estimates typically exceeding 80%. To identify variants involved in primary tooth eruption, we performed a population-based genome-wide association study of ‘age at first tooth’ and ‘number of teeth’ using 5998 and 6609 individuals, respectively, from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) and 5403 individuals from the 1966 Northern Finland Birth Cohort (NFBC1966). We tested 2 446 724 SNPs imputed in both studies. Analyses were controlled for the effect of gestational age, sex and age of measurement. Results from the two studies were combined using fixed effects inverse variance meta-analysis. We identified a total of 15 independent loci, with 10 loci reaching genome-wide significance (P eruption, and potentially craniofacial growth and more generally organ development. PMID:23704328

  9. Primary cilia regulate Shh activity in the control of molar tooth number

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ohazama, A.; Haycraft, C. J.; Seppala, M.; Ghafoor, S.; Cobourne, M.; Martinelli, D. C.; Fan, CH. M.; Peterková, Renata; Lesot, H.; Yoder, B. K.; Sharpe, P. T.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 136, č. 6 (2009), s. 897-903 ISSN 0950-1991 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/07/0223; GA MŠk OC B23.002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : intraflagellar transport * supernumerary tooth * tooth development Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.194, year: 2009

  10. Expression patterns of genes critical for BMP signaling pathway in developing human primary tooth germs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiuqing; Shen, Bin; Ruan, Ningsheng; Guan, Zhen; Zhang, Yanding; Chen, YiPing; Hu, Xuefeng

    2014-12-01

    The developing murine tooth has been used as an excellent model system to study the molecular mechanism of organ development and regeneration. While the expression patterns of numerous regulatory genes have been examined and their roles have begun to be revealed in the developing murine tooth, little is known about gene expression and function in human tooth development. In order to unveil the molecular mechanisms that regulate human tooth morphogenesis, we examined the expression patterns of the major BMP signaling pathway molecules in the developing human tooth germ at the cap and bell stages by in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and real-time RT-PCR. Expression of BMP ligands and antagonist, including BMP2, BMP3, BMP4, BMP7, and NOOGGIN, exhibited uniform patterns in the tooth germs of incisor and molar at the cap and bell stages with stronger expression in the inner dental epithelium than that in the dental mesenchyme. Both type I and type II BMP receptors were present in widespread expression pattern in the whole-enamel organ and the dental mesenchyme with the strongest expression in inner dental epithelium at the cap and bell stages. SMAD4 and SMAD1/5/8 showed an expression pattern similar to that of BMP ligands with more intensive signals in the inner dental epithelium. Despite some unique and distinct patterns as compared to the mouse, the intensive expression of BMP signaling pathway molecules in the developing human tooth strongly suggests conserved functions of BMP signaling during human odontogenesis, such as in mediating tissue interactions and regulating differentiation and organization of odontogenic tissues. Our results provide an important set of documents for studying molecular regulatory mechanisms underlying tooth development and regeneration in humans.

  11. Extrinsic tooth staining potential of high dose and sustained release iron syrups on primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Sharat Chandra; Alenazi, Fahad Murdhi; Alotain, Abdullah Muhammad; Alanazi, Hamad Daher; Alasmari, Abdullah Saeed

    2015-08-04

    Iron in the form of oral supplements is routinely prescribed to children to help fight anemia, however tooth staining is a commonly reported complication. This study tests in vitro, the staining potential of two different forms of iron syrup on primary teeth. Forty caries free primary central incisors were divided into four groups of ten teeth each. The control group comprised of ten teeth immersed in artificial saliva, while the test solutions were comprised of different forms of iron mixed with vitamins such that the iron content of each solution was approximately 100 mg (from 100 to 101.1 mg). The test solutions used iron syrup (Ferrose®, SPIMACO, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia) with iron in the form of ferric oxide polymaltose (FOP), slow release formula (Ferroglobin®, Vitabiotics ltd., London, UK) containing ferrous fumarate (FF and a combination of the two (FOP + FF). All the teeth were then immersed for 72 h and subjected to a protocol developed by Lee et al. to test staining. Color changes were measured using a wave dispersion spectro-photometer (Color-Eye 7000A, X-Rite Gmbh, Regensdorf, Switzerland) on the exposed labial surface at 4, 8, 24, 48 and 72 h. Two-way ANOVA with Scheffe's post hoc test was used to determine significance of difference in shade, while the Kurskull-Wallis test used to determine the significance of difference in clinical staining (∆E > 3). While all three iron groups showed some amount of staining, the combination of the two forms of iron (FOP+FF) showed significantly lower incidence of clinical staining than the other two groups at the end of 72 h. At the end of 72 h the (FOP) had significantly higher ∆E than ferrous fumarate (FF ) while the combination (FOP+ FF) had a significantly lower ∆E than either group. In an in vitro model, combining different forms of iron seems to elicit a lower intensity of staining than equivalent doses of a single form of iron.

  12. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Multiple Loci Associated with Primary Tooth Development during Infancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipilä, Kirsi; Lähdesmäki, Raija; Millwood, Iona Y.; Kaakinen, Marika; Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan; Blane, David; Charoen, Pimphen; Sovio, Ulla; Pouta, Anneli; Freimer, Nelson; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Laitinen, Jaana; Vaara, Sarianna; Glaser, Beate; Crawford, Peter; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Ring, Susan M.; Deng, Guohong; Zhang, Weihua; McCarthy, Mark I.; Deloukas, Panos; Peltonen, Leena

    2010-01-01

    Tooth development is a highly heritable process which relates to other growth and developmental processes, and which interacts with the development of the entire craniofacial complex. Abnormalities of tooth development are common, with tooth agenesis being the most common developmental anomaly in humans. We performed a genome-wide association study of time to first tooth eruption and number of teeth at one year in 4,564 individuals from the 1966 Northern Finland Birth Cohort (NFBC1966) and 1,518 individuals from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). We identified 5 loci at P<5×10−8, and 5 with suggestive association (P<5×10−6). The loci included several genes with links to tooth and other organ development (KCNJ2, EDA, HOXB2, RAD51L1, IGF2BP1, HMGA2, MSRB3). Genes at four of the identified loci are implicated in the development of cancer. A variant within the HOXB gene cluster associated with occlusion defects requiring orthodontic treatment by age 31 years. PMID:20195514

  13. Comparison of Salivary Antioxidants in Children with Primary Tooth Abscesses before and after Treatment in Comparison with Healthy Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarban, Asghar; Ebrahimipour, Sediqe; Sharifzadeh, Gholam-Reza; Rashed-Mohassel, Anousheh; Barkooi, Mina

    2017-12-29

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of children with primary molar abscesses before and two weeks after extraction of the infected tooth. Materials and methods: Forty one children aged between 3-6 years participatesd in this cross sectional study. The antioxidant activity of saliva was investigated in 20 patients with tooth abscesses affecting one of the first primary molars before and after tooth extraction in the case group and once in 21 children with no caries or dental problems in the control group. The FRAP (ferric reduction antioxidant power) method was used to measure the antioxidant power of salivary samples and TAC values were calculated. Data were analyzed with SPSS Version 16 using the paired t-test at a significance level of 0.05. Results: The mean antioxidant index increased in children after (509.2 ± 138.4) treatment (before 483.4 ± 183.6), but this difference was not significant (P=0.61). Also, there was no difference in the mean antioxidant index in control group (494.5±147.9) compared the study group before (P=0.83) and after (P=0.75) treatment. Conclusion: Under the conditions of this study the total antioxidant capacity of saliva was not compromised in children with abscessed teeth. Creative Commons Attribution License

  14. Primary tooth emergence in Polish children: timing, sequence and the relation between morphological and dental maturity in males and females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadzińska, Elzbieta; Nieczuja-Dwojacka, Joanna; Borowska-Sturgińska, Beata

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was an assessment of differences between boys and girls in the process of emergence of primary teeth. This paper also provides updated data on the timing and sequence of primary tooth emergence in Polish children. The research were conducted in the years 2004-2008, and covered 865 children (437 boys and 428 girls) aged 3 to 36 months from all nursery and randomly selected "Healthy Child Clinics" in Lodz (central Poland). The first and last primary tooth emerged, on average: in boys at 6.24 months and 24.75 months respectively; in girls at 7.07 months and 24.21 months respectively. All incisors and the first upper molars erupted significantly earlier in boys. Typical order of teeth emergence--central incisor, lateral incisor, first molar, canine, second molar--was observed in 86.36% of boys and in 89.47% of girls. The interdependence between the morphological and the dental criterion of biological maturity during the completion of primary teeth was very strong in both sexes (stronger in boys). The regression equations for the estimation of the number of erupted primary teeth based on child's chronological age, body height and body mass were proposed separately for boys and for girls.

  15. An unusual object in the root canal of a primary tooth - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Treville; Pereira, Svylvy

    2013-11-01

    Children often have the habit of inserting objects into their mouth. Occasionally, these objects may be accidentally ingested. This may be frightening and stressful both for the child and the parents. In most cases, children avoid informing their parents due to the fear of being punished. This article presents a case of a foreign object embedded in the tooth of a 7-year-old boy. The parents were unaware of the presence of a foreign object in their child's tooth. The tooth was extracted and the foreign body was retrieved from the canal to avoid any complications. © 2013 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Comparative evaluation of microshear bond strength of the caries-affected dentinal surface treated with conventional method and chemomechanical method (papain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittem, Jyothi; Sajjan, Girija S; Varma, Kanumuri Madhu

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing interest in chemomechanical excavation (papain) in permanent molar teeth. There are several studies dealing with primary molar teeth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of conventional method and Carie-care (chemomechanical method) on the microshear bond strength (μSBS) and the type of failure of an adhesive system to caries-affected dentin of permanent molar teeth. Twenty permanent molar teeth with carious lesions extending into the dentin were selected. Through the center of the carious lesion, teeth were sectioned mesiodistally and divided into two groups based on the method of caries excavation (conventional and chemomechanical method). The time required for the completion of excavation procedure was noted. Samples were again divided into two subgroups in each according to the method of restoration (Ketac N100 and Filtek Z350 composite). The bonded interface was subjected to μSBS testing in a universal testing machine. Fractured surfaces were examined under a stereomicroscope, and representative specimens were examined under scanning electron microscope for the type of failure. It was achieved with unpaired t-test and Kruskal-Wallis H-test at 5% level of significance. The μSBS values of Carie-care groups were similar to that of the conventional method. The μSBSs of resin composite were significantly (P caries excavation. A papain-based chemomechanical agent can be used safely as a method for caries removal when employing conventional adhesive systems.

  17. Caries Experience and Distribution by Tooth Surfaces in Primary Molars in the Pre-school Child Population of Lodz, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzda-Zwiech, Agnieszka; Filipińska, Renata; Borowska-Strugińska, Beata; Żądzińska, Elżbieta; Wochna-Sobańska, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate caries experience in primary molars as well as the differences in caries prevalence and caries lesion location on individual tooth surfaces between first and second primary molars in pre-school children. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 307 children, aged 3 to 5 years, from randomly chosen kindergartens in Lodz, Poland. Caries experience was scored according to WHO recommendations. The caries intensity (dmft, dmfts) for first and second primary molars was calculated. In addition, the percentage of particular surfaces with caries was counted for each molar separately. The mean dmft for primary molars was 1.84 (dmfts=2.47) and dmft>0 was seen in 53.09% of the study subjects. While in the entire examined population dmft and dmfts for first and second molars did not differ significantly, in 5-year-old children, the left mandibular first molar was associated with a higher caries intensity than the left mandibular second molar (dmfts=0.465 vs 0.344, Z=-1.98, p=0.04). However, in 5-year-olds, higher caries occurrence was seen for occlusal surfaces of the tooth 85 than 84 (33.62% vs 20.68%, χ2=4.09, p=0.03). The distal surface was more frequently affected in first molars than in second molars in children aged 4 (85 vs 84, χ2=17.1, pprimary second molars. However, distal surfaces were affected more in first than second molars.

  18. Application of 17% EDTA Enhances Diffusion of (45)Ca-labeled OH(-) and Ca(2+) in Primary Tooth Root Canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ximenes, Marcos; Cavalcanti Taguchi, Carolina Mayumi; Triches, Thaisa Cezaria; Sartori, Neimar; Pereira Dias, Luis Alberto; de Araujo, Elaine Bortoleti; Cardoso, Mariane

    2016-01-01

    Proper cleaning of the root canal is key to the success of endodontic treatment as it allows more effective diffusion of medication throughout the dentinal tubules. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the efficacy of 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in enhancing diffusion of hydroxyl (OH(-)) and calcium ions (Ca(2+)) throughout the root canal in primary teeth. The canals of 25 primary tooth roots were cleaned with endodontic files and 1% sodium hypochlorite. Three groups (G) were then established: GI, in which final irrigation was performed with 1% sodium hypochlorite; GII, in which 17% EDTA was used; and GIII, in which no irrigation was performed. The roots canals in GI and GII were filled with a calcium hydroxide-based paste labeled with the radioisotope calcium-45. Diffusion of OH(-) was detected with pH strips and Ca(2+) analyzed by measuring radioactivity in counts per min. Group II differed statistically from the other groups in diffusion of OH(-) at 24 hr (p<0.05), but no significant difference among groups was found at the day 7 evaluation; GII also differed statistically from the other groups in diffusion of Ca(2+) at 24 hr (p<0.05). These results suggest that application of 17% EDTA in primary tooth enhances diffusion of OH(-) and Ca(2+).

  19. Effect of caries-affected dentin on one-step universal and multi-step etch-and-rinse adhesives’ bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clecila MÜLLER

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To evaluate the influence of caries-affected dentin on bond strength of a universal one-step and a multi-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system. Material and method Enamel of 60 third human molars with and without caries was removed to expose dentin. The teeth were randomly assigned to six groups: Single Bond Universal (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA in etch-and-rinse and in self-etch mode and Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply Co, Konstanz, Germany, all on sound and caries-affected dentin. Smear layer of the 30 sound dentin specimens was standardized by polishing with 600-grit SiC paper under water cooling. Residual infected dentin of the 30 caries-affected specimens was removed with a number 4 CA carbide bur until no caries smooth tissue was detectable by tactile-visual inspection. Cylinders of a light cured composite resin (Filtek Z350 XT, 3M ESPE were built up using starch tubes and microshear test was performed until failure. The data was analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test. Result Significant differences in microshear bond strength (μSBS were observed for the caries-affected groups, but not for sound dentin. The μSBS of Single Bond Universal were not influenced by the application protocol on sound dentin, however they were lower in the caries-affected group with both application protocols. The μSBS for Prime & Bond NT was not influenced by the dentin conditions. Conclusion Caries-affected dentin decrease in bond strength of Single Bond Universal in comparison to sound dentin. The bond strength of Prime & Bond NT was not altered by substrate conditions.

  20. Knowledge and Attitude of Primary School Teachers toward Tooth Avulsion and Dental First Aid in Davangere City: A Cross-sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna, Sapna; Giriraju, Anjan; Narayan, Nagesh Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic dental injuries including avulsed tooth is a tragic and ignored problem among school children. As children spend much of their time in schools, school teachers form the group who commonly supervise the physical activity of the children, so awareness about avulsed tooth emergency management among school teachers is an important concept for long-term success and to prevent its future consequences. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitude regarding tooth avulsion and dental first aid among primary school teachers in Davangere city. The study was performed by administering a self-designed questionnaire on a sample of 300 primary school teachers. Sixty-eight percent of the school teachers (government, semi-aided and aided schools) admitted the possibility of an avulsed tooth to be replanted and thirty-two percent had no idea on tooth replantation and only twenty-three percent of the teachers knew the procedures taken in cases of avulsed teeth. Seventy-seven percent of all teachers did not feel the possibility of tooth replantation. There is poor knowledge in the management of avulsed teeth among the school teachers of Davangere city. They do not feel capable of replanting an avulsed tooth. As one of the child supervisors, all the school teachers should have the basic knowledge to recognize oral emergencies and regarding conservation of avulsed teeth to prevent its consequences in the child's future.

  1. Timing of primary tooth emergence among U.S. racial and ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, John J; Fontana, Margherita; Blanchette, Derek R; Dawson, Deborah V; Drake, David R; Levy, Steven M; Kolker, Justine L; Phipps, Kathy R

    2016-09-01

    To compare timing of tooth emergence among groups of American Indian (AI), Black and White children in the United States at 12 months of age. Data were from two sources - a longitudinal study of a Northern Plains tribal community and a study with sites in Indiana, Iowa and North Carolina. For the Northern Plains study, all children (n = 223) were American Indian, while for the multisite study, children (n = 320) were from diverse racial groups. Analyses were limited to data from examinations conducted within 30 days of the child's first birthday. AI children had significantly more teeth present (Mean: 7.8, Median: 8.0) than did Whites (4.4, 4.0, P Tooth emergence occurs at a younger age for AI children than it does for contemporary White or Black children in the United States. © 2016 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  2. PTH1R Mutants Found in Patients with Primary Failure of Tooth Eruption Disrupt G-Protein Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Hariharan; Döring, Frank; Kollert, Sina; Rukoyatkina, Natalia; Sturm, Julia; Gambaryan, Stepan; Stellzig-Eisenhauer, Angelika; Meyer-Marcotty, Philipp; Eigenthaler, Martin; Wischmeyer, Erhard

    2016-01-01

    Primary failure of tooth eruption (PFE) is causally linked to heterozygous mutations of the parathyroid hormone receptor (PTH1R) gene. The mutants described so far lead to exchange of amino acids or truncation of the protein that may result in structural changes of the expressed PTH1R. However, functional effects of these mutations have not been investigated yet. In HEK293 cells, PTH1R wild type was co-transfected with selected PTH1R mutants identified in patients with PFE. The effects on activation of PTH-regulated intracellular signaling pathways were analyzed by ELISA and Western immunoblotting. Differential effects of wild type and mutated PTH1R on TRESK ion channel regulation were analyzed by electrophysiological recordings in Xenopus laevis oocytes. In HEK293 cells, activation of PTH1R wild type increases cAMP and in response activates cAMP-stimulated protein kinase as detected by phosphorylation of the vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP). In contrast, the PTH1R mutants are functionally inactive and mutant PTH1R/Gly452Glu has a dominant negative effect on the signaling of PTH1R wild type. Confocal imaging revealed that wild type PTH1R is expressed on the cell surface, whereas PTH1R/Gly452Glu mutant is mostly retained inside the cell. Furthermore, in contrast to wild type PTH1R which substantially augmented K+ currents of TRESK channels, coupling of mutated PTH1R to TRESK channels was completely abolished. PTH1R mutations affect intracellular PTH-regulated signaling in vitro. In patients with primary failure of tooth eruption defective signaling of PTH1R mutations is suggested to occur in dento-alveolar cells and thus may lead to impaired tooth movement.

  3. Zirconia-Prefabricated Crowns for Pediatric Patients With Primary Dentition: Technique and Cementation for Esthetic Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Carla

    2016-09-01

    Traditionally, many clinicians tend to forego esthetic considerations when full-coverage restorations are indicated for pediatric patients with primary dentitions. However, the availability of new zirconia pediatric crowns and reliable techniques for cementation makes esthetic outcomes practical and consistent when restoring primary dentition. Two cases are described: a 3-year-old boy who presented with severe early childhood caries affecting both anterior and posterior teeth, and a 6-year-old boy who presented with extensive caries of his primary posterior dentition, including a molar requiring full coverage. The parents of both boys were concerned about esthetics, and the extent of decay indicated the need for full-coverage restorations. This led to the boys receiving treatment using a restorative procedure in which the carious teeth were prepared for and restored with esthetic tooth-colored zirconia crowns. In both cases, comfortable function and pleasing esthetics were achieved.

  4. Alveolar dimensional changes relevant to implant placement after minimally traumatic tooth extraction with primary closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Nelson; Bonta, Hernan; Gualtieri, Ariel F; Rojas, Mariana A; Galli, Federico G; Caride, Facundo

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dimensional changes that occur in the alveolar ridge after minimally traumatic tooth extraction by means of computed tomography (CT), with special focus on the portion of bone supporting the gingival zenith. Twenty subjects with indication for singlerooted tooth extraction and preserved alveolar walls were selected for this study. After a minimally traumatic extraction, two CT scans were performed; the first within 24 hours postextraction (TC1) and the second 6 months (TC2) later. A radiographic guide with a radiopaque marker was used to obtain references that enabled accurate measurements over time, in both vertical and horizontal directions. The bone crest immediately apical to the gingival zenith was identified and termed "osseous zenith". The displacement of the osseous zenith in horizontal and vertical direction was analyzed and correlated with several alveolar anatomical variables with the aim of identifying possible predictors for bone remodeling. Dimensional changes that occur in postextraction sockets within a 6month period showed significant vertical and horizontal displacement of the osseous zenith (p 3 mm) should be expected. The present study suggests that the width of the alveolar crest at its midlevel, rather than crestal width, may be correlated with the displacement of the osseous zenith. Sociedad Argentina de Investigación Odontológica.

  5. Identification of Six Novel PTH1R Mutations in Families with a History of Primary Failure of Tooth Eruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Lotte; Christoffersen, Line Borck; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette

    2013-01-01

    Primary Failure of tooth Eruption (PFE) is a non-syndromic disorder which can be caused by mutations in the parathyroid hormone receptor 1 gene (PTH1R). Traditionally, the disorder has been identified clinically based on post-emergent failure of eruption of permanent molars. However, patients...... with PTH1R mutations will not benefit from surgical and/or orthodontic treatment and it is therefore clinically important to establish whether a given failure of tooth eruption is caused by a PTH1R defect or not. We analyzed the PTH1R gene in six patients clinically diagnosed with PFE, all of which had...... undergone surgical and/or orthodontic interventions, and identified novel PTH1R mutations in all. Four of the six mutations were predicted to abolish correct mRNA maturation either through introduction of premature stop codons (c.947C>A and c.1082G>A), or by altering correct mRNA splicing (c.544...

  6. Primary Study about Intensity Signal of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance in vivo Tooth Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hoon; Gang, Seo Gon; Kim, Jeong In; Lee, Byung Il [KHNP Radiation Health Institute, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The signal of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance(EPR) dosimetry system using human tooth has been well introduced as one of the efficient tool to evaluate radiation exposure. But, EPR dosimetry, even in the case of classical in vitro EPR system using tooth sample(measured molars), was regarded as having big signal fluctuation. One of reason for such difficulty in getting accurate intensity was the big effect of organic materials mixed in enamel part of teeth samples. They are mainly caused by the adaptation process of system itself to the movement of measured human subject. Generally, when we measured human teeth in vivo, five of six teeth spectrum were gathered and averaged for real evaluation. The these spectrum are measured under very different environment like angle of external magnet making magnetic filed with teeth(incisor). Random movement of these signals should be considered in different view point to understand and compare each EPR in vivo EPR spectrum. The peak to peak value of obtained five or six in vivo EPR system to get averaged value for final quantity of free radicals in hydroxy apatite crystal construction in enamel part of human teeth looks so randomly changed without regulation. But, in overall view, the EPR signal, especially at no irradiation level, is almost same for every measurement trial which is mainly composed of big noise and very small signal from real free radicals. The peak to peak value of obtained five or six in vivo EPR system to get averaged value for final quantity of free radicals in hydroxy apatite crystal construction in enamel part of human teeth looks so randomly changed without regulation.

  7. Primary Study about Intensity Signal of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance in vivo Tooth Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hoon; Gang, Seo Gon; Kim, Jeong In; Lee, Byung Il

    2017-01-01

    The signal of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance(EPR) dosimetry system using human tooth has been well introduced as one of the efficient tool to evaluate radiation exposure. But, EPR dosimetry, even in the case of classical in vitro EPR system using tooth sample(measured molars), was regarded as having big signal fluctuation. One of reason for such difficulty in getting accurate intensity was the big effect of organic materials mixed in enamel part of teeth samples. They are mainly caused by the adaptation process of system itself to the movement of measured human subject. Generally, when we measured human teeth in vivo, five of six teeth spectrum were gathered and averaged for real evaluation. The these spectrum are measured under very different environment like angle of external magnet making magnetic filed with teeth(incisor). Random movement of these signals should be considered in different view point to understand and compare each EPR in vivo EPR spectrum. The peak to peak value of obtained five or six in vivo EPR system to get averaged value for final quantity of free radicals in hydroxy apatite crystal construction in enamel part of human teeth looks so randomly changed without regulation. But, in overall view, the EPR signal, especially at no irradiation level, is almost same for every measurement trial which is mainly composed of big noise and very small signal from real free radicals. The peak to peak value of obtained five or six in vivo EPR system to get averaged value for final quantity of free radicals in hydroxy apatite crystal construction in enamel part of human teeth looks so randomly changed without regulation.

  8. Comparison of Parental Satisfaction with Three Tooth-Colored Full-Coronal Restorations in Primary Maxillary Incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salami, A; Walia, T; Bashiri, R

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the parental satisfaction among resin composite strip crown, preveneered stainless steel crown (PVSSC) and the newly introduced pre-fabricated primary zirconia crown for restoring maxillary primary incisors. A prospective clinical study on 39 children with carious or traumatized primary maxillary incisors. They were randomly and equally distributed in three groups and received one of the full-coronal restorations. Children were recalled to evaluate and compare parental satisfaction about performance of crowns after one year through a questionnaire. Parents were satisfied with all three tooth colored full-coronal restoration techniques. A significant relationship was found between colour of PVSSC (p=0.003) and durability of resin strip crowns (p=0.009) with the overall parental satisfaction levels. Parents who gave poor ratings in these two variables however rated their overall acceptance levels as being satisfied. Parental overall satisfaction was highest for zirconia primary crowns followed by resin composite strip crowns and lowest satisfaction was reported for pre-veneered SSCs. Parents were least satisfied with durability of resin composite strip crowns and colour of pre-veneered stainless steel crowns. However, this did not affect their overall satisfaction with these crowns.

  9. Effect of tooth preparation on microleakage of stainless steel crowns placed on primary mandibular first molars with reduced mesiodistal dimension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Ramazani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Incomplete adaptation of stainless steel crown margins leads to microleakage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tooth preparation on microleakage of stainless steel crowns (SSCs placed on mesiodistally reduced primary mandibular first molars.In this In vitro study, 60 primary mandibular first molars with reduced mesiodistal dimension were selected. Pulp cavities were filled with amalgam and occlusal surfaces were reduced. The samples were randomly divided into two groups (groups P and BLP. Standard preparation was done in group P with only proximal reduction. In group BLP, after reducing the proximal undercuts, buccal and lingual surfaces were slightly reduced. Occlusal one-third of the buccal surfaces was beveled in both groups. Then, the SSCs of the primary maxillary and mandibular first molars were fitted and cemented in P and BLP groups, respectively. After immersing the samples into deionized water, thermo-cycling, and immersion in 2% basic fuchsin, the samples were sectioned buccolingually. The mesial halves were evaluated microscopically for microleakage in both buccal and lingual margins. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test in SPSS 19 at the significant level of 0.05.There was a significant difference in microleakage of the buccal margin (P=0.003; whereas, the difference observed in the lingual margin was not significant (P=0.54.We suggest reduction of buccal and lingual surfaces of mesiodistally reduced primary mandibular first molars and placing lower (mandibular crowns.

  10. Caries experience of children in primary schools with long-term tooth brushing programs: A pilot Australian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakar, T; Harrison-Barry, L; Pukallus, M L; Kazoullis, S; Seow, W K

    2017-03-26

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a primary school-based tooth brushing (TB) program conducted in a low socio-economic area of Queensland, Australia, to determine its effectiveness in reducing caries. Records kept at the central dental clinic of the district were used to analyse the caries experience (decayed, missing, filled teeth [dmft/DMFT]) and caries prevalence in children from two schools with long-term TB programs (TB) (N=1191) and three Non-TB schools (N=553). The schools were matched by socio-economic indices. Historical records showed that the baseline caries experience in all TB and Non-TB primary schools were similar at each primary school year. After a mean period of 5-9 years of the TB program, the caries experience (mean decayed, missing, filled teeth, dmft/DMFT) and prevalence were lower for TB group than Non-TB group. In the primary dentition, the overall mean dmft (±standard deviation) of TB group (2.53±3.00) was significantly lower than the Non-TB group (3.06±3.30) (Pprimary school TB program significantly reduced caries experience and caries prevalence in an optimally fluoridated (1-ppm), very low socio-economic district. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The prevalence of developmental anomalies of teeth and their association with tooth size in the primary and permanent dentitions of 1650 Japanese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooshima, T; Ishida, R; Mishima, K; Sobue, S

    1996-06-01

    The prevalence of microdontia, macrodontia, peg-shaped tooth, Carabelli's tubercle, protostylid, paramolar tubercle, central tubercle and palatal accessory cusp were examined in Japanese children. This study included 905 children with primary dentitions (mean age 4 years 7 months) and 745 high-school students with permanent dentitions (mean age 16 years 8 months). Microdontia, macrodontia, Carabelli's tubercle, protostylid and paramolar tubercle were more frequent in the primary dentition, whereas peg-shaped tooth, central tubercle and palatal accessory cusp were more frequent in the permanent dentition. The association between the presence of developmental anomalies and the size of the remaining teeth was significant in permanent dentitions. Both the literature and this study indicate that developmental anomalies of tooth number, size and morphology should be studied as a group rather than as isolates.

  12. Effects of Er, Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on external adaptation of restorations in caries-affected cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Saad, José Roberto Cury; Campos, Edson Alves de; Neto, Sizenando de Toledo Porto; De Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Pinto, Shelon Cristina Souza

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on the external adaptation of composite resin restorations in caries-affected cavities. Mixed class V cavity preparations were performed in 36 intact human third molars, in half of which caries was artificially induced. Both healthy and carious dentin were etched with 35% phosphoric acid (Ultradent Products Inc., South Jordan, Utah, USA), and the teeth were divided into three groups, i.e., (a) untreated etched dentin, (b) application of the Er, Cr:YSGG laser and (c) use of chlorhexidine as an adjunct in the bonding process. Restorations were fabricated with Z350 XT FiltekTM composite resin (3M ESPE) and subsequently the specimens were subjected to thermocycling to simulate artificial ageing. Quantitative analysis of external adaptation was performed by scanning electron microscopy in both healthy and affected dentin using epoxy resin replicas. It was concluded that the application of laser and chlorhexidine did not affect the percentages of marginal adaptation of class V restorations. Furthermore, thermocycling may influence adaptation values. (letter)

  13. Long-term neuroplasticity of the face primary motor cortex and adjacent somatosensory cortex induced by tooth loss can be reversed following dental implant replacement in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avivi-Arber, Limor; Lee, Jye-Chang; Sood, Mandeep; Lakschevitz, Flavia; Fung, Michelle; Barashi-Gozal, Maayan; Glogauer, Michael; Sessle, Barry J

    2015-11-01

    Tooth loss is common, and exploring the neuroplastic capacity of the face primary motor cortex (face-M1) and adjacent primary somatosensory cortex (face-S1) is crucial for understanding how subjects adapt to tooth loss and their prosthetic replacement. The aim was to test if functional reorganization of jaw and tongue motor representations in the rat face-M1 and face-S1 occurs following tooth extraction, and if subsequent dental implant placement can reverse this neuroplasticity. Rats (n = 22) had the right maxillary molar teeth extracted under local and general anesthesia. One month later, seven rats had dental implant placement into healed extraction sites. Naive rats (n = 8) received no surgical treatment. Intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) and recording of evoked jaw and tongue electromyographic responses were used to define jaw and tongue motor representations at 1 month (n = 8) or 2 months (n = 7) postextraction, 1 month postimplant placement, and at 1-2 months in naive rats. There were no significant differences across study groups in the onset latencies of the ICMS-evoked responses (P > 0.05), but in comparison with naive rats, tooth extraction caused a significant (P tooth loss and their replacement with dental implants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Effect of conventional and sugar free pediatric syrup formulations on primary tooth enamel hardness: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurao Vasant Mali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess and compare the effect of conventional and sugar free pediatric syrup formulations on primary tooth enamel hardness over a period of 14 days. Materials and Methods: An in vitro study was done on 40 noncarious deciduous teeth. 10 teeth in each group were dipped in 4 pediatric medicinal syrups (1 sugarfree and 3 conventional for 1 min thrice daily for 14 days and the enamel surface micro hardness was checked at baseline, 7 th day and 14 th day by Vickers hardness testing machine. The pH, titratable acidity and buffering capacity of the syrups were assessed. Results: The pH of syrups were above critical pH for demineralization of the tooth but tiratable acidity and buffering capacity differed. ANOVA test indicated that the reduction in mean micro hardness was maximum in Group D (Conventional Analgesic syrup and least in Group A (Sugarfree cough syrup on 7 th and 14 th day. On intergroup comparison there was no difference (P > 0.05 in micro hardness between Group B (Conventional Cough syrup and Group C (Conventional Antibiotic. However, highly significant (P < 0.01 difference between the either pair of Group B with Group D, and Group C with Group D on 14 th day. The percentage reduction in micro hardness on 14 th day was maximum for Group D (24.4 ± 2.2 and minimum for Group A (14.0 ± 1.3 which was statistically significant (P < 0.01. Conclusion: Sugar free pediatric medicines can be effective in reducing dental erosion and efforts should be made to incorporate sugar substitutes in formulation of pediatric medicines.

  15. Effect of conventional and sugar free pediatric syrup formulations on primary tooth enamel hardness: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Gaurao Vasant; Dodamani, Arun Suresh; Karibasappa, Gundabaktha Nagappa; Kumar, Prashanth Vishwakarma; Jain, Vardhaman Mulchand

    2015-01-01

    To assess and compare the effect of conventional and sugar free pediatric syrup formulations on primary tooth enamel hardness over a period of 14 days. An in vitro study was done on 40 noncarious deciduous teeth. 10 teeth in each group were dipped in 4 pediatric medicinal syrups (1 sugarfree and 3 conventional) for 1 min thrice daily for 14 days and the enamel surface micro hardness was checked at baseline, 7 th day and 14 th day by Vickers hardness testing machine. The pH, titratable acidity and buffering capacity of the syrups were assessed. The pH of syrups were above critical pH for demineralization of the tooth but tiratable acidity and buffering capacity differed. ANOVA test indicated that the reduction in mean micro hardness was maximum in Group D (Conventional Analgesic syrup) and least in Group A (Sugarfree cough syrup) on 7 th and 14 th day. On intergroup comparison there was no difference (P > 0.05) in micro hardness between Group B (Conventional Cough syrup) and Group C (Conventional Antibiotic). However, highly significant (P < 0.01) difference between the either pair of Group B with Group D, and Group C with Group D on 14 th day. The percentage reduction in micro hardness on 14 th day was maximum for Group D (24.4 ± 2.2) and minimum for Group A (14.0 ± 1.3) which was statistically significant (P < 0.01). Sugar free pediatric medicines can be effective in reducing dental erosion and efforts should be made to incorporate sugar substitutes in formulation of pediatric medicines.

  16. Effectiveness of oral hygiene after supervised tooth-brushing education in six-year-old children at a primary school in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Lindmark, Ulrika; Do, Thi Thu Hien; Do, Quang Trung; Bengtsson, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of dental caries is very high among Vietnamese children why methods and techniques for good oral hygiene behaviours therefore is very important in caries prevention. Aim: To assess oral hygiene before and after supervised tooth-brushing education in six-yearold children. Design: A pilot study with a pre-post-test design was used. Forty children, six years of age, at a primary school in Hanoi, participated in the study. The modified Bass tooth-brushing method were ta...

  17. Deproteinization treatment on bond strengths of primary, mature and immature permanent tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, S; Küçükeşmen, C; Küçükeşmen, H C; Sönmez, I Saroğlu

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of pre-post deproteinization treatment with 5% sodium hypochloride on shear bond strength (sbs) of adhesive resin to primary, immature and mature permanent teeth enamel. 30 teeth were used for each of primary, immature and mature permanent teeth groups. (totally 90). In control groups, enamel was etched for 60s with 37% phosphoric acid (3M) and rinsed for 10s (Procedure A). In experimental groups, deproteinization was applied with 5% NaOCI solution for 120s before (Procedure D+A) and after acid-etching (Procedure A+D). Gluma Comfort Bond (Heraeus-Kulzer) and Charisma (Heraeus-Kulzer) composite resin were applied to etched enamel surfaces. Data were determined with Two-Way ANOVA and LSD Multiple Comparison Test (p Deproteinization after acid etching significantly enhanced the shear bond strength values in primary and immature permanent teeth.

  18. Evaluation and comparison of white mineral trioxide aggregate and formocresol medicaments in primary tooth pulpotomy: Clinical and radiographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheranjeevi Jayam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The primary aim of the following study is to evaluate and secondary aim is to compare clinically and radiographically the success of using white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA versus formocresol (FC medicament for primary tooth pulpotomy. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 teeth were selected for pulpotomy; of which 50 teeth underwent FC pulpotomy and 50 teeth underwent pulpotomy with white MTA. Out of 100 treated teeth, 82 teeth (42 FC and 40 MTA teeth were available at the end of 24 months for evaluation. 4 failures were found in FC group at 1 st month evaluation and no failures were found in white MTA group. A statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the overall success rate of study and individual success rates of medicaments. Overall success rate of the study was 95%, success rate of FC group was 90.48% and success rate of MTA group was 100%. Results: MTA produced better results as pulpotomy medicament in comparison to FC. The superior success obtained in the present study was matching other studies mentioned in the literature. Conclusion: MTA seems to be a promising pulpotomy medicament for future use.

  19. Evaluation and comparison of white mineral trioxide aggregate and formocresol medicaments in primary tooth pulpotomy: clinical and radiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayam, Cheranjeevi; Mitra, Malay; Mishra, Jiban; Bhattacharya, Bhaswar; Jana, Biswanath

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim of the following study is to evaluate and secondary aim is to compare clinically and radiographically the success of using white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) versus formocresol (FC) medicament for primary tooth pulpotomy. A total of 100 teeth were selected for pulpotomy; of which 50 teeth underwent FC pulpotomy and 50 teeth underwent pulpotomy with white MTA. Out of 100 treated teeth, 82 teeth (42 FC and 40 MTA teeth) were available at the end of 24 months for evaluation. 4 failures were found in FC group at 1 st month evaluation and no failures were found in white MTA group. A statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the overall success rate of study and individual success rates of medicaments. Overall success rate of the study was 95%, success rate of FC group was 90.48% and success rate of MTA group was 100%. MTA produced better results as pulpotomy medicament in comparison to FC. The superior success obtained in the present study was matching other studies mentioned in the literature. MTA seems to be a promising pulpotomy medicament for future use.

  20. Elemental composition of normal primary tooth enamel analyzed with XRMA and SIMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Nina; Dietz, Wolfram; Lundgren, Ted; Nietzsche, Sandor; Odelius, Hans; Rythén, Marianne; Rizell, Sara; Robertson, Agneta; Norén, Jörgen G; Klingberg, Gunilla

    2009-01-01

    There is an interest to analyze the chemical composition of enamel in teeth from patients with different developmental disorders or syndromes and evaluate possible differences compared to normal composition. For this purpose, it is essential to have reference material. The aim of this study was to, by means of X-ray micro analyses (XRMA) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), present concentration gradients for C, O, P and Ca and F, Na, Mg, Cl, K and Sr in normal enamel of primary teeth from healthy individuals. 36 exfoliated primary teeth from 36 healthy children were collected, sectioned, and analyzed in the enamel and dentin with X-ray micro analyses for the content of C, O, P and Ca and F, Na MgCl, K and Sr. This study has supplied reference data for C, O, P and Ca in enamel in primary teeth from healthy subjects. No statistically significant differences in the elemental composition were found between incisors and molars.The ratio Ca/P is in concordance with other studies. Some elements have shown statistically significant differences between different levels of measurement. These results may be used as reference values for research on the chemical composition of enamel and dentin in primary teeth from patients with different conditions and/or syndromes.

  1. Effect of endodontic sealers on bond strength of restorative systems to primary tooth pulp chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ülkü Şermet Elbay

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Composite materials seemed to bond to pulp chamber dentin in primary teeth with a higher strength than compomer and resin-modified glass ionomer. Metapex and zinc-oxide eugenol canal filling materials reduced the bond strength of all three restorative systems.

  2. Caspase 3 activation in the primary enamel knot of developing molar tooth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matalová, Eva; Kovářů, František; Míšek, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 55, 2 (2006), s. 183-188 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/04/0101; GA AV ČR KJB500450503; GA MŠk OC B23.001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : apoptosis * caspase 3 * primary enamel knot Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.093, year: 2006

  3. EFFECT OF ADDING TRICALCIUM PHOSPHATE TO FLUORIDE MOUTHRINSE ON MICROHARDNESS OF DEMINERALIZED PRIMARY HUMAN TOOTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rirattanapong, Praphasri; Vongsavan, Kadkao; Saengsirinavin, Chavengkiat; Phuekcharoen, Pimonchat

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of fluoride mouthrinse containing tricalcium phosphate on microhardness of demineralized primary enamel. Thirty-six sound primary incisors were immersed in a demineralizing solution (pH 4.4) for 96 hours at 37 degrees C to create artificial caries-like lesions. After artificial caries formation, the specimens were randomly divided into 3 groups (with 12 specimens in each group): Group A: deionized water; Group B: 0.05% NaF plus 20 ppm tricalcium phosphate mouthrinse and Group C: 0.05% NaF mouthrinse. All the specimens were immersed for 1 minute at 37 degrees C three times per day for 7 days in the respective mouthrinse among pH cycling. The surface microhardness was examined using a Vickers hardness tester (100 grams for 15 seconds) at baseline, before and after the pH-cycling procedure. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparison tests with a significance level of 0.05. After treatment, Group Ahad a significantly lower surface microhardness value than the other two groups (p=0.000); however, there was no significant difference between Groups B and C (p=0.728). We concluded fluoride mouthrinse containing tricalcium phosphate and fluoride mouthrinse have similar remineralizing effects on microhardness of demineralized primary teeth.

  4. Effect of Nd:YAG laser combined with fluoride on the prevention of primary tooth enamel demineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Danielle Torres; Faraoni-Romano, Juliana Jendiroba; Derceli, Juliana Dos Reis; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka

    2012-01-01

    Most studies dealing with the caries preventive action of Nd:YAG laser have been done in permanent teeth and studies on primary teeth are still lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of Nd:YAG laser combined or not with fluoride sources on the acid resistance of primary tooth enamel after artificial caries induction by assessing longitudinal microhardness and demineralization depth. Sixty enamel blocks obtained from the buccal/lingual surface of exfoliated human primary molars were coated with nail polish/wax, leaving only a 9 mm² area exposed on the outer enamel surface, and randomly assigned to 6 groups (n=10) according to the type of treatment: C-control (no treatment); APF: 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride gel; FV: 5% fluoride varnish; L: Nd:YAG laser 0.5 W/10 Hz in contact mode; APFL: fluoride gel + laser; FVL: fluoride varnish + laser. After treatment, the specimens were subjected to a des-remineralization cycle for induction of artificial caries lesions. Longitudinal microhardness data (%LMC) were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test and demineralization depth data were analyzed by oneway ANOVA and Fisher's LSD test (á=0.05). APFL and APF groups presented the lowest percentage of microhardness change (p<0.05). Demineralization depth was smaller in all treated groups compared with the untreated control. In conclusion, Nd:YAG laser combined or not with fluoride gel/varnish was not more effective than fluoride alone to prevent enamel demineralization within the experimental period.

  5. Primary Tooth Vital Pulp Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, James A; Seale, N Sue; Vargas, Kaaren; Marghalani, Abdullah A; Al Shamali, Shahad; Graham, Laurel

    2017-01-15

    This systematic review and meta-analysis assessed outcomes in primary teeth for the vital pulp therapy (VPT) options of indirect pulp therapy (IPT), direct pulp capping (DPC), and pulpotomy after a minimum of 12 months to determine whether one VPT was superior. The following databases were searched from 1960 to September 2016: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, EBSCO, ICTRP, Dissertation abstracts, and grey literature for parallel and split-mouth randomized controlled trials of at least 12 months duration comparing the success of IPT, DPC, and pulpotomy in children with deep caries in primary teeth. Our primary outcome measure was overall success (combined clinical and radiographic). Three authors determined the included RCTs, performed data extraction, and assessed the risk of bias (ROB). Meta-analysis and assignment of quality of evidence by Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach were done. Forty-one articles qualified for meta-analysis (six IPT, four DPC, and 31 pulpotomy) from 322 screened articles. The 24-month success rates were: IPT=94.4 percent, and the liner material (calcium hydroxide [CH]/bonding agents) had no effect on success (P=0.88), based on a moderate quality of evidence; DP =88.8 percent, and the capping agent (CH/alternate agent) did not affect success (P=0.56), based on a low quality of evidence. The combined success rate for all pulpotomies was 82.6 percent based on 1,022 teeth. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) (89.6 percent) and formocresol (FC) (85.0 percent) success rates were the highest of all pulpotomy types and were not significantly different (P=0.15), with a high quality of evidence. MTA's success rate (92.2 percent) was higher than ferric sulfate (FS) (79.3 percent) and approached significance (P=0.06), while FS's success rate (84.8 percent) was not significantly different from FC (87.1 percent), both with a moderate quality of evidence. MTA and FC success rates were significantly better than CH (P=0

  6. Impact of CO2 laser and stannous fluoride on primary tooth erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Cristiane Tomaz; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Rodrigues-Júnior, Antonio Luiz; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the effect of input power of CO2 laser, either associated or not to stannous fluoride (SnF2) gel, for the control of intrinsic erosion in primary teeth. One hundred four enamel slabs (3 × 3 × 2 mm) from human primary molars were flattened and polished. Adhesive tapes were placed on their surface leaving a window of 3 × 1 mm. Slabs were then cycled four times in 0.01 M hydrochloric acid (pH 2, 2 min) and in artificial saliva (2 h) for creation of erosive lesions. Specimens were randomly assigned into eight groups (n = 13) according to fluoride application [absent (control) or 0.4% stannous fluoride gel (SnF2)] and input power of CO2 laser [unlased (control), 0.5, 1.0 or 1.5 W]. The CO2 laser irradiation was performed in an ultra-pulse mode (100 μs of pulse duration), 4-mm working distance, for 10 s. Specimens were then submitted to further erosive episodes for 5 days and evaluated for enamel relative permeability. Fluoride did not show any protective effect for any of the laser-treated groups or control (p = 0.185). However, a significant effect was detected for input power of CO2 laser (p = 0.037). Tukey's test showed that there was a significant statistically difference between specimens irradiated with 0.5 and 1.5 W (p = 0.028). The input power of 0.5 W showed lower permeability. Variation of input power CO2 laser can influence enamel permeability, at the power of 1.5 W which promoted greater permeability.

  7. Formocresol mutagenicity following primary tooth pulp therapy: an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzar, P A; Rosenblatt, A; Takahashi, C S; Takeuchi, P L; Costa Júnior, L A

    2003-09-01

    To investigate whether formocresol, in Buckley's original formulation, is mutagenic in vivo to lymphocyte cultures obtained from the peripheral blood of children aged from 5 to 10 years old. These children were recruited from those attending the dental clinics of Recife City Council and the University of Pernambuco School of Dentistry, Brazil. The sample comprised 20 children who had primary teeth with cariously exposed vital pulps. Two venous blood samples were collected (6-8 ml) from each child, the first prior to vital pulpotomy (control group) and the second 24 h after pulpotomy (treated group). This research is a case-control study. The peripheral lymphocytes were grown in a complete culture medium consisting of 78% RPMI 1640 medium (a), supplemented with streptomycin (0.01 mg/ml), penicillin (0.005 ml(-1)), 20% fetal bovine serum (b) and 2% phytohemagglutinin (c). The lymphocytes were assessed for chromosomal aberrations via a previously published method which was modified. The cytogenetic analysis was performed in a blind test, where the slides were codified by an annotator and the scorers did not know which group they were analyzing. For each sample, this envolved the analysis of 200 metaphases. The level of significance adopted in the statistical test was 5.0% (pformocresol was mutagenic for one patient, raising doubt about the desirability of its use for pulpotomies in children. The results revealed that, from a statistical standpoint, formocresol is not mutagenic. However, further investigations are required, preferably with a larger sample, in patients needing more than one pulpotomy in order to observe whether an increase in the quantity of the drug would increase the quantity of chromosome aberrations and also to verify individual susceptibility to chromosome alterations with the use of formocresol.

  8. Comparison of ferric sulfate, formocresol, and a combination of ferric sulfate/formocresol in primary tooth vital pulpotomies: a retrospective radiographic survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Spence; Walker, Jerry

    2002-01-01

    Studies have suggested that formocresol has toxic and carcinogenic potential. A search for an alternative medicament for primary tooth pulpotomies has led to ferric sulfate as a possible alternative. A retrospective study was done in a multipractitioner IHS (Indian Health Service) clinic. Radiographic success or failure was determined for 202 primary tooth pulpotomies performed with either formocresol, ferric sulfate, or a combination procedure of formocresol and ferric sulfate. The post-operative period for the pulpotomies ranged from one month to thirty-six plus months. There was no statistical difference in radiographic failure rates between formocresol, ferric sulfate, or the combination procedure when results were analyzed regardless of post-op period. However, when post-op periods were considered, formocresol performed better at > 36 months and the combination procedure showed significantly more failures at > 36 months.

  9. Tooth extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... several teeth using the methods above. For an impacted tooth , the surgeon may have to cut a flap ... loosens or damages teeth Tooth injury from trauma Impacted teeth that are causing problems, such as wisdom teeth ( ...

  10. Tooth anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002214.htm Tooth anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... upper jawbone is called the maxilla. Images Tooth anatomy References Chan S, Alessandrini EA. Dental injuries. In: Selbst ...

  11. Primary wound closure after tooth extraction for prevention of medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw in patients under denosumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Akihiko; Sasaki, Masanori; Schmelzeisen, Rainer; Oyama, Yukiko; Mori, Yoshihide; Voss, Pit Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Some recent reports have indicated that local infection causes osteonecrosis of the jaw and described that tooth extraction may not be a direct cause of developing medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ) in patients receiving antiresorptive medications. Tooth extraction and elimination of the source of infection are expected to reduce the risk of developing MRONJ. However, there is no data regarding prevention for developing osteonecrosis of the jaw in patients receiving denosumab. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the outcome of tooth extractions with proper wound closure in patients receiving denosumab. Forty teeth in 19 patients treated with denosumab therapy were extracted under preoperative intravenous antibiotics. Patients who had already developed MRONJ in the extraction sites or who had a history of radiation therapy were excluded. During surgery, bone edges were smoothed and all wounds were closed using the double-layered technique. Thirty-seven extraction sites (92.5 %) in 17 out of 19 patients (89.5 %) were healed. However, three extraction sites in two patients had complications; one patient had exposed bone and developed MRONJ (stage 1) and the other developed a mucosa fistula. Additional surgical procedures were performed and all wounds were completely healed. Tooth extractions in patients receiving denosumab can be performed in an appropriate manner and result in good outcomes. This study indicated that tooth extraction with proper wound closure to avoid secondary infection may be effective for the prevention of MRONJ even in high-risk patients.

  12. Effect of Caries Removal Methods on the Shear Bond Strength of Resin and Glass IonomerAdhesives to Primary Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi N

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: There is no enough published data about the shear bond strength of resin modified glass ionomer adhesives on caries-affected primary tooth dentin excavated using minimally invasive systems. Objectives: To evaluate the shear bond strength of 2 different adhesives (one resin modified glass ionomer and one resin using two caries removal tech- niques on healthy and caries-affected primary dentin. Materials and Methods: Two caries removal methods including mechanical (handpiece and chemomechanical (Carisolv techniques and two types of ad- hesives including one resin adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond; CSEB, Kuraray and one resin-modified glass ionomer adhesive (Riva Bond LC; RBLC, SDI were used in this study. Ten extracted healthy primary teeth were used for the control group. The teeth were sectioned bucco-lingually and mesio-distally in order to obtain four specimens from each tooth. Thirty suitable specimens were selected as the “control” and randomly divided into two groups of “sound dentin” based on the type of the adhesive used. Sixty extracted caries affected teeth were used for the carious group; sectioned as mentioned above and sixty suitable specimens were selected as the “treatment”. Then the specimens were arbitrarily divided into four groups based on caries removal techniques and the type of ad- hesive used (n = 15. After bonding with either CSEB or RBLC, the specimens were restored with a resin composite by means of PVC tubes and subjected to the shear bond strength test. The data was analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: The specimens in Carisolv group bonded with CSEB (11.68 ± 3.1 showed a statistically significant higher mean bond strength followed by those in handpiece group bonded with CSEB (9.4 ± 2.7, which exhibited higher mean values than those groups with RBLC (p < 0.05. Shear bond strength values for Clearfil SE Bond was not significantly higher than Riva Bond LC when used in sound

  13. Alveolar bone resorption after primary tooth loss has a negative impact on straightforward implant installation in patients with agenesis of the lower second premolar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertl, Kristina; Bertl, Michael H; Heimel, Patrick; Burt, Maria; Gahleitner, André; Stavropoulos, Andreas; Ulm, Christian

    2018-02-01

    To compare the alveolar bone dimensions in patients with lower second premolar (P2) agenesis prior to and after primary molar loss on CT scans, and assess the possibility for straightforward implant placement. Alveolar bone dimensions were evaluated on 150 mandibular CT scans in three groups: (i) agenesis of P2, with the primary tooth in situ, and regularly erupted first premolar (P1) and molar (M1) (AW); (ii) agenesis of P2, without the primary tooth in situ for ≥3 m, but regularly erupted P1 and M1 (AWO); and (iii) P1, P2, and M1 regularly erupted (CTR). The possibility of straightforward placement of an implant 3.5 or 4.3 mm in Ø × 10 mm long was digitally simulated and compared to the actually performed treatment. Buccolingual width (7.3 ± 2.0 mm) at the coronal aspect of the ridge in the AWO group was statistically significantly smaller comparing with both the AW (9.2 ± 1.4 mm) and the CTR (9.5 ± 1.1 mm) group; width reduction appeared to be mainly due to "collapse" of the buccal aspect of the ridge. Simulated straightforward placement of implants with a diameter of 3.5 or 4.3 mm was possible in 62% and 56% of the cases in the AWO vs. 86% and 84% in the AW group (p = .006 and .002, respectively). Straightforward implant placement was actually possible in all patients (22) in the AW group, while 28% (11 of 39) of the patients in the AWO group needed additional hard tissue augmentation. Significant dimensional differences exist in the alveolar ridge, especially in the coronal part, at lower P2 agenesis sites missing the primary tooth for ≥3 m, when compared to P2 agenesis sites with the primary tooth in situ. It seems thus reasonable to advise that the primary second molar should be kept as long as possible, in order to facilitate straightforward implant installation and reduce the probability of additional bone augmentation procedures. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Evaluation of primary tooth enamel surface morphology and microhardness after Nd:YAG laser irradiation and APF gel treatment--an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda, Naveen Reddy; Vanaja Reddy, G; Shashikiran, N D

    2011-01-01

    Laser irradiation and fluoride has been used as a preventive tool to combat dental caries in permanent teeth, but little has been done for primary teeth which are more prone to caries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate microhardness alterations in the primary tooth enamel after Nd-YAG laser irradiation alone and combined with topical fluoride treatment either before or after Nd-YAG laser irradiation. Ten primary molars were sectioned and assigned randomly to: control group, Nd-YAG laser irradiation, Nd-YAG lasing before APF and APF followed by Nd-YAG lasing. The groups were evaluated for microhardness. Surface morphological changes were observed using SEM. Statistical comparisons were performed. The control group's SEM showed a relatively smooth enamel surface and lasing group had fine cracks and porosities. In the lasing + fluoride group a homogenous confluent surface was seen. In the fluoride + lasing group an irregular contour with marked crack propagation was noted. There was a significant increase in the microhardness of the treatment groups. Nd-YAG laser irradiation and combined APF treatment of the primary tooth enamel gave morphologically hardened enamel surface which can be a protective barrier against a cariogenic attack.

  15. Shear bond strength of a self-etch adhesive to caries-affected dentin after caries removal by Er:YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Zhenlin; Wu, Weiliang; Zhao, Haibin; Zhang, Xianzeng; Lin, Shi; Xie, Shusen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of a self-etch adhesive to caries-affected dentin after caries removal by erbium: yttrium, aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser and analyze the resin-dentin interface. The caries-infected dentin of human molars were removed by Er:YAG laser with energy density of 20 J/cm2 and pulse repetition rate of 20 Hz. The conventional bur was used as control group. After bonding procedures, specimens were subjected to shear bond strength test and the adhesive interface was examined by laser confocal scanning microscope (LCSM). The result showed that Er:YAG laser could effectively remove dentin caries. There was no statistical difference in shear bond strength between two groups and the adhesive interface created on laser-irradiated dentin surface presented similar feature to that on bur-ground surface.

  16. On modeling and nanoanalysis of caries-affected dentin surfaces restored with Zn-containing amalgam and in vitro oral function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, Manuel; Aguilera, Fátima S; Osorio, Estrella; López-López, Modesto T; Cabello, Inmaculada; Toledano-Osorio, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel

    2015-12-19

    The aim of this research was to assess the influence of mechanical loading on the ability of Zn-free versus Zn-containing amalgams to promote remineralization at the dentin interface. Sound and caries-affected dentin surfaces (CAD) were restored using Zn-free or Zn-containing dental amalgams. Midcoronal dentin surfaces were studied by (1) atomic force microscopy analysis (including plot and phase imaging, nanoindentation test [modulus of Young (Ei), nanoroughness measurements, and fibril diameter assessment], (2) Raman spectroscopy/cluster analysis, (3) x-ray diffraction, (4) field emission electron microscope and energy-dispersive analysis, for morphological, mechanical, and physicochemical characterization. Analyses were performed before amalgam placement and after amalgam removal, at 24 h and 3 weeks of load cycling. Zn-free and Zn-containing amalgams restorations promoted an increase in the modulus of Young of CAD surfaces, after 3 weeks of load cycling; at this time, Zn-containing amalgams attained higher Ei than Zn-free restorations. Zn-containing amalgams induced tubular occlusion after load cycling, in both sound and CAD. Zn free-amalgams promoted remineralization of both intertubular and peritubular dentin in CAD substrata. These minerals were identified as calcium-phosphate deposits and crystals as hydroxyl-apatite with augmented crystallographic maturity but with some components of lattice distortion. Crosslinking of collagen diminished and secondary structure of collagen increased in CAD substrate restored with Zn-containing amalgam after 3 weeks of load cycling, indicating an advanced preservation, molecular organization, and orientation of collagen fibrils after load cycling. Plot and phase images permitted to observe the topographical changes which were promoted by the mineral deposits; in general, the indexes related to higher remineralization gave rise to a decrease of nanoroughness and an augmentation of the bandwidth of the collagen fibrils. Zn

  17. In vitro performance of QLF system and conventional methods for detection of occlusal caries around tooth-colored restorations in primary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, Tathiane L; Piovesan, Chaiana; Mendes, Fausto M; Braga, Mariana M; Raggio, Daniela P

    2016-01-01

    Secondary caries is the main reason for restoration replacement, and therefore, an accurate detection of this type of condition is fundamental. To compare in vitro the performance of different conventional and quantitative light-induced fluorescence-based (QLF) methods in detecting occlusal caries around resin composite restorations in primary molars. Two examiners evaluated independently 42 sites adjacent to tooth-colored restorations using visual inspection (ICDAS-CARS), radiographic examination, and QLF. Histological examination was used as reference standard method. Area under the ROC curve (Az), sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the methods were calculated at enamel (D1) and dentin caries (D3) lesions thresholds. Intra- and interexaminer reproducibility were calculated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and kappa statistics. There was no difference among the methods considering Az at D1 threshold. Visual inspection, radiograph, and QLF (scores) methods presented similar sensitivities and significantly higher than those obtained with the QLF (∆F%). At D3 threshold, there were no differences among the methods regarding sensitivities, specificities, and accuracy, except for the examiner 2 with the QLF (∆F%) who achieved a very low sensitivity value. Conventional methods are similar to QLF methods for detecting caries around tooth-colored restorations in primary teeth. © 2015 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The influence of smear layer removal on primary tooth pulpectomy outcome: a 24-month, double-blind, randomized, and controlled clinical trial evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelos, Roberta; Tannure, Patricia Nivoloni; Gleiser, Rogerio; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Primo, Laura Guimarães

    2012-09-01

    The effect of smear layer (SL) removal on primary tooth pulpectomy outcome has not been well elucidated. To determine the effect of SL removal on primary tooth pulpectomy outcome. This is a double-blind, randomized, and controlled clinical trial. Forty-eight patients were randomly divided into SL removal (G1 = 40 teeth) or smear layer nonremoval (G2 = 42 teeth) groups. Following the chemomechanical preparation with K-files and 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), teeth were irrigated with either 6% citric acid and 0.9% physiologic solution (G1) or only 0.9% physiologic solution (G2). Camphorated paramonochlorophenol was used as intracanal medication. At the second appointment, 1 week after, root canals were filled with zinc oxide-eugenol paste. Clinical and radiographical baseline criteria were stipulated equally for both groups. The success rate (G1 = 91.2%; G2 = 70.0%) was statistically different (P = 0.04) between the groups. In G2, the outcome was affected significantly by pulpal necrosis (P = 0.02), pre-operatory symptoms (P = 0.02), and periapical/inter-radicular radiolucency (P = 0.04). The pulpectomy outcome was improved by smear layer removal. The outcome for teeth with pulpal necrosis, pre-operatory symptoms, or periapical/inter-radicular radiolucency was significantly improved by removal of the smear layer. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry © 2011 BSPD, IAPD and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Traumatic displacement of a maxillary primary canine tooth into the middle nasal concha presenting as chronic facial pain: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bušic, Njegoslav; Mihovilovic, Ante; Poljak, Nikola Kolja; Macan, Darko

    2015-01-01

    The case of a 32-year-old woman who sustained a nasal bone fracture and dental trauma at the age of 9 is described in this article. Misdiagnosis of the dental displacement into the middle turbinate at the initial examination led to chronic facial pain. The cause of the pain was incorrectly diagnosed or misinterpreted by several medical specialists, including an otolaryngologist, neurologist, physiatrist, ophthalmologist, internist, radiologist, oral surgeon, dentist, and the patient's family physician. Finally, 23 years after the dental trauma, a multislice computed tomogram revealed that the primary maxillary canine was dislocated into the right middle nasal concha. The tooth, which had become embedded into necrotic, inflammatory tissue, was removed by endoscopic surgery, which resulted in full resolution of the patient's pain.

  20. A multicenter retrospective study of the risk factors associated with medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw after tooth extraction in patients receiving oral bisphosphonate therapy: can primary wound closure and a drug holiday really prevent MRONJ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, T; Kawakita, A; Ueda, N; Funahara, R; Tachibana, A; Kobayashi, M; Kondou, E; Takeda, D; Kojima, Y; Sato, S; Yanamoto, S; Komatsubara, H; Umeda, M; Kirita, T; Kurita, H; Shibuya, Y; Komori, T

    2017-08-01

    Root amputation, extraction of a single tooth, bone loss or severe tooth mobility, and an unclosed wound were significantly associated with increased risk of developing medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ). We recommend a minimally traumatic extraction technique, removal of any bone edges, and mucosal wound closure as standard procedures in patients receiving bisphosphonates. Osteonecrosis of the jaws can occur following tooth extraction in patients receiving bisphosphonate drugs. Various strategies for minimizing the risk of MRONJ have been advanced, but no studies have comprehensively analyzed the efficacy of factors such as primary wound closure, demographics, and drug holidays in reducing its incidence. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively investigate the relationships between these various risk factors after tooth extraction in patients receiving oral bisphosphonate therapy. Risk factors for MRONJ after tooth extraction were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analysis. All patients were investigated with regard to demographics; type and duration of oral bisphosphonate use; whether they underwent a discontinuation of oral bisphosphonates before tooth extraction (drug holiday), and the duration of such discontinuation; and whether any additional surgical procedures (e.g., incision, removal of bone edges, root amputation) were performed. We found that root amputation (OR = 6.64), extraction of a single tooth (OR = 3.70), bone loss or severe tooth mobility (OR = 3.60), and an unclosed wound (OR = 2.51) were significantly associated with increased risk of developing MRONJ. We recommend a minimally traumatic extraction technique, removal of any bone edges, and mucosal wound closure as standard procedures in patients receiving bisphosphonates. We find no evidence supporting the efficacy of a pre-extraction short-term drug holiday from oral bisphosphonates in reducing the risk of MRONJ.

  1. Effect of active pretreatment of self-etching primers on the ultramorphology of intact primary and permanent tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Eminkahyagil, Neslihan

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the ultramorphological changes after agitated and nonagitated application of self-etching primer systems on unground primary and permanent enamel. Five self-etching primer systems were used: (1) Clearfil SE Bond; (2) Clearfil Protect Bond; (3) Adper Prompt; (4) Xeno III; and (5) nonrinse conditioner (NRC). Noncarious human primary and permanent incisors were collected and stored frozen until used. Intact labial surfaces were divided into 2 halves, applying the self-etching primers with (active application) and without (inactive agitation) using a microbrush within the times recommended by the manufacturers. Treated surfaces were further processed for ultramorphological evaluation under scanning electron microscope (SEM). All tested self-etching systems produced weaker etch patterns and less dissolution of enamel surface compared with acid-etched samples in both primary and permanent teeth. Except for NRC and Adper Prompt, agitation of the surface did not increase the etching efficacy. Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil Protect Bond resulted in similar morphological features following application in either mode. While agitation of self-etching primers may improve etching efficacy, this effect appears to be dependent on the material used. Phosphoric acid produces well-defined etching patterns on intact primary and permanent enamel.

  2. Prevalence of dental caries in primary and permanent teeth and its relation with tooth brushing habits among schoolchildren in Eastern Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Faraz A.; Khabeer, Abdul; Moheet, Imran A.; Khan, Soban Q.; Farooq, Imran; ArRejaie, Aws S.,

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of dental caries in the primary and permanent teeth, and evaluate the brushing habits of school children in Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Methods: This study was conducted at Dammam, KSA. Oral examination of the participants was conducted from February to May 2014. The total sample size for this cross-sectional study was 711. There were 397 children between the age of 6-9 years, who were examined for primary teeth caries, and 314 between the age 10-12 years were examined for permanent teeth caries. Primary and permanent dentitions were studied for decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmft [primary teeth], DMFT [permanent teeth]). Results: The overall prevalence of dental caries in primary and permanent teeth was almost 73% (n=711). Among the 6-9-year-old, the prevalence of caries was approximately 78% (n=397) whereas, among the 10-12-year-old children, it was approximately 68% (n=314). Mean dmft value among the 6-9-year-olds was 3.66±3.13 with decayed (d) component of 3.28±2.92, missing (m) component of 0.11±0.69, and filled (f) component of 0.26±0.9. Mean DMFT value among the 10-12-year-old children was 1.94±2.0 with decayed (D) component of 1.76±1.85, missing (M) component of 0.03±0.22, and filled (F) of component 0.15±0.73. Daily tooth brushing had a positive effect on caries prevention, and this effect was statistically significant for caries in primary teeth. Conclusion: Although the prevalence of dental caries in primary and permanent teeth was not found to be as high as other researchers reported from different cities of KSA, still the prevalence was high considering the World Health Organization future oral health goals. Awareness should be provided to students, as well as, teachers and parents regarding the importance of good brushing habits and regular dental visits. PMID:25987118

  3. Tooth wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tušek Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tooth wear is the loss of dental hard tissue that was not caused by decay and represents a common clinical problem of modern man. In the etiology of dental hard tissue lesions there are three dominant mechanisms that may act synergistically or separately:friction (friction, which is caused by abrasion of exogenous, or attrition of endogenous origin, chemical dissolution of dental hard tissues caused by erosion, occlusal stress created by compression and flexion and tension that leads to tooth abfraction and microfracture. Wear of tooth surfaces due to the presence of microscopic imperfections of tooth surfaces is clinically manifested as sanding veneers. Tribology, as an interdisciplinary study of the mechanisms of friction, wear and lubrication at the ultrastructural level, has defined a universal model according to which the etiopathogenesis of tooth wear is caused by the following factors: health and diseases of the digestive tract, oral hygiene, eating habits, poor oral habits, bruxism, temporomandibular disorders and iatrogenic factors. Attrition and dental erosion are much more common in children with special needs (Down syndrome. Erosion of teeth usually results from diseases of the digestive tract that lead to gastroesophageal reflux (GER of gastric juice (HCl. There are two basic approaches to the assessment of the degree of wear and dental erosion. Depending on the type of wear (erosion, attrition, abfraction, the amount of calcium that was realised during the erosive attack could be determined qualitatively and quantitatively, or changes in optical properties and hardness of enamel could be recorded, too. Abrasion of teeth (abrasio dentium is the loss of dental hard tissue caused by friction between the teeth and exogenous foreign substance. It is most commonly provoked by prosthetic dentures and bad habits, while its effect depends on the size of abrasive particles and their amount, abrasive particle hardness and hardness of tooth

  4. Tooth Fairy guilty of favouritism!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patcas, Raphael; van Waes, Hubertus Jm; Daum, Moritz M; Landolt, Markus A

    2017-12-11

    To determine the proportion of children visited by the Tooth Fairy, the child-related factors that influence the likelihood of her visit, and the parent-related variables that affect the amount of money the Tooth Fairy leaves. Cross-sectional questionnaire study. Zürich, Switzerland. 3617 parents of children (mean age of children, 6.8 years; 51.9% girls) who had lost at least one deciduous tooth received a self-developed questionnaire; 1274 questionnaires were returned (35.2%). Primary outcome variables were the Tooth Fairy's visit after tooth loss and the amount of money given in case of a visit. Child- and parent-related variables were assessed as predictors of the main outcomes. Most parents (71.0%) reported that the Tooth Fairy visited their child. She usually exchanged the lost tooth for money (55.8% of visits) or placed money next to the tooth (40.7%); rarely did she take the tooth without pecuniary substitution. The Tooth Fairy left an average of 7.20 Swiss francs (approximately AU$9.45). The Tooth Fairy favoured visiting for the teeth of older children (odds ratio [OR], per year, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.09-3.21), of boys (OR, 2.65; 95% CI, 1.09-6.42), and of children who believed in her (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.77-9.64). The amount of money was influenced by maternal, but not paternal socio-demographic factors, including level of education (OR, per level, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66-0.92) and country of origin (OR, Western countries v non-Western countries, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.20-4.62). The Tooth Fairy does not visit all children after tooth loss, displaying clear preferences in her choice of business partners. The odds of a visit are dramatically increased if she is believed in, and the value of a deciduous tooth is influenced by socio-demographic factors.

  5. Acoustic comparison of Er,Cr:YSGG laser and dental high speed handpiece for primary anterior tooth preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorden, Monserrat; Chen, Jung-Wei; Easley, Elisabeth; Li, Yiming; Kurti, R. Steven

    The acoustics of a dental hard tissue laser (Er,Cr:YSGG laser, Waterlase MD, Biolase, USA) and a traditional dental high speed hand piece (Midwest®, Dentsply International, USA) were compared in vitro using a simple approach that can be easily adapted for in vivo studies. Thirty one extracted caries and restoration free primary anterior teeth were selected. These teeth were sectioned along a symmetry axis to give two identical halves for use in a split study. These halves were randomly assigned to either the laser (experimental) or the high speed (control) group. A miniature electret microphone was coupled to the sample using a polymer and used to collect the acoustic signal at the interface of the pulp chamber. This signal was captured periodically by a digitizing oscilloscope and multiple traces were stored for subsequent analysis. 2x1x1mm3 preparations were made according to manufacturers recommendations for the given method. Each cavity was prepared by the same clinician and calibration tests were performed to ensure consistency. The measurements indicated that the peak acoustic pressures as well as cumulative acoustic effects (due to duty cycle) were significantly higher (P<0.001, T-test) with the dental hand piece than with the dental laser. Our study suggests the need for further investigations into the neurological implications of acoustic effects in dental patient care such as pain studies.

  6. Overview of Tooth Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... necessitated by crowns and bridges. Bonding involves the attachment of tooth-colored fillings to natural teeth with ... Drugs Mentioned In This Article Generic Name Select Brand Names tetracycline ACHROMYCIN V Tooth Disorders Overview of ...

  7. Tooth - abnormal colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  8. Tooth Eruption without Roots

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, X.-P.

    2013-01-01

    Root development and tooth eruption are very important topics in dentistry. However, they remain among the less-studied and -understood subjects. Root development accompanies rapid tooth eruption, but roots are required for the movement of teeth into the oral cavity. It has been shown that the dental follicle and bone remodeling are essential for tooth eruption. So far, only limited genes have been associated with root formation and tooth eruption. This may be due to the diffic...

  9. WITHDRAWN: Dental fillings for the treatment of caries in the primary dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yengopal, Veerasamy; Harnekar, Soraya Yasin; Patel, Naren; Siegfried, Nandi

    2016-10-17

    Childhood caries (tooth decay) consists of a form of tooth decay that affects the milk teeth (also known as baby or primary teeth) of children. This may range from tooth decay in a single tooth to rampant caries affecting all the teeth in the mouth. Primary teeth in young children are vital to their development and every effort should be made to retain these teeth for as long as is possible. Dental fillings or restorations have been used as an intervention to repair these damaged teeth. Oral health professionals need to make astute decisions about the type of restorative (filling) material they choose to best manage their patients with childhood caries. This decision is by no means an easy one as remarkable advances in dental restorative materials over the last 10 years has seen the introduction of a multitude of different filling materials claiming to provide the best performance in terms of durability, aesthetics, symptom relief, etc when placed in the mouth. This review sought to compare the different types of dental materials against each other for the same outcomes. The objective of this review was to compare the outcomes (including pain relief, survival and aesthetics) for restorative materials used to treat caries in the primary dentition in children.  Additionally, the restoration of teeth was compared with extraction and no treatment. Electronic searches of the following databases were undertaken: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (up to January 2009); CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue1); MEDLINE (1966 to January 2009); EMBASE (1996 to January 2009); SIGLE (1976 to 2004); and conference proceedings on early childhood caries, restorative materials for paediatric dentistry, and material sciences conferences for dental materials used for children's dentistry (1990 to 2008). The searches attempted to identify all relevant studies irrespective of language.Additionally, the reference lists from articles of eligible papers were searched

  10. Dental fillings for the treatment of caries in the primary dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yengopal, Veerasamy; Harneker, Suyara Yasmin; Patel, Naren; Siegfried, Nandi

    2009-04-15

    Childhood caries (tooth decay) consists of a form of tooth decay that affects the milk teeth (also known as baby or primary teeth) of children. This may range from tooth decay in a single tooth to rampant caries affecting all the teeth in the mouth. Primary teeth in young children are vital to their development and every effort should be made to retain these teeth for as long as is possible. Dental fillings or restorations have been used as an intervention to repair these damaged teeth. Oral health professionals need to make astute decisions about the type of restorative (filling) material they choose to best manage their patients with childhood caries. This decision is by no means an easy one as remarkable advances in dental restorative materials over the last 10 years has seen the introduction of a multitude of different filling materials claiming to provide the best performance in terms of durability, aesthetics, symptom relief, etc when placed in the mouth. This review sought to compare the different types of dental materials against each other for the same outcomes. The objective of this review was to compare the outcomes (including pain relief, survival and aesthetics) for restorative materials used to treat caries in the primary dentition in children. Additionally, the restoration of teeth was compared with extraction and no treatment. Electronic searches of the following databases were undertaken: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (up to January 2009); CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue1); MEDLINE (1966 to January 2009); EMBASE (1996 to January 2009); SIGLE (1976 to 2004); and conference proceedings on early childhood caries, restorative materials for paediatric dentistry, and material sciences conferences for dental materials used for children's dentistry (1990 to 2008). The searches attempted to identify all relevant studies irrespective of language.Additionally, the reference lists from articles of eligible papers were searched

  11. Dental anomaly patterns associated with tooth agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Su Ji; Lee, Je Woo; Song, Ji Hyun

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the relationship between tooth agenesis and the occurrence of other dental anomalies in children and adolescents. Panoramic radiographs of 195 subjects with tooth agenesis, except for the third molar, were retrospectively examined and compared with a non-agenesis control group of 600 subjects. Their ages ranged from 7 to 15 years. Panoramic and periapical radiographs were used to analyze the presence of other associated dental anomalies. The occurrences of these anomalies were compared with those in the non-agenesis group. Subjects with tooth agenesis showed a significantly higher prevalence of a small maxillary lateral incisor (17.7%), distoangulation of the mandibular second premolar (6.5%), delayed development of a permanent tooth (10.8%), and hypo-occlusion of a primary molar (11.8%). In contrast, the prevalence of a supernumerary tooth was higher in the control group, and no difference was observed in the prevalence of ectopic eruption of a first molar. According to the agenesis area, microdontia of the maxillary lateral incisors occurred more often in patients with anterior or premolar agenesis than in the molar agenesis groups. Distoangulation of the mandibular second premolars, delayed tooth development, and hypo-occlusion of the primary molars were associated with premolar tooth agenesis. A small maxillary lateral incisor, distoangulation of the mandibular second premolar, delayed development of a permanent tooth, and hypo-occlusion of a primary molar were frequently associated with tooth agenesis, providing additional evidence of a genetic interrelationship in the causes of these dental anomalies.

  12. Tooth eruption without roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X-P

    2013-03-01

    Root development and tooth eruption are very important topics in dentistry. However, they remain among the less-studied and -understood subjects. Root development accompanies rapid tooth eruption, but roots are required for the movement of teeth into the oral cavity. It has been shown that the dental follicle and bone remodeling are essential for tooth eruption. So far, only limited genes have been associated with root formation and tooth eruption. This may be due to the difficulties in studying late stages of tooth development and tooth movement and the lack of good model systems. Transgenic mice with eruption problems and short or no roots can be used as a powerful model for further deciphering of the cellular, molecular, and genetic mechanisms underlying root formation and tooth eruption. Better understanding of these processes can provide hints on delivering more efficient dental therapies in the future.

  13. A survey of primary tooth pulp therapy as taught in US dental schools and practiced by diplomates of the American Board Of Pediatric Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunston, Bryan; Coll, James A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to repeat a 1997 survey of current pulp therapy practice. The directors of dental school predoctoral pediatric dentistry programs (N=56) and board certified pediatric dentists (N=1200) were surveyed in 2005. More dental schools (83%) taught indirect pulp therapy (IPT) compared to 1997. Significantly more used glass ionomer for IPT with most dental schools and diplomates not re-entering a tooth after IPT. Over 30% of schools and diplomates do direct pulp cops using glass ionomer. For pulpotomy, diluted formocresol usage decreased in dental schools (54%) while ferric sulfate significantly increased (24%) and full strength remained at 22%. Shorter placement of pulpotomy medication was noted and ZOE alone the preferred base. Pulpectomy was advocated by 85% of 2005 schools and diplomates with ZOE filler use decreasing while iodoform/calcium hydroxide filler use increasing. More pediatric dentists are using glass ionomer for IPT and direct pulp capping, and there was a trend away from the use of 1:5 diluted formocresol with more using ferric sulfate for pulpotomy. For pulpectomy, most use ZOE but iodoform pastes and calcium hydroxide have increased in usage since 1997 Disagreements continue concerning when to use certain pulp therapies and some directors and diplomates did not follow the AAPD guidelines.

  14. Cavities/Tooth Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a process that occurs over time. Here's how tooth decay develops: Plaque forms. Dental plaque is a clear sticky film that coats ... by a lack of saliva, which helps prevent tooth decay by washing away food and plaque from your teeth. Substances found in saliva also help counter the ...

  15. Effect of silver diamine fluoride and ammonium hexafluorosilicate applications with and without Er:YAG laser irradiation on the microtensile bond strength in sound and caries-affected dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucukyilmaz, Ebru; Savas, Selcuk; Akcay, Merve; Bolukbasi, Basak

    2016-01-01

    Cariostatic and preventive agents are applied to create caries-resistant dentin surfaces and may affect subsequent resin bonding. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different agents with and without Er:YAG laser irradiation on the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of resin composite to sound dentin (SD) and caries-affected dentin (CAD), and to assess the morphological and chemical changes in the specimens. Ninety-six extracted molar teeth were divided into a control group (deionized water) and two experimental groups (ammonium hexafluorosilicate [SiF], silver diamine fluoride [SDF]), that subdivided according to different conditions (SD, CAD, SD+laser irradiation, CAD+laser irradiation). After treatment procedures, the teeth were restored and the µTBS was tested with a universal testing machine. Morover, 144 teeth were prepared and after treatment modalities; morphological changes of the surface were investigated and elemental analyses were performed using scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). The data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. SDF and SiF applications reduced the µTBS values in both the SD and CAD subgroups (P Laser irradiation increased the µTBS values in the SiF group and the values were adversely affected in the SDF group (P laser irradiation and the use of SiF and SDF solutions under the resin restorations do not seem appropriate. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Tooth brushing for oral prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruaki Hayasaki, DDS, PhD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Control of plaque and debris is essential for the prevention of inflammatory periodontal diseases and dental caries, because plaque is the primary etiological factor in the introduction and development of both of these infection-oriented diseases. Plaque removal with a toothbrush is the most frequently used method of oral hygiene. Powered toothbrushes were developed beginning in the 1960s and are now widely used in developed countries. The bristles of a toothbrush should be able to reach and clean efficiently most areas of the mouth, and recently the design of both manual and powered toothbrushes has focused on the ability to reach and clean interproximal tooth surfaces. An individual's tooth brushing behavior, including force, duration, motivation and motion, are also critical to tooth brushing efficacy. Dental floss and the type of toothpaste play additional important roles as auxiliary tools for oral prophylaxis. Dental professionals should help their care-receivers’ meet the requirements of oral hygiene to maintain their QOL. This article reviews these topics.

  17. A novel homozygous PTH1R variant identified through whole-exome sequencing further expands the clinical spectrum of primary failure of tooth eruption in a consanguineous Saudi family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelani, Musharraf; Kang, Changsoo; Mohamoud, Hussein Sheikh Ali; Al-Rehaili, Rayan; Almramhi, Mona Mohammad; Serafi, Rehab; Yang, Huanming; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousuf; Naeem, Muhammad; Alkhiary, Yaser Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to identify the genetic cause of non-syndromic primary failure of tooth eruption in a five-generation consanguineous Saudi family using whole-exome sequencing (WES) analysis. The family pedigree and phenotype were obtained from patient medical records. WES of all four affected family members was performed using the 51 Mb SureSelect V4 library kit and then sequenced using the Illumina HiSeq2000 sequencing system. Sequence alignment, variant calling, and the annotation of single nucleotide polymorphisms and indels were performed using standard bioinformatics pipelines. The genotype of candidate variants was confirmed in all available family members by Sanger sequencing. Pedigree analysis suggested that the inheritance was autosomal recessive. WES of all affected individuals identified a novel homozygous variant in exon 8 of the parathyroid hormone 1 receptor gene (PTH1R) (NM_000316: c.611T>A: p.Val204Glu). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of primary failure of eruption caused by a homozygous mutation in PTH1R. Our findings prove the application of WES as an efficient molecular diagnostics tool for this rare phenotype and further broaden the clinical spectrum of PTH1R pathogenicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Mechanisms of tooth eruption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltha, J C

    2014-04-01

    Tooth eruption is of the utmost importance for the normal development of the dentition and the face. Since the 1980s, it has been known that the tooth germ itself is not essential for facilitating the processes that make tooth eruption possible. For that reason, recent research on the regulatory mechanisms of tooth eruption has focused mainly on the enamel organ and the dental follicle. Different regulatory mechanisms act on the occlusal and the apical sides of an erupting tooth. On the occlusal side osteoclast differentiation is stimulated. This leads to the development of an eruption canal, a process in which macrophages and matrix metalloproteases also play an important role. On the apical side the most important factors are the transcription factor RUNX2 and the bone morphogenic protein 2. They are responsible for the deposition of trabecular bone in that area. Many regulatory mechanisms which are involved in tooth eruption are also active in other developmental processes. This explains that certain syndromes can also have an effect on the tooth eruption process.

  19. Prevalence of dental caries in primary and permanent teeth and its relation with tooth brushing habits among schoolchildren in Eastern Saudi Arabia‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Faraz A; Khabeer, Abdul; Moheet, Imran A; Khan, Soban Q; Farooq, Imran; ArRejaie, Aws S

    2015-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of dental caries in the primary and permanent teeth, and evaluate the brushing habits of school children in Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA).  Methods. This study was conducted at Dammam, KSA. Oral examination of the participants was conducted from February to May 2014. The total sample size for this cross-sectional study was 711. There were 397 children between the age of 6-9 years, who were examined for primary teeth caries, and 314 between the age 10-12 years were examined for permanent teeth caries. Primary and permanent dentitions were studied for decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmft [primary teeth], DMFT [permanent teeth]).   The overall prevalence of dental caries in primary and permanent teeth was almost 73% (n=711). Among the 6-9-year-old, the prevalence of caries was approximately 78% (n=397) whereas, among the 10-12-year-old children, it was approximately 68% (n=314). Mean dmft value among the 6-9-year-olds was 3.66±3.13 with decayed (d) component of 3.28±2.92, missing (m) component of 0.11±0.69, and filled (f) component of 0.26±0.9. Mean DMFT value among the 10-12-year-old children was 1.94±2.0 with decayed (D) component of 1.76±1.85, missing (M) component of 0.03±0.22, and filled (F) of component 0.15±0.73. Daily tooth brushing had a positive effect on caries prevention, and this effect was statistically significant for caries in primary teeth.   Although the prevalence of dental caries in primary and permanent teeth was not found to be as high as other researchers reported from different cities of KSA, still the prevalence was high considering the World Health Organization future oral health goals. Awareness should be provided to students, as well as, teachers and parents regarding the importance of good brushing habits and regular dental visits.

  20. Autogenous tooth transplantation for replacing a lost tooth: case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Youn Kang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The autogenous tooth transplantation is an alternative treatment replacing a missing tooth when a suitable donor tooth is available. It is also a successful treatment option to save significant amount of time and cost comparing implants or conventional prosthetics. These cases, which required single tooth extraction due to deep caries and severe periodontal disease, could have good results by transplanting non-functional but sound donor tooth to the extraction site.

  1. Replacing a Missing Tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... there are two options for replacement: First, a removable partial denture may be used to replace the missing tooth. ... appearance look and feel more natural than a removable partial denture. However, it does require grinding down the support ...

  2. To Tell the Tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Sparkling Smile Holiday Workshop Thanksgiving Back to School Fourth of July Fun Tooth Fairy Sugar Wars Valentine's Day Halloween Defeat Monster Mouth! Color and Count Puzzle Fun Oral Health Made Easy ...

  3. The cracked tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, G R

    1998-01-01

    Fractured molars and premolars are very common. Fractures usually result from cracks that develop and slowly extend until the tooth separates into buccal and lingual fragments. Sometimes, as these cracks expand, the patient exhibits symptoms of what is commonly referred to as "cracked tooth syndrome" (CTS). When CTS occurs, an opportunity exists to diagnose and treat these patients, to relieve their discomfort and prevent sequelae that would require more extensive treatment.

  4. Dental plaque, preventive care, and tooth brushing associated with dental caries in primary teeth in schoolchildren ages 6-9 years of Leon, Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Miriam del Socorro; Medina-Solís, Carlo Eduardo; Minaya-Sánchez, Mirna; Pontigo-Loyola, América Patricia; Villalobos-Rodelo, Juan José; Islas-Granillo, Horacio; de la Rosa-Santillana, Rubén; Maupomé, Gerardo

    2013-11-19

    Our study aimed to evaluate the effect of various risk indicators for dental caries on primary teeth of Nicaraguan children (from Leon, Nicaragua) ages 6 to 9, using the negative binomial regression model. A cross-sectional study was carried out to collect clinical, demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioral data from 794 schoolchildren ages 6 to 9 years, randomly selected from 25 schools in the city of León, Nicaragua. Clinical examinations for dental caries (dmft index) were performed by 2 trained and standardized examiners. Socio-demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioral data were self-reported using questionnaires. Multivariate negative binomial regression (NBR) analysis was used. Mean age was 7.49 ± 1.12 years. Boys accounted for 50.1% of the sample. Mean dmft was 3.54 ± 3.13 and caries prevalence (dmft >0) was 77.6%. In the NBR multivariate model (pBrushing teeth at least once a day and having received preventive dental care in the last year before data collection were associated with declines in the expected mean dmft by 19.5% and 69.6%, respectively. Presence of dental plaque increased the expected mean dmft by 395.5%. The proportion of students with caries in this sample was high. We found associations between dental caries in the primary dentition and dental plaque, brushing teeth at least once a day, and having received preventive dental care. To improve oral health, school programs and/or age-appropriate interventions need to be developed based on the specific profile of caries experience and the associated risk indicators.

  5. Twenty-year follow-up of a familial case of PTH1R-associated primary failure of tooth eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Cláudia Misue; de Oliveira, José Américo; Garcia, José Fernando; Roth, Helmut; Weber, Bernhard H F

    2017-03-01

    Nonsyndromic primary failure of eruption (PFE) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of dental eruption with no obvious dental or soft tissue interference. The purposes of this study were to genetically and clinically characterize a family with many members affected by PFE and to describe the natural evolution of the disorder. Three generations of a family with 18 members, 10 of them clinically affected by PFE, were evaluated periodically during 20 years of clinical follow-up. PFE was observed in varying degrees of severity in both sexes. Clinical presentation became more severe in adulthood. One patient had spontaneous reeruption of 2 posterior teeth. Cervical root resorptions were observed in 3 members. Genetic analysis showed a deleterious heterozygous mutation in intron 9 of the PTH1R gene (c.639-2A>G) and diagnosed an additional affected member. The long-term follow-up of PFE cases in this family permitted the following observations: (1) the onset occurred from the preemergence to the postemergence phases, (2) PFE appeared to be closely related to ankylosis, (3) affected teeth maintained the eruptive potential even in adulthood, (4) the earlier the onset the more severe the open bite, and (5) cervical root resorptions occurred in 3 affected members. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Histology of tooth attachment tissues and plicidentine in Varanus (Reptilia: Squamata), and a discussion of the evolution of amniote tooth attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Erin E; Caldwell, Michael W; Lamoureux, Denis O; Budney, Lisa A

    2011-10-01

    Few recent studies have examined the histological basis for tooth attachment in squamates. In the past few years, a surge of interest in this topic has led to the intriguing suggestion that the major tissues derived from the tooth germ (enamel, dentine, cementum and alveolar bone), are conservative and are present in all amniotes. In this study, we describe the histology and development of the tooth attachment complex in Varanus rudicollis, the rough-neck monitor. We provide the first published evidence for the role of cementum and alveolar bone in tooth attachment in varanoid lizards. In Varanus, cementum is deposited on the external surface of the tooth root as well as at the base of the tooth, where it plays a role in the attachment of the tooth to the jawbone. Alveolar bone is also involved in tooth ankylosis. Our results support the hypothesis that the major tooth germ tissues are found in all amniotes. We provide insights into the structure and development of plicidentine, defined as infolding of the dentine around the tooth base. This feature is unique to varanoids among extant tetrapods and is the third tissue implicated in tooth attachment in Varanus. Plicidentine develops asymmetrically along the labial-lingual axis of a tooth. Varanus is characterized by the presence of both primary and higher-order lamellae, which anastomose to form a honeycomb-like surface that then interacts with the more basal attachment tissues. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Biomaterial Selection for Tooth Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhenglin; Nie, Hemin; Wang, Shuang; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Fu, Susan Y.; Zhou, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or synthetic polymers, three-dimensional scaffold fabrication, stem cell transplantation, and stem cell homing. A tooth is a complex biological organ. Tooth loss represents the most common organ failure. Tooth regeneration encompasses not only regrowth of an entire tooth as an organ, but also biological restoration of individual components of the tooth including enamel, dentin, cementum, or dental pulp. Regeneration of tooth root represents perhaps more near-term opportunities than the regeneration of the whole tooth. In the adult, a tooth owes its biological vitality, arguably more, to the root than the crown. Biomaterials are indispensible for the regeneration of tooth root, tooth crown, dental pulp, or an entire tooth. PMID:21699433

  8. The cracked tooth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Christoper D; McConnell, Robert J

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the clinical features, diagnosis and management of the cracked tooth syndrome (CTS). The condition refers to an incomplete fracture of a vital posterior tooth that occasionally extends into the pulp. A lack of awareness of the condition coupled with its varied clinical features can make diagnosis of CTS difficult. Common symptoms include an uncomfortable sensation or pain from a tooth that occurs while chewing hard foods and which ceases when the pressure is withdrawn. The patient is often unable to identify the offending tooth or quadrant involved, and may report a history of numerous dental procedures with unsatisfactory results. Successful diagnosis and management requires an awareness of the existence of CTS and the appropriate diagnostic tests. Management options depend on the nature of the symptoms and extent of the lesion. These options include routine monitoring, occlusal adjustments, placement of a cast restoration and endodontic treatment. A decision flowchart indicating the treatment options available to the dental practitioner is presented.

  9. Administration of the bisphosphonate zoledronic acid during tooth development inhibits tooth eruption and formation and induces dental abnormalities in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraga, Toru; Ninomiya, Tadashi; Hosoya, Akihiro; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2010-06-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are potent inhibitors of osteoclastic bone resorption and widely used for the treatment of osteoporosis and metastatic bone diseases. Recently, BPs have also been shown to benefit children with primary and secondary osteoporosis, including osteogenesis imperfecta; however, their long-term safety has not been established yet. Clinical and experimental studies have demonstrated that BPs delay or inhibit tooth eruption. The failure of tooth eruption causes several dental abnormalities. In this study, to determine the effects of BPs on tooth formation, the BP zoledronic acid (ZOL) was injected into 7- and 14-day-old rats, and the development of the mandibular teeth was examined. X-ray analysis demonstrated that ZOL inhibited the eruption of both incisors and molars and their formation, especially in the molar roots. Histological examination showed that, in ZOL-treated animals, alveolar bone remained unresorbed around tooth crowns, which injured ameloblasts and enamel matrix, leading to defects of the enamel. Furthermore, haphazard proliferation of odontogenic epithelium and mesenchyme associated with primitive tooth structures, which resembles human odontomas, was induced at the basal end of incisors but not around the molars. Tooth ankylosis to alveolar bone was occasionally observed in molars. These results suggest that administration of BPs during tooth development has the potential to inhibit tooth eruption and formation and to induce several types of dental abnormalities, which may be attributed to the altered osteoclastic activities.

  10. Concrescent triplets involving primary anterior teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urvashi Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenesis is a complex process wherein more than 200 genes are known to play a significant role in tooth development. An imbalance can lead to an abnormality in the number, size, shape or structure of the developing tooth/teeth. The presence of an extra dental lamina forms a supernumerary tooth. The supernumerary teeth are of two types: A rudimentary tooth where the supernumerary tooth does not resemble any tooth in the normal series or a supplemental tooth in which this anomalous tooth resembles one in the normal series. It is also very rare to encounter triple teeth in primary dentition. The union of these teeth may be through fusion, gemination, concrescence or a combination of fusion and gemination. Presented is a rare case of concrescence involving maxillary deciduous incisors and a supplemental tooth in a 7-year-old boy. The differential diagnosis, etiology, and complications of primary anterior triple teeth are discussed.

  11. Unique case of a geminated supernumerary tooth with trifid crown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ather, Amber; Ather, Hunaiza; Sheth, Sanket Milan; Muliya, Vidya Saraswathi [Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Gemination, a relatively uncommon dental anomaly, is characterized by its peculiar representation as a tooth with a bifid crown and a common root and root canal. It usually occurs in primary dentition. To come across gemination in a supernumerary tooth is a rare phenomenon. The purpose of this paper is to present a unique case of hyperdontia wherein gemination in an impacted supernumerary tooth resulted in a trifid crown unlike the usual bifid crown. The role of conventional radiographs as well as computed tomography, to accurately determine the morphology and spatial location, and to arrive at a diagnosis, is also emphasized in this paper.

  12. Microleakage in different primary tooth restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yu Shih

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Restorations using GI and GI+B indicated that these materials performed better than the other materials in this study overall. However, none of the materials were entirely devoid of leakage.

  13. Cracked tooth syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Tanumihardja

    2009-01-01

    Cracked tooth syndrome is usually found in daily dental practice. The incidence of cracks teeth tends to increasing. People are living longer and keeping their teeth longer. As a consequence, people have more complex restoration and endodontic treatment, leaving teeth more prone to cracks. In addition, stressful lives may provoke unconscious habits such as clenching and bruxism which can induce cracks in teeth. However, many cracks teeth can be saved nowadays when the character...

  14. Chick tooth induction revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jinglei; Cho, Sung-Won; Ishiyama, Mikio; Mikami, Masato; Hosoya, Akihiro; Kozawa, Yukishige; Ohshima, Hayato; Jung, Han-Sung

    2009-07-15

    Teeth have been missing from Aves for almost 100 million years. However, it is believed that the avian oral epithelium retains the molecular signaling required to induce odontogenesis, and this has been widely examined using heterospecific recombinations with mouse dental mesenchyme. It has also been argued that teeth can form from the avian oral epithelium owing to contamination of the mouse mesenchyme with mouse dental epithelial cells. To investigate the possibility of tooth formation from chick oral epithelium and the characteristics of possible chick enamel, we applied LacZ transgenic mice during heterospecific recombination and examined the further tooth formation. Transmission electron microscopy was used to identify the two tissues during development after heterospecific recombination. No mixing was detected between chick oral epithelium and mouse dental mesenchyme after 2 days, and secretory ameloblasts with Tomes' processes were observed after 1 week. Teeth were formed after 3 weeks with a single cusp pattern, possibly determined by epithelial factors, which is similar to that of the avian tooth in the late Jurassic period. These recombinant teeth were smaller than mouse molars, whereas perfect structures of both ameloblasts and enamel showed histological characteristics similar to those of mice. Together these observations consistent with previous report that odontogenesis is initially directed by species-specific mesenchymal signals interplaying with common epithelial signals. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Impaired tooth eruption: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noffke, C E E; Chabikuli, N J; Nzima, N

    2005-11-01

    Eruption is the continuous process of movement of a tooth from its developmental location inside the jaw to its functional location in the mouth. Impaired tooth eruption, where this process is disturbed, is common in dental practice. It may manifest either as delayed or complete absence of eruption. Although unerupted teeth are usually asymptomatic, they may cause cosmetic and pathologic complications. The purpose of this article is to provide a review on the pathogenesis and differential radiographic interpretation of impaired tooth eruption.

  16. [Tooth eruption disturbances and syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterkamp, B C M; Ockeloen, C W; Carels, C E L; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M

    2014-04-01

    In the tooth eruption mechanism, various disturbances can appear as a result of gene mutations, a consequence of which can be that tooth eruption does not occur. There are 5 syndromes which involve the complete failure of several or even all teeth to erupt, specifically: cleidocranial dysplasia, Gardner's syndrome, osteopetrosis, mucopolysaccharidosis and GAPO syndrome. Some are very rare and will seldom be encountered in a dental practice, but they show how vulnerable the tooth eruption mechanism is. Dentists are generally the ones who identify a tooth eruption problem in a patient. Since syndromes can be associated with other disorders, additional investigation by a clinical geneticist is always important when a syndrome is suspected.

  17. Expression of Sox genes in tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Katsushige; Kawasaki, Maiko; Watanabe, Momoko; Idrus, Erik; Nagai, Takahiro; Oommen, Shelly; Maeda, Takeyasu; Hagiwara, Nobuko; Que, Jianwen; Sharpe, Paul T; Ohazama, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Sox gene family play roles in many biological processes including organogenesis. We carried out comparative in situ hybridization analysis of seventeen sox genes (Sox1-14, 17, 18, 21) during murine odontogenesis from the epithelial thickening to the cytodifferentiation stages. Localized expression of five Sox genes (Sox6, 9, 13, 14 and 21) was observed in tooth bud epithelium. Sox13 showed restricted expression in the primary enamel knots. At the early bell stage, three Sox genes (Sox8, 11, 17 and 21) were expressed in pre-ameloblasts, whereas two others (Sox5 and 18) showed expression in odontoblasts. Sox genes thus showed a dynamic spatio-temporal expression during tooth development.

  18. Autogenous tooth transplantation: an alternative to replace extracted tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Kamadjaja

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The gold standard treatment to replace missing tooth is dental implants, however, in certain cases, such as in young patients its placement is contraindicated. Autogenous tooth transplantation, which has been widely done in Scandinavian countries for many years, may become a good alternative to overcome this problem. Purpose: This article attempted to provide information about the indication, treatment planning, surgical technique and the successful result of autogenous tooth transplantation. Case: A fifteen year old male patient presented with large caries and periapical disease of his lower left first molar, which was partially erupted and the roots was not fully formed in radiograph. Case management: Autogenous tooth transplantation procedure was performed consisting of extraction of #36, odontectomy of #38 followed by its implantation to socket #36 and fixation of the transplanted tooth to the adjacent teeth. Post operative evaluation was done on regular basis within 18 months period. There was no complaint, the tooth was clinically stable and no evidence of periodontal problem. Serial radiographs showed healing of alveolar bone and periodontal tissue, and the complete root formation was evident by 18 months post operatively. Conclusion: Autogenous tooth transplantation is a potential alternative to replace extracted tooth. Provided that the case be properly planned and operation carefully performed, successful result of this treatment can be achieved.

  19. [Tooth eruption disturbances and syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterkamp, B.A.M. van; Ockeloen, C.W.; Carels, C.E.L.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    In the tooth eruption mechanism, various disturbances can appear as a result of gene mutations, a consequence of which can be that tooth eruption does not occur. There are 5 syndromes which involve the complete failure of several or even all teeth to erupt, specifically: cleidocranial dysplasia,

  20. Broken or knocked out tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Broken or knocked out tooth URL of this page: // ... and fluid solution. Consider buying 1 for your home first aid kit . Also ... If your tooth is badly broken, your nerve endings may be exposed. You will ...

  1. Causes and pattern of tooth loss in children and adolescents in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information obtained included age, gender, missing and extracted teeth, and reasons for extraction/tooth loss. Exfoliated primary teeth and congenitally missing teeth were excluded. Data was analysed using Epi info 2007 statistical software. Chi-square test was used to compare proportions of tooth loss among age groups.

  2. Behavioral changes during dental appointments in children having tooth extractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Gonzalez Cademartori

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tooth extractions are associated with anxiety-related situations that can cause behavioral problems in pediatric dental clinics. Aim: We aimed to describe the behavior of children during tooth extraction appointments, compare it to their behavior in preceding and subsequent dental appointments, and assess the behavioral differences according to gender, age, type of dentition, and reason for extraction. Settings and Design: This was a retrospective study based on information obtained from records of children between 6 and 13 years of age who were cared for at the Dentistry School in Pelotas, Brazil. Materials and Methods: Child behavior was assessed during the dental appointment that preceded the tooth extraction, during the tooth extraction appointment, and in the subsequent dental appointment using the Venham Behavior Rating Scale. Statistical Analysis: Results were analyzed using the Pearson Chi-square and McNemar tests. Results: Eighty-nine children were included. Cooperative behavior prevailed in all the dental appointments. The prevalence of “mild/intense protest” was higher in the tooth extraction appointments than in the previous or subsequent dental appointments (P < 0.001. No significant differences in behavior were detected between the type of dentition (primary or permanent teeth, reason for extraction or gender. Conclusion: In this sample of children treated at a dental school, the occurrence of uncooperative behavior was higher during the tooth extraction appointments than in the preceding and subsequent dental appointments.

  3. Abiotic tooth enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Bongjun; Sain, Trisha; Lacevic, Naida; Bukharina, Daria; Cha, Sang-Ho; Waas, Anthony M.; Arruda, Ellen M.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2017-03-01

    Tooth enamel comprises parallel microscale and nanoscale ceramic columns or prisms interlaced with a soft protein matrix. This structural motif is unusually consistent across all species from all geological eras. Such invariability—especially when juxtaposed with the diversity of other tissues—suggests the existence of a functional basis. Here we performed ex vivo replication of enamel-inspired columnar nanocomposites by sequential growth of zinc oxide nanowire carpets followed by layer-by-layer deposition of a polymeric matrix around these. We show that the mechanical properties of these nanocomposites, including hardness, are comparable to those of enamel despite the nanocomposites having a smaller hard-phase content. Our abiotic enamels have viscoelastic figures of merit (VFOM) and weight-adjusted VFOM that are similar to, or higher than, those of natural tooth enamels—we achieve values that exceed the traditional materials limits of 0.6 and 0.8, respectively. VFOM values describe resistance to vibrational damage, and our columnar composites demonstrate that light-weight materials of unusually high resistance to structural damage from shocks, environmental vibrations and oscillatory stress can be made using biomimetic design. The previously inaccessible combinations of high stiffness, damping and light weight that we achieve in these layer-by-layer composites are attributed to efficient energy dissipation in the interfacial portion of the organic phase. The in vivo contribution of this interfacial portion to macroscale deformations along the tooth’s normal is maximized when the architecture is columnar, suggesting an evolutionary advantage of the columnar motif in the enamel of living species. We expect our findings to apply to all columnar composites and to lead to the development of high-performance load-bearing materials.

  4. Detecting gear tooth fracture in a high contact ratio face gear mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrajsek, James J.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Lewicki, David G.; Decker, Harry J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarized the results of a study in which three different vibration diagnostic methods were used to detect gear tooth fracture in a high contact ratio face gear mesh. The NASA spiral bevel gear fatigue test rig was used to produce unseeded fault, natural failures of four face gear specimens. During the fatigue tests, which were run to determine load capacity and primary failure mechanisms for face gears, vibration signals were monitored and recorded for gear diagnostic purposes. Gear tooth bending fatigue and surface pitting were the primary failure modes found in the tests. The damage ranged from partial tooth fracture on a single tooth in one test to heavy wear, severe pitting, and complete tooth fracture of several teeth on another test. Three gear fault detection techniques, FM4, NA4*, and NB4, were applied to the experimental data. These methods use the signal average in both the time and frequency domain. Method NA4* was able to conclusively detect the gear tooth fractures in three out of the four fatigue tests, along with gear tooth surface pitting and heavy wear. For multiple tooth fractures, all of the methods gave a clear indication of the damage. It was also found that due to the high contact ratio of the face gear mesh, single tooth fractures did not significantly affect the vibration signal, making this type of failure difficult to detect.

  5. PiggyBac transposon-mediated gene delivery efficiently generates stable transfectants derived from cultured primary human deciduous tooth dental pulp cells (HDDPCs) and HDDPC-derived iPS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Emi; Saitoh, Issei; Watanabe, Satoshi; Aoki, Reiji; Miura, Hiromi; Ohtsuka, Masato; Murakami, Tomoya; Sawami, Tadashi; Yamasaki, Youichi; Sato, Masahiro

    2015-09-14

    The ability of human deciduous tooth dental pulp cells (HDDPCs) to differentiate into odontoblasts that generate mineralized tissue holds immense potential for therapeutic use in the field of tooth regenerative medicine. Realization of this potential depends on efficient and optimized protocols for the genetic manipulation of HDDPCs. In this study, we demonstrate the use of a PiggyBac (PB)-based gene transfer system as a method for introducing nonviral transposon DNA into HDDPCs and HDDPC-derived inducible pluripotent stem cells. The transfection efficiency of the PB-based system was significantly greater than previously reported for electroporation-based transfection of plasmid DNA. Using the neomycin resistance gene as a selection marker, HDDPCs were stably transfected at a rate nearly 40-fold higher than that achieved using conventional methods. Using this system, it was also possible to introduce two constructs simultaneously into a single cell. The resulting stable transfectants, expressing tdTomato and enhanced green fluorescent protein, exhibited both red and green fluorescence. The established cell line did not lose the acquired phenotype over three months of culture. Based on our results, we concluded that PB is superior to currently available methods for introducing plasmid DNA into HDDPCs. There may be significant challenges in the direct clinical application of this method for human dental tissue engineering due to safety risks and ethical concerns. However, the high level of transfection achieved with PB may have significant advantages in basic scientific research for dental tissue engineering applications, such as functional studies of genes and proteins. Furthermore, it is a useful tool for the isolation of genetically engineered HDDPC-derived stem cells for studies in tooth regenerative medicine.

  6. Tooth fragment reattachment technique on a pluri traumatized tooth

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Lo Giudice; Frank Lipari; Angelo Lizio; Gabriel Cervino; Marco Cicciù

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes and analyses a tooth fragment reattachment technique used to resolve crown fractures of the anterior teeth. This treatment allows a conservative approach to traumatic coronal lesions offering a better possibility of maintaining aesthetics and function. The authors have illustrated here a clinical case of a fractured incisor. This case is characterized by several traumas on the same tooth that required different therapeutic solutions. We used an easy and ultra-conser...

  7. NSAIDs in orthodontic tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukumar Karthi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic tooth movement is basically a biological response toward a mechanical force. The movement is induced by prolonged application of controlled mechanical forces, which create pressure and tension zones in the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, causing remodeling of tooth sockets. Orthodontists often prescribe drugs to manage pain from force application to biologic tissues. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are the drugs usually prescribed. NSAIDs block prostaglandin synthesis and result in slower tooth movement. Prostaglandins have been found to play a direct role in bone resorption. Aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen, diclofenac, vadecoxib, and celecoxib are the commonly prescribed drugs. Acetaminophen is the drug of choice for orthodontic pain without affecting orthodontic tooth movement.

  8. Erosive tooth wear in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, T.S.; Lussi, A.; Jaeggi, T.; Gambon, D.L.; Lussi, A.; Ganss, C.

    2014-01-01

    Erosive tooth wear in children is a common condition. Besides the anatomical differences between deciduous and permanent teeth, additional histological differences may influence their susceptibility to dissolution. Considering laboratory studies alone, it is not clear whether deciduous teeth are

  9. SEM Analysis of Tooth Enamel

    OpenAIRE

    Azinović, Zoran; Keros, Jadranka; Buković, Dino; Azinović, Ana

    2003-01-01

    SEM analysis contains researches of tooth enamel surfaces of two populations. First group of samples is tooth enamel of prehistorically ancestor from Vu~edol and the second group of samples is enamel of modern Croatian citizen. Even on small number of human teeth samples from cooperage site of Vu~edol (3,000 BC) and today’s Croatian people, we can conclude about chewing biometry of prehistorically ancestors and today’s modern Croatian people, comparing interspecifically the mor...

  10. Orthodontic tooth movement and bioelectricity.

    OpenAIRE

    Karanth H; Shetty K

    2001-01-01

    Research in the field of orthodontics is now focused on the biology of tooth movement. Advanced molecular biology techniques has showed the researchers new avenue towards finding answers to the questions asked for the last few decades. Now it is possible for the researches to explore the lacunae in the field. One such field is, pharmaco-therapeutically or electrophysiologically enhancing the rate of tooth movement, improving the stability of the results, augmenting the anchorage. The voltage ...

  11. The prevalence of tooth-buds extraction in children and mother’s knowledge on teething symptoms in children of Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Simangwa, L.; Gazhva, S.; Gurenkova, N.

    2012-01-01

    A total of 900 mothers were interviewed with regard to practice of tooth-buds extraction in children and 900 children aged 0-5 years old were examined for missing primary teeth, scar or wounds on the gums due to tooth-buds extraction. The prevalence of tooth-buds extraction at Ilembula Lutheran Hospital was 0.7% and in all cases the extracted tooth-buds were lower jaw canines.

  12. Labiogingival groove: A rare developmental tooth anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Chauhan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Labiogingival groove is a congenital morphologic dental anomaly, in which an infolding of the inner enamel epithelium and Hertwig's epithelial root sheath create a groove extending varying depth into root. Epithelial attachment can be breached by gingival irritation secondary to plaque accumulation creating a periodontal defect that spreads to the pulp causing primary periodontal/secondary endodontic. A 12-year-old boy reported with the complaint of painful tooth with pus discharge from labial gingival surface in the maxillary right lateral incisor for 4 months. Intraoral examination revealed bluish red gingiva with loss of contour in relation to maxillary right lateral incisor and purulent discharge in relation to it. A provisional diagnosis of localized gingival abscess in relation to maxillary right incisor (primary periodontic and secondary endodontic involvement was given, and required treatment was carried out. On exposure of the involved tooth, a labiogingival groove was noticed which could have been a contributing factor for the progression of the condition.

  13. Analysis of split tooth as an unstudied reason for tooth extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Osaghae, Ifueko Patience; Azodo, Clement Chinedu

    2014-01-01

    Background Split tooth is an unstudied reason for tooth extraction. The purpose of this study was to determine and analyze split tooth as a reason for extraction in a dental clinic in Benin City. Methods The prospective study was carried out on 669 patients having tooth extraction between May, 2005 and December, 2012. Over the period of the study, diagnosis and tooth extraction were done by three dentists of more five years practice experience. The indications for tooth extraction were noted ...

  14. The phenomenon of cathodoluminescence in tooth hard tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessudnova, Nadezda O.; Matasov, Maxim D.

    2012-03-01

    The phenomenon of luminescence in tooth hard tissues under the hits of electrons accelerated up to 3keV has been investigated and the nature of luminescence has been described. It has been discovered that the change in luminescence color depends on the place of the impingement of primary electrons. The latter could be explained by different chemical compositions of compounds and complexes where luminescence is observed. Based on the analysis of RGB color bar charts, the correlation between the color of luminescence and calcium-phosphorus ratio in tooth hard tissues has been investigated. Thus, cathodoluminescence can be considered as a tool for in vitro quantitative assessment of tooth hard tissues compositions.

  15. Detecting Gear Tooth Fatigue Cracks in Advance of Complete Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrajsek, James J.; Lewicki, David G.

    1996-01-01

    Results of using vibration-based methods to detect gear tooth fatigue cracks are presented. An experimental test rig was used to fail a number of spur gear specimens through bending fatigue. The gear tooth fatigue crack in each test was initiated through a small notch in the fillet area of a tooth on the gear. The primary purpose of these tests was to verify analytical predictions of fatigue crack propagation direction and rate as a function of gear rim thickness. The vibration signal from a total of three tests was monitored and recorded for gear fault detection research. The damage consisted of complete rim fracture on the two thin rim gears and single tooth fracture on the standard full rim test gear. Vibration-based fault detection methods were applied to the vibration signal both on-line and after the tests were completed. The objectives of this effort were to identify methods capable of detecting the fatigue crack and to determine how far in advance of total failure positive detection was given. Results show that the fault detection methods failed to respond to the fatigue crack prior to complete rim fracture in the thin rim gear tests. In the standard full rim gear test all of the methods responded to the fatigue crack in advance of tooth fracture; however, only three of the methods responded to the fatigue crack in the early stages of crack propagation.

  16. Tooth polishing: The current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Alankar Sawai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Healthy teeth and gums make a person feel confident and fit. As people go about their daily routines and with different eating and drinking habits, the tooth enamel turns yellowish or gets stained. Polishing traditionally has been associated with the prophylaxis procedure in most dental practices, which patients know and expect. However, with overzealous use of polishing procedure, there is wearing of the superficial tooth structure. This would lead to more accumulation of local deposits. Also, it takes a long time for the formation of the fluoride-rich layer of the tooth again. Hence, now-a-days, polishing is not advised as a part of routine oral prophylaxis procedure but is done selectively based on the patients′ need. The article here, gives an insight on the different aspects of the polishing process along with the different methods and agents used for the same.

  17. Coping with cracked tooth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benenati, F W

    1996-01-01

    Cracked tooth syndrome typically poses a diagnostic challenge for the dentist. Symptoms include tenderness to biting on certain foods, often poorly localized, and occasional thermal sensitivity. Knowing where to look for this entity, especially in the mandibular molar region, can be especially helpful. Treatment of the tooth depends on the degree of pulpal involvement and the extent of the crack. Cuspal coverage is required of all cracked posterior teeth that are retainable. Root canal therapy is included if symptoms persist or if pulpal pathosis exists at the outset. Cracks extending beyond the osseous crest indicate a poor prognosis. Armed with this knowledge, the dentist can overcome many cracked tooth dilemmas, resulting in satisfaction for both patient and practitioner alike.

  18. On gear tooth stiffness evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard; Jørgensen, Martin Felix

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of gear stiffness is important for determining the load distribution between the gear teeth when two sets of teeth are in contact. Two factors have a major influence on the stiffness; firstly the boundary condition through the gear rim size included in the stiffness calculation...... and secondly the size of the contact. In the FE calculation the true gear tooth root profile is applied. The meshing stiffnesses of gears are highly non-linear, it is however found that the stiffness of an individual tooth can be expressed in a linear form assuming that the contact width is constant. © 2014...... Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  19. Proteomic analysis of human tooth pulp: proteomics of human tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Adam; Jágr, Michal; Pataridis, Statis; Mikšík, Ivan

    2014-12-01

    The unique pulp-dentin complex demonstrates strong regenerative potential, which enables it to respond to disease and traumatic injury. Identifying the proteins of the pulp-dentin complex is crucial to understanding the mechanisms of regeneration, tissue calcification, defense processes, and the reparation of dentin by dental pulp. The lack of knowledge of these proteins limits the development of more efficient therapies. The proteomic profile of human tooth pulp was investigated and compared with the proteome of human dentin and blood. The samples of tooth pulp were obtained from 5 sound permanent human third molars of 5 adults (n = 5). The extracted proteins were separated by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, analyzed by nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, and identified by correlating mass spectra to the proteomic databases. A total of 342 proteins were identified with high confidence, and 2 proteins were detected for the first time in an actual human sample. The identified tooth pulp proteins have a variety of functions: structural, catalytic, transporter, protease activity, immune response, and many others. In a comparison with dentin and blood plasma, 140 (pulp/dentin) shared proteins were identified, 37 of which were not observed in plasma. It can be suggested that they might participate in the unique pulp-dentin complex. This proteomic investigation of human tooth pulp, together with the previously published study of human dentin, is one of the most comprehensive proteome lists of human teeth to date. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more Children's Oral Health What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? What is Orofacial Pain? How Do I Care ... Is My Child at Risk for Early Childhood Tooth Decay? Learn what those dental words mean. The Life ...

  1. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more Children's Oral Health What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? What is Orofacial Pain? How Do I Care ... Is My Child at Risk for Early Childhood Tooth Decay? Learn what those dental words mean. The Life ...

  2. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Child First See a Dentist? The History of Dental Advances Why is Oral Health Important for Men? What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? Learn what those dental words mean. The Life of a Tooth Home | ...

  3. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? Why is Oral ... Tooth Decay? The History of Dental Advances Learn what those dental words mean. The Life of a ...

  4. The cracked tooth syndrome: an elusive diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türp, J C; Gobetti, J P

    1996-10-01

    The authors review the literature and present a case of cracked tooth syndrome. Special emphasis is placed on diagnostic problems associated with this syndrome. The case report demonstrates classic and atypical features of cracked tooth syndrome.

  5. Intentional replantation of periodontally compromised hopeless tooth

    OpenAIRE

    Nagappa, G.; Aspalli, Shivanand; Devanoorkar, Archana; Shetty, Sudhir; Parab, Prachi

    2013-01-01

    Aesthetic considerations have influenced the management of dental maladies in varying degrees for many years. Even single tooth mal-alignment makes the patient to approach a dentist. Intentional replantation is a procedure in which an intentional tooth extraction is performed followed by reinsertion of the extracted tooth. Many authors agree that it should be reserved as the last resort to save a tooth after other procedures have failed or would likely to fail. The main reason of failure in r...

  6. Multiphoton microscopy imaging of developing tooth germs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Yu Pan

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: In this study, a novel multiphoton microscopy database of images from developing tooth germs in mice was set up. We confirmed that multiphoton laser microscopy is a powerful tool for investigating the development of tooth germ and is worthy for further application in the study of tooth regeneration.

  7. AUTOGENOUS TOOTH TRANSPLANTATION IN ADULT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    ABSTRACT. A case of autotransplantation of a tooth in a 26 year old female African cleft palate patient is reported. This case report emphasizes the possibility and success of autotransplantation in our centre, it also emphasizes that transplantation is only technique sensitive but less equipment sensitive. It further stresses.

  8. Stem cells for tooth engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Bluteau

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Tooth development results from sequential and reciprocal interactions between the oral epithelium and the underlying neural crest-derived mesenchyme. The generation of dental structures and/or entire teeth in the laboratory depends upon the manipulation of stem cells and requires a synergy of all cellular and molecular events that finally lead to the formation of tooth-specific hard tissues, dentin and enamel. Although mesenchymal stem cells from different origins have been extensively studied in their capacity to form dentin in vitro, information is not yet available concerning the use of epithelial stem cells. The odontogenic potential resides in the oral epithelium and thus epithelial stem cells are necessary for both the initiation of tooth formation and enamel matrix production. This review focuses on the different sources of stem cells that have been used for making teeth in vitro and their relative efficiency. Embryonic, post-natal or even adult stem cells were assessed and proved to possess an enormous regenerative potential, but their application in dental practice is still problematic and limited due to various parameters that are not yet under control such as the high risk of rejection, cell behaviour, long tooth eruption period, appropriate crown morphology and suitable colour. Nevertheless, the development of biological approaches for dental reconstruction using stem cells is promising and remains one of the greatest challenges in the dental field for the years to come.

  9. Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a group of genetic nerve disorders. It is named after the three doctors who first identified it. ... a nerve biopsy. There is no cure. The disease can be so mild you don't realize ...

  10. Diagnosis of cracked tooth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebeena Mathew

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidences of cracks in teeth seem to have increased during the past decade. Dental practitioners need to be aware of cracked tooth syndrome (CTS in order to be successful at diagnosing CTS. Early diagnosis has been linked with successful restorative management and predictably good prognosis. The purpose of this article is to highlight factors that contribute to detecting cracked teeth.

  11. Diagnosis of cracked tooth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Sebeena; Thangavel, Boopathi; Mathew, Chalakuzhiyil Abraham; Kailasam, Sivakumar; Kumaravadivel, Karthick; Das, Arjun

    2012-08-01

    The incidences of cracks in teeth seem to have increased during the past decade. Dental practitioners need to be aware of cracked tooth syndrome (CTS) in order to be successful at diagnosing CTS. Early diagnosis has been linked with successful restorative management and predictably good prognosis. The purpose of this article is to highlight factors that contribute to detecting cracked teeth.

  12. Diagnosis of cracked tooth syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, Sebeena; Thangavel, Boopathi; Mathew, Chalakuzhiyil Abraham; Kailasam, SivaKumar; Kumaravadivel, Karthick; Das, Arjun

    2012-01-01

    The incidences of cracks in teeth seem to have increased during the past decade. Dental practitioners need to be aware of cracked tooth syndrome (CTS) in order to be successful at diagnosing CTS. Early diagnosis has been linked with successful restorative management and predictably good prognosis. The purpose of this article is to highlight factors that contribute to detecting cracked teeth.

  13. A SINGLE VISIT IMMEDIATE TEMPORIZATION WITH NATURAL TOOTH PONTIC FOR PERIODONTALLY INVOLVED ANTERIOR TEETH : ANESTHETIC AND INNOVATIVE APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Nilofer Sultan Sheikh, Neelima S. Rajhans, Preeti Mundhe, Gabriela Jude Fernandez, Nilkanth Mhaske, Nikesh Moolya, Sudeep HM

    2015-01-01

    Aim and Objectives: Sudden loss of anterior tooth is a dreadful situation. It can be as a result of trauma, endodontic failure or periodontal disease which is a true aesthetic emergency for a patient. Along with the patient, the dentist also emphasizes on saving an anterior tooth for the primary reason of aesthetics. If the tooth crown is intact, is not grossly decayed, broken down or discoloured, it can be used as a natural tooth pontic in designing an interim prosthesis. Case: A chair side ...

  14. A simple rule governs the evolution and development of hominin tooth size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Alistair R; Daly, E Susanne; Catlett, Kierstin K; Paul, Kathleen S; King, Stephen J; Skinner, Matthew M; Nesse, Hans P; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Townsend, Grant C; Schwartz, Gary T; Jernvall, Jukka

    2016-02-25

    The variation in molar tooth size in humans and our closest relatives (hominins) has strongly influenced our view of human evolution. The reduction in overall size and disproportionate decrease in third molar size have been noted for over a century, and have been attributed to reduced selection for large dentitions owing to changes in diet or the acquisition of cooking. The systematic pattern of size variation along the tooth row has been described as a 'morphogenetic gradient' in mammal, and more specifically hominin, teeth since Butler and Dahlberg. However, the underlying controls of tooth size have not been well understood, with hypotheses ranging from morphogenetic fields to the clone theory. In this study we address the following question: are there rules that govern how hominin tooth size evolves? Here we propose that the inhibitory cascade, an activator-inhibitor mechanism that affects relative tooth size in mammals, produces the default pattern of tooth sizes for all lower primary postcanine teeth (deciduous premolars and permanent molars) in hominins. This configuration is also equivalent to a morphogenetic gradient, finally pointing to a mechanism that can generate this gradient. The pattern of tooth size remains constant with absolute size in australopiths (including Ardipithecus, Australopithecus and Paranthropus). However, in species of Homo, including modern humans, there is a tight link between tooth proportions and absolute size such that a single developmental parameter can explain both the relative and absolute sizes of primary postcanine teeth. On the basis of the relationship of inhibitory cascade patterning with size, we can use the size at one tooth position to predict the sizes of the remaining four primary postcanine teeth in the row for hominins. Our study provides a development-based expectation to examine the evolution of the unique proportions of human teeth.

  15. Leukotrienes in orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, A H; Tatakis, D N; Dziak, R

    1989-03-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) and leukotrienes (LTs) are products of arachidonic acid conversion. PGs have an established role in mediating orthodontic tooth movement. The role of LTs in modulating or mediating orthodontic tooth movement was investigated in this study. One hundred thirty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were used; the animals weighed 300 to 400 gm with equal numbers of male and female rats. They were divided into five main groups of 24 animals each and a sham group of 12 animals. An orthodontic appliance was placed and activated on all the animals except the sham group; in this group the appliances were not active. Each main group was given one of the following treatments daily: distilled water, 5% gum arabic solution, PG synthesis inhibitor indomethacin, LT synthesis inhibitor AA861, and a combination of both drugs. Each group was divided into six subgroups of four animals; the animals were killed at either 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, or 14 days, and tooth movement measured. The three sham subgroups received distilled water and were killed at 1, 7, or 10 days. The first maxillary molar (the moved tooth) and surrounding tissues were removed from all animals in the sham group and the subgroups killed at 1, 7, and 10 days in the gum arabic solution group and the LT synthesis inhibitor group. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) were extracted, measured with radioimmunoassay (RIA), and standardized per milligram of protein in the sample. A significant inhibition of tooth movement occurred beginning on day 7 in the indomethacin, AA861, and combination groups; there was no significant difference among these groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. [Tooth decay complications incidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrikas, A Zh; Zakharova, E L; Ol'khovskaia, E B; Chestnykh, E V

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the article is to assess the quality of endodontic therapy and estimate further treatment needs. 900 orthopantomograms of 442 men and 458 women (aged 18-70) without any clinical manifestations of endodontic pathology were examined for endodontic treatment. 1,170 patients (41%) had additional intraoral radiographs taken for assessment of their periapical status. 2,852 (13.8%) of the 20,724 teeth examined had periapical lesions and/or root fillings. 2,503 of the 2,853 teeth were endodontically treated, only 1,011 of them (40.4%) having all their root canals obturated. 612 (41.3%) of the 1,492 (59.6%) teeth with inadequate root canal fillings hat a healthy apical periodontium. Of the 1,229 teeth to be endodontically treated 349 teeth required primary treatment, 880 required retreatment.

  17. [Clinical observation on the characteristics of occlusion and tooth abrasion in patients with cracked tooth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Lin, Zheng-mei; Ling, Jun-qi

    2009-09-01

    To investigate the occlusal characteristics and the condition of tooth abrasion in patients with cracked tooth and to discuss the etiology of the cracked tooth and the relationships between occlusal disorder, tooth abrasion and cracked tooth. Twenty-seven patients with cracked tooth were selected. The occlusal courses were recorded by T-ScanIII system in intercuspal position, protrusive movement and lateral movement. Teeth with cracked tooth were regarded as the cracked tooth group, and the healthy adjacent teeth as the control group. The distribution of premature contact, occlusal interference, the center of occlusal force were examined. The abrasive conditions of the two groups were recorded according to the Smith tooth wear index and compared. There were more teeth with occlusal interference in cracked tooth group (20 teeth) than in the control group (6 teeth), which was significantly different (OR = 5.67, chi(2) = 8.45, P = 0.003). In 24 patients with single affected tooth, the center of occlusal force (COF) located in the inside and outside ellipse were 6 teeth (25%) and 18 teeth (75%) respectively, Z test showed that there were statistical differences between the cracked tooth group and normal people. In cracked tooth group, the proportion of the teeth with abrasion was higher in teeth with occlusal interference than those without occlusal interference (chi(2) = 4.79, P = 0.029). The formation of the cracked tooth was related to the occlusal disorder and associated with the tooth abrasion.

  18. Role of computer-based learning in tooth carving in dentistry: An Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juneja, Saurabh; Juneja, Manjushree

    2016-01-01

    Tooth carving is an important practical preclinical exercise in the curriculum in Indian dental education setup. It forms the basis of introduction to tooth anatomy, morphology and occlusion of primary and permanent teeth through practical approach. It requires enormous time and manpower to master the skill. Therefore, there is an imminent necessity to incorporate computer-based learning of the art of tooth carving for effective teaching and efficient student learning. This will ensure quality time to be spent on other academic and research activities by students and faculty in addition to adding value as a teaching aid.

  19. Patterns and reasons for tooth extraction at the Winterveldt Clinic: 1998-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesolang, R R; Motloba, D P; Lalloo, R

    2009-06-01

    Tooth extraction is the most common form of dental treatment in developing countries despite significant advances in medicine and dentistry. Dental caries, periodontitis, orthodontics, trauma and prosthodontics are the main reasons for extractions. To determine the patterns of tooth extractions and the reasons for these extractions in a primary care dental clinic attached to a dental training institution. A descriptive, retrospective and quantitative study design was followed. Data was gathered from 3793 patient files to record the following variables: age, gender, type of tooth extracted and reason for the extraction. Almost 60% of teeth extracted were lower and upper molars. The main reasons for extractions were dental caries (47.9%) and periodontitis (22.6%). The findings of the study show an urgent need to reverse the trends in extractions and more emphasis should be placed on primary prevention in order to reduce tooth loss.

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Human Tooth Pulp: Proteomics of Human Tooth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eckhardt, Adam; Jágr, Michal; Pataridis, Statis; Mikšík, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 12 (2014), s. 1961-1966 ISSN 0099-2399 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-17224S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP206/12/0453; GA MZd(CZ) NT14324 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : dentin * human pulp * tandem mass spectrometry * tooth proteome * 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 3.375, year: 2014

  1. Fluoridation and tooth wear in Irish adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, F M

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of tooth wear in adults in Ireland and its relationship with water fluoridation. The National Survey of Adult Oral Health was conducted in 2000\\/2001. Tooth wear was determined using a partial mouth examination assessing the upper and lower anterior teeth. A total of 2456 subjects were examined. In this survey, increasing levels and severity of tooth wear were associated with ageing. Men were more affected by tooth wear and were more likely to be affected by severe tooth wear than women. It was found that age, and gender were significant predictors of tooth wear (P < 0.01). Overall, there was no significant relationship between fluoridation and tooth wear in this study.

  2. Towards tooth friendly soft drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolahi, Jafar; Fazilati, Mohamad; Kadivar, Mahdi

    2009-10-01

    Most soft drinks contain high concentration of simple carbohydrates and have a pH of 3 or even lower. Therefore, they are harmful for tooth structure. A tooth friendly soft drink (T.F.S.D) should have the following characteristics and elements; fluoride (approximately 1 ppm), casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (2%), xylitol (4-6g/serving), tea polyphenols (2-4 mg/ml), cranberry extract (250 mg/ml of the flavonoids quercetin and myricetin), sugar free, pH close to 5.5 and super oxygenation (240,000 ppm) vs. carbonation. T.F.S.D can be packaged in a container which gaseous oxygen is dissolved in a liquid in the form of bubbles. However, looking at opportunities for so-called sophisticated soft drinks, T.F.S.D will be an example for a functional and health oriented soft drink.

  3. Pink tooth phenomenon: an enigma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapar, Raveena; Choudhry, Swati; Sinha, Anju; Bali, Ruchita; Shukla, Deepika

    2013-10-01

    The appearance of pink teeth is a common phenomenon which has been observed after death in certain circumstances on post-mortem examination. Extra fibrinolytic activity of pulp facilitates rapid breakdown of red blood cells and diffusion of hemoglobin and its derivatives to flow into dentine. We reviewed various studies on pink tooth phenomenon which have stated the various factors that lead to pink tooth formation. Most of the authors have stressed that post-mortem pink teeth must not be considered as a reliable odontological parameter for determining cause of death. No correlation has been found between the occurrence of pink teeth and the cause of death but condition of the surroundings certainly plays an important role in the development of this phenomenon. This paper reviews the factors and conditions responsible for formation of pink teeth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  4. Optical spectroscopy and tooth decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, P.; De, T.; Singh, R.

    2005-11-01

    Optical spectroscopy in the ultraviolet, visible and mid-infrared spectral regions has been used to discriminate between healthy and diseased teeth of patients in the age range 15-75 years. Spectral scans of absorbance versus wavenumber and fluorescence intensity versus wavelength have been recorded and investigated for caries and periodontal disease. Such optical diagnostics can prove very useful in the early detection and treatment of tooth decay.

  5. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reilly, Mary M

    2011-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the commonest inherited neuromuscular disorder affecting at least 1 in 2,500. Over the last two decades, there have been rapid advances in understanding the molecular basis for many forms of CMT with more than 30 causative genes now described. This has made obtaining an accurate genetic diagnosis possible but at times challenging for clinicians. This review aims to provide a simple, pragmatic approach to diagnosing CMT from a clinician\\'s perspective.

  6. Tooth eruption and browridge formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, M D

    1982-05-01

    One of the most reasonable hypotheses regarding the functional significance of the browridge is that the supraorbital torus forms in response to masticatory stress during development. Oyen, Walker, and Rice (1979) have recently proposed a model that tests this hypothesis: if browridges are functionally related to masticatory stresses on the cranial vault, then changes in the biomechanics of the masticatory system ought to be reflected by changes in the browridge. To test their model they attempted to relate biomechanical discontinuities resulting from tooth eruption to episodes of bone deposition on the supraorbital tori of a developmental series of dry Papio crania. This paper reports on a parallel test of the model on a cross-sectional sample of Australian Aboriginal juvenile crania. This sample showed no relation between tooth eruption and the supraorbital surface morphology thought to be indicative of active bone deposition. It is also demonstrated that no significant relationship between tooth eruption and episodes of bone deposition is shown by the Papio sample. It is concluded that the use of small cross-sectional samples of dry crania does not provide a valid test of the model.

  7. Molecular Genetics of Supernumerary Tooth Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu-Ping; Fan, Jiabing

    2011-01-01

    Summary Despite advances in the knowledge of tooth morphogenesis and differentiation, relatively little is known about the aetiology and molecular mechanisms underlying supernumerary tooth formation. A small number of supernumerary teeth may be a common developmental dental anomaly, while multiple supernumerary teeth usually have a genetic component and they are sometimes thought to represent a partial third dentition in humans. Mice, which are commonly used for studying tooth development, only exhibit one dentition, with very few mouse models exhibiting supernumerary teeth similar to those in humans. Inactivation of Apc or forced activation of Wnt/β(catenin signalling results in multiple supernumerary tooth formation in both humans and in mice, but the key genes in these pathways are not very clear. Analysis of other model systems with continuous tooth replacement or secondary tooth formation, such as fish, snake, lizard, and ferret, is providing insights into the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying succesional tooth development, and will assist in the studies on supernumerary tooth formation in humans. This information, together with the advances in stem cell biology and tissue engineering, will pave ways for the tooth regeneration and tooth bioengineering. PMID:21309064

  8. [Assessment of tooth bleaching efficacy with spectrophotometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenhao; Liu, Chang; Pan, Jie

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the changes in CIE L*, a*, and b* at cervical, body, and incisal sites after tooth bleaching by using a spectrophotometer. Sixty-seven intact and healthy maxillary central incisors were in-vestigated. These incisors were darker than A3 according to the Vita Classical shade guide. The CIE tooth shade parameters L*, a*, and b* were simultaneously recorded at three tooth areas (cervical, body, and incisal) with a spectrophotometer before and after tooth bleaching (35%H2O2 coordinating with Beyond whitening accelerator irradiating). The shade dif-ferential (DeltaE) was calculated. ANOVA, paired t-test, and Pearson correlation analysis were used for data analysis. The efficacy rates of tooth bleaching were satisfactory, with 86.6%, 86.6%, and 85.1% in the cervical, body, and incisal sites, respectively. The average values of DeltaE were 5.09, 4.44, and 4.40 in the cervical, body, and incisal sites. Tooth bleaching significantly increased L* and significantly decreased a* and b* in all tooth areas (P spectrophotometer could objectively evaluate the whitening effect of tooth bleaching at the different tooth sites. The tooth bleaching system (35%H202 coordinating with Beyond whitening accelerator irradiating) exerts powerful bleaching actions in most of the tooth areas investigated. The order of tooth bleaching effectiveness is cervicalbody>incisal. Yellow coloration is decreased mainly at the cervical site, and brightness was increased mostly at theincisal site. The effectiveness of tooth bleaching increases as the baseline b* value increases.

  9. Experience of maintaining tooth brushing for children born with a cleft lip and/or palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yin-Ling; Davies, Karen; Callery, Peter

    2017-08-24

    Children with a Cleft Lip and/or Palate (CL/P) have been reported to have poorer oral health than those without the condition. The consequences for these children can be particularly problematic due to implications for future treatments. Tooth brushing is an important behaviour contributing to children's oral health, but is under researched in the CL/P population. The aim of the study is to explore the experience of maintaining tooth brushing among children in the United Kingdom (UK) with a CL/P and their parents. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with twenty-two parents and sixteen children with a CL/P (5-11 years), recruited at a cleft centre in the UK. Thematic analysis was used for data analysis. Three key themes were drawn from the qualitative data: first, parents of children with a CL/P generally had strong motivation to look after their children's teeth but children's motivation was inconsistent. Second, parents were primary enablers of children's tooth brushing behaviour, often employing approaches adapted to their child's characteristics to encourage tooth brushing. Third, a range of obstacles were encountered by parents and children in maintaining regular tooth brushing behaviours. They reported obstacles such as issues related to CL/P, 'forgetting' and childhood illness. The paper suggests that parents of children with a CL/P need support to enact their intention to maintain regular tooth brushing and prioritise tooth brushing within the context of demanding and dynamic family life.

  10. Effects of alendronate on tooth eruption and molar root formation in young growing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradaschia-Correa, Vivian; Massa, Luciana F; Arana-Chavez, Victor E

    2007-12-01

    Tooth eruption consists of the movement of teeth from the bony crypt in which they initiate their development to the occlusal plane in the oral cavity. Interactions between the tooth germ and its surrounding alveolar bone occur in order to offer spatial conditions for its development and eruption. This involves bone remodeling during which resorption is a key event. Bisphosphonates are a group of drugs that interfere with the resorption of mineralized tissues. With the purpose of investigating the effects of sodium alendronate (a potent bisphosphonate inhibitor of osteoclast activity) on alveolar bone during tooth development and eruption, we gave newborn rats daily doses of this drug for 4, 14, and 30 days. Samples of the maxillary alveolar process containing the tooth germs were processed for light, transmission, and scanning electron microscopy and were also submitted to tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase histochemistry and high-resolution colloidal-gold immunolabeling for osteopontin. Inhibition of osteoclast activity by sodium alendronate caused the absence of tooth eruption. The lack of alveolar bone remodeling resulted in primary bone with the presence of latent osteoclasts and abundant osteopontin at the interfibrillar regions. The developing bone trabeculae invaded the dental follicle and reached the molar tooth germs, provoking deformities in enamel surfaces. No root formation was observed. These findings suggested that alendronate effectively inhibited tooth eruption by interfering with the activation of osteoclasts, which remained in a latent stage.

  11. A SINGLE VISIT IMMEDIATE TEMPORIZATION WITH NATURAL TOOTH PONTIC FOR PERIODONTALLY INVOLVED ANTERIOR TEETH : ANESTHETIC AND INNOVATIVE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilofer Sultan Sheikh, Neelima S. Rajhans, Preeti Mundhe, Gabriela Jude Fernandez, Nilkanth Mhaske, Nikesh Moolya, Sudeep HM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim and Objectives: Sudden loss of anterior tooth is a dreadful situation. It can be as a result of trauma, endodontic failure or periodontal disease which is a true aesthetic emergency for a patient. Along with the patient, the dentist also emphasizes on saving an anterior tooth for the primary reason of aesthetics. If the tooth crown is intact, is not grossly decayed, broken down or discoloured, it can be used as a natural tooth pontic in designing an interim prosthesis. Case: A chair side technique for replacing the missing tooth using the patient’s own natural tooth as a pontic in the three dimensional original position using a fibre reinforced composite resin splint thus restoring the aesthetics and relieving the apprehension of the patient, as described in this case report. Conclusion: The concept of Natural tooth pontic placement is a simple, economical, minimal intervention, viable and an easy to handle treatment option and promises an excellent transient aesthetic solution for a lost tooth as well as require minimal or no tooth preparation, thus is a reversible technique and avoids the laboratory cost.

  12. Mechanisms of tooth eruption and orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, G E; King, G J

    2008-05-01

    Teeth move through alveolar bone, whether through the normal process of tooth eruption or by strains generated by orthodontic appliances. Both eruption and orthodontics accomplish this feat through similar fundamental biological processes, osteoclastogenesis and osteogenesis, but there are differences that make their mechanisms unique. A better appreciation of the molecular and cellular events that regulate osteoclastogenesis and osteogenesis in eruption and orthodontics is not only central to our understanding of how these processes occur, but also is needed for ultimate development of the means to control them. Possible future studies in these areas are also discussed, with particular emphasis on translation of fundamental knowledge to improve dental treatments.

  13. Intentional replantation of periodontally compromised hopeless tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagappa, G.; Aspalli, Shivanand; Devanoorkar, Archana; Shetty, Sudhir; Parab, Prachi

    2013-01-01

    Aesthetic considerations have influenced the management of dental maladies in varying degrees for many years. Even single tooth mal-alignment makes the patient to approach a dentist. Intentional replantation is a procedure in which an intentional tooth extraction is performed followed by reinsertion of the extracted tooth. Many authors agree that it should be reserved as the last resort to save a tooth after other procedures have failed or would likely to fail. The main reason of failure in replanted teeth is root resorption, specifically ankylosis or replacement resorption. Although the success rate is not always high, intentional replantation may be a treatment alternative that deserves consideration to maintain the natural dentition and avoid extraction of the tooth. Here is case report of a patient desiring alignment of malpositioned periodontally involved anterior single tooth due to various causes treated by intentional replantation. PMID:24174765

  14. Intentional replantation of periodontally compromised hopeless tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Nagappa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic considerations have influenced the management of dental maladies in varying degrees for many years. Even single tooth mal-alignment makes the patient to approach a dentist. Intentional replantation is a procedure in which an intentional tooth extraction is performed followed by reinsertion of the extracted tooth. Many authors agree that it should be reserved as the last resort to save a tooth after other procedures have failed or would likely to fail. The main reason of failure in replanted teeth is root resorption, specifically ankylosis or replacement resorption. Although the success rate is not always high, intentional replantation may be a treatment alternative that deserves consideration to maintain the natural dentition and avoid extraction of the tooth. Here is case report of a patient desiring alignment of malpositioned periodontally involved anterior single tooth due to various causes treated by intentional replantation.

  15. Intentional replantation of periodontally compromised hopeless tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagappa, G; Aspalli, Shivanand; Devanoorkar, Archana; Shetty, Sudhir; Parab, Prachi

    2013-09-01

    Aesthetic considerations have influenced the management of dental maladies in varying degrees for many years. Even single tooth mal-alignment makes the patient to approach a dentist. Intentional replantation is a procedure in which an intentional tooth extraction is performed followed by reinsertion of the extracted tooth. Many authors agree that it should be reserved as the last resort to save a tooth after other procedures have failed or would likely to fail. The main reason of failure in replanted teeth is root resorption, specifically ankylosis or replacement resorption. Although the success rate is not always high, intentional replantation may be a treatment alternative that deserves consideration to maintain the natural dentition and avoid extraction of the tooth. Here is case report of a patient desiring alignment of malpositioned periodontally involved anterior single tooth due to various causes treated by intentional replantation.

  16. Diagnosis and treatment planning: cracked tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Eric M; Williamson, Anne

    2003-03-01

    This article discusses the cracked tooth, one of the five major classifications of longitudinal tooth fractures: 1) craze line; 2) cuspal fracture; 3) cracked tooth; 4) split tooth; and 5) vertical root fracture. The term "longitudinal tooth fracture" was first introduced by Rivera (Personal Communication, Iowa City, IA, 1996) and has two meanings. The first implies distance (length), particularly in the vertical (occlusal-cervical) plane, as illustrated by longitudinal lines on a map. The second indicates that these fractures occur over a period of time. Therefore, the term longitudinal tooth fracture applies to fractures that have both a distance and a time component. Thus, fractures are described that are not related to impact trauma (which occurs primarily in incisors), in which the distance (length) component may be similar, but is immediate instead of over a period of time.

  17. Test Tube Tooth: The Next Big Thing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Preeti; Tahir, Mohammed; Yadav, Harsh; Sureka, Rakshit; Garg, Aarti

    2016-06-01

    Unlike some vertebrates and fishes, humans do not have the capacity for tooth regeneration after the loss of permanent teeth. Although artificial replacement with removable dentures, fixed prosthesis and implants is possible through advances in the field of prosthetic dentistry, it would be ideal to recreate a third set of natural teeth to replace lost dentition. For many years now, researchers in the field of tissue engineering have been trying to bioengineer dental tissues as well as whole teeth. In order to attain a whole tooth through dental engineering, that has the same or nearly same biological, mechanical and physical properties of a natural tooth, it's necessary to deal with all the cells and tissues which are concerned with the formation, maintenance and repair of the tooth. In this article we review the steps involved in odontogenesis or organogenesis of a tooth and progress in the bioengineering of a whole tooth.

  18. Prospective evaluation of immediate and delayed provisional single tooth restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Michael S; Mercante, Donald E; Lirette, Denise; Mohamed, Waheed; Ryser, Mark; Castellon, Paulino

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was 2-fold: to determine whether there is a significant difference in the hard and soft tissue response comparing immediate with delayed implant placement after tooth removal, with immediate provisionalization, in maxillary anterior sites; and to determine and compare the crestal bone levels as the primary endpoint variable for implants placed and immediately temporized in extraction sites, to implants placed into extraction sites after the extraction site has been grafted and healed for 4 months, all immediately restored with an anatomic provisional restoration. This aim was to be evaluated by measuring crestal bone levels on standardized digital radiographs of the implants, using implant threads as a monitor of magnification and a pre-extraction reference. Secondary endpoint variables include soft tissue measures compared with method. A total of 76 patients were recruited and randomized into treatment groups. Group 1 had a maxillary tooth (premolar, canine, lateral or central incisor) removed, with immediate socket grafting, followed by implant placement and provisionalization 4 months later with a single tooth. Group 2 had immediate implant placement and provisionalization. Standardized radiograph holders were used to expose digital radiographs every 6 months from baseline to up to 2 years restored. Soft tissue measures were made from standardized reference points. Data collected were analyzed by a statistician to test the hypotheses. A total of 55 patients completed their follow-up. Twenty-one patients were lost to follow-up because of implant loss (n = 5), 1 treated out of protocol because of labial bone loss found at the time of tooth removal (n = 1), geographic relocation (n = 11), dropped for noncompliance (n = 3), or medical problems (n = 1). The analyses showed no significant differences between groups in implant integration or crestal interdental bone movement on either the implant or the adjacent tooth. The bone level on the

  19. Molariform mesiodens in primary dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangalekar, Sachin B; Ahmed, Tajammul; Zakirulla, M; Shivappa, Halawar Sangmesh; Bheemappa, F B; Yavagal, Chandrashekar

    2013-01-01

    Mesiodens is a midline supernumerary tooth commonly seen in the maxillary arch, and incidence of molariform mesiodens in the maxillary midline is rare in permanent dentition and extremely uncommon in primary dentition. A midline supernumerary tooth in the primary dentition can cause ectopic or delayed eruption of permanent central incisors which will further alter occlusion and may compromise esthetics and formation of dentigerous cysts. This paper reports a rare case of the presence of a molariform mesiodens in the primary dentition. On clinical and radiographic examination, flaring of the primary central incisors was seen, with a molariform mesiodens consisting of multiple lobes or tubercles on the occlusal surface with the well-formed root. The treatment plan consisted of the extraction of the supernumerary tooth and regular observation of permanent central incisors for proper eruption and alignment.

  20. Molariform Mesiodens in Primary Dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin B. Mangalekar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesiodens is a midline supernumerary tooth commonly seen in the maxillary arch, and incidence of molariform mesiodens in the maxillary midline is rare in permanent dentition and extremely uncommon in primary dentition. A midline supernumerary tooth in the primary dentition can cause ectopic or delayed eruption of permanent central incisors which will further alter occlusion and may compromise esthetics and formation of dentigerous cysts. This paper reports a rare case of the presence of a molariform mesiodens in the primary dentition. On clinical and radiographic examination, flaring of the primary central incisors was seen, with a molariform mesiodens consisting of multiple lobes or tubercles on the occlusal surface with the well-formed root. The treatment plan consisted of the extraction of the supernumerary tooth and regular observation of permanent central incisors for proper eruption and alignment.

  1. [Dissertations 25 years after date 9. How is tooth eruption regulated?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltha, J C

    2006-08-01

    A lot of attention has been paid to the questions of how and why teeth erupt. In the past many theories were developed, all of which showed mechanistic characteristics and suggested that a certain structure exerts force on the tooth germ to initiate its eruption. The dominant theory considered the collagenous fibres or the fibroblasts within the periodontal ligament to be the primary moving force in the eruption process. However, most research was done on continuously erupting incisors of rodents or lagomorphs, an experimental model with serious drawbacks. Because dogs, like humans, have teeth with limited eruption, 25 years ago research was carried out on tooth eruption in beagles. One of the most important conclusions of this study was that the periodontal ligament is not the primary moving force in tooth eruption, as its development only begins at the end of the eruption process. In subsequent years several others have focused their research on tooth eruption in beagles. The current state of knowledge in this field can be summarized as follows: the reduced enamel epithelium and the dental follicle control bone deposition and resorption around an erupting tooth germ, enabling its occlusal movement; the periodontal ligament develops only after its emergence in the oral cavity, and is thus not important in the eruption process; the tooth itself does not play a role in the regulation of its eruption.

  2. Family income and tooth decay in US children: does the association change with age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabé, E; Delgado-Angulo, E K; Murasko, J E; Marcenes, W

    2012-01-01

    This study explored whether the association of family income with tooth decay changes with age among children in the United States. A second objective was to explore the role of access to dental health care services in explaining the interrelationships between family income, child age and tooth decay. Data from 7,491 2- to 15-year-old children who participated in the 1999-2004 National and Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed. The association of family income with the prevalence of tooth decay in primary, permanent and primary or permanent teeth was first estimated in logistic regression models with all children, and then, separately in four age groups that reflect the development of the dentition (2-5, 6-8, 9-11 and 12-15 years, respectively). Findings showed that the income gradient in tooth decay attenuated significantly in 9- to 11-year-olds only to re-emerge in 12- to 15-year-olds. The age profile of the income gradient in tooth decay was not accounted for by a diverse set of family and child characteristics. This is the first study providing some evidence for age variations in the income gradient in tooth decay among children in the United States. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. PRIMARY CARIES: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Solanki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary caries is an initial lesions produced by direct extension from an external surface. Dental caries is called as tooth decay or a cavity is a disease in which bacterial processes changes carbohydrate to acid which than dematerializes the hard tooth structure like enamel, dentin and cementum. Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus are the bacteria responsible for the dental caries by acid production. This article throws light on the dental caries disease, its sign and symptoms, treatment and prevention of it. A review of some patents on dental caries is also provided that summarizes the recent technical advancements taken place in this area.

  4. Analysis of tooth tissues using Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timchenko, E.V.; Timchenko, P.E.; Kulabukhova, A.Yu.; Volova, L.T.; Rosenbaum, A.Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The results of experimental studies of healthy tooth tissue and tooth tissues during caries disease are presented. Features of Raman spectrum of tooth tissues during caries disease are obtained: the main changes are detected at wavenumbers 956 cm -1 .1069 cm -1 . corresponding to phosphates. and 1241 cm -1 . 1660 cm -1 . corresponding to collagen III and collagen I. respectively. Were introduced criteria allowing to detect caries and to identify weakening of tooth tissues. preceding the caries. The reliability of research results is confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. (paper)

  5. Cracked tooth syndrome: Overview of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Shamimul; Singh, Kuldeep; Salati, Naseer

    2015-01-01

    Pain is defined as an ?unpleasant sensory and emotional feeling which is associated with actual or potential injury of tissue or expressed in terms of such injury.? Tooth pain usually refers to pain around the teeth or jaws mainly as a result of a dental condition. Mostly, toothaches are caused by a carious cavity, a broken tooth, an exposed tooth root or gum disease. The toothache may sometimes be the result of radiating pain from structures in the vicinity of tooth and jaws (cardiac pain, e...

  6. Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szigeti, Kinga; Lupski, James R

    2009-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders presenting with the phenotype of a chronic progressive neuropathy affecting both the motor and sensory nerves. During the last decade over two dozen genes have been identified in which mutations cause CMT. The disease illustrates a multitude of genetic principles, including diverse mutational mechanisms from point mutations to copy number variation (CNV), allelic heterogeneity, age-dependent penetrance and variable expressivity. Population based studies have determined the contributions of the various genes to disease burden enabling evidence-based approaches to genetic testing. PMID:19277060

  7. Psychosocial Aspect of Anterior Tooth Discoloration among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixty two (65.9%), 47 (50.0%) and 38 (40.4%) respectively reported that it prevented them from freely answering questions, smiling and interacting. After oral examination, 120 (31.2%) subjects had one form of anterior tooth discoloration. The cause of tooth discoloration in the majority 64 (16.7%) of the participants was due ...

  8. psychosocial aspect of anterior tooth discoloration among

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    discoloration on the psychosocial well being of adolescents with a view to providing information that will aid the ... Keywords: Psychosocial, Anterior tooth discolouration, Adolescents. Ann Ibd. Pg. Med 2011. Vol.9, No.2 94-99 ... often results in loss of self-esteem and damage to physical and mental health.9,10 Tooth ...

  9. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Posture! Is My Child at Risk for Early Childhood Tooth Decay? Men: Looking for a Better Job? Start by Visiting the Dentist Learn what those dental words mean. The Life of a Tooth Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | RSS About AGD | Contact AGD | Site Map | Reprints ...

  10. Orthodontic Tooth Movement: A Historic Prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    The earliest report on orthodontic tooth movement in the English literature was published in 1911. Oppenheim carried out studies on baboons to determine what histologic changes occurred during tooth movement. Reitan and many others carried out research into the nature of tooth movement. The pressure-tension model of tooth movement developed from these studies, whereby the two sides of the tooth responded to forces as if in isolation. A second theory, proposed by Stuteville in 1938, was the hydraulic theory of tooth movement. In this theory, fluid from the vasculature, lymphatic system and intercellular spaces responds to the forces of tooth movement, damping the force and limiting movement. Bien and Baumrind expanded on this theory with their own studies in the 1960s. It is clear that both the pressure-tension and fluid flow concepts have merit, but considerable work needs to be done to ascertain the details so that tooth movement can be managed and controlled. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Addressing Tooth Decay in Head Start Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth decay is the most prevalent chronic disease of childhood. Oral health education and dental services are crucial to reducing the number of children afflicted with dental cavities. Due to limited access to preventative care, Head Start children are particularly vulnerable to tooth decay. This article outlines practical implications of a…

  12. Mathematical description of tooth flank surface of globoidal worm gear with straight axial tooth profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Połowniak, Piotr; Sobolak, Mariusz

    2017-12-01

    In this article, a mathematical description of tooth flank surface of the globoidal worm and worm wheel generated by the hourglass worm hob with straight tooth axial profile is presented. The kinematic system of globoidal worm gear is shown. The equation of globoid helix and tooth axial profile of worm is derived to determine worm tooth surface. Based on the equation of meshing the contact lines are obtained. The mathematical description of globoidal worm wheel tooth flank is performed on the basis of contact lines and generating the tooth side by the extreme cutting edge of worm hob. The presented mathematical model of tooth flank of TA worm and worm wheel can be used e.g. to analyse the contact pattern of the gear.

  13. Accelerated orthodontic tooth movement: molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hechang; Williams, Ray C; Kyrkanides, Stephanos

    2014-11-01

    Accelerating orthodontic tooth movement can significantly reduce treatment duration and risks of side effects. The rate of orthodontic tooth movement is chiefly determined by the remodeling of tissues surrounding the roots; this in turn is under the control of molecular mechanisms regulating cellular behaviors in the alveolar bone and periodontal ligament. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms underlying accelerated orthodontic tooth movement, and the clinical and experimental methods that accelerate orthodontic tooth movement with possible molecular mechanisms. The review also shows directions for future studies to develop more clinically applicable methods to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of split tooth as an unstudied reason for tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaghae, Ifueko Patience; Azodo, Clement Chinedu

    2014-09-10

    Split tooth is an unstudied reason for tooth extraction. The purpose of this study was to determine and analyze split tooth as a reason for extraction in a dental clinic in Benin City. The prospective study was carried out on 669 patients having tooth extraction between May, 2005 and December, 2012. Over the period of the study, diagnosis and tooth extraction were done by three dentists of more five years practice experience. The indications for tooth extraction were noted with specific interest on those diagnosed as split tooth without restoration. Data was entered into Microsoft excel, sorted and transported into SPSS (SPSS version 16.0, Chicago, IL, USA). Split teeth constituted for 39 (5%) of extracted teeth. This 39 extractions were done in 38 patients meaning that two split teeth were extracted on separate occasions from same patient. The majority 23 (61%) of extracted split tooth were done in patients in the fifth decade of life. More of the split tooth extraction were performed in males 28 (72%) than females 11 (28%). Overall mandibular teeth were more affected than the maxillary teeth and the most affected teeth were mandibular second molars 23 (59%) while the least affected were the mandibular first premolars 1 (3%) and the third molars 1 (3%). The reported masticatory accident as aetiology, were biting on stone 21 (53%) or piece of bone 10 (26%) while eating. A few 3 (8%) were suspected bruxists. The majority 25 (65%) visited the dental clinic 3-6 months after the incident and onset of symptoms. Split tooth constitute a reasonable common reason for tooth extraction and this was most common in the fifth decade of life. It is therefore important to improve early diagnosis of a cracked tooth in order to prevent the progression of the crack tooth to split tooth.

  15. Tooth whitening: what we now know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Clifton M

    2014-06-01

    Current research about tooth whitening shows that it is safe and effective when manufacturer's protocol is followed, yet there are risks of which the profession and users should be aware. This update provides a summary of current research and assessment of the safety and efficacy of tooth whitening regimens. Tooth whitening has become one of the most frequently requested dental procedures by the public. The public has come to demand whiter, more perfect smiles and in response many choices for tooth whitening have been made available. These include home-based products such as toothpastes, gels, and films, as well as in-office based systems where products containing highly concentrated bleaching agents are applied under professional supervision. The profession and public have been aware of certain risks related to tooth whitening such as increased tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation. New research has shown that there are other risks such as tooth surface roughening and softening, increased potential for demineralization, degradation of dental restorations, and unacceptable color change of dental restorations. The new research is also focused on optimizing whitening procedures to reduce tooth sensitivity and to increase the persistence of the whitening. Current reports in the literature are reviewed that are related to the use of peroxide based whitening methods. These reports include in vitro studies for method optimization and mechanism as well as clinical studies on effects of various whitening regimens. When manufacturer's instructions are followed, hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide based tooth whitening is safe and effective. Patients should be informed of the risks associated with tooth whitening and instructed on identification of adverse occurrences so that they may seek professional help as needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Severe Impaction of the Primary Mandibular Second Molar Accompanied by Displacement of the Permanent Second Premolar

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuyama, Junko; Kinoshita-Kawano, Shoko; Hayashi-Sakai, Sachiko; Mitomi, Tomoe; Sano-Asahito, Tomiko

    2015-01-01

    Tooth impaction is defined as any tooth that fails to erupt into a normal functional position and remains unerupted beyond the time at which it should normally erupt. Reports of impaction and eruption failure in primary teeth are relatively rare compared to permanent teeth. We report 2 rare cases where the second premolar was located on the occlusal side of the impacted mandibular second primary molar. In the first case, the succedaneous permanent tooth erupted after extraction of the primary...

  17. Mechanism of human tooth eruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Inger

    2014-01-01

    Human eruption is a unique developmental process in the organism. The aetiology or the mechanism behind eruption has never been fully understood and the scientific literature in the field is extremely sparse. Human and animal tissues provide different possibilities for eruption analyses, briefly...... discussed in the introduction. Human studies, mainly clinical and radiological, have focused on normal eruption and gender differences. Why a tooth begins eruption and what enables it to move eruptively and later to end these eruptive movements is not known. Pathological eruption courses contribute......, and the ability of the periodontal ligament to adapt to eruptive movements. Animal studies and studies on normal and pathological eruption in humans can support and explain different aspects in the new theory. The eruption mechanism still needs elucidation and the paper recommends that future research on eruption...

  18. Immunohistochemical Examination for the Distribution of Podoplanin-Expressing Cells in Developing Mouse Molar Tooth Germs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Yuri; Amano, Ikuko; Tsuruga, Eichi; Kojima, Hiroshi; Sawa, Yoshihiko

    2010-01-01

    We recently reported the expression of podoplanin in the apical bud of adult mouse incisal tooth. This study was aimed to investigate the distribution of podoplanin-expressing cells in mouse tooth germs at several developing stages. At the bud stage podoplanin was expressed in oral mucous epithelia and in a tooth bud. At the cap stage podoplanin was expressed on inner and outer enamel epithelia but not in mesenchymal cells expressing the neural crest stem cell marker nestin. At the early bell stage nestin and podoplanin were expressed in cervical loop and odontoblasts. At the root formation stage both nestin and podoplanin were weakly expressed in odontoblasts generating radicular dentin. Podoplanin expression was also found in the Hertwig epithelial sheath. These results suggest that epithelial cells of developing tooth germ acquire the ability to express nestin, and that tooth germ epithelial cells maintain the ability to express podoplanin in oral mucous epithelia. The expression of podoplanin in odontoblasts was induced as tooth germ development advanced, but was suppressed with the completion of the primary dentin, suggesting that podoplanin may be involved in the cell growth of odontoblasts. Nestin may function as an intermediate filament that binds podoplanin in odontoblasts. PMID:21060740

  19. Relative contribution of restorative treatment to tooth extraction in a teaching institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alomari, Q D; Khalaf, M E; Al-Shawaf, N M

    2013-06-01

    Teeth can be extracted due to multiple factors. The aim of this retrospective cross-sectional study was to identify the relative contribution of restorative treatments to tooth loss. The study reviewed records of 826 patients (1102 teeth). Patient's gender, age and education were obtained. In addition to the main reason for extraction (caries, periodontal disease, pre-prosthetic extraction, restorative failure and remaining root), the following information was collected about each extracted tooth: type, the status of caries if any (primary or secondary) and pulpal status (normal or reversible pulpitis, irreversible pulpitis, necrotic or root canal treated) and type and size of restoration, if present. Following data collection, descriptive analysis was performed. A log-linear model was used to examine the association between restorative treatment and tooth loss and between reasons for tooth loss and type of tooth. Lower molars followed by upper molars were the most commonly extracted teeth. Teeth with no restorations or with crowns were less likely to be extracted (P tooth loss. In conclusion, teeth receiving multiple restorative therapies were more likely to be extracted. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Towards unraveling the human tooth transcriptome: the dentome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijia Hu

    Full Text Available The goal of the study was to characterize the transcriptome profiles of human ameloblasts and odontoblasts, evaluate molecular pathways and advance our knowledge of the human "dentome". Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate odontoblasts and ameloblasts from human tooth buds (15-20week gestational age from 4 fetuses. RNA was examined using Agilent 41k whole genome arrays at 2 different stages of enamel formation, presecretory and secretory. Probe detection was considered against the array negative control to control for background noise. Differential expression was examined using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM 4.0 between different cell types and developmental stages with a false discovery rate of 20%. Pathway analysis was conducted using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. We found that during primary tooth formation, odontoblasts expressed 14,802 genes, presecretory ameloblasts 15,179 genes and secretory ameloblasts 14,526 genes. Genes known to be active during tooth development for each cell type (eg COL1A1, AMELX were shown to be expressed by our approach. Exploring further into the list of differentially expressed genes between the motile odontoblasts and non-motile presecretory ameloblasts we found several genes of interest that could be involved in cell movement (FN1, LUM, ASTN1. Furthermore, our analysis indicated that the Phospholipase C and ERK5 pathways, that are important for cell movement, were activated in the motile odontoblasts. In addition our pathway analysis identified WNT3A and TGFB1 as important upstream contributors. Recent studies implicate these genes in the development of Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia. The utility of laser capture microdissection can be a valuable tool in the examination of specific tissues or cell populations present in human tooth buds. Advancing our knowledge of the human dentome and related molecular pathways provides new insights into the complex mechanisms regulating

  1. [Clinical relevance of tooth brushing in relation to dental caries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita-Fernández, Salvador; Pombo-Sánchez, Antonio; Suárez-Quintanilla, Juan; Novio-Mallón, Silvia; Rivas-Mundiña, Berta; Pértega-Díaz, Sonia

    2010-07-01

    To determine the impact and clinical relevance of tooth brushing on oral health. Prevalence study. Fontiñas Health Centre. (Santiago de Compostela, Spain). Prevalence study (n=281 children aged 5-14 years. Odontological examination according to WHO methodology, to determine the frequency of tooth brushing, frequency of sweet consumption and their impact on the prevalence of caries. Logistic regression and estimation of the relative prevalence difference (RPD) and the Number Needed to Treat in order to prevent one additional bad outcome (NNT). The children who never brush their teeth have a 40% (95% CI: 24.3%-57.8%) of early caries, while those who brush their teeth several times a day have 15.3% (95% CI: 9.4%-23.7%). An association between not brushing the teeth and caries in primary teeth (OR=2.3; 95% CI:1.05-5.3) was observed after adjusting for age, sweet consumption and visits to the dentist. The same occurred with final teeth (OR=3.9; 95% CI:1.4-10.3). The RPD was 62%(95% CI: 30%-79%), meaning that prevalence of caries is 62% lower in children who brush their teeth several times a day as compared to those who never brush their teeth. The NNT is 4 (95% CI: 2.4-14), so for every 4 children who brush their teeth several times a day, there is one less case of caries, compared to those who never brush their teeth. There is a dose-response relationship between prevalence of caries and brushing frequency. The same effect was observed with definitive caries: RPD=55% (95% CI:16%-76%), NNT=5 (95% CI:2.8-53.3). Tooth brushing is related to oral health, with a major clinical impact. The positive effect of tooth brushing was superior to that of a correct diet. 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Unicuspid and bicuspid tooth crown formation in squamates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handrigan, Gregory R; Richman, Joy M

    2011-12-15

    The molecular and developmental factors that regulate tooth morphogenesis in nonmammalian species, such as snakes and lizards, have received relatively little attention compared to mammals. Here we describe the development of unicuspid and bicuspid teeth in squamate species. The simple, cone-shaped tooth crown of the bearded dragon and ball python is established at cap stage and fixed in shape by the differentiation of cells and the secretion of dental matrices. Enamel production, as demonstrated by amelogenin expression, occurs relatively earlier in squamate teeth than in mouse molars. We suggest that the early differentiation in squamate unicuspid teeth at cap stage correlates with a more rudimentary tooth crown shape. The leopard gecko can form a bicuspid tooth crown despite the early onset of differentiation. Cusp formation in the gecko does not occur by the folding of the inner enamel epithelium, as in the mouse molar, but by the differential secretion of enamel. Ameloblasts forming the enamel epithelial bulge, a central swelling of cells in the inner enamel epithelium, secrete amelogenin at cap stage, but cease to do so by bell stage. Meanwhile, other ameloblasts in the inner enamel epithelium continue to secrete enamel, forming cusp tips on either side of the bulge. Bulge cells specifically express the gene Bmp2, which we suggest serves as a pro-differentiation signal for cells of the gecko enamel organ. In this regard, the enamel epithelial bulge of the gecko may be more functionally analogous to the secondary enamel knot of mammals than the primary enamel knot. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  3. Tooth Decay Process: How to Reverse It and Avoid a Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Finding Dental Care Home Health Info Health Topics Tooth Decay Tooth decay (dental caries) is damage to a tooth that can happen ... hole in a tooth, called a cavity. If tooth decay is not treated, it can cause pain, infection, ...

  4. Evaluation of autogenous tooth transplantation for replacement of the missing or unrestorable mandibular molar tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahiduj Jaman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to evaluate the functional and occlusal stability of autogenous tooth transplantation. A total of 30 patients were included. Among them, 21 participants received transplanted first molar and the remaining 9 received transplanted second molar. In all the cases, donor tooth were third molar. In each participant, extraction of un-restorable first or second molar tooth was performed which was then replaced by atrumatic extracted third molar tooth. Each third molar tooth was placed in the recipient extracted socket, followed by the evaluation of the occlusion and then stabilized with arch bar and ligature wire. Clinical follow-up evaluation was performed at 15 days, 3 and 12 months in respect to occlusal stability, tooth mobility and periodontal status. It was found that 23 transplanted tooth were successful and the remaining 7 tooth need long-term observation for the final outcome, which was statistically significant. It can be concluded that the autogenous tooth transplantation can replace missing tooth to ensure the preservation of function, aesthetic and to prevent bone resorption of the missing area of the jaw, which can lead to exceptional esthetic and functional outcome.

  5. Spectroscopic investigations of carious tooth decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thareja, R K; Sharma, A K; Shukla, Shobha

    2008-11-01

    We report on the elemental composition of healthy and infected part of human tooth using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). We have used prominent constituent transitions in laser-excited tooth to diagnose the state of the tooth. A nanosecond laser pulse (355nm, 5ns) was used as an ablating pulse and the sodium (3s2S-3p2P) at 588.99 and (3s2S-3p2P) at 589.99nm, strontium (5s21S-1s5P) at 460.55nm, and calcium (3d3D-4f 3F0) at 452.55nm transitions for spectroscopic analysis. The spectroscopic observations in conjunction with discriminate analysis showed that calcium attached to the hydroxyapatite structure of the tooth was affected severely at the infected part of the tooth. The position-time plots generated from two-dimensional (2D) images conclusively showed a decrease in calcium concentration in the infected region of the irradiated tooth. Using the technique, we could distinguish between the healthy and carious parts of the tooth with significant accuracy.

  6. Tooth Retained Implant: No More an Oxymoron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Bhat

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Periodontally af-fected teeth are treated in one of the two ways. (1 Tooth retention after periodontal surgery, in which the degree of regeneration achieved is unpredictable. (2 Tooth extrac-tion and implant placement. Implants have an osseointegrated surface which does not provide adequate shock absorption. Regeneration can be achieved by resecting the crown of the affected tooth and submerging the root. This technique has not had a clinical application so far as the tooth becomes difficult to restore. Placing an implant within the root can make the retained root restorable. At the same time, as the implant is placed within the root surface it achieves a periodontal integration which dampens occlusal forces better than osseointegration. Therefore, such a “tooth retained implant” may serve as an additional treatment option with significant benefits over tooth retention and implant placement alone. The hypothesis: Implants placed within retained roots have shown cementum deposition and attachment of periodontal ligament fibers over their surface. This periodontal attachment may be able to dam-pen forces better than in an osseointegrated implant. Moreover, since an implant is being placed, the crown of the tooth can be resected and submerged. This prevents epithelial migration, allows for the periodontal ligament cells to populate the wound and favors regeneration.Evaluation of the hypothesis: The technique of placing implants within cavities prepared in the root and then submerging them are simple for any practitioner placing implants routinely.

  7. Tooth fractures in canine clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capik, I.; Ledecky, V.; Sevcik, A.

    2001-01-01

    Tooth fractures constitute a considerable fraction of all tooth diseases. Out of the 5,370 dogs treated during four years, 492 were presented with dental problems and 28.3 % of the latter were treated for tooth fractures. Canines were the most frequently affected teeth (38.8 %), followed by premolars (33.1 %), incisors (25.9 %), and molars (2.2 %), 55.4 % of the patients with canine and incisor fractures being large breed dogs. Fractures of premolars (mostly of 108, 208) were divided evenly irrespective of breed or body size. Nonsurgical endodontic treatment yielded good therapeutic results in most cases, but repeated treatment was necessary in some patients

  8. Prevalence and genetic basis of tooth agenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiko Shimizu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Tooth agenesis or hypodontia is one of the most common anomalies of the human dentition, characterized by the developmental absence of one or more teeth. Many studies have reported that the prevalence of congenital absence of permanent teeth varies from 3% to 11% among European and Asian populations. Recent advances in the fields of molecular biology and human genetics have improved our understanding of the cause of tooth agenesis. In this review, we assess the previous literature on prevalence of tooth agenesis comparing the Japanese with other racial populations, and describe the recent genetic studies associated with hypodontia in human and mouse models.

  9. Power Consumption Optimization in Tooth Gears Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanatnikov, N.; Harlamov, G.; Kanatnikova, P.; Pashmentova, A.

    2018-01-01

    The paper reviews the issue of optimization of technological process of tooth gears production of the power consumption criteria. The authors dwell on the indices used for cutting process estimation by the consumed energy criteria and their applicability in the analysis of the toothed wheel production process. The inventors proposed a method for optimization of power consumptions based on the spatial modeling of cutting pattern. The article is aimed at solving the problem of effective source management in order to achieve economical and ecological effect during the mechanical processing of toothed gears. The research was supported by Russian Science Foundation (project No. 17-79-10316).

  10. Properties of tooth enamel in great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James J-W; Morris, Dylan; Constantino, Paul J; Lucas, Peter W; Smith, Tanya M; Lawn, Brian R

    2010-12-01

    A comparative study has been made of human and great ape molar tooth enamel. Nanoindentation techniques are used to map profiles of elastic modulus and hardness across sections from the enamel-dentin junction to the outer tooth surface. The measured data profiles overlap between species, suggesting a degree of commonality in material properties. Using established deformation and fracture relations, critical loads to produce function-threatening damage in the enamel of each species are calculated for characteristic tooth sizes and enamel thicknesses. The results suggest that differences in load-bearing capacity of molar teeth in primates are less a function of underlying material properties than of morphology. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. A retrospective radiographic study on the effect of natural tooth-implant proximity and an introduction to the concept of a bone-loading platform switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdaneta, Rainer A; Seemann, Rudolf; Dragan, Irina-Florentina; Lubelski, William; Leary, Joseph; Chuang, Sung-Kiang

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tooth-implant proximity using an implant system with a double platform shift that was designed to load bone coronal to the implant-abutment cohort study was conducted between January 2008 and December 2009. The sample was composed of patients who had received at least one 5-mm-wide hydroxyapatite-coated single-tooth Bicon implant that had been placed adjacent to at least one natural tooth. Descriptive statistics and univariate and multivariate linear mixed-effects regression models, adjusted for multiple implants in the same patient, were utilized. The primary predictor variable was the horizontal distance between implant and adjacent tooth, and the primary outcome variable was the change in peri-implant bone levels over time. Two hundred six subjects who received 235 plateau root-form implants were followed for an average of 42 months. Tooth-implant distance ranged between 0 and 14.6 mm. Out of 235 implants, 43 implants were placed tooth on mesial and/or distal sides. The proximity of a plateau root-form implant was not associated with complications on the adjacent tooth such as bone loss, root resorption, endodontic treatment, pain, or extraction. The proximity of an adjacent tooth was not a risk factor for the failure of a plateau root-form implant. After adjusting for other covariates in a multivariate model, the proximity of a natural tooth did not have a statistically significant effect on peri-implant bone levels (P = .13). The extraction of an adjacent tooth was associated with a significant increase in peri-implant bone loss (P = .008). The placement of a plateau root-form implant with a sloping shoulder in close proximity to an adjacent tooth did not cause damage to that tooth or lead to bone loss or the failure of the implant.

  12. Regenerative Applications Using Tooth Derived Stem Cells in Other Than Tooth Regeneration: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Jong Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tooth derived stem cells or dental stem cells are categorized according to the location from which they are isolated and represent a promising source of cells for regenerative medicine. Originally, as one kind of mesenchymal stem cells, they are considered an alternative of bone marrow stromal cells. They share many commonalties but maintain differences. Considering their original function in development and the homeostasis of tooth structures, many applications of these cells in dentistry have aimed at tooth structure regeneration; however, the application in other than tooth structures has been attempted extensively. The availability from discarded or removed teeth can be an innate benefit as a source of autologous cells. Their origin from the neural crest results in exploitation of neurological and numerous other applications. This review briefly highlights current and future perspectives of the regenerative applications of tooth derived stem cells in areas beyond tooth regeneration.

  13. Regenerative Applications Using Tooth Derived Stem Cells in Other Than Tooth Regeneration: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yun-Jong; Cha, Seunghee; Park, Young-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Tooth derived stem cells or dental stem cells are categorized according to the location from which they are isolated and represent a promising source of cells for regenerative medicine. Originally, as one kind of mesenchymal stem cells, they are considered an alternative of bone marrow stromal cells. They share many commonalties but maintain differences. Considering their original function in development and the homeostasis of tooth structures, many applications of these cells in dentistry have aimed at tooth structure regeneration; however, the application in other than tooth structures has been attempted extensively. The availability from discarded or removed teeth can be an innate benefit as a source of autologous cells. Their origin from the neural crest results in exploitation of neurological and numerous other applications. This review briefly highlights current and future perspectives of the regenerative applications of tooth derived stem cells in areas beyond tooth regeneration.

  14. Evolution of high tooth replacement rates in sauropod dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Emic, Michael D; Whitlock, John A; Smith, Kathlyn M; Fisher, Daniel C; Wilson, Jeffrey A

    2013-01-01

    Tooth replacement rate can be calculated in extinct animals by counting incremental lines of deposition in tooth dentin. Calculating this rate in several taxa allows for the study of the evolution of tooth replacement rate. Sauropod dinosaurs, the largest terrestrial animals that ever evolved, exhibited a diversity of tooth sizes and shapes, but little is known about their tooth replacement rates. We present tooth replacement rate, formation time, crown volume, total dentition volume, and enamel thickness for two coexisting but distantly related and morphologically disparate sauropod dinosaurs Camarasaurus and Diplodocus. Individual tooth formation time was determined by counting daily incremental lines in dentin. Tooth replacement rate is calculated as the difference between the number of days recorded in successive replacement teeth. Each tooth family in Camarasaurus has a maximum of three replacement teeth, whereas each Diplodocus tooth family has up to five. Tooth formation times are about 1.7 times longer in Camarasaurus than in Diplodocus (315 vs. 185 days). Average tooth replacement rate in Camarasaurus is about one tooth every 62 days versus about one tooth every 35 days in Diplodocus. Despite slower tooth replacement rates in Camarasaurus, the volumetric rate of Camarasaurus tooth replacement is 10 times faster than in Diplodocus because of its substantially greater tooth volumes. A novel method to estimate replacement rate was developed and applied to several other sauropodomorphs that we were not able to thin section. Differences in tooth replacement rate among sauropodomorphs likely reflect disparate feeding strategies and/or food choices, which would have facilitated the coexistence of these gigantic herbivores in one ecosystem. Early neosauropods are characterized by high tooth replacement rates (despite their large tooth size), and derived titanosaurs and diplodocoids independently evolved the highest known tooth replacement rates among archosaurs.

  15. Evolution of high tooth replacement rates in sauropod dinosaurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D D'Emic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tooth replacement rate can be calculated in extinct animals by counting incremental lines of deposition in tooth dentin. Calculating this rate in several taxa allows for the study of the evolution of tooth replacement rate. Sauropod dinosaurs, the largest terrestrial animals that ever evolved, exhibited a diversity of tooth sizes and shapes, but little is known about their tooth replacement rates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present tooth replacement rate, formation time, crown volume, total dentition volume, and enamel thickness for two coexisting but distantly related and morphologically disparate sauropod dinosaurs Camarasaurus and Diplodocus. Individual tooth formation time was determined by counting daily incremental lines in dentin. Tooth replacement rate is calculated as the difference between the number of days recorded in successive replacement teeth. Each tooth family in Camarasaurus has a maximum of three replacement teeth, whereas each Diplodocus tooth family has up to five. Tooth formation times are about 1.7 times longer in Camarasaurus than in Diplodocus (315 vs. 185 days. Average tooth replacement rate in Camarasaurus is about one tooth every 62 days versus about one tooth every 35 days in Diplodocus. Despite slower tooth replacement rates in Camarasaurus, the volumetric rate of Camarasaurus tooth replacement is 10 times faster than in Diplodocus because of its substantially greater tooth volumes. A novel method to estimate replacement rate was developed and applied to several other sauropodomorphs that we were not able to thin section. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Differences in tooth replacement rate among sauropodomorphs likely reflect disparate feeding strategies and/or food choices, which would have facilitated the coexistence of these gigantic herbivores in one ecosystem. Early neosauropods are characterized by high tooth replacement rates (despite their large tooth size, and derived titanosaurs and

  16. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Pregnancy and Oral Health Headaches and Jaw Pain? Check Your Posture! Men: ... Start by Visiting the Dentist Why is Oral Health Important for Men? What is Baby Bottle Tooth ...

  17. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... April 7, 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health The History of Dental ... Orofacial Pain? What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? Learn what those dental words mean. The Life of ...

  18. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? What is ... The History of Dental Advances Why is Oral Health Important for Men? How Do I Care for ...

  19. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Is My Child at Risk for Early Childhood Tooth Decay? What is a Composite Resin (White Filling)? How Do I Care for My Child's Baby Teeth? Learn what those dental words mean. The Life ...

  20. Immediate tooth replacement using fiber-reinforced composite and natural tooth pontic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermanshah, Hamid; Motevasselian, Fariba

    2010-01-01

    The loss and replacement of anterior maxillary teeth poses several challenges. In patients refusing implant surgery, when minimal tooth reduction is desired, a fiber-reinforced composite fixed-partial denture may be used as a conservative alternative to a conventional fixed-partial denture for replacement of a single missing tooth. This article describes a clinical technique and six-year follow-up. The patient presented with a missing maxillary central incisor due to localized juvenile periodontitis. The abutment teeth were clinically stable. The advantage of supragingival margins and minimal tooth structure removal made the bonded bridge with a natural tooth pontic a viable procedure for this compromised restorative situation.

  1. Comparative study of gene expression during tooth eruption and orthodontic tooth movement in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X F; Zhao, Y B; Zhang, F M; Han, P Y

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to understand tooth eruption by comparing the gene expression during tooth eruption and orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). Orthodontic force was applied on maxillary molars for 2, 4, 7 and 14 days to study tooth movement. Mice at PN 0, 7, 10, 15 and 21 were fixed to observe tooth eruption. Comparative study of two procedures was assessed by haematoxylin and eosin, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining and in situ hybridization for matrix metalloproteinase (Mmp)2, 13, bone sialoprotein (Bsp) and osteocalcin (Ocn). Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity and expression of Mmp2, 13 were obviously detectable in the compression region during OTM. They were also identified in the occlusal and apical region of alveolar bone during tooth eruption. Strong expression of Bsp and Ocn was detectable at the tension side during OTM. These genes were also expressed in the inner lateral region of alveolar bone adjacent to the tooth, but absent in the inner surface of the occlusal and root apical regions during tooth eruption. The process of alveolar bone metabolism during developmental eruption and OTM shares the same mechanism. Internal force, as the orthodontic force for OTM, may be initiating factor for tooth eruption.

  2. Impacted supernumerary tooth in coronoid process: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Won Se; Lee, Je Ho; Park, Hyok; Jung, Ho Gul; Kim, Kee Deog [Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Impaction of tooth is a situation in which an unerupted tooth is wedged against another tooth or teeth or otherwise located so that it cannot erupt normally. The supernumerary tooth is also called as hyperdontia and defined as the condition of having additional tooth to the regular number of teeth. The most common supernumerary tooth is a mesiodens, which is a mal-formed, peg-like tooth that occurs between the maxillary incisors. The supernumerary tooth is commonly impacted but they are frequently impacted on maxilla. Ectopic impaction of supernumerary tooth on mandibular condyle, coronoid process, ascending ramus, and pterygomandibular space is very rare condition. In this case, we report a case of impacted supernumerary tooth on mandibular sigmoid notch without definite pathologic change.

  3. Association between Tooth Agenesis and Skeletal Malocclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ana Maria Guerra; Trevizan, Mariana; Matsumoto, Mírian Aiko Nakane; da Silva, Raquel Assed Bezerra; da Silva, Lea Assed Bezerra; Horta, Karla Carpio; Romano, Fabio Lourenço; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Küchler, Erika Calvano

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between tooth agenesis and skeletal malocclusions in Brazilian non-syndromic orthodontic patients. Pretreatment orthodontic records of 348 patients of both genders and with various skeletal malocclusions were examined. Tooth agenesis was evaluated in panoramic radiographs. Angular measurements were taken from lateral cephalometric radiographs to classify the patient's malocclusion as skeletal Class I, Class II and Class III. Subjects were divided into 2 groups, "with tooth agenesis" and "without tooth agenesis". Chi-square or Fisher exact test was used to compare categorical data. ANOVA with Tukey's post-test was used for means comparisons. An alpha of 5% was established. From 348 analysed patients, 28 presented tooth agenesis. There was no difference between genders (P = 0.27) nor mean age (P = 0.16). The most prevalent skeletal malocclusion was Class I (63.11%), followed by Class II (25.94%), and Class III (10.95%). The mean of congenitally missing teeth was 1.3 (SD 0.13). Thirteen subjects had premolar agenesis, 13 upper lateral incisor agenesis, 4 lower incisor agenesis and 2 molars agenesis. The group with tooth agenesis presented A point-nasion-B point (ANB) angle smaller (1.66 [SD 2.52]) than the group without tooth agenesis (2.86 [SD 2.49]) (P = 0.01). ANB angle had a negative correlation with the number of congenitally missing teeth (P = 0.039; r = -0.39). Tooth agenesis is associated with a smaller A point-nasion-B point angle and is negatively correlated with the number of congenitally missing teeth.

  4. Dielectric response of the human tooth dentine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leskovec, J. [Dental Clinic, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Hrvatski trg 6, 1104 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Filipic, C. [Jozef Stefan Institute, P.O. Box 3000, 1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Levstik, A. [Jozef Stefan Institute, P.O. Box 3000, 1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia)]. E-mail: adrijan.levstik@ijs.si

    2005-07-15

    Dielectric properties of tooth dentine can be well described by the model which was developed for the dielectric response to hydrating porous cement paste. It is shown that the normalized dielectric constant and the normalized specific conductivity are proportional to the model parameters -bar {sub v0} and {sigma}{sub v}, indicating the deposition of AgCl in the dentine tubules during the duration of the precipitation. The fractal dimension of the tooth dentine was determined by dielectric spectroscopy.

  5. Dielectric response of the human tooth dentine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovec, J.; Filipic, C.; Levstik, A.

    2005-01-01

    Dielectric properties of tooth dentine can be well described by the model which was developed for the dielectric response to hydrating porous cement paste. It is shown that the normalized dielectric constant and the normalized specific conductivity are proportional to the model parameters -bar v0 and σ v , indicating the deposition of AgCl in the dentine tubules during the duration of the precipitation. The fractal dimension of the tooth dentine was determined by dielectric spectroscopy

  6. Dielectric response of the human tooth dentine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskovec, J.; Filipič, C.; Levstik, A.

    2005-07-01

    Dielectric properties of tooth dentine can be well described by the model which was developed for the dielectric response to hydrating porous cement paste. It is shown that the normalized dielectric constant and the normalized specific conductivity are proportional to the model parameters ɛ and σv, indicating the deposition of AgCl in the dentine tubules during the duration of the precipitation. The fractal dimension of the tooth dentine was determined by dielectric spectroscopy.

  7. Alveolar bone resorption after tooth extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Popovski, Stipica

    2012-01-01

    Alveolar ridge resorption has long been considered an unavoidable consequence of tooth extraction. Atrophy of the alveolar bone may cause significant esthetic and surgical problems in implantation, as well as at prosthetic and restorative dentistry. Alveolar ridge prophylaxis immediately upon tooth extraction may reduce such sequelae for both, the treating dentist and the patient. Attempts to reduce alveolar bone resorption have included the placement of natural roots, root analogues, and...

  8. Tooth surface treatment strategies for adhesive cementation

    OpenAIRE

    Rohr, Nadja; Fischer, Jens

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tooth surface pre-treatment steps on shear bond strength, which is essential for understanding the adhesive cementation process. MATERIALS AND METHODS Shear bond strengths of different cements with various tooth surface treatments (none, etching, priming, or etching and priming) on enamel and dentin of human teeth were measured using the Swiss shear test design. Three adhesives (Permaflo DC, Panavia F 2.0, and Panavia V5) and one sel...

  9. Computer simulation of gear tooth manufacturing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri; Huston, Ronald L.

    1990-01-01

    The use of computer graphics to simulate gear tooth manufacturing procedures is discussed. An analytical basis for the simulation is established for spur gears. The simulation itself, however, is developed not only for spur gears, but for straight bevel gears as well. The applications of the developed procedure extend from the development of finite element models of heretofore intractable geometrical forms, to exploring the fabrication of nonstandard tooth forms.

  10. Orthodontic Tooth Movement with Clear Aligners

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, Carl T.; McGorray, Susan P.; Dolce, Calogero; Nair, Madhu; Wheeler, Timothy T.

    2012-01-01

    Clear aligners provide a convenient model to measure orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). We examined the role of in vivo aligner material fatigue and subject-specific factors in tooth movement. Fifteen subjects seeking orthodontic treatment at the University of Florida were enrolled. Results were compared with data previously collected from 37 subjects enrolled in a similar protocol. Subjects were followed prospectively for eight weeks. An upper central incisor was programmed to move 0.5 mm. ev...

  11. Primary and secondary impaction of four primary molar teeth in a single patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Ramos Chrcanovic

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The lack of eruption of a primary tooth can be considered rare. In primary impaction, the primary tooth not only has never appeared in the oral cavity, but also is always covered by a more or less thick layer of bone. Secondary impaction, which is relatively more common, denotes teeth that at one time erupted into the mouth, but subsequently clinically appear to have receded from this position. The purpose of this paper is to present a case of primary and secondary impaction of four primary molar teeth in a single patient.

  12. Ultrasonographic Detection of Tooth Flaws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.; Ghorayeb, S. R.

    2010-02-01

    The goal of our work is to adapt pulse-echo ultrasound into a high resolution imaging modality for early detection of oral diseases and for monitoring treatment outcome. In this talk we discuss our preliminary results in the detection of: demineralization of the enamel and dentin, demineralization or caries under and around existing restorations, caries on occlusal and interproximal surfaces, cracks of enamel and dentin, calculus, and periapical lesions. In vitro immersion tank experiments are compared to results from a handpiece which uses a compliant delay line to couple the ultrasound to the tooth surface. Because the waveform echoes are complex, and in order to make clinical interpretation of ultrasonic waveform data in real time, it is necessary to automatically interpret the signals. We apply the dynamic wavelet fingerprint algorithms to identify and delineate echographic features that correspond to the flaws of interest in teeth. The resulting features show a clear distinction between flawed and unflawed waveforms collected with an ultrasonic handpiece on both phantom and human cadaver teeth.

  13. Complex single-tooth restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushkowsky, Richard D; Burgess, John O

    2002-04-01

    There are many options for restoring the decimated dentition. [43] Excellent results can be obtained with many of the materials currently available. The restorative option will depend on the size and location of the lesion, adequate isolation for adhesive restorations, caries rate, the patient's age, the aesthetic needs of the patient, occlusal habits, maintenance of maximum tooth structure, the skill of the dentist, and the longevity desired for the restoration. Amalgam is a cost-effective material, and when used properly, it can provide many years of service. Aesthetic demands, the desire to strengthen teeth, [44] and concern about the safety of mercury in amalgam have increased the use of direct composites, ceramic material, and indirect composites. The main drawback with these materials, however, is their increased technique sensitivity and concerns about their longevity. Gold continues to be a cost-effective and predictable material if placed properly. Full-coverage gold or porcelain fused to metal provides long-term predictability but is more destructive and not as aesthetically appealing. The wide varieties of materials available provide both a challenge and an opportunity to place the most effective material for a particular patient. A thorough understanding of the available materials and their appropriate use is needed to achieve a long-lasting restoration that serves the patient's needs.

  14. Endodontic therapy or single tooth implant? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabinejad, Mahmoud; Lozada, Jaime; Puterman, Israel; White, Shane N

    2008-06-01

    Should a tooth with pulpal involvement be saved through endodontic therapy, or extracted and replaced with a single tooth implant? Within the limitations of the existing literature, this systematic review of treatment outcomes found that initial endodontic treatment had a high long-term survival rate, equivalent to replacement of a missing tooth with an implant-supported restoration. Single tooth implants should be considered as the first treatment option for patients requiring extraction and tooth replacement.

  15. Cracked tooth syndrome: Overview of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Shamimul; Singh, Kuldeep; Salati, Naseer

    2015-01-01

    Pain is defined as an "unpleasant sensory and emotional feeling which is associated with actual or potential injury of tissue or expressed in terms of such injury." Tooth pain usually refers to pain around the teeth or jaws mainly as a result of a dental condition. Mostly, toothaches are caused by a carious cavity, a broken tooth, an exposed tooth root or gum disease. The toothache may sometimes be the result of radiating pain from structures in the vicinity of tooth and jaws (cardiac pain, ear, nose, throat pain, and sinusitis). Therefore, evaluation by both dentists and physicians are sometimes necessary to diagnose medical illnesses causing "toothache." Cracked tooth syndrome is a major diagnostic challenge in clinical practice. Accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment are complicated due to lack of awareness of this condition and its bizarre clinical features. Early diagnosis has been linked with successful restorative management and good prognosis. This article provides a detailed literature on the causes, classification, signs and symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment planning of cracked tooth syndrome.

  16. A review on alveolar ridge preservation following tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Robert; Holtzclaw, Danny; Rosen, Paul S

    2012-09-01

    The question that clinicians face is whether the use of bone replacement grafts and/or barrier membranes enhance their ability to provide for the future placement of a dental implant or to maximize ridge dimensions following the extraction of a tooth versus no additional treatments. The evidence was obtained by search of Entrez PubMed and manual search of The International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Implants, The International Journal of Periodontics & Restorative Dentistry, Clinical Oral Implant Research, The Journal of Periodontology, The Journal of Clinical Periodontology, and The Compendium of Continuing Education in Dentistry. Key search words included Guided Bone Regeneration, Dental Extraction, Tooth Extraction, Bone Replacement Graft, Alveolar Ridge. The years of search included from January 2011 through February 2012. The recurring theme was that there was considerable heterogeneity to study designs, time periods, and methods of evaluation. This created great difficulty in trying to answer with good high-quality evidence questions about the techniques and materials to be used for maximizing regeneration at the time of tooth extraction or in which situations this ought to be used. There appears to be consensus from the reviewed literature supporting ridge preservation techniques as a whole. Multiple studies demonstrated less ridge resorption occurring when alveolar ridge preservation procedures were used versus the placement of no graft material in fresh alveolar sockets. The analysis did not show any grafting materials demonstrating a clear benefit over any others or that a barrier membrane is necessary. The evidence is also too premature about whether socket preservation efforts require primary closure. In the emerging area of growth factors, there is no high-quality evidence to either support or refute their use. Tooth extraction is one of the most widely performed procedures in dentistry today and it has been historically well documented that

  17. Can dead man tooth do tell tales? Tooth prints in forensic identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Vineetha; Murthy, Sarvani; Ashwinirani, S R; Prasad, Kulkarni; Girish, Suragimath; Vinit, Shashikanth Patil

    2017-01-01

    We know that teeth trouble us a lot when we are alive, but they last longer for thousands of years even after we are dead. Teeth being the strongest and resistant structure are the most significant tool in forensic investigations. Patterns of enamel rod end on the tooth surface are known as tooth prints. This study is aimed to know whether these tooth prints can become a forensic tool in personal identification such as finger prints. A study has been targeted toward the same. In the present in-vivo study, acetate peel technique has been used to obtain the replica of enamel rod end patterns. Tooth prints of upper first premolars were recorded from 80 individuals after acid etching using cellulose acetate strips. Then, digital images of the tooth prints obtained at two different intervals were subjected to biometric conversion using Verifinger standard software development kit version 6.5 software followed by the use of Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) software for comparison of the tooth prints. Similarly, each individual's finger prints were also recorded and were subjected to the same software. Further, recordings of AFIS scores obtained from images were statistically analyzed using Cronbach's test. We observed that comparing two tooth prints taken from an individual at two intervals exhibited similarity in many cases, with wavy pattern tooth print being the predominant type. However, the same prints showed dissimilarity when compared with other individuals. We also found that most of the individuals with whorl pattern finger print showed wavy pattern tooth print and few loop type fingerprints showed linear pattern of tooth prints. Further more experiments on both tooth prints and finger prints are required in establishing an individual's identity.

  18. Changes in the prevalence of dental caries in primary school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of tooth decay and the prevalence of untreated tooth decay were calculated for the two years, that is, 2000 and 2003. Also the degree of unmet treatment need among the population with caries experience was measured. Differences in the prevalence and severity of dental caries in the primary and ...

  19. Deletion of Osr2 Partially Rescues Tooth Development in Runx2 Mutant Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, H J E; Park, E K; Jia, S; Liu, H; Lan, Y; Jiang, R

    2015-08-01

    Tooth organogenesis depends on genetically programmed sequential and reciprocal inductive interactions between the dental epithelium and neural crest-derived mesenchyme. Previous studies showed that the Msx1 and Runx2 transcription factors are required for activation of odontogenic signals, including Bmp4 and Fgf3, in the early tooth mesenchyme to drive tooth morphogenesis through the bud-to-cap transition and that Runx2 acts downstream of Msx1 to activate Fgf3 expression. Recent studies identified Osr2 as a repressor of tooth development and showed that inactivation of Osr2 rescued molar tooth morphogenesis in the Msx1(-/-) mutant mice as well as in mice with neural crest-specific inactivation of Bmp4. Here we show that Runx2 expression is expanded in the tooth bud mesenchyme in Osr2(-/-) mutant mouse embryos and is partially restored in the tooth mesenchyme in Msx1(-/-)Osr2(-/-) mutants in comparison with Msx1(-/-) and wild-type embryos. Whereas mandibular molar development arrested at the bud stage and maxillary molar development arrested at the bud-to-cap transition in Runx2(-/-) mutant mice, both mandibular and maxillary molar tooth germs progressed to the early bell stage, with rescued expression of Msx1 and Bmp4 in the dental papilla as well as expression of Bmp4, p21, and Shh in the primary enamel knot in the Osr2(-/-)Runx2(-/-) compound mutants. In contrast to the Msx1(-/-)Osr2(-/-) compound mutants, which exhibit nearly normal first molar morphogenesis, the Osr2(-/-)Runx2(-/-) compound mutant embryos failed to activate the expression of Fgf3 and Fgf10 in the dental papilla and exhibited significant deficit in cell proliferation in both the dental epithelium and mesenchyme in comparison with the control embryos. These data indicate that Runx2 synergizes with Msx1 to drive tooth morphogenesis through the bud-to-cap transition and that Runx2 controls continued tooth growth and morphogenesis beyond the cap stage through activation of Fgf3 and Fgf10 expression

  20. CHARCOT-MARIE-TOOTH DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Leonardis

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease is a common inherited disorder of the peripheral nervous system. In our paper, different types of CMT are described with their typical clinical pictures, electrophysiological signs and molecular genetic studies. CMT is classified as demyelinative and axonal type and distal motor neuronopathy.Conclusions. CMT can be of autosomal dominant, recessive and X-linked inheritance. The most frequent form of CMT is the result of the dominantly inherited duplication of chromosome 17p11.2 and is marked as CMT1A. The same group involves also rare patients with point mutation in the peripheral myelin protein-22 gene. CMT1B is associated with point mutations in protein zero gene. CMT1C is linked to chromosome 16p13.1–12.3. Patients with point mutations in early growth response 2 gene (EGR2 are included in group CMT1D. The disease can be also inhereted X-linked (CMTX with the mutations in connexin-32 gene. In autosomal recessive inherited demyelinating polyneuropathies (CMT4, mutations are found in the myotubularin-related protein-2 (CMT4B, N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (CMT4D, EGR2 (CMT4E, and in the periaksin (CMT4F genes. In axonal inherited neuropathy, mutations are found in KIF1beta (CMT2A and in light neurofilament (CMT2E genes, other forms map to different chromosomal loci (CMT2B, CMT2D, CMT2F. Some suggestions for the diagnostic procedures of patients with CMT are given.

  1. Optimum Design of the Involute-Cycloid Composite Tooth Profile Helical Gear

    OpenAIRE

    Tutulan, Florin G.; Nagamura, Kazuteru; Ikejo, Kiyotaka

    2004-01-01

    The tooth bending and tooth contact strengths of the involute-cycloid composite tooth profile helical gear, which was developed as a non-involute tooth profile gear based on cycloid tooth profile, are directly affected by its tooth profile. The involute-cycloid composite tooth profile curve changes with some design parameters such as pressure angle and radius of rolling circle. In this study, we developed a method to calculate the tooth root stress and the tooth contact stress of the involute...

  2. Advances and perspectives in tooth tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Nelson; Yelick, Pamela C

    2017-09-01

    Bio-engineered teeth that can grow and remodel in a manner similar to that of natural teeth have the potential to serve as permanent replacements to the currently used prosthetic teeth, such as dental implants. A major challenge in designing functional bio-engineered teeth is to mimic both the structural and anisotropic mechanical characteristics of the native tooth. Therefore, the field of dental and whole tooth regeneration has advanced towards the molecular and nanoscale design of bio-active, biomimetic systems, using biomaterials, drug delivery systems and stem cells. The focus of this review is to discuss recent advances in tooth tissue engineering, using biomimetic scaffolds that provide proper architectural cues, exhibit the capacity to support dental stem cell proliferation and differentiation and sequester and release bio-active agents, such as growth factors and nucleic acids, in a spatiotemporal controlled manner. Although many in vitro and in vivo studies on tooth regeneration appear promising, before tooth tissue engineering becomes a reality for humans, additional research is needed to perfect methods that use adult human dental stem cells, as opposed to embryonic dental stem cells, and to devise the means to generate bio-engineered teeth of predetermined size and shape. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Complete tooth loss as status passage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Barry John; Sussex, Philip V; Fitzgerald, Ruth P; Thomson, William Murray

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this article is to add to the literature on the sociology of oral health and dentistry by presenting the relevance of status passage to the study of complete tooth loss. The article reports on an analysis of data taken from participants residing in the Nelson region of New Zealand. In total the data include interviews from 20 participants, all of whom had their remaining natural teeth removed before 1960. In total, 12 women and eight men were interviewed. All were from a European background with an age range of 71 to 101 years. Following a narrative approach, participants were interviewed on the nature of the social factors that resulted in complete tooth loss by starting with their family history and then focusing on the factors and events leading up to their total tooth loss. Data were analysed using the methods and techniques of grounded theory. This article provides an outline of the importance of scheduling, prescribing, social factors, 'compound awareness contexts' and reversibility to the status passage into complete tooth loss. We conclude by arguing that the theory of status passage may enable a detailed analysis of the 'time-space extensionality' of trajectories into complete tooth loss. © 2016 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  4. The evolution of dinosaur tooth enamel microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sunny H

    2011-02-01

    The evolution of tooth enamel microstructure in both extinct and extant mammalian groups has been extensively documented, but is poorly known in reptiles, including dinosaurs. Previous intensive sampling of dinosaur tooth enamel microstructure revealed that: (1) the three-dimensional arrangement of enamel types and features within a tooth-the schmelzmuster-is most useful in diagnosing dinosaur clades at or around the family level; (2) enamel microstructure complexity is correlated with tooth morphology complexity and not necessarily with phylogenetic position; and (3) there is a large amount of homoplasy within Theropoda but much less within Ornithischia. In this study, the examination of the enamel microstructure of 28 additional dinosaur taxa fills in taxonomic gaps of previous studies and reinforces the aforementioned conclusions. Additionally, these new specimens reveal that within clades such as Sauropodomorpha, Neotheropoda, and Euornithopoda, the more basal taxa have simpler enamel that is a precursor to the more complex enamel of more derived taxa and that schmelzmusters evolve in a stepwise fashion. In the particularly well-sampled clade of Euornithopoda, correlations between the evolution of dental and enamel characters could be drawn. The ancestral schmelzmuster for Genasauria remains ambiguous due to the dearth of basal ornithischian teeth available for study. These new specimens provide new insights into the evolution of tooth enamel microstructure in dinosaurs, emphasizing the importance of thorough sampling within broadly inclusive clades, especially among their more basal members. © 2010 The Author. Biological Reviews © 2010 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  5. Effect of drugs on orthodontic tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Sarah Aulia Amrullah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic tooth movement is basically a biological response to mechanical forces given to the teeth in orthodontic treatment, which involving the periodontal tissue and alveolar bone, resulting in the release of numerous substances from the dental tissues and surrounding structure. Remodeling changes in periodontal tissues are considered to be essential in effecting orthodontic tooth movement which is the base of orthodontic correction. Molecules produced in various diseased tissues or drugs and nutrients consumed regularly by patients, can influence mechanically stressed periodontal tissue through the circulation and interact with target cell combination of which may be inhibitory, additive or synergize. Medications might have an important influence on the rate of tooth movement, and information on their consumption is essential to adequately discuss treatment planning with patients. Therefore it is imperative to the practitioners being in medical profession, must pay close attention to the drug consumption history of every patient before and during the course of treatment.

  6. Whole Tooth Regeneration as a Future Dental Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Masamitsu; Tsuji, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Dental problems caused by dental caries, periodontal disease and tooth injury compromise the oral and general health issues. Current advances for the development of regenerative therapy have been influenced by our understanding of embryonic development, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering technology. Tooth regenerative therapy for tooth tissue repair and whole tooth replacement is currently expected a novel therapeutic concept with the full recovery of tooth physiological functions. Dental stem cells and cell-activating cytokines are thought to be candidate approach for tooth tissue regeneration because they have the potential to differentiate into tooth tissues in vitro and in vivo. Whole tooth replacement therapy is considered to be an attractive concept for next generation regenerative therapy as a form of bioengineered organ replacement. For realization of whole tooth regeneration, we have developed a novel three-dimensional cell manipulation method designated the "organ germ method". This method involves compartmentalisation of epithelial and mesenchymal cells at a high cell density to mimic multicellular assembly conditions and epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in organogenesis. The bioengineered tooth germ generates a structurally correct tooth in vitro, and erupted successfully with correct tooth structure when transplanted into the oral cavity. We have ectopically generated a bioengineered tooth unit composed of a mature tooth, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, and that tooth unit was engrafted into an adult jawbone through bone integration. Bioengineered teeth were also able to perform physiological tooth functions such as mastication, periodontal ligament function and response to noxious stimuli. In this review, we describe recent findings and technologies underpinning whole tooth regenerative therapy.

  7. Maxillary tooth displacement in the infratemporal fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korosh Roshanghias

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wisdom tooth operations are sometimes accompanied by complications. This case report shows complications during upper jaw third molar removal. Expectable problems during oral surgery should be planned to be solved in advance. Displacement of the third molar during oral surgeries as a considerable complication is rarely discussed scientifically. A good design of flap, adequate power for extraction, and clear view on the surgical field are crucial. Three-dimensional radiographic diagnostics in terms of cone beam computed tomography is helpful after tooth displacement into the infratemporal fossa.

  8. Dietary and social characteristics of children with severe tooth decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, F L; Weaver, L T; Wright, C M; Welbury, R R

    2006-08-01

    Dental decay remains a major public health problem in Scottish children. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between diet, bowel habit, social class, and body mass index (BMI) in children with severe tooth decay. A cross sectional study of 165 children aged 3 -11 years attending Glasgow Dental Hospital for extraction of teeth under dental general anaesthesia (DGA), was undertaken. A structured questionnaire was used to obtain information from each child on diet, bowel habit, and social status of their parents. Fibre and sugar scores were calculated from the frequency of consumption of a range of relevant foods. The children (mean age 5.7 (SD1.8) years) had between 1 and 20 decayed, missing or filled primary teeth (dmft) with a mean dmft of 7.9 (SD 3.5). 37% ate a chocolate bar daily, and 29% regularly drank a sugary drink after brushing their teeth. An excess of children were from the most deprived parts of the city and they had the worst decay. Children with the worst decay were also significantly thinner. No relationship was found between tooth decay and bowel habit. In this selected group of children with poor dental health, those from deprived families were over-represented and had significantly more decay. Severe dental decay was also associated with underweight.

  9. Guided tooth preparation for a pediatric zirconia crown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Hyoung

    2018-03-01

    Unesthetic primary incisors can produce negative self-perceptions in preschool-aged children. In recent years, because of increased esthetic demands, prefabricated zirconia crowns have become increasingly popular. However, zirconia crowns cannot be crimped, and the clinician must prepare the teeth to fit the zirconia crowns. Therefore, extended preparation and fitting times are necessary, especially for inexperienced practitioners. A 1- to 2-millimeter subgingival feather margin also is required. Gingival hemorrhage after subgingival preparation compromises the retention of zirconia crowns. In this clinical report, the author presents a step-by-step description of the clinical and laboratory procedures for restoring a discolored traumatized incisor with a zirconia crown. The author used a polyvinyl siloxane occlusal registration material as an impression material and made 2 identical casts. The author fabricated 3 reduction guides after prospective tooth preparation on the casts. The author rapidly prepared the discolored incisor with the reduction guides and ultrasonic burs. A zirconia crown provided an optimal esthetic result and gingival health. Because the reduction guides provided a visibility intraorally, fast tooth reduction, less trial placement, and passive adaptation of the crown were successful. Because the ultrasonic burs prevented gingival injuries, hemorrhage control was not necessary. The presented technique reduced the patient's discomfort and total chair time. Therefore, this alternative technique is helpful for inexperienced practitioners. Copyright © 2018 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Tooth Decay Process: How to Reverse It and Avoid a Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Info Health Topics Tooth Decay Tooth decay (dental caries) is damage to a tooth that can happen ... Clinical Trials Show All Clinical Trials Data & Statistics Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic disease ...

  11. 21 CFR 872.5525 - Preformed tooth positioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5525 Preformed tooth positioner. (a) Identification. A preformed tooth positioner is a plastic device that is an impression of a perfected bite...

  12. Application of tooth brushing behavior to active rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadachi, Hidetoshi; Murakami, Yoshinori; Tonomura, Manabu; Yada, Yukihiro; Simoyama, Ichiro

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of tooth brushing with toothpaste as active rest using the flicker value as a physiological parameter and a subjective questionnaire as a psychological parameter. Seventeen healthy, right-handed subjects (12 males and 5 females) aged 22.5 +/- 1.5 yr (mean +/- standard deviation) were randomly divided into tooth brushing with toothpaste (N=9) and non-tooth brushing groups (N=8). The subjects performed a serial calculation task for 20 min using personal computers. Subsequently, the tooth brushing group brushed their teeth, and the flicker value and mood were compared before and after the tooth brushing. The flicker value significantly increased in the tooth brushing group compared with the non-tooth brushing group (pbrushing group, the incidence of a "feeling of being refreshed" significantly increased (pbrushing activated cerebral activity, producing refreshing effects. These results suggest the applicability of tooth brushing to active rest.

  13. An interdisciplinary approach to treat crown‑root‑fractured tooth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to accurately select colour without objective interference to achieve ideal cosmetic effects. Keywords: Crown lengthening surgery, crown‑root fractured tooth, endodontic root canal treatment, fractured tooth, orthodontic appliance, orthodontic extrusion, prosthodontic post‑core‑crown restoration, prosthodontic treatment

  14. Are interventions for accelerating orthodontic tooth movement effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2014-12-01

    Pubmed, Embase, Sciences Citation Index, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and grey literature database of SIGLE were searched from January 1, 1990 to August 20, 2011 with no language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs in which the participants were healthy and received additional interventions to conventional orthodontic treatment for accelerating tooth movements were included. Subjects with defects in oral and maxillofacial regions (ie, cleft lip/palate), dental pathologies and medical conditions were excluded. Studies were selected by two independent reviewers and disagreements were resolved by discussion with a third reviewer. The primary outcomes included accumulative moved distance (AMD) or movement rate (MR) and time required to move the tooth to its destination. Secondary outcomes were pain improvement, anchorage loss, periodontal health, orthodontic caries, pulp vitality and root resorption. The reviewers performed statistical pooling, where possible, according to a priori criteria on the basis of comparability of patient type, treatments and outcomes measured and risk of bias. The reviewers tested for heterogeneity, publication bias and sensitivity. A quality assessment test was conducted to evaluate the method used to measure AMD. The authors selected seven RCTs and two quasi-RCTs, which included a total of 101 patients with an age range of 12-26.3 years. Eight studies compared four intervention methods to no intervention group (control group). From them, four studies assessed low laser therapy (LLL), two evaluated corticotomy (CC), one assessed electrical current therapy (EC) and one evaluated pulsed electromagnetic field (PEF). Another study compared dentoalveolar distraction (DAD) vs periodontal distraction (PDD).Quality assessment scores showed that only two studies were of high quality, five studies were of medium quality, while two studies were of low quality. All studies, except one, compared

  15. A panorama of tooth wear during the medieval period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esclassan, Rémi; Hadjouis, Djillali; Donat, Richard; Passarrius, Olivier; Maret, Delphine; Vaysse, Frédéric; Crubézy, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Tooth wear is a natural phenomenon and a universal occurrence that has existed from the origin of humankind and depends on the way of life, especially diet. Tooth wear was very serious in ancient populations up to the medieval period. The aim of this paper is to present a global view of tooth wear in medieval times in Europe through different parameters: scoring systems, quantity and direction of wear, gender, differences between maxilla and mandible, relations with diet, caries, tooth malpositions and age.

  16. Social ranking effects on tooth-brushing behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Maltby, John; Paterson, Kevin; Day, Liz; Jones, Ceri; Kinnear, Hayley; Buchanan, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Objective: A tooth-brushing social rank hypothesis is tested suggesting tooth-brushing duration is influenced when individuals position their behaviour in a rank when comparing their behaviour with other individuals.\\ud Design: Study 1 used a correlation design, Study 2 used a semi-experimental design, and Study 3 used a randomized intervention design to examine the tooth-brushing social rank hypothesis in terms of self-reported attitudes, cognitions, and behaviour towards tooth-brushing dura...

  17. Hyaluronan in human deciduous tooth germs in the bell stage. Histochemistry and immunohistochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Martin Ebbe; Garbarsch, Charly; Olsen, Birgitte Engelbrecht

    1997-01-01

    Anatomy, development, glycosaminoglycans, hyaluronan, tooth germs, histochemistry, immunocytochemistry......Anatomy, development, glycosaminoglycans, hyaluronan, tooth germs, histochemistry, immunocytochemistry...

  18. Rare case of generalised aggressive periodontitis in the primary dentition

    OpenAIRE

    Spoerri, A; Signorelli, C; Erb, J; van Waes, H; Schmidlin, P R

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Generalised aggressive periodontitis (AP) in the prepubescent age is an exceptionally rare disease in the primary dentition of otherwise healthy children. Characteristics of AP are gingival inflammation, deep periodontal pockets, bone loss, tooth mobility and even tooth loss. The most common way of treating this disease is the extraction of all the involved primary teeth. CASE REPORT A 4-year-old girl presented with signs of severe gingival inflammation. Clinical examination rev...

  19. Anomalies of tooth formation in hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lexner, Michala O; Bardow, Allan; Hertz, Jens Michael

    2007-01-01

    affected males had multiple missing permanent teeth and tooth malformations. The heterozygous females had a significantly higher frequency of agenesis of permanent teeth compared to normative data. The heterozygous females had an increased prevalence of tooth malformations and reduced tooth size...

  20. Severe hypodontia: identifying patterns of human tooth agenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, S.P.K.; van Wijk, A.J.; Prahl-Andersen, B.

    2011-01-01

    Tooth agenesis is the most common dental anomaly. The aim of this retrospective study was to identify common patterns of tooth agenesis in a sample of 92 patients (55 females and 37 males; mean age 27.7 years) with non-syndromic severe hypodontia. The Tooth Agenesis Code (TAC) procedure was used for

  1. 21 CFR 872.3580 - Preformed gold denture tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... tooth in a fixed or removable partial denture. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preformed gold denture tooth. 872.3580 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3580 Preformed gold denture tooth. (a...

  2. Tooth-marked small theropod bone: an extremely rare trace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Aase Roland

    2001-01-01

    Tooth-marked dinosaur bones provide insight into feeding behaviours and biting strategies of theropod dinosaurs. The majority of theropod tooth marks reported to date have been found on herbivorous dinosaur bones, although some tyrannosaurid bones with tooth marks have also been reported. In 1988...

  3. Etiology of tooth discoloration- a review | Manuel | Nigerian Dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the management of patients with discolored tooth, knowledge of the mechanisms behind tooth discoloration is of relevance as it can influence the treatment plan. In certain instances it may even have an effect on the outcome of the treatment. A grasp of the pathological process involved in tooth staining will also allow the ...

  4. Molar tooth sign - looking beyond the obvious | Mahomed | SA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The molar tooth sign was initially identified in Joubert syndrome, named after Marie Joubert who first described it in 1968 as a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterised by the neuroradiological hallmark of the molar tooth sign caused by cerebellar vermian hypoplasia. Subsequently, it emerged that the molar tooth ...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3200 - Resin tooth bonding agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resin tooth bonding agent. 872.3200 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3200 Resin tooth bonding agent. (a) Identification. A resin tooth bonding agent is a device material, such as methylmethacrylate, intended to be painted...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3690 - Tooth shade resin material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tooth shade resin material. 872.3690 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3690 Tooth shade resin material. (a) Identification. Tooth shade resin material is a device composed of materials such as bisphenol-A glycidyl...

  7. How to Prevent Tooth Decay in Your Baby

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also be called nursing caries or baby bottle tooth decay . Healthy dental habits should begin early because tooth decay can ... a pacifier in the parent's or caregiver's mouth. Tooth decay also develops when the child's teeth and gums are exposed to any liquid or ...

  8. The Importance of Tooth Decay Prevention in Children under Three

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Peter; Huebner, Colleen; Chi, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Tooth decay and tooth loss was once the norm but public health interventions have led to major improvements for most people. Nevertheless, not all children have benefited. Dental disease in young children is unacceptably high. Tooth decay is preventable. Early childhood educators are often the first to notice the problem. Professional…

  9. Storing tooth segments for optimal esthetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuzuner, T.; Turgut, S.; Özen, B.; Kılınç, H.; Bagis, B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: A fractured whole crown segment can be reattached to its remnant; crowns from extracted teeth may be used as pontics in splinting techniques. We aimed to evaluate the effect of different storage solutions on tooth segment optical properties after different durations. Study design: Sixty

  10. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Oral Health and Overal Health Headaches and Jaw Pain? Check ... Tooth Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | RSS About AGD | Contact AGD | Site Map | Reprints ...

  11. Tooth structure and fracture strength of cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondelli, José; Sene, Fábio; Ramos, Renata Pereira

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated, in vitro, the loss of tooth substance after cavity preparation for direct and indirect restorations and its relationship with fracture strength of the prepared teeth. Sixty sound human maxillary first premolars were assigned to 6 groups (n=10). MOD direct composite cavities...

  12. Apoptotic cell elimination during early tooth development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matalová, Eva; Míšek, Ivan; Chovancová, Eva

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 7 (2003), s. 34 ISSN 0001-7213. [Congress of the European Association of Veterinary Anatomists/24./. 21.07.2002-25.07.2002, Brno] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP204/02/P112 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : tooth development Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry

  13. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? Temporomandibular Joint ... Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | RSS About AGD | Contact AGD | Site Map | Reprints ...

  14. Molecular basis of tooth germ development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fleischmannová, Jana; Krejčí, P.; Matalová, Eva; Míšek, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 4 (2007), s. 39-46 ISSN 1210-4272 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB500450503; GA MŠk OC B23.001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : tooth germ development Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry

  15. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Bomberman atari oyunlarý bakugan oyunlarý geta poker friv Home InfoBites Find an AGD Dentist Your Family's Oral ... dental words mean. The Life of a Tooth Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | ...

  16. Tooth loss: Are the patients prepared?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Aim: Tooth loss is associated with esthetic, functional, psychological, and social impacts on the life of individuals. This study was designed to find out how Nigerians feel about losing their teeth and what effects, if any, this has on their lives. Most of the problems presented to the dentist as difficult denture ...

  17. Effect of endodontic sealers on tooth color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meincke, Débora Könzgen; Prado, Maíra; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo; Bona, Alvaro Della; Sousa, Ezilmara Leonor Rolim

    2013-08-01

    One of the goals of endodontic treatment is the adequate filling of the root canal,which is often done using gutta-percha and sealer. It has been reported that sealer remnants in the coronary pulp chamber cause tooth color changes. Therefore, this study was designed to examine the effect of endodontic sealer remnants on tooth color, testing the hypothesis that sealers cause coronal color changes. Forty single-rooted human teeth were endodontically treated leaving excess sealer material in the coronary pulp chamber. The specimens were divided into four groups (n = 10) according to the endodontic sealer used (AH, AH Plus; EF, Endofill; EN,endome´ thasoneN; and S26, Sealer 26). Teeth were stored at 37 8C moist environment.Color coordinates (L*a*b*) were measured with a spectrophotometer before endodontic treatment(baseline-control), 24 h and 6 months after treatment. L*a*b* values were used to calculate color changes (DE). Data were statistically analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney-U tests. Color changes were observed for all groups with S26 and EN producing the greatest mean DE values after 6 months. Endodontic sealer remnants affect tooth color confirming the experimental hypothesis. This study examined the effect of endodontic sealer remnants on tooth color, and observed that after 6 months, the sealers produced unacceptable color changes. 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Bevarage consumption during television viewing and tooth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The study assessed the television (TV) viewing habits, preferred energy and acidic drinks consumed when watching television and the history of tooth sensitivity among adolescents who watched television >2 hours daily (HTV) and <2 hour daily. (LTV). Subjects and Methods: This is a descriptive study conducted in Ife ...

  19. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dentist Your Family's Oral Health About the AGD Dental care and oral health information you need from the Academy of General Dentistry Tuesday, March 13, 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference ... Learn what those dental words mean. The Life of a Tooth Home | ...

  20. Age effect on orthodontic tooth movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Yijin

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of age on the efficiency of orthodontic tooth movement based on critical literature reviews, studies on a standardized orthodontic animal model and a non-invasive clinical investigation. A systematic review was performed on the optimum force for

  1. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Posture! Learn what those dental words mean. The Life of a Tooth Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | RSS About AGD | Contact AGD | Site Map | Reprints and Permissions | Privacy Statement | Terms and Conditions © 1996-2018 Academy of General Dentistry. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health Check Menstrual Calendar for Tooth Extraction The History ... Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | RSS About AGD | Contact AGD | Site Map | Reprints ...

  3. Death in the life of a tooth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matalová, Eva; Tucker, A. S.; Sharpe, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 1 (2004), s. 11-16 ISSN 0022-0345 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP204/02/P112 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : apoptosis * tooth development Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 3.131, year: 2004

  4. Bleaching of the discolored traumatized tooth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jon E.; Kopperud, Siemen E.; Pallesen, Ulla

    2018-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the treatment of discolored traumatized teeth, most of them being non-vital and subsequently, endodontically treated. Tooth bleaching based upon hydrogen peroxide as the active agent, applied directly or produced in a chemical reaction from sodium perborate or carbamide pe...

  5. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

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    Full Text Available ... information you need from the Academy of General Dentistry Monday, April 16, 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick ... Joint Disorder Is My Child at Risk for Early Childhood Tooth Decay? The History of Dental Advances Learn what those dental words ...

  6. Restoration of the endodontically treated posterior tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Polesel

    2014-06-01

    Results and conclusions: Direct adhesive restorations, indirect bonded restorations and traditional full crown are three therapeutic options for the single posterior endodontically treated teeth. The amount of remaining sound tooth structure is the most significant factor influencing the therapeutic approach. The clinician's operative skill is a determining aspect for long-term success of adhesive inlays.

  7. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... friv Home InfoBites Find an AGD Dentist Your Family's Oral Health About the AGD Dental care and ... a Tooth Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | RSS About AGD | Contact AGD | Site ...

  8. Computed tomography to quantify tooth abrasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofmehl, Lukas; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Filippi, Andreas; Hotz, Gerhard; Berndt-Dagassan, Dorothea; Kramis, Simon; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2010-09-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography, also termed digital volume tomography, has become a standard technique in dentistry, allowing for fast 3D jaw imaging including denture at moderate spatial resolution. More detailed X-ray images of restricted volumes for post-mortem studies in dental anthropology are obtained by means of micro computed tomography. The present study evaluates the impact of the pipe smoking wear on teeth morphology comparing the abraded tooth with its contra-lateral counterpart. A set of 60 teeth, loose or anchored in the jaw, from 12 dentitions have been analyzed. After the two contra-lateral teeth were scanned, one dataset has been mirrored before the two datasets were registered using affine and rigid registration algorithms. Rigid registration provides three translational and three rotational parameters to maximize the overlap of two rigid bodies. For the affine registration, three scaling factors are incorporated. Within the present investigation, affine and rigid registrations yield comparable values. The restriction to the six parameters of the rigid registration is not a limitation. The differences in size and shape between the tooth and its contra-lateral counterpart generally exhibit only a few percent in the non-abraded volume, validating that the contralateral tooth is a reasonable approximation to quantify, for example, the volume loss as the result of long-term clay pipe smoking. Therefore, this approach allows quantifying the impact of the pipe abrasion on the internal tooth morphology including root canal, dentin, and enamel volumes.

  9. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... friv Home InfoBites Find an AGD Dentist Your Family's Oral Health About the AGD Dental care and ... a Tooth Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | Newsroom | RSS About AGD | Contact AGD | ...

  10. Cigarette smoking, tooth brushing characteristics, and perceived ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted among four hundred non-dental undergraduates of University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria to assess the prevalence of cigarette smoking, tooth brushing characteristics, perceived efficacy in oral self-care and preventing gingivodental diseases among them. The result showed that the perceived ...

  11. Recent Approaches in Tooth Engineering Research

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švandová, Eva; Veselá, Barbora; Křivánek, J.; Hampl, A.; Matalová, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 60, Suppl 1 (2014), s. 21-29 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/11/1418; GA MZd(CZ) NT11420 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : engineering * tooth * stem cells * culture techniques Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2014

  12. Early Onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The clinical signs and genetic analysis of early-onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT in a 2-year-old boy and members of his family are reported from the Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, and Sophia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

  13. Dentigerous cyst in primary dentition: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passi S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentigerous cyst is a developmental odontogenic cyst, which apparently develops by accumulation of fluid between the reduced enamel epithelium and the tooth crown of an unerupted tooth. There is usually no pain or discomfort associated with the cyst unless there is acute inflammatory exacerbation. Management of dentigerous cyst in primary dentition needs special consideration regarding the preservation of the developing permanent tooth buds. Here, we report a case of dentigerous cyst in primary dentition in a 10-year-old male patient and its management.

  14. Relative cheek-tooth size in Australopithecus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, H M

    1984-07-01

    Until the discovery of Australopithecus afarensis, cheek-tooth megadontia was unequivocally one of the defining characteristics of the australopithecine grade in human evolution along with bipedalism and small brains. This species, however, has an average postcanine area of 757 mm2, which is more like Homo habilis (759 mm2) than A. africanus (856 mm2). But what is its relative cheek-tooth size in comparison to body size? One approach to this question is to compare postcanine tooth area to estimated body weight. By this method all Australopithecus species are megadont: they have cheek teeth 1.7 to 2.3 times larger than modern hominoids of similar body size. The series from A. afarensis to A. africanus to A. robustus to A. boisei shows strong positive allometry indicating increasing megadontia through time. The series from H. habilis to H. erectus to H. sapiens shows strong negative allometry which implies a sharp reduction in the relative size of the posterior teeth. Postcanine megadontia in Australopithecus species can also be demonstrated by comparing tooth size and body size in associated skeletons: A. afarensis (represented by A.L. 288-1) has a cheek-tooth size 2.8 times larger than expected from modern hominoids; A. africanus (Sts 7) and A. robustus (TM 1517) are over twice the expected size. The evolutionary transition from the megadont condition of Australopithecus to the trend of decreasing megadontia seen in the Homo lineage may have occurred between 3.0 and 2.5 m.y. from A. afarensis to H.habilis but other evidence indicates that it is more likely to have occurred between 2.5 to 2.0 m.y. from an A. africanus-like form to H. habilis.

  15. Association of dietary habits and parental-reported sleep tooth grinding with tooth wear in children with mixed dentition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Restrepo, C.; Manfredini, D.; Manrique, R.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tooth wear has a multifactorial etiology, thus it should be assessed within a multiple-variable framework. The objective of this investigation was to assess the association of dietary habits and parental-reported sleep tooth grinding (STG) with tooth wear in children with mixed

  16. Multilobed mesiodens: a supernumerary tooth with unusual morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Bhavna; Patel, Jalark; Swadas, Milan; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-02-06

    An 8-year-old boy came with a chief complaint of an abnormally shaped tooth situated in upper front teeth region. On examination a supernumerary tooth with multiple lobes was present palatally to the maxillary right permanent central incisor. The morphology of the tooth crown was found to be unusual due to the presence of five lobes in the crown portion. Because of the supernumerary tooth, the permanent right central incisor was displaced labially. Radiographic examination showed a completely formed supernumerary tooth with dilacerated root. On the basis of clinical and radiographic examination, the supernumerary tooth was diagnosed as multilobed mesiodens. Since patient expressed dissatisfaction with the presence of supernumerary tooth, it was decided to extract this mesiodens followed by orthodontic treatment for alignment of labially placed maxillary right permanent central incisor.

  17. Molariform mesiodens in primary dentition: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indira, Md; Dhull, Kanika Singh; R, Sujatha; Kumar Ps, Praveen; Devi Bm, Gayatri

    2014-05-01

    A supernumerary tooth is a developmental anomaly and it has been argued to arise from multiple aetiologies. Mesiodens is a midline supernumerary tooth which is commonly seen in the maxillary arch, and incidence of molariform mesiodens in the maxillary midline is rare in permanent dentition and extremely uncommon in primary dentition. A midline supernumerary tooth in the primary dentition can cause an ectopic or a delayed eruption of permanent central incisors, which will further alter occlusion and may compromise aesthetics and formation of dentigerous cysts. This paper reports a rare case which had the presence of a molariform mesiodens in the primary dentition. The treatment plan consisted of extraction of the supernumerary tooth and regular observation of permanent central incisors for proper eruption and alignment.

  18. The efficacy of chlorhexidine dentifrice or gel on plaque, clinical parameters of gingival inflammation and tooth discoloration: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, D.E.; Berchier, C.E.; Addy, M.; van der Velden, U.; van der Weijden, G.A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Based on the existing scientific literature, the effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) dentifrice/gel as compared to a regular or placebo dentifrice/gel is established in healthy adults on the primary outcome parameters of plaque and gingivitis scores. As secondary parameter, tooth surface discoloration

  19. Large scale study of tooth enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodart, F.; Deconninck, G.; Martin, M.T.

    Human tooth enamel contains traces of foreign elements. The presence of these elements is related to the history and the environment of the human body and can be considered as the signature of perturbations which occur during the growth of a tooth. A map of the distribution of these traces on a large scale sample of the population will constitute a reference for further investigations of environmental effects. On hundred eighty samples of teeth were first analyzed using PIXE, backscattering and nuclear reaction techniques. The results were analyzed using statistical methods. Correlations between O, F, Na, P, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb and Sr were observed and cluster analysis was in progress. The techniques described in the present work have been developed in order to establish a method for the exploration of very large samples of the Belgian population. (author)

  20. Tooth structure and fracture strength of cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondelli, José; Sene, Fábio; Ramos, Renata Pereira

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated, in vitro, the loss of tooth substance after cavity preparation for direct and indirect restorations and its relationship with fracture strength of the prepared teeth. Sixty sound human maxillary first premolars were assigned to 6 groups (n=10). MOD direct composite cavities......) or 1/2 (Groups III and VI) of the intercuspal distance. Teeth were weighed (digital balance accurate to 0.001 g) before and after preparation to record tooth substance mass lost during cavity preparation. The prepared teeth were submitted to occlusal loading to determine their fracture strength using...... a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (alpha= 0.05). 1/4-inlay cavities had higher percent mean mass loss (9.71%) than composite resin cavities with the same width (7.07%). 1/3-inlay preparations also produced higher percent mean...

  1. Tooth mobility changes subsequent to root fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg; Tsilingaridis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth mobility changes in root-fractured permanent teeth and relate this to type of interfragment healing (hard tissue healing (HT), interfragment healing with periodontal ligament (PDL) and nonhealing with interposition of granulation tissue (GT) because...... of pulp necrosis in the coronal fragment. Furthermore, the effect of age, location of the fracture on the root, and observation period on mobility values was analyzed. Mobility values were measured for 44 of 95 previous reported root-fractured permanent incisors. Mobility changes were measured...... with a Mühlemanns periodontometer and noninjured incisors served as controls. The mobility values represented the labial-lingual excursion of the root measured in μm when the tooth received a frontal and a palatal impact of 100 g force. In 18 cases of hard tissue healing (HT), a slightly increased mobility was seen...

  2. Autotransplantation of maxillary second premolars to mandibular recipient sites where the primary second molars were impacted, predisposes for complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bokelund, Mette; Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate whether ankylosis of a transplanted permanent tooth can be predicted based on an evaluation of the primary and permanent dentitions.......The aim of the study was to elucidate whether ankylosis of a transplanted permanent tooth can be predicted based on an evaluation of the primary and permanent dentitions....

  3. Influence of personality on tooth shade selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralur, Satheesh B; Al-Shehri, Khalid Saleh; Assiri, Hassan Mohammed; Al-Qahtani, Mushabab AbdulRahman

    2016-01-01

    The harmonious shade matching of restorations with adjacent natural teeth is a prerequisite for a successful esthetic restoration. Color is a combined effect of the physical properties of an object, the light source, and the perception of the observer. The interpretation of color is influenced by both the physiological and psychological health of an individual. It is critical to understand the influence of an individual's psychological state on the shade selection procedure to achieve better shade matching and post-treatment patient counseling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of personality on tooth shade selection capability. Two porcelain fused to metal (PFM) discs were fabricated. A reference shade was determined using a spectrophotometer (Vita Easyshade, Vita). The personalities of volunteers were identified using a Myers- Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) questionnaire. The volunteers visually identified the shade of the two PFM discs under a controlled light source. The mean color difference was determined between the visual and the spectrophotometer values. The data thus obtained was statistically analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and post-hoc comparison tests to ascertain the difference between the groups. The groups that performed better in tooth shade selection were ENTJ (2.923 ± 2.36), ISTJ (3.086 ± 2.56), ENFJ (3.197 ± 2.936), and ESTJ (3.431± 2.78). The groups INTP (9.383 ± 3.30), ISTP (9.133 ± 3.44), ISFP (8.737 ± 2.81), and INTJ (8.480 ± 3.35) showed poor tooth shade selection ability. The Kruskal- Wallis test showed lower mean rank for group ENTJ (89.75), followed by ISTJ (92.25), and ENFJ (94.80). Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that there was a statistically significant difference between the different personalities with regard to tooth shade selection ability.

  4. Surgical Tooth Implants, Combat and Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-11-15

    were fabricated from Reynolds RC-HP-DBM alumina, bisque ground and sintered. The surface finish was also ground and sintered. Flexural strenghts average...firing preform rods at 11200C for 2 hours (3) Contour grinding tooth roots (roots were made in 1 millimeter sizes from 4 x 4 to 8 x 10) (4) Hand ...placed in a low-speed contra-angle air turbine hand - piece with sterile saline cooling. Over the period of clinical study, a series of specialized

  5. Tooth surface treatment strategies for adhesive cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Nadja; Fischer, Jens

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tooth surface pre-treatment steps on shear bond strength, which is essential for understanding the adhesive cementation process. Shear bond strengths of different cements with various tooth surface treatments (none, etching, priming, or etching and priming) on enamel and dentin of human teeth were measured using the Swiss shear test design. Three adhesives (Permaflo DC, Panavia F 2.0, and Panavia V5) and one self-adhesive cement (Panavia SA plus) were included in this study. The interface of the cement and the tooth surface with the different pre-treatments was analyzed using SEM. pH values of the cements and primers were measured. The highest bond strength values for all cements were achieved with etching and primer on enamel (25.6 ± 5.3 - 32.3 ± 10.4 MPa). On dentin, etching and priming produced the highest bond strength values for all cements (8.6 ± 2.9 - 11.7 ± 3.5 MPa) except for Panavia V5, which achieved significantly higher bond strengths when pre-treated with primer only (15.3 ± 4.1 MPa). Shear bond strength values were correlated with the micro-retentive surface topography of enamel and the tag length on dentin except for Panavia V5, which revealed the highest bond strength with primer application only without etching, resulting in short but sturdy tags. The highest bond strength can be achieved for Panavia F 2.0, Permaflo DC, and Panavia SA plus when the tooth substrate is previously etched and the respective primer is applied. The new cement Panavia V5 displayed low technique-sensitivity and attained significantly higher adhesion of all tested cements to dentin when only primer was applied.

  6. Clear aligners generations and orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Joe; Al-Awadhi, Ebrahim A

    2016-03-01

    Clear aligner technology has evolved over the last 15 years, with these appliances continually being modified to increase the range of tooth movements that they can achieve. However, there is very little clinical research available to show how these appliances achieve their results. This article describes the different generations of clear aligners that are available and highlights their use. However, until more clinical research becomes available, aligners cannot be routinely prescribed as an effective alternative to fixed labial appliances.

  7. Diagnostic challenges of neuropathic tooth pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matwychuk, Michael J

    2004-09-01

    This article presents the clinical characteristics, epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of 2 neuropathic conditions: trigeminal neuralgia and atypical odontalgia. A case report highlights the complexities involved in diagnosing neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain is chronic, diverse in quality, difficult to localize and it occurs in the absence of obvious pathology. To avoid multiple, ineffective dental treatments, general practitioners must be familiar with the signs of nonodontogenic sources of tooth pain.

  8. Diagnosing, managing, and preventing cracked tooth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Edward F; Bartoloni, Joseph A

    2012-01-01

    Cracked tooth syndrome (CTS) can be a perplexing disorder to diagnose and manage. Many practitioners wonder whether the latest dental materials and adhesives can or should be used when restoring these teeth. The authors reviewed the literature and developed recommendations for how to diagnose and manage CTS and prevent it in susceptible teeth. As the population continues to age and people retain their teeth longer, it is anticipated that patients will present even more frequently with symptoms of CTS.

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of the cracked tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, K; Youngson, C C

    1997-09-01

    This review paper discusses the recognised factors which predispose to cracked-tooth syndrome. In addition, common presenting symptoms and the various methods to aid clinical diagnosis of this problem are examined. The incidence of the condition is reported and the prognosis of the various forms of fracture, as suggested by clinical presentation, are outlined with reference to the available literature. Benefits and relative demerits of traditional and more modern treatment options are presented and recommendations made for future research.

  10. Caspase-7 in molar tooth development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matalová, Eva; Vanden Berghe, T.; Švandová, Eva; Vandenabeele, P.; Healy, C.; Sharpe, P. T.; Tucker, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 11 (2012), s. 1474-1481 ISSN 0003-9969 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600450904 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP502/12/1285 Program:GA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : tooth * apoptosis * mineralisation Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 1.549, year: 2012

  11. Tooth damage in captive orcas (Orcinus orca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jett, John; Visser, Ingrid N; Ventre, Jeffrey; Waltz, Jordan; Loch, Carolina

    2017-12-01

    Tooth damage as a result of oral stereotypies is evident in captive orca, yet little research on the topic exists. This study examines the associations between dental pathology, sex, facility, duration of captivity and other factors in captive orca. We evaluated mandibular and maxillary teeth from dental images of 29 captive orca owned by a US-based theme park. Each tooth was scored for coronal wear, wear at or below gum line and bore holes. Fractured and missing teeth were also noted. Summary statistics described the distribution and severity of pathologies; inferential statistics examined how pathologies differed between sexes, between wild-captured and captive-born orcas and between captive orca at four facilities. We also evaluated how dental pathology and duration of captivity were related. Approximately 24% of whales exhibited "major" to "extreme" mandibular coronal tooth wear, with coronal wear and wear at or below gum line highly correlated. More than 60% of mandibular teeth 2 and 3 exhibited fractures. Bore holes were observed primarily among anterior mandibular teeth, with more than 61% of teeth 2 and 3 bearing evidence of having been drilled. Four of five orca with the highest age-adjusted tooth pathology indices were captive-born. Various dental pathologies were observed across all whales, with pathologies beginning at a young age. Oral stereotypies exhibited by captive orca contributed to the observed dental damage. By making dental and health records of captive whales publicly available, the theme park industry is uniquely positioned to provide further insight into dental pathology and resultant health consequences in captive orca. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional Tooth Regeneration Using a Bioengineered Tooth Unit as a Mature Organ Replacement Regenerative Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Aya; Ogawa, Miho; Yasukawa, Masato; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Morita, Ritsuko; Ikeda, Etsuko; Nakao, Kazuhisa; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Kasugai, Shohei; Saito, Masahiro; Tsuji, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Donor organ transplantation is currently an essential therapeutic approach to the replacement of a dysfunctional organ as a result of disease, injury or aging in vivo. Recent progress in the area of regenerative therapy has the potential to lead to bioengineered mature organ replacement in the future. In this proof of concept study, we here report a further development in this regard in which a bioengineered tooth unit comprising mature tooth, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, was successfully transplanted into a properly-sized bony hole in the alveolar bone through bone integration by recipient bone remodeling in a murine transplantation model system. The bioengineered tooth unit restored enough the alveolar bone in a vertical direction into an extensive bone defect of murine lower jaw. Engrafted bioengineered tooth displayed physiological tooth functions such as mastication, periodontal ligament function for bone remodeling and responsiveness to noxious stimulations. This study thus represents a substantial advance and demonstrates the real potential for bioengineered mature organ replacement as a next generation regenerative therapy. PMID:21765896

  13. Tooth Wear Inclination in Great Ape Molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight-Sadler, Jordan; Fiorenza, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Primate dietary diversity is reflected in their dental morphology, with differences in size and shape of teeth. In particular, the tooth wear angle can provide insight into a species' ability to break down certain foods. To examine dietary and masticatory information, digitized polygon models of dental casts provide a basis for quantitative analysis of wear associated with tooth attrition. In this study, we analyze and compare the wear patterns of Pongo pygmaeus, Gorilla gorillagorilla and Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii lower molars, focusing on the degree of inclination of specific wear facets. The variation in wear angles appears to be indicative of jaw movements and the specific stresses imposed on food during mastication, reflecting thus the ecology of these species. Orangutans exhibit flatter wear angles, more typical of a diet consisting of hard and brittle foods, while gorillas show a wear pattern with a high degree of inclination, reflecting thus their more leafy diet. Chimpanzees, on the other hand, show intermediate inclinations, a pattern that could be related to their highly variable diet. This method is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for better understanding the relationship between food, mastication and tooth wear processes in living primates, and can be potentially used to reconstruct the diet of fossil species. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Efficacy of gallium in tooth loss prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksić Milena D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Over the past three decades, gallium compounds have gained importance in medicine. Radioactive gallium and stable gallium nitrate are used as diagnostic and therapeutic agents in cancer and disorders of calcium and bone metabolism. In addition, gallium compounds have displayed anti inflammatory and immunosuppressive activity in animal models of human diseases. More recent studies have shown that gallium compounds may also function as antimicrobial agents. In the review, the potential application of gallium in the future treatment of periodontitis and prevention of tooth loss will be discussed. Gingival inflammation, bacterial infection, alveolar bone destruction and subsequent tooth loss are characteristic features of periodontal disease. Surgical techniques, mechanical debridement of the denuded root surface, and local or systemic application of antimicrobial agents are currently used treatments for periodontitis. However, the development of antibiotic resistance in bacteria has prompted a great need for new and alternative treatment methods for infection. Conclusion: The potential anti-periodontitis benefits of gallium are related to eradicating infection due to bacterial biofilms, increasing bone deposition and downregulating unwanted immune responses. Adjunctive use of gallium laser therapy with mechanical instrumentation in combination with gallium-containing gingival gels, toothpastes and mouth rinses may represent the final solutions for tooth loss prevention.

  15. Iatrogenic traumatic brain injury during tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troxel, Mark

    2015-01-01

    An 8 yr old spayed female Yorkshire terrier was referred for evaluation of progressive neurological signs after a routine dental prophylaxis with tooth extractions. The patient was circling to the left and blind in the right eye with right hemiparesis. Neurolocalization was to the left forebrain. MRI revealed a linear tract extending from the caudal oropharynx, through the left retrobulbar space and frontal lobe, into the left parietal lobe. A small skull fracture was identified in the frontal bone through which the linear tract passed. Those findings were consistent with iatrogenic trauma from slippage of a dental elevator during extraction of tooth 210. The dog was treated empirically with clindamycin. The patient regained most of its normal neurological function within the first 4 mo after the initial injury. Although still not normal, the dog has a good quality of life. Traumatic brain injury is a rarely reported complication of extraction. Care must be taken while performing dental cleaning and tooth extraction, especially of the maxillary premolar and molar teeth to avoid iatrogenic damage to surrounding structures.

  16. Tooth loss in 776 treated periodontal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John A; Page, Roy C; Loeb, Carl F; Levi, Paul A

    2010-02-01

    The most common form of periodontitis is a variably progressive dynamic pathologic process that causes attachment loss, destroys the alveolar bone supporting a tooth, and terminates with tooth loss. We evaluated the loss of teeth of treated periodontal patients categorized by severity and risk. Each of nine periodontists evaluated 100 consecutive periodontal maintenance patients. The disease severity and risk level were determined from data at the initial examination. The number of teeth lost was determined from data at the initial and maintenance visits. A stepwise regression analysis showed that disease (P = 0.0000478) and risk (P = 0.00129) scores predicted the mean tooth loss rate. The adjusted R(2) statistic was 88.56%. The ordinal logistic regression model showed that only the disease score (P periodontal patient. The disease score can be used to establish a criterion and target for care. For example, treatment can result in nearly no lost teeth when the severity is low, and this benefit is lost when the severity is high. The disease score provides an objective means to quickly determine severity. An increase in the disease score provides evidence that a new treatment plan is needed. Therefore, the effect of the routine use of the disease score could result in fewer patients with severe disease and reduce the number of teeth lost.

  17. [Tooth brushing in babies and toddlers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot-Nievaart, M A; Veerkamp, J S J

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate tooth brushing in toddlers and children younger than 4 years of age and the experiences of their parents. This study was performed in 3 towns in the middle of the Netherlands at the Office for Parent and Childcare. 99.4% of the children were brushed at least once a day during 0.5-1 minute. Tooth brushing is considered as a part of daily health care. Most children are cooperative and their parents enjoy brushing the teeth of their children. 17.5% of all parents experience problems with brushing teeth of their toddler or young child; 46% of them would like more information. But as the total number of children in a family increases, the parents' pleasure in brushing decreases. The Office for Parent and Childcare in the Netherlands has an important place in providing information on oral healthcare and especially tooth brushing for toddlers and children younger than 4 years of age. It would be useful to investigate how these healthcare workers get their dental information.

  18. Vital tooth bleaching with Nightguard vital bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, V B; Robinson, F G

    1997-01-01

    Between July 1994 and May 1996, several landmark articles were published concerning the safety and efficacy of vital tooth bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide in a customfitted tray. The American Dental Association (ADA) published guidelines for ADA acceptance, and three products received approval. Long-term clinical trials on 38 patients indicated 92% successful bleaching after 6 weeks of treatment. Results were stable in 74% of the patients at 1.5 years, and in 62% of the patients at 3-year follow-up with no further treatment. Clinical pulpal studies and periodontal studies indicated no detrimental safety problems, although some laboratory cell studies suggested concerns. The noncarcinogenic potential of 10% carbamide peroxide was established in animal studies. Successful bleaching of tetracycline-stained teeth was achieved after 6 months of treatment, with no tooth problems detected clinically or by scanning electron micrograph. Extended treatment times are effective on other stains from dentinogenesis imperfecta or nicotine. On insertion in the mouth, 10% carbamide peroxide elevated the pH in the tray and saliva. After 4 hours of clinical wear, over 60% of the newer, thicker materials (Opalescence [Ultraclent Products, South Jordon, UT] and Platinum [Colgate Oral Pharmaceuticals, Canton, MA]) was present and active in the tray. Nightguard vital bleaching seems to be the most cost-efficient, user-friendly, patient-accepted method of bleaching teeth available to the profession and is safe and effective. Over-the-counter products can have harmful effects on tooth structure and may not lighten teeth.

  19. Orthodontic tooth movement with clear aligners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Carl T; McGorray, Susan P; Dolce, Calogero; Nair, Madhu; Wheeler, Timothy T

    2012-01-01

    Clear aligners provide a convenient model to measure orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). We examined the role of in vivo aligner material fatigue and subject-specific factors in tooth movement. Fifteen subjects seeking orthodontic treatment at the University of Florida were enrolled. Results were compared with data previously collected from 37 subjects enrolled in a similar protocol. Subjects were followed prospectively for eight weeks. An upper central incisor was programmed to move 0.5 mm. every two weeks using clear aligners. A duplicate aligner was provided for the second week of each cycle. Weekly polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impressions were taken, and digital models were fabricated to measure OTM. Initial and final cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained to characterize OTM. Results were compared to data from a similar protocol, where subjects received a new aligner biweekly. No significant difference was found in the amount of OTM between the two groups, with mean total OTM of 1.11 mm. (standard deviation (SD) 0.30) and 1.07 mm. (SD 0.33) for the weekly aligner and biweekly control groups, respectively (P = 0.72). Over eight weeks, in two-week intervals, material fatigue does not play a significant role in the rate or amount of tooth movement.

  20. A Radiographic Study of Fused and Geminated Tooth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chul Jae; Lee, Sang Rae [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Kyunhee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-02-15

    The incidence and several characteristic features of fused and geminated teeth were studied radiographically, with full mouth periapical radiogram and pantomogram, in 4201 patients of mixed dentition and 5358 patients of permanent dentition. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The prevalence was revealed to 2.86%, 0.32%, 0.33%, and 0.06% in deciduous fused tooth, permanent fused tooth, deciduous geminated tooth and permanent geminated tooth respectively, and these anomalies were occurred in female more than male. 2. Fused teeth were observed predominantly in lower anterior teeth area, especially in lateral incisor and canine region, and many cases of deciduous geminated tooth were observed in upper central incisor region. 3. Congenital missing rates of succedaneous tooth in deciduous fused teeth were 57.1%, 85.7%, 71.0%, 69.0% in upper right and left central-lateral incisor regions, lower right and left lateral incisor-canine regions, respectively. 4. Prevalence of dental caries was 42.3%, 18.8% and 5.6% in deciduous fused, deciduous geminated and permanent fused tooth, respectively. 5. In classifying of fused and geminated teeth into 9 type, by following appearance such as number of crown, root, pulp chamber and pulp canal of those teeth, it was more favorable that Type I (2 crown, 2 root, 2 pulp chamber, 2 pulp canal) in deciduous fused tooth and Type IX (1 crown, 1 root, 1 pulp chamber, 1 pulp canal) in permanent used tooth, deciduous and permanent geminated tooth.

  1. A Radiographic Study of Fused and Geminated Tooth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chul Jae; Lee, Sang Rae

    1990-01-01

    The incidence and several characteristic features of fused and geminated teeth were studied radiographically, with full mouth periapical radiogram and pantomogram, in 4201 patients of mixed dentition and 5358 patients of permanent dentition. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The prevalence was revealed to 2.86%, 0.32%, 0.33%, and 0.06% in deciduous fused tooth, permanent fused tooth, deciduous geminated tooth and permanent geminated tooth respectively, and these anomalies were occurred in female more than male. 2. Fused teeth were observed predominantly in lower anterior teeth area, especially in lateral incisor and canine region, and many cases of deciduous geminated tooth were observed in upper central incisor region. 3. Congenital missing rates of succedaneous tooth in deciduous fused teeth were 57.1%, 85.7%, 71.0%, 69.0% in upper right and left central-lateral incisor regions, lower right and left lateral incisor-canine regions, respectively. 4. Prevalence of dental caries was 42.3%, 18.8% and 5.6% in deciduous fused, deciduous geminated and permanent fused tooth, respectively. 5. In classifying of fused and geminated teeth into 9 type, by following appearance such as number of crown, root, pulp chamber and pulp canal of those teeth, it was more favorable that Type I (2 crown, 2 root, 2 pulp chamber, 2 pulp canal) in deciduous fused tooth and Type IX (1 crown, 1 root, 1 pulp chamber, 1 pulp canal) in permanent used tooth, deciduous and permanent geminated tooth.

  2. [Study on the appropriate parameters of automatic full crown tooth preparation for dental tooth preparation robot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, F S; Wang, Y; Zhang, Y P; Sun, Y C; Wang, D X; Lyu, P J

    2017-05-09

    Objective: To further study the most suitable parameters for automatic full crown preparation using oral clinical micro robot. Its purpose is to improve the quality of automated tooth preparing for the system and to lay the foundation for clinical application. Methods: Twenty selected artificial resin teeth were used as sample teeth. The micro robot automatic tooth preparation system was used in dental clinic to control the picosecond laser beam to complete two dimensional cutting on the resin tooth sample according to the motion planning path. Using the laser scanning measuring microscope, each layer of cutting depth values was obtained and the average value was calculated. The monolayer cutting depth was determined. The three-dimensional (3D) data of the target resin teeth was obtained using internal scanner, and the CAD data of full-crown tooth preparation was designed by CAD self-develged software. According to the depth of the single layer, 11 complete resin teeth in phantom head were automatically prepared by the robot controlling the laser focused spot in accordance with the layer-cutting way. And the accuracy of resin tooth preparation was evaluated with the software. Using the same method, monolayer cutting depth parameter for cutting dental hard tissue was obtained. Then 15 extracted mandibular and maxillary first molars went through automatic full crown tooth preparation. And the 3D data of tooth preparations were obtained with intra oral scanner. The software was used to evaluate the accuracy of tooth preparation. Results: The results indicated that the single cutting depth of cutting resin teeth and in vitro teeth by picosecond laser were (60.0±2.6) and (45.0±3.6) μm, respectively. Using the tooth preparation robot, 11 artificial resin teeth and 15 complete natural teeth were automatically prepared, and the average time were (13.0±0.7), (17.0±1.8) min respectively. Through software evaluation, the average preparation depth of the occlusal surface

  3. Age estimation in older adults: Use of pulp/tooth ratios calculated from tooth sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ortenzio, Lori; Prowse, Tracy; Inskip, Michael; Kahlon, Bonnie; Brickley, Megan

    2018-03-01

    Accurate age estimates are foundational for bioarchaeological research, yet the ability to accurately age older adult skeletons remains elusive. This study uses a new version of pulp/tooth area calculations to investigate chronological age of older archaeological individuals. Pulp/tooth area ratios were calculated on modern control teeth (n = 10) that were first radiographed and then sectioned for comparative analysis. Pulp/tooth area ratios were determined on sectioned teeth using ImageJ software for: (a) modern individuals of known age (n = 26); (b) individuals from Belleville, Ontario, Canada (1821-1874) with documented age (n = 50); and (c) Belleville individuals with skeletally estimated age (n = 122). Calculations from tooth sections on modern teeth (n = 10) resulted in a mean absolute error (MAE) of ±3.9 years, whereas the radiographic method for the same teeth had an MAE of ±14.45 years. Results indicate that sectioned pulp/tooth area ratios are a significant predictor of chronological age (p age estimations between modern and archaeological individuals, or with respect to tooth type, sex, or intra/inter-observer estimations. This study provides a new more accurate method for estimating age-at-death, particularly for individuals in the 50+ age category. Sectioning the teeth and directly measuring exposed pulp chambers results in age estimations that were within ±4.15 years for both modern and archaeological individuals, thus presenting a method that will enhance the ability to age older individuals. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. [Development of a screening scale for children at risk of baby bottle tooth decay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadra-Eid, J; Baudet, D; Fourny, M; Sellier, E; Brun, C; François, P

    2012-03-01

    Baby bottle tooth decay is a severe form of early childhood caries. This study aims to elaborate a screening tool for at risk children in order to facilitate primary prevention. A case-control study was conducted among children suffering from baby bottle tooth decay and children with no dental caries. Cases were children aged 5 years or less at diagnosis who experienced at least four caries with one or more affecting maxillary incisors. Controls were children matched for age and sex. Parents were interviewed by phone about their child's exposure to potential risk factors. We included 88 children suffering from baby bottle tooth decay and 88 children with no dental caries. In multivariate analysis, low social class (OR 6.39 [95% CI, 1.45-28.11]), prolonged bottle feeding or bedtime feeding (OR 153.2 [95% CI, 11.77-1994.96]), and snacking (OR 5.94 [95% CI, 1.35-26.2]) were significantly associated with baby bottle tooth decay. Regular dental visits were a significant protecting factor (OR 0.13 [95% CI, 0.02-0.77]). A score was developed using these significant risk factors and tested on the survey population. The mean score was 13/20 for cases and 4/20 for controls. These results are in accordance with the literature, except for brushing teeth, which was not significantly associated with baby bottle tooth decay in our study. A screening scale with a score of 20 points was proposed. Future validation is required. Pediatricians and general practitioners should encourage parents to change their habits. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Parental Attitudes and Tooth Brushing Habits in Preschool Children in Mangalore, Karnataka: A Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullishery, Fawaz; Shenoy Panchmal, Ganesh; Shenoy, Rekha

    2013-09-01

    Adoption of consistent behavioral habits in childhood takes place at home, with the parents especially the mother, being the primary model for behavior. Tooth brushing habits which is learnt during early years of life, is deeply ingrained in the child's mind and it is expected that this leads to an adaptation of good oral hygiene in their later life. To assess the tooth brushing habits of preschool children and to determine the role and amount of supervision given to them by parents. A pretested self-designed questionnaire was used to collect information from parents of 130 preschool children in Anganwadi and Kindergarten in Mangalore. Statistical analysis was done and Chi-square test was used. Tooth brushing habits in these children was started at a mean age of 22.4 months (SD 8.4).62% of the preschool children used toothbrush and toothpaste for cleaning teeth and brushing habits were mainly (84%) introduced by mothers. Seventy-one percent of the children were cooperative when they were introduced to tooth brushing. Preschool children of Mangalore were introduced to tooth brushing at a mean age of 22.4 months. Mothers played a vital role in introducing and teaching the child how to brush. In children less than 10 months of age tooth brushing was not started at all. How to cite this article: Pullishery F, Panchmal GS, Shenoy R. Parental Attitudes and Tooth Brushing Habits in Preschool Children in Mangalore, Karnataka: A Cross-sectional Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(3):156-160.

  6. The interactions between attrition, abrasion and erosion in tooth wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellis, R Peter; Addy, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Tooth wear is the result of three processes: abrasion (wear produced by interaction between teeth and other materials), attrition (wear through tooth-tooth contact) and erosion (dissolution of hard tissue by acidic substances). A further process (abfraction) might potentiate wear by abrasion and/or erosion. Knowledge of these tooth wear processes and their interactions is reviewed. Both clinical and experimental observations show that individual wear mechanisms rarely act alone but interact with each other. The most important interaction is the potentiation of abrasion by erosive damage to the dental hard tissues. This interaction seems to be the major factor in occlusal and cervical wear. The available evidence is insufficient to establish whether abfraction is an important contributor to tooth wear in vivo. Saliva can modulate erosive/abrasive tooth wear, especially through formation of pellicle, but cannot prevent it. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. IBA analysis of a possible therapeutic ancient tooth inlay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, E.; Pineda, J. C.; Zavala, E. P.; Murillo, G.; Chavez, R.; Lazcurain, R.; Espinosa, Ma. L.; Villanueva, O.

    1998-03-01

    Five pre-Columbian human teeth from the same skeleton found during excavation in an ancient ceremonial center in Mexico, have been analyzed by two conventional Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) techniques: PIXE and 4He RBS. The anthropologists have estimated that the skeleton is about 2000 years old. X-ray radiography studies of one of these teeth have revealed that they contain an inlay in the tooth crown. The IBA methods have been used to study the inlay materials and also the tooth enamel. The IBA studies show that the tooth inlay materials have almost the same atomic composition as the tooth enamel. These results suggest that the tooth inlay were made for therapeutic purposes, using healthy tooth grains as inlay materials which were glued into the prepared teeth to fill it up.

  8. Endogenous and Exogenous Substances Influencing the Orthodontic Tooth Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Geçgelen Cesur

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic tooth movement occurs as a result of prolonged application of controlled mechanical forces. Recent studies have focused on the effects of systemic or local applications of medications and the intake of dietary supplements as well as the mechanical forces. Factors affecting the orthodontic tooth movement are parathyroid hormone, thyroid hormones, estrogen, vitamin D3, eicosanoids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, paracetamol, corticosteroids, bisphosphonates, cholesterol drugs, anticonvulsants, oral contraceptives, alcohol and nicotine use, nitric oxide, and fluoride. These medications have an important effect on the rate of tooth movement and treatment time. NSAIDs decrease tooth movement, but paracetamol has no effect. Parathyroid and thyroxin hormones increase tooth movement. Bisphosphonates have a strong inhibitory effect. Vitamin D3 stimulates tooth movement and dietary calcium seems to reduce it. It is important to discuss with patients about the consumption of these substances during orthodontic treatment.

  9. The cracked-tooth syndrome and fractured posterior cusp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, D E

    1976-06-01

    1. Even from such a small sample as that reported in this study, it is evident that the fractured cusp and cracked-tooth syndrome are common problems. The large number of fractured cusps compared to the cracked-tooth syndrome suggests that some of the cases of fractured cusp could have been diagnosed earlier. 2. It is most important that dentists be aware of the cracked-tooth syndrome in order to relieve the patient's discomfort, prevent the possible eventual loss of the pulp or tooth, and avoid unnecessary and possibly damaging treatment for misdiagnosed facial pain. 3. Conservation of tooth structure in restorative procedures is most necessary in order to prevent the cracked-tooth syndrome or fractured posterior cusp.

  10. Infrared light sensor applied to early detection of tooth decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjumea, Eberto; Espitia, José; Díaz, Leonardo; Torres, Cesar

    2017-08-01

    The approach dentistry to dental care is gradually shifting to a model focused on early detection and oral-disease prevention; one of the most important methods of prevention of tooth decay is opportune diagnosis of decay and reconstruction. The present study aimed to introduce a procedure for early diagnosis of tooth decay and to compare result of experiment of this method with other common treatments. In this setup, a laser emitting infrared light is injected in core of one bifurcated fiber-optic and conduced to tooth surface and with the same bifurcated fiber the radiation reflected for the same tooth is collected and them conduced to surface of sensor that measures thermal and light frequencies to detect early signs of decay below a tooth surface, where demineralization is difficult to spot with x-ray technology. This device will can be used to diagnose tooth decay without any chemicals and rays such as high power lasers or X-rays.

  11. Revascularization of an impacted, immature dilacerated permanent maxillary central incisor associated with odontoma and a supernumerary tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Subramaniam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To intentionally replant an impacted immature permanent maxillary central incisor in the mixed dentition period followed by revascularization in order to achieve apical root closure. A 9-year-old boy presented with retained maxillary left primary incisors. Radiographic evaluation revealed the presence of a supernumerary tooth and an odontoma associated with an impacted permanent maxillary left central incisor, having root dilaceration. Treatment included surgical removal of mesiodens and odontoma. The impacted dilacerated permanent central incisor was removed and intentionally replanted, followed by revascularization of pulp. During the follow-up, root end closure with narrowing of canal space was observed, patient has been asymptomatic and the tooth remains vital. Revascularization of the immature reimplanted tooth showed continued root development and thickening of the lateral dentinal walls through deposition of new hard tissue and narrowing of the canal space.

  12. Patients' experience of partial tooth loss and expectations to treatment: a qualitative study in Danish and Swedish patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øzhayat, Esben Boeskov; Åkerman, Sigvard; Lundegren, Nina

    2016-01-01

    social awareness, (iii) expectation to treatment, (iv) expectation to durability/survival, (v) coping strategies dealing with the tooth loss including explanations of the tooth loss and (vi) modifications to experienced impairment. The impairments were mostly experienced as problems in social settings......, indicating a high wish of the participants to explain their tooth loss and how they coped with it. In conclusion, a large degree of social impairment was found in the patient group along with several coping strategies. The impairments were modified by a number of factors indicating that highly individualised...... care and treatment is needed. A state of normality was described as the primary treatment wish with a higher acceptance of removable solutions in Denmark than in Sweden. For final decision-making, surrounding factors seemed to influence the patients’ choices...

  13. Diagnostics of power transmissions system with tooth gear

    OpenAIRE

    Grzegorz WOJNAR; Bogusław ŁAZARZ; Henryk MADEJ

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents results of laboratory tests that were aimed at detecting early stages of various faults in toothed wheels by measurement and analysis of transverse vibration speed of the transmission gear shafts. In experimental investigation, cracking of the root tooth and chipping of the tooth were detected. The laser vibrometer Ometron VH300+ was used for non-contact measurement of shaft transversal vibration speed. Gear vibrations were recorded in selected points of gear housing and g...

  14. Fracture resistance of single-tooth implant-supported

    OpenAIRE

    Piloto, P.A.G.; Piloto, Joana F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify and compare the fracture behaviour of the ceramic used in a single-tooth implant-supported. This type of prosthesis is mainly used when a single tooth replacement is needed. Two different materials are tested for the abutment (ceramic and titanium), assuming fully connection to the crown. The implant is made of Titanium. The numerical simulations used the concept of continuous damage mechanics to predict crack pattern when loading the tooth in the vert...

  15. Alveolar Fracture Caused by Tooth Extraction at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Fabrício Kitazono; Xavier, Thaís Aparecida; Lima, Nicole Gonçalves; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino; Vinhorte, Marcilene Coelho; Nelson-Filho, Paulo

    Injuries to the teeth and surrounding structures are relatively common. Although traumatic injuries caused by falls or activities related to sports are widely discussed, the same cannot be said regarding accidents arising from non-professional extraction of primary teeth. The present study reports a 6-year-old male child who underwent mandibular alveolar bone fracture during non-professional extraction of his central lower left incisor at home, performed by his 30-year-old aunt. The root of the tooth was with an irregular physiological resorption, which acted as a lever component for the mechanical force applied, leading to bone fracture. Although not common, the possibility that dental roots with irregular resorption can act as a possible risk factor for accidents if the parents or guardians of children during the period of transitional dentition try to perform intentional extraction of primary teeth should be highlighted. Parents should always consult a professional, preferably a pediatric dentist, for monitoring this period of transitional dentition.

  16. Patterns of tooth agenesis in patients with orofacial clefts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermus, Ruurd R; van Wijk, Arjen J; Tan, Stephan P K; Kramer, Gem J C; Ongkosuwito, Edwin M

    2013-08-01

    Orofacial clefts are a common oral disorder associated with tooth agenesis. As information on the simultaneous absence of teeth can be an aid in treatment planning, a large sample of orofacial cleft patients was examined. The sample consisted of 910 patients with cleft lip and palate. Tooth agenesis was assessed on the basis of at least two panoramic radiographs and patient records. Third-molar agenesis was determined in 474 patients. Patterns of tooth agenesis were analysed using Tooth Agenesis Code (TAC) values, according to VAN WIJK & TAN. Per quadrant, at least 90% of patients could be described according to three different patterns. In the maxilla, 85% of patients with tooth agenesis had a TAC-value of 2, 16, or 18 on either the left side, right side or bilaterally. In the mandible, 90% of patients with tooth agenesis had a TAC-value of 16, 1 or 2 on either the left side, right side or bilaterally. In patients with tooth agenesis, patterns were symmetrical in the maxilla in 18.8% and in the mandible in 51%. More extended cleft types were associated with a higher prevalence of tooth agenesis. Third-molar agenesis (prevalence = 22.4%) was significantly related to the prevalence of other absent teeth. These results show which patterns of tooth agenesis can be expected to occur in most orofacial cleft patients. © 2013 Eur J Oral Sci.

  17. Prevalence and distribution of tooth wear among Sri Lankan adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayake, Nilantha; Ekanayake, Lilani

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence, distribution and sociodemographic factors associated with tooth wear among Sri Lankan adolescents. A total of 1200 17-year-olds were selected from government, private and international schools in the Colombo district of Sri Lanka using a two-stage cluster sampling technique. The data were collected using a pretested, validated self-administered questionnaire and by conducting a clinical examination. Tooth wear was recorded using a modified version of Smith and Knight's tooth wear index. The prevalence of tooth wear among Sri Lankan adolescents was found to be 22.4%. In nearly 13.7%, tooth wear was confined to the enamel, whereas 8.7% had wear lesions extending up to the dentine. Occlusal surface was the most frequently affected surface, while the first molar was the most frequently affected tooth. Tooth wear was significantly associated with the type of school attended, father's occupational status and mother's level of education. The present study found that nearly one-fourth of the adolescents were affected by tooth wear. These findings are in agreement with those from developed countries where tooth wear has been shown to be an emerging oral health problem.

  18. Tooth positioners and their effects on treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravindevaprasad, A; Therese, Beena Agnes

    2013-07-01

    Malocclusion can also be corrected by means of clear removable appliances called as "tooth positioners" or "aligners". A tooth positioner is used to control settling and to minimize or eliminate relapse of the teeth after an orthodontic treatment. In this article, a complete review of the objectives, course of treatment, fabrication, and the materials used for fabrication of tooth positioners along with their importance and disadvantages were discussed. Tooth positioners did improve the overall orthodontic treatment outcome as quantified by the ABO (American Board of orthodontics) objective scoring method. But once the initial occlusal contact was achieved, the vertical movement of teeth was found to be inhibited.

  19. Patient Discomfort Following Single-Tooth Implant Placement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spin-Neto, Rubens; Pontes, Ana Emília Farias; Wenzel, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Evaluate postoperative discomfort (pain, bleeding and swelling) in single-tooth implant patients submitted to immediate or conventional tooth restoration together with assessment of treatment time. Methods: Twenty-four patients who received single-tooth maxillary dental implants were randomly...... assigned to an IR (Immediate Restoration) or CR (Conventional Restoration) group. In IR, an implant was inserted and a provisional tooth crown was delivered within the same session, while in CR it was delivered three months after implantation. Pain (first three days), bleeding (first day) and swelling...

  20. ROLE OF BACTERIA IN THE TOOTH ABSCESS: A MINI REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Biswajit Batabyal; Gautam kr. Kundu

    2013-01-01

    A tooth abscess or root abscess is pus enclosed in the tissues of the jaw bone at the apex of an infected tooth's root(s). Usually the abscess originates from a bacterial infection that has accumulated in the soft, often dead, pulp of the tooth. This can be caused by untreated tooth decay, cracked teeth or extensive periodontal disease. A failed root canal treatment may also create a similar abscess. Recently developed molecular methods have made it possible to characterise mixed micro flora ...

  1. Unerupted Primary Molar Teeth Positioned Inferior to the Permanent Premolar: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bagheri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary tooth impaction is a rare finding during the development of primary dentition. Several factors contribute to the impaction of a deciduous tooth. This report describes the diagnosis and treatment of a 10-year-old boy who presented an impacted second primary mandibular molar. This tooth, located inferior to the second premolar together with an odontoma, was positioned superior to the premolar teeth. Treatment consisted of surgical removal of the impacted deciduoustooth and odontoma and placement of a passive lower lingual holdingarch. Periodic examination was indicated for follow- up. Early intervention was recommended to manage orofacial disfigurement and to avoid consequent problems.

  2. Incisor inclination and perceived tooth colour changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciucchi, Philip; Kiliaridis, Stavros

    2017-10-01

    Social attractiveness is influenced by a variety of different smile-related factors. We evaluated whether the degree of upper central incisor proclination can result in tooth colour change. Forty young adult subjects (20-25 years) in good health with a complete sound dentition were selected. The subjects were seated in standardized light conditions with an above-directed light source. Their natural head position was stated as 0 degrees. To mimic the range of possible anterior torque movements they were asked to tilt their heads upward +15 degrees (upward tilting) and downward -15 degrees (downward tilting). Frontal macro photographs, parallel to the Frankfort plane of the patient's natural head position were taken at the three head angulations (+15, 0, and -15 degrees ). Photographs were analysed for colour differences at the centre of the incisor clinical crowns with a CIE L*a*b* colour model based software. A paired t-test was used to test for significance between each value for each inclination. Differences were found between the CIE L*a*b* colour values for: upward tilting, downward tilting, and -15 to +15 degrees (total tilting) except for b* values for downward tilting. As the inclination of the subject's head changed downward, the upper incisors were retroclined and the CIE L*a*b* values indicated a darker and less green but redder colour component. As the inclination of the subject's head changed upwards the upper incisors were proclined and the L*a*b* values indicated a lighter and less green and yellow but redder and bluer colour component. Proclination of upper incisors caused lighter tooth colour parameters compared to retroclined incisors and colour changes. Orthodontic change of upper incisor inclination may induce alterations on how tooth colour is perceived.

  3. Temperament and perception of tooth bleaching results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Mehr

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background . The neurophysiological process of perceiving the results of tooth bleaching requires the correct interaction between the central nervous system and the organs of sight. Exaggerated beliefs concerning defective facial features may enhance inner attitudes about one’s own color of dentition, as well as a feeling of dissatisfaction with the degree of leaching. Objectives. The study aimed to assess the degree of the patient satisfaction with the results of tooth bleaching in relation to their temperament. Material and methods. There were 68 generally healthy volunteers, aged 28–38 years, with external discolorations of the teeth. They had never undergone dental bleaching and their frontal teeth did not have any fillings. After clinical evaluation and the completion of formalities, the patients were asked to fill in Strelau’s temperament questionnaire. Questionnaires and visual status were assessed three times by three doctors: before bleaching, and then 24 hours and two weeks after the home-bleaching operation, which was done with the use of Opalescence (Ultradent in uniform sequence. Results . There were practically no adverse side results, except a periodic dentin hypersensitivity that occurred periodically in 44 patients. The results of the visual assessment performed by the physicians did not differ. The questionnaire data showed that women were more critical of the results in relation to the expectations. Among elancholics, full satisfaction was declared by 41%, whereas among sanguine people, full satisfaction was obtained by 85%. Satisfaction with the aesthetic results was associated with bleaching by at least 4 degrees. Conclusions . Patients’ temperament affects their subjective evaluation of the effectiveness of tooth bleaching, which should be taken into consideration in the patient’s individual dental treatment plan.

  4. Forensic Identification Based on Tooth Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Ibrahim Auerkari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Human teeth are the most robust and stable parts of the body, providing biological clue material for forensic purposes even when most of the oter means of identifcation have been seriously affected by adverse environmental conditions. In particular blood grouping, isozymes, serum proteins and DNA polymorhphisms can be detected from teeth that protect these identification markers in addition to the traditional dental records. While in general the value of traditional dental records in the forensic work is decreasing eg due to mproved dental care, the newer means of identification from tooth material provide considerable promise for effective identification in difficult cases.The DNA analysis from tooth material has been shown to ba a viable route in forensic analysis, when other material for such an analysis is unusable. However in most cases useful biologic material other than teeth is abailable, and then DNA analysis can be made from other tissue with less effort than by using teeth. Also, in cases with lacking other tissue, blood grouping, isozymes and serum proteins may provide cheaper inherited combinations of blood grouping, isozymes and serum proteins can be treated similary to polymorphic DNA loci as independent markers, their identification can be managed if the false positives and negatives in analysis can be minimmised, and the corresponding frequencies of occurrence are known.It was the purpose of the present work to review the methods of forensic identification from tooth material, based on analysis of blood grouping, isozymes and serum proteins. It appears that such a combined analysis provides a robust method for forensic purposes. Nevertheless, for efficient identification it is recommended that as many (multiple forensic methods as possible are combined, so that faster and cheaper methods such as imminent medical forensics are used first, and more thorough analysis is used to support and complement these methods.

  5. Epithelial topography for repetitive tooth formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Gaete

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During the formation of repetitive ectodermally derived organs such as mammary glands, lateral line and teeth, the tissue primordium iteratively initiates new structures. In the case of successional molar development, new teeth appear sequentially in the posterior region of the jaw from Sox2+ cells in association with the posterior aspect of a pre-existing tooth. The sequence of molar development is well known, however, the epithelial topography involved in the formation of a new tooth is unclear. Here, we have examined the morphology of the molar dental epithelium and its development at different stages in the mouse in vivo and in molar explants. Using regional lineage tracing we show that within the posterior tail of the first molar the primordium for the second and third molar are organized in a row, with the tail remaining in connection with the surface, where a furrow is observed. The morphology and Sox2 expression of the tail retains characteristics reminiscent of the earlier stages of tooth development, such that position along the A-P axes of the tail correlates with different temporal stages. Sox9, a stem/progenitor cell marker in other organs, is expressed mainly in the suprabasal epithelium complementary with Sox2 expression. This Sox2 and Sox9 expressing molar tail contains actively proliferating cells with mitosis following an apico-basal direction. Snail2, a transcription factor implicated in cell migration, is expressed at high levels in the tip of the molar tail while E-cadherin and laminin are decreased. In conclusion, our studies propose a model in which the epithelium of the molar tail can grow by posterior movement of epithelial cells followed by infolding and stratification involving a population of Sox2+/Sox9+ cells.

  6. Pediatric Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani-Acsadi, Agnes; Ounpuu, Sylvia; Pierz, Kristan; Acsadi, Gyula

    2015-06-01

    Heritable diseases of the peripheral nerves (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease [CMT]) affect the motor units and sensory nerves, and they are among the most prevalent genetic conditions in the pediatric patient population. The typical clinical presentation includes distal muscle weakness and atrophy, but the severity and progression are largely variable. Improvements in supportive treatment have led to better preservation of patients' motor functions. More than 80 genes have been associated with CMT. These genetic discoveries, along with the developments of cellular and transgenic disease models, have allowed clinicians to better understand the disease mechanisms, which should lead to more specific treatments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cracked tooth syndrome. Part 2: restorative options for the management of cracked tooth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, S; Mehta, S B; Millar, B J

    2010-06-01

    The second of this two part series on 'cracked tooth syndrome' will focus on the available methods for the immediate, intermediate and definitive management of patients affected by this condition. Included in this article is a comprehensive account of the relative merits/drawbacks of various restorative materials and their respective techniques of application for the treatment of symptomatic, incompletely fractured posterior teeth.

  8. Long-term provisional anterior tooth replacement using fiber-reinforced composite and avulsed tooth crowns as pontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurdagüven, Haktan; Say, Esra Can; Güler, Nurhan

    2010-02-01

    The loss of anterior teeth due to trauma requires immediate attention for function and esthetics. While implant- supported or conventional fixed prostheses may be the treatments of choice for adults, relatively noninvasive and reversible provisional procedures for tooth replacement are necessary for adolescents. In recent years, developments in fiber and composite technology offer a conservative treatment approach to restore the anterior edentulous space as a fixed provisional tooth replacement. This case report presents the chairside procedures of anterior tooth replacement in an adolescent using the avulsed tooth crowns as pontics which were bonded to teeth on either side of the edentulous space and reinforced with a preimpregnated fiber.

  9. Dentition and tooth replacement pattern in Chalcides (Squamata; Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Sidney; Davit-Beal, Tiphaine; Sire, Jean-Yves

    2003-05-01

    This study was undertaken as a prerequisite to investigations on tooth differentiation in a squamate, the Canarian scincid Chalcides. Our main goal was to determine whether the pattern of tooth replacement, known to be regular in lizards, could be helpful to predict accurately any stage of tooth development. A growth series of 20 laboratory-reared specimens, aged from 0.5 month after birth to about 6 years, was used. The dentition (functional and replacement teeth) was studied from radiographs of jaw quadrants. The number of tooth positions, the tooth number in relation to age and to seasons, and the size of the replacement teeth were recorded. In Chalcides, a single row of pleurodont functional teeth lies at the labial margin of the dentary, premaxillary, and maxillary. Whatever the age of the specimens, 16 tooth positions were recorded, on average, in each quadrant, suggesting that positions are maintained throughout life. Replacement teeth were numerous whatever the age and season, while the number of functional teeth was subject to variation. Symmetry of tooth development was evaluated by comparing teeth two by two from the opposite side in the four jaw quadrants of several specimens. Although the relative size of some replacement teeth fitted perfectly, the symmetry criterion was not reliable to predict the developmental stage of the opposite tooth, whether the pair of teeth compared was left-right or upper-lower. The best fit was found when comparing the size of successive replacement teeth from the front to the back of the jaw. Every replacement tooth that is 40-80% of its definitive size is followed, in the next position on the arcade, by a tooth that is, on average, 20% less developed. Considering teeth in alternate positions (even and odd series), each replacement tooth was a little more developed than the previous, more anterior, one (0.5-20% when the teeth are from 10-40% of their final size). The latter pattern showed that tooth replacement occurred in

  10. Tooth cusp sharpness as a dietary correlate in great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthaume, Michael A

    2014-02-01

    Mammalian molars have undergone heavy scrutiny to determine correlates between morphology and diet. Here, the relationship between one aspect of occlusal morphology, tooth cusp radius of curvature (RoC), and two broad dietary categories, folivory and frugivory, is analyzed in apes. The author hypothesizes that there is a relationship between tooth cusp RoC and diet, and that folivores have sharper teeth than frugivores, and further test the correlation between tooth cusp RoC and tooth cusp size. Eight measures of tooth cusp RoC (two RoCs per cusp) were taken from 53 M(2) s from four species and subspecies of frugivorous apes (Pongo pygmaeus, Pan troglodytes troglodytes, Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii, and Gorilla gorilla gorilla) and two subspecies of folivorous apes (Gorilla beringei beringei, and Gorilla beringei graueri). Phylogenetically corrected ANOVAs were run on the full dataset and several subsets of the full dataset, revealing that, when buccolingual RoCs are taken into account, tooth cusp RoCs can successfully differentiate folivores and frugivores. PCAs revealed that folivores consistently had duller teeth than frugivores. In addition, a weak, statistically significant positive correlation exists between tooth cusp size and tooth cusp RoC. The author hypothesizes differences in tooth cusp RoC are correlated with wear rates, where, per vertical unit of wear, duller cusps will have a longer length of exposed enamel ridge than sharper cusps. More data need to be gathered to determine if the correlation between tooth cusp RoC and tooth cusp size holds true when small primates are considered. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Multidisciplinary approach on rehabilitation of primary teeth traumatism repercussion on the permanent successor: 6-year follow-up case report

    OpenAIRE

    Mello-Moura ACV; Bonini GAVC; Suga S; Navarro R; Wanderley M

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic lesions in primary teeth are frequent in pediatric patients and can cause problems both to the deciduous tooth and permanent successor. The impact strength on deciduous tooth can reach the growing permanent tooth, affecting its morphology, structure and position, or even hampering its proper development. This report describes an aesthetic-functional rehabilitation process in an 8 year 10 month old boy during a multidisciplinary treatment held at the Clinical Center of Dental Trauma ...

  12. 3D Simulation Modeling of the Tooth Wear Process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Dai

    Full Text Available Severe tooth wear is the most common non-caries dental disease, and it can seriously affect oral health. Studying the tooth wear process is time-consuming and difficult, and technological tools are frequently lacking. This paper presents a novel method of digital simulation modeling that represents a new way to study tooth wear. First, a feature extraction algorithm is used to obtain anatomical feature points of the tooth without attrition. Second, after the alignment of non-attrition areas, the initial homogeneous surface is generated by means of the RBF (Radial Basic Function implicit surface and then deformed to the final homogeneous by the contraction and bounding algorithm. Finally, the method of bilinear interpolation based on Laplacian coordinates between tooth with attrition and without attrition is used to inversely reconstruct the sequence of changes of the 3D tooth morphology during gradual tooth wear process. This method can also be used to generate a process simulation of nonlinear tooth wear by means of fitting an attrition curve to the statistical data of attrition index in a certain region. The effectiveness and efficiency of the attrition simulation algorithm are verified through experimental simulation.

  13. Tooth -Wear Lesions Among Patients Attending Tertiary Hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tooth wear manifest in the form of abrasion, attrition, erosion and abfraction and can affect the quality of life of the sufferer. This was a prospective study of patients who ... We recommend oral hygiene advice, dietary counseling and regular dental examination for early detection. Key words: Tooth wear, lesion, prospective, ...

  14. "ToothPIC": An Interactive Application for Teaching Oral Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaid, Maria; Ashrafi, Seema; Zefran, Mil; Steinberg, Arnold D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of an interactive educational program, "Tooth" "P"lacement and "I"dentification "C"oach ("ToothPIC"). The program uses a game-based learning paradigm and 3D visualization techniques to allow first year dentistry and hygiene students to get…

  15. Factors associated with implant recommendation for single-tooth replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shammari, Khalaf F; Al-Ansari, Jassem M; Al-Khabbaz, Areej K; Nociti, Francisco H; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2005-06-01

    The use of dental implants for single-tooth replacement has been established as a predictable treatment option; yet, limited data are available as to how frequently this option is recommended to patients. The aim of the present study was to examine the frequency of implant recommendation by general dental practitioners after single-tooth extraction and factors influencing their decision to recommend an implant. All single-tooth extractions performed in 26 general dental practice clinics in Kuwait over a 30-day period were examined. Dentists in these centers used the study form to record demographic data, the type of tooth extracted, reason for extraction, and replacement options presented to the patients. Univariate and logistic regression analyses were used to examine associations between background factors and decisions to recommend implant therapy. A total of 1367 patients (mean age, 37.9 +/- 11.8 years) had an extraction of one tooth during the study period. Forty-three patients were offered implants as a replacement option (3.3% of the total sample; 8.6% of patients who were offered tooth replacement options). Factors associated significantly with the recommendation of an implant by Kuwaiti dentists to their patients included younger age, regular dental maintenance visits, and adequate oral hygiene practices (P single-tooth replacement in the present sample of dentists was low. Factors associated significantly with dentist recommendation of an implant for single-tooth replacement included age, history of dental maintenance, and oral hygiene practices.

  16. Patterns of tooth agenesis in patients with orofacial clefts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermus, R.R.; van Wijk, A.J.; Tan, S.P.K.; Kramer, G.J.C.; Ongkosuwito, E.M.

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are a common oral disorder associated with tooth agenesis. As information on the simultaneous absence of teeth can be an aid in treatment planning, a large sample of orofacial cleft patients was examined. The sample consisted of 910 patients with cleft lip and palate. Tooth agenesis

  17. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies Novel Variants for Tooth Agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinckan, N; Du, R; Petty, L E; Coban-Akdemir, Z; Jhangiani, S N; Paine, I; Baugh, E H; Erdem, A P; Kayserili, H; Doddapaneni, H; Hu, J; Muzny, D M; Boerwinkle, E; Gibbs, R A; Lupski, J R; Uyguner, Z O; Below, J E; Letra, A

    2018-01-01

    Tooth agenesis is a common craniofacial abnormality in humans and represents failure to develop 1 or more permanent teeth. Tooth agenesis is complex, and variations in about a dozen genes have been reported as contributing to the etiology. Here, we combined whole-exome sequencing, array-based genotyping, and linkage analysis to identify putative pathogenic variants in candidate disease genes for tooth agenesis in 10 multiplex Turkish families. Novel homozygous and heterozygous variants in LRP6, DKK1, LAMA3, and COL17A1 genes, as well as known variants in WNT10A, were identified as likely pathogenic in isolated tooth agenesis. Novel variants in KREMEN1 were identified as likely pathogenic in 2 families with suspected syndromic tooth agenesis. Variants in more than 1 gene were identified segregating with tooth agenesis in 2 families, suggesting oligogenic inheritance. Structural modeling of missense variants suggests deleterious effects to the encoded proteins. Functional analysis of an indel variant (c.3607+3_6del) in LRP6 suggested that the predicted resulting mRNA is subject to nonsense-mediated decay. Our results support a major role for WNT pathways genes in the etiology of tooth agenesis while revealing new candidate genes. Moreover, oligogenic cosegregation was suggestive for complex inheritance and potentially complex gene product interactions during development, contributing to improved understanding of the genetic etiology of familial tooth agenesis.

  18. [Tooth decay and its complication prognosis in smokers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orekhova, L Iu; Osipova, M V

    2014-01-01

    The study focuses on complicated and non-complicated tooth decay course and prognosis in smokers. Oral status, prevention and treatment effectiveness was assessed in 330 non-smokers and 345 smoking patients. The results allowed concluding with guidelines for tooth decay prevention and treatment in smokers.

  19. Assessment of the progression of tooth wear on dental casts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoorn-Vis, G.M.G.J.; Wetselaar, P.; Koutris, M.; Visscher, C.M.; Evälahti, M.; Ahlberg, J.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2015-01-01

    Many methods are available for the grading of tooth wear, but their ability to assess the progression of wear over time has not been studied frequently. The aim was to assess whether the occlusal/incisal grading scale of the Tooth Wear Evaluation System (TWES) was sensitive enough for the detection

  20. Association between Severity of Tooth Wear and Dentinal Hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Ayer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Tooth wear (attrition, abrasion, erosion, and abfraction is perceived globally as ever increasing problem. Several outcome of the tooth wear are hypersensitivity, esthetic problems, functional impairment, annoyance to the patient, and fracture of the tooth. Among these, the measurable and more commonly reported outcome is hypersensitivity to stimuli. Although dentin hypersensitivity is a common clinical condition and is generally reported by the patient after experiencing a sharp, short pain caused by one of the several different external stimuli, it is often inadequately understood. None of the scientific literature available till date attempted to establish the relationship between tooth wear and dentin hypersensitivity which could be a key factor in monitoring those patients.  The aim of the study was to estimate the association between severity of teeth wear and sensitivity in the patients with reported dentinal hypersensitivity.Materials & Methods: Fifty patients with dentin hypersensitivity were investigated for tooth wear. Tooth wear measured using exact tooth wear index and level of sensitivity to stimuli was recorded using a numerical rating scale. Results: Enamel wear at cervical region of teeth showed a positive correlation (p=.010, similarly, dentin wear at cervical region of teeth showed positive correlation and significant association (p<.001 with dentinal hypersensitivity.Conclusion: The observation supports a significant association between severities of tooth surface wear and dentinal hypersensitivity.

  1. SIGNS Molar tooth sign − looking beyond the obvious

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tooth are represented by thick, perpendicular, non-decussated superior cerebellar peduncles, while the 'body' of the molar tooth is formed by the cerebral peduncles of the brainstem with a deep interpeduncular fossa (Fig. 1a).[3]. Diffusion tensor tractography confirms the failure of superior cerebellar peduncle decussation.

  2. Severe tooth wear: European consensus statement on management guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loomans, Bas AC; Opdam, Niek JM; Attin, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports a European expert consensus statement on guidelines for the management of severe tooth wear. It focuses on the definition of physiological versus pathological tooth wear and recommends diagnosis, monitoring and counseling to define the activity of the wear. Restorative interven...

  3. Smokeless tobacco use, tooth loss and oral health issues among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Smokeless tobacco user were more likely to have poor oral hygiene, dental caries, gingival recession, leukoplakia, erythroplakia, abnormal growth, tooth wear lesion, experienced tooth loss and edentulousnss than non smokeless tobacco users. However, the significantly associated lesions with smokeless tobacco use ...

  4. A theropod tooth from the Late Triassic of southern Africa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    An isolated, large recurved and finely serrated tooth found associated with the prosauropod Euskelosaurus from the Late Triassic part of the Elliot Formation is described here. It is compared to the Triassic thecodonts and carnivorous dinosaurs and its possible affinity is discussed. The tooth possibly belongs to a basal ...

  5. Two-Dimensional Identification of Fetal Tooth Germs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, Mariana; Vaz, Paula; Valente, Francisco; Braga, Ana; Felino, António

    2017-03-01

      To demonstrate the efficiency and applicability of two-dimensional ultrasonography in the identification of tooth germs and in the assessment of potential pathology.   Observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study.   Prenatal Diagnosis Unit of Centro Hospitalar de Vila Nova de Gaia / Espinho-Empresa Pública in Portugal.   A total of 157 white pregnant women (median age, 32 years; range, 14 to 47 years) undergoing routine ultrasound exams.   Description of the fetal tooth germs, as visualized by two-dimensional ultrasonography, including results from prior fetal biometry and detailed screening for malformations.   In the first trimester group, ultrasonography identified 10 tooth germs in the maxilla and 10 tooth germs in the mandible in all fetuses except for one who presented eight maxillary tooth germs. This case was associated with a chromosomal abnormality (trisomy 13) with a bilateral cleft palate. In the second and third trimesters group, ultrasonography identified a larger range of tooth germs: 81.2% of fetuses showed 10 tooth germs in the maxilla and 85.0% of fetuses had 10 tooth germs in the mandible. Hypodontia was more prevalent in the maxilla than in the mandible, which led us to use qualitative two-dimensional ultrasonography to analyze the possible association between hypodontia and other variables such as fetal pathology, markers, head, nuchal, face, and spine.   We recommend using this method as the first exam to evaluate fetal morphology and also to help establish accurate diagnosis of abnormalities in pregnancy.

  6. Errata: Reasons For Tooth Extraction Among Nigerian Children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 756 tooth extractions were done during the survey period. Female constituted 57.4% of patients seen. Caries was the most frequent reason for tooth extraction (82%). The deciduous teeth were mostly extracted (66.1%) than permanent teeth (33.9%). Deciduous molar accounted for 42.6% of all extraction in children ...

  7. Relationship between Tooth Colour, Skin Colour and Age: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is presently limited scientific knowledge in the literature about the relationship between tooth and skin colour and ability to provide fully edentulous patients with their natural tooth color on their complete dentures has always been a ... Manufacturers should include lighter shades on the shade guides and acrylic teeth.

  8. Accelerated tooth eruption in children with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Shantanu; Cheng, Bin; Kaplan, Selma; Softness, Barney; Greenberg, Ellen; Goland, Robin S; Lalla, Evanthia; Lamster, Ira B

    2008-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate tooth eruption in 6- to 14-year-old children with diabetes mellitus. Tooth eruption status was assessed for 270 children with diabetes and 320 control children without diabetes. Data on important diabetes-related variables were collected. Analyses were performed using logistic regression models. Children with diabetes exhibited accelerated tooth eruption in the late mixed dentition period (10-14 years of age) compared to healthy children. For both case patients and control subjects the odds of a tooth being in an advanced eruptive stage were significantly higher among girls than boys. There was also a trend associating gingival inflammation with expedited tooth eruption in both groups. No association was found between the odds of a tooth being in an advanced stage of eruption and hemoglobin A(1c) or duration of diabetes. Patients with higher body mass index percentile demonstrated statistically higher odds for accelerated tooth eruption, but the association was not clinically significant. Children with diabetes exhibit accelerated tooth eruption. Future studies need to ascertain the role of such aberrations in dental development and complications such as malocclusion, impaired oral hygiene, and periodontal disease. The standards of care for children with diabetes should include screening and referral programs aimed at oral health promotion and disease prevention.

  9. Orientation and deformation of mineral crystals in tooth surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisaki, Kazuhiro; Todoh, Masahiro; Niida, Atsushi; Shibuya, Ryota; Kitami, Shunsuke; Tadano, Shigeru

    2012-06-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest material in the human body, and it is mainly composed of hydroxyapatite (HAp)-like mineral particles. As HAp has a hexagonal crystal structure, X-ray diffraction methods can be used to analyze the crystal structure of HAp in teeth. Here, the X-ray diffraction method was applied to the surface of tooth enamel to measure the orientation and strain of the HAp crystals. The c-axis of the hexagonal crystal structure of HAp was oriented to the surface perpendicular to the tooth enamel covering the tooth surface. Thus, the strain of HAp at the surface of teeth was measured by X-ray diffraction from the (004) lattice planes aligned along the c-axis. The X-ray strain measurements were conducted on tooth specimens with intact surfaces under loading. Highly accurate strain measurements of the surface of tooth specimens were performed by precise positioning of the X-ray irradiation area during loading. The strains of the (004) lattice plane were measured at several positions on the surface of the specimens under compression along the tooth axis. The strains were obtained as tensile strains at the labial side of incisor tooth specimens. In posterior teeth, the strains were different at different measurement positions, varying from tensile to compressive types. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Peroxide dental bleaching via laser microchannels and tooth color measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altshuler, Gregory; Belikov, Andrey; Skrypnik, Alexei; Feldchtein, Felix; Pushkareva, Alexandra; Shatilova, Ksenia; Cernavin, Igor; Tuchin, Valery

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to use microchannels drilled by an Er:YAG laser into a human tooth through the enamel into the dentin for direct injection of hydrogen peroxide (HP) to produce a minimally invasive, rapid, tooth bleaching effect. The experiments were conducted in vitro. Five microchannels with a diameter of ˜200 μm and a depth of ˜2 mm were drilled through the palatal side of a human tooth crown using the microbeam of an Er:YAG-laser with a wavelength of 2.94 μm. After injection of an aqueous solution of 31%-HP through the microchannels, the tooth color was evaluated using a VITA shade guide and International Commission on Illumination L*ab color parameters. A tooth model used for the evaluation of the distribution of HP concentration was created and the amount of HP which can be injected into tooth dentin to bleach it safely was estimated. Injection of 1.5±0.1 mm3 of 31%-HP into the tooth led to noticeable bleaching within 3 h and significant improvement of tooth color within 24 h.

  11. Causes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for MDA Blog Donate Search MDA.org Close Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Share print email share facebook twitter ... More than 30 genes have been implicated in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). In different types of CMT, peripheral ...

  12. Role of the Wnt signaling molecules in the tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Tamura, PhD, DDS

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Wnt signaling plays a central role in many processes during embryonic development and adult homeostasis. At least 19 types of Wnt ligands, receptors, transducers, transcription factors, and antagonists have been identified in mammals. Two distinct Wnt signaling pathways, the canonical signaling pathway and the noncanonical signaling pathway, have been described. Some Wnt signaling pathway components are expressed in the dental epithelium and mesenchyme during tooth development in humans and mice. Functional studies and experimental analysis of relevant animal models confirm the effects of Wnt signaling pathway on the regulation of developing tooth formation and adult tooth homeostasis. Mutations in some Wnt signaling pathway components have been identified in syndromic and non-syndromic tooth agenesis. This review provides an overview of progress in elucidating the role of Wnt signaling pathway components in the tooth and the resulting possibilities for therapeutic development.

  13. Power loss analysis in altered tooth-sum spur gearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachidananda H. K.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The main cause of power loss or dissipation of heat in case of meshed gears is due to friction existing between gear tooth mesh and is a major concern in low rotational speed gears, whereas in case of high operating speed the power loss taking place due to compression of air-lubricant mixture (churning losses and windage losses due to aerodynamic trial of air lubricant mixture which controls the total efficiency needs to be considered. Therefore, in order to improve mechanical efficiency it is necessary for gear designer during gear tooth optimization to consider these energy losses. In this research paper the power loss analysis for a tooth-sum of 100 altered by ±4% operating between a specified center distance is considered. The results show that negative altered tooth-sum gearing performs better as compared to standard and positive altered tooth-sum gearing.

  14. Age and perception of dental appearance and tooth colour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhatib, Mhd N; Holt, Ruth; Bedi, Raman

    2005-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of satisfaction with dental appearance and own tooth colour in the UK and investigate the impact of ageing on these perceptions. Data about ageing and satisfaction with dental appearance and tooth colour was gathered by means of a questionnaire completed at face-to-face interview. The questionnaire was first tested and then used by the Office of National Statistics (ONS) in a stratified random sample of adults drawn from the UK. A total of 3384 adults were interviewed. Three quarters of the population were satisfied with their own dental appearance and two-thirds were satisfied with their tooth colour. Subjects over the age of 55 were significantly more likely to be satisfied with their dental appearance and tooth colour (p perception of dental appearance or tooth colour. Greater dissatisfaction with dental appearance or colour in younger ages may suggest that perceived appearance is linked to cognitive factors other than social or cultural ones.

  15. Cracked tooth syndrome: A report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadasiva, Kadandale; Ramalingam, Sathishmuthukumar; Rajaram, Krishnaraj; Meiyappan, Alagappan

    2015-08-01

    Cracked tooth syndrome (CTS), the term was coined by Cameron in 1964, which refers to an incomplete fracture of a vital posterior tooth extending to the dentin and occasionally into the pulp. CTS has always been a nightmare to the patient because of its unpredictable symptoms and a diagnostic dilemma for the dental practitioner due to its variable, bizarre clinical presentation. The treatment planning and management of CTS has also given problems and challenges the dentist as there is no specific treatment option. The management of CTS varies from one case to another or from one tooth to another in the same individual based on the severity of the symptoms and depth of tooth structure involved. After all, the prognosis of such tooth is still questionable and requires continuous evaluation. This article aims at presenting a series three cases of CTS with an overview on the clinical presentation, diagnosis and the different treatment options that varies from one case to another.

  16. An Analysis of the Symptomatic Domains Most Relevant to Charcot Marie Tooth Neuropathy (CMT) Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    Charcot Marie Tooth Disease (CMT); Hereditary Sensory and Motor Neuropathy; Nerve Compression Syndromes; Tooth Diseases; Congenital Abnormalities; Genetic Diseases, Inborn; Heredodegenerative Disorders, Nervous System

  17. Comparative tooth whitening and extrinsic tooth stain prevention efficacy of a new dentifrice and a commercially available tooth whitening dentifrice: six-week clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Naresh; Galustians, H Jack; Qaqish, Jimmy; Rustogi, Kedar; Zhang, Yun Po; Petrone, Margaret E; DeVizio, William; Proskin, Howard M

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this six-week, examiner-blind clinical study was to assess the tooth whitening and extrinsic stain prevention efficacy of a new dentifrice delivering 1.0% hydrogen peroxide, 0.243% sodium fluoride, and sodium tripolyphosphate in a high-cleaning silica base (Test Dentifrice) relative to that of a commercially available hexametaphosphate-containing whitening dentifrice (Positive Control Dentifrice). Following a baseline oral soft tissue examination and scoring of extrinsic tooth stain and tooth shade, qualifying adult male and female subjects from the Mississauga, Ontario, Canada area were randomized into either the Test or Positive Control Dentifrice group. The two groups were balanced for age, tobacco use, extrinsic tooth stain, and tooth shade scores. All subjects received a dental prophylaxis, and were provided with a supply of their assigned product and a soft-bristled adult toothbrush for use at home. Subjects were instructed to brush their teeth for two minutes twice daily (morning and evening) using only the dentifrice provided, and to refrain from using any other oral hygiene products for the entire six weeks of the study. There were no restrictions regarding diet or smoking habits during the course of the study. Oral soft tissue, extrinsic tooth stain and tooth shade assessments for each subject were repeated after two and six weeks of product use. All statistical tests were two-sided and employed a level of significance of alpha = 0.05. Seventy-six (76) subjects complied with the protocol and completed the entire study. At both the two-week and six-week examinations, the Test Dentifrice prevented statistically significant (p tooth stain as compared to the Positive Control Dentifrice. Also, at the two-week and six-week examinations, the Test Dentifrice provided statistically significant (p tooth whitening as compared to the Positive Control Dentifrice (2.64 and 3.77 shade rank reductions, respectively). A new whitening dentifrice

  18. Microleakage of different adhesive systems in primary molars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and aim: This study aimed to examine the microleakage of class V cavities of primary molars prepared by either a conventional dental bur or Er:YAG laser and one of two different adhesive systems. Methods: A total of 50 tooth samples from primary molars were used in this study. They were randomly assigned ...

  19. Supernumerary primary teeth and the clinical significance: a report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Supernumerary teeth occur frequently in the permanent dentition but they are rare in the primary dentition. Supernumerary teeth in the primary dentition usually erupt normally and are frequently of the supplemental type. The issue of differentiating the supplemental tooth from the normal series requires careful consideration.

  20. Replantation of avulsed primary teeth: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Júnior, Paulo Antônio; Franco, Felipe Augusto da Silva; de Barcelos, Ramon Valério; Marques, Leandro Silva; Ramos-Jorge, Maria Letícia

    2014-03-01

    There is little evidence regarding the risks and benefits of replantation of avulsed primary teeth. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review of the literature on the replantation of avulsed primary teeth, analysing the risks and benefits to help guide dentists regarding the best clinical decision-making in such cases. The Medline/Pubmed, LILACS, and SciELO databases were searched for articles published in English, Portuguese, German or Spanish on the replantation of avulsed primary teeth in dental journals dating from the inception of the databases through to May 2013. Among the 891 papers identified in the search, nineteen fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All 19 studies were case reports involving a total of 41 replanted primary teeth. No negative consequences to either the primary tooth or permanent successor were observed in 15 cases. Among the other 26 cases, there were negative consequences to only the replanted primary tooth in 16 cases, only the permanent successor in three cases and both the replanted primary tooth and permanent successor in seven cases. There is a lack of high-quality studies that can help guide clinicians regarding the best approach in cases of primary tooth avulsion. © 2013 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Case report: Management of severe posterior open bite due to primary failure of eruption.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mc Cafferty, J

    2010-06-01

    Primary failure of tooth eruption (PFE) is a rare condition affecting any or all posterior quadrants. Unilateral involvement of maxillary and mandibular quadrants causes a dramatic posterior open bite that requires complex management strategies.

  2. Cracked tooth syndrome mimicking trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia: A report of four cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noma, Noboru; Shimizu, Kohei; Watanabe, Kosuke; Young, Andrew; Imamura, Yoshiki; Khan, Junad

    2017-01-01

    This report describes four cases of cracked tooth syndrome secondary to traumatic occlusion that mimicked trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias. All patients were referred by general practitioners to the Orofacial Pain Clinic at Nihon University Dental School for assessment of atypical facial pain. Case 1: A 51-year-old woman presented with severe pain in the maxillary and mandibular left molars. Case 2: A 47-year-old woman presented with sharp, shooting pain in the maxillary left molars, which radiated to the temple and periorbital region. Case 3: A 49-year-old man presented with sharp, shooting, and stabbing pain in the maxillary left molars. Case 4: A 38-year-old man presented with intense facial pain in the left supraorbital and infraorbital areas, which radiated to the temporoparietal and maxillary regions. All cases mimicked trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, a group of primary headache disorders characterized by unilateral facial pain and ipsilateral cranial autonomic symptoms. Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias include cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, hemicrania continua, and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing/short-lasting neuralgiform headache attacks with cranial autonomic features. Pulpal necrosis, when caused by cracked tooth syndrome, can manifest with pain frequencies and durations that are unusual for pulpitis, as was seen in these cases. Although challenging, differentiation of cracked tooth syndrome from trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias is a necessary skill for dentists.

  3. Remineralising efficacy of tooth mousse plus (ACP CCPF) on radiated tooth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priya; Hegde, Mithra N.; Hegde, Nidarsh D.; Suchetha Kumari, N.; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    Dental complication is the common problem faced all over the world. Subjects with poor oral hygiene and patients undergoing radiotherapy for oral cancers are developing signs of decalcification of enamel, lesions and Caries. A well designed treatment is necessary to safeguard the tooth enamel surface before and after radiation, only then the caries on the enamel surface can be arrested by re-hardening it and ultimately converting them to the normal healthy condition. To determine the Annealing effect of radiated tooth by testing maximum micro hardness of the teeth before and after 30 days of radiation by the application of Remineralising agents. In our study, we collected 30 intact caries free human molar teeth and were sectioned mesio-distally

  4. Methods to validate tooth-supporting regenerative therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padial-Molina, Miguel; Marchesan, Julie T; Taut, Andrei D; Jin, Qiming; Giannobile, William V; Rios, Hector F

    2012-01-01

    In humans, microbially induced inflammatory periodontal diseases are the primary initiators that disrupt the functional and structural integrity of the periodontium (i.e., the alveolar bone, the periodontal ligament, and the cementum). The reestablishment of its original structure, properties, and function constitutes a significant challenge in the development of new therapies to regenerate tooth-supporting defects. Preclinical models represent an important in vivo tool to critically evaluate and analyze the key aspects of novel regenerative therapies, including (1) safety, (2) effectiveness, (3) practicality, and (4) functional and structural stability over time. Therefore, these models provide foundational data that supports the clinical validation and the development of novel innovative regenerative periodontal technologies. Steps are provided on the use of the root fenestration animal model for the proper evaluation of periodontal outcome measures using the following parameters: descriptive histology, histomorphometry, immunostaining techniques, three-dimensional imaging, electron microscopy, gene expression analyses, and safety assessments. These methods will prepare investigators and assist them in identifying the key end points that can then be adapted to later stage human clinical trials.

  5. Native Language Spoken as a Risk Marker for Tooth Decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, J; Walker, L A; Sanders, B J; Jones, J E; Weddell, J A; Tomlin, A M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess dmft, the number of decayed, missing (due to caries), and/ or filled primary teeth, of English-speaking and non-English speaking patients of a hospital based pediatric dental clinic under the age of 72 months to determine if native language is a risk marker for tooth decay. Records from an outpatient dental clinic which met the inclusion criteria were reviewed. Patient demographics and dmft score were recorded, and the patients were separated into three groups by the native language spoken by their parents: English, Spanish and all other languages. A total of 419 charts were assessed: 253 English-speaking, 126 Spanish-speaking, and 40 other native languages. After accounting for patient characteristics, dmft was significantly higher for the other language group than for the English-speaking (p0.05). Those patients under 72 months of age whose parents' native language is not English or Spanish, have the highest risk for increased dmft when compared to English and Spanish speaking patients. Providers should consider taking additional time to educate patients and their parents, in their native language, on the importance of routine dental care and oral hygiene.

  6. Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease and intracellular traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, Cecilia; Bakke, Oddmund; Progida, Cinzia

    2012-01-01

    Mutations of genes whose primary function is the regulation of membrane traffic are increasingly being identified as the underlying causes of various important human disorders. Intriguingly, mutations in ubiquitously expressed membrane traffic genes often lead to cell type- or organ-specific disorders. This is particularly true for neuronal diseases, identifying the nervous system as the most sensitive tissue to alterations of membrane traffic. Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) disease is one of the most common inherited peripheral neuropathies. It is also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN), which comprises a group of disorders specifically affecting peripheral nerves. This peripheral neuropathy, highly heterogeneous both clinically and genetically, is characterized by a slowly progressive degeneration of the muscle of the foot, lower leg, hand and forearm, accompanied by sensory loss in the toes, fingers and limbs. More than 30 genes have been identified as targets of mutations that cause CMT neuropathy. A number of these genes encode proteins directly or indirectly involved in the regulation of intracellular traffic. Indeed, the list of genes linked to CMT disease includes genes important for vesicle formation, phosphoinositide metabolism, lysosomal degradation, mitochondrial fission and fusion, and also genes encoding endosomal and cytoskeletal proteins. This review focuses on the link between intracellular transport and CMT disease, highlighting the molecular mechanisms that underlie the different forms of this peripheral neuropathy and discussing the pathophysiological impact of membrane transport genetic defects as well as possible future ways to counteract these defects. PMID:22465036

  7. Unusual intraosseous transmigration of impacted tooth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Santosh; Urala, Arun Srinivas; Kamath, Abhay Taranath; Jayaswal, Priyanka; Valiathan, Ashima [Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal (India)

    2012-03-15

    Transmigration of an impacted tooth through the symphyseal suture is a rare and special developmental anomaly of unknown etiology that is unique to the mandibular canine. Maxillary canine transmigration is even rarer. Transmigrated canines are particularly significant due to the aesthetic and functional importance. A maxillary lateral incisor crossing the mid-palatal suture has never been reported in the literature. The aim of this report is to present the first case of simultaneous transmigration of a lateral incisor and canine in the maxilla. The paper also reports four unusual cases of unilateral canine transmigration in the maxilla and mandible and successful eruption of one of the transmigrated mandibular canines following orthodontic traction. Etiology of transmigration and its clinical considerations are also discussed.

  8. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaeth, Signe; Vaeth, Michael; Andersen, Henning

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited disorder of the peripheral nervous system, yet no studies have compared the mortality in patients with CMT with that of the general population, and prevalence estimates vary considerably. We performed a nationwide register....... The prevalence was estimated by 31 December 2012, and the incidence rate was calculated based on data from 1988 to 2012. We calculated a standardised mortality ratio (SMR) and an absolute excess mortality rate (AER) stratified according to age categories and disease duration. RESULTS: A total of 1534 patients...... a significantly higher SMR in cases below 50 years of age, and in cases with disease duration of more than 10 years. CONCLUSIONS: We found a reduced life expectancy among patients diagnosed with CMT. To our knowledge, this is the first study of CMT to use nationwide register-based data, and the first to report...

  9. Alveolar ridge preservation immediately after tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Bouckaert, M; Lemmer, J

    2013-10-01

    Ridge preservation procedures immediately after tooth extraction, are commonly used with a view to minimising remodelling and shrinkage of the alveolar ridge, associated with socket healing. These procedures may sometimes be effective, but they cannot completely prevent reduction in dimension of the ridge. Certain biomater als used may actually hamper normal deposition of bone within the healing socket, reducing bone trabeculae that can integrate with the implant surface. However, in extraction sockets in alveolar ridges of low bone density, particles of implanted bone substitute incorporated in the healing bone, may enhance the mechanical support for the implant, provided by normal healed bone of low trabecular density alone. This paper reviews biological rationales and procedures for ridge preservation immediately after extraction and comments on their clinical use.

  10. Side effects of external tooth bleaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruzell, E.M.; Pallesen, Ulla; Thoresen, N.R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The study was performed to assess the risk of at-home and in-office bleaching procedures, and to recognise potential predictors for side effects. Design Multi-centre, questionnaire-based prospective study with follow-ups at around 14 days and around one year post-treatment. Setting......-office = 39.3% [n = 28]; p >0.05; 95% CI [OR]: 0.198‑1.102) whereas prevalence of gingival irritation was higher after in-office treatment (at-home = 14.0%; in-office = 35.7%; p effects...... attributed to the bleaching treatment in the at-home and in-office groups, respectively. Predictors for side effects were tooth sensitivity, surface loss and gingivitis when observed at inclusion. Treatment-related predictors were bleaching concentration and contact between tray and gingiva. Conclusions...

  11. Update on Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzkó, Ágnes; Shy, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) disease encompasses a genetically heterogeneous group of inherited neuropathies, also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies. CMT results from mutations in more than 40 genes expressed in Schwann cells and neurons causing overlapping phenotypes. The classic CMT phenotype reflects length-dependent axonal degeneration characterized by distal sensory loss and weakness, deep tendon reflex abnormalities, and skeletal deformities. Recent articles have provided insight into the molecular pathogenesis of CMT, which, for the first time, suggest potential therapeutic targets. Although there are currently no effective medications for CMT, multiple clinical trials are ongoing or being planned. This review will focus on the underlying pathomechanisms and diagnostic approaches of CMT and discuss the emerging therapeutic strategies. PMID:21080241

  12. Failure of tooth eruption in two patients with cerebral palsy and bruxism-a 10-year follow-up: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staufer, Kirsten; Hamadeh, Sinan; Gesch, Dietmar

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to analyze delayed tooth eruption in two children with cerebral palsy who had severe bruxism and to determine whether treatment could influence tooth eruption and alignment. Extraction of primary teeth was carried out and orthodontic treatment was considered due to severe tooth wear of primary teeth, lack of space, and development of a class III malocclusion. Analysis was based on clinical examination, photographs, radiographs, and dental casts. In both patients, early mixed dentition was delayed for more than 5 years. Calcification and root development of posterior permanent teeth corresponded with the chronological age. Root resorption of the severely abraded primary teeth and eruption of their successors were delayed or failed. Eruption of permanent teeth occurred slowly after primary teeth were extracted. Orthodontic treatment succeeded in one patient, achieving a normal overjet in combination with a successful orofacial therapy. The disturbed exfoliation of abraded primary teeth and failure of tooth eruption of the posterior teeth could be linked to the systemic pathology and to bruxism. At age 20, eruption of the canines and premolars remained questionable.

  13. Prevalence of delayed tooth development and its relation to tooth agenesis in Korean children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min Kyoung; Shin, Min Kyung; Kim, Seong Oh; Lee, Hyo Seol; Lee, Jae-Ho; Jung, Han-Sung; Song, Je Seon

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of delayed tooth development (DTD) and the link between DTD and tooth agenesis (TA). The dental maturity of all of the developing permanent teeth of 4611 children (2417 males and 2194 females) was evaluated from panoramic radiographs. The prevalence of DTD and TA was analyzed, and gender difference for DTS and TA was investigated. The correlation of DTD and TA was investigated in intra-fields and inter-fields. The total prevalence of DTD among the 4611 children was 3.40%. The maxillary second premolar was the most frequently delayed tooth (1.02%), followed by the maxillary second molar (0.88%) and the mandibular second premolar (0.74%). DTD significantly correlated with TA in both intra-fields and inter-fields (p<0.05). The field of delayed development exhibited a significant correlation with that of TA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Biogeneric tooth: a new mathematical representation for tooth morphology in lower first molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Albert; Blanz, Volker; Hickel, Reinhard

    2005-08-01

    A mathematical representation of tooth morphology may help to improve and automate restorative computer-aided design processes, virtual dental education, and parametric morphology. However, to date, no quantitative formulation has been identified for the description of dental features. The aim of this study was to establish and to validate a mathematical process for describing the morphology of first lower molars. Stone replicas of 170 caries-free first lower molars from young patients were measured three-dimensionally with a resolution of about 100,000 points. First, the average tooth was computed, which captures the common features of the molar's surface quantitatively. For this, the crucial step was to establish a dense point-to-point correspondence between all teeth. The algorithm did not involve any prior knowledge about teeth. In a second step, principal component analysis was carried out. Repeated for 3 different reference teeth, the procedure yielded average teeth that were nearly independent of the reference (less than +/- 40 microm). Additionally, the results indicate that only a few principal components determine a high percentage of the three-dimensional shape variability of first lower molars (e.g. the first five principal components describe 52% of the total variance, the first 10 principal components 72% and the first 20 principal components 83%). With the novel approach presented in this paper, surfaces of teeth can be described efficiently in terms of only a few parameters. This mathematical representation is called the 'biogeneric tooth'.

  15. Original Research. Surface Roughness Changes of Different Restoration Materials after Tooth Brushing Simulation Using Different Toothpastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudás Csaba

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The need for the whitening effects of toothpastes became primary for most users. Changes in the surface roughness of restoration materials after tooth brushing are inevitable, and the abrasion is known to increase the possibility of dental plaque accumulation. Aim of the study: To evaluate in vitro surface roughness changes of different dental restorative materials after tooth brushing simulation. Material and methods: Fifty specimens of two composite materials (Evicrol, Super-Cor, two glass ionomer materials (Glassfill, Kavitan Cem and a silicate cement (Fritex were prepared according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Each group of specimens was divided in three subgroups for tooth brushing simulation: using two different types of toothpaste and without toothpaste. Before and after 153 hours of tooth brushing simulation with a custom-made device, the surface roughness was measured with a surface roughness tester. Statistical analysis was performed after collecting the data. Results: All materials exhibited changes in surface roughness after the use of both toothpastes. The self-curing composite showed the less change and glass ionomer materials showed the greatest changes in surface roughness. Conclusions: The surface changes of dental materials depended on their composition and the cleaning procedure. Although self-curing composite was the most resistant to surface changes, its surface roughness values were high. Light-curing composite presented the lowest surface roughness values, even after brushing with toothpastes. The “medium” labeled toothbrush caused significant changes without toothpaste on the surface of light-curing composite, glass ionomer and silicate cement materials.

  16. In vitro differentiation of human tooth germ stem cells into endothelial- and epithelial-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Ayşegül; Demirci, Selami; Şahin, Fikrettin

    2015-01-01

    Current clinical techniques in dental practice include stem cell and tissue engineering applications. Dental stem cells are promising primary cell source for mainly tooth tissue engineering. Interaction of mesenchymal stem cell with epithelial and endothelial cells is strictly required for an intact tooth morphogenesis. Therefore, it is important to investigate whether human tooth germ stem cells (hTGSCs) derived from wisdom tooth are suitable for endothelial and epithelial cell transformation in dental tissue regeneration approaches. Differentiation into endothelial and epithelial cell lineages were mimicked under defined conditions, confirmed by real time PCR, western blotting and immunocytochemical analysis by qualitative and quantitative methods. HUVECs and HaCaT cells were used as positive controls for the endothelial and epithelial differentiation assays, respectively. Immunocytochemical and western blotting analysis revealed that terminally differentiated cells expressed cell-lineage markers including CD31, VEGFR2, VE-Cadherin, vWF (endothelial cell markers), and cytokeratin (CK)-17, CK-19, EpCaM, vimentin (epithelial cell markers) in significant levels with respect to undifferentiated control cells. Moreover, high expression levels of VEGFR1, VEGFR2, VEGF, CK-18, and CK-19 genes were detected in differentiated endothelial and epithelial-like cells. Endothelial-like cells derived from hTGSCs were cultured on Matrigel, tube-like structure formations were followed as an indication for functional endothelial differentiation. hTGSCs successfully differentiate into various cell types with a broad range of functional abilities using an in vitro approach. These findings suggest that hTGSCs may serve a potential stem cell source for tissue engineering and cell therapy of epithelial and endothelial tissue. © 2014 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  17. HDAC6 is a therapeutic target in mutant GARS-induced Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoy, Veronick; Van Helleputte, Lawrence; Prior, Robert; d'Ydewalle, Constantin; Haeck, Wanda; Geens, Natasja; Scheveneels, Wendy; Schevenels, Begga; Cader, M Zameel; Talbot, Kevin; Kozikowski, Alan P; Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Van Damme, Philip; Robberecht, Wim; Van Den Bosch, Ludo

    2018-02-05

    Peripheral nerve axons require a well-organized axonal microtubule network for efficient transport to ensure the constant crosstalk between soma and synapse. Mutations in more than 80 different genes cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, which is the most common inherited disorder affecting peripheral nerves. This genetic heterogeneity has hampered the development of therapeutics for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. The aim of this study was to explore whether histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) can serve as a therapeutic target focusing on the mutant glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS/GARS)-induced peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral nerves and dorsal root ganglia from the C201R mutant Gars mouse model showed reduced acetylated α-tubulin levels. In primary dorsal root ganglion neurons, mutant GlyRS affected neurite length and disrupted normal mitochondrial transport. We demonstrated that GlyRS co-immunoprecipitated with HDAC6 and that this interaction was blocked by tubastatin A, a selective inhibitor of the deacetylating function of HDAC6. Moreover, HDAC6 inhibition restored mitochondrial axonal transport in mutant GlyRS-expressing neurons. Systemic delivery of a specific HDAC6 inhibitor increased α-tubulin acetylation in peripheral nerves and partially restored nerve conduction and motor behaviour in mutant Gars mice. Our study demonstrates that α-tubulin deacetylation and disrupted axonal transport may represent a common pathogenic mechanism underlying Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and it broadens the therapeutic potential of selective HDAC6 inhibition to other genetic forms of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. © The Author(s) (2018). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  18. Evaluation of the effect of tooth and dental restoration material on electron dose distribution and production of photon contamination in electron beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Akbari, Fatemeh; Mehrpouyan, Mohammad; Sobhkhiz Sabet, Leila

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of tooth and dental restoration materials on electron dose distribution and photon contamination production in electron beams of a medical linac. This evaluation was performed on 8, 12 and 14 MeV electron beams of a Siemens Primus linac. MCNPX Monte Carlo code was utilized and a 10 × 10 cm(2) applicator was simulated in the cases of tooth and combinations of tooth and Ceramco C3 ceramic veneer, tooth and Eclipse alloy and tooth and amalgam restoration materials in a soft tissue phantom. The relative electron and photon contamination doses were calculated for these materials. The presence of tooth and dental restoration material changed the electron dose distribution and photon contamination in phantom, depending on the type of the restoration material and electron beam's energy. The maximum relative electron dose was 1.07 in the presence of tooth including amalgam for 14 MeV electron beam. When 100.00 cGy was prescribed for the reference point, the maximum absolute electron dose was 105.10 cGy in the presence of amalgam for 12 MeV electron beam and the maximum absolute photon contamination dose was 376.67 μGy for tooth in 14 MeV electron beam. The change in electron dose distribution should be considered in treatment planning, when teeth are irradiated in electron beam radiotherapy. If treatment planning can be performed in such a way that the teeth are excluded from primary irradiation, the potential errors in dose delivery to the tumour and normal tissues can be avoided.

  19. Primary Failure of Eruption- A Case Report with Cone Beam Computerized Tomographic Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Aruna, U.; Annamalai, P.R.; Nayar, Sanjna; Bhuminathan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Tooth eruption is an intricate and complex process which can fail to occur due to several reasons. Failure of tooth eruption in the absence of any systemic condition or any obstruction in the eruptive pathway can be attributed to lack of inherent eruptive potential of the tooth, termed as Primary Failure of Eruption (PFE). This is a rare condition and usually has a genetic etiology. Here we report a rare case in which there is Primary Failure of Eruption in the mandibular right quadrant. Ther...

  20. Safety issues of tooth whitening using peroxide-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Greenwall, L

    2013-07-01

    In-office tooth whitening using hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) has been practised in dentistry without significant safety concerns for more than a century. While few disputes exist regarding the efficacy of peroxide-based at-home whitening since its first introduction in 1989, its safety has been the cause of controversy and concern. This article reviews and discusses safety issues of tooth whitening using peroxide-based materials, including biological properties and toxicology of H₂O₂, use of chlorine dioxide, safety studies on tooth whitening, and clinical considerations of its use. Data accumulated during the last two decades demonstrate that, when used properly, peroxide-based tooth whitening is safe and effective. The most commonly seen side effects are tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation, which are usually mild to moderate and transient. So far there is no evidence of significant health risks associated with tooth whitening; however, potential adverse effects can occur with inappropriate application, abuse, or the use of inappropriate whitening products. With the knowledge on peroxide-based whitening materials and the recognition of potential adverse effects associated with the procedure, dental professionals are able to formulate an effective and safe tooth whitening regimen for individual patients to achieve maximal benefits while minimising potential risks.

  1. Dental regenerative therapy: Stem cell transplantation and bioengineered tooth replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Nakao

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available For clinical treatment of tooth defects and tooth loss, nonbiotechnological approaches, such as the use of prostheses and implants, have generally been employed. Dental regenerative therapies which restore or replace defective teeth using autologous explants are being investigated using current understandings of developmental biology, stem cell biology, and regenerative medicine. Recently, dental tissue stem/progenitor cells, which can differentiate into dental cell lineages, have been identified in both impacted and erupted human teeth, and these cells can be used to regenerate some dental tissues. Tissue engineering using scaffold and cell aggregate methods may also be used to produce bioengineered teeth from dissociated cells for therapeutic applications of whole tooth replacement. Recent breakthroughs in single cell manipulation methods for the reconstitution of bioengineered tooth germ and the investigation of in vivo development of artificial tooth germ in the adult oral environment have been reported. These researches and developments will ultimately lead to the realization of dental regenerative therapies for partial repair by stem cell transplantation and for whole tooth replacement using bioengineered tooth germ.

  2. Comprehensive intermaxillary tooth width proportion of Bangkok residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somchai Manopatanakul

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Proper occlusion depends on the correct width ratio between upper and lower teeth, known as Bolton's ratio. In fact, this ratio can be calculated for each pair of teeth from the central incisor to the first permanent molar. This set of ratios, known as comprehensive cumulative percentage ratios (CPRs, can be used not only to determine which tooth or teeth have a tooth width discrepancy, but can also enable the partial graphical analysis of tooth width discrepancy when there is agenesis of certain permanent teeth. Although CPRs have been calculated for Caucasians, tooth width is known to vary depending on racial origin. Therefore, a test of differences between racial groups should be carried out. If these ratios of the Caucasians and Bangkokians are significantly different, the ratio of the Bangkokians is recommended. The objective of this study was to measure tooth size disproportion for Thai patients and to calculate a corresponding set of CPRs. Thirty-seven pairs of dental models were made from a group of Bangkok residents with normal occlusion. Mesiodistal tooth width was measured for each model. The intra- and inter-examiner measurement errors were ascertained as insignificant (p > 0.05. CPRs were then calculated and compared to those derived from other studies. Ten of thirteen CPRs were significantly different from corresponding values derived from Caucasians. We conclude that tooth width ratios vary between different racial groups, and therefore that these should be calculated specifically for each patient racial group.

  3. A study of prevalence and distribution of tooth agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozga, A; Stanciu, R P; Mănuc, D

    2014-01-01

    Tooth agenesis is a phenomenon that occurs relatively commonly. The incidence of the missing teeth presented in the previous reports varies according to the studied population. The aim of this study was to find the prevalence of tooth agenesis in a population group in Bucharest. The prevalence and distribution of dental agenesis was determined in a sample of 518 patients, 285 females and 233 males, aged 6 to 41 years, who had been treated in the Clinic of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics in Bucharest. The tooth agenesis was diagnosed by using the orthodontic records and study casts for each patient. 35 of the patients, 17 males and 18 females, were diagnosed with at least one absent permanent tooth and 47 missing permanent teeth were reported. A prevalence of 6.757% was observed for tooth agenesis. The mandibular second premolar was found to be the most affected tooth, followed by the maxillary lateral incisor, maxillary second premolar, mandibular central incisors, mandibular second molar and mandibular lateral incisor. The incidence of dental agenesis, its pattern and distribution per tooth type are in accordance with the previous published studies.

  4. ClC-7 Deficiency Impairs Tooth Development and Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Pan, Meng; Ni, Jinwen; Zhang, Yanli; Zhang, Yutao; Gao, Shan; Liu, Jin; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Rong; He, Huiming; Wu, Buling; Duan, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    CLCN7 gene encodes the voltage gated chloride channel 7 (ClC-7) in humans. The mutations in CLCN7 have been associated with osteopetrosis in connection to the abnormal osteoclasts functions. Previously, we found that some osteopetrosis patients with CLCN7 mutations suffered from impacted teeth and root dysplasia. Here we set up two in vivo models under a normal or an osteoclast-poor environment to investigate how ClC-7 affects tooth development and tooth eruption. Firstly, chitosan-Clcn7-siRNA nanoparticles were injected around the first maxillary molar germ of newborn mice and caused the delay of tooth eruption and deformed tooth with root dysplasia. Secondly, E13.5 molar germs infected with Clcn7 shRNA lentivirus were transplanted under the kidney capsule and presented the abnormal changes in dentin structure, periodontal tissue and cementum. All these teeth changes have been reported in the patients with CLCN7 mutation. In vitro studies of ameloblasts, odontoblasts and dental follicle cells (DFCs) were conducted to explore the involved mechanism. We found that Clcn7 deficiency affect the differentiation of these cells, as well as the interaction between DFCs and osteoclasts through RANKL/OPG pathway. We conclude that ClC-7 may affect tooth development by directly targeting tooth cells, and regulate tooth eruption through DFC mediated osteoclast pathway. PMID:26829236

  5. Biology Explaining Tooth Repair and Regeneration: A Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balic, Anamaria

    2018-03-13

    The tooth is an intricate composition of precisely patterned, mineralized matrices and soft tissues. Mineralized tissues include enamel (produced by the epithelial cells called ameloblasts), dentin and cementum (produced by mesenchymal cells called odontoblasts and cementoblasts, respectively), and soft tissues, which include the dental pulp and the periodontal ligament along with the invading nerves and blood vessels. It was perceived for a very long time that teeth primarily serve an esthetical function. In recent years, however, the role of healthy teeth, as well as the impact of oral health on general well-being, became more evident. Tooth loss, caused by tooth decay, congenital malformations (tooth agenesis), trauma, periodontal diseases, or age-related changes, is usually replaced by artificial materials which lack many of the important biological characteristics of the natural tooth. Human teeth have very low to almost absent regeneration potential, due to early loss of cell populations with regenerative capacity, namely stem cells. Significant effort has been made in recent decades to identify and characterize tooth stem cells, and to unravel the developmental programs which these cells follow in order to generate a tooth. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. ClC-7 Deficiency Impairs Tooth Development and Eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Pan, Meng; Ni, Jinwen; Zhang, Yanli; Zhang, Yutao; Gao, Shan; Liu, Jin; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Rong; He, Huiming; Wu, Buling; Duan, Xiaohong

    2016-02-01

    CLCN7 gene encodes the voltage gated chloride channel 7 (ClC-7) in humans. The mutations in CLCN7 have been associated with osteopetrosis in connection to the abnormal osteoclasts functions. Previously, we found that some osteopetrosis patients with CLCN7 mutations suffered from impacted teeth and root dysplasia. Here we set up two in vivo models under a normal or an osteoclast-poor environment to investigate how ClC-7 affects tooth development and tooth eruption. Firstly, chitosan-Clcn7-siRNA nanoparticles were injected around the first maxillary molar germ of newborn mice and caused the delay of tooth eruption and deformed tooth with root dysplasia. Secondly, E13.5 molar germs infected with Clcn7 shRNA lentivirus were transplanted under the kidney capsule and presented the abnormal changes in dentin structure, periodontal tissue and cementum. All these teeth changes have been reported in the patients with CLCN7 mutation. In vitro studies of ameloblasts, odontoblasts and dental follicle cells (DFCs) were conducted to explore the involved mechanism. We found that Clcn7 deficiency affect the differentiation of these cells, as well as the interaction between DFCs and osteoclasts through RANKL/OPG pathway. We conclude that ClC-7 may affect tooth development by directly targeting tooth cells, and regulate tooth eruption through DFC mediated osteoclast pathway.

  7. Mesiodistal tooth angulation to segmental occlusal plane in panoramic radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Duk; Kim, Jin Soo; You, Choong Hyun

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the stability of the segmental occlusal plane and anatomical line as the reference line for measuring the mesiodistal tooth angulation in panoramic radiography and to determine the mean angle and the range of the mesiodistal tooth angulation in Korean population with normal occlusions. Twenty nine subjects (15 men, 14 women) with normal occlusion were selected. A total of 29 panoramic radiograms were taken at normal head position and then 10 images of 5 subjects selected were repeatedly taken with repositioning 2 times at each of the head down (V-shaped occlusion) and up (horizontal occulsion) for evaluation of stability of adopted reference lines by using PM2002CC (Planmeca, Finland). The images were traced with adoption of two test reference lines and the long axes of the teeth. The mesial angles formed by each reference line and the long axes of the teeth were measured and analyzed. With anatomical reference line, the mesiodistal tooth angulations of the molars showed the significant difference by over 5 degree between the normal and each changed head position. With segmented occlusal reference line, deviations of mesiodistal tooth angulations by the two changed head positions were less than 1 degree. The means, standard deviations, and maximum and minimum values of mesiodistal tooth angulations to segmental occlusal reference line on panoramic radiography were determined. It would appear that mesiodistal tooth angulations to segmental occlusal plane as reference line in panograms are predictable as standards of normal occlusion and useful for evaluation of tooth arrangement between adjacent teeth.

  8. Mesiodistal tooth angulation to segmental occlusal plane in panoramic radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Duk; Kim, Jin Soo; You, Choong Hyun [Chosun University College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    To evaluate the stability of the segmental occlusal plane and anatomical line as the reference line for measuring the mesiodistal tooth angulation in panoramic radiography and to determine the mean angle and the range of the mesiodistal tooth angulation in Korean population with normal occlusions. Twenty nine subjects (15 men, 14 women) with normal occlusion were selected. A total of 29 panoramic radiograms were taken at normal head position and then 10 images of 5 subjects selected were repeatedly taken with repositioning 2 times at each of the head down (V-shaped occlusion) and up (horizontal occulsion) for evaluation of stability of adopted reference lines by using PM2002CC (Planmeca, Finland). The images were traced with adoption of two test reference lines and the long axes of the teeth. The mesial angles formed by each reference line and the long axes of the teeth were measured and analyzed. With anatomical reference line, the mesiodistal tooth angulations of the molars showed the significant difference by over 5 degree between the normal and each changed head position. With segmented occlusal reference line, deviations of mesiodistal tooth angulations by the two changed head positions were less than 1 degree. The means, standard deviations, and maximum and minimum values of mesiodistal tooth angulations to segmental occlusal reference line on panoramic radiography were determined. It would appear that mesiodistal tooth angulations to segmental occlusal plane as reference line in panograms are predictable as standards of normal occlusion and useful for evaluation of tooth arrangement between adjacent teeth.

  9. Tooth whitening evaluation of blue covarine containing toothpastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Danying; Smith, Richard N; Zhang, Qiong; Sun, Jianing N; Philpotts, Carole J; Ricketts, Stephen R; Naeeni, Mojgan; Joiner, Andrew

    2017-12-01

    To measure the tooth whitening effects delivered immediately after brushing with silica-based toothpastes containing blue covarine in vitro and in vivo. Salivary pellicle coated human extracted teeth were brushed with either a slurry of a toothpaste containing blue covarine (BC), a formulation containing an increased level of blue covarine (BC+) or a negative control toothpaste containing no blue covarine. The colour of the specimens were measured in vitro using either a Minolta chromameter or a VITA Easyshade spectrophotometer, before and after brushing and changes in CIELAB values and tooth Whiteness Index (WIO) values calculated. In a double-blind cross-over clinical study, subjects brushed with either BC or BC+ toothpaste and tooth colour changes were measured with a digital image analysis system. The in vitro studies demonstrated that toothpastes containing blue covarine gave a significantly (pbrushing with the BC+ toothpaste than with the BC toothpaste (WIO p=0.006; b* p=0.013). Toothpastes containing blue covarine gave a statistically significant reduction in tooth yellowness and improvement in tooth whiteness immediately after brushing in both in vitro and clinical studies. In addition, the higher concentration blue covarine toothpaste gave statistically significant greater tooth whitening benefits than the lower concentration blue covarine toothpaste. The silica-based toothpastes containing blue covarine evaluated in the current study gave tooth whitening benefits immediately after one brush. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Interventions for accelerating orthodontic tooth movement: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Hu; Pyakurel, Ujjwal; Wang, Yan; Liao, Lina; Zhou, Yang; Lai, Wenli

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of interventions on accelerating orthodontic tooth movement. We searched the databases of PubMed, Embase, Science Citation Index, CENTRAL, and SIGLE from January 1990 to August 2011 for randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials that assessed the effectiveness of interventions on accelerating orthodontic tooth movement. The processes of study search, selection, and quality assessment were conducted independently in duplicate by two review authors. Original outcome data, if possible, underwent statistical pooling by using Review Manager 5. Through a predefined search strategy, we finally included nine eligible studies. Among them, five interventions were studied (ie, low-level laser therapy, corticotomy, electrical current, pulsed electromagnetic fields, and dentoalveolar or periodontal distraction). Six outcomes were evaluated in these studies (ie, accumulative moved distance or movement rate, time required to move tooth to its destination, anchorage loss, periodontal health, pulp vitality, and root resorption). Among the five interventions, corticotomy is effective and safe to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement, low-level laser therapy was unable to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement, current evidence does not reveal whether electrical current and pulsed electromagnetic fields are effective in accelerating orthodontic tooth movement, and dentoalveolar or periodontal distraction is promising in accelerating orthodontic tooth movement but lacks convincing evidence.

  11. Multiple essential MT1-MMP functions in tooth root formation, dentinogenesis, and tooth eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H; Snider, T N; Wimer, H F; Yamada, S S; Yang, T; Holmbeck, K; Foster, B L

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-type matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MT1-MMP) is a transmembrane zinc-endopeptidase that breaks down extracellular matrix components, including several collagens, during tissue development and physiological remodeling. MT1-MMP-deficient mice (MT1-MMP(-/-)) feature severe defects in connective tissues, such as impaired growth, osteopenia, fibrosis, and conspicuous loss of molar tooth eruption and root formation. In order to define the functions of MT1-MMP during root formation and tooth eruption, we analyzed the development of teeth and surrounding tissues in the absence of MT1-MMP. In situ hybridization showed that MT1-MMP was widely expressed in cells associated with teeth and surrounding connective tissues during development. Multiple defects in dentoalveolar tissues were associated with loss of MT1-MMP. Root formation was inhibited by defective structure and function of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS). However, no defect was found in creation of the eruption pathway, suggesting that tooth eruption was hampered by lack of alveolar bone modeling/remodeling coincident with reduced periodontal ligament (PDL) formation and integration with the alveolar bone. Additionally, we identified a significant defect in dentin formation and mineralization associated with the loss of MT1-MMP. To segregate these multiple defects and trace their cellular origin, conditional ablation of MT1-MMP was performed in epithelia and mesenchyme. Mice featuring selective loss of MT1-MMP activity in the epithelium were indistinguishable from wild type mice, and importantly, featured a normal HERS structure and molar eruption. In contrast, selective knock-out of MT1-MMP in Osterix-expressing mesenchymal cells, including osteoblasts and odontoblasts, recapitulated major defects from the global knock-out including altered HERS structure, short roots, defective dentin formation and mineralization, and reduced alveolar bone formation, although molars were able to erupt. These data

  12. Unusual Case of a Talon Cusp on a Supernumerary Tooth in Association with a Mesiodens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Babaji

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Talon cusp is an accessory cusp similar to a projection, extending from the cingulum or cemento-enamel junction to the incisal edge. It occurs on labial or palatal surfaces of primary or permanent anterior teeth in both arches. This accessory cusp can occur as an isolated entity or in association with other dental anomalies. Occurrence of a talon cusp on supernumerary teeth is rare and uncommon. This paper reports an unusual case of a talon cusp on a supernumerary tooth in association with mesiodens.

  13. Unusual case of a talon cusp on a supernumerary tooth in association with a mesiodens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaji, Prashant; Sanadi, Firoza; Melkundi, Mahesh

    2010-01-01

    Talon cusp is an accessory cusp similar to a projection, extending from the cingulum or cemento-enamel junction to the incisal edge. It occurs on labial or palatal surfaces of primary or permanent anterior teeth in both arches. This accessory cusp can occur as an isolated entity or in association with other dental anomalies. Occurrence of a talon cusp on supernu-merary teeth is rare and uncommon. This paper reports an unusual case of a talon cusp on a supernumerary tooth in association with mesiodens.

  14. Angulation change of the third molar tooth in orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardiansyah S. Pawinru

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Impaction of the third molar tooth mandibular is often found in patients with orthodontic treatment. In orthodontic treatment, extraction cases of impaction of the third molar tooth are usually performed, but the patients often refuse this extraction. Extraction of premolar has a good effect on the third molar mandibular angulation during treatment. Material and Methods : This study is a retrospective clinical study with descriptive analytic to find out the effect of the first mandibular premolar tooth extraction to angulation change of the third molar mandibular in orthodontic treatment with a standard edgewise method. Angulation change was performed by comparing the third molar mandibular angulation before and after orthodontic treatment with panoramic radiographs. Angulation of the third molar tooth mandibular was calculated from the angle formed between the long axis of the tooth with the reference line infraorbita. Results : The sample comprised 60 of impacted mandibular third molar region of the left and right regions of 30 patients who had been treated declared cured in clinic of orthodontic specialist of Dentistry Faculty Padjadjaran University. The sample was divided into three (3 groups of patients before treatment angulation of the third molar tooth mandibular under 300, 300 to 600 and above 60o, then measured change of angulation and observed whether it increased, fixed or decreased. Results were analyzed by T- test and Wilcoxon test showed that there was a significant change in angulation of the third molar mandibular in orthodontic treatment with the first premolar tooth mandibular extraction. Conclusion : This study is that the first premolar tooth mandibular extraction affects the angulation of the third molar tooth mandibular after orthodontic treatment.

  15. Tooth loss prevalence among cardiac males and females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokhari, S.A.H.; Khan, A.A.; Butt, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    Objective of study was to observe differences of tooth loss prevalence in males and females with Cardiac diseases Poor oral health, tooth loss and periodontal diseases have been reported to be associated with coronary heart diseases. Studies report gender differences in prevalence of cardiac diseases and tooth loss. This paper presents gender differences of tooth loss in cardiac patients of a cardiac hospital of Lahore, Pakistan. Methodology: Age matched Cardiac males and females attending OPD of the Punjab Institute of Cardiology (PIC), Lahore were included in the study. Personal and health-related information were questioned and noted. Oral examination was performed for recording of missing teeth. 1200 CHD study subjects with age-range of 30 to 80 years were enrolled for study. 1045 age matched, 766 (73.30%) males and 279 (26.70%) females were examined for tooth loss. 852 (81.53%) genders had at least one tooth missing. 599 (78.19) males and 253 (90.68%) females were observed with mean tooth loss of 7.5 (SD 8.720) and 11.15 (SD 10.375)respectively statistical association among them was also significant (P= 0.000) with OR of 2.339. More subjects (76.29%) showed a loss of 1-15 teeth that I was also significant among males and females. Tooth loss was significant in age groups of 41-50 years (P=0.001) and 51-60 years (P=0.000) Gender differences of tooth loss prevalence among CHD Subjects were significant with more risk for males as compared to females. (author)

  16. Functional constraints on tooth morphology in carnivorous mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smits Peter D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The range of potential morphologies resulting from evolution is limited by complex interacting processes, ranging from development to function. Quantifying these interactions is important for understanding adaptation and convergent evolution. Using three-dimensional reconstructions of carnivoran and dasyuromorph tooth rows, we compared statistical models of the relationship between tooth row shape and the opposing tooth row, a static feature, as well as measures of mandibular motion during chewing (occlusion, which are kinetic features. This is a new approach to quantifying functional integration because we use measures of movement and displacement, such as the amount the mandible translates laterally during occlusion, as opposed to conventional morphological measures, such as mandible length and geometric landmarks. By sampling two distantly related groups of ecologically similar mammals, we study carnivorous mammals in general rather than a specific group of mammals. Results Statistical model comparisons demonstrate that the best performing models always include some measure of mandibular motion, indicating that functional and statistical models of tooth shape as purely a function of the opposing tooth row are too simple and that increased model complexity provides a better understanding of tooth form. The predictors of the best performing models always included the opposing tooth row shape and a relative linear measure of mandibular motion. Conclusions Our results provide quantitative support of long-standing hypotheses of tooth row shape as being influenced by mandibular motion in addition to the opposing tooth row. Additionally, this study illustrates the utility and necessity of including kinetic features in analyses of morphological integration.

  17. Miniscrew Supported Interim Tooth Replacement: A Temporary Alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurkeerat Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Replacement of congenitally missing anterior tooth poses special problems in growing patients. Because an adolescent is typically self- conscious about removing an appliance and revealing a large edentulous space, a removable single tooth partial denture or retainer is an undesirable option. The temporary anchorage devices are invasive and the best recommended for malocclusion that cannot be effectively managed with conventional mechanics. The use of orthodontic miniscrews for interim restorations before the completion of skeletal growth has been used successfully unlike osseointegrated implants lacking the compensatory growth mechanisms of the natural dentition. The following case reports show an esthetic alternative to temporary tooth replacement using miniscrews.

  18. Effect of Cervical Lessions on the Tooth FEM Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Bereşescu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The approach used until recently concerning the phenomena of dental abfraction points to the conclusion that the cervical area of the tooth, were this type of lesion usually occur, concentrates the stress resulted from the action of the forces applied on various areas on the crown. Moreover, any lesion in the cervical area facilitates the possibility of its advance into the tooth, ultimately fracturing it. Our paper presents a FEM (finite element method study on the results of a mechanical analysis of the phenomena involving the tooth damaged by cervical lesions.

  19. Autogenous tooth bone graft: Ingenious bone regeneration material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadalavada Sarala

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Tooth-derived bone graft material, which is proved to be rich in bone growth factors and bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs, have been becoming a practical substitute to bone grafting. It can also be used as a carrier for growth factors and stem cells as reported in many recent studies. Autogenous-tooth bone grafting technique is significant as this biomaterial has excellent bone regeneration capacity and also relatively non-existent chances of antigenicity, genetic diseases and disease transmission. In this article, a broad overview of the published findings with regard to the properties and uses of tooth-derived regenerative bone grafting is discussed.

  20. Periodontal profile classes predict periodontal disease progression and tooth loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Thiago; Moss, Kevin L; Preisser, John S; Beck, James D; Divaris, Kimon; Wu, Di; Offenbacher, Steven

    2018-02-01

    Current periodontal disease taxonomies have limited utility for predicting disease progression and tooth loss; in fact, tooth loss itself can undermine precise person-level periodontal disease classifications. To overcome this limitation, the current group recently introduced a novel patient stratification system using latent class analyses of clinical parameters, including patterns of missing teeth. This investigation sought to determine the clinical utility of the Periodontal Profile Classes and Tooth Profile Classes (PPC/TPC) taxonomy for risk assessment, specifically for predicting periodontal disease progression and incident tooth loss. The analytic sample comprised 4,682 adult participants of two prospective cohort studies (Dental Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study and Piedmont Dental Study) with information on periodontal disease progression and incident tooth loss. The PPC/TPC taxonomy includes seven distinct PPCs (person-level disease pattern and severity) and seven TPCs (tooth-level disease). Logistic regression modeling was used to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association of these latent classes with disease progression and incident tooth loss, adjusting for examination center, race, sex, age, diabetes, and smoking. To obtain personalized outcome propensities, risk estimates associated with each participant's PPC and TPC were combined into person-level composite risk scores (Index of Periodontal Risk [IPR]). Individuals in two PPCs (PPC-G: Severe Disease and PPC-D: Tooth Loss) had the highest tooth loss risk (RR = 3.6; 95% CI = 2.6 to 5.0 and RR = 3.8; 95% CI = 2.9 to 5.1, respectively). PPC-G also had the highest risk for periodontitis progression (RR = 5.7; 95% CI = 2.2 to 14.7). Personalized IPR scores were positively associated with both periodontitis progression and tooth loss. These findings, upon additional validation, suggest that the periodontal/tooth profile classes and the derived

  1. In patients requiring single-tooth replacement, what are the outcomes of implant- as compared to tooth-supported restorations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Thomas J; Eckert, Steven E

    2007-01-01

    The study provides a systematic review of the literature to determine the long-term survival characteristics of single implant-supported crowns and fixed partial dentures. A search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Collaboration databases was conducted to identify articles that compared survival and success of fixed partial dentures and single implant-supported crowns. In addition to comparative cohort studies, articles that pertained specifically to single implant-supported crowns or fixed partial dentures were included in this review. Inclusion criteria for implant and fixed partial denture articles included a minimum 2-year study, primary publication in the English language, a minimum of 12 implants, implants designed to osseointegrate, and inclusion of data regarding implant and prosthetic performance. Data were analyzed using cumulative proportions of survival and success for both prosthetic types and for individual implants. Wilson score method was used to establish 95% confidence intervals for each population. The chi-square test for homogeneity was performed. The literature search failed to identify any articles that directly compared survival or success of single implant-supported restorations with fixed partial dentures. Following the search criteria, and independent analysis by reviewers, 51 articles were identified in the implant literature (agreement, 95.42%; kappa coefficient, 0.8976), and 41 were identified in the fixed partial denture literature (agreement, 90.97%; kappa coefficient, 0.7524). Pooled success of single-implant restorations at 60 months was 95.1% (CI: 92.2%-98.0%), while fixed partial dentures of all designs exhibited an 84.0% success rate (CI: 79.1%-88.9%). This systematic review of the scientific literature failed to demonstrate any direct comparative studies assessing clinical performance of single implant-supported crowns and tooth-supported fixed partial dentures. The analysis suggested differences at 60 months between survival

  2. Prevention of dental anomalies in children by prosthetics defects hard tooth tissues and dentitions: the need to possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suetenkov D.Ye.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the possibility of restore the function and anatomy of the tooth and replacement of defects of dentition by prosthesis in children under the removable bite as a method of prevention of dentoalveolar anomalies. Identified the need for prosthetic treatment of children and the willingness of dentists as primary health care professional to address the problems identified. A clinical analysis of complex treatment of defects in the teeth with fixed restorations

  3. [Comparison between the tooth length measured by cone-beam CT and the tooth length measured with vernier caliper].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi-qiang; Mi, Zhen-lin; Ge, Zhen-lin

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of cone-bean CT (CBCT) on the measurement of the tooth length. One hundred and sixty single root premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were selected. The tooth length was measured with vernier caliper. The premolars were divided into 10 groups randomly, 16 premolars in each group.In each group, the teeth were lined in molar area, premolar area, canine area and anterior tooth area in maxilla and mandible. Then CBCT was taken, and the tooth length was measured using the software supplied by the manufacturer in coronal and sagittal plane. Accuracy was compared between vernier caliper measurement and CBCT measurement. The tooth length measured by CBCT was smaller than that measured with the vernier caliper. Significant differences were found in six areas, except the maxillary and mandibular premolar areas. With the increase of mesial-distal inclination or buccolingual torque angle, the difference between tooth length measured by CBCT and that measured with vernier caliper increased. The correlation between buccolingual torque angle (∠X1) and the coronal view of CBCT radiology tooth length (Spearmen index was 7.00, P caliper.

  4. The primary enamel knot determines the position of the first buccal cusp in developing mice molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Won; Lee, Hyun-A; Cai, Jinglei; Lee, Min-Jung; Kim, Jae-Young; Ohshima, Hayato; Jung, Han-Sung

    2007-06-01

    The enamel knot (EK), which is located in the center of bud and cap stage tooth germs, is a transitory cluster of non-dividing epithelial cells. The EK acts as a signaling center that provides positional information for tooth morphogenesis and regulates the growth of tooth cusps by inducing secondary EKs. The morphological, cellular, and molecular events leading to the relationship between the primary and secondary EKs have not been described clearly. This study investigated the relationship between the primary and secondary EKs in the maxillary and mandibular first molars of mice. The location of the primary EK and secondary EKs was investigated by chasing Fgf4 expression patterns in tooth germ at some intervals of in vitro culture, and the relationship between the primary EK and secondary EK was examined by tracing the primary EK cells in the E13.5 tooth germs which were frontally half sliced to expose the primary EK. After 48 hr, the primary EK cells in the sliced tooth germs were located on the buccal secondary EKs, which correspond to the future paracone in maxilla and protoconid in mandible. The Bmp4 expression in buccal part of the dental mesenchyme might be related with the lower growth in buccal epithelium than in lingual epithelium, and the Msx2 expressing area in epithelium was overlapped with the enamel cord (or septum) and cell dense area. The enamel cord might connect the primary EK with enamel navel to fix the location of the primary EK in the buccal side during the cap to bell stages. Overall, these results suggest that primary EK cells strictly contribute to form the paracone or protoconid, which are the main cusps of the tooth in the maxilla or mandible.

  5. Association of dietary habits and parental-reported sleep tooth grinding with tooth wear in children with mixed dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Claudia; Manfredini, Daniele; Manrique, Ruben; Lobbezoo, Frank

    2017-12-20

    Tooth wear has a multifactorial etiology, thus it should be assessed within a multiple-variable framework. The objective of this investigation was to assess the association of dietary habits and parental-reported sleep tooth grinding (STG) with tooth wear in children with mixed dentition. One hundred twenty-one (N = 121) subjects (mean age 9.6 years) participated in a cross-sectional study. Wear of 1637 teeth was evaluated using the screening module of the Tooth Wear Evaluation System (TWES). Parental-report of STG was evaluated by means of the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ), whilst dietary habits were investigated by means of the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children Food-Frequency Questionnaire (HBSC-FFQ). Data were analyzed with the Spearman correlation test and ordinal-multiple-variable regression analyses. Odds Ratio (OR) and ordinal OR were obtained for the independent variables included in the models. Parental-report of STG is not associated with tooth wear in the mixed dentition; some dietary habits were found to be correlated with specific tooth wear patterns, but the correlation values were weak. Associations were found between dietary habits and the increase-to-increase severity of occlusal/incisal and non-occlusal/non-incisal tooth wear of some teeth (OR > 2). A strong correlation of dietary habits and sleep tooth grinding with tooth wear in the mixed dentition was not demonstrated. However, dietary habits showed to have effects in terms of increase-to-increase severity.

  6. Relationship between gestational age, birth weight and deciduous tooth eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afrin Mohamed Khalifa

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Delayed tooth eruption was related to lower birth weight and prematurity. The delayed eruption in preterm babies may be related to premature birth and not to a delay in dental development.

  7. Drugs influencing orthodontic tooth movement: An overall review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamatchi Diravidamani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic treatment is based on the premise that when force is delivered to a tooth and thereby transmitted to the adjacent investing tissues, certain mechanical, chemical, and cellular events take place within these tissues, which allow for structural alterations and contribute to the movement of that tooth. Molecules present in drugs and nutrients consumed regularly by patients can reach the mechanically stressed paradental tissues through the circulation and interact with local target cells. The combined effect of mechanical forces and one or more of these agents may be inhibitory, additive, or synergistic. Current orthodontic research aims to develop methods of increasing the tissue concentration of molecules promoting tooth movement, while simultaneously decreasing the concentration of unwanted elements which can produce harmful side effects. This article discusses in detail the various possible drugs that can bring about alterations in the desired orthodontic tooth movement.

  8. Circumscribed Lipoatrophy of the Chin after Tooth Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe the rare occurrence of circumscribed facial lipoatrophy after tooth extraction. Correction by minimal invasive esthetic techniques such as soft tissue fillers or autologous fat transfer is possible but was not warranted.

  9. Enhanced Prediction of Gear Tooth Surface Fatigue Life, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sentient will develop an enhanced prediction of gear tooth surface fatigue life with rigorous analysis of the tribological phenomena that contribute to pitting...

  10. The diagnosis and treatment of the cracked tooth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, G A

    1989-01-01

    Teeth restored with intracoronal restorations that provide no protection of the cusps from occlusal loading may fracture completely or partially. An incomplete dentinal fracture of a vital posterior tooth may cause pain. This condition is commonly known as the "cracked tooth syndrome". Location of the dentinal crack is difficult and must be guided by a precise history, thermal pulp testing and inspection of the dentinal walls within the suspect tooth. The number, extent and direction of the fracture lines may be ascertained readily by using transillumination and magnification. This allows the clinician to distinguish between oblique and vertical cracks. Treatment of oblique incomplete fracture relies on desensitisation of the hypersensitive dentine followed by splinting of the tooth fragments. Treatment of vertical incomplete fracture requires pulpectomy and immediate splinting of the crown. Two case reports are presented.

  11. Complications associated with cheek tooth extraction in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earley, Edward T; Rawlinson, Jennifer E; Baratt, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    Common indications for cheek tooth extraction in the horse include dental fracture, periodontal disease, severe decay/ caries, mandibular fracture with alveolar/tooth involvement, and periapical abscess. Complications secondary to extraction of cheek teeth are prevalent. Typical complications may include retained root tip(s), collateral damage of neighboring teeth and alveolar bone, mandibular fracture non-union or delayed union, cemental ankylosis, dilacerated root(s), oroantral/oronasal fistula, palatal deviation of cheek teeth, bone sequestration, sinus involvement, alveolar plug failure, and palatine artery laceration. This paper presents a series of cases that had complications following cheek tooth extraction. Anticipation of problematic extractions, recognition of complications, and appropriate treatment will aid the clinician in managing the inevitable cheek tooth extraction complication.

  12. Tooth extraction education at dental schools across Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; van der Cammen, C.C.J.; Roorda, S.M.E.; Baart, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives/Aims: To explore students’ opinion about theoretical and clinical training in tooth extraction at different European dental schools. Materials and Methods: An online questionnaire, containing 36 dichotomous, multiple choice and Likert scale rating questions, was distributed among students

  13. Dental regenerative therapy: Stem cell transplantation and bioengineered tooth replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Kazuhisa Nakao; Takashi Tsuji

    2008-01-01

    For clinical treatment of tooth defects and tooth loss, nonbiotechnological approaches, such as the use of prostheses and implants, have generally been employed. Dental regenerative therapies which restore or replace defective teeth using autologous explants are being investigated using current understandings of developmental biology, stem cell biology, and regenerative medicine. Recently, dental tissue stem/progenitor cells, which can differentiate into dental cell lineages, have been identi...

  14. Effect of Cervical Lessions on the Tooth FEM Study

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriela Bereşescu; Ligia Brezeanu; Claudia Şoaita

    2010-01-01

    The approach used until recently concerning the phenomena of dental abfraction points to the conclusion that the cervical area of the tooth, were this type of lesion usually occur, concentrates the stress resulted from the action of the forces applied on various areas on the crown. Moreover, any lesion in the cervical area facilitates the possibility of its advance into the tooth, ultimately fracturing it. Our paper presents a FEM (finite element method) study on the results of a mechanical a...

  15. Electron paramagnetic resonance biophysical radiation dosimetry with tooth enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rao F. H.

    This thesis deals with advancements made in the field of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) for biophysical dosimetry with tooth enamel for accident, emergency and retrospective radiation dose reconstruction. A methodology has been developed to measure retrospective radiation exposures in human tooth enamel. This entails novel sample preparation procedures with minimum mechanical treatment to reduce the preparation induced uncertainties, establish optimum measurement conditions inside the EPR cavity, post process the measured spectrum with functional simulation of dosimetric and other interfering signals, and reconstruct dose. By using this technique, retrospective gamma radiation exposures as low as 80 +/- 30 mGy have been successfully deciphered. The notion of dose modifier was introduced in EPR biodosimetry for low dose measurements. It has been demonstrated that by using the modified zero added dose (MZAD) technique for low radiation exposures, doses in the 100 mGy range can be easily reconstructed in teeth which were previously thought useless for EPR dosimetry. Also the use of a dose modifier makes robust dose reconstruction possible for higher radiation exposures. The EPR dosimetry technique was also developed for tooth samples extracted from rodents, which represent small tooth sizing. EPR doses in the molars, extracted from mice irradiated with whole body exposures, were reassessed and shown to be correct within the experimental uncertainty. The sensitivity of human tooth enamel for neutron irradiation, obtained from the 3 MV McMaster K. N. Van de Graaff accelerator, was also studied. For the first time this work has shown that the neutron sensitivity of the tooth enamel is approximately 1/10th of the equivalent gamma sensitivity. Parametric studies for neutron dose rate and neutron energy within the available range of the accelerator, showed no impact on the sensitivity of the tooth enamel. Therefore, tooth enamel can be used as a dosimeter for both

  16. 3-D finite element simulation for ultrasonic propagation in tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoqing; Witzel, Erich A; Bian, Hongxin; Kang, Shaoying

    2008-07-01

    Ultrasonic testing of the tooth has been suggested as an alternative method of identifying dental pathology. Due to the complex geometry and low transmission efficiency of ultrasonic signals in tooth structures, it is difficult to establish one-to-one correspondence between ultrasonic behaviour and specific tooth pathologies both in vitro and in vivo. In order to facilitate ultrasonic diagnosis in dental applications, finite element modeling (FEM) was used to simulate ultrasonic wave propagation in teeth with several dental conditions. 3-D finite element tooth models were developed. The geometry of the tooth models was defined by 3-D images generated by scanning real tooth samples using an X-ray computerized tomography machine. Poro-elastic material was used to simulate the mechanical behaviour of the dentine. Numerical simulations of ultrasonic wave propagation were performed on the 3-D FEM models altered to mimic various dental conditions. The software ABAQUS was used as the calculator in the simulation. Excellent replication of ultrasonic behaviours by the FEM simulation was demonstrated through comparison of the simulation results with those of the actual ultrasonic testing on tooth specimens. Pathologies, such as caries, were also simulated on the finite element models. The unique influence of each dental condition on the patterns of ultrasonic waves propagating through the tooth (A-scan) was observed. Through FEM simulation, the influence of a particular dental pathology on ultrasonic wave pattern can be studied without the impact of other parameters. This will lead to a better understanding of how ultrasound could be applied to the diagnosis of pathology within teeth.

  17. Variables affecting orthodontic tooth movement with clear aligners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisari, Justin R; McGorray, Susan P; Nair, Madhu; Wheeler, Timothy T

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we examined the impacts of age, sex, root length, bone levels, and bone quality on orthodontic tooth movement. Clear aligners were programmed to move 1 central incisor 1 mm over the course of 8 weeks. Thirty subjects, ages 19 to 64, were enrolled, and measurements were made on digital models (percentage of tooth movement goal achieved). Morphometric features and bone quality were assessed with cone-beam computed tomography. Data from this study were combined with data from 2 similar studies to increase the power for some analyses. The mean percentage of tooth movement goal achieved was 57% overall. Linear regression modeling indicated a cubic relationship between age and tooth movement, with a decreasing rate of movement from ages 18 to 35 years, a slightly increasing rate from ages 35 to 50, and a decreasing rate from ages 50 to 70. The final decreasing trend was not apparent for women. As would be expected, the correlation was significant between the percentage of the goal achieved and the cone-beam computed tomography superimposed linear measures of tooth movement. A significant negative correlation was found between tooth movement and the measurement apex to the center of rotation, but bone quality, as measured by fractal dimension, was not correlated with movement. The relationship between age and tooth movement is complex and might differ for male and female patients. Limited correlations with cone-beam computed tomography morphology and rate of tooth movement were detected. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The cracked tooth syndrome--crown root vertical fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Majid, Z. A.; Zain, R. B.

    1988-01-01

    A case of an incomplete tooth fracture followed by a complete fracture was presented. The difficulty of diagnosing this condition was discussed as well as the possible histological explanation of the symptoms experienced by the patient. It once again points out to practising dentists, that whilst deep pockets can give rise to severe periodontal pain, intense and excruciating pain should be investigated with the cracked tooth in mind. This record was migrated from the OpenDepot repository serv...

  19. Cracked tooth syndrome: A report of three cases

    OpenAIRE

    Sadasiva, Kadandale; Ramalingam, Sathishmuthukumar; Rajaram, Krishnaraj; Meiyappan, Alagappan

    2015-01-01

    Cracked tooth syndrome (CTS), the term was coined by Cameron in 1964, which refers to an incomplete fracture of a vital posterior tooth extending to the dentin and occasionally into the pulp. CTS has always been a nightmare to the patient because of its unpredictable symptoms and a diagnostic dilemma for the dental practitioner due to its variable, bizarre clinical presentation. The treatment planning and management of CTS has also given problems and challenges the dentist as there is no spec...

  20. Cracked tooth syndrome--incidence, clinical findings and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homewood, C I

    1998-08-01

    Cracked tooth syndrome (CTS) is a common occurrence in modern general practice. This article reviews the forces placed on the human dentition and the effect restorative dentistry has on the strength of tooth structure. The study reports on the incidence of CTS in a general practice, finding a far higher incidence in teeth which have had the marginal ridge restored than those which have not. The various types of treatment modalities advocated and their relative merits are discussed.