WorldWideScience

Sample records for caribbean tunicate trididemnum

  1. A Bibliography of Pelagic Tunicates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waard-Pouw, van G.; Soest, van R.W.M.

    1973-01-01

    The present bibliography on pelagic Tunicates has been compiled over a period of 4 years, mainly by the first author. It is meant, not as an official publication, but as a working aid for students of pelagic Tunicates. It comprises about 1300-1400 different titles of books and articles. For obvious

  2. The role of vanadium in the chemical defense of the solitary tunicate, Phallusia nigra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odate, Shobu; Pawlik, Joseph R

    2007-03-01

    Ascidians (sea squirts) may defend themselves from predators, biofouling competitors, and bacterial infection by producing secondary metabolites or sequestering acid, but many species also accumulate heavy metals, most notably vanadium. The defensive functions of heavy metals in ascidians remain unclear, and to this end, the solitary Caribbean tunicate, Phallusia nigra, was studied to localize vanadium in its tissues and to assess the defensive properties of vanadium-containing compounds. As determined by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy, the internal tissues and blood contained the highest vanadium concentrations (mean values of 2280 and 1886 ppm dry mass, respectively), followed by the tunic surface (871 ppm dry mass). Results of laboratory feeding assays with the bluehead wrasse, Thalassoma bifasciatum, confirmed outcomes of past studies that demonstrated that vanadyl sulfate (VOSO4.6H20) and sodium vanadate (Na3VO4) were unpalatable to fish, although these salts do not accurately reflect the chelation environment or oxidation state of vanadium in living tunicates. Fresh preparations of whole tunic, internal tissues, and blood were unpalatable to fish, but freezing and thawing of internal tissues and blood rendered them palatable. Crude organic extracts of whole tunic and internal tissues contained vanadium metabolites (225 and 750 ppm dry mass, respectively) and were palatable to T. bifasciatum; crude extracts also exhibited no antimicrobial effects against a panel of four marine bacteria known to be pathogens of marine invertebrates (Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio harveyi, Leucothrix mucor, and Deleya marina). Nonacidic vanadium (+3) complexes neither deterred predation nor inhibited microbial growth, whereas acidic aqua vanadium (+3 and +4) complexes were unpalatable to 7 bifasciatum and exhibited antimicrobial activity. Difficulties in decoupling low pH from oxidation state and chelation environment of vanadium prevent definitive conclusions about the

  3. Aggregation of organic matter by pelagic tunicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomeroy, L.R. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens); Deibel, D.

    1980-07-01

    Three genera of pelagic tunicates were fed concentrates of natural seston and an axenic diatom culture. Fresh and up to 4-day-old feces resemble flocculent organic aggregates containing populations of microorganisms, as described from highly productive parts of the ocean, and older feces resemble the nearly sterile flocculent aggregates which are ubiquitous in surface waters. Fresh feces consist of partially digested phytoplankton and other inclusions in an amorphous gelatinous matrix. After 18 to 36 h, a population of large bacteria develops in the matrix and in some of the remains of phytoplankton contained in the feces. From 48 to 96 h, protozoan populations arise which consume the bacteria and sometimes the remains of the phytoplankton in the feces. Thereafter only a sparse population of microorganisms remains, and the particles begin to fragment. Water samples taken in or below dense populations of salps and doliolids contained greater numbers of flocculent aggregates than did samples from adjacent stations.

  4. Filtration of submicrometer particles by pelagic tunicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Kelly R; Madin, Laurence P; Stocker, Roman

    2010-08-24

    Salps are common in oceanic waters and have higher per-individual filtration rates than any other zooplankton filter feeder. Although salps are centimeters in length, feeding via particle capture occurs on a fine, mucous mesh (fiber diameter d approximately 0.1 microm) at low velocity (U = 1.6 +/- 0.6 cmxs(-1), mean +/- SD) and is thus a low Reynolds-number (Re approximately 10(-3)) process. In contrast to the current view that particle encounter is dictated by simple sieving of particles larger than the mesh spacing, a low-Re mathematical model of encounter rates by the salp feeding apparatus for realistic oceanic particle-size distributions shows that submicron particles, due to their higher abundances, are encountered at higher rates (particles per time) than larger particles. Data from feeding experiments with 0.5-, 1-, and 3-microm diameter polystyrene spheres corroborate these findings. Although particles larger than 1 microm (e.g., flagellates, small diatoms) represent a larger carbon pool, smaller particles in the 0.1- to 1-microm range (e.g., bacteria, Prochlorococcus) may be more quickly digestible because they present more surface area, and we find that particles smaller than the mesh size (1.4 microm) can fully satisfy salp energetic needs. Furthermore, by packaging submicrometer particles into rapidly sinking fecal pellets, pelagic tunicates can substantially change particle-size spectra and increase downward fluxes in the ocean.

  5. Evolutionary loss of melanogenesis in the tunicate Molgula occulta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Racioppi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analyzing close species with diverse developmental modes is instrumental for investigating the evolutionary significance of physiological, anatomical and behavioral features at a molecular level. Many examples of trait loss are known in metazoan populations living in dark environments. Tunicates are the closest living relatives of vertebrates and typically present a lifecycle with distinct motile larval and sessile adult stages. The nervous system of the motile larva contains melanized cells associated with geotactic and light-sensing organs. It has been suggested that these are homologous to vertebrate neural crest-derived melanocytes. Probably due to ecological adaptation to distinct habitats, several species of tunicates in the Molgulidae family have tailless (anural larvae that fail to develop sensory organ-associated melanocytes. Here we studied the evolution of Tyrosinase family genes, indispensible for melanogenesis, in the anural, unpigmented Molgula occulta and in the tailed, pigmented Molgula oculata by using phylogenetic, developmental and molecular approaches. Results We performed an evolutionary reconstruction of the tunicate Tyrosinase gene family: in particular, we found that M. oculata possesses genes predicted to encode one Tyrosinase (Tyr and three Tyrosinase-related proteins (Tyrps while M. occulta has only Tyr and Tyrp.a pseudogenes that are not likely to encode functional proteins. Analysis of Tyr sequences from various M. occulta individuals indicates that different alleles independently acquired frameshifting short indels and/or larger mobile genetic element insertions, resulting in pseudogenization of the Tyr locus. In M. oculata, Tyr is expressed in presumptive pigment cell precursors as in the model tunicate Ciona robusta. Furthermore, a M. oculata Tyr reporter gene construct was active in the pigment cell precursors of C. robusta embryos, hinting at conservation of the regulatory network underlying

  6. Effect of drought stress, corm size and corm tunic on morphoecophysiological characteristics of saffron (Crocus sativus L. in greenhouse conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sabet Teimouri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effects of corm tunic, corm weight and drought stress on saffron (Crocus sativus L., an experiment was conducted at the greenhouse of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran. Treatment were combination of four corm weights range (2-4, 4-6, 6-8 and 8-10 g, two levels of water availability (100% field capacity and drought and two levels of corm tunic (natural corm with tunic and without tunic as factorial arrangement based on completely randomized block design with three replications. The corms were divided to four groups based on their weights and removed tunics of corm in tunic free treatment. Results indicated that the highest biomass produced in irrigation, corms with tunic with maximum weight. Both chlorophyll a and b contents decreased significantly under drought stress and chlorophyll b content was 50% of chlorophyll a content. Effect of corm size and corm tunic and interaction of these treatments imposed a significant effect on the leaf number per plant, leaf weight and chlorophyll content. Effect of corm tunic in 8-10 g corm size increased ch (a/ch (b ratio and leaf number. The relative water content was decreased in drought treatment in both tunic and tunicless treatments and the best corm weight in all treatment was 6-8g and could be useful to tolerate drought stress.

  7. Swarming of pelagic tunicates associated with phytoplankton bloom in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhupratap, M.; Devassy, V.P.; Nair, S.R.S.; Rao, T.S.S.

    During the 40th cruise of R V Gaveshani, a large swarm pelagic tunicates associated with a bloom of diatoms and blue green algae was observed off Nagapattinam. The doliolid Dolioletta gegenbauri, Uljanin, the salp Thalia democratica Forskal...

  8. Tunicates: exploring the sea shores and roaming the open ocean. A tribute to Thomas Huxley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Patrick; Piette, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This review is a tribute to the remarkable contributions of Thomas Huxley to the biology of tunicates, the likely sister group of vertebrates. In 1851, the great biologist and philosopher published two landmark papers on pelagic tunicates in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. They were dedicated to the description of the adult anatomy and life cycle of thaliaceans and appendicularians, the pelagic relatives of ascidians. In the first part of this review, we discuss the novel anatomical observations and evolutionary hypotheses made by Huxley, which would have a lasting influence on tunicate biology. We also briefly comment on the more philosophical reflections of Huxley on individuality. In the second part, we stress the originality and relevance of past and future studies of tunicates in the resolution of major biological issues. In particular, we focus on the complex relationship between genotype and phenotype and the phenomenon of developmental system drift. We propose that more than 150 years after Huxley's papers, tunicate embryos are still worth studying in their own right, independently of their evolutionary proximity to vertebrates, as they provide original and crucial insights into the process of animal evolution. Tunicates are still at the forefront of biological research. PMID:26085517

  9. Caribbean Tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Robert

    1983-01-01

    Describes a teaching unit which explores the concept of development in a study of the Caribbean tourist industry. Intended for use by high school students, its purpose is to make students aware that development must not be equated with economic growth alone and that tourism brings both costs and benefits. (CS)

  10. Tolerance of the invasive tunicate Styela clava to air exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillock, Kristina A; Costello, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    Styela clava is a subtidal invasive marine species in Northern Europe, Atlantic Canada, Australia and New Zealand. It grows attached to solid substrata, including boat hulls, ropes, moorings, piers and aquaculture equipment, all of which can aid its spread to new locations. It interferes with feeding of mussels and oysters, and increases their harvesting costs. Being subtidal, it could be assumed that tunicates would rapidly die in air and thus exposure to air would be a practical method to prevent their spread on boats and equipment. This study tested their survival when exposed to air for up to (1) 120 h at a constant temperature of 10 °C, (2) shade ambient 15-27 °C, and (3) full sun ambient 15-29 °C. Humidity was consistently high (78-100%). The results indicated that survival was longer when the air temperature was cooler. Larger individuals of S. clava generally survived for longer out of seawater than smaller individuals. The results predict that two weeks of exposure to air for two weeks could be an effective management method to eradicate S. clava from marine equipment when the air temperature is 10 °C. However, drying time would be less under conditions of low humidity and under direct sunlight.

  11. A Nanocellulose Polypyrrole Composite Based on Tunicate Cellulose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawei Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The water-dispersed conductive polypyrrole (PPy was prepared via the in situ oxidative chemical polymerization by using ammonium persulfate (APS as oxidant and tunicate cellulose nanocrystals (T-CNs as a dopant and template for tuning the morphologies of PPy nanoparticles. Highly flexible paper-like materials of PPy/T-CNs nanocomposites with high electrical conductivity values and good mechanical properties were prepared. The structure of nanocomposites of PPy/T-CNs was investigated by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyses of the composites revealed that PPy consisted of nanoparticles about 2.5 nm in mean size to form a continuous coating covered on the T-CNs. The diameters of the PPy nanoparticles increased from 10 to 100 nm with the increasing pyrrole amount. Moreover, electrical properties of the obtained PPy/T-CNs films were studied using standard four-probe technique and the electrical conductivity could be as high as 10−3 S/cm.

  12. Tunicates and not cephalochordates are the closest living relatives of vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delsuc, Frédéric; Brinkmann, Henner; Chourrout, Daniel; Philippe, Hervé

    2006-02-23

    Tunicates or urochordates (appendicularians, salps and sea squirts), cephalochordates (lancelets) and vertebrates (including lamprey and hagfish) constitute the three extant groups of chordate animals. Traditionally, cephalochordates are considered as the closest living relatives of vertebrates, with tunicates representing the earliest chordate lineage. This view is mainly justified by overall morphological similarities and an apparently increased complexity in cephalochordates and vertebrates relative to tunicates. Despite their critical importance for understanding the origins of vertebrates, phylogenetic studies of chordate relationships have provided equivocal results. Taking advantage of the genome sequencing of the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica, we assembled a phylogenomic data set of 146 nuclear genes (33,800 unambiguously aligned amino acids) from 14 deuterostomes and 24 other slowly evolving species as an outgroup. Here we show that phylogenetic analyses of this data set provide compelling evidence that tunicates, and not cephalochordates, represent the closest living relatives of vertebrates. Chordate monophyly remains uncertain because cephalochordates, albeit with a non-significant statistical support, surprisingly grouped with echinoderms, a hypothesis that needs to be tested with additional data. This new phylogenetic scheme prompts a reappraisal of both morphological and palaeontological data and has important implications for the interpretation of developmental and genomic studies in which tunicates and cephalochordates are used as model animals.

  13. The Pharmacological Potential of Nonribosomal Peptides from Marine Sponge and Tunicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivankar Agrawal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marine biodiversity is recognized by a wide and unique array of fascinating structures. The complex associations of marine microorganisms, especially with sponges, bryozoans, and tunicates, make it extremely difficult to define the biosynthetic source of marine natural products or to deduce their ecological significance. Marine sponges and tunicates are important source of novel compounds for drug discovery and development. Majority of these compounds are nitrogen containing and belong to non-ribosomal peptide (NRPs or mixed polyketide–NRP natural products. Several of these peptides are currently under trial for developing new drugs against various disease areas, including inflammatory, cancer, neurodegenerative disorders and infectious disease. This review features pharmacologically active NRPs from marine sponge and tunicates based on their biological activities.

  14. Digestive gland ultrastructure of the tunicate, Halocynthia roretzi (Ascidiacea: Pyuridae in relation to function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Kyung Shin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the glycogen storage and lipid digestion, as well as detoxification of the digestive gland of the tunicate, Halocynthia roretzi. Methods: Tunicates used in this study were collected from tunicate aquafarm located in Hansan Bay on the southern coast of Korea. Light and electron microscopy was performed. Results: The digestive gland was divided into the tubular and blind ampulla portions. Fine vacuolar granules were present, and lipofuscin granules were confirmed in the cytoplasm of the epithelia of the blind ampulla portion. Epithelial cells of the blind ampulla portion could be classified into three types. Conclusions: The results indicate that these three types of cells are involved in glycogen storage, lipid digestion and detoxification.

  15. [Concerning changes of oral cavity mucous tunic in acute enteric infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolov, B P; Sorokina, A A

    2008-01-01

    The authors represented the results of oral cavity stomatological examination in 171 patients with acute enteric infection (AEI): shigellosis, salmonellosis etc in dynamics of disease. These patients had first diagnosed inflammatory changes of oral cavity mucous tunic: catarrhal gingivitis, catarrhal and benign migratory glossitis, aphthous stomatitis with submandibular lymphadenitis. These changes were accompanied by aggravation of herpetic infection or its debut, candidosis. Lesions of oral cavity mucous tunic in patients with AEI are particular manifestation of infectious process. In acute period patients with AEI have to be examined by stomatologist.

  16. Biological results of the Snellius expedition. XXIV. Pelagic Tunicates of the Snellius expedition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tokioka, T.

    1974-01-01

    Eleven samples of pelagic tunicates were found in the material collected during the Snellius Expedition 1929-30. In these, seven species, viz., two pyrosomas and five salpas, are included. In addition, a few old specimens of another species of Pyrosoma were found in the collection of the Leiden

  17. A second form of collagenous lectin from the tunicate, Styela plicata.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, P.; Luty, J.F.; Nair, S.; Radford, J.; Raftos, D.

    2006-01-01

    This study characterised a 90 kDa lectin from an invertebrate chordate, the tunicate Styela plicata. One- and two-dimensional electrophoresis showed that the apparent molecular weight of this protein is maintained under both reducing and non-reducing conditions, suggesting that its native form is a

  18. RIBOMUNYL IN CORRECTION OF DYSBIOSIS OF MUCOUS TUNICS OF UPPER AIRWAYS AND GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT IN CHILDREN WITH RECURRENT STENOSING LARYNGOTRACHEITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.N. Orlova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of evaluation of clinical effectiveness of ribomunyl in complex of medical and rehabilitative measures in 43 children with recurrent stenosing laryngotracheitis on the basis of respiratory viral infections, and with ii degree of dysbiosis of mucous tunics of nasopharynx, fauces and bowel are presented. Ribomunyl allows recovering of disturbed microbiocenosis of mucous tunics not only in upper airways, but in bowels, and decreasing rate of common Ige and nitric oxide, what indicates to reduction of persisting infectious9allergic inflammation. Treatment with ribomunyl leads to termination of recurrence of disease.Key words: dysbiosis of mucous tunics, recurrent stenosing laryngotracheitis, ribomunyl, children.

  19. Protective effect of new hygienic means on the oral mucous tunic at radial stomatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ієвлєва, Юлія Валеріївна

    2015-01-01

    The radial stomatitis development is the one of the main problems in patients who underwent radial therapy of the malignant tumors in head and neck region that impedes the effective antitumor treatment. The means of prophylaxis and local treatment of radial injuries are not always effective.Aim of research. The determination of effectiveness of the new hygienic means based on antimatters on the state of oral mucous tunic at the radial stomatitis.Materials and methods of research. Experiments ...

  20. Spatial and temporal variation of natural toxicity in cnidarians, bryozoans and tunicates in Mediterranean caves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Martí

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The natural toxicity of cnidarians, bryozoans and tunicates in two caves was assessed using the Microtox® technique in spring and autumn. One cave was located in the Cabrera Archipelago (Balearic Islands and the other in the Medes Islands (Catalan littoral. The organisms analysed were good representatives of the coverage of each Phylum in the communities; however, these Phyla are less abundant than sponges which are the dominant group in these caves. Seventy-one percent of the species of cnidarians and bryozoans analysed were toxic in one of the caves, communities or seasons, which indicates the relevance of bioactive species in these groups. The tunicate Lissoclinum perforatum was the most toxic species. Although all three Phyla had some highly toxic species, a common pattern that related the caves, communities and seasons was not found. Seasonal variation of toxicity in cnidarians and bryozoans was higher in the Cabrera than in the Medes cave. Moreover, variation in toxicity either between communities or between seasons was a common trait for most cnidarians and bryozoans, whereas tunicates remained toxic throughout communities and seasons.

  1. Distribution and abundance of pelagic tunicates in the North Yellow Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Pietro; Chen, Hongju; Liu, Guangxing

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, the distribution patterns and abundance of pelagic tunicates in the North Yellow Sea of China during the period 2006-2007 were analyzed. Zooplankton samples were obtained with vertical towing from bottom to surface using a WP2 plankton net (200 μm mesh size; mouth area: 0.25 m2). Five species belonging to two classes were identified: Oikopleura dioica, O. longicauda and Fritillaria borealis belonging to class Appendicularia; Salpa fusiformis and Doliolum denticulatum of class Thaliacea. O. dioica and O. longicauda were the dominant species, occurring in the samples of all four seasons, with different distribution patterns. Their maximum abundance were 1664.7 ind. m-3 (spring) and 1031.7 ind. m-3 (spring) respectively. Following Oikopleura spp. were D. denticulatum, which was found only in autumn with an average abundance of 149.6 ind. m-3, and S. fusiformis, which was detected all the year long except for autumn with low abundance (max. abundance 289.4 ind. m-3 in summer). Only a very small amount of F. borealis was detected in summer samples, with an average abundance of 2.7 ind. m-3. The relationship between tunicates abundances and the environmental factors was analyzed using the stepwise regression model for each species. The variation of appendicularian abundance showed a significant correlation with the surface water temperature and with the concentration of Chl- a. No relationship was found between tunicates abundance and salinity, likely due to the slight changes in surface salinity of the studied area during the four seasons. Salps abundance and that of doliolids were significantly correlated to bottom water temperature, indicating that these two species ( S. fusiformis and D. denticulatum) migrate vertically in the water column. In particular D. denticulatum, known to be a warm water species, showed not only an important correlation with water temperature, but also a spatial distribution connected to the warm currents in the North Yellow

  2. 3,7-Isoquinoline quinones from the ascidian tunicate Ascidia virginea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possner, Sven T; Schroeder, Frank C; Rapp, Hans Tore; Sinnwell, Volker; Franke, Stefan; Francke, Wittko

    2017-07-14

    A new isoquinoline quinone system and its iodinated derivatives were isolated from the ascidian tunicate Ascidia virginea Müller 1776 (Phlebobranchia: Ascidiidae). Structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods and derivatization reactions. Ascidine A (3,7-dihydro-1,8-dihydroxy-4-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)isoquinoline-3,7-dione (1), ascidine B (3,7-dihydro-1,8-dihydroxy-4-(4'-hydroxy-3'-iodophenyl)isoquinoline-3,7-dione (2), and ascidine C (3,7-dihydro-1,8-dihydroxy-4-(4'-hydroxy-3',5'-diiodophenyl)isoquinoline-3,7-dione (3) represent a novel type of tyrosine-derived alkaloids.

  3. Caribbean landscapes and their biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. E. Lugo; E. H. Helmer; E. Santiago Valentín

    2012-01-01

    Both the biodiversity and the landscapes of the Caribbean have been greatly modified as a consequence of human activity. In this essay we provide an overview of the natural landscapes and biodiversity of the Caribbean and discuss how human activity has affected both. Our Caribbean geographic focus is on the insular Caribbean and the biodiversity focus is on the flora,...

  4. Long-term patient satisfaction after surgical correction of penile curvature via tunical plication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Paez

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess patient satisfaction and functional results at long term follow-up after surgical correction for Peyronie's disease (PD and congenital penile curvature (CPC with the technique of tunical plication. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and two men operated for PD (n = 76 or CPC (n = 26 in four different departments of urology in public hospitals agreed to answer a six-question telephone questionnaire about treatment satisfaction. Tunica albuginea plication procedures represented the standard surgical approach. Subjects under investigation were correction of the deformity, feeling of bumps under the skin, pain during erection, penile sensory changes, development of erectile dysfunction (ED and postoperative ability for complete vaginal intromission. Subjective response rates were compared using the chi square test on the basis of the etiology of the disease (CPC or PD. RESULTS: Significant differences (p < 0.05 between patients with CPC and PD were noticed in the prevalence of postoperative penile deformity, sensory changes, ED and ability to complete vaginal intromission, PD patients always showing a more pessimistic view. No significant differences (p = ns were detected in terms of unpleasant nodes under the penile skin or pain during erection. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term outcome after surgical correction for PD and CPC with the technique of tunical plication can be poor. Probably patient expectations are above the real performance of surgical techniques. Preoperative information should be more exhaustive.

  5. The use of food grade oil in the prevention of vase tunicate fouling on mussel aquaculture gear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiselle A. BAKKER

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Current mitigation strategies against invasive tunicates on mussel aquaculture gear in Prince Edward Island concentrate on labour-intensive and costly fouling removal. Instead of removal, this study focused on preventing the settlement of the vase tunicate Ciona intestinalis and other fouling organisms by applying a layer of food grade oil to gear prior to recruitment. Laboratory tests established the adherence and persistence of shortening, a food grade oil with a melting point exceeding ambient water temperatures, to rope and mussels. In situ tests showed that shortening decreased C. intestinalis weight and abundance on buoys, spat collector ropes and collector plates but not on mussel socks. Fouling by algae and other tunicates was significantly reduced on most substrates. There were no detrimental effects of shortening treatment on mussel length and abundance on mussel socks, but total mussel weight was significantly lower on shortening-treated socks. Shortening treatment did not significantly affect mussel spat settlement on spat collector ropes, but further evaluation is required. Overall, shortening application has considerable potential for reducing tunicate and other fouling, particularly on buoys.

  6. Tunicate-Inspired Gallic Acid/Metal Ion Complex for Instant and Efficient Treatment of Dentin Hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajatelistia, Ekavianty; Ju, Sung-Won; Sanandiya, Naresh D; Jun, Sang Ho; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2016-04-20

    Dentin hypersensitivity is sharp and unpleasant pains caused by exposed dentinal tubules when enamel outside of the tooth wears away. The occlusion of dentinal tubules via in situ remineralization of hydroxyapatite is the best method to alleviate the symptoms caused by dentin hypersensitivity. Commercially available dental desensitizers are generally effective only on a specific area and are relatively toxic, and their performance usually depends on the skill of the clinician. Here, a facile and efficient dentin hypersensitivity treatment with remarkable aesthetic improvement inspired by the tunicate-self-healing process is reported. As pyrogallol groups in tunicate proteins conjugate with metal ions to heal the torn body armor of a tunicate, the ingenious mechanism by introducing gallic acid (GA) as a cheap, abundant, and edible alternative to the pyrogallol groups of the tunicate combined with a varied daily intake of metal ion sources is mimicked. In particular, the GA/Fe(3+) complex exhibits the most promising results, to the instant ≈52% blockage in tubules within 4 min and ≈87% after 7 d of immersion in artificial saliva. Overall, the GA/metal ion complex-mediated coating is facile, instant, and effective, and is suggested as an aesthetic solution for treating dentin hypersensitivity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Caribbean development: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Sutton

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Reviews development in the Caribbean, especially since 1990 to the present, and highlights future development prospects. Author discusses 2 reports from 2005 on present developments problems in the Caribbean region: the economics-focussed 'A time to choose: Caribbean development in the 21st century' by the World Bank, and the UN ECLAC report 'The Millennium Development Goals: a Latin American and Caribbean perspective', with a broader, also social and political, development agenda. He relates what both reports recommend for the Caribbean on the basis of their evaluations of past development. The World Bank report advocates a move toward the services sector, including tourism, offshore education, ICT services, and health services as most viable. The ECLAC report notes some social and political advances in comparison to other developing countries, but also remaining problems and inequalities. The author finds that the World Bank report's neoliberal, one-size-fits-all approach is not mindful of specific Caribbean realities, while the ECLAC study is more sensitive to local realities, and espouses a mixed economy. He thus considers the ECLAC approach preferable, but argues that it needs to go further, as it excludes Cuba and Haiti as atypical states.

  8. An updated 18S rRNA phylogeny of tunicates based on mixture and secondary structure models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenkar Noa

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tunicates have been recently revealed to be the closest living relatives of vertebrates. Yet, with more than 2500 described species, details of their evolutionary history are still obscure. From a molecular point of view, tunicate phylogenetic relationships have been mostly studied based on analyses of 18S rRNA sequences, which indicate several major clades at odds with the traditional class-level arrangements. Nonetheless, substantial uncertainty remains about the phylogenetic relationships and taxonomic status of key groups such as the Aplousobranchia, Appendicularia, and Thaliacea. Results Thirty new complete 18S rRNA sequences were acquired from previously unsampled tunicate species, with special focus on groups presenting high evolutionary rate. The updated 18S rRNA dataset has been aligned with respect to the constraint on homology imposed by the rRNA secondary structure. A probabilistic framework of phylogenetic reconstruction was adopted to accommodate the particular evolutionary dynamics of this ribosomal marker. Detailed Bayesian analyses were conducted under the non-parametric CAT mixture model accounting for site-specific heterogeneity of the evolutionary process, and under RNA-specific doublet models accommodating the occurrence of compensatory substitutions in stem regions. Our results support the division of tunicates into three major clades: 1 Phlebobranchia + Thaliacea + Aplousobranchia, 2 Appendicularia, and 3 Stolidobranchia, but the position of Appendicularia could not be firmly resolved. Our study additionally reveals that most Aplousobranchia evolve at extremely high rates involving changes in secondary structure of their 18S rRNA, with the exception of the family Clavelinidae, which appears to be slowly evolving. This extreme rate heterogeneity precluded resolving with certainty the exact phylogenetic placement of Aplousobranchia. Finally, the best fitting secondary-structure and CAT-mixture models

  9. Genome Sequence of Vibrio campbellii Strain UMTGB204, a Marine Bacterium Isolated from a Green Barrel Tunicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Huan You; Noor, Mohd Ezhar Mohd; Saari, Nur Azna; Musa, Najiah; Mustapha, Baharim; Usup, Gires

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio campbellii strain UMTGB204 was isolated from a green barrel tunicate. The genome of this strain comprises 5,652,224 bp with 5,014 open reading frames, 9 rRNAs, and 116 tRNAs. It contains genes related to virulence and environmental tolerance. Gene clusters for the biosynthesis of nonribosomal peptides and bacteriocin were also identified. PMID:25814609

  10. Proceraea exoryxae sp. nov. (Annelida, Syllidae, Autolytinae, the first known polychaete miner tunneling into the tunic of an ascidian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Martin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available While studying organisms living in association with the solitary tunicate Phallusia nigra (Ascidiacea, Ascidiidae from a shallow fringing reef at Zeytouna Beach (Egyptian Red Sea, one of the collected ascidians showed peculiar perforations on its tunic. Once dissected, the perforations revealed to be the openings of a network of galleries excavated in the inner tunic (atrium by at least six individuals of a polychaetous annelid. The worms belonged to the Autolytinae (Syllidae, a subfamily that is well known to include specialized predators and/or symbionts, mostly associated with cnidarians. The Red Sea worms are here described as Proceraea exoryxae sp. nov., which are anatomically distinguished by the combination of simple chaetae only in anterior chaetigers, and a unique trepan with 33 teeth in one outer ring where one large tooth alternates with one medium-sized tricuspid tooth, and one inner ring with small teeth located just behind the large teeth. Male and female epitokes were found together with atokous individuals within galleries. Proceraea exoryxae sp. nov. constitutes the first known miner in the Autolytinae and the second species in this taxon known to live symbiotically with ascidians. The implications of finding this specialized parasite are discussed considering that Phallusia nigra has been introduced worldwide, in tropical and sub-tropical ecosystems, where it has the potential of becoming invasive.

  11. IDRC in the Caribbean

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Since the early 1970s, IDRC has supported the efforts of researchers in the English-speaking Caribbean to reduce poverty and inequality, restore degraded coastal ecosystems, and protect communities against disease and natural disasters. Research has helped to improve farming and fishing practices and tackle.

  12. Small angle X-ray study of cellulose macromolecules produced by tunicates and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Mudrika; Windle, Alan H

    2014-07-01

    The organisation of poly-glucan chains into cellulose macromolecular microfibrils has been studied using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Three kinds of cellulose - bacterial cellulose (BC), nata-de-coco (NdC) (food grade bacterial cellulose) and tunicate cellulose (TC) have been investigated. Given the large ambiguity in literature on the microfibril dimensions owing to different methods and data analysis strategies, a method to extract dimensions of cellulose microfibrils using SAXS has been shown, which was found to be consistent across all the samples. The results have been verified with microscopy data. Two populations of microfibrils with different cross-section dimensions were identified. The dimensions of the rectangular cross-sections of BC were found to be 32nm by 16nm and 21nm by 10nm. The dimensions for NdC were calculated to be 25nm×8nm and 14nm×6nm and that for TC were determined to be 25nm×10nm and 15nm×8nm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Pod Corn Is Caused by Rearrangement at the Tunicate1 Locus[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jong-Jin; Jackson, David; Martienssen, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Pod corn (Zea mays var tunicata) was once regarded as ancestral to cultivated maize, and was prized by pre-Columbian cultures for its magical properties. Tunicate1 (Tu1) is a dominant pod corn mutation in which kernels are completely enclosed in leaflike glumes. Here we show that Tu1 encodes a MADS box transcription factor expressed in leaves whose 5′ regulatory region is fused by a 1.8-Mb chromosomal inversion to the 3′ region of a gene expressed in the inflorescence. Both genes are further duplicated, accounting for classical derivative alleles isolated by recombination, and Tu1 transgenes interact with these derivative alleles in a dose-dependent manner. In young ear primordia, TU1 proteins are nuclearly localized in specific cells at the base of spikelet pair meristems. Tu1 branch determination defects resemble those in ramosa mutants, which encode regulatory proteins expressed in these same cells, accounting for synergism in double mutants discovered almost 100 years ago. The Tu1 rearrangement is not found in ancestral teosinte and arose after domestication of maize. PMID:22829149

  14. How diverse is the oxygen consumption during the life cycle of the pelagic tunicate Dolioletta gegenbauri?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, M.; Paffenhofer, G. A.

    2016-02-01

    The goal of our study was to study the intraspecies physiological diversity of different life stages of the pelagic tunicate Dolioletta gegenbauri (Tunicata, Thaliacea) that occur intermittently in high abundances on the shelf off the southeastern US. The complex life cycle of this species starts with solitary oozooids that develop to nurses with colonies of feeding trophozooids and phorozooids. As the latter mature they produce clusters of gonozooids. As oxygen consumption is a good physiological indicator for metabolic expenditures, we quantified the oxygen consumption of different zooids of D. gegenbauri (nurses, phorozooids and gonozooids) at environmental conditions. Oxygen consumption rates were determined from changes in oxygen concentration that were monitored non-invasively and continuously by an innovative sensor system in time-series-experiments. Specific oxygen consumption rates varied considerably and were related to moving activity, feeding behaviour, biomass, and growth of different life stages of doliolids. The results of our study will advance our understanding of variability in oxygen consumption of different stages of doliolid development due to their specific ecological role.

  15. Caribbean AIDS explosion examined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-13

    Homophobia, sex tourism, infidelity, and poverty are major factors causing a rapid explosion of AIDS and increasingly infecting women in the Caribbean. The region has the second largest incidence of AIDS in the world after Africa. The number of people with the HIV virus is likely greater than 500,000 and could be as high as 700,000, about twice the previously reported figures. Societal norms encourage homosexuals to have heterosexual relationships, and married men to have extramarital affairs, while poverty forces men and women to prostitution, often with tourists. In addition, a survey of 8100 school children in 4 English-speaking Caribbean islands revealed that 42% of the children had experienced sex before the age of 10 years; 62% had experienced it by age 12. This finding may reflect a high rate of child molestation in the region.

  16. Rodents of the Caribbean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Mouatt, Julia Thidamarth Vilstrup; Raghavan, Maanasa

    2014-01-01

    The Capromyidae (hutias) are endemic rodents of the Caribbean and represent a model of dispersal for non-flying mammals in the Greater Antilles. This family has experienced severe extinctions during the Holocene and its phylogenetic affinities with respect to other caviomorph relatives are still ...... (Bahamas, Cuba, Jamaica) hutias. Recent divergences among these western hutias suggest Plio-Pleistocene dispersal waves associated with glacial cycles....

  17. Reactions between vanadium ions and biogenic reductants of tunicates: spectroscopic probing for complexation and redox products in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, D E; Grant, K B; Nakanishi, K; Frank, P; Hodgson, K O

    1996-07-02

    Several species of marine tunicates store oxygen-sensitive VIII in blood cells. A sensitive colorimetric VIII assay was used to survey the leading candidates for the native reducing agent of vanadate in tunicates (i.e., An-type tunichromes, glutathione, NADPH, and H2S) in reactions with VV or VIV ions under anaerobic, aqueous conditions at acidic or neutral pH. Except for the case of An-1 and VV ions in pH 7 buffer, the assay results for the biogenic reducing agents clearly showed that appreciable quantities of VIII products were not generated under the conditions tested. Therefore, the assay results place new limits on hypothetical mechanisms of VIII formation in vivo. For reactions between An-1 and VV ions in pH 7 buffer, low levels of VIII products could not be ruled out because of an interfering peak in the colorimetric assays. For similar reactions between VV ions and An-1, or an An-1,2 mixture, in mildly to moderately basic media, the product mixtures precipitated as greenish black solids. Analyses of the precipitated V/An mixtures using vanadium K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) showed that the major products were tris(catecholate)-type VIV complexes (65 +/- 6%) and bis(catecholate)-type VIVO complexes (20 +/- 4%). XAS analysis of the V/An-1 product mixture also provided evidence of a minor VIII component (9 +/- 5% of total V), notable for possible relevance to tunicate biochemistry. The combined results of XAS studies, spectrophotometric studies [Ryan, D. E., et al. (1996) Biochemistry 35, 8640-8650], and EPR studies [Grant, K. B., et al. (1996) J. Inorg. Biochem. (manuscript in preparation)] consistently establish that reactions between tunichromes (Mm-1 or An-1) and VV ions generate predominantly VIV-tunichrome complexes in neutral to moderately basic aqueous media.

  18. Characterization and transcription studies of a phytochelatin synthase gene from the solitary tunicate Ciona intestinalis exposed to cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franchi, Nicola [Department of Biology, University of Padova, Padova (Italy); Department of Biological, Chemical, Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, University of Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Piccinni, Ester [Department of Biology, University of Padova, Padova (Italy); Ferro, Diana [Department of Biology, University of Padova, Padova (Italy); Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität, Münster (Germany); Basso, Giuseppe [Department of Woman and Child Health, University of Padova, Padova (Italy); Spolaore, Barbara [CRIBI Biotechnology Centre, University of Padova, Padova (Italy); Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, University of Padova, Padova (Italy); Santovito, Gianfranco, E-mail: gianfranco.santovito@unipd.it [Department of Biology, University of Padova, Padova (Italy); Ballarin, Loriano [Department of Biology, University of Padova, Padova (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Ciona intestinalis have a functional phytochelatin synthase (PCS) gene (cipcs). • CiPCS amino acid sequence is phylogentically related to other metazoan PCSs. • CiPCS catalyze the synthesis of PC2. • cipcs are mostly transcribed in circulating hemocytes, in both tunic and blood lacunae. • Cadmium exposure results in a significant increase of cipcs and cipcna transcription. - Abstract: The major thiol-containing molecules involved in controlling the level of intracellular ROS in eukaryotes, acting as a nonenzymatic detoxification system, are metallothioneins (MTs), glutathione (GSH) and phytochelatins (PCs). Both MTs and GSH are well-known in the animal kingdom. PC was considered a prerogative of the plant kingdom but, in 2001, a phytochelatin synthase (PCS) gene was described in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans; additional genes encoding this enzyme were later described in the earthworm Eisenia fetida and in the parasitic nematode Schistosoma mansoni but scanty data are available, up to now, for Deuterostomes. Here, we describe the molecular characteristics and transcription pattern, in the presence of Cd, of a PCS gene from the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis, a ubiquitous solitary tunicate and demonstrate the presence of PCs in tissue extracts. We also studied mRNA localization by in situ hybridization. In addition, we analyzed the behavior of hemocytes and tunic cells consequent to Cd exposure as well as the transcription pattern of the Ciona orthologous for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), usually considered a proliferation marker, and observed that cell proliferation occurs after 96 h of Cd treatment. This matches the hypothesis of Cd-induced cell proliferation, as already suggested by previous data on the expression of a metallothionein gene in the same animal.

  19. Physical and functional properties of tunicate (Styela clava hydrolysate obtained from pressurized hydrothermal process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Jeong Lee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, marine tunicate Styela clava hydrolysate was produced by an environment friendly and green technology, pressurized hot water hydrolysis (PHWH at different temperatures (125–275 °C and pressure 50 bar. A wide range of physico-chemical and bio-functional properties such as color, pH, protein content, total carbohydrate content, reducing sugar content, and radical scavenging activities of the produced hydrolysates were evaluated. The appearance (color of hydrolysates varied depending on the temperature; hydrolysates obtained at 125–150 °C were lighter, whereas at 175 °C gave reddish-yellow, and 225 °C gave dark brown hydrolysates. The L* (lightness, a* (red–green, and b* (yellow–blue values of the hydrolysates varied between 35.20 and 50.21, −0.28 and 9.59, and 6.45 and 28.82, respectively. The pH values of S. clava hydrolysates varied from 6.45 (125 °C to 8.96 (275 °C and the values were found to be increased as the temperature was increased. The hydrolysis efficiency of S. clava hydrolysate was ranged from 46.05 to 88.67% and the highest value was found at 250 °C. The highest protein, total carbohydrate content, and reducing sugar content of the hydrolysates were found 4.52 mg/g bovine, 11.48 mg/g and 2.77 mg/g at 175, and 200 and 200 °C, respectively. Hydrolysates obtained at lower temperature showed poor radical scavenging activity and the highest DPPH, ABTS, and FRAP activities were obtained 10.25, 14.06, and 10.91 mg trolox equivalent/g hydrolysate (dry matter basis, respectively. Therefore, S. clava hydrolysate obtained by PHWH at 225–250 °C and 50 bar is recommended for bio-functional food supplement preparation.

  20. The occurrence of domoic acid linked to a toxic diatom bloom in a new potential vector: the tunicate Pyura chilensis (piure).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rivera, Américo; Pinto, Maricela; Insinilla, Andrea; Suárez Isla, Benjamín; Uribe, Eduardo; Alvarez, Gonzalo; Lehane, Mary; Furey, Ambrose; James, Kevin J

    2009-11-01

    The tunicate Pyura chilensis (Molina, 1782); Phylum Chordata; Subphylum Urochordata; Class Ascidiacea, common local name "piure" or sea squirt; a filter-feeder (plankton and suspended particles) sessile species; may play an important role in monitoring domoic acid (DA) the principal toxic component of Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning (ASP). Significant DA concentrations have been determined in tunicate samples, collected during a recent ASP outbreak in Bahía Inglesa, an important scallop (Argopecten purpuratus) farming area. Several infaunal species were tested for the presence of DA, in addition to the usual scallop monitoring programme. DA was found at sub-toxic levels in filtering bivalves such as mussels (Mytilus chilensis), large mussels (Aulacomya ater) and clams (Protothaca thaca) (6.4, 5.4 and 4.7 microg DA/g tissue respectively). Of particular interest was the observation of significant accumulations of toxic Pseudo-nitzschia sp. diatoms in the internal siphon and atrium spaces of the tunicate. Toxin distribution within major tunicate organs was heterogeneous with 8.7-15.5 microg DA/g in edible tissues, 14.9-17.9 microg DA/g in the fecal material and 13.6-32.7 microg DA/g in the gut content. DA was determined by HPLC-UV and confirmed by diode-array detection and LC-MS/MS analysis. This is the first report of the presence of DA in a tunicate that is regularly consumed by coastal populations. These results confirm the need to include these organisms in sanitation programs for marine toxins.

  1. The Caribbean after-shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canak, W L; Levy, D

    1988-03-01

    The population of the Caribbean islands, is expected to double by the mid-21st century, placing new pressures on local labor markets and economic resources and increasing the need for social expenditures. Most of this growth will take place in urban areas. Emigration to the US is an increasingly important trend, especially in the Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Jamaica, and local Caribbean economies are linked with labor markets in the US through a system of family remittances. Oil price hikes, escalating debt burdens, and falling export prices have created an economic crisis in the Caribbean since the late 1970s. There has been double-digit inflation, rising unemployment, and only sporadic growth in the gross national product. The Caribbean Basin Initiative, established by the Reagan Administration, provides the Caribbean nations with duty-free export entry to the US market for 12 years and targets manufacturing, tourism, agriculture, and foreign investment for growth. Overall, however, the results of this initiative have been an effective subsidy to US investors and little stimulus for growth in locally owned businesses. Haiti and the Dominican Republic are the islands with the most poverty, while Trinidad and Tobago are the most prosperous. Puerto Rico plays an important role in the Caribbean region, serving as a link between North and South America and between cultural differences.

  2. Isolation and Total Synthesis of Stolonines A–C, Unique Taurine Amides from the Australian Marine Tunicate Cnemidocarpa stolonifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trong D. Tran

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cnemidocarpa stolonifera is an underexplored marine tunicate that only occurs on the tropical to subtropical East Coast of Australia, with only two pyridoacridine compounds reported previously. Qualitative analysis of the lead-like enhanced fractions of C. stolonifera by LC-MS dual electrospray ionization coupled with PDA and ELSD detectors led to the identification of three new natural products, stolonines A–C (1–3, belonging to the taurine amide structure class. Structures of the new compounds were determined by NMR and MS analyses and later verified by total synthesis. This is the first time that the conjugates of taurine with 3-indoleglyoxylic acid, quinoline-2-carboxylic acid and β-carboline-3-carboxylic acid present in stolonines A–C (1–3, respectively, have been reported. An immunofluorescence assay on PC3 cells indicated that compounds 1 and 3 increased cell size, induced mitochondrial texture elongation, and caused apoptosis in PC3 cells.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of living tunicate blood cells and the structure of the native vanadium chromogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R M

    1975-01-01

    The 1-H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of living tunicate blood cells was examined in an attempt to develop a biophysical assay for the native vanadium chromogen. The living cell spectrum was found to exhibit a broad 21 ppm downfield Gaussian signal which, however, disappears immediately upon cell disruption. Examination of the properties of this extremely low field signal revealed that it corresponds to a labile vanadium (III) aquo complex contained in the cell vacuoles, that vanadium(III) concentrations are rigidly regulated within these vacuoles, and that artifact formation does occur in the hemolysate. The living cell spectrum also indicates the number of ligand-bound vanadium(III) coordination sites in the native blood pigment. Results are discussed relation to the possible functions of the vandium chromogen. Images PMID:1056026

  4. Isolation and Characterization of a Shewanella Phage–Host System from the Gut of the Tunicate, Ciona intestinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Leigh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Outnumbering all other biological entities on earth, bacteriophages (phages play critical roles in structuring microbial communities through bacterial infection and subsequent lysis, as well as through horizontal gene transfer. While numerous studies have examined the effects of phages on free-living bacterial cells, much less is known regarding the role of phage infection in host-associated biofilms, which help to stabilize adherent microbial communities. Here we report the cultivation and characterization of a novel strain of Shewanella fidelis from the gut of the marine tunicate Ciona intestinalis, inducible prophages from the S. fidelis genome, and a strain-specific lytic phage recovered from surrounding seawater. In vitro biofilm assays demonstrated that lytic phage infection affects biofilm formation in a process likely influenced by the accumulation and integration of the extracellular DNA released during cell lysis, similar to the mechanism that has been previously shown for prophage induction.

  5. Survey report: Eastern Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yinger, N

    1991-01-01

    Over 1 million people live on 8 small islands in the Eastern Caribbean: St. Kitts-Nevis, Montserrat, Grenada, St. Vincent, Antigua, Barbados, St. Lucia, and Dominica. Starting in 1985 the International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region has carried out a series of contraceptive prevalence surveys in these countries. Current information is provided by these surveys in the areas of fertility levels and preferences, contraceptive knowledge and use. Also, socioeconomic, historical and demographic background and analysis such as fertility patterns, desire for additional children, and breastfeeding data; contraceptive awareness including family planning methods and sources; contraceptive use by method, source, and timing, satisfaction, and male attitudes are provided in the surveys, but not in the report abstracted here. The total fertility rate (TFR) and the contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) for the 8 islands are as follows: St. Kitts-Nevis (1984) 2.9 TFR, 40.6 CPR; St. Vincent (1988) 2.9 TFR, 58.3 CPR; Antigua (1988) 1.8 TFR, 52.6 CPR; Barbados (1988) not given, 55.0 CPR; St. Lucia (1988) 3.2 TFR, 47.3 CPR; Dominica (1987) 3.2 TFR, 49.8 CPR. The islands have unusual demographic patterns related to extensive out-migration.

  6. Artists in and out of the Caribbean

    OpenAIRE

    Sally Price; Sally Price

    1999-01-01

    [First paragraph] Caribbean Art. VEERLE POUPEYE. London: Thames and Hudson, 1998. 224 pp. (Paper US$ 14.95) Transforming the Crown: African, Asian and Caribbean Artists in Britain, 1966-1996. MORA J. BEAUCHAMP-BYRD & M. FRANKLIN SIRMANS (eds.). New York: Caribbean Cultural Center, 1998. 177 pp. (Paper US$ 39.95, £31.95) "Caribbean" (like "Black British") culture is (as a Dutch colleague once said of postmodernism) a bit of a slippery fish. One of the books under ...

  7. Polyplacophora of the Caribbean Region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaas, P.

    1972-01-01

    The present monograph has been drawn up chiefly from material collected by Dr. P. WAGENAAR HUMMELINCK, secretary of the Foundation for Scientific Research in Surinam and the Netherlands Antilles, during his trips to the Caribbean in 1936/37, 1948/49, 1955, 1963, and 1967. This collection comprises

  8. Prehistoric settlements in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter L. Drewett

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Mesoamerican archaeology has focused mainly on the ancient civilizations of the mainland, but knowledge of early settlement, society and economy in the Caribbean islands is essential for our understanding of the prehistory of the region as a whole. Institute staff and students are currently working in three islands: Puerto Rico, Tortola and Barbados.

  9. Sidney Mintz and Caribbean Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel Baud

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Empirical Futures: Anthropologists and Historians Engage the Work of Sidney W. Mintz. George Baca, A isha Khan & Stephan Palmié (eds.. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2009. v + 232 pp. (Paper US$ 24.95 Three Ancient Colonies: Caribbean Themes and Variations. Sidney W. Mintz. Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 2010. xiv + 257 pp. (Cloth US$ 27.95 [First paragraph] There can be no doubt about the importance of U.S. anthropologist Sidney Mintz in the development of Caribbean Studies. His work has influenced both the historiography and anthropology of Caribbean slavery and the emergence of Caribbean peasant societies. Now two books have been published that interrogate the significance of his work. The first is an anthology that tries to build on Mintz’s ideas – as I will argue below, in a circumspect and not fully convincing way. In the second Mintz describes and compares the societies of Jamaica, Haiti, and Puerto Rico, and looks back on his work that started in the 1940s.

  10. Sidney Mintz and Caribbean Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baud, M.

    2011-01-01

    Review of:Empirical Futures: Anthropologists and Historians Engage the Work of Sidney W. Mintz. George Baca, A isha Khan & Stephan Palmié (eds.). Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2009. v + 232 pp. (Paper US$ 24.95)Three Ancient Colonies: Caribbean Themes and Variations. Sidney W.

  11. Rotaria of the Caribbean region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, de Marg.

    1977-01-01

    1. In this paper, a study of Rotifers has been made of extensive material, collected in the Caribbean province by Dr. P. WAGENAAR HUMMELINCK, between 1930 and 1973. 2. 64 species of Rotifers have been found. For 19 of these, particulars are given on their morphology, ecology and biogeographical

  12. From gelatinous to muscle food chain: rock cod Patagonotothen ramsayi recycles coelenterate and tunicate resources on the Patagonian Shelf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipkin, A; Laptikhovsky, V

    2013-11-01

    Stomach contents of 4808 fishes of 20 species caught in the eastern part of the Patagonian Shelf between 1999 and 2012 were analysed to assess dietary contributions of gelatinous plankton resources. Gelatinous plankton occurred in diets of seven species with two species, Patagonotothen ramsayi and Squalus acanthias, having >10% ctenophores in their diet. Consumption of gelatinous plankton was important in P. ramsayi and was strikingly seasonal, with maximum occurrence (up to 46% of non-empty stomachs) in late summer to autumn. Ctenophores were most abundant in P. ramsayi of 25-34 cm total length, L(T) whereas salps were more frequent in larger >35 cm L(T) individuals. In winter to spring, occurrence of gelatinous plankton in diets was minimal, reflecting their overall seasonal abundance in the ocean. The recent increase in abundance of P. ramsayi has enabled the species to recycle a significant proportion of the ecosystem production from gelatinous dead end to the main muscular food chain via seasonal reliance on ctenophores, jellyfish and tunicates. This additional influx of production that has been diverted from the gelatinous food chain favours the increase in abundance of several piscivorous top predators and affects the trophic web structure of the Patagonian Shelf ecosystem. © 2013 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  13. Identification and Bioactivity of Compounds from the Fungus Penicillium sp. CYE-87 Isolated from a Marine Tunicate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamiaa A. Shaala

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the course of our continuous interest in identifying bioactive compounds from marine microbes, we have investigated a tunicate-derived fungus, Penicillium sp. CYE-87. A new compound with the 1,4-diazepane skeleton, terretrione D (2, together with the known compounds, methyl-2-([2-(1H-indol-3-ylethyl]carbamoylacetate (1, tryptamine (3, indole-3-carbaldehyde (4, 3,6-diisobutylpyrazin-2(1H-one (5 and terretrione C (6, were isolated from Penicillium sp. CYE-87. The structures of the isolated compounds were established by spectral analysis, including 1D (1H, 13C and 2D (COSY, multiplicity edited-HSQC and HMBC NMR and HRESIMS, as well as comparison of their NMR data with those in the literature. The compounds were evaluated for their antimigratory activity against the human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231 and their antiproliferation activity against HeLa cells. Compounds 2 and 6 showed significant antimigratory activity against MDA-MB-231, as well as antifungal activity against C. albicans.

  14. Symbiodinium photosynthesis in Caribbean octocorals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake D Ramsby

    Full Text Available Symbioses with the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium form the foundation of tropical coral reef communities. Symbiodinium photosynthesis fuels the growth of an array of marine invertebrates, including cnidarians such as scleractinian corals and octocorals (e.g., gorgonian and soft corals. Studies examining the symbioses between Caribbean gorgonian corals and Symbiodinium are sparse, even though gorgonian corals blanket the landscape of Caribbean coral reefs. The objective of this study was to compare photosynthetic characteristics of Symbiodinium in four common Caribbean gorgonian species: Pterogorgia anceps, Eunicea tourneforti, Pseudoplexaura porosa, and Pseudoplexaura wagenaari. Symbiodinium associated with these four species exhibited differences in Symbiodinium density, chlorophyll a per cell, light absorption by chlorophyll a, and rates of photosynthetic oxygen production. The two Pseudoplexaura species had higher Symbiodinium densities and chlorophyll a per Symbiodinium cell but lower chlorophyll a specific absorption compared to P. anceps and E. tourneforti. Consequently, P. porosa and P. wagenaari had the highest average photosynthetic rates per cm2 but the lowest average photosynthetic rates per Symbiodinium cell or chlorophyll a. With the exception of Symbiodinium from E. tourneforti, isolated Symbiodinium did not photosynthesize at the same rate as Symbiodinium in hospite. Differences in Symbiodinium photosynthetic performance could not be attributed to Symbiodinium type. All P. anceps (n = 9 and P. wagenaari (n = 6 colonies, in addition to one E. tourneforti and three P. porosa colonies, associated with Symbiodinium type B1. The B1 Symbiodinium from these four gorgonian species did not cluster with lineages of B1 Symbiodinium from scleractinian corals. The remaining eight E. tourneforti colonies harbored Symbiodinium type B1L, while six P. porosa colonies harbored type B1i. Understanding the symbioses between gorgonian corals and

  15. The European Union – Caribbean Relation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, Morten

    2016-01-01

    EU diplomats consider the Caribbean countries to be allies and therefore expect these countries to support the EU in international affairs – but they find that this support has been waning in recent years. Caribbean diplomats and politicians do not share the European viewpoint. Rather, they take ...... the view that the EU has forgotten its Caribbean allies and instead channels its attention and funding towards Sub-Saharan Africa. This article examines to what extent this asserted ‘rift’ really signals a profound change in the EU-Caribbean relations....

  16. Brian Meeks, Envisioning Caribbean Futures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay R. Mandle

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this feature we highlight a recently launched book. We invite specialists in the field to comment on the book, and we invite the author to respond to their comments. In this issue we focus on Brian Meeks's, Envisioning Caribbean Futures. Those invited to comment on the book are Jay Mandle and Rivke Jaffe. [First paragraph] In Envisioning Caribbean Futures: Jamaican Perspectives (2007, Brian Meeks writes “in sympathy with the new social movements that have evolved in the past decade which assert boldly that ‘another world is possible’” (p. 2. His effort is “to explore the horizons for different approaches to social living in Jamaica and the Caribbean in the twenty-first century” (p. 2. In this, he “seeks to move beyond a statement of general principles to propose specific alternatives” in order to “stimulate a conversation that looks beyond the horizon of policy confines, yet is not so far removed as to appear hopelessly utopian” (p. 3. My hope with this essay is to advance that conversation, in the first place by reviewing and assessing Meeks’s contribution and then by extending the discussion to the role that Jamaica’s diaspora (and by extension that of the region’s generally might play in moving the country, as Meeks puts it, from its current “state of crime and murder, and the broad undermining of the rule of law that pervades the society” (p. 71.

  17. Trans-Atlantic variability in ecology of the pelagic tunicate Salpa thompsoni near the Antarctic Polar Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomov, Evgeny A.; Hunt, Brian P. V.

    2017-04-01

    The distribution, density, demography and feeding dynamics of the pelagic tunicate Salpa thompsoni were investigated during the trans-Atlantic ANTARKTIS XXVIII/3 expedition to the Southern Ocean, on board RV Polarstern, between January and March 2012. Net samples were collected using an RMT-8 at four major sampling regions in the proximity of the Antarctic Polar Front (APF): along a 10°E transect, Salpastan, 12°W eulerian study, and the South Georgia Basin. Salps, mostly S. thompsoni, were found at all but one station and with few exceptions contributed Salp abundance and biomass was lowest (6.2 ind.1000 m-3 and 0.8 mgDW m-3) north of the APF along the 10°E transect and highest (3150 ind.1000 m-3 and 20.5 mgDW m-3) at the Salpastan station south of the APF. Size distributions of S. thompsoni aggregates and solitaries, and their developmental dynamics, were similar in all locations except the Salpastan region. In aggregates, the overall salp size distributions were strongly right-tailed with the mass of the distribution always concentrated in the left where small aggregates (6-10 mm) dominated. During the eulerian study at 12°W, several cohorts of aggregates and solitaries were traceable allowing assessment of the daily growth rates of S. thompsoni. Estimated in situ growth rates of aggregates and solitaries were 0.53±0.18 and 2.83±0.42 mm day-1, respectively, and the complete S. thompsoni life cycle duration (sexual+asexual) during austral summer at the APF region may have been as short as 2-3 months. The rapid growth rates of S. thompsoni found in this study urgently require further research to re-evaluate salp life cycle in the Southern Ocean.

  18. Languages in Contemporary Anglophone Caribbean Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davids, Melva P.

    2013-01-01

    The paper Languages in Contemporary Anglophone Caribbean Societies examines how language is treated in Jamaica and other Anglophone Caribbean societies and the effects of a haphazard approach to language planning on the social dynamics of the society as well as the individual. It briefly explores how Language is handled in Francophone or…

  19. ICT Enabled Disaster Communications for Vulnerable Caribbean ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus Research Program. A new funding opportunity on Zika virus is responding to the virus outbreak and the health threat it represents for the affected populations in the hardest hit countries in Latin America and the... View moreCanada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus ...

  20. Electronic Government : Caribbean Pilot Project | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus Research Program. A new funding opportunity on Zika virus is responding to the virus outbreak and the health threat it represents for the affected populations in the hardest hit countries in Latin America and the... View moreCanada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus ...

  1. Cimate change impacts within the Dutch Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debrot, A.O.

    2016-01-01

    The most recent climate change predictions for the Caribbean region (2013/2014) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) are alarming and suggest that the islands of the Dutch Caribbean will go through profound environmental changes within the next century.

  2. Resources for Teaching about the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, Toni Fuss

    2000-01-01

    Provides a list of resources to aid educators in teaching about the Caribbean. Includes outreach centers for Latin American and Caribbean studies, publishers and distributors, curriculum resource guides and monographs for teachers, citations of children's literature, and a website providing links to embassies. (CMK)

  3. British African Caribbean Women and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkison-Bradley, Carla; Maynard, Donna; Johnson, Phillip; Carter, Stephaney

    2009-01-01

    Depression is a common condition among women in the United Kingdom. However, little is known about the context of depression among British African Caribbean women. This article offers a preliminary discussion regarding issues and information pertaining to depression among British African Caribbean women. Characteristics and symptoms of depression…

  4. Caribbean tectonics and relative plate motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, K.; Dewey, J. F.; Cooper, C.; Mann, P.; Pindell, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    During the last century, three different ways of interpreting the tectonic evolution of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean have been proposed, taking into account the Bailey Willis School of a permanent pre-Jurassic deep sea basin, the Edward Suess School of a subsided continental terrain, and the Alfred Wegener School of continental separation. The present investigation is concerned with an outline of an interpretation which follows that of Pindell and Dewey (1982). An attempt is made to point out ways in which the advanced hypotheses can be tested. The fit of Africa, North America, and South America is considered along with aspects of relative motion between North and South America since the early Jurasic. Attention is given to a framework for reconstructing Caribbean plate evolution, the evolution of the Caribbean, the plate boundary zones of the northern and southern Caribbean, and the active deformation of the Caribbean plate.

  5. Comparison of the properties of cellulose nanocrystals and cellulose nanofibrils isolated from bacteria, tunicate, and wood processed using acid, enzymatic, mechanical, and oxidative methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacui, Iulia A; Nieuwendaal, Ryan C; Burnett, Daniel J; Stranick, Stephan J; Jorfi, Mehdi; Weder, Christoph; Foster, E Johan; Olsson, Richard T; Gilman, Jeffery W

    2014-05-14

    This work describes the measurement and comparison of several important properties of native cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs), such as crystallinity, morphology, aspect ratio, and surface chemistry. Measurement of the fundamental properties of seven different CNCs/CNFs, from raw material sources (bacterial, tunicate, and wood) using typical hydrolysis conditions (acid, enzymatic, mechanical, and 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediated oxidation), was accomplished using a variety of measurement methods. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to conclude that CNCs, which are rodlike in appearance, have a higher crystallinity than CNFs, which are fibrillar in appearance. CNC aspect ratio distributions were measured and ranged from 148±147 for tunicate-CNCs to 23±12 for wood-CNCs. Hydrophobic interactions, measured using inverse gas chromatography (IGC), were found to be an important contribution to the total surface energy of both types of cellulose. In all cases, a trace amount of naturally occurring fluorescent compounds was observed after hydrolysis. Confocal and Raman microscopy were used to confirm that the fluorescent species were unique for each cellulose source, and demonstrated that such methods can be useful for monitoring purity during CNC/CNF processing. This study reveals the broad, tunable, multidimensional material space in which CNCs and CNFs exist.

  6. Probing crystal structure and mesoscale assembly of cellulose microfibrils in plant cell walls, tunicate tests, and bacterial films using vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christopher M; Kafle, Kabindra; Park, Yong Bum; Kim, Seong H

    2014-06-14

    This study reports that the noncentrosymmetry and phase synchronization requirements of the sum frequency generation (SFG) process can be used to distinguish the three-dimensional organization of crystalline cellulose distributed in amorphous matrices. Crystalline cellulose is produced as microfibrils with a few nanometer diameters by plants, tunicates, and bacteria. Crystalline cellulose microfibrils are embedded in wall matrix polymers and assembled into hierarchical structures that are precisely designed for specific biological and mechanical functions. The cellulose microfibril assemblies inside cell walls are extremely difficult to probe. The comparison of vibrational SFG spectra of uniaxially-aligned and disordered films of cellulose Iβ nanocrystals revealed that the spectral features cannot be fully explained with the crystallographic unit structure of cellulose. The overall SFG intensity, the alkyl peak shape, and the alkyl/hydroxyl intensity ratio are sensitive to the lateral packing and net directionality of the cellulose microfibrils within the SFG coherence length scale. It was also found that the OH SFG stretch peaks could be deconvoluted to find the polymorphic crystal structures of cellulose (Iα and Iβ). These findings were used to investigate the cellulose crystal structure and mesoscale cellulose microfibril packing in intact plant cell walls, tunicate tests, and bacterial films.

  7. Highly conserved elements discovered in vertebrates are present in non-syntenic loci of tunicates, act as enhancers and can be transcribed during development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanges, Remo; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Gueroult-Bellone, Marion; Roure, Agnes; Ferg, Marco; Meola, Nicola; Amore, Gabriele; Basu, Swaraj; Brown, Euan R.; De Simone, Marco; Petrera, Francesca; Licastro, Danilo; Strähle, Uwe; Banfi, Sandro; Lemaire, Patrick; Birney, Ewan; Müller, Ferenc; Stupka, Elia

    2013-01-01

    Co-option of cis-regulatory modules has been suggested as a mechanism for the evolution of expression sites during development. However, the extent and mechanisms involved in mobilization of cis-regulatory modules remains elusive. To trace the history of non-coding elements, which may represent candidate ancestral cis-regulatory modules affirmed during chordate evolution, we have searched for conserved elements in tunicate and vertebrate (Olfactores) genomes. We identified, for the first time, 183 non-coding sequences that are highly conserved between the two groups. Our results show that all but one element are conserved in non-syntenic regions between vertebrate and tunicate genomes, while being syntenic among vertebrates. Nevertheless, in all the groups, they are significantly associated with transcription factors showing specific functions fundamental to animal development, such as multicellular organism development and sequence-specific DNA binding. The majority of these regions map onto ultraconserved elements and we demonstrate that they can act as functional enhancers within the organism of origin, as well as in cross-transgenesis experiments, and that they are transcribed in extant species of Olfactores. We refer to the elements as ‘Olfactores conserved non-coding elements’. PMID:23393190

  8. Analysis of a botryllid enriched-full-length cDNA library: insight into the evolution of spliced leader trans-splicing in tunicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Fabio; Shimeld, Sebastian M

    2011-03-01

    In some animals, mRNA may be modified after transcription by the addition of a 5' spliced leader sequence. This is known as spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing, and is of uncertain function and evolutionary origin. Here, we report the identification of SL trans-splicing in the colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri. Combining our own expressed sequence tag (EST) data with additional data from GenBank, we identify the dominant spliced leader sequence and show it to be similar to that of other ascidians and to that of Oikopleura dioica, a basally diverging tunicate. Gene Ontology analysis of B. schlosseri ESTs with and without a 5' spliced leader shows that genes encoding ribosomal proteins tend not to be trans-spliced, a character shared with the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. We also examine individual cases of genes that produce mRNAs that are SL trans-spliced in B. schlosseri but not in C. intestinalis. We conclude that SL trans-splicing evolved early in the tunicate lineage and shows stability over considerable evolutionary time. However, SL trans-splicing may be gained or lost in individual genes.

  9. Artists in and out of the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Price

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] Caribbean Art. VEERLE POUPEYE. London: Thames and Hudson, 1998. 224 pp. (Paper US$ 14.95 Transforming the Crown: African, Asian and Caribbean Artists in Britain, 1966-1996. MORA J. BEAUCHAMP-BYRD & M. FRANKLIN SIRMANS (eds.. New York: Caribbean Cultural Center, 1998. 177 pp. (Paper US$ 39.95, £31.95 "Caribbean" (like "Black British" culture is (as a Dutch colleague once said of postmodernism a bit of a slippery fish. One of the books under review here presents the eclectic artistic productions of professional artists with Caribbean identities of varying sorts - some of them lifelong residents of the region (defined broadly to stretch from Belize and the Bahamas to Curacao and Cayenne, some born in the Caribbean but living elsewhere, and others from far-away parts of the world who have lingered or settled in the Caribbean. The other focuses on artists who trace their cultural heritage variously to Lebanon, France, Malaysia, Spain, China, England, Guyana, India, the Caribbean, the Netherlands, the Philippines, and the whole range of societies in West, East, and Central Africa, all of whom meet under a single ethnic label in galleries in New York and London. Clearly, the principles that vertebrate Caribbean Art and Transforming the Crown are built on the backs of ambiguities, misperceptions, ironies, and ethnocentric logics (not to mention their stronger variants, such as racism. Yet far from invalidating the enterprise, they offer an enlightening inroad to the social, cultural, economic, and political workings of artworlds that reflect globally orchestrated pasts of enormous complexity.

  10. Caribbean | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    speaking Caribbean. Our work has helped reduce poverty and inequality, restore degraded coastal systems, and protect communities against disease and natural disasters. Our research has also helped improve farming and fishing practices, and ...

  11. 75 FR 9574 - Caribbean Trade Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-03

    ..., the Caribbean Region is the 3rd largest export market for U.S. manufactured goods in Latin America..., tied closely together by geography, history, and culture. The region as a whole represents a market of...

  12. Caribbean Marine Mammal Assessment Vessel Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data sets are a compilation of large vessel surveys for marine mammal stock assessments in Caribbean waters conducted during 2000-2001. These surveys were...

  13. Forest fires in the insular Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, A Marcus J; Eckelmann, Claus-Martin; Quiñones, Maya

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a summary of the forest fire reports in the insular Caribbean derived from both management reports and an analysis of publicly available Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrodiometer (MODIS) satellite active fire products from the region. A vast difference between the amount of fires reported by land managers and fire points in the MODIS Fire Information for Resource Management System data can be observed. Future research is recommended to better understand the nature of these differences. While there is a general lack of available statistical data on forest fires in the Caribbean, a few general observations can be made: Forest fires occur mainly in dry forest types (500 to 1000 mm of mean annual rainfall). These are also the areas where most human settlements are located. Lowland high forests and montane forests with higher rainfall (1000 and more mm y(-1)) are less susceptible to forest fire, but they can burn in exceptionally dry years. Most of the dry forest ecosystems in the Caribbean can be considered to be fire-sensitive ecosystems, while the pine forests in the Caribbean (Cuba, Dominican Republic, and the Bahamas) are maintained by wildfires. In fire-sensitive ecosystems, uncontrolled burning often encourages the spread of alien invasive species. A Caribbean Fire Management Cooperation Strategy was developed between 2005 and 2006 under auspices of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. This regional strategy aims to strengthen Caribbean fire management networking by encouraging closer collaboration among countries with similar ecological conditions. The strategy for the Caribbean identifies a number of research, training, and management activities to improve wildfire management capacity in the Caribbean.

  14. [Changes in biomechanical properties of the ocular fibrous tunic in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma in response to drug-induced stress-relief tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makashova, N V; Vasilyeva, A E

    2017-01-01

    To determine the effect of drug-induced stress-relief tests on biomechanical properties of the ocular fibrous tunic in eyes with early, moderate, or advanced primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). A total of 202 eyes of 150 patients with POAG of different severity (early, moderate, or advanced) and 36 eyes of 30 healthy controls were examined. The mean patient age was 62±8.2 years. All groups were standardized by age, sex, and the range of corneal-compensated intraocular pressure (IOP) at baseline (21-30 mmHg). All patients underwent a standard ophthalmic examination, including visometry, biomicroscopy, gonioscopy, ophthalmoscopy, and Humphrey visual field assessment. Corneal hysteresis (CH), corneal resistance factor (CRF), CH-CRF difference, corneal-compensated IOP (IOPcc), and Goldmann-related IOP (IOPg) were measured with Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA, Reichert, USA). The axial eye length was measured on an ultrasonic A-scan (Ocuscan RxP, Alcon, USA) in the 10 MHz mode. CH and CRF variability analysis was conducted to assess changes in biomechanical properties of the fibrous tunic due to an IOP decrease and a tendency toward compensation. For the first time, the ratio between CH and CRF changes (ΔCH/ΔCRF) was used to evaluate biomechanical properties of the fibrous tunic. This ratio provides understanding of the significance of CH and CRF changes after reduction of IOP. In early glaucoma patients, it differed inconsiderably from the control group (p>0.05) and averaged 1.62±0.9. In moderate glaucoma, CH changes were more pronounced than those of CRF: ΔCH/ΔCRF - 2.03±2.41 (under conservative treatment) and 2.12±1.07 (without treatment). In advanced glaucoma an opposite pattern was observed: the CH/CRF ratio got closer to 1.0 largely due to CRF changes, while CH changes became much less pronounced (or even negative, in some cases): ΔCH/ΔCRF - 0.27±0.32 (under conservative treatment), 0.16±1.29 (without treatment). While the IOP decreased as a result of

  15. East Indians in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen M. Schnepel

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] Transients to Settlers: The Experience of Indians in Jamaica 1845-J950. VERENE SHEPHERD. Leeds, U.K.: Peepal Tree Books, 1993. 281 pp. (Paper £12.95 Survivors of Another Crossing: A History of East Indians in Trinidad, 1880-1946. MARIANNE D. SOARES RAMESAR. St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago: U.W.I. School of Continuing Education, 1994. xiii + 190 pp. (Paper n.p. Les Indes Antillaises: Presence et situation des communautes indiennes en milieu caribeen. ROGER TOUMSON (ed.. Paris: L'Harmattan, 1994. 264 pp. (Paper 140.00 FF Nation and Migration: The Politics of Space in the South Asian Diaspora. PETER VAN DER VEER (ed.. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1995. vi + 256 pp. (Cloth US$ 39.95, Paper US$ 17.95 In the decade since 1988, Caribbean nations with Indian communities have commemorated the 150th anniversary of the arrival of East Indians to the West Indies. These celebrations are part of local revitalization movements of Indian culture and identity stretching from the French departement of Guadeloupe in the Windward Islands to Trinidad and Guyana in the south. Political changes have mirrored the cultural revival in the region. While the debate so often in the past centered on the legitimacy of East Indian claims to local nationality in these societies where African or Creole cultures dominate, in the 1990s leaders of Indian descent were elected heads of government in the two Caribbean nations with the most populous East Indian communities: Cheddi Jagan as President of Guyana in October 1992 (after a 28-year hiatus and Basdeo Panday as Prime Minister of Trinidad in November 1995. Both men have long been associated with their respective countries' struggles for economic, political, and social equality. Outside the region during the summer of 1997, fiftieth-anniversary celebrations marking the independence of India and Pakistan from Britain confirmed that Indo chic — or "Indofrenzy" as anthropologist

  16. Poverty, drug abuse fuel Caribbean AIDS outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleski, S F

    1998-01-01

    Hatred and fear of homosexuals, together with a fear of losing tourism revenue, drove many high-level policymakers in the Caribbean to ignore the HIV/AIDS in its infancy. With an annual incidence rate of at least 146.6 people per 100,000, the Bahamas now has one of the highest AIDS rates in the world and the highest such rate in the English-speaking Caribbean. AIDS has become the major cause of death for men and women aged 20-44 in the Bahamas. Indeed, throughout the Caribbean, countries like the Bahamas must now cope with a growing AIDS epidemic. UN AIDS Program figures indicate that at least 310,000 people in the Caribbean have either HIV infection or AIDS, and that the prevalence rate among adults is almost 2%. This compares with an estimated 7.4% of the adult population of sub-Saharan Africa which is infected and 0.6% of adults in North America. 65% of reported AIDS cases in the region result from heterosexual intercourse. While the annual number of AIDS cases has been falling in North America over the last several years and rates in Latin America have leveled off, rates in the Caribbean are increasing sharply. Poverty, the population's lack of awareness, low levels of education, internal and international migration, crack cocaine use, promiscuity, high levels of STDs, prostitution, and tourism are also facilitating the spread of HIV in the Caribbean. Social conservatism, mainly in the English-Caribbean, about discussing sex impedes the implementation and success of HIV/AIDS prevention interventions.

  17. SEAMAP Caribbean Reef Fish Survey (PC1202, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Objectives of the 2012 SEAMAP Caribbean Reef Fish Survey were to assess relative abundance of reef fish species around the US Caribbean Islands, estimate...

  18. 77 FR 70419 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    .... Miguel A. Rol n, Executive Director, Caribbean Fishery Management Council, 268 Mu oz Rivera Avenue, Suite... contact Mr. Miguel A. Rol n, Executive Director, Caribbean Fishery Management Council, 268 Mu oz Rivera...

  19. SEAMAP Caribbean Reef Fish Survey (PC1202, ME70)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Objectives of the 2012 SEAMAP Caribbean Reef Fish Survey were to assess relative abundance of reef fish species around the US Caribbean Islands, estimate...

  20. Medical tourism in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez de Arellano, Annette B

    2011-01-01

    Although travel for medical reasons has a long history, it has more recently evolved from a cottage industry to a worldwide enterprise. A number of countries are positioning themselves to attract visitors who are willing to travel to obtain health services that are more accessible, less expensive, or more available than in their countries of origin. This has in turn given rise to medical packages that combine tourism with health. Several Caribbean nations - including Cuba, Barbados, Jamaica, and Puerto Rico - hope to expand their revenues in this new market. Each country has selected specific service niches and promotes its services accordingly. While Cuba has been promoting its services to other countries for several decades, medical tourism is just beginning in the other islands. Ultimately, these nations' economic success will hinge on their comparative advantage vis-à-vis other options, while their success in terms of improving their own health care depends on the extent to which the services for tourists are also available to the islands' populations.

  1. From the past to the globalized future for Caribbean birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph Wunderle Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Extinctions of Caribbean animals were well underway during the period of Amerindian occupation and have continued since the arrival of Columbus. Despite high extinction rates, the Caribbean still retains high levels of terrestrial biodiversity and, for some taxa, exceptionally high levels of endemism relative to other parts of the world. The fate of the Caribbean’s...

  2. The Caribbean, the U.S. and World Politics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singham, A.W.

    1981-01-01

    Attempts by major powers to redefine the Caribbean area in their own geopolitical terms are aimed at isolating the Caribbean and at stunting the development of its potentially important role in world politics. In defense of national sovereignty, Caribbean nations must retain links with other Third World and nonaligned countries. (Author/GC)

  3. Regulating private security companies in the Caribbean | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Diversity in local food production combats obesity in the Caribbean. In the Caribbean region, the combination of increased imports of processed foods and limited consumption of healthy foods, such as fresh fruit and. View moreDiversity in local food production combats obesity in the Caribbean ...

  4. 78 FR 69048 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... --Other Business December 12, 2013, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Overview of the Caribbean Large Marine Ecosystem Program... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC980 Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Caribbean Fishery Management Council...

  5. [Echinoderms (Echinodermata) of the Mexican Caribbean].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguarda-Figueras, Alfredo; Solis-Marín, Francisco A; Durán-González, Alicia; Ahearn, Cynthia Gust; Buitrón Sánchez, Blanca Estela; Torres-Vega, Juan

    2005-12-01

    A systematic list of the echinoderms of the Mexican Caribbean based on museum specimens of the Colección Nacional de Equinodermos, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. is presented. This list reveals an important echinoderm biodiversity in the Mexican Caribbean, where five of the six echinoderm classes are represented. A total of 178 echinoderm species is recorded, distributed in 113 genera, 51 families and 22 orders. 30 new records for the Mexican Caribbean are presents: Crínoidea (three), Asteroidea (two), Ophiuroidea (eleven), Echinoidea (one), Holothuroidea (thirteen).

  6. Towards indigenous feminist theorizing in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, P

    1998-01-01

    This theoretical study of feminism in the Caribbean opens by presenting the contemporary image of the Caribbean and then pointing to the continuing influence of the colonial past in the creation of contemporary community and the establishment of identity. The paper continues with a focus on three aspects of identity, or difference, that have influenced the daily articulation of feminism and academic debates. The first concerns the positions taken by women in the region's political struggles. The second is an exploration of the linguistic meanings of the gender discourse within the region. Finally, the essay examines the idea of linguistic difference in light of contemporary Western feminist views of "sexual difference" versus equality. The discussion of each of these issues is grounded in historical analysis and illustrated with specific examples. The study concludes that, in this region, feminism offers a new way to investigate the past while creating challenges and opportunities in the struggle to establish a Caribbean identity.

  7. Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat, Sustainable Development Secretariat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fevrier, C.

    1999-11-01

    In spite of low petroleum prices, energy remains a significant issue in the development thrust of the Caribbean. With the exception of Trinidad and Tobago and to a lesser extent Barbados the region relies on imported petroleum for its commercial energy needs. The Secretariat will continue to pursue collaboration with agencies in the hemisphere so that the potential of the renewable energy resource of the Caribbean region can be fully utilized. This commitment is being demonstrated with collaboration with the Caribbean Energy Information System (CEIS), The University of the West Indies Centre for Environment and Development (UWICED) and the Latin American Energy Organization and the Climate Institute in formulating projects and programmes in the Energy Sector. (EHS)

  8. Caribbean literary theory: modernist and postmodern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. James Arnold

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] The Repeating Mand: The Caribbean and the Postmodern Perspective. ANTONIO BENITEZ-ROJO. Durham NC: Duke University Press, 1992. xi + 303 pp. (Cloth US$ 49.95, Paper US$ 15.95 Myth and History in Caribbean Fiction: Alejo Carpentier, Wilson Harris, and Edouard Glissant. BARBARA J. WEBB. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1992. x + 185 pp. (Cloth US$ 25.00 Caribbean literature has been overtaken of late by the quarrels that have pitted postmodernists against modernists in Europe and North America for the past twenty years. The modernists, faced with the fragmentation of the region that hard-nosed pragmatists and empiricists could only see as hostile to the emergence of any common culture, had sought in myth and its literary derivatives the collective impulse to transcend the divisions wrought by colonial history. Fifteen years ago I wrote a book that combined in its lead title the terms Modernism and Negritude in an effort to account for the efforts by mid-century Caribbean writers to come to grips with this problem. A decade later I demonstrated that one of the principal Caribbean modernists, Aimé Césaire, late in his career adopted stylistic characteristics that we associate with the postmodern (Arnold 1990. The example of Césaire should not be taken to suggest that we are dealing with some sort of natural evolution of modernism toward the postmodern. In fact the two terms represent competing paradigms that organize concepts and data so differently as to offer quite divergent maps of the literary Caribbean.

  9. Cancer incidence and mortality in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Adrienne A; Jacobson, Judith S; Magai, Carol; Consedine, Nathan; Horowicz-Mehler, Nathalie C; Neugut, Alfred I

    2007-09-01

    Nearly 10% of immigrants to the United States come from the Caribbean region. In this paper, we analyzed incidence and mortality rates of the major cancers in the Bahamas, Barbados, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, and Trinidad and Tobago, and compared them with US patterns. We obtained age-standardized, sex-specific cancer incidence and mortality rates for cancers of the bladder, breast, cervix, esophagus, large bowel, liver, lung, pancreas, prostate, and stomach for 8 Caribbean countries and the United States from the GLOBOCAN program of the International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC) and for the U.S. population from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the NCI. GLOBOCAN incidence and mortality rates for the overall United States were lower than but correlated with overall SEER rates. Based on GLOBOCAN data, the incidence and mortality rates of cancers of the breast, prostate, large bowel, and lung, and, among males, bladder cancer were lower in the Caribbean countries than the United States. Caribbean countries had higher rates of cancers of the cervix, esophagus, liver, and stomach. Haiti had the highest incidence and mortality rates of cervix and liver cancers. Jamaica and Haiti had the highest rates of stomach cancer. Cancer incidence and mortality in the Caribbean generally follow known patterns of association with economic development, infectious agents, and racial/ethnic origin. Studying these patterns and how immigration changes them may yield clues to cancer etiology. A better understanding of cancer incidence and mortality rates may help health policymakers to implement state-of-the-art treatment and preventive services for people of Caribbean descent both in their native countries and in immigrant communities in the United States.

  10. Fostering Entrepreneurship in the Caribbean | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project seeks to answer the following questions: Can entrepreneurs play a significant role in promoting economic advancement in the Caribbean? ... Women in the developing world continue to face obstacles that limit their ability to establish careers and become leaders in the fields of science, technology, engineering, ...

  11. Networks for Development : Caribbean Information and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The second component, Rethinking ICT Policy and Regulation, will examine policymaking and regulation formulation and their implementation across four jurisdictions: Barbados, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, and the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States. All these jurisdictions have implemented ICT reforms with ...

  12. Caribbean Knowledge Economy : Coordinating Network | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    A special effort will be made to involve representatives from Haiti in order to provide insights into the reconstruction process. The project will include training in the use of Outcome Mapping for impact evaluation, and support to the University of the West Indies (UWI) to establish a virtual institute for the Caribbean knowledge ...

  13. Latin America and the Caribbean | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Our projects that capitalize on local and global knowledge bring strength to our quest for lasting solutions. Our aim? Long-term sustainability of development in Latin America and the Caribbean through economic growth, equitable access to health and social services, sustainable natural resources, and civil security. And we ...

  14. Canada: psychosis in the immigrant Caribbean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Mary V

    2011-09-01

    Many reports from European countries suggest that acute episodes of psychosis are more frequent among immigrants from the Caribbean than among their non-immigrant peers. The aim of this selective review is to examine how the social correlates of migration to Canada interact with biological mechanisms to contribute to psychosis in the Caribbean population. PubMed and JSTOR social science databases (between 1966 and 2010) were searched using the following search terms: psychiatric genetics; dopamine pathways; Caribbean family structure and child rearing; cannabis and psychosis; obstetric complications and schizophrenia; social defeat; social capital; racial discrimination; urbanicity; immigration; assimilation; and immigration. This was followed by the cross-checking of references pertinent to Canada. There was no information about the prevalence of psychosis in Afro-Caribbean immigrant groups to Canada. There was a suggestion that the form the acute episode takes may differ, depending perhaps on the island of origin. Ethnicity and migration influence susceptibility and response to psychotic illness in a number of distinct and interacting ways depending both on the host country and the country of origin. Understanding the pathways can help to protect the health of immigrants.

  15. Decolonization and life expectancy in the Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstraeten, S.P.A.; Van Oers, J.A.M.; Mackenbach, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    Decolonization has brought political independence to half the Caribbean states in the last half of the 20th century, while the other states remain affiliated. Previous studies suggested a beneficial impact of affiliated status on population health, which may be mediated by more favorable economic

  16. Latin American and Caribbean Environmental Economics Program ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Latin American and Caribbean Environmental Economics Program Phase III. A grant to improve a new generation of Latin American leaders' understanding of how to better manage natural resources will contribute to the region's economic and social development. Earlier IDRC grants helped the Latin American and ...

  17. Environmental Influences on Caribbean Fish Catch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Jury

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A Caribbean fishery index is used to identify contrasting environmental conditions in atmosphere and ocean reanalysis fields associated with high- and low-catch years over the period 1971–2004. A number of composite features are noted: cooler surface temperatures and warmer, drier weather across the southern half of the Caribbean favors higher catch rates. There is a ridge of elevated sea level on 16°N. South of the ridge the Caribbean Current is strengthened while north of the ridge anomalous eastward currents flow past the Antilles Islands. The atmospheric Hadley circulation weakens in years of high catch and tropical cyclones are rare. This paper uncovers basin-scale forcing of aggregate fish catch, reflecting a north-south gradient in land-atmosphere hydrology, and composite oceanographic differences based on reanalysis data. In addition, seasonal and interannual cycles of ocean productivity are investigated using satellite ocean color. Summertime upwelling along the coast of Venezuela joins fresher waters from the North Brazil Current to infuse the Caribbean ecosystem with higher nutrients.

  18. The Caribbean Bildungsroman: Notes on a Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Jacqueline Brice

    The universality of the childhood experience is a perspective that is useful in the classroom where the student body reflects the multiethnic, multicultural roots of American culture. The novels from the Caribbean can add new material to the body of world literature and should be included in a crosscultural study of the "bildungsroman"…

  19. Migration and rural development in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momsen, J D

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between migration and agricultural development in the Caribbean is examined. The data, collected by survey, concern the islands of Nevis, Montserrat, and Saint Lucia. The results show that migration is not associated with agricultural innovation or the use of specific technical inputs and that it frequently has a negative impact on agricultural productivity and attitudes toward farming.

  20. Presence of the tunicateAsterocarpa humilison ship hulls and aquaculture facilities in the coast of the Biobío Region, south central Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinochet, Javier; Leclerc, Jean-Charles; Brante, Antonio; Daguin-Thiébaut, Claire; Díaz, Christian; Tellier, Florence; Viard, Frédérique

    2017-01-01

    Non-native ascidians are important members of the fouling community associated with artificial substrata and man-made structures. Being efficient fouling species, they are easily spread by human-mediated transports (e.g., with aquaculture trade and maritime transports). This is exemplified by the ascidian Asterocarpa humilis which displays a wide distribution in the Southern Hemisphere and has been recently reported in the Northern Hemisphere (NW Europe). In continental Chile, its first report dates back from 2000 for the locality of Antofagasta (23°S). Although there was no evidence about the vectors of introduction and spread, nor the source, some authors suggested maritime transport by ship hulls and aquaculture devices as putative introduction pathways and vectors. In the present study, we report for the first time the presence of A. humilis on the hull of an international ship in a commercial port in Concepción bay (36°S), south central Chile. We also found one individual associated to a seashell farm, 70 km far from Concepción bay. Further individuals were subsequently identified within Concepción bay: one juvenile settled upon international harbor pilings and a dozen individuals along aquaculture seashell longlines. For the first specimens sampled, species identification was ascertained using both morphological criteria and molecular barcoding, using the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and a nuclear gene (ribosomal RNA 18S). The nuclear 18S gene and the mitochondrial gene COI clearly assigned the specimens to A. humilis, confirming our morphological identification. Two haplotypes were obtained with COI corresponding to haplotypes previously obtained with European and Northern Chilean specimens. The present study thus reports for the first time the presence of A. humilis in the Araucanian ecoregion, documenting the apparent expansion of this non-native tunicate in Chile over 2,000 km, spanning over three ecoregions. In addition

  1. Presence of the tunicate Asterocarpa humilis on ship hulls and aquaculture facilities in the coast of the Biobío Region, south central Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Pinochet

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-native ascidians are important members of the fouling community associated with artificial substrata and man-made structures. Being efficient fouling species, they are easily spread by human-mediated transports (e.g., with aquaculture trade and maritime transports. This is exemplified by the ascidian Asterocarpa humilis which displays a wide distribution in the Southern Hemisphere and has been recently reported in the Northern Hemisphere (NW Europe. In continental Chile, its first report dates back from 2000 for the locality of Antofagasta (23°S. Although there was no evidence about the vectors of introduction and spread, nor the source, some authors suggested maritime transport by ship hulls and aquaculture devices as putative introduction pathways and vectors. In the present study, we report for the first time the presence of A. humilis on the hull of an international ship in a commercial port in Concepción bay (36°S, south central Chile. We also found one individual associated to a seashell farm, 70 km far from Concepción bay. Further individuals were subsequently identified within Concepción bay: one juvenile settled upon international harbor pilings and a dozen individuals along aquaculture seashell longlines. For the first specimens sampled, species identification was ascertained using both morphological criteria and molecular barcoding, using the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI and a nuclear gene (ribosomal RNA 18S. The nuclear 18S gene and the mitochondrial gene COI clearly assigned the specimens to A. humilis, confirming our morphological identification. Two haplotypes were obtained with COI corresponding to haplotypes previously obtained with European and Northern Chilean specimens. The present study thus reports for the first time the presence of A. humilis in the Araucanian ecoregion, documenting the apparent expansion of this non-native tunicate in Chile over 2,000 km, spanning over three ecoregions

  2. Methods to eradicate soft tunic syndrome (STS-causing protozoa Azumiobodo hoyamushi, the highly infectious parasite from the edible ascidian (Halocynthia roretzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hoon Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although soft tunic syndrome (STS in the ascidian is a serious disease, helpful measures have yet not been established. It was examined in this study by applying aniti-parasitic drugs to eradicate the causative protozoa Azumiobodo hoyamushi from infected ascidians. Formalin was synergistic in killing parasites in vitro when co-treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 or bronopol, but not with chloramine-T or povidone-iodine (PVP-I, when tested with in vitro parasite culture. The synergistic effects did not change when formalin-H2O2 (or bronopol ratios were changed. It was found that treatment periods less than 60 min achieved a sub-maximal efficacy. Increasing drug concentration while keeping 30 min period improved anti-parasitic effects. Anti-parasitic effects of formalin(F + H2O2(H were also assessed in an in vivo STS model infected with cultured parasites. It was observed that combined 50 (40F + 10H and 100 (80F +20H ppm were effective in partially preventing STS-caused mortality. In horizontally transmitted artificial STS model, significant prevention of ascidian mortality was also observed after 50 ppm. Marked reduction of living parasites were noted after drug treatments in vivo. The results provide a highly useful basis to develop a preventive or treatment measure against the currently uncontrollable STS in the ascidian.

  3. New strategic directions for Caribbean CSM project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Recent changes in the strategy of the Caribbean Contraceptive Social Marketing Project emphasize the condom, under the brand name, Panther. Since 1984, CCSMP began marketing their Perle rand of oral contraceptive, since dropped, in Barbados, St. Vincent and St. Lucia. Now wider commercial connections are envisioned, with support by CCSMP to promote generic brands. The Panther condom campaign will include an array of mass media, point-of-purchase and sporting event advertising. Pharmacies report that Panther is selling as well as the leading commercial brand. CCSMP is looking to introduce an ultra-thin condom and a vaginal foaming tablet. Market research, involving physicians and users as well as retail audits, indicates that although population in numbers alone is not a serious problem in the Caribbean, early pregnancy is a concern in the area.

  4. Regional Disease Vector Ecology Profile: Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    malathion treatment on Aedes aegypti during a dengue outbreak in Kingston, Jamaica. Rev. Panam. Salud Publica 5: 100-105. Chadee, D.D. 1988. Landing...Baboolal. 2000. Lymphatic filariasis in the Caribbean region: the opportunity for its elimination and certification. Rev. Panam. Salud Publica 7: 319...Rev. Panam. Salud Publica 6: 16-25. Van Der Kuip, E.J. 1969. Trypanosomiasis cruzi in Aruba and Curaçao. Trop. Geogr. Med. 21: 462-469

  5. Art Music by Caribbean Composers: The Bahamas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangelhoff, Christine

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The cultural identity of the Bahamas owes much to its West African and British colonial heritages and to its physical proximity to the United States. A combination of African and European elements - rhyming spirituals, anthems, rushin' music at watch-night services, wake and setting-up songs; ringplays, fire dance, jump-in-dance, quadrille music (rake-‘n’-scrape music, goombay, and junkanoo - can be seen in musical traditions throughout the Caribbean, including art music.

  6. Assistance Focus: Latin America/Caribbean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-03-29

    The Clean Energy Solutions Center, an initiative of the Clean Energy Ministerial, helps countries throughout the world create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. Through the Solutions Center's no-cost 'Ask an Expert' service, a team of international experts has delivered assistance to countries in all regions of the world. High-impact examples from the Latin American/Caribbean region are featured here.

  7. Art Music by Caribbean Composers: Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LeGrand, Cathleen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Haïti has by far the longest history of independence of any of its Caribbean neighbors, having gained independence from France in 1804. Haïti's tradition of classical music takes root in its colonial heritage. Haïtian classical music, "mizik savant ayisyen," is derived from that "desire to retain European standards while including local features" of indigenous musical traditions (Grenier & Averill, 2007-2011.

  8. Marine biodiversity in the Caribbean: regional estimates and distribution patterns

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miloslavich, Patricia; Díaz, Juan Manuel; Klein, Eduardo; Alvarado, Juan José; Díaz, Cristina; Gobin, Judith; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Weil, Ernesto; Cortés, Jorge; Bastidas, Ana Carolina; Robertson, Ross; Zapata, Fernando; Martín, Alberto; Castillo, Julio; Kazandjian, Aniuska; Ortiz, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    .... The coastal Caribbean region is a large marine ecosystem (LME) characterized by coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses, but including other environments, such as sandy beaches and rocky shores...

  9. CARICOF - The Caribbean Regional Climate Outlook Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meerbeeck, Cedric

    2013-04-01

    Regional Climate Outlook Forums (RCOFs) are viewed as a critical building block in the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS) of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). The GFCS seeks to extend RCOFs to all vulnerable regions of the world such as the Caribbean, of which the entire population is exposed to water- and heat-related natural hazards. An RCOF is initially intended to identify gaps in information and technical capability; facilitate research cooperation and data exchange within and between regions, and improve coordination within the climate forecasting community. A focus is given on variations in climate conditions on a seasonal timescale. In this view, the relevance of a Caribbean RCOF (CARICOF) is the following: while the seasonality of the climate in the Caribbean has been well documented, major gaps in knowledge exist in terms of the drivers in the shifts of amplitude and phase of seasons (as evidenced from the worst region-wide drought period in recent history during 2009-2010). To address those gaps, CARICOF has brought together National Weather Services (NWSs) from 18 territories under the coordination of the Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology (CIMH), to produce region-wide, consensus, seasonal climate outlooks since March 2012. These outlooks include tercile rainfall forecasts, sea and air surface temperature forecasts as well as the likely evolution of the drivers of seasonal climate variability in the region, being amongst others the El Niño Southern Oscillation or tropical Atlantic and Caribbean Sea temperatures. Forecasts for both the national-scale forecasts made by the NWSs and CIMH's regional-scale forecast amalgamate output from several forecasting tools. These currently include: (1) statistical models such as Canonical Correlation Analysis run with the Climate Predictability Tool, providing tercile rainfall forecasts at weather station scale; (2) a global outlooks published by the WMO appointed Global Producing

  10. Biochemical changes and drug residues in ascidian Halocynthia roretzi after formalin–hydrogen peroxide treatment regimen designed against soft tunic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hoon Lee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Soft tunic syndrome (STS is a protozoal disease caused by Azumiobodo hoyamushi in the edible ascidian Halocynthia roretzi. Previous studies have proven that combined formalin–hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 bath is effective in reducing STS progress and mortality. To secure target animal safety for field applications, toxicity of the treatment needs to be evaluated. Healthy ascidians were bathed for 1 week, 1 h a day at various bathing concentrations. Bathing with 5- and 10-fold optimum concentration caused 100% mortality of ascidians, whereas mortality by 0.5- to 2.0-fold solutions was not different from that of control. Of the oxidative damage parameters, MDA levels did not change after 0.5- and 1.0-fold bathing. However, free radical scavenging ability and reducing power were significantly decreased even with the lower-than-optimal 0.5-fold concentration. Glycogen content tended to increase with 1-fold bathing without statistical significance. All changes induced by the 2-fold bathing were completely or partially restored to control levels 48 h post-bathing. Free amino acid analysis revealed a concentration-dependent decline in aspartic acid and cysteine levels. In contrast, alanine and valine levels increased after the 2-fold bath treatment. These data indicate that the currently established effective disinfectant regimen against the parasitic pathogen is generally safe, and the biochemical changes observed are transient, lasting approximately 48 h at most. Low levels of formalin and H2O2 were detectable 1 h post-bathing; however, the compounds were completely undetectable after 48 h of bathing. Formalin–H2O2 bathing is effective against STS; however, reasonable care is required in the treatment to avoid unwanted toxicity. Drug residues do not present a concern for consumer safety.

  11. Child Support, Poverty and Gender Equality in the Caribbean ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Child Support, Poverty and Gender Equality in the Caribbean - Phase II. This project aims to inform policy on both the content and administration of family law in the Caribbean, and to facilitate integration of legal and social protection systems. Based on the research findings from the previous phase (102617), researchers ...

  12. A school fight against AIDS in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBean, G

    1996-06-01

    The English-speaking Caribbean consists of some fifteen countries, with a population of just over 6 million. The countries including Suriname are united under CARICOM, (the Caribbean Economic Community) and share a common education system. The area is characterised by low infant mortality rates (averaging less than 20/1000 live births) and high literacy rates (above 85% for many years).

  13. Highlight: IDRC sponsors Caribbean symposium on impact of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-15

    Apr 15, 2016 ... The Mona ICT Policy Centre, the Caribbean Institute of Media and Communication and the University of the West Indies hosted the meeting, in partnership with the World Bank and IDRC. The symposium provided an opportunity for experts from the Caribbean and elsewhere to examine the impact of ...

  14. Analytical Support to African and Caribbean Trade Negotiations ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Analytical Support to African and Caribbean Trade Negotiations - Phase III. International Lawyers and Economists against Poverty (ILEAP) is an initiative that aims to help African and Caribbean countries derive full benefit from integration into the global economy. Its work is premised on the recognition that while significant ...

  15. Electronic Waste Toolkit for Latin America and the Caribbean | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus Research Program. A new funding opportunity on Zika virus is responding to the virus outbreak and the health threat it represents for the affected populations in the hardest hit countries in Latin America and the... View moreCanada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus ...

  16. CarlSnet II : Strengthening the Caribbean ICT Virtual Stakeholders ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus Research Program. A new funding opportunity on Zika virus is responding to the virus outbreak and the health threat it represents for the affected populations in the hardest hit countries in Latin America and the... View moreCanada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus ...

  17. Canada-Latin America and the Caribbean Research Exchange ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus Research Program. A new funding opportunity on Zika virus is responding to the virus outbreak and the health threat it represents for the affected populations in the hardest hit countries in Latin America and the... View moreCanada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus ...

  18. School Leadership in the Caribbean: Perceptions, Practices, Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paul, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Successful school leadership is an issue currently being debated up and down Caribbean territories. Key issues in the ongoing debate include: students' outcomes and participation in the regional Caribbean Secondary Examinations (CSEC); teacher recruitment and retention; teacher training and continuing professional development (upgrading); and…

  19. Caribbean health: Healthy children, healthy nation — tackling the ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The health problem in Caribbean children has recently shifted to one of overweight instead of underweight and stunting. • Approximately 25% of school aged children in St. Kitts-Nevis and Trinidad and Tobago are overweight or obese. • The cost to the Caribbean economy of diseases linked to obesity, such as diabetes and ...

  20. 78 FR 33959 - National Caribbean-American Heritage Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... for independence, our countries won the right to chart their own destinies after generations of... arts, spurring our movements and answering the call to serve. Caribbean traditions have enriched our own, and woven new threads into our cultural fabric. Again and again, Caribbean immigrants and their...

  1. Structure and financing of nature management costs in Caribbean Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van I.J.M.; Debrot, A.O.; Rockmann, C.; Jak, R.G.

    2015-01-01

    The Nature Policy Plan Caribbean Netherlands identifies the need to “Evaluate the financial instruments available for nature conservation in the Caribbean Netherlands and make recommendations aimed at guaranteeing a sustainable financial future” as one of its strategic actions. Three preceding

  2. 50 CFR 622.50 - Caribbean spiny lobster import prohibitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Caribbean spiny lobster import... ATLANTIC Management Measures § 622.50 Caribbean spiny lobster import prohibitions. (a) Minimum size limits for imported spiny lobster. There are two minimum size limits that apply to importation of spiny...

  3. Coastal Resource Management in the Wider Caribbean : Resilience ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    1 janv. 2010 ... Coastal Resource Management in the Wider Caribbean : Resilience, Adaptation, and Community Diversity. Couverture du livre Coastal Resource Management in the Wider Caribbean : Resilience, Adaptation, and. Directeur(s) : Yvan Breton, David Brown, Brian Davy, Milton Haughton et Luis Ovares.

  4. Theorising African Caribbean Absences in Multicultural Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This article looks at the learning of African Caribbean pupils in art and design classrooms in the United Kingdom. It proceeds from the proposition that African Caribbean pupils, as the descendants of enslaved peoples whose cultural lineage has been blurred by the skewed relationship with the white majority group, are uniquely disadvantaged in the…

  5. 76 FR 2672 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 068-XA145 Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Caribbean Fishery Management Council (Council) in partnership with the Fisheries Leadership and Sustainability Forum ] (FLSF) will conduct an...

  6. Another style of Christianity in the Capitalist Ridden Caribbean

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two characteristics mark the Caribbean: capitalism and the hegemony of North Atlantic versions of Christianity. The colonization and exploitation of the Caribbean was justified in the name of profit and the dominant North Atlantic renderings of Christ's message. Having been conceived by the joint forces of these worldly and ...

  7. The European Union and the Caribbean Region: Situating the Caribbean Overseas Countries and Territories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Sutton

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:This paper examines one important dimension of the European Union's (EU 'regional' engagement with the Caribbean: its relations with the Overseas Countries and Territories (OCT, with a particular focus on the possibility of furthering the policy goals of greater regional integration and cooperation. It does so in three parts. The first sets out the basis for current EU policy to the OCT which has been under discussion between the EU, the OCT and the four EU member states most involved (Denmark, France, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom since 2008. It reports EU proposals for change and the responses to them by the Caribbean OCTs. The second part examines EU policy toward promoting greater regional cooperation among the Caribbean OCTs and between them and some of the other Caribbean regional organizations. Three distinct frameworks for cooperation and integration are discussed: with independent states as established in the Caribbean Community, the Caribbean Forum and the Economic Partnership Agreement; with the French departments and collectivities; and with the Caribbean OCT. In each the position of the Caribbean OCT is situated. The final part briefly discusses the creation of a 'new' framework for regional cooperation specific for the Caribbean OCT which will most closely match their interests in the Caribbean.Resumen: La Unión Europea y la Región del Caribe: Situando a los Países y Territorios de Ultramar del CaribeEste ensayo analiza una dimensión importante de la Unión Europea (UE 'regional' y su compromiso con el Caribe: de igual manera sus relaciones con los Países y Territorios de Ultramar (PTU, con un enfoque particular sobre la posibilidad de promover los objetivos de la política con una mayor integración regional y cooperación. Este proceso se desglosa en tres partes. La primera establece la base para la actual política de la UE hacia los PTU, ya que esta ha sido objeto de debate entre los mismos y los cuatro

  8. African dust and the demise of Caribbean Coral Reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Eugene A.; Smith, Garriet W.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Betzer, Peter; Hayes, Marshall L.; Garrison, Virginia; Barber, Richard T.

    2000-10-01

    The vitality of Caribbean coral reefs has undergone a continual state of decline since the late 1970s, a period of time coincidental with large increases in transatlantic dust transport. It is proposed that the hundreds of millions of tons/year of soil dust that have been crossing the Atlantic during the last 25 years could be a significant contributor to coral reef decline and may be affecting other ecosystems. Benchmark events, such as near synchronous Caribbean-wide mortalities of acroporid corals and the urchin Diadema in 1983, and coral bleaching beginning in 1987, correlate with the years of maximum dust flux into the Caribbean. Besides crustal elements, in particular Fe, Si, and aluminosilicate clays, the dust can serve as a substrate for numerous species of viable spores, especially the soil fungus Aspergillus. Aspergillus sydowii, the cause of an ongoing Caribbean-wide seafan disease, has been cultured from Caribbean air samples and used to inoculate sea fans.

  9. Diabetes in the English-speaking Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennis, Anselm; Fraser, Henry S

    2004-02-01

    Rates of diabetes mellitus in the English-speaking Caribbean have been rising in recent years, and they are projected to continue climbing in the new millennium. Prevalence rates across countries of the African diaspora mirror levels of Western acculturation, and available data emphasize the importance of obesity as a modifiable risk factor. The population-based Barbados Eye Studies have provided new information about the burden of ocular complications of diabetes such as retinopathy and lens opacities. Diabetes was shown to increase the risk of lens opacities, and 14% of prevalent cataract was attributed to diabetes. Persons with type 1 diabetes were particularly at increased risk of retinopathy, as a result of longer durations of illness and poor glycemic control. Other Caribbean studies have suggested that glycemic control in patients evaluated in various clinical settings is suboptimal, which raises important concerns about quality of care. Diabetics are at increased risk of mortality compared with nondiabetics, and that mortality risk increases with higher baseline levels of glycosylated hemoglobin, even among nondiabetics. These data highlight the need for urgent attention to public health and clinical strategies to prevent diabetes in unaffected persons as well as to prevent or reduce the burden of complications among those who are affected. Among the measures that should be adopted to stem the flood of diabetes in the Caribbean region are lifestyle interventions to promote better nutrition and to increase exercise; patient education, particularly about the central role of diabetes self-management; and the multidisciplinary team approach in the provision of care.

  10. Decolonization and life expectancy in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Soraya P A; van Oers, Hans A M; Mackenbach, Johan P

    2016-12-01

    Decolonization has brought political independence to half the Caribbean states in the last half of the 20th century, while the other states remain affiliated. Previous studies suggested a beneficial impact of affiliated status on population health, which may be mediated by more favorable economic development. We assessed how disparities in life expectancy between currently sovereign and affiliated states developed over time, whether decolonization coincided with changes in life expectancy, and whether decolonization coincided with similar changes in GDP per capita. Time-series data on life expectancy and related variables, GDP per capita and political status were collected from harmonized databases. We quantified variations in life expectancy by current political status during the 1950-2010 period. We assessed whether decolonization coincided with life expectancy trend changes by: 1. calculating the annual changes before and after independence, and 2. evaluating trend breaks in a predefined period during decolonization using joinpoint analyses. Similar analyses were undertaken for GDP per capita. Life expectancy in currently sovereign Caribbean states was already lower than in affiliated states before political independence. Overall, decolonization coincided with reductions in life expectancy growth, but not with reductions in economic growth, and changes in life expectancy growth in the decade after independence did not correspond with changes in economic performance. The widening of the life expectancy gap between currently sovereign and affiliated states accelerated in the 1990's and continues to increase. Despite considerable life expectancy gains in all Caribbean states, life expectancy in currently sovereign states increasingly lags behind that of states which remained affiliated. Our results indicate that changing economic conditions were not the main determinant of the unfavorable trends in life expectancy during and after decolonization. Circumstantial

  11. Art Music by Caribbean Composers: Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangelhoff, Christine

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Jamaica is among the Caribbean islands that Columbus claimed for Spain. In response to its rich diversity of peoples: Europeans, Asians, Chinese, Indians and Africans, the motto of Jamaica is: Out of Many, One People."Jamaican music is as varied as the people who inhabit the island... [M]uch folk music retains features and functions of black African music, blended with elements of European (primarily British music" (Lewin & Gordon, 2007-2011. Jamaican musical genres, such as ska, rocksteady, reggae, and dancehall, are popular and influential internationally.The classical music tradition in Jamaica dates back to the 18th century.

  12. WELFARE REGIMES IN LATIN AMERICA AND CARIBBEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa Campana-Alabarce

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a characterization of Latin American and Caribbean Welfare regimes in historiographical perspective. Firstly, it makes a review of the emergence conditions of Welfare States in Western Europe and its core features, with particular emphasis on its role as a method to regulate inequalities in industrial capitalism. Dialoguing with it, then stops in the specific configurations that welfare regimes have taken in Latin America during the course of the twentieth century. Finally, it provides a map of its contemporary features and the major challenges that the States of the region face in his capacity as right guarantors for the future.

  13. Gospel Film/Video in the Caribbean - Reading The Grace Thrillers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article makes the case for the short-video form as constituting “film” in the Caribbean and in Caribbean discourse. It suggests that Caribbean gospel culture has been significantly influenced by western popular culture, which has given two main types of music videos to Caribbean gospel performers. The main body of ...

  14. Education and health care in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaroop, V

    1997-06-01

    Primary and secondary education and preventive health care are essential to the well-being of the poor in developing countries. Average expenditures on education and health care as a percentage of the gross domestic product in Caribbean countries exceed those in other developing countries. Such investment has resulted in high literacy rates and steady declines in infant mortality. Barbados, which has provided free and universal primary and secondary education since 1985, ranks first among developing countries in human development indicators (e.g., life expectancy and income). There are concerns, however, that the poor are not benefiting from this public sector investment. Government subsidies for tertiary-level services (e.g., university education and hospital-based curative care) disproportionately benefit higher-income urban families who could afford to pay a substantial portion of the cost of such services. Although primary and secondary school attendance rates are impressive in Caribbean countries, schools in rural areas tend to provide poor instruction and lack appropriate educational materials. Public sector funding should focus on basic services to maximize the returns to society. If the public sector is the primary provider of tertiary services, charges should be introduced to facilitate cost recovery from high-income users.

  15. Water Security and Services in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Cashman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The efficient management of water resources and services continues to be a concern in many of the small island states of the Caribbean. There are growing concerns over the ability of governments in the region to ensure the good management and provision of water without jeopardizing economic growth and the maintenance of social well-being. This paper provides an overview of the major factors influencing the water security facing the Caribbean Region and how the emerging concerns are being addressed. The key challenges and vulnerabilities may be summarized as lack of data and barriers to making available what information there is. Forward planning has been largely neglected and is symptomatic of a lack of appreciation of the need for having national water policies. In this respect Jamaica’s development of a national master water plan serves as a good example of what is needed. Water service providers have to be efficient, well managed and allowed to do their job. This means that they have to be on a sound financial footing. The challenge is to find the balance between appropriate political and regulatory oversight and the autonomy of water managers and service providers.

  16. Neogene Proto-Caribbean porcupinefishes (Diodontidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Orangel; Silva, Guilherme Oliveira Andrade; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Machado, Alessandra Silveira; Dos Santos, Thaís Maria; Marques, Gabriela; Bertucci, Thayse; Aguiar, Thayanne; Carrillo-Briceño, Jorge; Rodriguez, Felix; Jaramillo, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Fossil Diodontidae in Tropical America consist mostly of isolated and fused beak-like jawbones, and tooth plate batteries. These durophagous fishes are powerful shell-crushing predators on shallow water invertebrate faunas from Neogene tropical carbonate bottom, rocky reefs and surrounding flats. We use an ontogenetic series of high-resolution micro CT of fossil and extant species to recognize external and internal morphologic characters of jaws and tooth plate batteries. We compare similar sizes of jaws and/or tooth-plates from both extant and extinct species. Here, we describe three new fossil species including †Chilomycterus exspectatus n. sp. and †Chilomycterus tyleri n. sp. from the late Miocene Gatun Formation in Panama, and †Diodon serratus n. sp. from the middle Miocene Socorro Formation in Venezuela. Fossil Diodontidae review included specimens from the Neogene Basins of the Proto-Caribbean (Brazil: Pirabas Formation; Colombia: Jimol Formation, Panama: Gatun and Tuira formations; Venezuela: Socorro and Cantaure formations). Diodon is present in both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, whereas the distribution of Chilomycterus is highly asymmetrical with only one species in the Pacific. It seems that Diodon was as abundant in the Caribbean/Western Atlantic during the Miocene as it is there today. We analyze the paleogeographic distribution of the porcupinefishes group in Tropical America, after the complete exhumation of the Panamanian isthmus during the Pliocene.

  17. Women in Physics: A Caribbean Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Kandice

    2009-03-01

    This paper is concerned with aspects of post-secondary education of women in physics in the Caribbean, focusing more specifically on the main university campuses in Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica, and Barbados. Within this framework, there are three institutions of tertiary education that provide for undergraduate and post-graduate studies in physics. On average, the bachelor-level graduating class is roughly 40% female. A great majority of these students go on to seek master's degrees in engineering. Among those enrolled in graduate programs featuring research in astronomy, materials science, environmental physics, medical physics, and quantum physics, 58% are female. Significant numbers of women from the selected countries and from the Caribbean region are engaged in bachelor and doctoral programs in physics abroad, but no formal survey is available to provide the relevant quantitative information. However, an attempt will be made to quantify this component. Based in part on personal experience, a comparison will be made between domestic and foreign educational pathways, in terms of access to resources, level of research training, and occupational opportunities following graduation.

  18. Migration and development in the Caribbean: relating policies and people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, R

    1985-01-01

    Throughout the 20th century, the US has feared that political instability in the Caribbean area could be exploited by adversaries; therefore, the US and the nations of the Caribbean share a compelling interest in the region's development. The dramatic increase in legal and illegal immigration to the US from the Caribbean in the last 2 decades has offered an additional human reason for US interest in the region. This migration has also created a new source of dependence and vulnerability for the region. Curtailment of migration would undoubtedly affect the region, and if the effect were social and political instability, then the US would also share those consequences. The 1984 Conference on Migration and Development in the Caribbean held discussions to 1) enhance the benefits of migration to Caribbean development, 2) identify development strategies, policies, and projects that would reduce pressures that have accelerated the rate of international migration, making it less manageable and more costly, and 3) identify ways to reduce dependence on migration by expanding employment and assisting economies in the region to become more self-reliant. The attitudes of both US and Caribbean participants seemed to reflect a considerable degree of ambivalence on the migration issue. The US views itself as "a nation of immigrants" and yet is troubled by the recent large influx of immigrants, particularly illegal migrants and refugees. While Americans recognize that the "brain" reduces the development capacity of developing countries, the US still needs and benefits from young immigrants trained in the sciences, engineering, and computers. Caribbean participants were also ambivalent about immigration. They consider immigration "a way of life" and a "right," but they also recognize that there are significant developmental costs to some types of migration. While many want the US to keep a wide open door to Caribbean immigrants, they are aware that most Caribbean Community (CARICOM

  19. Combining environmental suitability and population abundances to evaluate the invasive potential of the tunicate Ciona intestinalis along the temperate South American coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella M. Januario

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The tunicate Ciona intestinalis is an opportunistic invader with high potential for causing economic losses in aquaculture centers. Recent phylogenetic and population genetic analysis support the existence of a genetic complex described as C. intestinalis with two main dominant species (sp A and B occurring worldwide. In Chile, the species has been observed around 30°S of latitude, but no official reports exist for the presence of C. intestinalis in southern regions (above 40°S, where most of the mollusk aquaculture centers are located. Here, we used occurrences from multiple invaded regions and extensive field sampling to model and validate the environmental conditions that allow the species to persist and to find the geographic areas with the most suitable environmental conditions for the spread of C. intestinalis in the Chilean coast. By studying the potential expansion of C. intestinalis southward in the Chilean Coast, we aimed to provide valuable information that might help the development of control plans before the species becomes a significant problem, especially above 40°S. Our results highlight that, by using portions of the habitat that are apparently distinguishable, the species seem to be not only genetically distinct, but ecologically distinct as well. The two regional models fitted for sp A and for sp B showed disagreement on which sections of Chilean coastline are considered more suitable for these species. While the model for sp A identifies moderately to highly suitable areas between 30° and 40°S, the model for sp B classifies the areas around 45°S as the most appropriate. Data from field sampling show a positive linear relationship between density of C. intestinalis and the index of suitability for sp A in aquaculture centers. Understanding the relation of the distinct species with the surrounding environment provided valuable insights about probable routes of dispersion in Chile, especially into those areas considered

  20. Protective effects of the antioxidant extract collected from Styela clava tunics on UV radiation‑induced skin aging in hairless mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Ji Eun; Go, Jun; Song, Sung Hwa; Sung, Ji Eun; Son, Hong Joo; Jung, Young Jin; Kim, Bae Hwan; Jung, Young Suk; Hwang, Dae Youn

    2016-11-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is considered a primary cause of skin damage, which is characterized by deep wrinkles, roughness, laxity and pigmentation through oxidative stress and oxidative photodamage. To examine the therapeutic effects of ethanol extract of Styela clava tunics (EtSCT) on UV radiation-induced skin aging in hairless mice, alterations in skin phenotype, histological structures, inflammation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative conditions and toxicity were investigated during 13 weeks of UV irradiation and topical application of EtSCT. EtSCT showed high reducing power (3.1%), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity (92.7%) and NO scavenging activity (15.6%) due to its high total flavonoids (15.3 mg/ml) and total phenolics (36.8 mg/ml). The topical application of EtSCT suppressed photoaging of the skin of UV-irradiated mice, and this was demonstrated by the inhibition of wrinkle formation, the suppression of the erythema index as well as the prevention of transepidermal water loss. Additionally, the epidermal thickness and adipocytes number were recovered to a similar level as that in the no radiation group in the UV + EtSCT‑treated groups compared with the UV + vehicle‑treated group, and the expression of collagen I increased. The attenuation of mitogen‑activated protein kinase and ER stress signaling pathways activated by reactive oxygen species was also detected in the UV + EtSCT‑treated group. Inflammatory responses including the infiltration of mast cells, CD31 expression and interleukin-6 secretion were significantly lower in the UV + EtSCT-treated groups. Moreover, the concentration of malondialdehyde was reduced and the activity of superoxide dismutase was effectively recovered in the UV + EtSCT-treated groups compared with that in the vehicle-treated groups. Liver and kidney toxicity factors were maintained at a constant level. These results suggest that EtSCT has the potential for

  1. The CARICOM/FAO/IICA Caribbean Amblyomma Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegram, R G; De Castro, J J; Wilson, D D

    1998-06-29

    The objective of the Caribbean Amblyomma Program is to eradicate the tropical bont tick (TBT), Amblyomma variegatum, from the Caribbean. Field activities directed to eradication of the TBT were initiated in May 1995 commencing in northern Caribbean islands. Plans have been finalized for the remaining islands to the south to start eradication activities in early 1997. The components of the program include tick control and surveillance, adaptive research, training, communications, and extension. Despite uncertain financial support, substantial progress has been made so far with strong participation by farmers and livestock owners who have been made responsible for the compulsory treatment of all ruminant livestock.

  2. 77 FR 46409 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-03

    ..., 2012, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ADDRESSES: The meetings will be held at the El Conquistador Hotel, 1000 El Conquistador Avenue, Fajardo, Puerto Rico. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Caribbean Fishery Management...

  3. 77 FR 47603 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-09

    ..., from 9 a.m. until noon. ADDRESSES: The meetings will be held at the El Conquistador Hotel, 1000 El Conquistador Avenue, Fajardo, Puerto Rico. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Caribbean Fishery Management...

  4. Caribbean Seasonal and/or Area Closures GIS data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data represents the geographic area described in Title 50 CFR Part 622, Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic, Subpart S - Reef Fish...

  5. Surface Geology of the Caribbean Region (geo6bg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes polygons that describe the geologic age of surface outcrops of bedrock of the Caribbean region (Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas,...

  6. Faults of the Caribbean Region (flt6bg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset describes faults and structural features of the Caribbean region (Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, British Virgin...

  7. Caribbean women: changes in the works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Isabel Quiñones-Arocho

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] The women of Azua: work and family in the rural Dominican Republic, by BARBARA FINLAY. New York: Praeger, 1989. xi + 190 pp. (Cloth US$ 35.00 The psychosocial development of Puerto Rican women, edited by CYNTHIA T. GARCIA COLL & MARIA DE LOURDES MATTEI. New York: Praeger, 1989. xiii + 272 pp. (Cloth US$ 45.00 Women and the sexual division oflabour in the Caribbean, edited by KEITH HART. Mona, Jamaica: Consortium Graduate School of Social Sciences, UWI, 1989. 141 pp. (Paper n.p. The three books under review work have a common theme: the impact of changing gender expectations on Caribbean women. The authors are mainly concerned with recent political and economie changes that might have contributed to either the improvement or deterioration of women's status in these societies. The questions raised by the contributors are strikingly similar: What has been the impact of dependent economie development on women's lives and has this resulted in increased labor participation (a problem explored for rural Dominican women as well as for Jamaican and Barbadian women or in the migration to metropolitan centers, with its psychosocial consequences (an issue raised for Puerto Rican women living in the United States? If patriarchal values (often referred to as traditional values prevail in these societies, then what impact might wage work, migration, or improved education have on those values? Could it be the disintegration of the nuclear family with an increased proportion of female-headed households (Hart, higher rates of mental illness as a result of dysfunctional aceulturation (Garcia Coll and Mattei, or even an improvement of women's status within their families and communities (Finlay?

  8. Virginia Tech creates Caribbean center for education and research

    OpenAIRE

    Felker, Susan B.

    2006-01-01

    Virginia Tech has established a research, education, and outreach center in the Caribbean that will serve as part of a broad strategy to create international centers of scholarship around the world. The Caribbean Center for Education and Research (CCER) in Punta Cana, on the eastern tip of the Dominican Republic, will allow Virginia Tech faculty to conduct research as well as instruct students on biodiversity, environmental and social sustainability, global issues in natural resources, and ho...

  9. Common wood decay fungi found in the Caribbean Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Jean. Lodge

    2016-01-01

    There are hundreds of wood-decay fungi in the Caribbean Basin, but relatively few of these are likely to grow on manmade structures built of wood or wood-composites. The wood-decay fungi of greatest concern are those that cause brown-rot, and especially brown-rot fungi that are resistant to copper-based wood preservatives. Some fungi that grow in the Caribbean and...

  10. Effect of ascidian (Halocynthia roretzi, Drasche 1884 tunics carotenoids on enhancing growth and muscle coloring of sea-reared rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum 1792

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuliyati Rohmah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A 120 days trial was conducted to investigate the effect of sea squirt (Halocynthia roretzi, Drasche 1884 tunic’s carotenoid to sea-reared rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum 1792 growth and muscle color. Sea-rearing was done at Tongyeong sea area, Korea. Three dietary treatments, namely control (C, CT, and AT, were administered to 6 groups of fish (n = 490-520. C was given basal diet which has contained 40 mg kg−1 of astaxanthin. A further inclusion of 10 mg kg−1 canthaxanthin was added to diet of CT, while AT’s feed was supplemented with 10 mg kg−1 H. roretzi tunics carotenoids extract. The result revealed that AT has the highest final weight (1119.2 ± 82.4 g compare to those of C (881.0 ± 121.2 g and CT (1068.2 ± 4.3 g. The specific growth rate (SGR of AT (1.0 ± 0.07%/day was significantly higher than C (0.7 ± 0.22%/day and CT (0.7 ± 0.25%/day while the feed conversion ratio (FCR were 1.5 ± 0.6, 1.4 ± 0.6, and 1.2 ± 0.1 for C, CT and AT respectively. The hepatosomatic index (HSI and Viscerosomatic index (VSI of all groups showed no significant difference (p > 0.05. The muscle color was also positively affected by the treatments, CT and AT were significantly different from C (p < 005. The initial muscle color score was 1.7 ± 0.0 and the final scores were 3.4 ± 0.2, 5.6 ± 0.1, and 5.7 ± 0.0 for C, CT, and AT respectively. Moreover, muscle carotenoids content of AT (8.5 ± 0.2 mg kg−1 was significantly higher (p < 0.05 than those of CT (6.9 ± 0.3 mg kg−1 and C (6.1 ± 0.2 mg kg−1. Astaxanthin evidently is the most prominent carotenoid present in the muscle from all groups.

  11. Bacterial biosynthesis and maturation of the didemnin anti-cancer agents

    KAUST Repository

    Xü, Ying

    2012-05-23

    The anti-neoplastic agent didemnin B from the Caribbean tunicate Trididemnum solidum was the first marine drug to be clinically tested in humans. Because of its limited supply and its complex cyclic depsipeptide structure, considerable challenges were encountered during didemnin B\\'s development that continue to limit aplidine (dehydrodidemnin B), which is currently being evaluated in numerous clinical trials. Herein we show that the didemnins are bacterial products produced by the marine α-proteobacteria Tistrella mobilis and Tistrella bauzanensis via a unique post-assembly line maturation process. Complete genome sequence analysis of the 6,513,401 bp T. mobilis strain KA081020-065 with its five circular replicons revealed the putative didemnin biosynthetic gene cluster (did) on the 1,126,962 bp megaplasmid pTM3. The did locus encodes a 13-module hybrid non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase enzyme complex organized in a collinear arrangement for the synthesis of the fatty acylglutamine ester derivatives didemnins X and Y rather than didemnin B as first anticipated. Imaging mass spectrometry of T. mobilis bacterial colonies captured the time-dependent extracellular conversion of the didemnin X and Y precursors to didemnin B, in support of an unusual post-synthetase activation mechanism. Significantly, the discovery of the didemnin biosynthetic gene cluster may provide a long-term solution to the supply problem that presently hinders this group of marine natural products and pave the way for the genetic engineering of new didemnin congeners. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  12. Latin American and Caribbean Urban Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christien Klaufus

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The new development agendas confirmed in the year 2015 evidence an increased global interest in cities and urban challenges. In Latin America and the Caribbean, cities have long been an established topic of study and debate. This exploration gives a brief overview of current research on urban development in the region and suggests fruitful avenues for future research. Following different ideological trends in twentieth-century urban studies, we currently see more pragmatic frameworks and a belief in technocratic solutions. Some scholars consider Latin American and Caribbean cities to be the world’s new signposts in urban development, given their role as sites of innovations in politics, architecture and urban design; we see potential here for urban scholars of the region to move beyond technocratic language. In addition, we argue for an area studies approach to these cities that uses the framework of the region as a heuristic device to unsettle global urbanist epistemologies that privilege North-to-South mobilities in both policy and theory. Resumen: El desarrollo urbano latinoamericano y caribeñoLas nuevas agendas de desarrollo confirmadas en el año 2015 reflejan un mayor interés mundial en las ciudades y en los retos urbanos. En Latinoamérica y en el Caribe, las ciudades llevan mucho tiempo siendo un tema habitual de estudio y debate. Esta exploración ofrece un resumen breve de las investigaciones actuales sobre desarrollo urbano en la región y sugiere caminos fructíferos para futuras investigaciones. Siguiendo las distintas tendencias ideológicas en los estudios urbanos del siglo XX, actualmente observamos marcos más pragmáticos y una creencia en soluciones tecnocráticas. Algunos investigadores consideran las ciudades latinoamericanas y caribeñas como los nuevos referentes mundiales en desarrollo urbano, dado su papel como centros de innovación en política, arquitectura y diseño urbano; vemos potencial para que los

  13. Caribbean immigrants in Britain and Canada: socio-economic adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, A H

    1988-12-01

    This paper compares the socioeconomic experiences of Caribbean immigration in Britain and Canada and shows how differing immigration trends together with changing economic circumstances influenced the process of integration. Caribbean immigrants in Canada are more recent arrivals than those in Britain and, in 1981, were still experiencing initial adjustment problems aggravated by an economy in which unemployment is still high. Unlike Britain, which has a large population born in that country of West Indian parentage, the "2nd generation" in Canada is small and mostly still in school. Despite higher levels of education and qualifications than their counterparts in Britain, Caribbean immigrants in Canada faced similar problems. Males were relatively more concentrated in manufacturing industries in Canada and in transportation in Britain, sectors which were undergoing significant structural change and experiencing high levels of unemployment. Earned income was below average in both countries but there were interesting gender differences. Caribbean women experienced the same "earnings gap", relative to men, that characterized most women in the labor force. However, Caribbean women were relatively more successful than men, as measured by unemployment rates and earned incomes. This appears to be due to their qualifications in nursing and other service occupations that continued to expand, and to be in demand in the 1970s and 1980s, when other occupations were declining in response to technological change and "post-industrial" developments. In both countries there were residual disadvantages, faced by Caribbean men and women, which cannot be statistically explained by factors such as age, education, period of immigration, or structural changes in the economy. These can be attributed, at least in part, to the institutionalized prejudice and discrimination against racial minorities which is prevalent in both societies. In absolute terms Caribbean immigrants in Canada are

  14. Caribbean Coral Reef, Seagrass and Mangrove Sites (CARICOMP), (NODC Accession 0000501)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Caribbean Coastal Marine Productivity (CARICOMP) Program is a Caribbean-wide research and monitoring network of 27 marine laboratories, parks, and reserves in 17...

  15. Baseball and society in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Zimbalist

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] The Tropic of Baseball: Baseball in the Dominican Republic. Rob Ruck. Westport CT: Meckler, 1991. x + 205 pp. (Cloth n.p. Trading with the Enemy: A Yankee Travels Through Castro's Cuba. Tom Miller. New York: Atheneum, 1992. x + 338 pp. (Cloth US$ 24.00 Read Bart Giamatti's Take Time for Paradise (1989 or any of the other grand old game sentimentalists and you'11 discover that baseball somehow perfectly reflects the temperament of U.S. culture. This match, in turn, accounts for basebali's enduring and penetrating popularity in the United States. Read Ruck and Miller and you'11 learn that baseball is more popular and culturally dominant in the Dominican Republic and Cuba than it is to the north. The suppressed syllogism affirms that U.S. and Caribbean cultures hold intimate similarities. If that is true, this Caribbeanist has been out to lunch; then again, no one ever accused economists of having acute cultural sensibilities.

  16. The Caribbean and the Wild Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Goslinga

    1992-07-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] Suriname: a bibliography, 1980-1989. Jo DERKX & IRENE ROLFES. Leiden, the Netherlands: Department of Caribbean Studies, KITLV/Royal Institute of Linguistics and Anthropology, 1990. x + 297 pp. (Paper NLG 25.00 La Caraïbe politique et internationale: bibliographie politologique avec références économiques et socio-culturelles. MICHEL L. MARTIN. Paris: L'Harmattan, 1990. xvii + 287 pp. Suriname. ROSEMARIJN HOEFTE. Oxford and Santa Barbara CA: Clio Press, 1990. xxx + 229 pp. (Cloth US$ 45.00 Although in North American academie circles interest in Suriname (or the Wild Coast, as the area was originally called has always been marginal, the same cannot be said for the Dutch, for whom the former colony continues to hold an enduring fascination. Not only have the Dutch studied the country's historical beginnings assiduously, but Suriname's controversial relationship with the former mother country assures it a definite place in contemporary social and political thought.

  17. [Occupational leptospirosis in a Colombian Caribbean area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nájera, Saholeth; Alvis, Nelson; Babilonia, David; Alvarez, Ligia; Máttar, Salim

    2005-01-01

    To establish the seroprevalence of infection by Leptospira in an occupational setting in Cordoba. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 334 farmworkers, butchers, and garbage collectors, to identify the presence of anti-leptospira IgM antibodies, in the Department of Cordoba, Colombia. Stratified sampling proportional to the number of inhabitants and occupation was used to select the sample population (confidence level 99.9%, error 0.5%, prevalence 72%). The SPSS software 11.0 version was used to perform non parametric tests with p < 0.05, as well as odds ratios with confidence intervals. The prevalence of previous infection by Leptospira was high (13.1%). No differences among areas were found, however, higher infection was associated with living in Cienaga de Oro municipality (OR = 3.52 Cl 1.70-7.26) (p = 0,00283). Being a farmer was also a risk factor for infection (OR = 2.04 Cl 1.080-3.85) (p = 0.025), as well as drinking water from a dam (OR = 2.4 CI 1.24-4.70) (p = 0.00787). The rate of infection is important and a significant public health problem in this area of the Colombian Caribbean coast.

  18. Precautionary assessment and management of dolphinfish in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Mahon

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Dolphinfish in the Caribbean are fast growing and short-lived, living for about 12 to 18 months in the southern Caribbean and a maximum of 2-3 years in the north of the region. They are believed to be highly migratory, are seasonally abundant, and likely to have a more complex stock structure than the larger oceanic epipelagic species. Most of the information on dolphinfish in the western central Atlantic comes from studies in the waters of the USA and the eastern Caribbean, and there is a general paucity of information particularly for stock-based management of this species. No Caribbean country undertakes regular assessment of dolphinfish, or has put in place any species-specific management program. Yield-per-recruit analyses for this species in the eastern Caribbean suggest that maximization of Y/R is likely to lead to very low levels of mature stock biomass. A stock recruitment analysis does not show any dependency of recruitment on stock size within the observed stock size range. This suggests that recruitment failure could be sudden at some threshold below the minimum observed stock size, probably at about one third of the average observed stock size. Given the trends observed in landings of dolphinfish, a precautionary approach to management is needed for this species in the western central Atlantic. Given the migratory, shared nature of the dolphinfish resource, a regional approach to assessment and management is required. However, the institutional basis for this approach does not currently exist within the region in a form that is functional. The membership of the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT does not include any of the small island states where dolphinfish is of primary importance. ICCAT would need to establish a regional presence in order to serve the needs of Caribbean states. The FAO Western Central Atlantic Fishery Commission (WECAFC does not operate in a mode which would allow it to

  19. Regional diversity of amphipoda in the Caribbean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Alberto; Díaz, Yusbelly; Miloslavich, Patricia; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Guerra-García, José Manuel; Ortiz, Manuel; Valencia, Bellineth; Giraldo, Alan; Klein, Eduardo

    2013-12-01

    The order Amphipoda is one of the most diverse within Peracarids, and comprises 6950 described marine species. Amphipod research in the Caribbean Sea began in the late 1800s, but has increased significantly since 1980. In this study, we analized the amphipod biodiversity (Caprellidea, Gammaridea, Hyperiidea, and Ingolfiellidea) of the Caribbean Sea. For this, we compiled available data on species diversity of marine amphipods (data bases: WoRMS and OBIS and published species lists) into a comprehensive taxonomic list by country for the ecoregions of the Caribbean. Additionally, we analized the relative contribution of each country to regional diversity and the rate of discovery of new species. The Caribbean amphipod fauna is composed of 535 species within 236 genera and 73 families for the higher taxon. The Western Caribbean ecoregion holds the largest diversity (282 species), while the Eastern Caribbean recorded the lowest one (73). Mexico and Venezuela recorded the largest number of species with 266 and 206, respectively. Twelve countries had less than 50 species. The richest suborder is the Gammaridea with 381 species followed by the suborder Hyperiidea with 116. From the total of 535 amphipod species reported for the Caribbean region, 218 have the Caribbean as the holotype locality, and 132 are endemic (about 25% of the total). Areas of higher diversity seem to be concentrated along the Mexican Caribbean, Cuba and the Northern coast of South America (Venezuela-Colombia); however, such pattern is most likely reflecting local collection efforts and taxonomic expertise rather than actual distribution. Knowledge of amphipod species is mostly limited to shallow, near-shore waters, with little infonnation available on the deep sea fauna. Regional research priorities for this group should be focused on completing shallow water coastal inventories of species in Central America and the Greater and Lesser Antilles. In addition, sampling the deep sea ecosystems should

  20. Regional diversity of Amphipoda in the Caribbean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Martín

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The order Amphipoda is one of the most diverse within Peracarids, and comprises 6 950 described marine species. Amphipod research in the Caribbean Sea began in the late 1 800s, but has increased significantly since 1 980. In this study, we analized the amphipod biodiversity (Caprellidea, Gammaridea, Hyperiidea, and Ingolfiellidea of the Caribbean Sea. For this, we compiled available data on species diversity of marine amphipods (data bases: WoRMS and OBIS and published species lists into a comprehensive taxonomic list by country for the ecoregions of the Caribbean. Additionally, we analized the relative contribution of each country to regional diversity and the rate of discovery of new species. The Caribbean amphipod fauna is composed of 535 species within 236 genera and 73 families for the higher taxon. The Western Caribbean ecoregion holds the largest diversity (282 species, while the Eastern Caribbean recorded the lowest one (73. Mexico and Venezuela recorded the largest number of species with 266 and 206, respectively. Twelve countries had less than 50 species. The richest suborder is the Gammaridea with 381 species followed by the suborder Hyperiidea with 116. From the total of 535 amphipod species reported for the Caribbean region, 218 have the Caribbean as the holotype locality, and 132 are endemic (about 25% of the total. Areas of higher diversity seem to be concentrated along the Mexican Caribbean, Cuba and the Northern coast of South America (Venezuela-Colombia; however, such pattern is most likely reflecting local collection efforts and taxonomic expertise rather than actual distribution. Knowledge of amphipod species is mostly limited to shallow, near-shore waters, with little information available on the deep sea fauna. Regional research priorities for this group should be focused on completing shallow water coastal inventories of species in Central America and the Greater and Lesser Antilles. In addition, sampling the deep sea

  1. An Historical and Contemporary Overview of Gendered Caribbean Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Sharla Blank

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a broad overview of historical and contemporary gender and social class relations in the British, French, and Spanish Caribbean islands focusing primarily on Afro-Caribbean people. It begins with a discussion of gendered relations during slavery and then investigates gender roles post emancipation. Next, multiple aspects of contemporary West Indian family life are addressed including the prevalence of matrifocal households and child shifting. The important roles played by Caribbean female household heads are discussed in the context of patriarchy. Highlights include the significance of the maternal role over the marital, socializing youth, particular negative expectations each sex holds of the other, customary sexual behavior, as well as common relationship types. Varying aspects of women’s behavior according to social class is touched upon followed by a brief synopsis of the status of Caribbean women on measures of educational and work force participation rates; finally, a summary of the dearth of active women’s movements in the region is addressed. The paper provides an introduction to the intimate and working lives of Caribbean women and men.

  2. Aluminum across the Americas: Caribbean Mobilities and Transnational American Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimi Sheller

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of critical mobilities research posits the need to replace sedentary approaches to nation-states as containers for national societies and repositories of national histories with a far more relational understanding of transnational and cross-regional dynamics. It proposes “mobile methodologies” for research that cross national boundaries, including following people, commodities, and cultures as they circulate between various interlinked sites of production and consumption. Yet few have noted the debt of mobilities research to Caribbean Studies and to the theoretical trajectories that have arisen out of research on the colonial and postcolonial Atlantic world. This article aims to situate the “new mobilities paradigm” in relation to Caribbean and transnational American Studies, and to mobilize Caribbean Studies as an approach that transcends regional or national paradigms. After tracing some of the theoretical intersections of mobilities theory and Caribbean Studies, the article sketches the arc of the author’s own work, leading into a current research project on the mobilities of bauxite/aluminum as a material object. Following the mobilities of aluminum allows us to break open both US American history and particular Caribbean national histories into a dynamic pan-American framework that challenges the geographical fixity of American Studies and illustrates the importance of placing (immobilities at the center of transnational American Studies.

  3. Gendered Perceptions of Schooling: Classroom Dynamics and Inequalities within Four Caribbean Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, Mike; Cobbett, Mary

    2014-01-01

    This paper sets out to interrogate the reality of secondary schooling in one part of the Caribbean, through a case study exploration of the "gender regimes" of four secondary schools in the small Eastern Caribbean nation state of Antigua and Barbuda. In Antigua, as in the Caribbean region more broadly, the focus of attention has been on…

  4. Communication from the Information Sharing Working Group: Agreement for Data Sharing Among Caribbean Foresters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamara Heartsill Scalley; Saara DeWalt; François Korysko; Guy Van Laere; Kasey Jacobs; Seth Panka; Joseph Torres

    2016-01-01

    We presented a new information-sharing platform at the 16th Caribbean Foresters Meeting in August 2013 to facilitate and promote collaboration among Caribbean foresters. The platform can be accessed through the Caribbean Foresters website where information and data on forest research sites can be shared. There is a special focus on identifying potential collaborations...

  5. 78 FR 57534 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ..., Caribbean reef fish, Caribbean spiny lobster, Caribbean queen conch, Gulf red drum, Gulf reef fish, Gulf... related to the IFQ program for Gulf red snapper as specified in Sec. 622.21, or the IFQ program for Gulf... regarding the IFQ program for Gulf red snapper as specified in Sec. 622.21, or the IFQ program for Gulf...

  6. Marital Satisfaction among African Americans and Black Caribbeans: Findings from the National Survey of American Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Chalandra M.; Taylor, Robert Joseph; Lincoln, Karen D.; Chatters, Linda M.; Jackson, James S.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the correlates of marital satisfaction using data from a national probability sample of African Americans (N = 962) and Black Caribbeans (N = 560). Findings reveal differences between African Americans and Black Caribbeans, and men and women within those groups, in the predictors of marital satisfaction. Black Caribbean women…

  7. Competing Meanings of Childhood and the Social Construction of Child Sexual Abuse in the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasura, Dominic; Jones, Adele D.; Hafner, James A. H.; Maharaj, Priya E.; Nathaniel-DeCaires, Karene; Johnson, Emmanuel Janagan

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the dynamic interplay between competing meanings of childhood and the social construction of sexual abuse in the Caribbean. Drawing on qualitative data from a study undertaken in six Caribbean countries, the article suggests that Caribbean childhoods are neither wholly global nor local but hybrid creations of the region's…

  8. Observations on the whale shark (Rhincodon typus) in the Dutch Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debrot, A.O.; Leon, R.; Esteban, N.; Meesters, H.W.G.

    2013-01-01

    Records of whale sharks in the Caribbean are relatively sparse. Here we document 24 records of whale sharks (Rhincodon typus Smith 1882) for the Dutch Caribbean, four for the windward islands of Saba, St. Eustatius and St. Maarten, and twenty for the southern Caribbean leeward islands of Aruba,

  9. Caribbean Oceans: Utilizing NASA Earth Observations to Detect, Monitor, and Respond to Unprecedented Levels of Sargassum in the Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ped, Jordan; Scaduto, Erica; Accorsi, Emma; Torres-Perez, Juan (Editor)

    2016-01-01

    In 2011 and 2015, the nations of the Caribbean Sea were overwhelmed by the unprecedented quantity of Sargassum that washed ashore. This issue prompted international discussion to better understand the origins, distribution, and movement of Sargassum, a free-floating brown macro alga with ecological, environmental, and commercial importance. In the open ocean, Sargassum mats serve a vital ecological function. However, when large quantities appear onshore without warning, Sargassum threatens local tourist industries and nearshore ecosystems within the Caribbean. As part of the international response, this project investigated the proliferation of this macro alga within the Caribbean Sea from 2003-2015, and used NASA Earth observations to detect and model Sargassum growth across the region. The Caribbean Oceans team calculated the Floating Algal Index (FAI) using Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, and compared the FAI to various oceanic variables to determine the ideal pelagic environment for Sargassum growth. The project also examined the annual spread of Sargassum throughout the region by using Earth Trends Modeler (ETM) in Clark Labs' TerrSet software. As part of the international effort to better understand the life cycle of Sargassum in the Caribbean, the results of this project will help local economies promote sustainable management practices in the region.

  10. African American and Black Caribbean Feelings of Closeness to Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Michael C; Taylor, Robert Joseph; Chatters, Linda M; Forsythe-Brown, Ivy

    2017-01-01

    African American and Black Caribbean relations dominate research on interactions across black ethnic divides. Using National Survey of American Life data, we explore a different aspect of black interethnic attitudes: how close these groups feel toward Africans. African Americans and Black Caribbeans were largely similar in their feelings of closeness to Africans. For Black Caribbeans, younger and male respondents, those reporting higher levels of financial strain, living in the northeast and persons who immigrated to the United States at least 11 years ago, report feeling especially close to Africans. Being male was the only significant correlate among African Americans. The findings are discussed in relation to how race, ethnicity and national origin shape personal identities within the U.S. and their significance for intergroup perceptions. These broader issues warrant further consideration in light of assertions that race as a defining feature of American life and intergroup relations is obsolete.

  11. Art at the crossroads: Francisco Oller and Caribbean art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Manthorne

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of Edward J. Sullivan, From San Juan to Paris and Back: Francisco Oller and Caribbean Art in the Era of Impressionism: Francisco Oller (1833-1917 was a Puerto Rican born artist who helped shape the visual production of the Caribbean in the second half of the nineteenth century. He enjoyed a reputation on both sides of the Atlantic, both at home and in Europe, where he spent twenty years. This book fills provides a much-needed analysis of the achievement of Oller, who has received little scholarly attention in the past thirty years. In six chapters that analyze major artworks and themes in Oller’s oeuvre, this book recasts the artist as a key figure in nineteenth century art and sheds new light on his contribution to a uniquely Caribbean aesthetic.

  12. Religious Involvement among Caribbean Blacks in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robert Joseph; Chatters, Linda M.; Mattis, Jacqueline S.; Joe, Sean

    2011-01-01

    This study examined demographic and denominational differences in religious involvement (i.e., organizational, non-organizational, subjective) among Caribbean Blacks (Black Caribbeans) residing in the U.S. using data from the National Survey of American Life. Caribbean Blacks who were born in the U.S. had lower levels of religious involvement than those who immigrated and respondents originating from Haiti (as compared to Jamaica) had higher levels of religious involvement, while persons from Trinidad-Tobago reported lower service attendance than did Jamaicans. Older persons, women and married persons generally demonstrated greater religious involvement than their counterparts, while highly educated respondents expressed lower levels of self-rated religiosity. Denominational differences indicated that Baptists reported high levels of religious involvement; however, in several cases, Pentecostals and Seventh Day Adventists reported greater involvement. PMID:21927509

  13. Presence of Ruvettus pretiosus (Gempylidae in the Colombian continental Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Camila Gómez-Cubillos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The first record of Ruvettus pretiosus Cocco, 1833 for the Colombian continental Caribbean is presented. The specimen was collected at Los Cocos, department of Magdalena (11°16’33, 84’’ N 73°53’33, 01’’ W, using a demersal longline gear placed at 100 m depth. Biometrics, diagnosis and comments regarding its distribution, ecology and biology are included in the description. This new record expands the distribution of the species in the Caribbean Sea and increases the reported number of gempylids for Colombia to five.

  14. Digital Poverty: Latin American and Caribbean Perspectives | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2007-01-01

    Jan 1, 2007 ... This book examines the problem of inadequate access to information and communication technology (ICT) and the need to develop appropriate pro-poor ICT policies within the Latin American and Caribbean context. The authors show how market reforms have failed to ensure that the benefits of the ...

  15. Rethinking Education for the Caribbean: A Radical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jules, Didacus

    2008-01-01

    The article reflects critically on the experience of the Caribbean Anglophone countries (CARICOM) in reforming their education systems to meet the challenges of the present era. It argues that education reform in the current conjuncture can no longer be incremental and that what is required is a fundamental rethinking of educational provision.…

  16. Coastal Resource Management in the Wider Caribbean: Resilience ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-01-01

    Jan 1, 2010 ... The Caribbean Sea is the second largest sea in the world, including more than 30 insular and continental countries with an approximate population of 35 million. In addition to its highly fractionalized territory, it is characterized by a great linguistic and cultural diversity, a phenomenon enhanced by ...

  17. Measurement Invariance of the UTAUT Constructs in the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Troy D.; Singh, Lenandlar; Gaffar, Kemuel; Thakur, Dhanaraj; Jackman, Grace-Ann; Thomas, Michael; Gajraj, Roger; Allen, Claudine; Tooma, Keron

    2014-01-01

    This article employs confirmatory factor analysis to evaluate the factorial validity and the cross-national comparability of the UTAUT constructs with respect to mobile learning in higher education in four Caribbean countries. Except for the measurement of one factor, the UTAUT constructs exhibit adequate reliability and validity. Though full…

  18. 75 FR 65453 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    .... Executive Director's Report. ACLs/AMs Report/Discussion. Trap Reduction Program Update--Anthony Iarocci/Tony... contact Mr. Miguel A. Rol n, Executive Director, Caribbean Fishery Management Council, 268 Mu oz Rivera.... Although non-emergency issues not contained in this agenda may come before this group for discussion, those...

  19. 78 FR 67127 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... auxiliary aids, please contact Mr. Miguel A. Rol n, Executive Director, Caribbean Fishery Management Council... agenda issues. Although non-emergency issues not contained in this agenda may come before this group for... days prior to the meeting date. Dated: November 5, 2013. Tracey L. Thompson, Acting Deputy Director...

  20. Productivity in services in Latin America and the Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arias Ortiz, E.; Crespi, G.A.; Rasteletti, A.; Vargas, F.

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies productivity in Latin America and the Caribbean, with an emphasis on the service sector. It shows that the low levels of productivity observed in the region are not only a consequence of low productivity at the firm level, but also of misallocation of workers across firms. These

  1. The Case of Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacio, Jairo

    1993-01-01

    Reviews the history of population education programs in Latin America and the Caribbean from 1970 to 1992 and changes in fertility, mortality, and migration during that period. Considers issues such as government styles and motivations, staff shortages, cooperation among administrators, teacher training, distance education, and new management…

  2. Women in Development: The Issues for the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antrobus, Peggy

    1980-01-01

    In the Caribbean, women's programs have focused on women's reproductive roles, to the detriment of equal opportunities in education, training, access to jobs, land, and credit. This deprives developing nations of the full contribution of women to social and economic development. (SK)

  3. Caribbean dry forest networking: an opportunity for conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. Banda-Rodriguez; J. Weintritt; R.T. Pennington

    2016-01-01

    Seasonally dry tropical forest is the most threatened tropical forest in the world. Though its overall plant species diversity is lower than in neighboring biomes such as rain forest, species endemism can be high, and its conservation has often been neglected. Caribbean dry forests face diverse threats including tourism, agriculture, and climate change. The Latin...

  4. Caribbean piracy and youth restiveness in Niger delta: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our aim in this paper is to make a comparative analysis of Caribbean piracy and youth restiveness in Niger Delta of Nigeria. It will not be out of place to carry out such an analysis having seen, heard or read of the ongoing chaos, insecurity in the. Niger Delta Zone in Nigeria. We have to look at the past to find out such similar

  5. The Educational Experience of Afro-Caribbean Student Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmore, Keiana; Vazquez-Montilla, Elia; Greene, Jackie

    2016-01-01

    The following article summarizes a research study which involved an investigation of the educational experiences of Afro-Caribbean student immigrants who were academically successful in the United States (U.S.). Although immigrants of African descent experience barriers such as immigrant status and racial minority status which leads to a double…

  6. Canada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus Research Program ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-05-10

    May 10, 2016 ... A new funding opportunity on Zika virus is responding to the virus outbreak and the health threat it represents for the affected populations in the hardest hit countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. The Canadian Institutes for Health Research and the International Development Research Centre, ...

  7. Canada-Latin America and the Caribbean Research Exchange ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Like the three earlier phases (002624, 004097 and 101783), this project will allow the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC) to offer academics (graduate students, professors, researchers) from Canada and Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) opportunities for face-to-face dialogue on ...

  8. Preliminary analysis of interannual Caribbean Current spatial variability

    OpenAIRE

    Bryce Corlett, W.; Ezer, Tal

    2014-01-01

    2012 Poster Presentation - Old Dominion University The preliminary results shown here are an initial attempt to connect spatial variations of the Caribbean Current to eddy activity at the Meso-American Barrier Reef, as is an important driver for currents around the reef during spawning.

  9. On Afro-American and Afro-Caribbean Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Clement G. B.

    1980-01-01

    Cites negative stereotypes and cultural differences as barriers to unity among Black Americans and immigrants from the Caribbean islands. Calls for political unity of the two groups, based on the fact that they are perceived and discriminated against as one by the dominant White majority. (GC)

  10. Wave-swept coralliths of Saba Bank, Dutch Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksema, Bert W.; Hassell, Dahlia; Meesters, Erik H.W.G.; Duyl, van Fleur C.

    2017-01-01

    During a recent reef coral survey at the submarine Saba Bank (Eastern Caribbean), an uncommon and diverse assemblage of unattached scleractinian corals (coralliths) was encountered, which has not been reported from the Atlantic before. Four different types of these free-living (unattached) corals

  11. How to Avoid a Darkening Debt Storm in the Caribbean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallett, Andrew Hughes; Hougaard Jensen, Svend E.

    Using the euro area and the Eastern Caribbean Currency Union as case studies, this chapter argues that a comprehensive policy framework should comprise not only a rule for fiscal policy but also, and equally important, a broader set of strategies designed to improve competitiveness and economic...

  12. Familiar faces from abroad: Diaspora tourism in the Caribbean ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2012-03-02

    Mar 2, 2012 ... Altogether, millions of Caribbean natives, or their descendants, live in global cities abroad. ... Diaspora members, it turns out, return home not just for sun and relaxation, but also to invest and do business, to improve education, to establish a new residence, to attend festivals or family events such as ...

  13. Racial and Ego Identity Development in Black Caribbean College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Delida

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the relationships between racial identity attitudes and ego identity statuses among 255 Black Caribbean college students in the Northeast United States. Findings indicated that racial identity attitudes were predictive of ego identity statuses. Specifically, preencounter racial identity attitudes were predictive of lower scores…

  14. Boys' Educational "Underachievement" in the Caribbean: Interpreting the "Problem"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbett, Mary; Younger, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Education ministries in the Caribbean countries have directed considerable attention over the last decade to "solving" the "problem" of boys' underachievement. Rather than considering such interventions, our central concern in this paper is to revisit debates about the interpretation of the issue, to explore whether boys'…

  15. Highlight: IDRC sponsors Caribbean symposium on impact of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2015-05-12

    12 mai 2015 ... An IDRC-sponsored symposium exploring the impact of the Internet on economic growth and public service delivery in the Caribbean was held in Saint Andrew, Jamaica, on May 12, 2015. Discussions from the symposium will feed into the 2016 World Development Report: Internet for Development.

  16. Freshwater resources in the insular Caribbean: an environmental perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. Heartsill Scalley

    2012-01-01

    From islands with no permanent flowing streams to those with navigable inland waters, the insular Caribbean contains a great range of conditions regarding the access to freshwater resources. Because of the variation in topography and size, the ability of islands to retain freshwater also varies widely. The usage of freshwater in this region is being led by two major...

  17. Lessons from NAFTA for Latin America and the Caribbean

    OpenAIRE

    Lederman, Daniel; William F. Maloney; Servén, Luis

    2004-01-01

    Analyzing the experience of Mexico under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), "Lessons from NAFTA" aims to provide guidance to Latin American and Caribbean countries considering free trade agreements with the United States. The authors conclude that the treaty raised external trade and foreign investment inflows and had a modest effect on Mexico's average income per person. It ...

  18. Rewriting The Caribbean Experience In Homerian Style: A Study Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is realised that the poem is a reenactment of the total Caribbean experience in all its totality. However, the study goes further to underscore the peculiar Homerian style of the poem. The style is discussed with regards to the extant epics of Homer and Dante and some of the stylistic indicators discovered include the use of ...

  19. Strengthening Coastal Pollution Management in the Wider Caribbean Region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavieren, van H.; Metcalfe, C.D.; Drouillard, K.; Sale, P.; Gold-Bouchot, G.; Reid, R.; Vermeulen, L.C.

    2011-01-01

    Control of aquatic pollution is critical for improving coastal zone management and for the conservation of fisheries resources. Countries in the Wider Caribbean Region (WCR) generally lack monitoring capacity and do not have reliable information on the levels and distribution of pollutants,

  20. Breastfeeding and food pattern in overweight children in the Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greaux, K.; Schwiebbe, L.; Renders, C.M.; Doak, C.M.; Visser, R.; Kist-van Holthe, J.E.; Hirasing, R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: As in most countries around the globe, overweight and obesity are a major threat to public health on the Caribbean island of Aruba. Increasing evidence confirms that breastfeeding protects against overweight and obesity. However, little is known about the mechanism underlying the

  1. Disaster-induced displacement in the Caribbean and the Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Hamza

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available People in Small Island Developing States are particularly vulnerable to displacement by disaster. Governments in the Caribbean and the Pacific need urgently to do more risk management and planning, rather than focusing almost exclusively on response and relocation.

  2. Nocturnal foraging by artificial light in three Caribbean bird species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debrot, A.O.

    2014-01-01

    I discuss observations of opportunistic use of artificial light for feeding in the dark by the native White-tailed Nightjar (Caprimulgus cayennensis), the long-established Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis), and the introduced Carib Grackle (Quiscalus lugubris) in Curaçao, Dutch Caribbean. The

  3. Migration as an Agent of Change in Caribbean Island Ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Dawn

    1982-01-01

    There is need to assess the impact of migration on the Caribbean ecosystems. As a 150-year-old institution, emigration is related to the carrying capacity of the islands and the need to export the surplus population when capacity is threatened. Emigration, however, is a deterrent to development and individual independence. (KC)

  4. Improving food security in Latin America and the Caribbean | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-21

    Apr 21, 2016 ... Fish farming is greatly improving food security, incomes, health, and quality of life for families in Bolivia. Women are empowered to become leaders in their communities, promoting gender equality. More fruits and vegetables in children's diets in Caribbean primary schools are helping with child obesity.

  5. The Care Chain, Children's Mobility and the Caribbean Migration Tradition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Karen Fog

    2012-01-01

    Children’s mobility is analysed in this article as an important foundation of the migration tradition that has been an integral aspect of most Caribbean societies. I show that, because of their position as dependents who are not yet fully socialised and who are subject to adult authority, childre...

  6. Early Efforts at Educating the Indians in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchus, M. K.

    1988-01-01

    Examines history of three native Caribbean groups, the Ciboney, the Arawaks, and the Caribs, from beginning of European colonization in the fifteen th century. Details destruction of Indian society and culture by Spanish settlers, who subjugated Natives with education and religion. Includes section of "Some Positive Educational Contributions…

  7. Premiere of "Forward Home:" The economic power of Caribbean ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    26 avr. 2016 ... The documentary "Forward Home," produced as part of IDRC'sOpportunities in CARICOM Migration : Brain Circulation, Diasporic Tourism, and Investment project, reveals the economic power of the Caribbean's overseas communities. The 30-minute film showcases the experiences of peoples who ...

  8. Spanish? What Spanish? The Search for a 'Caribbean Standard.'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, C.

    1978-01-01

    Variations in lexicon, phonology, morphology, and syntax of Spanish as spoken in Venezuela, Cuba, Mexico, and Castile have led to a diversity in the types of Spanish taught in Caribbean schools. The Programa Interamericano de Linguistica y Ensenanza de Idiomas is conducting a survey which will provide authoritative standards for Spanish teachers.…

  9. Premiere of "Forward Home:" The economic power of Caribbean ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-26

    Apr 26, 2016 ... The documentary "Forward Home," produced as part of IDRC'sOpportunities in CARICOM Migration : Brain Circulation, Diasporic Tourism, and Investment project, reveals the economic power of the Caribbean's overseas communities. The 30-minute film showcases the experiences of peoples who ...

  10. book review the cambridge guide to african ano caribbean theatre.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    THE CAMBRIDGE GUIDE TO AFRICAN ANO CARIBBEAN. THEATRE. Edited by Martin Banham, Errol Hill and George Woodyard. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994, pp.24. 35 Pounds, $39.95. Six years after the Guide to World Theatre, which was "particularly designed to offer to scholars, students and general ...

  11. Knowledge and attitudes of students in a caribbean medical school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AIDS) is seen as one of the most devastating infection/disease known to have attacked the human population. This study is aimed at assessing the level of knowledge, attitudes and misconceptions of the medical students in a Caribbean Medical ...

  12. Rewriting the Caribbean experience in Homerian style: a study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates the themes that bother upon the Caribbean experience in Derek Walcott's Omeros. A brief introduction to the poetry of Derek Walcott is given before attempts are made at rendering some of the themes of the work such as identity, slavery/colonialism, rootlessness, reconciliation, and migration.

  13. Improving food security in Latin America and the Caribbean | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    21 avr. 2016 ... Fish farming is greatly improving food security, incomes, health, and quality of life for families in Bolivia. Women are empowered to become leaders in their communities, promoting gender equality. More fruits and vegetables in children's diets in Caribbean primary schools are helping with child obesity.

  14. Dust and Air Quality Forecasting in the Eastern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealy, A. M.; Reyes, A.; Farrell, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Significant amounts of dust travel across the northern tropical Atlantic to the Caribbean every year from the Sahara region. These dust concentrations in the Caribbean often exceed United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for particulate matter of 2.5 microns or less (PM 2.5) which could have serious implications for human health in the region. Air pollution has become a major issue in the Caribbean because of urban development, increased vehicle emissions and growing industrialisation. However, the majority of territories in the Caribbean do not have routine air quality monitoring programmes and several do not have or enforce air quality standards for PM2.5 and PM10. As a result, the Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology (CIMH) has taken the initiative to provide dust and air quality forecasts for the Eastern Caribbean using the advanced WRF-Chem modeling system. The applications of the WRF-Chem modelling system at CIMH that are currently being focused on are the coupled weather prediction/dispersion model to simulate the release and transport of constituents, especially Saharan dust transport and concentration; and as a coupled weather/dispersion/air quality model with full interaction of chemical species with prediction of particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10). This will include future applications in the prediction of ozone (O3) and ultraviolet (UV) radiation as well as examining dust radiative forcing and effects on atmospheric precipitation and dynamics. The simulations are currently initialised at 00Z for a seven day forecast and run at 36 km resolution with a planned second domain (at 12 km) for air quality forecasts. Preliminary results from this study will be presented and compared to other dust forecast models currently used in other regions. This work also complements in situ measurements at Ragged Point, Barbados (oldest dust record since 1965), Martinique, Guadeloupe, French Guiana and Puerto Rico. The goal of this study

  15. VOLCANIC TSUNAMI GENERATING SOURCE MECHANISMS IN THE EASTERN CARIBBEAN REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Pararas-Carayannis

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, volcanic island flank failures and underwater slides have generated numerous destructive tsunamis in the Caribbean region. Convergent, compressional and collisional tectonic activity caused primarily from the eastward movement of the Caribbean Plate in relation to the North American, Atlantic and South American Plates, is responsible for zones of subduction in the region, the formation of island arcs and the evolution of particular volcanic centers on the overlying plate. The inter-plate tectonic interaction and deformation along these marginal boundaries result in moderate seismic and volcanic events that can generate tsunamis by a number of different mechanisms. The active geo-dynamic processes have created the Lesser Antilles, an arc of small islands with volcanoes characterized by both effusive and explosive activity. Eruption mechanisms of these Caribbean volcanoes are complex and often anomalous. Collapses of lava domes often precede major eruptions, which may vary in intensity from Strombolian to Plinian. Locally catastrophic, short-period tsunami-like waves can be generated directly by lateral, direct or channelized volcanic blast episodes, or in combination with collateral air pressure perturbations, nuéss ardentes, pyroclastic flows, lahars, or cascading debris avalanches. Submarine volcanic caldera collapses can also generate locally destructive tsunami waves. Volcanoes in the Eastern Caribbean Region have unstable flanks. Destructive local tsunamis may be generated from aerial and submarine volcanic edifice mass edifice flank failures, which may be triggered by volcanic episodes, lava dome collapses, or simply by gravitational instabilities. The present report evaluates volcanic mechanisms, resulting flank failure processes and their potential for tsunami generation. More specifically, the report evaluates recent volcanic eruption mechanisms of the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat, of Mt. Pel

  16. Recruitment phenology and pelagic larval duration in Caribbean amphidromous fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engman, Augustin C.; Kwak, Thomas J.; Fischer, Jesse R.

    2017-01-01

    Amphidromous fishes are major components of oceanic tropical island stream ecosystems, such as those of the Caribbean island, Puerto Rico. Fishes with this life history face threats related to the requirement for connectivity between freshwater and marine environments during early life stages. Pelagic larval duration and recruitment phenology are 2 early life-history processes that are crucial for the biology, ecology, conservation, and management of amphidromous fishes. However, these processes are understudied in the Caribbean in general and have never been quantified in Puerto Rico. We quantified recruit abundance, recruitment phenology, and pelagic larval duration of several Caribbean amphidromous fish species in multiple rivers in Puerto Rico and explored the effects of environmental variables on recruit abundances. Two fish taxa—sirajo goby (Sicydium spp.) and River Goby (Awaous banana)—were exceptionally abundant as postlarvae and recruited to Caribbean rivers in pulsed migration episodes that were periodic at annual and lunar scales. Sirajo goby and River Goby recruit abundances varied among rivers, were greater at sunrise than at sunset, and were positively related to river discharge. The pelagic larval duration of 4 fish taxa ranged from a minimum of 28 d to a maximum of 103 d with means between 43 ± 7 d (SD) and 65 ± 11 d. We identified the last-quarter moon phase during the months of June through January as periods of maximum amphidromous fish recruitment to freshwater streams. The results and conclusions of our study can be applied to identify critical times to maintain river–ocean connectivity and stream flow for the benefit of the amphidromous fish population dynamics, stream ecology, and natural resources of the Caribbean.

  17. Marine biodiversity in the Caribbean: regional estimates and distribution patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Miloslavich

    Full Text Available This paper provides an analysis of the distribution patterns of marine biodiversity and summarizes the major activities of the Census of Marine Life program in the Caribbean region. The coastal Caribbean region is a large marine ecosystem (LME characterized by coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses, but including other environments, such as sandy beaches and rocky shores. These tropical ecosystems incorporate a high diversity of associated flora and fauna, and the nations that border the Caribbean collectively encompass a major global marine biodiversity hot spot. We analyze the state of knowledge of marine biodiversity based on the geographic distribution of georeferenced species records and regional taxonomic lists. A total of 12,046 marine species are reported in this paper for the Caribbean region. These include representatives from 31 animal phyla, two plant phyla, one group of Chromista, and three groups of Protoctista. Sampling effort has been greatest in shallow, nearshore waters, where there is relatively good coverage of species records; offshore and deep environments have been less studied. Additionally, we found that the currently accepted classification of marine ecoregions of the Caribbean did not apply for the benthic distributions of five relatively well known taxonomic groups. Coastal species richness tends to concentrate along the Antillean arc (Cuba to the southernmost Antilles and the northern coast of South America (Venezuela-Colombia, while no pattern can be observed in the deep sea with the available data. Several factors make it impossible to determine the extent to which these distribution patterns accurately reflect the true situation for marine biodiversity in general: (1 highly localized concentrations of collecting effort and a lack of collecting in many areas and ecosystems, (2 high variability among collecting methods, (3 limited taxonomic expertise for many groups, and (4 differing levels of activity in the study

  18. Marine Biodiversity in the Caribbean: Regional Estimates and Distribution Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloslavich, Patricia; Díaz, Juan Manuel; Klein, Eduardo; Alvarado, Juan José; Díaz, Cristina; Gobin, Judith; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Weil, Ernesto; Cortés, Jorge; Bastidas, Ana Carolina; Robertson, Ross; Zapata, Fernando; Martín, Alberto; Castillo, Julio; Kazandjian, Aniuska; Ortiz, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the distribution patterns of marine biodiversity and summarizes the major activities of the Census of Marine Life program in the Caribbean region. The coastal Caribbean region is a large marine ecosystem (LME) characterized by coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses, but including other environments, such as sandy beaches and rocky shores. These tropical ecosystems incorporate a high diversity of associated flora and fauna, and the nations that border the Caribbean collectively encompass a major global marine biodiversity hot spot. We analyze the state of knowledge of marine biodiversity based on the geographic distribution of georeferenced species records and regional taxonomic lists. A total of 12,046 marine species are reported in this paper for the Caribbean region. These include representatives from 31 animal phyla, two plant phyla, one group of Chromista, and three groups of Protoctista. Sampling effort has been greatest in shallow, nearshore waters, where there is relatively good coverage of species records; offshore and deep environments have been less studied. Additionally, we found that the currently accepted classification of marine ecoregions of the Caribbean did not apply for the benthic distributions of five relatively well known taxonomic groups. Coastal species richness tends to concentrate along the Antillean arc (Cuba to the southernmost Antilles) and the northern coast of South America (Venezuela – Colombia), while no pattern can be observed in the deep sea with the available data. Several factors make it impossible to determine the extent to which these distribution patterns accurately reflect the true situation for marine biodiversity in general: (1) highly localized concentrations of collecting effort and a lack of collecting in many areas and ecosystems, (2) high variability among collecting methods, (3) limited taxonomic expertise for many groups, and (4) differing levels of activity in the study of

  19. Marine biodiversity in the Caribbean: regional estimates and distribution patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloslavich, Patricia; Díaz, Juan Manuel; Klein, Eduardo; Alvarado, Juan José; Díaz, Cristina; Gobin, Judith; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Weil, Ernesto; Cortés, Jorge; Bastidas, Ana Carolina; Robertson, Ross; Zapata, Fernando; Martín, Alberto; Castillo, Julio; Kazandjian, Aniuska; Ortiz, Manuel

    2010-08-02

    This paper provides an analysis of the distribution patterns of marine biodiversity and summarizes the major activities of the Census of Marine Life program in the Caribbean region. The coastal Caribbean region is a large marine ecosystem (LME) characterized by coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses, but including other environments, such as sandy beaches and rocky shores. These tropical ecosystems incorporate a high diversity of associated flora and fauna, and the nations that border the Caribbean collectively encompass a major global marine biodiversity hot spot. We analyze the state of knowledge of marine biodiversity based on the geographic distribution of georeferenced species records and regional taxonomic lists. A total of 12,046 marine species are reported in this paper for the Caribbean region. These include representatives from 31 animal phyla, two plant phyla, one group of Chromista, and three groups of Protoctista. Sampling effort has been greatest in shallow, nearshore waters, where there is relatively good coverage of species records; offshore and deep environments have been less studied. Additionally, we found that the currently accepted classification of marine ecoregions of the Caribbean did not apply for the benthic distributions of five relatively well known taxonomic groups. Coastal species richness tends to concentrate along the Antillean arc (Cuba to the southernmost Antilles) and the northern coast of South America (Venezuela-Colombia), while no pattern can be observed in the deep sea with the available data. Several factors make it impossible to determine the extent to which these distribution patterns accurately reflect the true situation for marine biodiversity in general: (1) highly localized concentrations of collecting effort and a lack of collecting in many areas and ecosystems, (2) high variability among collecting methods, (3) limited taxonomic expertise for many groups, and (4) differing levels of activity in the study of different

  20. The politics of representing the African diaspora in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A. Yelvington

    1994-07-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] Roots of Jamaican Culture. MERVYN C. ALLEYNE. London: Pluto Press, 1988. xii + 186 pp. (Paper US$ 15.95 Guinea's Other Suns: The African Dynamic in Trinidad Culture. MAUREEN WARNER-LEWIS. Foreword by Rex Nettleford. Dover MA: The Majority Press, 1991. xxii + 207 pp. (Paper US$ 9.95 A recent trend in anthropology is defined by the interest in the role of historical and political configurations in the constitution of local cultural practices. Unfortunately, with some notable individual exceptions, this is the same anthropology which has largely ignored the Caribbean and its "Islands of History."1 Of course, this says much, much more about the way in which anthropology constructs its subject than it says about the merits of the Caribbean case and the fundamental essence of these societies, born as they were in the unforgiving and defining moment of pervasive, persuasive, and pernicious European construction of "Otherness." As Trouillot (1992:22 writes, "Whereas anthropology prefers 'pre-contact' situations - or creates 'no-contact' situations - the Caribbean is nothing but contact." If the anthropological fiction of pristine societies, uninfluenced and uncontaminated by "outside" and more powerful structures and cultures cannot be supported for the Caribbean, then many anthropologists do one or both of the two anthropologically next best things: they take us on a journey that finds us exploding the "no-contact" myth over and over (I think it is called "strawpersonism", suddenly discovering political economy, history, and colonialism, and/or they end up constructing the "pristine" anyway by emphasizing those parts of a diaspora group's pre-Caribbean culture that are thought to remain as cultural "survivals."

  1. Internalized racism and mental health among African-Americans, US-born Caribbean Blacks, and foreign-born Caribbean Blacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouzon, Dawne M; McLean, Jamila S

    2017-02-01

    The tripartite model of racism includes personally mediated racism, institutionalized racism, and the less-oft studied internalized racism. Internalized racism - or negative beliefs about one's racial group - results from cultural racism that is endemic in American society. In this project, we studied whether these negative stereotypes are associated with mental health among African-Americans and Caribbean Blacks. Using secondary data from the National Survey of American Life, we investigated the association between internalized racism and mental health (measured by depressive symptoms and serious psychological distress (SPD)) among these two groups. We also explored whether ethnicity/nativity and mastery moderate the association between internalized racism and mental health among African-Americans and Caribbean Blacks. Internalized racism was positively associated with depressive symptoms and SPD among all Black subgroups. However, internalized racism was a weaker predictor of SPD among foreign-born Caribbean Blacks than US-born Caribbean Blacks and US-born African-Americans. Additionally, higher mastery was protective against distress associated with internalized racism. Internalized racism is an important yet understudied determinant of mental health among Blacks. Future studies should take into account additional heterogeneity within the Black population (e.g. African-born individuals) and other potential protective mechanisms in addition to mastery (e.g. self-esteem and racial identity).

  2. A proposal to conduct a Caribbean plate project involving the application of space technology to the study of Caribbean geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadge, G. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The Caribbean plate project is designed to improve current understanding of geological resources and geological hazards within the Caribbean region. Models of mineral occurrence and genesis (including energy resources) on a regional scale, which contribute to nonrenewable resource investigations. Models of lithospheric stress and strain on a regional scale, which contribute to forecasting geological hazards such as earthquakes and major volcanic eruptions are developed. Geological information is synthesize, and research tools provided by space technology the study of the Earth's crust are used. The project was organized in a thematic fashion, to focus on specific geological aspects of the Caribbean plate which are considered to be key factors in developing the types of models described. The project adopts a synoptic perspective in seeking to characterize the three dimensional structure, composition, state of stress, and evolution of the entire Caribbean plate. Geological information derived from analysis of space acquired data is combined with information provided by conventional methods to obtain insight into the structure, composition, and evolution of the Earth's crust. In addition, very long baseline interferometry and laser ranging techniques, which are also based upon the use of space technology, obtain information concerning crustal motion that, in turn, provides insight into the distribution and localization of crustal stress.

  3. Which Fishers Are Satisfied in the Caribbean? A Comparative Analysis of Job Satisfaction among Caribbean Lobster Fishers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnereau, Iris; Pollnac, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Lobster fishing (targeting the spiny lobster "Panulirus argus") is an important economic activity throughout the Wider Caribbean Region both as a source of income and employment for the local population as well as foreign exchange for national governments. Due to the high unit prices of the product, international lobster trade provides a…

  4. Perinatal care in six eastern Caribbean countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, E R

    1985-01-01

    In December, 1981, the Government of the Netherlands conducted evaluation studies of perinatal health care in the 6 Caribbean countries of Antigua, the Bahamas, Barbados, Dominica, Saint Lucia, and St. Vincnet. In recent years, the governments of the 6 countries expressed their concerns about the need to improve perinatal health care and about the limited funds, health facilities, and health manpower available for meeting this need. Data for the studies were collected during visits to the 6 countries and consisted of availble vital statistics and hospital records collected by local physicians and chief nurses. Since 70%-95% of the deliveries in these countries occurred in hospitals, hospital data were used to assess the level of perinatal mortality. Perinatal death rates for the 6 countries ranged from 29/1000 live births to 38/1000 live births. When stillbirths and neonatal death rates were examined separately, there was considerable variation between countries. Stillbirth rates ranged from 23.4-13.6/1000 live births and neonatal death rates ranged from 9.9-22.5/1000 live births. These differences probably reflected classification problems rather than actual differences. Although there was considerable variation in per capita income levels in the 6 countries (US$380-US$2620) these differences did not appear to be associated with differences in perinatal death rates. Average birth weights for the 6 countries ranged from 3000 gm to 3150 gm, and the average for all 6 countries combined was 3100 gm. The incidence of low birth weights (2500 gm or less) ranged from 5.9% in Dominica to 11% in Barbados. The major causes of perinatal death were complications resulting from anoxia or hypoxia, prematurity complications, and neonatal infections. Infants who survive these conditions frequently develop handicaps. Average breastfeeding duration ranged from 1 month in the Bahamas to 7 months in St. Vincent. Bottle feeding is common and generally begins early. Mistaken beliefs

  5. Action through Partnerships : The Pan-Caribbean Partnership Against HIV/AIDS (PANCAP)

    OpenAIRE

    Carpio, Carmen; Mulusa, Mary

    2005-01-01

    The Pan-Caribbean Partnership against HIV/AIDS (PANCAP) was designated an 'international best practice' by the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). A case study on the Pan-Caribbean Partnership against HIV/AIDS (PANCAP) in December, 2004. The Caribbean region is second only to Sub-Saharan Africa in HIV prevalence with an estimated adult HIV prevalence rate of 2.3 percent in 2...

  6. Marital Satisfaction Among African Americans and Black Caribbeans: Findings From the National Survey of American Life*

    OpenAIRE

    Bryant, Chalandra M.; Taylor, Robert Joseph; Lincoln, Karen D.; Chatters, Linda M.; Jackson, James S.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the correlates of marital satisfaction using data from a national probability sample of African Americans (N = 962) and Black Caribbeans (N = 560). Findings reveal differences between African Americans and Black Caribbeans, and men and women within those groups, in the predictors of marital satisfaction. Black Caribbean women reported overall higher levels of marital satisfaction than African American women. The findings amply demonstrate the significance of ethnic diversi...

  7. Area Handbook Series: Islands of the Commonwealth Caribbean; A Regional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    in Beautiful Countries and Caribbean Dependence on the United States Economy, Anthony Payne and Paul Sutton’s Dependency under Challenge; and Clive Y...Development Challenges and Coopera- tion in the Commonwealth Caribbean; detailed essays on Caricom and the Commonwealth Caribbean may be found in Anthony Payne ...and Johanna Jones. Authors and Areas of the West In- dies. Austin: Steck-Vaughn, 1970. Karch, Cecilia A. "The Role of the Barbados Mutual Life Assur

  8. Sites for priority biodiversity conservation in the Caribbean Islands Biodiversity Hotspot

    OpenAIRE

    V. Anadon-Irizarry; D.C. Wege; A. Upgren; Young, R; Boom, B.; Leon, Y.M.; Y Arias; Koenig, K.; Morales, A.L.; Burke, W

    2012-01-01

    The Caribbean Islands Biodiversity Hotspot is exceptionally important for global biodiversity conservation due to high levels of species endemism and threat. A total of 755 Caribbean plant and vertebrate species are considered globally threatened, making it one of the top Biodiversity Hotspots in terms of threat levels. In 2009, Key Biodiversity Areas (KBAs) were identified for the Caribbean Islands through a regional-level analysis of accessible data and literature, followed by extensive nat...

  9. Tangled roots: Kalenda and other neo-African dances in the circum-Caribbean

    OpenAIRE

    Julian Gerstin

    2004-01-01

    Investigates descriptions of Afro-Caribbean dances in early chronicles and historical material. Author focuses on choreography, as well as on musical instruments and their use. He pays special attention to descriptions of the Martinican kalenda dance. He discusses descriptions from the 18th c. of black Caribbean dance in French and other colonies, by priests and others, of the kalenda as a couple dance within a ring, and descriptions of other widespread early dances in the Caribbean, such as ...

  10. Postglacial expansion pathways of red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle, in the Caribbean Basin and Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, John Paul; Pil, Maria W; Proffitt, C Edward; Boeger, Walter A; Stanford, Alice M; Devlin, Donna J

    2016-02-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) was a period of massive range contraction. Post-LGM, water-dispersed coastal species, including the red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle), expanded poleward as propagules were transported by ocean currents. We assessed postglacial marine expansion pathways for R. mangle within the Caribbean Basin and Florida. Six microsatellite loci were used to genotype 237 individuals from nine R. mangle populations in the Caribbean, Florida, and Northwest Africa. We evaluated genetic variation, population structure, gene flow along alternative post-LGM expansion pathways to Florida, and potential long-distance dispersal (LDD) from West Africa to Caribbean islands. These R. mangle populations had substantial genetic structure (FST = 0.37, P < 0.0001) with three discrete population clusters (Caribbean mainland, Caribbean islands, and Florida). Genetic connectivity along the mainland pathway (Caribbean mainland to Florida) vs. limited gene dispersal along the Antilles Island pathway (Caribbean islands to Florida) supported Florida recolonization from Caribbean mainland sources. Genetic similarity of Northwest Africa and two Caribbean islands provided evidence for trans-Atlantic LDD. We did not find a pattern of decreasing genetic diversity with latitude. We outline a complex expansion history for R. mangle, with discrete pathways of recolonization for Florida and Caribbean islands. Contrary to expectation, connectivity to putative Caribbean mainland refugial populations via ocean currents, and not latitude, appears to dictate genetic diversity within Caribbean island and Florida R. mangle. These findings provide a framework for further investigation of additional water-dispersed neotropical species, and insights for management initiatives. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  11. Raising the priority of chronic noncommunicable diseases in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospedales, C James; Samuels, T Alafia; Cummings, Rudolph; Gollop, Gayle; Greene, Edward

    2011-10-01

    The Caribbean's long history of cooperation in health now focuses on noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), given that Caribbean Community (CARICOM) countries have the highest NCD burden in the Americas. The heads of government convened a first in the world one-day summit on NCDs, largely due to advocacy by George Alleyne and others, on the health, social, and economic impact of NCDs; the need for upstream multisectoral interventions to address the common, multifactoral risks; and the need for increased global attention to NCDs. Implementation of the NCD Summit Declaration mandates was most effective in larger countries with greater capacity, but countries of all sizes performed well, when they had regional or global support. Progress was limited in regional approaches to food security, labeling, and elimination of trans fats. Inadequate funding stymied several resource-dependent interventions. Monitoring mechanisms were established, but more concrete goals are needed, especially for actions of nonhealth government agencies.

  12. Curriculum, human development and integral formation within the colombian caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Rodríguez Akle

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the reality of the colombian Caribbean from the perspective of human development integral to start to understand that problematic situations are opportunities to enhance the transformations that allow to retrieve the subject social and collective. So the reconstruction of regional identity from the contributions of educational communities that build-oriented curriculum to become full, proactive, people with leadership and management capacity for sustainable development in a changing world. The article proposes some strategies to address alternatives to a society in which the quality of life and human dignity are the sense of the daily work in the context of the caribbean colombianidad and globalism in practice.  

  13. CARIBBEAN OFFSHORE CORPORATE STRUCTURES UNDER A SWOT ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria GEAMÃNU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tax havens have long been under the attention of numerous Governments and International Organizations which triggered the concern of an uneven playing field in the taxation area. As a result numerous amendments have been made to both their commercial and tax legislations in order to be in line with the internationally agreed tax standards. The aim of this article is to conduct a SWOT analysis on the offshore corporate structures found in the Caribbean landscape. Based on a selection process of the most commonly recognized tax havens in the Caribbean region and an analysis of their offshore companies at the level of incorporation, administration, activities conducted and costs, a set of frequently met characteristics have been identified which stand at the basis of the SWOT analysis. The results stand to present a comprehensive four dimension framework of the offshore corporate structures in regards to their strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats.

  14. Regional Integration Through Law: the Central American and Caribbean Cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caserta, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    The article builds an innovative theoretical framework with the goal of unveiling the preconditions allowing ICs to become engines of supranationality in different institutional and socio-political contexts. In so doing, the article nuances the theoretical approaches on the relationship between...... supranationality and supranational adjudication. The article focuses on the Central American Court of Justice (CACJ) and the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ), and it compares them with the Court of Justice of the EU (CJEU). Both the CACJ and the CCJ have been branded as institutional copies of the Luxembourg Court....... The two Court have also borrowed key jurisprudential principles from the CJEU with the goal of expanding the reach of Central American and Caribbean Community laws. Despite this, both Courts have thus far failed to foster supranationality in their respective systems. This is because the conditions...

  15. Chikungunya Fever in Japan Imported from the Caribbean Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Kazuo; Nakayama, Eri; Maeda, Takuya; Mikita, Kei; Kobayashi, Yukiko; Mitarai, Aoi; Honma, Yasuko; Miyake, Satoru; Kaku, Koki; Miyahira, Yasushi; Kawana, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old Japanese woman who was working as a volunteer in the Commonwealth of Dominica in the Caribbean islands presented with a high-grade fever and severe incapacitating generalized arthralgia. The Asian genotype of the chikungunya virus was confirmed using reverse transcription-PCR and serology, based on the presence of a specific neutralization titer and immunoglobulin M antibodies. She was diagnosed with post-chikungunya chronic arthritis based on persistence of her polyarthritis for 3 months and the presence of rheumatoid factor, immunoglobulin G-rheumatoid factor, and matrix metalloproteinase-3. Chikungunya virus should be considered as a causative pathogen in travelers returning from Caribbean islands. Clinicians should consider chikungunya fever in the differential diagnosis of patients who complain of chronic arthritis and have a history of travel to an endemic area.

  16. Outlook for hydropower in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Sierra, G. (OLADE, Quito (Ecuador))

    1993-02-01

    In the last two decades, the Latin America/Carribean region has become increasingly dependent on electricity to meet growing demands for energy. Hydropower is the prevailing source for meeting this need. Hydroelectric generation increased at an annual average rate of nearly 9% between 1971 and 1989. HYdro now provides more than two-thirds of total electric power generated in Latin America and the Caribbean. The only other predominant source used for electric generation is fossil fuels. In this region there are several trends developing. They include: developing more small hydro facilities, opportunities for sharing water resources, an interest in changing the approach to water use regulation, and possibilities for more participation by the private sector. Overall, hydro appears to have a favorable competitive position in the power industry in the Latin America/Caribbean region.

  17. Cancer burden in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curado, Maria Paula; de Souza, Dyego Leandro Bezerra

    2014-01-01

    In Latin America and the Caribbean, the epidemiological transition has been occurring in an unequal manner. Infectious-contagious diseases share space with the increase of chronic nontransmissible diseases, such as cancer, which already represents the second most common cause of death, after cardiovascular illnesses. This study provides a global picture of the burden of cancer in Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as the challenges faced when controlling this disease in these regions. Epidemiological information on cancer in Latin America originates mainly from mortality registries and from a limited number of population-based cancer registries. Estimates indicate increases of 72% in the incidence of cancer and 78% in the mortality of men between 2012 and 2030, and for women the rates are 62% and 74%, respectively. These increases in incidence rates, accompanied by disproportionally high mortality rates, when compared with other regions of the world, reveal the magnitude of the challenge of controlling cancer in Latin America and the Caribbean. Although neoplasms are among the main causes of death, the control strategies are faced with issues such as organization and development of the health system, and the public policy formulation mechanism. Establishing knowledge on the real impact of incidence, mortality, and survival in Latin America and the Caribbean is quite a challenge due to the lack of an updated and dynamic information system on mortality and incidence, although some improvement has been made in the information systems of some countries within the most recent decade. Other obstacles for cancer control are the uneven allocation of resources, lack of investments in equipment and infrastructure, and the concentration of health care professionals in large urban centers, which contribute to the reproduction of socioeconomic iniquities in the assistance of populations that suffer from cancer. Copyright © 2014 Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

  18. Seafood Import Demand in Caribbean Common Market (CARICOM) Area

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Giap V.; Jolly, Curtis M.

    2010-01-01

    An aggregate seafood import demand function for selected Caribbean countries is estimated using Autoregressive Error model and a Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity model to correct autocorrelation and heteroscedasticity. The results show that aggregated seafood import is elastic (-1.12), low-valued import is more elastic (-1.21), but high-valued import is inelastic (-0.72). Exchange rate has a negative effect on seafood import quantity. Income is not a factor in Caribbe...

  19. Parenting and depressive symptoms among adolescents in four Caribbean societies

    OpenAIRE

    Lipps Garth; Lowe Gillian A; Gibson Roger C; Halliday Sharon; Morris Amrie; Clarke Nelson; Wilson Rosemarie N

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The strategies that parents use to guide and discipline their children may influence their emotional health. Relatively little research has been conducted examining the association of parenting practices to depressive symptoms among Caribbean adolescents. This project examines the association of parenting styles to levels of depressive symptoms among adolescents in Jamaica, the Bahamas, St. Kitts and Nevis, and St. Vincent. Methods Adolescents attending grade ten of academ...

  20. Assistance Focus: Latin America and the Caribbean Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-05-17

    The Clean Energy Solutions Center, an initiative of the Clean Energy Ministerial, helps countries throughout the world create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. Through the Solutions Center's no-cost Ask an Expert service, a team of international experts has delivered assistance to countries in all regions of the world, including Latin America and the Caribbean.

  1. Metabolite variability in Caribbean sponges of the genus Aplysina

    OpenAIRE

    Puyana, Monica; Pawlik, Joseph; Blum, James; Fenical, William

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sponges of the genus Aplysina are among the most common benthic animals on reefs of the Caribbean, and display a wide diversity of morphologies and colors. Tissues of these sponges lack mineralized skeletal elements, but contain a dense spongin skeleton and an elaborate series of tyrosine-derived brominated alkaloid metabolites that function as chemical defenses against predatory fishes, but do not deter some molluscs. Among the earliest marine natural products to be isolated and ide...

  2. Reconstructing the population genetic history of the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Gravel, Simon; Zakharia, Fouad; McCauley, Jacob L; Byrnes, Jake K; Gignoux, Christopher R; Ortiz-Tello, Patricia A; Martínez, Ricardo J; Hedges, Dale J; Morris, Richard W; Eng, Celeste; Sandoval, Karla; Acevedo-Acevedo, Suehelay; Norman, Paul J; Layrisse, Zulay; Parham, Peter; Martínez-Cruzado, Juan Carlos; Burchard, Esteban González; Cuccaro, Michael L; Martin, Eden R; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2013-11-01

    The Caribbean basin is home to some of the most complex interactions in recent history among previously diverged human populations. Here, we investigate the population genetic history of this region by characterizing patterns of genome-wide variation among 330 individuals from three of the Greater Antilles (Cuba, Puerto Rico, Hispaniola), two mainland (Honduras, Colombia), and three Native South American (Yukpa, Bari, and Warao) populations. We combine these data with a unique database of genomic variation in over 3,000 individuals from diverse European, African, and Native American populations. We use local ancestry inference and tract length distributions to test different demographic scenarios for the pre- and post-colonial history of the region. We develop a novel ancestry-specific PCA (ASPCA) method to reconstruct the sub-continental origin of Native American, European, and African haplotypes from admixed genomes. We find that the most likely source of the indigenous ancestry in Caribbean islanders is a Native South American component shared among inland Amazonian tribes, Central America, and the Yucatan peninsula, suggesting extensive gene flow across the Caribbean in pre-Columbian times. We find evidence of two pulses of African migration. The first pulse--which today is reflected by shorter, older ancestry tracts--consists of a genetic component more similar to coastal West African regions involved in early stages of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. The second pulse--reflected by longer, younger tracts--is more similar to present-day West-Central African populations, supporting historical records of later transatlantic deportation. Surprisingly, we also identify a Latino-specific European component that has significantly diverged from its parental Iberian source populations, presumably as a result of small European founder population size. We demonstrate that the ancestral components in admixed genomes can be traced back to distinct sub-continental source

  3. Rapidly spreading seagrass invades the Caribbean with unknown ecological consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Caroline S.; Willette, Demian A; Miller, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    The non-native seagrass Halophila stipulacea has spread rapidly throughout the Caribbean Sea (Willette et al. 2014); without additional research, the ecological ramifications of this invasion are difficult to predict. Biodiversity, connectivity of marine ecosystems, and recovery of degraded coral reefs could all be affected. The invasive seagrass, native to the Red Sea and Indian Ocean, has taken over sand bottoms and intermixed with or replaced native seagrasses, including Thalassia testudinum, Syringodium filiforme, and Halodule wrightii.

  4. 'Caribbean Creep' chills out: climate change and marine invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning-Clode, João; Fowler, Amy E; Byers, James E; Carlton, James T; Ruiz, Gregory M

    2011-01-01

    New marine invasions have been recorded in increasing numbers along the world's coasts due in part to the warming of the oceans and the ability of many invasive marine species to tolerate a broader thermal range than native species. Several marine invertebrate species have invaded the U.S. southern and mid-Atlantic coast from the Caribbean and this poleward range expansion has been termed 'Caribbean Creep'. While models have predicted the continued decline of global biodiversity over the next 100 years due to global climate change, few studies have examined the episodic impacts of prolonged cold events that could impact species range expansions. A pronounced cold spell occurred in January 2010 in the U.S. southern and mid-Atlantic coast and resulted in the mortality of several terrestrial and marine species. To experimentally test whether cold-water temperatures may have caused the disappearance of one species of the 'Caribbean Creep' we exposed the non-native crab Petrolisthes armatus to different thermal treatments that mimicked abnormal and severe winter temperatures. Our findings indicate that Petrolisthes armatus cannot tolerate prolonged and extreme cold temperatures (4-6 °C) and suggest that aperiodic cold winters may be a critical 'reset' mechanism that will limit the range expansion of other 'Caribbean Creep' species. We suggest that temperature 'aberrations' such as 'cold snaps' are an important and overlooked part of climate change. These climate fluctuations should be accounted for in future studies and models, particularly with reference to introduced subtropical and tropical species and predictions of both rates of invasion and rates of unidirectional geographic expansion. © 2011 Canning-Clode et al.

  5. FACTORS INFLUENCING ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION IN CARIBBEAN AND LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRIES

    OpenAIRE

    Carel LIGEON; Gregorowicz, Philip; Jolly, Curtis M.

    2007-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is considered an important social activity but a major health risk in Latin American and Caribbean countries (LAC). Alcohol consumption net benefits are doubtful and the factors influencing alcohol consumption in the LAC countries are not well documented. In this study, we use secondary data and Ordinary Least Squares Regression models to evaluate the factors influencing alcohol consumption in LAC countries. The factors that significantly affect alcohol consumption are: al...

  6. Proactive Ecological Reef Rehabilitation for Caribbean Coral Reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dustan, P.; Wheeler, L.

    2016-02-01

    Coral reef formation is a function of deposition and erosion modulated by biological and physical forcing functions. In 1982-4, the Caribbean-wide mass mortality of Diadema antillarum, the long-spine sea urchin phase-shifted coral reefs into algal gardens. With few exceptions, Diadema's ecological role has not been replaced and coral cover and recruitment have dropped precipitously. Additional local to global stressors have accelerated the decline and Caribbean reefs are losing their three-dimensionality and ecological integrity. Most are mere ghosts of their luxuriant past as bioerosion is overtaking accretion melting them into carbonate sand. In some shallow reef habitats Diadema populations have regenerated and their herbivory cleans the reef substrate of micro and macro algae. These reefs have high rates of recruitment and are showing signs of regeneration. The deeper reefs, without D. antillarum are mired in algae and show no potential for recovery without increased herbivory. We transplanted shallow water D. antillarum to the deeper fore reef slopes of Jamaican and Belizean reefs in an attempt to understand why the species is restricted to the shallows. The urchins were initially caged at densities of 5-20/m2 for three days to protect them while acclimating to their new habitat and to track their algal consumption. Upon cage removal, we found that the Diadema had efficiently removed the complex algal community from the substratum and the edges of live corals. Over the next week, the urchins remained together and continued foraging out from their previously caged area. Algal overgrowth is widespread throughout the Caribbean and Western Atlantic and is generally agreed upon to be one of the major drivers of Caribbean coral reef collapse. While D. antillarum may eventually extend its range deeper, the current rates of degradation highlight the need for proactive reef restoration efforts to prevent collapse of the deeper reefs.

  7. Mapping Indigenous Settlement Topography in the Caribbean Using Drones

    OpenAIRE

    Sonnemann, Till F.; Jorge Ulloa Hung; Corinne L. Hofman

    2016-01-01

    The archaeology of Amerindian settlements in the Caribbean has mostly been identified through scatters of artefacts; predominantly conglomerations of shells, ceramics and lithics. While archaeological material may not always be visible on the surface, particular settlement patterns may be identifiable by a topography created through cultural action: earthen mounds interchanging with mostly circular flattened areas. In northern Hispaniola, recent foot surveys have identified more than 200 pre-...

  8. Intimacy’s Politics: New Directions in Caribbean Sexuality Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Agard-Jones

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Pleasures and Perils: Girls’ Sexuality in a Caribbean Consumer Culture. Debra Curtis. New Brunswick NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2009. xii + 222 pp. (Paper US$ 23.95 Economies of Desire: Sex and Tourism in Cuba and the Dominican Republic. Amalia L. Cabezas. Philadelphia PA : Temple University Press, 2009. xii + 218 pp. (Paper US$ 24.95 Queer Ricans: Cultures and Sexualities in the Diaspora. Lawrence La Fountain-Stokes. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2009. xxvii + 242 pp. (Paper US$ 22.50 [First paragraph] Over the last ten years the field of Caribbean Studies has seen a precipitous expansion of work on sexualities, as recent review essays by Jenny Sharpe and Samantha Pinto (2006 and Kamala Kempadoo (2009 have observed. The three books under review here, all based on dissertation research and all published in 2009, make important contributions to this growing literature. While each one approaches sexual politics from a distinctive disciplinary, geographic, and theoretical vantage point, all three ask readers to take seriously the central place that sexual desires and practices occupy in the lives of Caribbean people, both at home and in the diaspora. Caribbean sexuality studies are still sometimes thought of as belonging to a domain outside of, or auxiliary to “real” politics, but these studies demonstrate without hesitation how sexuality functions as an important prism through which we might understand broader debates about ethics, politics, and economics in the region. Building from the insights of feminist theorists who connect the “private” realm to community, national, and global geopolitics, they show that sex is intimately connected to certain freedoms – be they market, corporeal, or political – as well as to their consequences. Taken together, they consider sexual subjectivity, political economy, and cultural production in unexpected ways and point to exciting new directions for the

  9. Leading Causes of Cancer Mortality - Caribbean Region, 2003-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaghi, Hilda; Quesnel-Crooks, Sarah; Sherman, Recinda; Joseph, Rachael; Kohler, Betsy; Andall-Brereton, Glennis; Ivey, Marsha A; Edwards, Brenda K; Mery, Les; Gawryszewski, Vilma; Saraiya, Mona

    2016-12-16

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide (1); in 2012, an estimated 65% of all cancer deaths occurred in the less developed regions of the world (2). In the Caribbean region, cancer is the second leading cause of mortality, with an estimated 87,430 cancer-related deaths reported in 2012 (3). The Pan American Health Organization defines the Caribbean region as a group of 27 countries that vary in size, geography, resources, and surveillance systems.* CDC calculated site- and sex-specific proportions of cancer deaths and age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for 21 English- and Dutch-speaking Caribbean countries, the United States, and two U.S. territories (Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands [USVI]), using the most recent 5 years of mortality data available from each jurisdiction during 2003-2013. The selection of years varied by availability of the data from the countries and territories in 2015. ASMR for all cancers combined ranged from 46.1 to 139.3 per 100,000. Among males, prostate cancers were the leading cause of cancer deaths, followed by lung cancers; the percentage of cancer deaths attributable to prostate cancer ranged from 18.4% in Suriname to 47.4% in Dominica, and the percentage of cancer deaths attributable to lung cancer ranged from 5.6% in Barbados to 24.4% in Bermuda. Among females, breast cancer was the most common cause of cancer deaths, ranging from 14.0% of cancer deaths in Belize to 29.7% in the Cayman Islands, followed by cervical cancer. Several of the leading causes of cancer deaths in the Caribbean can be reduced through primary and secondary preventions, including prevention of exposure to risk factors, screening, early detection, and timely and effective treatment.

  10. 'Caribbean Creep' chills out: climate change and marine invasive species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Canning-Clode

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: New marine invasions have been recorded in increasing numbers along the world's coasts due in part to the warming of the oceans and the ability of many invasive marine species to tolerate a broader thermal range than native species. Several marine invertebrate species have invaded the U.S. southern and mid-Atlantic coast from the Caribbean and this poleward range expansion has been termed 'Caribbean Creep'. While models have predicted the continued decline of global biodiversity over the next 100 years due to global climate change, few studies have examined the episodic impacts of prolonged cold events that could impact species range expansions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A pronounced cold spell occurred in January 2010 in the U.S. southern and mid-Atlantic coast and resulted in the mortality of several terrestrial and marine species. To experimentally test whether cold-water temperatures may have caused the disappearance of one species of the 'Caribbean Creep' we exposed the non-native crab Petrolisthes armatus to different thermal treatments that mimicked abnormal and severe winter temperatures. Our findings indicate that Petrolisthes armatus cannot tolerate prolonged and extreme cold temperatures (4-6 °C and suggest that aperiodic cold winters may be a critical 'reset' mechanism that will limit the range expansion of other 'Caribbean Creep' species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We suggest that temperature 'aberrations' such as 'cold snaps' are an important and overlooked part of climate change. These climate fluctuations should be accounted for in future studies and models, particularly with reference to introduced subtropical and tropical species and predictions of both rates of invasion and rates of unidirectional geographic expansion.

  11. Renewable power production in a Pan-Caribbean energy grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David

    The Small Island Developing States of the Caribbean are victims of geography and geopolitics. Lacking access to large fossil fuel reserves, they are forced to import fuel at prices they have no control over. Renewable energy resources, particularly wind, have the potential to help break the Caribbean dependency on fossil fuels and allow for increased development at the same time. Working from a sustainable development point of view, this project discusses the history of the area, the theoretical background for the idea of large scale renewable power production, the regional initiatives already in place that address both the cost of fossil fuels and the policy hurdles that need to be overcome to assist the region in gaining energy independence. Haiti is highlighted as a special case in the region and the potential use of several renewable resources are discussed, along with a potential business model based on the idea of the Internet. Power storage is covered, specifically the potential of battery operated vehicles to have a positive impact on the Caribbean region and other developing states. The role of government regulation and policy comes into play next, followed by a discussion on the need for developed states to change patterns of behavior in order to achieve sustainability. Finally, nuclear power and liquefied natural gas are reviewed and rejected as power options for the region.

  12. Caribbean coral growth influenced by anthropogenic aerosol emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Lester; Cox, Peter M.; Economou, Theo; Halloran, Paul R.; Mumby, Peter J.; Booth, Ben B. B.; Carilli, Jessica; Guzman, Hector M.

    2013-05-01

    Coral growth rates are highly dependent on environmental variables such as sea surface temperature and solar irradiance. Multi-decadal variability in coral growth rates has been documented throughout the Caribbean over the past 150-200 years, and linked to variations in Atlantic sea surface temperatures. Multi-decadal variability in sea surface temperatures in the North Atlantic, in turn, has been linked to volcanic and anthropogenic aerosol forcing. Here, we examine the drivers of changes in coral growth rates in the western Caribbean between 1880 and 2000, using previously published coral growth chronologies from two sites in the region, and a numerical model. Changes in coral growth rates over this period coincided with variations in sea surface temperature and incoming short-wave radiation. Our model simulations show that variations in the concentration of anthropogenic aerosols caused variations in sea surface temperature and incoming radiation in the second half of the twentieth century. Before this, variations in volcanic aerosols may have played a more important role. With the exception of extreme mass bleaching events, we suggest that neither climate change from greenhouse-gas emissions nor ocean acidification is necessarily the driver of multi-decadal variations in growth rates at some Caribbean locations. Rather, the cause may be regional climate change due to volcanic and anthropogenic aerosol emissions.

  13. Life after Stroke: Coping mechanisms among African Caribbean Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorley, Calvin R; Cahill, Sharon; Corcoran, Nova T

    2016-11-01

    In the UK, stroke is the third most common cause of death for women and the incidence in African Caribbean women is higher than that in the general population. Stroke burden has major consequences for the physical, mental and social health of African Caribbean women. In order to adjust to life after stroke, individuals affected employ a range of strategies which may include personal, religious (church) or spiritual support (i.e. prayer), individual motivation or resignation to life with a disability. This study explored these areas through the coping mechanisms that African Caribbean women utilised post stroke in the context of stroke recovery and lifestyle modification efforts needed to promote healthy living post stroke. A qualitative approach using interpretative phenomenological analysis was adopted. Seven women were recruited into the study. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were audio recorded and were transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using a four-stage framework: familiarisation, sense making, developing themes, and data refinement and analysis. Three main themes on coping emerged: the need to follow medical rules to manage stroke, strength and determination, and the use of religion and faith to cope with life after stroke. These findings illustrate both a tension between religious beliefs and the medical approach to stroke and highlight the potential benefits that religion and the church can play in stroke recovery. Implications for practice include acknowledgement and inclusion of religion- and church-based health promotion in post-stroke recovery. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Caribbean Shallow-water Black Corals (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Antipatharia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opresko, Dennis M [ORNL; Sanchez, Juan Armando [Universidad de los Andes

    2005-01-01

    Our aim is to provide a complete key and guide to the species of black corals from the Caribbean reefs at depths shallower than about 100 m. The key to the species is mostly based on colonial features that are recognized in the field, although some closely related species can only be differentiated by microscopic skeletal features. Each species is illustrated with one or more photos showing the size and shape of the colony; many photos were taken in the natural environment to facilitate underwater identification. Additionally, a short description is provided of each species and their microscopic diagnostic characters are illustrated with the aid of the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Fifteen black coral species are found in relatively shallow-water in the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and other parts of the tropical western Atlantic; these belong to the families Myriopathidae [Tanacetipathes hirta (Gray), T. tanacetum (Pourtales), T. barbadensis (Brook), T. thamnea (Warner), and Plumapathes pennacea (Pallas)]; Antipathidae [Antipathes lenta Pourtales, A. rubusifonnis Warner and Opresko, A. furcata Gray, A. umbratica Opresko, A. atlantica Gray, A. gracilis Gray, A. caribbeana Opresko, Stichopathes lutkeni Brook, and S. accidentalis (Gray)]; and Aphanipathidae [Rhipidipathes colombiana (Opresko and Sinchez)]. We hope that this guide will facilitate research on black corals on Caribbean reefs, where population surveys are urgently needed to evaluate or modify conservation policies.

  15. Widespread local chronic stressors in Caribbean coastal habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Rachel; Bastidas, Carolina; Cróquer, Aldo; Gayle, Peter M. H.; Jordán-Dahlgren, Eric; Koltes, Karen; Oxenford, Hazel; Rodriguez-Ramirez, Alberto; Weil, Ernesto; Alemu, Jahson; Bone, David; Buchan, Kenneth C.; Creary Ford, Marcia; Escalante-Mancera, Edgar; Garzón-Ferreira, Jaime; Guzmán, Hector M.; Kjerfve, Björn; Klein, Eduardo; McCoy, Croy; Potts, Arthur C.; Ruíz-Rentería, Francisco; Smith, Struan R.; Tschirky, John; Cortés, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Coastal ecosystems and the livelihoods they support are threatened by stressors acting at global and local scales. Here we used the data produced by the Caribbean Coastal Marine Productivity program (CARICOMP), the longest, largest monitoring program in the wider Caribbean, to evidence local-scale (decreases in water quality) and global-scale (increases in temperature) stressors across the basin. Trend analyses showed that visibility decreased at 42% of the stations, indicating that local-scale chronic stressors are widespread. On the other hand, only 18% of the stations showed increases in water temperature that would be expected from global warming, partially reflecting the limits in detecting trends due to inherent natural variability of temperature data. Decreases in visibility were associated with increased human density. However, this link can be decoupled by environmental factors, with conditions that increase the flush of water, dampening the effects of human influence. Besides documenting environmental stressors throughout the basin, our results can be used to inform future monitoring programs, if the desire is to identify stations that provide early warning signals of anthropogenic impacts. All CARICOMP environmental data are now available, providing an invaluable baseline that can be used to strengthen research, conservation, and management of coastal ecosystems in the Caribbean basin. PMID:29261694

  16. Exploring Emotional Intelligence in a Caribbean Medical School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, B; Baboolal, N; Williams, S; Ramsewak, S

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the emotional intelligence (EI) in medical students in a Caribbean medical school and investigate its association with gender, age, year of study and ethnicity. Design and Methods: A cross-sectional design using convenient sampling of 304 years two to five undergraduate medical students at the School of Medicine, The University of the West Indies (UWI), St Augustine campus, was conducted. The Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT-V2.0) was administered to test four branches of EI: perceiving emotions, facilitating thought, understanding emotions and managing emotions. Data were analysed using SPSS version 19. T-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and r (product moment correlation) were calculated to establish the effects of selected variables (gender, age, year of study and ethnicity) on total and sub-scales EI scores and tested against 0.05 and 0.01 significance levels. Results: The total mean score for EI fell within the average according to MSCEIT standards. Gender analysis showed significantly higher scores for males and for younger age groups (emotional stability. It would be valuable to widen this study by including other UWI campuses and offshore medical schools in the Caribbean. This preliminary study examined a sample of medical students from a well-established Caribbean medical school. Since EI is considered to be important in the assessment and training of medical undergraduates, consideration should be given to introducing interventions aimed at increasing EI. PMID:25303251

  17. Exploring emotional intelligence in a Caribbean medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, B; Baboolal, N; Williams, S; Ramsewak, S

    2014-03-01

    To explore the emotional intelligence (EI) in medical students in a Caribbean medical school and investigate its association with gender, age, year of study and ethnicity. A cross-sectional design using convenient sampling of 304 years two to five undergraduate medical students at the School of Medicine, the University of the West Indies (UWI), St Augustine campus, was conducted. The Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT-V2.0) was administered to test four branches of EI: perceiving emotions, facilitating thought, understanding emotions and managing emotions. Data were analysed using SPSS version 19. T-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and r (product moment correlation) were calculated to establish the effects of selected variables (gender, age, year of study and ethnicity) on total and sub-scales EI scores and tested against 0.05 and 0.01 significance levels. The total mean score for EI fell within the average according to MSCEIT standards. Gender analysis showed significantly higher scores for males and for younger age groups (emotional stability. It would be valuable to widen this study by including other UWI campuses and offshore medical schools in the Caribbean. This preliminary study examined a sample of medical students from a well-established Caribbean medical school. Since EI is considered to be important in the assessment and training of medical undergraduates, consideration should be given to introducing interventions aimed at increasing EI.

  18. Annotated bibliography of coal in the Caribbean region. [Lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orndorff, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of preparing this annotated bibliography was to compile information on coal localities for the Caribbean region used for preparation of a coal map of the region. Also, it serves as a brief reference list of publications for future coal studies in the Caribbean region. It is in no way an exhaustive study or complete listing of coal literature for the Caribbean. All the material was gathered from published literature with the exception of information from Cuba which was supplied from a study by Gordon Wood of the US Geological Survey, Branch of Coal Resources. Following the classification system of the US Geological Survey (Wood and others, 1983), the term coal resources has been used in this report for reference to general estimates of coal quantities even though authors of the material being annotated may have used the term coal reserves in a similar denotation. The literature ranges from 1857 to 1981. The countries listed include Colombia, Mexico, Venezuela, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, and the countries of Central America.

  19. Strengthening integrated research and capacity development within the Caribbean region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewailly Eric

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Caribbean region, like other developing regions of the world, faces significant challenges in conducting research, especially in the context of limited resource capacities and capabilities. Further, due to its diverse and multiple island states, research capacity is scattered and unevenly spread within the region. The Caribbean EcoHealth Programme (CEHP is a research program that is structured to improve the capacity and capability of health professionals in the Caribbean region to respond in integrative and innovative ways to on-going and emerging environmental health challenges by means of multi-sectoral interventions. Methods Core parts of the CEHP’s mission are to (1 conduct collaborative research in areas that the region has identified as critical; (2 build and strengthening integrated approaches to research; and (3 develop and enhance basic research capacity within the Caribbean region. Fundamental to the success of the CEHP’s human and resource development mission has been its use of the Atlantis Mobile Laboratory (AML. The AML has allowed the CEHP program to move throughout the Caribbean and be able to respond to calls for specific research and capacity building opportunities. Results The CEHP’s five main research projects have generated the following results: (1 the Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs study has evaluated human exposures to POPs, heavy metals, pesticides, and zoonotic infections; (2 the Burden of Illness (BOI studies have developed protocols for the testing of foodborne microorganisms, strengthen laboratory analytical capabilities, and determined the prevalence and incidence of food-borne illness; (3 the Rainwater Harvesting (RWH study has evaluated the microbial and chemical quality of rainwater harvesting systems; (4 the Ecotoxicology Water (ETW studies have provided much needed data on the quality of recreational and drinking water supplies, and (5 the Food Safety Training Program has

  20. Coral Research Data from NOAA's Undersea Research Center, Caribbean Marine Research Center, NOAA's Undersea Research Program (NURP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Undersea Research Center for the Caribbean Marine Research Center, Perry Institure for Marine Science, for the Caribbean region explores and studies...

  1. Comparative phylogeography of Atlantic reef fishes indicates both origin and accumulation of diversity in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson D Ross

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two processes may contribute to the formation of global centers of biodiversity: elevated local speciation rates (the center of origin hypothesis, and greater accumulation of species formed elsewhere (the center of accumulation hypothesis. The relative importance of these processes has long intrigued marine biogeographers but rarely has been tested. Results To examine how origin and accumulation affected the Greater Caribbean center of diversity, we conducted a range-wide survey of mtDNA cytochrome b in the widespread Atlantic reef damselfish Chromis multilineata (N = 183 that included 10 locations in all four tropical Atlantic biogeographic provinces: the Greater Caribbean, Brazil, the mid-Atlantic ridge, and the tropical eastern Atlantic. We analyzed this data and re-evaluated published genetic data from other reef fish taxa (wrasses and parrotfishes to resolve the origin and dispersal of mtDNA lineages. Parsimony networks, mismatch distributions and phylogenetic analyses identify the Caribbean population of C. multilineata as the oldest, consistent with the center of origin model for the circum-Atlantic radiation of this species. However, some Caribbean haplotypes in this species were derived from Brazilian lineages, indicating that mtDNA diversity has not only originated but also accumulated in the Greater Caribbean. Data from the wrasses and parrotfishes indicate an origin in the Greater Caribbean in one case, Caribbean origin plus accumulation in another, and accumulation in the remaining two. Conclusion Our analyses indicate that the Greater Caribbean marine biodiversity hotspot did not arise through the action of a single mode of evolutionary change. Reef fish distributions at the boundaries between Caribbean and Brazilian provinces (the SE Caribbean and NE Brazil, respectively indicate that the microevolutionary patterns we detected in C. multilineata and other reef fishes translate into macroevolutionary processes

  2. Comparative phylogeography of Atlantic reef fishes indicates both origin and accumulation of diversity in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Luiz A; Rocha, Claudia R; Robertson, D Ross; Bowen, Brian W

    2008-05-22

    Two processes may contribute to the formation of global centers of biodiversity: elevated local speciation rates (the center of origin hypothesis), and greater accumulation of species formed elsewhere (the center of accumulation hypothesis). The relative importance of these processes has long intrigued marine biogeographers but rarely has been tested. To examine how origin and accumulation affected the Greater Caribbean center of diversity, we conducted a range-wide survey of mtDNA cytochrome b in the widespread Atlantic reef damselfish Chromis multilineata (N = 183) that included 10 locations in all four tropical Atlantic biogeographic provinces: the Greater Caribbean, Brazil, the mid-Atlantic ridge, and the tropical eastern Atlantic. We analyzed this data and re-evaluated published genetic data from other reef fish taxa (wrasses and parrotfishes) to resolve the origin and dispersal of mtDNA lineages. Parsimony networks, mismatch distributions and phylogenetic analyses identify the Caribbean population of C. multilineata as the oldest, consistent with the center of origin model for the circum-Atlantic radiation of this species. However, some Caribbean haplotypes in this species were derived from Brazilian lineages, indicating that mtDNA diversity has not only originated but also accumulated in the Greater Caribbean. Data from the wrasses and parrotfishes indicate an origin in the Greater Caribbean in one case, Caribbean origin plus accumulation in another, and accumulation in the remaining two. Our analyses indicate that the Greater Caribbean marine biodiversity hotspot did not arise through the action of a single mode of evolutionary change. Reef fish distributions at the boundaries between Caribbean and Brazilian provinces (the SE Caribbean and NE Brazil, respectively) indicate that the microevolutionary patterns we detected in C. multilineata and other reef fishes translate into macroevolutionary processes and that origin and accumulation have acted in concert

  3. Correction: Dermatan sulfate in tunicate phylogeny: Order-specific sulfation pattern and the effect of [→4IdoA(2-Sulfateβ-1→3GalNAc(4-Sulfateβ-1→] motifs in dermatan sulfate on heparin cofactor II activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugahara Kazuyuki

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract After the publication of the work entitled "Dermatan sulfate in tunicate phylogeny: Order-specific sulfation pattern and the effect of [→4IdoA(2-Sulfateβ-1→3GalNAc(4-Sulfateβ-1→] motifs in dermatan sulfate on heparin cofactor II activity", by Kozlowski et al., BMC Biochemistry 2011, 12:29, we found that the legends to Figures 2 to 5 contain serious mistakes that compromise the comprehension of the work. This correction article contains the correct text of the legends to Figures 2 to 5.

  4. A multiscale analysis of the stability of Caribbean coastal ecosystems through the biogeomorphic modelling of its complex bays and inlets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Candy, A.S.; Pietrzak, J.D.; Zijlema, M.

    2017-01-01

    The Dutch Caribbean consists of two island groups, the Leeward Antilles off the Venezuelan coast separated from the Windward Islands east of Puerto Rico over distances of the scale of the Caribbean Sea itself. Climate change in the Caribbean Sea is predicted to lead to rising sea levels, warming

  5. 76 FR 82403 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Amendments to the Queen Conch and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ... component of Caribbean coral reef ecosystems. The level of reduction was designed to balance those... Part 622 Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Amendments to the Queen Conch... of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Amendments to the Queen Conch and Reef Fish...

  6. Gender, Sexual Culture and HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Young women are believed to be the most vulnerable group in the spread and transmission of HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean. This project is premised on the awareness that unequal gender relations are central to explaining the transmission of HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean. Researchers will examine sexual culture in three ...

  7. Afro-Caribbean Women in the United States: Images and Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Annette

    Most American-born (or native) blacks think of Afro-Caribbean women as clannish, thrifty to the point of greed, constant strivers, uninvolved in civil rights and women's rights activities, and believing in stereotypes of native blacks' inferiority. These images are tied to the Afro-Caribbean woman's immigrant status. As a foreigner, she constantly…

  8. Some intertidal and shallow water polychaetes of the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Harlan K

    2017-03-01

    The polychaete fauna of the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica has been inadequately characterized with only nine species previously reported. Collections of polychaetes from intertidal coralline rocks and several shallow sub-tidal sites on the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica have been examined and 68 species were identified. Of these, 66 are new records for Costa Rica.

  9. Post Doctorate Award on Central America and the Caribbean at St ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus Research Program. A new funding opportunity on Zika virus is responding to the virus outbreak and the health threat it represents for the affected populations in the hardest hit countries in Latin America and the... View moreCanada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus ...

  10. International Symposium on Composers of African and Afro-Caribbean descent: Veni, vidi, vici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sharing a history similar to that of its Caribbean neighbours, yet endowed with greater economic and logistic liquidity, Nassau, The Bahamas’ capital city (on the island of New Providence, seemed the best venue for the first International Symposium on Composers of African & Afro-Caribbean Descent, held on February 21, 2013.

  11. Folate and vitamin B12 status in Latin America and the Caribbean: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The current magnitude of folate and vitamin B12 deficiency in Latin America and the Caribbean is uncertain. Objective: To summarize data on plasma or serum vitamin B12 and folate concentrations in Latin America and the Caribbean reported since 1990, a period that covers the era before an...

  12. SOTER-based soil parameter estimates for Latin America and the Caribbean (ver. 1.0)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batjes, N.H.

    2014-01-01

    This harmonized set of soil parameter estimates for Latin America and the Caribbean was derived from a revised version of the 1:5M Soil and Terrain Database for the region (SOTERLAC, ver. 2.0) and the ISRIC-WISE soil profile database. The land surface of Latin America and the Caribbean has been

  13. The marine mammals of the Dutch Caribbean: a comparison between EEZ sectors, contrasts and concerns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debrot, A.O.; Witte, R.H.; Scheidat, M.

    2011-01-01

    We here provide a synoptic overview and preliminary update of the marine mammals of the Dutch Caribbean EEZ based on 279 cetacean sighting and stranding records. The Dutch Caribbean EEZ is composed of two distinct sectors. One is centered around the leeward Dutch islands of Aruba, Bonaire and

  14. 77 FR 39221 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Hearings and Scoping Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ..., and Locations. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Caribbean Fishery Management Council, 268 Mu oz Rivera...: Meetings, Dates, and Locations Puerto Rico July 23, 2012, DoubleTree by Hilton San Juan, 105 De Diego... contact Mr. Miguel A. Rol n, Executive Director, Caribbean Fishery Management Council, 268 Mu oz Rivera...

  15. Biological and management aspects of a Caribbean mangal: West Harbour, Jamaica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chow, Barbara A.

    1997-01-01

    CHOW, Barbara A., 1997. Biological and management aspects of a Caribbean mangal: West Harbour, Jamaica. Studies Nat. Hist. Caribbean Region 73, Amsterdam, 1997: 1-22. Observations are given for the first time of West Harbour, a pristine south-coast Jamaican mangal. West Harbour is shown to be a

  16. Intercultural-Bilingual Education for an Interethnic-Plurilingual Society? The Case of Nicaragua's Caribbean Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, Jane

    2003-01-01

    Latin American models of "intercultural-bilingual" education may be inappropriate for multilingual, interethnic regions such as Nicaragua's Caribbean Coast, where five indigenous and Afro-Caribbean minorities interact in overlapping territories. Examination of one such program and of Coast people's complex linguistic and cultural…

  17. New York City and the New Caribbean Immigration: A Contextual Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce-Laporte, Roy Simon

    1979-01-01

    Socio-historical, demographic, political, and cultural aspects of Caribbean migration to New York are discussed. New York is seen as a traditional port of entry of immigrants and as an indicator of economic and political development of the United Satates. Changes resulting from the recent increase in Caribbean immigrants are examined. (Author/MC)

  18. Functional Patterns in International Organizations for University Cooperation in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Daniel A.; Lopez, Daniel C.; Andrade, Lorenzo I.; Lopez, Boris A.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the coverage, organizational patterns, problems and trends of international organizations for university cooperation in Latin America and the Caribbean. More than 30 international organizations for cooperation currently operating in Latin America and the Caribbean were identified. Two groups of institutions with more than 60%…

  19. Popular Gospel in the Caribbean: Gospel Video as a Site of Meaning

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This essay provides a perspective on aspects of the current trends within popular gospel culture in the Caribbean. It represents an important intervention, since there is relatively little published about this subject in academic and critical journals. This essay, therefore, introduces the reader to Caribbean popular gospel ...

  20. Substance Abuse, Acculturation, and HIV Risk among Caribbean-Born Immigrants in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Jean, Gilbert; Dévieux, Jessy; Malow, Robert; Tammara, Hayley; Carney, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    US immigrants of Caribbean origin are overrepresented in the HIV/AIDS prevalence statistics. Bidirectional travel between the United States and the Caribbean region by providing opportunities for sexual mixing may contribute to these high HIV rates. Caribbean immigrants face further risk because of limited health care access, social isolation, and stigma. Additionally, although substance abuse may not represent a major health issue in their countries of origin, Caribbean immigrants are composed disproportionately of adolescents who are at greatest risk of substance abuse. There is little information on the health care characteristics of these migrants, especially regarding HIV care. This article describes how the social and economic circumstances that surround the lives of people from the Caribbean and the challenges of the acculturation process have placed these individuals at risk of substance abuse and HIV infection. The article draws on findings from the literature and analysis of data from several sources.

  1. Climate Change and Caribbean Small Island States: The State of Play

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have indicated that climate change is likely to have dramatic negative effects for Caribbean small island developing states. This article considers the main economic effects that climate change is anticipated to have in these vulnerable states, charts the progress of international negotiations at the 2009 Copenhagen conference, and provides a brief analysis of the impact of the Copenhagen Accord on Caribbean Small Island Developing States (SIDS.Although climate change has traditionally been seen solely as an environmental issue, its economic effects on vulnerable developing nations, such as Caribbean SIDS, forces a re-definition of climate change to that of a more complex union of environmental and developmental issues for these states. By highlighting some of the anticipated economic effects of climate change for Caribbean SIDS, the author aims to provide a broader context for the issue of climate change for Caribbean SIDS.

  2. Child Sexual Abuse in the Eastern Caribbean: The report of a study carried out across the Eastern Caribbean during the period October 2008 to June 2009

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Adele; Trotman Jemmott, Ena

    2009-01-01

    This report from the Centre for Applied Childhood Studies at the University of Huddersfield in the United Kingdom (UK) and the UK-based Action for Children describes an action research project study that investigated child sexual abuse across several Caribbean countries. The study, "Perceptions of, Attitudes to, and Opinions on Child Sexual Abuse in the Eastern Caribbean", was carried out across 6 countries - Anguilla, Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, Montserrat, and St. Kitts and Nevis - in an e...

  3. Mangroves Enhance Reef Fish Abundance at the Caribbean Regional Scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph E Serafy

    Full Text Available Several studies conducted at the scale of islands, or small sections of continental coastlines, have suggested that mangrove habitats serve to enhance fish abundances on coral reefs, mainly by providing nursery grounds for several ontogenetically-migrating species. However, evidence of such enhancement at a regional scale has not been reported, and recently, some researchers have questioned the mangrove-reef subsidy effect. In the present study, using two different regression approaches, we pursued two questions related to mangrove-reef connectivity at the Caribbean regional scale: (1 Are reef fish abundances limited by mangrove forest area?; and (2 Are mean reef fish abundances proportional to mangrove forest area after taking human population density and latitude into account? Specifically, we tested for Caribbean-wide mangrove forest area effects on the abundances of 12 reef fishes that have been previously characterized as "mangrove-dependent". Analyzed were data from an ongoing, long-term (20-year citizen-scientist fish monitoring program; coastal human population censuses; and several wetland forest information sources. Quantile regression results supported the notion that mangrove forest area limits the abundance of eight of the 12 fishes examined. Linear mixed-effects regression results, which considered potential human (fishing and habitat degradation and latitudinal influences, suggested that average reef fish densities of at least six of the 12 focal fishes were directly proportional to mangrove forest area. Recent work questioning the mangrove-reef fish subsidy effect likely reflects a failure to: (1 focus analyses on species that use mangroves as nurseries, (2 consider more than the mean fish abundance response to mangrove forest extent; and/or (3 quantitatively account for potentially confounding human impacts, such as fishing pressure and habitat degradation. Our study is the first to demonstrate at a large regional scale (i

  4. Thresholds and the resilience of Caribbean coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumby, Peter J; Hastings, Alan; Edwards, Helen J

    2007-11-01

    The deteriorating health of the world's coral reefs threatens global biodiversity, ecosystem function, and the livelihoods of millions of people living in tropical coastal regions. Reefs in the Caribbean are among the most heavily affected, having experienced mass disease-induced mortality of the herbivorous urchin Diadema antillarum in 1983 and two framework-building species of coral. Declining reef health is characterized by increases in macroalgae. A critical question is whether the observed macroalgal bloom on Caribbean reefs is easily reversible. To answer this question, we must resolve whether algal-dominated reefs are an alternative stable state of the ecosystem or simply the readily reversible result of a phase change along a gradient of some environmental or ecological parameter. Here, using a fully parameterized simulation model in combination with a simple analytical model, we show that Caribbean reefs became susceptible to alternative stable states once the urchin mortality event of 1983 confined the majority of grazing to parrotfishes. We reveal dramatic hysteresis in a natural system and define critical thresholds of grazing and coral cover beyond which resilience is lost. Most grazing thresholds lie near the upper level observed for parrotfishes in nature, suggesting that reefs are highly sensitive to parrotfish exploitation. Ecosystem thresholds can be combined with stochastic models of disturbance to identify targets for the restoration of ecosystem processes. We illustrate this principle by estimating the relationship between current reef state (coral cover and grazing) and the probability that the reef will withstand moderate hurricane intensity for two decades without becoming entrained in a shift towards a stable macroalgal-dominated state. Such targets may help reef managers face the challenge of addressing global disturbance at local scales.

  5. Women’s leadership in local government in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kizzann Lee Sam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Women and men are traditionally cast in different roles, with males being leaders in the workplace, home and government. In contrast, communities promote women as caregivers who support male leaders and shape future generations as mothers, mentors and teachers. In recognition of this societal view of women that often led to inequality and inequity, the UNDP listed Gender Equality and empowering women as one of eight Millennium Development Goals. The post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals, adopted by the United Nations in autumn 2015, also included gender equality and empowering women as Goal 5. In its work in the Caribbean, the Caribbean Local Economic Development Project (CARILED examined gender as it relates to micro, small and medium enterprise (MSME development in six Caribbean countries.  The findings of this study showed gender gaps for both male and female entrepreneurs in different areas of development.  Traditionally gendered roles for MSME sectors, access to financing and lack of adequate guidance or community support were some areas that affected men and women differently in the region.  The study outlines ways in which male and female leaders can address traditional gender roles by identifying priority areas for development, creating an enabling environment for start-ups and expansion, and fostering a policy and legislative base that facilitates ease of doing business.  The recommendations further describe the public–private partnerships needed to successfully meet gender gaps, and the importance of both elected officials and technocrats in inter alia community engagement and advocacy towards local economic development. The importance of gender equality among elected officials and technocrats, and the influence gender has on determining priority areas of focus within local government strategic plans for communities are also set out within this paper.

  6. Plate Coupling and Strain Partitioning in the Northeastern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaker, D.; Calais, E.; Jansma, P.; Mattioli, G.

    2006-12-01

    Major strike-slip faults commonly found on the margin of overriding plates in oblique subduction zone settings facilitate the partitioning of strain into trench-parallel and trench-normal tectonics. Their development has been proposed to be controlled by factors such as convergence obliquity, basal tractions, magnitude of slab-pull force, or strength of interplate coupling. In the northeastern Caribbean, the direction of GPS velocities and earthquake slip vectors suggests low coupling along the Puerto Rico and Lesser Antilles trenches, but strong coupling to the west along the Hispaniola margin, while the convergence obliquity remains constant. Coincidentally, large strike-slip faults in the overriding plate only develop in Hispaniola, which is also the locus of the largest historical subduction earthquakes in the Caribbean (M8.0, 1946-53 sequence). We investigate interplate coupling at the Caribbean-North American plate boundary using a model that allows for block rotations and elastic strain accumulation on partially coupled faults. Model parameters (block rotations and coupling on interplate faults) are derived from an inversion of earthquake slip vectors and new GPS data covering Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the Lesser Antilles. We find that intraplate coupling is high in the western half of the domain, coincident with the development of large and fast-slipping strike-slip faults in the upper plate that partition the Carribean/North America plate motion, but low in its eastern half, along the Puerto Rico and Lesser Antilles subductions, that show little to no strain partitioning. This suggests that strain partitioning occur only if interplate coupling is large enough to effectively transfer shear stresses to the overriding plate.

  7. A BRIEF HISTORY OF TSUNAMIS IN THE CARIBBEAN SEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A. Lockridge

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The area of the Caribbean Sea is geologically active. Earthquakes and volcanoes are common occurrences. These geologic events can generate powerful tsunamis some of which are more devastating than the earthquake or volcanic eruption itself. This document lists brief descriptions of 91 reported waves that might have been tsunamis within the Caribbean region. Of these, 27 are judged by the authors to be true, verified tsunamis and an additional nine are considered to be very likely true tsunamis. The additional 53 events either are not described with sufficient detail in the literature to verify their tsunami nature or are judged to be reports of other phenomenasuch as sea quakes or hurricane storm surges which may have been reported as tsunamis. Included in these 91 reports are teletsunamis, tectonic tsunamis, landslide tsunamis, and volcanic tsunamis that have caused major damage and deaths. Nevertheless, in recent history these events have been relatively rare. In the interim since the last major tsunami event in the Caribbean Sea the coastal regions have greatly increased in population. Coastal development has also increased. Today tourism is a major industry that exposes thousands of non-residents to the disastrous effects of a tsunami. These factors make the islands in this region much more vulnerable today than they were when the last major tsunami occurred in this area. This paper gives an overview of the tsunami history in the area. This history illustrates what can be expected in the future from this geologic hazard and provides information that will be useful for mitigation purposes.

  8. Latin American and Caribbean intercomparison of surface contamination monitoring equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, T S; Ramos, M M O; Laranjeira, A S; Santos, D S; Suarez, R C

    2011-03-01

    In October 2009, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) sponsored an intercomparison exercise of surface contamination monitoring equipment, which was held at the Laboratório Nacional de Metrologia das Radiações Ionizantes, from the Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria, IRD/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro. This intercomparison was performed to evaluate the calibration accessibility in Latin America and the Caribbean. Thirteen countries within the region and IAEA have sent instruments to be compared, but only five countries and IAEA were considered apt to participate. Analysis of instruments, results and discussions are presented and recommendations are drawn.

  9. Kinematics of the Southwestern Caribbean from New Geodetic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, G.; La Femina, P. C.; Tapia, A.; Camacho, E.; Chichaco, E.; Mora-Paez, H.; Geirsson, H.

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of the Caribbean, Cocos, Nazca, and South American plates has resulted in a complex plate boundary zone and the formation of second order tectonic blocks (e.g., the North Andean, Choco and Central America Fore Arc blocks). The Panama Region [PR], which is bounded by these plates and blocks, has been interpreted and modeled as a single tectonic block or deformed plate boundary. Previous research has defined the main boundaries: 1) The Caribbean plate subducts beneath the isthmus along the North Panama Deformed Belt, 2) The Nazca plate converges at very high obliquity with the PR and motion is assumed along a left lateral transform fault and the South Panama Deformed Belt, 3) The collision of PR with NW South America (i.e., the N. Andean and Choco blocks) has resulted in the Eastern Panama Deformed Belt, and 4) collision of the Cocos Ridge in the west is accommodated by crustal shortening, Central American Fore Arc translation and deformation across the Central Costa Rican Deformed Belt. In addition, there are several models that suggest internal deformation of this region by cross-isthmus strike-slip faults. Recent GPS observations for the PR indicates movement to the northeast relative to a stable Caribbean plate at rates of 6.9±4.0 - 7.8±4.8 mm a-1 from southern Costa Rica to eastern Panama, respectively (Kobayashi et al., 2014 and references therein). However, the GPS network did not have enough spatial density to estimate elastic strain accumulation across these faults. Recent installation and expansion of geodetic networks in southwestern Caribbean (i.e., Costa Rica, Panama, and Colombia) combined with geological and geophysical observations provide a new input to investigate crustal deformation processes in this complex tectonic setting, specifically related to the PR. We use new and existing GPS data to calculate a new velocity field for the region and to investigate the kinematics of the PR, including elastic strain accumulation on the

  10. Tourism, globalization and the environment in the Mexican Caribbean Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Córdoba y Ordóñez

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The terms globalization and tourism tend to be regarded as synonyms in the Mexican Caribbean, an area which shifted from a virtually uninhabited borderline territory to a tourism center receiving over six million visitors peryear. Territorial occupation patterns derived from tourism -identified during field work through a physiognomic analysiswere used to investigate some of the implications of the complex relationship between tourism and development, the latter including not only economic but human factors, as well as with the natural and cultural environment characterized by both a great diversity and a great fragility.

  11. Capgras syndrome presenting in an adolescent girl in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, R C; Lowe, G A; Morgan, K A D; Henryl, M; De La Haye, W; Irons, A

    2013-01-01

    The case of a 16-year old Jamaican girl who presented to the psychiatric service of a general hospital with features of Capgras syndrome is presented. Her history, treatment, progress and relevant psychodynamic and neurocognitive issues are explored. This is the first known published case of an adolescent with Capgras syndrome from the Caribbean. The case highlights that the syndrome may occur in different cultural contexts and that clinicians should be sensitive to its existence in order to avert under-diagnosis or misdiagnosis.

  12. Sugar cane as an energy resource for the Caribbean area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, J.E.

    1982-09-01

    Sugar cane presents tremendous potential as a renewable energy source for the non-oil-producing, developing countries of the Caribbean basin. The analysis presented here, finds the overall energy balance to be extremely favorable. The economics are also favorable, even though capital investment requirements are high. Potential for improvement, in both the energy balance and the economic aspects, is very great. Such improvement is attainable by the development of new technology, which could be available in the short term and at moderate cost. (Refs. 8).

  13. Prodigal daughters: portraying lesbians in Hispanic Caribbean cinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Reyes, Consuelo

    2012-01-01

    During the last twenty years, Hispanic Caribbean cinema has slowly developed roles to represent lesbians. In order to draw a conceptual map and to examine the un/successfulness of this new lesbian "public image," I analyze both independent films that challenge the status quo by portraying openly lesbian characters and mainstream films that insist on denying autonomy to same-sex love. Whereas commercial markets may deem an openly lesbian role transgressive, queer female roles can be considered "appropriate." Gender-queering functions as a symbolically transitional stage toward lesbian visibility and inclusion.

  14. The 2009/2010 Caribbean drought: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Everson J

    2015-10-01

    The impacts of drought in the Caribbean have not been as dramatic as in some other parts of world, but it is not exempt from the experiences of drought. As a result of the effects of a prolonged drought in 2009/2010, the agenda for the 21st Inter-Sessional Meeting of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) paid particular attention to the issue of drought. This paper reviews the management framework for responding to drought disasters in five CARICOM countries. The paper also reports on some of the effects of the 2009/2010 drought with particular reference to Grenada and the Grenadines. During the drought in these islands there were numerous bush fires with devastating effects on agriculture, severe water shortages that impacted on the tourism industry and other social effects. It is evident that there was inadequate preparation for the event. Greater planning and investment are therefore required to reduce future impacts. © 2015 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2015.

  15. Strategies to eradicate rubella in the English-speaking Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, B; Lewis, M J; Dahl-Regis, M; Castillo-Solórzano, C; Carrasco, P A; de Quadros, C A

    2000-10-01

    This report presents the strategies used to eradicate rubella in the Caribbean region and the challenges faced by that effort. Using the surveillance system for measles cases that was instituted in all countries in the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), 12 countries confirmed cases of rubella between 1992 and 1996. Rubella infections occurred in epidemic proportions in 6 countries during that period. On the basis of the rubella prevalence data, rubella-congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) cost-benefit analysis, and cost-effectiveness of the mass campaign, the Council for Human and Social Development of CARICOM resolved, on April 21, 1998, that every effort would be made to eradicate rubella, as well as to prevent the occurrence of new cases of CRS by the end of 2000. Using the Pan American Health Organization's template for measles eradication, CARICOM proposed and implemented the main strategies for rubella and CRS eradication, and rubella mass campaigns were conducted in 18 countries. The target population, which included males and females (aged 20-40 years), was approximately 2.2 million. The major challenges for rubella eradication are attaining high vaccine coverage in the adult population and maintaining an effective surveillance system able to detect rubella activity.

  16. Mass coral bleaching in 2010 in the southern Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemu I, Jahson Berhane; Clement, Ysharda

    2014-01-01

    Ocean temperatures are increasing globally and the Caribbean is no exception. An extreme ocean warming event in 2010 placed Tobago's coral reefs under severe stress resulting in widespread coral bleaching and threatening the livelihoods that rely on them. The bleaching response of four reef building taxa was monitored over a six month period across three major reefs systems in Tobago. By identifying taxa resilient to bleaching we propose to assist local coral reef managers in the decision making process to cope with mass bleaching events. The bleaching signal (length of exposure to high ocean temperatures) varied widely between the Atlantic and Caribbean reefs, but regardless of this variation most taxa bleached. Colpophyllia natans, Montastraea faveolata and Siderastrea siderea were considered the most bleaching vulnerable taxa. Interestingly, reefs with the highest coral cover showed the greatest decline reef building taxa, and conversely, reefs with the lowest coral cover showed the most bleaching but lowest change in coral cover with little algal overgrowth post-bleaching.

  17. Towards establishing MS prevalence in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcon, M O; Melcon, C M; Bartoloni, L; Cristiano, E; Duran, J C; Grzesiuk, A K; Fragoso, Y D; Brooks, J B Bidin; Díaz, V; Romero García, K M; Cabrera Gomez, J A; Abad, P; Islas, M A Macías; Gracia, F; Diaz de Bedoya, V F Hamuy; Ruiz, M E Córdova; Hackembruch, J H; Oehninger, C; Ketzoian, C N; Soto, A

    2013-02-01

    A very high prevalence of multiple sclerosis (MS) has been reported in some Western European and North American countries. The few surveys of MS epidemiology in South America reveal lower prevalence rates, implying that susceptibility varies between distinct ethnic groups, thus forming an important determinant of the geographic distribution of the disease. The objective of this study is to review MS prevalence estimates in different Latin American and Caribbean countries. We reviewed surveys of regional MS prevalence from 1991 to 2011. Sources included an online database, authors' reports and proceedings or specific lectures from regional conferences. We obtained a total of 30 prevalence surveys from 15 countries, showing low/medium MS prevalence rates. Both the number and the quality of prevalence surveys have greatly improved in this region over recent decades. This is the first collaborative study to map the regional frequency of MS. Establishment of standardized methods and joint epidemiological studies will advance future MS research in Latin America and the Caribbean.

  18. Substance Abuse and HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo-Arreola, Iliana Alexandra; Bastos, Francisco I; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    The Caribbean and Central America represent a formidable challenge for researchers and policy makers in the HIV field, due to their pronounced heterogeneity in terms of social, economic, and cultural contexts and the different courses the HIV epidemic has followed in the region. Such contrasting contexts and epidemics can be exemplified by 2 countries that share the island of Hispaniola, the French Creole-speaking Haiti, and the Spanish-speaking Dominican Republic. Haiti has experienced the worst epidemics outside of sub-Saharan Africa. Following a protracted economic and social crisis, recently aggravated by a devastating earthquake, the local HIV epidemic could experience resurgence. The region, strategically located on the way between coca-producing countries and the profitable North American markets, has been a transshipment area for years. Notwithstanding, the impact of such routes on local drug scenes has been very heterogeneous and dynamic, depending on a combination of local mores, drug enforcement activities, and the broad social and political context. Injecting drug use remains rare in the region, but local drug scenes are dynamic under the influence of increasing mobility of people and goods to and from North and South America, growing tourism and commerce, and prostitution. The multiple impacts of the recent economic and social crisis, as well as the influence of drug-trafficking routes across the Caribbean and other Latin American countries require a sustained effort to track changes in the HIV risk environment to inform sound drug policies and initiatives to minimize drug-related harms in the region.

  19. A Amazônia Caribenha The Caribbean Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argemiro Procópio

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A economia informal no Brasil ligando esse país à Guiana, ao Suriname, à Venezuela e à Guiana Francesa permite pensar numa Amazônia brasileiro-caribenha. O Suriname e a Guiana, essa última sede do CARICOM, convivem com fluxos migratórios de garimpeiros brasileiros fugitivos do desemprego. A economia clandestina dá o seu tom à geopolítica cultural e é mais eficiente, que a diplomacia, em estimular a aproximação entre os países caribenhos.The Informal economy in Brazil creates strong linkages between the country and Guyana, Surinam, Venezuela and the French Guyana. For this reason it allows us to think of a Caribbean-Brazilian Amazon. Both Surinam and Guyana, the latter a host to CARICOM, deal with migration flows of Brazilian miners escaping unemployment. The clandestine economy sets the stage for cultural geopolitics and is more efficient than diplomacy in bringing Caribbean countries closer together.

  20. The status of marine turtles in Montserrat (Eastern Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin, C. S.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The status of marine turtles in Montserrat (Eastern Caribbean is reviewed following five years of monitoring (1999-2003. The mean number of nests recorded during the annual nesting season (June-October was 53 (± 24.9 SD; range: 13-43. In accordance with earlier reports, the nesting of hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata and green (Chelonia mydas turtles was confirmed on several beaches around the island. Only non-nesting emergences were documented for loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta and there was no evidence of nesting by leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea; however, it is possible that additional survey effort would reveal low density nesting by these species. Officially reported turtle capture data for 1993-2003 suggest that a mean of 0.9 turtle per year (±1.2 SD; range: 0-4 were landed island-wide, with all harvest having occurred during the annual open season (1 October to 31 May. Informed observers believe that the harvest is significantly under-reported and that fishermen avoid declaring their catch by butchering turtles at sea (both during and outside the open season. Of concern is the fact that breeding adults are potentially included in the harvest, and that the open season partially coincides with the breeding season. The present study has shown that although Montserrat is not a major nesting site for sea turtles, it remains important on a regional basis for the Eastern Caribbean.

  1. Caribbean small-island tourism styles and sustainable strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Albuquerque, Klaus; McElroy, Jerome L.

    1992-09-01

    This article focuses on developing a sustainable tourism in small Caribbean islands, defined here as those that have populations of fewer than 500,000. Such islands share a very fragile ecology and a high dependence on tourism. They differ in their degree of tourist penetration and visitor density and the related degree of environmental degradation. To explain the link between tourism intensity and ecological vulnerability, the so-called “destination life-cycle model” is presented. This suggests that islands pass through three primary stages of tourist development low-density exploration, rapid growth and consolidation, and high-density maturation involving the substitution of man-made for natural attractions. A broad empirical test of the model is performed through a quantitative examination of the tourism characteristics and visitor densities of a cross section of 23 small Caribbean islands. The three basic stages or tourism styles are identified: low-impact emerging areas, high-density mass-market mature destinations, and rapidly growing intermediate islands in between. Some broad strategies consistent with the systems framework for a sustainable tourism with moderate densitites are briefly explored.

  2. Impact of Undertreated Sickle Cell Pain in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PD Shah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Undertreated pain around the world includes the acute and chronic pain caused by sickle cell disease (SCD. In collaboration with a Caribbean association that aims to provide assistance to those diagnosed with SCD, we surveyed adults with SCD about pain management and impact of SCD pain. Methods: Participants were recruited from a group of 55 adults with SCD. A survey was administered to those who agreed to participate. Questions centred on their self-assessed level of pain due to SCD, the extent to which that pain interferes with daily activities, and how they seek and obtain pain relief. Results: Responses were received from 39 participants (female: n = 28, 72%, male: n = 11, 28%; mean age: 31.6 (SD ± 13.7 years. Sickle cell disease pain significantly disrupts participants’ daily activities (62%, mood (72%, work (64% and sleep (69%. Prescription medicine was ineffective for 41% and about half (n = 19 sought alternate means of relief. Conclusion: Sickle cell disease pain is undertreated in the Caribbean, disrupts daily activities and affects quality of life by impinging on education, employment and marital status. Sickle cell disease and other types of pain can be clinically managed safely, effectively and inexpensively. By failing to palliate and overcome the problem of undertreated pain, healthcare systems and providers contribute to socio-economic amongst other repercussions for sufferers, their families and caregivers, and their nations.

  3. Gestational syphilis and stillbirth in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnesen, Lauren; Martínez, Gerardo; Mainero, Luis; Serruya, Suzanne; Durán, Pablo

    2015-03-01

    To measure the association between gestational syphilis and stillbirth in Latin America and the Caribbean. In a retrospective study, data on stillbirth and gestational syphilis extracted from the Sistema Informático Perinatal database were analyzed for deliveries in 11 countries between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2012. Potential confounders were examined, and binary logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the association between gestational syphilis and stillbirth. Among 368 151 deliveries, 3875 (1.1%) were by women with a positive syphilis test, and 1461 (0.4%) were stillbirths. Among the stillbirths, 29 (2.0%) were delivered by women with a positive syphilis test. After controlling for country, congenital anomalies, gestational age at labor, maternal age, and previous stillbirth, gestational syphilis was significantly associated with stillbirth (odds ratio 1.88, 95% confidence interval 1.25-2.83; P=0.002). Gestational syphilis contributes to stillbirth in Latin America and the Caribbean. Interventions targeting gestational syphilis are highly cost-effective and should be implemented across the region. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Inclusive education in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa BLANCO GUIJARRO

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The region of Latin America and the Caribbean is known for being the most socially unequal in the world and for this has highly segmented societies, which affects the education, integration and social cohesion of the population. Expanding opportunities for everyone to have access to quality education and developing more inclusive schools, which would educate within and for diversity, stand out as two powerful strategies in a move towards more just and democratic societies in Latin America. This paper presents a detailed analysis of the educational situation in the region from the perspective of rights and inclusion, with particular attention paid to those individuals and groups that suffer most from the impact of inequality, exclusion and marginalization. This analysis begins with an assessment the progress and challenges still to be made regarding access, attendance, quality and equity of education in Latin America. In the second part it addresses the major issues on the agenda of Inclusion in Latin America and the Caribbean.

  5. Family Life Education in the English-speaking Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epps, R P; Corona, E; Kodagoda, N; Simonen, M

    1986-01-01

    Unique experience has accumulated in the English-speaking Caribbean in the field of family life education for youth. Although birth rates are relatively low, the increase in adolescent pregnancy and births is becoming more visible. Mother-centered homes are frequent, and support from the father is often lacking. A series of family life education (FLE) programs funded by the United National Fund for Population Activities is aimed at providing help to the various groups in the Caribbean in an acceptable and non-threatening manner. These out-of-school FLE techniques include several approaches: integration of the proposed program into an already established place (a factory, youth center, or community center); education in human growth, food and nutrition, environmental health, mental health, safety and first-aid, dental health and human relations, including human sexuality, rights and responsibilities, and decision making; and the use of specially trained personnel who understand the conditions of the particular community. In some countries adolescent pregnancy is viewed as a problem. In others it may not be so considered. It is vital for the staff and community leaders to review proposals for the FLE program and bring into the centers all subjects that are free of controversy. Family planning, contraceptive delivery and even human sexuality may be acceptable subjects in some quarters, and not in others. Efforts must be continued to find innovative approaches to assure that the benefits of these learning activities continue to be provided, and expanded in response to growing acceptance.

  6. CARIBE WAVE/LANTEX Caribbean and Western Atlantic Tsunami Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hillebrandt-Andrade, C.; Whitmore, P.; Aliaga, B.; Huerfano Moreno, V.

    2013-12-01

    Over 75 tsunamis have been documented in the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions over the past 500 years. While most have been generated by local earthquakes, distant generated tsunamis can also affect the region. For example, waves from the 1755 Lisbon earthquake and tsunami were observed in Cuba, Dominican Republic, British Virgin Islands, as well as Antigua, Martinique, Guadalupe and Barbados in the Lesser Antilles. Since 1500, at least 4484 people are reported to have perished in these killer waves. Although the tsunami generated by the 2010 Haiti earthquake claimed only a few lives, in the 1530 El Pilar, Venezuela; 1602 Port Royale, Jamaica; 1918 Puerto Rico; and 1946 Samaná, Dominican Republic tsunamis the death tolls ranged to over a thousand. Since then, there has been an explosive increase in residents, visitors, infrastructure, and economic activity along the coastlines, increasing the potential for human and economic loss. It has been estimated that on any day, upwards of more than 500,000 people could be in harm's way just along the beaches, with hundreds of thousands more working and living in the tsunamis hazard zones. Given the relative infrequency of tsunamis, exercises are a valuable tool to test communications, evaluate preparedness and raise awareness. Exercises in the Caribbean are conducted under the framework of the UNESCO IOC Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami and other Coastal Hazards Warning System for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (CARIBE EWS) and the US National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program. On March 23, 2011, 34 countries and territories participated in the first CARIBE WAVE/LANTEX regional tsunami exercise, while in the second exercise on March 20, 2013 a total of 45 countries and territories participated. 481 organizations (almost 200 more than in 2011) also registered to receive the bulletins issued by the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC), West Coast and Alaska Tsunami Warning Center and/or the Puerto Rico

  7. A hierarchical tectonic model of the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Malcolm I.; Scotese, Christopher R.

    1988-12-01

    A quantitative computer graphic methodology (hierarchical tectonic analysis) has been used to model the tectonic evolution of the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean region. This method employs a highly structured, hierarchical description of the relative motions of pairs of tectonic elements in order to quantify the timing and style of plate interactions. The main features described in this model are: (1) a revised fit of Pangea (2) the opening of the Gulf of Mexico in the Middle-Late Jurassic (3) the formation of a Proto-Caribbean Ocean due to the separation of North and South America during the Early Cretaceous (4) the formation of the Greater Antilles Arc along the western margin of the Proto-Caribbean Ocean (5) the insertion of the Farallon plate between North and South America during the Middle Cretaceous resulting in the northeastward advance of the Greater Antilles Arc and the subduction of Proto-Caribbean oceanic crust (6) the complete subduction of the Proto-Caribbean Ocean and the collision of the Greater Antilles arc with the Bahamas Platform in the Late Cretaceous (7) the truncation of the Caribbean section of the Farallon plate from its Pacific counterpart and the formation of the Panama Arc (latest Cretaceous), and (8) the westward movement of North and South America with respect to the Caribbean plate resulting in the opening of the Yucatan Basin (Paleocene) and subsequently in the evolution of the Cayman Trough and E-W zone of strike-slip.

  8. Analysis of Grid Emission Factors for the Electricity Sector in Caribbean Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinostroza, Miriam L.; Desgain, Denis DR; Perez Martín, David

    As part of their capacity development efforts to promote mitigation actions, the UNEP DTU Partnership, together with the UNFCCC Regional Collaborating Centre in the Caribbean, UNDP and OLADE, agreed to collaborate with Caribbean countries willing to update or establish their grid emission factors....... The study analyses the following topics: – Status of the calculation and adoption of grid emissionfactors for each country in the region. – Characteristics of electricity generation units in thedifferent Caribbean countries. – Application of the CDM methodological tool forcalculating a standardized grid...

  9. Rigidity and definition of Caribbean plate motion from COCONet and campaign GPS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, Glen; Miller, Jamie; DeMets, Charles; Jansma, Pamela

    2014-05-01

    The currently accepted kinematic model of the Caribbean plate presented by DeMets et al. (2007) is based on velocities from 6 continuous and 14 campaign GPS sites. COCONet is a multi-hazard GPS-Met observatory, which extends the existing infrastructure of the Plate Boundary Observatory in North America into the Caribbean basin. In 2010, UNAVCO in collaboration with UCAR, was funded by NSF to design, build, and initially maintain a network of 50 new cGPS/Met sites and include data from another 50 existing sites in the Caribbean region. The current COCONet siting plan calls for 46 new stations, 21 refurbished stations, and 77 existing stations across 26 nations in the Caribbean region. Data from all COCONet sites flow into the UNAVCO archive and are processed by the PBO analysis centers and are also processed independently by the UTA Geodesy Lab using GIPSY-OASISII (v.6.2) using an absolute point positioning strategy and final, precise orbits, clocks, and Earth orientation parameters from JPL in the IGS08 frame. We present here our refined estimate of Caribbean plate motion by evaluating data from an expanded number of stations with an improved spatial distribution. In order to better constrain the eastern margin of the plate near the Lesser Antilles subduction interface, campaign GPS observations have been collected on the island of Dominica over the last decade. These are combined with additional campaign observations from the western Caribbean, specifically from Honduras and Nicaragua. We have analyzed a total of 117 sites from the Caribbean region, including campaign data and the data from the cGPS stations that comprise COCONet. An updated velocity field for the Caribbean plate is presented and an inversion of the velocities for 24 sites yields a plate angular velocity that differs from previously published models. Our best fitting inversion to GPS velocities from these 24 sites suggests that 2-plate model for the Caribbean is required to fit the GPS

  10. [Breast cancer trends in Latin America and the Caribbean].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Ascencio, Rafael; Gómez-Dantés, Héctor; Lewis, Sarah; Torres-Sánchez, Luisa; López-Carrillo, Lizbeth

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is currently the most significant cause of death from malignancies in Latin American women, including cervical cancer. Describe the magnitude and spatial-temporal distribution of breast cancer in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) from 1979-2005. National and international incidence and mortality statistics were reviewed and organized (registries, databases, and published literature), basic estimators and mortality ratios for each country were calculated and trends were analyzed. Despite substantial data gaps in incidence for many countries, an increase in incidence and mortality is observed in LAC countries. Deaths/cases ratios illustrate problems in access to detection and treatment and the greatest gaps are observed in poorer countries. A regional effort is needed to improve information systems related to cancer in general and breast cancer in particular. It is imperative to develop strategies to improve diagnostic infrastructure in order to achieve early detection and effective treatment and halt the upward trend in premature mortality.

  11. Critical Decline of the Eastern Caribbean Sperm Whale Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gero, Shane; Whitehead, Hal

    2016-01-01

    Sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) populations were expected to rebuild following the end of commercial whaling. We document the decline of the population in the eastern Caribbean by tracing demographic changes of well-studied social units. We address hypotheses that, over a ten-year period of dedicated effort (2005-2015), unit size, numbers of calves and/or calving rates have each declined. Across 16 units, the number of adults decreased in 12 units, increased in two, and showed no change in two. The number of adults per unit decreased at -0.195 individuals/yr (95% CI: -0.080 to -0.310; P = 0.001). The number of calves also declined, but the decline was not significant. This negative trend of -4.5% per year in unit size started in about 2010, with numbers being fairly stable until then. There are several natural and anthropogenic threats, but no well-substantiated cause for the decline.

  12. Smokefree Policies in Latin America and the Caribbean: Making Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanton A. Glantz

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed the adoption and implementation of smokefree policies in all Latin American and the Caribbean (LAC countries. Significant progress has been achieved among LAC countries since the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC was adopted in 2005. Both national and sub-national legislation have provided effective mechanisms to increase the fraction of the population protected from secondhand tobacco smoke. Civil society has actively promoted these policies and played a main role in enacting them and monitoring their enforcement. The tobacco industry, while continuing to oppose the approval and regulation of the laws at legislative and executive levels, has gone a step further by litigating against them in the Courts. As in the US and elsewhere, this litigation has failed to stop the legislation.

  13. Island Demography: A Review of Selected Caribbean Contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McElroy, Jerome L.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This article traces the demographic contributions of island studies scholarship in four sections. First, demographic transition theory is applied to the population history of the region. The second highlights the impact of this demographic scholarship on related social science fields in the Caribbean. The third and fourth contributions focus on the impact of migration on two related hypotheses: the demographic transition and the mobility transition. In the first case, migration patterns between St. Kitts-Nevis and the U.S. Virgin Islands in the 1960s suggest that the age-sex selectivity of migration tends to accelerate the transition in sending societies and retard its progress in receiving societies. In the second case, empirical support is provided for the so-called ‘migration transition’ whereby former chronic labour exporters become labour importers under sustained growth.

  14. Comparative balance of border regulations in four neighboring Caribbean countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Cristina Mantilla Valbuena

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to investigate whether there is a potential for border integration among four adjoining Caribbean countries: Colombia, Nicaragua, Panama and Costa Rica. The discussion is part of the “cross-border” concept and the integration of subnational entities in two or more nation states, with particular emphasis on the role played by the societies that inhabit border regions. A comparative analysis model is used to assess border regulations in each country’s various territorial levels based on relevant legal elements, autonomous processes and decentralization. The article concludes that the more modern each country’s border regulations and constitutional, political and administrative reforms are, the greater the likelihood of cross-border integration. Colombia and Nicaragua have the highest potential for integrating their borders, whereas Panama and Costa Rica have the lowest potential.

  15. Tardigrada of the Caribbean island of Dominica (West Indies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana G. Hinton

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In June 2009 we surveyed the terrestrial Tardigrada of Dominica, the most northerly of the Windward islands of the Lesser Antilles in the Caribbean sea. Out of 112 moss, lichen, liverwort and leaf litter samples, 35 had tardigrades, representing 10 genera and 25 species or species groups. This survey increases the number of species reported from Dominica from 3 to 25, more than the total recorded from any other West Indian island. Twelve species found in Dominica are cosmopolitan or belong to cosmopolitan species groups. Eight species are new to the fauna of the West Indies, one is new to the fauna of the Americas, and at least one is endemic to Dominica.

  16. Foreword to special volume “Art Music by Caribbean Composers”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz Diaz, Edgardo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The present volume of The International Journal of Bahamian Studies is the beginning of a long-needed project aimed at compiling and organizing the work by composers from the Caribbean.

  17. Labor Informality in Latin America and the Caribbean: Patterns and Trends from Household Survey Microdata

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gasparini, Leonardo; Tornarolli, Leopoldo

    2009-01-01

    This paper documents the main patterns and trends of alternative definitions of labor informality in Latin America and the Caribbean, by exploiting a large database of more than 100 household surveys...

  18. Cancer patterns, trends and projections in Latin America and the Caribbean: a global context

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bray, Freddie; Piñeros, Marion

    2016-01-01

    To develop a situation analysis encompassing the patterns and trends in cancer incidence and mortality in South and Central America and the Caribbean, with comparisons globally and with selected external countries...

  19. Exploring the Future of Security in the Caribbean: a Regional Security Partnership?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-14

    include the Southern Common Market (MERCOSUR), the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), the North American Free Trade Agreement ( NAFTA ), the Andean Community...an improved security environment will trump ideological differences. The continued diplomatic efforts at the regional and international levels to

  20. 78 FR 34042 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Comprehensive Fishery Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... U.S. Caribbean islands with respect to culture, markets, gear, seafood preferences, and the... language interpretation or other auxiliary aids should be directed to the Council (see ADDRESSES). Island...

  1. First case of Mycobacterium heckeshornense cavitary lung disease in the Latin America and Caribbean region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coitinho, C.; Greif, G.; Ingen, J. van; Laserra, P.; Robello, C.; Rivas, C.

    2016-01-01

    A case of cavitary pulmonary disease caused by Mycobacterium heckeshornense in Uruguay is described. This is the first case reported in the Latin America and Caribbean region, showing that this species is a worldwide opportunistic human pathogen.

  2. Changes in the Fluorescence of the Caribbean Coral Montastraea faveolata during Heat-Induced Bleaching

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David G. Zawada; Jules S. Jaffe

    2003-01-01

    In order to evaluate the response of commonly occurring green and orange fluorescent host-based pigments, a thermal stress experiment was performed on specimens of the Caribbean coral Montastraea faveolata...

  3. Regional Specialization. The Middle Americas: Mexico, Panama, Central America and the Caribbean Basin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Owen, Mark H; Inman, Kenneth A

    1997-01-01

    .... Generally viewed as lagging in efforts to develop stable governments and self-sustaining economies, Mexico, Central America to include Panama and the Caribbean, henceforth Middle America, have in the...

  4. Oil and Gas Fields of the Caribbean Region, 2004 (fld6bg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Caribbean region is part of World Energy Assessment region 6 (Central and South America). A fundamental task in the assessment is to map the locations and type...

  5. A COMPARATIVE-STUDY OF TEMPERATURE RESPONSES OF CARIBBEAN SEAWEEDS FROM DIFFERENT BIOGEOGRAPHIC GROUPS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PAKKER, H; BREEMAN, AM; VANREINE, WFP; VANDENHOEK, C

    Temperature tolerances were determined for Caribbean isolates (total 31) of seaweeds belonging to three distributional groups: 1) species confined to the tropical western Atlantic (Botryocladia spinulifera, Chamaedoris peniculum, Cladophoropsis sundanensis, Dictyopteris justii, Dictyurus

  6. Macroalgal-associated dinoflagellates belonging to the genus Symbiodinium in Caribbean reefs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Porto, Isabel; Granados, Camila; Restrepo, Juan C; Sánchez, Juan A

    2008-01-01

    .... Here ecological and molecular evidence is presented demonstrating the existence of demersal free-living Symbiodinium populations in Caribbean reefs and the possible role of the stoplight parrotfish (Sparisoma viride...

  7. Mestizaje and African Heritage in Afro-Caribbean Music, Veracruz, Mexico

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rinaudo, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Rinaudo discusses mestizaje and African heritage in Afro-Caribbean music performed in Veracruz, Mexico, with a focus on the social uses of music and dance categories, and stereotypes liked to the African legacy...

  8. Toward a Diaspora Literature: Black Women Writers from Africa, the Caribbean, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilentz, Gay

    1992-01-01

    Adds to the growing dialogue on diaspora literature in relation to women's writings. Examines Anglophone West African, African-American, and Caribbean women writers for hidden and not so hidden commonalities in their works. (RS)

  9. Dengue in an area of the Colombian Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Barreto, Heidi; Mattar-Velilla, Salim

    2015-01-01

    Background: In Colombia, dengue is an endemic disease and the four serotypes have been reported. Objective: To describe the frequency and severity of dengue in an area of the Colombian Caribbean (Department of Cordoba) Methods: A retrospective study was conducted. Two data sources were analysed: The database from the Direction of Health in Córdoba, and clinical registers of patients diagnosed with haemorrhagic fevers and fevers of unknown origin in reference hospitals. Results: The mean incidence of dengue between 2003-2010 was 36.5 cases/105 inhabitants (CI95%: 34.3-37.5) and adjusted for sub-reporting, could be between 178.5 and 521.6. The mean incidence of severe dengue was 4.7 cases/105 inhabitants (CI95%: 4.3-5.0). Mean mortality rate due to dengue was 0.3 cases/105 inhabitants. The fatality rate was below 1%. The mean total leukocyte count in patients with dengue was 6,181 mm3 (CI95%: 5,973-6,389) and with severe Dengue was 4,729 mm3 (CI95%: 4,220-5,238). The average platelet count in patients with Dengue was 118,793/mm3 (CI95%: 107,255-130,331) and in patients with Severe Dengue 77,655 (CI95%: 59,640-95,670). Both differences were statistically significant (p <0.05). The frequency of laboratories test per patient in patients with Dengue and severe Dengue were different. Conclusion: The department of Cordoba is a highly endemic zone of Dengue and severe Dengue in the Colombian Caribbean. Moreover, the results show significant differences between dengue and severe dengue so much in tests as in frequency of use of healthcare services. PMID:26019378

  10. Coral diseases and bleaching on Colombian Caribbean coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Camacho, Raúl; Gil-Agudelo, Diego Luis; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Alberto; Reyes-Nivia, María Catalina; Garzón-Ferreira, Jaime

    2010-05-01

    Since 1998 the National Monitoring System for the Coral Reefs of Colombia (SIMAC) has monitored the occurrence of coral bleaching and diseases in some Colombian coral reefs (permanent stations at San Andres Island, Rosario Islands, Tayrona, San Bernardo Islands and Urabá). The main purpose is to evaluate their health status and to understand the factors that have been contributing to their decline. To estimate these occurrences, annual surveys in 126 permanent belt transects (10 x 2m) with different depth intervals (3-6 meters, 9-12 meters and 15-18 meters) are performed at all reef sites. Data from the 1998-2004 period, revealed that San Andrés Island had many colonies with diseases (38.9 colonies/m2), and Urabá had high numbers with bleaching (54.4 colonies/m2). Of the seven reported coral diseases studied, Dark Spots Disease (DSD), and White Plague Disease (WPD) were noteworthy because they occurred in all Caribbean monitored sites, and because of their high interannual infection incidence. Thirty five species of scleractinian corals were affected by at least one disease and a high incidence of coral diseases on the main reef builders is documented. Bleaching was present in 34 species. During the whole monitoring period, Agaricia agaricites and Siderastrea siderea were the species most severely affected by DSD and bleaching, respectively. Diseases on species such as Agaricia fragilis, A. grahamae, A. humilis, Diploria clivosa, Eusmilia fastigiata, Millepora complanata, and Mycetophyllia aliciae are recorded for first time in Colombia. We present bleaching and disease incidences, kinds of diseases, coral species affected, reef localities studied, depth intervals of surveys, and temporal (years) variation for each geographic area. This variation makes difficult to clearly determine defined patterns or general trends for monitored reefs. This is the first long-term study of coral diseases and bleaching in the Southwestern Caribbean, and one of the few long

  11. Drivers of Holocene sea-level change in the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nicole; Ashe, Erica; Horton, Benjamin P.; Dutton, Andrea; Kopp, Robert E.; Brocard, Gilles; Engelhart, Simon E.; Hill, David F.; Peltier, W.R.; Vane, Christopher H.; Scatena, Fred N.

    2017-01-01

    We present a Holocene relative sea-level (RSL) database for the Caribbean region (5°N to 25°N and 55°W to 90°W) that consists of 499 sea-level index points and 238 limiting dates. The database was compiled from multiple sea-level indicators (mangrove peat, microbial mats, beach rock and acroporid and massive corals). We subdivided the database into 20 regions to investigate the influence of tectonics and glacial isostatic adjustment on RSL. We account for the local-scale processes of sediment compaction and tidal range change using the stratigraphic position (overburden thickness) of index points and paleotidal modeling, respectively. We use a spatio-temporal empirical hierarchical model to estimate RSL position and its rates of change in the Caribbean over 1-ka time slices. Because of meltwater input, the rates of RSL change were highest during the early Holocene, with a maximum of 10.9 ± 0.6 m/ka in Suriname and Guyana and minimum of 7.4 ± 0.7 m/ka in south Florida from 12 to 8 ka. Following complete deglaciation of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) by ∼7 ka, mid-to late-Holocene rates slowed to model constrains the spatial extent of the mid-Holocene highstand. RSL did not exceed the present height during the Holocene, except on the northern coast of South America, where in Suriname and Guyana, RSL attained a height higher than present by 6.6 ka (82% probability). The highstand reached a maximum elevation of +1.0 ± 1.1 m between 5.3 and 5.2 ka. Regions with a highstand were located furthest away from the former LIS, where the effects from ocean syphoning and hydro-isostasy outweigh the influence of subsidence from forebulge collapse.

  12. Latin America and the Caribbean: Between the OAS and CELAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Segovia

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This essay aims at analysing the position of Latin America and the Caribbean in its totality as a global player, and the challenges facing CELAC – Community of Latin American and Caribbean Countries – as a mechanism of political partnership with its own views on the Organization of American States (OAS. Indeed, CELAC is to some extent presented as a hemispheric mechanism that rivals the OAS and which may eventually replace it, leaving the U.S. and Canada aside. In this regard, a comparison and an assessment of the implications involved will be made. It is therefore useful to pose the following question: Is CELAC the key to structuring an alternative movement to the OAS?Resumen:El motivo de este ensayo consiste en analizar la posición de América Latina y el Caribe en su conjunto como actor global frente al reto que supone la CELAC – Comunidad de Estados Latinoamericanos y Caribeños – como mecanismo de concertación política y su postura frente la OEA – Organización de Estados Americanos. En efecto, la CELAC se presenta para algunos como un nuevo mecanismo hemisférico que rivaliza con la OEA y que eventualmente podría sustituirla, dejando a un lado a los Estados Unidos y Canadá. En tal sentido, se pretende contrastar y valorar dicha apreciación. Es por ello que resulta útil plantearse la siguiente cuestión: ¿Es la CELAC la clave para estructurar un movimiento alternativo a la OEA?

  13. Dietary habits and health status of African-Caribbean adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earland, J; Campbell, J; Srivastava, A

    2010-06-01

    Although African-Caribbeans in the UK are more likely to suffer from a number of diet-related health conditions, including obesity, hypertension and type II diabetes, there have been few dietary studies on this group. The present study is based on a small survey of food and nutrient intakes and traditional dietary habits of African-Caribbean adults living in Staffordshire. A questionnaire, designed to collect demographic data and information on medical status, physical activities, dietary, cooking and food shopping habits was administered to a convenience sample of 39 adults. Detailed information on food intakes was gathered using a modified existing Food Frequency Questionnaire with 169 items. Height and weight were measured for the calculation of body mass index. The average age of the subjects was 47 years (range 19-65 years). The prevalence of obesity was 39% and one-third of subjects reported having at least one health condition. Physical activities, outside of work, were undertaken by 95% of the sample. Traditional foods were used by 92% of respondents, including fruit and vegetables purchased at markets outside of their local area. A wide variety of foods were consumed and the percentages of energy provided by fats and carbohydrates (30% and 53%, respectively) appeared to be meeting government recommendations. However, absolute energy intakes were high and salt consumption, often in the form of commercial seasonings, exceeded government recommendations. The positive aspects of the diets of this population need to be encouraged. Interventions need to focus on ways of reducing total energy intakes, as well as levels of salt consumption.

  14. Satellites as Shared Resources for Caribbean Climate and Health Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2002-01-01

    Remotely-sensed data and observations are providing powerful new tools for addressing climate and environment-related human health problems through increased capabilities for monitoring, risk mapping, and surveillance of parameters useful to such problems as vector-borne and infectious diseases, air and water quality, harmful algal blooms, UV (ultraviolet) radiation, contaminant and pathogen transport in air and water, and thermal stress. Remote sensing, geographic information systems (GIS), global positioning systems (GPS), improved computational capabilities, and interdisciplinary research between the Earth and health science communities are being combined in rich collaborative efforts resulting in more rapid problem-solving, early warning, and prevention in global health issues. Collaborative efforts among scientists from health and Earth sciences together with local decision-makers are enabling increased understanding of the relationships between changes in temperature, rainfall, wind, soil moisture, solar radiation, vegetation, and the patterns of extreme weather events and the occurrence and patterns of diseases (especially, infectious and vector-borne diseases) and other health problems. This increased understanding through improved information and data sharing, in turn, empowers local health and environmental officials to better predict health problems, take preventive measure, and improve response actions. This paper summarizes the remote sensing systems most useful for climate, environment and health studies of the Caribbean region and provides several examples of interdisciplinary research projects in the Caribbean currently using remote sensing technologies. These summaries include the use of remote sensing of algal blooms, pollution transport, coral reef monitoring, vectorborne disease studies, and potential health effects of African dust on Trinidad and Barbados.

  15. Breast cancer in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia C Robles

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available As recently as two decades ago breast cancer was not a significant public health concern in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC. However, mortality rates from breast cancer have been increasing for at least 40 years in most LAC countries. Socioeconomic development and consequent changes in reproductive behaviors over the past 50 years are thought to have contributed to the increased risk of breast cancer. Socioeconomic development has also increased women's health awareness and therefore the demand for quality services. In industrialized countries, screening and widely available, high-quality treatment protocols are being implemented as the main strategy for breast cancer control. Studies show that out of three available screening methods (mammography, clinical breast examination, and breast self-examination, only mammography for women 50-69 years of age has been effective at reducing mortality, and has done so by an estimated 23%. While there is much controversy about the benefits and cost-effectiveness of mammography screening for women aged 40-49, some countries, including Australia, the United States of America, and four European nations, recommend that physicians assess the need for it on an individual basis. A survey that we conducted of LAC countries shows that most of their breast cancer screening policies are not justified by available scientific evidence. Moreover, as seen by relatively high mortality/incidence ratios, breast cancer cases are not being adequately managed in many LAC countries. Before further developing screening programs, these countries need to evaluate the feasibility of designing and implementing appropriate treatment guidelines and providing wide access to diagnostic and treatment services. Given the relevance of breast cancer in Latin America and the Caribbean today, it is crucial that both women and health care providers have access to up-to-date information on which to base their decisions.

  16. Giant Upper Cretaceous oysters from the Gulf coast and Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohl, Norman F.; Kauffman, Erle G.

    1964-01-01

    Two unusually massive ostreid species, representing the largest and youngest Mesozoic members of their respective lineages, occur in Upper Cretaceous sediment of the gulf coast and Caribbean areas. Their characteristics and significance, as well as the morphologic terminology of ostreids in general, are discussed. Crassostrea cusseta Sohl and Kauffman n. sp. is the largest known ostreid from Mesozoic rocks of North America; it occurs sporadically in the Cusseta Sand and rarely in the Blufftown Formation of the Chattahoochee River region in Georgia and Alabama. It is especially notable in that it lacks a detectable posterior adductor muscle scar on large adult shells. C. cusseta is the terminal Cretaceous member of the C. soleniscus lineage in gulf coast sediments; the lineage continues, however, with little basic modification, throughout the Cenozoic, being represented in the Eocene by C. gigantissima (Finch) and probably, in modern times, by C. virginica (Gmelin). The C. soleniscus lineage is the first typically modern crassostreid group recognized in the Mesozoic. Arctostrea aguilerae (Böse) occurs in Late Campanian and Early Maestrichtian sediments of Alabama, Mississippi, Texas(?), Mexico, and Cuba. The mature shell of this species is larger and more massive than that of any other known arctostreid. Arctostrea is well represented throughout the Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous of Europe, but in North America, despite the great numbers and diversity of Cretaceous oysters, only A. aguilerae and the Albian form A. carinata are known. The presence of A. aquilerae in both the Caribbean and gulf coast faunas is exceptional, as the Late Cretaceous faunas of these provinces are generally distinct and originated in different faunal realms.

  17. Measuring surface energy and evapotranspiration across Caribbean mangrove forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagomasino, D.; Fatoyinbo, T. E.; Price, R.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal mangroves lose large amounts of water through evapotranspiration (ET) that can be equivalent to the amount of annual rainfall in certain years. Satellite remote sensing has been used to estimate surface energy and ET variability in many forested ecosystems, yet has been widely overlooked in mangrove forests. Using a combination of long-term datasets (30-year) acquired from the NASA Landsat 5 and 7 satellite databases, the present study investigated ET and surface energy balance variability between two mangrove forest sites in the Caribbean: 1) Everglades National Park (ENP; Florida, USA) and 2) Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve (SKBR; Quintana Roo, Mexico). A satellite-derived surface energy balance model was used to estimate ET in tall and scrub mangroves environments at ENP and SKBR. Results identified significant differences in soil heat flux measurements and ET between the tall and scrub mangrove environments. Scrub mangroves exhibited the highest soil heat flux coincident with the lowest biophysical indices (i.e., Fractional Vegetation Cover, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, and Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index) and ET rates. Mangrove damage and mortality was observed on the satellite images following strong tropical storms and associated with anthropogenic modifications and resulted in low values in spectral vegetation indices, higher soil heat flux, and higher ET. Recovery of the spectral characteristics, soil heat flux and ET was within 1-2 years following hurricane disturbance while, degradation caused by human disturbance persisted for many years. Remotely sensed ET of mangrove forests can provide estimates over a few decades and provide us with some understanding of how these environments respond to disturbances to the landscape in periods where no ground data exists or in locations that are difficult to access. Moreover, relationships between energy and water balance components developed for the coastal mangroves of Florida and Mexico could be

  18. Defining and dividing the greater Caribbean: insights from the biogeography of shorefishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, D Ross; Cramer, Katie L

    2014-01-01

    The Greater Caribbean biogeographic region is the high-diversity heart of the Tropical West Atlantic, one of four global centers of tropical marine biodiversity. The traditional view of the Greater Caribbean is that it is limited to the Caribbean, West Indies, southwest Gulf of Mexico and tip of Florida, and that, due to its faunal homogeneity, lacks major provincial subdivisions. In this scenario the northern 2/3 of the Gulf of Mexico and southeastern USA represent a separate temperate, "Carolinian" biogeographic region. We completed a comprehensive re-assessment of the biogeography of the Greater Caribbean by comparing the distributions of 1,559 shorefish species within 45 sections of shelf waters of the Greater Caribbean and adjacent areas. This analysis shows that that the Greater Caribbean occupies a much larger area than usually thought, extending south to at least Guyana, and north to encompass the entire Carolinian area. Rather than being homogenous, the Greater Caribbean is divided into three major provinces, each with a distinctive, primarily tropical fauna: (1) a central, tropical province comprising the West Indies, Bermuda and Central America; (2) a southern, upwelling-affected province spanning the entire continental shelf of northern South America; and (iii) a northern, subtropical province that includes all of the Gulf of Mexico, Florida and southeastern USA. This three-province pattern holds for both reef- and soft bottom fishes, indicating a general response by demersal fishes to major variation in provincial shelf environments. Such environmental differences include latitudinal variation in sea temperature, availability of major habitats (coral reefs, soft bottom shorelines, and mangroves), and nutrient additions from upwelling areas and large rivers. The three-province arrangement of the Greater Caribbean broadly resembles and has a similar environmental basis to the provincial arrangement of its sister biogeographic region, the Tropical Eastern

  19. Defining and dividing the greater Caribbean: insights from the biogeography of shorefishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Ross Robertson

    Full Text Available The Greater Caribbean biogeographic region is the high-diversity heart of the Tropical West Atlantic, one of four global centers of tropical marine biodiversity. The traditional view of the Greater Caribbean is that it is limited to the Caribbean, West Indies, southwest Gulf of Mexico and tip of Florida, and that, due to its faunal homogeneity, lacks major provincial subdivisions. In this scenario the northern 2/3 of the Gulf of Mexico and southeastern USA represent a separate temperate, "Carolinian" biogeographic region. We completed a comprehensive re-assessment of the biogeography of the Greater Caribbean by comparing the distributions of 1,559 shorefish species within 45 sections of shelf waters of the Greater Caribbean and adjacent areas. This analysis shows that that the Greater Caribbean occupies a much larger area than usually thought, extending south to at least Guyana, and north to encompass the entire Carolinian area. Rather than being homogenous, the Greater Caribbean is divided into three major provinces, each with a distinctive, primarily tropical fauna: (1 a central, tropical province comprising the West Indies, Bermuda and Central America; (2 a southern, upwelling-affected province spanning the entire continental shelf of northern South America; and (iii a northern, subtropical province that includes all of the Gulf of Mexico, Florida and southeastern USA. This three-province pattern holds for both reef- and soft bottom fishes, indicating a general response by demersal fishes to major variation in provincial shelf environments. Such environmental differences include latitudinal variation in sea temperature, availability of major habitats (coral reefs, soft bottom shorelines, and mangroves, and nutrient additions from upwelling areas and large rivers. The three-province arrangement of the Greater Caribbean broadly resembles and has a similar environmental basis to the provincial arrangement of its sister biogeographic region, the

  20. Three new Nannastacidae (Crustacea: Cumacea) species from a Caribbean mesophotic ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Iorgu; Chatterjee, Tapas; Schizas, Nikolaos V

    2014-02-19

    Examination of substrata from the mesophotic reefs of Mona Island, Puerto Rico yielded 3 new species of cumaceans, all from the family Nannastacidae: Cumella achimae sp. nov., C. victoriae sp. nov. and Nannastacus craciuni sp. nov. The 3 new species bring the total of new cumacean taxa described from the mesophotic reefs of US Caribbean to 9, highlighting the potential of mesophotic reefs as a biodiversity hotspot. For the first time we report the genus Nannastacus from the Caribbean Sea. 

  1. Demographic history of Diadema antillarum, a keystone herbivore on Caribbean reefs.

    OpenAIRE

    Lessios, H A; Garrido, M. J.; Kessing, B.D.

    2001-01-01

    The sea urchin Diadema antillarum was the most important herbivore on Caribbean reefs until 1983, when mass mortality reduced its populations by more than 97%. Knowledge of its past demography is essential to reconstruct reef ecology as it was before human impact, which has been implicated as having caused high pre-mortality Diadema abundance. To determine the history of its population size, we sequenced the ATPase 6 and 8 region of mitochondrial DNA from populations in the Caribbean and in t...

  2. The Diasporic Dimensions of British Caribbean Federation in the Early Twentieth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D. Duke

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available [Second and third pragraph] While much has been written on the significance of British Caribbean activists in various movements associated with black diaspora politics in the twentieth century, particularly their important roles in Pan-African struggles, little has been written on how the various British Caribbean colonies themselves were envisioned among diaspora activists and within the scope of black diaspora politics. Did such Caribbean activists, especially those interested in and connected to diasporic movements beyond the British Caribbean, and their African American and African counterparts forsake the British West Indies as a focus of political engagement for other lands and causes? If not, what was the place of “West Indian liberation” and nation building in the British Caribbean in relation to black diasporic struggles in the early twentieth century? This article address these questions through an examination of how the idea of a united “West Indian nation” (via a federation or closer union among British Caribbean colonies was envisioned within black diaspora politics from the turn of the twentieth century through the 1920s, and the ways in which racial consciousness and motivations informed conceptualizations of such a nation among black political activists of the British Caribbean and other parts of the diaspora. This study argues that efforts to create a federation in the Anglophone Caribbean were much more than simply imperial or regional nation-building projects. Instead, federation was also a diasporic, black nation-building endeavor intricately connected to notions of racial unity, racial uplift, and black self-determination.

  3. Transients and settlers: varieties of Caribbean migrants and the socio-economic implications of their return.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-hope, E M

    1986-09-01

    The author analyzes international migration patterns of Caribbean populations, with particular attention to the persistence of significant return flows. A typology of migration in the region is presented, which includes categories of transients or shuttle migrants and settlers or long-stay migrants. Skill or occupational changes, principal remittances, and migration objectives of each group are summarized. The social, economic, and policy implications of international circulation in the Caribbean are considered. (SUMMARY IN FRE AND SPA)

  4. A Revised Caribbean Plate Motion Model: GPS Geodetic Results From the Dominica NSF- REU Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauria, K.; Styron, R. H.; James, S.; Turner, H. L.; Ashlock, A.; Cavness, C. L.; Collier, X.; Feinstein, R.; Murphy, R.; Staisch, L.; Williams, B.; Demets, C.; Mattioli, G. S.; Jansma, P. E.; Cothren, J.

    2007-12-01

    Velocities from sixteen campaign GPS sites on the Caribbean island of Dominica are analyzed in combination with fifteen existing Caribbean GPS sites to further constrain Caribbean plate motion. High precision GPS geodesy was used to determine the site positions of 16 sites in Dominica between 2000 and 2007. All observations were obtained using dual-frequency, code-phase receivers and geodetic-quality antennae, primarily choke rings. Generally, three consecutive 24 hour observation days were acquired for each site at every epoch. Absolute point positions were obtained using GIPSY-OASIS II along with final, precise orbits, clocks, earth orientation parameters, and x-files from JPL. All site velocities are calculated relative to ITRF05 and legacy site velocities from elsewhere in the eastern and western stable Caribbean were transformed from ITRF00 to ITRF05 before inversion. The addition of Dominican GPS data from the 16 new sites resulted in no statistically significant (the 95% confidence level) change in the Caribbean Euler pole as recently published by DeMets et al., 2007. Our calculated pole is 35.929°N, 102.536° E, and rotating at a rate of .2610 degrees/m.yr. The updated rotation model verifies the previously published pole and supports the conclusion that within current error bounds, Dominica is part of the stable Caribbean plate, with residual motions on the order of only a few mm/yr.

  5. Structural features and oil-and-gas bearing of the Caribbean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabanbark, A.; Lobkovsky, L. I.

    2017-09-01

    The structure of the Caribbean region testifies to the extremely unstable condition of the terrestrial crust of this intercontinental and simultaneously interoceanic area. In the recent geological epoch, the Caribbean region is represented by a series of structural elements, the main of which are the Venezuelan and Colombian deep-sea suboceanic depressions, the Nicaraguan Rise, and the Greater and Lesser Antilles bordering the Caribbean Sea in the north and east. There are 63 sedimentary basins in the entire Caribbean region. However, only the Venezuelan and Colombian basins, the Miskito Basin in Nicaragua, and the northern and eastern shelves of the Antilles, Paria Bay, Barbodos-Tobago, and Grenada basins are promising in terms of oil-and-gas bearig. In the Colombian Basin, the southwestern part, located in the rift zone of the Gulf of Uraba, is the most promising. In the Venezuelan Basin, possible oil-and-gas-bearing basins showing little promise are assumed to be in the northern and eastern margins. The main potential of the eastern Caribbean region is attributed to the southern margin, at the shelf zone of which are the Tokuyo-Bonaire, Tuy-Cariaco, Margarita, Paria Bay, Barbados-Tobago, and Grenada oil-and-gas-bearing basins. The rest of the deepwater depressions of the Caribbean Sea show little promise for hydrocarbon research due to the small thickness of the deposits, their flat bedding, and probably a lack of fluid seals.

  6. 78 FR 76807 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Revisions to Dealer Permitting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ... Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Revisions to Dealer Permitting and Reporting Requirements for... providing food production and recreational opportunities, and protecting marine ecosystems. To further this...

  7. The perspectives of Caribbean high school students' experiences in American science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Renae Luenell

    The purpose of this study was to describe the perspectives of Caribbean high school students' experiences in American science classrooms. Research suggests that psychological, cultural, and socioeconomic perspectives influence the science experiences of African Americans or Blacks; the result of which is under-representation (Lewis et al., 2000). Nonetheless, what is uncertain is if these and other perspectives are similar to the science experiences of Caribbeans who also are majority black by race and rank as the 3 rd largest immigrant population in America's schools (Suarez-Orozco, 2000). Questions guiding this study were: (1) What are the perspectives of Caribbean high school students' experiences in American science classrooms? (2) What can we learn from the perspectives of Caribbean high school students' science experiences that may address issues of participation and interest; consequently, influencing the overall performance of ethnic minorities in school science? Sociocultural theory provides the framework for the analysis of the study. Four Caribbean born students in an American high school participated in this naturalistic qualitative research. A constant comparative method was used to categorize and analyze the data and uncover meaningful patterns that emerged from the four interviews and written documents. Although there were similarities between African Americans' science experiences as documented in the literature and that of Caribbeans in this study, the Caribbean participants relied on prior native experiences to dictate their perspectives of their science experiences in America. According to Caribbean students, American science high schools classrooms utilize an objective style of assessments; are characterized by a lack of teacher support; allow behavioral problems in the classroom; and function through different communication styles than the native Caribbean science classroom environment. This study implies science educators should be sensitive

  8. The CAMI Project - Weather and Climate Services for Caribbean Food Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman, Adrian; Van Meerbeeck, Cedric

    2013-04-01

    Food security is major focus of Caribbean governments, with production being of particular concern. For the past three decades, Caribbean agriculture has been declining in relative importance, both in terms of its contribution to GDP and its share of the labour force. One of the problems Caribbean agriculture faces is the destructive impacts from weather and climate extremes. These include flood, drought, extreme temperatures, and strong winds from tropical cyclones. Other potential disasters, such as from pests and diseases attacks, are also weather and climate driven. These make weather and climate information critically important to decision-making in agriculture in the Caribbean region. In an effort to help reduce weather and climate related risks to the food security sector, The Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology, along with its partners the Caribbean Agricultural Research and Development Institute, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and ten National Meteorological Services from within the Caribbean Community launched and implemented the Caribbean Agrometeorological Initiative (CAMI). From 2010 to 2013, CAMI set out to provide relevant information to farmers, and the industry in general, for decision and policy making. The project is funded by the European Union through the Science and Technology Programme of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of Countries' (ACP). The overarching objective of CAMI was to increase and sustain agricultural productivity at the farm level in the Caribbean region through improved applications of weather and climate information, using an integrated and coordinated approach. Currently, this is done through (i) provision of relevant climate information appropriately disseminated, (ii) predictions on seasonal rainfall and temperature, (iii) support for improved irrigation management, (iv) the development of strategically selected weather-driven pest and disease models, (v) use of crop simulation models

  9. Static measurements of the resilience of Caribbean coral populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W. Bruckner

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The progressive downward shift in dominance of key reef building corals, coupled with dramatic increases in macroalgae and other nuisance species, fields of unstable coral rubble ,loss of structural relief, and declines of major functional groups of fishes is a common occurrence throughout the Caribbean today. The incorporation of resilience principles into management is a proposed strategy to reverse this trend and ensure proper functioning of coral reefs under predicted scenarios of climate change, yet ecosystem processes and functions that underlie reef resilience are not fully understood. Rapid assessments using the Atlantic and Gulf Rapid Reef Assessment (AGRRA and the IUCN Resilience Assessment protocol can provide baseline information on reef resilience. A key aspect of these surveys focuses on coral population dynamics, including measures of coral cover, size, partial and whole-colony mortality, condition, and recruitment. One challenge is that these represent static measures involving a single assessment. Without following individual corals over time, it is difficult to determine rates of survival and growth of recruits and adult colonies, and differentiation of juveniles from small remnants of older colonies may not be possible, especially when macroalgal cover is high. To address this limitation, corals assessed in Bonaire in July 2010 were subdivided into two categories: 1 colonies on the reef substrate; and 2 colonies colonizing dead corals and exposed skeletal surfaces of living corals. Coral populations in Bonaire exhibited many features indicative of high resilience, including high coral cover (often 30-50%, high levels of recruitment, and a large number of corals that settled on dead corals and survived to larger size-classes. Overall, the skeletal surfaces of 12 species of corals were colonized by 16 species of corals, with up to 12 settlers on each colony, most (67% on M. annularis (complex skeletons. Nevertheless, completely

  10. Coral diseases and bleaching on Colombian Caribbean coral reefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Navas-Camacho

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Since 1998 the National Monitoring System for the Coral Reefs of Colombia (SIMAC has monitored the occurrence of coral bleaching and diseases in some Colombian coral reefs (permanent stations at San Andres Island, Rosario Islands, Tayrona, San Bernardo Islands and Urabá. The main purpose is to evaluate their health status and to understand the factors that have been contributing to their decline. To estimate these occurrences, annual surveys in 126 permanent belt transects (10x2m with different depth intervals (3-6 meters, 9-12 meters and 15-18 meters are performed at all reef sites. Data from the 1998-2004 period, revealed that San Andrés Island had many colonies with diseases (38.9 colonies/m2, and Urabá had high numbers with bleaching (54.4 colonies/m2. Of the seven reported coral diseases studied, Dark Spots Disease (DSD, and White Plague Disease (WPD were noteworthy because they occurred in all Caribbean monitored sites, and because of their high interannual infection incidence. Thirty five species of scleractinian corals were affected by at least one disease and a high incidence of coral diseases on the main reef builders is documented. Bleaching was present in 34 species. During the whole monitoring period, Agaricia agaricites and Siderastrea siderea were the species most severely affected by DSD and bleaching, respectively. Diseases on species such as Agaricia fragilis, A.grahamae, A. humilis, Diploria clivosa, Eusmilia fastigiata, Millepora complanata, and Mycetophyllia aliciae are recorded for first time in Colombia. We present bleaching and disease incidences, kinds of diseases, coral species affected, reef localities studied, depth intervals of surveys, and temporal (years variation for each geographic area. This variation makes difficult to clearly determine defined patterns or general trends for monitored reefs. This is the first long-term study of coral diseases and bleaching in the Southwestern Caribbean, and one of the few

  11. Migration transition in small Northern and Eastern Caribbean states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcelroy, J L; De Albuquerque, K

    1988-01-01

    1 area of intra-Caribbean migration that has been overlooked is the "migration transition"--the transformation of rapidly modernizing societies from net labor exporters to net labor importers. This article assembles 8 case studies to 1) briefly present a spectrum of migration experiences in the Caribbean, 2) uncover some transitions under way, 3) pinpoint the forces that underlie the migration transition, and 4) point out some of the more important policy implications of labor migration reversals. The 8 island societies sampled for illustration purposes include 1) the Bahamas and the US Virgin Islands as post-migration transition societies (Zelinsky's advanced society), 2) the British Virgin Islands and the Cayman Islands as undergoing transition (Zelinsky's late transitional society), and 3) Anguilla, St. Kitts-Nevis, Turks and Caicos, and Montserrat as premigration transition societies (Zelinsky's early transitional society). Population data for the islands were derived primarily from the West Indian censuses and government statistics. These 8 historical sketches reveal certain commonalities. All are at various stages in a long-term economic restructuring to displace traditional staple crops with more income elastic, high value export services. In such societies, population growth and progress along the migration transition is an increasing function of this kind of successful export substitution. In addition, along the migration and economic transitions, such insular economies exhibit a relatively large public sector (20-30% of all activity), declining unemployment, increasing fiscal autonomy, and are committed to a development strategy remarkably similar to the "successful" model of the Bahamas and the US Virgin Islands. Cursory evidence suggests that, because of intersectoral competition for land and labor, there is an inverse relationship between farm effort/manufacturing employment and tourism intensity. This review suggests that small islands undergoing

  12. Octocoral Species Assembly and Coexistence in Caribbean Coral Reefs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Velásquez

    Full Text Available What are the determinant factors of community assemblies in the most diverse ecosystem in the ocean? Coral reefs can be divided in continental (i.e., reefs that develop on the continental shelf, including siliciclastic reefs and oceanic (i.e., far off the continental shelf, usually on volcanic substratum; whether or not these habitat differences impose community-wide ecological divergence or species exclusion/coexistence with evolutionary consequences, is unknown.Studying Caribbean octocorals as model system, we determined the phylogenetic community structure in a coral reef community, making emphasis on species coexistence evidenced on trait evolution and environmental feedbacks. Forty-nine species represented in five families constituted the species pool from which a phylogenetic tree was reconstructed using mtDNA. We included data from 11 localities in the Western Caribbean (Colombia including most reef types. To test diversity-environment and phenotype-environment relationships, phylogenetic community structure and trait evolution we carried out comparative analyses implementing ecological and evolutionary approaches.Phylogenetic inferences suggest clustering of oceanic reefs (e.g., atolls contrasting with phylogenetic overdispersion of continental reefs (e.g., reefs banks. Additionally, atolls and barrier reefs had the highest species diversity (Shannon index whereas phylogenetic diversity was higher in reef banks. The discriminant component analysis supported this differentiation between oceanic and continental reefs, where continental octocoral species tend to have greater calyx apertures, thicker branches, prominent calyces and azooxanthellate species. This analysis also indicated a clear separation between the slope and the remaining habitats, caused by the presence or absence of Symbiodinium. K statistic analysis showed that this trait is conserved as well as the branch shape.There was strong octocoral community structure with opposite

  13. Octocoral Species Assembly and Coexistence in Caribbean Coral Reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velásquez, Johanna; Sánchez, Juan A

    2015-01-01

    What are the determinant factors of community assemblies in the most diverse ecosystem in the ocean? Coral reefs can be divided in continental (i.e., reefs that develop on the continental shelf, including siliciclastic reefs) and oceanic (i.e., far off the continental shelf, usually on volcanic substratum); whether or not these habitat differences impose community-wide ecological divergence or species exclusion/coexistence with evolutionary consequences, is unknown. Studying Caribbean octocorals as model system, we determined the phylogenetic community structure in a coral reef community, making emphasis on species coexistence evidenced on trait evolution and environmental feedbacks. Forty-nine species represented in five families constituted the species pool from which a phylogenetic tree was reconstructed using mtDNA. We included data from 11 localities in the Western Caribbean (Colombia) including most reef types. To test diversity-environment and phenotype-environment relationships, phylogenetic community structure and trait evolution we carried out comparative analyses implementing ecological and evolutionary approaches. Phylogenetic inferences suggest clustering of oceanic reefs (e.g., atolls) contrasting with phylogenetic overdispersion of continental reefs (e.g., reefs banks). Additionally, atolls and barrier reefs had the highest species diversity (Shannon index) whereas phylogenetic diversity was higher in reef banks. The discriminant component analysis supported this differentiation between oceanic and continental reefs, where continental octocoral species tend to have greater calyx apertures, thicker branches, prominent calyces and azooxanthellate species. This analysis also indicated a clear separation between the slope and the remaining habitats, caused by the presence or absence of Symbiodinium. K statistic analysis showed that this trait is conserved as well as the branch shape. There was strong octocoral community structure with opposite diversity

  14. Mental health advocacy and African and Caribbean men: good practice principles and organizational models for delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbigging, Karen; McKeown, Mick; French, Beverley

    2013-03-01

    Advocacy has a critical role to play in addressing concerns about access to appropriate mental health care and treatment for African and Caribbean men. To investigate good practice principles and organizational models for mental health advocacy provision for African and Caribbean men. The study consisted of: (i) A systematic literature review. Bibliographic and internet searching was undertaken from 1994 to 2006. The inclusion criteria related to mental health, advocacy provision for African and Caribbean men. (ii) Four focus groups with African and Caribbean men to explore needs for and experiences of mental health advocacy. (iii) An investigation into current advocacy provision through a survey of advocacy provision in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. (iv) Twenty-two qualitative stakeholder interviews to investigate the operation of mental health advocacy for this client group. The study was undertaken in partnership with two service user-led organizations and an African Caribbean mental health service. Primary research in this area is scant. Mainstream mental health advocacy services are often poor at providing appropriate services. Services developed by the Black Community and voluntary sector are grounded in different conceptualizations of advocacy and sharper understanding of the needs of African and Caribbean men. The lack of sustainable funding for these organizations is a major barrier to the development of high-quality advocacy for this group, reflecting a lack of understanding about their distinctive role. The commissioning and provision of mental health advocacy needs to recognize the distinct experiences of African and Caribbean men and develop capacity in the range of organizations to ensure equitable access. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Millennial-scale Surface and Subsurface Dynamics in the Caribbean Sea from LGM to Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reißig, S.; Nuernberg, D.; Poggemann, D. W.

    2016-12-01

    The Caribbean Sea is an important source of warm and saline water that is transported into the North Atlantic, and therefore plays a key role in the global thermohaline circulation. Today, waters from the (sub-) tropical Atlantic enter the Caribbean through a variety of passages. The water masses flow through the Caribbean into the Gulf of Mexico via the Yucatan Strait, forming the Gulf Stream which represents the northward flowing branch of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). The AMOC is intimately linked to abrupt northern hemisphere climate change and is a key player for the transport of tropical heat to high northern latitudes. A reduced AMOC during the deglacial resulted in sea-surface cooling in wide areas of the tropical North Atlantic, while the subsurface ocean experienced regional warming by several degrees due to the reorganization of ocean circulation at intermediate depths. Based on stable isotope compositions (δ13C, δ18O) and elemental (Mg/Ca) ratios of a surface dwelling (Globigerinoides ruber) and deep dwelling (Globorotalia truncatulinoides) planktonic foraminifera, we reconstruct surface and subsurface temperature, thermocline variation and salinity changes during the past 24 thousand years, to evaluate the role of a weakened AMOC on the main inflow areas of Equatorial Current waters into the Caribbean. This study reveals new information about water mass inflow into the Caribbean basin and is compared to an unpublished record of the water masses exiting the Caribbean from a core located at the flow-through of the Caribbean into the Gulf of Mexico (Campeche Bank).

  16. Evaluation of pyrethroid exposures in pregnant women from 10 Caribbean countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewailly, Eric; Forde, Martin; Robertson, Lyndon; Kaddar, Nisrin; Laouan Sidi, Elhadji A; Côté, Suzanne; Gaudreau, Eric; Drescher, Olivia; Ayotte, Pierre

    2014-02-01

    Pyrethroid pesticides are commonly used in tropical regions such as the Caribbean as household insecticides, pet sprays, and where malaria is endemic, impregnated into mosquito-repellent nets. Of particular concern is exposure during pregnancy, as these compounds have the potential to cross the placental barrier and interfere with fetal development, as was shown in limited animal studies. The objective of this study was to evaluate exposure to pyrethroids to pregnant women residing in 10 English-speaking Caribbean countries. Pyrethroid exposures were determined by analyzing five pyrethroid metabolites in urine samples from 295 pregnant women: cis-DBCA, cis-DCCA, trans-DCCA, 3-PBA, and 4-F-3-PBA. Pyrethroid metabolite concentrations in Caribbean pregnant women were generally higher in the 10 Caribbean countries than levels reported for Canadian and U.S. women. In Antigua & Barbuda and Jamaica participants the geometric mean concentrations of cis-DBCA was significantly higher than in the other nine countries together (p<0.0001 and <0.0012 respectively). For cis- and trans-DCCA, only Antigua & Barbuda women differed significantly from participants of the other nine Caribbean countries (p<0.0001). Urinary 4-F-3-PBA and 3-PBA levels were significantly higher in Antigua & Barbuda (p<0.0028 and p<0.0001 respectively) as well as in Grenada (p<0.0001 and p<0.007 respectively). These results indicate extensive use of pyrethroid compounds such as permethrin and cypermethrin in Caribbean households. In Antigua & Barbuda, the data reveals a greater use of deltamethrin. This study underscores the need for Caribbean public health authorities to encourage their populations, and in particular pregnant women, to utilize this class of pesticides more judiciously given the potentially adverse effects of exposure on fetuses and infants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hydrochemical aspects of major Pacific and caribbean rivers of colombia hydrochemical aspects of major Pacific and caribbean rivers of colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, J. D.

    2003-04-01

    Although the South American continent includes three of the largest river basins of the world, the Amazon, the Orinoco, and the Paraná, with some of the highest discharges and sediment loads, a number of comparatively smaller systems in Colombia carry a significant share of sediment and dissolved loads from the continent. Fifteen rivers west of the Cordilleras in South America discharge a combined 254 km3 yr-1 or 8020 m3 s-1 of water into the Pacific. The San Juan River has the highest water discharge (2550 m3 s-1), sediment load (16 x 106 t yr-1), and basin-wide sediment yield (1150 t km-2 yr-1) on the entire west coast of South America. The best estimate of total sediment load into the Pacific Ocean from both gauged and ungauged rivers is 96 x 106 t yr-1. These results in a sediment yield estimate of 1,260 t km-2 yr-1. Analysis of 22 rivers draining into the Caribbean Sea indicate that the combined water discharge and sediment load are 338 km3 yr-1 and 168 x 106 t yr-1, respectively, corresponding to a sediment yield for the Colombia Caribbean drainage basins of 541 t km-2 yr-1, or approximately half of the yield for the Pacific basins of Colombia. The Magdalena River, the largest river system in Colombia, has an annual discharge of 7,232 m3 s-1. Load measurements during the 21 year period yielded an annual sediment load of 144 x 106 t yr-1. The Magdalena has the highest sediment yield (559 t km-2 yr-1) of any medium-sized or large river along the entire east coast of South America and contributes 9% of the total sediment load discharged into the Atlantic Ocean from eastern South America. The concentrations of major dissolved constituents and mass transport rates for major Colombian rivers were based on averages calculated from monthly samples from 1990-1993. Ca2+ and Mg2+ are the dominant ions, indicating that the water corresponds to the rock-dominated type. Dissolved inorganic carbon, present mostly as bicarbonate ions, constitutes almost 50% of the total

  18. Planning cancer control in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Paul E; Lee, Brittany L; Badovinac-Crnjevic, Tanja; Strasser-Weippl, Kathrin; Chavarri-Guerra, Yanin; St Louis, Jessica; Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; Unger-Saldaña, Karla; Ferreyra, Mayra; Debiasi, Márcio; Liedke, Pedro E R; Touya, Diego; Werutsky, Gustavo; Higgins, Michaela; Fan, Lei; Vasconcelos, Claudia; Cazap, Eduardo; Vallejos, Carlos; Mohar, Alejandro; Knaul, Felicia; Arreola, Hector; Batura, Rekha; Luciani, Silvana; Sullivan, Richard; Finkelstein, Dianne; Simon, Sergio; Barrios, Carlos; Kightlinger, Rebecca; Gelrud, Andres; Bychkovsky, Vladimir; Lopes, Gilberto; Stefani, Stephen; Blaya, Marcelo; Souza, Fabiano Hahn; Santos, Franklin Santana; Kaemmerer, Alberto; de Azambuja, Evandro; Zorilla, Andres Felipe Cardona; Murillo, Raul; Jeronimo, Jose; Tsu, Vivien; Carvalho, Andre; Gil, Carlos Ferreira; Sternberg, Cinthya; Dueñas-Gonzalez, Alfonso; Sgroi, Dennis; Cuello, Mauricio; Fresco, Rodrigo; Reis, Rui Manuel; Masera, Guiseppe; Gabús, Raúl; Ribeiro, Raul; Knust, Renata; Ismael, Gustavo; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Roth, Berta; Villa, Luisa; Solares, Argelia Lara; Leon, Marta Ximena; Torres-Vigil, Isabel; Covarrubias-Gomez, Alfredo; Hernández, Andrés; Bertolino, Mariela; Schwartsmann, Gilberto; Santillana, Sergio; Esteva, Francisco; Fein, Luis; Mano, Max; Gomez, Henry; Hurlbert, Marc; Durstine, Alessandra; Azenha, Gustavo

    2013-04-01

    Non-communicable diseases, including cancer, are overtaking infectious disease as the leading health-care threat in middle-income and low-income countries. Latin American and Caribbean countries are struggling to respond to increasing morbidity and death from advanced disease. Health ministries and health-care systems in these countries face many challenges caring for patients with advanced cancer: inadequate funding; inequitable distribution of resources and services; inadequate numbers, training, and distribution of health-care personnel and equipment; lack of adequate care for many populations based on socioeconomic, geographic, ethnic, and other factors; and current systems geared toward the needs of wealthy, urban minorities at a cost to the entire population. This burgeoning cancer problem threatens to cause widespread suffering and economic peril to the countries of Latin America. Prompt and deliberate actions must be taken to avoid this scenario. Increasing efforts towards prevention of cancer and avoidance of advanced, stage IV disease will reduce suffering and mortality and will make overall cancer care more affordable. We hope the findings of our Commission and our recommendations will inspire Latin American stakeholders to redouble their efforts to address this increasing cancer burden and to prevent it from worsening and threatening their societies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Are physiological characteristics of Caribbean dance useful for health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Blasio, A; De Sanctis, M; Gallina, S; Ripari, P

    2009-03-01

    Although the current literature underlines the main role of physical inactivity in the development of chronic diseases and premature death, 65% of adults do not reach the minimum movement levels required to maintain and improve health. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the metabolic and cardiocirculatory characteristics of a single lesson of Caribbean dance fit with international recommendations to improve health through movement. Energy expenditure, exercise intensity, mean heart rate and blood pressure response to a 90-minute lesson were analysed in 24 beginner and 24 experienced dancers (mean age 33.93+/-9.98 years). MANCOVA was used to analyse energy expenditure and exercise intensity of our sample, stratified for gender and experience. Body weight was inserted as a covariate. Experienced had a major total energy expenditure (372.75+/- 75.32 vs 297.33+/-87.54 kcal; P6 metabolic equivalents (METs) (8.04+/-10.65 vs 1.47+/-2.16; Pdance fits with international guidelines to improve health and can aid the promotion and enhancement of health through its physiological characteristics, and may reduce drop-out due to a reduced motivation to move.

  20. Health and entrepreneurship in four Caribbean Basin countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietveld, Cornelius A; Bailey, Henry; Hessels, Jolanda; van der Zwan, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The literature dealing with health and entrepreneurship has focused on developed countries. We use a sample of almost 5000 business owners and wage-workers from four Caribbean Basin countries to study this relationship. Analyses are performed using data from the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor along with the Visual Analogue Scale of the EQ-5D-5L instrument as an overall health rating. The results show that business owners are healthier than wage-workers, which is in line with the findings from studies in developed countries. Furthermore, better health is associated with a lower likelihood for fear of business failure to be a deterrent to new business formation, a greater likelihood of self-belief in having the skills to run a business, and an increased recognition of start-up business opportunities among wage-workers. These positive associations between health and entrepreneurial perceptions provide new evidence about why less healthy individuals refrain from entrepreneurship. Finally, we find that the healthiest business owners run the companies with the highest growth expectations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Phenotypic plasticity in the Caribbean sponge Callyspongia vaginalis (Porifera: Haplosclerida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna López-Legentil

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Sponge morphological plasticity has been a long-standing source of taxonomic difficulty. In the Caribbean, several morphotypes of the sponge Callyspongia vaginalis have been observed. To determine the taxonomic status of three of these morphotypes and their relationship with the congeneric species C. plicifera and C. fallax, we compared the spicule composition, spongin fiber skeleton and sequenced fragments of the mitochondrial genes 16S and COI and nuclear genes 28S and 18S ribosomal RNA. Phylogenetic analyses with ribosomal markers 18S and 28S rRNA confirmed the position of our sequences within the Callyspongiidae. None of the genetic markers provided evidence for consistent differentiation among the three morphotypes of C. vaginalis and C. fallax, and only C. plicifera stood as a distinct species. The 16S mtDNA gene was the most variable molecular marker for this group, presenting a nucleotide variability (π = 0.024 higher than that reported for COI. Unlike recent studies for other sponge genera, our results indicate that species in the genus Callyspongia maintain a high degree of phenotypic plasticity, and that morphological characteristics may not reflect reproductive boundaries in C. vaginalis.

  2. Corruption and Political Participation in the Americas and the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Bonifácio

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with an issue as yet little explored in the vast literature about political participation: the role of corruption in political engagement. It investigates whether the coexistence, the values and the perception of citizens in relation to corrupt practices and actors have effects on political activism, and it verifies the direction in which this is evolving, whether it is in the direction of engagement in or withdrawal from politics. The unit of analysis is the individual, the geographic sector includes the Americas and the Caribbean, and the time frame includes biennial intervals between 2004 and 2012. A theoretical discussion and empirical analysis of the data from the Americas Barometer is used. Five distinct types of political participation were identified: contact with political and governmental actors, community activism, partisan and electoral activism, voter turnout and protest activism. The article concludes that the experience with corruption and the tolerance for bribe increase the chances of engagement in participative activities, going against the principal contributions of the specialized literature.

  3. Nursing empire: travel letters from Africa and the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    This essay analyses colonial nurses’ travel letters, written from West Africa and the Caribbean between the turn of the century and 1920, in order to better understand the role of nurses in forming satellite versions of home. Though their primary function was to ‘nurse empire’ by helping to repair and maintain the bodies needed for imperial labour, nurses also contributed to written discourses supporting Britain's economic interests and political goals. Through careful consideration of primary archival material, this essay analyses the rhetorical modes that may have helped nurses gain professional and personal authority abroad. It considers nurses as moving within several kinds of imperial networks – geographical, institutional and discursive – and traces the shifts in their written self-representation according to these different contexts. In order to reform nursing, in the mid-nineteenth century Florence Nightingale defined the ‘New Nurse's’ ideal personality as well as her duties. Ever since, the nurse's ‘character’ has often been essentialised in literature and culture. As Julia Hallam observes in Nursing the Image (2000), the nurse is commonly portrayed as ministering angel, potential seductress, battleaxe or doctor's helpmate. The goal of this essay is to resist simplifying nurses’ cultural significance, motivations or experiences by studying the multiple influences to which colonial nurses were subject and the shifting registers in their writing. PMID:24764748

  4. Sexual reproduction in the Caribbean coral genus Isophyllia (Scleractinia: Mussidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Soto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The sexual pattern, reproductive mode, and timing of reproduction of Isophyllia sinuosa and Isophyllia rigida, two Caribbean Mussids, were assessed by histological analysis of specimens collected monthly during 2000–2001. Both species are simultaneous hermaphroditic brooders characterized by a single annual gametogenetic cycle. Spermatocytes and oocytes of different stages were found to develop within the same mesentery indicating sequential maturation for extended planulation. Oogenesis took place during May through April in I. sinuosa and from August through June in I. rigida. Oocytes began development 7–8 months prior to spermaries but both sexes matured simultaneously. Zooxanthellate planulae were observed in I. sinuosa during April and in I. rigida from June through September. Higher polyp and mesenterial fecundity were found in I. rigida compared to I. sinuosa. Larger oocyte sizes were found in I. sinuosa than in I. rigida, however larger planula sizes were found in I. rigida. Hermaphroditism is the exclusive sexual pattern within the Mussidae while brooding has been documented within the related genera Mussa, Scolymia and Mycetophyllia. This study represents the first description of the sexual characteristics of I. rigida and provides an updated description of I. sinuosa.

  5. Weak prezygotic isolating mechanisms in threatened Caribbean Acropora corals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole D Fogarty

    Full Text Available The Caribbean corals, Acropora palmata and A. cervicornis, recently have undergone drastic declines primarily as a result of disease. Previous molecular studies have demonstrated that these species form a hybrid (A. prolifera that varies in abundance throughout the range of the parental distribution. There is variable unidirectional introgression across loci and sites of A. palmata genes flowing into A. cervicornis. Here we examine the efficacy of prezygotic reproductive isolating mechanisms within these corals including spawning times and choice and no-choice fertilization crosses. We show that these species have subtly different mean but overlapping spawning times, suggesting that temporal isolation is likely not an effective barrier to hybridization. We found species-specific differences in gametic incompatibilities. Acropora palmata eggs were relatively resistant to hybridization, especially when conspecific sperm are available to outcompete heterospecific sperm. Acropora cervicornis eggs demonstrated no evidence for gametic incompatibility and no evidence of reduced viability after aging four hours. This asymmetry in compatibility matches previous genetic data on unidirectional introgression.

  6. Weak prezygotic isolating mechanisms in threatened Caribbean Acropora corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Nicole D; Vollmer, Steven V; Levitan, Don R

    2012-01-01

    The Caribbean corals, Acropora palmata and A. cervicornis, recently have undergone drastic declines primarily as a result of disease. Previous molecular studies have demonstrated that these species form a hybrid (A. prolifera) that varies in abundance throughout the range of the parental distribution. There is variable unidirectional introgression across loci and sites of A. palmata genes flowing into A. cervicornis. Here we examine the efficacy of prezygotic reproductive isolating mechanisms within these corals including spawning times and choice and no-choice fertilization crosses. We show that these species have subtly different mean but overlapping spawning times, suggesting that temporal isolation is likely not an effective barrier to hybridization. We found species-specific differences in gametic incompatibilities. Acropora palmata eggs were relatively resistant to hybridization, especially when conspecific sperm are available to outcompete heterospecific sperm. Acropora cervicornis eggs demonstrated no evidence for gametic incompatibility and no evidence of reduced viability after aging four hours. This asymmetry in compatibility matches previous genetic data on unidirectional introgression.

  7. Status and trends of Caribbean coral reefs: 1970-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jeremy; Donovan, Mary; Cramer, Katie; Lam, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    vigorously communicate results in simple and straightforward terms to foster more effective conservation and management.This and subsequent reports will focus on separate biogeographic regions in a stepwise fashion and combine all of the results for a global synthesis in the coming years. We began in the wide Caribbean region because the historical data are so extensive and to refine methods of analysis before moving on to other regions. This report documents quantitative trends for Caribbean reef corals, macroalgae, sea urchins, and fishes based on data from 90 reef locations over the past 43 tears. This is the first report to combine all these disparate kinds of data in a single place to explore how the different major components of coral reef ecosystems interact on a broadly regional oceanic scale.We obtained data from more than 35,000 ecological surveys carried out by 78 principal investigators (PIs) and some 200 colleagues working in 34 countries, states, and territories throughout the wide Caribbean region. We conducted two workshops in Panama and Brisbane, Australia to bring together people who provided the data to assist in data quality control, analysis, and synthesis. The first workshop at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in the Republic of Panama 29 April to 5 May, 2012 included scientists from 18 countries and territories to verify and expand the database and to conduct exploratory analyses of status and trends. Preliminary results based on the Panama workshop were presented to the DC Marine Community and Smithsonian Institution Senate of Scientists in May 2012 and at the International Coral Reef Symposium (ICRS) and annual ICRI meeting in Cairns, Australia in July 2012. The second workshop in Brisbane, Australia in December 2012 brought together eight coral reef scientists for more detailed data analysis and organization of results for this report and subsequent publications. Subsequent presentations to solicit comments while the report was

  8. The isolation and purification of a caribbean maitotoxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, S.E.; Knoepp, S.M.; Lanoue, B.A. [and others

    1994-12-31

    The phenomenon known as red tide has been a topic of great interest in that there is concern that the scale and complexity of this natural phenomenon are expanding. It is known that the benthic dinoflagellate, Gambierdiscus toxicus, produces a variety of polyether toxins that contaminate seafood and result in human illness. Maitotoxin (MTX) is one of the toxins that have been implicated in ciguatera seafood poisoning. There is a need for the development of a much broader understanding of the nature of the poisoning toxins. MTX cogeners can be difficult to isolate due to its size and chemical nature. A major goal is to obtain a purified standard of a Caribbean MTX so that more efficient assays can be developed to test seafood for the presence of toxins and thus avoid human harm. The primary goal of this project is to obtain large amounts of pure maitotoxin. The procedure described is also useful as a starting point for the purification of other toxins.

  9. Predatory fish depletion and recovery potential on Caribbean reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, Abel; Cox, Courtney Ellen; Bruno, John Francis

    2017-03-01

    The natural, prehuman abundance of most large predators is unknown because of the lack of historical data and a limited understanding of the natural factors that control their populations. Determining the supportable predator biomass at a given location (that is, the predator carrying capacity) would help managers to optimize protection and would provide site-specific recovery goals. We assess the relationship between predatory reef fish biomass and several anthropogenic and environmental variables at 39 reefs across the Caribbean to (i) estimate their roles determining local predator biomass and (ii) determine site-specific recovery potential if fishing was eliminated. We show that predatory reef fish biomass tends to be higher in marine reserves but is strongly negatively related to human activities, especially coastal development. However, human activities and natural factors, including reef complexity and prey abundance, explain more than 50% of the spatial variation in predator biomass. Comparing site-specific predator carrying capacities to field observations, we infer that current predatory reef fish biomass is 60 to 90% lower than the potential supportable biomass in most sites, even within most marine reserves. We also found that the scope for recovery varies among reefs by at least an order of magnitude. This suggests that we could underestimate unfished biomass at sites that provide ideal conditions for predators or greatly overestimate that of seemingly predator-depleted sites that may have never supported large predator populations because of suboptimal environmental conditions.

  10. Evaluation of Solar Photosensitised River Water Treatment in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tota-Maharaj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An economical supply of hygienic potable water is one of the most pressing public health issues facing developing countries in the Caribbean region today. This project investigates the performance of a novel solar photochemical reactor for disinfecting river water. The prototype photochemical reactor was designed, constructed, and tested for the microbiological degradation of faecal coliform present in River Water. The experiments evaluated the efficacy of two photosensitive dyes (malachite green and methylene blue as agents for detoxification with concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 mg/L. The photochemical reactor operated in a single-pass mode and compared the disinfection rates with direct photolysis. The photosensitizers showed a high efficacy rate using natural sunlight with microbial reduction ranging from 97 to 99% for concentrations as low as 0.5 mg/L of dye. The sensitizers were found to be photobleaching and were very effective at lower concentrations (0.01. Post-solar disinfection included the use of a coconut fiber filter which polished the water removing residual dye concentrations and bacterial contaminants.

  11. Caribbean mesophotic coral ecosystems are unlikely climate change refugia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tyler B; Gyory, Joanna; Brandt, Marilyn E; Miller, William J; Jossart, Jonathan; Nemeth, Richard S

    2016-08-01

    Deeper coral reefs experience reduced temperatures and light and are often shielded from localized anthropogenic stressors such as pollution and fishing. The deep reef refugia hypothesis posits that light-dependent stony coral species at deeper depths are buffered from thermal stress and will avoid bleaching-related mass mortalities caused by increasing sea surface temperatures under climate change. This hypothesis has not been tested because data collection on deeper coral reefs is difficult. Here we show that deeper (mesophotic) reefs, 30-75 m depth, in the Caribbean are not refugia because they have lower bleaching threshold temperatures than shallow reefs. Over two thermal stress events, mesophotic reef bleaching was driven by a bleaching threshold that declines 0.26 °C every +10 m depth. Thus, the main premise of the deep reef refugia hypothesis that cooler environments are protective is incorrect; any increase in temperatures above the local mean warmest conditions can lead to thermal stress and bleaching. Thus, relatively cooler temperatures can no longer be considered a de facto refugium for corals and it is likely that many deeper coral reefs are as vulnerable to climate change as shallow water reefs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Assessment of current occupational safety and health regulations and legislation in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar-Elci, Muge; Nguyen, MyNgoc; Randall, Marvin; Bidaisee, Satesh; Elci, Omur; Olayinka, Olaniyi; Guzman, Julieta Rodriguez

    2017-06-08

    Neglecting occupational safety and health (OSH) can have adverse and even deadly consequences. While OSH is important in any nation, the issue is particularly concerning in developing countries, including ones in the Caribbean. The purpose of this study, which was carried out in 2012 and 2013, was to examine the reasons for an apparent fundamental lack of awareness of OSH in the Caribbean. We conducted a descriptive study, in which a questionnaire was administered, via telephone, to key policy-making representatives from six English-speaking Caribbean nations, in order to assess the current OSH environment in their countries. We also did a situational analysis of current OSH regulations and legislation within the six countries. We found that that some of the countries' OSH laws are out of date or are limited to a certain type of industry. We also found that there is very little documentation on research on exposure to and risks from hazards and on psychological and reproductive health as related to OSH. It is recommended that these Caribbean countries both increase national OSH awareness and strengthen enforcement of OSH regulations. Additionally, further assistance and a more coordinated effort from intergovernmental bodies could help build and fortify OSH systems in the Caribbean.

  13. Seismic Monitoring Capabilities of the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions Tsunami Warning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurel, Jean-Marie; von Hillebrandt-Andrade, Christa; Crespo, Hector; McNamara, Dan; Huerfano, Victor

    2014-05-01

    Over 75 tsunamis have been documented in the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions during the past 500 years. Since 1500, at least 4484 people are reported to have perished in these killer waves. Hundreds of thousands are currently threatened along the Caribbean coastlines. In 2005 the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami and other Coastal Hazards Warning System for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (CARIBE EWS) was established. It recommended the following minimum seismic performance standards for the detection and analysis of earthquakes: 1) Earthquake detection within 1 minute, 2) Minimum magnitude threshold = M4.5, and 3) Initial hypocenter error of M4.0) can be detected within 1 minute throughout much of the Caribbean. The remaining exceptions to this standard for detection are portions of northern South America and Mexico. Another performance criterion is 90% data availability. Currently 60-70% of the stations meet this standard. The presentation will further report on the status of the CARIBE EWS seismic capability for the timely and accurate detection and analysis of earthquakes for tsunami warning purposes for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions.

  14. Saharan dust - A carrier of persistent organic pollutants, metals and microbes to the Caribbean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, V.H.; Foreman, W.T.; Genualdi, S.; Griffin, Dale W.; Kellogg, C.A.; Majewski, M.S.; Mohammed, A.; Ramsubhag, A.; Shinn, E.A.; Simonich, S.L.; Smith, G.W.

    2006-01-01

    An international team of scientists from government agencies and universities in the United States, U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI), Trinidad & Tobago, the Republic of Cape Verde, and the Republic of Mali (West Africa) is working together to elucidate the role Saharan dust may play in the degradation of Caribbean ecosystems. The first step has been to identify and quantify the persistent organic pollutants (POPs), trace metals, and viable microorganisms in the atmosphere in dust source areas of West Africa, and in dust episodes at downwind sites in the eastern Atlantic (Cape Verde) and the Caribbean (USVI and Trinidad & Tobago). Preliminary findings show that air samples from Mali contain a greater number of pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and in higher concentrations than the Caribbean sites. Overall, POP concentrations were similar in USVI and Trinidad samples. Trace metal concentrations were found to be similar to crustal composition with slight enrichment of lead in Mali. To date, hundreds of cultureable microorganisms have been identified from Mali, Cape Verde, USVI, and Trinidad air samples. The sea fan pathogen, Aspergillus sydowii, has been identified in soil from Mali and in air samples from dust events in the Caribbean. We have shown that air samples from a dust-source region contain orders of magnitude more cultureable microorganisms per volume than air samples from dust events in the Caribbean, which in turn contain 3-to 4-fold more cultureable microbes than during non-dust conditions.

  15. Gravity modeling of the Muertos Trough and tectonic implications (north-eastern Caribbean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja, Bruna J. L.; Munoz-Martin, A.; ten Brink, Uri S.; Carbó-Gorosabel, Andrés; Llanes, Estrada P.; Martin-Davila, J.; Cordoba-Barba, D.; Catalan, Morollon M.

    2010-01-01

    The Muertos Trough in the northeast Caribbean has been interpreted as a subduction zone from seismicity, leading to infer a possible reversal subduction polarity. However, the distribution of the seismicity is very diffuse and makes definition of the plate geometry difficult. In addition, the compressive deformational features observed in the upper crust and sandbox kinematic modeling do not necessarily suggest a subduction process. We tested the hypothesized subduction of the Caribbean plate's interior beneath the eastern Greater Antilles island arc using gravity modeling. Gravity models simulating a subduction process yield a regional mass deficit beneath the island arc independently of the geometry and depth of the subducted slab used in the models. This mass deficit results from sinking of the less dense Caribbean slab beneath the lithospheric mantle replacing denser mantle materials and suggests that there is not a subducted Caribbean plateau beneath the island arc. The geologically more realistic gravity model which would explain the N-S shortening observed in the upper crust requires an overthrusted Caribbean slab extending at least 60 km northward from the deformation front, a progressive increase in the thrusting angle from 8?? to 30?? reaching a maximum depth of 22 km beneath the insular slope. This new tectonic model for the Muertos Margin, defined as a retroarc thrusting, will help to assess the seismic and tsunami hazard in the region. The use of gravity modeling has provided targets for future wide-angle seismic surveys in the Muertos Margin. ?? 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  16. Impact of Caribbean cyclones on the detachment of Loop Current anticyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athié, Gabriela; Candela, Julio; Ochoa, José; Sheinbaum, Julio

    2012-03-01

    The western boundary current in the North Atlantic is characterized by an intense flow (reaching 2.5 ms-1, at the surface) that enters the Caribbean Sea through the Lesser Antilles passages, crosses the entire Caribbean and enters the Gulf of Mexico through the Yucatan Channel, where it is known as the Loop Current. A characteristic feature of the Loop Current is eddy-shedding events (i.e., the detachment of large anticyclonic eddies) at irregular intervals. Moored current measurements between January 2005 and July 2009 in the Loop Current, the Yucatan Channel, and the Caribbean coastal waters of Mexico (i.e., the Western Cayman Sea), along with AVISO altimetry, are used to evidence the northward propagation of cyclonic anomalies along the Caribbean coast of Mexico and the marked eastward displacement of the Loop Current at 23°N latitude, just before several anticyclonic eddy shedding events. After entering the Gulf of Mexico, these cyclonic anomalies might initiate or enhance existing Campeche Bank cyclonic eddies, which are related to many of the Loop Current detachment events. Sixteen of the twenty-one detachments that occurred during the study period (76%) are related to the cyclonic eddies in the Western Caribbean Sea; six of them were not reattached again to the Loop Current. Observations, thus, clearly indicate that cyclonic eddies in the Western Cayman Sea contribute significantly to the Loop Current eddy-shedding process, which is complex and in principle not unique.

  17. Estimating occurrence of Strongyloides stercoralis in the Caribbean island countries: Implications for monitoring and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketzis, Jennifer K; Conan, Anne

    2017-07-01

    Few data are available for the prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis in the Caribbean region. This frequently under diagnosed soil-transmitted helminth (STH) can result in long-term low intensity chronic infections that are asymptomatic or can cause varied intestinal disturbances. With autoinfections, infections lasting over 60 years can occur and hyperinfections lead to high morbidity and mortality. Historical literature was searched to determine the prevalence of S. stercoralis in the Caribbean island countries with some additional countries and islands included for comparative data. A previously published model was used to calculate prevalence taking in to account the sensitivity of the diagnostic methods used. Data for 17 islands/Caribbean countries were found and sufficient data were located to calculate prevalence for 14 locations. Prevalence ranges from <1% to 20.3% and while it has decreased in many islands it has not decreased at the same rate as other STHs in the last 40 years within the Caribbean region. S. stercoralis continues to be an important STH within the Caribbean. Potential reasons for the current prevalence include: long lasting infections, populations not targeted with mass drug administration (MDA) programs being infected, low efficacy of commonly used drugs in MDA programs, and under-diagnosis resulting in infections not being treated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic Diversity in the Lesser Antilles and Its Implications for the Settlement of the Caribbean Basin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jada Benn Torres

    Full Text Available Historical discourses about the Caribbean often chronicle West African and European influence to the general neglect of indigenous people's contributions to the contemporary region. Consequently, demographic histories of Caribbean people prior to and after European contact are not well understood. Although archeological evidence suggests that the Lesser Antilles were populated in a series of northward and eastern migratory waves, many questions remain regarding the relationship of the Caribbean migrants to other indigenous people of South and Central America and changes to the demography of indigenous communities post-European contact. To explore these issues, we analyzed mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome diversity in 12 unrelated individuals from the First Peoples Community in Arima, Trinidad, and 43 unrelated Garifuna individuals residing in St. Vincent. In this community-sanctioned research, we detected maternal indigenous ancestry in 42% of the participants, with the remainder having haplotypes indicative of African and South Asian maternal ancestry. Analysis of Y-chromosome variation revealed paternal indigenous American ancestry indicated by the presence of haplogroup Q-M3 in 28% of the male participants from both communities, with the remainder possessing either African or European haplogroups. This finding is the first report of indigenous American paternal ancestry among indigenous populations in this region of the Caribbean. Overall, this study illustrates the role of the region's first peoples in shaping the genetic diversity seen in contemporary Caribbean populations.

  19. Zoogeography of Elasmobranchs in the Colombian Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Felipe Navia

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In order to investigate zoogeographical patterns of the marine elasmobranch species of Colombia, species richness of the Pacific and Caribbean and their subareas (Coastal Pacific, Oceanic Pacific, Coastal Caribbean, Oceanic Caribbean was analyzed. The areas shared 10 families, 10 genera and 16 species of sharks, and eight families, three genera and four species of batoids. Carcharhinidae had the highest contribution to shark richness, whereas Rajidae and Urotrygonidae had the greatest contribution to batoid richness in the Caribbean and Pacific, respectively. Most elasmobranchs were associated with benthic and coastal habitats. The similarity analysis allowed the identification of five groups of families, which characterize the elasmobranch richness in both areas. Beta diversity indicated that most species turnover occurred between the Coastal Pacific and the two Caribbean subareas. The difference in species richness and composition between areas may be due to vicariant events such as the emergence of the Isthmus of Panama. It is unlikely that the Colombian elasmobranch diversity originated from a single colonization event. Local diversification/speciation, dispersal from the non-tropical regions of the Americas, a Pacific dispersion and an Atlantic dispersion are origin possibilities without any of them excluding the others.

  20. Between Community Law and Common Law: The Rise of the Caribbean Court of Justice at the Intersection of Regional Integration and Post-Colonial Legacies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caserta, Salvatore; Madsen, Mikael Rask

    2016-01-01

    The article focuses on the rise of the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) post-colonial legacies. Topics discussed include Caribbean Community (CARICOM) which accepted the Court's jurisdiction to interpret and apply the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas (RTC); empowerment of CCJ for hearing cases...... involving Caribbean Community law (Community law); and CCJ's unique double jurisdiction.....

  1. 78 FR 20496 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Commercial Trap Sectors of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Commercial Trap Sectors of the Reef Fish and... control date of February 10, 2011, to control future access to the commercial trap sectors of the reef... commercial trap sectors of the reef fish and spiny lobster fisheries in the U.S. Caribbean. The control date...

  2. 76 FR 19380 - Notice of Entry Into Effect of MARPOL Annex V Wider Caribbean Region Special Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-07

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Notice of Entry Into Effect of MARPOL Annex V Wider Caribbean Region Special Area... effect of discharge requirements from ships in the Wider Caribbean Region (WCR) special area (SA) as...(b), the Coast Guard announces the May 1, 2011 date for entry into effect of discharge requirements...

  3. Romantic Relationships among Unmarried African Americans and Caribbean Blacks: Findings from the National Survey of American Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Karen D.; Taylor, Robert Joseph; Jackson, James S.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the correlates of relationship satisfaction, marriage expectations, and relationship longevity among unmarried African American and Black Caribbean (Caribbean Black) adults who are in a romantic relationship. The study used data from the National Survey of American Life, a national representative sample of African Americans…

  4. 76 FR 48202 - Trade Policy Staff Committee; Public Comments on the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    ... TRADE REPRESENTATIVE Trade Policy Staff Committee; Public Comments on the Caribbean Basin Economic... States Trade Representative. ACTION: Notice and request for public comment. SUMMARY: The Trade Policy... Basin Economic Recovery Act (CBERA), as amended by the Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act (CBTPA) (19...

  5. 77 FR 55448 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Snapper-Grouper Fishery off the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 622 RIN 0648-BC30 Fisheries of the Caribbean... Ecosystem-Based Amendment 2 for the South Atlantic (76 FR 82183, December 30, 2011). That rule established... be amended as follows: PART 622--FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC 1. The...

  6. 78 FR 26740 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Snapper-Grouper Fishery Off the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 622 RIN 0648-BD04 Fisheries of the Caribbean... opportunities, and protecting marine ecosystems. To further this goal, the Magnuson-Stevens Act requires fishery... CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC 0 1. The authority citation for part 622 continues to read as...

  7. 76 FR 58455 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 622 RIN 0648-BB22 Fisheries of the Caribbean... protecting marine ecosystems. To further this goal, the Magnuson-Stevens Act requires fishery managers to end... preamble, 50 CFR part 622 is proposed to be amended as follows: PART 622--FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF...

  8. 76 FR 9530 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Snapper-Grouper Fishery Off the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 622 RIN 0648-BA51 Fisheries of the Caribbean... ecosystems. To further this goal, the Magnuson-Stevens Act requires fishery managers to end overfishing of... be amended as follows: PART 622--FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC 1. The...

  9. 78 FR 10122 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 622 RIN 0648-BC66 Fisheries of the Caribbean... opportunities, and protecting marine ecosystems. To further this goal, the Magnuson-Stevens Act requires fishery... CARIBBEAN, GULF, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC 0 1. The authority citation for part 622 continues to read as follows...

  10. Communication from the National Forest Inventories Working Group of the 16th Caribbean Foresters meeting: proposal for a regional workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humfredo Marcano-Vega; Carlton Roberts; Henri Valles; Jacqueline Andre; Kevin Boswell; Dennis Lemen; Floyd Liburd; Christian López

    2016-01-01

    We addressed the National Forests Inventories Working Group of the 16th Caribbean Foresters Meeting to propose a series of training modules regarding how to conduct national forest inventories and analyze the data collected. Improving regional capacity is crucial to ensuring the sustainable management of Caribbean forest ecosystems. We focused on the statistical and...

  11. 76 FR 59102 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ... Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and South... providing food production and recreational opportunities, and protecting marine ecosystems. Management... From the Fishery Management Unit Five species of lobster are currently within the FMP: the Caribbean...

  12. 76 FR 78879 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Snapper-Grouper Fishery Off the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 622 RIN 0648-BB10 Fisheries of the Caribbean... production and recreational opportunities, and protecting marine ecosystems. To further this goal, the... 622--FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC 1. The authority citation for part 622...

  13. 76 FR 54727 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ... Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and South...) for Caribbean spiny lobster; revise the Federal spiny lobster tail- separation permitting requirements... production and recreational opportunities, and protecting marine ecosystems. Actions Contained in the...

  14. 77 FR 27374 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Snapper-Grouper Fishery Off the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 622 RIN 0648-BB10 Fisheries of the Caribbean... Ecosystem-Based Amendment 3 (CE-BA 3), considers additional measures to reduce the bycatch of speckled hind... part 622 is amended as follows: PART 622--FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC 0 1. The...

  15. 77 FR 23652 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Comprehensive Annual Catch Limit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 622 RIN 0648-BB93 Fisheries of the Caribbean... food production and recreational opportunities, and protecting marine ecosystems. An ACL is the level... proposed to be amended as follows: PART 622--FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC 1. The...

  16. 77 FR 28308 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 622 RIN 0648-BB90 Fisheries of the Caribbean... the document ``Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of... opportunities, and protecting marine ecosystems. To further this goal, the Magnuson- Stevens Act requires...

  17. 76 FR 82043 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Generic Annual Catch Limits...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... Part 622 Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Generic Annual Catch Limits... Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 622 RIN 0648-AY22 Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South... analysis. Although ecosystem-based or single-species ACLs may be desirable for many species, stock groups...

  18. 78 FR 31511 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Snapper-Grouper Fishery Off the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ... CFR Part 622 [Docket No. 120924488-3473-01] RIN 0648-BC60 Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico... be amended as follows: PART 622--FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC 0 1. The... chrysops The following species are designated as ecosystem component species: Cottonwick, Haemulon...

  19. 77 FR 76458 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Spiny Lobster Fishery of Puerto...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... 0648-XC331 Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Spiny Lobster Fishery of... history are limited, particularly growth rates and abundance patterns. Additional life history information...) concerning exempted fishing. The described research is part of a life history study of Caribbean spiny...

  20. Looking In, Looking Out: The Chinese-Caribbean Diaspora through Literature—Meiling Jin, Patricia Powell, Jan Lowe Shinebourne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Misrahi-Barak

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Few scholars have focused on the Chinese diaspora in the Caribbean, and it is only fairly recently that the literature written by Caribbean writers of Chinese origin has aroused interest. This essay interrogates the lack of visibility of Chinese-Caribbean writers, like Meiling Jin and Jan Shinebourne, whose ancestors arrived in Guyana in the nineteenth century as indentured workers, and are now considered to be Caribbean writers of Guyanese origin living in the UK, with the Chinese element being (almost erased (but not quite. This essay also considers Patricia Powell since she focuses on the Chinese diaspora in the Caribbean, even though she is not of Chinese origin but a Jamaican American writer.

  1. Female-headed families: a comparative perspective of the Caribbean and the developed world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, S

    1996-06-01

    Official statistics indicate that 22-44% of women in CARICOM countries are sole heads of households. Some have argued that there are so many female-headed households in the Caribbean simply because those societies have failed to realize the nuclear family norms espoused by the American sociologists of the 1950s. On the contrary, family formations are adaptations to economic and social conditions, with the nuclear family being only one of many family forms. Women have long been acknowledged as the backbone of Caribbean families. In the dominant culture of the region, marriage is not considered necessary for procreation, so women may choose to have and raise children independently. The female-headed household widely seen in the Caribbean is becoming more widely seen in the West. The notion that single-parent families are dysfunctional needs to be re-examined and equal recognition and support given to all family forms.

  2. Experiences of and responses to HIV among African and Caribbean communities in Toronto, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardezi, F; Calzavara, L; Husbands, W; Tharao, W; Lawson, E; Myers, T; Pancham, A; George, C; Remis, R; Willms, D; McGee, F; Adebajo, S

    2008-07-01

    African and Caribbean communities in Canada and other developed countries are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS. This qualitative study of African and Caribbean communities in Toronto sought to understand HIV-related stigma, discrimination, denial and fear, and the effects of multiple intersecting factors that influence responses to the disease, prevention practices and access to treatment and support services. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 30 HIV-positive men and women and focus groups were conducted with 74 men and women whose HIV status was negative or unknown. We identified a range of issues faced by African and Caribbean people that may increase the risk for HIV infection, create obstacles to testing and treatment and lead to isolation of HIV-positive people. Our findings suggest the need for greater sensitivity and knowledge on the part of healthcare providers; more culturally specific support services; community development; greater community awareness; and expanded efforts to tackle housing, poverty, racism and settlement issues.

  3. Climate Change mitigation opportunities in the Energy sector for the Caribbean region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doral, Wenceslao Carrera; Chinchilla, Oscar Coto; Delgado, Ivan Relova

    in the region interested in linking energyclimate change benefits as part of the on-going and future scaling up efforts for Renewable Energy (RE) dissemination in the Caribbean. The study is based on an analysis of the mitigation potential in 16 countries in the Caribbean Region, due to the interconnection...... of renewable energy to the grid, the modeling of in-country energy sector development and its associated emissions for different scenarios; that include both the “business as usual” and “mitigation” due to the scaling up of Renewable Energy Technology. The study also looks at the experience from participation...... in the CDM in the region and narrows on some of the perceived institutional challenges, especially from the perspective of Programme of Activities (CDM PoA) development in the field of renewable energy for the Caribbean Region, as precursors for evolving mitigation activities (under broader climate finance...

  4. The Influence of Spirituality on Health Behaviors in an Afro-Caribbean Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jacqueline; Archibald, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Spirituality is an integral part of the Afro-Caribbean experience. This study explored spirituality's influence on health in a church-going Afro-Caribbean population in order to further develop the concept of Spiritually-Guided Health risk Interception (SGHRI). Using a naturalistic approach, ten (10) members of local Pentecostal churches including ministry leaders, were interviewed. Items from the Spiritual Health Locus of Control scale (SHLC) guided the sessions. Content analysis was used to examine the data, and three themes emerged: compassion for service, divine authority, and shared responsibility. The findings of this study suggested that Afro Caribbean church-goers are fervent in their spirituality and dedication to social services provided by the church. While they rely on church leaders for guidance in health matters, recognition of personal role in health promotion was acknowledged. This valuable resource may be used to combine the fundamental principles associated with their spiritual practices and with health risk interceptions.

  5. Investigating the Link Between Climate and Leptospirosis in the Caribbean Using Wavelet Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, T. W.; Amarakoon, D.; Taylor, M. A.; Stephenson, T.

    2009-05-01

    The Caribbean has shown changes in its climate (temperature and rainfall) as a result of urbanisation, population growth and industrialisation. The climatic changes have implications for the emergence and re- emergence of rodent-borne diseases such as leptospirosis. In this paper wavelet analysis is used to investigate the relationship between the incidence of leptospirosis in the Caribbean and climate variables such as temperature and precipitation. Wavelet analysis takes into account characteristics unique to climate and epidemiological data which other spectral techniques failed to do. The analysis reveals 2-3 year periodic signals in both the wavelet power spectrum and wavelet coherency. There is also a correlation between incidence of leptospirosis and late season Caribbean rainfall.

  6. Afro-Caribbean migrants in France: employment, state policy and the migration process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, S A; Ogden, P E

    1991-01-01

    "Afro-Caribbean labour in France plays a distinctive role relative to the French population as a whole and the foreign immigrant population. Using a variety of qualitative and quantitative sources, this paper demonstrates that the role of the state in the process of migration from the French Caribbean islands of Martinique and Guadeloupe from the early 1960s onwards was crucial.... Aggregate sources are used to describe detailed occupational distributions while records of individual migrants illustrate the process of migration and the influences on employment. At a time usually characterized by lack of direct involvement in migration by the French state, for Afro-Caribbeans state intervention in recruitment, training and settlement is shown to be very substantial." excerpt

  7. Tangled roots: Kalenda and other neo-African dances in the circum-Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Gerstin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigates descriptions of Afro-Caribbean dances in early chronicles and historical material. Author focuses on choreography, as well as on musical instruments and their use. He pays special attention to descriptions of the Martinican kalenda dance. He discusses descriptions from the 18th c. of black Caribbean dance in French and other colonies, by priests and others, of the kalenda as a couple dance within a ring, and descriptions of other widespread early dances in the Caribbean, such as chica. Author notes that in these early descriptions the authors focus obsessively on eroticism, thus simplifying and exaggerating the dances as sexual, and ignoring their variety. Further, he analyses early chronicles on other widespread dances in the circum-Caribbean, such as stick-fighting dances, bamboula, djouba, and belair, comparing with present-day Caribbean dances, and on "challenge dancing" involving a dance soloist "challenged" by a lead drummer, found, for instance, in kalenda and rumba. In addition, the author focuses on the dances' musical accompaniment by drums, and the drum types and methods, specifically transverse drumming and drumming with sticks on the side of the drum, found today in kalenda, and other Caribbean styles. He points at the inaccuracy of some chronicles, mixing up dance names, and recurring superficiality and stereotypes. He nonetheless concludes from them that slaves from the Congo/Angola region probably played a crucial role in forming these early dance styles, and that their spread was connected with French colonialism and slavery and migrations from (once French colonies. He describes probable Congolese/Angolan influences, such as pelvic isolation, challenge dances, couple dancing within a circle, and transverse drumming, but indicates that these are over time combined with other African and other influences.

  8. Rules of engagement: predictors of Black Caribbean immigrants' engagement with African American culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Nancy; Watson, Natalie N; Wang, Zhenni; Case, Andrew D; Hunter, Carla D

    2013-10-01

    The cultural context in the United States is racialized and influences Black Caribbean immigrants' acculturation processes, but what role it plays in Black Caribbean immigrants' acculturation into specific facets of American society (e.g., African American culture) has been understudied in the field of psychology. The present study extends research on Black Caribbean immigrants' acculturative process by assessing how this group's experience of the racial context (racial public regard, ethnic public regard, and cultural race-related stress) influences its engagement in African American culture (i.e., adoption of values and behavioral involvement). Data were collected from 93 Black participants of Caribbean descent, ranging in age from 13 to 45 and analyzed using a stepwise hierarchical regression. The findings highlighted that when Black Caribbean-descended participants perceived that the public held a favorable view of their racial group they were more likely to engage in African American culture. In contrast, when participants perceived that the public held a favorable view of their ethnic group (e.g., Haitian) they were less likely to engage in African American culture. Furthermore, among participants experiencing low levels of cultural race-related stress, the associations between racial public regard and engagement with African American culture were amplified. However, for participants experiencing high cultural race-related stress, their engagement in African American culture did not change as a function of racial public regard. These findings may suggest that, for Black Caribbean immigrants, the experience of the racial context influences strategies that serve to preserve or bolster their overall social status and psychological well-being in the United States. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. Population genetics of a trochid gastropod broadens picture of Caribbean Sea connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo Díaz-Ferguson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regional genetic connectivity models are critical for successful conservation and management of marine species. Even though rocky shore invertebrates have been used as model systems to understand genetic structure in some marine environments, our understanding of connectivity in Caribbean communities is based overwhelmingly on studies of tropical fishes and corals. In this study, we investigate population connectivity and diversity of Cittarium pica, an abundant rocky shore trochid gastropod that is commercially harvested across its natural range, from the Bahamas to Venezuela. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested for genetic structure using DNA sequence variation at the mitochondrial COI and 16S loci, AMOVA and distance-based methods. We found substantial differentiation among Caribbean sites. Yet, genetic differentiation was associated only with larger geographic scales within the Caribbean, and the pattern of differentiation only partially matched previous assessments of Caribbean connectivity, including those based on larval dispersal from hydrodynamic models. For instance, the Bahamas, considered an independent region by previous hydrodynamic studies, showed strong association with Eastern Caribbean sites in our study. Further, Bonaire (located in the east and close to the meridional division of the Caribbean basin seems to be isolated from other Eastern sites. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The significant genetic structure and observed in C. pica has some commonalities in pattern with more commonly sampled taxa, but presents features, such as the differentiation of Bonaire, that appear unique. Further, the level of differentiation, together with regional patterns of diversity, has important implications for the application of conservation and management strategies in this commercially harvested species.

  10. A Collaborative Effort Between Caribbean States for Tsunami Numerical Modeling: Case Study CaribeWave15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón-Barrantes, Silvia; López-Venegas, Alberto; Sánchez-Escobar, Rónald; Luque-Vergara, Néstor

    2017-10-01

    Historical records have shown that tsunami have affected the Caribbean region in the past. However infrequent, recent studies have demonstrated that they pose a latent hazard for countries within this basin. The Hazard Assessment Working Group of the ICG/CARIBE-EWS (Intergovernmental Coordination Group of the Early Warning System for Tsunamis and Other Coastal Threats for the Caribbean Sea and Adjacent Regions) of IOC/UNESCO has a modeling subgroup, which seeks to develop a modeling platform to assess the effects of possible tsunami sources within the basin. The CaribeWave tsunami exercise is carried out annually in the Caribbean region to increase awareness and test tsunami preparedness of countries within the basin. In this study we present results of tsunami inundation using the CaribeWave15 exercise scenario for four selected locations within the Caribbean basin (Colombia, Costa Rica, Panamá and Puerto Rico), performed by tsunami modeling researchers from those selected countries. The purpose of this study was to provide the states with additional results for the exercise. The results obtained here were compared to co-seismic deformation and tsunami heights within the basin (energy plots) provided for the exercise to assess the performance of the decision support tools distributed by PTWC (Pacific Tsunami Warning Center), the tsunami service provider for the Caribbean basin. However, comparison of coastal tsunami heights was not possible, due to inconsistencies between the provided fault parameters and the modeling results within the provided exercise products. Still, the modeling performed here allowed to analyze tsunami characteristics at the mentioned states from sources within the North Panamá Deformed Belt. The occurrence of a tsunami in the Caribbean may affect several countries because a great variety of them share coastal zones in this basin. Therefore, collaborative efforts similar to the one presented in this study, particularly between neighboring

  11. Geologic rationale for hydrocarbon exploration in the Caribbean and adjacent regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pindell, J.L. (Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Earth Science)

    1991-07-01

    Sedimentary basins in the Caribbean and adjacent areas are assessed in terms of the plate-tectonic and paleogeographic history of the regions. Primary phases of development were rifting and passive margin development during Jurassic-Cretaceous drift of North from South America; and the Late Cretaceous to Recent relative eastwards migration of the Caribbean Plate from the eastern Pacific area to its present position between North and South America. Two primary stratigraphic suites of rock occur in the Carribean region: (1) autochthonous Jurassic, Cretaceous and Cenozoic passive margin sediments deposited along the rifted margins of North and South American basement; and (2) allochthonous oceanic crustal and magmatic arc rocks and overlying sedimentary units of the migrating Caribbean Plate. The tectonic boundary between these suites coincides roughly with the limit of circum-Carribean thrusted metamorphic/mafic rocks above the formerly passive Proto-Caribbean shelf rocks and juxtaposition youngs from west to east. Although Jurassic rift/early drift-related source rocks occur in some areas, such as in Cuba-Bahamas, the primary source rocks in both suites were deposited well after rifting in the ''medial'' Cretaceous. Basin development during the Late Cretaceous to Recent tectonic juxtaposition of the two suites (i.e. Caribbean migration) directly controlled both clastic reservoir facies deposition and hydrocarbon maturation in many areas around the Caribbean. Basin development, source and reservoir rock deposition, and maturation of source rocks in all basins in the region can be directly related to plate-tectonic evolution. (author)

  12. Creating Disaster-resistant Universities in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Lesales

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Reconnaissant le niveau d’exposition élevé de la zone Caraïbe aux catastrophes d’origines naturelle et anthropique, l’article souligne la nécessité pour les établissements d’enseignement supérieur implantés dans la région à la fois d’optimiser leur niveau de préparation face aux catastrophes, et de définir des plans opérationnels de réduction des risques. Sur la base de leur expérience de l’initiative « Universités Résistantes aux Catastrophes », les auteurs suggèrent une méthodologie de planification préventive adaptée au contexte caraïbe. Une évaluation des risques en 4 étapes autorise la mise en place d’un plan de réduction des risques ; le plan ainsi adopté par les universités devra être associé à la mise en œuvre de simulations essentielles au développement des savoir-faire au sein même de l’établissementAcknowledging the high exposure of the region to natural and man-made disasters, this article emphasizes the need for the Institutions of Higher Education operating in the Caribbean to improve their level of preparedness and develop efficient mitigation plans. Based on their experience of the Disaster Resistant Universities initiative, the authors suggest a methodology to develop such plans adapted to the Caribbean context. A four-step risk assessment allows the definition and implementation of a hazard mitigation plan for the universities, along with table-top exercises critical for capacity building within the institution.Reconociendo la alta exposición de la región a los desastres naturales y artificiales, este artículo da énfasis a la necesidad para las instituciones de educación superior que funcionan en la zona Caribe de mejorar su nivel del estado de preparación, y desarrollar planes eficientes de mitigación. De acuerdo con su experiencia de la iniciativa « Universidades Resistentes a los Desastres », los autores sugieren una metodología para desarrollar tales planes

  13. Parenting and depressive symptoms among adolescents in four Caribbean societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipps Garth

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The strategies that parents use to guide and discipline their children may influence their emotional health. Relatively little research has been conducted examining the association of parenting practices to depressive symptoms among Caribbean adolescents. This project examines the association of parenting styles to levels of depressive symptoms among adolescents in Jamaica, the Bahamas, St. Kitts and Nevis, and St. Vincent. Methods Adolescents attending grade ten of academic year 2006/2007 in Jamaica, the Bahamas, St. Vincent, and St. Kitts and Nevis were administered the Parenting Practices Scale along with the BDI-II. Authoritative, Authoritarian, Permissive and Neglectful parenting styles were created using a median split procedure of the monitoring and nurturance subscales of the Parenting Practices Scale. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine the relationships of parenting styles to depressive symptoms. Results A wide cross-section of tenth grade students in each nation was sampled (n = 1955; 278 from Jamaica, 217 from the Bahamas, 737 St. Kitts and Nevis, 716 from St. Vincent; 52.1% females, 45.6% males and 2.3% no gender reported; age 12 to 19 years, mean = 15.3 yrs, sd = .95 yrs. Nearly half (52.1% of all adolescents reported mild to severe symptoms of depression with 29.1% reporting moderate to severe symptoms of depression. In general, authoritative and permissive parenting styles were both associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms in adolescents. However, the relationship of parenting styles to depression scores was not consistent across countries (p  Conclusions There appears to be an association between parenting styles and depressive symptoms that is differentially manifested across the islands of Jamaica, the Bahamas, St. Kitts and Nevis and St. Vincent.

  14. A screening for antimicrobial activities of Caribbean herbal remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano-Montalvo, Claribel; Boulogne, Isabelle; Gavillán-Suárez, Jannette

    2013-06-04

    The TRAMIL program aims to understand, validate and expand health practices based on the use of medicinal plants in the Caribbean, which is a "biodiversity hotspot" due to high species endemism, intense development pressure and habitat loss. The antibacterial activity was examined for thirteen plant species from several genera that were identified as a result of TRAMIL ethnopharmacological surveys or were reported in ethnobotanical accounts from Puerto Rico. The aim of this study was to validate the traditional use of these plant species for the treatment of bacterial infections, such as conjunctivitis, fever, otitis media and furuncles. An agar disc diffusion assay was used to examine five bacterial strains that are associated with the reported infections, including Staphylococcus saprophyticus (ATCC 15305), S. aureus (ATCC 6341), Escherichia coli (ATCC 4157), Haemophilus influenzae (ATCC 8142), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 7700) and Proteus vulgaris (ATCC 6896), as well as the fungus Candida albicans (ATCC 752). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values were determined for each of the extracts that showed inhibitory activity. The decoctions of Pityrogramma calomelanos, Tapeinochilus ananassae, and Syzygium jambos, as well as the juice of Gossypium barbadense, showed > 20% growth inhibition against several bacteria relative to the positive control, which was the antibiotic Streptomycin. Extracts with the best antimicrobial activities were S. jambos that showed MIC = 31 μg/mL and MBC = 1.0 mg/mL against P. vulgaris and T. ananassae that showed MIC = 15 μg/mL against S. aureus. This report confirms the traditional use of P. calomelanos for the treatment of kidney infections that are associated with stones, as well as the antimicrobial and bactericidal effects of T. ananassae against P. vulgaris and S. saprophyticus and the effects of S. jambos against S. aureus and S. saprophyticus.

  15. Parenting and depressive symptoms among adolescents in four Caribbean societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipps, Garth; Lowe, Gillian A; Gibson, Roger C; Halliday, Sharon; Morris, Amrie; Clarke, Nelson; Wilson, Rosemarie N

    2012-09-21

    The strategies that parents use to guide and discipline their children may influence their emotional health. Relatively little research has been conducted examining the association of parenting practices to depressive symptoms among Caribbean adolescents. This project examines the association of parenting styles to levels of depressive symptoms among adolescents in Jamaica, the Bahamas, St. Kitts and Nevis, and St. Vincent. Adolescents attending grade ten of academic year 2006/2007 in Jamaica, the Bahamas, St. Vincent, and St. Kitts and Nevis were administered the Parenting Practices Scale along with the BDI-II. Authoritative, Authoritarian, Permissive and Neglectful parenting styles were created using a median split procedure of the monitoring and nurturance subscales of the Parenting Practices Scale. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine the relationships of parenting styles to depressive symptoms. A wide cross-section of tenth grade students in each nation was sampled (n = 1955; 278 from Jamaica, 217 from the Bahamas, 737 St. Kitts and Nevis, 716 from St. Vincent; 52.1% females, 45.6% males and 2.3% no gender reported; age 12 to 19 years, mean = 15.3 yrs, sd = .95 yrs). Nearly half (52.1%) of all adolescents reported mild to severe symptoms of depression with 29.1% reporting moderate to severe symptoms of depression. In general, authoritative and permissive parenting styles were both associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms in adolescents. However, the relationship of parenting styles to depression scores was not consistent across countries (p parenting, caregivers in this study used a mixture of different parenting styles with the two most popular styles being authoritative and neglectful parenting. There appears to be an association between parenting styles and depressive symptoms that is differentially manifested across the islands of Jamaica, the Bahamas, St. Kitts and Nevis and St. Vincent.

  16. Mapping Indigenous Settlement Topography in the Caribbean Using Drones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till F. Sonnemann

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The archaeology of Amerindian settlements in the Caribbean has mostly been identified through scatters of artefacts; predominantly conglomerations of shells, ceramics and lithics. While archaeological material may not always be visible on the surface, particular settlement patterns may be identifiable by a topography created through cultural action: earthen mounds interchanging with mostly circular flattened areas. In northern Hispaniola, recent foot surveys have identified more than 200 pre-colonial sites of which several have been mapped in high resolution. In addition, three settlements with topographical characteristics have been extensively excavated, confirming that the mounds and flattened areas may have had a cultural connotation in this region. Without the availability of high resolution LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging data, a photogrammetric approach using UAS (unmanned aircraft system, commonly known as drones can fill the knowledge gap on a local scale, providing fast and reliable data collection and precise results. After photogrammetric processing, digital clearance of vegetation, and extraction of the georeferenced DEM (digital elevation model and orthophoto, filters and enhancements provide an opportunity to visualize the results in GIS. The outcome provides an overview of site size, and distribution of mounds and flattened areas. Measurement of the topographic changes in a variety of past settlements defines likely zones of habitat, and provides clues on the actual dimensions and density of living space. Understanding the relation of the mounds and adjacent flat areas within their environment allows a discussion on how, and for what purpose, the settlement was founded at a particular location, and provides clues about its spatial organization.

  17. Parenting and depressive symptoms among adolescents in four Caribbean societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The strategies that parents use to guide and discipline their children may influence their emotional health. Relatively little research has been conducted examining the association of parenting practices to depressive symptoms among Caribbean adolescents. This project examines the association of parenting styles to levels of depressive symptoms among adolescents in Jamaica, the Bahamas, St. Kitts and Nevis, and St. Vincent. Methods Adolescents attending grade ten of academic year 2006/2007 in Jamaica, the Bahamas, St. Vincent, and St. Kitts and Nevis were administered the Parenting Practices Scale along with the BDI-II. Authoritative, Authoritarian, Permissive and Neglectful parenting styles were created using a median split procedure of the monitoring and nurturance subscales of the Parenting Practices Scale. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine the relationships of parenting styles to depressive symptoms. Results A wide cross-section of tenth grade students in each nation was sampled (n = 1955; 278 from Jamaica, 217 from the Bahamas, 737 St. Kitts and Nevis, 716 from St. Vincent; 52.1% females, 45.6% males and 2.3% no gender reported; age 12 to 19 years, mean = 15.3 yrs, sd = .95 yrs). Nearly half (52.1%) of all adolescents reported mild to severe symptoms of depression with 29.1% reporting moderate to severe symptoms of depression. In general, authoritative and permissive parenting styles were both associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms in adolescents. However, the relationship of parenting styles to depression scores was not consistent across countries (p parenting, caregivers in this study used a mixture of different parenting styles with the two most popular styles being authoritative and neglectful parenting. Conclusions There appears to be an association between parenting styles and depressive symptoms that is differentially manifested across the islands of Jamaica, the Bahamas, St. Kitts and Nevis and St

  18. Perspective: private schools of the Caribbean: outsourcing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhert, N Lynn

    2010-04-01

    Twenty-five percent of the U.S. physician workforce is made up of international medical graduates (IMGs), a growing proportion of whom (27% in 2005) are U.S. citizens. Most IMGs graduate from "offshore medical schools" (OMSs), for-profit institutions primarily located in the Caribbean region and established to train U.S. students who will return home to practice medicine. Following the recent call for a larger physician workforce, OMSs rapidly increased in number. Unlike U.S. schools, which must be accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education, OMSs are recognized by their home countries and may not be subject to a rigorous accreditation process. Although gaps in specific data exist, a closer look at OMSs reveals that most enroll three groups of students per year, and many educate students initially at "offshore campuses" and later at clinical sites in the United States. Students from some OMSs are eligible for the U.S. Federal Family Education Loan Program. The lack of uniform data on OMSs is problematic for state medical boards, which struggle to assess the quality of the medical education offered at any one school and which, in some cases, disapprove a school. With the United States' continued reliance on IMGs to meet its health needs, the public and the profession will be best served by knowing more about medical education outside of the United States. Review of medical education in OMSs whose graduates will become part of U.S. health care delivery is timely as the United States reforms its health-care-delivery system.

  19. Non-stationary background intensity and Caribbean seismic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmy, Larissa; Vaillant, Jean

    2014-05-01

    We consider seismic risk calculation based on models with non-stationary background intensity. The aim is to improve predictive strategies in the framework of seismic risk assessment from models describing at best the seismic activity in the Caribbean arc. Appropriate statistical methods are required for analyzing the volumes of data collected. The focus is on calculating earthquakes occurrences probability and analyzing spatiotemporal evolution of these probabilities. The main modeling tool is the point process theory in order to take into account past history prior to a given date. Thus, the seismic event conditional intensity is expressed by means of the background intensity and the self exciting component. This intensity can be interpreted as the expected event rate per time and / or surface unit. The most popular intensity model in seismology is the ETAS (Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence) model introduced and then generalized by Ogata [2, 3]. We extended this model and performed a comparison of different probability density functions for the triggered event times [4]. We illustrate our model by considering the CDSA (Centre de Données Sismiques des Antilles) catalog [1] which contains more than 7000 seismic events occurred in the Lesser Antilles arc. Statistical tools for testing the background intensity stationarity and for dynamical segmentation are presented. [1] Bengoubou-Valérius M., Bazin S., Bertil D., Beauducel F. and Bosson A. (2008). CDSA: a new seismological data center for the French Lesser Antilles, Seismol. Res. Lett., 79 (1), 90-102. [2] Ogata Y. (1998). Space-time point-process models for earthquake occurrences, Annals of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics, 50 (2), 379-402. [3] Ogata, Y. (2011). Significant improvements of the space-time ETAS model for forecasting of accurate baseline seismicity, Earth, Planets and Space, 63 (3), 217-229. [4] Valmy L. and Vaillant J. (2013). Statistical models in seismology: Lesser Antilles arc case

  20. ‘Reparational’ Genetics: Genomic Data and the Case for Reparations in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jada Benn Torres

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on my population genomic research among several Caribbean communities, I consider how ongoing Caribbean reparations movements index genomic information. Specifically, I examine the intersection between genetic ancestry and calls for reparatory justice to gain insight into the ways that scientific data are utilized in social articulations of both racial and indigenous identity. I argue that when contextualized within complex historical and cultural frameworks, the application of genomic data complicates notions about biological continuity and belonging, yet is compatible with broader conceptualizations of how people imagine themselves and histories in relation to geographic origins.

  1. Using DNA barcoding to assess Caribbean reef fish biodiversity: expanding taxonomic and geographic coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigt, Lee A; Baldwin, Carole C; Driskell, Amy; Smith, David G; Ormos, Andrea; Reyier, Eric A

    2012-01-01

    This paper represents a DNA barcode data release for 3,400 specimens representing 521 species of fishes from 6 areas across the Caribbean and western central Atlantic regions (FAO Region 31). Merged with our prior published data, the combined efforts result in 3,964 specimens representing 572 species of marine fishes and constitute one of the most comprehensive DNA barcoding "coverages" for a region reported to date. The barcode data are providing new insights into Caribbean shorefish diversity, allowing for more and more accurate DNA-based identifications of larvae, juveniles, and unknown specimens. Examples are given correcting previous work that was erroneous due to database incompleteness.

  2. Using DNA barcoding to assess Caribbean reef fish biodiversity: expanding taxonomic and geographic coverage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee A Weigt

    Full Text Available This paper represents a DNA barcode data release for 3,400 specimens representing 521 species of fishes from 6 areas across the Caribbean and western central Atlantic regions (FAO Region 31. Merged with our prior published data, the combined efforts result in 3,964 specimens representing 572 species of marine fishes and constitute one of the most comprehensive DNA barcoding "coverages" for a region reported to date. The barcode data are providing new insights into Caribbean shorefish diversity, allowing for more and more accurate DNA-based identifications of larvae, juveniles, and unknown specimens. Examples are given correcting previous work that was erroneous due to database incompleteness.

  3. Between the death penalty and decriminalization : new directions for drug control in the Commonwealth Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Klein

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Traces the changes in public attitudes toward and political stances on drug control in the British Caribbean between 1980 and 2000. Author first discusses the origins of drug control, the role of US pressure, and the vulnerability of the Caribbean. He then looks at European involvement and the different plans and policies to control drugs in the region. Finally, he describes the consequences of these policy approaches on the justice system and legal reform, drug demand, and social structures in the region.

  4. Static measurements of the resilience of Caribbean coral populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W. Bruckner

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The progressive downward shift in dominance of key reef building corals, coupled with dramatic increases in macroalgae and other nuisance species, fields of unstable coral rubble ,loss of structural relief, and declines of major functional groups of fishes is a common occurrence throughout the Caribbean today. The incorporation of resilience principles into management is a proposed strategy to reverse this trend and ensure proper functioning of coral reefs under predicted scenarios of climate change, yet ecosystem processes and functions that underlie reef resilience are not fully understood. Rapid assessments using the Atlantic and Gulf Rapid Reef Assessment (AGRRA and the IUCN Resilience Assessment protocol can provide baseline information on reef resilience. A key aspect of these surveys focuses on coral population dynamics, including measures of coral cover, size, partial and whole-colony mortality, condition, and recruitment. One challenge is that these represent static measures involving a single assessment. Without following individual corals over time, it is difficult to determine rates of survival and growth of recruits and adult colonies, and differentiation of juveniles from small remnants of older colonies may not be possible, especially when macroalgal cover is high. To address this limitation, corals assessed in Bonaire in July 2010 were subdivided into two categories: 1 colonies on the reef substrate; and 2 colonies colonizing dead corals and exposed skeletal surfaces of living corals. Coral populations in Bonaire exhibited many features indicative of high resilience, including high coral cover (often 30-50%, high levels of recruitment, and a large number of corals that settled on dead corals and survived to larger size-classes. Overall, the skeletal surfaces of 12 species of corals were colonized by 16 species of corals, with up to 12 settlers on each colony, most (67% on M. annularis (complex skeletons. Nevertheless, completely

  5. Distribution of Tortoises and Freshwater Turtles of the Colombian Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Camilo Montes Corea

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This research reviews the Colombian Caribbean distribution of the species Kinosternon scorpioides, Trachemys callirostris,Mesoclemmys dahli and Chelonoidis carbonaria, and to present new records for the region. The species K. scorpioides is reported for the first time in the Manzanares River drainage, Santa Marta, department of Magdalena. Trachemys callirostris was recorded inthe Cañas River, department of La Guajira, being the first record for this species in a small river on the north side of the SierraNevada de Santa Marta. Chelonoidis carbonaria was recorded in a wetland in Santa Marta. We recorded a female M. dahli in thevillage of Monterrubio, municipality of Sabanas de San Angel, department of Magdalena. Three of the four species includedin this account are listed in some category of threat. The lack of knowledge of the biology and distribution of these species could be considered a threat to them because ignorance precludes the establishment of their true conservation status and hinders the development of management plans required for their protection.DISTRIBUCIÓN DE TORTUGAS CONTINENTALESDEL CARIBE COLOMBIANOEste estudio revisa la distribución para el Caribe colombiano de las especies Kinosternon scorpioides, Trachemys callirostris,Mesoclemmys dahli y Chelonoidis carbonaria y nuevas localidades en la distribución de dichas especies para la región. La especie K. scorpioides es registrada por primera vez en la cuenca del río Manzanares, en Santa Marta, Magdalena. Trachemys callirostris fue registrada en el río Cañas, La Guajira, constituyéndose en el primer registro para la especie en un riachuelo de la cara norte de la Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta. Chelonoidis carbonaria fue registrada en un humedal ubicado en la ciudad de Santa Marta. Se registró una hembra de M. dahli en el corregimiento Monterrubio, municipio Sabana de San Ángel, Magdalena. Tres de las cuatro especies incluidas en esta revisión se encuentran en alguna

  6. Metabolite variability in Caribbean sponges of the genus Aplysina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Puyana

    Full Text Available Abstract Sponges of the genus Aplysina are among the most common benthic animals on reefs of the Caribbean, and display a wide diversity of morphologies and colors. Tissues of these sponges lack mineralized skeletal elements, but contain a dense spongin skeleton and an elaborate series of tyrosine-derived brominated alkaloid metabolites that function as chemical defenses against predatory fishes, but do not deter some molluscs. Among the earliest marine natural products to be isolated and identified, these metabolites remain the subject of intense interest for commercial applications because of their activities in various bioassays. In this study, crude organic extracts from 253 sponges from ten morphotypes among the species Aplysina archeri,Aplysina bathyphila,Aplysina cauliformis,Aplysina fistularis,Aplysina fulva,A. insularis, and Aplysina lacunosa were analyzed by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS to characterize the pattern of intra- and interspecific variabilities of the twelve major secondary metabolites present therein. Patterns across Aplysina species ranged from the presence of mostly a single compound, fistularin-3, in A. cauliformis, to a mixture of metabolites present in the other species. These patterns did not support the biotransformation hypothesis for conversion of large molecular weight molecules to smaller ones for the purpose of enhanced defense. Discriminant analyses of the metabolite data revealed strong taxonomic patterns that support a close relationship between A. fistularis,A. fulva and A. insularis, while two morphotypes of A. cauliformis (lilac creeping vs. brown erect were very distinct. Two morphotypes of A. lacunosa, one with hard tissue consistency, the other soft and thought to belong to a separate genus (Suberea, had very similar chemical profiles. Of the twelve metabolites found among samples, variation in fistularin-3, dideoxyfistularin-3 and hydroxyaerothionin provided the most predictive

  7. Microphytoplankton variations during coral spawning at Los Roques, Southern Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francoise Cavada-Blanco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton drives primary productivity in marine pelagic systems. This is also true for the oligotrophic waters in coral reefs, where natural and anthropogenic sources of nutrients can alter pelagic trophic webs. In this study, microphytoplankton assemblages were characterized for the first time in relation to expected coral spawning dates in the Caribbean. A hierarchical experimental design was used to examine these assemblages in Los Roques archipelago, Venezuela, at various temporal and spatial scales for spawning events in both 2007 and 2008. At four reefs, superficial water samples were taken daily for 9 days after the full moon of August, including days before, during and after the expected days of coral spawning. Microphytoplankton assemblages comprised 100 microalgae taxa at up to 50 cells per mL (mean ± 8 SD and showed temporal and spatial variations related to the coral spawning only in 2007. However, chlorophyll a concentrations increased during and after the spawning events in both years, and this was better matched with analyses of higher taxonomical groups (diatoms, cyanophytes and dinoflagellates, that also varied in relation to spawning times in 2007 and 2008, but asynchronously among reefs. Heterotrophic and mixotrophic dinoflagellates increased in abundance, correlating with a decrease of the diatom Cerataulina pelagica and an increase of the diatom Rhizosolenia imbricata. These variations occurred during and after the coral spawning event for some reefs in 2007. For the first time, a fresh-water cyanobacteria species of Anabaena was ephemerally found (only 3 days in the archipelago, at reefs closest to human settlements. Variability among reefs in relation to spawning times indicated that reef-specific processes such as water residence time, re-mineralization rates, and benthic-pelagic coupling can be relevant to the observed patterns. These results suggest an important role of microheterotrophic grazers in re

  8. Themes Caribbean Overseas Students Perceive Influence Their Levels of Culture Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards-Joseph, Arline; Baker, Stanley B.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether or not Caribbean overseas students, attending universities in the United States, perceived that they experienced culture shock and what themes emerged explaining their experiences. Thirty-eight participants indicated having experienced culture shock, and 20 did not. Five major themes (loneliness and feelings of not…

  9. Who Succeeds in Mathematics? Caribbean Perspectives on the Mix of Schools and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Within the Caribbean, there has been a perception that students are underachieving in mathematics. This assessment has seemingly been based amongst other things upon the proportion of students who are successful in mathematics compared to other subjects in external examinations. This notion was investigated in a case study of secondary schools in…

  10. 76 FR 22385 - Fisheries of the Caribbean; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR); Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... held at the Hotel El Convento, 100 Cristo Street, Old San Juan, PR 00901, telephone: (181) 723-9036..., North Charleston, SC 29405; telephone: (843) 571-4366. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Gulf of Mexico... by the Gulf of Mexico, South Atlantic, and Caribbean Fishery Management Councils and NOAA Fisheries...

  11. 77 FR 26746 - Fisheries of the Caribbean; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR); Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    .... Location The Buccaneer Frenchman's Reef....... Rincon Beach Hotel. Address 5007 Estate Shoys...... 5 Estate... be held at the Hotel El Convento, 100 Cristo Street, Old San Juan, PR 00901; telephone: (181) 723... Mexico, South Atlantic, and Caribbean Fishery Management Councils, in conjunction with NOAA Fisheries and...

  12. Caribbean Wellness Day: mobilizing a region for chronic noncommunicable disease prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, T Alafia; Fraser, Henry

    2010-12-01

    The member states of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) have the highest prevalence of chronic noncommunicable diseases (CNCDs) in the Americas. The CARICOM heads of government issued the Port-of-Spain Declaration "Uniting to Stop the Epidemic of Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases in the Caribbean," mandating intersectoral, population-based approaches and commemoration of the summit on the second Saturday in September as "Caribbean Wellness Day (CWD)." CWD, inaugurated in September 2008, is designed to strengthen public, private, and civil society partnerships and to promote multicountry, multisectoral activities in support of wellness. By 2009, the second year of the celebrations, 18 of the 20 CARICOM countries embraced and celebrated with multifaceted, multifocal activities, using this as a catalyst for sustained physical activities, healthy food choices, and health screening in a smoke-free environment. Organizational support and Caribbean branding of products came from the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization and CARICOM. Outcomes will be measured by input and process indicators and CNCD risk factor surveillance.

  13. From Cutlass to Agribusiness: Caribbean Food and Agriculture in Transition within a Global System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Michael J.

    This examination of the future role of food and agriculture in world peace and prosperity presents a regional cross-country view of the Caribbean countries with emphasis on the Caricom English speaking countries within a global food system environment. Following an introductory section, the second of six sections focuses on two broad agricultural…

  14. The Future of Education in the Caribbean: Report of the CARICOM Advisory Task Force on Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, Edwin W.

    The Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Regional Policy on Education was approved by the Standing Committee of Ministers with responsibility for Education (SCME) in a special meeting held on September 9, 1993. The policy constitutes a major regional effort to build a strong and dynamic community. An overall theme of the policy is regionalism as an…

  15. A conservation framework for the Critically Endangered endemic species of the Caribbean palm Coccothrinax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    With 30 threatened species [14 Critically Endangered (CR) and 16 Endangered, sensu IUCN)] Coccothrinax (c. 54 species) is the flagship palm genus for conservation in the Caribbean Island Biodiversity Hotspot. Coccothrinax has its center of taxonomic diversity in these islands, with c. 51 endemic spe...

  16. St. Philip: A Simulation about the Development of a Caribbean Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walford, Rex

    1983-01-01

    This simulation highlights problems of development strategies for underdeveloped countries and examines aspects of tourism. As Parliament members on a Caribbean island, students discuss a proposal from a foreign source and make a decision on behalf of their people. Includes procedures, timetable, character list, role descriptions, and other…

  17. Caribbean Popular Culture: Everyday Lives, Racial Politics and Transnational Movements : Review essay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.S. Martens (Emiel)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract__Book review of:__ – Radical Moves: Caribbean Migrants and the Politics of Race in the Jazz Age, by Lara Putman. Chapell Hill: University of Carolina Press, 2013. – Remixing Reggaetón: The Cultural Politics of Race in Puerto Rico, by Petra R. Rivera-Rideau. Durham and London:

  18. Terrorism or heroism? The potrait of the rebel in French Caribbean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The portrait of the rebel character in French Caribbean fiction is often ambivalent: a hero or a terrorist. To the slavemaster/colonizer, the rebel is a convulsive and heinous fugitive, a tameless outlaw, a frenetic and impetuous nihilist or anarchist, a homicidal maniac, a bloody assassin, in one word, a terrorist. To his fellow ...

  19. Forms of Bullying Reported by Middle-School Students in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClanahan, Molly; McCoy, Stephanie M.; Jacobsen, Kathryn H.

    2015-01-01

    Nationally representative data from more than 25,000 middle-school students in 15 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean who participated in the Global School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS) between 2004 and 2009 were analyzed. The proportion of students by country who reported being the victim of a bully in the past month ranged from 17%…

  20. SURVIVAL OF CAPTIVE-REARED PUERTO RICAN PARROTS RELEASED IN THE CARIBBEAN NATIONAL FOREST

    Science.gov (United States)

    THOMAS H. WHITE; JAIME A. COLLAZO; FRANCISCO J. VILELLA

    2005-01-01

    We report first-year survival for 34 captive-reared Puerto Rican Parrots (Amazona vittata) released in the Caribbean National Forest, Puerto Rico between 2000 and 2002. The purpose of the releases were to increase population size and the potential number of breeding individuals of the sole extant wild population, and to refine release protocols for eventual...

  1. Regional trends and controlling factors of fatal landslides in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, S. A.; Petley, D. N.

    2015-04-01

    A database of landslides that caused loss of life in Latin America and the Caribbean in the period from 2004 and 2013 inclusive has been compiled using established techniques. This database indicates that in the ten year period a total of 11 631 people lost their lives across the region in 611 landslides. The geographical distribution of the landslides is very heterogeneous, with areas of high incidence in parts of the Caribbean (most notably Haiti), Central America, Colombia, and SE. Brazil. The number of landslides varies considerably between years; the El Niño/La Niña cycle emerges as a major factor controlling this variation, although the study period did not capture a large event. Analysis suggests that on a continental scale the mapped factors that best explain the observed distribution are topography, annual precipitation and population density. On a national basis we have compared the occurrence of fatality-inducing landslide occurrence with the production of research articles with a local author, which shows that there is a landslide research deficit in Latin America and the Caribbean. Understanding better the mechanisms, distributions causes and triggers of landslides in Latin America and the Caribbean must be an essential first step towards managing the hazard.

  2. The association between stunting and overweight in Latin American and Caribbean preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Pablo; Caballero, Benjamin; de Onis, Mercedes

    2006-12-01

    Although some segments of the population continue to suffer from undernutrition, other groups exhibit excess weight gain, resulting in the coexistence of undernutrition and obesity and leading to a dual nutritional burden. To explore the association between stunting and overweight in preschool children from Latin American and Caribbean countries. We analyzed cross-sectional data from children 0 to 5 years of age from 79 nationally representative surveys, compiled by the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Database on Child Growth and Malnutrition. This database defines stunting as low height-for-age and overweight as high weight-for-height. These variables were explored with the use of simple and multiple regression models. There were significant differences between subregions in the prevalence of stunting: the prevalence was 7.4% in the Caribbean, 11.3% in South America, and 20.4% in Central America (p Latin America and the Caribbean in the year 2000 were 13.7% and 4.3%, respectively. We found an inverse relationship (r = -0.3) between the prevalence rates of overweight and stunting, overall and within subregions. South America exhibited the highest slope and intercept on the regression of overweight on stunting. Different subregions of Latin America and the Caribbean have different prevalence rates of childhood stunting but similar prevalence rates of overweight. There is an inverse relationship between stunting and overweight. The South American subregion had the highest increase and prevalence of overweight of the Latin American region.

  3. Investment Commitments in Latin America and the Caribbean Increased in 2007

    OpenAIRE

    Izaguirre, Ada Karina; Jett, Alexander Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    Investment commitments to infrastructure projects with private participation in Latin America and the Caribbean grew by 28 percent to US$38.3 billion in 2007, according to just-released data from the private participation in infrastructure project database. The region accounted for 24 percent of the year's total investment commitments in developing countries. Despite having grown for four ...

  4. Barriers to Information Technology in Latin America and the Caribbean: Some Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Ketty

    1994-01-01

    Considers barriers which inhibit the development of information technology in Latin America and the Caribbean. Highlights include research in science and technology; the publishing industry; information transfer; indigenous database development; and options for developing countries, including national information policies, computer education, and…

  5. Embracing Technology in the Secondary School Curriculum: The Status in Two Eastern Caribbean Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Karleen A.

    2007-01-01

    The non-technology, technology, and school factors related to technology use and technology integration in the curriculum by secondary school teachers in two Eastern Caribbean countries are identified. The studies have suggested that the factors of technology development, attitude towards technology and computer experience are related to the…

  6. Factors Caribbean Overseas Students Perceive Influence Their Academic Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards-Joseph, Arline; Baker, Stanley

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated factors that influenced the academic self-efficacy of Caribbean overseas students attending universities in the United States, and the themes that emerged from their perceptions of variables impacting their academic self-efficacy. Seven major themes (educational background, faith in God, finances, age and maturity,…

  7. Caribbean mangroves and seagrass beds as daytime feeding habitats for juvenile French grunts, Haemulon flavolineatum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, M.C.; Nagelkerken, I.; Wartenbergh, S.L.J.; Pen, I.R.; Van der Velde, G.

    Caribbean seagrass beds are important feeding habitats for so-called nocturnally active zoobenthivorous fish, but the extent to which these fishes use mangroves and seagrass beds as feeding habitats during daytime remains unclear. We hypothesised three feeding strategies: (1) fishes feed

  8. Regional trends and controlling factors of fatal landslides in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, S. A.; Petley, D. N.

    2015-08-01

    A new data set of landslides that caused loss of life in Latin America and the Caribbean in the 10-year period from 2004 and 2013 inclusive has been compiled, providing new insight into the impact of landslides in this key part of the world. This data set indicates that in the 10-year period a total of 11 631 people lost their lives across the region in 611 landslides. The geographical distribution of the landslides is highly heterogeneous, with areas of high incidence in parts of the Caribbean (most notably Haiti), Central America, Colombia, and southeast Brazil. There is significant interannual variation in the number of landslides, with the El Niño/La Niña cycle emerging as a key control. Our analysis suggests that on a continental scale the mapped factors that best explain the observed distribution are topography, annual precipitation and population density. On a national basis we have compared the occurrence of fatality-inducing landslide occurrence with the production of locally authored research articles, demonstrating that there is a landslide research deficit in Latin America and the Caribbean. Understanding better the mechanisms, distribution causes and triggers of landslides in Latin America and the Caribbean must be an essential first step towards managing the hazard.

  9. Family and friendship informal support networks and social anxiety disorder among African Americans and Black Caribbeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Debra Siegel; Taylor, Robert Joseph; Nguyen, Ann W; Chatters, Linda M; Himle, Joseph A

    2015-07-01

    This study explores relationships between Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) and quality and frequency of involvement with family and friends. Data are from a nationally representative sample of African American and Black Caribbean adults (n = 5191), the National Survey of American Life. SAD was assessed using the DSM-IV World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Findings indicated that among both populations, close supportive ties with family members and friends are protective against meeting criteria for SAD. Negative interactions with family (e.g., conflicts), however, are a risk factor for SAD among both African Americans and Black Caribbeans. For African Americans, an interaction indicates that the relationship between negative interaction and social anxiety is much stronger among African Americans who are not emotionally close to their families. For Caribbean Blacks, an interaction suggests that the odds of meeting criteria for SAD were higher among Black Caribbeans who had high negative interaction with family as well as low levels of friendship closeness. The cross-sectional nature of the study does not allow for causal attributions for findings. This study demonstrates that SAD may impact black ethnic subgroups differently, which has important implications for understanding the nature, etiology, and treatment of this disorder.

  10. [Inequities in health among Latin American and Caribbean countries (2005-2010)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Doris; Acosta, Laura Débora; Bertone, Carola Leticia

    2013-01-01

    To identify health inequalities among Latin American and Caribbean countries in recent years (2005-2010), based on the view that measurement of inequalities is the first step in identifying health inequities. We performed an ecological study, whose units of analysis were 20 Latin American and Caribbean countries. These units were used to build the Inequalities in Health Index. This index summarizes, in a value ranging from 0 to 1, a set of socio-economic and health indicators, developed by international organizations. These indicators are considered as proximal and contextual determinants of health. According to the index calculated, the five countries with the worst health status were Haiti, Guatemala, Bolivia, Venezuela and Honduras. In contrast, the five countries with the most favorable health status were Cuba, Argentina, Uruguay, Chile and Mexico. Even today, there are wide health inequalities in Latin America and the Caribbean. The country with the most favorable health indicators was Cuba and that with the least favorable was Haiti. We recommend systematic evaluation of health inequalities in Latin America and the Caribbean through the Inequalities in Health Index and other indices, in order to analyze actions, policies and programs to reduce inequities in this region. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. A baseline assessment of beach debris and tar contamination in Bonaire, Southeastern Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debrot, A.O.; Rijn, van J.; Bron, P.S.; Leon, R.

    2013-01-01

    Data on beach debris and tar contamination is provided for 21 natural beach sites in Bonaire, Southeastern Caribbean. Transects amounting to a combined length of 991 m were sampled March–May 2011 and a total of 8960 debris items were collected. Highest debris and tar contamination were found on the

  12. Deep down on a Caribbean reef: lower mesophotic depths harbor a specialized coral-endosymbiont community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongaerts, P.; Frade, P.R.; Hay, K.B.; Englebert, N.; Latijnhouwers, K.R.W.; Bak, R.P.M.; Vermeij, M.J.A.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O

    2015-01-01

    The composition, ecology and environmental conditions of mesophotic coral ecosystems near the lower limits of their bathymetric distributions remain poorly understood. Here we provide the first in-depth assessment of a lower mesophotic coral community (60-100 m) in the Southern Caribbean through

  13. Deep down on a Caribbean reef: lower mesophotic depths harbor a specialized coral-endosymbiont community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongaerts, P.; Frade, P.R.; Hay, K.B.; Englebert, N.; Latijnhouwers, K.R.W.; Bak, R.P.M.; Vermeij, M.J.A.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.

    2015-01-01

    The composition, ecology and environmental conditions of mesophotic coral ecosystems near the lower limits of their bathymetric distributions remain poorly understood. Here we provide the first in-depth assessment of a lower mesophotic coral community (60–100 m) in the Southern Caribbean through

  14. Diet of some spring migrant landbirds on the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jared D. Wolfe

    2009-01-01

    Spring dietary patterns of migrants in tropical latitudes are largely unknown. Here I present diet data derived from an analysis of fecal samples for six migrant landbird species during spring migration along the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica. High levels of insectivory were detected for all six species captured. The nature of the data presented is discussed in light...

  15. Counternarcotic Efforts in the Caribbean & Prospects for Cooperation: A Jamaican Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-01

    The entire island Caribbean has signed the 1988 United Nations Convention against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances, and...American Program Of Action Of Rio De Janeiro Against The Illicit Use And Production Of Narcotic Drugs And Psychotropic Substances And Traffic...1997/1). Vienna, Austria, 1997. 104 . United Nations Convention Against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances

  16. TBT pollution and effects in molluscs at US Virgin Islands, Caribbean Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Jakob; Jørgensen, Anne; Tairova, Zhanna

    2009-01-01

    Thais deltoidea, Thais rustica and Purpura patula all seem to have potential as suitable and sensitive bioindicators for assessing levels and effects of TBT pollution in coastal areas including coral reefs in the Caribbean Sea. However, considerable interspecies differences in especially accumulation...

  17. First record of Fraser's dolphin Lagenodelphis hosei for the Dutch Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, R.H.; Buurt, van G.; Debrot, A.O.; Bermudez-Villapol, L.A.; Simal, F.

    2012-01-01

    A dead dolphin found on Bonaire in August 2011 is identified as adult Fraser's dolphin Lagenodelphis hosei, a new species for the Dutch Caribbean. A first closer examination showed a collapsed lung, stomach parasite infection and abundant mouth ulceration as indications of its health status. The

  18. Exploring the Use of Information Communication Technologies by Selected Caribbean Extension Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Robert; Ganpat, Wayne; Harder, Amy; Irby, Travis L.; Lindner, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe selected Caribbean extension officers' technology preferences and examine factors that may affect their technology preferences. Design/methodology/approach: The sample consisted of extension officers (N = 119) participating in professional development training sessions in Grenada, Belize and Saint…

  19. [Crustaceans associated to macroalgae in Bajo Pepito, Isla Mujeres, Mexican Caribbean].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Vázquez, C

    2000-01-01

    Crustaceans associated with macroalgae were collected for one year by scuba diving in Bajo Pepito, Isla Mujeres, mexican Caribbean. A total of 148 organisms were found: three orders, 11 families, 18 genera and 19 species in nine types of associations. The order with highest abundance was Isopoda (112), followed by Amphipoda (20) and Decapoda (16).

  20. The atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) technique in the English-speaking Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewakun, A A

    1996-01-01

    FDI World has featured the atraumatic restorative technique on several occasions. In this article, Dr. Adenike A. Adewakun of the School of Dentistry, Faculty of Medical Sciences at the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad, describes a workshop which took place to introduce the concept and practicalities of the technique to nations in the Caribbean region.

  1. 11-Deoxyfistularin-3, a new cytotoxic metabolite from the caribbean sponge Aplysina fistularis insularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compagnone, R S; Avila, R; Suárez, A I; Abrams, O V; Rangel, H R; Arvelo, F; Piña, I C; Merentes, E

    1999-10-01

    11-Deoxyfistularin-3 (1), a new bromotyrosine derivative, was isolated among other known compounds such as fistularin-3 (2), aerothionin (3), and 11-oxoaerothionin (4) from the Caribbean sponge Aplysinafistularis (Aplysinellidae). The structure of 1 was determined by spectroscopic analysis and showed in vitro activity against the human breast carcinoma cell line MCF-7.

  2. Changing Fatherhood: An Exploratory Qualitative Study with African and African Caribbean Men in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Robert; Hewison, Alistair; Wildman, Stuart; Roskell, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a qualitative study undertaken with 46 African and African Caribbean men exploring their experiences of fatherhood. Data analysis was informed by Connell's theoretical work on changing gender relations. Findings indicate that fathers' lives were mediated by masculinities, racism, gender, migration and generational…

  3. Medical tourism in the Caribbean region: a call to consider environmental health equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, R; Crooks, V A

    2013-03-01

    Medical tourism, which is the intentional travel by private-paying patients across international borders for medical treatment, is a sector that has been targeted for growth in many Caribbean countries. The international development of this industry has raised a core set of proposed health equity benefits and drawbacks for host countries. These benefits centre on the potential investment in health infrastructure and opportunities for health labour force development while drawbacks focus on the potential for reduced access to healthcare for locals and inefficient use of limited public resources to support the growth of the medical tourism industry. The development of the medical tourism sector in Caribbean countries raises additional health equity questions that have received little attention in existing international debates, specifically in regard to environmental health equity. In this viewpoint, we introduce questions of environmental health equity that clearly emerge in relation to the developing Caribbean medical tourism sector These questions acknowledge that the growth of this sector will have impacts on the social and physical environments, resources, and waste management infrastructure in countries. We contend that in addition to addressing the wider health equity concerns that have been consistently raised in existing debates surrounding the growth of medical tourism, planning for growth in this sector in the Caribbean must take environmental health equity into account in order to ensure that local populations, environments, and ecosystems are not harmed by facilities catering to international patients.

  4. Enhancing stewardship in Latin America and Caribbean small-scale fisheries : challenges and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gasalla, M.A.; de Castro, F.

    2016-01-01

    This thematic series, entitled “Enhancing Stewardship in Latin America and Caribbean Small-Scale Fisheries”, emerged as part of a joint effort to bridge Latin-American scholars interested in networking on small-scale fisheries in the region. Built on results presented at two meetings (‘Too Big to

  5. Molecular Systematics of Threatened Seed Plant Species Endemic in the Caribbean Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    A review of available Caribbean Island red-lists species (CR and EN categories based on the IUCN guidelines from 2001, and E category established according to the IUCN guidelines from 1980) is presented. A database of at least 1,300 endemic species that are either Critically Endangered or Endangered...

  6. Exploring the Global/Local Boundary in Education in Developing Countries: The Case of the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, June; Lewis, Theodore

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on education in developing countries in the context of globalization and with specific reference to the Caribbean. It examines the concept of globalization and related concepts and positions developing countries within this context. It explores the possibility of the creation of a third space where the local and the global can…

  7. A baseline water quality assessment of the coastal reefs of Bonaire, Southern Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slijkerman, D.M.E.; León, de R.; Vries, de P.

    2014-01-01

    Bonaire is considered to harbor some of the best remaining coral reefs of the Caribbean, but faces multiple pressures including eutrophication. We measured multiple water quality indicators twice annually, from November 2011 to May 2013, at 11 locations at the west coast of Bonaire. This study

  8. Post Doctorate Award on Central America and the Caribbean at St ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Universalismo y política social en México : el caso del Seguro Popular. Documents. Descentralización, democracia y desarrollo local : una exploración del FAISM en los municipios de México. Rapports. Post-doctorate award on Central America and the Caribbean at St Antony's College : final technical report. Rapports.

  9. Molecular evidence for sequential colonization and taxon cycling in freshwater decapod shrimps on a Caribbean island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin D. Cook; Catherine M. Pringle; Jane M. Hughes

    2008-01-01

    Taxon cycling, i.e. sequential phases of expansions and contractions in species’ distributions associated with ecological or morphological shifts, are postulated to characterize dynamic biogeographic histories in various island faunas. The Caribbean freshwater shrimp assemblage is mostly widespread and sympatric throughout the region, although one species (Atyidae:...

  10. What drives microplate motion and deformation in the northeastern Caribbean plate boundary region?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Benthem, S.A.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833657; Govers, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/108173836; Wortel, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068439202

    2014-01-01

    The north Caribbean plate boundary zone is a broad deformation zone with several fault systems and tectonic blocks that move with different velocities. The indentation by the Bahamas Platform (the “Bahamas Collision”) is generally invoked as a cause of this fragmentation. We propose that a second

  11. Financial services and trade agreements in Latin America and the Caribbean : an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Goncalves, Marilyne Pereira; Stephanou, Constantinos

    2007-01-01

    The authors review the international framework governing trade in financial services, describe the treatment of financial services in recent trade agreements involving Latin America and Caribbean countries, and analyze the liberalization commitments made in three selected country case studies-Chile, Colombia, and Costa Rica. They give emphasis to free trade agreements because of the genera...

  12. Spionidae (Polychaeta) of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foster, Nancy Marie

    1971-01-01

    Although there have been several collections of polychaetous annelids from the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea, very few spionids have been included in the published species lists. This is not because they are poorly represented in this area but probably a result of their small size and the fact

  13. The Role of Language in Religious Identity Making: A Case of a Caribbean-Chinese Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerrett, Allison

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the processes of religious identity development in a Caribbean-Chinese adolescent who is from a multifaith, multilingual home. Findings include (1) the youth developed a Christian religious identity through his multiple situatedness within home and school worlds that privileged that faith and the dominant language of English…

  14. Current status of Tomato chlorotic spot virus in Florida and the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaging outbreaks of Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV), an emerging thrips-vectored tospovirus, and several invasive species of thrips are significantly impacting vegetable and other crops in Florida and the Caribbean. Host and geographic ranges of TCSV are continuing to expand in this region. Dev...

  15. Feminist Pedagogy and Social Change: The Impact of the Caribbean Institute in Gender and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Charmaine; Jackson-Best, Fatimah

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the utility of a feminist pedagogical framework in establishing and organising the Caribbean Institute in Gender and Development (CIGAD), which is a biennial intensive gender and development training programme that has taken place in Barbados since 1993. To highlight the major impact that CIGAD has had in educating and…

  16. Exploring Individual Factors Affecting Business Students' Willingness to Study Abroad: A Case Study from the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Díaz, Arleen; Fernández-Morales, Leticia M.; Vega-Vilca, José C.; Córdova-Claudio, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Despite a low rate of student participation in study abroad programs in the Caribbean, there is insufficient research about the individual factors that help determine business students' willingness to study or to participate in internship programs abroad. This study aims to explore business students' attitudes toward study abroad. The positive…

  17. 3 CFR 8390 - Proclamation 8390 of June 2, 2009. National Caribbean-American Heritage Month, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Proclamation 8390 of June 2, 2009. National Caribbean-American Heritage Month, 2009 8390 Proclamation 8390 Presidential Documents Proclamations... more important. We are neighbors, partners, and friends; we share the same aspirations for our children...

  18. New species of scleractinian coral (Cnidaria, anthozoa), Madracis carmabi n. sp from the Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekmann, OE; Bak, RPM

    2003-01-01

    Madracis carmabi, n. sp. is a relatively common zooxanthellate scleractinian coral found throughout the Caribbean. The species is described based on colonies collected from Curacao. Features that distinguish this species from other Madracis species are the combination of (1) a branching morphology,

  19. Characteristics of a French African Caribbean Epidemiological Psychiatric Sample with a History of Suicide Attempt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slama, Frederic; Dehurtevent, Benedicte; Even, Jean-Daniel; Charles-Nicolas, Aime; Ballon, Nicolas; Slama, Remy

    2008-01-01

    Research on vulnerability factors among ethnic groups, independent of primary psychiatric diagnosis, may help to identify groups at risk of suicidal behavior. French African Caribbean general psychiatric patients (N = 362) were recruited consecutively and independently of the primary psychiatric diagnosis. Demographic and clinical characteristics…

  20. Key elements towards a Joint Invasive Alien Species Strategy for the Dutch Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, S.R.; Burg, van der W.J.; Debrot, A.O.; Buurt, van G.; Freitas, de J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent inventories have documented no less than 211 exotic alien species in the wild for the Dutch Caribbean. These amount to no less than 27 introduced marine species, 65 introduced terrestrial plants, 72 introduced terrestrial and freshwater animals and 47 introduced agricultural pests and

  1. Hanging around in suburbia : Understanding normalizing power in professional relationships with Dutch Caribbean migrants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacqueline Rothfusz

    2012-01-01

    Professional interventions are rarely successful when used to “normalize” the behaviour of a disruptive group of Dutch-Caribbean migrants. Surprisingly a large number of professionals have not succeeded in assimilating a relatively small groupFoucault developed a means of analysing power mechanisms,

  2. DECOLONIZING “COMPROMISO CARIBE”: TOWARD THE DESIGN AND IDENTIFICATION FOR OTHER PERSPECTIVES ON COLOMBIAN CARIBBEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Sánchez Maldonado

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This text makes a reading of the document “compromiso Caribe” exploring the context in it was raised. Makes a review of how this discourse has hidden the emergence of other approaches and claims of Caribbean -Colombian subjects about their multiple realities and experience at different sites of existence. It is argued that although the “compromiso caribe” is in a sense a general cry of the Caribbean -Colombian and offers some regional unity against a centralized state, its orientation is still in the hands of hegemonic sectors (economic, political and academic that that reproduce patterns of cultural racism that starts on a lack of the perspectives of caribbean colombian subjects perspectives, who have been made invisible by that speech, while they are to give a political power to Compromiso Caribe as a device of coloniality. Thus, compromiso Caribe is a prisoner of culturalist and that the power, action repertoires and the path of the struggles of other subjects elsewhere in the Colombian Caribbean in order to its existence, undermining their own chances of enriching and the nature of their demands.

  3. Expansion and fragment settlement of the non-native seagrass Halophila stipulacea in a Caribbean bay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, Fee O.H.; Vonk, J.A.; Engel, M.S.; Christianen, Marjolijn J.A.

    2017-01-01

    The non-native seagrass species Halophila stipulacea has spread throughout the Eastern Caribbean since 2002, and could potentially impact the functioning of local seagrass ecosystems. Important characteristics for invasiveness, such as dispersal, recruitment and expansion of H. stipulacea at a

  4. Flattening of Caribbean coral reefs: region-wide declines in architectural complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Filip, Lorenzo; Dulvy, Nicholas K; Gill, Jennifer A; Côté, Isabelle M; Watkinson, Andrew R

    2009-08-22

    Coral reefs are rich in biodiversity, in large part because their highly complex architecture provides shelter and resources for a wide range of organisms. Recent rapid declines in hard coral cover have occurred across the Caribbean region, but the concomitant consequences for reef architecture have not been quantified on a large scale to date. We provide, to our knowledge, the first region-wide analysis of changes in reef architectural complexity, using nearly 500 surveys across 200 reefs, between 1969 and 2008. The architectural complexity of Caribbean reefs has declined nonlinearly with the near disappearance of the most complex reefs over the last 40 years. The flattening of Caribbean reefs was apparent by the early 1980s, followed by a period of stasis between 1985 and 1998 and then a resumption of the decline in complexity to the present. Rates of loss are similar on shallow (20 m) reefs and are consistent across all five subregions. The temporal pattern of declining architecture coincides with key events in recent Caribbean ecological history: the loss of structurally complex Acropora corals, the mass mortality of the grazing urchin Diadema antillarum and the 1998 El Nino Southern Oscillation-induced worldwide coral bleaching event. The consistently low estimates of current architectural complexity suggest regional-scale degradation and homogenization of reef structure. The widespread loss of architectural complexity is likely to have serious consequences for reef biodiversity, ecosystem functioning and associated environmental services.

  5. 77 FR 30506 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, South Atlantic; Comprehensive Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-BC22 Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico... its draft Comprehensive Ecosystem-Based Amendment 3 (CE-BA 3). CE-BA 3 would amend the Fishery... Lobster FMP. Public Hearings, Times, and Locations Public hearings for the Comprehensive Ecosystem-Based...

  6. Can a thermally tolerant symbiont improve the future of Caribbean coral reefs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Juan Carlos; González-Rivero, Manuel; Mumby, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    The detrimental effect of climate change induced bleaching on Caribbean coral reefs has been widely documented in recent decades. Several studies have suggested that increases in the abundance of thermally tolerant endosymbionts may ameliorate the effect of climate change on reefs. Symbionts that confer tolerance to temperature also reduce the growth rate of their coral host. Here, we show, using a spatial ecosystem model, that an increment in the abundance of a thermally tolerant endosymbiont (D1a) is unlikely to ensure the persistence of Caribbean reefs, or to reduce their rate of decline, due to the concomitant reduction in growth rate under current thermal stress predictive scenarios. Furthermore, our results suggest that given the documented vital rates of D1a-dominated corals, increasing dominance of D1a in coral hosts may have a detrimental effect by reducing the resilience of Caribbean reefs, and preventing their long-term recovery. This is because Caribbean ecosystems appear to be highly sensitive to changes in the somatic growth rate of corals. Alternative outcomes might be expected in systems with different community-level dynamics such as reefs in the Indo-Pacific, where the ecological costs of reduced growth rate might be far smaller. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Indicators on the status and trends of ecosystems in the Dutch Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, P.J.F.M.; Meesters, H.W.G.; Debrot, A.O.

    2015-01-01

    The Caribbean islands of Bonaire, Saba, St.Eustatius, Aruba, Curacao and St. Maarten are part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The islands have a rich biological diversity and a variety of globally threatened ecosystems. These ecosystems are important for their services such as the production of

  8. Hurricanes, Coral Reefs and Rainforests: Resistance, Ruin and Recovery in the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. E. Lugo; C. S. Rogers; S. W Nixon

    2000-01-01

    The coexistence of hurricanes, coral reefs, and rainforests in the Caribbean demonstrates that highly structured ecosystems with great diversity can flourish in spite of recurring exposure to intense destructive energy. Coral reefs develop in response to wave energy and resist hurricanes largely by virtue of their structural strength. Limited fetch also protects some...

  9. Chronologies in wood and resin: AMS 14C dating of pre-Hispanic Caribbean Wood Sculpture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joanna Ostapkowicz; Christopher Bronk-Ramsey; Fiona Brock; Tom Higham; Alex C. Wiedenhoeft; Erika Ribechini; Jeannette J. Lucejko; Samuel. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    This paper establishes a chronological framework for selected pieces of Caribbean (Tafno/Lucayan) wooden sculpture, enabling previously ahistoric artefacts to fit back into the wider corpus of pre-colonial material culture. Seventy-two 14C AMS determinations from 56 artefacts held in museum collections are reported, including 32 ceremonial

  10. Reef flattening effects on total richness and species responses in the Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newman, Steven P.; Meesters, E.H.; Dryden, Charlie S.; Williams, Stacey M.; Sanchez, Cristina; Mumby, Peter J.; Polunin, Nicholas V.C.

    2015-01-01

    There has been ongoing flattening of Caribbean coral reefs with the loss of habitat having severe implications for these systems. Complexity and its structural components are important to fish species richness and community composition, but little is known about its role for other taxa or

  11. "Bad Talk" Made Good: Language Variety in Four Caribbean British Children's Poets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article looks at how four British-based poets born in the Caribbean exploit the rich language repertoire available to them in their work for children and young people. Following initial consideration of questions of definition and terminology, poetry collections by James Berry, John Agard, Grace Nichols and Valerie Bloom are discussed, with a…

  12. The Caribbean News Agency: Third World Model. Journalism Monographs Number 71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbert, Marlene

    This monograph is a history of the Caribbean News Agency (CANA), which is jointly owned by private and public mass media of its region and independent of both governments and foreign news agencies. It is proposed that CANA may provide a unique model of an independent, regional third-world news agency. Sections of the monograph examine (1) CANA's…

  13. Organic matter degradation drives benthic cyanobacterial mat abundance on caribbean coral reefs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brocke, Hannah J.; Polerecky, Lubos; De Beer, Dirk; Weber, Miriam; Claudet, Joachim; Nugues, Maggy M.

    2015-01-01

    Benthic cyanobacterial mats (BCMs) are impacting coral reefs worldwide. However, the factors and mechanisms driving their proliferation are unclear. We conducted a multi-year survey around the Caribbean island of Curaçao, which revealed highest BCM abundance on sheltered reefs close to urbanised

  14. Demographic history of Diadema antillarum, a keystone herbivore on Caribbean reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessios, H A; Garrido, M J; Kessing, B D

    2001-11-22

    The sea urchin Diadema antillarum was the most important herbivore on Caribbean reefs until 1983, when mass mortality reduced its populations by more than 97%. Knowledge of its past demography is essential to reconstruct reef ecology as it was before human impact, which has been implicated as having caused high pre-mortality Diadema abundance. To determine the history of its population size, we sequenced the ATPase 6 and 8 region of mitochondrial DNA from populations in the Caribbean and in the eastern Atlantic (which was not affected by the mass mortality), as well as from the eastern Pacific D. mexicanum. The Caribbean population harbours an order of magnitude more molecular diversity than those of the eastern Pacific or the eastern Atlantic and, despite the recent mass mortality, its DNA sequences bear the genetic signature of a previous population expansion. By estimating mutation rates from divergence between D. antillarum and D. mexicanum, that were separated at a known time by the Isthmus of Panama, and by using estimates of effective population size derived from mismatch distributions and a maximum likelihood coalescence algorithm, we date the expansion as having occurred no more recently than 100 000 years before the present. Thus, Diadema was abundant in the Caribbean long before humans could have affected ecological processes; the genetic data contain no evidence of a recent, anthropogenically caused, population increase.

  15. New species of the genus Copidognathus (Halacaridae) from the Caribbean region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartsch, I.

    1984-01-01

    The halacarid fauna of the eastern North Atlantic Ocean and its adjacent waters, the Mediterranean, the North Sea, and the Baltic, has been studied and described in more than 100 papers; but only a few papers deal with the halacarid fauna on the east coast of the United States and the Caribbean

  16. First visual record of a living basking shark Cetorhinus maximus in the Caribbean Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geelhoed, S.C.V.; Janinhoff, N.; Verdaat, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of basking sharks in the Caribbean Sea is only recently documented by satellite tagging studies, which show that some individuals migrate through the region en route from waters off the east coast of the USA to waters off northeastern South-America. The observation of a basking shark

  17. Deep-water sponges (Porifera) from Bonaire and Klein Curacao, Southern Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soest, R.W.M.; Meesters, H.W.G.; Becking, L.E.

    2014-01-01

    Four submersible dives off the coast of Bonaire (Caribbean Netherlands) and Klein Curaçao (Curaçao) to depths of 99.5–242 m, covering lower mesophotic and upper dysphotic zones, yielded 52 sponge specimens belonging to 31 species. Among these we identified 13 species as new to science. These are

  18. Caribbean and Central American Women's Feminist Inquiry through Theater-Based Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Ares, Rocío

    2015-01-01

    Feminist action research interrogates gendered dynamics in the development of a collective consciousness. A group of immigrant Latina women (Latinas) from the Caribbean and Central America employed community-based theater as an instrument to mobilize diverse audiences against discriminatory practices and policies. Based on their theater work, I…

  19. Foreword: Regional solidarity and commitment to protection in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Grandi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available At a time when over 65 million people are forcibly displaced worldwide, Latin America and the Caribbean offer examples of good practices from a region which continues to uphold a long-standing commitment to protect those in need.

  20. Sexual relationships and working lives of free Afro-Caribbean women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Marie Veisegaard

    2016-01-01

    is inspired by concepts of race and gender in postcolonial studies. The investigation shows the prevalence in the Danish-Norwegian West Indies of discourses of Afro-Caribbean women as, on the one hand, unwomanly and physically strong and, on the other hand, promiscuous and of easy virtue. On this basis...