WorldWideScience

Sample records for caribe wood treated

  1. Bioremediation of treated wood with fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara L. Illman; Vina W. Yang

    2006-01-01

    The authors have developed technologies for fungal bioremediation of waste wood treated with oilborne or metal-based preservatives. The technologies are based on specially formulated inoculum of wood-decay fungi, obtained through strain selection to obtain preservative-tolerant fungi. This waste management approach provides a product with reduced wood volume and the...

  2. Corrosion of Fasteners in Wood Treated with Newer Wood Preservatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka

    2013-01-01

    This document compiles recent research findings related to corrosion of metals in preservative treated wood into a single report on corrosion of metals in wood. The research was conducted as part of the Research, Technology and Education portion of the National Historic Covered Bridge Preservation (NHCBP) Program administered by the Federal Highway Administration. The...

  3. Bioremediation of treated wood with bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol A. Clausen

    2006-01-01

    This chapter reviews prior research in the field of bacterial bioremediation for wood treated with oilborne and inorganic preservatives. Current state of the art is summarized along with potential benefits and pitfalls of a pilot-scale bioremediation process for CCA-treated waste wood.

  4. Finishability of CCA pressure-treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan Ross; Richard Carlson; William Feist; Steven Bussjaeger

    2000-01-01

    Thus, a need arose for the development of surface finishes for CCA-treated wood that could address the special requirements of this substrate and provide protection against the ravages of water, sunlight, mildew, and other aspects of weathering and wear. Initially, this need was not addressed, most wood preserving companies had little expertise in surface finishes and...

  5. The reuse of treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Smith; David Bailey; Delton R. Alderman; Philip A. Araman

    2006-01-01

    The primary goals of this book chapter are to identify barriers to the reuse of treated lumber, to describe the physical properties of spent chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated lumber coming from residential decks and to identify potential products and markets that can use spent treated lumber. The primary focus will be on CCA-treated lumber because it has been the...

  6. Pesticides released from burning treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles K. McMahon; H.B. Clements; P.B. Bush; D.G. Neary; J.W. Taylor

    1985-01-01

    Abstract. Demands for firewood are high and rising, and pesticide-treated trees are often an obvious source. Wood treated with five herbicides (2,4-D, picloram, hexazinone, dicamba, and dichloroprop) and two insecticides (lindane and chlorpyrifos) were burned under controlled combustion conditions in a horizontal tube furnace to simulate the wide...

  7. Electrodialytic remediation of CCA treated waste wood in pilot scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Christensen, Iben Vernegren; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2005-01-01

    When CCA (Chromated Copper Arsenate) treated wood is removed from service and turns into waste, the contents of Cu, Cr and As is still high due to the strong fixation of CCA in the wood. This high content of toxic compounds presents a disposal challenge. Incineration of CCA treated waste wood...... is not allowed in Denmark, instead the wood is to be land filled until new methods for handling the wood are available. Since the amounts of CCA treated wood being removed from service is expected to increase in the years to come, the need of finding alternative handling methods is very relevant. In this present...... study the utility of the method Electrodialytic Remediation was demonstrated for handling of CCA treated waste wood in pilot scale. The electrodialytic remediation method, which uses a low level DC current as the cleaning agent, combines elektrokinetic movement of ions in the wood matrix with the princi...

  8. Electrodialytic remediation of CCA treated waste wood in pilot scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Christensen, Iben Vernegren; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2005-01-01

    When CCA (Chromated Copper Arsenate) treated wood is removed from service and turns into waste, the contents of Cu, Cr and As is still high due to the strong fixation of CCA in the wood. This high content of toxic compounds presents a disposal challenge. Incineration of CCA treated waste wood...... study the utility of the method Electrodialytic Remediation was demonstrated for handling of CCA treated waste wood in pilot scale. The electrodialytic remediation method, which uses a low level DC current as the cleaning agent, combines elektrokinetic movement of ions in the wood matrix with the princi...

  9. The challenge of bonding treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2004-01-01

    Wood products are quite durable if exposure to moisture is minimized; however, most uses of wood involve considerable exposure to moisture. To preserve the wood, chemicals are used to minimize moisture pickup, to prevent insect attack, and/or to resist microbial growth. The chemicals used as preservatives can interfere with adhesive bonds to wood. Given the many...

  10. Variability in evaluating environmental impacts of treated wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan Lebow; Paul Cooper; Patricia. Lebow

    2004-01-01

    Preservative treated wood contains components that may be toxic to non-target organisms if released into the environment in sufficient quantities. Numerous studies have been conducted to determine the rate of preservative release from treated wood and/or the extent of their subsequent accumulation in the environment. These studies have produced a wide range of results...

  11. Factors affecting sodium hypochlorite extraction of CCA from treated wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezer, E D; Cooper, P A

    2009-12-01

    Significant amounts of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood products, such as utility poles and residential construction wood, remain in service. There is increasing public concern about environmental contamination from CCA-treated wood when it is removed from service for reuse or recycling, placed in landfills or burned in commercial incinerators. In this paper, we investigated the effects of time, temperature and sodium hypochlorite concentration on chromium oxidation and extraction of chromated copper arsenate from CCA-treated wood (Type C) removed from service. Of the conditions evaluated, reaction of milled wood with sodium hypochlorite for one hour at room temperature followed by heating at 75 degrees C for two hours gave the highest extraction efficiency. An average of 95% Cr, 99% Cu and 96% As could be removed from CCA-treated, milled wood by this process. Most of the extracted chromium was oxidized to the hexavalent state and could therefore be recycled in a CCA treating solution. Sodium hypochlorite extracting solutions could be reused several times to extract CCA components from additional treated wood samples.

  12. Outdoor weathering of sol-gel-treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandla A Tshabalala; Ryan Libert; Nancy Ross Sutherland

    2009-01-01

    Outdoor weathering of wood specimens treated with sol-gel formulations based on methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMOS), hexadecyltrimethoxysilane (HDTMOS), and ferric-zirconia-titania (Fe-Zr-Ti) sol was evaluated. The sol-gel process allowed deposition of a thin film of hybrid inorganic-organic networks (gel) in the wood cell wall that resulted in improved outdoor weathering...

  13. Creosote movement from treated wood immersed in fresh water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung-Mo Kang; Jeffrey J. Morrell; John Simonsen; Stan Lebow

    2005-01-01

    Creosote has a long history of successful use as a wood preservative, but polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in this preservative have raised environmental concerns, particularly when creosote-treated wood is used in aquatic environments. A number of models have been developed to predict the risk of creosote use in aquatic environments, but one limitation of these models...

  14. Extraction of chromium, copper, and arsenic from CCA-treated wood by using wood vinegar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yong-Seok; Ahn, Byoung Jun; Kim, Gyu-Hyeok

    2012-09-01

    In the present study, wood vinegar was used to extract chromium, copper, and arsenic from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood. The extraction efficiency for CCA elements was evaluated using various concentrations of wood vinegar, extraction temperatures, and extraction periods. The extraction efficiency for CCA elements increased with increasing the concentration of wood vinegar and the extraction conditions, resulting in maximal removal rate of copper (95.7%), followed by arsenic (92.7%) and chromium (86.3%). Since wood vinegar afforded high levels of copper extraction, its use was extended to copper-based preservative-treated wood, wherein significant extraction of copper up to 97.6% and 95.7% was obtained from alkaline copper quats (ACQ)- and copper azole (CuAz)-treated sawdust, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study on the application of wood vinegar for the extraction of metal elements from CCA-treated wood. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Surface properties of thermally treated composite wood panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croitoru, Catalin; Spirchez, Cosmin; Lunguleasa, Aurel; Cristea, Daniel; Roata, Ionut Claudiu; Pop, Mihai Alin; Bedo, Tibor; Stanciu, Elena Manuela; Pascu, Alexandru

    2018-04-01

    Composite finger-jointed spruce and oak wood panels have been thermally treated under standard pressure and oxygen content conditions at two different temperatures, 180 °C and respectively 200 °C for short time periods (3 and 5 h). Due to the thermally-aided chemical restructuration of the wood components, a decrease in water uptake and volumetric swelling values with up to 45% for spruce and 35% for oak have been registered, comparing to the reference samples. In relation to water resistance, a 15% increase of the dispersive component of the surface energy has been registered for the thermal-treated spruce panels, which impedes water spreading on the surface. The thermal-treated wood presents superior resistance to accelerated UV exposure and subsequently, with up to 10% higher Brinell hardness values than reference wood. The proposed thermal treatment improves the durability of the finger-jointed wood through a more economically and environmental friendly method than traditional impregnation, with minimal degradative impact on the structural components of wood.

  16. Characteristics of heat-treated Turkish pine and fir wood after ThermoWood processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kol, Hamiyet Sahin

    2010-11-01

    The Finnish wood heat treatment technology ThermoWood, was recently introduced to Turkey. Data about the mechanical and physical properties of Turkish wood species are important for industry and academia. In this study two industrially important Turkish wood species, pine (Pinus nigraArnold.) and fir (Abies bornmülleriana Matf.) were heat-treated using the ThermoWood process. Pine and fir samples were thermally modified for 2 hr at 212 and 190 degrees C, respectively. The modulus of rupture (MOR), modulus of elasticity in bending (MOE), impact bending strength (IBS), and compression strength (CS), in addition to swelling (Sw) and shrinkage (Sh) of thermally-modified wood were examined. The results indicate that the heat treatment method clearly decreased the MOR, MOE and lBS of pine and fir. However, a small increase was observed for CS values of heat treated wood species. The most affected mechanical properties were MOR and lBS for both pine and fir. The reduction in MOE was smaller than that in MOR and lBS. Volumetric shrinkage and swelling of these species were also improved by approximately half. In Addition, the changes in the mechanical and physical properties studied in pine were larger than that of fir.

  17. Biocide leaching from CBA treated wood - a mechanistic interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupsea, Maria; Mathies, Helena; Schoknecht, Ute; Tiruta-Barna, Ligia; Schiopu, Nicoleta

    2013-02-01

    Treated wood is frequently used for construction. However, there is a need to ensure that biocides used for the treatment are not a threat for people or environment. The paper focused on Pinus sylvestris treated with copper-boron-azole (CBA), containing tebuconazole as organic biocide and monoethanolamine (Mea). This study investigates chemical mechanisms of fixation and mobilisation involved in the leaching process of the used inorganic and organic biocides in CBA. A pH dependent leaching test was performed, followed by a set of complementary analysis methods in order to identify and quantify the species released from wood. The main findings of this study are: - Organic compounds are released from untreated and treated wood; the quantity of released total organic carbon, carboxylic and phenolic functions increasing with the pH. - Nitrogen containing compounds, i.e. mainly Mea and its reaction products with extractives, are released in important quantities from CBA treated wood, especially at low pH. - The release of copper is the result of competitive reactions: fixation via complexation reactions and complexation with extractives in the liquid phase. The specific pH dependency of Cu leaching is explained by the competition of ligands for protonation and complexation. - Tebuconazole is released to a lesser extent relative to its initial content. Its fixation on solid wood structure seems to be influenced by pH, suggesting interactions with \\OH groups on wood. Boron release appears to be pH independent and very high. This confirms its weak fixation on wood and also no or weak interaction with the extractives. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Biocide leaching from CBA treated wood — A mechanistic interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupsea, Maria [University of Toulouse, INSA, UPS, INP, LISBP, 135 Avenue de Rangueil, F-31077 Toulouse (France); INRA, UMR 792, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5504, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Paris-Est University, CSTB — Scientific and Technical Centre for the Building Industry, ESE/Environment, 24 rue Joseph Fourier, F-38400 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Mathies, Helena; Schoknecht, Ute [BAM — Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division 4.1, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany); Tiruta-Barna, Ligia, E-mail: ligia.barna@insa-toulouse.fr [University of Toulouse, INSA, UPS, INP, LISBP, 135 Avenue de Rangueil, F-31077 Toulouse (France); INRA, UMR 792, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5504, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Schiopu, Nicoleta [Paris-Est University, CSTB — Scientific and Technical Centre for the Building Industry, ESE/Environment, 24 rue Joseph Fourier, F-38400 Saint Martin d' Hères (France)

    2013-02-01

    Treated wood is frequently used for construction. However, there is a need to ensure that biocides used for the treatment are not a threat for people or environment. The paper focused on Pinus sylvestris treated with copper–boron–azole (CBA), containing tebuconazole as organic biocide and monoethanolamine (Mea). This study investigates chemical mechanisms of fixation and mobilisation involved in the leaching process of the used inorganic and organic biocides in CBA. A pH dependent leaching test was performed, followed by a set of complementary analysis methods in order to identify and quantify the species released from wood. The main findings of this study are: -Organic compounds are released from untreated and treated wood; the quantity of released total organic carbon, carboxylic and phenolic functions increasing with the pH. -Nitrogen containing compounds, i.e. mainly Mea and its reaction products with extractives, are released in important quantities from CBA treated wood, especially at low pH. -The release of copper is the result of competitive reactions: fixation via complexation reactions and complexation with extractives in the liquid phase. The specific pH dependency of Cu leaching is explained by the competition of ligands for protonation and complexation. -Tebuconazole is released to a lesser extent relative to its initial content. Its fixation on solid wood structure seems to be influenced by pH, suggesting interactions with -OH groups on wood. Boron release appears to be pH independent and very high. This confirms its weak fixation on wood and also no or weak interaction with the extractives. - Highlights: ► A pH dependent leaching mechanism for CBA treated wood is described. ► The fixation and mobilisation of inorganic and organic biocides was investigated. ► Extractives' quantity and nature depend on pH. ► Competition of ligands for protonation and complexation explains Cu behaviour. ► Tebuconazole seems to interact with -OH groups

  19. Statistical process control for residential treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia K. Lebow; Timothy M. Young; Stan Lebow

    2017-01-01

    This paper is the first stage of a study that attempts to improve the process of manufacturing treated lumber through the use of statistical process control (SPC). Analysis of industrial and auditing agency data sets revealed there are differences between the industry and agency probability density functions (pdf) for normalized retention data. Resampling of batches of...

  20. Bond quality of phenol-based adhesives containing liquefied creosote-treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung-Yun Hse; Feng Fu; Hui Pan

    2009-01-01

    Liquefaction of spent creosote-treated wood was studied to determine the technological practicability of its application in converting treated wood waste into resin adhesives. A total of 144 plywood panels were fabricated with experimental variables included 2 phenol to wood (P/W) ratios in liquefaction, 6 resin formulations (3 formaldehyde/liquefied wood (F/...

  1. Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unterrainer, Walter

    2014-01-01

    come from? How is it harvested? How is it manufactured and treated ? How are the buildings detailed and protected against weather during construction to keep them dry and make them long-life ? In a period of climate change, forests are the last lungs of the planet to sequestrate CO2. Their global size......Wood – a sustainable building material ? For thousands of years and all over the planet, wood has been used as a building material and exciting architecture has been created in wood. The fantastic structural, physical and aesthetic properties of the material as well as the fact that wood...... is a renewable resource makes it predestinated for what is considered ´sustainable architecture´. But the reality is less linear and there are serious traps: In fact the lecture shows by examples that it is much easier to build very unsustainable buildings in wood than the other way round! Where does the wood...

  2. Exposure testing of fasteners in preservative treated wood : gravimetric corrosion rates and corrosion product analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Rebecca J. Sichel; Donald S. Stone

    2010-01-01

    Research was conducted to determine the corrosion rates of metals in preservative treated wood and also understand the mechanism of metal corrosion in treated wood. Steel and hot-dip galvanized steel fasteners were embedded in wood treated with one of six preservative treatments and exposed to 27oC at 100% relative humidity for 1 year. The...

  3. Common questions and concerns from government users of industrial treated wood products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan Lebow; James Wacker

    2011-01-01

    Because pressure-treated wood is perceived as economical and relatively easy to install, federal, state and local government agencies sometimes utilize treated wood for industrial-type applications. When these agencies have questions or concerns about treated wood they may make inquiries to the US Forest Products Laboratory. These inquiries provide an indication of...

  4. Role of construction debris in release of copper, chromium, and arsenic from treated wood structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan T. Lebow; Steven A. Halverson; Jeffrey J. Morrell; John. Simonsen

    Recent research on the release of wood preservatives from treated wood used in sensitive environments has not considered the potential contribution from construction residues. This study sought to develop leaching rate data for small construction debris and compare those to the release rate from treated wood itself. Western hemlock boards were pressure treated with...

  5. 76 FR 13616 - Picayune Wood Treating Site Picayune, Pearl River County, MS; Notice of Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... AGENCY Picayune Wood Treating Site Picayune, Pearl River County, MS; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Picayune Wood Treating Site located in Picayune, Pearl River County, Mississippi for publication. DATES..., identified by Docket ID No. EPA-RO4- SFUND-2011-0201 or Site name Picayune Wood Treating Superfund Site by...

  6. Spent CCA treated wood from residential decks can be a resource for reuse and recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L Smith; Philip A. Araman; David Bailey; Matthew F. Winn

    2005-01-01

    The volume of CCA treated wood being disposed of in landfills is growing at an alarming rate. In order to reduce the demand on landfills and timber harvest, more environmentally responsible alternatives for spent CCA treated wood have to be addressed. The objective of this study was to determine feasible products that can be produced from CCA treated wood....

  7. Nanotechnologies for the restoration of alum-treated archaeological wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriulo, Fabrizio; Braovac, Susan; Kutzke, Hartmut; Giorgi, Rodorico; Baglioni, Piero

    2016-04-01

    The project Saving Oseberg is funded by the Norwegian State with the aim to preserve the Viking Age wooden objects from the Oseberg burial mound. They were excavated in 1904 near Tønsberg, Norway, and many have been treated in the past with alum salts (KAl(SO4)2·12H2O). Alum was widely used during the early 1900s as a treatment for archaeological wood to prevent shrinkage and impart strength. In the 1990s, conservators observed an alarming condition of the objects. Initial investigations showed that the alum treatment has initiated a slow but ongoing deterioration process, attacking the wood for over 100 years. Today, the artefacts are highly acidic and have significantly reduced mechanical strength. In the last decade, the use of non-aqueous alkaline nanoparticle dispersions has provided successful results for the protection of cellulose-based materials. Alum-treated archaeological wood samples from Oseberg, with a pH ≤ 2, have been treated with alkaline nanoparticle dispersions, and the effects of the treatment have been evaluated by thermal analysis (TG-DTG), infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray microtomography (micro-CT) analyses. In this contribution, the preliminary results will be presented.

  8. Corrosion of metals in treated wood examined by synchrotron based xanes and XFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Joseph E. Jakes; Grant T. Kirker; Leandro Passarini; Barry Lai

    2016-01-01

    Copper based waterborne wood preservatives are frequently used to extend the service life of wood products used in outdoor environments. While these copper based treatments protect the wood from fungal decay and insect attack, they increase the corrosion of metals embedded or in contact with the treated wood. Over the past ten years, several studies have looked at the...

  9. Repensando el Caribe: valoraciones sobre el gran Caribe hispano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Santana Castillo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Todo intento de estudiar las ideas y su evolución histórica en lo que hoy en día se denomina Caribe, exige siempre un esfuerzo adicional para el estudioso: el pensar y repensar el Caribe, debido a la diversidad de criterios y puntos de vista que existen sobre la región y los países que la integran. El problema no se hace menor cuando se reduce el referente al contexto del Caribe hispano, pues, en este caso, existe igualmente disparidad de opiniones. El presente estudio se propone explorar las diferentes interpretaciones existentes en la historiografía del concepto Caribe y determinar cuales son los elementos y factores comunes en la misma. Foco de atención principal es el Gran Caribe Hispano. Por tanto, lo que se tratará es en pensar y redefinir el Caribe.Palabras Clave: Caribe; Hispanoamérica; Historiografía; Pensamiento; Identidad y Cultura. Rethink the Caribbean: valuations on the great Hispanic CaribbeanAbstractAll attempt to study the ideas and their historical evolution in which nowadays we denominated the Caribbean, always demands an additional effort for the student: thinking and rethink the Caribbean, due to the diversity of criteria and country and points of view that exist on the region that integrate it. The problem is not made minor when the referring one to the context of the Hispanic Caribbean is reduced, then, in this case, also exists disparity of opinions. The present study sets out to explore the different existing interpretations in the historiography from the Caribbean concept and to determine as they are the elements and factors common in the same one. Main center of attention is the Great Hispanic Caribbean. Therefore, which will treat is in thinking and redefining the Caribbean.Keywords: The Caribbean; Hispano-America; Historiography; Thought; Identity and Culture. 

  10. Characterization of the surface and the interphase of PVC-copper amine-treated wood composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haihong; Kamdem, D. Pascal

    2010-05-01

    Contact angles and surface energy of wood, as well as interfacial shear strength between wood and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) were investigated and used to monitor the modifications generated on the surfaces of wood treated with a copper ethanolamine solution. An increase in surface energy of wood after treatments promotes wetting of PVC on wood surfaces. Improved interfacial shear strength between treated wood and PVC matrix can be attributed to the formation of a stronger wood-PVC interphase. This suggests that treatment may be used to improve the adhesion between wood surface and PVC in the formulation of wood fiber composites to yield products with enhanced mechanical properties and better biological and physical performance against decay and insect destroying wood.

  11. Leaching of CCA-treated wood: implications for waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, Timothy; Tolaymat, Thabet; Solo-Gabriele, Helena; Dubey, Brajesh; Stook, Kristin; Wadanambi, Lakmini

    2004-01-01

    Leaching of arsenic, chromium, and copper from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood poses possible environmental risk when disposed. Samples of un-weathered CCA-treated wood were tested using a variety of the US regulatory leaching procedures, including the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP), extraction procedure toxicity method (EPTOX), waste extraction test (WET), multiple extraction procedure (MEP), and modifications of these procedures which utilized actual MSW landfill leachates, a construction and demolition (C and D) debris leachate, and a concrete enhanced leachate. Additional experiments were conducted to assess factors affecting leaching, such as particle size, pH, and leaching contact time. Results from the regulatory leaching tests provided similar results with the exception of the WET, which extracted greater quantities of metals. Experiments conducted using actual MSW leachate, C and D debris leachate, and concrete enhanced leachate provided results that were within the same order of magnitude as results obtained from TCLP, SPLP, and EPTOX. Eleven of 13 samples of CCA-treated dimensional lumber exceeded the US EPA's toxicity characteristic (TC) threshold for arsenic (5 mg/L). If un-weathered arsenic-treated wood were not otherwise excluded from the definition of hazardous waste, it frequently would require management as such. When extracted with simulated rainwater (SPLP), 9 of the 13 samples leached arsenic at concentrations above 5 mg/L. Metal leachability tended to increase with decreasing particle size and at pH extremes. All three metals leached above the drinking water standards thus possibly posing a potential risk to groundwater. Arsenic is a major concern from a disposal point of view with respect to ground water quality

  12. Leaching of CCA-treated wood: implications for waste disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Timothy; Tolaymat, Thabet; Solo-Gabriele, Helena; Dubey, Brajesh; Stook, Kristin; Wadanambi, Lakmini

    2004-10-18

    Leaching of arsenic, chromium, and copper from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood poses possible environmental risk when disposed. Samples of un-weathered CCA-treated wood were tested using a variety of the US regulatory leaching procedures, including the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP), extraction procedure toxicity method (EPTOX), waste extraction test (WET), multiple extraction procedure (MEP), and modifications of these procedures which utilized actual MSW landfill leachates, a construction and demolition (C and D) debris leachate, and a concrete enhanced leachate. Additional experiments were conducted to assess factors affecting leaching, such as particle size, pH, and leaching contact time. Results from the regulatory leaching tests provided similar results with the exception of the WET, which extracted greater quantities of metals. Experiments conducted using actual MSW leachate, C and D debris leachate, and concrete enhanced leachate provided results that were within the same order of magnitude as results obtained from TCLP, SPLP, and EPTOX. Eleven of 13 samples of CCA-treated dimensional lumber exceeded the US EPA's toxicity characteristic (TC) threshold for arsenic (5 mg/L). If un-weathered arsenic-treated wood were not otherwise excluded from the definition of hazardous waste, it frequently would require management as such. When extracted with simulated rainwater (SPLP), 9 of the 13 samples leached arsenic at concentrations above 5 mg/L. Metal leachability tended to increase with decreasing particle size and at pH extremes. All three metals leached above the drinking water standards thus possibly posing a potential risk to groundwater. Arsenic is a major concern from a disposal point of view with respect to ground water quality.

  13. Leaching of CCA-treated wood: implications for waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, Timothy [Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-6450 (United States)]. E-mail: ttown@ufl.edu; Tolaymat, Thabet [Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-6450 (United States); Solo-Gabriele, Helena [Department of Civil Architectural and Environmental Engineering, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33124-0630 (United States); Dubey, Brajesh [Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-6450 (United States); Stook, Kristin [Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-6450 (United States); Wadanambi, Lakmini [Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-6450 (United States)

    2004-10-18

    Leaching of arsenic, chromium, and copper from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood poses possible environmental risk when disposed. Samples of un-weathered CCA-treated wood were tested using a variety of the US regulatory leaching procedures, including the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP), extraction procedure toxicity method (EPTOX), waste extraction test (WET), multiple extraction procedure (MEP), and modifications of these procedures which utilized actual MSW landfill leachates, a construction and demolition (C and D) debris leachate, and a concrete enhanced leachate. Additional experiments were conducted to assess factors affecting leaching, such as particle size, pH, and leaching contact time. Results from the regulatory leaching tests provided similar results with the exception of the WET, which extracted greater quantities of metals. Experiments conducted using actual MSW leachate, C and D debris leachate, and concrete enhanced leachate provided results that were within the same order of magnitude as results obtained from TCLP, SPLP, and EPTOX. Eleven of 13 samples of CCA-treated dimensional lumber exceeded the US EPA's toxicity characteristic (TC) threshold for arsenic (5 mg/L). If un-weathered arsenic-treated wood were not otherwise excluded from the definition of hazardous waste, it frequently would require management as such. When extracted with simulated rainwater (SPLP), 9 of the 13 samples leached arsenic at concentrations above 5 mg/L. Metal leachability tended to increase with decreasing particle size and at pH extremes. All three metals leached above the drinking water standards thus possibly posing a potential risk to groundwater. Arsenic is a major concern from a disposal point of view with respect to ground water quality.

  14. CCA retention and its effects on the bonding performance of decommissioned treated wood: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng Piao; Todd F. Shupe; Mark Gibson; Chung Y. Hse

    2009-01-01

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) continues to be widely used as a wood preservative for industrial uses in the U.S. Disposal of treated wood is a potential long-term environmental liability. Current practices for disposing of decommissioned preservative-treated wood include landfilling and incineration, which are increasingly impractical due to environmental...

  15. Research update for the treated wood reusing program at the Calhoun Research Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng Piao; Todd F. Shupe; Leslie Groom; W. Allen Nipper

    2009-01-01

    The reusability of decommissioned treated wood is primarily dependent on residual preservative retention and residual strength of the wood after service. Therefore, determining the residual preservative retention, bonding performance, and residual strength of spent treated wood can provide vital information to further recycling efforts. This report summarizes the...

  16. Wood preservatives and pressure-treated wood: considerations for historic-preservation projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald W. Anthony; Stan T. Lebow

    2015-01-01

    Wood, an abundant resource throughout most of the world, has been used as a building material for thousands of years. Many historic buildings have been built primarily of wood, and masonry and stone buildings generally have wood elements, both structural and architectural. As a biological material, wood is both remarkably complex and yet quite durable if well...

  17. Documenting the Durability and Service Life of Pressure-treated Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan Lebow; Bessie Woodward; Patricia Lebow

    2014-01-01

    Estimates of service life are increasingly used to compare life cycle costs of building materials. Because of a lack of published data for treated wood, some users assume a relatively low service life for wood in comparison to alternative materials. Such bias against durable wood products may cause alternative materials to appear more economical. This paper discusses...

  18. Aureobasidium melanogenum: a native of dark biofinishes on oil treated wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, Elke J.; Houbraken, Jos A M P; Meijer, Martin; Adan, Olaf C G; Samson, Robert A

    The genus Aureobasidium, which is known as a wood staining mould, has been detected on oil treated woods in the specific stain formation called biofinish. This biofinish is used to develop a new protective, self-healing and decorative biotreatment for wood. In order to understand and control

  19. Environmental impact of preservative-treated wood in a wetland boardwalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan T. Lebow; Patricia K. Lebow; Daniel O. Foster; Kenneth M. Brooks

    Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, and industry partners are cooperating in a study of the leaching and environmental effects of a wetland boardwalk. The construction project is considered bworst casec because the site has high rainfall and large volumes of treated wood were used. Separate boardwalk test sections were constructed using untreated wood or wood...

  20. Subterranean Termite Resistance of Polystyrene-Treated Wood from Three Tropical Wood Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Sudo Hadi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to investigate the resistance of three Indonesian wood species to termite attack. Samples from sengon (Falcataria moluccana, mangium (Acacia mangium, and pine (Pinus merkusii were treated with polystyrene at loading levels of 26.0%, 8.6%, and 7.7%, respectively. Treated and untreated samples were exposed to environmental conditions in the field for 3 months. Untreated specimens of sengon, mangium, and pine had resistance ratings of 3.0, 4.6, and 2.4, respectively, based on a 10-point scale from 0 (no resistance to 10 (complete or near-complete resistance. Corresponding resistance values of 7.8, 7.2, and 8.2 were determined for specimens treated with polystyrene. Overall weight loss values of 50.3%, 23.3%, and 66.4% were found for untreated sengon, mangium, and pine samples, respectively; for treated samples, the values were 7.6%, 14.4%, and 5.1%, respectively. Based on the findings in this study, overall resistance to termite attack was higher for treated samples compared to untreated samples.

  1. Evaluation of the accessibility of CCA metals in liquefied CCA-treated wood sludge for recovery and reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui Pan; Todd F. Shupe; Chung-Yun Hse

    2009-01-01

    CCA-treated wood was liquefied with polyethylene glycol/glycerin and sulfuric acid. The heavy metals were precipitated by Ca(OH)2 from liquefied CCA-treated wood. The original CCA-treated wood and precipitated wood sludge were fractionated by a modified BCR (Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction procedure. The purpose of the BCR...

  2. Long-Term Durability of Pressure-Treated Wood in a Severe Test Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan Lebow; Bessie Woodward; Grant Kirker; Patricia Lebow

    2013-01-01

    Improved estimates of the long-term durability of treated wood products are needed to guide choices about construction materials and allow estimates of design life. This report summarizes the long-term decay and insect resistance of treated wood post and lumber specimens placed in ground contact at a test site of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,...

  3. Physical and mechanical properties of flakeboard produced from recycled CCA-treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Li; T.F. Shupe; Chung-Yun Hse

    2004-01-01

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood has been most widely used in North America since the 1970s for many exterior applications such as decks, fences, playground equipment, utility poles, and others. A large volume of CCA-treated wood is currently coming out of service. Traditional disposal methods such as landfilling and incineration are not without adverse...

  4. Selection, production, procurement, and use of preservative treated wood : supplementing federal specification TT-W-571

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee R. Gjovik; Roy H. Baechler

    1977-01-01

    This report has been prepared to supplement Federal Specification TT-W-571 “Wood Preservation: Treating Practices.” developed for the General Services Administration by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, the Specification is used by Federal agencies, State agencies, and private users in procuring preservative-treated wood....

  5. An analysis of the physical properties of recovered CCA-treated wood from residential decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Bailey; Robert L. Smith; Philip A. Araman

    2004-01-01

    A large volume of CCA-treated wood removed from residential decks is disposed of in landfills every year, and better environmentally conscious alternatives are needed. Recycling CCA-treated wood from the decks could be a feasible alternative, but there is a lack of knowledge regarding the physical properties of the material. This research analyzed the chemical and...

  6. Oil Uptake Percentage in Oil-Heat-Treated Wood, its Determination by Soxhlet Extraction, and its Effects on Wood Compression Strength Parallel to the Grain

    OpenAIRE

    Dali Cheng; Lijun Chen; Shenxue Jiang; Qisheng Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Oil heat treatment can effectively improve the dimensional stability and bio-durability of wood. However, the characteristics of high oil uptake (50 percent or higher) and high susceptibility to leaching from wood have an adverse effect on subsequent manufacturing processes of wood product and production costs. A solvent extraction (100% ethanol) process was used to extract the surplus oil from the treated wood. Because the making of powder specimens from high oil uptake wood would result in ...

  7. FIELD-SCALE LEACHING OF ARSENIC, CHROMIUM AND COPPER FROM WEATHERED TREATED WOOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, A. Rasem; Hu, Ligang; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Fieber, Lynne; Cai, Yong; Townsend, Timothy G.

    2010-01-01

    Earlier studies documented the loss of wood preservatives from new wood. The objective of this study was to evaluate losses from weathered treated wood under field conditions by collecting rainfall leachate from 5 different wood types, all with a surface area of 0.21 m2. Wood samples included weathered chromate copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood at low (2.7 kg/m3), medium (4.8 kg/m3) and high (35.4 kg/m3) retention levels, new alkaline copper quat (ACQ) treated wood (1.1 kg/m3 as CuO) and new untreated wood. Arsenic was found to leach at a higher rate (100 mg in 1 year for low retention) than chromium and copper (leached at the highest rate from the ACQ sample (670 mg). Overall results suggest that metals’ leaching is a continuous process driven by rainfall, and that the mechanism of release from the wood matrix changes as wood weathers. PMID:20053493

  8. Bioremediation and degradation of CCA-treated wood waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara L Illman; Vina W. Yang

    2004-01-01

    Bioprocessing CCA wood waste is an efficient and economical alternative to depositing the waste in landfills, especially if landfill restrictions on CCA waste are imposed nation wide. We have developed bioremediation and degradation technologies for microbial processing of CCA waste. The technologies are based on specially formulated inoculum of wood decay fungi,...

  9. Quantities of arsenic-treated wood in demolition debris generated by Hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Brajesh; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Townsendt, Timothy G

    2007-03-01

    The disaster debris from Hurricane Katrina is one of the largest in terms of volume and economic loss in American history. One of the major components of the demolition debris is wood waste of which a significant proportion is treated with preservatives, including preservatives containing arsenic. As a result of the large scale destruction of treated wood structures such as electrical poles, fences, decks, and homes a considerable amount of treated wood and consequently arsenic will be disposed as disaster debris. In this study an effort was made to estimate the quantity of arsenic disposed through demolition debris generated in the Louisiana and Mississippi area through Hurricane Katrina. Of the 72 million cubic meters of disaster debris generated, roughly 12 million cubic meters were in the form of construction and demolition wood resulting in an estimated 1740 metric tons of arsenic disposed. Management of disaster debris should consider the relatively large quantities of arsenic associated with pressure-treated wood.

  10. Comparative study on liquefaction of creosote and chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood and untreated southern pine wood: effects of acid catalyst content, liquefaction time, temperature, and phenol to wood ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui Pan; Chung-Yun Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2009-01-01

    Creosote- and chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood waste and untreated southern pine wood were liquefied with phenol and sulfuric acid. The effects of sulfuric acid content, liquefaction time, liquefaction temperature, and phenol to wood ratio on liquefaction rate (i.e., wood residue content) were investigated and analyzed by analysis of variance (...

  11. Synergistic effect of heartwood extractives and quaternary ammonium compounds on termite resistance of treated wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Won-Joung; Kartal, S Nami; Yoshimura, Tsuyoshi; Imamura, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluates the synergistic effect of wood extractives and quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) on the resistance to termites of several treated wood species. Wood specimens from different natural durability classes were extracted with either hot water alone or hot water + ethanol/benzene. The extracted and unextracted wood specimens were treated with either didecyldimethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (DBF) or commercial didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) solutions and then exposed to subterranean termites, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, for 3 weeks under laboratory conditions. The results showed that extractives of the heartwood portions of the wood species contributed to increased resistance against termite attack in the presence of either DBF or DDAC wood preservatives. The synergistic effect of wood extractives and DBF was much clearer with Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirbel) Franco and Tsuga heterophylla Sarg wood samples. Further studies are needed for a better understanding of the synergism between wood extractives and either DBF or DDAC using both the sapwood and heartwood portions of the same wood species. Copyright (c) 2006 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. REMOVAL COPPER, CHROMIUM, ARSENIC FROM OUT-OF- SERVICE CCA-TREATED WOOD MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin Derya Gezer

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Remediation can be defined as removing copper, chromium and arsenic from out-of-service CCA treated wood products. There are some various remediation methods that can be applied to remove copper, chromium and arsenic from out-of service CCA treated wood products in order to re-use that wooden materials and minimize adverse impacts of those out-of service CCA treated wood to environment, human health, animals and other living organisms. In this study, those applied various remediation methods to remove copper, chromium and arsenic were summarized.

  13. Electrodialytic remediation of CCA-treated waste wood in a 2 m3 pilot plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Iben Vernegren; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2006-01-01

    Waste wood that has been treated with chromated-copper-arsenate (CCA) poses a potential environmental problem due to the content of copper, chromium and arsenic. A pilot plant for electrodialytic remediation of up to 2 m3 wood has been designed and tested and the results are presented here. Several...

  14. Chapter 14: Evaluating the Leaching of Biocides from Preservative-Treated Wood Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan T. Lebow

    2014-01-01

    Leaching of biocides is an important consideration in the long term durability and any potential for environmental impact of treated wood products. This chapter discusses factors affecting biocide leaching, as well as methods of evaluating rate and quantity of biocide released. The extent of leaching is a function of preservative formulation, treatment methods, wood...

  15. Understanding decay resistance, dimensional stability and strength changes in heat treated and acetylated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger M. Rowell; Rebecca E. Ibach; James McSweeny; Thomas Nilsson

    2009-01-01

    Reductions in hygroscopicity, increased dimensional stability and decay resistance of heat-treated wood depend on decomposition of a large portion of the hemicelluloses in the wood cell wall. In theory, these hemicelluloses are converted to small organic molecules, water and volatile furan-type intermediates that can polymerize in the cell wall. Reductions in...

  16. Effect of precipitation pattern on leaching of preservative from treated wood and implications for accelerated testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan Lebow

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to develop improved accelerated test methods for evaluating the leaching of wood preservatives from treated wood exposed to precipitation. In this study the effects of rate of rainfall and length of intervals between rainfall events on leaching was evaluated by exposing specimens to varying patterns of simulated rainfall under controlled laboratory...

  17. Effect of simulated rainfall and weathering on release of preservative elements from CCA treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan Lebow; R. Sam Williams; Patricia Lebow

    2003-01-01

    The release of arsenic from wood pressure-treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) can be decreased by application of wood finishes, but little is known about the types of finishes that are best suited for this purpose. This study evaluated the effects of finish water repellent content and ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the release of arsenic, copper, and chromium...

  18. Guide for minimizing the effect of preservative-treated wood on sensitive environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan T. Lebow; Michael Tippie

    2001-01-01

    Preservative-treated wood is often used for construction of highway and foot bridges, wetland boardwalks, and other structures in or over water or sensitive environments. In these applications it is important that release of preservative from the wood into the environment is minimized. This publication addresses this concern by describing the various types of pressure-...

  19. Statistical analysis of influence of soil source on leaching of arsenic and copper from CCA-C treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia Lebow; Richard Ziobro; Linda Sites; Tor Schultz; David Pettry; Darrel Nicholas; Stan Lebow; Pascal Kamdem; Roger Fox; Douglas Crawford

    2006-01-01

    Leaching of wood preservatives affects the long-term efficacy and environmental impact of treated wood. Soil properties and wood characteristicscan affectleaching of woad preservatives, but these effects are not well understood. This paper reports a statistical analysis of the effects of soil and wood properties on leaching of arsenic (As) and copper (Cu) from southern...

  20. Synchrotron based x-ray fluorescence microscopy confirms copper in the corrosion products of metals in contact with treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Joseph E. Jakes; Grant T. Kirker; David Vine; Stefan Vogt

    2017-01-01

    Copper based waterborne wood preservatives are frequently used to extend the service life of wood products when subjected to frequent moisture exposure. While these copper based treatments protect the wood from fungal decay and insect attack, they increase the corrosion of metals embedded or in contact with the treated wood. Previous research has shown the most...

  1. Modification of static bending strength properties of Eucalyptus grandis heat-treated wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Henrique Gonzalez de Cademartori

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the effect of thermal rectification on physical and mechanical properties of Eucalyptus grandis wood at different levels of temperature and time. Samples of Eucalyptus grandis wood (10 × 10 × 200 mm were heat-treated at 180, 200, 220 and 240 °C during 4 and 8 hours. The mechanical properties of heat-treated and untreated samples were determined by static bending tests. The physical properties were determined by weight loss and swelling tests. The results showed that modulus of elasticity, modulus of rupture, weight loss, volumetric swelling and linear swelling were affected significantly by the thermal rectification. However, the length of exposure influenced just weight loss, while the temperature influenced all the studied properties of heat-treated wood. More significant modifications with treatments at a temperature of 200 °C or higher were found in the properties of heat-treated wood.

  2. Summary of PCP-Treated Wood Waste Management at Army Installations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Broder, Michael

    1999-01-01

    .... At most installations, the PCP-treated wood waste is either shredded and composted for use as mulch on the installation or ft is disposed of in a sanitary landfill at a cost of around $30 per ton...

  3. In vitro bioaccessibility of copper azole following simulated dermal transfer from pressure-treated wood

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — In vitro bioaccessibility of copper azole following simulated dermal transfer from pressure-treated wood. This dataset is associated with the following publication:...

  4. Use of small volume cups in XRF analysis of treated wood retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rene Stelzer; Adam Taylor; Patricia Lebow

    2017-01-01

    Efforts are underway in the United States to improve the conformance of commercially-treated wood with the applicable retention standards. As part of an effort to devise a practical method for on-site assessment of within-charge retention variation, we investigated whether small-volume x-ray fluorescence (XRF) sample cups could be used with treated wood. A range of cup...

  5. Wood ash to treat sewage sludge for agricultural use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, R.K. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    About 90% of the three million tons of wood ash generated in the United States from wood burning facilities is being landfilled. Many landfills are initiated tipping fees and/or restrictions on the disposal of special wastes such as ash. The purpose of this work was to evaluate (1) the feasibility of using wood ash to stabilize sewage sludge and (2) the fertilizer and liming value of the sludge/ash mixture on plant response and soil pH. Research showed that wood ash, when mixed with sludge, will produce a pH above 12.0, which meets US EPA criteria for pathogen reduction for land application on non-direct food chain crops. Different ratios of wood ash to sludge mixtures were tested and the 1:1 ratio (by weight) was found to be optimal. Five replications of wood ash from four sources were tested for moisture content, pH and fertilizer nutrients. The pH of the ash/sludge mixture (1:1) on day one ranged from 12.4 to 13.2. In most cases the pH remained the same over a 21 day test or only dropped 0.1 to 0.3 units. Analyses of the mixtures showed that heavy metal concentrations (As, B, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, S, Se, Zn) were low. The 1:1 ash/sludge mixture had a calcium carbonate equivalency of 17%. Green house pot studies using tall fescue grass were loadings of 300 to 750 pounds per acre of TKN-N than for 500 lb/acre of 10-10-10 commercial fertilizer. Plant tissue analysis showed N, P, K, Ca, and Mg levels to be within the sufficiency range for tall fescue.

  6. Sorption Properties of Steam Treated Wood and Plant Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmeyer, Preben; Jensen, Signe Kamp; Jones, Dennis

    2003-01-01

    Hygrothermal treatment of wood and plant fibres was carried out to improve the dimensional stability of the fibres and products made from these. Fibres of Norway spruce, beech, wheat and hemp were included. The efficiency of the treatment was assessed by studying the moisture sorption properties...... sorption sites. The annual plant fibres proved less susceptible than wood fibres to chemical breakdown from steam treatment. The component most susceptible to chemical breakdown was hemicellulose. Beech, wheat and hemp showed only a modest decrease of cellulose content, even at high temperatures, whereas...

  7. Effect of UV exposure on the surface chemistry of wood veneers treated with ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patachia, Silvia; Croitoru, Catalin; Friedrich, Christian

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the influence of four types of imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) on the chemical alteration of the surface of wood veneers exposed to 254 nm UV irradiation have been studied by using image analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and surface energy calculation. The wood treated with ionic liquids showed better stability to UV light, as demonstrated by the low lignin, carbonyl index and cellulose crystallinity index variation, as well as very small color modification of the surface with the increase of the UV exposure period, by comparing to non-treated wood. The results show that the tested ionic liquids could be effective as UV stabilizers.

  8. Release of copper-amended particles from micronized copper-pressure-treated wood during mechanical abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civardi, Chiara; Schlagenhauf, Lukas; Kaiser, Jean-Pierre; Hirsch, Cordula; Mucchino, Claudio; Wichser, Adrian; Wick, Peter; Schwarze, Francis W M R

    2016-11-28

    We investigated the particles released due to abrasion of wood surfaces pressure-treated with micronized copper azole (MCA) wood preservative and we gathered preliminary data on its in vitro cytotoxicity for lung cells. The data were compared with particles released after abrasion of untreated, water (0% MCA)-pressure-treated, chromated copper (CC)-pressure-treated wood, and varnished wood. Size, morphology, and composition of the released particles were analyzed. Our results indicate that the abrasion of MCA-pressure-treated wood does not cause an additional release of nanoparticles from the unreacted copper (Cu) carbonate nanoparticles from of the MCA formulation. However, a small amount of released Cu was detected in the nanosized fraction of wood dust, which could penetrate the deep lungs. The acute cytotoxicity studies were performed on a human lung epithelial cell line and human macrophages derived from a monocytic cell line. These cell types are likely to encounter the released wood particles after inhalation. Our findings indicate that under the experimental conditions chosen, MCA does not pose a specific additional nano-risk, i.e. there is no additional release of nanoparticles and no specific nano-toxicity for lung epithelial cells and macrophages.

  9. Liquefaction of the Used Creosote-Treated Wood in the Presence of Phenol and Its Application to Phenolic Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nubuo Shiraishi; Chung-Yun Hse

    2000-01-01

    A limited initial study was made to evaluate liquefaction of creosote-treated southern pine wood sawdust with liquefaction of birch wood powder as a control. The objective was to assess the feasibility of using creosote-treated southern pine wood as a raw material for the-formulation-of-phenol-based resin adhesives. The liquefaction was conducted in the presence of...

  10. Arsenic Speciation of Solvent-Extracted Leachate from New and Weathered CCA-Treated Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    KHAN, BERNINE I.; SOLO - GABRIELE, HELENA M.; DUBEY, BRAJESH K.; TOWNSEND, TIMOTHY G.; CAI, YONG

    2009-01-01

    For the past 60 yr, chromate-copper-arsenate (CCA) has been used to pressure-treat millions of cubic meters of wood in the United States for the construction of many outdoor structures. Leaching of arsenic from these structures is a possible health concern as there exists the potential for soil and groundwater contamination. While previous studies have focused on total arsenic concentrations leaching from CCA-treated wood, information pertaining to the speciation of arsenic leached is limited. Since arsenic toxicity is dependent upon speciation, the objective of this study was to identify and quantify arsenic species leaching from new and weathered CCA-treated wood and CCA-treated wood ash. Solvent-extraction experiments were carried out by subjecting the treated wood and the ash to solvents of varying pH values, solvents defined in the EPA’s Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure (SPLP) and Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), rainwater, deionized water, and seawater. The generated leachates were analyzed for inorganic As(III) and As(V) and the organoarsenic species, monomethylarsonic acid (MMAA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA), using high-performance liquid chromatography followed by hydride generation and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC–HG-AFS). Only the inorganic species were detected in any of the wood leachates; no organoarsenic species were found. Inorganic As(V) was the major detectable species leaching from both new and weathered wood. The weathered wood leached relatively more overall arsenic and was attributed to increased inorganic As(III) leaching. The greater presence of As(III) in the weathered wood samples as compared to the new wood samples may be due to natural chemical and biological transformations during the weathering process. CCA-treated wood ash leached more arsenic than unburned wood using the SPLP and TCLP, and ash samples leached more inorganic As(III) than the unburned counterparts. Increased leaching was due

  11. Kinetics and potential significance of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon desorption from creosote-treated wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevao, B.; Jones, K.C.

    1998-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are major constituents of creosote, a wood-preserving product derived from the distillation of coal tar. It has been suggested that their devolatilization from treated wood could make a major contribution to the UK's atmospheric emission inventories. This paper reports a study to eluadate the tolatilization characteristics of selected PAHs from creosote-treated wood and estimates the potential significance of this source to the UK inventory. Desorption kinetics from untreated and treated wood were measured at 4 and 30 degree C for five PAHs (ancenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene) using chambers in the laboratory. Rates of desorption followed first-order kinetics for all compounds and were higher at 30 than 4 degree C. A prolonged study of the kinetics at 4 degree C showed that the volatilization rate remained constant over about 7 weeks, after which >85% of the compounds still remained sorbed on the wood. Although estimates for PAH emissions may be low (due to uncertainties of the contribution from older treated wood), they are of the same order as those from vehicle emissions. 17 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Fractionation of heavy metals in liquefied chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood sludge using a modified BCR-sequential extraction procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui Pan; Chung-Yun Hse; Robert Gambrell; Todd F. Shupe

    2009-01-01

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood was liquefied with polyethylene glycol/glycerin and sulfuric acid. After liquefaction, most CCA metals (98% As, 92% Cr, and 83% Cu) were removed from liquefied CCA-treated wood by precipitation with calcium hydroxide. The original CCA-treated wood and liquefied CCA-treated wood sludge were fractionated by a modified...

  13. Uncertainties in corrosion rate measurements of fasteners exposed to treated wood at 100% relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka

    2007-01-01

    This paper evaluates the effect that uncertainties in measurements of time, weight, and surface area have on the determination of the corrosion rate of metal fasteners in contact with wood. Three different types of nails were driven into alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ)-treated wood and exposed to 26.7°C (80°C) at 100 % relative humidity environment for up to 1 year....

  14. FIRE RESISTANCE OF DOUGLAS FIR [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb. Franco] WOOD TREATED WITH SOME CHEMICALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kemal YALINKILIÇ

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available Combustible properties of treated douglas wood specimens and fire-retardancy of some preservatives were tested in this study. Crib test of ASTM E 160-150 was followed. Results indicated that, aqueous solutions of boric acid (BA, borax (Bx (Na2BO7 10H2O or BA + Bx mixture (7: 3, w: w had fire retardant efficacy (FRE over untreated wood and reduced the combustibility of vinil monomers (Styrene and methylmetacrylate which were applied as secondary treatment.

  15. A non-destructive approach for assessing decay in preservative treated wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machek, L.; Edlund, M.L.; Sierra-Alvarez, R.; Militz, H.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the suitability of the non-destructive vibration-impulse excitation technique to assess the attack of preservative-treated wood in contact with the ground. Small stakes (10×5×100 mm3) of treated and untreated Scots pine sapwood were exposed to decay in laboratory-scale

  16. Fifty-Year Durability Evaluation of Posts Treated with Industrial Wood Preservatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan T. Lebow; Patricia Lebow; Bessie Woodward; Grant T. Kirker; Rachel Arango

    2015-01-01

    Long-term durability data are needed to improve service life estimates for treated wood products used as critical structural supports in industrial applications. This article reports the durability of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) posts pressure treated with ammoniacal copper arsenate (ACA), chromated copper arsenate (CCA), creosote, or...

  17. Electron microscopic study on pyrolysis of CCA (chromium, copper and arsenic oxide)-treated wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hata, T.; Bronsveld, P.M; Vystavel, T.; Kooi, B.J.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Kakitani, T.; Otono, A.; Imamura, Y.

    The effectiveness of pyrolysis as a possible technique for disposing of CCA (chromium, copper and arsenic oxide)-treated wood was studied. A CCA-treated sample given an extra heat treatment at 450 degreesC for 10 min was thoroughly investigated in order to establish the details of the reaction in

  18. Effects of Treated Wood Flour on Physico-Mechanical Properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wood flour was crushed in to particle size and given two surface treatments each with alkali and 3-chloro-2 hydroxylpropyltrimethylammoniumchloride. The raw, alkali-treated and bonding agent treated fibers were used as natural rubber composites. The samples were used to produce fiber-reinforced natural rubber ...

  19. Evaluation of XRF and LIBS technologies for on-line sorting of CCA-treated wood waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Townsend, Timothy G; Hahn, David W; Moskal, Thomas M; Hosein, Naila; Jambeck, Jenna; Jacobi, Gary

    2004-01-01

    Contamination of wood waste with chromated copper arsenate greatly limits recycling opportunities for the wood waste as a whole. Separation of CCA-treated wood from other wood types is one means by which such contamination can be removed. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate two detector technologies for sorting CCA-treated wood from other wood types. The detector technologies evaluated included X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The XRF detector system utilized in this study was capable of rapidly detecting the presence of CCA in painted wood, wet wood, heartwood, sapwood, and at portions of the wood containing knots. Furthermore, the XRF system was capable of distinguishing between CCA-treated wood and wood treated with alternative wood treatment preservatives, but was limited by the fact that it was not designed for on-line operation so tests were conducted in a batch mode on a conveyor. The analysis time used in this study (3 s) can be decreased significantly for an XRF system designed specifically for on-line operation. The LIBS system developed for this study was found to effectively identify CCA-treated wood for pieces ranging in thickness from 1 to 8 cm. High sorting efficiencies were noted when 10 laser shots were taken on a piece of wood. Furthermore, the LIBS system was found to be effective for identifying wood that has been coated with stains and paints in addition to identifying wood that has been CCA treated. The major drawback with the LIBS system developed in this study was the limited laser pulse energy. With an increase in laser pulse energy it is anticipated that the working focal length of the LIBS system can be increased to enable the monitoring of wood samples of more variable thicknesses. Limitations associated with analysis of very rotted pieces of wood and wet wood can also be overcome by using a higher pulse energy laser. Overall, both technologies show incredible promise for

  20. Wolfiporia cocos : a potential agent for composting of bioprocessing Douglas-fir wood treated with copper-based preservatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney. De Groot; Bessie. Woodward

    1998-01-01

    In laboratory experiments, Douglas-fir wood blocks that were treated with copper- based wood preservatives were challenged with two wood decay fungi known to be tolerant of copper. Factors influencing the amount of decay, as determined by loss of weight in the test blocks, were preservative, then fungus. Within those combinations, the relative importance of...

  1. Potassium methyl siliconate-treated pulp fibers and their effects on wood plastic composites: Water sorption and dimensional stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng Piao; Zhiyong Cai; Nicole M. Stark; Charles J. Monlezun

    2013-01-01

    Potassium methyl siliconate (PMS) was investigated as a new nano modifier of wood fiber and wood flour to improve the compatibility between the fiber/flour and the plastic matrix in fiber reinforced plastic composites. Before injection molding, bleached and brown pulp fibers and mixed species wood flour were pretreated in PMS solutions. The morphology of the treated...

  2. Effect of weathering on chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood : leaching of metal salts and change in water repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Sam Williams; Stan Lebow; Patricia Lebow

    2003-01-01

    Wood pressure-treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) wood preservative is commonly used for outdoor construction. Oxides of arsenic, copper, and chromium are bound in the wood by a complex series of chemical reactions, but a small percentage of these compounds are gradually released by leaching and weathering. Recent studies suggest that the release of these...

  3. Incorporation of treated straw and wood fly ash into clay building brick

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Wan; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2016-01-01

    High Cd content in straw and wood fly ash, generated from biomass-fired power plants, prohibits its recycling as fertilizer spreading on the landfilled. To improve and alter the current mainstream of fly ash treatment by landfilling, different approaches were tried for treatment of straw and wood...... absorption, porosity, density, compressive strength and leaching behavior, and compared with the 100% clay bricks. It’s promising to use the treated ash as a secondary building material....... in the treated ash, suggests the possibility of the ash reuse in sintered clay bricks. In this study, the straw and wood fly ash treated by washing and EDR was incorporated into yellow clay bricks at different substitution rates. The properties of the clay-ash bricks were studied in terms of shrinkage, water...

  4. Carcinogenic risk of chromium, copper and arsenic in CCA-treated wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohgami, Nobutaka; Yamanoshita, Osamu; Thang, Nguyen Dinh; Yajima, Ichiro; Nakano, Chihiro; Wenting, Wu; Ohnuma, Shoko

    2015-01-01

    We showed that 2.1% of 233 pieces of lumber debris after the Great East Japan Earthquake was chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood. Since hexavalent chromium (Cr), copper (Cu) and pentavalent arsenic (As) in the debris may be diffused in the air via incineration, we exposed human lung normal (BEAS-2B) and carcinoma (A549) cells to Cr, Cu and As at the molar ratio in a representative CCA-treated wood. Co-exposure to 0.10 μM Cr and 0.06 μM As, which solely had no effect on colony formation, synergistically promoted colony formation in BEAS-2B cells, but not A549 cells, with activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway. Sole exposure and co-exposure to Cu showed limited effects. Since previous reports showed Cr and As concentrations to which human lungs might be exposed, our results suggest the importance to avoid diffusion of Cr and As in the air via incineration of debris including CCA-treated wood after the disaster. - Highlights: • CCA-treated wood was found in debris after the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011. • Carcinogenic risk of CCA-treated woods was evaluated with human lung cell lines. • Co-exposure to Cr and As synergistically promoted colony formation. • Co-exposure to Cr and As synergistically activated the PI3/AKT pathway. • Effects of sole exposure and co-exposure to Cu on colony formation were limited. - Co-exposure to Cr and As, but not Cu, in CCA-treated wood debris from the Great East Japan Earthquake showed carcinogenicity in vitro.

  5. STATIC BENDING STRENGHT OF WOOD TREATED WITH FIRE RETERDANT AND WATER REPELLENT PRESERVATION CHEMICALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin PEKER

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This study has designed for determination of static bending strenght of mainly boron impregnated scots pine and east beech wood. Other chemicals used as control are polyethylene glycole (PEG-400 and some commercial preservatives such as Vacsol (V, Ammonıum sulphate (AS and Diammonium phospate (DAP were used by secondary process on the boron or PEG treated wood by the aim of improving static bending strenght and avoiding the leachability of both chemicals. Result indicated that static bending strenght of scots pine wood were reduced by acidic solutions of salts. In beech wood static bending strenght were also affected by neutral pH of the solution. Water repellent , surprisingly don't show their aspected protective properties of static bending strength, in general .

  6. Modification of static bending strength properties of Eucalyptus grandis heat-treated wood

    OpenAIRE

    Cademartori,Pedro Henrique Gonzalez de; Schneid,Eduardo; Gatto,Darci Alberto; Beltrame,Rafael; Stangerlin,Diego Martins

    2012-01-01

    The present study describes the effect of thermal rectification on physical and mechanical properties of Eucalyptus grandis wood at different levels of temperature and time. Samples of Eucalyptus grandis wood (10 × 10 × 200 mm) were heat-treated at 180, 200, 220 and 240 °C during 4 and 8 hours. The mechanical properties of heat-treated and untreated samples were determined by static bending tests. The physical properties were determined by weight loss and swelling tests. The results showed th...

  7. Above ground performance of preservative-treated western wood species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey J. Morrell; D.J. Miller; Stan T. Lebow

    2000-01-01

    Incised and non-incised Douglas-fir, western hemlock, and ponderosa pine L- joints were treated with ammoniacal-based pentachlorophenol, chromated zinc chloride, thiocyanomethylthiobenzothiazole (TCMBT) or TCMTB plus methylenebisthiocyanate or 3 iodo-2-propynyl carbamate with or without chlorpyrifos to retentions between 0.8 and 6.4 kg/m3 and exposed, uncoated, above...

  8. Application of near-infrared spectroscopy to preservative-treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi-Leung So; Stan T. Lebow; Thomas L. Eberhardt; Leslie H. Groom; Todd F. Shupe

    2009-01-01

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is now a widely-used technique in the field of forest products, especially for physical and mechanical property determinations. This technique is also ideal for the chemical analysis of wood. There has been a growing need to find a rapid, inexpensive and reliable method to distinguish between preservative-treated and untreated waste...

  9. Resistance of borax–copper treated wood in aboveground exposure to attack by Formosan subterranean termites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan Lebow; Bessie Woodward; Douglas Crawford; William Abbott

    2005-01-01

    The spread of Formosan subterranean termites (FSTs) in the southern United States has increased public interest in finding a preservative treatment to protect framing lumber from termite attack. This study evaluated the use of a borax-based preservative to protect wood from FST attack. Southern Pine and Douglas-fir specimens were pressure-treated with three...

  10. Corrosion rates of fasteners in treated wood exposed to 100% relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2009-01-01

    In the past, gravimetric corrosion data for fasteners exposed to treated wood has been reported as a percent weight loss. Although percent weight loss is a valid measure of corrosion for comparing identical fasteners, it can distort the corrosion performance of fasteners with different geometries and densities. This report reevaluates a key report on the corrosiveness...

  11. PRODUCTS OF INCOMPLETE COMBUSTION FROM DIRECT BURNING OF PENTACHLOROPHENOL-TREATED WOOD WASTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a study to identify potential air pollution problems from the combustion of waste wood treated with pentachlorophenol preservative for energy production in a boiler. The study emphasized the characterization of the products of incomplete combustion (PI...

  12. New Approach to Remove Metals from Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA)-Treated Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd F. Shupe; Chung Y. Hse; Hui Pan

    2012-01-01

    Recovery of metals from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated southern pine wood particles was investigated using binary acid solutions consisting of acetic, oxalic, and phosphoric acids in a microwave reactor. Formation of an insoluble copper oxalate complex in the binary solution containing oxalic acid was the major factor for low copper removal. Furthermore, the...

  13. Moisture storage and transport properties of preservative treated and untreated southern pine wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Samuel V. Glass; Charles R. Boardman; Dominique. Derome

    2016-01-01

    Moisture storage and transport properties of southern pine (Pinus spp.) wood were measured for implementation into hygrothermal models. Specimens were untreated or pressure-treated with alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ) preservative. Moisture storage was characterized with sorption isotherms in the hygroscopic region (high capillary pressures) and...

  14. Phosphate removal by refined aspen wood fiber treated with carboxymethyl cellulose and ferrous chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas L. Eberhardt; Soo-Hong Min; James S. Han

    2006-01-01

    Biomass-based filtration media are of interest as an economical means to remove pollutants and nutrients found in stormwater runoff. Refined aspen wood fiber samples treated with iron salt solutions demonstrated limited capacities to remove (ortho)phosphate from test solutions. To provide additional sites for iron complex formation, and thereby impart a greater...

  15. Rapid microwave-assisted acid extraction of metals from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated southern pine wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Yu; Chung Y. Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2009-01-01

    The effects of acid concentration, reaction time, and temperature in a microwave reactor on recovery of CCA-treated wood were evaluated. Extraction of copper, chromium, and arsenic metals from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated southern pine wood samples with three different acids (i.e., acetic acid, oxalic acid, and phosphoric acid) was investigated using in...

  16. Ground-contact durability of wood treated with borax-copper preservative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan T. Lebow; Bessie Woodward; Patricia K. Lebow

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the ability of a borax-copper(BC) preservative to protect wood exposed in ground contact. Southern pine sapwood stakes were pressure-treated with 0.9%, 1.4%, 2.3%, and 4.7% BC solution concentrations and placed into the ground at test sites near Mississippi, or Madison, Wisconsin. Untreated stakes and stakes treated with 1% chromated copper...

  17. Fungal bioremediation of creosote-treated wood: a laboratory scale study on creosote components degradation by Pleurotus ostreatus mycelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcaro, C M; Brancaleoni, E; Donati, E; Frattoni, M; Galli, E; Migliore, L; Rapanà, P

    2008-08-01

    A bioremediation system for creosote-treated wood is proposed, based on the detoxifying capability of Pleurotus ostreatus, a ligninolythic fungus. Non-sterilized chipped contaminated wood was mixed at various ratios with wheat straw on which Pleurotus mycelia was grown. At 1:2 initial ratio contaminated wood:wheat straw, chemical analyses demonstrated an almost complete degradation of creosote oil components after 44 days, also confirmed by a significant reduction of ecotoxicity. Lower ratios, i.e. higher amount of contaminated wood, lower system efficiency, although a better creosote degradation was obtained by a stepped up wood addition.

  18. Adhesive bond performance of heat-treated wood at various conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kol, Hamiyet Sahin; Özbay, Günay

    2016-07-01

    Heat treatment of wood leads to chemical, structural and physical changes in wood constituents, which can significantly affect the bonding performance of wood in several ways depending on the adhesive type used. In the present study, fir (Abies bornmülleriana Mattf.) and beech (Fagus orientalis L.) were heat treated at 170 degrees C, 180 degrees C, 190 degrees C, 200 and 212 degrees C for 2 hours. Four different types of adhesives were used for bonding process: melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF), melamine formaldehyde (MF), phenol formaldehyde (PF), and polyurethane (PUR). For all the pretreatment conditions, highest shear strength of adhesive bonds of each adhesive system was observed for untreated samples and shear strength decreased with increasing heat treatment. The strength of each adhesive bond of samples which were soaked in water was much less than dry samples, approximately half of the dry strength. Generally, the shear strength of the adhesive bonds after boiling was smaller than or similar to the values obtained for soaking. The untreated samples lost more strength after soaking and boiling than heat treated samples. With increasing heat treatment severity, reduction in shear strength increased in dry samples while decreased in soaking and boiling samples. For instance, after soaking, the untreated samples lost more strength (almost 39%) than heat treated samples (almost 24% for most severely heat treated samples). The results showed that the shear strength of adhesive bonds was influenced by heat treatment and depended on pretreatment of samples prior to testing. In general, all adhesives used performed in quite a similar way for all pretreatment conditions, and the bonding performance of heat treated fir wood was less satisfactory than that of beech wood for all adhesive system and condition.

  19. Arcos con madera laminada del Pino Caribe Venezolano. Una propuesta para procesos de arquitectura ecosustentable - Arches with Venezuelan Caribbean Pine´S laminated wood. A proposal for eco-sustainable architecture processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Gerardo Páez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available El principio generador de la madera laminada establece que piezas aserradas, débiles y pequeñas, al unirse con adhesivos artificiales, conforman elementos más grandes, con propiedades físico-mecánicas superiores a las de la misma especie maderable. En esta investigación se analiza la aplicación de la madera laminada del Pinus caribaea Morelet, var. hondurensis; cultivado en la Orinoquia venezolana, para fabricar sistemas estáticos curvos, dentro de procedimientos edificatorios en construcciones ecológicas y sustentables. El objetivo general propone definir un modelo estructural de arcos que simplifique las labores de producción, transporte, pre-ensamblado, montaje, aprovechamiento, transformabilidad, deconstrucción y reciclaje; que justifique los principios de desarrollo tecnológico ecosustentable basados en las innovaciones tecnológicas de la madera laminada de pino Caribe. La metodología empleada permitió analizar comparativamente y describir los predimensionamientos del peralte de distintos componentes estructurales portantes, que responden eficientemente a esfuerzos de flexo-compresión, configurados a partir de los diagramas de momentos flexionantes de vigas rectas simplemente apoyadas y empotradas y son geométricamente análogos a sistemas de arcos bi o triarticulados. Entre las conclusiones se determina que la arquitectura ecosustentable queda definida como el conjunto de medidas que aportan soluciones constructivas que no dañan el medio ambiente; que emplea, además, materiales naturales renovables, respeta los ecosistemas, construye sin desperdicios; que deconstruye y recicla, sin demoler ni generar escombros. Este artículo queda incluido en la línea de Investigación: Innovación Tecnológica como Proceso; sub-línea: Asimilación y Dominio Tecnológico; Postgrado de Gestión de Investigación y Desarrollo - Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Sociales de la Universidad Central de Venezuela. Abstract The main

  20. Mechanical and natural durability properties of wood treated with a novel organic preservative/consolidant product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lionetto, Francesca; Frigione, Mariaenrica

    2009-01-01

    An organic preservative/consolidant of new formulation was selected in order to evaluate its effect on the mechanical properties of worm-eaten walnut wood. Walnut wood is widely used for the realization of artistic handworks (e.g. statues, altars, etc.) furniture and flooring. The flexural strength and modulus of elasticity, the toughness and the hardness were determined on both treated and untreated samples. The experimental results showed that the product increased significantly the flexural strength while the other mechanical properties were not appreciably affected by the chemical treatment. The microstructure of the samples tested was observed using scanning electron microscopy. The preserving character against insects of the investigated product was assessed by both visual inspection and measurements of weight loss on the treated specimens after their exposure to living insects. The samples on which the product was applied, exposed to Oligomerus ptilinoides for one year, were more resistant to decay than the corresponding untreated samples.

  1. Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    David W. Green; Robert H. White; Antoni TenWolde; William Simpson; Joseph Murphy; Robert J. Ross; Roland Hernandez; Stan T. Lebow

    2006-01-01

    Wood is a naturally formed organic material consisting essentially of elongated tubular elements called cells arranged in a parallel manner for the most part. These cells vary in dimensions and wall thickness with position in the tree, age, conditions of growth, and kind of tree. The walls of the cells are formed principally of chain molecules of cellulose, polymerized...

  2. Study of the Polymer-Substrate Bonding Obtained by Radiation in Resin-Treated Woods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillemain, Jeanine; Laizier, J.; Marchand, J.; Roland, J.C.

    1969-01-01

    The use of homogeneous ternary mixtures of a monomer, a solvent and water gives excellent dimensional stability to treated beech wood. This is not the case when we use a pure monomer or even a monomer in aqueous emulsion or in mixture with a solvent like dioxane. In the latter cases, very low or no stabilization is obtained. In the case of ternary mixtures, the polymer retained by the wood cannot be totally extracted. The fixation of the polymer increases with dose up to a plateau, whose height varies with the type of solvent. The electron-microscopic examination of woods thus treated shows a profound change in the cell wall. The cellulose layers seem to undergo filling and be in a swollen state, which may be attributed to grafting. Various methods of degradation of resin-treated woods were used in order to separate and characterize the copolymer - hydrolysis of the polyoxides to isolate lignin, removal of lignin with sodium chlorite to obtain holocellulose, determination of pentoxanes and determination of methoxyl groups. At every stage the isolated polymer was analysed by infra-red spectroscopy. Grafting was found to have occurred on the cellulose fraction of the material. A supplementary crosslinking reaction may be assumed from the increase in mean molecular mass and the decrease in solubility of the cellulose; Comparison of the respective weights, which differ according to the order in which, the extractions are performed, shows that lignin has a retentive effect on the polymer; this retention may be interpreted as grafting. The ''resin-treated woods'', thus characterized, appear to be quite different compounds from the ''irradiated impregnated woods''. Their dimensional stability is due to chemical fixation of the polymer on the ligno-cellulose material. There is no doubt that this fixation occurs on cellulose, in which it is accompanied by crosslinking; it is also not improbable that it occurs on lignin. This chemical change is accompanied by a marked change

  3. Improving the two-step remediation process for CCA-treated wood. Part I, Evaluating oxalic acid extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol Clausen

    2004-01-01

    In this study, three possible improvements to a remediation process for chromated-copper-arsenate (CCA) treated wood were evaluated. The process involves two steps: oxalic acid extraction of wood fiber followed by bacterial culture with Bacillus licheniformis CC01. The three potential improvements to the oxalic acid extraction step were (1) reusing oxalic acid for...

  4. Venezuela y el Caribe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Cardozo de da Silva

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Venezuela es uno de los principales actores económicos de América Latina, de allí la importancia de conocer las características de su política exterior. Los desarreglos de la política exterior hacia el caribe pueden ser resueltos si se les comprende en su dimensión local y global. En este sentido es necesario avanzar del espacio "inter-societal" de la preocupación estrictamente comercial a los espacios culturales y de cooperación técnica.

  5. An emissions audit of a biomass combustor burning treated wood waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, P.M.; Jones, H.H.; King, P.G.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the Emissions Audit carried out on a Biomass Combustor burning treated wood waste at the premises of a furniture manufacturer. The Biomass Combustor was tested in two firing modes; continuous fire and modulating fire. Combustion chamber temperatures and gas residence times were not measured. Boiler efficiencies were very good at greater than 75% in both tests. However, analysis of the flue gases indicated that improved efficiencies are possible. The average concentrations of CO (512mgm -3 ) and THC (34mgm -3 ) for Test 1 were high, indicating that combustion was poor. The combustor clearly does not meet the requirements of the Guidance Note for the Combustion of Wood Waste. CO 2 and O 2 concentrations were quite variable showing that combustion conditions were fairly unstable. Improved control of combustion should lead to acceptable emission concentrations. (Author)

  6. Robust and Low-Cost Flame-Treated Wood for High-Performance Solar Steam Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Guobin; Liu, Kang; Chen, Qian; Yang, Peihua; Li, Jia; Ding, Tianpeng; Duan, Jiangjiang; Qi, Bei; Zhou, Jun

    2017-05-03

    Solar-enabled steam generation has attracted increasing interest in recent years because of its potential applications in power generation, desalination, and wastewater treatment, among others. Recent studies have reported many strategies for promoting the efficiency of steam generation by employing absorbers based on carbon materials or plasmonic metal nanoparticles with well-defined pores. In this work, we report that natural wood can be utilized as an ideal solar absorber after a simple flame treatment. With ultrahigh solar absorbance (∼99%), low thermal conductivity (0.33 W m -1 K -1 ), and good hydrophilicity, the flame-treated wood can localize the solar heating at the evaporation surface and enable a solar-thermal efficiency of ∼72% under a solar intensity of 1 kW m -2 , and it thus represents a renewable, scalable, low-cost, and robust material for solar steam applications.

  7. Effect of pyrolysis on solvent extractability of toxic metals from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakitani, Tomo; Hata, Toshimitsu; Kajimoto, Takeshi; Imamura, Yuji

    2004-06-18

    Solvent extraction was conducted to investigate the behavior of toxic metals in chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood and its pyrolysis residue. Four kinds of solvents, along with sulfuric and phosphoric acid as mineral agents, and citric and oxalic acid as complexing agents, were used. The CCA elements from the wood treated without pyrolysis were easily extracted. However, only a small amount of CCA elements were extracted from the pyrolyzed residue, even under very low pH conditions. The toxic elements in the pyrolyzed wood showed high stabilization against the solvent extraction. Pyrolysis strongly immobilized the toxic elements in the residue. Therefore, pyrolysis is not suitable as a pretreatment.

  8. From hazardous waste to valuable raw material: hydrolysis of CCA-treated wood for the production of chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakola, Maija; Kallioinen, Anne; Leskelä, Markku; Repo, Timo

    2013-05-01

    Solid wood, metal finnish: Instead of burning waste wood treated with chromated copper arsenite (CCA) or disposing of it in landfills, the CCA-treated wood can be used as a raw material for the production of chemicals. Catalytic or alkaline oxidation together with very mild sulfuric acid extraction produces an easily enzymatically hydrolyzable material. Usage as a raw material for the chemical industry in this manner demonstrates a sustainable and value-added waste management process. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Mechanical properties of wood from Pinus sylvestris L. treated with Light Organic Solvent Preservative and with waterborne Copper Azole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villasante, A.; Laina, R.; Rojas, J. A. M.; Rojas, I. M.; Vignote, S.

    2013-07-01

    Aim of study: To determine the effect on wood from Pinus sylvestris of treatment with preservatives on mechanical properties and to establish the relation between the penetration and compression strenght. Area of study: Spain. Material and methods: 40 samples of defect-free wood from Pinus sylvestris L. were treated with Light Organic Solvent Preservative (Vacsol Azure WR 2601) and 50 with waterborne Copper Azole (Tanalith E 3492). 40 control samples were not treated (water or preservative). Mechanical resistance to static bending, modulus of elasticity and compression strength parallel to the grain were compared with untreated wood. Regression analysis between the penetration and compression strength parallel was done with the samples treated with waterborne preservative. Main results: The results indicate that the treated wood (with either product) presents a statistically significant increase in mechanical resistance in all three mechanical characteristics. The results obtained differ from earlier studies carried out by other authors. There was no correlation between parallel compression strength and the degree of impregnation of the wood with waterborne Copper Azole. The most probable explanation for these results concerns changes in pressure during treatment. The use of untreated control samples instead of samples treated only with water is more likely to produce significant results in the mechanical resistance studies. Research highlights: Treated wood presents a statistically significant increase in MOE, modulus of rupture to static bending and parallel compression strength. There was no correlation between parallel compression strength and the degree of impregnation with waterborne preservative. (Author)

  10. Counter-current acid leaching process for copper azole treated wood waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janin, Amélie; Riche, Pauline; Blais, Jean-François; Mercier, Guy; Cooper, Paul; Morris, Paul

    2012-09-01

    This study explores the performance of a counter-current leaching process (CCLP) for copper extraction from copper azole treated wood waste for recycling of wood and copper. The leaching process uses three acid leaching steps with 0.1 M H2SO4 at 75degrees C and 15% slurry density followed by three rinses with water. Copper is recovered from the leachate using electrodeposition at 5 amperes (A) for 75 min. Ten counter-current remediation cycles were completed achieving > or = 94% copper extraction from the wood during the 10 cycles; 80-90% of the copper was recovered from the extract solution by electrodeposition. The counter-current leaching process reduced acid consumption by 86% and effluent discharge volume was 12 times lower compared with the same process without use of counter-current leaching. However, the reuse of leachates from one leaching step to another released dissolved organic carbon and caused its build-up in the early cycles.

  11. Extraction of chromium, copper, and arsenic from CCA-treated wood using biodegradable chelating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Chun-Han; Chen, Pin-Jui; Chen, Shu-Hui; Chang, Fang-Chih; Lin, Far-Ching; Chen, Ke-Kung

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the biodegradable chelating agents S,S-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (SS-EDDS) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as potential alternatives and compare them with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) for effectiveness. Extraction of heavy metals from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood with EDDS, NTA, or EDTA solvent was evaluated at various solvent pH levels and stoichiometric ratios. Based on the present data, the recommended extraction conditions are pH 4.0 and EDDS-CCA stoichiometric ratios of 10. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Volatile organic compound and formaldehyde emissions from Populus davidiana wood treated with low molecular weight urea-formaldehyde resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Xian; Shen, Jun; Lei, Cheng-Shuai; Feng, Qi

    2014-09-01

    Populus davidiana wood was usually impregnated with low molecular weight thermosetting resins to improve its physical and mechanical properties. However, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and formaldehyde emitted from treated wood have lead to poor indoor air quality (IAQ). The trends of VOC and formaldehyde emissions as a function of the weight percent gain (WPG) factor were mainly investigated in this work. Aldehydes and alkanes were the predominant compositions indentified in the VOC emissions, although low amount of ketones, terpenes and alcohols were also found. With the increase in WPG, VOC and formaldehyde concentrations improved. However, their concentration began to decrease when WPG was over 44.06% (VOC) and 36.35% (formaldehyde), respectively. The modulus of elasticity (MOE) of untreated and treated wood at different WPG levels was detected. It showed that treatment of wood with UF resin significantly improved the mechanical properties. Therefore, it is probably helpful to comprehensively analyze correlations among environmental performance, mechanical performance and processing costs.

  13. Laboratory Evaluations of Durability of Southern Pine Pressure Treated With Extractives From Durable Wood Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirker, G T; Bishell, A B; Lebow, P K

    2016-02-01

    Extracts from sawdust of four naturally durable wood species [Alaskan yellow cedar, AYC, Cupressus nootkanansis D. Don 1824; eastern red cedar, ERC, Juniperus virginiana L.; honey mesquite, HM, Prosopis glandulosa Torr.; and black locust, BL, Robinia pseudoacacia L.] were used to treat southern pine, Pt, Pinus taeda L. sapwood blocks. Extractive treated blocks were evaluated for decay resistance in standard soil bottle fungal assays challenged with brown and white rot decay fungi. Results showed that extractives did impart some improvement to decay resistance of Pt blocks. BL- and HM-treated Pt blocks were also used in choice and no-choice assays to determine feeding preference and damage by eastern subterranean termites (Reticulitermes flavipes) Kollar. Minimal feeding on treated blocks was seen in both choice and no-choice assays. In choice assays, there was similar mortality between HM and BL arenas; however, in no-choice assays, complete mortality was recorded for HM-treated Pt and high mortality was seen with BL-treated Pt. Subsequent dose mortality termite assays showed HM to be effective in killing R. flavipes at low concentrations. Both HM and BL show promise as deterrents or termiticidal protectants and will be further evaluated in field studies. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  14. VOCs and PAHs emissions from creosote-treated wood in a field storage area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, E; Roca, F J; Perales, J F; Guardino, X; Berenguer, M J

    2008-08-25

    In this study, the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, in this case aromatic hydrocarbons containing one benzene ring and furans) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from wood recently treated with creosote are examined. The VOCs and PAHs were identified and quantified in the gas phase. Additionally, the PAHs were quantified in the particulate phase. Glass multi-sorbent tubes (Carbotrap, Carbopack X, Carboxen-569) were used to hold the VOCs. The analysis was performed using automatic thermal desorption (ATD) coupled with capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). PAHs vapours were collected on XAD-2 resin, and particulate matter was collected on glass fibre filters. The PAHs were analysed using GC/MS. The main components of the vapours released from the creosote-treated wood were naphthalene, toluene, m+p-xylene, ethylbenzene, o-xylene, isopropylbenzene, benzene and 2-methylnaphthalene. VOCs emission concentrations ranged from 35 mg m(-3) of air on the day of treatment to 5 mg m(-3) eight days later. PAHs emission concentrations ranged from 28 microg m(-3) of air on the day of treatment to 4 microg m(-3) eight days later. The air concentrations of PAHs in particulate matter were composed predominantly of benzo[b+j]fluoranthene, benzo[a]anthracene, chrysene, fluoranthene, benzo[e]pyrene and 1-methylnaphthalene. The emission concentrations of particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons varied between 0.2 and 43.5 ng m(-3). Finally, the emission factors of VOCs and PAHs were determined.

  15. Mechanical properties of wood from Pinus sylvestris L. treated with Light Organic Solvent Preservative and with waterborne Copper Azole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Villasante

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: To determine the effect on wood from Pinus sylvestris of treatment with preservatives on mechanical properties and to establish the relation between the penetration and compression strength.Area of study: SpainMaterial and Methods: 40 samples of defect-free wood from Pinus sylvestris L. were treated with Light Organic Solvent Preservative (Vacsol Azure WR 2601 and 50 with waterborne Copper Azole (Tanalith E 3492. 40 control samples were not treated (water or preservative. Mechanical resistance to static bending, modulus of elasticity and compression strength parallel to the grain were compared with untreated wood. Regression analysis between the penetration and compression strength parallel was done with the samples treated with waterborne preservative.Main results: The results indicate that the treated wood (with either product presents a statistically significant increase in mechanical resistance in all three mechanical characteristics. The results obtained differ from earlier studies carried out by other authors.There was no correlation between parallel compression strength and the degree of impregnation of the wood with waterborne Copper Azole . The most probable explanation for these results concerns changes in pressure during treatment.The use of untreated control samples instead of samples treated only with water is more likely to produce significant results in the mechanical resistance studies.Research highlights: Treated wood presents a statistically significant increase in MOE, modulus of rupture to static bending  and parallel compression strength.There was no correlation between parallel compression strength and the degree of impregnation with waterborne preservative.Keywords: Light Organic Solvent Preservative; MOE; parallel compression; static bending; waterborne Copper Azole; wood technology.

  16. Method development for the determination of wood preservatives in commercially treated wood using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šťávová, Jana; Sedgeman, Carl A; Smith, Zachary T; Frink, Lillian A; Hart, Jessica A; Niri, Vadoud H; Kubátová, Alena

    2011-09-30

    Fungicides and insecticides are commonly used preservatives to protect wood products against microbiological degradations. Currently, there is a lack of analytical methods addressing the quantitative determination of a wide range of wood preserving species in wood matrices. In this study, a reliable method was developed for the determination of a mixture of wood preserving agents with differing chemical structures (i.e., properties), including tebuconazole (TAZ), propiconazole (PAZ), 3-iodo-2-propynyl butylcarbamate (IPBC), and permethrin (PER), in pine wood. The analyte recoveries obtained by Soxhlet and multiple-stage sonication extractions were compared. While both extraction methods yielded similar results (80-100%), Soxhlet extraction was found to be less labor-intensive and thus preferred providing also lower RSDs of 1-6%. In comparison to methanol, commonly used as an extraction solvent for triazoles, acetone yielded similar extraction efficiencies for all analytes while reducing the time of sample concentration. The solid phase extraction method for triazoles was adapted to allow for a separation of IPBC and PER from the wood matrix. As opposed to previous studies, three recovery standards were employed, which enabled the correction of individual analyte losses during the sample preparation. The matrix-affected limits of detection (LODs) using gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection were nearly the same for triazoles 0.07 and 0.21 ng g(-1) for PAZ and TAZ in sapwood and 0.18 and 0.21 ng g(-1) in heartwood, respectively. Higher LODs were observed for IPBC and PER: 3.9 and 1.7 ng g(-1) in sapwood, and 2.0 and 6.0 ng g(-1) in heartwood, respectively. The recoveries in the wood submitted to commercial sample treatment showed gradient distribution of analytes depending on the penetration of the treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Hexadecyl ammonium chloride amylose inclusion complex to emulsify cedarwood oil and treat wood against termites and wood-decay fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedarwood oil (CWO) has a wide range of bioactivities, including insect repellency and toxicity as well as conferring resistance against termites and wood-rot fungi. In previous pressure treatment work, ethanol was used as the diluent/carrier for CWO. However, it is preferable to use a water-based ...

  18. Transformation and Release of Micronized Cu Used as a Wood Preservative in Treated Wood in Wetland Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micronized Cu (µ-Cu) is used as a wood preservative, replacing toxic Chromated Copper Arsenates. Micronized Cu is Malachite [Cu2CO3(OH)2] that has been milled to micron/submicron particles, many with diameters less than 100 nm, and then mixed with quat or azol biocides. I...

  19. Effects of Heat-Treated Wood Particles on the Physico-Mechanical Properties and Extended Creep Behavior of Wood/Recycled-HDPE Composites Using the Time–Temperature Superposition Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng-Chun Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effectiveness of heat-treated wood particles for improving the physico-mechanical properties and creep performance of wood/recycled-HDPE composites. The results reveal that the composites with heat-treated wood particles had significantly decreased moisture content, water absorption, and thickness swelling, while no improvements of the flexural properties or the wood screw holding strength were observed, except for the internal bond strength. Additionally, creep tests were conducted at a series of elevated temperatures using the time–temperature superposition principle (TTSP, and the TTSP-predicted creep compliance curves fit well with the experimental data. The creep resistance values of composites with heat-treated wood particles were greater than those having untreated wood particles due to the hydrophobic character of the treated wood particles and improved interfacial compatibility between the wood particles and polymer matrix. At a reference temperature of 20 °C, the improvement of creep resistance (ICR of composites with heat-treated wood particles reached approximately 30% over a 30-year period, and it increased significantly with increasing reference temperature.

  20. Effects of Heat-Treated Wood Particles on the Physico-Mechanical Properties and Extended Creep Behavior of Wood/Recycled-HDPE Composites Using the Time-Temperature Superposition Principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Teng-Chun; Chien, Yi-Chi; Wu, Tung-Lin; Hung, Ke-Chang; Wu, Jyh-Horng

    2017-03-30

    This study investigated the effectiveness of heat-treated wood particles for improving the physico-mechanical properties and creep performance of wood/recycled-HDPE composites. The results reveal that the composites with heat-treated wood particles had significantly decreased moisture content, water absorption, and thickness swelling, while no improvements of the flexural properties or the wood screw holding strength were observed, except for the internal bond strength. Additionally, creep tests were conducted at a series of elevated temperatures using the time-temperature superposition principle (TTSP), and the TTSP-predicted creep compliance curves fit well with the experimental data. The creep resistance values of composites with heat-treated wood particles were greater than those having untreated wood particles due to the hydrophobic character of the treated wood particles and improved interfacial compatibility between the wood particles and polymer matrix. At a reference temperature of 20 °C, the improvement of creep resistance ( ICR ) of composites with heat-treated wood particles reached approximately 30% over a 30-year period, and it increased significantly with increasing reference temperature.

  1. Advances in corrosion testing of metals in contact with treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel Zelinka; D.S. Stone

    2010-01-01

    A January 2004 change in the regulation of wood preservatives used in the U.S.has increased the use of newer wood preservatives, such as alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ) and copper azole (CuAz). These preservatives contain high amounts of cupric ions, which may be reduced to copper metal at the expense of less noble steel and galvanized fasteners in the wood....

  2. Improving the two-step remediation process for CCA-treated wood. Part II, Evaluating bacterial nutrient sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol A. Clausen

    2004-01-01

    Remediation processes for recovery and reuse of chromated-copper-arsenate-(CCA) treated wood are not gaining wide acceptance because they are more expensive than landfill disposal. One reason is the high cost of the nutrient medium used to culture the metal tolerant bacterium, Bacillus licheniformis, which removes 70-100% of the copper, chromium, and arsenic from CCA-...

  3. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) as a tool for measuring corrosion of polymer-coated fasteners used in treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Lorraine Ortiz-Candelaria; Donald S. Stone; Douglas R. Rammer

    2009-01-01

    Currently, many of the polymer-coated fasteners on the market are designed for improved corrosion performance in treated wood; yet, there is no way to evaluate their corrosion performance. In this study, a common technique for measuring the corrosion performance of polymer-coated metals, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), was used to evaluate commercial...

  4. Effects of compost and phosphate on plant arsenic accumulation from soils near pressure-treated wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Xinde [Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)]. E-mail: xcao@stevens.edu; Ma, Lena Q. [Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2004-12-01

    Leaching of arsenic (As) from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood may elevate soil arsenic levels. Thus, an environmental concern arises regarding accumulation of As in vegetables grown in these soils. In this study, a greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate As accumulation by vegetables from the soils adjacent to the CCA-treated utility poles and fences and examine the effects of soil amendments on plant As accumulation. Carrot (Daucus carota L.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) were grown for ten weeks in the soil with or without compost and phosphate amendments. As expected, elevated As concentrations were observed in the pole soil (43 mg kg{sup -1}) and in the fence soil (27 mg kg{sup -1}), resulting in enhanced As accumulation of 44 mg kg{sup -1} in carrot and 32 mg kg{sup -1} in lettuce. Addition of phosphate to soils increased As accumulation by 4.56-9.3 times for carrot and 2.45-10.1 for lettuce due to increased soil water-soluble As via replacement of arsenate by phosphate in soil. However, biosolid compost application significantly reduced plant As uptake by 79-86%, relative to the untreated soils. This suppression is possibly because of As adsorbed by biosolid organic mater, which reduced As phytoavailability. Fractionation analysis showed that biosolid decreased As in soil water-soluble, exchangeable, and carbonate fraction by 45%, whereas phosphate increased it up to 2.61 times, compared to the untreated soils. Our results indicate that growing vegetables in soils near CCA-treated wood may pose a risk of As exposure for humans. Compost amendment can reduce such a risk by reducing As accumulation by vegetables and can be an important strategy for remediating CCA-contaminated soils. Caution should be taken for phosphate application since it enhances As accumulation. - Capsule: Compost amendment can reduce As exposure risk for humans by reducing As accumulation by vegetables and can be an important strategy for remediating CCA

  5. La 'invención del caribe a partir de 1898 (las definiciones del caribe, revisitadas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Gaztambide

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se muestra que los conceptos de la historia están cargados de historicidad, cambios y transformaciones tal como lo demuestra el nombre Caribe. También se muestra quena existe una definición pura y exacta del, por esto el autor propone cuatro tendencias con las¡ que pudiera definirse este espacio insular. Estas tendencias son las siguientes: Caribe Insular o etno-, Caribe geopolítico, Gran Caribe o Cuenca del Caribe y Caribe cultural o Afro- América Central.

  6. Assessing the current and future impacts of the disposal of chromated copper arsenate-treated wood in unlined landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Elisabeth L; Kresic, Neven; Wright, Alexandra P; Kavanaugh, Michael C

    2009-03-01

    Several states have recently considered altering disposal requirements for chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood waste, particularly Florida, where CCA-treated wood waste is disposed in unlined construction and demolition (C&D) debris and Class III municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The primary concern is the potential for CCA-treated wood waste to elevate arsenic levels in groundwater downgradient of the disposal sites. To address this concern, we evaluated the impact of past disposal practices of these wastes in unlined Florida C&D and Class III landfills by conducting a statistical analysis of two sets of groundwater data compiled by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP). The databases contain water quality data from C&D and Class III landfills in Florida covering 15 yr of record from February 1992 through February 2007 and together provide the most complete datasets to evaluate this issue. Comparative statistics of the different population groups in the databases showed that the arithmetic mean concentrations of total arsenic were in most cases higher in background wells than in wells downgradient of the landfills. The statistical analysis indicates that past disposal of CCA-treated wood in C&D and Class III landfills in Florida has not increased arsenic levels downgradient of the landfills. Policy decisions regarding the continued disposal of CCA-treated wood waste as a nonhazardous waste in unlined landfills must therefore be based on a scientifically sound assessment of potential future impacts. Quantitative predictions of future impacts are difficult and pose several scientific challenges. Therefore, future management decisions should be based on a more accurate and comprehensive risk analysis that assesses the risks and benefits of different alternatives and takes into account the natural attenuation capacity of soils and aquifer solids for arsenic and the practical limitations of managing this waste stream as a hazardous

  7. Influence of corn steep liquor and glucose on colonization of control and CCB (Cu/Cr/B)-treated wood by brown rot fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humar, Miha; Amartey, Sam A.; Pohleven, Franc

    2006-01-01

    There are increasing problems with regard to the disposal of treated wood waste. Due to heavy metals or arsenic in impregnated wood waste, burning and landfill disposal options are not considered to be environmentally friendly solutions for dealing with this problem. Extraction of the heavy metals and recycling of the preservatives from the wood waste is a much more promising and environmentally friendly solution. In order to study the scale up of this process, copper/chromium/boron-treated wood specimens were exposed to copper tolerant (Antrodia vaillantii and Leucogyrophana pinastri) and copper sensitive wood decay fungi (Gloeophyllum trabeum and Poria monticola). Afterwards, the ability of fungal hyphae to penetrate and overgrow the wood specimens was investigated. The fungal growths were stimulated by immersing the specimens into aqueous solution of glucose or corn steep liquor prior to exposure to the fungi. The fastest colonization of the impregnated wood was by the copper tolerant A. vaillantii. Addition of glucose onto the surface of the wood specimens increased the fungi colonization of the specimens; however, immersion of the specimens into the solution of corn steep liquor did not have the same positive influence. These results are important in elucidating copper toxicity in wood decay fungi and for using these fungi for bioremediation of treated wood wastes

  8. Chemical yields from low-temperature pyrolysis of CCA-treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qirong Fu; Dimitris Argyropolous; Lucian Lucia; David Tilotta; Stan Lebow

    2009-01-01

    Low-temperature pyrolysis offers a feasible option for wood-waste management and the recovery of a variety of useful chemicals. The effect of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) wood preservative on the yield and composition of various pyrolysis products was investigated in the present research. A novel quantitative 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (...

  9. EFFECT OF ARTIFICIAL WEATHERING ON WOOD LAMINATES COLOR TREATED WITH TWO FINISHING PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Jacob Mendes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Weathering is one of the main reasons for the degradation of wood, especially its color. The application of finishes minimizes these effects. This study aimed to monitor the effect of artificial weathering on wood veneer of the species cumaru (Dipteryx odorata and pau marfim (Balfourodendron riedelianum with two finishes, the marine varnish and Cetol, with monitoring using a spectrophotometer. The samples were subjected to cycles of exposure to weathering for 20, 40, 52, 76, 124, 226, 430, 838 and 960 hours. The colorimetric parameters (L*, a*, b*, C and h* were measured before treatment, after application of the products and during the weathering time intervals. The application of finishes darkened veneer of cumaru wood and pau marfim in nature. However, in higher weathering times, both species returned to a lighter color, and even became lighter than the natural wood. The use of Cetol was more efficient, giving greater stability in the conservation of wood color of the species studied.

  10. Arsenic levels in wipe samples collected from play structures constructed with CCA-treated wood: Impact on exposure estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barraj, Leila M. [Chemical Regulation and Food Safety, Exponent, Inc., Suite 1100, 1150 Connecticut Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20036 (United States)], E-mail: lbarraj@exponent.com; Scrafford, Carolyn G. [Chemical Regulation and Food Safety, Exponent, Inc., Suite 1100, 1150 Connecticut Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20036 (United States); Eaton, W. Cary [RTI International, 3040 Cornwallis Road, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Rogers, Robert E.; Jeng, Chwen-Jyh [Toxcon Health Sciences Research Centre Inc., 9607 - 41 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, T6E 5X7 (Canada)

    2009-04-01

    Lumber treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) has been used in residential outdoor wood structures and playgrounds. The U.S. EPA has conducted a probabilistic assessment of children's exposure to arsenic from CCA-treated structures using the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for the wood preservative scenario (SHEDS-Wood). The EPA assessment relied on data from an experimental study using adult volunteers and designed to measure arsenic in maximum hand and wipe loadings. Analyses using arsenic handloading data from a study of children playing on CCA-treated play structures in Edmonton, Canada, indicate that the maximum handloading values significantly overestimate the exposure that occurs during actual play. The objective of our paper is to assess whether the dislodgeable arsenic residues from structures in the Edmonton study are comparable to those observed in other studies and whether they support the conclusion that the values derived by EPA using modeled maximum loading values overestimate hand exposures. We compared dislodgeable arsenic residue data from structures in the playgrounds in the Edmonton study to levels observed in studies used in EPA's assessment. Our analysis showed that the dislodgeable arsenic levels in the Edmonton playground structures are similar to those in the studies used by EPA. Hence, the exposure estimates derived using the handloading data from children playing on CCA-treated structures are more representative of children's actual exposures than the overestimates derived by EPA using modeled maximum values. Handloading data from children playing on CCA-treated structures should be used to reduce the uncertainty of modeled estimates derived using the SHEDS-Wood model.

  11. Increased bioavailability of metals in two contrasting agricultural soils treated with waste wood-derived biochar and ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchini, P; Quilliam, R S; Deluca, T H; Vamerali, T; Jones, D L

    2014-03-01

    Recycled waste wood is being increasingly used for energy production; however, organic and metal contaminants in by-products produced from the combustion/pyrolysis residue may pose a significant environmental risk if they are disposed of to land. Here we conducted a study to evaluate if highly polluted biochar (from pyrolysis) and ash (from incineration) derived from Cu-based preservative-treated wood led to different metal (e.g., Cu, As, Ni, Cd, Pb, and Zn) bioavailability and accumulation in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). In a pot experiment, biochar at a common rate of 2 % w/w, corresponding to ∼50 t ha(-1), and an equivalent pre-combustion dose of wood ash (0.2 % w/w) were added to a Eutric Cambisol (pH 6.02) and a Haplic Podzol (pH 4.95), respectively. Both amendments initially raised soil pH, although this effect was relatively short-term, with pH returning close to the unamended control within about 7 weeks. The addition of both amendments resulted in an exceedance of soil Cu statutory limit, together with a significant increase of Cu and plant nutrient (e.g., K) bioavailability. The metal-sorbing capacity of the biochar, and the temporary increase in soil pH caused by adding the ash and biochar were insufficient to offset the amount of free metal released into solution. Sunflower plants were negatively affected by the addition of metal-treated wood-derived biochar and led to elevated concentration of metals in plant tissue, and reduced above- and below-ground biomass, while sunflower did not grow at all in the Haplic Podzol. Biochar and ash derived from wood treated with Cu-based preservatives can lead to extremely high Cu concentrations in soil and negatively affect plant growth. Identifying sources of contaminated wood in waste stream feedstocks is crucial before large-scale application of biochar or wood ash to soil is considered.

  12. CCA-treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW landfill disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambeck, Jenna; Weitz, Keith; Solo-Gabriele, Helena; Townsend, Timothy; Thorneloe, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood is a preservative treated wood construction product that grew in use in the 1970s for both residential and industrial applications. Although some countries have banned the use of the product for some applications, others have not, and the product continues to enter the waste stream from construction, demolition and remodeling projects. CCA-treated wood as a solid waste is managed in various ways throughout the world. In the US, CCA-treated wood is disposed primarily within landfills; however some of the wood is combusted in waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities. In other countries, the predominant disposal option for wood, sometimes including CCA-treated wood, is combustion for the production of energy. This paper presents an estimate of the quantity of CCA-treated wood entering the disposal stream in the US, as well as an examination of the trade-offs between landfilling and WTE combustion of CCA-treated wood through a life-cycle assessment and decision support tool (MSW DST). Based upon production statistics, the estimated life span and the phaseout of CCA-treated wood, recent disposal projections estimate the peak US disposal rate to occur in 2008, at 9.7 million m(3). CCA-treated wood, when disposed with construction and demolition (C&D) debris and municipal solid waste (MSW), has been found to increase arsenic and chromium concentrations in leachate. For this reason, and because MSW landfills are lined, MSW landfills have been recommended as a preferred disposal option over unlined C&D debris landfills. Between landfilling and WTE for the same mass of CCA-treated wood, WTE is more expensive (nearly twice the cost), but when operated in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) regulations, it produces energy and does not emit fossil carbon emissions. If the wood is managed via WTE, less landfill area is required, which could be an influential trade-off in some countries. Although metals are concentrated

  13. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 3): Southern Maryland Wood Treating Site, Hollywood, MD, September 8, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Southern Maryland Wood Treating Site (`the Site`), in Hollywood, Maryland. This is the second and final phase of remedial action for the Site. This phase addresses soil and sediment contamination and non-aqueous phase liquids (`NAPLs`) which are the principal threats remaining at the Site and are a source of contamination to the ground water and surface water.

  14. Magnetic separation of carbon-encapsulated Fe nanoparticles from thermally-treated wood char

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung Phil Mun; Zhiyong Cai; Jilei Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Wood char,a by-product from the fast-pyrolysis process of southern yellow pine wood for bio-oil production, was carbonized with Fenano particles (FeNPs) as a catalyst to prepare carbon-encapsulated Fe nanoparticles. A magnetic separation method was tested to isolate carbon-encapsulated Fe nano particles from the carbonized char. X-ray diffraction pattern clearly shows...

  15. Chemical changes and increased degradability of wheat straw and oak wood chips treated with the white rot fungi Ceriporiopsis subvermispora and Lentinula edodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijk, van Sandra J.A.; Sonnenberg, Anton S.M.; Baars, Johan J.P.; Hendriks, Wouter H.; Río, del José C.; Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; Ruijter, de Norbert C.A.; Cone, John W.

    2017-01-01

    Wheat straw and oak wood chips were incubated with Ceriporiopsis subvermispora and Lentinula edodes for 8 weeks. Samples from the fungal treated substrates were collected every week for chemical characterization. L. edodes continuously grew during the 8 weeks on both wheat straw and oak wood chips,

  16. Evaluating the potential for environmental pollution from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood waste: a new mass balance approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, T G; Frostick, L E

    2014-07-15

    The potential for pollution from arsenic, chromium and copper in chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood waste was assessed using two lysimeter studies. The first utilised lysimeters containing soil and CCA wood waste mulch exposed to natural conditions over a five month period. The second study used the same lysimeter setup in a regulated greenhouse setting with a manual watering regime. Woodchip, soil and leachate samples were evaluated for arsenic, chromium and copper concentrations. Resultant concentration data were used to produce mass balances, an approach thus far unused in such studies. This novel analysis revealed new patterns of mobility and distribution of the elements in the system. The results suggest that CCA wood waste tends to leach on initial exposure to a leachant and during weathering of the wood. When in contact with soil, metal(loid) transport is reduced due to complexation reactions. With higher water application or where the adsorption capacity of the soil is exceeded, the metal(loid)s are transported through the soil column as leachate. Overall, there was an unexplained loss of metal(loid)s from the system that might be attributed to volatilisation of arsenic and plant uptake. This suggests a hitherto unidentified risk to both the environment and human health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Arsenic, chromium, and copper leaching from CCA-treated wood and their potential impacts on landfill leachate in a tropical country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamchanawong, S; Veerakajohnsak, C

    2010-04-01

    This study looks into the potential risks of arsenic, chromium, and copper leaching from disposed hardwoods treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) in a tropical climate. The Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and the Waste Extraction Test (WET) were employed to examine new CCA-treated Burseraceae and Keruing woods, weathered CCA-treated teak wood, and ash from new CCA-treated Burseraceae wood. In addition, a total of six lysimeters, measuring 2 m high and 203 mm in diameter were prepared to compare the leachate generated from the wood monofills, construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills and municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills, containing CCA-treated Burseraceae wood. The TCLP and WET results showed that the CCA-treated Burseraceae wood leached higher metal concentrations (i.e. 9.19-17.70 mg/L, 1.14-5.89 mg/L and 4.83-23.89 mg/L for arsenic, chromium, and copper, respectively) than the CCA-treated Keruing wood (i.e. 1.74-11.34 mg/L, 0.26-3.57 mg/L and 0.82-13.64 mg/L for arsenic, chromium and copper, respectively). Ash from the CCA-treated Burseraceae wood leached significantly higher metal concentrations (i.e. 108.5-116.9 mg/L, 1522-3862 mg/L and 84.03-114.4 mg/L for arsenic, chromium and copper, respectively), making this type of ash of high concern. The lysimeter study results showed that the MSW lysimeter exhibited higher reducing conditions, more biological activities and more dissolved ions in their leachates than the wood monofill and C&D debris lysimeters. All leachates generated from the lysimeters containing the CCA-treated Burseraceae wood contained significantly higher concentrations of arsenic in comparison to those of the untreated wood: in the range of 0.53-15.7 mg/L. It can be concluded that the disposal of CCA-treated Burseraceae wood in an unlined C&D landfill or a MSW landfill has the potential to contaminate groundwater.

  18. Prospects for co-firing of clean coal and creosote-treated waste wood at small-scale power stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zandersons Janis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available If a small-scale clean coal fueled power plant is co-fueled with 5% of creosote-treated used-up sleeper wood, the decontamination by carbonisation at 500 °C in an indirectly heated rotary kiln with the diameter 1.7 m and effective length 10 m can be realized. It should be included in the "3R Clean Coal Carbonisation Plant" system, which processes coal. It will improve the heat balance of the system, since the carbonisation of wood will deliver a lot of high caloricity pyroligneous vapour to the joint furnace of the "3R Clean Coal Carbonisation Plant". Pine wood sleeper sapwood contains 0.25% of sulphur, but the average pine sleeper wood (sapwood and heartwood 0.05% of sulphur. Most of the sulphur is lost with the pyroligneous vapour and burned in the furnace. Since the "3R Clean Coal Carbonisation Plant" is equipped with a flue gases cleaning system, the SO2 emission level will not exceed 5 mg/m3. The charcoal of the sapwood portion of sleepers and that of the average sleeper wood will contain 0.22% and 0.035% of sulphur, respectively. The increase of the carbonisation temperature does not substantially decrease the sulphur content in charcoal, although it is sufficiently low, and the charcoal can be co-fired with clean coal. The considered process is suitable for small power plants, if the biomass input in the common energy balance is 5 to 10%. If the mean distance of sleepers transportation for Central and Eastern Europe is estimated not to exceed 200 km, the co-combustion of clean coal and carbonized sleepers would be an acceptable option from the environmental and economic points of view.

  19. Fast pyrolysis of creosote treated wood ties in a fluidized bed reactor and analytical characterization of product fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Su-Hwa; Koo, Won-Mo; Kim, Joo-Sik

    2013-01-01

    A fraction of creosote treated wood ties was pyrolyzed in a pyrolysis plant equipped with a fluidized bed reactor and char-separation system at different temperatures. Analyses of each pyrolysis product, especially the oil, were carried out using a variety of analytical tools. The maximum oil yield was obtained at 458 °C with a value of 69.3 wt%. Oils obtained were easily separated into two phases, a creosote-derived fraction (CDF) and a wood-derived fraction (WDF). Major compounds of the WDF were acetic acid, furfural and levoglucosan, while the CDF was mainly composed of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), such as 1-methylnaphthalene, biphenyl, acenaphthene, dibenzofuran, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene and pyrene. HPLC analysis showed that the concentration of PAHs of the CDF obtained at 458 °C constituted about 22.5 wt% of the oil. - Highlights: • Creosote treated wood ties was stably pyrolyzed in a fluidized bed reactor. • Pyrolysis oil contained extremely low metal content due to the char removal system. • Bio-oil components was quantitatively analyzed by relative response factor. • Creosote-derived pyrolysis oil fraction was composed of PHAs and has a high caloric value (39 MJ/kg)

  20. Evaluation of Mechanical Properties of Plywood Treated with a new Wood Preservative (CEB) Chemical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalawate, Aparna; Shahoo, Shadhu Charan; Khatua, Pijus Kanti; Das, Himadri Sekhar

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the physical and mechanical properties of the plywood made with phenolic glue and rubber wood as core veneer with CEB as a wood preservative. The studied properties were glue shear strength in dry, wet mycological, modulus of elasticity, modulus of rupture and tensile strength in parallel to grain direction as per IS:1734 part-4, 11 and 9 (1983) respectively. Results of the above mentioned tests were compared with the prescribed values given in IS 710-2010 and results revealed that samples conformed the prescribed values.

  1. Starch inclusion complex to emulsify cedarwood oil and pressure treat wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previously, we have demonstrated that CO2-derived cedarwood oil has a range of bioactivities, including insect repellency and toxicity as well as conferring resistance to both termites and wood-rot fungi. In the earlier pressure treatment work, ethanol was used as the diluent/carrier. However, it is...

  2. In vitro bioaccessibility of copper azole following simulated dermal transfer from pressure-treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micronized copper azole (MCA) and micronized copper quaternary are the latest wood preservatives to replace the liquid lkaline copper and chromated copper arsenate preservatives due to concerns over the toxicity or lack of effectiveness of the earlier formulations. Today, the use...

  3. Removal of nano- and micronized-copper from treated wood by chelating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Nami Kartal; Evren Terzi; Bessie Woodward; Carol A. Clausen; Stan T. Lebow

    2013-01-01

    Micronized and nano-copper (Cu)-based and arsenic and chromium-free systems have received much attention for wood protection in recent years. Because they have different fixation, and micro-distribution properties, such copper systems may be more or less subject to release using known remediation methods than soluble forms of Cu. This study evaluated Cu recovery from...

  4. Elastic and Strength Properties of Heat-Treated Beech and Birch Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlastimil Borůvka

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the impact of heat treatment on the elastic and strength properties of two diffuse porous hardwoods, namely Fagus sylvatica and Betula pendula. Two degrees of the heat treatment were used at temperatures of 165 °C and 210 °C. The dynamic and static elasticity modulus, bending strength, impact toughness, hardness, and density were tested. It is already known that an increase in treatment temperature decreases the mechanical properties and, on the other hand, leads to a better shape and dimensional stability. Higher temperatures of the heat treatment correlated with lower elastic and strength properties. In the case of higher temperature treatments, the decline of tested properties was noticeable as a result of serious changes in the chemical composition of wood. It was confirmed that at higher temperature stages of treatment, there was a more pronounced decrease in beech properties compared to those of the birch, which was the most evident in their bending strength and hardness. Our research confirmed that there is no reason to consider birch wood to be of a lesser quality, although it is regarded by foresters as an inferior tree species. After the heat treatment, the wood properties are almost the same as in the case of beech wood.

  5. An innovative wood-chip-framework soil infiltrator for treating anaerobic digested swine wastewater and analysis of the microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bowei; Li, Jianzheng; Leu, Shao-Yuan

    2014-12-01

    Combined anaerobic-aerobic processes are efficacious and economic approaches in treating swine wastewater. Nitrogen removal efficiency of these processes, however, is usually limited due to the low carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio of the wastewater. An innovative wood-chip-framework soil infiltrator (WFSI) was developed and its performance in treating anaerobic digested swine wastewater was investigated. The WFSI showed comparable removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and amongst the highest efficiency of nitrogen removal in treating low C/N wastewater. At a COD volume loading rate of 98.6 g/m3 d the WFSI could remove up to 47.7 g/m3 d of COD. Removal rates of NH4+-N and total nitrogen, also reached 69.1 and 30.4 g/m3 d, respectively, when NH4+-N loading rate was 88.4 g/m3 d. Biological analysis indicated that aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic microbiota occurred throughout the WFSI. Abundant cellulose and lignin decomposing bacteria could degrade the wood chips and provided extra carbon source to enhance denitrification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Durability of the reaction to fire performance for fire retardant treated (FRT wood products in exterior applications – a ten years report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Östman Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several long term experimental studies on the maintained reaction to fire performance of fire retardant treated (FRT wood products over time are presented. They are performed according to a European system based on earlier Nordic and North American systems and include accelerated ageing according to different procedures and natural weathering up to ten years. Main conclusions are: The hygroscopic properties are unchanged compared to untreated wood for most FRT wood products used commercially. The reaction to fire properties of FRT wood may be maintained after accelerated and natural ageing if the retention levels are high enough, but several FRT wood products loose most of their improved reaction to fire properties during weathering. Paint systems contribute considerably to maintain of the fire performance at exterior application and are usually needed to maintain the fire performance after weathering.

  7. La vida en el pensamiento caribe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Avella

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Para llegar a una interpretación del pensamiento caribe se puede pensar en un breve recorrido histórico que resulta insuficiente a la hora de brindar a la polifonía del caribe contemporáneo. Se hace necesario, desde este escrito, aludir a la vida cotidiana del caribe que se ofrece como una amalgama de voces que se liberan más allá de los simples estamentos políticos que toma como referente la esclavitud.

  8. Effects of permethrin treated wood on the subterranean termite Reticulitermes flavipes (Kollar) and comparison of solvent extraction for HPLC analysis of permethrin in wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Mankowski; Blossie Boyd; Geoffrey Webb

    2016-01-01

    Permethrin is a common insecticide used in wood preservation. It is an effective synthetic pyrethroid that is considered to be less toxic to higher organisms than organochlorine insecticides. In wood preservation, it can be used in combination with fungicides such as 3-iodo-2-propynyl butyl carbamate (IPBC). Permethrin has a dual mode of action as it is a repellent and...

  9. Formation of metal agglomerates during carbonisation of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood waste: Comparison between a lab scale and an industrial plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helsen, Lieve; Hacala, Amelie

    2006-01-01

    This paper compares the results obtained by scanning electron microscopy coupled to X-ray analysis (SEM-EDXA) of the solid product after carbonisation of treated wood waste in a lab scale and in an industrial installation. These setups (lab scale and industrial) are characterized by different operating conditions of the carbonisation process. Moreover, the wood waste input to the processes differs significantly. From this study, it is clear that some similarities but also some differences exist between the lab scale study and the study with the industrial Chartherm plant. In both reactors, a metal (and mineral) agglomeration process takes place, even in the case of untreated wood. The agglomerates initially present in the wood input may serve as a seed for the metal agglomeration process during 'chartherisation'. The industrial setup leads to a broader range of agglomerates' size (0.1-50 μm) and composition (all possible combinations of Cu, Cr, As and wood minerals). Some agglomerates contain the three metals but the major part is a combination of wood minerals and one or two of the three preservative metals, while all agglomerates analysed in the lab scale product contain the three metals. The separate influence of wood input characteristics and process conditions cannot be derived from these experiments, but the observations suggest that the higher the CCA retention in the wood input is, the easier is the metal agglomeration process during chartherisation of CCA treated wood waste. From the analyses performed in this study it seems that copper behaves differently in the sense that it agglomerates easily, but the resulting particles are small (<1 μm)

  10. Emissions of organics from bioslurry reactors treating soil contaminated with wood preserving waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, R.F.; Smith, M.; Hessling, J.; Dosani, M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper is a part of the work conducted for a joint Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) project and a study for the EPA's Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER) that is developing information for Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT). The project was conducted at the US EPA Test and Evaluation Center located at the Gest Street Waste Water Treatment Plant in Cincinnati, Ohio. The contaminated soil chosen for the test of the effectiveness of bioslurry reactors for the degradation of wood preserving wastes was a soil from the Burlington Northern NPL site in Brainerd, Minnesota. The overall results of the soil treatment are presented in a paper titled Slurry Reactor Bioremediation of Soil-Bound Polycyclic Aromatic Hyrocarbon by Alan Jones, Madonna Brinkmann, and William Mahaffey of Ecova Corporation. Air sampling was conducted to characterize the off-gases emitted from the bioreactors during the operations and to determine organic constituent loss through volatilization. 1 tab

  11. Wood mouse and box turtle populations in an area treated annually with DDT for five years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.

    1951-01-01

    A 117-acre area of dense woodland on the Patuxent Research Refuge received an aerial application of DDT in oil at the rate of 2 pounds per acre gnnually for five years. DDT reached ground level in a much smaller amount (thousandths to hundredths of a pound per acre). Treatment was made during the first week of June of each year from 1945 through 1949. Field studies of the wood mouse population in DDT and check areas showed no significant differences in the two areas before and after the 1949 DDT treatment. There was no significant difference between trapping samples taken in DDT and check areas in 1945 and those taken in 1949. Field studies of the box turtles in DDT and check areas in 1945 and 1949 showed no significant difference in population size. Growth of the four young turtles taken in the DDT area in both 1945 and 1949 appeared to be normal in comparison with growth of check area turtles.

  12. Determination of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) in treated wood of Eucalyptus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parreira, Paulo S.; Vendrametto, Guilherme R.; Cunha, Magda E.T.

    2009-01-01

    This work deals with the possible application of a portable energy dispersive handmade system (PXRF-LFNA-02) for the determination of Chromium, Copper and Arsenic in the preservative solution used to protect commercial wood of Eucalyptus, which are employed as wood fence, posts, contention fences, railroad sleepers, etc. It was prepared five body-of-proof made of eucalyptus alburnum with different concentrations for each element varying from 0.0061 to 0.0180 (g/g) for CrO 3 , 0.0024 to 0.0070 (g/g) for CuO and 0.0044 to 0.0129 (g/g) for As 2 O 5 . Four of them were used for calibration curves and one used as reference sample. It was used a commercial CCA (Chromated Copper Arsenate ) solution to prepare the samples. The results show a good linear regression between concentrations and X-rays intensities, after applied the multiple linear regression methodology for interelemental corrections. The values obtained with this methodology were 3.01(kg/m 3 ), 1.18 (kg/m 3 ) e 2.21 (kg/m 3 ) for CrO 3 , CuO and As 2 O 5 , respectively, while the nominal values are 2.90 (kg/m 3 ) for CrO 3 , 1.13 (kg/m 3 ) for CuO and 2.07 (kg/m 3 ) for As 2 O 5 . The ED-XRF (Energy Dispersive X-Rays Fluorescence) is a well established technique with high-speed of analytical procedure and its portable configuration allowing a multielemental, simultaneous and non destructive analyses besides in situ application. (author)

  13. Modelling inorganic and organic biocide leaching from CBA-amine (Copper–Boron–Azole) treated wood based on characterisation leaching tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupsea, Maria [University of Toulouse, INSA, UPS, INP, LISBP, 135 Avenue de Rangueil, F–31077 Toulouse (France); INRA, UMR 792, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5504, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Paris-Est University, CSTB — Scientific and Technical Centre for the Building Industry, DEE/Environment and Life Cycle Engineering Team, 24 Rue Joseph Fourier, F-38400 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Tiruta-Barna, Ligia, E-mail: ligia.barna@insa-toulouse.fr [University of Toulouse, INSA, UPS, INP, LISBP, 135 Avenue de Rangueil, F–31077 Toulouse (France); INRA, UMR 792, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5504, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Schiopu, Nicoleta [Paris-Est University, CSTB — Scientific and Technical Centre for the Building Industry, DEE/Environment and Life Cycle Engineering Team, 24 Rue Joseph Fourier, F-38400 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Schoknecht, Ute [BAM — Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division 4.1, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-09-01

    Numerical simulation of the leaching behaviour of treated wood is the most pertinent and less expensive method for the prediction of biocides' release in water. Few studies based on mechanistic leaching models have been carried out so far. In this work, a coupled chemistry-mass transport model is developed for simulating the leaching behaviour of inorganic (Cu, B) and organic (Tebuconazole) biocides from CBA-amine treated wood. The model is based on experimental investigations (lab-scale leaching tests coupled with chemical and structural analysis). It considers biocides' interactions with wood solid components and with extractives (literature confirmed reactions), as well as transport mechanisms (diffusion, convection) in different compartments. Simulation results helped at identifying the main fixation mechanisms, like (i) direct complexation of Cu by wood-phenolic and -carboxylic sites (and not via monoethanolamine; complex) on lignin and hemicellulose and strong dependence on extractives' nature, (ii) pH dependent binding of tebuconazole on polarized -OH moieties on wood. The role of monoethanolamine is to provide a pore-solution pH of about 7.5, when copper solubility is found to be weakest. The capability of the developed model to simulate the chemical and transport behaviour is the main result of this study. Moreover, it proved that characterization leaching tests (pH dependency and dynamic tests), combined with appropriate analytical methods are useful experimental tools. Due to its flexibility for representing and simulating various leaching conditions, chemical-transport model developed could be used to further simulate the leaching behaviour of CBA treated wood at larger scales. - Highlights: • Biocide and extractives leaching from ammonia-CBA treated wood were modelled. • The chemical-transport model identifies the main fixation/solubilisation mechanisms. • The model describes well the results of equilibrium and dynamic leaching

  14. Effect of different extracting solutions on the electrodialytic remediation of CCA-treated wood waste Part I. - Behaviour of Cu and Cr

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velizarova, E.; Ribeiro, A. B.; Mateus, E.

    2004-01-01

    Removal of Cu and Cr from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood waste under batch electrodialytic conditions was studied. The effect of different types of extracting solutions, such as deionised water or aqueous solutions of NaCl, formic acid, oxalic acid, and EDTA, on the magnitude and di...

  15. Effects of wood saw dust ash admixed with treated sisal fibre on the geotechnical properties of lateritic soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Engbonye SANI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The preliminary investigation conducted on the lateritic soil collected at Shika, Zaria shows that it falls under A-7-6 (10 classification for AASHTO (1986 and CL according to unified soil classification system USCS (ASTM 1992. The soil was treated with both wood saw dust ash (WSDA and treated sisal fiber, in stepped concentration of 0,2,4,6, and 8% for WSDA and 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1% treated sisal fibre by dry weight of soil using Standard proctor. The Sisal Fibre was treated with Sodium Borohydride (NaBH4 (1% wt/vol for 60 minutes at room temperature to remove the cellulose content present in the Fibre. Statistical analysis was carried out on the obtained results using XLSTART 2017 software and analysis of variance with the Microsoft Excel Analysis Tool Pak Software Package. The liquid limit (LL of the soil was found to be 48% while the plastic limit(PL is 21.27%. The maximum dry density(MDDhowever, decreases generally from a value of 1.85 Mg/m3 to 1.68Mg/m3 at 0.25% sisal fiber content/0% WSDA. It has its least value of 1.57Mg/m3 at 1% sisal fiber and 8% WSDA. The OMC increased from 18 % of the natural soil to 23.7% at 0.75% sisal fiber / 6% WSDA content. There was a general increase in the value of UCS of the soil-sisal fibre mixture with WSDA content from 100 kN/m2 of the natural soil to 696 kN/m2 at 0.75 % sisal fibre content / 6% WSDA. The UCS value met the standard of 687-1373 kN/m2 requirements of sub base for adequate lime and cement stabilization, respectively (Ingas and Metcalf 1972.

  16. Modelling inorganic and organic biocide leaching from CBA-amine (Copper-Boron-Azole) treated wood based on characterisation leaching tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupsea, Maria; Tiruta-Barna, Ligia; Schiopu, Nicoleta; Schoknecht, Ute

    2013-09-01

    Numerical simulation of the leaching behaviour of treated wood is the most pertinent and less expensive method for the prediction of biocides' release in water. Few studies based on mechanistic leaching models have been carried out so far. In this work, a coupled chemistry-mass transport model is developed for simulating the leaching behaviour of inorganic (Cu, B) and organic (Tebuconazole) biocides from CBA-amine treated wood. The model is based on experimental investigations (lab-scale leaching tests coupled with chemical and structural analysis). It considers biocides' interactions with wood solid components and with extractives (literature confirmed reactions), as well as transport mechanisms (diffusion, convection) in different compartments. Simulation results helped at identifying the main fixation mechanisms, like (i) direct complexation of Cu by wood-phenolic and -carboxylic sites (and not via monoethanolamine; complex) on lignin and hemicellulose and strong dependence on extractives' nature, (ii) pH dependent binding of tebuconazole on polarized OH moieties on wood. The role of monoethanolamine is to provide a pore-solution pH of about 7.5, when copper solubility is found to be weakest. The capability of the developed model to simulate the chemical and transport behaviour is the main result of this study. Moreover, it proved that characterization leaching tests (pH dependency and dynamic tests), combined with appropriate analytical methods are useful experimental tools. Due to its flexibility for representing and simulating various leaching conditions, chemical-transport model developed could be used to further simulate the leaching behaviour of CBA treated wood at larger scales. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Interrelationship between lignin-rich dichloromethane extracts of hot water-treated wood fibers and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) in wood plastic composite (WPC) production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel R. Pelaez-Samaniego; Vikram Yadama; Manuel Garcia-Perez; Eini Lowell; Rui Zhu; Karl Englund

    2016-01-01

    Hot water extraction (HWE) partially removes hemicelluloses from wood while leaving the majority of the lignin and cellulose; however, the lignin partially migrates to the inner surfaces of the cell wall where it can be deposited as a layer that is sometimes visible as droplets. This lignin-rich material was isolated via Soxhlet extraction with dichloromethane to...

  18. Metals determination in wood treated by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vives, Ana Elisa Sirito de [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Santa Barbara D' Oeste, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mail: aesvives@unimep.br; Silva, Richard Maximiliano da Cunha [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: maxcunha@cena.usp.br; Medeiros, Jean Gabriel da Silva; Tomazello Filho, Mario [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz]. E-mail: jeangm@esalq.usp.br; mtomazel@esalq.usp.br; Moreira, Silvana [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mail: Silvana@fec.unicamp.br; Zucchi, Orgheda Luiza Araujo Domingues [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas]. E-mail: olzucchi@fcfrp.usp.br; Barroso, Regina Cely [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: cely@uerj.br

    2005-07-01

    The paper describes the use of X-Ray fluorescence analysis for distribution and quantification of metals in the hardwood (Eucalyptus sp) and softwood (Pinus sp) treated with CCA (copper-chromium-arsenic). The sapwood/heartwood for hardwood sample and the growth-rings for softwood sample were analyzed. The samples were scanned in 320 mm steps in the vertical direction. For excitation of the elements a white beam synchrotron radiation of {approx} 320 x 180 mm was employed and for the X-ray detection a Si(Li) semiconductor detector. The elements K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn and As were determined. Fundamental parameters were used to quantify the elements concentrations. (author)

  19. Metals determination in wood treated by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vives, Ana Elisa Sirito de; Medeiros, Jean Gabriel da Silva; Tomazello Filho, Mario

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes the use of X-Ray fluorescence analysis for distribution and quantification of metals in the hardwood (Eucalyptus sp) and softwood (Pinus sp) treated with CCA (copper-chromium-arsenic). The sapwood/heartwood for hardwood sample and the growth-rings for softwood sample were analyzed. The samples were scanned in 320 mm steps in the vertical direction. For excitation of the elements a white beam synchrotron radiation of ∼ 320 x 180 mm was employed and for the X-ray detection a Si(Li) semiconductor detector. The elements K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn and As were determined. Fundamental parameters were used to quantify the elements concentrations. (author)

  20. Corrosão de parafusos fixados à madeira tratada com soluções de creosoto vegetal Corrosion of screws fixed into wood treated with wood tar creosote solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juarez Benigno Paes

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desta pesquisa foi avaliar a corrosão de parafusos auto-rosqueáveis fixados à madeira tratada com soluções preservativas preparadas com creosoto vegetal, em condições de campo. Obteve-se o creosoto vegetal bruto por meio da destilação à temperatura de 110 - 255ºC do alcatrão vegetal. Uma fração dos destilados foi lavada com solução a 9% de bicarbonato de sódio, obtendo-se o creosoto vegetal purificado. Ambas as frações foram enriquecidas com 3% de naftenato de cobre; 3% de naftenato de zinco; 3% naftenato de cobalto; 2% de TBTO; 2% de tribromofenato de tubutil-estanho; 2% de pentaclorofenol; ou 0,4% de trióxido de arsênico. Foram preparadas 16 soluções, sendo 14 enriquecidas, além do creosoto vegetal bruto e do creosoto vegetal purificado. Estacas confeccionadas com madeira de alburno de Eucalyptus grandis foram tratadas pelo processo de célula- cheia (processo Bethell. Após o tratamento, parafusos auto-rosquéaveis de ferro zincado foram fixados às estacas. O ensaio foi instalado em três localidades da Zona da Mata de Minas Gerais (Viçosa, Ponte Nova e Leopoldina. A corrosividade das soluções de creosoto vegetal foi comparada à causada pelo creosoto mineral. As soluções preparadas com creosoto vegetal purificado foram menos corrosivas que suas similares preparadas com creosoto vegetal bruto, assemelhando-se ao creosoto mineral.The objective of this research was to evaluate the corrosion of screws fixed into wood treated with preservative solutions of wood tar creosote. The crude wood tar creosote was obtained through distillation of wood tar at 110 - 255ºC. A fraction of this product was washed with a solution of sodium bicarbonate at 9%, resulting in purified wood tar creosote. Both fractions were enriched with 3% of copper naphtenate, 3% of zinc naphtenate, 3% of cobalt naphtenate, 2% of TBTO, 2% of tributhyl-tin tribromophenate, 2% of pentachlorophenol, or with 0.4% of arsenic trioxide. A total

  1. Weathering properties of treated southern yellow pine wood examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and physical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salaita, Ghaleb N.; Ma, Frank M.S.; Parker, Trudy C.; Hoflund, Gar B.

    2008-01-01

    In this study the weathering behavior of southern yellow pine (SYP) wood samples pretreated in different solutions has been examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and various types of physical characterization regarding material loss and discoloration. The treatment solutions include water as a control, a commercially available water repellent (WR) wood treating additive and polyethylene glycol (PEG) products including PEG PLUS TM , PEG 8000 solutions and Compound 20M in varying concentrations. All contained the wood preservative chromated copper arsenate (CCA). One sample was treated with a CCA solution only. The treatments were carried out at 20 deg. C and 150 psig for 1/2 h after exposure to vacuum (28 mmHg) for 15 min. Simulated weathering was achieved in an Atlas 65-W Weather-Ometer for 2000 h with both light and dark periods and rain. The temperature ranged from 23 deg. C during the dark cycle to 35 deg. C during the light cycle. With weathering the XPS O/C ratios increase due to oxidation of the surface. Exposure to UV light results in bond breakage and reaction with oxygen in the presence of air to form organic functional groups such as , , C=O and/or O-C-O. These oxidized products can protect the underlying wood from deterioration if they are insoluble in water and remain on the surface as a protective coating. If soluble, rain washes the compounds away and assists in the degradation. Correlated changes are observed in the XPS O/C ratios, the high-resolution XPS C 1s spectra, the SEM micrographs and physical measurements including thickness alteration, weight loss, and discoloration by yellowing or whitening of the weathered wood. The PEG treatments are effective in protecting wood with the 2% PEG PLUS treatment providing the best weathering behavior similar to that of the CCA treatment. The WR and water treatments yield the poorest weathering properties

  2. Literatura y antropologia: arawak y caribes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Bouletreau

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Los mitos caribes están estrechamente ligados al mar.  originario de las mesetas amazónicas del alto Brasil, ese pueblo emigro durante generaciones descendiendo en un primer momento a la amazonia para esparcirse sobre las costas de Guyana y de Venezuela.

  3. Review of test methods used to determine the corrosion rate of metals in contact with treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to give an overview of test methods previously used to evaluate the corrosion of metals in contact with wood. This article reviews the test methods used to evaluate the corrosion of metals in contact with wood by breaking the experiments into three groups: exposure tests, accelerated exposure tests, and electrochemical tests....

  4. A cell-based potentiometric biosensor using the fungus Lentinus sajor-caju for permethrin determination in treated wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arip, Mohamad Nasir Mat; Heng, Lee Yook; Ahmad, Musa; Ujang, Salmiah

    2013-11-15

    The characteristics of a potentiometric biosensor for the determination of permethrin in treated wood based on immobilised cells of the fungus Lentinus sajor-caju on a potentiometric transducer are reported this paper. The potentiometric biosensor was prepared by immobilisation of the fungus in alginate gel deposited on a pH-sensitive transducer employing a photocurable acrylic matrix. The biosensor gave a good response in detecting permethrin over the range of 1.0-100.0 µM. The slope of the calibration curve was 56.10 mV/decade with detection limit of 1.00 µM. The relative standard deviation for the sensor reproducibility was 4.86%. The response time of the sensor was 5 min at optimum pH 8.0 with 1.00 mg/electrode of fungus L. sajor-caju. The permethrin biosensor performance was compared with the conventional method for permethrin analysis using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and the analytical results agreed well with the HPLC method (at 95% confidence limit). There was no interference from commonly used organophosphorus pesticides such as diazinon, parathion, paraoxon, and methyl parathion. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons degradation and microbial community shifts during co-composting of creosote-treated wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covino, Stefano; Fabianová, Tereza; Křesinová, Zdena; Čvančarová, Monika; Burianová, Eva; Filipová, Alena; Vořísková, Jana; Baldrian, Petr; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2016-01-15

    The feasibility of decontaminating creosote-treated wood (CTW) by co-composting with agricultural wastes was investigated using two bulking agents, grass cuttings (GC) and broiler litter (BL), each employed at a 1:1 ratio with the matrix. The initial concentration of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in CTW (26,500 mg kg(-1)) was reduced to 3 and 19% after 240 d in GC and BL compost, respectively. PAH degradation exceeded the predicted bioaccesible threshold, estimated through sequential supercritical CO2 extraction, together with significant detoxification, assessed by contact tests using Vibrio fisheri and Hordeum vulgare. GC composting was characterized by high microbial biomass growth in the early phases, as suggested by phospholipid fatty acid analyses. Based on the 454-pyrosequencing results, fungi (mostly Saccharomycetales) constituted an important portion of the microbial community, and bacteria were characterized by rapid shifts (from Firmicutes (Bacilli) and Actinobacteria to Proteobacteria). However, during BL composting, larger amounts of prokaryotic and eukaryotic PLFA markers were observed during the cooling and maturation phases, which were dominated by Proteobacteria and fungi belonging to the Ascomycota and those putatively related to the Glomeromycota. This work reports the first in-depth analysis of the chemical and microbiological processes that occur during the co-composting of a PAH-contaminated matrix. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Wood preservative testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca Ibach; Stan T. Lebow

    2012-01-01

    Most wood species used in commercial and residential construction have little natural biological durability and will suffer from biodeterioration when exposed to moisture. Historically, this problem has been overcome by treating wood for outdoor use with toxic wood preservatives. As societal acceptance of chemical use changes, there is continual pressure to develop and...

  7. Landfill disposal of CCA-treated wood with construction and demolition (C&D) debris: arsenic, chromium, and copper concentrations in leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambeck, Jenna R; Townsend, Timothy G; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M

    2008-08-01

    Although phased out of many residential uses in the United States, the disposal of CCA-treated wood remains a concern because significant quantities have yet to be taken out of service, and it is commonly disposed in landfills. Catastrophic events have also led to the concentrated disposal of CCA-treated wood, often in unlined landfills. The goal of this research was to simulate the complex chemical and biological activity of a construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfill containing a realistic quantity of CCA-treated wood (10% by mass), produce leachate, and then evaluate the arsenic, copper, and chromium concentrations in the leachate as an indication of what may occur in a landfill setting. Copper concentrations were not significantly elevated in the control or experimental simulated landfill setting (alpha = 0.05). However, the concentrations of arsenic and chromium were significantly higher in the experimental simulated landfill leachate compared to the control simulated landfill leachate (alpha = 0.05, p debris can impact leachate quality which, in turn could affect leachate management practices or aquifers below unlined landfills.

  8. Migration of iron and manganese into CCA-treated wood in soil contact and the resulting error in leaching results when using energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tor P. Schultz; Darrel D. Nicholas; Stan Lebow

    2003-01-01

    In a laboratory leaching study, we found that chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood, which had been exposed to one of five soils examined, unexpectedly appeared to gain significant Cr (47%) when measured with an energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence instrument (American Wood-Preservers' Association (AWPA) Method A9-01 2001). Analysis of some of the leached...

  9. Modeling of electrodialytic and dialytic removal of Cr, Cu and As from CCA-treated wood chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribeiro, Alexandra; Rodriguez-Maroto, J.M.; Mateus, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    A one-dimensional model is developed for simulating the electrodialytic and dialytic treatment of a saturated bed of wood chips containing chromium, copper and arsenic. The movement of Cr, Cu and As is mathematically modeled taking into account the diffusion transport resulting from the concentra......A one-dimensional model is developed for simulating the electrodialytic and dialytic treatment of a saturated bed of wood chips containing chromium, copper and arsenic. The movement of Cr, Cu and As is mathematically modeled taking into account the diffusion transport resulting from...

  10. Biosorbents prepared from wood particles treated with anionic polymer and iron salt: Effect of particle size on phosphate adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas L. Eberhardt; Soo-Hong Min

    2008-01-01

    Biomass-based adsorbents have been widely studied as a cost-effective and environmentally-benign means to remove pollutants and nutrients from water. A two-stage treatment of aspen wood particles with solutions of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and ferrous chloride afforded a biosorbent that was effective in removing phosphate from test solutions. FTIR spectroscopy of...

  11. Differentiation of Wines Treated with Wood Chips Based on Their Phenolic Content, Volatile Composition, and Sensory Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyraleou, Maria; Kallithraka, Stamatina; Chira, Kleopatra; Tzanakouli, Eleni; Ligas, Ioannis; Kotseridis, Yorgos

    2015-12-01

    The effects of both wood chips addition and contact time on phenolic content, volatile composition, color parameters, and organoleptic character of red wine made by a native Greek variety (Agiorgitiko) were evaluated. For this purpose, chips from American, French, Slavonia oak, and Acacia were added in the wine after fermentation. A mixture consisting of 50% French and 50% Americal oak chips was also evaluated. In an attempt to categorize wine samples, various chemical parameters of wines and sensory parameters were studied after 1, 2, and 3 mo of contact time with chips. The results showed that regardless of the type of wood chips added in the wines, it was possible to differentiate the samples according to the contact time based on their phenolic composition and color parameters. In addition, wood-extracted volatile compounds seem to be the critical parameter that could separate the samples according to the wood type. The wines that were in contact with Acacia and Slavonia chips could be separated from the rest mainly due to their distinct sensory characters. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. Biomass Burning observed during IAGOS - CARIBIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumaier, Marco; Förster, Eric; Bönisch, Harald; Fischbeck, Garlich; Safadi, Layal; Hermann, Markus; Assmann, Denise; Zahn, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Since May 2005 the CARIBIC passenger aircraft (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container - Lufthansa, Airbus 340-600) measures ˜100 trace gases and aerosol components in the UTLS (9-12 km altitude) on 4-6 consecutive long-distance flights per month. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are measured with a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). In 2017 the current instrument will be replaced by an improved version, similar to the one operated by our group onboard the HALO research aircraft. Worldwide ˜1.3 Tg/y of acetonitrile (CH3CN) is emitted into the atmosphere almost exclusively from biomass burning (BB) together with other VOCs (e.g. ketones, aldehydes, aromatics), CO, CO2, NOx and aerosol particles. Therefore, and due to its rather long tropospheric lifetime of ˜6 months, acetonitrile constitutes a reliable BB tracer. Based on the signal of acetonitrile and CO, we analyzed the IAGOS-CARIBIC data set with respect to signatures of BB. The most intense but relatively rare BB signals (up to ˜1200 pptV acetonitrile, i.e. ˜8 times the tropospheric background) were sampled ˜3 km above the thermal tropopause over North America and Greenland in boreal summer. However, the largest contribution of BB signatures (˜40%) was observed over the tropics in autumn and winter. In the tropics ECMWF back trajectory calculations show that the upward transport is driven by convection and we found hints for secondary O3 production in BB affected air masses leading to an enhancement of ˜25 ppb O3 relative to the tropospheric background. Based on our applied detection algorithm, ˜8% of the IAGOS-CARIBIC data were identified to be affected by BB.

  13. Characterization of residues from thermal treatment of treated wood and extraction of Cu, Cr, As and Zn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Christensen, Iben Vernegren

    2005-01-01

    Thermal treatment of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) impregnated waste wood is a way to utilize the energy resource of the wood and at the same time to reduce the volume of the waste. An issue of concern in relation to the thermal treatment is As emission to the air. Meanwhile, there is still......, that the charcoal contained a high concentration of Zn, probably from paint. Chemical extraction experiments in HNO were conducted with the charcoal and it was found that the order of extraction (in percentage) was Zn > Cu > As > Cr. A SEM/EDX investigation of the mixed ash from combustion showed the presence...... form in a small layer on the surface of some matrix particles indicating condensation of volatile Cu species. Chemical extraction with inorganic acids showed the order of percentages mobilized as: As > Cu > Cr....

  14. Production of bio-oil with low contents of copper and chlorine by fast pyrolysis of alkaline copper quaternary-treated wood in a fluidized bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Won-Mo; Jung, Su-Hwa; Kim, Joo-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis of ACQ (alkaline copper quaternary)-treated wood was carried out in a bench-scale pyrolysis plant equipped with a fluidized bed reactor and char separation system. This study focused on the production of a bio-oil with low copper and chlorine contents, especially by adopting the fractional condensation of bio-oil using water condensers, an impact separator and an electrostatic precipitator. In addition, various analytical tools were applied to investigate the physicochemical properties of the pyrolysis products and the behavior of the preservative during pyrolysis. The bio-oil yield was maximized at 63.7 wt% at a pyrolysis temperature of 411 °C. Highly water-soluble holocellulose-derived components such as acetic acid and hydroxyacetone were mainly collected by the condensers, while lignin-derived components and levoglucosan were mainly observed in the oils collected by the impact separator and electrostatic precipitator. All the bio-oils produced in the experiments were almost free of copper and chlorine. Most copper in ACQ was transferred into the char. - Highlights: • ACQ(alkaline copper quaternary)-treated wood was successfully pyrolyzed in a bench-scale fluidized bed. • Bio-oils separately collected were different in their characteristics. • Bio-oils were free of didecyldimethylammonium chloride. • Bio oils were almost free of copper and chlorine. • The concentration of levoglucosan in a bio-oil was 24–31 wt%

  15. Wood Colorization through Pressure Treating: The Potential of Extracted Colorants from Spalting Fungi as a Replacement for Woodworkers’ Aniline Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara C. Robinson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular colorants produced by Chlorociboria aeruginosa, Scytalidium cuboideum, and Scytalidium ganodermophthorum, three commonly utilized spalting fungi, were tested against a standard woodworker’s aniline dye to determine if the fungal colorants could be utilized in an effort to find a naturally occurring replacement for the synthetic dye. Fungal colorants were delivered in two methods within a pressure treater—the first through solubilization of extracted colorants in dichloromethane, and the second via liquid culture consisting of water, malt, and the actively growing fungus. Visual external evaluation of the wood test blocks showed complete surface coloration of all wood species with all colorants, with the exception of the green colorant (xylindein from C. aeruginosa in liquid culture, which did not produce a visible surface color change. The highest changes in external color came from noble fir, lodgepole pine, port orford cedar and sugar maple with aniline dye, cottonwood with the yellow colorant in liquid culture, lodgepole pine with the red colorant in liquid culture, red alder and Oregon maple with the green colorant in dichloromethane, and sugar maple and port orford cedar with the yellow colorant in dichloromethane. The aniline dye was superior to the fungal colorants in terms of internal coloration, although none of the tested compounds were able to completely visually color the inside of the test blocks.

  16. Wood flour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig M. Clemons; Daniel F. Caufield

    2005-01-01

    The term “wood flour” is somewhat ambiguous. Reineke states that the term wood flour “is applied somewhat loosely to wood reduced to finely divided particles approximating those of cereal flours in size, appearance, and texture”. Though its definition is imprecise, the term wood flour is in common use. Practically speaking, wood flour usually refers to wood particles...

  17. Characterization of residues from thermal treatment of treated wood and extraction of Cu, Cr, As and Zn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Christensen, Iben Vernegren

    2005-01-01

    , that the charcoal contained a high concentration of Zn, probably from paint. Chemical extraction experiments in HNO were conducted with the charcoal and it was found that the order of extraction (in percentage) was Zn > Cu > As > Cr. A SEM/EDX investigation of the mixed ash from combustion showed the presence...... a matter to cope with when methods to avoid As emission are implemented: the residues with increased concentrations of Cu, Cr and As. In the present paper two different residues after thermal treatment are characterized: a mixed bottom and fly ash from combustion of CCA impregnated wood, and a charcoal...... form in a small layer on the surface of some matrix particles indicating condensation of volatile Cu species. Chemical extraction with inorganic acids showed the order of percentages mobilized as: As > Cu > Cr....

  18. Dynamic mechanical properties and thermal stability of furfuryl alcohol and nano-SiO2 treated poplar wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Youming; Shen, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Shifeng; Li, Jianzhang

    2015-07-01

    Wood polymer nanocomposites (WPNC) were prepared from the furfuryl alcohol and nano-SiO2 using a method of vacuum impregnation. Dynamic mechanical properties in storage modulus and mechanical loss factor, as well as the thermal stability of the WPNC were evaluated. The interface interaction between the organic and inorganic compounds was also studied by the scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The dynamic mechanical analysis showed the improvement in the storage modulus and mechanical loss factor of WPNC as a result of the strong interfacial interaction between the organic and inorganic matrix. Additionally, with an increase in nanoparticles content in the composites, the thermo-stability of WPNC improved significantly.

  19. Effects of long-term ambient ozone exposure on biomass and wood traits in poplar treated with ethylenediurea (EDU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carriero, G.; Emiliani, G.; Giovannelli, A.; Hoshika, Y.; Manning, W.J.; Traversi, M.L.; Paoletti, E.

    2015-01-01

    This is the longest continuous experiment where ethylenediurea (EDU) was used to protect plants from ozone (O 3 ). Effects of long-term ambient O 3 exposure (23 ppm h AOT40) on biomass of an O 3 sensitive poplar clone (Oxford) were examined after six years from in-ground planting. Trees were irrigated with either water or 450 ppm EDU. Above (−51%) and below-ground biomass (−47%) was reduced by O 3 although the effect was significant only for stem and coarse roots. Ambient O 3 decreased diameter of the lower stem, and increased moisture content along the stem of not-protected plants (+16%). No other change in the physical wood structure was observed. A comparison with a previous assessment in the same experiment suggested that O 3 effects on biomass partitioning to above-ground organs depend on the tree ontogenetic stage. The root/shoot ratios did not change, suggesting that previous short-term observations of reduced allocation to tree roots may be overestimated. - Highlights: • 6-y ambient O 3 exposure was investigated in a sensitive poplar clone. • EDU irrigation protected poplar against ambient O 3 exposure. • O 3 reduced biomass of roots and stem, but did not change biomass allocation. • O 3 decreased stem diameter only in the lower third of the stem. • O 3 increased moisture content of the wood along the stem. - Ozone exposure reduced lateral branching, leaves and roots in younger trees, and affected stem and roots in older trees, while shoot/root ratios did not change.

  20. Evaluation of the Resistance of Gmelina arborea Wood Treated With Creosote Oil and Liquid Cashew Nut Shell to Subterranean Termites' Attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Mayowa OWOYEMI

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the resistance of Creosote oil (CREO and Cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL on theprotection of Gmelina arborea wood against subterranean termites’ attack. Gmelina wooden stakes weretreated with undiluted CREO and with diluted CREO/ kerosene mixtures ratio 1:1 and 1:3; undiluted CNSLand diluted CNSL/kerosene mixtures ratio 1:1 and 1:3, using cold dipping method. Termites’ field exposuretest was carried out at the timber grave yard for 36 months (3 years to test the resistance of CREO andCNSL preservatives to subterranean termites. Weekly visual observations according to American Standardsfor Testing Materials (ASTM were taken to find out the effect of prolonged exposure of treated woodsamples to termites’ attack. CREO treated samples had 54.2, 65.0 and 76.0% weight loss compared to thecontrol (untreated sample having 86.7% respectively for the same period. CNSL treated samples had 80.0,80.8 and 85.0% weight loss respectively compared with the control with 86.7%. These results indicated thatCREO treated samples provided a better protection against subterranean termites compared with CNSLtreated samples for the 36-month period.

  1. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Southern Maryland Wood Treating Site, Hollywood, Maryland (first remedial action) June 1988. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-06-29

    The Southern Maryland Wood Treating (SMWT) site is located in Hollywood, St. Mary's County, Maryland. The site is situated within a wetland area in a drainage divide such that runoff from the site discharges into Brooks Run and McIntosh Run tributaries, which flow into the Potomac River. The area surrounding the site is predominantly used for agricultural and residential purposes. Currently, part of the site is being used as a retail outlet for pretreated lumber and crab traps. The waste generated at the site included retort and cylinder sludges, process wastes, and material spillage. These wastes were in six onsite unlined lagoons. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the onsite ground water, soil, surface water, sediments, and debris include: VOCs, PNA, and base/neutral acid extractables. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  2. Combustion properties of wood impregnated with commercial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-19

    Dec 19, 2011 ... ... thermal conductivity and the fact that wood char is formed when wood is burned. In order to reduce flammability and provide safety, wood is treated with fire-retardant chemicals. In other words, the combustibility of wood may be reduced with flame- retardant or fire-retardant materials (Nussbaum, 1988;.

  3. Wood frame systems for wood homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Molina

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of constructive systems that combine strength, speed, with competitive differential techniques and mainly, compromising with the environment, is becoming more popular in Brazil. The constructive system in wood frame for houses of up to five stories is very interesting, because it is a light system, structured in reforested treated wood which allows the combination of several materials, besides allowing speed in the construction and total control of the expenses already in the project phase for being industrialized. The structural behavior of the wood frame is superior to the structural masonry in strength, thermal and acoustic comfort. However, in Brazil, the wood frame is still little known and used, due to lack of technical knowledge about the system, prejudice associated the bad use of the wood as construction material, or still, in some cases, lack of normalization. The aim of this manuscript consists of presenting the main technical characteristics and advantages of the constructive system in wood frame homes, approaching the main stages of the constructive process through examples, showing the materials used in the construction, in addition the main international normative recommendations of the project. Thus, this manuscript also hopes to contribute to the popularization of the wood frame system in Brazil, since it is a competitive, fast and ecologically correct system. Moreover, nowadays, an enormous effort of the technical, commercial and industrial section has been accomplished for the development of this system in the country.

  4. Steam-treated wood pellets: Environmental and financial implications relative to fossil fuels and conventional pellets for electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKechnie, Jon; Saville, Brad; MacLean, Heather L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Steam-treated pellets can greatly reduce greenhouse gas emissions relative to coal. • Cost advantage is seen relative to conventional pellets. • Higher pellet cost is more than balanced by reduced retrofit capital requirements. • Low capacity factors further favour steam-treated pellets over conventional pellets. - Abstract: Steam-treated pellets can help to address technical barriers that limit the uptake of pellets as a fuel for electricity generation, but there is limited understanding of the cost and environmental impacts of their production and use. This study investigates life cycle environmental (greenhouse gas (GHG) and air pollutant emissions) and financial implications of electricity generation from steam-treated pellets, including fuel cycle activities (biomass supply, pellet production, and combustion) and retrofit infrastructure to enable 100% pellet firing at a generating station that previously used coal. Models are informed by operating experience of pellet manufacturers and generating stations utilising coal, steam-treated and conventional pellets. Results are compared with conventional pellets and fossil fuels in a case study of electricity generation in northwestern Ontario, Canada. Steam-treated pellet production has similar GHG impacts to conventional pellets as their higher biomass feedstock requirement is balanced by reduced process electricity consumption. GHG reductions of more than 90% relative to coal and ∼85% relative to natural gas (excluding retrofit infrastructure) could be obtained with both pellet options. Pellets can also reduce fuel cycle air pollutant emissions relative to coal by 30% (NOx), 97% (SOx), and 75% (PM 10 ). Lesser retrofit requirements for steam-treated pellets more than compensate for marginally higher pellet production costs, resulting in lower electricity production cost compared to conventional pellets ($0.14/kW h vs. $0.16/kW h). Impacts of retrofit infrastructure become increasingly

  5. Effects of long-term ambient ozone exposure on biomass and wood traits in poplar treated with ethylenediurea (EDU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriero, G; Emiliani, G; Giovannelli, A; Hoshika, Y; Manning, W J; Traversi, M L; Paoletti, E

    2015-11-01

    This is the longest continuous experiment where ethylenediurea (EDU) was used to protect plants from ozone (O3). Effects of long-term ambient O3 exposure (23 ppm h AOT40) on biomass of an O3 sensitive poplar clone (Oxford) were examined after six years from in-ground planting. Trees were irrigated with either water or 450 ppm EDU. Above (-51%) and below-ground biomass (-47%) was reduced by O3 although the effect was significant only for stem and coarse roots. Ambient O3 decreased diameter of the lower stem, and increased moisture content along the stem of not-protected plants (+16%). No other change in the physical wood structure was observed. A comparison with a previous assessment in the same experiment suggested that O3 effects on biomass partitioning to above-ground organs depend on the tree ontogenetic stage. The root/shoot ratios did not change, suggesting that previous short-term observations of reduced allocation to tree roots may be overestimated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Elemental analysis of ash residue from combustion of CCA treated wood waste before and after electrodialytic extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2006-01-01

    . Chemical analyses of untreated and treated ash confirmed that most As, but only smaller amounts of Cu and Cr was removed due to the electrodialytic extraction. Overall metal contents in the original ash residue were: 1.4 g As, 2.76 g Cu and 2.48 g Cr, after electrodialytic extraction these amounts were...

  7. A comparative study on Cu, Cr and As removal from CCA-treated wood waste by dialytic and electrodialytic processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velizarova, Emiliya; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, electrodialytic and dialytic techniques were used for Cu, Cr and As removal from 20-years out-of-service CCA-treated Pinus pinaster Ait. pole. The effect of applying direct current, as "cleaning agent", of up to 120mA was investigated. Focus was given to a parallel comparison...

  8. Health assessment for Southern Maryland Wood Treating (SMWT) National Priorities List (NPL) Site, Hollywood, St. Mary's County, Maryland, Region 3. CERCLIS No. MDD980704852. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-04-10

    The Southern Maryland Wood Treating National Priorities List site is located in Hollywood, St. Mary's County, Maryland. Approximately 12,000 gallons of dioxin-contaminated wastes and 2,000 gallons of wastes contaminated with volatile organic compounds or polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, or both, remain in on-site tanks used during wood treatment operations. Until remediation of the site is completed there is a potential public health concern from dermal absorption, ingestion, or inhalation of contaminants from groundwater, surface water, sediments, soil, and contaminated on-site structures.

  9. A comparative study on Cu, Cr and As removal from CCA-treated wood waste by dialytic and electrodialytic processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velizarova, Emiliya; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, electrodialytic and dialytic techniques were used for Cu, Cr and As removal from 20-years out-of-service CCA-treated Pinus pinaster Ait. pole. The effect of applying direct current, as "cleaning agent", of up to 120mA was investigated. Focus was given to a parallel comparison...... incubation. Evaluation of the IARs of Cu, Cr and As showed that the rates of their appearance in the electrolytes were not linearly related to the current (except for Cr in the catholyte), mainly because of membrane retention. The maximum removal efficiencies obtained in a batch electrodialytic cell operated...

  10. Using community trait-distributions to assign microbial responses to pH changes and Cd in forest soils treated with wood ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruz Paredes, Carla; Wallander, Håkan; Kjøller, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    is the current land-use. In forestry, wood ash has been proposed as a liming agent and a fertilizer, but has been questioned due to the risk associated with its Cd content. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of wood ash on the structure and function of decomposer microbial communities in forest...... to additions of lime and Cd. Wood ash induced structural changes in the microbial community in both field experiments, and striking similarities were observed between the application of ash and that of lime in the microcosm experiments. Wood ash increased pH, and led to a shift toward faster SOM decomposition...

  11. Seguridad democrática y desarrollo en el Caribe

    OpenAIRE

    Rubén Sánchez David

    2003-01-01

    Este artículo explora la relación entre desarrollo y seguridad en el área del Caribe. La tesis está sustentada en la idea que la situación de cada sociedad y los retos que debe enfrentar llenan a los conceptos de contenido diferente. A partir de este planteamiento, el autor identifica las definiciones que rigen las políticas de seguridad democrática en el Caribe y en Colombia, así como sus intentos de aplicación en el área.

  12. Seguridad democrática y desarrollo en el Caribe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Sánchez David

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo explora la relación entre desarrollo y seguridad en el área del Caribe. La tesis está sustentada en la idea que la situación de cada sociedad y los retos que debe enfrentar llenan a los conceptos de contenido diferente. A partir de este planteamiento, el autor identifica las definiciones que rigen las políticas de seguridad democrática en el Caribe y en Colombia, así como sus intentos de aplicación en el área.

  13. Seguridad democrática y desarrollo en el Caribe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Sánchez David

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo explora la relación entre desarrollo y seguridad en el área del Caribe. La tesis está sustentada en la idea que la situación de cada sociedad y los retos que debe enfrentar llenan los conceptos de contenido diferente. A partir de este planteamiento, el autor identifica las definiciones que rigen las políticas de seguridad democrática en el Caribe y en Colombia, así como sus intentos de aplicación en el área.

  14. Wood Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about wood dust, which can raise the risk of cancers of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity. High amounts of wood dust are produced in sawmills, and in the furniture-making, cabinet-making, and carpentry industries.

  15. Wood preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca E. Ibach

    2003-01-01

    When wood is exposed to various environmental conditions, many degradation reactions (biological, ultraviolet, mechanical, moisture, and chemical) can occur. To protect wood from biological degradation, chemical preservatives are applied by nonpressure or pressure treatment. Penetration and retention of a chemical depend upon the wood species and the amount of...

  16. Dual protection of wood surface treated with melamine-modified urea-formaldehyde resin mixed with ammonium polyphosphate against both fire and decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing-xia Ma; Grant T. Kirker; Ming-liang Jiang; Yu-zhang Wu

    2016-01-01

    Surface coatings of melamine-modified urea-formaldehyde resins (MUFs) containing ammonium polyphosphate (APP) have been shown to significantly improve the fire retardancy of wood by prolonging the ignition time and reducing the heat release rate, total heat released, and mass loss rate. Dual protection of wood against both decay and fire has been proposed for remedial...

  17. Enhanced bioremediation process: A case study of effectiveness on PAH contamination in soils at a former wood-treating site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, W.F. [Miltech Environmental, Inc., Tucker, GA (United States); Matens, B.L. [Dames and Moore, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Buchalter, D.S. [EMCON, Norcross, GA (United States); Montgomery, D.N. [Georgia Dept. of Transportation, Forest Park, GA (United States). Office of Materials and Research

    1997-12-31

    The Enhanced Bioremediation Process (EBP) technology is an exsitu biodegradation process that utilizes bacterial and fungal inoculants to effectively oxidize and bioremediate persistent hard to degrade organics in contaminated soils. The EBP fungal inoculants produce highly reactive extracellular peroxidase enzymes that can oxidize and degrade lignin, a complex, natural polymer composed of phenylpropane units that is resistant to decay. The lignin peroxidase enzymes are highly nonspecific because of their ability to oxidize the heterogenic lignin molecule, and are capable of degrading a wide variety of complex organic compounds. Because the chemical sub-structure of lignin (1,2-aryl diethers, alkyl sidechains and connected aryl systems) resembles that of many persistent organic compounds, the EBP inoculants are very effective in biodegrading similar hazardous organic pollutants in contaminated soils. As an inadvertent by-product of these biochemical processes, the EBP organisms reduce the organic constituents to a soluble form. In a soluble form, the indigenous organisms can further degrade the contaminants. The technology is applied in such a manner as to maximize the activity of the indigenous organisms by establishing optimum growth conditions. The efficacy of the EBP technology in degrading persistent environmental pollutants has been documented at both the bench scale and pilot demonstration levels. A recently completed field pilot demonstration was conducted at a creosote contaminated site. The demonstration entailed the treatment of approximately 700 tons of soil contaminated with PAH constituents. Laboratory analyses of pre and post-treated soils indicate that total average PAH concentrations in many samples were reduced by greater than 91 percent over a two month treatment period.

  18. Comparative study of Nd:YAG laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser-induced gas plasma spectroscopy on chromated copper arsenate preservative-treated wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumaeni, Ali; Lie, Zener Sukra; Niki, Hideaki; Lee, Yong Inn; Kurihara, Kazuyoshi; Wakasugi, Motoomi; Takahashi, Touru; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2012-03-01

    Taking advantage of the specific characteristics of a transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO(2) laser, a sophisticated technique for the analysis of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) in wood samples has been developed. In this study, a CCA-treated wood sample with a dimension of 20 mm × 20 mm and a thickness of 2 mm was attached in contact to a nickel plate (20 mm × 20 mm × 0.15 mm), which functions as a subtarget. When the TEA CO(2) laser was successively irradiated onto the wood surface, a hole with a diameter of approximately 2.5 mm was produced inside the sample and the laser beam was directly impinged onto the metal subtarget. Strong and stable gas plasma with a very large diameter of approximately 10 mm was induced once the laser beam had directly struck the metal subtarget. This gas plasma then interacted with the fine particles of the sample inside the hole and finally the particles were effectively dissociated and excited in the gas plasma region. By using this technique, high precision and sensitive analysis of CCA-treated wood sample was realized. A linear calibration curve of Cr was successfully made using the CCA-treated wood sample. The detection limits of Cr, Cu, and As were estimated to be approximately 1, 2, and 15 mg/kg, respectively. In the case of standard LIBS using the Nd:YAG laser, the analytical intensities fluctuate and the detection limit was much lower at approximately one-tenth that of TEA CO(2) laser. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  19. One Step Clean-Up Method Combined with Single Accelerated Solvent Extraction for Analysis of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Phenols in Creosote-Treated Woods by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Go, Byung Rye; Choi, Hong Seok; Kim, Hai Dong; Kim, Joo Hoon

    2010-01-01

    A primary concern regarding the wide use of creosote is the long-term release of a variety of toxic constituents present within creosote-treated wood into the environment. The constituents of creosote include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, ∼85%), phenols (∼10%), and N-, S-, O-heterocyclic compounds (∼5%). Among the constituents, PAHs and phenols are considered as important pollutants because of their toxicity and high contents in creosote. For example, the US Environment Protection Agency (EPA) has defined 16 PAHs and 11 phenols, which are found in high quantities in creosote, as priority pollutants. The main constituents of creosote has been also reported as being carcinogenic to humans. Therefore, it is important to analyze PAHs and phenols in creosote-treated wood for minimizing the risk of human health and environmental contamination. Due to the environmental and health risk concerns, analysis of PAHs and phenols in creosote-treated wood has been performed using classical extraction and clean-up methods

  20. Wood composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lars Berglund; Roger M. Rowell

    2005-01-01

    A composite can be defined as two or more elements held together by a matrix. By this definition, what we call “solid wood” is a composite. Solid wood is a three-dimensional composite composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin (with smaller amounts of inorganics and extractives), held together by a lignin matrix. The advantages of developing wood composites are (...

  1. Caribe Brasil: una relación en debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Cabrera

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available La falta de vínculos entre los estudios de Brasil y el Caribe está enmarcada en la permanencia de los paradigmas nacionales y las relaciones entre los estados. Algunos conceptos comprensivos han sido utilizados para relacionar estos complejos espacios empíricos. Algunos enfatizan los procesos culturales, middle pasaje o cross cultural y la poética de la relación; otros proyectan relacionar el espacio, superando la visión geopolítica reducida al Mar Caribe, colocando el énfasis en el protagonismo de los afro-descendientes. En esa dirección podemos localizar las propuestas de Atlántico Negro y Conexiones AfroAtlánticas las cuales consideran la inclusión del Brasil.

  2. La esclavitud liberal. Liberalismo y abolicionismo en el Caribe hispano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Rojas

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Este ensayo prpone una reconstrucción de algunos debates fundamentales sobre la abolición de la esclavitud en el Caribe hispano, durante la primera mitad del siglo XIX. El punto de partida es la revolución haitiana y la polémica sobre la esclavitud durante las Cortes de Cádiz; el de llagada es la campaña abolicionista de los autonomistas y republicanos de Puerto Rico y Cuba en la década de 1860. El ensayo sostiene que así como en el mundo continental hispanoamericano la disputa por los derechos naturales del hombre, a mediados del siglo XIX, se traducía en términos del conflicto Estado-Iglesia en el Caribe colonial, en cambio, esa misma disputa pasaba por el problema de la trata y esclavitud.

  3. Methods for Mitigating the Environmental Risks Associated with Wood Preservatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis Hayward; Stan T. Lebow; Kenneth M. Brooks

    2011-01-01

    As noted in earlier chapters, the treatment of wood is both art and science. Wood is a variable material; treatment results tend to vary with the preservative and wood species and even within boards of the same species. This means that treated wood often contains a range of preservative retentions. Some pieces will have less than the desired retention, while others may...

  4. Raman spectroscopic characterization of wood and pulp fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh Prasad Agarwal

    2008-01-01

    This chapter reviews applications of Raman spectroscopy in the field of wood and pulp fibers. Most of the literature examined was published between 1998 and 2006. In addition to introduction, this chapter contains sections on wood and components, mechanical pulp, chemical pulp, modified/treated wood, cellulose I crystallinity of wood fibers, and the self-absorption...

  5. Corrosion of metals in wood : comparing the results of a rapid test method with long-term exposure tests across six wood treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Donald S. Stone

    2011-01-01

    This paper compares two methods of measuring the corrosion of steel and galvanized steel in wood: a long-term exposure test in solid wood and a rapid test method where fasteners are electrochemically polarized in extracts of wood treated with six different treatments. For traditional wood preservatives, the electrochemical extract method correlates with solid wood...

  6. Wood preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin Archer; Stan Lebow

    2006-01-01

    Wood preservation can be interpreted to mean protection from fire, chemical degradation, mechanical wear, weathering, as well as biological attack. In this chapter, the term preservation is applied more restrictively to protection from biological hazards.

  7. Environmental education on wood preservatives and preservative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Forest products specialists are often asked about the perceived risks and environmental costs of treated wood products. Evidently, the civil society is ignorant of the fact that preservative treated wood products (PTWP) are not as lethal as pesticides. In this paper, a careful review is made of the environmental and health ...

  8. Classification of waste wood treated with chromated copper arsenate and boron/fluorine preservatives; Classificacao de residuos de madeira tratada com preservativos a base de arseniato de cobre cromatado e de boro/fluor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrarini, Suzana Frighetto; Santos, Heldiane Souza dos; Miranda, Luciana Gampert; Azevedo, Carla M.N.; Pires, Marcal J.R., E-mail: suzana.ferrarini@gmail.com [Faculdade de Quimica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Maia, Sandra Maria [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Classification of waste wood treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) and boron/fluorine preservatives, according to NBR 10004, was investigated. The leaching test (ABNT NBR 10005) for As and Cr, and solubilization test (ABNT NBR 10006) for F, were applied to out-of-service wooden poles. Concentrations of As and Cr in leachates were determined by ICP-MS and of F by ESI. Values for As were higher than 1 mg L{sup -1} classifying the waste as hazardous material (Class I) whereas values for F (> 1.5 mg L{sup -1}) were non-hazardous but indicated non-inert material (Class IIA). (author)

  9. Wood handbook : wood as an engineering material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert J. Ross; Forest Products Laboratory. USDA Forest Service.

    2010-01-01

    Summarizes information on wood as an engineering material. Presents properties of wood and wood-based products of particular concern to the architect and engineer. Includes discussion of designing with wood and wood-based products along with some pertinent uses.

  10. Biodegradation of Phenolic Compounds in Creosote Treated Wood Waste by a Composting Microbial Culture Augmented with the Fungus Thermoascus aurantiacus

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel E. Ghaly; Bopeng Zhang; Deepika Dave

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: Creosote is used as a wood preservative and water proof agent in railway sleepers, utility poles, buildings foundations and fences and garden furniture. It is a mixture of over 300 hydrocarbons which include 75% polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, 2-17% phenolic compounds and 10-18% heterocyclic organic compounds. Exposure to creosote may result in several health problems including damage to kidney, liver, eyes and skin. Potential contamination of soil and water exist from cr...

  11. Environmental Degradation of Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Fasteners in Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the durability of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) nails in treated wood. The FRP nails were exposed to four conditions: (1) accelerated weathering, consisting of exposure to ultraviolet light and condensation; (2) 100% relative humidity (RH); (3) being driven into untreated wood and exposed to 100% RH; and (4) being driven into wood treated with...

  12. Capacidad antimitotica de extractos de esponjas marinas del Caribe colombiano

    OpenAIRE

    Mora-Christancho, J.; Zea, S.; Santos-Acevedo, M.; Newmark-Umbreit, F.

    2007-01-01

    La determinación de actividad antimitótica de extractos de organismos marinos genera expectativas para la obtención de sustancias con potencial anticancerígeno a partir de fuentes alternativas. Se evaluó la actividad antimitótica in vitro de extractos orgánicos crudos de 15 esponjas de la costa Caribe colombiana, en embriones del erizo de mar Lytechinus variegatus. El 80% de las especies (Spirastrella coccinea, Myrmekioderma rea, Iotrochota imminuta, Halichondria sp., Petromica ciocalyptoides...

  13. CArdiac resynchronization in combination with beta blocker treatment in advanced chronic heart failure (CARIBE-HF): the results of the CARIBE-HF study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosu, Aurelia; Senni, Michele; Iacovoni, Attilio; Gori, Mauro; Cantù, Francesco; Bisetti, Silvia; De Santo, Tiziana; De Luca, Alessandro; Gavazzi, Antonello

    2011-10-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), combined with optimal medical therapy (OMT), is an established treatment for patients with advanced chronic heart failure (ACHF). In ACHF, carvedilol at the dose used in clinical trials, reduces morbidity and mortality. However, patients often do not tolerate the drug at the targeted dosage. The aim of the CARIBE-HF prospective observational study was to investigate the role of CRT in the implementation of carvedilol therapy in patients with ACHF. One hundred and six patients (aged 65 12 [mean +/- SD] years) with ACHF were enrolled and treated with OMT, in which carvedilol was titrated up to the maximal dose (phase 1). Subsequently, patients with left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction or =120 msec were assigned to CRT. Both CRT and NO-CRT patients underwent a long-term follow-up of 7 years (1193.98 +/- 924 days), while efforts to up titrate the carvedilol dose were continued during the second phase (471 + 310 days). Phase 1 was completed by 84 patients (79%), and 15 (18%) underwent CRT. The mean carvedilol dose in the CRT group was 19.0 +/- 17.8 mg, against 32.7 +/- 19.1 mg in the remaining 69 patients (P = 0.018). At the end of phase 2, CRT patients presented a significantly greater variation of increasing in the carvedilol dose than NO-CRT patients (+20.0 +/- 19.8 mg vs. -0.3 +/- 20.5 mg; P = 0.015), a greater NYHA class reduction (-0.8 +/- 0.6 vs. -0.2 +/- 0.7; P = 0.011), and a greater increase in LV ejection fraction (10.8 +/- 9 vs. 3.1 +/- 6.1; P = 0.018). The data from the CARIBE study suggest that, in ACHF, CRT may be effective in enabling the target dose of carvedilol to be reached. The significant improvement seen in LV function was probably due to a synergistic effect of CRT and carvedilol. During the extended follow-up (mean 1193.98 +/- 924 days) the mean dosage of carvedilol in the CRT group was significantly higher (P < 0.02).

  14. Wood as an adherend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan H. River; Charles B. Vick; Robert H. Gillespie

    1991-01-01

    Wood is a porous, permeable, hygroscopic, orthotropic, biological composite material of extreme chemical diversity and physical intricacy. Table 1.1 provides an overview of the may variables, including wood variables, that bear on the bonding and performance of wood in wood joints and wood-based materials. Of particular note is the fact that wood properties vary...

  15. EL CARIBE MEXICANO: LA CONSTRUCCIÓN DE UNA FRONTERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo C. Dachary

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available En la actualidad, la palabra Caribe se asocia al ocio, al mágico mundo de las islas tropicales y con ello al placer; en síntesis, es un concepto geográfico que ha sido apropiado y transformado por una actividad moderna y de gran expansión: el turismo, haciendo de él lo que hoy se conoce como un icono. Pero esto no es un caso aislado de transformación de un concepto geográfico en un imaginario social, ya que la otra gran concentración de islas tropicales en el mundo y más específicamente en el Océano Pacífico, que casualmente es hoy el otro gran centro turístico mundial, Oceanía, también su nombre lleva a conceptos similares a los del Caribe. ¿Qué ocurrió con estos lugares? ¿Fueron siempre solamente espacios turísticos, o se construyeron en un tiempo relativamente largo como para borrar la otra visión que tenían los antiguos pobladores de los mismos?

  16. CARIBE WAVE/LANTEX Caribbean and Western Atlantic Tsunami Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hillebrandt-Andrade, C.; Whitmore, P.; Aliaga, B.; Huerfano Moreno, V.

    2013-12-01

    Over 75 tsunamis have been documented in the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions over the past 500 years. While most have been generated by local earthquakes, distant generated tsunamis can also affect the region. For example, waves from the 1755 Lisbon earthquake and tsunami were observed in Cuba, Dominican Republic, British Virgin Islands, as well as Antigua, Martinique, Guadalupe and Barbados in the Lesser Antilles. Since 1500, at least 4484 people are reported to have perished in these killer waves. Although the tsunami generated by the 2010 Haiti earthquake claimed only a few lives, in the 1530 El Pilar, Venezuela; 1602 Port Royale, Jamaica; 1918 Puerto Rico; and 1946 Samaná, Dominican Republic tsunamis the death tolls ranged to over a thousand. Since then, there has been an explosive increase in residents, visitors, infrastructure, and economic activity along the coastlines, increasing the potential for human and economic loss. It has been estimated that on any day, upwards of more than 500,000 people could be in harm's way just along the beaches, with hundreds of thousands more working and living in the tsunamis hazard zones. Given the relative infrequency of tsunamis, exercises are a valuable tool to test communications, evaluate preparedness and raise awareness. Exercises in the Caribbean are conducted under the framework of the UNESCO IOC Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami and other Coastal Hazards Warning System for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (CARIBE EWS) and the US National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program. On March 23, 2011, 34 countries and territories participated in the first CARIBE WAVE/LANTEX regional tsunami exercise, while in the second exercise on March 20, 2013 a total of 45 countries and territories participated. 481 organizations (almost 200 more than in 2011) also registered to receive the bulletins issued by the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC), West Coast and Alaska Tsunami Warning Center and/or the Puerto Rico

  17. Wood's light in Microsporum canis positive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefalidou, S; Odia, S; Gruseck, E; Schmidt, T; Ring, J; Abeck, D

    1997-12-01

    In 64 patients with culturally proven Microsporum canis infections, Wood's light examination was performed. In 30 patients (47%) the characteristic fluorescence correlated with the cultural findings, whereas in the remaining 34 patients (53%), Microsporum canis was isolated, although Wood's light examination was negative. Of the 30 positive and 34 negative cases eight patients of each group had been pre-treated. From the results presented, Wood's light examination has a poor sensitivity in cases of Microsporum canis-infections.

  18. Startup and long-term performance of biotrickling filters packed with polyurethane foam and poplar wood chips treating a mixture of ethylmercaptan, H2S, and NH3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, J; Lafuente, J; Prado, O J; Gabriel, D

    2013-04-01

    Treatment of a mixture of NH3, H2S, and ethylmercaptan (EM) was investigated for more than 15 months in two biotrickling filters packed with poplar wood chips and polyurethane foam. Inlet loads ranging from 5 to 10 g N-NH3 m-3 hr-1, from 5 to 16 g S-H2S m-3 hr-1, and from 0 to 5 g EM m-3 hr-1 were applied. During startup, the biotrickling filter packed with polyurethane foam was re-inoculated due to reduced biomass retention as well as a stronger effect of nitrogen compounds inhibition compared with the biotrickling filter packed with poplar wood. Accurate pH control between 7 and 7.5 favored pollutants abatement. In the long run, complete NH3 removal in the gas phase was achieved in both reactors, while H2S removal efficiencies exceeded 90%. EM abatement was significantly different in both reactors. A systematically lower elimination capacity was found in the polyurethane foam bioreactor. N fractions in the liquid phase proved that high nitrification rates were reached throughout steady-state operation in both bioreactors. CO2 production showed the extent of the organic packing material degradation, which allowed estimating its service lifetime in around 2 years. In the long run, the bioreactor packed with the organic packing material had a lower stability. However, an economic analysis indicated that poplar wood chips are a competitive alternative to inorganic packing materials in biotrickling filters. We provide new insights in the use of organic packing materials in biotrickling filters for the treatment of H2S, NH3, and mercaptans and compare them with polyurethane foam, a packing commonly used in biotrickling filters. We found interesting features related with the startup of the reactors and parameterized both the performance under steady-state conditions and the influence of the gas contact time. We provide relevant conclusions in the profitability of organic packing materials under a biotrickling filter configuration, which is infrequent but proven reliable

  19. Adhesives for Achieving Durable Bonds with Acetylated Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Acetylation of wood imparts moisture durability, decay resistance, and dimensional stability to wood; however, making durable adhesive bonds with acetylated wood can be more difficult than with unmodified wood. The usual explanation is that the acetylated surface has fewer hydroxyl groups, resulting in a harder-to-wet surface and in fewer hydrogen bonds between wood and adhesive. This concept was evaluated using four different adhesives (resorcinol–formaldehyde, emulsion polymer isocyanate, epoxy, and melamine–formaldehyde with unmodified wood, acetylated wood, and acetylated wood that had been planed. Strikingly, acetylation did not hinder adhesive bonds with a waterborne resorcinol–formaldehyde adhesive that bonded equally well to both unmodified and acetylated yellow poplar. An epoxy adhesive bonded better to the acetylated wood than to the unmodified wood, in contrast to an emulsion polymer isocyanate, which gave less durable bonds to acetylated than to unmodified wood. Planing of the acetylated wood surface prior to bonding reduced bond durability for the epoxy adhesive and increased the amount of surface hydroxyl groups, as measured using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis of the trifluoroacetic anhydride-treated wood. These experiments showed that wood modification is useful in understanding wood-adhesive interactions, in addition to determining how to develop adhesives for acetylated woods.

  20. Significance of wood extractives for wood bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffael, Edmone

    2016-02-01

    Wood contains primary extractives, which are present in all woods, and secondary extractives, which are confined in certain wood species. Extractives in wood play a major role in wood-bonding processes, as they can contribute to or determine the bonding relevant properties of wood such as acidity and wettability. Therefore, extractives play an immanent role in bonding of wood chips and wood fibres with common synthetic adhesives such as urea-formaldehyde-resins (UF-resins) and phenol-formaldehyde-resins (PF-resins). Extractives of high acidity accelerate the curing of acid curing UF-resins and decelerate bonding with alkaline hardening PF-resins. Water-soluble extractives like free sugars are detrimental for bonding of wood with cement. Polyphenolic extractives (tannins) can be used as a binder in the wood-based industry. Additionally, extractives in wood can react with formaldehyde and reduce the formaldehyde emission of wood-based panels. Moreover, some wood extractives are volatile organic compounds (VOC) and insofar also relevant to the emission of VOC from wood and wood-based panels.

  1. Protección social en salud en América latina y el Caribe ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    13 déc. 2010 ... Protección social en salud en América latina y el Caribe : Investigación y políticas. Couverture du livre Protección social en salud en América latina y el Caribe : Investigación y. Directeur(s) : Amparo Hernández Bello et Carmen Rico de Sotelo. Maison(s) d'édition : Editorial Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, ...

  2. Finishes for Wood Decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    Wood decks have become an important part of residential construction. Wood decks can add versatile living space to a home and, with minimal maintenance, provide decades of use. However, wood decks are exposed to high levels of stress from severe weather conditions that shrink and swell the wood. Without proper maintenance, wood decks can develop problems such as checks...

  3. Chapter 23: Corrosion of Metals in Wood Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka

    2014-01-01

    The corrosion of metals in contact with wood has been studied for over 80 years, and in most situations wood is not corrosive [1]. Recently, however, the durability of fasteners in preservative--treated wood has become a concern. Changes in legislation and certification in the United States, the European Union, and Australasia have restricted the use of chromated...

  4. Considerations in recycling of wood-plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.E. Winandy; N.M. Stark; C.M. Clemons

    2004-01-01

    Wood-plastic composite decking has made major advances in material performance, processing and user acceptance. The growth of wood-plastic composite decking in North America has grown from less than 1 % in mid- 0's to over 10% today with growth projected by several studies to reach +20% before the end of this decade (2010). Preservative-treated wood decking...

  5. Harvested wood products : basis for future methodological development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth E. Skog

    2003-01-01

    The IPCC Guidelines (IPCC 1997) provide an outline of how harvested wood could be treated in national greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories. This section shows the relation of that outline to the approaches and estimation methods to be presented in this Appendix. Wood and paper products are referred to as harvested wood products (HWP). It does not include carbon in...

  6. Direct current testing to measure corrosiveness of wood preservatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer; Donald S. Stone; James T. Gilbertson

    2007-01-01

    A qualitative test that mimics the corrosion behaviour of metals in contact with treated wood without using wood specimens would be of great value in rapidly evaluating the corrosiveness of new wood preservatives. The objective of this study was to determine whether the linear polarisation resistance of metals immersed in a solution of preservative chemicals is related...

  7. Flavanoid biocides: Wood preservatives based on condensed tannins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Laks; Peggy A. McKaig; Richard W. Hemingway

    1988-01-01

    The condensed tannins are natural wood preservatives found in high concentrations in the bark and wood of some tree species. Condensed tannin-containing bark extracts from loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) were evaluated as wood preservatives using standard methods. Bark extracts by themselves did not cause any reduction in weight loss of pressure-treated...

  8. Choosing Wood Burning Appliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information to assist consumers in choosing a wood burning appliance, including types of appliances, the differences between certified and non-certified appliances, and alternative wood heating options.

  9. Properties of Wood Fibre-Polypropylene Composites: Effect of Wood Fibre Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butylina, Svetlana; Martikka, Ossi; Kärki, Timo

    2011-04-01

    This study examined the effect of type of wood fibre source on the physical and mechanical properties of wood fibre-polypropylene composites. Wood flour, fibres of heat-treated wood and pellets were used as sources of wood fibres in the manufacturing process. All studied wood fibre-polypropylene composites were made from 75% wood, 22% recycled polypropylene (PP) and 3% maleated polypropylene (MAPP). Wood fibre-polypropylene composites were compounded in a conical twin-screw extruder. Water absorption and thickness swelling were studied. Mechanical properties of the composites were characterised by tensile, flexural, and impact testing. Micromechanical deformation processes were investigated using scanning electron microscopy done on the fractured surfaces of broken samples. The durability of composites exposed to three accelerated cycles of water immersion, freezing and thawing was examined. The results showed that the density of the composites was a key factor governing water absorption and thickness swelling. A significant improvement in tensile strength, flexural strength, and Charpy impact strength was observed for composites reinforced with heat-treated fibre compared to composites reinforced with pellets and especially to wood flour reinforced composites. The flexural strength and dimensional stability performance reduced after exposure to freeze-thaw cycling for all composites, but the degree of these changes was dependent on the wood fibre source.

  10. Thermal Properties of Wood-Plastic Composites Prepared from Hemicellulose-extracted Wood Flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Enayati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemicellulose of Southern Yellow Pine wood spices was extracted by pressurized hot water at three different temperatures: 140°C, 155°C and 170°C. Compounding with PP (polypropylene was performed by extrusion after preparing wood flour and sieving to determine its mesh size. The ratio of wood to polymer was 50:50 based on oven-dry weight of wood flour. All extraction treatments and control samples were compounded under two sets of conditions, without and with 2% MAPP as coupling agent. Injection molding was used to make tensile test samples (dogbone from the pellets made by extrusion. Thermal properties of wood-plastic composites were studied by TGA and DSC while the thermal stability of pretreated wood flours, PP and MAPP were studied by TGA as well. The greater weight loss of wood materials was an indication that higher treatment temperature increases the extractability of hemicellulose. The removal of hemicellulose by extraction improves thermal stability of wood flour, especially for extraction at 170°C. Wood-plastic composites made from extracted fibers at 170°C showed the highest thermal stability. Coupling agent did not have a significant effect on thermal stability but it improved the degree of crystallinity of the composites.Surface roughness of wood fiber increased after treatment. Extraction of hemicellulose increased the degree of crystallinity but it was not significant except for samples from treated wood flour at 170°C and with MAPP.

  11. CARIBIC observations of short-lived halocarbons and carbonyl sulphide over Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leedham, E.; Wisher, A.; Oram, D.; Baker, A. K.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    The CARIBIC project (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container, www.caribic-atmospheric.com) aims to investigate the spatial and temporal distribution of a wide-range of compounds, including those of marine origin/influence, via ~monthly flights to collect in situ data and whole air samples aboard a commercial Lufthansa aircraft. CARIBIC measures up to an altitude of 12 km, allowing the influence of marine compounds on the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) to be explored. In particular, CARIBIC is a useful tool for exploring the impact of very short lived halocarbons (e.g. CH2Br2, CHBr3), whose impact on stratospheric ozone is dependent on convective uplift to the UTLS, a process which is not yet fully quantified. As part of the suite of CARIBIC measurements, whole air samples are analysed at the University of East Anglia (UEA) via gas chromatography mass spectrometry for carbonyl sulphide (OCS) and up to 40 halocarbons (accounting for virtually 100% of organic chlorine, bromine and iodine in the UTLS). Here we present an overview of short-lived halocarbons and OCS measured by CARIBIC. We focus on two regions of particular interest. (1) measurements made in 2012 over the tropical west Pacific to link with UEA measurements made during the SHIVA campaign. (2) measurements made during a collection of flights over India in 2008. Flights over India investigated the impact of monsoon circulation on the distribution of these compounds; for example, elevated concentrations of OCS were seen in CARIBIC samples taken over India during the summer monsoon (July - September). These flights, along with a wider range of flights over Asia (from Frankfurt to Guangzhou, Manila, Bangkok and Kuala Lumpur) can provide unique information on the influence of tropical convection and monsoon circulation on halocarbon and OCS transport within this region.

  12. Jangwa Pana, el Caribe y “Publish or Perish”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Andrés Martínez-Dueñas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available La reconfiguración de la revista Jangwa Pana ha permitido que su propósito original aún se mantenga: ofrecer un espacio para crear aquello que muchos llaman caribe y que los que tengan algo que decir, lo puedan decir, siempre y cuando se sometan al proceso editorial. Desde la lógica del “publish or perish”, la revista posee una dinámica de citación que hace que mantengamos el compromiso de seguirla editando, tratando de hacernos un espacio en la lógica de las políticas transnacionales de la publicación científica que hemos asumido sin cuestionamiento alguno. Finalmente, y quizá lo más importante, es que podemos decir que Jangwa Pana es una revista que se consolida como una publicación centrada en temas inter y transdisciplinarios con enfoque crítico desde las diferentes disciplinas de las Ciencias Sociales y las Humanidades.

  13. HERPETOFAUNA DE NEGUANJE, PARQUE NACIONAL NATURAL TAYRONA, CARIBE COLOMBIANO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    jeiner jesus castellanos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available La herpetofauna del Parque Nacional Tayrona (Sector Neguanje fue estudiada durante 30 días entre los meses de septiembre y octubre del 2004 por medio del método de registros de encuentros visuales, la búsqueda activa y la disposición de barreras de intercepción con trampas de caída. Se registraron 44 especies, 11 de Anfibios y 33 de Reptiles, distribuidos en 18 familias y 37 géneros. Las curvas de acumulación de especie mostraron que aproximadamente 20 días son suficientes para registrar todas las especies de lagartos, situación inversa fue observada para las especies de ranas y serpientes. El lagarto Lepidoblepharis sanctaemartae fue la especie con mayor abundancia relativa registrada en el sector, lo que implica un buen criterio potencial para su protección. Se amplia la distribución local de la especie Colosthetus ruthveni, la cual era reportada solo para la Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta desde su descripción en 1997. Finalmente, este estudio revela que el sector Neguanje presentó el 33 % de la riqueza de especies registrada para la Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, lo que posiciona ha esta zona como una de las más representativas en cuanto a biodiversidad en el Caribe Colombiano.

  14. Wood Species Recognition System

    OpenAIRE

    Bremananth R; Nithya B; Saipriya R

    2009-01-01

    The proposed system identifies the species of the wood using the textural features present in its barks. Each species of a wood has its own unique patterns in its bark, which enabled the proposed system to identify it accurately. Automatic wood recognition system has not yet been well established mainly due to lack of research in this area and the difficulty in obtaining the wood database. In our work, a wood recognition system has been designed based on pre-processing te...

  15. La región Caribe y la hipótesis del retraso cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Juan Amar Amar

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo es parte de un estudio que analiza la región Caribe a partir de la hipótesis de William Ogburn sobre el «retraso cultural». En él se describen las nuevas realidades y conceptos de región, el papel de la virtualidad en el desarrollo regional y el rol que juega el conocimiento en el futuro de la región Caribe. Posteriormente, basado en una taxonomía sociológica, el autor sustenta el conflicto de la sociedad del Caribe, generado por los procesos de modernización y la persistencia en el mantenimiento de formas y esquemas mentales propios de la sociedad tradicional, y se destaca el déficit significativo en la inversión en desarrollo humano.

  16. La culture musicale caribéenne de New York - 14

    OpenAIRE

    Audebert , Cédric

    2012-01-01

    Le bassin caribéen est un espace de production musicale foisonnante (reggae, salsa, konpa, meringue, zouk, calypso, etc.) au rayonnement international. Les musiques puisent leur énergie principalement dans l'héritage de la plantation et des quartiers populaires urbains des îles d'origine, mais aussi dans le cosmopolitisme des métropoles d'immigration. La mondialisation des musiques caribéennes s'appuie sur les puissants réseaux nord-américains de production et de diffusion, dont les communaut...

  17. Wood used by Stradivari and Guarneri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagyvary, Joseph; DiVerdi, Joseph A; Owen, Noel L; Tolley, H Dennis

    2006-11-30

    Whether or not the great Italian violin-makers used wood that had been chemically processed in order to preserve it and enhance the instrument's sound quality has long been a contentious issue. Here we use nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy to analyse organic matter in wood taken from antique instruments made by Stradivari and Guarneri del Gesu. Our results indicate that the wood used by the masters could indeed have been chemically treated, a technique that may inspire an approach to violin making that is more chemistry-based.

  18. Environmental issues: New techniques for managing and using wood fuel ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehrs, J.E.; Donovan, C.T. [C.T. Donovan Associates, Inc., Burlington, VT (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Continued research and development of environmentally-acceptable and cost-effective end uses for wood ash is having a significant affect on the ability to use wood and wood waste for fuel. This is particularly true for ash resulting from treated wood combustion. Concerns about the contents of ash from wood containing paint, stain, preservatives, or other chemicals is one of the largest regulatory barriers to its use as fuel. The purpose of this paper is to: (1) Identify the physical and chemical characteristics of ashes produced from the combustion of untreated and treated wood; (2) Explain the types of {open_quotes}clean, untreated{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}treated{close_quotes} wood that are likely to produce ash that can beneficially used; (3) Describe existing and potential products and end uses for untreated and treated wood ash.

  19. Evaluation of wood species and preservatives for Wisconsin transportation sign posts : [research brief].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT) administers approximately 11,800 miles of state highways. It uses preservative-treated wood posts for much of the signage along these highways because wood is relatively inexpensive, easy to install...

  20. Evaluation of wood species and preservatives for WisDOT sign posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    The Wisconsin Department of Transportation (WisDOT) uses preservative-treated wood posts for much of the signage along state highways because wood is relatively inexpensive, easy to install, and has the necessary strength properties to tolerate typic...

  1. Nación, Región y Fragmentación en el Caribe Contemporáneo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Pantojas García

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Históricamente lo nacional se ha privilegiado sobre lo regional en el Caribe y América Latina. Los proyectos de integración del Caribe y América Latina se han fundamentado en visiones regionalistas, tecnocráticas e ideológicas que asumen identidades, congruencias y afinidades que no concuerdan con la realidad de la visión nacionalista de las élites dominantes del continente latinoamericano y el archipiélago caribeño. El Caribe se constituyó como parte integral del primer gran proyecto occidental de globalización y fue el fulcro del surgimiento de los imperios europeos. El Caribe no fue un simple eslabón en las cadenas y circuitos globales de producción, intercambio y valor sino que ha sido parte constitutiva de éstas desde sus inicios. Las élites Caribeñas ven su dominio como parte de esta vinculación al mercado mundial. El proyecto neoliberal de globalización plantea un gran reto para el desarrollo de una identidad caribeña que desemboque en un proyecto político de integración regional.

  2. Músicas, cuerpos e identidades hibridas en el caribe: ¿cuál música, cuál cuerpo, cuál identidad, cuál caribe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Aja

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presenta un panorama del Caribe en su identidad a partir de los artefactos culturales que engendran particularidades en su significación: la música y la danza. El cuerpo se retoma corno una amalgama de significados, de expresiones identitarias que devienen en la polifonía del ser caribe. En artículo se toma una postura conceptual sobre la identidad, la cultura y el caribe a partir de la experiencia personal del autor.

  3. Wood preservation of low-temperature carbonisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosselink, R.J.A.; Krosse, A.M.A.; Putten, van der J.C.; Kolk, van der J.C.; Klerk-Engels, de B.; Dam, van J.E.G.

    2004-01-01

    Pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) wood with dimensions (100 x 10 x 10mm) was thermally treated at 275degreesC in a muffle oven to impart resistance to microbial degradation. Low-temperature carbonised pine resulted in a visually homogeneously treated product with a substantial (about 70% w/w) reduced

  4. Wood's lamp examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003386.htm Wood lamp examination To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A Wood lamp examination is a test that uses ultraviolet ( ...

  5. Wood's lamp illumination (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Wood's lamp emits ultraviolet light and can be a diagnostic aid in determining if someone has a fungal ... is an infection on the area where the Wood's lamp is illuminating, the area will fluoresce. Normally ...

  6. Wood-plastic combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaudy, R.

    1978-02-01

    A review on wood-plastic combinations is given including the production (wood and plastic component, radiation hardening, curing), the obtained properties, present applications and prospects for the future of these materials. (author)

  7. Mechanics of Wood Machining

    CERN Document Server

    Csanády, Etele

    2013-01-01

    Wood is one of the most valuable materials for mankind, and since our earliest days wood materials have been widely used. Today we have modern woodworking machine and tools; however, the raw wood materials available are continuously declining. Therefore we are forced to use this precious material more economically, reducing waste wherever possible. This new textbook on the “Mechanics of Wood Machining” combines the quantitative, mathematical analysis of the mechanisms of wood processing with practical recommendations and solutions. Bringing together materials from many sources, the book contains new theoretical and experimental approaches and offers a clear and systematic overview of the theory of wood cutting, thermal loading in wood-cutting tools, dynamic behaviour of tool and work piece, optimum choice of operational parameters and energy consumption, the wear process of the tools, and the general regularities of wood surface roughness. Diagrams are provided for the quick estimation of various process ...

  8. Non_standard Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin

    . Using parametric design tools and computer controlled production facilities Copenhagens Centre for IT and Architecture undertook a practice based research into performance based non-standard element design and mass customization techniques. In close cooperation with wood construction software......, but the integration of traditional wood craft techniques. The extensive use of self adjusting, load bearing wood-wood joints contributed to ease in production and assembly of a performance based architecture....

  9. Construction of Hydrophobic Wood Surface and Mechanical Property of Wood Cell Wall on Nanoscale Modified by Dimethyldichlorosilane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui; Wang, Siqun; Zhou, Dingguo; Zhang, Jie; Lan, Ping; Jia, Chong

    2018-01-01

    Dimethyldichlorosilane was used to improve the hydrophobicity of wood surface. The water contact angle of the treated wood surface increased from 85° to 143°, which indicated increased hydrophobicity. The nanomechanical properties of the wood cell wall were evaluated using a nanoindentation test to analyse the hydrophobic mechanism on the nano scale. The elastic modulus of the cell wall was significantly affected by the concentration but the influence of treatment time is insignificant. The hardness of the cell wall for treated samples was significantly affected by both treatment time and concentration. The interaction between treatment time and concentration was extremely significant for the elastic modulus of the wood cell wall.

  10. Hazardous Waste Cleanup: Caribe General Electric Product in Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Caribe General Electric Product facility (GE Río Piedras) covers approximately 4 acres and is situated on the northern coastal plain in a relatively flat industrial/urban area of Río Piedras with an elevation between 20 and 40 feet above mean sea leve

  11. Hazardous Waste Cleanup: Puma Energy Caribe, LLC in Bayamon, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puma Energy Caribe LLC (Puma) is located in the Luchetti Industrial Park in Bayamón, Puerto Rico. The site is bounded to the west and southwest by industrial and commercial facilities, and to the south and east by Fort Buchanan, a U.S. military reservation

  12. Protección social en salud en América latina y el Caribe ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    . Book cover Protección social en salud en América latina y el Caribe: Investigación y políticas. Directeur(s) : Amparo Hernández Bello and Carmen Rico de Sotelo. Maison(s) d'édition : Editorial Pontificia Universidad ...

  13. Iron Stain on Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    Iron stain, an unsightly blue–black or gray discoloration, can occur on nearly all woods. Oak, redwood, cypress, and cedar are particularly prone to iron stain because these woods contain large amounts of tannin-like extractives. The discoloration is caused by a chemical reaction between extractives in the wood and iron in steel products, such as nails, screws, and...

  14. Wood thermoplastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel F. Caulfield; Craig Clemons; Roger M. Rowell

    2010-01-01

    The wood industry can expand into new sustainable markets with the formation of a new class of composites with the marriage of the wood industry and the plastics industry. The wood component, usually a flour or fiber, is combined with a thermoplastic to form an extrudable, injectable or thermoformable composite that can be used in many non-structural applications....

  15. Wood Formation in Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanie Mauriat; Gregoire Le Provost; Phillippe Rozenberg; Sylvain Delzon; Nathalie Breda; Bruno Clair; Catherine Coutand; Jean-Christoph Domec; Thierry Fourcaud; Jacqueline Grima-Pettenati; Raul Herrera; Jean-Charles Leple; Nicolas Richet; Jean-Francois Trontin; Christophe Plomion

    2014-01-01

    Among the ecosystem services provided by forests, wood provisioning takes a central position. Wood and derived products have played a critical role in the evolution of human kind and demand for raw material is increasing in a foreseeable future. Wood is used for energy production, construction and a wide variety of products for which different properties are required....

  16. Request for wood samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1977-01-01

    In recent years the wood collection at the Rijksherbarium was greatly expanded following a renewed interest in wood anatomy as an aid for solving classification problems. Staff members of the Rijksherbarium added to the collection by taking interesting wood samples with them from their expeditions

  17. Limited oxygen index levels of impregnated Scots pine wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomak, Eylem Dizman; Cavdar, Ayfer Donmez

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Scots pine samples were treated with 4 wood preservatives with various concentrations. • Limited oxygen index level was evaluated both for leached and un-leached samples. • All treatments improved fire retardance of samples despite some chemicals leached out. • Samples treated with fireproof agent showed the best results. • LOI of samples treated with boron powder and silicon oil was not changed by leaching. - Abstract: In this study, effect of various concentrations of boron powder, mixture of boric acid and borax, fireproof agent based on liquid blend of limestone, and silicon oil on limited oxygen index levels (LOI) of S. pine wood was investigated. Wood samples were first vacuum treated with the preservatives, and then were subjected to leaching procedure. Samples treated with fireproof agent showed the best results for improving the fire retardancy of wood, furthermore, samples treated with 25%, 50% and 100% of the solution did not burn. Leaching did not considerably change the LOI of wood samples treated with boron powder and silicon oil; however, LOI levels of samples treated with the mixture of boric acid and borax and fireproof agent were affected by leaching procedure probably arising those preservatives did not chemically bond to main wood components. All treatments improved fire retardancy of samples despite some amount of preservatives leached out from wood

  18. Limited oxygen index levels of impregnated Scots pine wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomak, Eylem Dizman, E-mail: eylemdizman@yahoo.com [Forest Industry Engineering Department, Faculty of Forestry, Bursa Technical University, 16200 Bursa (Turkey); Cavdar, Ayfer Donmez [Interior Architecture Department, Faculty of Architecture, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey)

    2013-12-10

    Highlights: • Scots pine samples were treated with 4 wood preservatives with various concentrations. • Limited oxygen index level was evaluated both for leached and un-leached samples. • All treatments improved fire retardance of samples despite some chemicals leached out. • Samples treated with fireproof agent showed the best results. • LOI of samples treated with boron powder and silicon oil was not changed by leaching. - Abstract: In this study, effect of various concentrations of boron powder, mixture of boric acid and borax, fireproof agent based on liquid blend of limestone, and silicon oil on limited oxygen index levels (LOI) of S. pine wood was investigated. Wood samples were first vacuum treated with the preservatives, and then were subjected to leaching procedure. Samples treated with fireproof agent showed the best results for improving the fire retardancy of wood, furthermore, samples treated with 25%, 50% and 100% of the solution did not burn. Leaching did not considerably change the LOI of wood samples treated with boron powder and silicon oil; however, LOI levels of samples treated with the mixture of boric acid and borax and fireproof agent were affected by leaching procedure probably arising those preservatives did not chemically bond to main wood components. All treatments improved fire retardancy of samples despite some amount of preservatives leached out from wood.

  19. Demographic change and marriage choices in one Carib family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, K

    1994-03-01

    The demographic adaptation of a family of Topside Caribs along the Barama River in Guyana was studied. The family history included two grandfather and granddaughter marriages. Jack Raymond's father, who was born in 1870, left Bottomside after the death of his wife in the 1920s and settled above the falls of the Barama River (Topside in Sawari) with the hope of subsistence living off the rain forest. Information on the grandfather generation was made difficult by name changes, general references to all men in the second generation as grandfathers, and the focus on father's and mother's generation. The typical pattern was for brothers to live close by, and intermarry with a family of sisters. Female children married mother's brothers' sons or father's sisters sons. Their children formed their own cluster settlements. The early history indicated economic hardship, loss of wives, and difficulties in remarrying. The Baird chronicles of the reintroduction of gold mining and the ethnography of Gillin indicated that malaria and round worm were diseases affecting the indigenous population during the 1920s and 1930s. The Topside population was supported by the local gold-mining economy, while the Bottomside population suffered economic hardship and high infant mortality. In the Jack Raymond family, remarriage resulted in children marrying cross cousins. The younger daughter married in the 1940s, when subsistence production of cassava and hunting and gold-mining income provided the family's livelihood. The daughter had 10 surviving children, compared to her adoptive mother's two. For the daughter's generation, the first pregnancy occurred between the ages of 18 and 22 years, and birth spacing was 20-30 months for 25 years. Neither polygyny nor monogamy affected the potential for 12 children. In this Baramita Air Strip population in 1971, there were 62 mothers; reproductive histories were available for 59. The changes in reproductive patterns after 1940 were apparent: for

  20. Economics of wood dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, J.A.

    1980-11-01

    This article reviews the economic effects of wood dust. The most important use of wood today is a fuel, and wood chips and shavings are sources of feedstock for boilers. Other uses include wood chips in the manufacture of particleboard, wood dust as bedding in riding stables and race tracks, as mulch for florists, and as an absorbent in the meat packing industry. The installation of dust collection systems is strongly urged as the consequences of inadequate collection include rapid machine wear, poor environmental conditions for workers, general interference with work, and its combustibility makes it a constant fire hazard.

  1. Floodplains and wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Ellen

    2013-08-01

    Interactions between floodplains and wood date to the Carboniferous, when stable, multithread channel deposits appear with the evolution of tree-like plants. Foundational geologic texts, such as Lyell's, 1830Principles of Geology, describe floodplain-wood interactions, yet modern technical literature describes floodplain-wood interactions in detail for only a very limited range of environments. This likely reflects more than a century of deforestation, flow regulation, and channel engineering, including instream wood removal, which has resulted in severe wood depletion in most of the world's river networks. Instream wood affects floodplain form and process by altering flow resistance, conveyance and channel-floodplain connectivity, and influencing lateral and vertical accretion of floodplains. Instream wood reflects floodplain form and process as the floodplain influences wood recruitment via bank erosion and overbank flow, and wood transport and storage via floodplain effects on stage-discharge relations and flow resistance. Examining turnover times for instream wood at the reach scale in the context of a wood budget, floodplain characteristics influence fluvial transport and dynamics (wood recruitment), valley geometry (wood transport and storage), and hydraulics and river biota (wood decay and breakage). Accumulations of wood that vary from in situ jams and beaver dams in small channels to transport jams and log rafts in very large rivers can create stable, multithread channels and floodplain wetlands. Floodplain-wood interactions are best understood for a subset of small to medium-sized rivers in the temperate zone. We know little about these interactions on very large rivers, or on rivers in the tropical or boreal regions. This review suggests that most, if not all, channels and floodplains within forested catchments in the temperate zone historically had much greater wood loads and consequently much more obvious and important influences from wood than do

  2. Mechanical properties of paraffin treated wood

    OpenAIRE

    Esteves, B.; Ribeiro Nunes, L. M.; Domingos, I.; Pereira, H.

    2013-01-01

    A parafina tem sido utilizada ao longo dos tempos como proteção superficial da madeira. A sua utilização por impregnação para melhorar a resistência à biodegradação é recente. Pretendeu-se com este estudo determinar a eventual melhoria das principais propriedades mecânicas da madeira com este tratamento. A madeira utilizada nos testes foi madeira sã de Pinus pinaster Ait. A madeira foi impregnada com parafina a diferentes níveis, usando um processo de quente-frio, partindo de madeira húmida e...

  3. Wood quality changes caused by mineral fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Sette Jr

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The diverse and important use of wood from fast growth eucalyptus plantations requires the analysis of the effect of mineral fertilizers on wood quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the anatomical characteristics and wood density from Eucalyptus grandis trees (3 m x 2 m spacing fertilized with potassium and sodium (at planting, 6 th and 12th month. Fifteen (15 6 years old eucalyptus trees were selected (5 trees/treatment, cut and wood samples at DBH (1,3 m were taken for anatomical characteristics (fiber and vessels and wood density analysis. Results showed that eucalyptus trees treated with mineral fertilizers did not show significant alteration in average wood density, with radial profile model common to all three treatments, characterized by a values increase in the region next to the pith, toward to bark. Mineral fertilization influenced wood anatomical characteristics: treatment with sodium was characterized by thinner walls and lumen larger diameter; in treatment with potassium, larger vessels were detected.

  4. Residual strength and stiffness of lumber from decommissioned chromated copper arsenate-treated southern pine utility poles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng Piao; Leslie Groom

    2010-01-01

    The reusability of decommissioned treated wood is primarily dependent on the residual strength of the wood after service. Determining the residual strength can provide useful information for structural design and reuse of the decommissioned treated wood. This study evaluated the residual strength of decommissioned chromated copper arsenate–treated utility pole wood....

  5. Penetration and Effectiveness of Micronized Copper in Refractory Wood Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civardi, Chiara; Van den Bulcke, Jan; Schubert, Mark; Michel, Elisabeth; Butron, Maria Isabel; Boone, Matthieu N; Dierick, Manuel; Van Acker, Joris; Wick, Peter; Schwarze, Francis W M R

    2016-01-01

    The North American wood decking market mostly relies on easily treatable Southern yellow pine (SYP), which is being impregnated with micronized copper (MC) wood preservatives since 2006. These formulations are composed of copper (Cu) carbonate particles (CuCO3·Cu(OH)2), with sizes ranging from 1 nm to 250 μm, according to manufacturers. MC-treated SYP wood is protected against decay by solubilized Cu2+ ions and unreacted CuCO3·Cu(OH)2 particles that successively release Cu2+ ions (reservoir effect). The wood species used for the European wood decking market differ from the North American SYP. One of the most common species is Norway spruce wood, which is poorly treatable i.e. refractory due to the anatomical properties, like pore size and structure, and chemical composition, like pit membrane components or presence of wood extractives. Therefore, MC formulations may not suitable for refractory wood species common in the European market, despite their good performance in SYP. We evaluated the penetration effectiveness of MC azole (MCA) in easily treatable Scots pine and in refractory Norway spruce wood. We assessed the effectiveness against the Cu-tolerant wood-destroying fungus Rhodonia placenta. Our findings show that MCA cannot easily penetrate refractory wood species and could not confirm the presence of a reservoir effect.

  6. Wood production, wood technology, and biotechnological impacts.

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    In the year 2001, Prof. Dr. Ursula Kües was appointed at the Faculty of Forest Sciences and Forest Ecology of the Georg-August-University Göttingen to the chair Molecular Wood Biotechnology endowed by the Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt (DBU). Her group studies higher fungi in basic and applied research. Research foci are on mushroom development and on fungal enzymes degrading wood and their applications in wood biotechnology. This book has been edited to thank the DBU for all support given to...

  7. Los empresarios venezolanos y colombianos frente a la integración regional en la cuenca del Caribe

    OpenAIRE

    Giacalone Sangeti, Rita Ana

    1996-01-01

    La Cuenca del Caribe ocupa un lugar especial dentro de la agenda de la política exterior de Venezuela y Colombia. Para los gobiernos de ambas naciones existen razones geográficas, quizás económicas, pero fundamentalmente de orden político y de seguridad para interesarse en lo que sucede dentro de la Cuenca del Caribe. Instituto de Integración Latinoamericana

  8. Cone calorimeter tests of wood-based decking materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. White; Mark A. Dietenberger; Nicole M. Stark

    2007-01-01

    New technologies in building materials have resulted in the use of a wide variety of materials in decks. As part of our effort to address fire concerns in the wildland-urban interface, the Forest Products Laboratory has been examining the fire performance of decking products. In addition to preservative-treated wood, decking products include wood-plastic composites and...

  9. BIOREMEDIATION FIELD INITIATIVE SITE PROFILE: ESCAMBIA WOOD PRESERVING SITE - BROOKHAVEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Escambia Wood Preserving Site—Brookhaven in Brookhaven, Mississippi, is a former wood preserving facility that used pentachlo- rophenol (PCP) and creosote to treat wooden poles. The site contains two pressure treatment cylinders, a wastewater treatment system, five bulk pr...

  10. Creosote treated timber in the Alaskan marine environment : volume ii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    ADOT&PF is responsible for many structures that incorporate wood pilings and other timber in Alaska waters. Most are treated with preservative to inhibit marine borers : that will quickly destroy unprotected wood. Creosote is generally the most econo...

  11. Creosote treated timber in the Alaskan marine environment : Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    ADOT&PF is responsible for many structures that incorporate wood pilings and other timber in Alaska waters. Most are treated with preservative to inhibit marine borers : that will quickly destroy unprotected wood. Creosote is generally the most econo...

  12. Urban Wood Waste Resource Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiltsee, G.

    1998-11-20

    This study collected and analyzed data on urban wood waste resources in 30 randomly selected metropolitan areas in the United States. Three major categories wood wastes disposed with, or recovered from, the municipal solid waste stream; industrial wood wastes such as wood scraps and sawdust from pallet recycling, woodworking shops, and lumberyards; and wood in construction/demolition and land clearing debris.

  13. Hot water extracted wood fiber for production of wood plastic composites (WPCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel Raul Pelaez-Samaniego; Vikram Yadama; Eini Lowell; Thomas E. Amidon; Timothy L. Chaffee

    2013-01-01

    Undebarked ponderosa pine chips were treated by hot water extraction to modify the chemical composition. In the treated pine (TP) , the mass was reduced by approximately 20%, and the extract was composed mainly of degradation products of hemicelluloses. Wood flour produced from TP and unextracted chips (untreated pine, UP) was blended with high-density polyethylene (...

  14. Primer registro de Uraspis Secunda (Poey, 1860 (Pisces: Carangidae del Caribe colombiano Primer registro de Uraspis Secunda (Poey, 1860 (Pisces: Carangidae del Caribe colombiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acero P. Arturo

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available Se registra la presencia del pez carángido Uraspis secunda en el Caribe colombiano a partir de ocho especímenes capturados en faenas de pesca de camarón al sur de Cartagena y otro proveniente del material de un pescador artesanal cerca de Santa Marta. Uraspis secunda is reported by the first time from the Colombian Caribbean, based on eight specimens fished by shrimp trawlers south of Cartagena, and another one captured by an artisanal fisherman near Santa Marta.

  15. Chapter 9: Wood Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco X. Aguilar; Karen Abt; Branko Glavonjic; Eugene Lopatin; Warren  Mabee

    2016-01-01

    The availabilty of information on wood energy continues to improve, particularly for commoditized woodfuels.  Wood energy consumption and production vary in the UNECE region because demand is strngly affected by weather and the prices of competing energy sources.  There has been an increase in wood energy in the power-and-heat sector in the EU28 and North American...

  16. Complex geometries in wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette; Riiber Nielsen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The versatility of wood constructions and traditional wood joints for the production of non standard elements was in focus of a design based research. Herein we established a seamless process from digital design to fabrication. A first research phase centered on the development of a robust...... parametric model and a generic design language a later explored the possibilities to construct complex shaped geometries with self registering joints on modern wood crafting machines. The research was carried out as collaboration with industrial partners....

  17. Complex geometries in wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette; Riiber Nielsen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The versatility of wood constructions and traditional wood joints for the production of non standard elements was in focus of a design based research. Herein we established a seamless process from digital design to fabrication. A first research phase centered on the development of a robust parame...... parametric model and a generic design language a later explored the possibilities to construct complex shaped geometries with self registering joints on modern wood crafting machines. The research was carried out as collaboration with industrial partners....

  18. From laboratory corrosion tests to a corrosion lifetime for wood fasteners : progress and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Dominique Derome; Samuel V. Glass

    2010-01-01

    Determining a “corrosion-lifetime” for fasteners embedded in wood treated with recently adopted preservative systems depends upon successfully relating results of laboratory tests to in-service conditions. In contrast to laboratory tests where metal is embedded in wood at constant temperature and moisture content, the in-service temperature and moisture content of wood...

  19. Wood pellet seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aarniala, M.; Puhakka, A.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the wood pellet seminar, arranged by OPET Finland and North Karelia Polytechnic, was to deliver information on wood pellets, pellet burners and boilers, heating systems and building, as well as on the activities of wood energy advisors. The first day of the seminar consisted of presentations of equipment and products, and of advisory desks for builders. The second day of the seminar consisted of presentations held by wood pellet experts. Pellet markets, the economy and production, the development of the pellet markets and their problems (in Austria), the economy of heating of real estates by different fuel alternatives, the production, delivery and marketing of wood pellets, the utilization of wood pellet in different utilization sites, the use of wood pellets in detached houses, pellet burners and fireplaces, and conversion of communal real estate houses to use wood pellets were discussed in the presentations. The presentations held in the third day discussed the utilization of wood pellets in power plants, the regional promotion of the production and the use of pellets. The seminar consisted also of visits to pellet manufacturing plant and two pellet burning heating plants

  20. Moisture Transport in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of moisture transport in wood is of great importance as most mechanical and physical properties of wood depend on moisture content. Moisture transport in porous materials is often described by Ficks second law, but several observations indicate that this does not apply very well to wood....... Recently at the Technical University of Denmark, Department of Civil Engineering, a new model for moisture transport in wood has been developed. The model divides the transport into two phases, namely water vapour in the cell lumens and bound water in the cell walls....

  1. Diversidad y microestructura de quitones (Mollusca: Polyplacophora del Caribe de Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedar I García-Ríos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Los poliplacóforos asociados a los arrecifes de coral en la costa caribeña de Costa Rica han sido poco estudiados. El examen del cascajo de coral acumulado en el sublitoral somero, en cuatro estaciones de colección, localizadas en la Provincia de Limón reveló una diversidad de quitones mayor a la documentada. Anteriormente se habían registrado ocho especies para el Caribe costaricense: Ischnochiton erythronotus (C.B. Adams, 1845; Ischnoplax pectinata (Sowerby 1840; Stenoplax boogii (Haddon, 1886; S. purpurascens (C.B. Adams, 1845; Acanthopleura granulata (Gmelin, 1791; Chiton marmoratus Gmelin, 1791; C. tuberculatus Linnaeus, 1758; Acanthochitona rhodea (Pilsbry, 1893. Otras cinco se registran aquí por primera vez: Callistochiton portobelensis Ferreira 1976; Ischnochiton kaasi Ferreira 1987; I. pseudovirgatus Kaas 1972; Acanthochitona balesae Abbott 1954; Cryptoconchus floridanus (Dall 1889.

  2. Mujer y medio ambiente en América Latina y el Caribe

    OpenAIRE

    Silva Ch., Paola; Alvarez, Susana; Cambría, Celeste; Sala, Mariella; de Ochoa, Regina; Corral, Thais; Olivera, Maria del Carmen; González, Nhelsyr; Solís, Vivienne; Rossato, Verónica; Pérez, Magdalena

    1991-01-01

    1. Mujer y medio ambiente en América Latina y el Caribe: los desafíos hacia el año 2.000. 2. Políticas de población vigentes en los países de América Latina y el Caribe. La mujer como protagonista del desarrollo sustentable. Política de población en Perú: la relación mujer y medio ambiente. Población, mujer y medio ambiente en Honduras. Medio ambiente y población: una visión crítica. 3. La mujer en el manejo de los recursos naturales y tecnologías apropiadas. Participación de la mujer campe...

  3. Sismicidad histórica e instrumental del Caribe de Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Boschini, Ileana M.; Montero, Walter

    2011-01-01

    La Región Caribe de Costa Rica, usualmente, fue considerada por geólogos y sismólogos y en el Código Sísmico de Costa Rica como una zona de bajo potencial sísmico, especialmente para eventos con magnitudes mayores que 7,0. El terremoto del 22 de abril de 1991 ha demostrado lo contrario. Una revisión de la sismicidad histórica e instrumental de la región Caribe de Costa Rica y Panamá, muestra que esta región fue el marco de importantes eventos sísmicos durante los siglos XIX y XX. En particula...

  4. Remarks on orthotropic elastic models applied to wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilson Tadeu Mascia

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Wood is generally considered an anisotropic material. In terms of engineering elastic models, wood is usually treated as an orthotropic material. This paper presents an analysis of two principal anisotropic elastic models that are usually applied to wood. The first one, the linear orthotropic model, where the material axes L (Longitudinal, R( radial and T(tangential are coincident with the Cartesian axes (x, y, z, is more accepted as wood elastic model. The other one, the cylindrical orthotropic model is more adequate of the growth caracteristics of wood but more mathematically complex to be adopted in practical terms. Specifically due to its importance in wood elastic parameters, this paper deals with the fiber orientation influence in these models through adequate transformation of coordinates. As a final result, some examples of the linear model, which show the variation of elastic moduli, i.e., Young´s modulus and shear modulus, with fiber orientation are presented.

  5. Reseña. Proyecto Caribe de comunicación, comercio y cultura.

    OpenAIRE

    Proyecto Caribe, Organización

    2017-01-01

    El proyecto Caribe es ina organización para el desarrollo que se dedica a la promoción de la producción material e inte¿lectual del sector afrocostarricense.Su trabajo consiste en promover intercambios culturales y comerciales, ubicar, sistematizar y centralizar mercancías e información del sector para beneficio de productores y consumidores.

  6. Intrusiones de polvo africano en la región Caribe de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Javier Ramírez Hernández

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available El transporte intercontinental de material mineral desde África hacia el Caribe, Norteamérica y Suramérica es un fenómeno de interés investigativo internacional. Varios estudios han llamado la atención sobre los efectos meteorológicos y las implicaciones climáticas derivadas de la presencia de este aerosol en la atmósfera, como también de los potenciales efectos sobre la salud humana. La región Caribe colombiana no es ajena a esta problemática, pero son escasos los estudios realizados. Por lo anterior, el objetivo de este artículo es identificar eventos de intrusión de polvo de origen africano en la región Caribe de Colombia. Metodológicamente se analizaron mapas de concentración de polvo generados por los modelos GEOS-5, SKIRON, NAAPS y CALIPSO, entre el 01 de enero y el 31 de diciembre de 2012. También se utilizaron imágenes generadas por el sensor satelital MODIS e información de redes de calidad del aire de la región. Según los resultados obtenidos, existen evidencias para afirmar que al norte de Colombia, en la región Caribe, se detectan eventos de intrusión de polvo de origen africano. El periodo del año en que se presentan mayores niveles de concentración es entre marzo y septiembre, sobresaliendo los meses de marzo, junio, julio y agosto.

  7. Assessment of the bioaccessibility of micronized copper wood in synthetic stomach fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    The widespread use of copper in treated lumber may result in a potential for human exposure. Due to a lack of information concerning the release of copper from treated wood particles following oral ingestion, the in vitro bioaccessibility of copper from copper-treated wood dust i...

  8. CARIBIC observations of gaseous mercury in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slemr F.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A unique set of gaseous mercury measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS has been obtained during the monthly CARIBIC (www.caribic-atmospheric.com flights since May 2005. The passenger Airbus 340-600 of Lufthansa covered routes to the Far East, North America, India, and the southern hemisphere. The accompanying measurements of CO, O3, NOy, H2O, aerosols, halocarbons, hydrocarbons, greenhouse gases, and several other parameters as well as backward trajectories enable a detailed analysis of these measurements. Speciation tests have shown that the CARIBIC measurements represent a good approximation of total gaseous mercury (TGM concentrations. Above the tropopause TGM always decrease with increasing potential vorticity (PV and O3 which implies its conversion to particle bound mercury. The observation of the lowest TGM concentrations at the highest particle concentrations in the stratosphere provides further evidence for such conversion. We will show how a seasonally dependent conversion rate could be derived using concomitantly measured SF6 mixing ratios as a timer. Tropospheric mercury data suggest the existence of a decreasing trend in the northern hemisphere whose size is comparable with the trend derived from long-term measurements by ship cruises, at Cape Point (South Africa and Mace Head (Ireland.

  9. Structural features of the spermatozoon of a passeridan bird, the Carib grackle, Quiscalus lugubris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aire, Tom A; du Plessis, Lizette; Deokar, Mahesh S; Rennie, Eugene; Gupta, Sunil K

    2017-04-01

    The spermatozoon of the Carib grackle, Quiscalus lugubris, a member of the family Icteridae, is generally similar in organization to the passerine-type of spermatozoon, in being highly elongated and displaying a helical structure of the acrosome, nucleus and principal piece of the tail. There are subtle variations in acrosomal structural features between this organelle in the grackle and that in some of the very few passerine species of birds in which the spermatozoon has been studied. The proximal centriole is present, and, thus, the Carib grackle is the third passeridan bird in which this organelle, hitherto regarded as absent in passerine birds, has been described in the spermatozoon. The spermatozoon of this bird also possesses a granular helix, which feature has been found variably even in the scanty available reports on passerine spermatozoa. It is advocated that the spermatozoon be studied in many more species of this large clade of birds. This report provides a basis for the study of spermiogenesis in the Carib grackle, with the aim of exposing, inter alia, a number of developmental features and processes of certain organelles that have received attention, recently, in the spermatozoa of passerine birds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Estructura y distribución de los condrictios de aguas profundas en el Caribe colombiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Paramo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Si bien, aunque actualmente no existe una pesquería de aguas profundas en el Caribe colombiano, es importante conocer la biología y ecología de la ictiofauna de aguas profundas para identificar el impacto de la pesca sobre estas comunidades. Con fines de aportar conocimiento que sirva como línea base para su conservación, el objetivo del presente estudio fue determinar la composición específica, y aspectos de su estructura poblacional y ecológica tales como abundancia y distribución (espacial y batimétrica de los condrictios de aguas profundas en el mar Caribe colombiano. Se realizaron cuatro muestreos a bordo de un barco de arrastre camaronero entre 200 y 550 m de profundidad, durante agosto y diciembre de 2009 y, marzo y mayo de 2010. Se encontró un total de 331 especímenes de 13 especies correspondientes a nueve familias. Las especies que se capturaron con más de 15% de frecuencia de ocurrencia fueron Etmopterus perryi, Galeus cadenati, Anacanthobatis americanus y Gurgesiella atlantica. La zona donde se encontró la mayor abundancia relativa de especies e individuos fue el norte del Caribe colombiano, denominada Ecoregión La Guajira.

  11. Sociabilidades modernas: sociedades fraternales secretas en el Caribe costarricense a finales del siglo XIX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Martínez Esquivel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Puerto Limón en el caribe costarricense fue transformado en un espacio multicultural y de interacción étnica a finales del siglo XIX debido a su vinculación con el mercado internacional, la construcción del ferrocarril y al desarrollo de la industria bananera. A este puerto llegaron europeos de las más diversas procedencias, estadounidenses, latinoamericanos y afrodescendientes criollos del Caribe, quienes con sus distintos acervos culturales definieron costumbres, hábitos de consumo y formas de sociabilidad. La sociedad limonense para estos años adquirió una dinámica más liberal, progresista, modernista y cosmopolita, que muchas otras partes de Costa Rica. La situación anterior facilitó el establecimiento de sociedades fraternales secretas como la masonería y los Knights of Pythias, microespacios de sociabilidad donde cohesionaron personas de distintas culturas y procedencias. El estudio de este tipo de agrupaciones es una tarea todavía pendiente en el Caribe, por lo que esta investigación es un aporte.

  12. IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION STRATEGIES FOR ORGANIC WOOD PRESERVATIVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory biotreatability studies evaluated the use of bioventing and biosparging plus groundwater circulation (UVB technology) for their potential abililty to treat soil and groundwater containing creosote and pentachlorophenol. Soils from two former wood-treatment facilities w...

  13. Treatment of wood with glucose-diammonium phosphate for fire and fungal decay protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    George C. Chen

    2002-01-01

    This study describes a method for dual protection of wood against fungal and fire degradation in one treatment. The method consists of impregnating wood with aqueous solution of glucose-diammonium phosphate at pH 9, followed by heating the treated wood at temperatures of 160 °C and 190 °C for various lengths of time to form water insoluble products in wood.

  14. The wood, renewable energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acket, C.

    2006-12-01

    This document evaluates the french forest situation and its future. Indeed, the wood energy constitutes in France the first renewable energy after the hydraulic. It presents the today situation of the french forest providing statistical data, evaluation of the energy estimation, the carbon fixation, the resources, the perspectives wood energy for 2050, the biofuels and an economic analysis. (A.L.B.)

  15. Wood thermoplastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel F. Caulfield; Craig Clemons; Rodney E. Jacobson; Roger M. Rowell

    2005-01-01

    The term “wood-plastic composites” refers to any number of composites that contain wood (of any form) and either thermoset or thermoplastic polymers. Thermosets or thermoset polymers are plastics that, once cured, cannot be remelted by heating. These include cured resins, such as epoxies and phenolics, plastics with which the forest products industry is most familiar (...

  16. Wood supply and demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter J. Ince; David B. McKeever

    2011-01-01

    At times in history, there have been concerns that demand for wood (timber) would be greater than the ability to supply it, but that concern has recently dissipated. The wood supply and demand situation has changed because of market transitions, economic downturns, and continued forest growth. This article provides a concise overview of this change as it relates to the...

  17. Heat sterilization of wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang

    2010-01-01

    Two important questions should be considered in heat sterilizing solid wood materials: First, what temperature–time regime is required to kill a particular pest? Second, how much time is required to heat the center of any wood configuration to the kill temperature? The entomology research on the first question has facilitated the development of international standards...

  18. Multifactorial antimicrobial wood protectants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert D. Coleman; Carol A. Clausen

    2008-01-01

    It is unlikely that a single antimicrobial compound, whether synthetic or natural, will provide the ‘magic bullet’ for eliminating multiple biological agents affecting wood products. Development of synergistic combinations of selected compounds, especially those derived from natural sources, is recognized as a promising approach to improved wood protection. Recent...

  19. Material model for wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandhaas, C.; Van de Kuilen, J.W.G.

    2013-01-01

    Wood is highly anisotropic and shows ductile behaviour in compression and brittle behaviour in tension and shear where both failure modes can occur simultaneously. A 3D material model for wood based on the concepts of continuum damage mechanics was developed. A material subroutine containing the

  20. Economy of wood supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imponen, V.

    1993-01-01

    Research and development of wood fuels production was vigorous in the beginning of the 1980's. Techniques and working methods used in combined harvesting and transportation of energy and merchantable wood were developed in addition to separate energy wood delivery. After a ten year silent period the research on this field was started again. At present the underutilization of forest supplies and the environmental effects of energy production based on fossil fuels caused the rebeginning of the research. One alternative for reduction of the price of wood fuels at the utilization site is the integration of energy and merchantable wood deliveries together. Hence the harvesting and transportation devices can be operated effectively, and the organizational costs are decreased as well. The wood delivery costs consist of the stumpage price, the harvesting and transportation costs, and of general expenses. The stumpage price form the largest cost category (over 50 %) of the industrial merchantable wood delivery, and the harvesting and transportation costs in the case of thinningwood delivery. Forest transportation is the largest part of the delivery costs of logging residues. The general expenses, consisting of the management costs and the interest costs of the capital bound to the storages, form a remarkable cost category in delivery of low-rank wood for energy or conversion purposes. The costs caused by the harvesting of thinningwood, the logging residues, chipping and crushing, the lorry transportation are reviewed in this presentation

  1. Inventory of contaminants in waste wood; Inventering av foeroreningar i returtrae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jermer, Joeran; Ekvall, Annika; Tullin, Claes [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden)

    2001-03-01

    Waste wood is increasingly used as fuel in Sweden. It is of Swedish origin as well as imported, mainly from Germany and the Netherlands. The waste wood is contaminated by e.g. paint and wood preservatives and objects of metal, glass, plastics etc. The contaminants may cause technical problems such as deposits and corrosion as well as plugging of air openings. The present study has focussed on potential contaminants in waste wood that could cause problems of technical as well as environmental nature. The major chemical contaminants are surface treatments (paints etc) and wood preservatives. The surface treatments contribute in particular to contaminants of zinc and lead. In some cases zinc has been found to cause severe deposits in the furnaces. Surface treatments also contribute to increased levels of sodium, chlorine, sulphur and nitrogen. Preservative-treated wood is the most important source of increased levels of copper, chromium and arsenic in the waste wood. Waste wood imported from Germany contains less arsenic but the same amount of copper and chromium as Swedish waste wood. The contents of mercury in German waste wood can be expected to be higher than in waste wood of Swedish origin. The fraction consisting of wood-based panels is comparably free from contaminants but as a result of the high contents of adhesives wood-based panels contribute to a higher proportion of nitrogen in waste wood than in forest residues. A great number of non-wood compounds (such as plastics and metals) do also contaminate waste wood. By careful and selective demolition and various sorting procedures most non-wood compounds will be separated from the waste wood. Waste sorting analyses carried out indicate that the waste wood contains approximately 1% non-wood compounds, mainly plastic and metal compounds, glass, dirt, concrete, bricks and gypsum. This may seem to be a small proportion, but if large amounts of waste wood are incinerated the non-wood compounds will inevitably cause

  2. LEACHING MECHANISM OF CHROMATED COPPER ARSENATE (CCA WOOD PRESERVATIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin Derya Gezer

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the increase demand on wooden raw materials and destroyed forest area (i.e clear cutting led to pressure on forest resources. Thus, Wood used in outdoor applications should be treated with preservatives to extent service life. in our country, although there is no regulations or any standards to be obeyed to preserve wood materials, averagely, 400.000 m3 /per year utility poles manufactured from softwood species and 30.000 m3/per year rail road slippers produced from either hardwood species or softwood species have been impregnated with wood preservatives. Chromated copper arsenic (CCA is commonly used wood preservatives to preserve utility poles in our country. According to data taken from Turkish Electricity Transmission Company (TEDAS 208.000 utility poles are used in Trabzon city area, 180.000 utility poles are in Rize city area, 121.000 utility poles are used in Artvin. Roughly 17.000 utility poles are replaced every year in three cities. Determining leaching factors of treated wood is important for explaining the short service life of utility poles treated with CCA used in Black Sea area. Factors such as preservative formulation, fixation temperature, post-treatment handling, wood dimensions, leaching media, pH, salinity and temperature have been shown to effect leaching of CCA treated wood.

  3. Mechanical and chemical properties of CCA-treated lumber removed from spent residential decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Smith; David Bailey; Philip A. Araman

    2007-01-01

    The amount of chromated copper arsenate (CCA)- treated wood being removed from spent residential decks is increasing at a tremendous rate. While most spent CCA-treated wood is being disposed in landfills, further useful and environmentally beneficial alternatives have to be met. If the volume of CCA-treated wood reaching landfills continues to rise, stricter disposal...

  4. Wood adhesives : vital for producing most wood products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2011-01-01

    A main route for the efficient utilization of wood resources is to reduce wood to small pieces and then bond them together (Frihart and Hunt 2010). Although humankind has been bonding wood since early Egyptian civilizations, the quality and quantity of bonded wood products has increased dramatically over the past 100 years with the development of new adhesives and...

  5. Mechanical performance of wood plastic composites containing decayed wood

    OpenAIRE

    Ayrılmış, Nadir; Kaymakcı, Alperen; Güleç, Türker

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the potential use of the decayed wood in the manufacture of wood plastic composite (WPC) panel. Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) sound wood and decayed wood (brown-rot fungi) were used as wood material. Three levels of 30%, 40%, and 50% of sound wood and decayed wood, based on the composition by weight, were mixed with the polypropylene with 3% (based on weight) maleic anhydride grafted PP (MAPP) as a coupling agent. The compound pellets were prepared from twin screw co-r...

  6. Cord Wood Testing in a Non-Catalytic Wood Stove

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Trojanowski, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wei, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-06-30

    EPA Method 28 and the current wood stove regulations have been in-place since 1988. Recently, EPA proposed an update to the existing NSPS for wood stove regulations which includes a plan to transition from the current crib wood fuel to cord wood fuel for certification testing. Cord wood is seen as generally more representative of field conditions while the crib wood is seen as more repeatable. In any change of certification test fuel, there are questions about the impact on measured results and the correlation between tests with the two different fuels. The purpose of the work reported here is to provide data on the performance of a noncatalytic stove with cord wood. The stove selected has previously been certified with crib wood which provides a basis for comparison with cord wood. Overall, particulate emissions were found to be considerably higher with cord wood.

  7. Cytochemical localization of cellulases in decayed and nondecayed wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murmanis, L.; Highley, T.L.; Palmer, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    Sawdust from undecayed western hemlock wood and from wood previously decayed by the brown-rot fungus Poria placenta or by the white-rot fungus Ganoderma applanatum was incubated with commercial cellulase from Trichoderma viride. Samples were treated cytochemically to locate cellulase activity and examined by TEM. Results showed that cellulase degraded undecayed wood extensively, with the attack starting on the outer border of a cell wall and progressing inside. Wood decayed by P. placenta, with or without cellulase incubation, and treated by the cytochemical test showed uniform distribution of electron dense particles throughout the cell walls. In wood decayed by G. applanatum, cellulase degradation was similar to that in undecayed wood. From measurements of particle diameter it is suggested that electron dense particles are cellulase. It is concluded that brown-rot and white-rot fungi have different effects on the microstructure of wood. The brown-rot fungus appears to open the wood microstructure so that cellulase can diffuse throughout the degraded tracheid wall.

  8. Chapter 6: Wood energy and competing wood product markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth E. Skog; Robert C. Abt; Karen Abt

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the effect of expanding wood energy markets is important to all wood-dependent industries and to policymakers debating the implementation of public programs to support the expansion of wood energy generation. A key factor in determining the feasibility of wood energy projects (e.g. wood boiler or pellet plant) is the long-term (i.e. 20-30year) supply...

  9. Wood wastes: Uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cipro, A.

    1993-01-01

    The 1,500 industrial firms manufacturing furniture in the Italian Province of Treviso can generate up to 190,000 tonnes of wood wastes annually. In line with the energy conservation-environmental protection measures contained in Italian Law No. 475/88, this paper indicates convenient uses for these wood wastes - as a raw material for fibreboards or as a fuel to be used in the furniture manufacturing plants themselves and in kilns producing lime. Reference is made to the wood wastes gasification/power generation system being developed by ENEA (the Italian Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment)

  10. Fatigue Damage in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clorius, Christian Odin; Pedersen, Martin Bo Uhre; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    1996-01-01

    An investigation of fatigue failure in wood subjected to load cycles in compression parallel to grain is presented. Fatigue failure is found to depend both on the total time under load and on the number of cycles.Recent accelerated fatigue research on wood is reviewed, and a discrepancy between...... to 10 Hz are used. The number of cycles to failure is found to be a poor measure of the fatigue performance of wood. Creep, maximum strain, stiffness and work are monitored throughout the fatigue tests. Accumulated creep is suggested identified with damage and a correlation between stiffness reduction...

  11. Impact of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) in wood mulch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Timothy G; Solo-Gabriele, Helena; Tolaymat, Thabet; Stook, Kristin

    2003-06-20

    The production of landscape mulch is a major market for the recycling of yard trash and waste wood. When wood recovered from construction and demolition (C&D) debris is used as mulch, it sometimes contains chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood. The presence of CCA-treated wood may cause some potential environmental problems as a result of the chromium, copper, and arsenic present. Research was performed to examine the leachability of the three metals from a variety of processed wood mixtures in Florida. The mixtures tested included mixed wood from C&D debris recycling facilities and mulch purchased from retail outlets. The synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) was performed to examine the leaching of chromium, copper and arsenic. Results were compared to Florida's groundwater cleanup target levels (GWCTLs). Eighteen of the 22 samples collected from C&D debris processing facilities leached arsenic at concentrations greater than Florida's GWCTL of 50 microg/l. The mean leachable arsenic concentration for the C&D debris samples was 153 microg/l with a maximum of 558 microg/l. One of the colored mulch samples purchased from a retail outlet leached arsenic above 50 microg/l, while purchased mulch samples derived from virgin materials did not leach detectable arsenic (<5 microg/l). A mass balance approach was used to compute the potential metal concentrations (mg/kg) that would result from CCA-treated wood being present in wood mulch. Less than 0.1% CCA-treated wood would cause a mulch to exceed Florida's residential clean soil guideline for arsenic (0.8 mg/kg).

  12. Non_standard Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin

    . Using parametric design tools and computer controlled production facilities Copenhagens Centre for IT and Architecture undertook a practice based research into performance based non-standard element design and mass customization techniques. In close cooperation with wood construction software......Non-Standard elements in architecture bear the promise of a better more specific performance (Oosterhuis 2003). A new understanding of design evolves, which is focusing on open ended approaches, able to negotiate between shifting requirements and to integrate knowledge on process and material......, but the integration of traditional wood craft techniques. The extensive use of self adjusting, load bearing wood-wood joints contributed to ease in production and assembly of a performance based architecture....

  13. Wood pellet research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohkansanj, S.; Bi, T.

    2006-01-01

    Wood pellets are composed of waste wood materials such as sawmill residue, municipal landfill waste and grain crops. Due to the high temperature combustion used to form the waste materials into the pellet, no additives or glues are necessary to bind them. The pellets are typically used for home heating; heat and power production; poultry bedding; and in biorefineries. This presentation provided an outline of the University of British Columbia wood pellet research and development program. Research at the university is being conducted to develop new types of pellets. Researchers at the program also analyze the physical and chemical properties of pellets in order to optimize pellet density and heating values. Wood pellet modelling and simulation studies are carried out, and various training and education programs are also offered. Research is currently being conducted to develop a reactor for off-gassing experiments. This presentation also provided details of a study investigating the economics of wood pellet production and transport. Pellet production costs and feedstock costs were compared. A summary of the costs and energy inputs of pellet production included details of product storage; transportation and transfer; handling; and transportation to energy plants. It was concluded that more than 35 per cent of the energy content of biomass is used up in the processing and transport of Canadian wood pellets to Europe. refs., tabs., figs

  14. A General Evaluation for Recycling Process of Impregnated Wood Removed From the Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihat Taşçıoğlu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Wood presevatives such as creosote, pentaclorophenol (PCP and chromated copper arsenate (CCA have been widely used over the years in order to extend wood products’ service life. CCA was known as most widely used wood preservative chemical in residendial and commercial applications world wide until 2004 volanteered phase out of the chemical from residential use bye the major manufacturers. Over the years CCA treated wood acuumulated in service reaching millions of cubic meters. But there is growing concern about the environmental impacts and increasing difficulty in disposing of treated wood products in many countries. Since disposal of CCA treated wood material poses greater problems than the other treated wood products due to heavy and toxic metal componets of CCA such as chromium and arsenic Traditional disposal methods like landfillig or incineration, both have negative environmental consequences. For that reason the increasing volume of CCA-treated wood products coming out of service requires alternative disposal methods and recycling techniques never tried before. The main purpose of this study, except for traditional methods like landfilling and incineration, is to evaluate the current alternative disposal and recycling methods for CCA treated wood removed from service.

  15. Etnoeducación Indígena Intercultural en el Caribe Colombiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemente Mendoza Castro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available El ensayo resume un avance del proyecto “Estudios etnoeducativos y curriculares en el Caribe colombiano”, tiene el propósito de reflexionar sobre la etnoeducación en Colombia como aporte a la educación desde las prácticas pedagógicas de los etnoeducadores indígenas. Se analiza la historia de la etnoeducación indígena en Colombia y a manera de ejemplo sintetiza las experiencias etnoinvestigativas que se desarrollan en las escuelas indígenas de la Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, La Guajira y el Atlántico, visibilizando la visión que tienen los maestros indígenas de etnoeducación y currículo, prácticas pedagógicas, etnoinvestigación, formando la aproximación de un programa etnoeducativo curricular pensado desde la realidad social e intercultural en el Caribe colombiano. Se propone con argumentación la aproximación a un modelo curricular integrado desde la etnoeducación indígena intercultural para el Caribe colombiano.AbstractThis essay summarizes an advance of the project Ethnoeducational and curricular studies in the Colombian Caribbean, and its purpose is to reflect on the ethnoeducation in Colombia as a contribution to the education from pedagogical practices of native ethnoeducators. The history of the native ethnoeducation in Colombia is analyzed and ethnoresearch experiences carried out in the native schools at Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Guajira and Atlántico are synthesized making evident teachers’ view on ethnoeducation and curriculum, pedagogical practices, ethnoresearch, and training. This is an approximation to an ethnoeducational and curricular program thought from the social and intercultural reality in the Colombian Caribbean. The approximation to a curricular integrated model from the intercultural native ethnoeducation for the Colombian Caribbean it is proposed with arguments.

  16. A Collaborative Effort Between Caribbean States for Tsunami Numerical Modeling: Case Study CaribeWave15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón-Barrantes, Silvia; López-Venegas, Alberto; Sánchez-Escobar, Rónald; Luque-Vergara, Néstor

    2017-10-01

    Historical records have shown that tsunami have affected the Caribbean region in the past. However infrequent, recent studies have demonstrated that they pose a latent hazard for countries within this basin. The Hazard Assessment Working Group of the ICG/CARIBE-EWS (Intergovernmental Coordination Group of the Early Warning System for Tsunamis and Other Coastal Threats for the Caribbean Sea and Adjacent Regions) of IOC/UNESCO has a modeling subgroup, which seeks to develop a modeling platform to assess the effects of possible tsunami sources within the basin. The CaribeWave tsunami exercise is carried out annually in the Caribbean region to increase awareness and test tsunami preparedness of countries within the basin. In this study we present results of tsunami inundation using the CaribeWave15 exercise scenario for four selected locations within the Caribbean basin (Colombia, Costa Rica, Panamá and Puerto Rico), performed by tsunami modeling researchers from those selected countries. The purpose of this study was to provide the states with additional results for the exercise. The results obtained here were compared to co-seismic deformation and tsunami heights within the basin (energy plots) provided for the exercise to assess the performance of the decision support tools distributed by PTWC (Pacific Tsunami Warning Center), the tsunami service provider for the Caribbean basin. However, comparison of coastal tsunami heights was not possible, due to inconsistencies between the provided fault parameters and the modeling results within the provided exercise products. Still, the modeling performed here allowed to analyze tsunami characteristics at the mentioned states from sources within the North Panamá Deformed Belt. The occurrence of a tsunami in the Caribbean may affect several countries because a great variety of them share coastal zones in this basin. Therefore, collaborative efforts similar to the one presented in this study, particularly between neighboring

  17. Modification of Wood Fiber for Use in Cement Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, F. Q.; Tan, X.; Zhao, F. Q.

    2017-12-01

    When ordinary Portland cement is used for wood fiber cement (WFC) board, the setting time is too long, even hard to solidify. Three methods can be used for wood fiber modification, i.e., soaking in water, treated with alkali solution and coated with some substances on the fiber surface. The results show that the proper water-cement ratio of WFC paste is 1:1.3 in the case of wood cement ratio being 1:1. The WFC board from modified wood fiber and cement is better than the control samples, in which the combined treatment, i.e. soaking in hot water and then coating with alkali-BFS-EVA slurry, behaves best. It is proved that ordinary Portland cement can be used to produce WFC board, with the modified wood fiber, which can greatly reduce production costs.

  18. La importancia de la tecnología en el desarrollo de América Latina y el Caribe

    OpenAIRE

    Vera-Vassallo, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    El documento gira en torno a tres ejes de la reflexión sobre el tema de la importancia de la tecnología para el desarrollo productivo y empresarial de América Latina y el Caribe. En la primera parte, el autor intenta bosquejar la posición relativa de América Latina y el Caribe, en materia de desarrollo tecnológico y competitividad internacional, con respecto a otras regiones del mundo tanto desarrolladas como en vías de desarrollo. En la segunda parte, se destaca brevemente las característica...

  19. Evolución geológica del margen Norte de la Placa del Caribe, República Dominicana

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Estaun, Andrés; Tavares, I.; García-Cortés, Ángel; Hernaiz Huerta, P. P.

    2002-01-01

    La Isla La Española se encuentra situada en la actualidad en la parte septentrional de la Placa del Caribe. Conjuntamente con Puerto Rico, constituye una unidad que puede interpretarse como una microplaca, limitada al Norte por una zona de subducción oblicua, con una fuerte componente de salto en dirección, y al Sur por otra zona de subducción incipiente a la que se asocia la Fosa de los Muertos. El margen Norte de la Placa del Caribe ha evolucionado desde constituir un límite contro...

  20. ADOPCIÓN Y USO DE MEDIOS SOCIALES POR JÓVENES DE LA COSTA CARIBE DE COLOMBIA

    OpenAIRE

    Marcela López Ponce; Carlos Arcila Calderón

    2016-01-01

    El estudio identifica el grado de adopción de los medios sociales por parte de los jóvenes de la Costa Caribe de Colombia, los medios a los que acceden con mayor frecuencia, así como los usos principales que hacen de ellos. Mediante un análisis cuantitativo de tipo correlacional, se analizaron las respuestas de 502 jóvenes entre los 16 a 28 años pertenecientes al Servicio Nacional de Aprendizaje en la Costa Caribe. Los resultados mostraron que el grado de adopción de los principales medios...

  1. Construcción y deconstrucción territorial del Caribe Colombiano durante el siglo XIX

    OpenAIRE

    Domínguez, Camilo; Chaparro Mendivelso, Jeffer; Gómez, Carla

    2007-01-01

    El proceso de estructuración territorial del Caribe Granadino durante el siglo XIX, específicamente de 1810 a 1886, se aborda desde una perspectiva geohistórica y geopolítica. Se parte de la base ambiental de la región, para luego abordar la evolución de los límites administrativos mediante reconstrucciones cartográficas basadas en mapas históricos. El proceso de cambio abarcó los antiguos estados de Magdalena y Bolívar (incluyendo las islas de San Andrés y Providencia), la costa caribe de Pa...

  2. Plagas, enfermedades y saberes agrícolas en el Caribe, un estudio de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández Prieto, Leida

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available From the new approaches in social studies of science and technology concerned with the analysis of sites where science is developed and how it circulates, I am interested to observe the Caribbean as an island-center in the tropical agronomic knowledge development. For this, I study how the scientific steps were formulated to eradicate the plagues that currently affect more intensely coconut plantations in the Caribbean and Latin America, called Lethal Yellowing Disease of Coconut, which has destroyed the industry crops in many areas. The epidemic first appeared in the nineteenth century in the Caribbean Antilles, which forced local scientists to develop a database of global knowledge. In particular, I observe the process in Cuba from scientific discussions generated at the Royal Academy of Medical Sciences, Physical and Natural Sciences of Havana, as well as the entry of U.S. scientists in the new imperial context of early twentieth century, who expanded their field of study throughout the English and Spanish Caribbean through the exchange of ideas and experiences.

    A partir de los nuevos enfoques en los estudios sociales de la ciencia y la tecnología interesados en el análisis de los sitios donde se produce la ciencia y cómo circula, me interesa observar el Caribe como isla-centro en la construcción del saber agronómico tropical. Para ello estudio cómo se fueron formulando científicamente los pasos a seguir para erradicar una de las plagas que actualmente afectan con más intensidad las plantaciones de cocos del Caribe y América Latina, llamada Amarillamiento Letal del Cocotero (ALC, la cual ha destruido la industria de la copra en muchas zonas productoras. La epidemia apareció por vez primera en el siglo XIX en el Caribe antillano, donde obligó a los científicos locales a elaborar un sistema de conocimiento global. En particular, observo ese proceso en Cuba a partir de los debates científicos generados en la Real

  3. Buena Vecindad y Populismo: El Caribe en las Relaciones Interamericanas de 1933 a 1946

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Gaztambide-Géigel

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Resumen La historiografía sobre la Política del Buen Vecino nos ha permitido distinguir dos períodos en las relaciones estadounidenses con América Latina entre 1933 y 1945. Se ha discutido poco, sin embargo, acerca del efecto de ese cambio sobre las políticas y en las relaciones. Tampoco se ha dicho mucho sobre las diferencias entre el contenido e impacto del Buen Vecino en el Caribe y en el resto del hemisferio. Aquí se abordan ambas dimensiones de las relaciones entre Estados Unidos y el Caribe vinculándolas a los desarrollos políticos internos en diversas sociedades de la región. Entre otras cosas, se manifiesta una tendencia a interpretar los cambios en el Caribe utilizando conceptos y teorías de los países centrales (como fascismo, comunismo, etcétera y del contexto latinoamericano (como nacionalismo, populismo, Buen Vecino, antimperialismo, etcétera. Este trabajo intenta revisar la aplicación de las teorías y conceptos, adoptar una perspectiva más comparativa y abordar cada experiencia en sus propios términos. Palabras chaves: Caribe, EUA, Relaciones Interamericanas, populismo, Política de buena vencidad. Boa Vizinhança e Populismo: o Caribe nas relações interamericanas de 1933 a 1946. Resumo A historiografia da Política de Boa Vizinhança permitiu-nos distinguir dois períodos nas relações dos EUA com a América Latina entre 1933 e 1945. Tem sido discutido pouco, no entanto, o efeito dessa mudança sobre a política e as relações. Também não disse muito sobre as diferenças entre o conteúdo e o impacto da Boa Vizinhança no Caribe e em outras partes do hemisfério. Aqui ambas as dimensões das relações entre os EUA e o Caribe serão abordadas, relacionando-as aos desenvolvimentos políticos internos em várias sociedades da região. Entre outras coisas, há uma tendência para interpretar mudanças no Caribe, utilizando conceitos e teorias dos países centrais (como o fascismo, comunismo, etc. e o contexto

  4. Criptofauna en rocas de Punta Nizuc, Caribe mexicano y su utilidad como biomonitor potencial

    OpenAIRE

    Campos-Vázquez, Concepción; Carrera-Parra, Luis F.; González, Norma Emilia; Salazar-Vallejo, Sergio I

    2015-01-01

    Para completar el diágnóstico de la calidad ambiental en el Parque Marino Nacional Isla Mujeres-Cancún-Nizuc Caribe mexicano, se estudió la posible utilidad de la criptofauna: de rocas como monitora de impacto. Se trazó un transecto a lo largo de un gradiente de intensidad de visitantes a Punta Nizuc. Se visitaron tres lugares (1.5-4 m proO, a 50, 250 Y 500 m de distancia de la plataforma turistica, y en cada uno de ellos se recogieron tres rocas. Los 1368 organismos encontrados fueron identi...

  5. Criptofauna en rocas de Punta Nizuc, Caribe mexicano y su utilidad como biomonitor potencial

    OpenAIRE

    Concepción Campos-Vázquez; Luis F Carrera-Parra; Norma Emilia González; Sergio I Salazar-Vallejo

    1999-01-01

    Para completar el diagnóstico de la calidad ambiental en el Parque Marino Nacional Isla Mujeres-Cancún-Nizuc Caribe mexicano, se estudió la posible utilidad de la criptofauna de rocas como monitora de impacto. Se trazó un transecto a lo largo de un gradiente de intensidad de visitantes a Punta Nizuc. Se visitaron tres lugares (1.5-4 m prof.), a 50, 250 y 500 m de distancia de la plataforma turistica, y en cada uno de ellos se recogieron tres rocas. Los 1368 organismos encontrados fueron ident...

  6. Los significados de la tortuga verde (chelonia mydas) en El Caribe costarricense

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas Mena, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    Introducción Este trabajo se enfoca en la identificación cualitativa de los significados culturales atribuidos a la tortuga verde (Chelonia mydas) en la historia del Caribe costarricense. Se distinguen, de maneras hipotéticas, tres etapas en la evolución cultural de esos significados: las tradiciones africanas ancestrales, la tradición jamaiquina y el sincretismo cultural de hoy. Se discute el alcance, el traslape y la oposición conflictiva entre los significados tradicionales y los modernos,...

  7. Development of polypropylene/wood flour ecocomposites. Evaluation of silane as coupling agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouza, R.; Barral, L.; Abad, M. J.; Montero, B.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of Pinus Sylvestris wood flour as filler in polypropylene matrix was evaluated. The mechanical properties and the morphology of different wood flour/polypropylene composites (WPC) were studied. The composites materials were prepared with several amounts of wood flour from 10 to 30% wt. Mechanical properties show that the wood flour incorporation increases the rigidity of the composites. Morphological analysis indicates that agglomerates are formed, with amounts exceeding 30% of wood flour. For the silane--treated composites, the dispersion of the filler into the polypropylene (PP) matrix improved. Shore D hardness of the composites is decreased with the addition of the coupling agent.

  8. Wood for the trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Garbutt

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Our paper focuses on the materiality, cultural history and cultural relations of selected artworks in the exhibition Wood for the trees (Lismore Regional Gallery, New South Wales, Australia, 10 June – 17 July 2011. The title of the exhibition, intentionally misreading the aphorism “Can’t see the wood for the trees”, by reading the wood for the resource rather than the collective wood[s], implies conservation, preservation, and the need for sustaining the originating resource. These ideas have particular resonance on the NSW far north coast, a region once rich in rainforest. While the Indigenous population had sustainable practices of forest and land management, the colonists deployed felling and harvesting in order to convert the value of the local, abundant rainforest trees into high-value timber. By the late twentieth century, however, a new wave of settlers launched a protest movements against the proposed logging of remnant rainforest at Terania Creek and elsewhere in the region. Wood for the trees, curated by Gallery Director Brett Adlington, plays on this dynamic relationship between wood, trees and people. We discuss the way selected artworks give expression to the themes or concepts of productive labour, nature and culture, conservation and sustainability, and memory. The artworks include Watjinbuy Marrawilil’s (1980 Carved ancestral figure ceremonial pole, Elizabeth Stops’ (2009/10 Explorations into colonisation, Hossein Valamanesh’s (2008 Memory stick, and AñA Wojak’s (2008 Unread book (in a forgotten language. Our art writing on the works, a practice informed by Bal (2002, Muecke (2008 and Papastergiadis (2004, becomes a conversation between the works and the themes or concepts. As a form of material excess of the most productive kind (Grosz, 2008, p. 7, art seeds a response to that which is in the air waiting to be said of the past, present and future.

  9. Wood fuel and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to try and demonstrate the role that the use of Wood as a Fuel can play in our environment. The term ''Wood Fuel'', for the purposes of these proceedings, refers to the use of wood obtained from the forest or the farm. It does not refer to waste wood from for example buildings. The role of wood fuel in the environment can be assessed at many different levels. In this paper three different scales of ''Environment'' and the role of wood fuel in each, will be considered. These three scales are namely the global environment, the local environment, and the National (community) environment. (Author)

  10. Ethnobotanical survey of the medicinal flora used by the Caribs of Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girón, L M; Freire, V; Alonzo, A; Cáceres, A

    1991-09-01

    An ethnobotanical survey was conducted among the Carib population of Guatemala in 1988-1989. In general terms, the sample surveyed possessed a relatively good standard of living. Results indicated that health services were utilized by the population, and that domestic medicine, mainly plants (96.9%) was used by 15% of the population. One hundred and nineteen plants used for medicinal purposes were collected, of which 102 (85.7%) could be identified; a list of these together with the information provided for each plant is presented. The most frequently reported plants used as medicine are: Acalypha arvensis, Cassia alata, Cymbopogon citratus, Melampodium divaricatum. Momordica charantia, Neurolaena lobata, Ocimum basilicum, Petiveria alliacea and Solanum nigrescens. Most of these plants are found in the region, but some are brought from the Highlands or outside of the country, such as Malva parviflora, Matricaria chamomilla, Peumus boldus, Pimpinella anisum, Rosmarinus officinalis and Tagetes lucida. This survey demonstrated that the Carib population of Guatemala has survived in a transcultural environment of African and native Amerindian beliefs.

  11. Movilidades y resistencias de los caribes negros. Pasado y presente de los garífuna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Agudelo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Los Caribes negros o Garífunas pueblan desde finales del siglo XVIII las costas caribes de 4países de América central (Belice, Guatemala, Honduras y Nicaragua. Actualmente, a travésde un proceso migratorio constante iniciado a mediados del siglo XX, buena parte de supoblación habita los Estados Unidos. La transnacionalidad originaria de su territorializaciónen Centroamérica y su presencia más reciente en Estados Unidos ha estado acompañadasiempre de una rica circulación de símbolos identitarios. Estos símbolos articulan diversasrepresentaciones etno-raciales que se transforman bajo la incidencia de procesos políticos ysociales de orden nacional, regional y global, hasta llegar a una identificación genérica comopueblo afrodescendiente. El propósito de este artículo es el de presentar, partiendo de unaperspectiva histórica, la dinámica de construcción de las identidades garífunas, los actoresque intervienen en dichos procesos y su dinámica política.

  12. Energy from wood - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussbaumer, T.

    2000-01-01

    The present publication is the introduction to a series of papers on fundamentals and applications of wood energy. It summarizes figures and data of the actual situation of fuel wood utilization in Switzerland and its potential for the future. Further, the advantages of bio-energy are discussed and the possibilities of funding for bio-energy in Switzerland are described. Wood contributes with 2.5% to the total energy demand in Switzerland nowadays. However, the utilization of wood energy can be more than doubled, which is one of the targets of the Swiss energy policy. The supply chains for the different types of fuel wood are described and specifications and prices of log wood, forestry wood chips and wood residues are presented. The main applications of wood energy are residential heating with manually operated wood boilers and stoves, on the one hand, and heat production with automatic wood furnaces in industry and communities, on the other hand. Automatic furnaces have been promoted in the past ten years and hence they contribute nowadays with more than 50% to the energy supply from wood with a further growing share. As an assistance for further information, a list of institutions and addresses in the field of wood energy in Switzerland is given in the paper. (author)

  13. Turning wood residues into wood revenues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, R.G.; Kravetz, Don

    1996-01-01

    Ensyn is a profitable commercial company which derives its revenues from the conversion of wood residues into liquid biofuel and chemicals. The technology, Rapid Thermal Processing (RTP (TM) )is based on extremely fast ''cracking'' of biomass which results in light liquid yields exceeding 70% by weight, from wood. Whether producing chemicals or liquid biofuel, the RTP plant is configured identically and operated essentially in the same mode. Chemicals production simply allows economical production to occur at a lower plant capacity, as low as 2 tonnes/day, than is feasible for a dedicated fuel plant (typically greater than 100 tonnes/day). Ensyn has developed the commercialisation of RTP TM from bench to industrial scale in 10 years. A variety of crative funding initiatives in the early years allowed for capital to be raised for R and D without the loss of intellectual property (IP). The transition years of technology demonstration, prior to full commercialisation, were funded by a blend of revenues from venture capital and public sources, and by quickly tapping into a niche market for RTP TM . The utilisation of the technology at the niche market scale opened the doors to the larger fuel and commodity markets. Once, again, both IP and control of the company were maintained during these years. Flexibility, creativity and expertise are necessary to understand the significance of various financing options (private investments, commercial banking and bond issues) and to integrate these options with various renewable energy, recycling and tax incentives. Understanding these options with various renewable energy, recycling and tax incentives is necessary. Understanding both the core and peripheral needs of the customer are essential in successfully advancing a commercial wood energy venture. Ensyn's experience in these areas is the focus of the paper. (Author)

  14. 76 FR 80913 - Carib Energy (USA) LLC; Application for Long-Term Authorization To Export Domestically Produced...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... Natural Gas for a 25-Year Period AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, DOE. ACTION: Notice of application... Application was filed under section 3 of the Natural Gas Act (NGA), as amended by section 201 of the Energy... is not prohibited by United States law or policy. Carib states that the source of natural gas supply...

  15. CO2 isotope analyses using large air samples collected on intercontinental flights by the CARIBIC Boeing 767

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assonov, S.S.; Brenninkmeijer, C.A.M.; Koeppel, C.; Röckmann, T.

    2009-01-01

    Analytical details for 13C and 18O isotope analyses of atmospheric CO2 in large air samples are given. The large air samples of nominally 300 L were collected during the passenger aircraft-based atmospheric chemistry research project CARIBIC and analyzed for a large number of trace gases and

  16. Precision wood particle feedstocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

    2013-07-30

    Wood particles having fibers aligned in a grain, wherein: the wood particles are characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L; the L.times.H dimensions define two side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers; the W.times.H dimensions define two cross-grain end surfaces characterized individually as aligned either normal to the grain or oblique to the grain; the L.times.W dimensions define two substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces; and, a majority of the W.times.H surfaces in the mixture of wood particles have end checking.

  17. Wood-pastures of Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plieninger, Tobias; Hartel, Tibor; Martín-López, Berta

    2015-01-01

    Wood-pastures are archetypes of High Nature Value Farmlands in Europe and hold exceptional ecological, social, and cultural values. Yet, wood-pastures have been through a sharp decline all over Europe, mainly due to processes of agricultural intensification and abandonment. Recently, wood......-pastures have found increasing attention from conservation science and policy across Europe. In this paper we (i) perform the first pan-European assessment of wood-pastures, considering individual countries and biogeographic regions, (ii) present the ecological and social-cultural values of a wide diversity...... of wood-pasture systems in Europe, (iii) outline management challenges around wood-pastures, and (iv) provide insights for the policy agenda targeting wood-pastures in Europe. We estimate that wood-pastures cover an area of approximately 203,000km2 in the European Union (EU...

  18. Variation in root wood anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, D.F.

    1976-01-01

    Variability in the anatomy of root wood of selected specimens particularly Fraxinus excelsior L. and Acer pseudoplatanus L. in the Kew reference microscope slide collection is discussed in relation to generalised statements in the literature on root wood anatomy.

  19. Methane from wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, T. F.; Barreto, L.; Kypreos, S.; Stucki, S.

    2005-07-01

    The role of wood-based energy technologies in the Swiss energy system in the long-term is examined using the energy-system Swiss MARKAL model. The Swiss MARKAL model is a 'bottom-up' energy-systems optimization model that allows a detailed representation of energy technologies. The model has been developed as a joint effort between the Energy Economics Group (EEG) at Paul Scherrer Institute PSI) and the University of Geneva and is currently used at PSI-EEG. Using the Swiss MARKAL model, this study examines the conditions under which wood-based energy technologies could play a role in the Swiss energy system, the most attractive pathways for their use and the policy measures that could support them. Given the involvement of PSI in the ECOGAS project, especial emphasis is put on the production of bio-SNG from wood via gasification and methanation of syngas and on hydrothermal gasification of woody biomass. Of specific interest as weIl is the fraction of fuel used in passenger cars that could be produced by locally harvested wood. The report is organized as follows: Section 2 presents a brief description of the MARKAL model. Section 3 describes the results of the base case scenario, which represents a plausible, 'middle-of-the-road' development of the Swiss energy system. Section 4 discusses results illustrating the conditions under which the wood-based methanation technology could become competitive in the Swiss energy market, the role of oil and gas prices, subsidies to methanation technologies and the introduction of a competing technology, namely the wood-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. FinaIly, section 5 outlines some conclusions from this analysis. (author)

  20. Compressive Fatigue in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clorius, Christian Odin; Pedersen, Martin Bo Uhre; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of fatigue failure in wood subjected to load cycles in compression parallel to grain is presented. Small clear specimens of spruce are taken to failure in square wave formed fatigue loading at a stress excitation level corresponding to 80% of the short term strength. Four...... frequencies ranging from 0.01 Hz to 10 Hz are used. The number of cycles to failure is found to be a poor measure of the fatigue performance of wood. Creep, maximum strain, stiffness and work are monitored throughout the fatigue tests. Accumulated creep is suggested identified with damage and a correlation...

  1. TCP HolyWood

    OpenAIRE

    Oscar Núñez Mori

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a new end-to-end, sender side Transport Control Protocol called TCP HolyWood or in short TCP-HW. In a simulated wired environment, TCP HolyWood outperforms in average throughput, three of the more important TCP protocols ever made, we are talking about TCP Reno, TCP Westwood, and TCP Vegas; and in average jitter to TCP Reno and TCP Vegas too. In addition, according to Jain’s index, our proposal is as fair as TCP Reno, the Standard. Apresentamos um novo Protocolo de Controle de...

  2. The Asian Wood Pellet Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph A. Roos; Allen Brackley

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the three major wood pellet markets in Asia: China, Japan, and South Korea. In contrast to the United States, where most wood pellets are used for residential heating with pellet stoves, a majority of the wood pellets in Asia are used for co-firing at coal-fired power plants. Our analysis indicated that Japan is the largest importer of wood pellets...

  3. Construction of hydrophobic wood surfaces by room temperature deposition of rutile (TiO2) nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Rongbo; Tshabalala, Mandla A.; Li, Qingyu; Wang, Hongyan

    2015-02-01

    A convenient room temperature approach was developed for growing rutile TiO2 hierarchical structures on the wood surface by direct hydrolysis and crystallization of TiCl3 in saturated NaCl aqueous solution. The morphology and the crystal structure of TiO2 coated on the wood surface were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The TiO2 morphology on the wood surface could be tuned by simply changing either the reaction time or pH value of the reaction mixture. After modification with perfluorodecyltriethoxysilane (PFDTS), the water contact angle (WCA) of the TiO2-treated wood (T1) surface increased to 140.0 ± 4.2°, which indicated a highly hydrophobic wood surface. In addition, compared with untreated control wood, PFDTS-TiO2 treatment (PFDTS-T1-treated) not only reduced liquid water uptake, but also delayed the onset of water saturation point of the wood substrate. The weight change of PFDTS-T1-treated wood after 24 h of water immersion was 19.3%, compared to 81.3% for the untreated control wood. After 867 h of water immersion, the weight change for the treated and untreated wood specimens was 117.1%, and 155.1%, respectively. The untreated control wood reached the steady state after 187 h, while the PFDTS-T1-treated wood did not reach the steady state until after 600 h of immersion.

  4. Serpúlidos (Polychaeta: Serpulidae del Caribe noroccidental con claves para la región del Gran Caribe: Salmacina, Ficopomatus, Pomatoceros, Pomatostegus, Protula, Pseudovermilia, Spirobranchus y Vermiliopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rolando Bastida-Zavala

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available A partir de la revisión de más de 1 250 ejemplares de serpúlidos, 15 especies de la región del Gran Caribe fueron identificadas y caracterizadas. Trece especies fueron recolectadas en las costas de la Península de Yucatán y ocho fueron encontradas en otras localidades en el Golfo de México, otras siete son de Cuba y se incluyeron comentarios sobre el material tipo de dos especies más. Se realizaron tres análisis morfométricos para evaluar algunos caracteres. El primero sobre Pomatostegus stellatus (Abildgaard y especies y subespecies relacionadas: P. brachysoma Schmarda, P. macrosoma Schmarda, P. s. fruticosa Mörch, P. s. pentapoma Mörch y P. s. tetrapoma Mörch, indicando que estas son con-específicas. Otro fue sobre las especies de Spirobranchus de Blainville: S. dendropoma Mörch, S. giganteus (Pallas, S. polycerus (Schmarda y S. polycerus augeneri ten Hove; se demostró que S. giganteus es diferente de los otros tres táxones. El tercer análisis fue realizado sobre Vermiliopsis annulata (Schmarda s.l., y permitió reconocer tres formas diferentes. Asimismo, varios ejemplares incompletos probablemente pertenecen a un género indescrito. Se incluye una clave de identificación para todas las especies registradas en la región del Gran Caribe.From the revision of more than 1 250 serpulids, 15 species from the Grand Caribbean Region were identified and characterized. Thirteen species were collected along the shores of the Yucatan Peninsula and eight were found in other localities in the Gulf of Mexico, seven others are from Cuba and comments on type specimens of two species are also included. Three morphometric analyses were made to evaluate some characters. The first on Pomatostegus stellatus (Abildgaard, and related species and subspecies: P. brachysoma Schmarda, P. macrosoma Schmarda, P. s. fruticosa Mörch, P. s. pentapoma Mörch and P. s. tetrapoma Mörch, indicated that they are conspecific. Another one on Spirobranchus de

  5. Influence of Heat Treatment Conditions on Strength Properties of Poplar Wood (Populus deltoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Ghofrani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research heat treatments of poplar wood in 2 different mediums (hot water and steam at 185ºC were done in the sealed autoclave for 1 and 3 hours. Specimens were compared in density and mechanical properties. Density loss in hydrothermally treated wood was higher than hygrothermally treated samples. Mechanical properties (MOR and MOE were decreased in both mediums, but strength loss was higher for hygrothermal treated samples. Compression strength parallel to grain didn’t show any significant change for hydrothermally treated wood but decreased in specimens with hygrothermal treatment. Poplar wood showed more decrease in toughness test with hygrothermal treatment. According to the results, hydrothermal treatment of poplar wood is recommended as a modification method with less negative effects on mechanical properties

  6. Waste wood as bioenergy feedstock. Climate change impacts and related emission uncertainties from waste wood based energy systems in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röder, Mirjam; Thornley, Patricia

    2018-04-01

    Considering the urgent need to shift to low carbon energy carriers, waste wood resources could provide an alternative energy feedstock and at the same time reduce emissions from landfill. This research examines the climate change impacts and related emission uncertainties of waste wood based energy. For this, different grades of waste wood and energy application have been investigated using lifecycle assessment. Sensitivity analysis has then been applied for supply chain processes and feedstock properties for the main emission contributing categories: transport, processing, pelletizing, urea resin fraction and related N 2 O formation. The results show, depending on the waste wood grade, the conversion option, scale and the related reference case, that emission reductions of up to 91% are possible for non-treated wood waste. Compared to this, energy from treated wood waste with low contamination can achieve up to 83% emission savings, similar to untreated waste wood pellets, but in some cases emissions from waste wood based energy can exceed the ones of the fossil fuel reference - in the worst case by 126%. Emission reductions from highly contaminated feedstocks are largest when replacing electricity from large-scale coal and landfill. The highest emission uncertainties are related to the wood's resin fraction and N 2 O formation during combustion and, pelletizing. Comparing wood processing with diesel and electricity powered equipment also generated high variations in the results, while emission variations related to transport are relatively small. Using treated waste wood as a bioenergy feedstock can be a valid option to reduce emissions from energy production but this is only realisable if coal and landfill gas are replaced. To achieve meaningful emission reduction in line with national and international climate change targets, pre-treatment of waste wood would be required to reduce components that form N 2 O during the energy conversion. Copyright © 2017

  7. Classroom Demonstrations of Wood Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulger, A. N.

    Presented in this manual are 20 activities selected to show some of the properties of wood and how these properties relate to the cellular structure of wood. Each activity includes stated objectives, indicates materials needed, and explains procedures. Illustrations related to the activities, glossary of terms, and photographs of wood structure…

  8. Status of wood energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerbe, J.I.

    1991-01-01

    In this address, the potential of wood and wood residues to supply future energy needs is examined. In addition, the possible environmental impact of the use of wood fuels on global climate change is discussed. Technologies for the development of new fuels are described

  9. Wrong way: Heating with wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-01

    Energy experts state that 'Heating with wood is a hobby, at the most'. Of course, one can save oil by heating with wood, but cost calculations shaw that it is a highly uneconomical substitute. On the other hand, wood can be recommended for thermal insulation.

  10. Strength loss in decayed wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Patricia K. Lebow

    2014-01-01

    Wood is a durable engineering material when used in an appropriate manner, but it is susceptible to biological decay when a log, sawn product, or final product is not stored, handled, or designed properly. Even before the biological decay of wood becomes visually apparent, the decay can cause the wood to become structurally unsound. The progression of decay to that...

  11. Ovalbumin as a Wood Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Holly Satori; Zhu Rongxian; Michael J. Birkeland

    2014-01-01

    Use of proteins to bond wood dominated industrial production until the middle of the 20th century (1). The ensuing creation of the plywood and glulam beam industries allowed for more efficient use of wood resources than is possible with solid wood products. Many protein sources have been used as adhesives, including plant (soybean) and animal (blood, fish scales,...

  12. Wood construction and magnetic characteristics of impregnated type magnetic wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Hideo; Hojo, Atsushi; Seki, Kyoushiro; Takashiba, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    The results of experiments involving the AC and DC magnetic characteristics of impregnated type magnetic wood were studied by taking into consideration the wood construction and fiber direction. The experimental results show that the sufficient amount of impregnated magnetic fluid varies depending on the fiber direction and length, and the grain face of the wood material. The impregnated type magnetic wood sample that is fully impregnated by magnetic fluid has a 60% saturation magnetization compared to the saturation magnetization of magnetic fluid. Samples for which the wood fiber direction was the same as the direction of the magnetic path had a higher magnetization intensity and permeability

  13. Wood combustion systems: status of environmental concerns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunwoody, J.E.; Takach, H.; Kelley, C.S.; Opalanko, R.; High, C.; Fege, A.

    1980-01-01

    This document addresses the uncertainties about environmental aspects of Wood Combustion Systems that remain to be resolved through research and development. The resolution of these uncertainties may require adjustments in the technology program before it can be commercialized. The impacts and concerns presented in the document are treated generically without reference to specific predetermined sites unless these are known. Hence, site-specific implications are not generally included in the assessment. The report consists of two main sections which describe the energy resource base involved, characteristics of the technology, and introduce the environmental concerns of implementing the technology; and which review the concerns related to wood combustion systems which are of significance for the environment. It also examines the likelihood and consequence of findings which might impede wood commercialization such as problems and uncertainties stemming from current or anticipated environmental regulation, or costs of potential environmental controls. This document is not a formal NEPA document. Appropriate NEPA documentation will be prepared after a formal wood combustion commercialization program is approved by DOE.

  14. Study of wood polymer combinations from woods of Kashmir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, V.P.; Hari Mohan; Rao, K.N.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the studies conducted to upgrade inferior woods of Kashmir by the application of radiation polymerization process. The process has brought about improvements in the physical and mechanical properties of wood. Wood polymer composite samples have been studied for their use in flooring, wall panelling, roofing shingles, wood carving and in other decorative items. It has been shown that 10% ethyl silicate, when present along with methyl methacrylate or styrene, considerably improves the impact strength and such wood polymer composite samples do not crack even on nailing. Wood polymer composites have been tested for carving and it has been shown that with 50% polymer content, carving quality is preserved. It has also been shown that surface coated wood is more advantageous for use in roofing shingles. (author)

  15. History of wood machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Koch

    1967-01-01

    The history of wood machining is closely tied to advanced in metallurgy and power sources. It has been strongly and continuously shaped by prevailing economic forces and the rise and decline of other contemporary industries. This paper sketches a few of the highlights, with emphasis on developments in North America.

  16. Grant Wood: "American Gothic."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Diane M.

    1988-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan which exposes students in grades 10-12 to the visual symbols and historical references contained in Grant Wood's "American Gothic." Includes background information on the artist and the painting, instructional strategies, a studio activity, and evaluation criteria. (GEA)

  17. Wood waste in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos, O.; Ribeiro, R. [Biomass Centre for Energy - CBE, Miranda do Corvo (Portugal)

    1997-12-31

    The energy policy of the EC, as well as most of member states points to a sizeable increase of energy production based on renewable energy sources, wood, wood residues, agricultural residues, energy crops including SRF, organic sludges, solid residues, etc. Most recent goals indicate a desirable duplication of today`s percentage by 2010. The reasons for this interest, besides diversification of sources, less dependence on imported fuels, use of endogenous resources, expected decrease of fossil fuel reserves, use of available land, additional employment and income for rural communities, etc., are related to important environmental benefits namely in terms of emissions of hot house gases. Wood waste, resulting from forest operations, cleaning, cultural and final cuttings, and from wood based industries, constitute a special important resource by reason of quality and availability. In addition to this they do not require additional land use and the removal is beneficial. In the run-up to the becoming December`s 1997 `Climate Change Summit` in Kioto, there is mounting pressure on companies to plan on carbon cuts. (author) 6 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Chapter 3: Wood Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan Cullen

    2014-01-01

    A significant portion of global carbon is sequestered in forest systems. Specialized fungi have evolved to efficiently deconstruct woody plant cell walls. These important decay processes generate litter, soil bound humic substances, or carbon dioxide and water. This chapter reviews the enzymology and molecular genetics of wood decay fungi, most of which are members of...

  19. Tannins in tropical woods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doat, J.

    1978-01-01

    A preliminary study was made of the chemistry of pyrogallol- and catecholtannins, their general properties and methods of extraction and determination. Three methods of estimation - Lowenthal, powdered hide and spectrophotometry - were compared using two control solutions, four samples of wood and one of bark. Using the empirical powdered hide method, tannins of both types were estimated in wood and bark of various tropical species (some separately and some as a mixture), Moroccan oaks (Quercus suber and Q. ilex), and European oak 9Q. petraea). Further tests were made on the wood and bark of the two mangrove species, Rhizophora mangle and R. racemosa, by subjecting them to successive extraction with a range of solvents. None of the woods tested had as much as the 10% of tannins considered necessary in economic sources. The bark of the two mangroves, of Eucalyptus urophylla and of Prosopis africana had tannin contents over 10% and the latter two species had very favorable tannin/non-tannin ratios. All the tropical species, with the probable exception of E. urophylla, had only catecholtannins. Only the oaks and E. urophylla bark gave positive results when tested for gallotannins.

  20. Lepidochitona bullocki, una nueva especie de quitón (Polyplacophora: Ischnochitonidae del Caribe colombiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedar I. García-Ríos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available El género Lepidochitona (Gray 1821 se encuentra representado en el Caribe por tres especies: L. liozonis (Dall & Simpson 1901, L. rosea (Kaas 1972 y L. rufoi. Veinte ejemplares de L. bullocki sp. nov. Fueron recolectados en un recorrido a lo largo del litoral rocoso, entre el norte de la playa del Rodadero y Puerto Luz, en Santa Marta, Colombia. Los ejemplares son pequeños, hasta 7.3mm, fueron recolectados a mano, entre 0.25 y 1.5m de profundidad, a distancias entre 1 y 5m de la orilla. Esta es la cuarta especie del género que se describe para el Caribe. Las tres especies previamente descritas son L. liozonis (Dall & Simpson, 1901, L. rosea Kaas, 1972 y L. rufoi García-Ríos, 2010. L. bullocki se diferencia de L. liozonis y L. rosea por tener la superficie del tegumento irregular y de otros colores. La misma se distingue de L. rufoi por tener muchas espículas hialinas largas, mayor tamaño, dientes centrales de la rádula anchos. Es la única especie del género en el Caribe que se localiza con mayor frecuencia en la superficie iluminada de las rocas, en el sublitoral somero.Lepidochitona bullocki, a new species of chiton (Polyplacophora: Ischnochitonidae from the Colombian Caribbean. The genus Lepidochitona is one of the most diverse in the Southern Caribbean. In order to describe this new species, twenty specimens of L. bullocki sp. nov. were collected by hand on the rocky coast, from 0.25 to 1.5m depth, and a shore distance of 1 to 5m, between the Northern section of Rodadero beach and Puerto Luz, in Santa Marta, Colombia. The specimens were small, with maximum observed size of 7.3mm. This is the fourth species of the genus Lepidochitona described for the Caribbean. The previously known species were L. liozonis (Dall & Simpson 1901, L. rosea (Kaas 1972 and L. rufoi (García-Ríos 2010. L. bullocki differs from L. liozonis and L. rosea in having a rough tegmentum and color. It differs from L. rufoi in having longer and numerous hyaline

  1. Thermogravimetric analysis of photodegraded acrylic coated lime wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Carmen-Mihaela; Tibirna, Carmen Mihaela; Vasile, Cornelia

    2011-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out to investigate the photodegradation of lime wood (Tilia cordata Mill.) coated with acrylic copolymer during artificial UV/Vis light irradiation for 600 h. Photodegradation of the Paraloid B72 films and Paraloid B72 treated lime wood samples was evaluated by thermogravimetry throughout the irradiation period of 100 h. The results obtained indicate a shifting of the DTG maxima to lower temperatures, which may be related to a decrease in the stability of the copolymer and wood during photodegradation. The decrease of weight loss with increasing time of exposure was observed, while the global kinetic parameters for the main peak increases when increasing exposure time of wood to the UV light. Even when the surface of the wood was covered with a thin layer of acrylic resin, some photodegradation reactions of the wood surface occurred. The modifications in the wood structure may be influenced by the newly formed structures from acrylic resin photodegradation. © 2011 The Authors. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2011 The American Society of Photobiology.

  2. Ability of tropical forest soils of French Guiana and Reunion to depollute woods impregnated with biocides

    OpenAIRE

    Zaremski, Alba; Gastonguay, Louis; Zaremski, Clara; Chaffanel, Fanny; Le Floch, Gaetan; Beauchêne, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Our study sought to fine-tune knowledge about those microorganisms, particularly wood-decaying fungi degrading pollutants in situ. With a view to the depollution or bioremediation of treated woods, wood-decaying microorganisms from tropical forest soils in French Guiana and the island of Reunion were assessed for their ability to degrade toxic biocides such as pentachlorophenol (PCP) or copper chromium arsenic compounds (CCA). The degradation of red pine (Pinus resinosa) test pieces was monit...

  3. Assessment of the Bioaccessibility of Micronized Copper Wood on Simulated Stomach Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    The widespread use of copper-treated lumber has increased the potential for human exposure. Moreover, there is a lack of information on the fate and behavior of copper-treated wood particles following oral ingestion. In this study, the in vitro bioaccessibility of copper from copper-treated wood dust in simulated stomach fluid and DI water was determined. Three copper-treated wood products, liquid alkali copper quaternary and two micronized copper quarternary from different manufacturers, were incubated in the extraction media then fractionated by centrifugation and filtration through 0.45 ?m and 10 kDa filters. The copper concentrations from isolated fractions were measured using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). Total amounts of copper from each wood product were also determined using microwave-assisted acid digestion of dried wood samples and quantification using ICP-OES. The percent in vitro bioaccessible copper was between 83 and 90 % for all treated wood types. However, the percent of copper released in DI water was between 14 and 25 % for all wood products. This data suggests that copper is highly bioaccessible at low pH and may pose a potential human exposure risk upon ingestion. This dataset is associated with the following publication:Santiago-Rodrigues, L., J.L. Griggs, K. Bradham , C. Nelson , T. Luxton , W. Platten , and K. Rogers. Assessment of the bioaccessibility of micronized copper wood in synthetic stomach flu

  4. Effects of heat treatment of wood on hydroxylapatite type mineral precipitation and biomechanical properties in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekola, J; Lassila, L V J; Hirvonen, J; Lahdenperä, M; Grenman, R; Aho, A J; Vallittu, P K

    2010-08-01

    Wood is a natural fiber reinforced composite. It structurally resembles bone tissue to some extent. Specially heat-treated birch wood has been used as a model material for further development of synthetic fiber reinforced composites (FRC) for medical and dental use. In previous studies it has been shown, that heat treatment has a positive effect on the osteoconductivity of an implanted wood. In this study the effects of two different heat treatment temperatures (140 and 200 degrees C) on wood were studied in vitro. Untreated wood was used as a control material. Heat treatment induced biomechanical changes were studied with flexural and compressive tests on dry birch wood as well as on wood after 63 days of simulated body fluid (SBF) immersion. Dimensional changes, SBF sorption and hydroxylapatite type mineral formation were also assessed. The results showed that SBF immersion decreases the biomechanical performance of wood and that the heat treatment diminishes the effect of SBF immersion on biomechanical properties. With scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis it was shown that hydroxylapatite type mineral precipitation formed on the 200 degrees C heat-treated wood. An increased weight gain of the same material during SBF immersion supported this finding. The results of this study give more detailed insight of the biologically relevant changes that heat treatment induces in wood material. Furthermore the findings in this study are in line with previous in vivo studies.

  5. Mineral preservatives in the wood of Stradivari and Guarneri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Nagyvary

    Full Text Available Following the futile efforts of generations to reach the high standard of excellence achieved by the luthiers in Cremona, Italy, by variations of design and plate tuning, current interest is being focused on differences in material properties. The long-standing question whether the wood of Stradivari and Guarneri were treated with wood preservative materials could be answered only by the examination of wood specimens from the precious antique instruments. In a recent communication (Nature, 2006, we reported about the degradation of the wood polymers in instruments of Stradivari and Guarneri, which could be explained only by chemical manipulations, possibly by preservatives. The aim of the current work was to identify the minerals from the small samples of the maple wood which were available to us from the antique instruments. The ashes of wood from one violin and one cello by Stradivari, two violins by Guarneri, one viola by H. Jay, one violin by Gand-Bernardel were analyzed and compared with a variety of commercial tone woods. The methods of analysis were the following: back-scattered electron imaging, X-ray fluorescence maps for individual elements, wave-length dispersive spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and quantitative microprobe analysis. All four Cremonese instruments showed the unmistakable signs of chemical treatments in the form of chemicals which are not present in natural woods, such as BaSO4, CaF2, borate, and ZrSiO4. In addition to these, there were also changes in the common wood minerals. Statistical evaluation of 12 minerals by discriminant analysis revealed: a. a difference among all four Cremona instruments, b. the difference of the Cremonese instruments from the French and English antiques, and c. only the Cremonese instruments differed from all commercial woods. These findings may provide the answer why all attempts to recreate the Stradivarius from natural wood have failed. There are many obvious

  6. EVALUATION OF CHEMICALS INCORPORATED WOOD FIBRE CEMENT MATRIX PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MST. SADIA MAHZABIN

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Wood fibre cement (WFC boards are well established commercially and widely used in many developed countries. The combination of the properties of two important materials, i.e., cement, and previously treated fibrous materials like wood or agricultural residues; which made up the board, contributed in the performance of the board as building material. In this work, the WFC matrix (WFCM samples are produced to determine the physical properties of WFCM such as the density and water absorption. The wood fibres are incorporated/treated with three different chemical additives; calcium formate (Ca(HCOO2, sodium silicate (Na2.SiO3 and magnesium chloride (MgCl2 prior to mixing with cement. The mechanical properties of the WFCM, with or without chemicals treatment of fibres, such as the compressive strength and flexural strength are evaluated. Three wood/cement ratios (50:50, 40:60, 30:70 are used and the percentages of water and accelerator were 80% and 3% based on the cement weight, respectively. Three moisture-conditioned samples; accelerated aging, dry and wet conditions are used for flexural test. The results reveal that the wood/cement ratio, chemical additives and moisture content had a marked influence on the physical and mechanical properties of the matrix. Finally, it has been shown that the 40:60 wood/cement ratio samples with prior chemicals treatment of the fibres that undergo accelerated aging conditioning achieve higher strength then dry and wet-conditioned boards.

  7. Tendencias e Instrumentos de Integración Regional en Latinoamericana y el Caribe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Moreno

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available El presente artí­culo es una revisión del tema de integración Latinoamericana y el Caribe desde una perspectiva inter y multidisciplinar que comprenden los procesos históricos de los paí­ses miembros, los análisis de la CEPAL tales como la teorí­a de la dependencia, el Sistema de Sustitución de Importaciones ISI, la heterogeneidad estructural de la región, el regionalismo abierto como resultado de las reformas económicas estructurales de finales de los años 80 y principios de los 90, y las nuevas tendencias o transformaciones de la integración en el marco de las teorí­as de las relaciones internacionales RI

  8. Moderno de otro modo. Lecciones caribeñas desde el lugar del salvaje

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel-Rolph Trouillot

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available «Modernidad» es un término turbio perteneciente a la familia de palabras que podemos etiquetar como «universales noratlánticos». Los universales noratlánticos son particulares que han adquirido un grado de universalidad, son pedazos de la historia de la humanidad convertidos en estándares históricos. En este artículo argumenta que en su más común despliegue como un universal noratlántico, la modernidad disfraza y desconoce a los muchos Otros que crea. Se examina entonces cómo desde el Caribe la modernidad nunca fue, y nunca podría ser, lo que dice ser.

  9. Literatura del caribe. De Martinica a Colombia cruce de caminos en el mar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Bouletreau

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available En el ambiente de internacionalización quo se vive hoy en día, las letras no pueden quedarse atrás. La Literatura Comparada llega a punto para participar de este movimiento y, tratándose de literatura del Caribe, el material es amplio: diversos mundos se abren ante nuestros ojos, cada uno con sus características: Inglaterra, Holanda, Francia y España dejaron sus huellas, África trajo su parte de magia, los rasgos autóctonos perduran. En esta Óptica, al poner de evidencia similitudes de idiosincrasia, contribuimos a reforzar unas relaciones interculturales: en este caso, nuestra región colombiana con una isla antillana francófona.

  10. O Brasil e o Grão Caribe: fundamentos para uma nova agenda de trabalho

    OpenAIRE

    Avila,Carlos Federico Domínguez

    2008-01-01

    O artigo aborda as relações econômicas, políticas e de segurança internacional vigentes entre o Brasil e os 25 países da bacia do Caribe - México, América Central, Antilhas, Colômbia, Venezuela, Guiana e Suriname, além de uma dezena de territórios coloniais administrados por potências extra-regionais. Constata-se que as relações econômicas são muito intensas, especialmente em termos comerciais e de investimentos produtivos. O diálogo político entre as partes é construtivo, relevante e cada ve...

  11. Crustáceos asociados a macroalgas en Bajo Pepito, Isla Mujeres, Caribe mexicano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción Campos Vázquez

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Como resultado de muestreos mensuales durante un año en Bajo Pepito, Isla Mujeres, Caribe mexicano, se presentan los crustáceos asociados a macroalgas recolectadas por buceo autónomo. Se hallaron un total de 148 organismos: tres ordenes, 11 familias, 18 géneros y 19 especies en nueve tipos de asociaciones. El orden con mayor abundacia fue Isopoda (112 seguido de Amphipoda (20 y Decapoda (16.Crustaceans associated with macroalgae were collected for one year by scuba diving in Bajo Pepito, Isla Mujeres, mexican Caribbean. A total of 148 organisms were found: three orders, 11 families, 18 genera and 19 species in nine types of associations. The order with highest abundance was Isopoda (112, followed by Amphipoda (20 and Decapoda (16.

  12. Maltrato entre iguales en adolescentes de zonas urbanas y rurales en el Caribe colombiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Quiroz Imbrecht

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de esta investigación fue identificar la relación entre las conductas de acoso entre iguales en estudiantes de una zona urbana y una zona rural así como la relación de dichas conductas con el género. Se estudió una muestra de 200 estudiantes ubicados en el Caribe colombiano mediante un estudio correlacional en el cual se aplicó el Autotest de Cisneros y se analizaron los datos mediante estadísticos descriptivos y el cálculo del Chi cuadrado de Pearson. La prevalencia del maltrato fue del 75.6%, predominando las formas de violencia verbal y la exclusión social. Todas las formas de acoso se asociaron con el género y sólo los robos mostraron relación significativa con la zona geográfica.

  13. Diversidad y microestructura de quitones (Mollusca: Polyplacophora del Caribe de Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedar I García-Ríos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Los poliplacóforos asociados a los arrecifes de coral en la costa caribeña de Costa Rica han sido poco estudiados. El examen del cascajo de coral acumulado en el sublitoral somero, en cuatro estaciones de colección, localizadas en la Provincia de Limón reveló una diversidad de quitones mayor a la documentada. Anteriormente se habían registrado ocho especies para el Caribe costaricense: Ischnochiton erythronotus (C.B. Adams, 1845; Ischnoplax pectinata (Sowerby 1840; Stenoplax boogii (Haddon, 1886; S. purpurascens (C.B. Adams, 1845; Acanthopleura granulata (Gmelin, 1791; Chiton marmoratus Gmelin, 1791; C. tuberculatus Linnaeus, 1758; Acanthochitona rhodea (Pilsbry, 1893. Otras cinco se registran aquí por primera vez: Callistochiton portobelensis Ferreira 1976; Ischnochiton kaasi Ferreira 1987; I. pseudovirgatus Kaas 1972; Acanthochitona balesae Abbott 1954; Cryptoconchus floridanus (Dall 1889.Diversity and microstructure of quitons (Mollusca: Polyplacophora from the Caribbean of Costa Rica. The polyplacophorans of the coral reef on the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica have been insufficiently studied. The examination of coral rubble accumulated in the shallow sublitoral waters on four collection stations in Provincia Limón revealed a higher diversity of chitons than was documented. From the country eight species were previously known: Ischnochiton erythronotus (C.B. Adams 1845; Ischnoplax pectinata (Sowerby 1840; Stenoplax boogii (Haddon 1886; S. purpurascens (C.B. Adams 1845; Acanthopleura granulate (Gmelin 1791; Chiton marmoratus Gmelin 1791; C. tuberculatus Linnaeus 1758 and Acanthochitona rhodea (Pilsbry 1893. This study added five more species that are reported here for the first time: Callistochiton portobelensis Ferreira 1976; Ischnochiton kaasi Ferreira 1987; I. pseudovirgatus Kaas 1972; Acanthochitona balesae Abbott 1954 and Cryptoconchus floridanus (Dall 1889. Rev. Biol. Trop. 59 (1: 129-136. Epub 2011 March 01.

  14. Characterization of non-methane hydrocarbons in Asian summer monsoon outflow observed by the CARIBIC aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Baker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Between April and December 2008 the CARIBIC commercial aircraft conducted monthly measurement flights between Frankfurt, Germany and Chennai, India. These flights covered the period of the Asian summer monsoon (June–September, during which enhancements in a number of atmospheric species were observed in the upper troposphere over southwestern Asia. In addition to in situ measurements of trace gases and aerosols, whole air samples were collected during the flights, and these were subsequently analyzed for a suite of trace gases that included a number of C2–C8 non-methane hydrocarbons. Non-methane hydrocarbons are relatively short-lived compounds and the large enhancements in their mixing ratios in the upper troposphere over southwestern Asia during the monsoon, sometimes more than double their spring and fall means, provides qualitative evidence for the influence of convectively uplifted boundary layer air. The particularly large enhancements of the combustion tracers benzene and ethyne, along with the similarity of their ratios with carbon monoxide and emission ratios from the burning of household biofuels, indicate a strong influence of biofuel burning to NMHC emissions in this region. Conversely, the ratios of ethane and propane to carbon monoxide, along with the ratio between i-butane and n-butane, indicate a significant source of these compounds from the use of fossil fuels, and comparison to previous campaigns suggests that this source could be increasing. Photochemical aging patterns of NMHCs showed that the CARIBIC samples were collected in two distinctly different regions of the monsoon circulation: a southern region where air masses had been recently influenced by low level contact and a northern region, where air parcels had spent substantial time in transit in the upper troposphere before being probed. Estimates of age using ratios of individual NMHCs have ranges of 3–6 days in the south and 9–12 days in

  15. Airborne multi-axis DOAS measurements of atmospheric trace gases on CARIBIC long-distance flights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dix

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy instrument was implemented and operated onboard a long-distance passenger aircraft within the framework of the CARIBIC project (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container. The instrument was designed to keep weight, size and power consumption low and to comply with civil aviation regulations. It records spectra of scattered light from three viewing directions (nadir, 10° above and below horizon using a miniaturized telescope system. The telescopes are integrated in the main pylon of the inlet system which is mounted at the belly of the aircraft. Fibre bundles transmit light from the telescopes to spectrograph-detector units inside the DOAS container instrument. The latter is part of the removable CARIBIC instrument container, which is installed monthly on the aircraft for a series of measurement flights.

    During 30 flight operations within three years, measurements of HCHO, HONO, NO2, BrO, O3 and the oxygen dimer O4 were conducted. All of these trace gases except BrO could be analysed with a 30 s time resolution. HONO was detected for the first time in a deep convective cloud over central Asia, while BrO, NO2 and O3 could be observed in tropopause fold regions. Biomass burning signatures over South America could be seen and measurements during ascent and descent provided information on boundary layer trace gas profiles (e.g. NO2 or HCHO.

  16. Estructura espacial de Eucinostomus argenteus (Pisces: Gerreidae en la zona norte del Caribe colombiano

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    Jorge Paramo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Esta investigación se llevó a cabo para determinar la distribución espacial de la densidad (captura por unidad de área – CPUA y de la estructura de tallas de Eucinostomus argenteus y su relación con las variables ambientales en la zona norte del Caribe colombiano. Los datos fueron se tomaron durante un crucero de investigación realizado en  la época seca (febrero de 2006 entre  Puerto Estrella (La Guajira y Santa Marta (Magdalena. Las muestras biológicas se colectaron con una red de arrastre (en estratos de profundidad < 50 m y 50-100 m siguiendo un diseño de muestreo sistemático. Los individuos maduros y de tallas mayores se encontraron distribuidos principalmente entre Manaure y Punta Gallinas, donde la plataforma continental es muy ancha y la oceanografía local esta modulada por la surgencia estacional. Los peces juveniles, se distribuyeron al sur del área de estudio, entre Boca Camarones y el Río Buritaca, cerca de la costa. En este sector la plataforma es muy estrecha y con alta productividad biológica por la presencia de ríos, manglares y pastos marinos, sirviendo como zona de alimentación y refugio para E. argenteus. En general los resultados sugieren que las variables ambientales son importantes para la distribución espacial de la abundancia y las tallas de  E. argenteus en la zona norte del Caribe colombiano, siendo la temperatura y la profundidad las variables que predijeron mejor la distribución espacial de la especie.

  17. Compósitos de polietileno reciclado e partículas de madeira de reflorestamento tratadas com polietileno modificado Composites of recycled polyethylene and reforestation wood particles treated with modified polyethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla I. Redighieri

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho foram obtidos compósitos poliméricos de partículas de madeira de eucalipto e polietileno de baixa densidade reciclado (LDPE reciclado. O polietileno funcionalizado com anidrido maleico (PE-g-MA foi utilizado como agente compatibilizante para conferir melhor adesão entre a matriz e a fase dispersa. As propriedades mecânicas de tração e flexão foram determinadas de acordo com as normas da American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM. Os resultados mostraram que o tratamento das partículas de eucalipto com PE-g-MA aumentou as propriedades mecânicas dos compósitos, em relação aos compósitos contendo partículas sem tratamento. Entretanto, as propriedades mecânicas de tração desses compósitos foram reduzidas depois de longo tempo de imersão em água.In this work polymeric composites were obtained from eucalypt wood particles and recycled low density polyethylene (recycled LDPE. The maleic anhydride functionalized PE (PE-g-MA was used as compatibiliser agent to provide better adhesion between the matrix and the dispersed phase. The mechanical properties of tensile and flexural were determined in accordance with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM procedures. The results showed that PE-g-MA as compatibiliser agent increased the mechanical properties, in relation to the composites containing particles without treatment. However, the tensile mechanical properties of these polymeric composites were reduced after long time of immersion in water.

  18. Radioactivity of Wood and Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hus, M.; Kosutic, K.; Lulic, S.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear experiments in the atmosphere and nuclear accidents caused global deposition of artificial radionuclides in the soil of Earth's northern hemisphere, the territory of the Republic of Croatia included. Soil contamination by radionuclides resulted in their deposition in plants growing on the contaminated soil as well as in the trees. Large area of the Republic of Croatia is covered with wood, which is exploited in manufacture of industrial wood and for firewood. From approximately 3 million cubic metres of wood exploited annually, nearly one third serves for firewood. In the process of burning a smaller portion of radionuclides deposited in the wood evaporates and goes to atmosphere while a larger portion is retained in the ash. In this paper are presented the results of natural radionuclides 4 0K , 2 32T h and 2 38U as well as of artificial radionuclide 1 37C s content determination in the wood, wood briquette, charcoal and in ash remained after burning the wood, wood briquette and charcoal. The obtained results are discussed from wood radiocontamination aspect and from the aspect of potential environmental radiocontamination by the products from wood burning process. (author)

  19. Lignin-Retaining Transparent Wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Fu, Qiliang; Rojas, Ramiro; Yan, Min; Lawoko, Martin; Berglund, Lars

    2017-09-11

    Optically transparent wood, combining optical and mechanical performance, is an emerging new material for light-transmitting structures in buildings with the aim of reducing energy consumption. One of the main obstacles for transparent wood fabrication is delignification, where around 30 wt % of wood tissue is removed to reduce light absorption and refractive index mismatch. This step is time consuming and not environmentally benign. Moreover, lignin removal weakens the wood structure, limiting the fabrication of large structures. A green and industrially feasible method has now been developed to prepare transparent wood. Up to 80 wt % of lignin is preserved, leading to a stronger wood template compared to the delignified alternative. After polymer infiltration, a high-lignin-content transparent wood with transmittance of 83 %, haze of 75 %, thermal conductivity of 0.23 W mK -1 , and work-tofracture of 1.2 MJ m -3 (a magnitude higher than glass) was obtained. This transparent wood preparation method is efficient and applicable to various wood species. The transparent wood obtained shows potential for application in energy-saving buildings. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  20. Lump wood combustion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubesa, Petr; Horák, Jiří; Branc, Michal; Krpec, Kamil; Hopan, František; Koloničný, Jan; Ochodek, Tadeáš; Drastichová, Vendula; Martiník, Lubomír; Malcho, Milan

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with the combustion process for lump wood in low-power fireplaces (units to dozens of kW). Such a combustion process is cyclical in its nature, and what combustion facility users are most interested in is the frequency, at which fuel needs to be stoked to the fireplace. The paper defines the basic terms such as burnout curve and burning rate curve, which are closely related to the stocking frequency. The fuel burning rate is directly dependent on the immediate thermal power of the fireplace. This is also related to the temperature achieved in the fireplace, magnitude of flue gas losses and the ability to generate conditions favouring the full burnout of the fuel's combustible component, which, at once ensures the minimum production of combustible pollutants. Another part of the paper describes experiments conducted in traditional fireplaces with a grate, at which well-dried lump wood was combusted.

  1. Effects of copper amine treatments on mechanical, biological and surface/interphase properties of poly (vinyl chloride)/wood composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haihong

    2005-11-01

    The copper ethanolamine (CuEA) complex was used as a wood surface modifier and a coupling agent for wood-PVC composites. Mechanical properties of composites, such as unnotched impact strength, flexural strength and flexural toughness, were significantly increased, and fungal decay weight loss was dramatically decreased by wood surface copper amine treatments. It is evident that copper amine was a very effective coupling agent and decay inhibitor for PVC/wood flour composites, especially in high wood flour loading level. A DSC study showed that the heat capacity differences (DeltaCp) of composites before and after PVC glass transition were reduced by adding wood particles. A DMA study revealed that the movements of PVC chain segments during glass transition were limited and obstructed by the presence of wood molecule chains. This restriction effect became stronger by increasing wood flour content and by using Cu-treated wood flour. Wood flour particles acted as "physical cross-linking points" inside the PVC matrix, resulting in the absence of the rubbery plateau of PVC and higher E', E'' above Tg, and smaller tan delta peaks. Enhanced mechanical performances were attributed to the improved wetting condition between PVC melts and wood surfaces, and the formation of a stronger interphase strengthened by chemical interactions between Cu-treated wood flour and the PVC matrix. Contact angles of PVC solution drops on Cu-treated wood surfaces were decreased dramatically compared to those on the untreated surfaces. Acid-base (polar), gammaAB, electron-acceptor (acid) (gamma +), electron-donor (base) (gamma-) surface energy components and the total surface energies increased after wood surface Cu-treatments, indicating a strong tendency toward acid-base or polar interactions. Improved interphase and interfacial adhesion were further confirmed by measuring interfacial shear strength between wood and the PVC matrix.

  2. Mechanical properties of wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    David W. Green; Jerrold E. Winandy; David E. Kretschmann

    1999-01-01

    The mechanical properties presented in this chapter were obtained from tests of small pieces of wood termed “clear” and “straight grained” because they did not contain characteristics such as knots, cross grain, checks, and splits. These test pieces did have anatomical characteristics such as growth rings that occurred in consistent patterns within each piece. Clear...

  3. Out of the woods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, J L

    1992-01-01

    Throughout Africa, Asia and Latin America women are pushed out of forests and from their maintenance by governments and private interests for cash crop development disregarding the role of women in conserving forests. In developing countries forests are a source of wood for fuel; 60-80% of women gather wood for family needs in America. Fruits, vegetables, and nuts gathered in woods enhance their diet. Indonesian women pick bananas, mangos, guavas, and avocados from trees around their homes; in Senegal shea-nut butter is made from a local tree fruit to be sold for cash. Women provide labor also in logging, wood processing, and tree nurseries. They make charcoal and grow seedlings for sale. In India 40% of forest income and 75% of forest products export earnings are derived from nonwood resources. Poor, rural women make items out of bamboo, rattan, and rope to sell: 48% of women in an Egyptian province make a living through such activities. In India 600,000 women harvest tendu leaves for use as wrappings for cigarettes. The expansion of commercial tree plantations replacing once communal natural forests has forced poor households to spend up to 4-% of their income on fuel that they used to find in forests. Tribal women in India know the medicinal uses of 300 forest species, and women in Sierra Leone could name 31 products they obtained or made from trees and bushes, while men named only 8 items. Only 1 forestry project appraised by the World Bank during 1984-97 named women as beneficiaries, and only 1 out of 33 rural development programs funded by the World Bank did. Women provide food, fuel, and water for their families in subsistence economies, they know sustainable methods of forestry, yet they are not included in development programs whose success or failure could hinge on more attention to women's contribution and on more equity.

  4. Wood fuels utilization in Central Europe - the wood fuels consumption and the targets of utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alakangas, E.

    1999-01-01

    Following subjects are discussed in this presentation: The share of bioenergy of the total energy consumption in EU region; the wood fuels consumption in EU region in 1995; the division of bioenergy utilization (households, wood- based district heating, wood consumption in industry, power generation from wood and residues, biofuels, biogas and sludges); wood fuels consumption in households in EU countries in 1995; wood consumption in France; the additional wood fuel consumption potential in France; Blan bois - wood energy program; French wood energy markets; German wood energy markets; energy consumption in Germany; wood consumption in Bavaria; the wood fuels potential in Bavaria; wood fuels consumption in households in Bavaria; wood fuels consumption for district heating in Bavaria; fuel prices in Bavaria; Environmental regulations in Germany; small boiler markets in Germany; Energy consumption in Austria; small-scale utilization of wood fuels; utilization of wood energy. (Slides, additional information from the author)

  5. Wood Fingerprints:Recognition of Sawn Wood Products

    OpenAIRE

    Pahlberg, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with wood fingerprints and presents ways to track sawn wood products through an industrial process using cameras. The possibility to identify individual wood products comes from the biological variation of the trees, where the genetic code, environment and breakdown process creates a unique appearance for every board. This application has much of the same challenges as are found in human biometrics applications.The vision for the future is to be able to utilize existing imag...

  6. Gadolinium chloride as a contrast agent for imaging wood composite components by magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas L. Eberhardt; Chi-Leung So; Andrea Protti; Po-Wah So

    2009-01-01

    Although paramagnetic contrast agents have an established track record in medical uses of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), only recently has a contrast agent been used for enhancing MRI images of solid wood specimens. Expanding on this concept, wood veneers were treated with a gadolinium-based contrast agent and used in a model system comprising three-ply plywood...

  7. Do bark beetles and wood borers infest lumber following heat treatment? The role of bark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Haack; Toby R. Petrice; Pascal Nzokou

    2007-01-01

    Wood packing material (WPM) is an important pathway for the movement of bark- and wood-infesting insects (Haack 2006). New international standards for treating WPM, often referred to as "ISPM 15," were adopted in 2002 (FAO 2002). The two approved WPM treatments are heat treatment (56? C core temperature for 30 min) and fumigation with methyl bromide. These...

  8. An investigation into the potential of ionic silver as a wood preservative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin Dorau; Rachel Arango; Frederick Green

    2004-01-01

    On December 3 1, 2003, the wood preservation industry, in conjunction with the Environmental Protection Agency, voluntarily phased out the use of chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated lumber for residential applications. This ended over 25 years of CCA as the predominant wood preservative in the United States. The first generation of replacement preservatives,...

  9. Radiographic testing of wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterloh, K.; Zscherpel, U.; Raedel, C.; Weidemann, G.; Meinel, D.; Goebbels, J.; Ewert, U.; Hasenstab, A.; Buecherl, T.

    2007-01-01

    Wood is an old and established consumption and construction material. It is still the most common material for constructing furniture, roofs, playgrounds and mine supports. In contrast to steel and concrete, wood warns of extreme loads by creaking. Its mechanical stability is more influenced by decay than by peripheral cracks. While external cracks are visible, internal decay by fungus growth is undetectable from outside. This may be a safety problem in supporting structures. The best analysis of the internal structure is provided by computed tomography, but this is also the most complex method, much more so than simple radiographic testing. However, the latter is made inaccurate by scattered radiation resulting from internal moisture. With the image processing options of digital radiographic techniques, the structural information can be separated effectively from noise. In contrast to X-ray and gamma radiography, neutron radiography provides information on the spatial distribution of moisture. In healthy wood, water is conducted in the sapwood while the hardwood is dry. Moisture in hardwood is caused by infestations, e.g. fungus growth. The contribution presents a comparative analysis of the available radiographic methods. (orig.)

  10. Identificación de malezas trepadoras del banano (musa sp. en la zona caribe de costa rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mar\\u00EDa Rodr\\u00EDguez

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Identificación de malezas trepadoras del banano (Musa sp. en la zona caribe de Costa Rica. Las poblaciones de las malezas conocidas como trepadoras, han ido en aumento en las plantaciones de banano en Costa Rica. La identificación es una base necesaria para otros estudios. El presente trabajo es de carácter exploratorio y deberá continuarse, ya que muchas de las especies objeto de este estudio son difíciles de identificar. Se procedió a visitar fincas bananeras ubicadas en diferentes regiones de la zona Caribe de Costa Rica y recolectar las principales malezas trepadoras del cultivo. Cucurbitaceae, Araceae y Fabaceae destacaron como las familias con el mayor número de especies

  11. Inequidades en salud entre países de Latinoamérica y el Caribe (2005-2010)

    OpenAIRE

    Cardona, Doris; Acosta, Laura Débora; Bertone, Carola Leticia

    2015-01-01

    Objetivo: Este trabajo pretende identificar la desigualdad en salud existente entre los países de América Latina y el Caribe, en los últimos a?nos (2005-2010), considerando que la medición de desigualdades es el primer paso hacia la identificación de inequidades en salud. Método: Se dise?nó un estudio ecológico, cuya unidad de análisis son 20 países latinoamericanos y del Caribe, en el cual se construyó el Índice de Inequidades en Salud (INIQUIS). Éste sintetiza, en un valor que varía entre 0...

  12. ¿En busca de una Pax Americana? La Cuenca del Caribe como el Mare Nostrum estadounidense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coronado Holman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available La periodización de la política exterior norteamericana frente a los Estados que componen la Cuenca del Caribe, permite formar una imagen de las conductas e identidades que se han tenido y aún se tienen con respecto a la inserción, participación e inclusión de Estados Unidos en el policy-making interno de la Cuenca del Caribe. Esta forma de hacer política de Estados Unidos ha sido cambiante y altamente influenciada por la idea de la estabilidad y control hemisférico que siempre ha pretendido, la cual puede llegar a ser comparada con el período de expansión del Imperio romano, cuyo punto de partida para el devenir de un gran Imperio fue el mar.

  13. Online sorting of recovered wood waste by automated XRF-technology: part II. Sorting efficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, A Rasem; Solo-Gabriele, Helena; Townsend, Timothy

    2011-04-01

    Sorting of waste wood is an important process practiced at recycling facilities in order to detect and divert contaminants from recycled wood products. Contaminants of concern include arsenic, chromium and copper found in chemically preserved wood. The objective of this research was to evaluate the sorting efficiencies of both treated and untreated parts of the wood waste stream, and metal (As, Cr and Cu) mass recoveries by the use of automated X-ray fluorescence (XRF) systems. A full-scale system was used for experimentation. This unit consisted of an XRF-detection chamber mounted on the top of a conveyor and a pneumatic slide-way diverter which sorted wood into presumed treated and presumed untreated piles. A randomized block design was used to evaluate the operational conveyance parameters of the system, including wood feed rate and conveyor belt speed. Results indicated that online sorting efficiencies of waste wood by XRF technology were high based on number and weight of pieces (70-87% and 75-92% for treated wood and 66-97% and 68-96% for untreated wood, respectively). These sorting efficiencies achieved mass recovery for metals of 81-99% for As, 75-95% for Cu and 82-99% of Cr. The incorrect sorting of wood was attributed almost equally to deficiencies in the detection and conveyance/diversion systems. Even with its deficiencies, the system was capable of producing a recyclable portion that met residential soil quality levels established for Florida, for an infeed that contained 5% of treated wood. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. European wood-fuel trade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillring, B.; Vinterbaeck, J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses research carried out during the l990s on European wood fuel trade at the Department of Forest Management and Products, SLU, in Sweden. Utilisation of wood-fuels and other biofuels increased very rapidly in some regions during that period. Biofuels are replacing fossil fuels which is an effective way to reduce the future influence of green house gases on the climate. The results indicate a rapid increase in wood-fuel trade in Europe from low levels and with a limited number of countries involved. The chief products traded are wood pellets, wood chips and recycled wood. The main trading countries are, for export, Germany and the Baltic states and, for import, Sweden, Denmark and to some extent the Netherlands. In the future, the increased use of biofuel in European countries is expected to intensify activity in this trade. (orig.)

  15. Variación del estado del mar al paso de las ondas tropicales por el mar Caribe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acacia del Sol Hernández

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available El mar Caribe está frecuentemente afectado por ondas tropicales desde mayo hasta noviembre. Estos sistemas siempre incrementan el viento y el oleaje. En el presente trabajo fueron estudiadas cinco temporadas (1985-89 de ondas en esa zona geográfica. Se observó que estos sistemas incrementan a su paso el oleaje en 1,5 m. Cuando el patrón nuboso estaba mejor organizado este incremento fue superior.

  16. Civil Aircraft for the regular investigation of the atmosphere based on an instrumented container: The new CARIBIC system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. M. Brenninkmeijer

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available An airfreight container with automated instruments for measurement of atmospheric gases and trace compounds was operated on a monthly basis onboard a Boeing 767-300 ER of LTU International Airways during long-distance flights from 1997 to 2002 (CARIBIC, Civil Aircraft for Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container, caribic-atmospheric.com">http://www.caribic-atmospheric.com. Subsequently a more advanced system has been developed, using a larger capacity container with additional equipment and an improved inlet system. CARIBIC phase #2 was implemented on a new long-range aircraft type Airbus A340-600 of the Lufthansa German Airlines (Star Alliance in December 2004, creating a powerful flying observatory. The instrument package comprises detectors for the measurement of O3, total and gaseous H2O, NO and NOy, CO, CO2, O2, Hg, and number concentrations of sub-micrometer particles (>4 nm, >12 nm, and >18 nm diameter. Furthermore, an optical particle counter (OPC and a proton transfer mass spectrometer (PTR-MS are incorporated. Aerosol samples are collected for analysis of elemental composition and particle morphology after flight. Air samples are taken in glass containers for laboratory analyses of hydrocarbons, halocarbons and greenhouse gases (including isotopic composition of CO2 in several laboratories. Absorption tubes collect oxygenated volatile organic compounds. Three differential optical absorption spectrometers (DOAS with their telescopes mounted in the inlet system measure atmospheric trace gases such as BrO, HONO, and NO2. A video camera mounted in the inlet provides information about clouds along the flight track. The flying observatory, its equipment and examples of measurement results are reported.

  17. Searching the Literatura Latino Americana e do Caribe em Ciencias da Saude (LILACS) database improves systematic reviews

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Otávio Augusto Câmara [UNIFESP; Castro, Aldemar Araujo [UNIFESP

    2002-01-01

    Background An unbiased systematic review (SR) should analyse as many articles as possible in order to provide the best evidence available. However, many SR use only databases with high English-language content as sources for articles. Literatura Latino Americana e do Caribe em Ciencias da Saude (LILACS) indexes 670 journals from the Latin American and Caribbean health literature but is seldom used in these SR. Our objective is to evaluate if LILACS should be used as a routine source of articl...

  18. Controlling mold on wood Pallets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol A. Clausen

    2012-01-01

    THE WOOD PALLET AND CONTAINER INDUSTRY CONSUMES 4.5 billion board feet (BBF) of hardwoods and 1.8 BBF of softwoods for the annual production of 400-500 million solid wood pallets. While alternative materials such as plastic, corrugated paperboard and metal have entered the market, solid wood remains the material of choice for a majority of pallets on the market (more...

  19. Inoculation Expedition of Agar wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, C.S.; Mohd Fajri Osman; Rusli Zakaria

    2015-01-01

    Inoculation expedition of agar wood is a main field works for researcher in Nuclear Malaysia to prove the real inoculation of agar wood in real jungle. These expeditions was conducted fourth times in the jungles of Malaysia including Gunung Tebu in Terengganu, Murum in Belaga, Sarawak, Kampung Timbang in Kota Belud, Sabah and Nuclear Malaysia itself. This expedition starts from preparation of samples and equipment, transportation into the jungle, searching and recognition of agar wood and lastly, inoculation of the agar wood. Safety aspects precedence set out in the preparation and implementation of this expedition. (author)

  20. A Study on the Effect of Plasma Treatment for Waste Wood Biocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MiMi Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface modification of wood powder by atmospheric pressure plasma treatment was investigated. The composites were manufactured using wood powder and polypropylene (wood powder: polypropylene = 55 wt% : 45 wt%. Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment was applied under the condition of 3 KV, 17±1 KHz, 2 g/min. Helium was used as the carrier gas and hexamethyl-disiloxane (HMDSO as the monomer to modify the surface property of the waste wood biocomposites by plasma polymerization. The tensile strengths of untreated waste wood powder (W3 and single species wood powder (S3 were about 18.5 MPa and 21.5 MPa while those of plasma treated waste wood powder (PW3 and plasma treated single species wood powder (PS3 were about 21.2 MPa and 23.4 MPa, respectively. Tensile strengths of W3 and S3 were improved by 14.6% and 8.8%, respectively. From the analyses of mechanical properties and morphology, we conclude that the interfacial bonding of polypropylene and wood powder can be improved by atmospheric pressure plasma treatment.

  1. Treating Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients Search FAQs Treating Infertility Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Treating Infertility Patient Education FAQs Treating Infertility Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Treating ...

  2. Quantifying arthropod contributions to wood decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Ulyshen; Terry Wagner

    2013-01-01

    Termites carry large amounts of soil into dead wood, and this behaviour complicates efforts to measure their contributions to wood decay. A novel method for isolating termite soil by burning the wood is described, and some preliminary results are presented.

  3. Amenazas naturales asociadas al ascenso del nivel del mar en Caribe Colombiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson Kim Gregory

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan los resultados de recientes investigaciones sobre el impacto del ascenso del nivel del mar en la Costa Caribe colombiana, bases para el primer informe de Colombia a la Convención Internacional de Cambio Climático, adelantado en convenio con elIDE..-.1f. Con base en el estudio de las geoformas litorales, los procesos dinámicos asociadosy su evolución reciente, se evaluó la amenaza por inundación y erosión asociada al actual ascenso del nivel del mar, proyectado por IP(C (panel Intergubemamcntal de Expertos de Cambio Climático en un metro pata el año 2100. A partir de la interpretación de imágenes de satélite y fotografias aéreas, apoyada en información secundaria y verificación de campo, se identificaron 15 unidades geomorfológicas básicas de origen estructural, fluvial y marino. Con base las características geomorfológicas y criterios de resiliencia frente a la acción del oleaje y la inundación litoral, se generó un modelo morfodinámico que pronostica el impacto del ascenso del nivel marino para el litoral Caribe colombiano. De acuerdo con este análisis, se estima que las unidades geomorfológicas recientes desarrolladas durante los últimos 2.500 años podrían ser reactivadas por el actual ascenso del nivel del mar, afectando numerosos centros urbanos tales como Cartagena, Santa Marta, Puerto Colombia y Turbo y actividades económicas de-importancia como el comercio portuario y el turismo. Para los 1.819 Km. de línea de costa del Caribe Colombiano, se estima que el 33.7% presenta alta susceptibilidad a la erosión marina, representado por geoformas que presentan grari fragilidad ante los procesos erosivos. En la linea de costa restante, 31,2% presenta susceptibilidad mec!ia y 35.1% susceptibilidad baja y muy baja, en una linea de costa caracterizada por geoformas con fragilidad y mecanismos de resiliencia variables. Por inundación, se pronostica que 1192 Km2 de costa baja serán anegados, 2331 Km2 sufrir

  4. Wood decay in desert riverine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Douglas; Stricker, Craig A.; Nelson, S. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Floodplain forests and the woody debris they produce are major components of riverine ecosystems in many arid and semiarid regions (drylands). We monitored breakdown and nitrogen dynamics in wood and bark from a native riparian tree, Fremont cottonwood (Populus deltoides subsp. wislizeni), along four North American desert streams. We placed locally-obtained, fresh, coarse material [disks or cylinders (∼500–2000 cm3)] along two cold-desert and two warm-desert rivers in the Colorado River Basin. Material was placed in both floodplain and aquatic environments, and left in situ for up to 12 years. We tested the hypothesis that breakdown would be fastest in relatively warm and moist aerobic environments by comparing the time required for 50% loss of initial ash-free dry matter (T50) calculated using exponential decay models incorporating a lag term. In cold-desert sites (Green and Yampa rivers, Colorado), disks of wood with bark attached exposed for up to 12 years in locations rarely inundated lost mass at a slower rate (T50 = 34 yr) than in locations inundated during most spring floods (T50 = 12 yr). At the latter locations, bark alone loss mass at a rate initially similar to whole disks (T50 = 13 yr), but which subsequently slowed. In warm-desert sites monitored for 3 years, cylinders of wood with bark removed lost mass very slowly (T50 = 60 yr) at a location never inundated (Bill Williams River, Arizona), whereas decay rate varied among aquatic locations (T50 = 20 yr in Bill Williams River; T50 = 3 yr in Las Vegas Wash, an effluent-dominated stream warmed by treated wastewater inflows). Invertebrates had a minor role in wood breakdown except at in-stream locations in Las Vegas Wash. The presence and form of change in nitrogen content during exposure varied among riverine environments. Our results suggest woody debris breakdown in desert riverine ecosystems is primarily a microbial process with rates determined by landscape position

  5. Wood pole overhead lines

    CERN Document Server

    Wareing, Brian

    2005-01-01

    This new book concentrates on the mechanical aspects of distribution wood pole lines, including live line working, environmental influences, climate change and international standards. Other topics include statutory requirements, safety, profiling, traditional and probabilistic design, weather loads, bare and covered conductors, different types of overhead systems, conductor choice, construction and maintenance. A section has also been devoted to the topic of lightning, which is one of the major sources of faults on overhead lines. The book focuses on the effects of this problem and the strate

  6. Durability of wood/plastic composites made from Parthenium species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poo Chow; Francis S. Nakayama; John A. Youngquist; James H. Muehl; Andrzej M. Krzysik

    2002-01-01

    Previous study indicated that the natural chemical constituents of the guayule plant (Parthenium argentatum) improved some durability properties of wood when it was treated with resin extracted from guayule. At present, there are about a dozen species of Parthenium growing in the North American continent. P. argentatum is the only species with harvestable amounts of...

  7. Subcellular Electrical Measurements as a Function of Wood Moisture Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; José L. Colon Quintana; Samuel V. Glass; Joseph E. Jakes; Alex C. Wiedenhoeft

    2015-01-01

    The percolation model developed by Zelinka et al. was based upon macroscale measurements of the electrical conductivity and implicitly treats the wood material as homogenous. The transport mechanism proposed by Jakes et al. depends upon a moisture induced glass transition occurring in the hemicelluloses. This theory suggests that there are likely differences in the...

  8. Preservation of forest wood chips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kofman, P.D.; Thomsen, I.M.; Ohlsson, C.; Leer, E.; Ravn Schmidt, E.; Soerensen, M.; Knudsen, P.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the Danish Energy Research Programme on biomass utilisation for energy production (EFP), this project concerns problems connected to the handling and storing of wood chips. In this project, the possibility of preserving wood chips of the Norway Spruce (Picea Abies) is addressed, and the potential improvements by anaerobic storage are tested. Preservation of wood chips aims at reducing dry matter losses from extensive heating during storage and to reduce production of fungal spores. Fungal spores pose a health hazards to workers handling the chips. Further the producers of wood chips are interested in such a method since it would enable them to give a guarantee for the delivery of homogeneous wood chips also during the winter period. Three different types of wood chips were stored airtight and further one of these was stored in accordance with normal practise and use as reference. The results showed that airtight storage had a beneficial impact on the quality of the chips: no redistribution of moisture, low dry matter losses, unfavourable conditions for microbial activity of most fungi, and the promotion of yeasts instead of fungi with airborne spores. Likewise the firing tests showed that no combustion problems, and no increased risk to the environment or to the health of staff is caused by anaerobic storage of wood chips. In all, the tests of the anaerobic storage method of forest wood chips were a success and a large-scale test of the method will be carried out in 1999. (au)

  9. Properties of seven Colombian woods

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. A. Bendtsen; M. Chudnoff

    1981-01-01

    Woods from abroad are an important raw material to the forest products industries in the United States. A major concern in effective utilization of this resource is the lack of technical information on many species. This report presents the results of an evaluation of the mechanical properties of small, clear specimens of seven Colombian woods. These results are...

  10. Moisture transport in coated wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meel, P.A. van; Erich, S.J.F.; Huinink, H.P.; Kopinga, K.; Jong, J. DE; Adan, O.C.G.

    2011-01-01

    Moisture accumulation inside wood causes favorable conditions for decay. Application of a coating alters the moisture sorption of wood and prevents accumulation of moisture. This paper presents the results of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study on the influence of a coating on the moisture

  11. The sustainable wood production initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert. Deal

    2004-01-01

    To address concerns about sustainable forestry in the region, the Focused Science Delivery Program is sponsoring a three year Sustainable Wood Production Initiative. The Pacific Northwest is one of the world's major timber producing regions, and the ability of this region to produce wood on a sustained yield basis is widely recognized. Concerns relating to the...

  12. Measuring wood specific gravity, correctly

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Bruce Williamson; Michael C. Wiemann

    2010-01-01

    The specific gravity (SG) of wood is a measure of the amount of structural material a tree species allocates to support and strength. In recent years, wood specific gravity, traditionally a forester’s variable, has become the domain of ecologists exploring the universality of plant functional traits and conservationists estimating global carbon stocks. While these...

  13. On Erdos–Wood's conjecture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article, we prove that infinite number of integers satsify Erdős–Woods conjecture. Moreover, it follows that the number of natural numbers ≤ satisfies Erdős–Woods conjecture with = 2 is at least /(log ) for some positive constant > 2.

  14. Composites from wood and plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig Clemons

    2010-01-01

    Composites made from thermoplastics and fillers or reinforcements derived from wood or other natural fibers are a dynamic research area encompassing a wide variety of composite materials. For example, as the use of biopolymers grows, wood and other natural fiber sources are being investigated as renewable sources of fillers and reinforcements to modify performance....

  15. The wood of Merovingian weaponry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tegel, W.; Muigg, B.; Büntgen, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, JAN (2016), s. 148-153 ISSN 0305-4403 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0248 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Early Middle Ages * Merovingian weaponry * Mineralised wood * Wood anatomy Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.602, year: 2016

  16. Public opinion and wood energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah Hitchner; John Schelhas; Teppo Hujala; J. Peter Brosius

    2014-01-01

    As wood-based bioenergy continues to develop around the world, it will utilize forestlands in new ways and will have different effects on a number of stakeholders, including forest landowners, local communities, extant industries, policymakers, investors, and others. As more stakeholders become involved in the wood energy web, and as the general public becomes more...

  17. Characterisation of wood combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto

    The combustion of wood chips and wood pellets for the production of renewable energy in Denmark increased from 5.7 PJ to 16 PJ during the period 2000-2015, and further increases are expected to occur within the coming years. In 2012, about 22,300 tonnes of wood ashes were generated in Denmark....... Currently, these ashes are mainly landfilled, despite Danish legislation allowing their application onto forest and agricultural soils for fertilising and/or liming purposes. During this PhD work, 16 wood ash samples generated at ten different Danish combustion plants were collected and characterised...... for their composition and leaching properties. Despite the relatively large variations in the contents of nutrients and trace metals, the overall levels were comparable to typical ranges reported in the literature for other wood combustion ashes, as well as with regards to leaching. In general, the composition...

  18. Origin of Petrified Wood Color

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Mustoe

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Fossil forests have world-wide distribution, commonly preserving mineralized wood that displays vivid hues and complex color patterns. However, the origin of petrified color has received little scientific attention. Color of silicified wood may be influenced by the presence of relict organic matter, but the most significant contribution comes from trace metals. This study reports quantitative analysis of trace metals in 35 silicified wood samples, determined using LA-ICP-MS spectrometry. The most important of these metals is Fe, which can produce a rainbow of hues depending on its abundance and oxidation state. Cr is the dominant colorant for bright green fossil wood from Arizona, USA and Zimbabwe, Africa. Complex color patterns result from the progressive nature of the fossilization process, which causes wood to have varying degrees of permeability during successive episodes of permineralization. These processes include simple diffusion, chromatographic separation, infiltration of groundwater along fractures and void spaces, and oxidation/reduction.

  19. Determination of Cr(VI) in wood specimen: A XANES study at the Cr K edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strub, E.; Plarre, R.; Radtke, M.; Reinholz, U.; Riesemeier, H.; Schoknecht, U.; Urban, K.; Juengel, P.

    2008-01-01

    The content of chromium in different oxidation states in chromium-treated wood was studied with XANES (X-ray absorption near-edge structure) measurements at the Cr K absorption edge. It could be shown that wood samples treated with Cr(VI) (pine and beech) did still contain a measurable content of Cr(VI) after four weeks conditioning. If such wood samples were heat exposed for 2 h with 135 deg. C prior conditioning, Cr(VI) was no longer detected by XANES, indicating a complete reduction to chromium (III)

  20. Intereses y rivalidades regionales en la Venezuela Caribeña

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlene Urdaneta Quintero

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Durante su primer gobierno (1870-1877, el Presidente Antonio Guzmán Blanco desarrolló un programa que aspiraba a centralizar política y económicamente a Venezuela. Una de las disposiciones aprobadas fue el cierre de los puertos de Maracaibo y La Vela, para las operaciones de importación y exportación realizadas desde los Andes venezolanos y colombianos, a través del Caribe. Estas funciones fueron transferidas al distante Puerto Cabello. Gran parte del occidente del país fue afectado por esta medida que no consideraba la larga tradición histórica de centros económicos que por centurias habían liderado las actividades agroexportadoras de sus respectivosámbitos comerciales. La medida no sólo perjudicó los intereses de la región histórica del Lago y de Coro, favoreció a grupos económicos rivales establecidos en la región norcentral, asociados con el presidente de la república. En el caso particular del Zulia, el cierre del puerto de Maracaibo afectó a financistas, pequeños y grandes comerciantes, transportistas, navegantes, marineros, productores y diferentes colectivos del estado; otros sectores perjudicados fueron los comerciantes vinculados con esta actividad en Colombia y Curazao.

  1. Ornitofauna en cuatro ecosistemas naturales del laboratorio natural Snaki-URACCAN, Costa Caribe Norte de Nicaragua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy A Salas Tathum

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available El estudio se realizó en el laboratorio natural Snaki ubicado en el la comunidad de Moss, municipio de Waspam, Región Autónoma de la Costa Caribe Norte. Se ha diagnosticado la ornitofauna en los ecosistemas bosque ripario, bosque latifoliado, área agrícola y área pecuaria del laboratorio natural Snaki-URACCAN. Se realizaron transectos lineales y entrevistas informales a cazadores de la zona que permitió crear un listado de aves y su estado de conservación. Los resultados de los diferentes ecosistemas re ejaron la existencia de 49 diferentes especies de aves, pertenecientes a 23 familias y 12 órde- nes. Las especies representativas son: Aratinga nana, Cyanocorax Morio, Ramphocelus Passerinii, Quiscalus nicaraguensis, Procnias tricarunculata, Tachyponus rufus. Al com- parar los índices de diversidad, Shannon y Simpson encontraron similitudes en sus resultados, existiendo una diversidad considerable en el bosque, principalmente en el de galería.

  2. EVALUACIÓN CITÓTOXICA DE FRACCIONES DE ESPONJAS MARINAS DEL CARIBE COLOMBIANO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NATALIA ESTRADA-ORTIZ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available En la búsqueda de actividad antitumoral en el desarrollo de fármacos, se requiere evaluar la actividad citotóxica de manera preliminar, con el fin de realizar otras potenciales actividades como antitproliferación y efecto genotóxico. En la evaluación de diferentes fracciones obtenidas de esponjas marinas del Caribe Colombiano se ha encontrado actividad antiproliferativa en algunas de ellas. Por lo anterior, en este trabajo se evaluó la actividad citotóxica de trece fracciones obtenidas de las esponjas marinas Amphimedon compressa, Cinachyrella kuekenthali, Svenzea zeai e Ircinia campana para determinar su potencial citotóxico, en las líneas celulares Jurkat clon E6-1 y CHO-K1. Se emplearon las técnicas de MTT y coloración vital de Azul de Tripano para evaluar su citotoxicidad y viabilidad para determinar su concentración inhibitoria media. En conclusión, los resultados muestran que ninguna fracción, presenta actividad citotóxica significativa.

  3. Palisada perforata (Rhodomelaceae, Ceramiales en el Caribe mexicano Palisada perforata (Rhodomelaceae, Ceramiales from the Mexican Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Sentíes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Palisada perforata fue originalmente descrita para el litoral de Tenerife (islas Canarias, España, está ampliamente distribuida en el océano Atlántico oriental en la zona tropical y subtropical, mientras que en el lado occidental sólo está registrada como dudosa en Venezuela y Brasil. Además de las características típicas del género, esta especie presenta un crecimiento cespitoso con ejes decumbentes y arqueados y ramificación unilateral. En el presente trabajo los autores aportan por primera vez una descripción concisa de las estructuras vegetativas y tetraspóricas y se amplía la distribución geográfica de P. perforata con un nuevo registro en el Caribe mexicano.Palisada perforata was originally described from Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain. This species has a wide distribution in tropical and subtropical zones of the Eastern Atlantic Ocean, but in the Western Atlantic there is only a doubtful record for Venezuela and Brazil. This species presents all typical features of the genus Palisada, being characterized by turf-like growth, the presence of arcuate and decumbent branches with erect branches disposed unilaterally. In the present paper we provide a detailed description of the vegetative and tetrasporangial structures. The geographical distribution of P. perforata in the Western Atlantic ocean was amplified with a new record in the Mexican Caribbean.

  4. Serpúlidos (Polychaeta: Serpulidae del Caribe noroccidental: Hydroides y Serpula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rolando Bastida-Zavala

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available A partir de la revisión de más de 450 ejemplares de Hydroides y Serpula, 12 especies de la región del Gran Caribe fueron identificadas y caracterizadas. Ocho especies fueron recolectadas en las costas de la Península de Yucatán y cinco fueron encontradas en otras localidades en el Golfo de México, otras siete son de Cuba y se incluyeron comentarios sobre el material tipo de cinco especies más. Se realizó un análisis morfométrico sobre Hydroides mucronatus Rioja e Hydroides cf. mucronatus indicando varias diferencias entre ellas. Se incluyen comentarios a todas las especies.From the study of more than 450 specimens of Hydroides and Serpula, 12 species from the Grand Caribbean Region were identified and characterized. Eight species were collected along the shores of the Yucatan Peninsula and five were found in other localities in the Gulf of Mexico, seven others are from Cuba and comments on type specimens of five species are also included. One morphometric analysis made on Hydroides mucronatus Rioja and Hydroides cf. mucronatus, indicated several differences among them. Comments on all species are also included.

  5. MAESTROS Y ESCUELAS NORMALES EN EL CARIBE COLOMBIANO DURANTE EL RÉGIMEN FEDERAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alarcón Meneses

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo da cuenta de uno de los principales actores del escenario escolar en Caribe colombiano: el maestro, quien ocupo un lugar central en el proyecto educativo propuesto por los liberales radicales durante el régimen federal. En efecto, para los liberales radicales la mejor forma de avanzar en la consolidación del régimen republicano pasaba necesariamente por el fortalecimiento de la instrucción pública, para lo cual era indispensable formar maestros en escuelas especializadas como las normales, las cuales también fueron establecidas en Cartagena, Santa Marta y Barranquilla durante la segunda mitad del siglo XIX. En efecto, las escuelas normales se constituyeron en el principal escenario educativo para la profesionalización del maestro, por lo cual historiarlas resulta clave para conocer las dinámicas de cómo se dio en la región el proceso educativo impulsado por los radicales, al mismo tiempo que ello nos transporta al interior del espacio escolar; es decir, más allá del discurso pedagógico y de la retórica de administradores y supervisores que muchas veces observaban las instituciones escolares desde afuera sin entrar en detalles sobre las prácticas educativas que allí tenían lugar.

  6. Islas de ida y vuelta. Canarias y El Caribe en contexto colonial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortiz García, Carmen

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available On the presupposition that the conquest of the Canary Islands set the colonial stage for the later Spanish enterprises in the Americas, the author discusses a number of elements of identity shared by the islands of both the eastern Atlantic and the Caribbean. Sugar, the slave trade and the raising of bananas, cochineal and tobacco are the instances chosen for this comparative analysis. In addition, the author makes a reference to the legends of the apparition of the Virgin of Charity at El Cobre, in Cuba, and of Candlemas in Tenerife.

    Partiendo de la idea de que la conquista de las Islas Canarias fue el primer ensayo colonial de lo que luego desarrollarían los españoles en América, se examinan algunos elementos de identidad entre el mundo isleño atlántico y caribeño, producidos precisamente por esa situación inicial de dominio colonial. El azúcar, la trata de esclavos, los cultivos de plátano, grana y tabaco son los ejemplos escogidos para este análisis comparado. Finalmente se hace una referencia comparativa de las leyendas de la aparición de la Virgen de la Caridad del Cobre en Cuba y de la Virgen de Candelaria en Tenerife

  7. Acumulación tóxica y despojo agroalimentario en La Mojana, Caribe colombiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana Camacho S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo aborda el vínculo entre con - taminación y despojo en relación con el cultivo de arroz comercial en La Mojana, en el Caribe colombiano. Por su riqueza am - biental y productividad agrícola, esta región se ha proyectado como una despensa ali - mentaria. El arroz es el eje del sistema pro - ductivo, alimentario e identitario regional. A partir de un estudio etnográfico se exa - minan los efectos despojadores del uso de agroquímicos tóxicos en los medios de vida, la alimentación y la salud. Un argumento central es que, en su operación silenciosa y cotidiana, la contaminación vulnera bie - nes comunes y sistemas agroalimentarios locales, a la vez que refuerza otras formas históricas de despojo e inequidad social. Sin embargo, en pequeña escala, también exis - ten otros modelos y prácticas locales que expresan alternativas en los tres escenarios propuestos: producción, dieta e identidad.

  8. Cosecha y manejo de Copernicia tectorum (Kunth Mart. Para uso artesanal en el caribe colombiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Claudia Torres Romero

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio se caracterizaron los sistemas de manejo de Copernicia tectorum en dos localidades de la Región Caribe de Colombia: Plato (Magdalena, y Magangué (Bolívar. También se analizó el impacto de la cosecha de cogollos en la estructura de la población, el número de hojas y la longitud de los cogollos. En Plato sólo se cosechan cogollos de palmas subadultas y adultas, lo que parece no afectar las palmas a nivel individual, ni poblacional. En Magangué se cosechan palmas de las clases juveniles, lo que limita su crecimiento; esto da como resultado palmares con muy pocos adultos, comprometiendo su sostenibilidad, incluso en el corto plazo. El modelo de uso comunitario y de libre acceso a los palmares ha permitido su conservación en Plato; en Magangué, por el contrario, se hizo apropiación individual de la tierra, tanto legal como ilegal, lo que trajo fraccionamiento de la población, tala y restricción de acceso para la cosecha. En Plato el manejo debe enfocarse en detener la tala y la afectación a los complejos cenagosos donde crece la palma. En Magangué se debe controlar la sobreexplotación y favorecer el reclutamiento de las clases juveniles.

  9. LIBERALIZACIÓN, REFORMAS Y EMPLEO EN LA INDUSTRIA MANUFACTURERA DEL CARIBE COLOMBIANO, 1974-2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewin Pérez Fuentes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo tiene como objetivo analizar los principales efectos (sobre el empleo, la productividad y los costos laborales de la industria manufacturera de la región Caribe de las reformas económicas que se dieron en los años noventa en el marco del proceso de apertura e internacionalización de la economía colombiana. El patrón de industrialización y las características del cambio técnico intensivo en capital y ahorrador de mano de obra están relacionados con los malos resultados en términos de empleo en la industria regional después de las reformas. Por otro lado, la evolución de la productividad laboral y de las remuneraciones refleja una tendencia decreciente en el costo laboral unitario, por tanto, la explicación a la caída del empleo debe ser distinta a las presiones salariales sobre las utilidades empresariales.

  10. Comportamiento del mercado turístico extranjero en el Caribe Mexicano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Francisco J. Güemes-Ricalde

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available El Caribe mexicano atrae visitantes de regiones distintas en diferentes épocas del año. A los prestadores de servicios turísticos les resulta difícil conocer y separar las preferencias de actividades que realizan los visitantes de cada país. Arriban visitantes mexicanos y extranjeros, las preferencias de estos últimos en relación a la demanda de servicios son diferentes. Contrario a lo que se conocía, el estudio de mercado determinó que la demanda mexicana representa un mercado importante en marcadas épocas del año. Se calcula que cada año alrededor de dos millones de turistas nacionales arriban a la Riviera y Costa Maya en la región norte de Quintana Roo. Conocer las preferencias de consumo de los diferentes segmentos de turistas y la forma en que evalúan la posibilidad de demandar los servicios turísticos da la pauta para ofrecérselos en forma diferenciada y adecuada a cada segmento y en relación a cada una de las diversas actividades turísticas que realizan, entre ellas el ecoturismo de la cual poco se conoce en esta región del país.

  11. Projected wood energy impact on US forest wood resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skog, K.E. [USDA Forest Service, Madison, WI (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The USDA Forest Service has developed long-term projections of wood energy use as part of a 1993 assessment of demand for and supply of resources from forest and range lands in the United States. To assess the impact of wood energy demand on timber resources, a market equilibrium model based on linear programming was developed to project residential, industrial, commercial, and utility wood energy use from various wood energy sources: roundwood from various land sources, primary wood products mill residue, other wood residue, and black liquor. Baseline projections are driven by projected price of fossil fuels compared to price of wood fuels and the projected increase in total energy use in various end uses. Wood energy use is projected to increase from 2.67 quad in 1986 to 3.5 quad in 2030 and 3.7 quad in 2040. This is less than the DOE National Energy Strategy projection of 5.5 quad in 2030. Wood energy from forest sources (roundwood) is projected to increase from 3.1 billion (10{sup 9}) ft{sup 3} in 1986 to 4.4. billion ft{sup 3} in 2030 and 4.8 billion ft{sup 3} in 2040 (88, 124 and 136 million m{sup 3}, respectively). This rate of increase of roundwood use for fuel -- 0.8 percent per year -- is virtually the same as the projected increase rate for roundwood for pulpwood. Pulpwood roundwood is projected to increase from 4.2 billion ft{sup 3} in 1986 to 6.0 billion ft{sup 3} in 2030 and 6.4 billion ft{sup 3} in 2040 (119, 170 and 183 million m{sup 3}, respectively).

  12. Wood-polymer composites obtained by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gago, Javier; Lopez, Alcides; Rodriguez, Juan; Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Lima; Acevedo, Moises; Santiago, Julio; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima

    2006-01-01

    It has been prepared composites materials by means of monomer penetration in pores of wood samples and later curing by means of gamma irradiation. The studied species were Hura crepitans L. (catahua), Aniba puchury-minor (C. Martinez) (mohena amarilla), and Calycophyllum spruceanum (Benth.) (capirona). These new materials exhibit smaller water absorption and better mechanical properties in comparison with native wood. The test tubes of catahua treated with the styrene-polyester mixture absorb only up to 10% humidity compared to the native species whereas its hardness is increased in a 100%. (author)

  13. Technological and chemical properties of heat-treated Anatolian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    Jun 3, 2009 ... +903662150900. Fax: +903662152316. pose, lignin softens, cellulose and hydrophilic groups modify (Bekhta and Niemz, 2003). As a result, treated wood with high temperatures loses its reabsorbing water capacity contrary to hydrophilic behavior of the conven- tionally dried wood (Kocaefe et al., 2007).

  14. Wood power in North Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleland, J.G.; Guessous, L. [Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    North Carolina (NC) is one of the most forested states, and supports a major wood products industry. The NC Department of Natural Resources sponsored a study by Research Triangle Institute to examine new, productive uses of the State`s wood resources, especially electric power generation by co-firing with coal. This paper summarizes our research of the main factors influencing wood power generation opportunities, i.e., (1) electricity demand; (2) initiative and experience of developers; (3) available fuel resources; (4) incentives for alternate fuels; and (5) power plant technology and economics. The results cover NC forests, short rotation woody crops, existing wood energy facilities, electrical power requirements, and environmental regulations/incentives. Quantitative assessments are based on the interests of government agencies, utilities, electric cooperatives, developers and independent power producers, forest products industries, and the general public. Several specific, new opportunities for wood-to-electricity in the State are identified and described. Comparisons are made with nationwide resources and wood energy operations. Preferred approaches in NC are co-generation in existing or modified boilers and in dedicated wood power plants in forest industry regions. Co-firing is mainly an option for supplementing unreliable primary fuel supplies to existing boilers.

  15. Cooling of wood briquettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adžić Miroljub M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the experimental research of surface temperature of wood briquettes during cooling phase along the cooling line. The cooling phase is an important part of the briquette production technology. It should be performed with care, otherwise the quality of briquettes could deteriorate and possible changes of combustion characteristics of briquettes could happen. The briquette surface temperature was measured with an IR camera and a surface temperature probe at 42 sections. It was found that the temperature of briquette surface dropped from 68 to 34°C after 7 minutes spent at the cooling line. The temperature at the center of briquette, during the 6 hour storage, decreased to 38°C.

  16. Narcotráfico, violencia y crisis social en el Caribe insular colombiano: El caso de la isla de San Andrés en el contexto del Gran Caribe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Mantilla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo tiene por objetivo presentar un diagnóstico preliminar de la magnitud del tráfico de drogas, sus dinámicas, modalidades, y las condiciones sociales y económicas que favorecen el desarrollo de este negocio ilegal en la isla de San Andrés (Colombia. El análisis se desarrolla, no obstante, en el marco de la condición histórica y natural de “zona de tránsito” de drogas, armas y otros recursos ilegales, que se le atribuye a la región del Gran Caribe, entendida como un continuo geográfico, histórico y cultural en el que se observan patrones comunes en materia de amenazas a la seguridad, la geopolítica de las relaciones con Estados Unidos y los efectos sociales y económicos derivados del flagelo del narcotráfico. En este sentido, el caso de la isla de San Andrés (Colombia se examina más como parte de la dinámica insular gran caribeña que como parte de las tendencias propias del negocio en la Colombia continental, lo que permite, sin embargo, establecer las conexiones entre ambos espacios regionales - el insular y el continental - y, a la vez, evaluar el impacto regional del fenómeno a partir de las conexiones ilegales que desde el archipiélago se establecen con algunos países vecinos del Gran Caribe. Finalmente, se sostiene la hipótesis de que el fenómeno del narcotráfico se instala en la isla como resultado de factores geohistóricos, culturales y socioeconómicos que en conjunto han determinado la participación activa de distintos sectores de la sociedad en este negocio ilegal.

  17. Wood would burn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swithenbank, Jim; Chen, Qun; Zhang, Xiaohui; Sharifi, Vida; Pourkashanian, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Absract: In view of the world-wide problem of energy sustainability and greenhouse gas production (carbon dioxide), it is timely to review the issues involved in generating heat and power from all fuels and especially new (to the UK) solid fuels, including high moisture fuels such as wood, SRF, oil shale, tar sands and brown coal, which will become major international fuels as oil and gas become depleted. The combustion properties of some of these materials are significantly different from traditional coal, oil and gas fuels, however the technology proposed herein is also applicable to these conventional fuels. This paper presents some innovative combustion system options and the associated technical factors that must be considered for their implementation. For clarity of understanding, the novel concepts will be largely presented in terms of a currently developing solid fuel market; biomass wood chips. One of the most important characteristics of many solid fuels to be used in the future (including oil shale and brown coal) is their high moisture content of up to 60%. This could be removed by utilising low grade waste heat that is widely available in industry to dry the fuel and thus reduce transport costs. Burning such dried wood for power generation also increases the energy available from combustion and thus acts as a thermal transformer by upgrading the low grade heat to heat available at combustion temperatures. The alternative approach presented here is to recover the latent heat by condensing the extrinsic moisture and the water formed during combustion. For atmospheric combustion, the temperature of the condensed combustion products is below the dew point at about 55-65 o C and is only suitable for recovery in an efficient district heating system. However, in order to generate power from the latent heat, the condensation temperature must be increased to the level where the heat can be used in the thermodynamic power cycle. This can be achieved by

  18. The Carbon Impacts of Wood Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Bergman; Maureen Puettmann; Adam Taylor; Kenneth E. Skog

    2014-01-01

    Wood products have many environmental advantages over nonwood alternatives. Documenting and publicizing these merits helps the future competitiveness of wood when climate change impacts are being considered. The manufacture of wood products requires less fossil fuel than nonwood alternative building materials such as concrete, metals, or plastics. By nature, wood is...

  19. Treatments that enhance physical properties of wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger M. Rowell; Peggy Konkol

    1987-01-01

    This paper was prepared for anyone who wants to know more about enhancing wood’s physical properties, from the amateur wood carver to the president of a forest products company. The authors describe chemical and physical treatments of wood that enhance the strength, stiffness, water repellency, and stability of wood. Five types of treatments are described: 1. water-...

  20. Physical properties and moisture relations of wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Simpson; Anton TenWolde

    1999-01-01

    The versatility of wood is demonstrated by a wide variety of products. This variety is a result of a spectrum of desirable physical characteristics or properties among the many species of wood. In many cases, more than one property of wood is important to the end product. For example, to select a wood species for a product, the value of appearance- type properties,...

  1. Moisture relations and physical properties of wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel V. Glass; Samuel L. Zelinka

    2010-01-01

    Wood, like many natural materials, is hygroscopic; it takes on moisture from the surrounding environment. Moisture exchange between wood and air depends on the relative humidity and temperature of the air and the current amount of water in the wood. This moisture relationship has an important influence on wood properties and performance. Many of the challenges of using...

  2. Wood Flour Moulding Technology: Implications for Technical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-04-19

    Apr 19, 2011 ... selected dry wood by grinding. Interest in this modern industrial practice in wood anchors ... flour moulding technology minimizes atmospheric pollution, reduces cost of wood waste disposal and curbs, ... Zhang and Wolcott,. 2007). Wood Flour Moulding Technology: Implications for Technical Education ...

  3. Fire Safety Design of Wood Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2006-01-01

    Lecture Notes on Fire Safety Design of Wood Structures including charring of wood and load bearing capacity of beams, columns, and connections.......Lecture Notes on Fire Safety Design of Wood Structures including charring of wood and load bearing capacity of beams, columns, and connections....

  4. Wood-based composites and panel products

    Science.gov (United States)

    John A. Youngquist

    1999-01-01

    Because wood properties vary among species, between trees of the same species, and between pieces from the same tree, solid wood cannot match reconstituted wood in the range of properties that can be controlled in processing. When processing variables are properly selected, the end result can sometimes surpass nature’s best effort. With solid wood, changes in...

  5. Wood Technology: Techniques, Processes, and Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oatman, Olan

    1975-01-01

    Seven areas of wood technology illustrates applicable techniques, processes, and products for an industrial arts woodworking curriculum. They are: wood lamination; PEG (polyethylene glycol) diffusion processes; wood flour and/or particle molding; production product of industry; WPC (wood-plastic-composition) process; residential construction; and…

  6. FIRE INSURANCE AND WOOD SCHOOL BUILDINGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PURCELL, FRANK X.

    A COMPARISON OF FIRE INSURANCE COSTS OF WOOD, MASONRY, STEEL AND CONCRETE STRUCTURES SHOWS FIRE INSURANCE PREMIMUMS ON WOOD STRUCTURES TEND TO BE HIGHER THAN PREMIUMS ON MASONRY, STEEL AND CONCRETE BUILDINGS, HOWEVER, THE INITIAL COST OF THE WOOD BUILDINGS IS LOWER. DATA SHOW THAT THE SAVINGS ACHIEVED IN THE INITIAL COST OF WOOD STRUCTURES OFFSET…

  7. Potential wood protection strategies using physiological requirements of wood degrading fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sailer, M.F.; Etten, B.D. van

    2004-01-01

    Due to the increasing restrictions in the use of wood preserving biocides a number of potential biocide free wood preserving alternatives are currently assessed. Wood degrading fungi require certain conditions in the wood in order to be able to use wood as a food source. This paper discusses the

  8. Peces colectados en el río Acandí (Chocó suroeste del Caribe colombiano Peces colectados en el río Acandí (Chocó suroeste del Caribe colombiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez León Ricardo

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available Se registra por primera vez la presencia de seis especies de peces colectados en el río Acandí durante la expedición URABA II, en febrero de 1985, tres de los cuales (Citharichtys spilopterus, Achirus lineatus y Sphoeroides testudineus, son nuevos registros para los ríos del Caribe colombiano. Six species of fishes, collected in the river Acandí during expedition URABA II, in February of 1985, are reported for first time, of the wish three (Citharichtys spilopterus, Achirus lineatus y Sphoeroides testudineus, is new report for the rivers of the Colombian Caribbean.

  9. COMBUSTION PROPERTIES OF EUCALYPTUS WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalçın ÖRS

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the combustion properties of some impregnation materials (abiotic and biotic factors used for eucalyptus wood in interior or exterior environments were investigated. The experimental samples were prepared from Eucalyptus wood based on ASTM-D-1413-76 Tanalith-CBC, boric acid, borax, vacsol-WR, immersol-WR, polyethylen glycole-400 and ammonium sulphate were used as an impregnation material. The results indicated that, vacuum treatment on Eucalyptus gave the lowest retention value of salts. Compounds containing boron+salt increased fire resistance however water repellents decreased the wood flammability.

  10. Exposure assessment of residents living near a wood treatment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlgren, James; Warshaw, Raphael; Horsak, Randy D.; Parker, Frank M. III; Takhar, Harpreet

    2003-01-01

    We report the results of environmental sampling and modeling in a neighborhood adjacent to a wood processing plant. This plant used creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP) to treat wood for over 70 years. Between 1999 and 2001, environmental samples were obtained to quantify the level of environmental contamination from the wood processing plant. Blood from 10 residents was measured for chlorinated dioxins and dibenzofurans. Soil sediment samples from drainage ditches and attic/dust samples from nearby residents' homes were tested for polychlorinated dioxins, furans, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The dioxin congeners analysis of the 10 residents revealed elevated valued for octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and heptachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin compatible with PCP as the source. The levels of carcinogenic PAHs were higher than background levels and were similar to soil contamination on wood preserving sites. Wipe sampling in the kitchens of 11 homes revealed that 20 of the 33 samples were positive for octachlorinated dioxins with a mean value of 10.27 ng/m 2 . The soil, ditch samples, and positive wipe samples from the homes indicate a possible ongoing route of exposure to the contaminants in the homes of these residents. Modeled air exposure estimated for the wood processing waste chemicals indicate some air exposure to combustion products. The estimated air levels for benzo(a)pyrene and tetrachlorodibenzodiozin in this neighborhood exceeded the recommended levels for these compounds in some states. The quantitative data presented suggest a significant contamination of a neighborhood by wood processing waste chemicals. These findings suggest the need for more stringent regulations on waste discharges from wood treatment plants

  11. Redes de distribución de caribú en Sheshatshiu, Labrador: una estrategia de modelización

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Castro

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available La localidad de Sheshatshiu, en la península de Québec/Labrador, es uno de los asentamientos del pueblo Innu impulsados por el gobierno canadiense en los 1950s y 1960s. A pesar de la crisis alimentaria que la sedentarización forzada produjo, el caribú sigue constituyendo una parte importante de la dieta y la cultura Innu. El objetivo de este trabajo es mostrar una estrategia de modelización de la distribución de caribú en Sheshatshiu. La metodología seleccionada incluye tres pasos. El primer paso de modelización es el diseño de una base de datos con la información de distribución obtenida a partir de una encuesta en la que se relevaron 30 casas aleatoriamente y un subsiguiente muestreo "bola de nieve". Luego, se usa el programa UCINET para determinar clusterización, conectividad y centralidad. El tercer y último paso es determinar el alcance la distribución de caribú a partir del análisis de los procedimientos previos.The town of Sheshatshiu, located in the Quebec-Labrador peninsula, is one of the settlements created by the Canadian government in the 1950s and 1960s. In spite of the nutritional crisis that the forced sedentarization produced, caribou is still an important part of the Innu diet and culture. The goal of this paper is to show a modeling strategy of the caribou distribution in Sheshatshiu. The selected methodology includes three steps. The first modeling step is the design of a database to store the distribution information obtained from a random survey of 30 households and a subsequent snowball survey. The second step is to determine the clusterization, connectivity and centrality measures, using UCINET software. The third and last step is establishing the scope of caribou distribution using the previous procedures.

  12. EL PELÍCANO BLANCO AMERICANO (PELECANUS ERYTHRORHYNCHUS EN COLOMBIA, CON COMENTARIOS SOBRE LOS EFECTOS DE LOS HURACANES EN EL CARIBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ESTELA FELIPE A.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos un registro fotográfico del Pelicano Blanco Americano (Pelecanus erythrorhynchus en un manglar de la isla de San Andrés, en el Caribe colombiano, con lo cual se confirma la presencia de esta especie en Colombia. Adicionalmente discutimos el posible efecto de los huracanes del Caribe en la dispersión de esta especie y los efectos que estas catástrofes naturales pueden tener en la conservación de la avifauna del Archipiélago de San Andrés y Providencia.

  13. EL PELÍCANO BLANCO AMERICANO (PELECANUS ERYTHRORHYNCHUS) EN COLOMBIA, CON COMENTARIOS SOBRE LOS EFECTOS DE LOS HURACANES EN EL CARIBE

    OpenAIRE

    ESTELA FELIPE A.; SILVA JOHN DOUGLAS; CASTILLO LUIS FERNANDO

    2005-01-01

    Presentamos un registro fotográfico del Pelicano Blanco Americano (Pelecanus erythrorhynchus) en un manglar de la isla de San Andrés, en el Caribe colombiano, con lo cual se confirma la presencia de esta especie en Colombia. Adicionalmente discutimos el posible efecto de los huracanes del Caribe en la dispersión de esta especie y los efectos que estas catástrofes naturales pueden tener en la conservación de la avifauna del Archipiélago de San Andrés y Providencia.

  14. Dos propuestas de clasificación climática para la vertiente Caribe costarricense según el sistema de Thornthwaite

    OpenAIRE

    Paula M. Pérez-Briceño; Eric J. Alfaro; Eric J. Alfaro

    2017-01-01

    Una alta variabilidad espacio-temporal en la temperatura y la precipitación son características del territorio costarricense, con una diferencia climática fuerte entre las dos vertientes, la Pacífica y el Caribe. La primera por estar a sotavento de la cadena central de montañas posee un régimen de menor humedad atmosférica mientras que la ladera a barlovento, recibe los vientos alisios cargados de humedad que determinan el clima de la vertiente Caribe, donde llueve prácticamente todo el año. ...

  15. Medios de recuperación utilizados por entrenadores en los IV Juegos Intercolegiados Centroamericanos y del Caribe

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno Bolívar, Hilario; Ayala Zuluaga, Carlos Federico; Melo Betancourth, Luis Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    El presente estudio tuvo como objetivos identificar los medios de recuperación y ayudas ergonutricionales empleados por parte de los entrenadores participes en los IV Juegos Intercolegiados Centroamericanos y del Caribe, así como la causa o razón por la que son utilizados. Métodos. A través de una encuesta validada, se desarrolló un estudio descriptivo y corte transversal donde fueron encuestados 41 entrenadores (36 de sexo masculino y 6 de femenino) de 13 modalidades deportivas y de 8 países...

  16. Legislación y Control de Riesgos de Salud en América Latina y el Caribe

    OpenAIRE

    Mónica Bolis

    2002-01-01

    Este estudio analiza la legislación en Latín América y el Caribe con el propósito de determinar en qué medida contribuyen, o no, a la eliminación de riesgos para la salud. Los países incluidos son: Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belice, Bolivia, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Jamaica, México, Nicaragua, Panamá, Paraguay, Perú, República Dominicana, Trinidad y Tobago, Uruguay y Venezuela. La investigación se centró en las áreas de medicam...

  17. Afinidades biogeográficas de los galateoideos (Decapoda: Anomura del Caribe y Pacífico colombiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel R. Navas S.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Determinar la distribución y afinidades biogeográficas de los galateoideos de aguas colombianas con base en la literatura y muestras recolectadas durante expediciones realizadas entre 1999 y 2002. Materiales y métodos. Se recolectaron ejemplares en 100 estaciones entre 20 y 550 m de profundidad en el Caribe y Pacífico colombiano. El material recolectado, junto con la información geográfica existente en literatura para las especies conocidas para Colombia se emplearon para realizar mapas de distribución, los cuales se compararon con el “Mapa de ecorregiones marinas del mundo”. Resultados. Se obtuvo la información geográfica para 3247 ejemplares recolectados de 18 especies de los géneros Agononida, Anomoeomunida, Munida, Munidoposis y Pleuroncodes, y se complementó con la obtenida a partir de la literatura para las 40 especies de la superfamilia con presencia conocida en aguas colombianas. Se generaron cinco grupos principales de distribución: especies restringidas al Caribe, al Caribe y Atlántico occidental, Anfiatlánticas, restringidas al Pacífico oriental y Anfiamericanas. Se encontró que el 53 % de las especies recolectadas en el Caribe se presentan también en la provincia Atlántico Norte Cálido-Templado, y para el Océano Pacífico la mayor afinidad se da con la provincia Pacífico Oriental Tropical. Conclusiones. Los galateoideos en aguas colombianas presentan ámbitos geográficos y batimétricos amplios, presentándose simpatría entre algunas especies. Las de aguas someras presentan mayores restricciones que aquellas de distribución en aguas profundas. Los mecanismos de distribución de las especies corresponden con el ciclo de vida de cada una y las corrientes predominantes en las provincias.

  18. Identificación de malezas trepadoras del banano (musa sp.) en la zona caribe de costa rica

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Mar\\u00EDa Rodr\\u00EDguez; Ren\\u00E1n Ag\\u00FCero

    2000-01-01

    Identificación de malezas trepadoras del banano (Musa sp.) en la zona caribe de Costa Rica. Las poblaciones de las malezas conocidas como trepadoras, han ido en aumento en las plantaciones de banano en Costa Rica. La identificación es una base necesaria para otros estudios. El presente trabajo es de carácter exploratorio y deberá continuarse, ya que muchas de las especies objeto de este estudio son difíciles de identificar. Se procedió a visitar fincas bananeras ubicadas ...

  19. Iniciativa Regional de Reforma del Sector de la Salud en América Latina y el Caribe

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Crocco; Patricia Schroeder; María Teresa Villen; Edwina Yen

    2000-01-01

    Muchos países de América Latina y el Caribe están introduciendo reformas que pueden influir profundamente en la forma como se prestan los servicios de salud y en quienes los reciben. Tanto en la Cumbre de las Américas de 1994 como en la "Reunión Especial sobre Reforma del Sector de la Salud" de 1995, organizada por la Organización Panamericana de la Salud/Organización Mundial de la Salud (OPS/OMS), el Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo, el Banco Mundial y otros organismos multilaterales y bil...

  20. Cuantificación del potencial energético undimotriz en las costas del Caribe colombiano

    OpenAIRE

    Jaime P; Wilson Becerra Colpas

    2017-01-01

    En este documento se describen los avances en la cuantificación de la energía de las olas de la costa caribeña colombiana. La metodología utilizada servirá como punto de partida para establecer el potencial energético en Colombia para este tipo de suministro energético. En la actualidad, el potencial energético teórico estimado en las ondas de la costa cercana en la costa atlántica es de aproximadamente 1107 MW y esto fue posible con datos que se han recogido y procesado desde enero de 2014. ...

  1. Trapping, chemistry, and export of trace gases in the South Asian summer monsoon observed during CARIBIC flights in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rauthe-Schöch

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container passenger aircraft observatory performed in situ measurements at 10–12 km altitude in the South Asian summer monsoon anticyclone between June and September 2008. These measurements enable us to investigate this atmospheric region (which so far has mostly been observed from satellites using the broad suite of trace gases and aerosol particles measured by CARIBIC. Elevated levels of a variety of atmospheric pollutants (e.g. carbon monoxide, total reactive nitrogen oxides, aerosol particles, and several volatile organic compounds were recorded. The measurements provide detailed information about the chemical composition of air in different parts of the monsoon anticyclone, particularly of ozone precursors. While covering a range of 3500 km inside the monsoon anticyclone, CARIBIC observations show remarkable consistency, i.e. with distinct latitudinal patterns of trace gases during the entire monsoon period. Using the CARIBIC trace gas and aerosol particle measurements in combination with the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART, we investigated the characteristics of monsoon outflow and the chemical evolution of air masses during transport. The trajectory calculations indicate that these air masses originated mainly from South Asia and mainland Southeast Asia. Estimated photochemical ages of the air were found to agree well with transport times from a source region east of 90–95° E. The photochemical ages of the air in the southern part of the monsoon anticyclone were systematically younger (less than 7 days and the air masses were mostly in an ozone-forming chemical mode. In its northern part the air masses were older (up to 13 days and had unclear ozone formation or destruction potential. Based on analysis of forward trajectories, several receptor regions were identified. In addition to predominantly westward

  2. Women's work... in wood products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janice K. Wiedenbeck

    1998-01-01

    Women have opportunities galore in the 1990s in wood products research, education, extension, consulting,manufacturing, marketing, and associations in North America. In the 1980s the same statement could not have been made.

  3. Wood and Paper Manufacturing Sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find EPA regulatory information for the wood product and paper manufacturing sectors, including paper, pulp and lumber. Information includes NESHAPs and effluent guidelines for pulp and paper rulemaking, and compliance guidelines

  4. Wood-burning stoves worldwide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luis Teles de Carvalho, Ricardo

    were suggested to facilitate the transition to cleaner wood-burning regimes. Considering that 40% of the world population continues relying on traditional forms of wood-burning, the design and dissemination of cleaner technologies of WBSs constitute relevant strategies to mitigate global climate...... of improved stoves. In the Brazilian case study, it was observed that the kitchen concentrations of PM2.5 monitored during wood cooking events increased by more than 10 times in relation to the background levels due to the improper use and maintenance of the studied ICSs (rocket stoves). In Southern Europe...... to facilitate the transition to more intelligent modes of using WBSs by: 1st training solid-fuel users to better operate and maintain existing installations, 2nd harmonizing wood-burning regulations to address the use of seasoned fuels, certified stoves and functioning chimneys; 3rd designing applications...

  5. LOS SERVICIOS DE CUIDADO INFANTIL EN AMÉRICA LATINA Y EL CARIBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Caridad Araujo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Los servicios de cuidado infantil para niños menores de cuatro años de edad han expandido su cobertura de forma importante en América Latina y el Caribe. Esta expansión ha buscado primordialmente facilitar el acceso de las mujeres al mercado laboral. El énfasis en la calidad de los servicios de cuidado durante los primeros años de la vida es fundamental. Este artículo sistematiza información sobre el diseño, la gestión, el financiamiento y la calidad de los servicios de cuidado infantil en la región. Entre sus principales hallazgos se encuentran los siguientes: i existe evidencia de una inconsistencia entre el objetivo que mayoritariamente declaran perseguir estos programas —el desarrollo infantil integral— y el diseño de los servicios que brindan; ii los programas que dependen de los municipios se destacan por tener mejores variables estructurales (asociadas, en general, con una mejor calidad del servicio, en comparación con aquellos de escala nacional, así como por un mayor nivel de inversión por niño atendido; y iii existe variabilidad en el costo unitario de atención, lo cual es consistente no sólo con una considerable heterogeneidad en el servicio sino también con diferencias en el costo-efectividad de distintos modelos de provisión y de gestión. Asegurar servicios de cuidado de calidad para todos los niños que acuden a ellos y garantizar que la oferta pública de estos servicios alcance a los niños de las familias más pobres son dos prioridades importantes y todavía pendientes en la agenda de la política social regional.

  6. Los escenarios sociales en América Latina y el Caribe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kliksberg Bernardo

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Las más variadas fuentes han destacado la magnitud y profundidad de los problemas que sacuden a América Latina y el Caribe en el campo social y los riesgos que suponen para la democracia. Aunque hay otros que también merecerían ser considerados, en este artículo se reseñan sumariamente nueve problemas sociales clave de gran impacto en la Región: 1 el aumento de la pobreza, 2 su impacto, 3 el desempleo y la informalidad del empleo, 4 las carencias en materia de salud pública, 5 los problemas de la educación, 6 los nuevos pobres, 7 la erosión de la familia, 8 el aumento de la criminalidad y 9 el círculo perverso de la exclusión. La solución de estos problemas no admite demoras. Urge dar el salto a una visión integrada del desarrollo que logre un tipo de equilibrio diferente entre las políticas económicas y sociales, y que reconozca el papel imprescindible de estas últimas en la obtención de un desarrollo que tenga bases realmente sostenibles. Están en juego problemas no solo de recursos, sino también de prioridades, de grados de equidad y de organización social. El enfrentamiento de la pobreza y la inequidad en la Región requiere una revisión profunda de las consecuencias sociales de las políticas económicas, del crucial tema de la inequidad latinoamericana, la mayor del mundo, y del papel de las políticas sociales. Se necesita también una revalorización del papel de las políticas públicas.

  7. Dinámicas del poblamiento en el Caribe continental colombiano (1938-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Avella

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El espacio regional del Caribe continental colombiano está organizado de acuerdo al difícil poblamiento de lo que desde la colonia tradicionalmente se han llamado zonas no aptas para el poblamiento.3 Estas zonas están caracterizadas por ser demasiado bajas, inundables, calurosas, de prolongadas sequías, y con períodos de intensas lluvias que no permiten una humedad relativa del suelo aceptable a lo largo de todo el año, por lo que no son aptas para laagricultura, según diversos analistas. Este espacio ha sido ocupado por una población que se ha movido entre la esperanza de tener tierras y la frustración de perderlas. Lo que ha producido una dinámica poblacional, que el estudio capta a partir de los saldos de efecto migratorio (SEM e ISEM en municipios agrupados en comarcas, como los estudiaron Guhl y Fornaguera, en cada uno de los Censos entre 1938 y 1964. El objeto de este análisis es el de buscar relaciones entre los procesos migratorios de resto (área rural y "cabecera" (área urbana, comparando los períodos intercensales, para formular posibles explicaciones sobre la asociación que los episodios violentos tienen con estos procesos migratorios y como se reflejan en la organización espacial del dichos territorios. Los resultados muestran patrones cíclicos en el área rural inversamente complementarios a los procesos violentos, que en unos períodos intercensales expulsan y en los más recientes atraen población. Lo que solo se puede entender a partir del contexto particular del conflicto en cada una de las comarcas, pues la suma de lo que sucede en las comarcas, no es igual al resultado de toda la región. Por el contrario su comportamiento es diferente.

  8. Modeling the Crust and Upper Mantle in Northern Beata Ridge (CARIBE NORTE Project)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Diana; Córdoba, Diego; Cotilla, Mario Octavio; Pazos, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The complex tectonic region of NE Caribbean, where Hispaniola and Puerto Rico are located, is bordered by subduction zone with oblique convergence in the north and by incipient subduction zone associated to Muertos Trough in the south. Central Caribbean basin is characterized by the presence of a prominent topographic structure known as Beata Ridge, whose oceanic crustal thickness is unusual. The northern part of Beata Ridge is colliding with the central part of Hispaniola along a transverse NE alignment, which constitutes a morphostructural limit, thus producing the interruption of the Cibao Valley and the divergence of the rivers and basins in opposite directions. The direction of this alignment coincides with the discontinuity that could explain the extreme difference between west and east seismicity of the island. Different studies have provided information about Beata Ridge, mainly about the shallow structure from MCS data. In this work, CARIBE NORTE (2009) wide-angle seismic data are analyzed along a WNW-ESE trending line in the northern flank of Beata Ridge, providing a complete tectonic view about shallow, middle and deep structures. The results show clear tectonic differences between west and east separated by Beata Island. In the Haiti Basin area, sedimentary cover is strongly influenced by the bathymetry and its thickness decreases toward to the island. In this area, the Upper Mantle reaches 20 km deep increasing up to 24 km below the island where the sedimentary cover disappears. To the east, the three seamounts of Beata Ridge provoke the appearance of a structure completely different where sedimentary cover reaches thicknesses of 4 km between seamounts and Moho rises up to 13 km deep. This study has allowed to determine the Moho topography and to characterize seismically the first upper mantle layers along the northern Beata Ridge, which had not been possible with previous MCS data.

  9. Especies de dinoflagelados del género Gambierdiscus (Dinophyceae del Mar Caribe mexicano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.U Hernández-Becerril

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Algunos dinoflagelados de hábitos bénticos están relacionados con la ciguatera, por consumo de pescado, en áreas tropicales. En el Caribe mexicano la ciguatera es un padecimiento relativamente común, sin embargo solo existe un trabajo sobre este tema y muy pocos antecedentes publicados sobre fitoplancton y microalgas bénticas. En este estudio se analizó material recolectado en varios puntos a lo largo de las costas del Estado de Quintana Roo, tanto con red de fitoplancton (54 mm, como de sedimento y epífitas de plantas macroscópicas, para estudiar los dinoflagelados tóxicos y asociados. Se registra la presencia de tres especies del género Gambierdiscus, asociadas con la producción de toxinas causantes de la ciguatera: G. belizeanus, G. toxicus y G. yasumotoi, todas distribuídas en áreas costeras poco profundas, incluyendo lagunas costeras. Las especies han sido estudiadas con microscopía de luz y electrónica de barrido. Para el reconocimiento de las especies se emplearon los caracteres morfológicos usuales, pero eventualmente se pueden usar caracteres fisiológicos, ecológicos y moleculares. La llamada "comunidad ciguatoxigénica" también está formada por especies de los géneros Prorocentrum, Ostreopsis y Coolia, cuyo estudio florístico y taxonómico se recomienda ampliamente, así como investigaciones complementarias de aspectos biológicos, ecológicos, fisiológicos y epidemiológicos de esta comunidad

  10. Diabetes in the English-speaking Caribbean La diabetes en el Caribe de habla inglesa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselm Hennis

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Rates of diabetes mellitus in the English-speaking Caribbean have been rising in recent years, and they are projected to continue climbing in the new millennium. Prevalence rates across countries of the African diaspora mirror levels of Western acculturation, and available data emphasize the importance of obesity as a modifiable risk factor. The population-based Barbados Eye Studies have provided new information about the burden of ocular complications of diabetes such as retinopathy and lens opacities. Diabetes was shown to increase the risk of lens opacities, and 14% of prevalent cataract was attributed to diabetes. Persons with type 1 diabetes were particularly at increased risk of retinopathy, as a result of longer durations of illness and poor glycemic control. Other Caribbean studies have suggested that glycemic control in patients evaluated in various clinical settings is suboptimal, which raises important concerns about quality of care. Diabetics are at increased risk of mortality compared with nondiabetics, and that mortality risk increases with higher baseline levels of glycosylated hemoglobin, even among nondiabetics. These data highlight the need for urgent attention to public health and clinical strategies to prevent diabetes in unaffected persons as well as to prevent or reduce the burden of complications among those who are affected. Among the measures that should be adopted to stem the flood of diabetes in the Caribbean region are lifestyle interventions to promote better nutrition and to increase exercise; patient education, particularly about the central role of diabetes self-management; and the multidisciplinary team approach in the provision of care.Las tasas de diabetes mellitus en los países del Caribe de habla inglesa se han venido incrementando en los últimos años y se espera que continúen aumentando en el nuevo milenio. Las tasas de prevalencia en los países receptores de la diáspora africana reflejan los niveles

  11. Minimizing corrosive action in timber bridges treated with waterborne preservatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer; James P. Wacker

    2007-01-01

    This work will briefly review published literature and current research activities on the corrosion of metals in contact with wood treated with waterborne alternatives to CCA. In addition, recommendations to minimize these corrosive effects in timber bridges will be discussed.

  12. Robert Williams Wood: pioneer of invisible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shruti; Sharma, Amit

    2016-03-01

    The Wood's lamp aids in the diagnosis of multiple infectious, inflammatory and neoplastic dermatologic conditions. Although the Wood's lamp has many applications, which have improved both the diagnosis and management of disease, the man credited for its invention is relatively unknown in medicine. Robert Williams Wood, a prominent physicist of the early 20th century, is credited for the invention of the Wood's lamp. Wood was the father of infrared and ultraviolet photography and made significant contributions to other areas in optics and spectroscopy. Wood's work encompassed the formative years of American Physics; he published over 200 original papers over his lifetime. A few years after the invention of the Wood's lamp for ultraviolet photography, physicians in Europe adopted the Wood's lamp for dermatologic applications. Wood's lamp remains popular in clinics globally, given its ease of use and ability to improve diagnostic precision. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Durabilidade de madeira de eucalipto citriodora (Corymbia citriodora (Hook. K.D. Hill & L.A.S. Johnson tratada com CCA em ambiente amazônico Durability of eucalyptus citriodora wood (Corymbia citriodora (Hook. K.D. Hill & L.A.S. Johnson treated with CCA in the Amazon environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique José Borges de Araujo

    2012-03-01

    alternative is the replacement by planted species of fast-growing treated with preservatives. Another advantage of to use species planted to replace the traditional species is environmental, because this will reduce the exploratory pressure on these species. The objective of this study is to evaluate the degree of biological degradation of eucalyptus citriodora wood (Corymbia citriodora (Hook. K.D. Hill & L.A.S. Johnson treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA under vacuum and pressure process and exposed in field experiment in Rio Branco-AC. The experiment was implemented in May 2005 with cuttings treated with CCA and not treated. The variables evaluated were: 1 degradation by fungi, 2 degradation by termites, and 3 region or part of the piece affected. After the 3rd evaluation (47 months of test, 100% of the specimens without treated were classified with the maximum degree of degradation and, in contrast, 100% of the specimens treated with CCA, after 60 months of test, were classified with the minimum degree of degradation. The parties of the pieces without treatment with the higher and the lesser degrees of degradation were, respectively, the inferior head and the aerial part above 10 cm of soil. The degradation caused by fungi was slightly lower than that of termites. The field experiment has shown that is technically feasible the use of eucalyptus wood to replace the traditional species of the Amazon.

  14. Suitability of hardwood treated with phenoxy and pyridine herbicides for firewood use

    Science.gov (United States)

    P.B. Bush; D.G. Neary; Charles K. McMahon; J.W. Taylor

    1987-01-01

    Abstract. Potential exposure to pesticide residues resulting from burning wood treated with phenoxyand pyridine herbicides was assessed. Wood samples from trees treated with 2,4-D [2,4-dichlo-rophenoxy acetic acid], dicamba [3,6-dichloro-o-anisic acid], dichlorprop [2-(2,4-dichlorphenoxy) propionic acid], picloram [4-amino-3,5,dtrichloropico-linic...

  15. Microwave-assisted organic acids extraction of chromate copper arsenate (CCA)-treated southern pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Yu; Chung Y. Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2010-01-01

    The extraction effects of acid concentration, reaction time and temperature in a microwave reactor on recovery of CCA-treated wood were evaluated. Extraction of copper, chromium, and arsenic metals from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated southern pine wood samples with two different organic acids (i.e., acetic acid and oxalic acid) was investigated using a...

  16. Resistance of treated rubber wood ( Hevea brasiliensis ) to termite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 24 and 36 weeks respectively). The better performance of CCA over CNSL, with respect to resistance to termite degrade, follows the same trend as preservative absorption in the test samples. Keywords: Rubberwood, Copper Chromium Arsenate, Cashew Nut Shell Liquid, Termites Bowen Journal of Agriculture Vol.

  17. ADOPCIÓN Y USO DE MEDIOS SOCIALES POR JÓVENES DE LA COSTA CARIBE DE COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela López Ponce

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available El estudio identifica el grado de adopción de los medios sociales por parte de los jóvenes de la Costa Caribe de Colombia, los medios a los que acceden con mayor frecuencia, así como los usos principales que hacen de ellos. Mediante un análisis cuantitativo de tipo correlacional, se analizaron las respuestas de 502 jóvenes entre los 16 a 28 años pertenecientes al Servicio Nacional de Aprendizaje en la Costa Caribe. Los resultados mostraron que el grado de adopción de los principales medios sociales es de 68 %, donde los usados con mayor frecuencia son Facebook (69.4 %, Google+ (57.6 %, Instagram (45.6 % y Twitter (42.6 %. Los datos también revelan que el uso principal que los usuarios hacen de los medios sociales es obtener información de noticias, seguido de conectarse con amigos, conectarse con familiares y encontrar música y videos. De acuerdo con la revisión de literatura, el estudio es el primero realizado en Colombia con una data obtenida de jóvenes de estratos 1 y 2 que tienen acceso frecuente a internet, lo cual contribuye a conocer la importancia que tienen los medios sociales para este grupo y a identificar las utilidades comunicacionales e informativas que brinda cada medio. Asimismo, se discuten las implicaciones prácticas del estudio.

  18. Capitales Nacionales y Caribeños en el Zulia: establecimiento de la primera Industria Azucarera Venezolana (1900-1920

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisol Rodríguez Arrieta

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available La asociación de hombres y mujeres zulianos, de diferentes clases y procedencia social, integrados en una red vinculada con capitales caribeños (puertorriqueños y cubanos transformaron, en las dos primeras décadas del siglo XX, la producción y el comercio de los derivados de la caña, creando una plataforma económica y social que facilitó el proceso de industrialización del azúcar por primera vez en Venezuela e incorporó el producto en el mercado nacional e internacional. La alianza criolla y caribeña se produjo cuando los actores sociales decidieron organizarse y fundar las compañías anónimas Unión Agrícola (1909 y Central Azucarero del Zulia (1912, localizadas en Bobures y Gibraltar del distrito Sucre, al sur del Lago de Maracaibo, las cuales mejoraron las prácticas tradicionales de explotación de la tierra y transformaron el estatus del agricultor y del comerciante en productores de materia prima y accionistas de las corporaciones azucareras. Las corporaciones azucareras operaron con tecnología proveniente de Cuba, Europa y Estados Unidos

  19. EL CAMINO DE LA PRIMERA VIRUELA EN EL NUEVO MUNDO, DEL CARIBE A TENOCHTITLÁN, 1493-1521

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Malvido

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available El tema que nos ocupa en ésta trabajo es el inicio de la nueva patología en el centro de convergencia de la historia americana de esos tiempos, el Caribe y desde ahí, su expansión atierra firme, o sea, que pretendemos perseguir el camino de la primer pandemia de viruela, para saber quiénes y cuándo la importaron, así como cuánto tiempo se tomó para continuar el contagio y los estragos que causó entre los habitantes nativos, es decir, jugar con la historia para hacer la geografía epidemiológica de la ruta de la viruela, utilizando los avances científicos de nuestros tiempos, así como incluir nuevos documentos y estudios del tema, para lo cual debemos hacer el viaje desde Cádiz a los mares caribeños recorriendo a las poblaciones de las islas y continuar elviaje por las rutas del padecimiento, desde la costa de la Vera Cruz hasta llegar al corazón de las culturas mesoamericanas, la gran Tenochtitlán.

  20. Interaction between research and diagnosis and surveillance of avian influenza within the Caribbean animal health network (CaribVET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrançois, T; Hendrikx, P; Vachiéry, N; Ehrhardt, N; Millien, M; Gomez, L; Gouyet, L; Gerbier, G; Gongora, V; Shaw, J; Trotman, M

    2010-04-01

    The Caribbean region is considered to be at risk for avian influenza (AI) because of predominance of the backyard poultry system, important commercial poultry production, migratory birds and disparities in the surveillance systems. The Caribbean animal health network (CaribVET) has developed tools to implement AI surveillance in the region: (i) a regionally harmonized surveillance protocol, (ii) specific web pages for AI surveillance on http://www.caribvet.net, and (iii) a diagnostic network for the Caribbean including AI virus molecular diagnostic capability in Guadeloupe and technology transfer. Altogether 303 samples from four Caribbean countries were tested between June 2006 and March 2009 by real time PCR either for importation purposes or following clinical suspicion. Following AI H5N2 outbreaks in the Dominican Republic in 2007, a questionnaire was developed to collect data for risk analysis of AI spread in the region through fighting cocks. The infection pathway of Martinique commercial poultry sector by AI through introduction of infected cocks was designed and recommendations were provided to the Caribbean veterinary services to improve fighting cock movement controls and biosecurity measures. Altogether, these CaribVET activities contribute to strengthen surveillance of AI in the Caribbean region and may allow the development of research studies on AI risk analysis.

  1. EFFECTS OF SOME BORON COMPOUNDS ON THE LEACHABILITY OF EUCALYPTUS (Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn. WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Tan

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Wood preservation effectiveness of boron compounds against biological damagers and fire is well known. But these compounds are not widely used in preservation of wood because of their leachability from wood by rain water and making wood more hyroscopic than untreated wood in damp environments. Main aim of this study is; therefore, to improve the undesired leachability properties of some boron compounds by various water repellents (WRs. Aqueous solutions with polyethyleneglycole (PEG-400 of boric acid and sodium perborate were chosen as boron compounds. WRs were used as secondary treatment chemicals which were considered as dimensional stabilizer of wood and phsical bariers of boron retained at innerparts of treated wood. Results indicated that WRs were reduced leachability of boron from wood significantly (P<0.05. Boron salts applied with. PEG were more leachable than were of equeous solutions. WRs were not found effective on reducing the leachability of boron solved in PEG. Longer leaching time caused more leachant and reduction the phsical alleviation of WRs on boron leaching.

  2. Micronized copper wood preservatives: an efficiency and potential health risk assessment for copper-based nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civardi, Chiara; Schwarze, Francis W M R; Wick, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential biocide for wood protection, but fails to protect wood against Cu-tolerant wood-destroying fungi. Recently Cu particles (size range: 1 nm-25 μm) were introduced to the wood preservation market. The new generation of preservatives with Cu-based nanoparticles (Cu-based NPs) is reputedly more efficient against wood-destroying fungi than conventional formulations. Therefore, it has the potential to become one of the largest end uses for wood products worldwide. However, during decomposition of treated wood Cu-based NPs and/or their derivate may accumulate in the mycelium of Cu-tolerant fungi and end up in their spores that are dispersed into the environment. Inhaled Cu-loaded spores can cause harm and could become a potential risk for human health. We collected evidence and discuss the implications of the release of Cu-based NPs by wood-destroying fungi and highlight the exposure pathways and subsequent magnitude of health impact. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Refraction and absorption of microwaves in wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziherl, Saša; Bajc, Jurij; Čepič, Mojca

    2013-01-01

    A demonstration experiment for physics students showing the dependence of the refractive index and absorption coefficient of wood on the direction of microwaves is presented. Wood and microwaves enable study of anisotropic properties, which are typically found in crystals. Wood is used as the persuasive representative of uniaxial anisotropic materials due to its visible structure and its consequent anisotropic properties. Wood can be cut in a general direction and wooden plates a few centimetres thick with well-defined fibre orientation are easily prepared. Microwaves are used because wood is transparent for microwaves and their centimetre-scale wavelength is comparable to the wood structure. (paper)

  4. An Investigation of Consolidants Penetration in Wood. Part 2: FTIR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina TIMAR

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available FTIR spectroscopy was used in this work for studying the penetration of some consolidants frequentlyused in old wood conservation into test pieces of sound spruce wood (Picea abies wood. Thin microsections(30-60 μm of control and treated wood were analysed in reflectance mode using an ATR system. Theconsolidation products investigated were Paraloid B72, bee wax, a mixture of bee wax / linseed oil and twotypes of paraffins. These products presented FTIR spectra with characteristic common and specific bands,allowing their identification in the treated wood with no impediments coming from their colour, transparencyor the percent of cell lumena filling. The treatment of wood with these products brought about alterations ofthe spectra aspect by the appearance or intensification of some characteristic bands and the modification ofthe ratio between the areas of some characteristic absorption bands so that a qualitative and semiquantitativeevaluation of the presence and penetration depth and distribution of these consolidationproducts in wood was possible, proving the adopted method as valuable and useful for further research inthis field.

  5. Hydrophobic modification of wood via surface-initiated ARGET ATRP of MMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Yanchun; Li Gang [Material Science and Engineering College, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Yu Haipeng, E-mail: yuhaipeng20000@yahoo.com.cn [Key laboratory of Bio-based Material Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Material Science and Engineering College, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Liu Yixing, E-mail: yxl200488@sina.com [Key laboratory of Bio-based Material Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Material Science and Engineering College, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China)

    2012-01-15

    To convert the hydrophilic surface of wood into a hydrophobic surface, the present study investigated activators regenerated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization (ARGET ATRP) as a method of grafting methyl methacrylate (MMA) onto the wood surface. The wood treated with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide and with the subsequently attached MMA via ARGET ATRP under different polymerization times (2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 8 h) were examined using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. All the analyses confirmed that PMMA had been grafted onto the wood surface. Water contact angle measurement proved that the covering layer of PMMA on wood made the surface hydrophobic. Polymerization time had a positive influence on the contact angle value and higher contact angle can be produced with the prolongation of the polymerization time. When the reaction time was extended to 8 h, the contact angle of treated wood surface reached 130 Degree-Sign in the beginning, and remained at 116 Degree-Sign after 60 s. The ARGET ATRP method may raise an alteration on the wood surface modification.

  6. Turismo y Metabolismo Social: Efectos ambientales de la actividad turística en la región Atlántico/Caribe. 1970-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Eduardo Blanco Obando

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Durante el período de estudio se evidencia que la actividad turística en la región Atlántico/Caribe mantuvo un metabolismo sustentable, debido a condiciones específicas que presentó la expansión del turismo en dicha región.

  7. wood burns down

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Bukh

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available To relax the local authorities and to receive the guests of high rank «with no tie» the so-called «Fisherman's House» was built at the source of Angara-river, near Lake Baikal. Vladimir Ivanov, a young architect, was noticed by his skillful performa nee of exclusive orders and became the author of this house. At the time of ferroconcrete boom the proposal to build a wooden guest house turned out to be unexpectedly to the point and was graciously approved. The economic department was entrusted to select the men good for carpenter's work, and the forestry department was entrusted to provide thick round timber. And the work started. But, as it usually happens, the workers did not take the trouble and made the first eight rims of the current timber with an inappropriate diameter.And when Pavlov insisted on demolishing the construction and replacing the logs by the logs with the necessary diameter, the building work obeyed to his will and was finished suecessfully.The architecture of the house is not the derived action of the saw and the fret-saw. It is a technology of the axe. It is natural, convincing and original. It is no use to look for the local sources in it. It grew up in the area of timber and cold winter. And this clear and efficient action kept the construction from the annoying vulgarity and provided Siberian exotics easily penetrating into one's soul, refined as it may be.One of the eminent guests said with admiration: «Even if Pavlov had created nothing more, he would have justified his professional choice with this single house.» Why not to say it as a good toast. However, this is a suitable case to add: style is an absence of style. It is a taste.After the Fisherman's House Irkutsk architects were attracted by wood. They followed the strictness in wood and, as much as they could, created a couple of successful remakes, until the cylinder logs and ... new

  8. Bioaccessibility and Solubility of Copper in Copper-Treated Lumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micronized copper (MC)-treated lumber is a recent replacement for Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) and Ammonium Copper (AC)-treated lumbers; though little is known about the potential risk of copper (Cu) exposure from incidental ingestion of MC-treated wood. The bioaccessibility o...

  9. Tannin-caprolactam and Tannin-PEG formulations as outdoor wood preservatives: weathering properties

    OpenAIRE

    Tondi , Gianluca; Hu , Jinbo; Rizzo , Filippo; Buh , Janez; Medved , Sergej; Petutschnigg , Alexander; Thevenon , Marie-France

    2017-01-01

    International audience; AbstractKey messageThis article presents the leaching, fire and weathering resistance improvements of samples treated with tannin-based wood preservatives added of caprolactam. PEG-added formulations show limited applicability. The FT-IR and13C-NMR analyses of the caprolactam-added formulations show some evidences of copolymerization.ContextTannin-boron wood preservatives are known for their high resistance against leaching, biological attacks, fire as well as for the ...

  10. Vulnerabilidad, pobreza y desastres 'socioculturales' en Centroamérica y El Caribe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salas Serrano, Julián

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses and quantifies the relative level of risk in a geographical area that is vulnerable to natural phenomena and with a high proportion of its population in a situation of residential poverty. We deduce that the hazard in the area, composed of nine Central American and Caribbean countries, is significantly higher than the world average. The first aspect is covered in the sections Population at risk and Natural phenomena, which analyse the "study area". The second aspect is covered by Poverty in the "study area", various analyses of the physical situation in the target area, inhabited by almost 160 million people. Contrasted information is used as a basis for the concepts underpinning the extraordinary presence and seriousness of the socio-natural phenomena in this area. The interrelationship between th degree of vulnerability and poverty leads to the conclusion that these are the primary causes of disaster-related destruction, which in a 33 year period (1972 to 2005 has left an annual average of 20,000 human lives lost, 250,000 directly affected and approximately ten billion dollars in material damage.El trabajo pretende el estudio y cuantificación del riesgo relativo en una geografía física propensa a los fenómenos naturales y con una alta proporción de población en situación de pobreza habitacional, del que se deduce que el riesgo en la zona conformada por nueve países –de Centroamérica y el Caribe- es extraordinariamente superior a la media mundial. Del primer aspecto se ocupan los apartados relativos a delimitar el 'Área de Estudio': fenómenos naturales y población bajo riesgo. El segundo aspecto se aborda estudiando la situación material objetiva en la que se alojan y viven casi 160 millones de habitantes: Pobreza en el 'Área de Estudio'. En base a información contrastada se articulan los fundamentos en los que se sustenta la extraordinaria presencia y gravedad de los fenómenos 'socionaturales' en la

  11. Integration of heat treatment of wood with cogeneration production and district heating; Vaermebehandling av trae integrerad med kraftvaermeproduktion och fjaerrvaerme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delin, Lennart; Essen, Henrik (AaF, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2011-05-15

    Heat treatment of wood changes the properties of wood so that the moisture uptake is reduced and the wood movements are reduced at variations in the ambient air humidity. The wood gets an increased resistance to rot and can therefore replace impregnated wood in certain applications. Heat treated wood is however not suitable for direct contact with soil. The strength is also reduced by heat treatment, so it is not recommended for supporting constructions. No additives whatsoever are used in the treatment, so the heat treated wood is very advantageous from an environmental point of view. The wood is dried completely at the heat treatment and heated to about 200 deg C. The question has hence been put, if it is advantageous to collocate a heat treatment plant with district heating or a power cogeneration plant. The aim of the study is to assess the value of such a collocation. Existing heat treatment plants are both few and small and the calculations have hence been made for how a large plant could be designed. A market study is included to assess the market for this type of plants. This shows that the present market for heat treated wood is very small. A full scale treatment plant of the type discussed in this study could probably not be built, since even single plants of this size would require a too large part of the market. The potential to replace impregnated wood is on the other hand very large. The cost for large scale heat treatment should be significantly lower than for impregnated wood and the cost for handling hazardous waste (which impregnated wood is classified as) is also removed. There should therefore be a potential for a future much larger volume of heat treated wood. The study shows that the energetic profit of collocation of a heat treatment plant for wood with district heating or power cogeneration plants is of lower importance. Maximally about 0.5 MSEK/year can be saved for a 25 000 m3/year plant. The initial drying of all sawn lumber has much more

  12. Thermopower of beech wood biocarbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, I. A.; Smirnov, B. I.; Orlova, T. S.; Sulkovski, Cz.; Misiorek, H.; Jezowski, A.; Muha, J.

    2011-11-01

    This paper reports on measurements of the thermopower S of high-porosity samples of beech wood biocarbon with micron-sized sap pores aligned with the tree growth direction. The measurements have been performed in the temperature range 5-300 K. The samples have been fabricated by pyrolysis of beech wood in an argon flow at different carbonization temperatures ( T carb). The thermopower S has been measured both along and across the sap pores, thus offering a possibility of assessing its anisotropy. The curves S( T carb) have revealed a noticeable increase of S for T carb biocarbons, which suggests that for T carb ˜ 1000°C they undergo a phase transition of the insulator-(at T carb 1000°C) type. The existence of this transition is attested also by the character of the temperature dependences S( T) of beech wood biocarbon samples prepared at T carb above and below 1000°C.

  13. Assessment of the wood waste resource and its position in the wood / wood-energy sector - Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinard, Ludovic; Deroubaix, Gerard; Roux, Marie-Lise; Levet, Anne-Laure; Quint, Vincent

    2015-04-01

    The first objective of this study is to obtain a better knowledge of the 'wood wastes' issue, to propose a photography of the wood waste sector (productions, trades, consumptions), and then to elaborate different prospective scenarios on the use of wood waste volumes while taking into account possible evolutions on the medium or short term of the regulation and market of the wood/wood energy sector. The considered wastes come from industrial production, from the use of wood-based products, and from the end of life of products potentially containing wood. The authors present bibliographical sources and the adopted methodology, briefly describe the 'wood waste' system with its actors, and then report their assessment of wood wastes. They propose a global assessment as well as detailed assessments with respect to waste origins: wood trade and distribution, industries, craft, households and communities, building sector, public and private tertiary sector, packaging. They also address the collection and management of wood wastes by public services, and present the different types of valorisation (panel fabrication, energy, and others). They discuss exports, and then present different scenarios: a trend-based scenario, and two prospective scenarios with a priority to energetic valorisation or to material valorisation of wood wastes. These scenarios are compared

  14. Growth of high-density ZnO nanorods on wood with enhanced photostability, flame retardancy and water repellency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Lizhuo; Tu, Kunkun; Guan, Hao [Research Institute of Wood Industry, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing 100091 (China); Wang, Xiaoqing, E-mail: wangxq@caf.ac.cn [Research Institute of Forestry New Technology, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing 100091 (China); Research Institute of Wood Industry, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing 100091 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • ZnO nanorod arrays were deposited on the wood surface via a hydrothermal process. • The assembled ZnO nanorod arrays greatly enhanced the photostability of wood. • The treated wood can sustain direct exposure to flame with only minor smoldering. • The ZnO-coated wood modified with stearic acid showed a superhydrophobic surface. - Abstract: Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod arrays were successfully assembled on the wood surface in situ via a two-step process consisting of formation of ZnO seeds and subsequent crystal growth under hydrothermal conditions at a low temperature. The morphology and crystalline structure of the formed ZnO nanorods were studied by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Highly dense and uniform arrays of ZnO nanorods with well-defined hexagonal facets were generated on the wood surface by tuning the concentration of the ZnO growth solution during the hydrothermal treatment. Accelerated weathering tests indicated that the assembled ZnO nanorod arrays were highly protective against UV radiation and greatly enhanced the photostability of the coated wood. Meanwhile, the ZnO nanorod-coated wood can withstand continuous exposure to flame with only minor smoldering in contrast with the pristine wood catching fire easily and burning rapidly. Moreover, when further modified with low-surface-energy stearic acid, the ZnO nanorod decorated wood surface can be transformed into a superhydrophobic surface, with a water contact angle (CA) of ∼154°. Such ZnO nanorod-modified woods with enhanced photostability, flame retardancy and water repellency offer an interesting alternative to conventional wood preservation strategies, highlighting their potential applications in some novel wood products.

  15. The influence of chlorine on the gasification of wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scala, C. von; Struis, R.; Stucki, S. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Chlorides of the heavy metals copper, lead and zinc inhibit the CO{sub 2}-gasification reaction of charcoal. This is observed either by impregnation the wood with the salts before pyrolysis or by mechanically mixing the salts with the charcoal before gasification. Charcoal impregnated or mixed with ammonium chloride reacts more slowly than untreated charcoal. Treating the charcoal with HCl also influences negatively the gasification reactivity, indicating that chlorine plays an important role in the gasification. (author) 2 figs., 4 refs.

  16. Preparation of Fe-cored carbon nanomaterials from mountain pine beetle-killed pine wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung Phil Mun; Zhiyong Cai; Jilei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle-killed lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) wood treated with iron (III) nitrate solution was used for the preparation of Fe-cored carbon nanomaterials (Fe-CNs) under various carbonization temperatures. The carbonization yield of Fe-treated sample (5% as Fe) was always 1–3% higher (after ash compensation) than that of the non-...

  17. Thermal Conversion of Pine Wood Char to Carbon Nanomaterials in the Presence of Iron Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung Phil Mun; Zhiyong Cai; Fumiya Watanabe; Umesh P. Agarwal; Jilei. Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Southern yellow pine (Pinus taeda) wood char powder was thermally treated at 1,000:C in the presence of a 25-nm-size Fe nanoparticle catalyst. The thermally treated carbon materials were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Well-aligned graphitic carbon structures with 15 to 17 layers on...

  18. Wood: a construction material for tall buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmers, Guido

    2017-12-01

    Wood has great potential as a building material, because it is strong and lightweight, environmentally friendly and can be used in prefabricated buildings. However, only changes in building codes will make wood competitive with steel and concrete.

  19. Ergonomics and safety in secondary wood processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rado Gazo; James D. McGlothlin; Yuehwern, Wiedenbeck, Jan Yih; Yuehwern Yih

    2002-01-01

    The main goal of the project was to initiate a pilot program in ergonomics for the secondary wood products industry. Case studies were conducted at three Midwest secondary wood product companies in 2000 and 2001.

  20. SYNERGISTIC WOOD PRESERVATIVES FOR REPLACEMENT OF CCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the potential synergistic combinations of environmentally-safe biocides as wood preservatives. These wood preservatives could be potential replacements for the heavy-metal based CCA.Didecyldimethylammonium chloride [DDAC] was...