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Sample records for caribbean sea recorded

  1. First visual record of a living basking shark Cetorhinus maximus in the Caribbean Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geelhoed, S.C.V.; Janinhoff, N.; Verdaat, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of basking sharks in the Caribbean Sea is only recently documented by satellite tagging studies, which show that some individuals migrate through the region en route from waters off the east coast of the USA to waters off northeastern South-America. The observation of a basking shark

  2. First visual record of a living basking shark Cetorhinus maximus in the Caribbean Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geelhoed, S.C.V.; Janinhoff, N.; Verdaat, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of basking sharks in the Caribbean Sea is only recently documented by satellite tagging studies, which show that some individuals migrate through the region en route from waters off the east coast of the USA to waters off northeastern South-America. The observation of a basking shark

  3. Southern Caribbean Sea temperature and salinity variability since the mid-Holocene from monthly resolved coral records

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    Felis, Thomas; Giry, Cyril; Kölling, Martin; Scholz, Denis; Wei, Wei; Lohmann, Gerrit; Scheffers, Sander

    2013-04-01

    In the tropical Atlantic, proxy reconstructions of Holocene sea surface temperature and salinity that resolve seasonality and interannual to decadal variability are sparse. However, ocean-atmosphere interactions on these timescales play a critical role for climate extremes such as droughts, floods and hurricanes. Consequently, a better understanding of the natural range of sea surface variability on these timescales is important for projections of future tropical Atlantic climate change. Here we present monthly resolved reconstructions of sea surface temperature (SST) and δ18Oseawater (used as proxy for sea surface salinity, SSS) in the southern Caribbean Sea for snapshots throughout the mid- to late Holocene, derived from Sr/Ca and δ18O analyses of fossil shallow-water corals (Diploria strigosa) from Bonaire (Netherlands Antilles). The corals were dated by the 230Th/U-method and provide a total of ~300 years of record, with individual time windows reaching up to 68 years in length. Our coral records indicate that mid- to late Holocene SST and SSS were characterized by persistent quasi-biennial and prominent interannual to multidecadal variability. However, the amplitude of variability on individual timescales has varied over the last 6200 years. We find that on interannual to multidecadal timescales, warmer conditions were accompanied by more saline conditions at the sea surface, and vice versa. Potential forcing mechanisms of this observed pattern are discussed, including the wind-induced advection of surface waters from the South and the variations in the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Compared to the late Holocene, SST variability on inter- to multidecadal timescales was more pronounced during the mid- Holocene, and accompanied by enhanced SSS variability. Moreover, an increased amplitude of the SSS annual cycle is reconstructed for the mid- Holocene, very likely resulting from increased summer precipitation at that time, which

  4. New geographic records of Hamlets, Hypoplectrus spp. (Serranidae), in the Caribbean Sea

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    Williams, E.H.; Bunkley-Williams, L.; Rogers, C.S.; Fenner, R.

    2006-01-01

    The exact number of species of hamlets, Hypoplectrus spp., in the Caribbean is controversial and the geographic distributions of these species/forms are poorly documented. We report Curac??ao, Netherlands Antilles, as a new locality for the Barred Hamlet, H. puella (Cuvier), and Shy Hamlet, H. guttavarius (Poey); and St. John and St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, for the Tan Hamlet, Hypoplectrus sp. The Black Hamlet, H. nigricans (Poey), has previously been reported from Curac??ao, but we did not see it there.

  5. New geographic records of Hamlets, Hypoplectrus spp. (Serranidae, in the Caribbean Sea

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    Ernest H Williams, Jr

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The exact number of species of hamlets, Hypoplectrus spp., in the Caribbean is controversial and the geographic distributions of these species/forms are poorly documented. We report Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles, as a new locality for the Barred Hamlet, H. puella (Cuvier, and Shy Hamlet, H. guttavarius (Poey; and St. John and St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, for the Tan Hamlet, Hypoplectrus sp. The Black Hamlet, H. nigricans (Poey, has previously been reported from Curaçao, but we did not see it there. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54 (Suppl. 3: 171-173. Epub 2007 Jan. 15.En el Caribe, el número exacto de especies de pez vaca, Hypoplectrus spp., es controversial y la distribución geográfica de estas especies/variedades está pobremente documentada. Presentamos Curaçao, Antillas Holandesas, como nueva localidad para el pez vaca de barras, H. puella (Cuvier y el vaca bicolor, H. guttavarius (Poey. Agregamos St. John y St. Thomas, Islas Vírgenes de los EUA, al ámbito del "Tan Hamlet", Hypoplectrus sp. Anteriormente se dijo que en Curaçao se halla el pez vaca negra, H. nigricans (Poey, pero no lo vimos en nuestros muestreos.

  6. Decadal- to interannual-scale source water variations in the Caribbean Sea recorded by Puerto Rican coral radiocarbon

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    Kilbourne, K.H. [University of South Florida, College of Marine Science, St. Petersburg, FL (United States); NOAA, Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, CO (United States); Quinn, Terrence M. [University of South Florida, College of Marine Science, St. Petersburg, FL (United States); John A. and Katherine G. Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas at Austin, Institute for Geophysics, Austin, TX (United States); Guilderson, Thomas P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, L-397, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA (United States); University of California at Santa Cruz, Department of Ocean Sciences and Institute of Marine Science, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Webb, Robert S. [NOAA, Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, CO (United States); Taylor, Frederick W. [John A. and Katherine G. Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas at Austin, Institute for Geophysics, Austin, TX (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Water that forms the Florida Current, and eventually the Gulf Stream, coalesces in the Caribbean from both subtropical and equatorial sources. The equatorial sources are made up of, in part, South Atlantic water moving northward and compensating for southward flow at depth related to meridional overturning circulation. Subtropical surface water contains relatively high amounts of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C), whereas equatorial waters are influenced by the upwelling of low {sup 14}C water and have relatively low concentrations of {sup 14}C. We use a 250 year record of {delta}{sup 14}C in a coral from southwestern Puerto Rico along with previously published coral {delta}{sup 14}C records as tracers of subtropical and equatorial water mixing in the northern Caribbean. Data generated in this study and from other studies indicate that the influence of either of the two water masses can change considerably on interannual to interdecadal time scales. Variability due to ocean dynamics in this region is large relative to variability caused by atmospheric {sup 14}C changes, thus masking the Suess effect at this site. A mixing model produced using coral {delta}{sup 14}C illustrates the time varying proportion of equatorial versus subtropical waters in the northern Caribbean between 1963 and 1983. The results of the model are consistent with linkages between multidecadal thermal variability in the North Atlantic and meridional overturning circulation. Ekman transport changes related to tradewind variability are proposed as a possible mechanism to explain the observed switches between relatively low and high {delta}{sup 14}C values in the coral radiocarbon records. (orig.)

  7. Decadal- to interannual-scale source water variations in the Caribbean Sea recorded by Puerto Rican coral radiocarbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilbourne, K H; Quinn, T M; Guilderson, T P; Webb, R S; Taylor, F W

    2006-12-05

    Water that forms the Florida Current, and eventually the Gulf Stream, coalesces in the Caribbean from both subtropical and equatorial sources. The equatorial sources are made up of, in part, South Atlantic water moving northward and compensating for southward flow at depth related to meridional overturning circulation. Subtropical surface water contains relatively high amounts of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C), whereas equatorial waters are influenced by the upwelling of low {sup 14}C water and have relatively low concentrations of {sup 14}C. We use a 250-year record of {Delta}{sup 14}C in a coral from southwestern Puerto Rico along with previously published coral {Delta}{sup 14}C records as tracers of subtropical and equatorial water mixing in the northern Caribbean. Data generated in this study and from other studies indicate that the influence of either of the two water masses can change considerably on interannual to interdecadal time scales. Variability due to ocean dynamics in this region is large relative to variability caused by atmospheric {sup 14}C changes, thus masking the Suess effect at this site. A mixing model produced using coral {Delta}{sup 14}C illustrates the time varying proportion of equatorial versus subtropical waters in the northern Caribbean between 1963 and 1983. The results of the model are consistent with linkages between multidecadal thermal variability in the North Atlantic and meridional overturning circulation. Ekman transport changes related to tradewind variability are proposed as a possible mechanism to explain the observed switches between relatively low and relatively high {Delta}{sup 14}C values in the coral radiocarbon records.

  8. The Caribbean conundrum of Holocene sea level.

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    Jackson, Luke; Mound, Jon

    2014-05-01

    In the tropics, pre-historic sea-level curve reconstruction is often problematic because it relies upon sea-level indicators whose vertical relationship to the sea surface is poorly constrained. In the Caribbean, fossil corals, mangrove peats and shell material dominate the pre-historic indicator record. The common approach to reconstruction involves the use of modern analogues to these indicators to establish a fixed vertical habitable range. The aim of these reconstructions is to find spatial variability in the Holocene sea level in an area gradually subsiding (Holocene sea-level indicators and the other of published, modern growth rates, abundance and coverage of mangrove and coral species for different depths. We use the first catalogue to calibrate 14C ages to give a probabilistic age range for each indicator. We use the second catalogue to define a depth probability distribution function (pdf) for mangroves and each coral species. The Holocene indicators are grouped into 12 sub-regions around the Caribbean. For each sub-region we apply our sea-level reconstruction, which involves stepping a fixed-length time window through time and calculating the position (and rate) of sea-level (change) using a thousand realisations of the time/depth pdfs to define an envelope of probable solutions. We find that the sub-regional relative sea-level curves display spatio-temporal variability including a south-east to north-west 1500 year lag in the arrival of Holocene sea level to that of the present day. We demonstrate that these variations are primarily due to glacial-isostatic-adjustment induced sea-level change and that sub-regional variations (where sufficient data exists) are due to local uplift variability.

  9. Namalycastis occulta n. sp. and a new record of N. borealis (Polychaeta: Nereididae: Namanereidinae) from the Northwestern Caribbean Sea.

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    Conde-Vela, Víctor Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The nereidid polychaete genus Namalycastis Hartman, 1959 has been recorded almost exclusively in non-marine environments. This genus includes species having four pairs of tentacular cirri, and its species mainly differ by the relative size of dorsal cirri in posterior chaetigers. Namalycastis occulta n. sp. is described based upon non-mature and mature specimens collected in the intertidal from Chetumal Bay, Quintana Roo, Mexico. Its distinctive features are the lack of notopodial spinigers, eyes, and teeth in the mandibles. Namalycastis borealis Glasby was found in Tamalcab Island, Chetumal Bay and it is the first record for Mexico. Analyses of the intraspecific variability, a key to the known species in the Grand Caribbean region, and commentaries about some taxonomic topics are also included.

  10. ICE-6G models of postglacial relative sea-level history applied to Holocene coral reef and mangrove records of the western Caribbean

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    Toscano, M. A.; Peltier, W. R.; Drummond, R.; Gonzalez, J.

    2012-12-01

    Fossil coral reefs and mangrove peat accumulations at western Caribbean sites along a latitudinal gradient from the Florida Keys through Belize and Panama provide dated and interpreted 8,000 year Holocene sea-level records for comparison with RSL predictions of the ICE-6G (VM5A, VM5B; L90) models of glacio-hydro-isostatic adjustment, with and without rotational feedback. These presumably passive continental margin sites provide the means to establish a N-S spatial trend in the varying influences of GIA, eustatic components of Holocene sea level, extent of forebulge collapse and influence of rotational feedback over a 20° latitudinal range. Previous ICE6G (VM5A) model-coral data comparisons for St Croix, USVI, Antigua, Martinique and Barbados (Toscano, Peltier and Drummond, 2011, QSR) along the eastern Caribbean plate and island arc illustrated the close model-data compatibility, the influence of rotational feedback acting as a significant factor in reducing misfits, and the need for high quality in situ data to confirm the extension of the proglacial forebulge into tropical latitudes. The gradient of western Caribbean continental shelf sites comprises a much more varied range of model-data relationships based on extensive combined Acropora palmata (reef crest coral) and Rhizophora mangle (microtidal mangrove) peat datasets in all cases. Starting at the northernmost region with the Florida Keys, there exist negative model misfits to the data, suggesting the possibility of a positive tectonic overprint upon expectations related to the glacial isostatic adjustment process acting alone, even though this region is normally believed to be tectonically stable. The largest multi-proxy database from Belize supports the likelihood of increasing rates of subsidence from north to south in the Belize Lagoon, which may account for numerous positive GIA model-data misfits. The southernmost site at Panama is most similar to Belize in the possible nature of tectonic influences on

  11. A 200-Year Record of Interannual SST and pH Variability from the Lesser Antilles (Caribbean Sea, North Atlantic) Inferred from a Siderastrea Siderea Reef Coral

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    Douville, E.; Paterne, M.; Feuillet, N.; Noury, C.; Bordier, L.; Thil, F.

    2014-12-01

    Global warming and ocean acidification caused by the rising levels of anthropogenic CO2 in the atmosphere need to be better constrained by long-term studies of high resolution natural archives, especially at inter-annual and decadal scales. In the framework of the French INSU program LEFE/CYBER ACID-Antilles, here we developed a 200-year long interannual time series of sea surface temperature and pH based on the geochemical composition of tropical reef forming coral. The selected tropical coral called CHANCEL-1 is a colony of genus Siderastrea Siderea which was collected in 2008 from a living micro-atoll off Martinique in the Lesser Antilles, facing the eastern side of the Caribbean Sea. The colony of 1-meter extension presents a mean growth rate of 4 - 5 mm/yr. Along the growth axis, we measured the boron isotopic composition (delta11B) and trace element ratios (Li/Mg, Sr/Ca), which reveal a progressive decrease of the surface water pH and increase of temperature during the past 200 years. These observations cooperate the anthropogenic forcing, i.e. rising atmospheric CO2 and rising sea surface temperatures due to global warming. However, other processes apparently affect the geochemical records, as indicated by sub-decadal variations of pH and temperature reconstruction overprinting the long term global trend. Possible drivers of such most likely regional variability might be decadal changes of oceanographic conditions (upwelling, freshwater runoff, seawater masse changes, etc.) as well as species dependent biological controls.

  12. Regional diversity of amphipoda in the Caribbean Sea.

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    Martín, Alberto; Díaz, Yusbelly; Miloslavich, Patricia; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Guerra-García, José Manuel; Ortiz, Manuel; Valencia, Bellineth; Giraldo, Alan; Klein, Eduardo

    2013-12-01

    The order Amphipoda is one of the most diverse within Peracarids, and comprises 6950 described marine species. Amphipod research in the Caribbean Sea began in the late 1800s, but has increased significantly since 1980. In this study, we analized the amphipod biodiversity (Caprellidea, Gammaridea, Hyperiidea, and Ingolfiellidea) of the Caribbean Sea. For this, we compiled available data on species diversity of marine amphipods (data bases: WoRMS and OBIS and published species lists) into a comprehensive taxonomic list by country for the ecoregions of the Caribbean. Additionally, we analized the relative contribution of each country to regional diversity and the rate of discovery of new species. The Caribbean amphipod fauna is composed of 535 species within 236 genera and 73 families for the higher taxon. The Western Caribbean ecoregion holds the largest diversity (282 species), while the Eastern Caribbean recorded the lowest one (73). Mexico and Venezuela recorded the largest number of species with 266 and 206, respectively. Twelve countries had less than 50 species. The richest suborder is the Gammaridea with 381 species followed by the suborder Hyperiidea with 116. From the total of 535 amphipod species reported for the Caribbean region, 218 have the Caribbean as the holotype locality, and 132 are endemic (about 25% of the total). Areas of higher diversity seem to be concentrated along the Mexican Caribbean, Cuba and the Northern coast of South America (Venezuela-Colombia); however, such pattern is most likely reflecting local collection efforts and taxonomic expertise rather than actual distribution. Knowledge of amphipod species is mostly limited to shallow, near-shore waters, with little infonnation available on the deep sea fauna. Regional research priorities for this group should be focused on completing shallow water coastal inventories of species in Central America and the Greater and Lesser Antilles. In addition, sampling the deep sea ecosystems should

  13. Understanding trophic relationships among Caribbean sea urchins

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez Barreras, Ruber; Cuevas, Elvira; Cabanillas-Terán, Nancy; Branoff, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The species Echinometra lucunter, Echinometra viridis, Lytechinus variegatus, Tripneustes ventricosus, and Diadema antillarum are the most common sea urchins of littoral habitats in the Caribbean. T. ventricosus and L. variegatus are associated with seagrass beds, while the other three species usually inhabit hardground substrates. Food preferences of these species are well documented and they are commonly accepted as being primarily herbivorous-omnivorous; nevertheless, few of them have prev...

  14. [Euphausiids (Crustacea: Melacostraca) from the southern Mexican Caribbean Sea].

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    Castellanos, Iván; Gasca, Rebeca

    2002-03-01

    The composition, abundance and distribution of euphausiids from the southern part of the Mexican Caribbean Sea (August 1986) were sampled during the ARCOMM I cruise on board the R/V "Justo Sierra" of UNAM. Sampling was done using a Bongo-net (0.5 mm mesh size) performing oblique hauls from 200 m to the surface at 28 stations. Of the total euphausiid numbers, the most abundant species was Stylocheiron carinatum (49%), followed by Euphausia americana (9.8%) and E. tenera with (7.8%). The highest total density and that of the three most abundant species occurred during the night sampling, and probably was related to vertical migration patterns. The Bray-Curtis index revealed three station assemblages, related to the day-night variations of the euphausiid community. Species were distributed mainly in the oceanic area, and were absent in the neritic zones. The local fauna shows a strong affinity for the euphausiid community of the Gulf of Mexico and other areas of the Caribbean Sea. Four species are considered to be new records for the western Caribbean Sea.

  15. Holocene Sea-Level Database For The Caribbean Region

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    Khan, N. S.; Horton, B.; Engelhart, S. E.; Peltier, W. R.; Scatena, F. N.; Vane, C. H.; Liu, S.

    2013-12-01

    Holocene relative sea-level (RSL) records from far-field locations are important for understanding the driving mechanisms controlling the nature and timing of the mid-late Holocene reduction in global meltwaters and providing background rates of late Holocene RSL change with which to compare the magnitude of 20th century RSL rise. The Caribbean region has traditionally been considered far-field (i.e., with negligible glacio-isostatic adjustment (GIA) influence), although recent investigations indicate otherwise. Here, we consider the spatial variability in glacio-isostatic, tectonic and local contributions on RSL records from the circum-Caribbean region to infer a Holocene eustatic sea-level signal. We have constructed a database of quality-controlled, spatially comprehensive, Holocene RSL observations for the circum-Caribbean region. The database contains over 500 index points, which locate the position of RSL in time and space. The database incorporates sea-level observations from a latitudinal range of 5°N to 25°N and longitudinal range of 55°W to 90°W. We include sea-level observations from 11 ka BP to present, although the majority of the index points in the database are younger than 8 ka BP. The database is sub-divided into 13 regions based on the distance from the former Laurentide Ice Sheet and regional tectonic setting. The index points were primarily derived from mangrove peat deposits, which in the Caribbean form in the upper half of the tidal range, and corals (predominantly Acropora palmata), the growth of which is constrained to the upper 5 m of water depth. The index points are classified on the basis of their susceptibility to compaction (e.g., intercalated, basal). The influence of temporal changes in tidal range on index points is also considered. The sea-level reconstructions demonstrate that RSL did not exceed the present height (0 m) during the Holocene in the majority of locations, except at sites in Suriname/Guayana and possibly Trinidad

  16. Mesoscale Variability of the Caribbean Sea from GEOSAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-01

    anomalies, their magnitude, and to track them as they travel through the basin. If insufficient data were available over the Caribbean during a given ERM...anticyclonic eddies traveling through the Caribbean Sea begin in the season of lower wind intensity (March to May) of both years. Apparently the wind plays... corriente norte colombiana para la circulaci6n de las aguas en la plataforma continental : Su acci6n sobre la dispersi6n de los efluentes en

  17. Future trends of the Sea Surface Temperature for the Caribbean and the Western Mediterranean Seas

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    L. Garcies

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Global Climate Models foresee a general warming of the atmosphere, with varying intensity depending on the characteristics of each model and the hypotheses made on the release of gases of antropic origin. The warming is not expected to be homogeneous over the planet. In this work we focus on the evolution of the sea surface temperature of the Caribbean and the Mediterranean seas, and its linked with the likely prolongation of the hurricane season and the increase of strength of the hurricanes in the Caribbean, as well as with the more apt conditions for severe weather in the Mediterranean sea. In both areas more frequent occurence and intensity of severe weather events are expected due to the predicted increment of the sea surface temperature, 1.5ºC for the Caribbean sea and 2.5ºC for the Mediterranean sea.

  18. Millennial-scale Surface and Subsurface Dynamics in the Caribbean Sea from LGM to Holocene

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    Reißig, S.; Nuernberg, D.; Poggemann, D. W.

    2016-12-01

    The Caribbean Sea is an important source of warm and saline water that is transported into the North Atlantic, and therefore plays a key role in the global thermohaline circulation. Today, waters from the (sub-) tropical Atlantic enter the Caribbean through a variety of passages. The water masses flow through the Caribbean into the Gulf of Mexico via the Yucatan Strait, forming the Gulf Stream which represents the northward flowing branch of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). The AMOC is intimately linked to abrupt northern hemisphere climate change and is a key player for the transport of tropical heat to high northern latitudes. A reduced AMOC during the deglacial resulted in sea-surface cooling in wide areas of the tropical North Atlantic, while the subsurface ocean experienced regional warming by several degrees due to the reorganization of ocean circulation at intermediate depths. Based on stable isotope compositions (δ13C, δ18O) and elemental (Mg/Ca) ratios of a surface dwelling (Globigerinoides ruber) and deep dwelling (Globorotalia truncatulinoides) planktonic foraminifera, we reconstruct surface and subsurface temperature, thermocline variation and salinity changes during the past 24 thousand years, to evaluate the role of a weakened AMOC on the main inflow areas of Equatorial Current waters into the Caribbean. This study reveals new information about water mass inflow into the Caribbean basin and is compared to an unpublished record of the water masses exiting the Caribbean from a core located at the flow-through of the Caribbean into the Gulf of Mexico (Campeche Bank).

  19. [Hermit crabs (Anomura: Paguroidea) distribution patterns in the Colombian Caribbean Sea].

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    Martínez Campos, Bibian; Hernando Campos, Néstor; Bermúdez Tobón, Adriana

    2012-03-01

    Hermit crabs represent the marine life in the Colombian Caribbean, and are important for the dynamic equilibrium maintenance in ecosystems, the ecological interactions and their impact on food web stability. Generally, in order to come up with some conservation strategies, strong bio-geographical information is needed for poll cies definition. With this aim, this study analyzed the distribution patterns of hermit crabs in the Colombian Caribbean Sea. through classification and spatial ordination multivariate analyses, using historical records from years 1916 to 2006. Besides, the world distribution of Colombian species and their geographic affinity in the Caribbean and Western Atlantic were identified. The results show deep differences between coastal and continental slope faunas, and latitudinal differences in the assemblages, with the identification of three groups: Northeast. Center and Southwest. The differences in faunal composition that support these three groups were determined. Based on maps of the Colombian marine ecosystems, it was found that the main factors affecting the distribution of hermit crabs were the Caribaná slope (depth), water-mass temperature, Guajira sea-grass beds, and particular conditions of "Coralline Archipelagos" and "Darién" eco-regions. Colombian hermit crab fauna is more related to the North Atlantic and the Antilles, than to the South Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. Additionally, geographical sub-provinces in which Colombia is included, these were found as transition zones among Northern and Austral subprovinces of the Greater Caribbean.

  20. Venezuelan Caribbean Sea under the threat of TBT.

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    Paz-Villarraga, César Augusto; Castro, Italo B; Miloslavich, Patricia; Fillmann, Gilberto

    2015-01-01

    Although environmental tributyltin (TBT) contamination is considered a solved problem, imposex occurrence in Plicopurpura patula as well as butyltins (BTs) contamination in sediments and tissues were detected along 700 km of the Caribbean coastal shore. Areas under the influence of five main ports of Venezuela were covered, as well as large marinas and sites located away from expected sources. Marinas were the most contaminated areas, whilst imposex incidence and TBT levels were relatively low in areas nearby commercial harbors. Thus, it is evident that marinas have become the main source of fresh TBT to the region. This might explain why imposex incidence seems to be widely distributed along the Venezuelan coast, since leisure boats are circulating along the whole coastal region. In fact, this could be the pattern for other areas of the Caribbean Sea.

  1. Distribution and Geochemical Composition of Living Planktonic Foraminifera in the Caribbean Sea

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    Jentzen, A.; Schönfeld, J.; Nuernberg, D.

    2014-12-01

    Planktonic foraminifera are widely used for paleoceanographic reconstructions of different water mass dynamics. For accurate reconstruction, it is crucial to understand the habitat, ecology and shell chemistry of single species. In this study, living planktonic foraminifera were collected with a multi closing net in the Caribbean Sea during R/V Meteor cruises M78/1 in 2009, and M94, M95 in 2013 respectively. The population structure in surface to subsurface waters was assessed and related to salinity, temperature and chlorophyll concentrations. Stable isotopes and trace elements of shell calcite are measured to improve the proxy calibration. At all stations, the highest standing stock was observed in the near-surface layer and the highest population densities in the eastern Caribbean Sea. Markedly low abundances of foraminifera were recognized in Gulf of Paria and close to the Orinoco River plume. The most frequent species in the Caribbean were Globigerinoides sacculifer, Globigerinita glutinata, Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerinella calida, and Neogloboquadrina dutertrei. Abundance maxima of G. sacculifer and G. ruber were always recorded in the surface water. The preferred habitat of N. dutertrei was the near-surface mixed layer, even though the species has been commonly referred to calcify in the thermocline. As expected, the deep dweller Globorotalia truncatulinoides (dextral) was mainly observed in upper intermediate waters, although juvenile specimens were found at shallower depths. Plankton tow data showed that shallow-living species adjusted their habitat to surface water masses, which deepened in the southern Caribbean Sea from East to West. Furthermore, intermediate to deep dwellers appear to prevail in surface or subsurface waters during the early stage of their life cycle.

  2. Drivers of Holocene sea-level change in the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nicole S.; Ashe, Erica; Horton, Benjamin P.; Dutton, Andrea; Kopp, Robert E.; Brocard, Gilles; Engelhart, Simon E.; Hill, David F.; Peltier, W. R.; Vane, Christopher H.; Scatena, Fred N.

    2017-01-01

    We present a Holocene relative sea-level (RSL) database for the Caribbean region (5°N to 25°N and 55°W to 90°W) that consists of 499 sea-level index points and 238 limiting dates. The database was compiled from multiple sea-level indicators (mangrove peat, microbial mats, beach rock and acroporid and massive corals). We subdivided the database into 20 regions to investigate the influence of tectonics and glacial isostatic adjustment on RSL. We account for the local-scale processes of sediment compaction and tidal range change using the stratigraphic position (overburden thickness) of index points and paleotidal modeling, respectively. We use a spatio-temporal empirical hierarchical model to estimate RSL position and its rates of change in the Caribbean over 1-ka time slices. Because of meltwater input, the rates of RSL change were highest during the early Holocene, with a maximum of 10.9 ± 0.6 m/ka in Suriname and Guyana and minimum of 7.4 ± 0.7 m/ka in south Florida from 12 to 8 ka. Following complete deglaciation of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) by ∼7 ka, mid-to late-Holocene rates slowed to model constrains the spatial extent of the mid-Holocene highstand. RSL did not exceed the present height during the Holocene, except on the northern coast of South America, where in Suriname and Guyana, RSL attained a height higher than present by 6.6 ka (82% probability). The highstand reached a maximum elevation of +1.0 ± 1.1 m between 5.3 and 5.2 ka. Regions with a highstand were located furthest away from the former LIS, where the effects from ocean syphoning and hydro-isostasy outweigh the influence of subsidence from forebulge collapse.

  3. Ciguatera fish poisoning and sea surface temperatures in the Caribbean Sea and the West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tester, Patricia A; Feldman, Rebecca L; Nau, Amy W; Kibler, Steven R; Wayne Litaker, R

    2010-10-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is a circumtropical disease caused by ingestion of a variety of reef fish that bioaccumulate algal toxins. Distribution and abundance of the organisms that produce these toxins, chiefly dinoflagellates of the genus Gambierdiscus, are reported to correlate positively with water temperature. Consequently, there is growing concern that increasing temperatures associated with climate change could increase the incidence of CFP. This concern prompted experiments on the growth rates of six Gambierdiscus species at temperatures between 18 degrees C and 33 degrees C and the examination of sea surface temperatures in the Caribbean and West Indies for areas that could sustain rapid Gambierdiscus growth rates year-round. The thermal optimum for five of six Gambierdiscus species tested was >/=29 degrees C. Long-term SST data from the southern Gulf of Mexico indicate the number of days with sea surface temperatures >/=29 degrees C has nearly doubled (44 to 86) in the last three decades. To determine how the sea surface temperatures and Gambierdiscus growth data correlate with CFP incidences in the Caribbean, a literature review and a uniform, region-wide survey (1996-2006) of CFP cases were conducted. The highest CFP incidence rates were in the eastern Caribbean where water temperatures are warmest and least variable.

  4. Weather types across the Caribbean basin and their relationship with rainfall and sea surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moron, Vincent; Gouirand, Isabelle; Taylor, Michael

    2016-07-01

    North Atlantic Oscillation; more (less) WT 2 and less (more) WT 8 than usually occur from January to early April during warm (cold) ENSO events, the strongest anomalies being recorded during eastern events. Multinomial logistic regression is used to hindcast the 11-day low-pass filtered occurrence of WTs from local (Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico) and remote (Eastern and Central Tropical Pacific) sea surface temperatures (SSTs). In boreal summer, the interannual variability of the seasonal occurrence of WTs 4-6 is well hindcast when at least the Caribbean Sea and Eastern Tropical Pacific are included as predictors with anomalously warm (cold) SSTs over the Caribbean Sea (Eastern Tropical Pacific) being related to more WT 5-6 and less WT 4 and vice-versa. Using antecedent SST to forecast WT frequency shows that the SST forcing is negligible at the start of boreal summer and increases toward its end.

  5. Controls of Caribbean surface hydrology during the mid- to late Holocene: insights from monthly resolved coral records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Giry

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Here we reconstruct seasonality and interannual to multidecadal variability of sea surface hydrology of the southern Caribbean Sea by applying paired coral Sr/Ca and δ18O measurements on fossil annually-banded Diploria strigosa corals from Bonaire. This allows for better understanding short-term (i.e., seasonal to multidecadal variability of the Caribbean hydrological cycle during the mid- to late Holocene. The monthly-resolved coral Δ δ18O records are used as a proxy for the oxygen isotopic composition of seawater (δ18Osw of the southern Caribbean Sea. Consistent with modern day conditions, annual δ18Osw cycles reconstructed from three modern corals reveal that freshwater budget at the study site is influenced by both the evaporation/precipitation ratio and the seasonal advection of tropical freshwater brought by wind-driven surface currents. In contrast, the annual δ18Osw cycle reconstructed from a mid-Holocene coral indicates sharp peaks towards more negative values in summer suggesting intense summer precipitation at 6 ka before present (BP. In line with this our model simulations indicate that increased seasonality of the hydrological cycle at 6 ka BP results from enhanced precipitation in summertime. On interannual to multidecadal timescales, the systematic positive correlation observed between reconstructed sea surface temperature and salinity suggests that freshwater discharged from the Orinoco and Amazon rivers and transported into the Caribbean by wind-driven surface currents is a critical component influencing sea surface hydrology on these timescales.

  6. The genus Gnathia Leach (Isopoda) from the Santa Marta area, northern Colombia, with a review of Gnathiidea from the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Hans-Georg

    1988-01-01

    Six species of the genus Gnathia (Crustacea: Isopoda: Gnathiidea) are recorded from the Caribbean Sea of northern Colombia. Gnathia gonzalezi n. sp., Gnathia magdalenensis n. sp., Gnathia samariensis n. sp., and Gnathia vellosa n. sp. are described; Gnathia beethoveni Paul & Menzies, 1971 and Gnathi

  7. Sea-surface salinity variations in the Northern Caribbean Sea across the mid-Pleistocene transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sepulcre

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at documenting climate changes in tropical area in response to the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT by reconstructing past hydrologic variations in the Northern Caribbean Sea and its influence on the stability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC during the last 940 kyr. Using core MD03-2628, we estimated past changes in sea surface salinity (SSS using Δδ18O, the difference between the modern and the past δ18O of seawater (obtained by combining alkenone thermometer data with the δ18O of the planktonic foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber (white and corrected for ice-sheet volume effects. Today, the lowest SSS values in the studied area are associated with the northernmost location of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ. The Δδ18O record exhibits glacial/interglacial cyclicity with higher values during all glacial periods spanning the last 940 kyr, indicating increased SSS. At a longer timescale, the Δδ18O exhibits a shift toward lower values for interglacial periods during the last 450 kyr, when compared to interglacial stages older than 650 kyr. A rise in SSS during glacial stages may be related to the southernmost location of the ITCZ, which is induced by a steeper interhemispheric temperature gradient and associated with reduced northward cross equatorial oceanic transport. Therefore, the results suggest a permanent link between the tropical salinity budget and the AMOC during the last 940 kyr. Following the MPT, lower salinities during the last five interglacial stages indicate a northernmost ITCZ location, forced by changes in the interhemispheric temperature gradient that is associated with the poleward position of Southern Oceanic Fronts that amplified the transport of heat and moisture to the North Atlantic. These processes may have contributed to amplification of the climate cycles that

  8. Sea-surface salinity variations in the northern Caribbean Sea across the Mid-Pleistocene Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sepulcre

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available By reconstructing past hydrologic variations in the Northern Caribbean Sea and their influence on the stability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC during the last 940 ka, we seek to document climate changes in this tropical area in response to the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT. Using core MD03-2628, we estimated past changes in sea surface salinity (SSS using Δδ18O, the difference between the modern, and the past δ18O of seawater (obtained by combining alkenone thermometer data with the δ18O of the planktonic foraminifera Globigerinoides rube (white and corrected for ice-sheet volume effects. Today, the lowest SSS values in the area studied are associated with the northernmost location of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ. The Δδ18O record obtained from core MD03-2628 exhibits glacial/interglacial cyclicity with higher values during all glacial periods spanning the last 940 ka, indicating increased SSS. A long-term trend was also observed in the Δδ18O values that exhibited a shift toward lower values for interglacial periods during the last 450 ka, as compared to interglacial stages older than 650 ka. A rise in SSS during glacial stages may be related to the southernmost location of the ITCZ, which is induced by a steeper cross-equator temperature gradient and associated with reduced northward cross-equatorial oceanic transport. Therefore, the results suggest a permanent link between the tropical salinity budget and the AMOC during the last 940 ka. Following the MPT, lower salinities during the last five interglacial stages indicated a northernmost ITCZ location that was forced by changes in the cross-equator temperature gradient and that was associated with the poleward position of Southern Oceanic Fronts that amplify the transport of heat and moisture to the North Atlantic. These processes may have contributed to the amplification of the

  9. Regional turbulence patterns driven by meso- and submesoscale processes in the Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Juan G. C.; Calil, Paulo H. R.

    2017-09-01

    The surface ocean circulation in the Caribbean Sea is characterized by the interaction between anticyclonic eddies and the Caribbean Upwelling System (CUS). These interactions lead to instabilities that modulate the transfer of kinetic energy up- or down-cascade. The interaction of North Brazil Current rings with the islands leads to the formation of submesoscale vorticity filaments leeward of the Lesser Antilles, thus transferring kinetic energy from large to small scales. Within the Caribbean, the upper ocean dynamic ranges from large-scale currents to coastal upwelling filaments and allow the vertical exchange of physical properties and supply KE to larger scales. In this study, we use a regional model with different spatial resolutions (6, 3, and 1 km), focusing on the Guajira Peninsula and the Lesser Antilles in the Caribbean Sea, in order to evaluate the impact of submesoscale processes on the regional KE energy cascade. Ageostrophic velocities emerge as the Rossby number becomes O(1). As model resolution is increased submesoscale motions are more energetic, as seen by the flatter KE spectra when compared to the lower resolution run. KE injection at the large scales is greater in the Guajira region than in the others regions, being more effectively transferred to smaller scales, thus showing that submesoscale dynamics is key in modulating eddy kinetic energy and the energy cascade within the Caribbean Sea.

  10. Projected SST trends across the Caribbean Sea based on PRECIS downscaling of ECHAM4, under the SRES A2 and B2 scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurse, Leonard A.; Charlery, John L.

    2016-01-01

    The Caribbean Sea and adjacent land areas are highly sensitive to the projected impacts of global climate change. The countries bordering the Caribbean Sea depend heavily on coastal and marine assets as a major source of livelihood support. Rising sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are known to be associated with coral bleaching, ocean acidification, and other phenomena that threaten livelihoods in the region. The paucity of SST systematic observations in both the Caribbean Sea and adjoining Western Atlantic waters is a limiting factor in the projection of future climate change impacts on the region's marine resources. Remote sensing of SST by satellites began only within the last three decades and although the data collected so far might be insufficient to provide conclusive definitions of long-term SST variations in the Caribbean waters, these data along with the output from climate model simulations provide a useful basis for gaining further insights into plausible SST futures under IPCC SRES scenarios. In this paper, we examine the recent SST records from the NESDIS AVHRR satellite data and NOAA Optimum Interpolation (OI) sea surface temperature V2 and provide a comparative analysis of projected SST changes for the Caribbean Sea up to the end of the twenty-first century, under the SRES A2 and B2 scenarios' simulations of the sea surface skin temperatures (SSsT) using the Hadley Centre's regional model, PRECIS. The implications of these projected SST changes for bleaching of coral reefs, one of the region's most valuable marine resource, and for rainfall are also discussed.

  11. Petroleum pollution in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botello, A V; Villanueva, S; Díaz, G

    1997-01-01

    In 1976, IOC-UNESCO and UNEP convened a meeting in Port of Spain to analyze the marine pollution problems in the region, noting that petroleum pollution was of regionwide concern and recommended initiating a research and monitoring program to determine the severity of the problem and monitor its effects. The Wider Caribbean is potentially one of the largest oil-producing areas in the world. Major production sites include Louisiana and Texas in the U.S.; the Bay of Campeche, Mexico; Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela; and the Gulf of Paria, Trinidad. All these are classified as high-risk production accident zones. Main sources of petroleum pollution in the Wider Caribbean are production, exploitation, transportation, urban and municipal discharges, refining and chemical wastes, normal loading and unloading operations, and accidental spills. About 5 million barrels of crude oil are transported daily in the Caribbean, thus generating an intense tanker traffic. It has been estimated that oil discharges from tank washings within the Wider Caribbean could be as high as 7 million barrels/yr. The results of the Caribbean Pollution Regional Program (CARIPOL) conducted between 1980 and 1987 pointed out that significant levels of petroleum pollution exist throughout the Wider Caribbean, including serious tar contamination of windward exposed beaches, high levels of floating tar within the major current systems, and very high levels of dissolved and dispersed hydrocarbons in surface waters. Major adverse effects of this type of pollution include: high tar levels on many beaches that either prevent their recreational use or require very expensive cleanup operations, distress and death for marine life, and responses in the enzyme systems of marine organisms that have been correlated with declines in reproductive success. Finally, the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in tissues of important economic species has been reported, creating a risk for public health because of

  12. Marine oil degrading bacteria related to oil inputs and surface currents in the western Caribbean Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizarraga-Partida, M.L.; Vicuna, F.B.I.; Chang, I.W. (Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada (CICESE), Ensenada (Mexico))

    1990-01-01

    The distribution of oil degrading bacteria (ODB) and its ratios to viable heterotrophic bacteria (CFU) and direct counts (AODC) were examined in relation to the surface currents of the western Caribbean Sea. High ODB/CFU and ODB/AODC ratios were found, suggesting that chronic sources of hydrocarbons in the region may have a larger impact than those in the southern Gulf of Mexico, where previous studies have been performed. It was concluded that, in western Caribbean waters, the distribution of oil degrading bacteria, or its ratios to CFU or AODC, could be useful indicators of chronic oil inputs originating at the east of the Caribbean Sea, as well as their motions afterwards. (author).

  13. Caribbean mangroves adjust to rising sea level through biotic controls on change in soil elevation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, K.L.; Cahoon, D.R.; Feller, Ilka C.

    2007-01-01

    Aim The long-term stability of coastal ecosystems such as mangroves and salt marshes depends upon the maintenance of soil elevations within the intertidal habitat as sea level changes. We examined the rates and processes of peat formation by mangroves of the Caribbean Region to better understand biological controls on habitat stability. Location Mangrove-dominated islands on the Caribbean coasts of Belize, Honduras and Panama were selected as study sites. Methods Biological processes controlling mangrove peat formation were manipulated (in Belize) by the addition of nutrients (nitrogen or phosphorus) to Rhizophora mangle (red mangrove), and the effects on the dynamics of soil elevation were determined over a 3-year period using rod surface elevation tables (RSET) and marker horizons. Peat composition and geological accretion rates were determined at all sites using radiocarbon-dated cores. Results The addition of nutrients to mangroves caused significant changes in rates of mangrove root accumulation, which influenced both the rate and direction of change in elevation. Areas with low root input lost elevation and those with high rates gained elevation. These findings were consistent with peat analyses at multiple Caribbean sites showing that deposits (up to 10 m in depth) were composed primarily of mangrove root matter. Comparison of radiocarbon-dated cores at the study sites with a sea-level curve for the western Atlantic indicated a tight coupling between peat building in Caribbean mangroves and sea-level rise over the Holocene. Main conclusions Mangroves common to the Caribbean region have adjusted to changing sea level mainly through subsurface accumulation of refractory mangrove roots. Without root and other organic inputs, submergence of these tidal forests is inevitable due to peat decomposition, physical compaction and eustatic sea-level rise. These findings have relevance for predicting the effects of sea-level rise and biophysical processes on tropical

  14. Pteropods from the Caribbean Sea: dissolution as an indicator of past ocean acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wall-Palmer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The aragonite shell–bearing thecosome pteropods are an important component of the oceanic plankton. However, with increasing pCO2 and the associated reduction in oceanic pH (ocean acidification, thecosome pteropods are thought to be particularly vulnerable to shell dissolution. The distribution and preservation of pteropods over the last 250,000 years have been investigated in marine sediment cores from the Caribbean Sea close to the island of Montserrat. Using the Limacina Dissolution Index (LDX, fluctuations in pteropod dissolution through the most recent glacial/interglacial cycles is documented. By comparison to the oxygen isotope record (global sea ice volume, we show that pteropod dissolution is closely linked to global changes in pCO2 and pH and is, therefore, a global signal. These data are in agreement with the findings of experiments upon living pteropods, which show that variations in pH can greatly affect aragonitic shells. The results of this study provide information which may be useful in the prediction of future changes to the pteropod assemblage caused by ocean acidification.

  15. DEEP-SEA FISHERY IN THE COLOMBIAN CARIBBEAN SEA: MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION STRATEGIES FOR AN ECOSYSTEM APPROACH TO FISHERIES

    OpenAIRE

    Paramo, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research was to identify the potential of new deep-sea fisheries in the Colombian Caribbean Sea determining their biomass and spatial distribution in order to advice management and conservation strategies, based on ecosystem approach to fisheries management. First, I examine morphological characteristics of the shallow water pink shrimp Farfantepenaeus notialis to investigate stock differentiation, presenting biological data such as size at 50% sexual maturity. The data onF. n...

  16. TBT pollution and effects in molluscs at US Virgin Islands, Caribbean Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Jakob; Jørgensen, Anne; Tairova, Zhanna

    2009-01-01

    Thais deltoidea, Thais rustica and Purpura patula all seem to have potential as suitable and sensitive bioindicators for assessing levels and effects of TBT pollution in coastal areas including coral reefs in the Caribbean Sea. However, considerable interspecies differences in especially accumulation...

  17. Spionidae (Polychaeta) of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foster, Nancy Marie

    1971-01-01

    Although there have been several collections of polychaetous annelids from the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea, very few spionids have been included in the published species lists. This is not because they are poorly represented in this area but probably a result of their small size and the fact

  18. Spionidae (Polychaeta) of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foster, Nancy Marie

    1971-01-01

    Although there have been several collections of polychaetous annelids from the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea, very few spionids have been included in the published species lists. This is not because they are poorly represented in this area but probably a result of their small size and the fact th

  19. The Turbellarian Hofstenia miamia in the Caribbean Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corrêa, Diva Diniz

    1963-01-01

    Some years ago I described Hofstenia miamia from Virginia Key, in the Miami area (CORREA 1960, p. 211 ff.). The species was based on a single specimen found among algae in the intertidal zone. When a grant from the Government of the Netherlands gave me the chance to work at the Caribbean Marine Biol

  20. Magnetic studies in the Cayman Trough, Caribbean Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramana, M.V.; Ramprasad, T.; Grahm, B.; Welsh, R.; Pathak, M.C.

    longitude. The mid-Cayman spreading centre is characterized by a rift valley with 4000 m depth. Sea-floor spreading-type linear magnetic anomalies have been observed in the Cayman Trough. A synthetic sea-floor-spreading model is generated across...

  1. A new genus and species of Serpulidae (Annelida, Polychaeta, Sabellida) from the Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    PRENTISS, NANCY K.; VASILEIADOU, KATERINA; FAULWETTER, SARAH; ARVANITIDIS, CHRISTOS; TEN HOVE, HARRY A.

    2015-01-01

    A new genus and species of Serpulidae (Annelida, Polychaeta) from the Caribbean Sea. Turbocavus secretus (gen. nov. and sp. nov.) is described from shallow hard substrates (0.5–3 m) in wind-sheltered bays of St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands and Curaçao, as well as from diving depths (46–49 m) around Bonaire (Leeward Antilles), Caribbean Sea. The new taxon, which has from 7 to 19 thoracic chaetigers and up to 335 abdominal chaetigers, bears a unique type of thoracic chaeta which is multifolded at the base and continues with a groove tapering to the capillary tip. The new serpulid has unique 18S rRNA sequences and genetic analysis of the 18S rRNA gene situates the new genus at the basis of the serpulid cla-dogram, well separated from other genera, and close to Filograna/Salmacina and Protula. PMID:25543733

  2. A Probabilistic Model of Illegal Drug Trafficking Operations in the Eastern Pacific and Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Illicit drug - trafficking is a major concern of the United States and is a primary pillar of President Barack Obama’s Strategy to Combat Transnational...Organized Crime. In the eastern Pacific and Caribbean Sea, drug - trafficking organizations operate a variety of vessels to transit drugs from South...interdicts illegal drug - trafficking in this region. In this thesis, we develop a probability model based on intelligence inputs to generate a spatial

  3. Cold fronts in the Colombian Caribbean Sea and their relationship to extreme wave events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Royero, J. C.; Otero, L. J.; Restrepo, J. C.; Ruiz, J.; Cadena, M.

    2013-11-01

    Extreme ocean waves in the Caribbean Sea are commonly related to the effects of storms and hurricanes during the months of June through November. The collapse of 200 m of the Puerto Colombia pier in March 2009 revealed the effects of meteorological phenomena other than storms and hurricanes that may be influencing the extreme wave regime in the Colombian Caribbean. The marked seasonality of these atmospheric fronts was established by analyzing the meteorological-marine reports of the Instituto de Hidrología, Meteorología y Estudios Ambientales of Colombia (IDEAM, based on its initials in Spanish) and the Centro de Investigación en Oceanografía y Meteorología of Colombia (CIOH, based on its initials in Spanish) during the last 16 yr. The highest number of cold fronts was observed during the months of January, February, and March, with 6 fronts occurring per year. An annual trend was observed and the highest number of fronts occurred in 2010 (20 in total); moreover, an annual strong relationship between the maximum average wave values and the cold fronts in the central zone of the Colombian Caribbean during the first three months of the year was established. In addition, the maximum values of the significant height produced by the passage of cold fronts during the last 16 yr were identified. Although the Colombian Caribbean has been affected by storms and hurricanes in the past, this research allows us to conclude that there is a strong relationship between cold fronts and the largest waves in the Colombian Caribbean during the last 16 yr, which have caused damage to coastal infrastructure. We verified that the passage of a cold front corresponded to the most significant extreme wave event of the last two decades in the Colombian Caribbean, which caused the structural collapse of the Puerto Colombia pier, located near the city of Barranquilla, between 5 and 10 March 2009. This information is invaluable when evaluating average and extreme wave regimes for the

  4. Diversification at the narrow sea-land interface in the Caribbean: phylogeography of endemic supralittoral Ligia isopods

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos A. Santamaria; Mateos, Mariana; Hurtado, Luis A.

    2014-01-01

    Phylogeographic studies have provided valuable insights into the evolutionary histories and biodiversity of different groups in the Caribbean, a region that harbors exceptional terrestrial and marine biodiversity. Herein, we examined phylogeographic patterns of the poorly dispersing supralittoral isopod Ligia sampled from 35 localities in the Caribbean Sea and adjacent areas, as well as from Veracruz (Gulf of Mexico), the type locality of L. baudiniana (the only currently recognized native Li...

  5. Record Arctic Sea Ice Loss in 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This image of the Arctic was produced from sea ice observations collected by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) Instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite on September 16, overlaid on the NASA Blue Marble. The image captures ice conditions at the end of the melt season. Sea ice (white, image center) stretches across the Arctic Ocean from Greenland to Russia, but large areas of open water were apparent as well. In addition to record melt, the summer of 2007 brought an ice-free opening though the Northwest Passage that lasted several weeks. The Northeast Passage did not open during the summer of 2007, however, as a substantial tongue of ice remained in place north of the Russian coast. According to the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), on September 16, 2007, sea ice extent dropped to 4.13 million square kilometers (1.59 million square miles)--38 percent below average and 24 percent below the 2005 record.

  6. Phylogenetic diversity and community structure of sponge-associated bacteria from mangroves of the Caribbean Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Jiangke

    2011-02-08

    To gain insight into the species richness and phylogeny of the microbial communities associated with sponges in mangroves, we performed an extensive phylogenetic analysis, based on terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiling and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences, of the 4 sponge species Aplysina fulva, Haliclona hogarthi, Tedania ignis and Ircinia strobilina as well as of ambient seawater. The sponge-associated bacterial communities contained 13 phyla, including Poribacteria and an unclassified group not found in the ambient seawater community, 98% of which comprised Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Although the sponges themselves were phylogenetically distant and bacterial community variation within the host species was observed, microbial phyla such as Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi and the unclassified group were consistently observed as the dominant populations within the communities. The sponge-associated bacterial communities resident in the Caribbean Sea mangroves are phylogenetically similar but significantly distinct from communities found in other biogeographical sites such as the deep-water environments of the Caribbean Sea, the South China Sea and Australia. The interspecific variation within the host species and the distinct biogeographical characteristics that the sponge-associated bacteria exhibited indicate that the acquisition, establishment and formation of functional sponge-associated bacterial communities may initially be the product of both vertical and horizontal transmission, and is then shaped by the internal environment created by the sponge species and certain external environmental factors. © Inter-Research 2011.

  7. Reproductive biology of the sea anemone shrimp Periclimenes rathbunae (Caridea, Palaemonidae, Pontoniinae), from the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azofeifa-Solano, Juan Carlos; Elizondo-Coto, Marcelo; Wehrtmann, Ingo S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Caridean shrimps are a highly diverse group and many species form symbiotic relationships with different marine invertebrates. Periclimenes rathbunae is a brightly colored shrimp that lives predominantly in association with sea anemones. Information about the reproductive ecology of the species is scarce. Therefore, we collected 70 ovigerous females inhabiting the sun sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus in coral reefs from the southern Caribbean coast of Costa Rica. Females produced on average 289 ± 120 embryos. The volume of recently-produced embryos was on average 0.038 mm3, and embryo volume increased by 192% during the incubation period. The average embryo mortality during embryogenesis was 24%. The reproductive output was 0.24 ± 0.094, considerably higher than in many other pontoniine shrimps. Females carrying embryos close to hatching showed fully developed ovaries, suggesting consecutive spawning. We assume that the sheltered habitat, living on sea anemones, allows Periclimenes rathbunae to allocate more energy in embryo production than most other free-living caridean shrimps. This is the first record of Periclimenes rathbunae for Costa Rica. PMID:25561838

  8. Geostrophic transport variability along the Aves Ridge in the eastern Caribbean Sea during 1985-1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, John M.; Smith, Orson P.

    1990-01-01

    Data from five cruises during 1985-1986 along 63.55°W, across the eastern Caribbean Sea, are examined for seasonal variability of gcostrophic transport. A biannual maximum transport signal appears to correspond to that measured in the Florida Straits as well as to variations in the regional wind stress curl. Similar seasonal variations in the properties of water masses, entering the eastern margin of the basin and concentrated through the passages of the Lesser Antilles, are also indicated. A permanent system of strong westward flowing streams, interspersed by weaker eastward flowing streams, is shown to exist.

  9. Assessment of Sea Surface Temperatures in the Caribbean Sea Associated with Hurricane Tracks Using GOES-East Infrared Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeaux, J. C.; Walker, N. D.; Haag, A.; Pino, J. V.

    2016-02-01

    A minimum sea surface temperature (SST) of 26° C is considered a requirement for hurricane generation and maintenance. Although the Caribbean Sea lies within the Western Hemisphere Warm Pool, notable north-south gradients in SST during summer often exist due to wind-induced cool water upwelling along the northern coast of South America. Our hypothesis is that the spatial extent and magnitude of cooling due to this upwelling process has an impact on the location of individual hurricane tracks. We propose that hurricanes will track further north when upwelling is strong and regionally extensive. We will investigate spatial SST variability within and across hurricane seasons in relationship to hurricane tracks. We will also investigate SST along the hurricane tracks. SSTs will be quantified using GOES-East weekly and monthly composites at a spatial resolution of 4x4 km and using the 4 micron channel, which is least affected by atmospheric water vapor attenuation.A minimum sea surface temperature (SST) of 26° C is considered a requirement for hurricane generation and maintenance. Although the Caribbean Sea lies within the Western Hemisphere Warm Pool, notable north-south gradients in SST during summer often exist due to wind-induced cool water upwelling along the northern coast of South America. Our hypothesis is that the spatial extent and magnitude of cooling due to this upwelling process has an impact on the location of individual hurricane tracks. We propose that hurricanes will track further north when upwelling is strong and regionally extensive. We will investigate spatial SST variability within and across hurricane seasons in relationship to hurricane tracks. We will also investigate SST along the hurricane tracks. SSTs will be quantified using GOES-East weekly and monthly composites at a spatial resolution of 4x4 km and using the 4 micron channel, which is least affected by atmospheric water vapor attenuation.

  10. A physical view of La Guajira Upwelling System, Colombian Basin, Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, G.; Beier, E.; Barton, E. D.; Ruiz-Ochoa, M.; Correa, J. G.

    2013-05-01

    La Guajira Peninsula lies within a large upwelling system along the South Caribbean Coast, created by the NE trade winds. In this location, sea surface temperature (SST) exhibits the lowest mean value and the highest variability in the whole Colombian Basin. The seasonal variation of SST explains up to 75 % of the total variability. La Guajira coastal zone also experiences the highest values of wind stress and wind stress curl, with the greatest annual and semiannual variability in the Colombian Basin. It has been shown that wind stress curl enhances the upwelling over the region. Near 90% of the variability of SST in La Guajira can be explained by the seasonality plus the first three EOFs interannual modes: the first, synchronous throughout the Basin, is dominant, and consists of a uniform interannual variation in phase with the North Tropical Atlantic Index; the second co-varies strongly with the second mode of wind stress curl; and the third reflects the role of the vertical atmospheric circulation cell associated with the Caribbean Low Level Jet off Central America. The inclusion of wind stress curl with its maximum offshore of La Guajira explains in part the extension of cool coastal water into the Colombian Basin, with advection in filaments, eddies and meanders. In order to complement the physical knowledge of La Guajira upwelling system, an analysis of water masses, sea surface height, Ekman suction, Ekman transport and coastal upwelling index (CUI) was performed. Hydrographic data was obtained from gridded climatologies from the National Oceanographic Data Center (WOD01); sea surface height anomalies from the Archiving, Validation, and Interpretation of Satellite Oceanography (AVISO) data; and wind data from the Cross-Calibrated Multi-Platform Ocean Surface Wind Velocity Product for Meteorological and Oceanographic Applications (CCMP). The upwelling forms a local water mass, La Guajira surface water (LGSW), with the mixing of subtropical underwater and

  11. 33 CFR 334.1470 - Caribbean Sea and Vieques Sound, in vicinity of Eastern Vieques; bombing and gunnery target area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Caribbean Sea and Vieques Sound, in vicinity of Eastern Vieques; bombing and gunnery target area. 334.1470 Section 334.1470 Navigation...; bombing and gunnery target area. (a) The danger zone. From Punta Conejo on the south coast of Vieques at...

  12. Upper ocean observations in eastern Caribbean Sea reveal barrier layer within a warm core eddy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudzin, J. E.; Shay, L. K.; Jaimes, B.; Brewster, J. K.

    2017-02-01

    Three-dimensional measurements of a large warm core eddy (WCE) and the Caribbean Current are acquired using oceanic profilers deployed during a NOAA research aircraft study in September 2014 in the eastern Caribbean Sea. Measurements of the near-surface atmosphere are also collected to examine air-sea processes over the eddy. These novel measurements showcase temperature and salinity for the eddy and background flow, upper ocean stratification, a residing barrier layer (BL), velocity structure, and water mass characteristics. The eddy's thermal structure is alike that of WCEs in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) whereas surrounding waters have relatively deeper isotherms compared to its GoM counterparts. Analyses suggest that upper ocean stratification within the study region is due to a BL. These are the first observations of a BL inside a WCE to the best of our knowledge. Reduced shear comparisons suggest that the upper ocean, especially within the WCE, would be more resistant to tropical cyclone (TC) induced mixing than the GoM because of the BL. The eddy is suspected to originate from North Brazil Current rings, given its fresh anomalies relative to climatology and surrounding waters and its trajectory prior to sampling. Atmospheric measurements suggest the WCE is influencing the lower atmosphere along its boundaries. These observations signify that not only does this WCE have deep thermal structure and modulate the near-surface atmosphere but it is unique because it has a BL. The findings and analyses suggest that a similar eddy could potentially influence air-sea processes, such as those during TC passage.

  13. Additional records of metazoan parasites from Caribbean marine mammals, including genetically identified anisakid nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón-Llavina, Marlene M; Mignucci-Giannoni, Antonio A; Mattiucci, Simonetta; Paoletti, Michela; Nascetti, Giuseppe; Williams, Ernest H

    2009-10-01

    Studies of marine mammal parasites in the Caribbean are scarce. An assessment for marine mammal endo- and ectoparasites from Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, but extending to other areas of the Caribbean, was conducted between 1989 and 1994. The present study complements the latter and enhances identification of anisakid nematodes using molecular markers. Parasites were collected from 59 carcasses of stranded cetaceans and manatees from 1994 to 2006, including Globicephala macrorhynchus, Kogia breviceps, Kogia sima, Lagenodelphis hosei, Mesoplodon densirostris, Peponocephala electra, Stenella longirostris, Steno bredanensis, Trichechus manatus. Tursiops truncatus, and Ziphius cavirostris. Sixteen species of endoparasitic helminthes were morphologically identified, including two species of acanthocephalans (Bolbosoma capitatum, Bolbosoma vasculosum), nine species of nematodes (Anisakis sp., Anisakis brevispiculata, Anisakis paggiae, Anisakis simplex, Anisakis typica, Anisakis ziphidarium, Crassicauda anthonyi, Heterocheilus tunicatus, Pseudoterranova ceticola), two species of cestodes (Monorygma grimaldi, Phyllobothrium delphini), and three species of trematodes (Chiorchis groschafti, Pulmonicola cochleotrema, Monoligerum blairi). The nematodes belonging to the genus Anisakis recovered in some stranded animals were genetically identified to species level based on their sequence analysis of mitochondrial DNA (629 bp of mtDNA cox 2). A total of five new host records and six new geographic records are presented.

  14. Faunistic analysis of the caridean shrimps inhabiting seagrasses along the NW coast of the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everardo Barba Macías

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Seagrass meadows are highly productive and ecologically important habitats in estuaries and coastal lagoons, and contain a variety of faunal communities, from which the caridean shrimps are a dominant component. The purpose of this work was to analyze the environmental parameters of water and sediments, with the biological components in seagrass epifaunal communities, from the Western Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea. For this, density and diversity of caridean shrimps were analyzed and correlated with environmental parameters and seagrass biomass, and zoogeographic affinities were determined. The spatial distribution of caridean shrimps was recorded for 12 localities with Halodule wrightii and Thalassia testudinum monospecific seagrass meadows. A total of 72 158 individuals of 16 taxa were collected. Among results, the Hippolytidae resulted the most abundant group (92.3% with eight species, and was followed by Palaemonidae with 7.6% of the abundance and seven species, and the Alpheidae with only one genus. From the total of collected carideans, a 37.3% was found in H. wrightii and 62.7% in T. testudinum. The dominant species were Hippolyte zostericola (12.39ind./m2, Tozeuma carolinense (9.5ind./m2, Thor dobkini (4.84ind./m2 and Palaemonetes vulgaris (4.87ind./m2. The zoogeographic distribution of the carideans presented two groups: species of the Virginian-Carolinean province representing its Southern limit (43.75% and species of the Brazilian-Caribbean province representing its Northern limit (56.25%. The species H. zostericola, T. carolinense, P. vulgaris, P. pugio and P. intermedius are widely distributed along the Western Atlantic coast. This study has base line information for seagrass habitats, the community of epifaunal carideans and their ecological affinities, previous to the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

  15. Faunistic analysis of the caridean shrimps inhabiting seagrasses along the NW coast of the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías, Everardo Barba

    2012-09-01

    Seagrass meadows are highly productive and ecologically important habitats in estuaries and coastal lagoons, and contain a variety of faunal communities, from which the caridean shrimps are a dominant component. The purpose of this work was to analyze the environmental parameters of water and sediments, with the biological components in seagrass epifaunal communities, from the Western Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea. For this, density and diversity of caridean shrimps were analyzed and correlated with environmental parameters and seagrass biomass, and zoogeographic affinities were determined. The spatial distribution of caridean shrimps was recorded for 12 localities with Halodule wrightii and Thalassia testudinum monospecific seagrass meadows. A total of 72158 individuals of 16 taxa were collected. Among results, the Hippolytidae resulted the most abundant group (92.3%) with eight species, and was followed by Palaemonidae with 7.6% of the abundance and seven species, and the Alpheidae with only one genus. From the total of collected carideans, a 37.3% was found in H. wrightii and 62.7% in T. testudinum. The dominant species were Hippolyte zostericola (12.39ind./m2), Tozeuma carolinense (9.5ind./m2), Thor dobkini (4.84ind./m2) and Palaemonetes vulgaris (4.87ind./m2). The zoogeographic distribution of the carideans presented two groups: species of the Virginian-Carolinean province representing its Southern limit (43.75%) and species of the Brazilian-Caribbean province representing its Northern limit (56.25%). The species H. zostericola, T. carolinense, P. vulgaris, P. pugio and P. intermedius are widely distributed along the Western Atlantic coast. This study has base line information for seagrass habitats, the community of epifaunal carideans and their ecological affinities, previous to the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

  16. Diversification at the narrow sea-land interface in the Caribbean: phylogeography of endemic supralittoral Ligia isopods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana eMateos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Phylogeographic studies have provided valuable insights into the evolutionary histories and biodiversity of different groups in the Caribbean, a region that harbors exceptional terrestrial and marine biodiversity. Herein, we examined phylogeographic patterns of the poorly dispersing supralittoral isopod Ligia sampled from 35 localities in the Caribbean Sea and adjacent areas, as well as from Veracruz (Gulf of Mexico, the type locality of L. baudiniana (the only currently recognized native Ligia species in the Caribbean. We conducted Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of four mitochondrial genes (Cytb, 16S rDNA, 12S rDNA and COI and Parsimony analyses of one nuclear gene (NaK. We found a well-supported and highly divergent clade of Ligia that is distributed in the Caribbean Sea, Bahamas, southern Florida, Bermuda, and the Pacific coast of Central America and Colombia, but not in the Gulf of Mexico. A characteristic appendix masculina distinguishes this clade from other lineages of Ligia. Large divergences within this clade suggest that it constitutes a cryptic species complex. Genetically and morphologically, the specimens from the type locality of L. baudiniana were indistinguishable from the non-native species L. exotica. Some phylogeographic patterns of Ligia in the study area may be consistent with the proto-Antillean or GAARlandia vicariant hypotheses, but uncertainty concerning divergence times and aspects of the geological history precludes stronger biogeographical inferences. Passive overwater dispersal appears to have played an important role in shaping phylogeographic patterns of Ligia in the Caribbean Sea. These patterns, however, do not correspond with predicted biogeographic patterns based on population connectivity of marine organisms with larval dispersal, and do not reflect the southeast to northwest colonization pattern that has been proposed for the colonization of the Caribbean from South America by some

  17. Caribbean Corals in Crisis: Record Thermal Stress, Bleaching, and Mortality in 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakin, C. Mark; Morgan, Jessica A.; Heron, Scott F.; Smith, Tyler B.; Liu, Gang; Alvarez-Filip, Lorenzo; Baca, Bart; Bartels, Erich; Bastidas, Carolina; Bouchon, Claude; Brandt, Marilyn; Bruckner, Andrew W.; Bunkley-Williams, Lucy; Cameron, Andrew; Causey, Billy D.; Chiappone, Mark; Christensen, Tyler R. L.; Crabbe, M. James C; Day, Owen; de la Guardia, Elena; Díaz-Pulido, Guillermo; DiResta, Daniel; Gil-Agudelo, Diego L.; Gilliam, David S.; Ginsburg, Robert N.; Gore, Shannon; Guzmán, Héctor M.; Hendee, James C.; Hernández-Delgado, Edwin A.; Husain, Ellen; Jeffrey, Christopher F. G.; Jones, Ross J.; Jordán-Dahlgren, Eric; Kaufman, Les S.; Kline, David I.; Kramer, Philip A.; Lang, Judith C.; Lirman, Diego; Mallela, Jennie; Manfrino, Carrie; Maréchal, Jean-Philippe; Marks, Ken; Mihaly, Jennifer; Miller, W. Jeff; Mueller, Erich M.; Muller, Erinn M.; Orozco Toro, Carlos A.; Oxenford, Hazel A.; Ponce-Taylor, Daniel; Quinn, Norman; Ritchie, Kim B.; Rodríguez, Sebastián; Ramírez, Alberto Rodríguez; Romano, Sandra; Samhouri, Jameal F.; Sánchez, Juan A.; Schmahl, George P.; Shank, Burton V.; Skirving, William J.; Steiner, Sascha C. C.; Villamizar, Estrella; Walsh, Sheila M.; Walter, Cory; Weil, Ernesto; Williams, Ernest H.; Roberson, Kimberly Woody; Yusuf, Yusri

    2010-01-01

    Background The rising temperature of the world's oceans has become a major threat to coral reefs globally as the severity and frequency of mass coral bleaching and mortality events increase. In 2005, high ocean temperatures in the tropical Atlantic and Caribbean resulted in the most severe bleaching event ever recorded in the basin. Methodology/Principal Findings Satellite-based tools provided warnings for coral reef managers and scientists, guiding both the timing and location of researchers' field observations as anomalously warm conditions developed and spread across the greater Caribbean region from June to October 2005. Field surveys of bleaching and mortality exceeded prior efforts in detail and extent, and provided a new standard for documenting the effects of bleaching and for testing nowcast and forecast products. Collaborators from 22 countries undertook the most comprehensive documentation of basin-scale bleaching to date and found that over 80% of corals bleached and over 40% died at many sites. The most severe bleaching coincided with waters nearest a western Atlantic warm pool that was centered off the northern end of the Lesser Antilles. Conclusions/Significance Thermal stress during the 2005 event exceeded any observed from the Caribbean in the prior 20 years, and regionally-averaged temperatures were the warmest in over 150 years. Comparison of satellite data against field surveys demonstrated a significant predictive relationship between accumulated heat stress (measured using NOAA Coral Reef Watch's Degree Heating Weeks) and bleaching intensity. This severe, widespread bleaching and mortality will undoubtedly have long-term consequences for reef ecosystems and suggests a troubled future for tropical marine ecosystems under a warming climate. PMID:21125021

  18. Caribbean corals in crisis: record thermal stress, bleaching, and mortality in 2005.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Mark Eakin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rising temperature of the world's oceans has become a major threat to coral reefs globally as the severity and frequency of mass coral bleaching and mortality events increase. In 2005, high ocean temperatures in the tropical Atlantic and Caribbean resulted in the most severe bleaching event ever recorded in the basin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Satellite-based tools provided warnings for coral reef managers and scientists, guiding both the timing and location of researchers' field observations as anomalously warm conditions developed and spread across the greater Caribbean region from June to October 2005. Field surveys of bleaching and mortality exceeded prior efforts in detail and extent, and provided a new standard for documenting the effects of bleaching and for testing nowcast and forecast products. Collaborators from 22 countries undertook the most comprehensive documentation of basin-scale bleaching to date and found that over 80% of corals bleached and over 40% died at many sites. The most severe bleaching coincided with waters nearest a western Atlantic warm pool that was centered off the northern end of the Lesser Antilles. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Thermal stress during the 2005 event exceeded any observed from the Caribbean in the prior 20 years, and regionally-averaged temperatures were the warmest in over 150 years. Comparison of satellite data against field surveys demonstrated a significant predictive relationship between accumulated heat stress (measured using NOAA Coral Reef Watch's Degree Heating Weeks and bleaching intensity. This severe, widespread bleaching and mortality will undoubtedly have long-term consequences for reef ecosystems and suggests a troubled future for tropical marine ecosystems under a warming climate.

  19. Caribbean corals in crisis: record thermal stress, bleaching, and mortality in 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakin, C Mark; Morgan, Jessica A; Heron, Scott F; Smith, Tyler B; Liu, Gang; Alvarez-Filip, Lorenzo; Baca, Bart; Bartels, Erich; Bastidas, Carolina; Bouchon, Claude; Brandt, Marilyn; Bruckner, Andrew W; Bunkley-Williams, Lucy; Cameron, Andrew; Causey, Billy D; Chiappone, Mark; Christensen, Tyler R L; Crabbe, M James C; Day, Owen; de la Guardia, Elena; Díaz-Pulido, Guillermo; DiResta, Daniel; Gil-Agudelo, Diego L; Gilliam, David S; Ginsburg, Robert N; Gore, Shannon; Guzmán, Héctor M; Hendee, James C; Hernández-Delgado, Edwin A; Husain, Ellen; Jeffrey, Christopher F G; Jones, Ross J; Jordán-Dahlgren, Eric; Kaufman, Les S; Kline, David I; Kramer, Philip A; Lang, Judith C; Lirman, Diego; Mallela, Jennie; Manfrino, Carrie; Maréchal, Jean-Philippe; Marks, Ken; Mihaly, Jennifer; Miller, W Jeff; Mueller, Erich M; Muller, Erinn M; Orozco Toro, Carlos A; Oxenford, Hazel A; Ponce-Taylor, Daniel; Quinn, Norman; Ritchie, Kim B; Rodríguez, Sebastián; Ramírez, Alberto Rodríguez; Romano, Sandra; Samhouri, Jameal F; Sánchez, Juan A; Schmahl, George P; Shank, Burton V; Skirving, William J; Steiner, Sascha C C; Villamizar, Estrella; Walsh, Sheila M; Walter, Cory; Weil, Ernesto; Williams, Ernest H; Roberson, Kimberly Woody; Yusuf, Yusri

    2010-11-15

    The rising temperature of the world's oceans has become a major threat to coral reefs globally as the severity and frequency of mass coral bleaching and mortality events increase. In 2005, high ocean temperatures in the tropical Atlantic and Caribbean resulted in the most severe bleaching event ever recorded in the basin. Satellite-based tools provided warnings for coral reef managers and scientists, guiding both the timing and location of researchers' field observations as anomalously warm conditions developed and spread across the greater Caribbean region from June to October 2005. Field surveys of bleaching and mortality exceeded prior efforts in detail and extent, and provided a new standard for documenting the effects of bleaching and for testing nowcast and forecast products. Collaborators from 22 countries undertook the most comprehensive documentation of basin-scale bleaching to date and found that over 80% of corals bleached and over 40% died at many sites. The most severe bleaching coincided with waters nearest a western Atlantic warm pool that was centered off the northern end of the Lesser Antilles. Thermal stress during the 2005 event exceeded any observed from the Caribbean in the prior 20 years, and regionally-averaged temperatures were the warmest in over 150 years. Comparison of satellite data against field surveys demonstrated a significant predictive relationship between accumulated heat stress (measured using NOAA Coral Reef Watch's Degree Heating Weeks) and bleaching intensity. This severe, widespread bleaching and mortality will undoubtedly have long-term consequences for reef ecosystems and suggests a troubled future for tropical marine ecosystems under a warming climate.

  20. Sea Surface Temperature Climate Data Record for the North Sea and Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Jacob L.; Karagali, Ioanna

    2016-01-01

    A 30-yr climate data record (CDR) of sea surface temperature (SST) has been produced with daily gap-free analysis fields for the North Sea and the Baltic Sea region from 1982 to 2012 by combining the Pathfinder AVHRR satellite data record with the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) Reprocessing...... observations on average. Validation against independent in situ observations shows a very stable performance of the data record, with a mean difference of -0.06 °C compared to moored buoys and a 0.46 °C standard deviation of the differences. The mean annual biases of the SST CDR are small for all years......, with a negligible temporal trend when compared against drifting and moored buoys. Analysis of the SST CDR reveals that the monthly anomalies for the North Sea, the Danish straits, and the central Baltic Sea regions show a high degree of correlation for interannual and decadal time scales, whereas the monthly...

  1. Trace metal analysis in sea grasses from Mexican Caribbean Coast by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solis, C.; Issac O, K. [Instituto de Fisica, Departamento de Fisica Experimental, UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Martinez, A.; Lavoisier, E.; Martinez, M. A. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2008-02-15

    The growing urban and tourist activity in the Mexican Caribbean coasts has resulted in an increase of chemical substances, metals in particular, discharged to the coastal waters. In order to reach an adequate management and conservation of these marine ecosystems it is necessary to perform an inventory of the actual conditions that reflect the vulnerability and the level of damage. Sea-grasses are considered good biological indicators of heavy metal contamination in marine systems. The goal of this preliminary work is to evaluate the concentrations of trace metals such as Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, and Pb in Thalassia testudinum, a very common sea-grass in the Mexican Caribbean Sea. Samples were collected from several locations in the coasts of the Yucatan Peninsula: Holbox, Blanquizal and Punta Allen, areas virtually uninfluenced by anthropogenic activities. Trace elements in different part plants were determined by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). This is a very suitable technique since it offers a fast, accurate and multi-element analysis. Also, the analysis by PIXE can be performed directly on powdered leaves without a laborious sample preparation. The trace metal concentration determined in sea-grasses growing in Caribbean generally fall in the range of the lowest valuables reported for sea grasses from the Gulf of Mexico. The results indicate that the studied areas do not present contamination by heavy metals. (Author)

  2. Fluvial fluxes into the Caribbean Sea and their impact on coastal ecosystems: The Magdalena River, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Juan D.; Zapata, Paula; Díaz, Juan M.; Garzón-Ferreira, Jaime; García, Camilo B.

    2006-02-01

    The Magdalena, a world-class river, in the top ten in terms of sediment load ˜ 150 MT/yr, is the largest river discharging directly into the Caribbean Sea. Data on water discharge, sediment load, and dissolved load of the Magdalena River is presented as an initial interpretation of coastal ecosystems changes in relation to water discharge and sediment load from the Magdalena. During the 1972-1998 yr-period, the Magdalena River has delivered approximately 4022 MT of sediment to the Caribbean coast. The river reflects high inter-annual variability and delivers large portions of its fluvial discharge and sediment loads in short periods of time. The analysis of annual deviations from the 27-yr mean sediment load indicates that 59% of the total sediment load variability of the Magdalena at Calamar could be attributed to flashy peak events. Further analyses of sediment load anomalies suggest that there was a high discharge period in the Magdalena River between 1985 and 1995 and another one in the Canal del Dique between 1985 and 1992. These increasing trends in sediment load coincide with the overall decline of live coral cover around the Rosario Islands, a 145 km 2 coral reef complex in the Caribbean Sea that constitutes a marine protected area. The comparison of live coral: algae ratios for the 1983-2004 yr-period, also indicates that there has been an associated increase in the percentage of algae cover (i.e., Grande Island 1983 = 5%, 2004 = 59%). Other analyses show that nearly 850 ha of seagrass existing in the Cartagena Bay in the 1930s, only 76 ha remained in 2001, which is less than 8% of the original cover. There has been a mix of multiple stressors (natural and anthropogenic; local, regional and global; temporal and chronic) affecting the coastal ecosystems in the area, but the effect of the Magdalena River runoff has been constant and very prolonged (several decades). The impacts of heavy sediment loads and freshwater discharges from the Canal del Dique to

  3. Podocotyle nimoyi n. sp. (Digenea: Opecoelidae: Plagioporinae) and a re-description of Podocotyle pearsei Manter, 1934 from five species of deep-sea macrourids from the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blend, Charles K; Dronen, Norman O; Armstrong, Howard W

    2016-06-02

    Two rare species of Podocotyle Dujardin, 1845 (Digenea: Opecoelidae) parasitizing five macrourid species inhabiting the deep waters of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea off Panama are described. Podocotyle nimoyi n. sp. was found in the intestine of the pugnose grenadier, Sphagemacrurus grenadae (Parr), and the common Atlantic grenadier, Nezumia aequalis (Günther) (Gadiformes: Macrouridae), at depths of 534-995 m in the Northeast Gulf of Mexico off Florida and represents the fifth species of Podocotyle endemic to the deep sea. Podocotyle pearsei Manter, 1934, was re-described from the intestine of the bullseye grenadier, Bathygadus macrops Goode & Bean, the doublethread grenadier, Gadomus arcuatus (Goode & Bean), and the western softhead grenadier, Malacocephalus occidentalis Goode & Bean (Gadiformes: Macrouridae), collected from 591-728 m depths in the Northeast Gulf of Mexico off Florida and the Caribbean Sea off Panama. The following new host records are established: P. nimoyi n. sp. is the third parasite species known from S. grenadae and the first digenean species reported from this host; P. nimoyi n. sp. is the first reported species of Podocotyle parasitizing N. aequalis; and this is the first report of P. pearsei or any representative of the genus Podocotyle infecting B. macrops, G. arcuatus and M. occidentalis. A listing of all digenean parasites previously reported from the five macrourid species examined herein is given and some observations are made about Podocotyle in the deep sea.

  4. Temperature profile data collected using XBT and BT casts in the Caribbean Sea from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER from 08 June 1983 to 15 July 1983 (NCEI Accession 8300120)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using XBT and BT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the Caribbean Sea from 08 June 1983 to 15 July 1983. Data were collected...

  5. Forecasting decadal changes in sea surface temperatures and coral bleaching within a Caribbean coral reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Angang; Reidenbach, Matthew A.

    2014-09-01

    Elevated sea surface temperature (SST) caused by global warming is one of the major threats to coral reefs. While increased SST has been shown to negatively affect the health of coral reefs by increasing rates of coral bleaching, how changes to atmospheric heating impact SST distributions, modified by local flow environments, has been less understood. This study aimed to simulate future water flow patterns and water surface heating in response to increased air temperature within a coral reef system in Bocas del Toro, Panama, located within the Caribbean Sea. Water flow and SST were modeled using the Delft3D-FLOWcomputer simulation package. Locally measured physical parameters, including bathymetry, astronomic tidal forcing, and coral habitat distribution were input into the model and water flow, and SST was simulated over a four-month period under present day, as well as projected warming scenarios in 2020s, 2050s, and 2080s. Changes in SST, and hence the thermal stress to corals, were quantified by degree heating weeks. Results showed that present-day reported bleaching sites were consistent with localized regions of continuous high SST. Regions with highest SST were located within shallow coastal sites adjacent to the mainland or within the interior of the bay, and characterized by low currents with high water retention times. Under projected increases in SSTs, shallow reef areas in low flow regions were found to be hot spots for future bleaching.

  6. Characterisation of nutrients wet deposition under influence of Saharan dust at Puerto-Rico in Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desboeufs, Karine; Formenti, Paola; Triquet, Sylvain; Laurent, Benoit; Denjean, Cyrielle; Gutteriez-Moreno, Ian E.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.

    2015-04-01

    Large quantities of African dust are carried across the North Atlantic toward the Caribbean every summer by Trade Winds. Atmospheric deposition of dust aerosols, and in particular wet deposition, is widely acknowledged to be the major delivery pathway for nutrients to ocean ecosystems, as iron, phosphorus and various nitrogen species. The deposition of this dustis so known to have an important impact on biogeochemical processes in the Tropical and Western Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean including Puerto-Rico. However, very few data exists on the chemical composition in nutrients in dusty rain in this region. In the framework of the Dust-ATTAcK project, rainwater was collected at the natural reserve of Cape San Juan (CSJ) (18.38°N, 65.62°W) in Puerto-Ricobetween 20 June 2012 and 12 July 2012 during thedusty period. A total of 7 rainwater events were sampled during various dust plumes. Complementary chemical analyses on aerosols in suspension was also determined during the campaign. The results on dust composition showed that no mixing with anthropogenic material was observed, confirming dust aerosols were the major particles incorporated in rain samples. The partitioning between soluble and particulate nutrients in rain samples showed that phosphorous solubility ranged from 30 and 80%. The average Fe solubility was around 0.5%, in agreement with Fe solubility observed in rains collected in Niger during African monsoon. That means that the high solubility measurements previously observed in Caribbean was probably due to an anthropogenic influence. Atmospheric wet deposition fluxes of soluble and total nutrients (N, P, Si, Fe, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Zn) to Caribbean Sea were determined. Atmospheric P and N inputs were strongly depleted relative to the stoichiometry of phytoplankton Fe, N, P and Si requirements.The nitrogen speciation was also determined and showed the predominance of ammonium form. 3-D modeling was used to estimate the spatial extend of these fluxes over the

  7. Habitat-dependent growth in a Caribbean sea urchin Tripneustes ventricosus: the importance of food type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciá, Silvia; Robinson, Michael P.

    2008-12-01

    The sea urchin Tripneustes ventricosus is a common, yet relatively poorly known, grazer of seagrass beds and coral reefs throughout the Caribbean. We compared the size and abundance of urchins between adjacent seagrass and coral reef habitats (where macroalgae are the dominant primary producers). We also conducted a laboratory experiment comparing the growth rate of juvenile urchins fed a diet of either macroalgae or seagrass. Reef urchins had significantly larger test diameter than those in the seagrass on some sampling dates. This size difference may be at least partially explained by diet, because laboratory-reared urchins fed macroalgae grew significantly faster than those fed seagrass. The seagrass population, however, was stable over time, whereas the reef population exhibited strong fluctuations in abundance. Overall, our study indicates that both the seagrass and coral reef habitats are capable of supporting healthy, reproductive populations of T. ventricosus. Each, however, appears to offer a distinct advantage: faster growth on the reef and greater population stability in the seagrass.

  8. Biofilm inhibition activity of compounds isolated from two Eunicea species collected at the Caribbean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yenny Martínez Díaz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Biofilm has a primary role in the pathogenesis of diseases and in the attachment of multicellular organisms to a fouled surface. Because of that, the control of bacterial biofilms has been identified as an important target. In the present study, five lipid compounds isolated from soft coral Eunicea sp. and three terpenoids together with a mixture of sterols from Eunicea fusca collected at the Colombian Caribbean Sea showed different effectiveness against biofilm formation by three marine bacteria associated with immersed fouled surfaces, Ochrobactrum pseudogringnonense,Alteromona macleodii and Vibrio harveyi, and against two known biofilm forming bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. The pure compounds were characterized by NMR, HRESI-MS, HRGC-MS and optical rotation. The most effective compounds were batyl alcohol (1 and fuscoside E peracetate (6, acting against four strains without affecting their microbial growth. Compound 1 showed biofilm inhibition greater than 30% against A. macleodii, and up to 60% against O. pseudogringnonense,V. harveyi and S. aureus. Compound 6 inhibited O. pseudogringnonense and V. harveyi between 25 and 50%, and P. aeruginosa or S. aureus up to 60% at 0.5 mg/ml. The results suggest that these compounds exhibit specific biofilm inhibition with lower antimicrobial effect against the bacterial species assayed.

  9. An Unprecedented Aggregation of Whale Sharks, Rhincodon typus, in Mexican Coastal Waters of the Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Parra Venegas, Rafael; Hueter, Robert; González Cano, Jaime; Tyminski, John; Gregorio Remolina, José; Maslanka, Mike; Ormos, Andrea; Weigt, Lee; Carlson, Bruce; Dove, Alistair

    2011-01-01

    Whale sharks, Rhincodon typus, are often perceived as solitary behemoths that live and feed in the open ocean. To the contrary, evidence is accumulating that they are gregarious and form seasonal aggregations in some coastal waters. One such aggregation occurs annually north of Cabo Catoche, off Isla Holbox on the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico. Here we report a second, much denser aggregation of whale sharks (dubbed “the Afuera”) that occurs east of the tip of the Yucatán Peninsula in the Caribbean Sea. The 2009 Afuera event comprised the largest aggregation of whale sharks ever reported, with up to 420 whale sharks observed in a single aerial survey, all gathered in an elliptical patch of ocean approximately 18 km2. Plankton studies indicated that the sharks were feeding on dense homogenous patches of fish eggs, which DNA barcoding analysis identified as belonging to little tunny, Euthynnus alletteratus. This contrasts with the annual Cabo Catoche aggregation nearby, where prey consists mostly of copepods and sergestid shrimp. Increased sightings at the Afuera coincide with decreased sightings at Cabo Catoche, and both groups have the same sex ratio, implying that the same animals are likely involved in both aggregations; tagging data support this idea. With two whale shark aggregation areas, high coastal productivity and a previously-unknown scombrid spawning ground, the northeastern Yucatán marine region is a critical habitat that deserves more concerted conservation efforts. PMID:21559508

  10. Relative sea-level changes during the last century recorded by coral microatolls in Belloc, Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil-Accardo, J.; Feuillet, N.; Jacques, E.; Deschamps, P.; Saurel, J.-M.; Thirumalai, K.; Demeza, S.; Anglade, D.

    2016-04-01

    We present here the first study of coral microatolls in the Caribbean. An exceptional site (Belloc reef) where dozens of microatolls were growing was uplifted and exposed during the 12 January 2010 Mw 7 Haiti earthquake. Total station measurements of the old pre-earthquake and the new post-earthquake coral highest level of survival (HLS) on two generations of Siderastrea siderea corals allowed us to estimate a value of 45 ± 14 cm for the coseismic uplift. In this small 90 m × 70 m reef, microatolls of different shapes (cups, hats or flats) coexist, indicating long term submergence, emergence or stable relative sea-level. This variability in coral shape is uncommon. Two slices of microatolls, one cup-shaped (B8) and one hat-shaped (B10) were sampled with a chain saw and X-rayed to study their stratigraphy. B10 recorded a mean relative sea-level decrease of about - 1 mm/yr over the last five decades, whereas B8 has grown in a context of relative sea-level rise at a rate of about 1 mm/yr over nine decades. Several sudden and temporary die downs simultaneously disrupted the growth of both corals in 1940 ± 2, 1963 ± 2, 1983 ± 2, 1992 ± 1, 2001 ± 1 and 2009 and may be caused by oceanographic/climatic phenomena occurring in the tropical North Atlantic. The last one, in 2009, was associated with a clear sea-level height decrease (about 10 cm) in the satellite data. B10 was strongly affected by these events and records die downs of systematically larger amplitude, which tended to delay its upward growth compared to B8. This makes B10 less reliable for the evaluation of the relative sea-level trend, its emergence rate being only an apparent estimate due to die downs. Fossil coral microatolls of Diploria strigosa which died between 1958 and 1966 (according to U/Th dating), probably during one of the strongest hurricane reported in Haiti (Flora, 1963), display a cup shape attesting for submergence. Their HLS is 1 cm below the HLS of the S. siderea killed in 2010. The

  11. Freshwater discharge into the Caribbean Sea from the rivers of Northwestern South America (Colombia): Magnitude, variability and recent changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Juan Camilo; Ortíz, Juan Carlos; Pierini, Jorge; Schrottke, Kerstin; Maza, Mauro; Otero, Luís; Aguirre, Julián

    2014-02-01

    The monthly averaged freshwater discharge data from ten rivers in northern Colombia (Caribbean alluvial plain) draining into the Caribbean Sea were analysed to quantify the magnitudes, to estimate long-term trends, and to evaluate the variability of discharge patterns. These rivers deliver ∼340.9 km3 yr-1 of freshwater to the Caribbean Sea. The largest freshwater supply is provided by the Magdalena River, with a mean discharge of 205.1 km3 yr-1 at Calamar, which is 26% of the total fluvial discharge into this basin. From 2000 to 2010, the annual streamflow of these rivers increased as high as 65%, and upward trends in statistical significance were found for the Mulatos, Canal del Dique, Magdalena, and Fundación Rivers. The concurrence of major oscillation processes and the maximum power of the 3-7 year band fluctuation defined a period of intense hydrological activity from approximately 1998-2002. The wavelet spectrum highlighted a change in the variability patterns of fluvial systems between 2000 and 2010 characterised by a shift towards a quasi-decadal process (8-12 years) domain. The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), El Niño - Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events, and quasi-decadal climate processes are the main factors controlling the fluvial discharge variability of these fluvial systems.

  12. Diurnal warming in shallow coastal seas: Observations from the Caribbean and Great Barrier Reef regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X.; Minnett, P. J.; Berkelmans, R.; Hendee, J.; Manfrino, C.

    2014-07-01

    A good understanding of diurnal warming in the upper ocean is important for the validation of satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) against in-situ buoy data and for merging satellite SSTs taken at different times of the same day. For shallow coastal regions, better understanding of diurnal heating could also help improve monitoring and prediction of ecosystem health, such as coral reef bleaching. Compared to its open ocean counterpart which has been studied extensively and modeled with good success, coastal diurnal warming has complicating localized characteristics, including coastline geometry, bathymetry, water types, tidal and wave mixing. Our goal is to characterize coastal diurnal warming using two extensive in-situ temperature and weather datasets from the Caribbean and Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia. Results showed clear daily warming patterns in most stations from both datasets. For the three Caribbean stations where solar radiation is the main cause of daily warming, the mean diurnal warming amplitudes were about 0.4 K at depths of 4-7 m and 0.6-0.7 K at shallower depths of 1-2 m; the largest warming value was 2.1 K. For coral top temperatures of the GBR, 20% of days had warming amplitudes >1 K, with the largest >4 K. The bottom warming at shallower sites has higher daily maximum temperatures and lower daily minimum temperatures than deeper sites nearby. The averaged daily warming amplitudes were shown to be closely related to daily average wind speed and maximum insolation, as found in the open ocean. Diurnal heating also depends on local features including water depth, location on different sections of the reef (reef flat vs. reef slope), the relative distance from the barrier reef chain (coast vs. lagoon stations vs. inner barrier reef sites vs. outer rim sites); and the proximity to the tidal inlets. In addition, the influence of tides on daily temperature changes and its relative importance compared to solar radiation was quantified by

  13. Intrareef variations in Li/Mg and Sr/Ca sea surface temperature proxies in the Caribbean reef-building coral Siderastrea siderea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowell, Sara E.; Sandford, Kate; Stewart, Joseph A.; Castillo, Karl D.; Ries, Justin B.; Foster, Gavin L.

    2016-10-01

    Caribbean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) have increased at a rate of 0.2°C per decade since 1971, a rate double that of the mean global change. Recent investigations of the coral Siderastrea siderea on the Belize Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System (MBRS) have demonstrated that warming over the last 30 years has had a detrimental impact on calcification. Instrumental temperature records in this region are sparse, making it necessary to reconstruct longer SST records indirectly through geochemical temperature proxies. Here we investigate the skeletal Sr/Ca and Li/Mg ratios of S. siderea from two distinct reef zones (forereef and backreef) of the MBRS. Our field calibrations of S. siderea show that Li/Mg and Sr/Ca ratios are well correlated with temperature, although both ratios are 3 times more sensitive to temperature change in the forereef than in the backreef. These differences suggest that a secondary parameter also influences these SST proxies, highlighting the importance for site- and species-specific SST calibrations. Application of these paleothermometers to downcore samples reveals highly uncertain reconstructed temperatures in backreef coral, but well-matched reconstructed temperatures in forereef coral, both between Sr/Ca-SSTs and Li/Mg-SSTs, and in comparison to the Hadley Centre Sea Ice and Sea Surface Temperature record. Reconstructions generated from a combined Sr/Ca and Li/Mg multiproxy calibration improve the precision of these SST reconstructions. This result confirms that there are circumstances in which both Li/Mg and Sr/Ca are reliable as stand-alone and combined proxies of sea surface temperature. However, the results also highlight that high-precision, site-specific calibrations remain critical for reconstructing accurate SSTs from coral-based elemental proxies.

  14. Why much of the Atlantic circulation enters the Caribbean Sea and very little of the Pacific circulation enters the Sea of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nof, Doron

    2000-01-01

    A peculiar aspect of western marginal seas is that some of them accommodate large transports whereas others, apparently similar seas, accommodate relatively small transports. For instance, about 30-40 Sv of Atlantic upper water passes through the Caribbean and yet only 2 Sv or so passes through the Sea of Japan. The passages connecting the Caribbean to the Atlantic are somewhat larger than their Sea of Japan counterparts, but the dimensions of the gaps are too similar to each other to account for the large difference in the transports. Four different baroclinic models are used to investigate the problem. First, we used a wind-driven, layer-and-a-half isopycnal model with an idealized basin and an adjacent marginal sea separated from the main basin by a thin and long island. In this scenario, thermocline water enters the marginal sea via a gap to the south of the island and exits the sea via a gap to the north of the island. The mean latitudinal position of the marginal sea is gradually increased and the numerical transport across the sea is measured. We then compared the transport determined this way to that computed using three analytical baroclinic models: Godfrey's island rule (Godfrey, J. S. (1989). A Sverdrup model of the depth-integrated flow for the world ocean allowing for island circulations. Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics, 45, 89-112.), the ‘ β-controlled’ transport formula (Nof, D. (1993). The penetration of Kuroshio water into the Sea of Japan. Journal of Physical Oceanography, 23, 797-807), and the general gap transport formula (Nof, D., (1995). Choked flows and wind-driven interbasin exchange. Journal of Marine Research, 53, 23-48). The results were also compared to Minato and Kimura's (Minato, S., & Kimura, R. (1980). Volume transport of the western boundary current penetrating into a marginal sea. Journal of the Oceanographic Society of Japan, 36, 185-195) barotropic calculations. All four baroclinic models show that, when the

  15. Biodiversity patterns of free-living marine nematodes in a tropical bay: Cienfuegos, Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenteros, M.; Ruiz-Abierno, A.; Fernández-Garcés, R.; Pérez-García, J. A.; Díaz-Asencio, L.; Vincx, M.; Decraemer, W.

    2009-11-01

    Spatial and temporal biodiversity patterns of free-living marine nematodes were studied in Cienfuegos Bay, a tropical semi-enclosed basin in the Caribbean Sea. Taxonomic (to species level) and functional (biological trait) approaches were applied for describing the assemblage structure and relating it to abiotic environment based on a sampling scheme in six subtidal stations and three months. Biological trait approach added relevant information to species pattern regarding relationships between diversity patterns and the abiotic environment. The most common morphotypes were deposit feeding nematodes, with colonising abilities of 2-3 (in a scale from 1 to 5), tail conical cylindrical or filiforme and body slender; and their abundance were correlated with depth, organic matter and silt/clay fraction. In spite of a high turnover of species, functional diversity of assemblages did not change notably in space and time. A result probably due to sampling of the habitat pool of species and to low heterogeneity of the studied muddy bottoms. Chemical pollution (organic enrichment and heavy metals) and hydrodynamic regime possibly drove the biodiversity patterns. Spatial distribution of assemblages support the existence of two well differentiated basins inside the bay, the northern basin more polluted than the southern one. The low hydrodynamic regime would determine a poor dispersion of nematodes resulting in high spatial variance in the assemblage structure; and also the associated hypoxic conditions and pollutants in sediments can explain the dominance of tolerant nematode species such as Daptonema oxycerca, Sabatieria pulchra, Terschellingia gourbaultae, and Terschellingia longicaudata. A comparison of spatial-temporal patterns of biodiversity between Cienfuegos Bay and other semi-enclosed bays in temperate regions suggests several similarities: nematode assemblages are strongly influenced by anthropogenic disturbance, temporal trends are weak or overridden by spatial

  16. Horizontal movements, migration patterns, and population structure of whale sharks in the Gulf of Mexico and northwestern Caribbean sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueter, Robert E; Tyminski, John P; de la Parra, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Whale sharks, Rhincodon typus, aggregate by the hundreds in a summer feeding area off the northeastern Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, where the Gulf of Mexico meets the Caribbean Sea. The aggregation remains in the nutrient-rich waters off Isla Holbox, Isla Contoy and Isla Mujeres, Quintana Roo for several months in the summer and then dissipates between August and October. Little has been known about where these sharks come from or migrate to after they disperse. From 2003-2012, we used conventional visual tags, photo-identification, and satellite tags to characterize the basic population structure and large-scale horizontal movements of whale sharks that come to this feeding area off Mexico. The aggregation comprised sharks ranging 2.5-10.0 m in total length and included juveniles, subadults, and adults of both sexes, with a male-biased sex ratio (72%). Individual sharks remained in the area for an estimated mean duration of 24-33 days with maximum residency up to about 6 months as determined by photo-identification. After leaving the feeding area the sharks showed horizontal movements in multiple directions throughout the Gulf of Mexico basin, the northwestern Caribbean Sea, and the Straits of Florida. Returns of individual sharks to the Quintana Roo feeding area in subsequent years were common, with some animals returning for six consecutive years. One female shark with an estimated total length of 7.5 m moved at least 7,213 km in 150 days, traveling through the northern Caribbean Sea and across the equator to the South Atlantic Ocean where her satellite tag popped up near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. We hypothesize this journey to the open waters of the Mid-Atlantic was for reproductive purposes but alternative explanations are considered. The broad movements of whale sharks across multiple political boundaries corroborates genetics data supporting gene flow between geographically distinct areas and underscores the need for management and conservation strategies for

  17. Aerial tracking of radio-marked white-tailed tropicbirds over the Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, M.R.; Obrecht, H.H.; Pennycuick, C.J.; Schaffner, F.C.; Amlaner, Charles J.

    1989-01-01

    We radio-marked nesting white-tailed tropicbirds at Culebra National Wildlife Refuge, Puerto Rico, and tracked them from a Cessna 182 during flights over the open sea. Locations of the birds were determined using standard aerial telemetry techniques for side-facing Yagi antennas. We used strut-mounted, 4-element Yagi antennas connected to a switchbox and scanning receiver. By recording bearing and distance from at least 1 of 3 aeronautical navigation beacons, the position of the aircraft and the bird could be estimated with an error of about 2 km. On several occasions we plotted the general heading of a bird and then relocated and tracked the same bird on the following day. Our method of aerial tracking and navigation was useful for tracking birds over the sea to at least 116 km from the breeding colony

  18. Distribución de cangrejos ermitaños (Anomura: Paguroidea en el mar Caribe colombiano Hermit crabs (Anomura: Paguroidea distribution patterns in the Colombian Caribbean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibian Martínez Campos

    2012-03-01

    the Colombian Caribbean Sea, through classification and spatial ordination multivariate analyses, using historical records from years 1916 to 2006. Besides, the world distribution of Colombian species and their geographic affinity in the Caribbean and Western Atlantic were identified. The results show deep differences between coastal and continental slope faunas, and latitudinal differences in the assemblages, with the identification of three groups: Northeast, Center and Southwest. The differences in faunal composition that support these three groups were determined. Based on maps of the Colombian marine ecosystems, it was found that the main factors affecting the distribution of hermit crabs were the Caribaná slope (depth, water-mass temperature, Guajira sea-grass beds, and particular conditions of “Coralline Archipelagos” and “Darién” eco-regions. Colombian hermit crab fauna is more related to the North Atlantic and the Antilles, than to the South Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. Additionally, geographical sub-provinces in which Colombia is included, these were found as transition zones among Northern and Austral subprovinces of the Greater Caribbean.

  19. The EUMETSAT sea ice concentration climate data record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonboe, Rasmus T.; Eastwood, Steinar; Lavergne, Thomas; Sørensen, Atle M.; Rathmann, Nicholas; Dybkjær, Gorm; Toudal Pedersen, Leif; Høyer, Jacob L.; Kern, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    An Arctic and Antarctic sea ice area and extent dataset has been generated by EUMETSAT's Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSISAF) using the record of microwave radiometer data from NASA's Nimbus 7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave radiometer (SMMR) and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager and Sounder (SSMIS) satellite sensors. The dataset covers the period from October 1978 to April 2015 and updates and further developments are planned for the next phase of the project. The methodology for computing the sea ice concentration uses (1) numerical weather prediction (NWP) data input to a radiative transfer model for reduction of the impact of weather conditions on the measured brightness temperatures; (2) dynamical algorithm tie points to mitigate trends in residual atmospheric, sea ice, and water emission characteristics and inter-sensor differences/biases; and (3) a hybrid sea ice concentration algorithm using the Bristol algorithm over ice and the Bootstrap algorithm in frequency mode over open water. A new sea ice concentration uncertainty algorithm has been developed to estimate the spatial and temporal variability in sea ice concentration retrieval accuracy. A comparison to US National Ice Center sea ice charts from the Arctic and the Antarctic shows that ice concentrations are higher in the ice charts than estimated from the radiometer data at intermediate sea ice concentrations between open water and 100 % ice. The sea ice concentration climate data record is available for download at www.osi-saf.org, including documentation.

  20. Two new records of Pyramidellidae (Gastropoda, Heterobranchia) from China seas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhiyun; ZHANG Suping

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports two species of the family Pyramidellidae (Gastropoda,Heterobranchia),Otopleura nitida (A.Adams,1854) and Rugadentia manzakiana (Yokoyama,1922).The former was from the South China Sea and the latter was from the Yellow Sea and East China Sea.The study was based on the collections deposited in the Marine Biological Museum,Chinese Academy of Sciences.This is for the first time that these species have been recorded in China seas.In the current contribution,we describe and illustrate these two species,and compare them with similar species.

  1. Zoogeography of Elasmobranchs in the Colombian Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Felipe Navia

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In order to investigate zoogeographical patterns of the marine elasmobranch species of Colombia, species richness of the Pacific and Caribbean and their subareas (Coastal Pacific, Oceanic Pacific, Coastal Caribbean, Oceanic Caribbean was analyzed. The areas shared 10 families, 10 genera and 16 species of sharks, and eight families, three genera and four species of batoids. Carcharhinidae had the highest contribution to shark richness, whereas Rajidae and Urotrygonidae had the greatest contribution to batoid richness in the Caribbean and Pacific, respectively. Most elasmobranchs were associated with benthic and coastal habitats. The similarity analysis allowed the identification of five groups of families, which characterize the elasmobranch richness in both areas. Beta diversity indicated that most species turnover occurred between the Coastal Pacific and the two Caribbean subareas. The difference in species richness and composition between areas may be due to vicariant events such as the emergence of the Isthmus of Panama. It is unlikely that the Colombian elasmobranch diversity originated from a single colonization event. Local diversification/speciation, dispersal from the non-tropical regions of the Americas, a Pacific dispersion and an Atlantic dispersion are origin possibilities without any of them excluding the others.

  2. Prevalence and Distribution of Vibrio spp. in Wild Aquatic Birds of the Southern Caribbean Sea, Venezuela, 2011-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Delgado, Milagro; Sanz, Virginia; Giner, Sandra; Suárez, Paula; Contreras, Monica; Michelangeli, Fabian; García-Amado

    2016-07-01

    Vibrio spp. are associated with waterbirds mainly in temperate latitudes. We evaluated the prevalence and distribution of Vibrio spp. from fecal samples of resident and migratory aquatic birds collected during October 2011 and March 2012 at two coastal sites in the tropical southern Caribbean Sea. We amplified DNA by PCR in 40% of samples, resulting in 47% and 36% estimated prevalence for resident and migratory birds in Cuare Wildlife Refuge, and 33% and 44% in Margarita Island, respectively. We found nontoxigenic Vibrio cholerae in Cuare Wildlife Refuge with a higher prevalence in resident birds (18%). Our PCR results for Vibrio and V. cholerae were not significantly different between sites or bird migratory status. The 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis sequences from fecal samples from Cuare Wildlife Refuge were highly similar to V. cholerae and Vibrio vulnificus , whereas sequences from Margarita Island samples formed clusters with species related to the Harveyi clade. Our findings indicate that several species of Vibrio are common in aquatic birds along the southern Caribbean Sea and contribute to our understanding of the role of birds as possible reservoirs of potentially pathogenic bacteria.

  3. Towards a satellite-based sea ice climate data record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, W. N.; Fetterer, F.; Stroeve, J.; Cavalieri, D.; Parkinson, C.; Comiso, J.; Weaver, R.

    2005-12-01

    Sea ice plays an important role in the Earth's climate through its influence on the surface albedo, heat and moisture transfer between the ocean and the atmosphere, and the thermohaline circulation. Satellite data reveal that since 1979, summer Arctic sea ice has, overall, been declining at a rate of almost 8%/decade, with recent summers (beginning in 2002) being particularly low. The receding sea ice is having an effect on wildlife and indigenous peoples in the Arctic, and concern exists that these effects may become increasingly severe. Thus, a long-term, ongoing climate data record of sea ice is crucial for tracking the changes in sea ice and for assessing the significance of long-term trends. Since the advent of passive microwave satellite instruments in the early 1970s, sea ice has been one of the most consistently monitored climate parameters. There is now a 27+ year record of sea ice extent and concentration from multi-channel passive microwave radiometers that has undergone inter-sensor calibration and other quality controls to ensure consistency throughout the record. Several algorithms have been developed over the years to retrieve sea ice extent and concentration and two of the most commonly used algorithms, the NASA Team and Bootstrap, have been applied to the entire SMMR-SSM/I record to obtain a consistent time series. These algorithms were developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and are archived at the National Snow and Ice Data Center. However, the complex surface properties of sea ice affect the microwave signature, and algorithms can yield ambiguous results; no single algorithm has been found to work uniformly well under all sea ice conditions. Thus there are ongoing efforts to further refine the algorithms and the time series. One approach is to develop data fusion methods to optimally combine sea ice fields from two or more algorithms. Another approach is to take advantage of the improved capabilities of JAXA's AMSR-E sensor on NASA's Aqua

  4. First record of Fraser's dolphin Lagenodelphis hosei for the Dutch Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, R.H.; Buurt, van G.; Debrot, A.O.; Bermudez-Villapol, L.A.; Simal, F.

    2012-01-01

    A dead dolphin found on Bonaire in August 2011 is identified as adult Fraser's dolphin Lagenodelphis hosei, a new species for the Dutch Caribbean. A first closer examination showed a collapsed lung, stomach parasite infection and abundant mouth ulceration as indications of its health status. The

  5. First record of Fraser's dolphin Lagenodelphis hosei for the Dutch Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, R.H.; Buurt, van G.; Debrot, A.O.; Bermudez-Villapol, L.A.; Simal, F.

    2012-01-01

    A dead dolphin found on Bonaire in August 2011 is identified as adult Fraser's dolphin Lagenodelphis hosei, a new species for the Dutch Caribbean. A first closer examination showed a collapsed lung, stomach parasite infection and abundant mouth ulceration as indications of its health status. The ani

  6. First record of a Caribbean green turtle (Chelonia mydas) grazing on invasive seagrass (Halophila stipulacea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becking, Leontine E.; van Bussel, Tineke C. J. M.; Debrot, Adolphe O.; Christianen, Marjolijn J. A.

    2014-01-01

    From Bonaire, we here provide the first documented case of the green turtle feeding on the invasive seagrass, Halophila stipulacea, in the Caribbean. The seagrass is rapidly invading existing seagrass meadows and altering key foraging habitat of this endangered marine reptile throughout the eastern

  7. First record of a Caribbean green turtle (Chelonia mydas) grazing on invasive seagrass (Halophila stipulacea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becking, Leontine E.; van Bussel, Tineke C. J. M.; Debrot, Adolphe O.; Christianen, Marjolijn J. A.

    2014-01-01

    From Bonaire, we here provide the first documented case of the green turtle feeding on the invasive seagrass, Halophila stipulacea, in the Caribbean. The seagrass is rapidly invading existing seagrass meadows and altering key foraging habitat of this endangered marine reptile throughout the eastern

  8. Population genetics of a trochid gastropod broadens picture of Caribbean Sea connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo Díaz-Ferguson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regional genetic connectivity models are critical for successful conservation and management of marine species. Even though rocky shore invertebrates have been used as model systems to understand genetic structure in some marine environments, our understanding of connectivity in Caribbean communities is based overwhelmingly on studies of tropical fishes and corals. In this study, we investigate population connectivity and diversity of Cittarium pica, an abundant rocky shore trochid gastropod that is commercially harvested across its natural range, from the Bahamas to Venezuela. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested for genetic structure using DNA sequence variation at the mitochondrial COI and 16S loci, AMOVA and distance-based methods. We found substantial differentiation among Caribbean sites. Yet, genetic differentiation was associated only with larger geographic scales within the Caribbean, and the pattern of differentiation only partially matched previous assessments of Caribbean connectivity, including those based on larval dispersal from hydrodynamic models. For instance, the Bahamas, considered an independent region by previous hydrodynamic studies, showed strong association with Eastern Caribbean sites in our study. Further, Bonaire (located in the east and close to the meridional division of the Caribbean basin seems to be isolated from other Eastern sites. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The significant genetic structure and observed in C. pica has some commonalities in pattern with more commonly sampled taxa, but presents features, such as the differentiation of Bonaire, that appear unique. Further, the level of differentiation, together with regional patterns of diversity, has important implications for the application of conservation and management strategies in this commercially harvested species.

  9. Understanding Climate Change and Sea Level: A Case Study of Middle School Student Comprehension and An Evaluation of Tide Gauges off the Panama Canal in the Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan-Otoya, Juan C.

    The present study had two main objectives. The first was to determine the degree of understanding of climate change, sea level and sea level rise among middle school students. Combining open-ended questions with likert-scaled questions, we identified student conceptions on these topics in 86 students from 7th and 8th grades during 2012 and 2013 before and after implementing a Curriculum Unit (CU). Additional information was obtained by adding drawings to the open-ended questions during the second year to gauge how student conceptions varied from a verbal and a visual perspective. Misconceptions were identified both pre- and post-CU among all the topics taught. Students commonly used climate and climate change as synonyms, sea level was often defined as water depth, and several students failed to understand the complexities that determine changes in sea level due to wind, tides, and changes in sea surface temperature. In general, 8th grade students demonstrated a better understanding of these topics, as reflected in fewer apparent misconceptions after the CU. No previous study had reported such improvement. This showed the value of implementing short lessons. Using Piaget's theories on cognitive development, the differences between 7th and 8th grade students reflect a transition to a more mature level which allowed students to comprehend more complex concepts that included multiple variables. The second objective was to determine if the frequency of sea level maxima not associated with tides over the last 100 years increased in two tide gauges located on the two extremes of the Panama canal, i.e. Balboa in the Pacific Ocean and Cristobal in the Caribbean Sea. These records were compared to time series of regional sea surface temperature, wind speed, atmospheric pressure, and El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), to determine if these played a role as physical drivers of sea level at either location. Neither record showed an increase in the frequency of sea level

  10. A modified Wyllie equation for the relationship between porosity and sonic velocity of mixed sediments and carbonates from the Caribbean Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Ida

    1997-01-01

    Continuous drill cores from the Caribbean Sea of up to 1 km thick mixed sediments and carbonates were recovered by Ocean Drilling Program Leg 165. The sediments range in porosity from 10% to 80% and in carbonate content from 20% to 95%. Unconfined P-wave velocities from this material were measure...

  11. Description of Metacirolana agujae n. sp., and redescription of M. agaricicola Kensley, 1984, from the Caribbean Sea of Colombia (Isopoda: Cirolanidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Hans-Georg

    1991-01-01

    Metacirolana agaricicola Kensley, 1984 from the Caribbean Sea of Colombia is redescribed, with particular reference to its sexual dimorphism. Metacirolana agujae n. sp., known only from Colombia, is decribed. The interspecific affinities of both species are discussed and notes on their habits are gi

  12. WIND DIRECTION, pH and other data from FOX in the Caribbean Sea from 1974-08-30 to 1974-08-31 (NCEI Accession 7601844)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data were collected in the Caribbean Sea from August 30-31, 1974. HMS FOX of the British navy was used to collect the data. Mr. Paul Ruiz, Tauton, Somerset, UK...

  13. Properties of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN in the trade wind marine boundary layer of the Eastern Caribbean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. B. Kristensen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cloud optical properties in the trade winds over the Eastern Caribbean Sea have been shown to be sensitive to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations. The objective of the current study was to investigate the CCN properties in the marine boundary layer (MBL in the Eastern Caribbean, in order to assess the respective roles of organic species, long-range transported mineral dust, and sea salt particles. Measurements were carried out in June–July 2013, on the East Coast of Barbados and included CCN number concentrations, particle number size distributions, as well as off-line analysis of sampled particulate matter (PM and sampled accumulation mode particles for an investigation of composition and mixing state with transmission electron microscopy (TEM in combination with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX. During most of the campaign, significant mass concentrations of long-range transported mineral dust was present in the PM, and influence from local island sources can be ruled out. The CCN and particle number concentrations were similar to what can be expected in pristine marine environments. The hygroscopicity parameter κ was inferred, and values in the range 0.2–0.5 were found during most of the campaign, with similar values for the Aitken and the accumulation mode. The accumulation mode particles studied with TEM were dominated by non-refractory material, and concentrations of mineral dust, sea salt, and soot were too small to influence the CCN properties. It is highly likely that the CCN were dominated by a mixture of sulphate species and organic compounds.

  14. A rock-magnetic study of coral skeletons: A record of African dust deposition in the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, P. M.; Clement, B. M.; Halley, R.; Helmle, K.; Swart, P.; Dodge, R.

    2008-05-01

    Aeolian African dust from the Saharan-Sahel deserts significantly influences the climate and ecology of the Caribbean region. Large summer dust storms produce mass quantities of air-born, clay-rich material (containing significant iron-oxide components), that are transported over the Atlantic Ocean and deposited in the Caribbean. We present here the results of a rock magnetic study of cores of Scleractinian corals, including a Montastraea annularis collected in Culebra, Puerto Rico on July of 1991, a M. faveolata collected off the coast of St. Vincent (Bequia) on November of 2002, and a Siderastrea radians collected off the coast of Cape Verde on July of 2002. Thin slabs (~5mm) were cut from these cores and x-rayed to reveal annual density banding. Small samples centered over each annual high-density band were cut from the slabs. These samples were then subjected to a series of standard rock magnetic experiments, including Anhysteretic Remanent Magnetization (ARM) acquisition and demagnetization, and Isothermal Remanent Magnetization (IRM) acquisition and demagnetization. Records of both ARMs and IRMs reveal coherent signals that vary with coral age. The IRM acquisition curves demonstrate the presence of two carriers of magnetization in most samples; a low-coercivity component consistent with the presence of magnetite or maghemite and a high-coercivity component consistent with the presence of hematite. Unmixing the IRM acquisition curves differentiates the magnetic components and yields a record of high-coercivity input that we interpret as a record of African dust. Preliminary data from the M. annularis core show a link between high and low variability in the high-coercivity component when compared with the historical record of dust flux to the Caribbean and with the Soudano-Sahel Precipitation Index (SSPI) over a time period of fifty years (1941-1990). High variability is displayed from 1941 through 1950 and 1965 through 1990 whereas low variability is displayed

  15. SURVIVAL, INDUCTION AND RESUSCITATION OF Vibrio cholerae FROM THE VIABLE BUT NON-CULTURABLE STATE IN THE SOUTHERN CARIBBEAN SEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milagro Fernández-Delgado

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The causative agent of cholera, Vibrio cholerae, can enter into a viable but non-culturable (VBNC state in response to unfavorable conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in situ survival of V. cholerae in an aquatic environment of the Southern Caribbean Sea, and its induction and resuscitation from the VBNC state. V. cholerae non-O1, non-O139 was inoculated into diffusion chambers placed at the Cuare Wildlife Refuge, Venezuela, and monitored for plate, total and viable cells counts. At 119 days of exposure to the environment, the colony count was < 10 CFU/mL and a portion of the bacterial population entered the VBNC state. Additionally, the viability decreased two orders of magnitude and morphological changes occurred from rod to coccoid cells. Among the aquatic environmental variables, the salinity had negative correlation with the colony counts in the dry season. Resuscitation studies showed significant recovery of cell cultivability with spent media addition (p < 0.05. These results suggest that V. cholerae can persist in the VBNC state in this Caribbean environment and revert to a cultivable form under favorable conditions. The VBNC state might represent a critical step in cholera transmission in susceptible areas.

  16. SURVIVAL, INDUCTION AND RESUSCITATION OF Vibrio cholerae FROM THE VIABLE BUT NON-CULTURABLE STATE IN THE SOUTHERN CARIBBEAN SEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Delgado, Milagro; García-Amado, María Alexandra; Contreras, Monica; Incani, Renzo Nino; Chirinos, Humberto; Rojas, Héctor; Suárez, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The causative agent of cholera, Vibrio cholerae, can enter into a viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state in response to unfavorable conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in situ survival of V. cholerae in an aquatic environment of the Southern Caribbean Sea, and its induction and resuscitation from the VBNC state. V. cholerae non-O1, non-O139 was inoculated into diffusion chambers placed at the Cuare Wildlife Refuge, Venezuela, and monitored for plate, total and viable cells counts. At 119 days of exposure to the environment, the colony count was < 10 CFU/mL and a portion of the bacterial population entered the VBNC state. Additionally, the viability decreased two orders of magnitude and morphological changes occurred from rod to coccoid cells. Among the aquatic environmental variables, the salinity had negative correlation with the colony counts in the dry season. Resuscitation studies showed significant recovery of cell cultivability with spent media addition (p < 0.05). These results suggest that V. cholerae can persist in the VBNC state in this Caribbean environment and revert to a cultivable form under favorable conditions. The VBNC state might represent a critical step in cholera transmission in susceptible areas. PMID:25651322

  17. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and North Atlantic Ocean from 2003-02-08 to 2004-01-03 (NODC Accession 0081032)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0081032 includes biological, chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea,...

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and others from 2006-01-15 to 2006-12-24 (NODC Accession 0109925)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0109925 includes biological, chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea,...

  19. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and North Atlantic Ocean from 2005-01-02 to 2005-12-18 (NODC Accession 0109924)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0109924 includes biological, chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea,...

  20. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the Pyxis in the Bering Sea, Caribbean Sea and others from 2001-11-06 to 2013-04-25 (NODC Accession 0081041)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0081041 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from Pyxis in the Bering Sea, Caribbean Sea, Coastal Waters...

  1. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2012-01-27 to 2012-11-16 (NODC Accession 0108232)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108232 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea and North...

  2. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and North Atlantic Ocean from 2004-01-03 to 2005-01-02 (NODC Accession 0081033)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0081033 includes biological, chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea,...

  3. Punishing the sea wolf: corsairs and cannibals in the early modern Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris Lane

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Looks at how Western law was interpreted and applied to perceived cannibals and corsairs in the Spanish Caribbean in the 16th and 17th c., by Spanish jurists in the period, and at the development of the cannibal and corsair image in Spanish culture. Author outlines the convergence of terms suggesting a growing semantic linkage between certain indigenous peoples, specially the famed "Carib cannibals", and foreign, mostly Western European, corsairs poaching on Spanish wealth. He describes how of the Caribs, said to be cannibals, involved in piracy, an image was constructed of not only cannibals, but also greedy criminals, or rebelers against Catholicism, in order to (legally justify punishments or wars against them, and thus Spanish rule. He then discusses how of French, British, and other corsairs in the Caribbean involved in piracy against the Spanish, an in some ways similar image was painted of fanatical canine types ruled by appetites, and also of anti-Catholic heretics and criminals, in order to justify punishments as well as the Spanish claim on rule of the Caribbean.

  4. Coral Reef Health Indices versus the Biological, Ecological and Functional Diversity of Fish and Coral Assemblages in the Caribbean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Pérez, Leopoldo; Rodríguez-Zaragoza, Fabián Alejandro; Ortiz, Marco; Cupul-Magaña, Amílcar Leví; Carriquiry, Jose D; Ríos-Jara, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Troncoso, Alma Paola; García-Rivas, María Del Carmen

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between the indices known as the Reef Health Index (RHI) and two-dimensional Coral Health Index (2D-CHI) and different representative metrics of biological, ecological and functional diversity of fish and corals in 101 reef sites located across seven zones in the western Caribbean Sea. Species richness and average taxonomic distinctness were used to asses biological estimation; while ecological diversity was evaluated with the indices of Shannon diversity and Pielou´s evenness, as well as by taxonomic diversity and distinctness. Functional diversity considered the number of functional groups, the Shannon diversity and the functional Pielou´s evenness. According to the RHI, 57.15% of the zones were classified as presenting a "poor" health grade, while 42.85% were in "critical" grade. Based on the 2D-CHI, 28.5% of the zones were in "degraded" condition and 71.5% were "very degraded". Differences in fish and coral diversity among sites and zones were demonstrated using permutational ANOVAs. Differences between the two health indices (RHI and 2D-CHI) and some indices of biological, ecological and functional diversity of fish and corals were observed; however, only the RHI showed a correlation between the health grades and the species and functional group richness of fish at the scale of sites, and with the species and functional group richness and Shannon diversity of the fish assemblages at the scale of zones. None of the health indices were related to the metrics analyzed for the coral diversity. In general, our study suggests that the estimation of health indices should be complemented with classic community indices, or should at least include diversity indices of fish and corals, in order to improve the accuracy of the estimated health status of coral reefs in the western Caribbean Sea.

  5. Coral Reef Health Indices versus the Biological, Ecological and Functional Diversity of Fish and Coral Assemblages in the Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Pérez, Leopoldo; Ortiz, Marco; Cupul-Magaña, Amílcar Leví; Carriquiry, Jose D.; Ríos-Jara, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Troncoso, Alma Paola; García-Rivas, María del Carmen

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between the indices known as the Reef Health Index (RHI) and two-dimensional Coral Health Index (2D-CHI) and different representative metrics of biological, ecological and functional diversity of fish and corals in 101 reef sites located across seven zones in the western Caribbean Sea. Species richness and average taxonomic distinctness were used to asses biological estimation; while ecological diversity was evaluated with the indices of Shannon diversity and Pielou´s evenness, as well as by taxonomic diversity and distinctness. Functional diversity considered the number of functional groups, the Shannon diversity and the functional Pielou´s evenness. According to the RHI, 57.15% of the zones were classified as presenting a "poor" health grade, while 42.85% were in "critical" grade. Based on the 2D-CHI, 28.5% of the zones were in "degraded" condition and 71.5% were "very degraded". Differences in fish and coral diversity among sites and zones were demonstrated using permutational ANOVAs. Differences between the two health indices (RHI and 2D-CHI) and some indices of biological, ecological and functional diversity of fish and corals were observed; however, only the RHI showed a correlation between the health grades and the species and functional group richness of fish at the scale of sites, and with the species and functional group richness and Shannon diversity of the fish assemblages at the scale of zones. None of the health indices were related to the metrics analyzed for the coral diversity. In general, our study suggests that the estimation of health indices should be complemented with classic community indices, or should at least include diversity indices of fish and corals, in order to improve the accuracy of the estimated health status of coral reefs in the western Caribbean Sea. PMID:27579575

  6. The Güira de Jauco amphibolite complex (eastern Cuba). A record of early Campanian collision in the Caribbean plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro, C.; Blanco-Quintero, I. F.; García-Casco, A.; Rojas--Agramonte, Y.; Corsini, M.; Núñez-Cambra, K.

    2012-04-01

    Petrological, geochemical and regional geological arguments suggest that the Güira de Jauco amphibolite complex (eastern Cuba) constitutes the metamorphic sole of the huge Cretaceous back-arc related Mayarí-Baracoa ophiolite belt and, hence, this complex is of major interest for deciphering the deficiently known intra-oceanic orogenic history of the Caribbean belt. The amphibolites have subalkaline low- to medium-K basaltic compositions. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns, ranging from flat LREE-depleted to slightly LREE-enriched patterns, and discrimination geochemical diagrams suggest N- to E-MORB protoliths. The peak mineral assemblages are formed by plagioclase (Xab=0.50-0.80), calcic amphibole (pargasite-edenite), titanite, ±epidote, ±quartz, ±diposide, ±garnet (Xalm = 0.45-0.48, Xgrs = 0.41-0.47), typical of epidote amphibolite facies. Retrograde albite, actinolite, clinozoisite, and chlorite record greenschist facies overprint. Peak P-T estimations are 650-750 °C and 7-10 kbar, corresponding to an apparent geothermal gradient of 25°C/km. 40Ar/39Ar step-heating dating of hornblende from three samples yielded ages of 76.6±2 Ma, 78.4±2 Ma and 80.7±7.5 Ma. These arguments, the strong syn-metamorphic deformation of the complex, and stratigraphic data of the eastern Cuba volcanic arc indicating lack of activity at (roughly) Mid-Campanian age indicate onset of collision and ophiolite obduction towards the NE in the back-arc environment of the region shortly before 80 Ma (early Campanian), i.e., more than 10 Myr before subduction/collision/accretion of platform- and arc-derived high-pressure metamorphic units took place in the leading edge of the Caribbean plate (Guatemala, Cuba and Dominican Republic) in response to arc-continent collision (from 70 Ma to Eocene). Such early Campanian age of onset of oceanic tectonic shortening can hardly be related to subduction/collision of the thick oceanic Caribbean lithosphere with the Caribbean arc, for no

  7. Arctic sea ice reaches second lowest in satellite record

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Xinhua reports that the blanket of sea ice that floats on the Arctic Ocean appears to have reached its lowest extent for 2011, the second lowest recorded since satellites began measuring it in 1979, according to a report released on September 15 by the University of Colorado Boulder's National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC).

  8. Physical and underway data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MV1111 in the Caribbean Sea, Indian Ocean and others from 2011-10-10 to 2011-10-31 (NCEI Accession 0131906)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0131906 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MV1111 in the Caribbean Sea, Indian Ocean and others from...

  9. Physical and underway data collected aboard the OCEANUS during cruise OC469-03 in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2010-10-24 to 2010-11-03 (NODC Accession 0104339)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0104339 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the OCEANUS during cruise OC469-03 in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from...

  10. Temperature profile and chemical data collected using BT and XBT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the North/South Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea from 1987-04-07 to 1987-09-30 (NCEI Accession 8700382)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and chemical data were collected using XBT and BT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the North/South Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea from 07...

  11. Chemical, optical and other data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MV1110 in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2011-09-03 to 2011-10-08 (NCEI Accession 0145826)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0145826 includes chemical, optical and other data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MV1110 in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean...

  12. Marine toxic substances and pollutants data from sediment corer and other instruments from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms in the Caribbean Sea from 1980-07-16 to 1987-11-29 (NCEI Accession 8800013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and pollutants data were collected using sediment corer and other instruments in the Caribbean Sea from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other...

  13. Physical and underway data collected aboard the KNORR during cruise KN197-08 in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2010-05-22 to 2010-06-24 (NODC Accession 0104289)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0104289 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the KNORR during cruise KN197-08 in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from...

  14. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Caribbean Sea as part of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) project from 15 February 1979 - 01 February 1980 (NODC Accession 8100608)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Caribbean Sea from February 15, 1979 to February 1, 1980. Data were submitted by University...

  15. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ENDEAVOR during cruise EN480 in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2010-07-13 to 2010-07-23 (NODC Accession 0103941)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0103941 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ENDEAVOR during cruise EN480 in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from...

  16. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Caribbean Sea as part of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) project from 27 September 1979 - 01 December 1979 (NODC Accession 8100607)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Caribbean Sea from September 27, 1979 to December 1, 1979. Data were submitted by...

  17. Reading the dental record : a dental anthropological approach to foodways, health and disease, and crafting in the pre-Columbian Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mickleburgh, Hayley Louise

    2013-01-01

    Reading the Dental Record investigates human foodways, health and disease, and certain (gender-related) craft activities in the pre-Columbian Caribbean archipelago, through integrated analyses of patterns of dental wear and pathology in a large number of skeletal remains from the region. Individuals

  18. Reading the dental record : a dental anthropological approach to foodways, health and disease, and crafting in the pre-Columbian Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mickleburgh, Hayley Louise

    2013-01-01

    Reading the Dental Record investigates human foodways, health and disease, and certain (gender-related) craft activities in the pre-Columbian Caribbean archipelago, through integrated analyses of patterns of dental wear and pathology in a large number of skeletal remains from the region.

  19. Screening of antimicrobials from Caribbean sea animals and isolation of bactericidal proteins from the littoral mollusk Cenchritis muricatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Abarrategui, Carlos; Alba, Annia; Lima, Loiane A; Maria-Neto, Simone; Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Oliveira, Jose T A; Dias, Simoni C; Otero-Gonzalez, Anselmo J; Franco, Octavio L

    2012-05-01

    Marine organisms represent approximately half of the world's biodiversity by virtue of the sea being an immense reservoir of bioactive molecules. Here, antimicrobial crude extract activities of different marine invertebrates from the Caribbean Sea were evaluated. One of the most active, crude extracts was that marine snail Cenchritis muricatus, it was capable of totally inhibiting the development of Staphylococcus aureus and also showed a growth inhibition of 95.9% in Escherichia coli. Aiming to isolate molecules that confirm antimicrobial activity, the crude extract was purified by reversed-phase HPLC C-18 chromatography. Thereafter, one of the obtained fractions preserved this antibacterial activity. Furthermore, SDS-PAGE analysis (15%) showed the presence of two proteins of molecular masses with approximately 10 and 15 kDa, respectively. The first 19 amino acids of both proteins were sequenced by using Edman degradation, yielding unidentified primary structures compared against sequences deposited at NCBI databank. This is the first report of antibacterial proteins isolated from the mollusk Cenchritis muricatus and these proteins could be used as antibiotic alternatives in the aquacultural industry, as well as in agricultural or biomedical research.

  20. Status of aspergillosis and sea fan populations in Curaçao ten years after the 1995 Caribbean epizootic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M Nugues

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1995, a survey of sea fan corals was conducted in Curaçao during a Caribbean-wide outbreak of the sea fan disease aspergillosis. The survey was repeated in 2005 using the same methodology and identical sites to examine changes in sea fan populations 10 years after the initial epizootic. Necrotic lesions typical of aspergillosis were present on as many sea fans in 2005 as in 1995 (mean ± SE: 52 ± 6 vs 43 ± 10%. The disease also showed no significant variation in virulence (9.6 ± 1.2 vs 8.8 ± 1.0% tissue loss per diseased colony. However, the average number of sea fan colonies per 10 m² decreased from 2.7 ± 1.1 to 0.7 ± 0.2 over the 10-year period, a decline of almost 75%. This decrease occurred for all colony sizes, but was more pronounced among small colonies, resulting in an overall trend of domination by large colonies. These results support that aspergillosis can have a significant, long-term impact on sea fan population size and structure. The continued presence of the disease in 2005 could be contributing to reduced recruitment and/or selective mortality among the smallest colonies. This study provides no indication that host resistance against aspergillosis could reverse the decline of Caribbean sea fan corals. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54 (Suppl. 3: 153-160. Epub 2007 Jan. 15.En 1995, se realizó un sondeo de los abanicos de mar durante un brote de aspergilosis, una enfermedad de abanicos de mar extendida en todo el Caribe. En el año 2005 se repitió el sondeo utilizando exactamente la misma metodología y los mismos sitios para examinar cambios en las poblaciones tras 10 años del inicio del brote. Se presentaron lesiones necróticas típicas de la aspergilosis en tantos abanicos en el 2005, como en 1995 (promedio ± ES: 52 ± 6 vs 43 ± 10%. La enfermedad tampoco mostró variaciones significativas en la virulencia (9.6 ± 1.2 vs 8.8 ± 1.0%, pérdida de tejido por colonia enferma. Sin embargo, el número promedio de colonias de

  1. The Satellite Passive-Microwave Record of Sea Ice in the Ross Sea Since Late 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Claire L.

    2009-01-01

    Satellites have provided us with a remarkable ability to monitor many aspects of the globe day-in and day-out and sea ice is one of numerous variables that by now have quite substantial satellite records. Passive-microwave data have been particularly valuable in sea ice monitoring, with a record that extends back to August 1987 on daily basis (for most of the period), to November 1970 on a less complete basis (again for most of the period), and to December 1972 on a less complete basis. For the period since November 1970, Ross Sea sea ice imagery is available at spatial resolution of approximately 25 km. This allows good depictions of the seasonal advance and retreat of the ice cover each year, along with its marked interannual variability. The Ross Sea ice extent typically reaches a minimum of approximately 0.7 x 10(exp 6) square kilometers in February, rising to a maximum of approximately 4.0 x 10(exp 6) square kilometers in September, with much variability among years for both those numbers. The Ross Sea images show clearly the day-by-day activity greatly from year to year. Animations of the data help to highlight the dynamic nature of the Ross Sea ice cover. The satellite data also allow calculation of trends in the ice cover over the period of the satellite record. Using linear least-squares fits, the Ross Sea ice extent increased at an average rate of 12,600 plus or minus 1,800 square kilometers per year between November 1978 and December 2007, with every month exhibiting increased ice extent and the rates of increase ranging from a low of 7,500 plus or minus 5,000 square kilometers per year for the February ice extents to a high of 20,300 plus or minus 6,100 kilometers per year for the October ice extents. On a yearly average basis, for 1979-2007 the Ross Sea ice extent increased at a rate of 4.8 plus or minus 1.6 % per decade. Placing the Ross Sea in the context of the Southern Ocean as a whole, over the November 1978-December 2007 period the Ross Sea had

  2. Faunistic analysis of the caridean shrimps inhabiting seagrasses along the NW coast of the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everardo Barba Macías

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Seagrass meadows are highly productive and ecologically important habitats in estuaries and coastal lagoons, and contain a variety of faunal communities, from which the caridean shrimps are a dominant component. The purpose of this work was to analyze the environmental parameters of water and sediments, with the biological components in seagrass epifaunal communities, from the Western Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea. For this, density and diversity of caridean shrimps were analyzed and correlated with environmental parameters and seagrass biomass, and zoogeographic affinities were determined. The spatial distribution of caridean shrimps was recorded for 12 localities with Halodule wrightii and Thalassia testudinum monospecific seagrass meadows. A total of 72 158 individuals of 16 taxa were collected. Among results, the Hippolytidae resulted the most abundant group (92.3% with eight species, and was followed by Palaemonidae with 7.6% of the abundance and seven species, and the Alpheidae with only one genus. From the total of collected carideans, a 37.3% was found in H. wrightii and 62.7% in T. testudinum. The dominant species were Hippolyte zostericola (12.39ind./m2, Tozeuma carolinense (9.5ind./m2, Thor dobkini (4.84ind./m2 and Palaemonetes vulgaris (4.87ind./m2. The zoogeographic distribution of the carideans presented two groups: species of the Virginian-Carolinean province representing its Southern limit (43.75% and species of the Brazilian-Caribbean province representing its Northern limit (56.25%. The species H. zostericola, T. carolinense, P. vulgaris, P. pugio and P. intermedius are widely distributed along the Western Atlantic coast. This study has base line information for seagrass habitats, the community of epifaunal carideans and their ecological affinities, previous to the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.Las praderas de pastos marinos son hábitats altamente productivos y ecológicamente importantes a lo largo de las costas y

  3. The 2014 high record of Antarctic sea ice extent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massonnet, Francois; Guemas, Virginie; Fuckar, Neven; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    In September 2014, Antarctic sea ice extent exceeded the symbolic level of 20 million km²for the first time since 1978, when reliable satellite measurements became available. After the successive records of 2012 and 2013, sea ice extent in 2014 once again reinforced the positive trend observed since the late 1970s. We conduct here a dedicated study to elucidate the origins of a major, and perhaps the most intriguing, event that happened at our Poles recently. Observations, reanalyses and model results all point towards the important role of winds in modifying near-surface heat advection patterns around Antarctica. The role of pre-conditioning (summer conditions) is found to be of lesser importance. Finally, we find no evidence that anomalous freshwater forcing (from atmospheric or continental origin) could have explained the record extent of 2014.

  4. A high-resolution temporal record of environmental changes in the Eastern Caribbean (Guadeloupe) from 40 to 10 ka BP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Aurélien; Malaizé, Bruno; Lécuyer, Christophe; Queffelec, Alain; Charlier, Karine; Caley, Thibaut; Lenoble, Arnaud

    2017-01-01

    In neotropical regions, fossil bat guano accumulated over time as laminated layers in caves, hence providing a high-resolution temporal record of terrestrial environmental changes. Additionally, cave settings have the property to preserve such organic sediments from processes triggered by winds (deflation, abrasion and sandblasting) and intense rainfall (leaching away). This study reports both stable carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions of frugivorous bat guano deposited in a well-preserved stratigraphic succession of Blanchard Cave on Marie-Galante, Guadeloupe. These isotopic data are discussed with regard to climate changes and its specific impact on Eastern Caribbean vegetation during the Late Pleistocene from 40 to 10 ka cal. BP. Guano δ13C values are higher than modern ones, suggesting noticeable vegetation changes. This provides also evidence for overall drier environmental conditions during the Pleistocene compared to today. Meanwhile, within this generally drier climate, shifts between wetter and drier conditions can be observed. Large temporal amplitudes in both δ13C and δ15N variations reaching up to 5.9‰ and 16.8‰, respectively, also indicate these oceanic tropical environments have been highly sensitive to regional or global climatic forcing. Stable isotope compositions of bat guano deposited from 40 to 35 ka BP, the Last Glacial Maximum and the Younger-Dryas reveal relatively wet environmental conditions whereas, at least from the end of the Heinrich event 1 and the Bølling period the region experienced drier environmental conditions. Nevertheless, when considering uncertainties in the model age, the isotopic record of Blanchard Cave show relatively similar variations with known proxy records from the northern South America and Central America, suggesting thus that the Blanchard Cave record is a robust proxy of past ITCZ migration. Teleconnections through global atmospheric pattern suggest that islands of the eastern Caribbean Basin could

  5. High resolution Holocene sea ice records from Herald Canyon, Chukchi Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Christof; Jakobsson, Martin; O'Regan, Matt; Rattray, Jayne; Barrientos, Natalia; Muchitiello, Francesco; Smittenburg, Rienk; Cronin, Tom; Coxall, Helen; Semiletov, Igor

    2016-04-01

    Arctic Ocean sea ice plays a critical role in the Earth's climate system because of the positive ice-albedo feedback mechanisms as well as its control on ocean-atmospheric heat exchange and potential influence on the thermohaline circulation. Key to improving our understanding of Arctic sea ice cover and its reaction to external forcing is the reconstruction of past variability through paleo-records such as marine sediment cores. Although the observed recent sea ice loss seems to be the strongest of the last millennia, it is still uncertain whether the shift from perennial to seasonal ice cover expected for the near future was unprecedented during the current interglacial. High resolution sea ice reconstructions from the Arctic Ocean are rare, and specifically records from the Russian Arctic are underrepresented. In this study, we present results from marine sediment cores from the Herald Canyon in the East Siberian Sea. The area is one of the major conduits of Pacific water entering the Arctic Ocean basin from the Bering Strait and is thus an ideal place to study past variability of the inflow of these nutrient rich waters. Radiocarbon dating of mollusks indicates very high sedimentation rates at the coring sites which allowed for analyses at centennial resolution up to decadal resolution in the late Holocene. Core samples were analyzed for the biomarker IP25, which is produced by diatoms living in sea ice and is used as a proxy of past seasonal sea ice concentrations. Preliminary results indicate the presence of seasonal sea ice during the entire Late Holocene and show a significant increase of sea ice concentrations during the last millennia.

  6. Storm-wave trends in Mexican waters of the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Elena; Appendini, Christian M.; Tonatiuh Mendoza, E.

    2017-08-01

    Thirty-year time series of hindcast wave data were analysed for 10 coastal locations along the eastern Mexican coast to obtain information about storm events occurring in the region, with the goal of examining the possible presence of interannual trends in the number of storm-wave events and their main features (wave height, duration and energy content). The storms were defined according to their significant wave height and duration, and the events were classified as related to either tropical cyclones or Norte events. The occurrence and characteristics of both types of events were analysed independently. There is no statistically significant change in the number of storm-wave events related to Nortes or their characteristics during the study period. However, there is a subtle increase in the number of events related to tropical cyclones in the western Caribbean region and a more evident increase in wave height and energy content of these events.

  7. A Record of Environmental Change in Caribbean Coral Reefs: Sclerochronology and Geochemistry of O. faveolata as a Paleoclimate Proxy at Coral Gardens and Rocky Point, Belize

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCorte, I. A.; Greer, L.; Wirth, K. R.; Flowers Falls, E.; Lescinsky, H.; Doss, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last several decades, Acropora cervicornis has seen a massive die-off in the Caribbean. (Aronson and Precht 2001; Gardner et al., 2003; Greer et al., 2009). The potential causes of decline in A. cervicornis in the Caribbean include: extremes in sea surface temperatures (SST), ocean acidification, eutrophication, white-band disease, storm disturbances, and other anthropogenic disturbances. Contrary to the regional decline in A. cervicornis, Coral Gardens on the Belize Barrier Reef has an Acropora sp. population that appears to be thriving. Through a combination of sclerochronology, stable isotope analysis, and in situ sensor data, this work capitilizes on the opportunity to study reef conditions in a site where micro-environmental conditions appear to be favorable for healthy A. cervicornis coral growth. We use cores from two Orbicella faveolata colonies located within Acropora stands, as A. cervicornis does not reveal annual banding. We compare two cores from one O. faveolata colony at Coral Gardens, first cored in 2011 and again in 2014, to one O. faveolata core at near-by Rocky Point, where A. cervicornis is much less abundant. These cores were x-radiographed in order to expose the annual banding and sampled for stable oxygen and carbon isotope analysis (10-15 samples/cm). We show that, although there are no significant differences in the range of the δ18O and δ13C signature between Rocky Point and Coral Gardens, there is a clear difference in the stress histories at these locations as inferred from linear extension rates (LER's) and annual banding patterns. Rocky Point averages a LER of 10.5±1.4 mm/year (n = 29) over a 30 year record and Coral Gardens averages 9.1±1.2 mm/year (n = 70) from ~1953 - 2001, and averages 6.2±1.6 mm/year (n = 36) from coral years 2001-2014 after an inferred stress-banding event. This is in contrast to the observed overall health of A. cervicornis at the two locations. The inferred stress-banding event is currently

  8. Sedimentary records of Typhoon Haiyan in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, C. C.; Chen, Y. H.; Chang, J. H.; Hsu, H. H.; Yu, P. S.; Liu, C. S.

    2016-12-01

    South China Sea (SCS), which is located at the boundary of the Eurasian, Philippine Sea, and Indian plates, is the largest marginal sea of the northwest Pacific and also on the North Western Pacific corridor of typhoons. The unique tectonic setting and climatic conditions make it has to face the severe natural hazards, like submarine landslides, and high sediment discharges which induced by typhoon. On November 8, 2013, the Typhoon Haiyan, which was one of the largest tropical cyclones ever recorded in western Pacific, devastated Philippines and caused catastrophic destruction. Before the Typhoon Haiyan reached Hainan Province, China and Quangninh Province, Vietnam, it emerged over the SCS. How was the large amount of terrestrial materials distributed and recorded in deep sea sediments by such intense typhoon? Is it possible for us to reconstruct the history of extreme tropical cyclones by using deep sea cores? In this study, twelve gravity cores were collected in the Central SCS Basin and around Taiping Island (Itu Aba Island) from 2014 to 2015 and a series of analysis including Multi-Sensor Core Logger, XRF Core Scanner, core surface and X-radiograph images, grain size, and excess 210Pb chronology were conducted for modern extreme event records in cores and attempt to evaluate the possibility of reconstructed extreme typhoon records in cores from the SCS. On core surface images, an obvious brownish oxidized layer exist in core top with higher 210Pb activities beneath the layer. According to the sampling time, we conjecture the oxidized layer might formed by Typhoon Haiyan in 2013. In addition, the Itrax data shows high manganese content only exist in this layer which might related to the modern industrial pollution delivered by typhoon induced flooding from Philippines. The Power Barge 103 of Napocor in Estancia IIoilo was dislodged from its mount by Typhoon Haiyan and the United Nations Disaster Assessment and Coordination Team reported 600,000 liters of bunker

  9. Presence of Ruvettus pretiosus (Gempylidae in the Colombian continental Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Camila Gómez-Cubillos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The first record of Ruvettus pretiosus Cocco, 1833 for the Colombian continental Caribbean is presented. The specimen was collected at Los Cocos, department of Magdalena (11°16’33, 84’’ N 73°53’33, 01’’ W, using a demersal longline gear placed at 100 m depth. Biometrics, diagnosis and comments regarding its distribution, ecology and biology are included in the description. This new record expands the distribution of the species in the Caribbean Sea and increases the reported number of gempylids for Colombia to five.

  10. Some species of Munidopsis from the Gulf of Mexico, Florida Straits and Caribbean Sea (Decapoda: Munidopsidae), with the description of two new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, Enrique; Beuck, Lydia; Freiwald, Andrè

    2016-07-12

    During two cruises to the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea, some specimens of squat lobsters belonging to the genus Munidopsis Whiteaves, 1874 (family Munidopsidae Ortmann, 1898) were collected. The present collection comprises five species, where two are considered as new species: M. karukera, closely related to M. ariadne Macpherson, 2011, from the Mediterranean Sea; and M. tuerkayi, which resembles M. kareenae Ahyong, 2013, from New Zealand. The specimens were caught at six stations between 522 and 1162 m; some were associated with live cold-water corals, such as Lophelia pertusa (Linnaeus, 1758), Enallopsammia profunda (Pourtalès, 1867) and Candidella imbricata (Johnson, 1862).

  11. Estimating decadal variability in sea level from tide gauge records: An application to the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frederikse, Thomas; Riva, R.E.M.; Slobbe, Cornelis; Broerse, D.B.T.; Verlaan, Martin

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary observational data sets of sea level is represented by the tide gauge record. We propose a new method to estimate variability on decadal time scales from tide gauge data by using a state space formulation, which couples the direct observations to a predefined state space model by

  12. Range-wide population genetic structure of the Caribbean sea fan coral, Gorgonia ventalina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andras, Jason P; Rypien, Krystal L; Harvell, Catherine D

    2013-01-01

    The population structure of benthic marine organisms is of central relevance to the conservation and management of these often threatened species, as well as to the accurate understanding of their ecological and evolutionary dynamics. A growing body of evidence suggests that marine populations can be structured over short distances despite theoretically high dispersal potential. Yet the proposed mechanisms governing this structure vary, and existing empirical population genetic evidence is of insufficient taxonomic and geographic scope to allow for strong general inferences. Here, we describe the range-wide population genetic structure of an ecologically important Caribbean octocoral, Gorgonia ventalina. Genetic differentiation was positively correlated with geographic distance and negatively correlated with oceanographically modelled dispersal probability throughout the range. Although we observed admixture across hundreds of kilometres, estimated dispersal was low, and populations were differentiated across distances <2 km. These results suggest that populations of G. ventalina may be evolutionarily coupled via gene flow but are largely demographically independent. Observed patterns of differentiation corroborate biogeographic breaks found in other taxa (e.g. an east/west divide near Puerto Rico), and also identify population divides not discussed in previous studies (e.g. the Yucatan Channel). High genotypic diversity and absence of clonemates indicate that sex is the primary reproductive mode for G. ventalina. A comparative analysis of the population structure of G. ventalina and its dinoflagellate symbiont, Symbiodinium, indicates that the dispersal of these symbiotic partners is not coupled, and symbiont transmission occurs horizontally.

  13. Statistical downscaling of IPCC sea surface wind and wind energy predictions for U.S. east coastal ocean, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhigang; Xue, Zuo; He, Ruoying; Bao, Xianwen; Song, Jun

    2016-08-01

    A multivariate statistical downscaling method is developed to produce regional, high-resolution, coastal surface wind fields based on the IPCC global model predictions for the U.S. east coastal ocean, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM), and the Caribbean Sea. The statistical relationship is built upon linear regressions between the empirical orthogonal function (EOF) spaces of a cross- calibrated, multi-platform, multi-instrument ocean surface wind velocity dataset (predictand) and the global NCEP wind reanalysis (predictor) over a 10 year period from 2000 to 2009. The statistical relationship is validated before applications and its effectiveness is confirmed by the good agreement between downscaled wind fields based on the NCEP reanalysis and in-situ surface wind measured at 16 National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) buoys in the U.S. east coastal ocean and the GOM during 1992-1999. The predictand-predictor relationship is applied to IPCC GFDL model output (2.0°×2.5°) of downscaled coastal wind at 0.25°×0.25° resolution. The temporal and spatial variability of future predicted wind speeds and wind energy potential over the study region are further quantified. It is shown that wind speed and power would significantly be reduced in the high CO2 climate scenario offshore of the mid-Atlantic and northeast U.S., with the speed falling to one quarter of its original value.

  14. On microseisms recorded near the Ligurian coast (Italy) and their relationship with sea wave height

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferretti, G.; Zunino, Andrea; Scafidi, D.;

    2013-01-01

    In this study, microseism recordings from a near coast seismic station and concurrent significant sea wave heights (H13 ) are analysed to calibrate an empirical relation for predicting sea wave height in the Ligurian Sea. The study stems from the investigation of the damaging sea storms occurred ...

  15. Seismic structure of ultra-slow spreading crust formed at the Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre, Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grevemeyer, I.; Merz, M.; Dannowski, A.; Papenberg, C. A.; Hayman, N. W.; Van Avendonk, H. J.; Peirce, C.

    2015-12-01

    About 57% of the Earth's surface is covered by oceanic crust and new ocean floor is continuously created along the ~60.000 km long mid-ocean ridge (MOR) system. About 25% of the MOR spread at an ultra-slow spreading rate of spreading rates the melt supply to the ridge is thought to dramatically decrease and crustal thickness decreases to a thickness of spreading rates. A formation of crust from a magma chamber would suggest the creation of a well stratified crust, with an extrusive upper crust (layer 2) and a lower gabbroic crust (lower 3) and a well-defined crust-mantle boundary and hence a seismic Moho. In contrast, decompressional melting without formation of a magma chamber would support a crustal structure where seismic velocities change gradually from values typical of crustal rocks to mantle rocks. Here, we report initial results from a survey from the ultra-slow spreading Cayman Spreading Centre in the Caribbean Sea, sampling mature crust along a flowline from both conjugated ridge flanks. The seismic refraction and wide-angle survey was conducted using ocean-bottom-seismometers from Germany, the UK, and Texas and a 5500 cubic-inch airgun-array source towed by the German research vessel METEOR in April 2015. Typical crustal velocities support a thin crust of 3 to 5 km thickness. However, a well-defined Moho boundary was not observed. Thus, velocities change gradually from crustal-type velocities (<7.2 km/s) to values of 7.6-7.8 km/s, supporting mantle rocks. We suggest that reduced mantle velocities indicate gabbroic intrusions within the mantle rather than indicating serpentinization.

  16. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2008-02-13 to 2008-12-11 (NODC Accession 0109928)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0109928 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea and North...

  17. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and North Atlantic Ocean from 2002-03-02 to 2002-12-28 (NODC Accession 0108131)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108131 includes biological, chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea,...

  18. Comparative Profiling of coral symbiont communities from the Caribbean, Indo-Pacific, and Arabian Seas

    KAUST Repository

    Arif, Chatchanit

    2014-12-01

    Coral reef ecosystems are in rapid decline due to global and local anthropogenic factors. Being among the most diverse ecosystems on Earth, a loss will decrease species diversity, and remove food source for people along the coast. The coral together with its symbionts (i.e. Symbiodinium, bacteria, and other microorganisms) is called the ‘coral holobiont’. The coral host offers its associated symbionts suitable habitats and nutrients, while Symbiodinium and coral-associated bacteria provide the host with photosynthates and vital nutrients. Association of corals with certain types of Symbiodinium and bacteria confer coral stress tolerance, and lack or loss of these symbionts coincides with diseased or bleached corals. However, a detailed understanding of the coral holobiont diversity and structure in regard to diseases and health states or across global scales is missing. This dissertation addressed coral-associated symbiont diversity, specifically of Symbiodinium and bacteria, in various coral species from different geographic locations and different health states. The main aims were (1) to expand the scope of existing technologies, (2) to establish a standardized framework to facilitate comparison of symbiont assemblages over coral species and sites, (3) to assess Symbiodinium diversity in the Arabian Seas, and (4) to elucidate whether coral health states have conserved bacterial footprints. In summary, a next generation sequencing pipeline for Symbiodinium diversity typing of the ITS2 marker is developed and applied to describe Symbiodinium diversity in corals around the Arabian Peninsula. The data show that corals in the Arabian Seas are dominated by a single Symbiodinium type, but harbor a rich variety of types in low abundant. Further, association with different Symbiodinium types is structured according to geographic locations. In addition, the application of 16S rRNA gene microarrays to investigate how differences in microbiome structure relate to

  19. Unified Sea Ice Thickness Climate Data Record Collection Spanning 1947-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Unified Sea Ice Thickness Climate Data Record is the result of a concerted effort to collect as many observations as possible of Arctic sea-ice draft, freeboard,...

  20. Downscaled projections of Sea Surface Temperatures and Degree Heating Weeks in the wider Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Projections of the onset of annual coral bleaching conditions in the Caribbean under Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 are produced using an ensemble of...

  1. Multilevel vector autoregressive prediction of sea surface temperature in the North Tropical Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Eun; Chapman, David; Henderson, Naomi; Chen, Chen; Cane, Mark A.

    2016-07-01

    We use a multilevel vector autoregressive model (VAR-L), to forecast sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTAs) in the Atlantic hurricane Main Development Region (MDR). VAR-L is a linear regression model using global SSTA data from L prior months as predictors. In hindcasts for the recent 30 years, the multilevel VAR-L outperforms a state-of-the-art dynamic forecast model, as well as the commonly used linear inverse model (LIM). The multilevel VAR-L model shows skill in 6-12 month forecasts, with its greatest skill in the months of the active hurricane season. The optimized model for the best long-range skill score in the MDR, chosen by a cross-validation procedure, has 12 time levels and 12 empirical orthogonal function modes. We investigate the optimal initial conditions for MDR SSTA prediction using a generalized singular vector decomposition of the propagation matrix. We find that the added temporal degrees of freedom for the predictands in VAR12 as compared with a LIM model, which allow the model to capture both the local wind-evaporation-SST feedback in the Tropical Atlantic and the impact on the Atlantic of an improved medium-range ENSO forecast, elevate the long-range forecast skill in the MDR.

  2. Benthic dinoflagellates from Red Sea, Egypt: Early records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermin El Semary

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dinoflagellates from Red Sea are hardly studied, in particular the benthic forms. Samples collected from shallow intertidal zone, Ain Sokhna, Egypt were microscopically examined. Three genera with seven species were recorded. The most frequently-encountered was Katodinium sp., a small mushroom-like with epitheca being consistently larger than hypotheca. Light micrographs revealed the presence of a nucleus in the hyposome and descending cingulum. Scanning electromicrographs (SEM confirmed this orientation and revealed the presence of apical pore system. Another species showed similarity to the mushroom-like morphology but with large conical episome and small hyposome. Heterotrophic, naked Gyrodinium cf dominans and Gyrodinium sp. were also observed where in the former, there were conspicuous longitudinal striations. A frequently-observed species had naked Gyrodinium-like morphology but with much smaller size. One photosynthetic species had a characteristic stigma similar to type B eyespot in “dinotoms” and episome being slightly larger than hyposome. Gymnodinium sp. with sulcus extending slightly in the episome but deeply to the end of hyposome was also recorded. This genus is reported to be mostly toxic and its presence should be monitored. Finally, this study presents some early records for benthic dinophytes from rather underexplored locality and raises alerts about genus with reported toxicity.

  3. First record of the polychaete Ficopomatus uschakovi (Pillai, 1960 (Annelida, Serpulidae in the Colombian Caribbean, South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Arteaga-Florez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Ficopomatus (Serpulidae consists of sessile, tubicolous polychaete annelid worms that may colonize a diversity of substrata, and tolerate considerable variations in salinity. Thus, members of this genus, including Ficopomatus uschakovi, in some cases are exotic and maybe invasive. The purpose of our research was to collect and identify marine organisms associated with the submerged roots of mangrove trees in the Gulf of Urabá, Colombian Caribbean, South America. Within the Gulf, there is a well-developed forest of the Red Mangrove, Rhizophora mangle, along the margins of El Uno Bay. We sampled the roots of R. mangle from five stations of the bay, and we identified specimens of F. uschakovi from each of those stations. Ficopomatus uschakovi was found to be more abundant in regions of the bay that exhibit the lowest salinity. Based on a morphological comparison of the present specimens with the original species description, revised descriptions, and other records from the Indo-West Pacific, Mexican Pacific, and Venezuelan and Brazilian Caribbean, we suggest that F. uschakovi has a broader geographical distribution. Furthermore, because of this broad distribution, and the observed tolerance for low salinity in our study, we also suggest that F. uschakovi is a euryhaline species. It is also likely that F. uschakovi will be found in other localities in the Gulf of Urabá, and in other regions of the Colombian Caribbean. Thus, this record extends the distribution of the species to the Colombian Caribbean, giving the species a continuous distribution across the northern coast of South America.

  4. Deep-water Oligocene pollen record from South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Guoxuan; QIN Jungan; MAO Shaozhi

    2003-01-01

    Leg 184 of ODP recovered a record of deep- water sediments spanning the past 32.8 Ma from the South China Sea (SCS). The sediments of the Oligocene (32.8 - 23.8 Ma) at Site 1148 contain relatively abundant fossil pollen. The pollen analysis at Site 1148 has established the first pollen assemblage sequence of deep-water Oligocene in the China Sea. The pollen assemblages of the Oligocene are dominated by montane conifer tree pollen. The abundances of broad-leaved tree pollen are lower in the assemblages. Both of the montane conifer and broad-leaved tree pollen groups include mainly tropical-subtropical components. The pollen of cold and drought-enduring plants is present in lower content. The distinct change in pollen assemblage sequence of deep-water Oligocene of the SCS occurred at 32.0 Ma, indicative of an important shift of the Oligocene climate in the SCS region. The characteristics of the pollen flora of the deep-water Oligocene indicate the tropical montane rainforest and lowland rainforest developed on the areas around the SCS before 32.0 Ma, reflecting the warm and wet climatic condition. In the pollen flora of the Oligocene after 32.0 Ma, the temperate montane conifer and cool and drought-en- during deciduous tree taxa remarkably increased, indicating that the climate in the SCS region became comparatively cool and dry.

  5. First record of Nanozoanthidae from the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Reimer, James Davis

    2015-01-30

    Here we report on the first finding of Nanozoanthidae (Anthozoa: Hexacorallia: Zoantharia) in the Red Sea and the first record west of Western Australia. A single specimen of Nanozoanthus sp. was found at a depth of 13 m off Dumsuq Island, the Farasan Islands, Saudi Arabia (16°33.846′N 42°03.510′E) during SCUBA surveys. Previous research had hypothesized that the genus could potentially be widespread in the Indo-Pacific and was simply undetected due to its small and cryptic nature, and the current specimen provides support for this idea. Such findings demonstrate the importance of biodiversity surveys by taxonomic specialists in understudied marine regions.

  6. Estimating decadal variability in sea level from tide gauge records: An application to the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederikse, Thomas; Riva, Riccardo; Slobbe, Cornelis; Broerse, Taco; Verlaan, Martin

    2016-03-01

    One of the primary observational data sets of sea level is represented by the tide gauge record. We propose a new method to estimate variability on decadal time scales from tide gauge data by using a state space formulation, which couples the direct observations to a predefined state space model by using a Kalman filter. The model consists of a time-varying trend and seasonal cycle, and variability induced by several physical processes, such as wind, atmospheric pressure changes and teleconnection patterns. This model has two advantages over the classical least-squares method that uses regression to explain variations due to known processes: a seasonal cycle with time-varying phase and amplitude can be estimated, and the trend is allowed to vary over time. This time-varying trend consists of a secular trend and low-frequency variability that is not explained by any other term in the model. As a test case, we have used tide gauge data from stations around the North Sea over the period 1980-2013. We compare a model that only estimates a trend with two models that also remove intra-annual variability: one by means of time series of wind stress and sea level pressure, and one by using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model. The last two models explain a large part of the variability, which significantly improves the accuracy of the estimated time-varying trend. The best results are obtained with the hydrodynamic model. We find a consistent low-frequency sea level signal in the North Sea, which can be linked to a steric signal over the northeastern part of the Atlantic.

  7. Records of Toba eruptions in the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LlANG; Xirong

    2001-01-01

    12]Rampino, M. R., Climate-volcanism feedback and the Toba eruption of 74, 000 years ago, Quaternary Research, 1993, 40:269-280.[13]Wang, P., Prell, W. L., Blum, P. et al., Proc. ODP, Init. Repts., 184 [CD-ROM], 2000, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77845-9547, USA.[14]Ninkovich, D., Shackleton, N. J., Abdel-Monem, A. A. et al., K-Ar age of the late Pleistocene eruption of Toba, north Sumatra, Nature, 1978, 276: 574-577.[15]Chesner, C. A., Rose, W. I., Deino, A.et al., Eruptive history of Earth's largest Quaternary caldera (Toba, Indonesia) clari fied, Geology, 1991, 19: 200-203.[16]Zhao Quanhong, Jian Zhimin, Li Baohua et al., Microtektites in the Middle Pleistocene deep-sea sediments of the South China Sea, Science in China, Set. D, 1999, 42 (5): 531-535.[17]Baksi, A. K., Hsu, V., McWilliams, M. O. et al., 40Ar/39Ar dating of the Brunhes-Matuyama geomagnetic field reversal,Science, 1992, 256: 356-357.[18]Schneider, D. A., Kent, D. V., Mello, G. A., A detailed chronology of the Australasian impact event, the Brunhes-atuyama geomagnetic polarity reversal, and global climate change, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 1992, 111: 395-405.[19]Zielinski, G. A., Mayewski, P. A., Meeker, L. D. et al., A ll0,000-Yr record of explosive volcanism from the GISP2(Greenland) ice core, Quaternary Research, 1996, 45: 109-118.[20]McGuire, W. J., Howarth, R. J., Firth, C. R. et al., Correlation between rate of sea-level change and frequency of explosive volcanism in the Mediterranean, Nature, 1997, 389: 473-476.[21]Schulz, H., Rad, U. V., Erlenkeuser, H., Correlation between Arabian Sea and Greenland climate oscillations of the past 110,000 years, Nature, 1998, 393: 54-57.[22]Ledbetter, M., Sparks, R. S. J., The duration of large-magnitude silicic eruptions deduced from graded bedding in deep-sea tephra layers, Geology, 1979, 7: 240-244.[23]Wei Gangjian, Gui Xuntang, Li Xianhua et al., Strontium and

  8. How a collaborative integrated taxonomic effort has trained new spongiologists and improved knowledge of Martinique Island (French Antilles, eastern Caribbean Sea) marine biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Although sponges are important components of benthic ecosystems of the Caribbean Sea, their diversity remained poorly investigated in the Lesser Antilles. By organizing a training course in Martinique, we wanted both to promote taxonomy and to provide a first inventory of the sponge diversity on this island. The course was like a naturalist expedition, with a field laboratory and a classroom nearby. Early-career scientists and environmental managers were trained in sponge taxonomy. We gathered unpublished data and conducted an inventory at 13 coastal sites. We explored only shallow water habitats (0–30 m), such as mangroves, reefs or rocky bottoms and underwater caves. According to this study, the sponge fauna of Martinique is currently represented by a minimum of 191 species, 134 of which we could assign species names. One third of the remaining non-identified sponge species we consider to be new to science. Martinique appears very remarkable because of its littoral marine fauna harboring sponge aggregations with high biomass and species diversity dominating over coral species. In mangroves, sponges cover about 10% of the surface of subtidal roots. Several submarine caves are true reservoirs of hidden and insufficiently described sponge diversity. Thanks to this new collaborative effort, the Eastern Caribbean has gained a significant increase of knowledge, with sponge diversity of this area potentially representing 40% of the total in the Caribbean Sea. We thus demonstrated the importance of developing exploratory and educational research in areas historically devoid of biodiversity inventories and systematics studies. Finally, we believe in the necessity to consider not only the number of species but their distribution in space to evaluate their putative contribution to ecosystem services and our willingness to preserve them. PMID:28329020

  9. Chlorophyll and suspended sediment mapping to the Caribbean Sea from rivers in the capital city of the Dominican Republic using ALOS AVNIR-2 data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuno, Yuji; Miño, Esteban R; Nakai, Satoshi; Mutsuda, Hidemi; Okuda, Tetsuji; Nishijima, Wataru; Castro, Rolando; García, Amarillis; Peña, Rosanna; Rodríguez, Marcos; Depratt, G Conrado

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to study the distribution of contaminants in rivers that flow into the Caribbean Sea using chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) and suspended sediment (SS) as markers and ALOS AVNIR-2 satellite sensor data. The Haina River (HN) and Ozama and Isabela Rivers (OZ-IS) that flow through the city of Santo Domingo, the capital of the Dominican Republic, were chosen. First, in situ spectral reflectance/Chl-a and SS datasets obtained from these rivers were acquired in March 2011 (case A: with no rain influence) and June 2011 (case B: with rain influence), and the estimation algorithm of Chl-a and SS using AVNIR-2 data was developed from the datasets. Moreover, the developed algorithm was applied to AVNIR-2 data in November 2010 for case A and August 2010 for case B. Results revealed that for Chl-a and SS estimations under cases A and B conditions, the reflectance ratio of AVNIR-2 band 4 and band 3 (AV4/AV3) and the reflectance of AVNIR-2 band 4 (AV4) were effective. The Chl-a and SS mapping results obtained using AVNIR-2 data corresponded with the field survey results. Finally, an outline of the distribution of contaminants at the mouth of the river that flows into the Caribbean Sea was obtained for both rivers in cases A and B.

  10. Is otolith microchemistry (Sr: Ca and Ba:Ca ratios useful to identify Mugil curema populations in the southeastern Caribbean Sea?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Avigliano

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential use of otolith microchemistry (Sr:Ca and Ba:Ca ratios to identify silver mullet, Mugil curema, populations in Southeastern Caribbean Sea. Fish samples were collected in 7 areas of Nueva Esparta State (Venezuela. The otolith Sr:Ca and Ba:Ca ratios and water Sr:Ca were determined (by ICP-OES and EDTA volumetric method. Otoliths Sr:Ca and Ba:Ca ratios and Sr:Ca partition coefficient of mullets in Cubagua island (south of the State were significantly different from ratios in La Guardia (north of the State. A discriminant analysis of otolith Sr:Ca and Ba:Ca ratios separated Cubagua Island from La Guardia values. These results suggest the existence of different mullet groups in the Southeastern Caribbean Sea. For this, the simultaneous use of Sr:Ca and Ba:Ca ratios could be a potential tool to identify populations in the study area.

  11. Late Holocene marine terraces of the Cartagena region, southern Caribbean: The product of neotectonism or a former high stand in sea-level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignacio Martínez, J.; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Gomez, Andres; Delgado, Adriana; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Rendon, Esteban

    2010-03-01

    The detailed stratigraphic survey and paleontological study (mollusks, corals, foraminifera and ostracods) of four low-level, ˜3 m, marine terrace sections: Punta Canoas, Manzanillo del Mar, Playa de Oro, and Tierra Bomba Island, from the Cartagena region, southern Caribbean, supplemented with 22 radiocarbon dates, reveals that the northern terraces were deposited as parasequences in a clastic depositional system compared to the Tierra Bomba Island succession that was deposited in a carbonate depositional system between ˜3600 and ˜1700 cal yrs BP. Drier conditions and the southern location of the ITCZ at about 3 ka triggered stronger easterly Trades and more dynamic southwestward sediment drift fed by the Magdalena River mouth, thus promoting the formation of sand spits that ultimately isolated the Cienaga de Tesca coastal lagoon from the Caribbean Sea. Our estimates support the hypothesis that the present position of the terraces is the product of neotectonism rather than a higher 3 ka, sea-level. Upheaval of the terraces varies between ˜3.8 mmyr -1 at Punta Canoas and ˜2.2 mmyr -1 at Tierra Bomba to ˜1.5 mmyr -1 at Manzanillo del Mar and Playa de Oro terraces. Our study corroborates previous contentions on the role of mud diapirism and the dynamics of the Dique Fault as late Holocene upheaval mechanisms.

  12. A record of an adult Warsaw grouper, Hyporthodus nigritus (Perciformes: Ephinephelidae), in a deep reef of the Colombian Caribbean

    OpenAIRE

    Bustos Montes, Diana; Viaña Tous, Jorge; Acero-P., Arturo; Pardo, Elkin R.; Garrido, Manuel; Rueda, Mario; Alonso, David

    2013-01-01

    The Warsaw grouper (Hyporthodus nigritus) has been reported from the western Atlantic between Massachusetts (United States) and Mexico, including a few South American reports to Brasil. In Colombia a juvenile specimen was reported from nearby Cartagena in 2003. Herein, we report an adult fish caught near to deep-water reefs in the Golfo de Morrosquillo, Colombian Caribbean.

  13. Cooperative Marine Turtle Tagging Program sea turtle tagging records on rehabilitated and released sea turtles from NOAA Galveston

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The database is a summary of records of: sea turtle size tags applied release and capture location are summarized in this database which is derived from paper data...

  14. Guidelines for Using Eastcoast 2001 Database of Tidal Constituents within Western North Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    TX 27.5800 -97.2167 NOS GOM -- -- 53 Port Isabel, Laguna Madre, TX 26.0600 -97.2150 NOS GOM 8.05 (5.00) 0.40 (0.25) 54 South Padre Island, TX...18.333333 -64.933333 IHO1 Remote -- -- 73 Lime Tree Bay, St. Croix, VI 17.696667 -64.753333 NOS Caribbean -- -- 74 San Juan, La Puntilla, Puerto Rico ...18.461667 -66.116667 NOS Remote -- -- 75 Magueyes Island, Puerto Rico 17.966667 -67.050000 IHO1 Caribbean -- -- 76 Ciudad, Dominican Republic 18.466667

  15. The Sedimentary Record of Sea-Level Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Angela L.; Bosence, Dan W. J.; Church, Kevin D.; Flint, Stephen S.; Howell, John A.; Wilson, R. Chris L.

    2003-05-01

    This unique textbook describes how past changes in sea-level can be detected through an analysis of the sedimentary record. In particular, it concentrates on the current sequence stratigraphy model. It explains this model from basics and shows how the model can be applied to both siliciclastic and carbonate successions. Designed for undergraduate and graduate courses in sequence stratigraphy, as well as for professional courses within the petroleum industry, this full-colour textbook includes numerous features that will aid tutors and students alike. These include detailed case studies demonstrating the practical applications of sequence stratigraphy and set-aside boxes providing supplementary and background information. Bulleted questions and answers are interspersed throughout the text, encouraging students to test their understanding of the material. The book is supported by a website hosting sample pages from the book, selected illustrations to download, and worked exercises. Written and developed over a number of years by a team of experts from the Open University Full colour throughout with superb illustrations Contains many pedagogical features that will appeal to students and tutors Supported by a website hosting sample pages, illustrations and worked exercises

  16. Oceanographic profile data collected from CTD casts aboard NOAA Ship NANCY FOSTER as part of project M-I907-NF-11 in the Caribbean Sea from 2011-03-29 to 2011-04-16 (NCEI Accession 0130790)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0130790 includes physical and profile data collected aboard NOAA Ship NANCY FOSTER during project M-I907-NF-11 in the Caribbean Sea from 2011-03-29 to...

  17. Physical and underway data collected aboard the OCEANUS during cruise OC469-02 in the Caribbean Sea from 2010-10-24 to 2010-10-28 (NODC Accession 0104338)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0104338 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the OCEANUS during cruise OC469-02 in the Caribbean Sea from 2010-10-24 to 2010-10-28....

  18. Detection of Salmonella enterica Serovar Montevideo and Newport in Free-ranging Sea Turtles and Beach Sand in the Caribbean and Persistence in Sand and Seawater Microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, A-K; Antaki, E; Stewart, K; Francis, S; Jay-Russell, M T; Sithole, F; Kearney, M T; Griffin, M J; Soto, E

    2017-09-01

    Salmonellae are Gram-negative zoonotic bacteria that are frequently part of the normal reptilian gastrointestinal flora. The main objective of this project was to estimate the prevalence of non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica in the nesting and foraging populations of sea turtles on St. Kitts and in sand from known nesting beaches. Results suggest a higher prevalence of Salmonella in nesting leatherback sea turtles compared with foraging green and hawksbill sea turtles. Salmonella was cultured from 2/9 and identified by molecular diagnostic methods in 3/9 leatherback sea turtle samples. Salmonella DNA was detected in one hawksbill turtle, but viable isolates were not recovered from any hawksbill sea turtles. No Salmonella was detected in green sea turtles. In samples collected from nesting beaches, Salmonella was only recovered from a single dry sand sample. All recovered isolates were positive for the wzx gene, consistent with the O:7 serogroup. Further serotyping characterized serovars Montevideo and Newport present in cloacal and sand samples. Repetitive-element palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) fingerprint analysis and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of the 2014 isolates from turtles and sand as well as archived Salmonella isolates recovered from leatherback sea turtles in 2012 and 2013, identified two distinct genotypes and four different pulsotypes, respectively. The genotyping and serotyping were directly correlated. To determine the persistence of representative strains of each serotype/genotype in these environments, laboratory-controlled microcosm studies were performed in water and sand (dry and wet) incubated at 25 or 35°C. Isolates persisted for at least 32 days in most microcosms, although there were significant decreases in culturable bacteria in several microcosms, with the greatest reduction in dry sand incubated at 35°C. This information provides a better understanding of the epizootiology of Salmonella in free-ranging marine reptiles and the potential

  19. Six new species of Lepidapedon Stafford, 1904 (Digenea: Lepocreadiidae) from deep-sea macrourid fishes from the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea, with revised keys to the species of the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blend, C K; Dronen, N O; Armstrong, H W

    2000-01-01

    Species of the genus Lepidapecon are divided into various groups and subgroups based on vitelline distribution relative to the acetabulum and anterior extent of the excretory vesicle. Members of this genus predominantly parasitise gadiform fishes and are commonly collected from relatively deep waters. A recent study of deep-sea helminths from macrourids of the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea revealed six new species of this genus. L. mexicanensis n. sp., of the elongatum group, elongatum subgroup, differs from other species in this subgroup in proportions (as % of body length), lacking confluent vitelline fields between both the ovary and anterior testis and the testes, and in having a smaller egg and body size. L. nezumiatis n. sp., of the elongatum group, desclersae oesophagus than prepharynx. L. caribbaei n. sp. and L. longivesicula n. sp., of the garrardi group, congeri sub-subgroup, differs from both L. filiformis and L. desclersae in having intermediate egg and body sizes, and a longer group, differ from L. congeri in having a sucker-ratio of 1: sucker, a similar-sized oesophagus and prepharynx, and a caecal bifurcation which is closer to the acetabulum than oral sucker, while L. longivesicula n. sp. has shorter, serrate or plate-like, lightly imbedded, widely to sporadically spaced spines, a more elongate body, a spherical to subspherical oral sucker, a longer oesophagus than prepharynx, and a caecal bifurcation which is closer to the oral sucker than acetabulum. L. desotoensis n. sp., of the rachion group, rachion subgroup, is distinct from both L. luteum and L. abyssensis in having a smaller size, lacking cervical glands or pharyngeal gland cells, and possessing dark-staining particles in the mesenchyme, while it differs from L. abyssensis specifically in having a much longer oesophagus than prepharynx, lateral vitelline fields that are not confluent intertesticularly, and wider eggs. L. zaniophori n. sp., also of the rachion subgroup, differs from both L

  20. Sea Surface Temperature Records Using Sr/Ca Ratios in a Siderastrea siderea Coral from SE Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargher, H. A.; Hughen, K. A.; Ossolinski, J. E.; Bretos, F.; Siciliano, D.; Gonzalez, P.

    2015-12-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) variability from Cuba remains relatively unknown compared to the rest of the Caribbean. Cuba sits near an inflection point in the spatial pattern of SST from the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and long SST records from the region could reveal changes in the influence of this climate system through time. A Siderastrea siderea coral from the Jardínes de la Reina in southern Cuba was drilled to obtain a 220 year long archive of environmental change. The genus Siderastrea has not been extensively studied as an SST archive, yet Sr/Ca ratios in the Cuban core show a clear seasonal signal and strong correlation to instrumental SST data (r2 = 0.86 and 0.36 for monthly and interannual (winter season) timescales, respectively). Annual growth rates (linear extension) of the coral are observed to have a minor influence on Sr/Ca variability, but do not show a direct correlation to SST on timescales from annual to multidecadal. Sr/Ca measurements from the Cuban coral are used to reconstruct monthly and seasonal (winter, summer) SST extending back more than two centuries. Wintertime SST in southern Cuba is compared to other coral Sr/Ca records of winter-season SST from locations sensitive to the NAO in order to investigate the stationarity of the NAO SST 'fingerprint' through time.

  1. Statistical modeling and trend detection of extreme sea level records in the Pearl River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiwen; Zhou, Wen

    2017-03-01

    Sea level rise has become an important issue in global climate change studies. This study investigates trends in sea level records, particularly extreme records, in the Pearl River Estuary, using measurements from two tide gauge stations in Macau and Hong Kong. Extremes in the original sea level records (daily higher high water heights) and in tidal residuals with and without the 18.6-year nodal modulation are investigated separately. Thresholds for defining extreme sea levels are calibrated based on extreme value theory. Extreme events are then modeled by peaks-over-threshold models. The model applied to extremes in original sea level records does not include modeling of their durations, while a geometric distribution is added to model the duration of extremes in tidal residuals. Realistic modeling results are recommended in all stationary models. Parametric trends of extreme sea level records are then introduced to nonstationary models through a generalized linear model framework. The result shows that, in recent decades, since the 1960s, no significant trends can be found in any type of extreme at any station, which may be related to a reduction in the influence of tropical cyclones in the region. For the longer-term record since the 1920s at Macau, a regime shift of tidal amplitudes around the 1970s may partially explain the diverse trend of extremes in original sea level records and tidal residuals.

  2. Sea level change: lessons from the geologic record

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1995-01-01

    Rising sea level is potentially one of the most serious impacts of climatic change. Even a small sea level rise would have serious economic consequences because it would cause extensive damage to the world's coastal regions. Sea level can rise in the future because the ocean surface can expand due to warming and because polar ice sheets and mountain glaciers can melt, increasing the ocean's volume of water. Today, ice caps on Antarctica and Greenland contain 91 and 8 percent of the world's ice, respectively. The world's mountain glaciers together contain only about 1 percent. Melting all this ice would raise sea level about 80 meters. Although this extreme scenario is not expected, geologists know that sea level can rise and fall rapidly due to changing volume of ice on continents. For example, during the last ice age, about 18,000 years ago, continental ice sheets contained more than double the modem volume of ice. As ice sheets melted, sea level rose 2 to 3 meters per century, and possibly faster during certain times. During periods in which global climate was very warm, polar ice was reduced and sea level was higher than today.

  3. Pattern recognition of the acoustic Sea-bed Profiling —Records and sea-bed geological classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Wenyun; LIN Yijun; ZHANG Shuying

    2001-01-01

    The physical properties of pattern characteristics for typical Acoustic Sea-bed Profiling Records (ASPRs) in the area of Changjiang Estuary and the East China Sea are analyzed in this paper. Nine pattern characteristics are summarized and it was shown that 9 geological categories can be determined by 4 pattern characteristics. Based on the above analysis, a Bayes-based pattern characteristics classifier for interpretation of ASPRs is developed.

  4. Four new recorded species of marine nanoplanktonic diatoms found in the East China Sea and Huanghai Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Li; Yahui Gao

    2003-01-01

    In a study of species composition of marine nanoplanktonic diatoms (< 20 μm) in watersamples from the East China Sea and Huanghai Sea (Yellow Sea), four diatom species were identifiedby TEM as new records for China. They were Thalassiosira oceanica Hasle, Navicula britannicaHustedt et Aleem, Nitzschia leehyi Fryxell and Synedra indica Taylor. Detailed description of the taxo-nomic characteristics with TEM photographs of the four species and their ecological behavior and distri-bution is given in this paper.

  5. A 500 kyr record of global sea-level oscillations in the Gulf of Lion, Mediterranean Sea: new insights into MIS 3 sea-level variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Frigola

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Borehole PRGL1-4 drilled in the upper slope of the Gulf of Lion provides an exceptional record to investigate the impact of late Pleistocene orbitally-driven glacio-eustatic sea-level oscillations on the sedimentary outbuilding of a river fed continental margin. High-resolution grain-size and geochemical records supported by oxygen isotope chronostratigraphy allow reinterpreting the last 500 ka upper slope seismostratigraphy of the Gulf of Lion. Five main sequences, stacked during the sea-level lowering phases of the last five glacial-interglacial 100-kyr cycles, form the upper stratigraphic outbuilding of the continental margin. The high sensitivity of the grain-size record down the borehole to sea-level oscillations can be explained by the great width of the Gulf of Lion continental shelf. Sea level driven changes in accommodation space over the shelf cyclically modified the depositional mode of the entire margin. PRGL1-4 data also illustrate the imprint of sea-level oscillations at millennial time-scale, as shown for Marine Isotopic Stage 3, and provide unambiguous evidence of relative high sea-levels at the onset of each Dansgaard-Oeschger Greenland warm interstadial. The PRGL1-4 grain-size record represents the first evidence for a one-to-one coupling of millennial time-scale sea-level oscillations associated with each Dansgaard-Oeschger cycle.

  6. A 500 kyr record of global sea level oscillations in the Gulf of Lion, Mediterranean Sea: new insights into MIS 3 sea level variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Frigola

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Borehole PRGL1-4 drilled in the upper slope of the Gulf of Lion provides an exceptional record to investigate the impact of Late Pleistocene orbitally-driven glacio-eustatic sea level oscillations on the sedimentary outbuilding of a river fed continental margin. High-resolution grain-size and geochemical records supported by oxygen isotope chronostratigraphy allow reinterpreting the last 500 ka upper slope seismostratigraphy of the Gulf of Lion which consists of five main sequences stacked during the sea level lowering phases of the last five glacial-interglacial 100-kyr cycles. The high sensitivity to sea level oscillations of the grain-size record along the borehole, favoured by the large width of the Gulf of Lion continental shelf, demonstrates that sea level driven changes in accommodation space over the shelf are able to cyclically modify the depositional mode of the entire margin. PRGL1-4 data also illustrate the imprint of sea level oscillations at millennial scale, as shown for Marine Isotopic Stage 3, and provide unambiguous evidence of relative high sea levels at the onset of each Dansgaard-Oeschger Greenland warm interstadial. The PRGL1-4 grain-size record represents the first evidence ever for a one-to-one coupling of millennial-scale sea level oscillations associated with each Dansgaard-Oeschger cycle.

  7. On experience in recording the voice of the sea in the water area of the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perepelkin, V. G.; Kulichkov, S. N.; Chunchuzov, I. P.; Repina, I. A.

    2015-11-01

    Some data on a high-frequency infrasound recorded within a range of 2-16 Hz (voice of the sea) in the water area of the Black Sea are given. Different parameters of the recorded infrasonic signal—the direction and phase velocity of arriving infrasonic waves, spectral composition, and coherence—have been studied. In the course of measurements, both wind and wave conditions in the water area of the Black Sea have been studied in detail. The collision of two atmospheric vortices was observed a few hours before the first arrivals of infrasonic waves, and the collision of differently directed sea waves was observed during infrasound recording. The direction of the arrivals of infrasonic waves coincides with the direction between the zone of collision of sea waves and the point of infrasound recording. The assumption was made that, in order to explain the observed infrasonic waves, it is necessary to use the mechanism responsible for the emission of infrasound into the atmosphere by standing surface waves formed due to the nonlinear interaction of surface waves propagating in opposite directions and to take into account the frequency-filtering properties of both wind-velocity and temperature stratifications of the atmosphere itself along the path of infrasound propagation. This assumption calls for additional verification.

  8. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the LAURENCE M. GOULD in the Caribbean Sea, North Pacific Ocean and others from 2002-03-07 to 2012-11-24 (NODC Accession 0083196)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0083196 includes chemical, physical and underway - surface data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the Caribbean Sea, North Pacific Ocean, South...

  9. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Bay of Fundy, Caribbean Sea and others from 2010-01-14 to 2011-01-02 (NODC Accession 0108230)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108230 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Bay of Fundy, Caribbean...

  10. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Bay of Fundy, Caribbean Sea and others from 2011-01-02 to 2011-11-20 (NODC Accession 0108231)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108231 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Bay of Fundy, Caribbean...

  11. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Bay of Fundy, Caribbean Sea and others from 2009-03-15 to 2009-12-20 (NODC Accession 0108229)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108229 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Bay of Fundy, Caribbean...

  12. First recording of the non-native species Beroe ovata Mayer 1912 in the Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. SHIGANOVA

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A new alien species Beroe ovata Mayer 1912 was recorded in the Aegean Sea. It is most likely that this species spread on the currents from the Black Sea. Beroe ovata is also alien to the Black Sea, where it was introduced in ballast waters from the Atlantic coastal area of the northern America. The species is established in the Black Sea and has decreased the population of another invaderMnemiopsis leidyi, which has favoured the recovery of the Black Sea ecosystem.We compare a new 1 species with the native species fam. Beroidae from the Mediterranean and predict its role in the ecosystem of the Aegean Sea using the Black Sea experience.

  13. First recording of the non-native species Beroe ovata Mayer 1912 in the Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. SHIGANOVA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A new alien species Beroe ovata Mayer 1912 was recorded in the Aegean Sea. It is most likely that this species spread on the currents from the Black Sea. Beroe ovata is also alien to the Black Sea, where it was introduced in ballast waters from the Atlantic coastal area of the northern America. The species is established in the Black Sea and has decreased the population of another invaderMnemiopsis leidyi, which has favoured the recovery of the Black Sea ecosystem.We compare a new 1 species with the native species fam. Beroidae from the Mediterranean and predict its role in the ecosystem of the Aegean Sea using the Black Sea experience.

  14. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the Caribbean Sea, North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2013-07-18 to 2013-10-31 (NODC Accession 0117689)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117689 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the Caribbean Sea, North...

  15. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the METEOR in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2005-08-13 to 2005-09-19 (NODC Accession 0116566)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116566 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from METEOR in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from...

  16. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from ATLANTIS in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2012-03-24 to 2012-04-17 (NODC Accession 0109915)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0109915 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from ATLANTIS in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2012-03-24 to 2012-04-17...

  17. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the METEOR in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2004-07-10 to 2004-08-07 (NODC Accession 0116644)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116644 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from METEOR in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from...

  18. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the KNORR in the Caribbean Sea, North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 1982-12-01 to 1983-02-18 (NODC Accession 0116706)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116706 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KNORR in the Caribbean Sea, North Atlantic Ocean and South...

  19. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the KNORR in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 1996-11-02 to 1997-09-03 (NODC Accession 0115005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115005 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KNORR in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from...

  20. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the L'ATALANTE in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2003-04-12 to 2003-04-25 (NODC Accession 0117494)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117494 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from L'ATALANTE in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from...

  1. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and time series profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from HERMANO GINES in the Caribbean Sea from 1995-11-08 to 2015-07-29 (NODC Accession 0112926)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0112926 includes discrete sample, profile and time series profile data collected from HERMANO GINES in the Caribbean Sea from 1995-11-08 to...

  2. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from ATLANTIS in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2012-03-24 to 2012-04-17 (NCEI Accession 0144247)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144247 includes Surface underway data collected from ATLANTIS in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2012-03-24 to 2012-04-17. These data...

  3. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the SONNE in the Caribbean Sea, North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2003-05-25 to 2003-06-13 (NODC Accession 0116705)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116705 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from SONNE in the Caribbean Sea, North Atlantic Ocean and South...

  4. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the Caribbean Sea, North Pacific Ocean and others from 2004-01-01 to 2004-12-21 (NCEI Accession 0144538)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144538 includes Surface underway data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the Caribbean Sea, North Pacific Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific...

  5. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the Caribbean Sea, North Pacific Ocean and others from 2004-01-02 to 2004-12-21 (NCEI Accession 0148768)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0148768 includes Surface underway data collected from LAURENCE M. GOULD in the Caribbean Sea, North Pacific Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific...

  6. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the KNORR in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2003-09-22 to 2003-11-13 (NODC Accession 0108060)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108060 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KNORR in the Caribbean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from...

  7. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the METEOR in the Caribbean Sea, North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2002-06-07 to 2002-07-04 (NODC Accession 0115586)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115586 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from METEOR in the Caribbean Sea, North Atlantic Ocean and South...

  8. NOAA/NSIDC Climate Data Record of Passive Microwave Sea Ice Concentration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set provides a Climate Data Record (CDR) of sea ice concentration from passive microwave data. It provides a consistent, daily and monthly time series of...

  9. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Sea Surface Temperature -WHOI, Version 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Ocean Surface Bundle (OSB) Climate Data Record (CDR) consist of three parts: sea surface temperature, near-surface atmospheric properties, and heat fluxes....

  10. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Passive Microwave Sea Ice Concentration, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Passive Microwave Sea Ice Concentration Climate Data Record (CDR) dataset is generated using daily gridded brightness temperatures from the Defense...

  11. A 6,700 years sea-level record based on French Polynesian coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, Nadine; Camoin, Gilbert; Eisenhauer, Anton; Vella, Claude; Samankassou, Elias; Botella, Albéric; Milne, Glenn; Fietzke, Jan; Dussouillez, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Sea-level change during the Mid- to Late Holocene has a similar amplitude to the sea-level rise that is likely to occur before the end of the 21st century providing a unique opportunity to study the coastal response to sea-level change and to reveal an important baseline of natural climate variability prior to the industrial revolution. Mid- to Late Holocene relative sea-level change in French Polynesia was reconstructed using coral reef records from ten islands, which represent ideal settings for accurate sea-level studies because: 1) they can be regarded as tectonically stable during the relevant period (slow subsidence), 2) they are located far from former ice sheets (far-field), 3) they are characterized by a low tidal amplitude, and 4) they cover a wide range of latitudes which produces significantly improved constraints on GIA (Glacial Isostatic Adjustment) model parameters. Absolute U/Th dating of in situ coral colonies and their accurate positioning via GPS RTK (Real Time Kinematic) measurements is crucial for an accurate reconstruction of sea-level change. We focus mainly on the analysis of coral microatolls, which are sensitive low-tide recorders, as their vertical accretion is limited by the mean low water springs level. Growth pattern analysis allows the reconstruction of low-amplitude, high-frequency sea-level changes on centennial to sub-decadal time scales. A sea-level rise of less than 1 m is recorded between 6 and 3-3.5 ka, and is followed by a gradual fall in sea level that started around 2.5 ka and persisted until the past few centuries. The reconstructed sea-level curve therefore extends the Tahiti sea-level curve [Deschamps et al., 2012, Nature, 483, 559-564], and is in good agreement with a geophysical model tuned to fit far-field deglacial records [Bassett et al., 2005, Science, 309, 925-928].

  12. Transition of Quaternary glacial cyclicity in deep-sea records at Nansha, the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Pinxian

    2001-01-01

    Sea, Sci ence in China Ser. D, 1999, 42(5): 532-535.[14]Li, B., Jian Z., Evolution of Planktonic foraminiferal and thermocline in the southern South China Sea Since 12 Ma (ODP-184, Site 1143), Science in China, Ser. D, 2001, 44(10): 889-896.[15]Imbrie, J., Hays, J. D., Martinson, D. G. etal., The orbital theory of Pleistocene climate: A support from a revised chro nology of the marine δ18O record, in Milankovitch and Climate (eds. Berger, A., Imbrie, J.), Frankfurt: D. Riedel, 1984,269-305.[16]Shackleton, N. J., Hall, M. A., Stable isotope history of the Pleistocene at ODP Site 677, in Proc. ODP, Sci. Results (eds.Becket, K., Sakai, H.), 1989, 111: 295-316.[17]Schmieder, F., yon Dobeneck, T., Bleil, U., The Mid-Pleistocene climate transition as documented in the deep South At lantic Ocean: Initiation, interimstate and terminal event, Earth Plan. Sci. Lett., 2000, 179: 539-549.[18]Berger. W. H., Yasuda, M., Bickert,T. et al., Quaternary time scale for the Ontong Java Plateau: Milankovitch template for Ocean Drilling Program Site 806, Geology, 1994, 22: 463-467.[19]Shackleton, N. J., Berger, A., Peltier, W. R., An alternative calibration of the lower Pleistocene timescale based on ODP Site 677, Trans. Royal .Soc. Edinburgh, Earth Sciences, 1990, 81: 251-261.[20]Fanell, J. W., Janecek, T. R., Late Neogene paleoceanography and paleoclimatology of the northern Indian Ocean (Site 758), in Proc. OCP Sci. Results, 1991, 121: 297-355.[21]Ruddiman, W. F., Raymo, M. E., Martinson, D. G. et al., Pleistocene evolution: Northern hemisphere ice sheets and North Atlantic Ocean, Paleoceanography, 1989, 4:353-412.[22]Imbrie, J., Imbrie, J. Z., Modeling the climatic response to orbital variations, Science, 1980, 207: 943-952.[23]Jian, Z., Wang, P., Chen, M. P. et al., Foraminiferal responses to major Pleistocene paleoceanographic changes in the southern South China Sea, Paleoceanography, 2000, 15: 229-243.[24]Loutre, M. F., Berger, A., Future

  13. New records of five sponge species (Porifera) for the Black Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evcen, Alper; Çinar, Melih Ertan; Zengin, Mustafa; Süer, Serdar; Rüzgar, Melih

    2016-04-13

    The present study deals with five sponge species [Chalinula renieroides, Haliclona (Halichoclona) fulva, H. (Rhizoniera) rosea, Hymedesmia (Hymedesmia) pansa and Ircinia variabilis] belonging to 3 families (Chalinidae, Hymedesmiidae, and Irciniidae) found at one locality (near the opening of Kızılırmak River) on the Black Sea coast of Turkey. All these species are new records for the Black Sea. Three species (Chalinula renieroides, H. (R.) rosea and H. (H.) pansa] are also new records for the marine fauna of Turkey. All these species were previously reported from Mediterranean Sea and the eastern Atlantic Ocean. The morphological and distributional features of these species are presented.

  14. Five years of Florida Current structure and transport from the Royal Caribbean Cruise Ship Explorer of the Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, Lisa M.; Hummon, Julia M.; Williams, Elizabeth; Brown, Otis B.; Baringer, Warner; Kearns, Edward J.

    2008-06-01

    Using ship-of-opportunity platform Explorer of the Seas, five years of full-depth velocity data have been collected across the Florida Straits at 26°N. Between May 2001 and May 2006 the mean transport of the Florida Current was 31.0 ± 4.0 Sv. This compares to a mean transport of 32.4 ± 3.2 Sv inferred from cable voltages at 27°N over the same period, implying an average 1.4 Sv transport into the Straits through the Northwest Providence Channel. The climatological core of the Florida Current is 170 cms-1 and is positioned at 79.8°W, about 10 km east of the shelf break. The largest variability in velocity occurs over the shelf and shelf break and is likely related to shelf waves. A secondary maximum occurs across much of the Straits over the top 100 m of the water column and may be associated with wind events. The annual cycle of Florida Current transports has a range of 4.7 Sv, with a maximum in May-June-July and a minimum in January. The difference between the summer and winter current structure appears as a first baroclinic mode with zero crossing at 150 m. The maximum difference is about 15 cms-1 at the surface and is centered just offshore of the mean current core. On interannual timescales, low-pass filtered Explorer and cable transports show similar downward trends between 2002 and 2005, but diverge over the last year or so of the record.

  15. Holocene trends in the foraminifer record from the Norwegian Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Andersson

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The early to mid-Holocene thermal optimum is a well-known feature in a wide variety of paleoclimate archives from the Northern Hemisphere. Reconstructed summer temperature anomalies from across northern Europe show a clear maximum around 6000 years before present (6 ka. For the marine realm, Holocene trends in sea-surface temperature reconstructions for the North Atlantic and Norwegian Sea do not exhibit a consistent pattern of early to mid-Holocene warmth. Sea-surface temperature records based on alkenones and diatoms generally show the existence of a warm early to mid-Holocene optimum. In contrast, several foraminifer and radiolarian based temperature records from the North Atlantic and Norwegian Sea show a cool mid-Holocene anomaly and a trend towards warmer temperatures in the late Holocene. In this paper, we revisit the foraminifer record from the Vøring Plateau in the Norwegian Sea. We also compare this record with published foraminifer based temperature reconstructions from the North Atlantic and with modelled (CCSM3 upper ocean temperatures. Model results indicate that while the seasonal summer warming of the sea-surface was stronger during the mid-Holocene, sub-surface depths experienced a cooling. This hydrographic setting can explain the discrepancies between the Holocene trends exhibited by phytoplankton and zooplankton based temperature proxy records.

  16. Late Quaternary record of pteropod preservation from the Andaman Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sijinkumar, A.V.; Nath, B.N.; Guptha, M.V.S.

    . Millennial/centennial-scale thermocline ventilation changes in the Indian Ocean as reflected by aragonite preservation and geochemical variations in Arabian Sea sediments. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 73, 6771–6788. Brown, B.E., 2007. Coral reefs... Quaternary millennial-scale variability in pelagic aragonite preservation off Somalia. Marine Micropaleontology 59, 171- 183. Klöcker, R., Henrich, R., 2006. Recent and Late Quaternary pteropod preservation on the Pakistan shelf and continental slope...

  17. Bowie Lecture: The Record of Sea Level Change from Satellite Measurements: What Have We Learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerem, R. S.

    2005-12-01

    Over the last decade, satellite geodetic measurements together with in situ measurements, have revolutionized our understanding of present-day sea level change. This is important because sea level change can be used as one barometer of climate variations and because of the implications sea level change has for coastal populations. With measurements from satellite altimeter missions (TOPEX/Posiedon and Jason), satellite gravity missions (GRACE), and the Global Positioning System (GPS), we are now able to start asking some important questions with regards to global sea level change and its regional variations. What has been the rate of global mean sea level change over the last dozen years? Is this rate different from the historical rate observed by the tide gauges over the last century? What are the principal causes of the observed sea level change, and are they related to anthropogenic climate variations? The record of sea level change from satellite altimetry will be reviewed, its error sources and limitations discussed, and the results placed in context with other estimates of sea level change from tide gauges, in situ measurements, and global climate models. The much shorter, but just as important, record of ocean mass variations from satellite gravity measurements will be similarly reviewed. In addition, GPS measurements of the deformation of the solid Earth due to the melting of continental ice and what they tell us about sea level change will be discussed. A sea level change budget will be presented, both for the altimetric era and the last century, containing estimates of contributions from thermal expansion, ocean mass changes (melting ice, runoff, etc.), and other contributions to sea level change. Finally, the need for continuing the satellite measurements of sea level change will be discussed in the context of future missions and the scientific gain that would result.

  18. A new species of Cephalodasys (Gastrotricha, Macrodasyida) from the Caribbean Sea with a determination key to species of the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieneke, Alexander; Schmidt-Rhaesa, Andreas; Hochberg, Rick

    2015-04-16

    A new marine gastrotrich species of the genus Cephalodasys is described from shallow sublittoral coralline sand sampled between Lee Stocking Island and Norman's Pond Cay (Exuma Cays), Bahamas. Cephalodasys interinsularis n. sp. reaches a body length of 471 µm and is characterized by a new combination of characters including six total anterior adhesive tubes and five pairs of ventrolateral adhesive tubes. The new species is morphologically similar to C. swedmarki but can be distinguished by the different number of anterior adhesive tubes, the spatial arrangement of the ventrolateral adhesive tubes, and a shorter pharynx. We provide an updated diagnosis of the genus and a determination key to all known species of Cephalodasys. C. interinsularis n. sp. is the third known species of Cephalodasys from the Caribbean marine province.

  19. Vertical ground motion and historical sea-level records in Dakar (Senegal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cozannet, Gonéri; Raucoules, Daniel; Wöppelmann, Guy; Garcin, Manuel; Da Sylva, Sylvestre; Meyssignac, Benoit; Gravelle, Médéric; Lavigne, Franck

    2015-08-01

    With growing concerns regarding future impacts of sea-level in major coastal cities, the most accurate information is required regarding local sea-level changes with respect to the coast. Besides global and regional sea-level changes, local coastal vertical ground motions can substantially contribute to local changes in sea-level. In some cases, such ground motions can also limit the usefulness of tide-gauge records, which are a unique source of information to evaluate global sea-level changes before the altimetry era. Using satellite synthetic aperture radar interferometry, this study aims at characterizing vertical coastal ground motion in Dakar (Senegal), where a unique century-long record in Africa has been rediscovered. Given the limited number of available images, we use a stacking procedure to compute ground motion velocities in the line of sight over 1992-2010. Despite a complex geology and a rapid population growth and development, we show that the city as a whole is unaffected by differential ground motions larger than 1 mm year-1. Only the northern part of the harbor displays subsidence patterns after 2000, probably as a consequence of land reclamation works. However, these ground motions do not affect the historical tide gauge. Our results highlight the value of the historical sea-level records of Dakar, which cover a 100 year time-span in a tropical oceanic region of Africa, where little data are available for past sea-level reconstructions.

  20. Record of thermoluminescence in sea sediments in the last millennia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cini Castagnoli, G.; Bonino, G.; Della Monica, P.; Taricco, C. [Turin, Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Cosmogeofisica. Dipt. di Fisica generale

    1997-01-01

    The profile of thermoluminescence (TL) has been measured in the Ionian shallow-water core GT89-3 with a resolution of 3.096 years (corresponding to a sampling interval of 2 mm) during the last 1800 years. A similar TL record was previously obtained in the core GM14, taken from the same area, with a resolution of 3.87 years (corresponding to a sampling interval of 2.5 mm). The authors present here the comparison of the TL profiles. They confirm the presence of the centennial and the decennial cycles earlier identified in the TL signal, corresponding to cyclicities appearing to exist in the solar-activity records. It discusses the origin of the TL signal by comparison with the cosmogenic isotopes {sup 14}C and {sup 10}Be records.

  1. Bellingshausen Sea ice extent recorded in an Antarctic Peninsula ice core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stacy E.; Parkinson, Claire L.; Mosley-Thompson, Ellen

    2016-12-01

    Annual net accumulation (An) from the Bruce Plateau (BP) ice core retrieved from the Antarctic Peninsula exhibits a notable relationship with sea ice extent (SIE) in the Bellingshausen Sea. Over the satellite era, both BP An and Bellingshausen SIE are influenced by large-scale climatic factors such as the Amundsen Sea Low, Southern Annular Mode, and Southern Oscillation. In addition to the direct response of BP An to Bellingshausen SIE (e.g., more open water as a moisture source), these large-scale climate phenomena also link the BP and the Bellingshausen Sea indirectly such that they exhibit similar responses (e.g., northerly wind anomalies advect warm, moist air to the Antarctic Peninsula and neighboring Bellingshausen Sea, which reduces SIE and increases An). Comparison with a time series of fast ice at South Orkney Islands reveals a relationship between BP An and sea ice in the northern Weddell Sea that is relatively consistent over the twentieth century, except when it is modulated by atmospheric wave patterns described by the Trans-Polar Index. The trend of increasing accumulation on the Bruce Plateau since 1970 agrees with other climate records and reconstructions in the region and suggests that the current rate of sea ice loss in the Bellingshausen Sea is unrivaled in the twentieth century.

  2. First record of sea snake (Hydrophis elegans, Hydrophiinae) entrapped in marine debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udyawer, Vinay; Read, Mark A; Hamann, Mark; Simpfendorfer, Colin A; Heupel, Michelle R

    2013-08-15

    Entanglement in derelict fishing gear and other marine debris is a major threat to the survival of large marine wildlife like cetaceans, seabirds and sea turtles. However, no previous reports of entanglement or entrapment have been recorded in sea snakes (Hydrophiinae). We report here on a sea snake (Hydrophis elegans) found with a ceramic washer encircling its body captured from the north-east coast of Queensland, Australia. The ring had constricted the body and over time caused extensive damage to the underlying tissues. A post-mortem examination showed the snake was severely emaciated as the ring restricted the passage of food to the stomach and intestine. This is the first record of mortality due to marine debris entrapment in sea snakes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. New records of Protobranchia (Mollusca: Bivalvia in the Peruvian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Paredes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The following species of Bivalvia have been recorded for the first time for Peruvian waters: Nucula (Nucula iphigenia (Dall, 1908; Ennucula cardara (Dall, 1916; Nuculana (Nuculana extenuata (Dall, 1897; Orthoyoldia panamensis (Dall, 1908. These bivalves were collected in the platform and continental slope down to depths of 864 meters.

  4. First record of depth octopus Muusoctopus longibrachus (Cephalopoda: Octopoda for Peruvian sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Cardoso

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The octopus deep-sea Muusoctopus longibrachus (Ibañez et al. 2006 is recorded for the first time in the Peruvian sea. Two male specimens were caught at 852 – 875 m depth between 05°08'S and 09°18'S. This species was known only from Chile, in the present study extends its distribution north to Peru.

  5. Isotopic and elemental indicators of nutrient sources and status of coastal habitats in the Caribbean Sea, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutchler, Troy; Dunton, Kenneth H.; Townsend-Small, Amy; Fredriksen, Stein; Rasser, Michael K.

    2007-09-01

    Nutrient inputs associated with coastal population growth threaten the integrity of coastal ecosystems around the globe. In order to assess the threat posed by rapid growth in tourism, we analyzed the nutrient concentrations as well as the δ15N of NO 3- and macrophytes to detect wastewater nitrogen (N) at 6 locations along a groundwater-dominated coastal seagrass bed on the Caribbean coast of Mexico. We predicted that locations with greater coastal development would have higher concentrations of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and phosphorus (P), as well as δ15N of NO 3-, reflecting wastewater sources of N. However, concentrations of NO 3- were not significantly different between developed (3.3 ± 5.3 μM NO 3-) and undeveloped (1.1 ± 0.7 μM) marine embayments. The most important control on DIN concentration appeared to be mixing of fresh and salt water, with DIN concentrations negatively correlated with salinity. The δ15N of NO 3- was elevated at an inland pond (7.0 ± 0.42‰) and a hydrologically-connected tide pool (7.6 ± 0.57‰) approximately 1 km downstream of the pond. The elevated δ15N of NO 3- at the pond was paralleled by high δ15N values of Cladophora sp., a ubiquitous green alga (10 ± 1‰). We hypothesize that inputs of nitrogen rich (NO 3- > 30 μM) groundwater, characterized by 15N enriched signatures, flow through localized submarine groundwater discharges (SGD) and contribute to the elevated δ15N signatures observed in many benthic macrophytes. However, changes in nitrogen concentrations and isotope values over the salinity gradient suggest that other processes (e.g. denitrification) could also be contributing to the 15N enrichments observed in primary producers. More measurements are needed to determine the relative importance of nitrogen transformation processes as a source of 15N to groundwaters; however, it is clear that continued inputs of anthropogenic N via SGD have the potential to severely impact ecologically and economically

  6. Multicentennial record of Labrador Sea primary productivity and sea-ice variability archived in coralline algal barium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, P.; Halfar, J.; Adey, W.; Hetzinger, S.; Zack, T.; Moore, G. W. K.; Wortmann, U. G.; Williams, B.; Hou, A.

    2017-06-01

    Accelerated warming and melting of Arctic sea-ice has been associated with significant increases in phytoplankton productivity in recent years. Here, utilizing a multiproxy approach, we reconstruct an annually resolved record of Labrador Sea productivity related to sea-ice variability in Labrador, Canada that extends well into the Little Ice Age (LIA; 1646 AD). Barium-to-calcium ratios (Ba/Ca) and carbon isotopes (δ13C) measured in long-lived coralline algae demonstrate significant correlations to both observational and proxy records of sea-ice variability, and show persistent patterns of co-variability broadly consistent with the timing and phasing of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). Results indicate reduced productivity in the Subarctic Northwest Atlantic associated with AMO cool phases during the LIA, followed by a step-wise increase from 1910 to present levels--unprecedented in the last 363 years. Increasing phytoplankton productivity is expected to fundamentally alter marine ecosystems as warming and freshening is projected to intensify over the coming century.

  7. 30-Year Satellite Record Reveals Accelerated Arctic Sea Ice Loss, Antarctic Sea Ice Trend Reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalieri, Donald J.; Parkinson, C. L.; Vinnikov, K. Y.

    2003-01-01

    Arctic sea ice extent decreased by 0.30 plus or minus 0.03 x 10(exp 6) square kilometers per decade from 1972 through 2002, but decreased by 0.36 plus or minus 0.05 x 10(exp 6) square kilometers per decade from 1979 through 2002, indicating an acceleration of 20% in the rate of decrease. In contrast to the Arctic, the Antarctic sea ice extent decreased dramatically over the period 1973-1977, then gradually increased, with an overall 30-year trend of -0.15 plus or minus 0.08 x 10(exp 6) square kilometers per 10yr. The trend reversal is attributed to a large positive anomaly in Antarctic sea ice extent observed in the early 1970's.

  8. Procamallanus (Spirocamallanus) chetumalensis n. sp. (Nematoda: Camallanidae) from the Mayan sea catfish, Ariopsis assimilis, off the Caribbean coast of México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Solís, David; Moravec, Frantisek; Vidal-Martínez, Victor M

    2002-08-01

    Procamallanus (Spirocamallanus) chetumalensis n. sp. is described from the stomach and intestine of the Mayan sea catfish Ariopsis assimilis (Günther, 1864), from the Bay of Chetumal, Quintana Roo, México. It is characterized by bifurcate deirids; males have 3 pairs of preanal papillae, 6 pairs of postanal papillae, 2 pairs of transverse elongate adanal papillae surrounding the cloacal aperture, wide caudal alae, spicules of unequal length, and a gubernaculum, and females have a rounded tail bearing a digit-like process terminating in 2 spines. This is the seventh Procamallanus (Spirocamallanus) species reported from fishes in Mexico and the first one recorded in sea catfishes of the Ariidae.

  9. New records of Lobatolampea tetragona (Ctenophora: Lobata: Lobatolampeidae) from the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Uyeno, Daisuke

    2015-03-18

    Lobatolampea tetragona Horita, 2000, a member of the monotypic family Lobatolampeidae (Lobata), is reported from the Red Sea based on seven specimens collected during marine biodiversity surveys conducted in the southern and central Red Sea. The ctenophore is characterized by the following characters: paired oral lobes lacking visible auricles and bearing auricular ctenes; subpharyngeal meridional canals bearing aboral blind ends; and c-shaped gonads. Previously, the species was recorded only from Japanese waters. This finding represents the first record of L. tetragona outside of the North Pacific and represents a substantial range expansion for this species.

  10. New records of Decapod Crustaceans (Decapoda: Pontoniinae and Inachidae associated with sea anemones in Turkish waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. DURIS

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Three anemone-associated decapod crustaceans, two shrimp species, Periclimenes amethysteus and P. aegylios (Caridea: Palaemonidae: Pontoniinae, and the crab Inachus phalangium (Brachyura: Inachidae, all collected from the Dardanelles, are reported for the first time from Turkish coasts. Another inachid crab, Macropodia czernjawskii is also reported for the first time to occur in association with the sea anemone, Anemonia viridis. Periclimenes scriptus was the fifth decapod species recorded associated with sea anemones within the present study, and while this species has already been reported from Turkish waters, this is the first time it is recorded from the Dardanelles (the Turkish Straits System.

  11. 60-year Nordic and arctic sea level reconstruction based on a reprocessed two decade altimetric sea level record and tide gauges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Peter Limkilde; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    Due to the sparsity and often poor quality of data, reconstructing Arctic sea level is highly challenging. We present a reconstruction of Arctic sea level covering 1950 to 2010, using the approaches from Church et al. (2004) and Ray and Douglas (2011). This involves decomposition of an altimetry ...... calibration record into EOFs, and fitting these patterns to a historical tide gauge record....

  12. More than 70 years of continuous sea level records on the Santander Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavín, Alicia; Tel, Elena; Molinero, Joaquin; Rodriguez, Carmen

    2017-04-01

    The knowledge of sea level height is important for many different sectors as navigation, transport, building infrastructures, tourism, or maritime sports, between others. Tides are mainly composed of an astronomical part and a meteorological one. Sometimes, their joined action is the responsible of extreme behaviors in the sea level. Influence of pressure differences, as well as related winds, is important in the behavior of sea level to analyze. The first system for reading the sea level was a tide board attached at the pier. In Spain the first modern tide gauge was installed in the Port of Alicante, Mediterranean Sea, in 1873 depending of the National Geographic Institute (IGN). Just the following year, a similar tide gauge was installed at the entrance of the Santander Bay. "La Magdalena" tide gauge was working during two periods 1876-1928 and 1963-1975. Together with Cádiz, the IGN tide gauges were used to determinate the national datum for terrestrial cartography. The Spanish Institute of Oceanography (IEO) tide gauge network was initiated in 1943 with the installation of tide gauges along the Spanish coast. One of them was located in Santander and has been working since then. At the beginning it was a float tide gauge connected to a graphical continuous recorder. Nowadays, it also has a digital encoder and a remote connection that allow using the recorded data for operational purposes. Later a Radar system was added. This tide gauge is referred to the Tide Gauge Zero and also calibrated to a benchmark in order to have a unique reference. This high quality sea level information is required for international and regional research activities, as Global Sea Level Observing System (GLOSS). In particular, long time series are widely used for climate change detection. The sea level long term variability studies require a very good quality data focus in the reference of the data along the whole period and also it will be more precisely if we can remove the crustal

  13. Marine biodiversity in the Caribbean: regional estimates and distribution patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Miloslavich

    Full Text Available This paper provides an analysis of the distribution patterns of marine biodiversity and summarizes the major activities of the Census of Marine Life program in the Caribbean region. The coastal Caribbean region is a large marine ecosystem (LME characterized by coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses, but including other environments, such as sandy beaches and rocky shores. These tropical ecosystems incorporate a high diversity of associated flora and fauna, and the nations that border the Caribbean collectively encompass a major global marine biodiversity hot spot. We analyze the state of knowledge of marine biodiversity based on the geographic distribution of georeferenced species records and regional taxonomic lists. A total of 12,046 marine species are reported in this paper for the Caribbean region. These include representatives from 31 animal phyla, two plant phyla, one group of Chromista, and three groups of Protoctista. Sampling effort has been greatest in shallow, nearshore waters, where there is relatively good coverage of species records; offshore and deep environments have been less studied. Additionally, we found that the currently accepted classification of marine ecoregions of the Caribbean did not apply for the benthic distributions of five relatively well known taxonomic groups. Coastal species richness tends to concentrate along the Antillean arc (Cuba to the southernmost Antilles and the northern coast of South America (Venezuela-Colombia, while no pattern can be observed in the deep sea with the available data. Several factors make it impossible to determine the extent to which these distribution patterns accurately reflect the true situation for marine biodiversity in general: (1 highly localized concentrations of collecting effort and a lack of collecting in many areas and ecosystems, (2 high variability among collecting methods, (3 limited taxonomic expertise for many groups, and (4 differing levels of activity in the study

  14. Marine biodiversity in the Caribbean: regional estimates and distribution patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloslavich, Patricia; Díaz, Juan Manuel; Klein, Eduardo; Alvarado, Juan José; Díaz, Cristina; Gobin, Judith; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Weil, Ernesto; Cortés, Jorge; Bastidas, Ana Carolina; Robertson, Ross; Zapata, Fernando; Martín, Alberto; Castillo, Julio; Kazandjian, Aniuska; Ortiz, Manuel

    2010-08-02

    This paper provides an analysis of the distribution patterns of marine biodiversity and summarizes the major activities of the Census of Marine Life program in the Caribbean region. The coastal Caribbean region is a large marine ecosystem (LME) characterized by coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses, but including other environments, such as sandy beaches and rocky shores. These tropical ecosystems incorporate a high diversity of associated flora and fauna, and the nations that border the Caribbean collectively encompass a major global marine biodiversity hot spot. We analyze the state of knowledge of marine biodiversity based on the geographic distribution of georeferenced species records and regional taxonomic lists. A total of 12,046 marine species are reported in this paper for the Caribbean region. These include representatives from 31 animal phyla, two plant phyla, one group of Chromista, and three groups of Protoctista. Sampling effort has been greatest in shallow, nearshore waters, where there is relatively good coverage of species records; offshore and deep environments have been less studied. Additionally, we found that the currently accepted classification of marine ecoregions of the Caribbean did not apply for the benthic distributions of five relatively well known taxonomic groups. Coastal species richness tends to concentrate along the Antillean arc (Cuba to the southernmost Antilles) and the northern coast of South America (Venezuela-Colombia), while no pattern can be observed in the deep sea with the available data. Several factors make it impossible to determine the extent to which these distribution patterns accurately reflect the true situation for marine biodiversity in general: (1) highly localized concentrations of collecting effort and a lack of collecting in many areas and ecosystems, (2) high variability among collecting methods, (3) limited taxonomic expertise for many groups, and (4) differing levels of activity in the study of different

  15. Marine Biodiversity in the Caribbean: Regional Estimates and Distribution Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloslavich, Patricia; Díaz, Juan Manuel; Klein, Eduardo; Alvarado, Juan José; Díaz, Cristina; Gobin, Judith; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Weil, Ernesto; Cortés, Jorge; Bastidas, Ana Carolina; Robertson, Ross; Zapata, Fernando; Martín, Alberto; Castillo, Julio; Kazandjian, Aniuska; Ortiz, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the distribution patterns of marine biodiversity and summarizes the major activities of the Census of Marine Life program in the Caribbean region. The coastal Caribbean region is a large marine ecosystem (LME) characterized by coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses, but including other environments, such as sandy beaches and rocky shores. These tropical ecosystems incorporate a high diversity of associated flora and fauna, and the nations that border the Caribbean collectively encompass a major global marine biodiversity hot spot. We analyze the state of knowledge of marine biodiversity based on the geographic distribution of georeferenced species records and regional taxonomic lists. A total of 12,046 marine species are reported in this paper for the Caribbean region. These include representatives from 31 animal phyla, two plant phyla, one group of Chromista, and three groups of Protoctista. Sampling effort has been greatest in shallow, nearshore waters, where there is relatively good coverage of species records; offshore and deep environments have been less studied. Additionally, we found that the currently accepted classification of marine ecoregions of the Caribbean did not apply for the benthic distributions of five relatively well known taxonomic groups. Coastal species richness tends to concentrate along the Antillean arc (Cuba to the southernmost Antilles) and the northern coast of South America (Venezuela – Colombia), while no pattern can be observed in the deep sea with the available data. Several factors make it impossible to determine the extent to which these distribution patterns accurately reflect the true situation for marine biodiversity in general: (1) highly localized concentrations of collecting effort and a lack of collecting in many areas and ecosystems, (2) high variability among collecting methods, (3) limited taxonomic expertise for many groups, and (4) differing levels of activity in the study of

  16. Multi-scale dynamical analysis (MSDA) of sea level records versus PDO, AMO, and NAO indexes

    CERN Document Server

    Scafetta, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Herein I propose a multi-scale dynamical analysis to facilitate the physical interpretation of tide gauge records. The technique uses graphical diagrams. It is applied to six secular-long tide gauge records representative of the world oceans: Sydney, Pacific coast of Australia; Fremantle, Indian Ocean coast of Australia; New York City, Atlantic coast of USA; Honolulu, U.S. state of Hawaii; San Diego, U.S. state of California; and Venice, Mediterranean Sea, Italy. For comparison, an equivalent analysis is applied to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) index and to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) index. Finally, a global reconstruction of sea level and a reconstruction of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index are analyzed and compared: both sequences cover about three centuries from 1700 to 2000. The proposed methodology quickly highlights oscillations and teleconnections among the records at the decadal and multidecadal scales. At the secular time scales tide gauge records present relatively...

  17. Macro- and megafauna recorded in the submarine Bari Canyon (southern Adriatic, Mediterranean Sea using different tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D'ONGHIA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Macro- and megafauna were recorded in the submarine Bari Canyon (southern Adriatic Sea, Mediterranean Sea during an oceanographic cruise carried out in May-June 2012 and an experimental fishing survey conducted in November 2013. During the former, a total of 20 benthic samples were taken using a Van Veen grab at depths between 268 and 770 m and 4 deployments of a baited lander, for about 43 hours of video records, were carried out at depths between 443 and 788 m. During the latter, 8 longline fishing operations were conducted from 338 down to 612 m. Eighty-five living benthic and benthopelagic species were recorded: 29 Porifera, 1 Cnidaria, 2 Mollusca, 11 Annelida, 1 Arthropoda, 19 Bryozoa, 3 Echinodermata and 19 Chordata. A total of 51 species are new records for the Bari Canyon, 29 new records for the Adriatic Sea. Among the Porifera Cerbaris curvispiculifer is a new addition for the Italian Sponge Fauna. The first certain record of living specimens for the bryozoan Crisia tenella longinodata is reported. A total of 6 Mediterranean endemic species have been identified: 4 Porifera and 2 Annelida. The bathymetric range of some species has been extended. New information acquired for deep sea species confirms their importance in the structure of cold-water coral communities. This study has updated the knowledge on the biodiversity of the Adriatic Sea, as well as of the Bari Canyon in particular, one of the sites designated as “jewels of the Mediterranean” for which urgent conservation measures are needed.

  18. Macro- and megafauna recorded in the submarine Bari Canyon (southern Adriatic, Mediterranean Sea using different tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D'ONGHIA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Macro- and megafauna were recorded in the submarine Bari Canyon (southern Adriatic Sea, Mediterranean Sea during an oceanographic cruise carried out in May-June 2012 and an experimental fishing survey conducted in November 2013. During the former, a total of 20 benthic samples were taken using a Van Veen grab at depths between 268 and 770 m and 4 deployments of a baited lander, for about 43 hours of video records, were carried out at depths between 443 and 788 m. During the latter, 8 longline fishing operations were conducted from 338 down to 612 m. Eighty-five living benthic and benthopelagic species were recorded: 29 Porifera, 1 Cnidaria, 2 Mollusca, 11 Annelida, 1 Arthropoda, 19 Bryozoa, 3 Echinodermata and 19 Chordata. A total of 51 species are new records for the Bari Canyon, 29 new records for the Adriatic Sea. Among the Porifera Cerbaris curvispiculifer is a new addition for the Italian Sponge Fauna. The first certain record of living specimens for the bryozoan Crisia tenella longinodata is reported. A total of 6 Mediterranean endemic species have been identified: 4 Porifera and 2 Annelida. The bathymetric range of some species has been extended. New information acquired for deep sea species confirms their importance in the structure of cold-water coral communities. This study has updated the knowledge on the biodiversity of the Adriatic Sea, as well as of the Bari Canyon in particular, one of the sites designated as “jewels of the Mediterranean” for which urgent conservation measures are needed.

  19. Environmental reconstructions of Eemian Stage interglacial marine records in the Lower Vistula area, southern Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Karen Luise; Jiang, Hui; Gibbard, Philip L

    2012-01-01

    the rapid relative sea-level rise in the area, which proceeded through ∼3000 years. A major salinity increase c. 1100 years after the beginning of the Eemian (early pollen zone E4) at both sites may be related to the opening of the Danish Straits. The Obrzynowo site became isolated from the sea at c. 3500...... the Vistula into the southern Baltic Sea. Correlation of the sediments with the Eemian is based on pollen analysis of the Obrzynowo record, showing the presence of regional pollen zones (RPAZ) E2–E6, combined with previously published pollen analyses from Licze (RPAZ E1–E7). A floating chronology...... the sea at c. 7000 years....

  20. Pattern recognition of acoustic sea-bed profiling records (part 1:a dynamic reasoning expert system)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Wenyun; LIN Yijun; ZHANG Shuying

    2001-01-01

    A computer-based pattern recognition systems has been developed for geological interpretation of Acoustic Sea-bed Profiling Records. Based on practical experience accumulated by specialists, the main pattern characteristics of Acoustic Sea-bed Profiling Records (ASPRs) corresponding to typical geological categories of marine sediment layers in the area of the East China Sea have been expressed altogether in 9 aspects, and a dynamic reasoning expert system designed correspondingly. Starting from an initial premise characteristic and makes the next step reasoning until the final conclusion (i.e. which geological category the sediment layer belongs to.) is derived, in the mean time, for quantitatively estimating the correctness of the final conclusions, the so-called certainty factor is calculated.

  1. Hot acidic Late Permian seas stifle life in record time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Svetoslav; Stein, Holly J.; Hannah, Judith L.; Bingen, Bernard; Weiss, Hermann M.; Piasecki, Stefan

    2011-10-01

    The end of Permian time (252-251 Ma) hosts the largest mass extinction in Earth history, yet events heralding this global catastrophe remain intensely disputed. We present a chemostratigraphic marker, the 187Re/ 188Os ratio, which soars to unprecedented levels approaching the Permo-Triassic boundary. These ratios are tied to profound trace element changes and a precise Re-Os time record at 252 Ma preserved in black shales from East Greenland and the mid-Norwegian shelf. Within a 36-meter shale section, an 80-fold increase in Re concentrations (two-fold for Os) signals seawater conditions that became increasingly inhospitable to life. Unwavering initial 187Os/ 188Os ratios of 0.6 preclude mafic volcanism and meteorite impact as the direct cause of Late Permian anoxia. We argue that extraordinarily high 187Re/ 188Os ratios are the hallmark of simultaneously rising ocean temperature and acidity, leading to loss of oxygen and the stifling of life in latest Permian time.

  2. Mid- to Late Holocene Sea-Level Record in French Polynesia, South-Central Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, N.; Camoin, G.; Vella, C.; Eisenhauer, A.; Samankassou, E.; Botella, A.; Milne, G. A.; Fietzke, J.; Dussouillez, P.; Plaine, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Mid- to Late Holocene provides the opportunity to study the coastal response to sea-level change that has a similar amplitude (i.e., a few decimetres up to 1 m) to the sea-level rise that is likely to occur before the end of the current century. Furthermore, this time period provides an important baseline of natural climate variability prior to the industrial revolution. This study aims to reconstruct Mid- to Late Holocene relative sea-level change in French Polynesia by examining coral reef records from ten islands, which represent ideal settings for accurate sea-level change studies because: 1) they can be regarded as tectonically stable during the relevant period (slow subsidence), 2) they are located far from former ice sheets ('far-field'), 3) they are characterized by a low tidal amplitude, and 4) they cover a wide range of latitudes which produces significantly improved constraints on GIA (Glacial Isostatic Adjustment) model parameters. The accurate reconstruction of sea-level change relies on absolute U/Th dating of in situ coral colonies and their accurate positioning via GPS RTK (Real Time Kinematic) measurements with a vertical and horizontal precision of ± 2.5 cm and ~1 cm, respectively. We focus mainly on the analysis of coral microatolls, which are sensitive low-tide recorders, as their vertical accretion is limited by the water level. Their growth patterns allow the reconstruction of low-amplitude and high-frequency sea-level changes on centennial to sub-decadal time scales. A sea-level rise of less than ~1 m is documented between 6 and 3-3.5 ka, and is followed by a gradual fall in sea level that started around 2 ka and persisted until the past few centuries. The reconstructed sea-level curve therefore extends the Tahiti sea-level curve [Deschamps et al., 2012, Nature, 483, 559-564], and is in good agreement with a geophysical model tuned to fit far-field deglacial records [Bassett et al., 2005, Science, 309, 925-928].

  3. Caribbean tectonics and relative plate motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, K.; Dewey, J. F.; Cooper, C.; Mann, P.; Pindell, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    During the last century, three different ways of interpreting the tectonic evolution of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean have been proposed, taking into account the Bailey Willis School of a permanent pre-Jurassic deep sea basin, the Edward Suess School of a subsided continental terrain, and the Alfred Wegener School of continental separation. The present investigation is concerned with an outline of an interpretation which follows that of Pindell and Dewey (1982). An attempt is made to point out ways in which the advanced hypotheses can be tested. The fit of Africa, North America, and South America is considered along with aspects of relative motion between North and South America since the early Jurasic. Attention is given to a framework for reconstructing Caribbean plate evolution, the evolution of the Caribbean, the plate boundary zones of the northern and southern Caribbean, and the active deformation of the Caribbean plate.

  4. Halogen species record Antarctic sea ice extent over glacial–interglacial periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Spolaor

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Sea ice is an integral part of the earth's climate system because it affects planetary albedo, sea-surface salinity, and the atmosphere–ocean exchange of reactive gases and aerosols. Bromine and iodine chemistry is active at polar sea ice margins with the occurrence of bromine explosions and the biological production of organoiodine from sea ice algae. Satellite measurements demonstrate that concentrations of bromine oxide (BrO and iodine oxide (IO decrease over sea ice toward the Antarctic interior. Here we present speciation measurements of bromine and iodine in the TALDICE (TALos Dome Ice CorE ice core (159°11' E, 72°49' S; 2315 m a.s.l. spanning the last 215 ky. The Talos Dome ice core is located 250 km inland and is sensitive to marine air masses intruding onto the Antarctic Plateau. Talos Dome bromide (Br− is positively correlated with temperature and negatively correlated with sodium (Na. Based on the Br−/Na seawater ratio, bromide is depleted in the ice during glacial periods and enriched during interglacial periods. Total iodine, consisting of iodide (I− and iodate (IO3−, peaks during glacials with lower values during interglacial periods. Although IO3− is considered the most stable iodine species in the atmosphere it was only observed in the TALDICE record during glacial maxima. Sea ice dynamics are arguably the primary driver of halogen fluxes over glacial–interglacial timescales, by altering the distance between the sea ice edge and the Antarctic plateau and by altering the surface area of sea ice available to algal colonization. Based on our results we propose the use of both halogens for examining Antarctic variability of past sea ice extent.

  5. Pollen record of the last 280 ka from deep sea sediments of the northern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Xiangjun

    2001-01-01

    [1]Wang, P., West Pacific in glacial cycles: Seasonality in marginal sea and variability of Warm Pool, Science in China, Ser.D, 1998, 41 (1): 35.[2]Jian, Z., Li, B., Pflaumann, U. et al., Late Holocene cooling event in the West Pacific, Science in China, Ser. D, 1996,39(5): 543.[3]Jian, Z., Chen, M., Lin, H. et al., Stepwise paleoceanographic changes during the last deglaciation in the southern South China Sea: Records of stable isotope and microfossils, Science in China, Ser. D, 1998, 41(2): 187.[4]Sun, X., Li, X., A pollen record of the last 37 ka in deep sea core 17940 from the northern slope of the South China Sea,Marine Geology, 1999, 156: 224-227.[5]Sun, X, Li, X., Luo, Y. et al., The vegetation and climate at the last glaciation on the emerged continental shelf of the South China Sea, Palaeogeogr. Palaeoclimatol. Palaeoecol., 2000, 160:301-316.[6]Department of Tectonics, Institute of Oceanography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Geological Tectonics of the South China Sea and Spreading of the Continental Margin (in Chinese), Beijing: Science Press, 1988, 339-379.[7]Zhao Huanting, Zhang Qiaomin, Song Chaojing et al., Geomorphology and environment of the South China Sea islands (in Chinese), Beijing: Science Press, 1999, 1-528.[8]Wang, P., Prell, W. L., Blum, P. et al., Proc, ODP, Init. Repts. 184, College Station TX (Ocean Drilling Program), 2000,1-77.[9]Florin, R., The distribution of conifer and taxad genera in time and space, Acta Horti Bergiani., 1963, 20 (4): 121-312.[10]Cooling, E. N. G., Pinus Mercusii Fast Growing Timber Tree of Lowland Tropics, Oxford: Dep. Forestry, Oxford, 1968.[11]Sun, X., Li, X., Beug, H. J., Pollen distribution in hemipelagic surface sediments of the South China Sea and its relation to modem vegetation distribution, Mar. Geol., 1999, 156:211226.[12]Sun Xiangjun, Song Changqing, Wang Fengyu, Pollen-climate response surface of selected taxa from northern China, Sci ence in China, Ser. D

  6. A New Record of Sea Star Genus Nearchaster (Asteroidea: Notomyotida: Benthopectinidae from East Sea, Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin, Sook

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An asteroid specimen was collected in adjacent water of Gisamun, Gangwon-do in the East Sea, Korea at a depth of 170 m by fishing net at May 2013. It was identified as Nearchaster (Nearchaster pedicellaris (Fisher, 1910 belonging to family Benthopectinidae of order Notomyotida, which was new to the Korean fauna. The genus, family, and order of this species were also new to Korean waters. The partial sequence of mitochodrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1 was determined for the first time and registered at GenBank.

  7. Sea level during storm surges as seen in tide-gauge records along the east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sundar, D.; Shankar, D.; Shetye, S.R.

    Analysis of hourly sea level recorded by tide gauges of the Survey of India (SOI) at Paradip, Vishakhapatnam, and Chennai provides a record of non-tidal sea level during three periods, 6-10 August 1979, 6-10 August 1981, and 24-27 September 1981...

  8. A new estuarine species, Nereis garwoodi (Polychaeta: Nereididae), from Bahía Chetumal, Mexican Caribbean coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Escalante, Luis E; Salazar-Vallejo, Sergio I

    2003-03-01

    Nereis garwoodi n. sp. is described on the basis of eight syntype specimens (six atokous and two heteronereis) collected in Bahía Chetumal, Mexican Caribbean coast, and the variability in the paragnath numbers in the pharynx is established using 180 specimens; paragnath numbers are I:10(SD = 1.9); II:30 (SD = 2.6); III:41 (SD = 5.2); IV:29 (SD = 3.5), V:1, VI:4, VII-VIII: > 30. Its eyes are big and its longest tentacular cirri reaches setiger 11. A revised key to species of Nereis recorded from the Grand Caribbean Sea is included.

  9. Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Activity of Pseudopterosins and seco-Pseudopterosins Isolated from the Octocoral Pseudopterogorgia elisabethae of San Andrés and Providencia Islands (Southwest Caribbean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Kerr

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available To expand the potential of pseudopterosins and seco-pseudopterosins isolated from the octocoral Pseudopterogorgia elisabethae of San Andrés and Providencia islands (southwest Caribbean Sea, we report the anti-microbial profile against four pathogenic microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans and report a more complete cytotoxic profile against five human cells lines (HeLa, PC-3, HCT116, MCF-7 and BJ for the compounds PsG, PsP, PsQ, PsS, PsT, PsU, 3-O-acetyl-PsU, seco-PsJ, seco-PsK and IMNGD. For the cytotoxic profiles, all compounds evaluated showed moderate and non-selective activity against both tumor and normal cell lines, where PsQ and PsG were the most active compounds (GI50 values between 5.8 µM to 12.0 µM. With respect to their anti-microbial activity the compounds showed good and selective activity against the Gram-positive bacteria, while they did not show activity against the Gram-negative bacterium or yeast. PsU, PsQ, PsS, seco-PsK and PsG were the most active compounds (IC50 2.9–4.5 µM against S. aureus and PsG, PsU and seco-PsK showed good activity (IC50 3.1–3.8 µM against E. faecalis, comparable to the reference drug vancomycin (4.2 µM.

  10. A new Liopropoma sea bass (Serranidae, Epinephelinae, Liopropomini) from deep reefs off Curaçao, southern Caribbean, with comments on depth distributions of western Atlantic liopropomins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Carole C.; Robertson, D. Ross

    2014-01-01

    Collecting reef-fish specimens using a manned submersible diving to 300 m off Curaçao, southern Caribbean, is resulting in the discovery of numerous new fish species. The new Liopropoma sea bass described here differs from other western Atlantic members of the genus in having VIII, 13 dorsal-fin rays; a moderately indented dorsal-fin margin; a yellow-orange stripe along the entire upper lip; a series of approximately 13 white, chevron-shaped markings on the ventral portion of the trunk; and a reddish-black blotch on the tip of the lower caudal-fin lobe. The new species, with predominantly yellow body and fins, closely resembles the other two “golden basses” found together with it at Curaçao: L. aberransand L. olneyi. It also shares morphological features with the other western Atlantic liopropomin genus,Bathyanthias. Preliminary phylogenetic data suggest that western Atlantic liopropomins, includingBathyanthias, are monophyletic with respect to Indo-Pacific Liopropoma, and that Bathyanthias is nested within Liopropoma, indicating a need for further study of the generic limits of Liopropoma. The phylogenetic data also suggest that western Atlantic liopropomins comprise three monophyletic clades that have overlapping depth distributions but different depth maxima (3–135 m, 30–150 m, 133–411 m). The new species has the deepest depth range (182–241 m) of any known western Atlantic Liopropomaspecies. Both allopatric and depth-mediated ecological speciation may have contributed to the evolution of western Atlantic Liopropomini.

  11. Four newly recorded free-living marine nematodes (Comesomatidae) from the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Er; Zhang, Zhinan

    2007-01-01

    Three species in genus Sabatieria and one in genus Cervonema from the East China Sea were recorded. S. breviseta is characterized by uniformly punctuated coarse dots, large amphids of 5.5 turns (♂) and prominent gubernaculum median piece. The characters of S. breviseta agree quite well with the European original descriptions and only differ in the male amphid turns (5.5 vs. 4.0 turns) and unmodified preanal supplements (5-7 vs. 6). S. pulchra can be recognized by amphid 2.75 turns, irregularly arranged lateral dots, and the first three supplements anterior to the anus, which are more widely spaced than the following ones. The excretory system of S. breviseta and S. pulchra shows sexual dimorphism. S. celtica is defined by amphids 2.00-2.25 turns, weakly developed pharyngeal bulb, curved apophyses and 12-13 conspicuous supplements. C. deltensis is characterized by amphids 4.75 turns, ovate pharyngeal posterior bulb, sperm dimorphism, 7 thin preanal supplements, and long tail cylindrical portion (50%-53% of tail length). All the three Sabatieria species are for the first time recorded in Chinese waters. C. deltensis was originally isolated from the Bohai Sea and Yellow Sea and newly recorded in the East China Sea.

  12. Four Newly Recorded Free-living Marine Nematodes(Comesomatidae) from the East China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Er; ZHANG Zhinan

    2007-01-01

    Three species in genus Sabatieria and one in genus Cervonema from the East China Sea were recorded. S. breviseta is characterized by uniformly punctuated coarse dots, large amphids of 5.5 turns (♂) and prominent gubemaculum median piece. The characters of S. breviseta agree quite well with the European original descriptions and only differ in the male amphid tums (5.5 vs.4.0 tums) and unmodified preanal supplements (5-7 vs. 6). S. pulchra can be recognized by amphid 2.75 turns, irregularly arranged lateral dots, and the first three supplements anterior to the anus, which are more widely spaced than the following ones. The excretory system of S. breviseta and S. pulchra shows sexual dimorphism. S. celtica is defined by amphids 2.00-2.25 turns, weakly developed pharyngeal bulb, curved apophyses and 12-13 conspicuous supplements. C. deltensis is characterized by amphids 4.75 tums, ovate pharyngeal posterior bulb, sperm dimorphism, 7 thin preanal supplements, and long tail cylindrical portion (50%-53% of tail length).All the three Sabatieria species are for the first time recorded in Chinese waters. C. deltensis was originally isolated from the Bohai Sea and Yellow Sea and newly recorded in the East China Sea.

  13. Species-energy relationship in the deep sea: A test using the Quaternary fossil record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, G.; Cronin, T. M.; Roy, K.

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about the processes regulating species richness in deep-sea communities. Here we take advantage of natural experiments involving climate change to test whether predictions of the species-energy hypothesis hold in the deep sea. In addition, we test for the relationship between temperature and species richness predicted by a recent model based on biochemical kinetics of metabolism. Using the deep-sea fossil record of benthic foraminifera and statistical meta-analyses of temperature-richness and productivity-richness relationships in 10 deep-sea cores, we show that temperature but not productivity is a significant predictor of species richness over the past c. 130 000 years. Our results not only show that the temperature-richness relationship in the deep-sea is remarkably similar to that found in terrestrial and shallow marine habitats, but also that species richness tracks temperature change over geological time, at least on scales of c. 100 000 years. Thus, predicting biotic response to global climate change in the deep sea would require better understanding of how temperature regulates the occurrences and geographical ranges of species. ??2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  14. Immune response of the Caribbean sea fan, Gorgonia ventalina, exposed to an Aplanochytrium parasite as revealed by transcriptome sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen A Burge

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Coral reef communities are undergoing marked declines due to a variety of stressors including disease. The sea fan coral, Gorgonia ventalina, is a tractable study system to investigate mechanisms of immunity to a natural occurring pathogen. Functional studies in Gorgonia ventalina immunity indicate that several key pathways and cellular responses are involved in response to natural microbial invaders, although to date the functional and regulatory pathways remain largely un-described. This study used short-read sequencing (Illumina GAIIx to identify genes involved in the response of G. ventalina to a naturally occurring Aplanochytrium spp. parasite. De novo assembly of the G. ventalina transcriptome yielded 90,230 contigs of which 40,142 were annotated. RNA-Seq analysis revealed 210 differentially expressed genes in sea fans exposed to the Aplanochytrium parasite. Differentially expressed genes involved in immunity include pattern recognition molecules, anti-microbial peptides, and genes involved in wound repair and reactive oxygen species formation. Gene enrichment analysis indicated eight biological processes were enriched representing 36 genes, largely involved with protein translation and energy production. This is the first report using high-throughput sequencing to characterize the host response of a coral to a natural pathogen. Furthermore, we have generated the first transcriptome for a soft (octocoral or non-scleractinian coral species. Expression analysis revealed genes important in invertebrate innate immune pathways, as well as those whose role is previously un-described in cnidarians. This resource will be valuable in characterizing G. ventalina immune response to infection and co-infection of pathogens in the context of environmental change.

  15. Five New Records of Free -living Marine Nematodes in the Yellow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Five species of free-living marine nematodes are redescribed and illustrated as new records in the Yellow Sea of China. These species include one monhysterid, Campylaimus gerlachi in the family Diplopeltidae and four enoplids species, Oxystomina elongata, Oxystomina elegans, Halalaimus lutarus and Halalaimus wodjanizkii in the family Oxystominidae. Ecological and taxonomic remarks are provided and discussed in comparison with the original description. The key to all known species of the genus Campylaimus is given. Our findings have offerred the taxonomic information of nematodes to the benthic ecology and biodiversity studies of the Yellow Sea.

  16. Circumpolar thinning of Arctic sea ice following the 2007 record ice extent minimum

    OpenAIRE

    Giles, K.A.; Laxon, S. W.; Ridout, A. L.

    2008-01-01

    September 2007 marked a record minimum in sea ice extent. While there have been many studies published recently describing the minimum and its causes, little is known about how the ice thickness has changed in the run up to, and following, the summer of 2007. Using satellite radar altimetry data, covering the Arctic Ocean up to 81.5 degrees North, we show that the average winter sea ice thickness anomaly, after the melt season of 2007, was 0.26 m below the 2002/2003 to 2007/2008 average. More...

  17. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the Caribbean Sea, North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2011-07-22 to 2011-12-06 (NODC Accession 0108094)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108094 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the Caribbean Sea, North...

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from Marcus G. Langseth in the Caribbean Sea, Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary and others from 2013-02-28 to 2013-06-25 (NCEI Accession 0144355)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144355 includes Surface underway data collected from Marcus G. Langseth in the Caribbean Sea, Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary, Gulf of Mexico,...

  19. Halodule emarginata nov. sp., a new sea-gras from Brazil (Potamogetonaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, den C.

    1970-01-01

    Hardly anything is known about the occurrence of sea-grasses along the Atlantic coast of the South American continent. There are a few records from the coasts of Venezuela and Colombia and only two certain records outside the Caribbean area. The Hydrocharitacean Halophila baillonis Aschers. ex Dicki

  20. Sea-level changes and crustal movements recorded along the east Adriatic coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlic, M.; Pasaric, M. [Zagreb Univ., Zagreb (Croatia). Andrija Mohorovicic Geophysical institute

    2000-08-01

    Sea-level changes in the Adriatic are investigated on the basis of monthly mean sea levels registered at Croatian tide-gauge stations Rovinj, Bakar, Split and Dubrovnik since the beginning of the 1950s. A comparison of sea-level anomalies with air-pressure anomalies recorded simultaneously at Pula, Rijeka, Split and Dubrovnik reveals a statistically significant relationship: a 1 mbar air-pressure change corresponds to a 1.8-2.0 cm sea-level change. The relationship enables sea-level anomalies to be corrected and, consequently, long term sea-level changes to be determined more reliably. A 20-year cycle observed in both the uncorrected and corrected anomalies is interpreted in terms of the global bidecadal signal and its regional manifestation in the Mediterranean. In order to minimize the effects of the bidecadal cycle, trends are analysed over a 30-year sliding window. The procedure reveals that the trends very along the Croatian coast from ca. 1mm/a in the North to zero to the South, with deceleration being visible at all the stations during the early 1970s. The finding is interpreted in terms of (a) global sea-level rise; (b) regional multidecadal sea-level variability, and (c) local tectonic movements. Multidecadal atmosphere above Europe and/or to the anthropogenic changes of the Mediterranean freshwater budget. Tectonic movements bring about a rising of the middle and south Adriatic budget. Tectonic movements bring about a rising of the middle and south Adriatic coast relatively to the north Adriatic coast at a 1 mm/a speed, with the Bakar area being characterized by anomalous crustal motions.

  1. Seemingly divergent sea surface temperature proxy records in the central Mediterranean during the last deglaciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-A. Sicre

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Sea surface temperatures (SSTs were reconstructed over the last 25 000 yr using alkenone paleothermometry and planktonic foraminifera assemblages from two cores of the central Mediterranean Sea: the MD04-2797 core (Siculo–Tunisian channel and the MD90-917 core (South Adriatic Sea. Comparison of the centennial scale structure of the two temperature signals during the last deglaciation period reveals significant differences in timing and amplitude. We suggest that seasonal changes likely account for seemingly proxy record divergences during abrupt transitions from glacial to interglacial climates and for the apparent short duration of the Younger Dryas (YD depicted by the alkenone time series, a feature that has already been stressed in earlier studies on the Mediterranean deglaciation.

  2. First record of Ostreopsis cfr. ovata on macroalgae in the Northern Adriatic Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti, Marina [Department of Biological Oceanography, National Institute of Oceanography and Applied Geophysics, Via Auguste Piccard 54, 34010 Trieste (Italy)]. E-mail: mmonti@inogs.it; Minocci, Marco [Department of Biological Oceanography, National Institute of Oceanography and Applied Geophysics, Via Auguste Piccard 54, 34010 Trieste (Italy); Beran, Alfred [Department of Biological Oceanography, National Institute of Oceanography and Applied Geophysics, Via Auguste Piccard 54, 34010 Trieste (Italy); Ivesa, Ljiljana [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Center for Marine Research, G. Paliaga 5, 52210 Rovinj (Croatia)

    2007-05-15

    Ostreopsis ovata is an epiphytic potentially toxic dinoflagellate. It has a world-wide distribution, normally associated with other epiphytic or benthic dinoflagellates. In tropical seas O. ovata is often associated with the genera Gambierdiscus, Coolia and Prorocentrum, causing cinguatera fish poisoning. Recently, Ostreopsis spp. blooms in the Tyrrhenian and southern Adriatic Sea have been related to human health problems, such as breathing and skin irritation. Here we report the first record of Ostreopsis cfr. ovata in the Northern Adriatic Sea. O. cfr. ovata was isolated from macroalgae in two areas, the Gulf of Trieste (Italy) and close to Rovinj (Croatia). The microalga was identified by scanning electron microscopy and by fluorescence light microscopy. Size range and thecal pore structure were similar to those described for O. cfr. ovata in previous studies. Ostreopsis cfr. ovata was present on all the macroalgae collected, particularly browns and reds. The microalgal association on macroalgae was mostly composed of Ostreopsis sp., Coolia monotis and Coscinodiscus sp.

  3. Cloudiness regime shift during 1946~1992 recorded by coral in the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    By extracting and comparing long-term trend components of coral gray value, sea surface temperature, cloudiness, and net heat flux for the period of 1946~1992, the relationships among them are addressed. There exists a prominent regime shift in the cloudiness associated with the corresponding variabilities of sea surface temperature and net heat flux occurred in the mid-1960s, which can be successfully recorded by coral gray value, a climatic proxy. Long-term cloudiness variations in the South China Sea are completely opposite to the equatorial western Pacific in the past five decades, whereas they share a similar trend to that over Asian monsoon prevailing waters. The fact that the coral gray value is highly correlated to cloudiness provides a unique perspective on utilizing this coral to study cloudiness variations in the pre-instrumental period.

  4. Sea-level probability for the last deglaciation: A statistical analysis of far-field records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, J. D.; Hemingway, R.; Rohling, E. J.; Challenor, P. G.; Medina-Elizalde, M.; Lester, A. J.

    2011-12-01

    Pulses of ice-sheet meltwater into the world ocean during the last deglaciation are of great current interest, because these large-scale events offer important test-beds for numerical models of the responses of ocean circulation and climate to meltwater addition. The largest such event has become known as meltwater pulse (mwp) 1a, with estimates of about 20 m of sea-level rise in about 500 years. A second meltwater pulse (mwp-1b) has been inferred from some sea-level records, but its existence has become debated following the presentation of additional records. Even the use of the more ubiquitous mwp-1a in modelling studies has been compromised by debate about its exact age, based upon perceived discrepancies between far-field sea-level records. It is clear that an objective investigation is needed to determine to what level inferred similarities and/or discrepancies between the various deglacial sea-level records are statistically rigorous (or not). For that purpose, we present a Monte Carlo style statistical analysis to determine the highest-probability sea-level history from six key far-field deglacial sea-level records, which fully accounts for realistic methodological and chronological uncertainties in all these records, and which is robust with respect to removal of individual component datasets. We find that sea-level rise started to accelerate into the deglaciation from around 17 ka BP. Within the deglacial rise, there were two distinct increases; one at around the timing of the Bølling warming (14.6 ka BP), and another, much broader, event that just post-dates the end of the Younger Dryas (11.3 ka BP). We interpret these as mwp-1a and mwp-1b, respectively. We find that mwp-1a occurred between 14.3 ka BP and 12.8 ka BP. Highest rates of sea-level rise occurred at ~ 13.8 ka, probably (67% confidence) within the range of 100-130 cm/century, although values may have been as high as 260 cm/century (99% confidence limit). Mwp-1b is robustly expressed as a broad

  5. Differences in foraging activity of deep sea diving odontocetes in the Ligurian Sea as determined by passive acoustic recorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorli, Giacomo; Au, Whitlow W. L.; Neuheimer, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the trophic roles of deep-diving odontocete species and how they vary in space and time is challenged by our ability to observe foraging behavior. Though sampling methods are limited, foraging activity of deep-diving odontocetes can be monitored by recording their biosonar emissions. Daily occurrence of echolocation clicks was monitored acoustically for five months (July-December 2011) in the Ligurian Sea (Mediterranean Sea) using five passive acoustic recorders. Detected odontocetes included Cuvier's beaked whales (Zipuhius cavirostris), sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus), Risso's dolphins (Grampus griseus), and long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas). The results indicated that the foraging strategies varied significantly over time, with sperm whales switching to nocturnal foraging in late September whereas Risso's dolphins and pilot whales foraged mainly at night throughout the sampling period. In the study area, winter nights are about five hours longer than summer nights and an analysis showed that pilot whales and Risso's dolphins adjusted their foraging activity with the length of the night, foraging longer during the longer winter nights. This is the first study to show that marine mammals exhibit diurnal foraging patterns closely correlated to sunrise and sunset.

  6. Pollen record of the last 280 ka from deep sea sediments of the northern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Environmental history of the northern continental shelf of the South China Sea during the last 280 ka BP, e.g. Marine Isotope Stages 1-8 (MIS 1-8) was reconstructed based on poi len record from the top 225m of ODP 1144 Site. During the interglacial periods, pollen assem blages are predominated by pine similar to those of the present day indicating that the environ ment of the interglacial periods was more or less close to that of today. Nevertheless, those from glacial periods are characterized by a large amount of herbaceous pollen, e.g. Artemisia,Gramineae, Cyperaceae, etc. inferring that grassland covered the merged continental shelf when the sea level lowered and the continental shelf was exposed. The exposed areas of the shelf were insignificant before MIS 5, but enlarged since MIS 4 and reached its maximum during MIS 2 ac cording to ratios of pollen percentages between pine and herbs. The history of different exposure of the shelf can be compared with transgression records of the coastal areas of China and might result from neotectonic movement of Chinese continent. Some changes also took place in the components of grassland growing on the shelf during glaciations. Gramineae is the main element at MIS 8. Then Artemisia increased upwards the profile and at last became the main component at the Last Glacial Maximum (MIS 2). Such changes in vegetation might be in response to cooler and drier climate.

  7. Tithonian-Early Valanginian evolution of deposition along the proto-Caribbean margin of North America recorded in Guaniguanico successions (western Cuba)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pszczółkowski, Andrzej; Myczyński, Ryszard

    2010-03-01

    In the Guaniguanico Mountains of western Cuba, the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous limestones occur in three stratigraphic successions, which have accumulated along the proto-Caribbean margin of North America. The Late Jurassic subsidence and shallow-water carbonate deposition of the Guaniguanico successions have no counterpart on the northeastern Maya block, but some distant similarities with the southeastern Gulf of Mexico may exist. Four facies types have been distinguished in the Tithonian-Lower Valanginian deposits of the Guaniguanico tectonic units. Drowning of the Late Jurassic carbonate bank of the Sierra de los Organos occurred at the Kimmeridgian/Tithonian boundary. During this boundary interval, sedimentation in the west Cuban area and southwestern margin of the Maya block (Mexico) has evolved in a similar way in response to a major second-order transgression. The Lower Tithonian ammonite assemblages of the Guaniguanico successions indicate, in general, the neritic zone. Presence of juvenile gastropods and lack of adult specimens suggest unfavorable environment for these molluscs, probably related to low oxygenation levels. The Early Tithonian transgressive phase terminated about the lower boundary of the Chitinoidella Zone. The Late Tithonian "regressive" phase is weakly marked, whereas the latest Tithonian-earliest Berriasian strata were deposited during a deepening phase. The latter transgressive phase has ended in the Late Berriasian Oblonga Subzone. We correlate the bioturbated pelagic biomicrites of the Tumbitas Member of the Guasasa Formation with a significant fall of the sea level during the latest Berriasian-Early Valanginian. The average sedimentation rate for the Tumbitas Member biomicrites was about three times faster than for the Berriasian Tumbadero Member limestones. Sedimentation rates for the Tumbitas Member and the Valanginian limestones at the DSDP Site 535 in the southeastern Gulf of Mexico were similar. In the Los Organos succession

  8. Crustal activities recorded in coral reefs in the northwestern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Wenhuan; YAO Yantao; ZHANG Zhiqiang; SUN Zongxun; ZHAN Meizhen; SUN Longtao; LIU Zaifeng

    2006-01-01

    Coral reefs in the northwest of South China Sea have recorded the information from not only the environmental variation but also the crustal activities there during their development. The main crustal activities correlated with the coral reef development include fault, seismic, and volcano activities,etc. The high-resolution spark seismic profiles in the northwestern South China Sea show that the fault activities in the coral reef region have been clearly recorded, and appear as neonatal faults incising reefs. Earthquakes in the coral reef region are rather intense, especially the two occurring on December,31, 1994, and January, 10, 1995, around the southwest of Leizhou Peninsula, with the magnitude of 6.1and 6.2, respectively. They have great influence on the growth of the local coral reefs. Quaternary volcanos are active in the northwestern South China Sea, especially around the southwest of Leizhou Peninsula, and they have obvious control of the coral reef development. Some submarine volcanoes form the substrates of coral reef, while a few emerge above the sea surface and form coral islands.

  9. Historical records of eutrophication in Changjiang (Yangtze River estuary and its adjacent East China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cheng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Two sediment cores from the Changjiang (Yangtze River estuary and its adjacent East China Sea were collected and studied for eutrophication history using paleoecological records of environmental changes over the last century. A multiproxy approach by using biological and geochemical analyses revealed changes in diatom assemblages, total organic carbon (TOC, total nitrogen (TN and biogenic silica (BSi and give an indication of nutrient in status and trends in Changjiang River estuary and its adjacent East China Sea. The diatom assemblages in the two cores generally increased gradually from the 1970s, and accelerated from the 1990s until now, reflecting the increased eutrophication and causing large algae blooms/red tides. The TOC, TN and BSi showing the similar trends, supported the interpretation of the eutrophication process indicated by diatom analyses. The two cores were located in different sea areas of the East China Sea, and we discuss their relative changes based on their environment characteristics. We also discuss the potential effect of anthropogenic influences and ongoing projects on eutrophication in the Changjiang River and its adjacent East China Sea.

  10. Arctic cyclone water vapor isotopes support past sea ice retreat recorded in Greenland ice

    OpenAIRE

    Eric S. Klein; J. E. Cherry; Young, J.; D. Noone; A. J. Leffler; Welker, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid Arctic warming is associated with important water cycle changes: sea ice loss, increasing atmospheric humidity, permafrost thaw, and water-induced ecosystem changes. Understanding these complex modern processes is critical to interpreting past hydrologic changes preserved in paleoclimate records and predicting future Arctic changes. Cyclones are a prevalent Arctic feature and water vapor isotope ratios during these events provide insights into modern hydrologic processes that help expla...

  11. First record of Taningia danae (Cephalopoda: Octopoteuthidae in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Quetglas

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The capture of a specimen of the oceanic cephalopod Taningia danae Joubin, 1931, caught during a bottom trawl survey carried out off the Algerian coast, is reported for the first time in the Mediterranean Sea. The individual, which was taken at 385-395 m depth, was a juvenile with a 55.6 mm mantle length and age of 132 days. This finding is important as there are few worldwide records of this species.

  12. First records of Parazoanthidae and Microzoanthidae (Anthozoa: Hexacorallia: Zoantharia) from the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Reimer, James Davis

    2014-01-01

    Here we report on the first records of the families Parazoanthidae and Microzoanthidae and by extension for the suborder Macrocnemina (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Hexacorallia: Zoantharia) from the Red Sea. Despite a long history of zoantharian research in the region, previous records only reported species of the suborder Brachycnemina, from the genera Zoanthus and Palythoa. Both Parazoanthus sp. and Microzoanthus sp. specimens were first found from the same small coral cave at a reef at Jaz\\'air Sila, Saudi Arabia, and subsequently observed at another location in the northern Red Sea. Numerous Antipathozoanthus sp. colonies were observed at Marker 9 north of Yanbu, Saudi Arabia in association with antipatharians inside small caves. The Parazoanthus sp. was in association with numerous encrusting sponge species on the roof of the cave, similar to previously reported undescribed species in the Pacific Ocean. Microzoanthus sp. was found on hard rubble on the cave floor. These records represent large range extensions (e.g. thousands of kilometres) for each genus, demonstrating the overall lack of research on the order Zoantharia, especially within the Red Sea. © Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 2014.

  13. Sea-level variability in tide-gauge and geological records: An empirical Bayesian analysis (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, R. E.; Hay, C.; Morrow, E.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Horton, B.; Kemp, A.

    2013-12-01

    Sea level varies at a range of temporal and spatial scales, and understanding all its significant sources of variability is crucial to building sea-level rise projections relevant to local decision-making. In the twentieth-century record, sites along the U.S. east coast have exhibited typical year-to-year variability of several centimeters. A faster-than-global increase in sea-level rise in the northeastern United States since about 1990 has led some to hypothesize a 'sea-level rise hot spot' in this region, perhaps driven by a trend in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation related to anthropogenic climate change [1]. However, such hypotheses must be evaluated in the context of natural variability, as revealed by observational and paleo-records. Bayesian and empirical Bayesian statistical approaches are well suited for assimilating data from diverse sources, such as tide-gauges and peats, with differing data availability and uncertainties, and for identifying regionally covarying patterns within these data. We present empirical Bayesian analyses of twentieth-century tide gauge data [2]. We find that the mid-Atlantic region of the United States has experienced a clear acceleration of sea level relative to the global average since about 1990, but this acceleration does not appear to be unprecedented in the twentieth-century record. The rate and extent of this acceleration instead appears comparable to an acceleration observed in the 1930s and 1940s. Both during the earlier episode of acceleration and today, the effect appears to be significantly positively correlated with the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation and likely negatively correlated with the North Atlantic Oscillation [2]. The Holocene and Common Era database of geological sea-level rise proxies [3,4] may allow these relationships to be assessed beyond the span of the direct observational record. At a global scale, similar approaches can be employed to look for the spatial fingerprints of land ice

  14. Monthly sea surface temperature records reconstructed by δ18O of reef-building coral in the east of Hainan Island,South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE; Xuexian(何学贤); LIU; Dunyi(刘敦一); PENG; Zicheng(彭子成); LIU; Weiguo(刘卫国)

    2002-01-01

    Stable oxygen isotopic compositions of a coral colony of Porites lutea obtained on a core allowed the reconstruction of a 56-a (1943-1998) proxy record of the sea surface temperatures. This coral δ18O data are from the east of Hainan Island water (22°20′N, 110°39′E), South China Sea. The relationship between δ18O in the skeletal aragonite carbonate and the sea surface temperature (SST) is SST = -5.36 δ18OPDB-3.51 (r = 0.73, n = 470), dδ18O/d(SST) = -0.187‰/ ℃; and the thermometer was set at monthly resolution. The 56-a (1943-1998) proxy record of the sea surface temperatures reflected the same change trend in the northern part of South China Sea as the air temperature change trend in China.

  15. A late Quaternary record of seasonal sea surface temperatures off southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, E.; Sealy, J.; Leng, M. J.; Lee-Thorp, J. A.

    2017-09-01

    The southern Cape coastal region is important for understanding both the behavioural history of modern humans, and regional and global climate dynamics, because it boasts a long archaeological record and occupies a key geographical location near the intersection of two major oceans. The western boundary Agulhas Current, implicated in global heat exchange dynamics, is an important modulator of southern African climates and yet we understand its past behaviour only broadly as the Current itself scours the coastal shelf and marine sediment core records necessarily provide little detail. Numerous archaeological sites from both the late Pleistocene and Holocene provide the opportunity for reconstruction of near-shore seasonal SST records, which respond both to localized wind-driven upwellings and Agulhas temperature shifts, corresponding in turn with terrestrial precipitation trends in the near-coastal and summer rainfall regions. Here we present a record of seasonal SSTs extending over MIS5, MIS4, and the Holocene, from serial δ18O measurements of a single gastropod species, Turbo sarmaticus. The results show that mean SST shifts accord well with global SST trends, although they are larger than those recorded in the Agulhas Current from coarser-scale marine sediment records. Comparison with a record of Antarctic sea-ice suggests that annual SST amplitude responds to Antarctic sea-ice extent, reflecting the positioning of the regional wind systems that drive upwelling dynamics along the coast. Thus, near-shore SST seasonality reflects the relative dominance of the westerly and easterly wind systems. These data provide a new climate archive for an important but understudied climate system.

  16. A Cryptic Invasion in the Western Atlantic: Presence of the Fouling Barnacle Megabalanus zebra (Darwin, 1854) (Crustacea, Cirripedia) in the Caribbean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitombo, Fabio Bettini; Gobin, Judith; Abreu, Nivia Maria Nunes; Jute, Alana

    2017-02-26

    The barnacle Megabalanus zebra is largely known from ship hulls, with little information on its biology, ecology, and natural range. We identify M. zebra here from the southern Caribbean, based upon specimens collected as early as 2002. Challenges associated with identifying megabalinine species have delayed recognition of this species as distinct from other Caribbean Megabalanus. Sequenced material of M. zebra from Curaçao did not match M. zebra GenBank sequences that could be verified by descriptions or vouchered material. The presence of young M. zebra on vessels that have not left the Caribbean, as well as on pier pilings and resident buoys, indicate that this species is established in the tropical Western Atlantic Ocean, but the timing of its invasion remains unknown.

  17. Middle Miocene near trench volcanism in northern Colombia: A record of slab tearing due to the simultaneous subduction of the Caribbean Plate under South and Central America?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, M.; Cardona, A.; Monsalve, G.; Yarce, J.; Montes, C.; Valencia, V.; Weber, M.; De La Parra, F.; Espitia, D.; López-Martínez, M.

    2013-08-01

    Field, geochemical, geochronological, biostratigraphical and sedimentary provenance results of basaltic and associated sediments northern Colombia reveal the existence of Middle Miocene (13-14 Ma) mafic volcanism within a continental margin setting usually considered as amagmatic. This basaltic volcanism is characterized by relatively high Al2O3 and Na2O values (>15%), a High-K calc-alkaline affinity, large ion lithophile enrichment and associated Nb, Ta and Ti negative anomalies which resemble High Al basalts formed by low degree of asthenospheric melting at shallow depths mixed with some additional slab input. The presence of pre-Cretaceous detrital zircons, tourmaline and rutile as well as biostratigraphic results suggest that the host sedimentary rocks were deposited in a platform setting within the South American margin. New results of P-wave residuals from northern Colombia reinforce the view of a Caribbean slab subducting under the South American margin. The absence of a mantle wedge, the upper plate setting, and proximity of this magmatism to the trench, together with geodynamic constraints suggest that the subducted Caribbean oceanic plate was fractured and a slab tear was formed within the oceanic plate. Oceanic plate fracturing is related to the splitting of the subducting Caribbean Plate due to simultaneous subduction under the Panama-Choco block and northwestern South America, and the fast overthrusting of the later onto the Caribbean oceanic plate.

  18. Lithology of the long sediment record recovered by the ICDP Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project (DSDDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Ina; Brauer, Achim; Schwab, Markus J.; Waldmann, Nicolas D.; Enzel, Yehouda; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Torfstein, Adi; Frank, Ute; Dulski, Peter; Agnon, Amotz; Ariztegui, Daniel; Ben-Avraham, Zvi; Goldstein, Steven L.; Stein, Mordechai

    2014-10-01

    The sedimentary sections that were deposited from the Holocene Dead Sea and its Pleistocene precursors are excellent archives of the climatic, environmental and seismic history of the Levant region. Yet, most of the previous work has been carried out on sequences of lacustrine sediments exposed at the margins of the present-day Dead Sea, which were deposited only when the lake surface level rose above these terraces (e.g. during the Last Glacial period) and typically are discontinuous due to major lake level variations in the past. Continuous sedimentation can only be expected in the deepest part of the basin and, therefore, a deep drilling has been accomplished in the northern basin of the Dead Sea during winter of 2010-2011 within the Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project (DSDDP) in the framework of the ICDP program. Approximately 720 m of sediment cores have been retrieved from two deep and several short boreholes. The longest profile (5017-1), revealed at a water depth of ˜300 m, reaches 455 m below the lake floor (blf, i.e. to ˜1175 m below global mean sea level) and comprises approximately the last 220-240 ka. The record covers the upper part of the Amora (penultimate glacial), the Last Interglacial Samra, the Last Glacial Lisan and the Holocene Ze'elim Formations and, therewith, two entire glacial-interglacial cycles. Thereby, for the first time, consecutive sediments deposited during the MIS 6/5, 5/4 and 2/1 transitions were recovered from the Dead Sea basin, which are not represented in sediments outcropping on the present-day lake shores. In this paper, we present essential lithological data including continuous magnetic susceptibility and geochemical scanning data and the basic stratigraphy including first chronological data of the long profile (5017-1) from the deep basin. The results presented here (a) focus on the correlation of the deep basin deposits with main on-shore stratigraphic units, thus providing a unique comprehensive stratigraphic framework for

  19. Seasonal Shift of Bycatch in the Artisanal Shrimp Trawl Fishery of the Gulf of Salamanca, Caribbean Sea of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Orlando Duarte

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bycatch assessments in trawl fisheries have been mainly referred to an annual scale, ignoring possible seasonal variations. In the Gulf of Salamanca, an artisanal shrimp trawl fleet operates recently and this study evaluates its bycatch for first time, considering the climatic and oceanographic seasonality that dominates the region (runoff and upwelling. 90 hauls in the calm or rainy season (November 2010 and 86 in the windy season (April 2011 were sampled on board of fishing boats. The bycatch to shrimp ratio was 2,69 (2,37 -3,21, 95 % CI and 6,37 (5,10 – 8,24, 95 % CI for the calm season and windy season respectively. We recorded a total of 101 taxa, with a large number of juveniles. The community structure of bycatch differed between seasons (ANOSIM, pStellifer spp., Symphurus caribbeanus y Callinectes sapidus, whereas, in addition, the calm season was characterized by Cathorops mapale, Anchovia clupeoides, Trichiurus lepturus, and the windy season by Larimus breviceps, Cnidaria (jellyfish, Cetengraulis edentulus (Simper. The results showed a seasonal change in the bycatch, raising the need to implement monitoring programs and management measures that address that temporal variability. Negative ecological effects of this fishery prompt the use of mitigation strategies, involving fishermen, to balance social needs and the ecosystem conservation. CAMBIO ESTACIONAL EN LA FAUNA ACOMPAÑANTE DE LA PESQUERÍA ARTESANAL DE ARRASTRE DE CAMARÓN DEL GOLFO DE SALAMANCA, MAR CARIBE DE COLOMBIALa evaluación de la fauna acompañante en las pesquerías de arrastre se ha referido generalmente a una escala anual, ignorando eventuales variaciones estacionales. En el golfo de Salamanca, recientemente opera una flota artesanal de arrastre de camarón, cuya fauna acompañante es evaluada por primera vez en el presente estudio, considerando la estacionalidad climática y oceanográfica que domina la región (descargas continentales y surgencia

  20. Arctic Ocean microbial community structure before and after the 2007 record sea ice minimum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeau, André M; Li, William K W; Tremblay, Jean-Éric; Carmack, Eddy C; Lovejoy, Connie

    2011-01-01

    Increasing global temperatures are having a profound impact in the Arctic, including the dramatic loss of multiyear sea ice in 2007 that has continued to the present. The majority of life in the Arctic is microbial and the consequences of climate-mediated changes on microbial marine food webs, which are responsible for biogeochemical cycling and support higher trophic levels, are unknown. We examined microbial communities over time by using high-throughput sequencing of microbial DNA collected between 2003 and 2010 from the subsurface chlorophyll maximum (SCM) layer of the Beaufort Sea (Canadian Arctic). We found that overall this layer has freshened and concentrations of nitrate, the limiting nutrient for photosynthetic production in Arctic seas, have decreased. We compared microbial communities from before and after the record September 2007 sea ice minimum and detected significant differences in communities from all three domains of life. In particular, there were significant changes in species composition of Eukarya, with ciliates becoming more common and heterotrophic marine stramenopiles (MASTs) accounting for a smaller proportion of sequences retrieved after 2007. Within the Archaea, Marine Group I Thaumarchaeota, which earlier represented up to 60% of the Archaea sequences in this layer, have declined to Arctic over the past decade.

  1. IODP Expedition 317: Exploring the Record of Sea-Level Change off New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Blum

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Expedition 317 investigated the record of global sea-level change (eustasy within continental margin sedimentary sequences and how eustasy interacts with local forcing to produce preserved sedimentary architectures. The Canterbury Basin, on the eastern margin of the South Island of New Zealand, was selected to study these complex interactions because of high rates of Neogene sediment supply fromthe uplifting Southern Alps. This sediment input results in a high-frequency (~0.1–0.5 My periods record of depositional cyclicity that is modulated by the presence of strong ocean currents. The expedition recovered sediments as old as Eocene but focused on the sequence stratigraphy of the late Miocene to Recent, when global sea-level change was dominated by glacioeustasy. A transect of three sites was drilled on the continental shelf (Sites U1353, U1354, and U1351, plus one on the continental slope (Site U1352. The transectsamples the shallow-water environment most directly affected by relative sea-level change. Lithologic boundaries, provisionally correlative with seismic sequence boundaries, have been identified in cores from each site. Continental slope Site U1352 provides a record of ocean circulation and fronts during the last ~35 My. The early Oligocene (~30 MaMarshall Paraconformity was the deepest target ofExpedition 317 and is hypothesized to represent intensified current erosion or non-deposition associated with the initiation of thermohaline circulation in the region. Expedition 317 involved operational challenges for JOIDES Resolution, including shallow-water, continental-shelf drilling and deep penetrations. Despitethese challenges, Expedition 317 set a number of records for scientific ocean drilling penetration and water-depth.

  2. A 27,000 year record of Red Sea outflow: Implication for timing of post-glacial monsoon intensification

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Fairbanks, R.G.

    a negligible dampening effect of continental albedo during this period. However, since analysis is confined to a single depth horizon and the record is sensitive to sea level, it has some limitations as an indicator of monsoon intensity...

  3. New records of Recent Brachiopoda from the Red Sea with a description of a new species .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Alan; Bitner, Maria Aleksandra

    2013-12-10

    A revised checklist of 14 Recent brachiopod species from Egypt and the Sudan in the Red Sea has been compiled. New records of Minutella minuta (Cooper), Thecidellina blochmanni Dall and Argyrotheca somaliensis Cooper are described and a new species Argyrotheca cooperi is erected for specimens with few but very strong costae. The new records support earlier suggestions that the affinities of the Red Sea brachiopod fauna are with those of the Mediterranean and Indo-Pacific areas.

  4. New Record of Pseudocycnus appendiculatus Heller, 1868 Parasites of Yellowfin Tuna Thunnus albacares (Bonnaterre, 1788 in the Andaman Sea, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watchariya PURIVIROJKUL

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Four samples of yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares (Bonnaterre, 1788, were collected from the Andaman Sea in the Exclusive Economic Zone, Thailand in May 2010. All samples were infested by the parasitic copepod Pseudocycnus appendiculatus at their gill filaments. This report documents a new record of the Andaman Sea, Thailand for P. appendiculatus and also a new host, T. albacares, for this apparent parasite in Thailand is recorded.

  5. Geochemical records of salt-water inflows into the deep basins of the Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neumann, T.; Christiansen, C.; Clasen, S.;

    1997-01-01

    +) accumulating in the deep, anoxic water body. Inflow of oxygenated water causes oxidation of Mn2+ to Mn4+ and precipitation of MnO2, which accumulates in Mn-rich layers at the sediment surface. When the bottom water becomes anoxic again, MnO2 degradation release Mn2+ into the pore water, and alkalinity......The estuarine circulation system of the Baltic Sea promotes stable stratification and bottom water anoxia in sedimentary basins of the Baltic proper. Ingressions of saline, oxygen-rich waters from the North Sea replace the oxygen depleted deep water. Timing and extent of the ingressions vary...... on time-scales of years to decades, and are largely determined by wind-strength and storm frequency over the North Atlantic Ocean and Europe. Mn/Fe-ratios in sediments from a dated sediment core of the Gotland Deep (250 m water depth) record variations in redox conditions that can be linked to historical...

  6. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from time series observations using Bubble type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MOORINGS in the Caribbean Sea from 2010-01-21 to 2012-11-26 (NODC Accession 0117354)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0117354 includes time series data collected from MOORINGS in the Caribbean Sea from 2010-01-21 to 2012-11-26 and retrieved during cruise LaPa20100121,...

  7. Physical and nutrient data collected from CTD and bottle casts from the R/V HERMANO GINES from the continental shelf of Venezuela in the Caribbean Sea in support of the project: Carbon Retention in a Colored Ocean (CARIACO) from 16 March 2006 to 06 March 2007 (NODC Accession 0014920)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CTD and bottle data were collected from the R/V HERMANO GINES in the Caribbean Sea on the continental shelf of Venezuela from 16 March 2006 to 06 March 2007. Data...

  8. A ˜25 ka Indian Ocean monsoon variability record from the Andaman Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, H.; Flower, B. P.; Poore, R. Z.; Quinn, T. M.

    2007-10-01

    Recent paleoclimatic work on terrestrial and marine deposits from Asia and the Indian Ocean has indicated abrupt changes in the strength of the Asian monsoon during the last deglaciation. Comparison of marine paleoclimate records that track salinity changes from Asian rivers can help evaluate the coherence of the Indian Ocean monsoon (IOM) with the larger Asian monsoon. Here we present paired Mg/Ca and δ 18O data on the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber (white) from Andaman Sea core RC12-344 that provide records of sea-surface temperature (SST) and δ 18O of seawater (δ 18O sw) over the past 25,000 years (ka) before present (BP). Age control is based on nine accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) dates on mixed planktic foraminifera. Mg/Ca-SST data indicate that SST was ˜3 °C cooler during the last glacial maximum (LGM) than the late Holocene. Andaman Sea δ 18O sw exhibited higher than present values during the Lateglacial interval ca 19-15 ka BP and briefly during the Younger Dryas ca 12 ka BP. Lower than present δ 18O sw values during the BØlling/AllerØd ca 14.5-12.6 ka BP and during the early Holocene ca 10.8-5.5 ka BP are interpreted to indicate lower salinity, reflect some combination of decreased evaporation-precipitation (E-P) over the Andaman Sea and increased Irrawaddy River outflow. Our results are consistent with the suggestion that IOM intensity was stronger than present during the BØlling/AllerØd and early Holocene, and weaker during the late glaciation, Younger Dryas, and the late Holocene. These findings support the hypothesis that rapid climate change during the last deglaciation and Holocene included substantial hydrologic changes in the IOM system that were coherent with the larger Asian monsoon.

  9. DNA and lipid molecular stratigraphic records of haptophyte succession in the Black Sea during the Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, Marco J. L.; Saenz, James P.; Giosan, Liviu; Trowbridge, Nan Y.; Dimitrov, Petko; Dimitrov, Dimitar; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2009-07-01

    Previous studies suggest that the coccolithophorid haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi entered the Black Sea ~ 3400 yrs ago and since then a coccolith ooze defined as Unit I has developed. Unit I sediments contain long-chain alkenones derived from E. huxleyi whereas the alkenone distribution of the deeper coccolith-free sapropel (Unit II) is rather unusual. Alkenone-derived past sea surface temperature (SST) estimates suggest a large difference between Unit II and Unit I, which is likely a result of unusual biological precursors of the alkenones in Unit II. Here, we report a high-resolution stratigraphic analysis of ancient haptophyte DNA to establish the Holocene succession of haptophytes as sources of the alkenones in the Black Sea. Haptophytes related to brackish Isochrysis spp. were the initial sources of alkenones, and appeared immediately after the onset of sapropel deposition (~ 7550 yrs before present [a BP]). As salinity increased, Isochrysis-related haptophytes were slowly replaced by a complex suite of E. huxleyi strains as sources of alkenones. Our paleogenetic data showed that E. huxleyi colonized the Black Sea shortly after the onset of sapropel deposition, ~ 4000 yrs earlier than previously recognized based on their preserved coccoliths. E. huxleyi strains were the most likely source of the previously reported abundant and unusual C 36 di-unsaturated "Black Sea alkenone". Strong haptophyte species and strain-specific effects were observed on the level of unsaturation of alkenones which resulted in spurious alkenone-derived SST estimates before 5250 a BP. In contrast, from ~ 5250 a BP onwards a relatively stable haptophyte assemblage dominated by a different suite of E. huxleyi strains yielded robust alkenone-SST values and indicated a gradual cooling from 19 °C to ~ 15 °C at the top of the record (~ 450 a BP).

  10. Anaerobic oxidation of methane alters sediment records of sulfur, iron and phosphorus in the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Matthias; Kraal, Peter; Jilbert, Tom; Sulu-Gambari, Fatimah; Sapart, Célia J.; Röckmann, Thomas; Slomp, Caroline P.

    2016-09-01

    The surface sediments in the Black Sea are underlain by extensive deposits of iron (Fe)-oxide-rich lake sediments that were deposited prior to the inflow of marine Mediterranean Sea waters ca. 9000 years ago. The subsequent downward diffusion of marine sulfate into the methane-bearing lake sediments has led to a multitude of diagenetic reactions in the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ), including anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate. While the sedimentary cycles of sulfur (S), methane and Fe in the SMTZ have been extensively studied, relatively little is known about the diagenetic alterations of the sediment record occurring below the SMTZ.Here we combine detailed geochemical analyses of the sediment and porewater with multicomponent diagenetic modeling to study the diagenetic alterations below the SMTZ at two sites in the western Black Sea. We focus on the dynamics of Fe, S and phosphorus (P), and demonstrate that diagenesis has strongly overprinted the sedimentary burial records of these elements. In line with previous studies in the Black Sea, we show that sulfate-mediated AOM substantially enhances the downward diffusive flux of sulfide into the deep limnic deposits. During this downward sulfidization, Fe oxides, Fe carbonates and Fe phosphates (e.g., vivianite) are converted to sulfide phases, leading to an enrichment in solid-phase S and the release of phosphate to the porewater. Below the sulfidization front, high concentrations of dissolved ferrous Fe (Fe2+) lead to sequestration of downward-diffusing phosphate as authigenic vivianite, resulting in a transient accumulation of total P directly below the sulfidization front.Our model results further demonstrate that downward-migrating sulfide becomes partly re-oxidized to sulfate due to reactions with oxidized Fe minerals, fueling a cryptic S cycle and thus stimulating slow rates of sulfate-driven AOM ( ˜ 1-100 pmol cm-3 d-1) in the sulfate-depleted limnic deposits. However, this process is

  11. Observations on the whale shark (Rhincodon typus) in the Dutch Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debrot, A.O.; Leon, R.; Esteban, N.; Meesters, H.W.G.

    2013-01-01

    Records of whale sharks in the Caribbean are relatively sparse. Here we document 24 records of whale sharks (Rhincodon typus Smith 1882) for the Dutch Caribbean, four for the windward islands of Saba, St. Eustatius and St. Maarten, and twenty for the southern Caribbean leeward islands of Aruba, Cura

  12. Estructura espacial de Eucinostomus argenteus (Pisces: Gerreidae en la zona norte del Caribe colombiano Spatial structure of Eucinostomus argenteus (Pisces: Gerreidae in the north zone of the Colombian Caribbean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pacheco

    Full Text Available Esta investigación se llevó a cabo para determinar la distribución espacial de la densidad (captura por unidad de área - CPUA y de la estructura de tallas de Eucinostomus argenteus y su relación con las variables ambientales en la zona norte del Caribe colombiano. Los datos fueron se tomaron durante un crucero de investigación realizado en la época seca (Febrero de 2006 entre Puerto Estrella ( La Guajira y Santa Marta (Magdalena. Las muestras biológicas se colectaron con una red de arrastre (en estratos de profundidad This research was carried out to determine the spatial distribution of density (catch per unit area - CPUA and size structure of Eucinostomus argenteus and their relationship with environmental variables in the north zone of the Colombian Caribbean sea. The data comes from a survey of fisheries research during the dry season (February of 2006 between Puerto Estrella ( La Guajira and Santa Marta ( Magdalena . Biological samples were taken with a bottom trawl net (< 50 m and 50- 100 m stratum of depth following a systematic design survey. The mature fishes with higher sizes were mainly located in the sector between Manaure and Punta Gallinas, where the continental shelf is very wide and the local oceanography is modulated by the seasonal upwelling. The juvenile fishes were found toward the south of the study area between Boca Camarones and the Rio Buritaca, close to the coast. In this sector the continental shelf is very narrow with high biological productivity for the presence of rivers, mangroves and sea grasses, which serve as feeding grounds and nursery habitat for E. argenteus. In general, our results suggest that environmental conditions were important determinants of spatial distribution of abundance and sizes of E. argenteus in the north zone of the Colombian Caribbean Sea, with temperature and depth as variables that better predict the spatial distribution of this specie.

  13. A new species of Caligus (Copepoda, Siphonostomatoida) from the plankton of the Caribbean coast of Venezuela with a key to species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Morales, Eduardo; Camisotti, Humberto; Martín, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Abstract During a survey of the zooplankton community of Bahía Amuay, Venezuelan Caribbean, specimens of an undescribed species of Caligus Müller were collected. It resembles Caligus xystercus Cressey and Caligus ocyurus Cressey, both known only from the Caribbean Sea. The new species can be distinguished from these and other congeners by a combination of characters including the armature of legs 1 and 4, but mainly by its unique female genital complex. This is the first species of Caligus described from Venezuela. The species is described in full and a key to the species of the genus recorded in Venezuela is provided. PMID:22768004

  14. Tsunami Warning Services for the Caribbean Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, P. M.; Ferris, J. C.; Weinstein, S. A.

    2007-05-01

    Tsunami warning and watch services are currently provided to the Caribbean region through a collaborative effort between the two NOAA Tsunami Warning Centers (TWCs): the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) in Ewa Beach, Hawaii, and the West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WCATWC) in Palmer, Alaska. The WCATWC, in coordination with the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN), provides fast-response warning services to the U.S. territories of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands (PR/VI). The PTWC provides regional watch services to other countries throughout and surrounding the Caribbean Sea as part of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Caribbean Sea and Adjacent Regions. This collaboration is analogous to the TWC's responsibilities in the Pacific basin: the WCATWC provides fast-response warning services for the U.S. west coast states, Alaska, and British Columbia in Canada, while the PTWC provides regional services for countries throughout and surrounding the Pacific Ocean (as well as a fast-response service for the U.S. State of Hawaii). Caribbean seismic data are transmitted to the TWCs through several means. The PRSN directly exports data to the WCATWC, providing the Center sufficient seismic data for the PR/VI region. Additionally, the PRSN provides the TWCs with data gathered from other Caribbean nations. Using modern communication capabilities, the seismic data can be processed at the TWCs at the same time it is processed locally. Another source of high- quality seismic data is the new USGS nine-station array that circles the region. The Global Seismic Network maintains several stations in Caribbean, Central American, and South American nations which are available in real-time to the TWCs. Unfortunately, sea level data coverage is sporadic in the region. The PR/VI has a relatively dense array of coastal tide gages, but coastal tide gage coverage is very sparse for the rest of the Caribbean basin. Three deep-ocean pressure

  15. Monsoon influence on planktic δ18O records from the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pinxian; Li, Qianyu; Tian, Jun; He, Juan; Jian, Zhimin; Ma, Wentao; Dang, Haowen

    2016-06-01

    While the benthic δ18O records from many South China Sea sites mimic the SPECMAP/LR04 standard, their paired planktic δ18O curves differ by comparable values at negative peaks corresponding to interstadials, especially between MIS 5.1, 5.3, 5.5, 6.5, and 7.3. Similar planktic δ18O records also occur in some other low-latitude oceans under monsoon influence. Because neither temperature nor salinity effects can fully account for the variations of such δ18O records after derivation from the SPECMAP/LR04 standard, variations in the rain water δ18O affected by regional hydroclimate changes are considered to have played an important role. In contrast to the SPECMAP/LR04 standard δ18O curve prevailed by 100-kyr cycles, these regional planktic δ18O curves are distinguished by 20-kyr precession signal, showing partial similarity to the δ18O records of atmospheric oxygen in polar ice-core bubbles and in stalagmite calcite. We speculate that the common features of these three independent δ18O records are indicative of the effect of evolving hydrological cycling driven by monsoon circulation in low latitudes.

  16. A 10,000-Year Record of Arctic Ocean Sea Ice Variability – View from the Beach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Svend Visby; Goose, Hugues; Jepsen, Hans

    2011-01-01

    increase in multiyear sea ice culminated during the past 2500 years and is linked to an increase in ice export from the western Arctic and higher variability of ice-drift routes. When the ice was at its minimum in northern Greenland, it greatly increased at Ellesmere Island to the west. The lack...... of uniformity in past sea-ice changes, which is probably related to large-scale atmospheric anomalies such as the Arctic Oscillation, is not well reproduced in models. This needs to be further explored, as it is likely to have an impact on predictions of future sea-ice distribution......We present a sea-ice record from northern Greenland covering the past 10,000 years. Multiyear sea ice reached a minimum between ~8500 and 6000 years ago, when the limit of year-round sea ice at the coast of Greenland was located ~1000 kilometers to the north of its present position. The subsequent...

  17. A 10,000-year record of Arctic Ocean sea-ice variability--view from the beach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funder, Svend; Goosse, Hugues; Jepsen, Hans; Kaas, Eigil; Kjær, Kurt H; Korsgaard, Niels J; Larsen, Nicolaj K; Linderson, Hans; Lyså, Astrid; Möller, Per; Olsen, Jesper; Willerslev, Eske

    2011-08-01

    We present a sea-ice record from northern Greenland covering the past 10,000 years. Multiyear sea ice reached a minimum between ~8500 and 6000 years ago, when the limit of year-round sea ice at the coast of Greenland was located ~1000 kilometers to the north of its present position. The subsequent increase in multiyear sea ice culminated during the past 2500 years and is linked to an increase in ice export from the western Arctic and higher variability of ice-drift routes. When the ice was at its minimum in northern Greenland, it greatly increased at Ellesmere Island to the west. The lack of uniformity in past sea-ice changes, which is probably related to large-scale atmospheric anomalies such as the Arctic Oscillation, is not well reproduced in models. This needs to be further explored, as it is likely to have an impact on predictions of future sea-ice distribution.

  18. A 10,000-Year Record of Arctic Ocean Sea-Ice Variability—View from the Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funder, Svend; Goosse, Hugues; Jepsen, Hans; Kaas, Eigil; Kjær, Kurt H.; Korsgaard, Niels J.; Larsen, Nicolaj K.; Linderson, Hans; Lyså, Astrid; Möller, Per; Olsen, Jesper; Willerslev, Eske

    2011-08-01

    We present a sea-ice record from northern Greenland covering the past 10,000 years. Multiyear sea ice reached a minimum between ~8500 and 6000 years ago, when the limit of year-round sea ice at the coast of Greenland was located ~1000 kilometers to the north of its present position. The subsequent increase in multiyear sea ice culminated during the past 2500 years and is linked to an increase in ice export from the western Arctic and higher variability of ice-drift routes. When the ice was at its minimum in northern Greenland, it greatly increased at Ellesmere Island to the west. The lack of uniformity in past sea-ice changes, which is probably related to large-scale atmospheric anomalies such as the Arctic Oscillation, is not well reproduced in models. This needs to be further explored, as it is likely to have an impact on predictions of future sea-ice distribution.

  19. Variations in seawater Sr/Ca recorded in deep-sea bamboo corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T. M.; Lavigne, M.; Spero, H. J.; Guilderson, T.; Gaylord, B.; Clague, D.

    2012-09-01

    A depth transect of deep-sea bamboo corals along the California margin provides evidence that coral strontium to calcium ratios (Sr/Cacoral) record seawater Sr/Ca ratios (Sr/Casw). A calibration was constructed utilizing Sr/Cacoral ratios and previously published Pacific Sr/Casw data (R2 = 0.53, n = 12, p < 0.01): Sr/Cacoral (mmol/mol) = 4.62*Sr/Casw (mmol/mol) - 36.64. Sr/Casw is ultimately governed by the remineralization of Sr-containing shells of surface water-derived marine organisms (e.g., Acantharia) at intermediate water depths. California margin Sr/Cacoral records from 792 and 1295 m document fluctuations in Sr/Casw that appear decadal-scale. These results suggest that Sr/Casw may not be as stable as previously assumed and may be influenced by surface productivity on short timescales.

  20. Caribbean ,More than Myths

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alice Ou

    2008-01-01

    @@ Have you ever watched the movie of Pirates of the Caribbean?This Hollywood movie hit several headlines in its time and pushed a charming and mysterious Caribbean under limelight.The Latin America and the Caribbean area caught the world's eyesight,so from China.On February 27th,the fourth session of CASS (Chinese Academy of Social Sciences)International Forum focus on Latin America and the Caribbean affairs was heldin Beijing,China.

  1. A 600-ka Arctic sea-ice record from Mendeleev Ridge based on ostracodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Thomas M.; Polyak, L.V.; Reed, D.; Kandiano, E. S.; Marzen, R. E.; Council, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    Arctic paleoceanography and sea-ice history were reconstructed from epipelagic and benthic ostracodes from a sediment core (HLY0503-06JPC, 800 m water depth) located on the Mendeleev Ridge, Western Arctic Ocean. The calcareous microfaunal record (ostracodes and foraminifers) covers several glacial/interglacial cycles back to estimated Marine Isotope Stage 13 (MIS 13, ∼500 ka) with an average sedimentation rate of ∼0.5 cm/ka for most of the stratigraphy (MIS 5–13). Results based on ostracode assemblages and an unusual planktic foraminiferal assemblage in MIS 11 dominated by a temperate-water species Turborotalita egelida show that extreme interglacial warmth, high surface ocean productivity, and possibly open ocean convection characterized MIS 11 and MIS 13 (∼400 and 500 ka, respectively). A major shift in western Arctic Ocean environments toward perennial sea ice occurred after MIS 11 based on the distribution of an ice-dwelling ostracode Acetabulastoma arcticum. Spectral analyses of the ostracode assemblages indicate sea ice and mid-depth ocean circulation in western Arctic Ocean varied primarily at precessional (∼22 ka) and obliquity (∼40 ka) frequencies.

  2. A first record of obligate halophilic aspergilli from the dead sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazareth, Sarita; Gonsalves, Valerie; Nayak, Shweta

    2012-03-01

    The isolation of obligate halophilic aspergilli from the Dead Sea and the range of salt tolerance of halophilic fungi isolated, are reported here for the first time. The mycobiota of the Dead Sea isolated in this study, was dominated by Aspergillus and Penicillium species; Cladosporium were found in lesser numbers. All three genera were obtained from the water sample; however, Aspergillus was the only genus obtained from the sediment. There was significant difference in growth of each isolate at different salt concentrations and intraspecies analysis revealed dissimilarity in response of strains to different salt concentrations in the growth medium The isolates were euryhaline, with halotolerance up to 20-25% solar salt, Aspergillus and Penicillium species showing a higher level of halotolerance, as compared to that of Cladosporium. Halophilic fungi were found in greater numbers in the sediment sample as compared to that in the water sample. Penicillium and Cladosporium species were exclusively facultative halophiles, while some species of Aspergillus were facultative halophiles. All the obligate halophiles isolated, belonged to the genus Aspergillus and were identified as A. penicillioides and A unguis, the latter being a first record of the species from the Dead Sea.

  3. Nephtyidae (Polychaeta, Phyllodocida) from the Red Sea, with record of a new species

    KAUST Repository

    Ravara, A.

    2017-08-10

    Six nephtyid species were identified from samples collected off the west coast of Saudi Arabia. Two of these species had been previously reported for the Red Sea (Inermonephtys aff. inermis, Nephtys palatii), three are new records (Aglaophamus lobatus, A. cf. verrilli, Micronephthys stammeri) and one is new to science (Inermonephtys aramco). Inermonephtys aramco was collected in the southern region of the Red Sea at depths between 60 and 83 m. It is characterized by the presence of branchiae from chaetiger 15 or 16, well-developed parapodial prechaetal lamellae, broadly rounded notopodial postchaetal lamellae and rudimentary neuropodial postchaetal lamellae. The species Nephtys palatii is transferred to the genus Micronephthys. Based on the current finding, the previously known bathymetric range of Micronephthys stammeri is extended from 4–7 to 17 m, and occurrence depths for N. palatii are given for the first time (4–90 m). Full descriptions are included for all species except M. stammeri. An identification key for all the species known to occur in the Red Sea is provided.

  4. A High-resolution Detrital and Oxygen Isotope Record from Flemish Pass, Labrador Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    deJesus, E.; Hoffman, J. S.; Clark, P. U.; Mix, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution records of deglacial paleoceanographic change along the Labrador shelf are scarce. However, they are required in order to characterize and understand possible ice-ocean interactions involving the eastern sector of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS). We have generated a high-resolution stable isotope and detrital stratigraphic record for core HU2001043-008 (990m, 48° N, 45° W) from Flemish Pass, Labrador Sea, to better understand the role of LIS ice-rafting events in abrupt climate changes during the last glaciation. Samples at two-centimeter resolution were disaggregated, washed, and picked for Neogloboquandrina pachyderma (sinistral) for stable isotope and radiocarbon analysis. The δ18O signal in foraminiferal calcite allows us to examine surface-ocean changes that may indicate an influx of freshwater, which may or may not be related to an LIS ice-rafting event. Our results will help in developing a better understanding of the source of LIS ice-rafting events, precursory indicators of the events, and how these events are associated with changes in deep-water formation in the Labrador Sea.

  5. Newly recorded Karlodinium veneficum dinoflagellate blooms in stratified water of the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xinfeng; Lu, Douding; Guan, Weibing; Wang, Hongxia; He, Piaoxia; Xia, Ping; Yang, Huajie

    2014-03-01

    Karlodinium veneficum is a cosmopolitan species, but has been poorly recorded in the East China Sea (ECS) due to its small size and difficulty in identification. The bloom dynamics of this species is not well understood globally. In this study, we examined its morphological characteristics that suggest the K. veneficum is the co-occurring bloom causative species of large scale Prorocentrum donghaiense blooms in spring 2011. The epicone of K. veneficum recorded in the investigated area is conical or rounded, and the hypocone is hemispherically rounded. The ventral pore is located at the left side of the apical groove. Nucleus is positioned centrally within the hypocone. Four large irregular chloroplasts are equally distributed in the epicone and hypocone. The mean length of cultured cells was 13.6±1.2 μm (range 11.0-15.8 μm) and the mean width was 10.0±1.1 μm (range 8.0-12 μm) (n=50). Cell abundance of K. veneficum population was low, in the region 1000-1600 cells L-1, along a transect in the East China Sea on April 19, 2011, when the water column was not distinctly stratified. Cell densities reached 3×107 cells L-1 along the same transect on May 13 2011 when the bloom occurred in the 10 m layer surface and the water column was distinctly stratified. Cell abundances therefore appear closely related to water column stratification.

  6. Last Glacial to Holocene history of the Indian Monsoon recorded in Andaman Sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathorne, E. C.; Yirgaw, D. G.; Ali, S.; Giosan, L.; Collett, T. S.; Nath, B.; Frank, M.

    2013-12-01

    Over 3 billion people live in the area influenced by the Asian monsoon, the rains of which provide vital water resources while posing a risk to human life through flooding. Despite the importance to so many the monsoon is difficult to predict and model, making its future development in a changing global climate uncertain. To help improve models and predictions, histories of monsoon variability beyond the instrumental record are required. The past variability of the Indian Monsoon is mostly known from records of monsoon wind strength over the Arabian Sea. This study uses a unique long sediment core obtained by the drill ship JOIDES Resolution in the Andaman Sea to examine the past variability of Indian Monsoon precipitation on the Indian sub-continent and directly over the ocean. Here we present multi-proxy data examining variations during the last glacial and deglaciation. The radiogenic Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic composition of the clay fraction (fresh water. References: Antonov, J. I., D. Seidov, T. P. Boyer, R. A. Locarnini, A. V. Mishonov, and H. E. Garcia (2010). World Ocean Atlas 2009 Volume 2: Salinity. S. Levitus, Ed., NOAA Atlas NESDIS 69, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 184 pp.

  7. New records of parasitic copepods (Crustacea, Copepoda) from marine fishes in the Argentinean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Cantatore Delfina María; Elizabeth, Braicovich Paola; Julia, Alarcos Ana; Laura, Lanfranchi Ana; Alejandra, Rossin María; Gustavo, Vales Damián; Tomás, Timi Juan

    2012-03-01

    Increasing knowledge of the biodiversity of parasitic copepods in the Argentinean Sea will provide a baseline against which changes in the distribution of marine biota can be detected. We provide new information on the distribution of 13 known species of parasitic copepods gathered from 11 species of marine fishes from Argentinean Sea, including 7 new host records and 9 new locality records. These species are: Bomolochus globiceps (Vervoort et Ramírez, 1968) and Nothobomolochus cresseyi Timi et Sardella, 1997 (Bomolochidae Sumpf, 1871); Brasilochondria riograndensis Thatcher et Pereira, 2004 (Chondracanthidae Milne Edwards, 1840); Taeniacanthus lagocephali Pearse, 1952 (Taeniacanthidae Wilson, 1911); Caligus rogercresseyi Boxshall et Bravo, 2000 and Metacaligus uruguayensis (Thomsen, 1949) (Caligidae Burmeister, 1835); Hatschekia conifera Yamaguti, 1939 (Hatschekiidae Kabata, 1979); Clavellotis pagri (Krøyer, 1863), Clavella adunca (Strøm, 1762), Clavella bowmani Kabata, 1963 and Parabrachiella amphipacifica Ho, 1982 (Lernaeopodidae Milne Edwards, 1840), and Lernanthropus leidyi Wilson, 1922 and Lernanthropus caudatus Wilson, 1922 (Lernanthropidae Kabata, 1979). A list of host species lacking parasitic copepods, for which large samples were investigated by the authors, is also provided in order to compare in future surveys.

  8. Comparison of Passive Microwave-Derived Early Melt Onset Records on Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Angela C.; Miller, Jeffrey A.; Meier, Walter N.

    2017-01-01

    Two long records of melt onset (MO) on Arctic sea ice from passive microwave brightness temperatures (Tbs) obtained by a series of satellite-borne instruments are compared. The Passive Microwave (PMW) method and Advanced Horizontal Range Algorithm (AHRA) detect the increase in emissivity that occurs when liquid water develops around snow grains at the onset of early melting on sea ice. The timing of MO on Arctic sea ice influences the amount of solar radiation absorbed by the ice-ocean system throughout the melt season by reducing surface albedos in the early spring. This work presents a thorough comparison of these two methods for the time series of MO dates from 1979through 2012. The methods are first compared using the published data as a baseline comparison of the publically available data products. A second comparison is performed on adjusted MO dates we produced to remove known differences in inter-sensor calibration of Tbs and masking techniques used to develop the original MO date products. These adjustments result in a more consistent set of input Tbs for the algorithms. Tests of significance indicate that the trends in the time series of annual mean MO dates for the PMW and AHRA are statistically different for the majority of the Arctic Ocean including the Laptev, E. Siberian, Chukchi, Beaufort, and central Arctic regions with mean differences as large as 38.3 days in the Barents Sea. Trend agreement improves for our more consistent MO dates for nearly all regions. Mean differences remain large, primarily due to differing sensitivity of in-algorithm thresholds and larger uncertainties in thin-ice regions.

  9. The status of marine turtles in Montserrat (Eastern Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin, C. S.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The status of marine turtles in Montserrat (Eastern Caribbean is reviewed following five years of monitoring (1999-2003. The mean number of nests recorded during the annual nesting season (June-October was 53 (± 24.9 SD; range: 13-43. In accordance with earlier reports, the nesting of hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata and green (Chelonia mydas turtles was confirmed on several beaches around the island. Only non-nesting emergences were documented for loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta and there was no evidence of nesting by leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea; however, it is possible that additional survey effort would reveal low density nesting by these species. Officially reported turtle capture data for 1993-2003 suggest that a mean of 0.9 turtle per year (±1.2 SD; range: 0-4 were landed island-wide, with all harvest having occurred during the annual open season (1 October to 31 May. Informed observers believe that the harvest is significantly under-reported and that fishermen avoid declaring their catch by butchering turtles at sea (both during and outside the open season. Of concern is the fact that breeding adults are potentially included in the harvest, and that the open season partially coincides with the breeding season. The present study has shown that although Montserrat is not a major nesting site for sea turtles, it remains important on a regional basis for the Eastern Caribbean.

  10. Arctic sea-ice decline archived by multicentury annual-resolution record from crustose coralline algal proxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfar, Jochen; Adey, Walter H; Kronz, Andreas; Hetzinger, Steffen; Edinger, Evan; Fitzhugh, William W

    2013-12-03

    Northern Hemisphere sea ice has been declining sharply over the past decades and 2012 exhibited the lowest Arctic summer sea-ice cover in historic times. Whereas ongoing changes are closely monitored through satellite observations, we have only limited data of past Arctic sea-ice cover derived from short historical records, indirect terrestrial proxies, and low-resolution marine sediment cores. A multicentury time series from extremely long-lived annual increment-forming crustose coralline algal buildups now provides the first high-resolution in situ marine proxy for sea-ice cover. Growth and Mg/Ca ratios of these Arctic-wide occurring calcified algae are sensitive to changes in both temperature and solar radiation. Growth sharply declines with increasing sea-ice blockage of light from the benthic algal habitat. The 646-y multisite record from the Canadian Arctic indicates that during the Little Ice Age, sea ice was extensive but highly variable on subdecadal time scales and coincided with an expansion of ice-dependent Thule/Labrador Inuit sea mammal hunters in the region. The past 150 y instead have been characterized by sea ice exhibiting multidecadal variability with a long-term decline distinctly steeper than at any time since the 14th century.

  11. [Over one hundred year sedimentary record of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Andaman Sea, Malaysia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Ling; Wang, Xin-Hong; Li, Yong-Yu; Hong, Hua-Sheng; Li, He-Yang; Yin, Ming-Duan

    2009-09-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a sediment core collected from Langkawi Island of the Andaman Sea, Malaysia were determined by GC/MS, the vertical variations of concentration and distributions of PAHs were investigated. In combining with 210Pb-dating, the PAHs sedimentary record in the last 100 years was reconstructed and their possible sources were also discussed. The sigmaPAH concentration ranged from 13.2-60.1 ng x g(-1) in the whole sedimentary section (0-56 cm) with the dominant compounds of phenanthrene, naphthalene and perylene. The sediments contaminated to a lesser extent comparing with the surrounding waters. Before the 1920s, the concentrations of PAHs were considered to be the background level, which was implied from the natural inputs. The historical records of PAHs in the core showed that two distinct peaks which represented the input time of 1960s and 1980s, respectively, inferred that there were some relatively dramatically land-based inputs, and human activities leaded a clear impact to these waters during these periods. Furthermore, PAHs diagnostic ratios indicated that PAHs in the core sediments were mainly of pyrolytic origin (combustion), accompanied with minor petroleum origin. These were related with agriculture, industry, ocean import and export, and shipping activities in the surrounding regions. Meanwhile as the vital communication line, the marine transportation of the Strait of Malacca had influenced the environmental quality of the Andaman Sea. Meanwhile, based on the sedimentary record, PAHs concentrations were found to correlate positively with humanism activities and socioeconomic development (Gross Domestic Production) in the surrounding regions.

  12. New records of sea lice (Copepoda: Caligidae) from marine fishes in Jaramijó, an area with potential for sea-cage aquaculture in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Serna, Francisco Neptali; Caña-Bozada, Víctor; Mera-Loor, Geormery; Loor-Andrade, Peggy; Fajer-Ávila, Emma J; Ho, Ju-Shey

    2015-02-20

    Farming of finfish in sea cages is gaining popularity worldwide. These systems are a suitable environment for the emergence, establishment and transmission of parasites or pathogens, such as sea lice (Copepoda: Caligidae), known to cause serious diseases and economic losses in finfish aquaculture worldwide. In coastal waters of Jaramijó, Ecuador, there are plans to culture spotted rose snapper (Lutjanus guttatus) and longfin yellowtail (Seriola rivoliana); however, the information about the occurrence of sea lice on fish from this country is scarce. To address this problem, a parasitological survey of economically important fish caught by artisanal fishermen was conducted between June 2013 and May 2014. A total of 608 fish belonging to 66 species were examined. Sea lice were found on 23 fish species. The diversity of these parasites consisted of 22 species of Caligus and 5 species of Lepeophtheirus. Most sea lice species (66%) occurred in a single fish species only, with low infection levels. The most frequently encountered species were Caligus asperimanus Pearse, 1951, Caligus mutabilis Wilson, 1905 and Caligus rufimaculatus Wilson, 1905. Taxonomic remarks are presented for some of the species recorded during this survey. All but two sea lice records are new to Ecuador, considerably expanding the geographical range of some species.

  13. Climate and sea level changes and the role of shelf morphology in recording in Sibuyan Sea Basin, Philippines during the last 14 kyBP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloren, R. B.; Siringan, F. P.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we reconstruct changes in precipitation using geochemical and grain size proxies and we look at how shelf morphology can influence the nature of sedimentary record of climate and oceanographic events. A 9.6m long sediment core from Sibuyan Sea basin within the internal seas of the Philippines, was raised from a water depth of 1660m. It was analyzed using an XRF core scanner at 1 cm resolution. Grain size was determined using a laser particle analyzer. Thirteen AMS radiocarbon dates from bulk organics provide age control spanning back to 14 kyBP. Overall, the trends of precipitation proxies Ti, Al and Al/Ti follow the 10o N insolation curve. A 1.4 ky periodicity rides on this general trend. But a stepwise decrease of these precipitation proxies occur at about 9ka and 4ka. The former correpond to the melt water pulse 1-c rapid sea level rise of about 15m while the latter correlates time-wise to a period of aridification. The Younger Dryas period, ca. 12.9-11.6 ka, another known dry period, does not show a shift or decrease in sediment input. Similarly, MWP -1B does no register a distinct signal in the core. The insensitivity of the core in reflecting the older climate and sea level events is attributed to the steep morphology of the sea floor where shoreline translations took place during the earlier sea level events; with a steeper sea floor, sediment sequestration near the shoreline will be low and therefore the basin will not feel much change in sediment input. For the younger climate and sea level events, the shoreline positions were already adjacent to sea floor with relatively gentler gradient where sediment sequestration is greater and where a sea level rise of a certain magnitude will translate the shoreline much farther.

  14. Drivers of sea-level change - using relative sea level records from the North and South Atlantic to fingerprint sources of mid-Holocene ice melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, B.; Khan, N.; Ashe, E.; Kopp, R. E.; Long, A. J.; Gehrels, W. R.

    2015-12-01

    Many factors give rise to relative sea-level (RSL) changes that are far from globally uniform. For example, spatially variable sea-level responses arise because of the exchange of mass between ice sheets and oceans. Gravitational, flexural, and rotational processes generate a distinct spatial pattern - or "fingerprint" - of sea-level change associated with each shrinking land ice mass. As a land ice mass shrinks, sea-level rise is greater in areas geographically distal to the ice mass than in areas proximal to it, in large part because the gravitational attraction between the ice mass and the ocean is reduced. Thus, the U.S. mid-Atlantic coastline experiences about 50% of the global average sea-level-rise due to Greenland Ice Sheet melt, but about 120% of the global average due to West Antarctic Ice Sheet melt. Separating the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheet contributions during the past 7,000 years requires analysis of sea-level changes from sites in the northern and southern hemisphere. Accordingly we present sea-level records within a hierarchical statistical modeling to: (1) quantify rates of change; (2) compare rates of change among sites, including full quantification of the uncertainty in their differences; and (3) test hypotheses about the sources of meltwater through their sea-level fingerprints. Preliminary analysis of three sites within our North and South Atlantic sea-level database indicates sea-level gradient in the rate of RSL rise during the mid Holocene between 6000 and 4000 years BP; a greater change in rate is found in Brazil than St Croix than New Jersey, consistent with an increase and then decrease in Greenland Ice Sheet mass.

  15. Tephrostratigraphic record from the Northern Ionian Sea and geochemical analytic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, B.; Siani, G.; Sanatcroce, R.; Zanchetta, G.; Paterne, M.; Villemant, B.

    2012-12-01

    condition in the Ionian Sea and can be used for land-sea correlations for this important climatic event. More in general, these data allow a significant update of the knowledge of the volcanic ash dispersal from Lipari and Somma-Vesuvius volcanoes. Caron et al., 2012, Late Pleistocene to Holocene tephrostratigraphic record from the Northern Ionian Sea. Marine Geology, 311-314; 41-51

  16. First records, rediscovery and compilation of deep-sea echinoderms in the middle and lower continental slope of the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Mecho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study provides a compilation of all available information on deep-sea echinoderms from the middle and lower slopes of the Mediterranean Sea, with the aim of providing a unified source of information on the taxonomy of this group. Previous records of species are updated with new data obtained from 223 trawl hauls conducted in 11 cruises within the northwestern Mediterranean Sea between 800 m and 2845 m depth. Valid names, bathymetric ranges and geographic distributions are given for all species. The new data report, for the first time, the presence of the Atlantic echinoid Gracilechinus elegans (Düben and Koren, 1844 in the Mediterranean Sea. We also report the presence of the endemic holothurians Hedingia mediterranea (Bartolini Baldelli, 1914, dredged only once previously in 1914 in the Tyrrhenian Sea, and Penilpidia ludwigi (von Marenzeller, 1893, known previously only from three samples, two in the Aegean Sea and one in the Balearic Sea. Additionally, the deeper limits of the bathymetric distribution of four species have been expanded: the asteroid Ceramaster grenadensis (Perrier, 1881 to 2845 m; the echinoid Brissopsis lyrifera (Forbes, 1841 to 2250 m; and the holothurians Hedingia mediterranea and Holothuria (Panningothuria forskali Delle Chiaje, 1823, to 1500 m and 850 m, respectively.

  17. A pathway to generating Climate Data Records of sea-surface temperature from satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnett, Peter J.; Corlett, Gary K.

    2012-11-01

    In addition to having known uncertainty characteristics, Climate Data Records (CDRs) of geophysical variables derived from satellite measurements must be of sufficient length to resolve signals that might reveal the signatures of climate change against a background of larger, unrelated variability. The length of the record requires using satellite measurements from many instruments over several decades, and the uncertainty requirement implies that a consistent approach be used to establish the errors in the satellite retrievals over the entire period. Retrieving sea-surface temperature (SST) from satellite is a relatively mature topic, and the uncertainties of satellite retrievals are determined by comparison with collocated independent measurements. To avoid the complicating effects of near-surface temperature gradients in the upper ocean, the best validating measurements are from ship-board radiometers that measure, at source, the surface emission that is measured in space, after modification by its propagation through the atmosphere. To attain sufficient accuracy, such ship-based radiometers must use internal blackbody calibration targets, but to determine the uncertainties in these radiometric measurements, i.e. to confirm that the internal calibration is effective, it is necessary to conduct verification of the field calibration using independent blackbodies with accurately known emissivity and at very accurately measured temperatures. This is a well-justifiable approach to providing the necessary underpinning of a Climate Data Record of SST.

  18. Is Ice-Rafted Sediment in a North Pole Marine Record Evidence for Perennial Sea-ice Cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, L.B.; Schmidt, G.A.; Pfirman, S.; Newton, R.; DeRepentigny, P.

    2015-01-01

    Ice-rafted sediments of Eurasian and North American origin are found consistently in the upper part (13 Ma BP to present) of the Arctic Coring Expedition (ACEX) ocean core from the Lomonosov Ridge, near the North Pole (approximately 88 degrees N). Based on modern sea-ice drift trajectories and speeds, this has been taken as evidence of the presence of a perennial sea-ice cover in the Arctic Ocean from the middle Miocene onwards. However, other high latitude land and marine records indicate a long-term trend towards cooling broken by periods of extensive warming suggestive of a seasonally ice-free Arctic between the Miocene and the present. We use a coupled sea-ice slab-ocean model including sediment transport tracers to map the spatial distribution of ice-rafted deposits in the Arctic Ocean. We use 6 hourly wind forcing and surface heat fluxes for two different climates: one with a perennial sea-ice cover similar to that of the present day and one with seasonally ice-free conditions, similar to that simulated in future projections. Model results confirm that in the present-day climate, sea ice takes more than 1 year to transport sediment from all its peripheral seas to the North Pole. However, in a warmer climate, sea-ice speeds are significantly faster (for the same wind forcing) and can deposit sediments of Laptev, East Siberian and perhaps also Beaufort Sea origin at the North Pole. This is primarily because of the fact that sea-ice interactions are much weaker with a thinner ice cover and there is less resistance to drift. We conclude that the presence of ice-rafted sediment of Eurasian and North American origin at the North Pole does not imply a perennial sea-ice cover in the Arctic Ocean, reconciling the ACEX ocean core data with other land and marine records.

  19. First record of Pantropical spotted dolphins Stenella attenuata in the Yellow Sea, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fuxing; Wang, Xianyan; Zhang, Qiuxia; Miao, Xing; Zhang, Ting; Zhu, Qian

    2015-07-01

    On October 1, 2009, sixteen dolphins were obtained from fishermen by incidental catching in the Yellow Sea, China. As the dolphins' skin color was ambiguous, morphological parameters were measured, and mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b (Cyt b) gene sequence was studied to identify the species. Morphological characteristics were consistent with Pantropical spotted dolphins, Stenella attenuata. Furthermore, a partial mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b (Cyt b) gene sequence as long as 328-bp was studied by extracting genomic DNA from the skins, and six haplotypes were detected in the sixteen dolphins. By comparing homologous sequences available in GenBank (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov), all the six haplotypes had maximal genetic similarity with Pantropical spotted dolphin. Eight species of cetacean (whales and dolphins) are now recognised in the Yellow Sea. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first record of Pantropical spotted dolphins from this region. Despite this species being listed as a Grade II National Key Protected Animal since 1988, little is known of its biology in Chinese waters. We recommend remedial research be undertaken to ensure appropriate management.

  20. Verification of a new NOAA/NSIDC passive microwave sea-ice concentration climate record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter N. Meier

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A new satellite-based passive microwave sea-ice concentration product developed for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR programme is evaluated via comparison with other passive microwave-derived estimates. The new product leverages two well-established concentration algorithms, known as the NASA Team and Bootstrap, both developed at and produced by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC. The sea-ice estimates compare well with similar GSFC products while also fulfilling all NOAA CDR initial operation capability (IOC requirements, including (1 self-describing file format, (2 ISO 19115-2 compliant collection-level metadata, (3 Climate and Forecast (CF compliant file-level metadata, (4 grid-cell level metadata (data quality fields, (5 fully automated and reproducible processing and (6 open online access to full documentation with version control, including source code and an algorithm theoretical basic document. The primary limitations of the GSFC products are lack of metadata and use of untracked manual corrections to the output fields. Smaller differences occur from minor variations in processing methods by the National Snow and Ice Data Center (for the CDR fields and NASA (for the GSFC fields. The CDR concentrations do have some differences from the constituent GSFC concentrations, but trends and variability are not substantially different.

  1. A 2500-year sea level change record in Fildes Peninsula, Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ye

    2004-01-01

    A detailed record of sea level changes during the last 2500 years is preserved in the northernwest coast of Fildes Peninsula in Antarctica. Fourteen marine alga layers were deposited in the beach with an altitude of 2.80 m, and one diatom layer deposited in the ancient lake on the terrace with an altitude of 6.84 m. A radiocarbon age of 695±70 aBP was obtained for the modern marine alga, and the age was used in correction for the carbon reservoir effect of the marine alga. Sea level fell 4.98 m from the 4th century B.C. to the early 13th century, at an average of -0.31 cm/a, then rose about 0.78 m during the early 13th to the middle 18th century, at an average of 0.14 cm/a. It has risen about 0.16 m since the middle 18th century, at an average of 0.07 cm/a.

  2. Biology and new records of the invasive species Branchiomma bairdi (Annelida: Sabellidae in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. ARIAS

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available First observations on the reproductive biology of the alien polychaete Branchiomma bairdi (McIntosh, 1885 (Sabellidae in the Mediterranean Sea are provided as well as additional Mediterranean records of the species which can help to understand its introduction and spreading. Re-examination of the specimens from Miseno harbour (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy revealed the presence of B. bairdi in the central-Mediterranean since September 2004. The histological study of individuals collected in Malta revealed that the species is a simultaneous hermaphrodite, developing male and female gametes in the same body segments; embryos are brooded inside the parent tube. However, there is evidence also for asexual reproduction. The species shows a different reproductive pattern from the previously reported population from the eastern-Pacific; this demonstrates its great plasticity and adaptability. Branchiomma bairdi has an invasive behaviour, colonizing large areas in relatively short-time, and reaching relatively high densities (c.a. 50 individuals/m2. Its expansion throughout several Mediterranean localities is largely a consequence of the high capacity of this species to colonize extremely different habitats and substrates, to the occurrence of sexual and asexual reproductive strategies, and the combination of both. Further, B. bairdi appears to be particularly abundant in confined and anthropogenic degraded areas. Finally, our findings strongly suggest that the pathway of introduction in the Mediterranean, previously hypothesized as the Suez Canal (Lessepsian migration, is most likely via the Gibraltar Strait.

  3. Verification of a New NOAA/NSIDC Passive Microwave Sea-Ice Concentration Climate Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Walter N.; Peng, Ge; Scott, Donna J.; Savoie, Matt H.

    2014-01-01

    A new satellite-based passive microwave sea-ice concentration product developed for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)Climate Data Record (CDR) programme is evaluated via comparison with other passive microwave-derived estimates. The new product leverages two well-established concentration algorithms, known as the NASA Team and Bootstrap, both developed at and produced by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The sea ice estimates compare well with similar GSFC products while also fulfilling all NOAA CDR initial operation capability (IOC) requirements, including (1) self describing file format, (2) ISO 19115-2 compliant collection-level metadata,(3) Climate and Forecast (CF) compliant file-level metadata, (4) grid-cell level metadata (data quality fields), (5) fully automated and reproducible processing and (6) open online access to full documentation with version control, including source code and an algorithm theoretical basic document. The primary limitations of the GSFC products are lack of metadata and use of untracked manual corrections to the output fields. Smaller differences occur from minor variations in processing methods by the National Snow and Ice Data Center (for the CDR fields) and NASA (for the GSFC fields). The CDR concentrations do have some differences from the constituent GSFC concentrations, but trends and variability are not substantially different.

  4. First Record of Icelus toyamensis (Scorpaeniformes: Cottidae from the East Sea, Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Sun Song

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A three specimen of Icelus toyamensis, belonging to Cottidae, Scorpaeniformes, was firstly collected from the East Sea, Korea during 2007-2009. We herein described the species as the first record from Korea on the basis of these specimens. Icelus toyamensis is characterized by the following morphological combinations: spinous scales absent on the base of dorsal fin; small ctenoid scales scattered on body sides; gill rakers are short, tubular, and relatively broad; the uppermost preopercular spine is sharp and simple; dorsal fin rays VIII-IX, 20-21; anal fin soft rays 18-19; pectoral fin rays 18, and vertebrae 40-41. New Korean name of I. toyamensis is proposed as “Min-jul-ga-si-hoet-dae.”

  5. On the Milankovitch sensitivity of the Quaternary deep-sea record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. H. Berger

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The response of the climate system to external forcing has become an item of prime interest in the context of global warming, especially with respect to the rate of melting land-based ice masses. The deep-sea record of ice-age climate change has been useful in assessing the sensitivity of the climate system to such forcing, notably to orbital forcing, which is well-known for the last several million years. When comparing response and forcing, one finds that sensitivity varies greatly through time, apparently in dependence on the state of the system. The changing stability of ice masses presumably is the underlying cause for the changing state of the system. A buildup of vulnerable ice masses within the latest Tertiary, when going into the ice ages, is conjectured to cause a stepwise increase of climate variability since the early Pliocene.

  6. Exceptional sea turtle nest records in 2011 suggest an underestimated nesting potential in Sicily (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Casale

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We report seven nesting events by loggerhead sea turtles in Sicily (Italy in 2011. In comparison to past records, this number is relatively high and may be at least in part due to an awareness campaign carried out in 2011 to solicit such reports. This suggests that Sicily may host a much higher nesting activity than previously thought and higher monitoring effort is recommended, especially in certain coastal tracts. Sand temperatures and incubation periods indicate that the beaches monitored so far in the southern coast are not optimal for development, resulting in low hatching success, and produce a majority of males. Five 2011 nests and two past nests from the same area had mtDNA haplotype CC-A2.1, the most common in the Mediterranean.

  7. Are Tide Gauges Useful Recorders of Relative Sea-Level Rise in Large Deltaic Settings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornqvist, T. E.; Keogh, M.; Jankowski, K. L.; Fernandes, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    It has long been recognized that the world's largest deltas that often host major population centers are particularly vulnerable to accelerating rates of relative sea-level rise (RSLR). Traditionally, tide-gauge records are used to obtain quantitative data on rates of RSLR, given that they are perceived to capture the rise of the sea surface as well as land subsidence which is often substantial in deltaic settings. We argue here that tide gauges in such settings often provide ambiguous data because they ultimately measure RSLR with respect to a benchmark that is typically anchored tens of meters below the land surface. This is problematic because the prime target of interest is usually the rate of RSLR with respect to the delta top. We illustrate this problem with newly obtained rod surface elevation table - marker horizon (RSET-MH) data from the Mississippi Delta (n=185) that show that total subsidence is dominated by shallow subsidence in the uppermost 5-10 m. Since benchmarks in this region are anchored at 20 m depth on average, tide-gauge records by definition do not capture this important (and often even dominant) component of total subsidence, and thus underestimate RSLR by a considerable amount. We show how RSET-MH data, combined with GPS and satellite altimetry data, enable us to bypass this problem. Present-day rates of RSLR in the Mississippi Delta are 13±9 mm/yr, considerably higher than numbers reported in recent studies based on tide-gauge analysis. It seems unlikely that this problem is unique to the Mississippi Delta, so we argue that the approach to RSLR measurements in large deltas across the planet needs rethinking.

  8. Long-Term High-Latitude Sea and Ice Surface Temperature Record from AVHRR GAC Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, C. S.; Dybkjær, G.; Eastwood, S.; Tonboe, R. T.; Høyer, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Surface temperature is among the most important variables in the surface energy balance equation and it significantly affects the atmospheric boundary layer structure, the turbulent heat exchange and, over ice, the ice growth rate. Here we measure the surface temperature using thermal infrared sensors from 10-12 μm wavelength, a method whose primary limitation over sea ice is the detection of clouds. However, in the Arctic and around Antarctica there are very few conventional observations of surface temperature from buoys, and it is sometimes difficult to determine if the temperature is measured at the surface or within the snowpack, the latter of which often results in a warm bias. To reduce this bias, much interest is being paid to alternative remote sensing methods for monitoring high latitude surface temperature. We used Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) global area coverage (GAC) data to produce a high latitude sea surface temperature (SST), ice surface temperature (IST) and ice cap skin temperature dataset spanning 27 years (1982-2009). This long-term climate record is the first of its kind for IST. In this project we used brightness temperatures from the infrared channels of AVHRR sensors aboard NOAA and Metop polar-orbiting satellites. Surface temperatures were calculated using separate split window algorithms for day SST, night SST, and IST. The snow surface emissivity across all angles of the swath were simulated specifically for all sensors using an emission model. Additionally, all algorithms were tuned to the Arctic using simulated brightness temperatures from a radiative transfer model with atmospheric profiles and skin temperatures from European Centre for Medium-Range Forecasts (ECMWF) re-analysis data (ERA-Interim). Here we present the results of product quality as compared to in situ measurements from buoys and infrared radiometers, as well as a preliminary analysis of climate trends revealed by the record.

  9. Trace Metal Record of a 200-Year-Old Deep-Sea Bamboo Coral (Isidella sp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornung, J. P.; Mix, A. C.; Tepley, F. J.; Kent, A. J.; Wakefield, W. W.

    2009-12-01

    High resolution records of past oceanic conditions can be constructed from the annually secreted calcite laminations of deep-sea gorgonian corals. Previous research has shown that deep-sea gorgonians incorporate both surface organic matter and nutrients from the surrounding water into their coral skeleton, making them ideal recorders of long-term ocean variability of surface and intermediate water. In this study we examined a 200-year-old bamboo coral (Isidella sp.) that was live collected by bottom trawl in the summer of 2000 on the Oregon continental margin at a water depth of 1148m. We explored how annual changes in upwelling strength, circulation and surface productivity are reflected in the trace metal concentrations recorded in the carbonate skeleton of the bamboo coral. To determine trace metal concentrations, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was employed at a resolution of 10microns on multiple radial transects of the coral cross section. Minor element abundances were determined on the same transects by electron microprobe (EMP) analysis. We constructed an age model by counting peaks in the ratio of magnesium to calcium abundances obtained from the EMP. Uranium series dating methods were then used to verify the age model. The concentrations of phosphorus (P), barium (Ba) and cadmium (Cd) showed considerable variation through time. Initial time series data of phosphorus to calcium (P/Ca) ratios indicates strong variability at the decadal scale, potentially reflecting varying nutrient availability. Cadmium to calcium (Cd/Ca) ratios also showed strong variability at the decadal scale. However, periods of increased P/Ca did not always correspond to elevated Cd/Ca, suggesting that P and Cd concentrations were not controlled by the same processes. The record of barium to calcium (Ba/Ca) ratios was poorly correlated to both P/Ca and Cd/Ca and showed irregular episodes of increased Ba/Ca. These irregular episodes may indicate disturbance

  10. Relative sea level variations recorded by coral microatolls over the last two centuries in Martinique and Guadeloupe: implication for seismic hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric, J.; Jennifer, W.; Feuillet, N.; Deschamps, P.; Guy, C.; Paul, T.; Galetzka, J. E.; Jean-Marie, S.; Bruno, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Lesser Antilles arc is a region of high seismic hazard, which results from the convergence of the American and Caribbean plates at 2cm/yr. Several earthquakes of magnitude ≥ 7 have struck the islands in the past. The largest ones (M 8+) occurred four years apart on January 11 1839 and February 8, 1843, offshore Martinique and Guadeloupe respectively. The 1843 event destroyed the town of Pointe-à-Pitre and killed several thousand people. It was probably a megathrust event. To better constrain the seismic hazard induced by this poorly known subduction interface, we have quantified the surface deformations of Lesser Antilles arc recorded by coral skeletons in Martinique and Guadeloupe. Certain coral species form microatolls, whose upwards growth is limited by the yearly lowest tides (Highest Level of Survival- HLS). They act as tide gauges and provide powerful tools to quantify with a precision of few centimeters the sea-level variations induced by tectonic or climatic processes at annual scale over several centuries. We identified several places where microatolls are growing on Martinique, Guadeloupe, Antigua and Barbuda Islands. Several reefs were first surveyed with low altitude helicopter flights. High-resolution aerial photographs were acquired by a drone in some areas, which allowed identifying sites featuring abundant microatolls. Accurate total station mapping of several sites showed that microatolls within the same area recorded the HLS with a precision of about 4±1cm. Several heads were sampled with a hydraulic chain saw along the eastern coast of Martinique and Guadeloupe. Most are Siderastrea Siderea or Diploria strigosa. Using sclerochronology combined with chemical analysis and U/Th dating, we have determined annual growth rates of 5 mm/yr for the former and of ~10mm/year for the latter. During the last two centuries, all microatolls sampled in Martinique recorded a local relative sea level (RSL) rise of ≈ 2-3 mm/yr, interrupted by sudden

  11. Late Pliocene climate change 3.4-2.3 Ma: paleoceanographic record from the Yabuta Formation, Sea of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, T. M.; Kitamura, A.; Ikeya, Noriyuki; Watanabe, M. E.; Kamiya, T.

    1994-01-01

    Late Pliocene paleoceanographic changes in the Sea of Japan between 3.4 and2.3 Ma were investigated through study of molluscs, diatoms, and ostracodes from the Yabuta Formation in Toyama Prefecture. The period 3.4-2.7 Ma was characterized by relatively high sea level and cool water benthic faunas. A progressive paleoceanographic shift towards colder oceanic conditions and lower sea level occurred beginning near 2.7 Ma, intenifying about 2.5 Ma, when important changes in ostracode and molluscan faunas occurred. Between 2.7 and 2.3 Ma, eight glacial events can be inferred based on drops in sea level of 50-60 m and increasing proportions of cold, shallow water ostracode species whose modern ecology and zoogeography indicate colder winter water temperatures (3-4??C). The glacial events between 2.5 and 2.3 Ma were the most intense. Preliminary interpretation of the faunal and oceanographic events of the Yabuta Formation suggests that they correspond to Northern Hemispheric cooling also known from North Atlantic deep-sea oxygen isotope, IRD, and planktic foraminiferal records, North Pacific diatom and radiolarian record, and the Chinese loess sequences. The eight glacial events may record a 41,000-yr obliquity cycle which characterized other late Pliocene climate proxy records. Inferred sea level drops near 2.5-2.3 Ma of about 50-60 m provide direct evidence from an ocean margin setting that supports deep sea oxygen isotopic evidence indicating major changes in global ice volume changes. ?? 1994.

  12. Reconstruction of Oceanographic Changes Based on the Diatom Records of the Central Okhotsk Sea over the last 500000 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Lung Wang and Liang-Chi Wang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study provides insight into changes in sea ice conditions and the oceanographic environment over the past 500 kyr through analysis of the diatom record. Based on the relative abundance of 13 diatoms species in piston core MD012414, four types of environmental conditions in the central Okhotsk Sea over the last 330 ka BP have been distinguished: (1 open-ocean alternating with seasonal sea-ice cover in Stages 9, 5, and 1; (2 almost open-ocean free of sea-ice cover in Stages 7 and 3; (3 perennial sea-ice cover in Stages 6, 4, and 2; and (4 a warm ice-age dominated by open ocean assemblages in Stage 8. The littoral diatom species, Paralia sulcata, showed a sudden increase from the glacial period to the nterglacial period over the last 330 ka BP, except during Stage 8. Such a result implies that melting sea-ice transported terrigenous materials from the north Okhotsk Sea continental shelves to the central ocean during eglaciation. From Stage 13 to Stage 10, however, cold and warm marine conditions unexpectedly occurred in the late interglacial periods and the glacial periods, respectively. One possible reason for this is a lack of age control points from Stage 13 to Stage 10, and the different sediment accumulation rates between glacial and interglacial periods. This study suggests not only the process by which oceanographic variation of sea ice occurred, but also new significance for Paralia sulcata as an indicator in the diatom record of the Okhotsk Sea.

  13. Cenozoic macroevolution in the deep-sea microfossil record: can we let go of species richness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannisdal, Bjarte; Liow, Lee Hsiang

    2014-05-01

    The deep-sea microfossil record is an outstanding resource for the study of macroevolutionary changes in planktonic groups. Studies of plankton evolution and its possible link to climate changes over the Cenozoic have typically targeted apparent trends in species richness. However, most species are rare, and fossil richness is particularly vulnerable to the imperfections (incompleteness, reworking, age and taxonomic errors) of existing microfossil occurrence databases. Here we use an alternative macroevolutionary quantity: Summed Common Species Occurrence Rate (SCOR). By focusing on the most commonly occurring species, SCOR is decoupled from species richness, robust to preservation/sampling variability, yet sensitive to relative changes in the overall abundance of a group. Numerical experiments are used to illustrate the sampling behavior of SCOR and its relationship to (sampling-standardized) species richness. We further show how SCOR estimated from the NEPTUNE database (ODP/DSDP) can provide a new perspective on long-term evolutionary and ecological changes in major planktonic groups (e.g. coccolithophores and forams). Finally, we test possible linkages between planktonic SCOR records and proxy reconstructions of climate changes over the Cenozoic.

  14. A 700-year record of mercury in avian eggshells of Guangjin Island, South China Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Liqiang [Institute of Polar Environment, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); USTC-CityU Joint Advanced Research Center, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Liu Xiaodong, E-mail: ycx@ustc.edu.cn [Institute of Polar Environment, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Sun Liguang, E-mail: slg@ustc.edu.cn [Institute of Polar Environment, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Chen Qianqian; Yan Hong; Liu Yi; Luo Yuhan; Huang Jing [Institute of Polar Environment, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Ancient eggshells over the past 700 years were extracted from an ornithogenic sediment profile on Guangjin Island, South China Sea. Based on SEM and nitrogen isotope analyses, we determined that neither post-depositional processes nor seabirds' dietary changes had a large influence on eggshell Hg levels. The historical change of Hg in these eggshells was reconstructed. Eggshell Hg was a marker for past Hg deposition in marine environment. The eggshell Hg showed three small peaks at around 1300AD, 1600 AD and 1700-1750AD and rapid increase since 1800 AD. Before 1970 AD the Hg deposition in the Xisha area had global distribution characteristics, with increased Hg emissions due to global anthropogenic activities in industrial times. However, after 1970 AD, a further sharp increase up to present day occurred, implying that the Hg production center had gradually shifted from Europe and America to Asia. - Research highlights: > Eggshell Hg is a marker for past mercury deposition in marine environment. > This is a Hg record from ancient sequential eggshell samples. > The 700-year record of eggshell Hg is closely related to human activities. > Eggshell Hg suggests the increase of Hg production in Asia over the past decades. - Our work provides a potential use of ancient sequential eggshells to reconstruct past mercury deposition in marine ecosystems.

  15. Magmatic relationships and ages between adakites, magnesian andesites and Nb-enriched basalt-andesites from Hispaniola: Record of a major change in the Caribbean island arc magma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escuder Viruete, J.; Contreras, F.; Stein, G.; Urien, P.; Joubert, M.; Pérez-Estaún, A.; Friedman, R.; Ullrich, T.

    2007-12-01

    Located in the Cordillera Central of the Dominican Republic, the Late Cretaceous Tireo Fm (TF) records a major change of the magma sources in the Caribbean island arc. It comprises a > 3 km thick sequence of arc-related volcanic and volcano-sedimentary rocks with variable geochemical characteristics. Combined detailed mapping, stratigraphy, geochemistry and U-Pb/Ar-Ar geochronology show that the volcanic rocks of the Tireo Fm include two main volcanic sequences. The lower volcanic sequence is dominated by monotonous submarine vitric-lithic tuffs and volcanic breccias of andesite to basaltic andesite, with minor interbedded flows of basalts and andesites. Fossil and (U-Pb and 40Ar- 39Ar) geochronological data show that arc magmatism in the lower sequence began to accumulate before ˜ 90 Ma, from the Aptian to Turonian. These rocks constitute an island arc tholeiitic suite, derived from melting by fluxing of a mantle wedge with subduction-related hydrous fluids. The upper volcanic sequence is characterized by a spatial and temporal association of adakites, high-Mg andesites, and Nb-enriched basalts, which collectivelly define a shift in the composition of the subduction-related erupted lavas. A dacitic to rhyolitic explosive volcanism with subaerial and episodic aerial eruptions, and sub-volcanic emplacements of domes, characterize mainly this stratigraphic interval. The onset of this volcanism took place at Turonian-Coniacian boundary and continued in the Santonian to Lower Campanian, with minor events in the Late Campanian. Adakites represent melts of the subducting slab, magnesian andesites the product of hybridization of adakite liquids with mantle peridotite, and Nb-enriched basalts melts of the residue from hybridization. We propose a model of oblique ridge subduction at ˜ 90 Ma and possibly subsequent slab window formation, as principal cause of magmatic variations recorded in the Caribbean island arc, above a southwestern-dipping subduction zone.

  16. A weekly Arctic sea-ice thickness data record from merged CryoSat-2 and SMOS satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, Robert; Hendricks, Stefan; Kaleschke, Lars; Tian-Kunze, Xiangshan; King, Jennifer; Haas, Christian

    2017-07-01

    Sea-ice thickness on a global scale is derived from different satellite sensors using independent retrieval methods. Due to the sensor and orbit characteristics, such satellite retrievals differ in spatial and temporal resolution as well as in the sensitivity to certain sea-ice types and thickness ranges. Satellite altimeters, such as CryoSat-2 (CS2), sense the height of the ice surface above the sea level, which can be converted into sea-ice thickness. Relative uncertainties associated with this method are large over thin ice regimes. Another retrieval method is based on the evaluation of surface brightness temperature (TB) in L-band microwave frequencies (1.4 GHz) with a thickness-dependent emission model, as measured by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. While the radiometer-based method looses sensitivity for thick sea ice (> 1 m), relative uncertainties over thin ice are significantly smaller than for the altimetry-based retrievals. In addition, the SMOS product provides global sea-ice coverage on a daily basis unlike the altimeter data. This study presents the first merged product of complementary weekly Arctic sea-ice thickness data records from the CS2 altimeter and SMOS radiometer. We use two merging approaches: a weighted mean (WM) and an optimal interpolation (OI) scheme. While the weighted mean leaves gaps between CS2 orbits, OI is used to produce weekly Arctic-wide sea-ice thickness fields. The benefit of the data merging is shown by a comparison with airborne electromagnetic (AEM) induction sounding measurements. When compared to airborne thickness data in the Barents Sea, the merged product has a root mean square deviation (RMSD) of about 0.7 m less than the CS2 product and therefore demonstrates the capability to enhance the CS2 product in thin ice regimes. However, in mixed first-year (FYI) and multiyear (MYI) ice regimes as in the Beaufort Sea, the CS2 retrieval shows the lowest bias.

  17. The record of Pliocene sea-level change at Enewetak Atoll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardlaw, Bruce R.; Quinn, Terrence M.

    Detailed seismic stratigraphy, lithostratigraphy, and chemostratigraphy indicate that atoll-wide subaerial exposure surfaces (major disconformities) developed during major sea-level lowstands form prominent seismic reflectors and are coincident with biostratigraphic breaks in the Plio-Pleistocene on Enewetak Atoll. Sea-level models based on the stratigraphic position and age of major disconformities suggest a maximum sea-level highstand elevation of 36 m above present sea level and a maximum sea-level lowstand elevation of 63 m below present sea level for the Pliocene.

  18. The National Deep-Sea Coral and Sponge Database: A Comprehensive Resource for United States Deep-Sea Coral and Sponge Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornback, M.; Hourigan, T.; Etnoyer, P.; McGuinn, R.; Cross, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Research on deep-sea corals has expanded rapidly over the last two decades, as scientists began to realize their value as long-lived structural components of high biodiversity habitats and archives of environmental information. The NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program's National Database for Deep-Sea Corals and Sponges is a comprehensive resource for georeferenced data on these organisms in U.S. waters. The National Database currently includes more than 220,000 deep-sea coral records representing approximately 880 unique species. Database records from museum archives, commercial and scientific bycatch, and from journal publications provide baseline information with relatively coarse spatial resolution dating back as far as 1842. These data are complemented by modern, in-situ submersible observations with high spatial resolution, from surveys conducted by NOAA and NOAA partners. Management of high volumes of modern high-resolution observational data can be challenging. NOAA is working with our data partners to incorporate this occurrence data into the National Database, along with images and associated information related to geoposition, time, biology, taxonomy, environment, provenance, and accuracy. NOAA is also working to link associated datasets collected by our program's research, to properly archive them to the NOAA National Data Centers, to build a robust metadata record, and to establish a standard protocol to simplify the process. Access to the National Database is provided through an online mapping portal. The map displays point based records from the database. Records can be refined by taxon, region, time, and depth. The queries and extent used to view the map can also be used to download subsets of the database. The database, map, and website is already in use by NOAA, regional fishery management councils, and regional ocean planning bodies, but we envision it as a model that can expand to accommodate data on a global scale.

  19. An assessment of global warming stress on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwood, D.K.; Hendec, J.C.; Mendez, A. (NOAA, Miami, FL (USA). Atlantic Oceanography and Meteorology Laboratory)

    1992-07-01

    There is evidence that stress on coral reef ecosystems in the Caribbean region is increasing. Recently numerous authors have stated that the major stress results from 'abnormally high' seasonal sea surface temperatures (SST) and have implicated global warming as a cause, stating that recent episodes of coral bleaching result therefrom. However, an analysis of available SST data sets shows no discernible warming trend that could cause an increase in coral bleaching. Given the lack of long-term records synoptic with observations of coral ecosystem health, there is insufficient evidence available to label temperatures observed in coincidence with recent regional bleaching events as 'abnormally' high.

  20. On the 2012 record low Arctic sea ice cover: Combined impact of preconditioning and an August storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Comiso, Josefino C.

    2013-04-01

    A new record low Arctic sea ice extent for the satellite era, 3.4 × 106 km2, was reached on 13 September 2012; and a new record low sea ice area, 3.0 × 106 km2, was reached on the same date. Preconditioning through decades of overall ice reductions made the ice pack more vulnerable to a strong storm that entered the central Arctic in early August 2012. The storm caused the separation of an expanse of 0.4 × 106 km2 of ice that melted in total, while its removal left the main pack more exposed to wind and waves, facilitating the main pack's further decay. Future summer storms could lead to a further acceleration of the decline in the Arctic sea ice cover and should be carefully monitored.

  1. First record of Thalassiosira curviseriata Takano (Bacillariophyta) and its bloom in the East China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wenling; LI Yang; GAO Yahui

    2008-01-01

    A bloom caused by a diatom,Thalassiosira curviseriata Takano (Bacillariophyta),is recorded in the East China Sea for the first time in China during a red tide investigation cruise (MC2005 - 2) from 27 March to 12 April 2005.This bloom was developed with the competition of Chaetoceros debilis and Skeletonema spp.The highest cell density of T.curviseriata,which has reached 1.27 × 106 cells/dm3,was found in the surface and middle water layers of Stss ZD,ZB in the East China Sea (27.22°~29.48°N,121.53°~ 122.98°E)in early spring in 2005.During the blooming period of T.curviseriata,the population with high cell density was found in the water area with temperature of 10 ~ 15 ℃ and salinity of 29.0 ~ 33.5.The percentage of the predominant spe-cies,T.curviseriata,has reached 95.8% of total diatom cells at one time in the middle water layer.The morphological character-istics of T.curviseriata,were observed with light microscope (LM) and transmission electronic microscope (TEM).The cells are 5.0 ~ 12.6 μm in diameter,connecting each other by mucilaginous thread to form spiral and curved chains.Description and LM and TEM images of T.curviseriata are presented.T.curviseriata is ecologically characterized by eurythermy and euryhalinity,and its population variation is affected mainly by silicate,the ratios of phosphorus to silicon and nitrogen to sihcon.

  2. First record of the non-indigenous fangtooth moray Enchelycore anatina from Rhodes Island, south- eastern Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. KALOGIROU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The collection of one specimen of the non-indigenous fangtooth moray Enchelycore anatina of tropical Atlantic origin was for the first time found in an area of south eastern Aegean Sea. This record may indicate a recent establishment of the species on the coasts of Rhodes Island and a possible expansion of it on the coastal rocky habitats.

  3. Sea-salt aerosol transport patterns over the Northern Hemisphere inferred from two subarctic ice core records

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Yuping; KANG Shichang; SUN Junying; Paul A. Mayewski; QIN Dahe

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric circulation reconstruction based on glaciochemical records requires knowledge of chemical concentration controls, such as source, transport pathway and strength. To gain insight into these processes, the relationships between glaciochemical records from two Northern Hemisphere sites (Mt. Logan in Yukon Territory and 20D in southern Greenland) and instrumental sea level pressure (SLP) series are investigated. Calibrations between Mt. Logan sea-salt sodium (ssNa+) concentration and SLP series show that ssNa+ concentrations are closely correlated with the autumntime (SON) Aleutian Low and the summertime (JJA) North Pacific Subtropical High. Both the deepened Aleutian Low and enhanced North Pacific Subtropical High strengthen the transport of sea-salt aerosols from the North Pacific to the Mt. Logan region. Calibrations between 20D ssNa+ concentrations and SLP series indicate that ssNa+ concentrations are closely related to the wintertime (Jan.) Icelandic Low. A deepening of the Icelandic Low strengthens winter storms and frequent cyclogenesis over the North Atlantic and pushes more sea-salt laden air masses to the Greenland ice sheet. Therefore, ice core ssNa+ records from the Mt. Logan region can be considered as a proxy for reconstructing the autumntime Aleutian Low and summertime North Pacific Subtropical High, and the ssNa+ records from Greenland ice core (20D) may provide a proxy for reconstructing the wintertime Icelandic Low.

  4. On the record of Red seabream Pagrus major (Temminck and Schlegel,1843 (Osteichthyes: Sparidae in the Adriatic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakov Dulcic

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available One specimen of red seabream Pagrus major, 44.9 cm total length, was caught in the eastern middle Adriatic (Island Molat, Cape Bonaster by long-line hook at a depth of about 20 m on a hard rocky bottom on 25 September 2004. It is the first record of this species in the Adriatic Sea and Mediterranean area.

  5. Interaction between trench retreat and Anatolian escape as recorded by neogene basins in the northern Aegean Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beniest, A.; Brun, J. P.; Gorini, C.; Crombez, V.; Deschamps, R.; Hamon, Y.; Smit, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of the North Aegean Sea is studied through the development of three deep basins: the North Aegean Trough, the North Skyros Basin and the Ikaria Basin. Bathymetric data, a 2D seismic dataset and the well-investigated stratigraphic records of the onshore deep basins of northern Greece

  6. Late Holocene intermediate water variability in the northeastern Atlantic as recorded by deep-sea corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copard, K.; Colin, C.; Henderson, G. M.; Scholten, J.; Douville, E.; Sicre, M.-A.; Frank, N.

    2012-01-01

    The Nd isotopic composition of the aragonite skeleton of fossil deep-sea corals ( Lophelia pertusa, Madrepora oculata and Desmophyllum dianthus) located in the northeastern Atlantic at water depths between 635 and 1300 m was investigated to reconstruct changes in the Atlantic mid-depth gyre circulation during the past millennium. The coral ɛNd values varied systematically from - 11.8 to - 14.4 during the past 1500 years, reflecting variations in seawater ɛNd and thus water mass provenance. Low ɛNd values (ɛNd = - 14) occurred during the warm Medieval Climatic Anomaly (MCA) (between 1000 AD and 1250 AD) and during the most recent period (1950 AD to 2000 AD), interrupted by a period of significantly higher ɛNd values (~-12.5) during the Little Ice Age (LIA) (between 1350 AD and 1850 AD). One long-lived branching coral even recorded an abrupt systematic rise from low to high ɛNd values around 1250 AD over the course of its 10-year growth period. These variations are interpreted to result from variable contributions of the subpolar and subtropical Atlantic intermediate water masses, which today are characterized by ɛNd values of - 15 and ~-11, respectively. The low ɛNd values observed during the warm MCA and during recent times imply a strong eastward extension of the mid-depth subpolar gyre (SPG) induced by a dominant positive phase of the North Atlantic oscillation (NAO). During the LIA, water from the subtropical gyre (STG) and potentially from the Mediterranean Sea Water (MSW) propagated further northward, as indicated by the higher coral ɛNd values. This pattern suggests a negative mean state of the NAO during the LIA, with weaker and more southerly located Westerlies and a westward contraction of the SPG. Variations in the contributions of the two gyres imply changes in the heat and salt budgets at intermediate depths during the past millennia that may have contributed to changes in the properties of North Atlantic inflow into the Nordic Seas and thus

  7. Detrital dating on drill-core records from McMurdo Sound, Ross Sea (Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zattin, M.; Andreucci, B.; Balestrieri, M.; Olivetti, V.; Pace, D.; Reiners, P. W.; Rossetti, F.; Talarico, F.; Thomson, S. N.

    2012-12-01

    The influence of Antarctic ice sheets on the global climate system during the Cenozoic has been intensely investigated in the last years, especially after the successful drilling projects off-shore the western Ross Sea. While the role of the Western Ice Sheet (WAIS) during the Miocene it is not clear, the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) has been suggested to be more or less stable and cold for the last 14 Ma. Records from drilling projects in syn-tectonic basins located on the continental shelf along the western margin of the West Antarctica Rift System (DSDP, CIROS, CRP and ANDRILL projects) may provide crucial information on the tectonic and paleo-climatic evolution of that region during Cenozoic. The drilled sedimentary records have been therefore investigated by detrital geochronology which, integrated by sandstone and gravel petrography, can provide valuable information on the dynamics of the ice sheets as provenance data are sensitive to variations in the ice-flow patterns. Apatite fission-track (AFT) data from ANDRILL and CRP records show multiple peaks in most of the samples. In the AND-2A well, whose stratigraphic record spans the last 20 Ma, the grain-age distributions are dominated by grains between 20 and 40 Ma. A young peak with a comparable age has been also episodically detected in CRP wells where conversely the most relevant population is made by grain ages between 45 and 70 Ma. Samples from Late Miocene-Pleistocene sediments of AND-1B well show a completely different AFT age distribution as a single peak is usually detected and ages are younger than 20 Ma. The AFT age range is well represented in bedrock data along the entire Transantarctic Mountains (TAM). The main denudation phase in the TAM began at 55-50 Ma but the occurrence of a young peak in the detrital data at ca. 35 Ma indicates the presence of an Oligocene pulse, as testified also by the small gap between AFT and some (U-Th-Sm)/He ages that have been detected on AND-2A samples. Such

  8. Spatial distribution and reconstruction potential of Japanese anchovy (Engraulis japonicus) based on scale deposition records in recent anaerobic sediment of the Yellow Sea and East China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jiansheng; SUN Yao; JIA Haibo; YANG Qian; TANG Qisheng

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have revealed that anchovy has exhibited large variability in population size on decadal tim-escales. However, such works concerning anchovy population are mainly based on short historical catch records. In order to understand the causes of variability in fish stocks (natural and/or anthropogenic) and calibrate the error between catches and standing stocks, it is essential to develop long-term time series of fish stocks from the time when human impacts are minimal or negligible. Well preserved fish scales from sediment record are regarded as useful indicators revealing the history of fish population dynamics over the last centuries. Anchovy scales was first analyzed over the Yellow Sea and East China Sea and the largest abundance was found in the central South Yellow Sea where is regarded as the largest overwintering ground for Japanese anchovy (Engraulis japonicas). Thus in the central South Yellow Sea, two cores covering the last 150 years were collected for estimating fish scale flux. The scale deposition rate (SDR) records show that the decadal scale SDRs were obviously coherent between cores with independent chronologies. Thecalibration of downcore SDRs to the standing stocks of anchovy further validated that SDR is a reliable proxy to recon-struct the long-term anchovy population dynamic in the central South Yellow Sea where anoxic conditions prevail in the sediment. When assembled with other productivity proxies, it would be expected that SDR could be associated with changes in oceanic productivity and may make a contribution to determine the forcing factors and elucidate the mechanism of the process in future.

  9. Tardigrada of the Caribbean island of Dominica (West Indies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana G. Hinton

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In June 2009 we surveyed the terrestrial Tardigrada of Dominica, the most northerly of the Windward islands of the Lesser Antilles in the Caribbean sea. Out of 112 moss, lichen, liverwort and leaf litter samples, 35 had tardigrades, representing 10 genera and 25 species or species groups. This survey increases the number of species reported from Dominica from 3 to 25, more than the total recorded from any other West Indian island. Twelve species found in Dominica are cosmopolitan or belong to cosmopolitan species groups. Eight species are new to the fauna of the West Indies, one is new to the fauna of the Americas, and at least one is endemic to Dominica.

  10. Foraminifera isotopic records... with special attention to high northern latitudes and the impact of sea-ice distillation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillaire-Marcel, Claude, E-mail: hillaire-marcel.claude@uqam.ca [GEOTOP, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, PO Box 8888, succursale ' centre ville' Montreal, Qc, H3C 3P8 (Canada)

    2011-05-15

    Since the reassessment of oxygen isotope paleotemperatures by N. Shackleton in the late 60s, most papers using isotopic records from planktic or benthic foraminifers imply a direct relationship between oxygen isotopes in seawater and the ice/ocean volume, thus some linkage with salinity, sea level, etc. Such assumptions are also made when incorporating 'isotopic modules' in coupled models. Here, we will further examine the linkages between salinity and oxygen isotope ratios of sea-water recorded by foraminifers, and their potential temporal and spatial variability, especially in the northern North Atlantic and the Arctic oceans. If temporal and spatial changes in the isotopic composition of precipitations and ice meltwaters tune the isotopic properties of the fresh water end-member that dilutes the ocean, rates of sea-ice formation and evaporation at the ocean surface play a further role on the salt and oxygen isotope contents of water masses. Thus, the oxygen 18-salinity relationship carries a specific isotopic signature for any given water mass. At the ocean scale, residence time and mixing of these water masses, as well as the time dependent-achievement of proxy-tracer equilibrium, will also result in variable recordings of mass transfers into the hydrosphere, notable between ice-sheets and ocean. Since these records in water mass may vary in both amplitude and time, direct correlations of isotopic records will potentially be misleading. Implications of such issues on the interpretation of oxygen isotope records from the sub-arctic seas will be discussed, as well as the inherent flaws of such records due to sedimentological and or ecological parameters.

  11. [Echinoderms (Echinodermata) of the Mexican Caribbean].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguarda-Figueras, Alfredo; Solis-Marín, Francisco A; Durán-González, Alicia; Ahearn, Cynthia Gust; Buitrón Sánchez, Blanca Estela; Torres-Vega, Juan

    2005-12-01

    A systematic list of the echinoderms of the Mexican Caribbean based on museum specimens of the Colección Nacional de Equinodermos, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. is presented. This list reveals an important echinoderm biodiversity in the Mexican Caribbean, where five of the six echinoderm classes are represented. A total of 178 echinoderm species is recorded, distributed in 113 genera, 51 families and 22 orders. 30 new records for the Mexican Caribbean are presents: Crínoidea (three), Asteroidea (two), Ophiuroidea (eleven), Echinoidea (one), Holothuroidea (thirteen).

  12. Improved sea level record over the satellite altimetry era (1993–2010 from the Climate Change Initiative Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ablain

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Sea level is one of the 50 Essential Climate Variables (ECVs listed by the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS in climate change monitoring. In the last two decades, sea level has been routinely measured from space using satellite altimetry techniques. In order to address a number of important scientific questions such as: "Is sea level rise accelerating?", "Can we close the sea level budget?", "What are the causes of the regional and interannual variability?", "Can we already detect the anthropogenic forcing signature and separate it from the internal/natural climate variability?", and "What are the coastal impacts of sea level rise?", the accuracy of altimetry-based sea level records at global and regional scales needs to be significantly improved. For example, the global mean and regional sea level trend uncertainty should become better than 0.3 and 0.5 mm year−1, respectively (currently of 0.6 and 1–2 mm year−1. Similarly, interannual global mean sea level variations (currently uncertain to 2–3 mm need to be monitored with better accuracy. In this paper, we present various respective data improvements achieved within the European Space Agency (ESA Climate Change Initiative (ESA CCI project on "Sea Level" during its first phase (2010–2013, using multi-mission satellite altimetry data over the 1993–2010 time span. In a first step, using a new processing system with dedicated algorithms and adapted data processing strategies, an improved set of sea level products has been produced. The main improvements include: reduction of orbit errors and wet/dry atmospheric correction errors, reduction of instrumental drifts and bias, inter-calibration biases, intercalibration between missions and combination of the different sea level data sets, and an improvement of the reference mean sea surface. We also present preliminary independent validations of the SL_cci products, based on tide gauges comparison and sea level budget closure approach

  13. Field-Analytical approach of land-sea records for elucidating the Younger Dryas Boundary syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, T.; Courty, M. M.; Guichard, F.

    2009-12-01

    Linking lonsdaleite crystals, carbon spherules and diamond polymorphs from the North American dark layers at 12.9 cal yr B.P. to a cosmic event has questioned the nature and timing of the related impact processes. A global signal should trace the invoked airshocks and/or surface impacts from a swarm of comets or carbonaceous chondrites. Here we report on the contextual analytical study of debris fall events from three reference sequences of the Younger Dyras period (11-13 ka cal BP) : (1) sand dune fields along the French Atlantic coast at the Audenge site; (2) A 10 m record of detrital/bioorganic accumulation in the southern basin of the Caspian Sea with regular sedimentation rate (0.1 to 3 mm per year) from 14 to 2-ka BP cal; (3) the Paijan sequence (Peruvian coastal desert) offering fossiliferous fluvial layers with the last large mammals and aquatic fauna at 13 ka BP sealed by abiotic sand dunes. The three sequences display one remarkable layer of exogenous air-transported microdebris that is part of a complex time series of recurrent fine dust/wildfire events. The sharp debris-rich microfacies and its association to ashes derived from calcination of the local vegetation suggest instantaneous deposition synchronous to a high intensity wildfire. The debris assemblage comprises microtektite-like glassy spherules, partly devitrified glass shards, unmelted to partly melted sedimentary and igneous clasts, terrestrial native metals, and carbonaceous components. The later occur as grape-clustered polymers, vitrified graphitic carbon, amorphous carbon spherules with a honeycomb pattern, and green carbon fibres with recrystallized quartz and metal blebs. Evidence for high temperature formation from a heterogeneous melt with solid debris and volatile components derived from carbonaceous precursors supports an impact origin from an ejecta plume. The association of debris deposition to total firing would trace a high energy airburst with surface effects of the fireball. In

  14. Influence of sea ice on ocean water vapor isotopes and Greenland ice core records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Eric S.; Welker, Jeffrey M.

    2016-12-01

    A warming climate results in sea ice loss and impacts to the Arctic water cycle. The water isotope parameter deuterium excess, a moisture source proxy, can serve as a tracer to help understand hydrological changes due to sea ice loss. However, unlocking the sea ice change signal of isotopes from ice cores requires understanding how sea ice changes impact deuterium excess, which is unknown. Here we present the first isotope data linking a gradient of sea ice extents to oceanic water vapor deuterium excess values. Initial loss of sea ice extent leads to lower deuterium excess moisture sources, and then values progressively increase with further ice loss. Our new process-based interpretation suggests that past rapid (1-3 years) Greenland ice core changes in deuterium excess during warming might not be the result of abrupt atmospheric circulation shifts, but rather gradual loss of sea ice extent at northern latitude moisture sources.

  15. Messinian Salinity Crisis - DREAM (Deep-sea Record of Mediterranean Messinian events) drilling projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofi, Johanna; Camerlenghi, Angelo

    2014-05-01

    About 6 My ago the Mediterranean Sea was transformed into a giant saline basin. This event, commonly referred to as the Messinian salinity crisis (MSC), changed the chemistry of the global ocean and had a permanent impact on both the terrestrial and marine ecosystems of a huge area surrounding the Mediterranean area. The first fascinating MSC scenario was proposed following DSDP Leg XIII in 1970 and envisaged an almost desiccated deep Mediterranean basin with a dramatic ~1,500 m drop of sea level, the incision of deep canyons by rivers on the continental margins, and a final catastrophic flooding event when the connections between the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic were re-established ~5.33 My ago. In spite of 40 years of multi-disciplinary research conducted on the MSC, modalities, timing, causes, chronology and consequence at local and planetary scale are still not yet fully understood, and the MSC event remains one of the longest-living controversies in Earth Science. Key factor for the controversy is the lack of a complete record of the MSC preserved in the deepest Mediterranean basins. Anywhere else, the MSC mostly generated a sedimentary/time lag corresponding to a widespread erosion surface. Correlations with the offshore depositional units are thus complex, preventing the construction of a coherent scenario linking the outcropping MSC evaporites, the erosion on the margins, and the deposition of clastics and evaporites in the abyssal plains. Recent activity by various research groups in order to identify locations for multiple-site drilling (including riser-drilling) in the Mediterranean Sea that would contribute to solve the open questions still existing about the MSC has culminated in two DREAM Magellan+ Workshops held in 2013 and 2014. A strategy and work plan have been established in order to submit an IODP Multi-phase Drilling Project("Uncovering A Salt Giant")including several site-specific drilling proposals addressing different scientific

  16. Paleoenvironments Recorded in a New-Type Ferromanganese Crust from the East Philippine Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    We attempt to recover the paleoenvironments recorded in the accretion of a typical newtype hydrogenetic ferromanganese crust from the deep water areas of the East Philippine Sea. From detailed geochemical and U-series chronological studies, analysis of major and minor dements performed by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICPMS), three major accretion periods and corresponding paleoenvironments can be ascertained. The first period is a faster accretion period in the terminal Late Miocene to the Early Pliocene with looser structure and higher volcanic detritus content, corresponding to the active Antarctic bottom waters and depressed temperature from the intermediate Middle Miocene to the Early Pliocene. The second period is a pulse of pelagic clay deposition at the Early to Middle Pliocene, reflecting the shrinkage of the Antarctic bottom waters and the global temperature elevation of this period. The third period is a slower accretion period from the Middle Pliocene, which indicates the more violent activity of Antarctic bottom waters once again and more depressed temperature than the first period, facilitating the accretion of a more compact and pure ferromanganese zone. The paleoceanographic histories of these studied areas had not been made clear in previous research.

  17. On the Milankovitch sensitivity of the Quaternary deep-sea record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. H. Berger

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The response of the climate system to external forcing (that is, global warming has become an item of prime interest, especially with respect to the rate of melting of land-based ice masses. The deep-sea record of ice-age climate change has been useful in assessing the sensitivity of the climate system to a different type of forcing; that is, to orbital forcing, which is well known for the last several million years. The expectation is that the response to one type of forcing will yield information about the likely response to other types of forcing. When comparing response and orbital forcing, one finds that sensitivity to this type of forcing varies greatly through time, evidently in dependence on the state of the system and the associated readiness of the system for change. The changing stability of ice masses is here presumed to be the chief underlying cause for the changing state of the system. A buildup of vulnerable ice masses within the latest Tertiary, when going into the ice ages, is thus here conjectured to cause a stepwise increase of climate variability since the early Pliocene.

  18. First record of Kemp’s ridley sea turtle, Lepidochelys kempii (Garman, 1880 (Cheloniidae, from the Italian waters (Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni Insacco

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work the authors describe the first case of Lepidochelys kempii stranding (Garman, 1880 happened in Italian waters (Sicily, Messina and considered to be the fifth in the entire Mediterranean Sea. A young individual was recovered with a longline hook in its oesophageal.

  19. The record of major quaternary sea-level changes in a large coastal plain estuary, Chesapeake Bay, Eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Steven M.; Mixon, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    Seismic-reflection surveys of the Chesapeake Bay, combined with geologic mapping and analysis of boreholes on the Delmarva Peninsula, provide evidence of at least three generations of the Susquehanna River system and three generations of the Chesapeake Bay. The evidence for ancient courses of the Susquehanna River is preserved as three distinct paleochannels, and evidence for ancient versions of the Chesapeake Bay is preserved as three sets of paleochannel fill beneath the bay and three generations of barrier-spit deposits on the southern Delmarva Peninsula. The paleochannels represent relative sea-level minima and the channel-fill and barrier-spit deposits represents relative sea-level maxima. A history of three major marine transgressions is recorded in the stratigraphy preserved in the filled paleochannels and in the overlying barrier-spit complexes: three systematic progressions from fluvial to estuarine to bay or nearshore marine environments. This sea-level record seems to be compatible with the saw-toothed pattern of the marine oxygen-isotope record and with the concept of glacial-interglacial terminations. It also seems to have a climax character in which most of the preserved evidence is related to the largest terminations and to the extreme sea-level positions that bound those terminations. The three paleochannel-fill and barrier-spit complexes appear to correspond to oxygen-isotope stages 1,5, and either 7 or 11; the three related paleochannels correspond to stages 2, 6, and either 8 or 12. ?? 1988.

  20. Multi-centennial Record of Labrador Sea Primary Productivity and Sea-Ice Variability Archived in Coralline Algal Ba/Ca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Phoebe; Halfar, Jochen; Adey, Walter; Hetzinger, Steffen; Zack, Thomas; Moore, Kent; Wortmann, Ulrich; Williams, Branwen; Hou, Alicia

    2017-04-01

    Arctic sea-ice thickness and concentration have dropped by approximately 9% per decade since 1978. Concurrent with this sea-ice decline is an increase in rates of phytoplankton productivity, driven by shoaling of the mixed layer and enhanced transmittance of solar radiation into the surface ocean. This has recently been confirmed by phytoplankton studies in Arctic and Subarctic basins that have revealed earlier timing, prolonged duration, and increased primary productivity of the spring phytoplankton bloom. However, difficulties of navigating in remote ice-laden waters and harsh polar climates have often resulted in short and incomplete records of in-situ plankton abundance in the northwestern Labrador Sea. Alternatively, information of past ocean productivity may be gained through the study of trace nutrient distributions in the surface water column. Investigations of dissolved barium (Ba) concentrations in the Arctic reveal significant depletions of Ba in surface seawaters due to biological scavenging during the spring phytoplankton bloom. Here we apply a barium-to-calcium (Ba/Ca) and carbon isotope (δ13C) multiproxy approach to long-lived crustose coralline algae in order to reconstruct an annually-resolved multi-centennial record of Labrador Sea productivity related to sea-ice variability in Labrador, Canada that extends well into the Little Ice Age (LIA; 1646 AD). The crustose coralline alga Clathromorphum compactum is a shallow marine calcareous plant that is abundant along the eastern Canadian coastline, and produces annual growth increments which allow for the precise calendar dating and geochemical sampling of hard tissue. Algal Ba/Ca ratios can serve as a promising new proxy for surface water productivity, demonstrating a close correspondence to δ13C that does not suffer from the anthropogenically-induced carbon isotope decline (ex. Suess Effect) beginning in the 1960s. Coralline algal Ba/Ca demonstrates statistically significant correlations to both

  1. Caribbean landscapes and their biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. E. Lugo; E. H. Helmer; E. Santiago Valentín

    2012-01-01

    Both the biodiversity and the landscapes of the Caribbean have been greatly modified as a consequence of human activity. In this essay we provide an overview of the natural landscapes and biodiversity of the Caribbean and discuss how human activity has affected both. Our Caribbean geographic focus is on the insular Caribbean and the biodiversity focus is on the flora,...

  2. Nuevos registros de macroalgas para el Atlántico mexicano y riqueza florística del Caribe mexicano New records of macroalgae for the Mexican Atlantic and floristic richness of the Mexican Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neidy Pauline Cetz-Navarro

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Se revisaron muestras de macroalgas de un hábitat pocas veces analizado (colindante a la parte basal del tejido vivo de los corales Acropora palmata y Diploria strigosa y de una zona de México poco conocida florísticamente (parte Sur del Caribe mexicano, con base a lo cual se reporta a Corallophila verongiae (Rhodophyta, Derbesia fastigiata (Chlorophyta y Hincksia onslowensis (Phaeophyta como nuevos registros de macroalgas para la costa del Atlántico mexicano. Además, se reporta a Lophosiphonia obscura (Rhodophyta como nuevo registro para la parte costera continental del Atlántico mexicano, ya que sólo se había registrado hace más de 40 años para Arrecife Alacranes, sitio alejado aproximadamente 180 km al norte de Puerto Progreso, Yucatán. Aunque las especies de macroalgas no presentaron estructuras reproductoras, probablemente por tener crecimiento clonal y estar invadiendo tejido coralino, los caracteres morfológicos permitieron su identificación con certeza. Con excepción de la primera especie, las otras no se habían registrado creciendo sobre corales. Tomando en cuenta estos nuevos registros, el total de especies de macroalgas registradas hasta este estudio para el Caribe mexicano es de 546, incluyendo 307 Rhodophyta, 171 Chlorophyta y 68 Phaeophyta. Esta zona tropical y la costa templada de Baja California conforman las dos zonas florísticas marinas más ricas de México.Macroalgae samples from a habitat uncommonly analyzed (next to the basal part of live tissue of the corals Acropora palmata and Diploria strigosa, and from a Mexican zone barely known floristically (the southern part of the Mexican Caribbean were studied. Based on those samples, Corallophila verongiae (Rhodophyta, Derbesia fastigiata (Chlorophyta, and Hincksia onslowensis (Phaeophyta are recognized as new records for the Mexican Atlantic coast. Similarly, Lophosiphonia obscura (Rhodophyta is recognized as a new record for the continental coast of the Mexican

  3. On contributing factors to the winter record low of the northern hemisphere sea ice extent in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuckar, Neven-Stjepan; Massonnet, Francois; Guemas, Virginie; Garcia-Serrano, Javier; Bellprat, Omar; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco; Acosta, Mario

    2017-04-01

    The northern hemisphere (NH) sea ice extent (SIE) has reached the record low in the satellite era (since November 1978) in March 2015. Would the 2014/15 fall-winter atmosphere yield this sea ice extreme if we reversed in time the long-term change in the ocean and sea ice state? We examine the contributions of the atmosphere and the long-term memory of the ocean and sea ice to the March 2015 record low of the NH SIE with a state-of-the-art ocean-sea-ice general circulation model (OGCM: NEMOv3.3). First, we perform a set of 5-month-long retrospective control simulations initialized on 1 November from 1979 to 2014 to assess the model skill in predicting the NH March SIE. We produce ERA-Interim-forced five ensemble members initialized from the five members of the ORAS4 ocean reanalysis and the associated five-member sea ice reconstruction. A climate variable can be decomposed into the sum of the background state represented as a linear fit over the period of interest and an interannual anomaly with respect to this fit: var(t) = [at + b] + var'(t). More specifically, initial conditions (IC) and surface forcing fields contain: (i) linear-fit background state of IC, (ii) interannual anomaly in IC with respect to factor (i), (iii) linear-fit background state of surface forcing fields, and (iv) interannual anomaly in surface forcing fields with respect to factor (iii). Next, we conduct two sets of sensitivity experiments with IC and surface forcing fields modified in such manner so that one set examine the influence of 2014/15 fall-winter atmospheric conditions, while the other focuses on the influence of change in linear-fit background state of the ocean and sea ice cover. Our forced experiments indicate that the most important factor driving the NH SIE to the record low in March 2015 was surface atmospheric conditions on average contributing at least 54% to the change from the past March states to 2015. The 1 November 2014 interannual anomaly of IC, which on average

  4. Long-term record of Barents Sea Ice Sheet advance to the shelf edge from a 140,000 year record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Ed L.; Talling, Peter J.; Hunt, James E.; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Allin, Joshua R.; Cartigny, Matthieu J. B.; Long, David; Mozzato, Alessandro; Stanford, Jennifer D.; Tappin, David R.; Watts, Millie

    2016-10-01

    The full-glacial extent and deglacial behaviour of marine-based ice sheets, such as the Barents Sea Ice Sheet, is well documented since the Last Glacial Maximum about 20,000 years ago. However, reworking of older sea-floor sediments and landforms during repeated Quaternary advances across the shelf typically obscures their longer-term behaviour, which hampers our understanding. Here, we provide the first detailed long-term record of Barents Sea Ice Sheet advances, using the timing of debris-flows on the Bear Island Trough-Mouth Fan. Ice advanced to the shelf edge during four distinct periods over the last 140,000 years. By far the largest sediment volumes were delivered during the oldest advance more than 128,000 years ago. Later advances occurred from 68,000 to 60,000, 39,400 to 36,000 and 26,000 to 20,900 years before present. The debris-flows indicate that the dynamics of the Saalian and the Weichselian Barents Sea Ice Sheet were very different. The repeated ice advance and retreat cycles during the Weichselian were shorter lived than those seen in the Saalian. Sediment composition shows the configuration of the ice sheet was also different between the two glacial periods, implying that the ice feeding the Bear Island Ice stream came predominantly from Scandinavia during the Saalian, whilst it drained more ice from east of Svalbard during the Weichselian.

  5. Oceanic terranes of S-Central America - 200 Million years of accretion history recorded on the W-edge of the Caribbean Plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, P. O.; Flores, K.; Bandini, A.; Buchs, D.; Andjic, G.; Baumgartner-Mora, C.

    2012-04-01

    The W-edge of the Caribbean Plate is characterized by two major basement domains, separated today by a SW-NE trending diffuse fault zone located SE of the Nicoya Peninsula (Costa Rica) and possibly connecting with the Hess Escarpment. To the NW, in the area originally called "Chortis Block", oceanic island/arc basements range in age from Late Triassic to Early Cretaceous and form a complicated puzzle of geodynamic units. To the SE of this fault line, no age older than Turonian-Santonian (90-85 Ma) is known. This area only represents the trailing edge of the Caribbean Large Igensous Procince (CLIP). The Mesquito Composite Oceanic Terrane (MCOT) comprises the southern half of the "Chortis Block", classically considered as a continental fragment of N-America. The MCOT is defined by isolated outcrops of ultramafic, mafic oceanic/arc rocks, and radiolarites of Late Triassic, Jurassic and Early Cretaceous age: Rhaetian (latest Triassic) radiolarites found in the El Castillo Mélange (S-MCOT: S-Nicaragua/N- Costa Rica). They are associated with blocks of OIB-metabasalts. These rocks document the presence of a Late Triassic oceanic basement that must have been the substrate of the 174 -177 Ma old (Early/Middle Jurassic) Petit-Spot-like alkaline volcanics that intruded Early Jurassic radiolarites. These rocks form tectonic slivers in the middle Cretaceous Santa Rosa Accretionary Complex (relative autochthonous of the Santa Elena ultramafic unit, N-Costa Rica). The oldest rocks of the Nicoya Complex s. str. (NW-Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica) are Bajocian (Middle Jurassic) radiolarites, that occur as blocks magmatically engulfed in plateau-type basalts and intrusives that range in age thoughout the pre-Campanian Cretaceous (130-83 Ma). Middle and Late Jurassic metaradiolarites occur as blocks in the Siuna Serpentinite Médange (NE-Nicaragua), along with High-p, arc-related mafics. We envision an oceanic arc that collided in the latest Jurassic with the Agua Fria arc system

  6. A new distributional record for the sea cucumber Holothuria (Semperothuria) cinerascens (Brandt) from Goa coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shirwaikar, P.; Parulekar, A.H.

    Occurrence of sea cucumber, Holothuria (Semperothuria) cinerascens from intertidal region of Anjuna (Goa) along central west coast of India is reported. Notes on morphological characteristics are given...

  7. The Caribbean -- Implications for the US Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-16

    Greater Antilles while those smaller, north-south islands are called the Lesser Antilles. Of the Lesser Antilles, those from Anguilla to Guadeloupe are...Land that is not used for housing or agriculture would be called lush forestation-jungle to some. The Caribbean Sea is deep-the average depth runs...South America) and eventually agricultural opportuni- ties.3 The French, English, Portugese and Dutch saw the military and economic potential in

  8. A record of Miocene carbon excursions in the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Quanhong

    2001-01-01

    [1]Mackensen, A., Bickert, T., Stable isotopes in benthic Foraminifera: Proxies for deep and bottom water circulation and new production, in Use of Proxies in Paleoceanography: Examples From the South Atlantic (eds. Fischer, G., Wefer, G.),Berlin-Heiderberg: Springer-Verlag, 1999, 229-254.[2]Shackleton, N. J., Pisias, N. G., Atmospheric carbon dioxide, orbital forcing, and climate, Geophys. Monogr. Ser., 1985,32: 303-317.[3]Shackleton, N. J., Carbon-13 in Uvigerina: Tropical rainforest history and the Equatorial Pacific carbonate dissolution cy cles, in The Fate of Fossil Fuel CO2 in the Oceans (eds. Andersen, N. R., Malahoff, A.), New York: Plenum Publ. Corp.,1977, 401-427.[4]Wang Pinxian, Neogene stratigraphy and paleoenvironments of China, Palaeogeogr. Palaeoclim. Palaeoecol., 1990, 77:315-334.[5]Jian Zhimin, Stable isotopic evidences of the glacial deep water properties in the South China Sea, Science in China, Ser.D, 1998, 41(4): 337-344.[6]Hao Yichun, Xu Yulin, Xu Shice et al., Research on Micropaleontology and Paleoceanography in Pear River Mouth Basin,South China Sea (in Chinese), Beijing: China Univ. of Geosci. Press, 1996, 136.[7]Wang, P, Prell, W. L.. Blum, P. et al.. Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Initial Reports Volume 184 (CD-ROM),Beijing Nat. Sci. Found. & Joint Oceanogr. Inst., Inc., 2000.[8]Zhao Quanhong, Jian Zhimin, Wang Jiliang et al., Neogene oxygen isotopic stratigraphy, ODP Site 1148, northern South China Sea, Sciences in China, Ser. D (in press).[9]Vincent, E., Killingley, J. S., Oxygen and carbon isotope record for the Early and Middle Miocene in the central equatorial Pacific (Leg 85) and paleoceanographic implications, in Init. Rep. DSDP (ed. Mayer, L.), 1985, 85: 749-769.[10]Miller, K. G., Fairbanks, R. G., Oligocene to Miocene carbon isotope cycles and abyssal circulation changes, Geophys.Monogr., 1985, 32: 469-486.[11]Wright, J. D., Miller, N. G., Miocene stable isotope

  9. Recent Increases in Snow Accumulation and Decreases in Sea-Ice Concentration Recorded in a Coastal NW Greenland Ice Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterberg, E. C.; Thompson, J. T.; Wong, G. J.; Hawley, R. L.; Kelly, M. A.; Lutz, E.; Howley, J.; Ferris, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    A significant rise in summer temperatures over the past several decades has led to widespread retreat of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) margin and surrounding sea ice. Recent observations from geodetic stations and GRACE show that ice mass loss progressed from South Greenland up to Northwest Greenland by 2005 (Khan et al., 2010). Observations from meteorological stations at the U.S. Thule Air Force Base, remote sensing platforms, and climate reanalyses indicate a 3.5C mean annual warming in the Thule region and a 44% decrease in summer (JJAS) sea-ice concentrations in Baffin Bay from 1980-2010. Mean annual precipitation near Thule increased by 12% over this interval, with the majority of the increase occurring in fall (SON). To improve projections of future ice loss and sea-level rise in a warming climate, we are currently developing multi-proxy records (lake sediment cores, ice cores, glacial geologic data, glaciological models) of Holocene climate variability and cryospheric response in NW Greenland, with a focus on past warm periods. As part of our efforts to develop a millennial-length ice core paleoclimate record from the Thule region, we collected and analyzed snow pit samples and short firn cores (up to 20 m) from the coastal region of the GIS (2Barrel site; 76.9317 N, 63.1467 W) and the summit of North Ice Cap (76.938 N, 67.671 W) in 2011 and 2012, respectively. The 2Barrel ice core was sampled using a continuous ice core melting system at Dartmouth, and subsequently analyzed for major anion and trace element concentrations and stable water isotope ratios. Here we show that the 2Barrel ice core spanning 1990-2010 records a 25% increase in mean annual snow accumulation, and is positively correlated (r = 0.52, p<0.01) with ERA-Interim precipitation. The 2Barrel annual sea-salt Na concentration is strongly correlated (r = 0.5-0.8, p<0.05) with summer and fall sea-ice concentrations in northern Baffin Bay near Thule (Figure 1). We hypothesize that the positive

  10. Extracting Past Climate and Local Sea Level Change from the Geologic Record of Coastal Sediment Transport in The Bahamas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, B.; D'Andrea, W. J.; Sandstrom, R. M.; Rovere, A.; Lorscheid, T.; Casella, E.; Raymo, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    Detailed reconstructions of past interglacial Earth climate provide a baseline to differentiate natural variability from human caused change and can reveal feedbacks that may become fundamental in predicting future climate change. In the last interglacial period (marine isotope stage 5e; MIS 5e - 128 to 116 kyr BP), global mean sea level was up to 6-9 meters higher than today, and greenhouse gases were similar to pre-industrial levels. If these observations are valid, they suggest that current sea level may be primed for sudden and drastic change. However, the exact elevation of global sea level during MIS 5e, and the rates of change during that interglacial are complicated by incomplete chronologies in the geologic record and uncertainties in local isostatic or tectonic adjustment of these records since deposition. The Bahamian archipelago consists of several isolated, shallow carbonate platforms that are tectonically stable and may record a relatively straightforward history of past interglacial sea level. The rocky islands on the eastern margins of the platforms are composed of carbonate sediments arranged in coast-parallel and V-shaped coast-perpendicular ridges as high as 20-30 meters above modern sea level. There is a lack of scientific consensus as to whether these sediments were deposited by the ocean during an interval of higher sea level (MIS 5e or 11), or if the ridges are aeolian carbonate dunes. We scan hand samples from these deposits and develop image segmentation code to isolate individual grains. With this dataset, we quantify the relative arrangement of grain sizes and shapes to objectively identify evidence of aeolian depositional features such as the inverse grading of ripple sets. Additionally, the modern average wind direction in the Bahamas aligns with the observed orientation of V-shaped ridges across the archipelago within 10 degrees. Remarkably, there are very few active dunes in the Bahamas today, which raises an important discussion on

  11. West Antarctic Ice Sheet dynamics recorded in Plio-Pleistocene strata of the Ross Sea, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, A. S.; Bartek, L. R.; Luyendyk, B. P.; Wilson, D. S.

    2008-12-01

    Within the 100,000 square kilometer Eastern Basin of the Ross Sea, a 290 km section, oriented parallel to depostional dip along with 10 intersecting seismic sections that are oriented parallel to depositional strike were analyzed. Using Single-Channel Seismic (SCS) data from three different seismic surveys (NBP 0306, PD9022, and NBP 9308) 36 Plio-Pleistocene sequences were correlated across the basin from the modern ice shelf edge to the contemporary shelf break. Few of the sequences are continuous across the shelf, the majority of the sequences are of limited lateral extent. The facies within the sequences were analyzed to determine ice sheet behavior at the time of deposition. Three distinct depositional environments were interpreted based upon variations in the reflection attributes within the seismic data. Subglacial facies have a spectrum of reflection attributes from reflection-free to parallel, low-amplitude, discontinuous facies. The Grounding Line Zone facies are characterized by high amplitude, mildly discontinuous reflections. Proglacial environments are distinguished by parallel, high amplitude, continuous reflection packages. The facies distribution within many of the sequences consists of Subglacial facies in updip locales, Grounding Line Zone facies widely distributed across the shelf, and Proglacial facies present at downdip sites. The facies distribution within the sequences provides a record of the variation of the extent of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) throughout the Plio-Pleistocene. Not all sequences have a consecutive facies relationship, which may have resulted from several causes: 1) changes in the flow of the WAIS, 2) interplay between the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) with the WAIS, or 3) additional grounding of the WAIS on paleobasin highs. Understanding the short-lived glacial events, whether they are a function of non-deposition or cannibalization of previous deposits, provides insight into the dynamics of marine based ice

  12. Sub-seasonally resolved coral records of northern Red Sea - eastern Mediterranean climate during the Holocene and the last interglacial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felis, T.; Rimbu, N.; Al-Rousan, S.; Kuhnert, H.; Lohmann, G.; Kölling, M.; Pätzold, J.

    2012-04-01

    The northern Red Sea represents a unique location where ocean currents transport warm tropical waters northward, enabling coral reef growth at unusually high latitudes of up to 29 °N. Moreover, one of the world's northernmost complexes of uplifted Pleistocene reef terraces can be found here at Aqaba (Jordan). We present sub-seasonally resolved reconstructions of surface ocean conditions in the northern Red Sea derived from annually banded Porites corals. The Sr/Ca and δ18O variations in the aragonitic skeletons of our modern and fossil coral colonies provide proxy records of temperature, salinity and hydrologic balance at the sea surface during the last centuries and during time windows (40 to 100 years length) of the Holocene and the last interglacial period. Previous work has shown that seasonality and interannual to decadal climate variability in the northern Red Sea as documented in our coral records is strongly coupled to climate variations in the eastern Mediterranean, Middle East and Europe, reflecting the prominent role of atmospheric teleconnections of the Arctic Oscillation (AO)/North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) in controlling regional climate on these timescales. New coral Sr/Ca data, in combination with δ18O, reveal an abrupt regime shift toward fresher surface ocean conditions in northern Red Sea surface waters at the end of the Little Ice Age. Possible mechanisms include a re-organization of the Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation. Sr/Ca records from a large number of fossil corals indicate a trend of decreasing temperature seasonality over the last 6000 years toward present-day. Such a trend is expected in the higher latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere from insolation changes on orbital timescales. Coral δ18O and Sr/Ca records suggest an increased seasonality in the hydrologic balance during time intervals around 4400, 4600 and 6000 years ago, which could result from both enhanced winter evaporation or increased summer precipitation

  13. Microgastropod records in paleoceanographical environment of southern shelf of South China Sea since 14 ka

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯伟民

    2002-01-01

    Very diversified and abundant benthic microgastropods and planktonic microgastropods (pteropods) from core NS93-12-25 could provide a glance of change of the sea level in the south continental shelf of the South China Sea since last 14 ka. Research shows that general sea level changes of this sea area were rising and later rising after a short period of falling in this period. In the range from the bottom of the core to the core depth of 200 cm, individuals in big size are common in microgastropods and Turritella filiola is very rich, signifying the environment of the inner continental shelf in the last deglaciation stage. In the core depth range of 200—150 cm the continuously getting light of the ??18O, the regularly decreasing of the percentage content of T. filiola and the high diversification of microgastropods indicate the rising of the sea level. Especially at the core depth range of 175—150 cm the pteropods became dominant, making sure the fact that the high sea level possibly occurred in the early Holocene. Channels of surrounding straits connecting the adjacent sea thus were opened. But at the core depth of about 100 cm T. filiola became very rich again. This possibly implies that there was a short term of the sea level falling, resulting in the temporal closure of the channels. In the core depth range of 55—50 cm the Scaliola' s representatives relatively develop and this may be inferred to the cooling of climate.

  14. An Improved 20-Year Arctic Ocean Altimetric Sea Level Data Record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Yongcun; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per

    2015-01-01

    reprocessed ERS-1/2/Envisat satellite altimetry to develop an improved 20-year sea level dataset for the Arctic Ocean. We have developed both an along-track dataset and three-day gridded sea level anomaly (SLA) maps from September 1992 to April 2012. A major improvement in data coverage was gained...

  15. Anaerobic oxidation of methane alters sediment records of sulfur, iron and phosphorus in the Black Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egger, M.J.; Kraal, P.; Jilbert, T.S.; Sulu-Gambari, F.A.; Sapart, C.J.; Roeckmann, T.; Slomp, C.P.

    2016-01-01

    The surface sediments in the Black Sea are underlain by extensive deposits of iron (Fe)-oxide-rich lake sediments that were deposited prior to the inflow of marine Mediterranean Sea waters ca. 9000 years ago. The subsequent downward diffusion of marine sulfate into the methane-bearing lake sediments

  16. A stalactite record of four relative sea-level highstands during the Middle Pleistocene Transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stocchi, P.; Antonioli, F.; Montagna, P.; Pepe, F.; Lo Presti, V.; Caruso, A.; Corradino, M.; Dardanelli, G.; Renda, P.; Frank, N.; Douville, E.; Thil, F.; de Boer, B.; Ruggieri, R.; Sciortino, R.; Pierre, C.

    2017-01-01

    Ice-sheet and sea-level fluctuations during the Early and Middle Pleistocene are as yet poorly understood. A stalactite from a karst cave in North West Sicily (Italy) provides the first evidence of four marine inundations that correspond to relative sea-level highstands at the time of the Middle

  17. Relocation of the Yellow River estuary in 1855 AD recorded in the sediment core from the northern Yellow Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Jia, Nan; Cheng, Wenhan; Wang, Yuhong; Sun, Liguang

    2013-12-01

    Relocation of the Yellow River estuary has significant impacts on not only terrestrial environment and human activities, but also sedimentary and ecological environments in coastal seas. The responses of regional geochemical characteristics to the relocation event, however, have not been well studied. In the present study, we performed detailed geochemical elemental analyses of a sediment core from the northern Yellow Sea and studied their geochemical responses to the 1855 AD relocation of the Yellow River estuary. The results show that TOC/TN, Co/Al2O3, Cr/Al2O3, Ni/Al2O3 and Se/Al2O3 ratios all decreased abruptly after 1855 AD, and similar decreases are observed in the sediments of the mud area southwest off the Cheju Island. These abrupt changes are very likely caused by the changes in source materials due to the relocation of the Yellow River estuary from the southern Yellow Sea to the Bohai Sea, which the corresponding decreasing trends caused by the changes in main source materials from those transported by the Liaohe River, the Haihe River and the Luanhe River to those by the Yellow River. Because the events have precise ages recorded in historical archives, these obvious changes in elemental geochemistry of sediments can be used to calibrate age models of related coastal sea sediments.

  18. One new species and two new records of free-living marine nematodes from the Huanghai Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    One new species of free-living marine nematode of the genus Curvolaimus, Curvolaimus filiformis sp. nov. from the Huanghai Sea is described and illustrated. This new species is characterized by the buccal cavity teeth, large amphids and two ventral seta at the conical part of tail. Meanwhile, two new records of genus Halalaimus, Halalaimus longic audatus and H. isaits hikovi are first reported in China.Types are deposited in the College of Marine Life Sciences, Ocean University of China.

  19. First Record of the Grey Reef Shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos, (Bleeker, 1856 (Carcharhiniformes: Carcharhinidae from the Lakshadweep Sea, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.V.A. Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Grey Reef Shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos is a moderately sized and fairly stocky species widely distributed in the Indian and Pacific Oceans from Easter Island and as far west as South Africa. In this paper, the first record of Grey reef shark (single specimen female 126cm in Total Length (TL, caught from the Lakshadweep Sea (10o47 N and 72o09 E by drift long line operation at 40m depth is reported.

  20. Quaternary high-resolution opal record and its paleopro- ductivity implication at ODP Site 1143, southern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The correlation of opal content and MAR with oxygen isotopic records of benthonic foraminifera at Site 1143, southern South China Sea indicates that, since about 900 ka, the increasing opal content and MAR during the interglacial periods is inferred to reflect the higher surface productivity, for the intensified summer monsoon during the interglacial periods would result in the enhanced upwelling and nutrient supply. Time-sequence spectral analyses of oxygen isotopic record, opal content and MAR at intervals of 0-900 ka reveal that the changes of surface productivity were dominantly forced by the variations of the earth orbital cycles.

  1. Development and sea trials of a subsea holographic camera for large volume in-situ recording of marine organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, John; Alexander, Stephen J.; Craig, Gary; Hendry, David C.; Hobson, Peter R.; Lampitt, R. S.; Marteau, J.-M.; Nareid, Helge; Nebrensky, J. J.; Player, Michael A.; Saw, Kevin; Tipping, Keith

    2002-06-01

    We describe the development, construction and sea testing of An underwater holographic camera (HoloCam) for in situ recording of marine organisms and particles in large volumes of sea water. HoloCam comprises a laser, power supply, holographic recording optics, and plate holders, a water- tight housing and a support frame. Added to this are control electronics such that the entire camera is remotely operable and controllable from ship or dock-side. Uniquely the camera can simultaneously record both in-line and off-axis holograms using a pulsed frequency double Nd:YAG laser. In- line holography is capable of producing images of organisms with a resolution of better than 10 micrometers . Off-axis holograms of aquatic systems of up to 50,000 cm3 volume, have been recorded. Following initial laboratory testing, the holo-camera was evaluated in an observation tank and ultimately was tested in Loch Etive, Scotland. In-line and off-axis holograms were recorded to a depth of 100 m. We will present result on the ste dives and evaluation of the camera performance.

  2. A long-term and reproducible passive microwave sea ice concentration data record for climate studies and monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Peng

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A long-term, consistent, and reproducible satellite-based passive microwave sea ice concentration climate data record (CDR is available for climate studies, monitoring, and model validation with an initial operation capability (IOC. The daily and monthly sea ice concentration data are on the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC polar stereographic grid with nominal 25 × 25 km grid cells in both the Southern and Northern Hemisphere Polar Regions from 9 July 1987 to 31 December 2007 with an update through 2011 underway. The data files are available in the NetCDF data format at http://nsidc.org/data/g02202.html and archived by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC under the satellite climate data record program (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdr/operationalcdrs.html. The description and basic characteristics of the NOAA/NSIDC passive microwave sea ice concentration CDR are presented here. The CDR provides similar spatial and temporal variability as the heritage products to the user communities with the additional documentation, traceability, and reproducibility that meet current standards and guidelines for climate data records. The dataset along with detailed data processing steps and error source information can be found at: doi:10.7265/N5B56GN3.

  3. A Long-Term and Reproducible Passive Microwave Sea Ice Concentration Data Record for Climate Studies and Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, G.; Meier, W. N.; Scott, D. J.; Savoie, M. H.

    2013-01-01

    A long-term, consistent, and reproducible satellite-based passive microwave sea ice concentration climate data record (CDR) is available for climate studies, monitoring, and model validation with an initial operation capability (IOC). The daily and monthly sea ice concentration data are on the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) polar stereographic grid with nominal 25 km × 25 km grid cells in both the Southern and Northern Hemisphere polar regions from 9 July 1987 to 31 December 2007. The data files are available in the NetCDF data format at http://nsidc.org/data/g02202.html and archived by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) under the satellite climate data record program (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdr/operationalcdrs.html). The description and basic characteristics of the NOAA/NSIDC passive microwave sea ice concentration CDR are presented here. The CDR provides similar spatial and temporal variability as the heritage products to the user communities with the additional documentation, traceability, and reproducibility that meet current standards and guidelines for climate data records. The data set, along with detailed data processing steps and error source information, can be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.7265/N5B56GN3.

  4. Shipwreck rates reveal Caribbean tropical cyclone response to past radiative forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouet, Valerie; Harley, Grant L.; Domínguez-Delmás, Marta

    2016-03-01

    Assessing the impact of future climate change on North Atlantic tropical cyclone (TC) activity is of crucial societal importance, but the limited quantity and quality of observational records interferes with the skill of future TC projections. In particular, North Atlantic TC response to radiative forcing is poorly understood and creates the dominant source of uncertainty for twenty-first-century projections. Here, we study TC variability in the Caribbean during the Maunder Minimum (MM; 1645-1715 CE), a period defined by the most severe reduction in solar irradiance in documented history (1610-present). For this purpose, we combine a documentary time series of Spanish shipwrecks in the Caribbean (1495-1825 CE) with a tree-growth suppression chronology from the Florida Keys (1707-2009 CE). We find a 75% reduction in decadal-scale Caribbean TC activity during the MM, which suggests modulation of the influence of reduced solar irradiance by the cumulative effect of cool North Atlantic sea surface temperatures, El Niño-like conditions, and a negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation. Our results emphasize the need to enhance our understanding of the response of these oceanic and atmospheric circulation patterns to radiative forcing and climate change to improve the skill of future TC projections.

  5. Demersal fish assemblages on seamounts and other rugged features in the northeastern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrini, Andrea M.; Demopoulos, Amanda W. J.; Singer, Randal; Roa-Varon, Adela; Chaytor, Jason D.

    2017-01-01

    Recent investigations of demersal fish communities in deep (>50 m) rugged habitats have considerably increased our knowledge of the factors that influence the assemblage structure of fishes across mesophotic to deep-sea depths. Although habitat types influence deepwater fish distribution, whether different rugged seafloor features provide functionally equivalent habitat for fishes is poorly understood. In the northeastern Caribbean, numerous rugged seafloor features (e.g., seamounts, banks, canyons) punctuate insular margins, and thus create a remarkable setting in which to examine demersal fish communities across various seafloor features. Also in this region, several water masses are vertically layered in the water column, creating strong stratification layers corresponding to specific abiotic conditions. In this study, we examined differences among fish assemblages across seafloor features (e.g., seamount, canyon, bank/ridge) and water masses at depths ranging from 98 to 4060 m in the northeastern Caribbean. We conducted 26 ROV dives across 18 sites, yielding 156 species; 42% of which had not been previously recorded from particular depths or localities in the region. While fewer species were observed at seamounts than at other habitats in the NE Caribbean, assemblage structure was similar among habitat features. Thus, similar to seamount studies in other regions, seamounts in the Anegada Passage do not harbor distinct communities from other rugged, topographic features. Species assemblages, however, differed among depths, with zonation generally corresponding to water mass boundaries in the region. High species turnover occurred at depths fish biogeography.

  6. Coastal erosion hazard and vulnerability using sig tools. Comparison between "La Barra town, Buenaventura, (Pacific Ocean of Colombia) and Providence - Santa Catalina islands (Colombian Caribbean Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca-Domínguez, Oswaldo; Ricaurte-Villota, Constanza; Morales-Giraldo, David; Rangel-Buitrago, Nelson

    2014-05-01

    Analysis of hazards and vulnerability associated to coastal erosion along coastlines is a first issue in order to establish plans for adaptation to climate change in coastal areas. La Barra Town, Buenaventura (Pacific ocean of Colombia) and Providence - Santa Catalina Islands (Colombian Caribbean) were selected to develop a detailed analysis of coastal erosion hazard and vulnerability from different perspectives: i) physical (hazard) , ii) social , iii) conservation approach and iv) cultural heritage (Raizal). The analysis was made by a semi quantitative approximation method, applying variables associated with the intrinsic coastal zone properties (i.e. type of beach, exposure of the coast to waves, etc.). Coastal erosion data and associated variables as well land use; conservation and heritage data were used to carry out a further detailed analysis of the human - structural vulnerability and exposure to hazards. The data shows erosion rates close to -17 m yr-1 in La Barra Town (highlighting their critical condition and urgent relocation process), while in some sectors of Providence Island, such as Old Town, erosion rate was -5 m yr-1. The observed erosion process affects directly the land use and the local and regional economy. The differences between indexes and the structural and physical vulnerability as well the use of methodological variables are presented in the context of each region. In this work, all the information was worked using a GIS environment since this allows editing and updating the information continuously. The application of this methodology generates useful information in order to promote risk management as well prevention, mitigation and reduction plans. In both areas the adaptation must be a priority strategy to be considered, including relocation alternatives and sustainable protection with the support of studies of uses and future outlooks in the coast. The methodology is framed into the use of GIS tools and it highlights their benefits

  7. Spatial and temporal variability in the Holocene sea-level record of the South Australian coastline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belperio, A. P.; Harvey, N.; Bourman, R. P.

    2002-06-01

    Studies of past sea levels based on radiocarbon-dated field samples suffer variously from compilation of information from disparate locations and the imprecise nature of the dated indicators. Geographic segregation and systematic elimination of poor samples from time-depth data sets leads to improved interpretation of Holocene sea-level history. An example is presented from Southern Australia, where this is achieved through selection of higher-resolution palaeoenvironmental indicators, separation of transgressive from regressive populations, and geographic regionalisation of data. In Southern Australia, fossil sea-level indicators preserved in prograding coastal plain settings include seagrass, sandflat, mangrove, samphire and chenier ridge organo-sedimentary remains. These provide sea-level time-depth data points with a variety of elevational and dating errors. Preserved organic remains at the transition from Posidonia seagrass to intertidal sandflat environment, and from sandflat to Avicennia mangrove environment provide the most precise local data for tracing sea-level change. Time-depth plots of 233 dated sea-level indicators from South Australia generate a broad sea-level envelope tracing the Southern Australian transgression from 10,000 to ca. 6000 radiocarbon years BP, followed by a more or less consistent level to the present. Finer details of sea-level behaviour are only apparent after systematic selection, separation and regionalisation of the data. The data indicate a very rapid sea-level rise in the early Holocene, at about 16 mm/year, reaching present levels at 6400 years BP. This was followed by regionally variable regression and emergence of the land of 1-3 m, a process that continues to the present. The systematic increase from 1 to 3 m in the elevation of the 6400-year BP highstand with distance away from the shelf margin is consistent with a hydro-isostatic origin for the emergence as predicted by geophysical models.

  8. Caribbean Reef Response to Plio-Pleistocene Climate Change: Results of the Dominican Republic Drilling Project (DRDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, J.; McNeill, D. F.; Diaz, V.; Swart, P. K.; Pourmand, A.

    2014-12-01

    Caribbean reefs changed profoundly in taxonomic composition, diversity, and dominance structure during late Pliocene and Pleistocene climatic change. These changes coincide with protracted climatic deterioration and cooling between 2.0 to 0.8 Ma, and the onset of high amplitude sea-level fluctuations ~400 ka. The Dominican Republic Drilling Project (DRDP) was initiated to determine how climate change and global high-amplitude sea level changes influenced depositional patterns in Pliocene to Recent reef systems of the Caribbean. A transect of 7 core borings (~700 m total depth) were collected along the southern coast of the DR. New age constraints based on U/Th geochronometry and radiogenic Sr isotopes, combined with depositional lithofacies, faunal indicators, and stable isotope profiles have allowed us to correlate between wells and define the internal anatomy and stratal geometry of the individual reef sigmoids and sigmoid sets. Faunal records suggest most extinction occurred prior to ~1 Ma. Following this extinction, fringing reef margins of the Caribbean display a characteristic zonation in which Acropora palmata dominates shallow high-energy reef crests and Acropora cervicornis calmer fore-reef slopes and backreef lagoons. The dominance of acroporids across this zonation has been attributed to growth rates 5-100 times faster than other corals.

  9. Possible Recording of the Hilina Pali Excursion in Cored Tyrrhenian Sea Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Marina; Liddicoat, Joseph; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Incoronato, Alberto; de Anteriis, Giovanni; Insinga, Donatella; Angelino, Antimo

    2013-04-01

    First encountered in marine sediment cored from the Gulf of Mexico (19.5˚ N, 267.0˚ E)(Clark and Kennett, 1973), the Hilina Pali Excursion (HPE) is named for a locality in Hawaii (19.5˚ N, 205.0˚ E) where inclination of about negative 40˚ is documented in cored basalt (Teanby et al., 2002). Prior to naming the excursion, Coe et al. (1978) also found shallow inclination in basalt from Kilauea Volcano (19.2˚ N, 204.7˚ E) that is dated at about 18,000 yrs B.P. (uncorrected Carbon-14, Rubin and Berthold, 1961) - the age now assigned to the HPE - and was erupted when the field intensity was reduced to nearly half the present intensity. More recently, the HPE was located at Changbaishan Volcano in northeastern China (40.2˚ N, 128.0˚ E) where the age is established by Ar40/Ar39 dates (Singer et al., 2011). In exposed lake sediments in the Mono Basin, CA (38.0˚ N, 240.8˚ E), shallow positive inclination at about 18,000 yrs B.P. might also be the HPE. In the Mono Basin, normalized (NRM/ARM) intensity is reduced at that time (Zimmerman et al., 2006), and the Virtual Geomagnetic Poles (VGPs) during the reduced intensity form a clockwise trending loop when followed from old to young that descends to 53.8˚ N, 22.7˚ E (n = 6, Alpha-95 = 2.3˚) and is centered at about 50˚ N, 30˚ E (Coe and Liddicoat, 2012). There is a possible excursion of the palaeomagnetic field recorded in marine sediment at a locality in the Tyrrhenian Sea about 25 km south of Ischia (40.5˚ N, 13.7˚ E). The excursion is in sediment from two core segments that span about 22,000-18,000 yrs B.P. (de Alteriis et al., 2010) and occurs as reduced positive inclination (about 50˚) at about 20,000 yrs B.P. that increases to about 80˚ at about 18,000 yrs B.P. when declination changes from west to east. This pattern of field behaviour is similar to the behaviour of the possible HPE in the Mono Basin (Coe and Liddicoat, 2012) and in sediment cored from Lac du Bouchet, FR (44.9˚ N, 3.8˚ E) that is

  10. Caribbean development: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Sutton

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Reviews development in the Caribbean, especially since 1990 to the present, and highlights future development prospects. Author discusses 2 reports from 2005 on present developments problems in the Caribbean region: the economics-focussed 'A time to choose: Caribbean development in the 21st century' by the World Bank, and the UN ECLAC report 'The Millennium Development Goals: a Latin American and Caribbean perspective', with a broader, also social and political, development agenda. He relates what both reports recommend for the Caribbean on the basis of their evaluations of past development. The World Bank report advocates a move toward the services sector, including tourism, offshore education, ICT services, and health services as most viable. The ECLAC report notes some social and political advances in comparison to other developing countries, but also remaining problems and inequalities. The author finds that the World Bank report's neoliberal, one-size-fits-all approach is not mindful of specific Caribbean realities, while the ECLAC study is more sensitive to local realities, and espouses a mixed economy. He thus considers the ECLAC approach preferable, but argues that it needs to go further, as it excludes Cuba and Haiti as atypical states.

  11. Diagenetic alteration of iron and phosphorus records below the sulfate-methane-transition-zone in Black Sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Matthias; Kraal, Peter; Jilbert, Tom; Sulu-Gambari, Fatimah; Slomp, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    The sediments of the Black Sea are characterized by vast deposits of iron oxide-rich lake sediments below the current marine sediments. The lake sediments were deposited until ca. 9000 years ago when the former giant lake became connected to the Mediterranean Sea through post-glacial sea level rise. The subsequent downward diffusion of marine sulfate into the methane-bearing lake sediments has led to a multitude of diagenetic reactions in the sulfate-methane-transition zone (SMTZ), including anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate. While the cycles of sulfur, methane and iron in the SMTZ have been extensively studied (e.g. Jorgensen et al., 2004), relatively little is known about the diagenetic alterations of the sediment record occurring directly below the SMTZ. Here, we combine detailed geochemical analyses of the sediment and pore water with multicomponent diagenetic modeling to study the diagenetic alterations below the SMTZ at two sites in the Black Sea. We focus on the dynamics of iron and phosphorus and demonstrate that downward sulfidization leads to dissolution of Fe-oxide bound P, Fe-carbonate and vivianite in the lake sediments. Below the sulfidization front, downward diffusing phosphate is bound again in vivianite. Trends in total sediment P with depth are significantly altered highlighting that diagenesis may strongly overprint burial records of P below a lake-marine transition. We also demonstrate that cryptic sulfur cycling cannot explain the observed release of dissolved Fe below the SMTZ. Instead, we suggest that organoclastic Fe-oxide reduction and/or AOM coupled to the reduction of Fe-oxides are the key processes explaining the high concentrations of dissolved Fe at depth in the sediment. Reference Jørgensen, B. B., Böttcher, M. E., Lüschen, H., Neretin, L. N. and Volkov, I. I.: Anaerobic methane oxidation and a deep H2S sink generate isotopically heavy sulfides in Black Sea sediments, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 68(9), 2095-2118, 2004.

  12. A new 25 years Arctic Sea level record from ESA satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Cheng, Yongcun; Knudsen, Per

    the ESA GOCE mission we are now able to derive a mean dynamic topography of the Arctic Ocean with unprecedented accuracy to constrain the ocean circulation. We present both a new estimation of the mean ocean circulation and new estimates of large scale sea level changes based on satellite data and perform......The Arctic is an extremely challenging region for the use of remote sensing for ocean studies. One is the fact that despite 25 years of altimetry only very limited sea level observations exists in the interior of the Arctic Ocean. However, with Cryosat-2 SAR altimetry the situation is changing...... and through development of tailored retrackers dealing with presence of sea ice within the radar footprint, we can now develop sea surface height and its variation in most of the Arctic Ocean. We have processed 5 years of Cryosat-2 data quantified as either Lead or Ocean data within the Cryosat-2 SAR mask...

  13. A new 25 years Arctic Sea level record from ESA satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Cheng, Yongcun; Knudsen, Per

    the ESA GOCE mission we are now able to derive a mean dynamic topography of the Arctic Ocean with unprecedented accuracy to constrain the ocean circulation. We present both a new estimation of the mean ocean circulation and new estimates of large scale sea level changes based on satellite data and perform......The Arctic is an extremely challenging region for the use of remote sensing for ocean studies. One is the fact that despite 25 years of altimetry only very limited sea level observations exists in the interior of the Arctic Ocean. However, with Cryosat-2 SAR altimetry the situation is changing...... and through development of tailored retrackers dealing with presence of sea ice within the radar footprint, we can now develop sea surface height and its variation in most of the Arctic Ocean. We have processed 5 years of Cryosat-2 data quantified as either Lead or Ocean data within the Cryosat-2 SAR mask...

  14. A First Record of Obligate Halophilic Aspergilli from the Dead Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Nazareth, Sarita; Gonsalves, Valerie; Nayak, Shweta

    2011-01-01

    The isolation of obligate halophilic aspergilli from the Dead Sea and the range of salt tolerance of halophilic fungi isolated, are reported here for the first time. The mycobiota of the Dead Sea isolated in this study, was dominated by Aspergillus and Penicillium species; Cladosporium were found in lesser numbers. All three genera were obtained from the water sample; however, Aspergillus was the only genus obtained from the sediment. There was significant difference in growth of each isolate...

  15. Reconciling late Quaternary transgressions in the Bohai Sea, China to the global sea level changes, and new linkage of sedimentary records to three astronomical rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Liang

    2013-04-01

    noticeable feature of these coastal sediment variations is the little internal similarity between records compared with high similarity with external forcing indicating that the coastal sediments in the south Bohai Sea integrate different influences from various environmental factors: (1) the grain-size variation represents Asian monsoon intensity which was dominated by both solar insolation (major) and global ice volume (minor) forcing; (2) the magnetic susceptibility indicates river incision processes which were sensitive to orbital tilt with influence from solar insolation; (3) the vegetation coverage responded to global ice volume coupled obliquity changes; and that (4) neither external nor internal factors could dominate the paleoenvironmental evolution on orbital timescales in an independent way, and they are both integrated in a complex pattern. Therefore, combining all of these results, we report those great similarities between regional and global sea-level patterns and the nonlinear interaction and the complex response to driving processes in a coastal evolution. However, all of these studies only used the upper part of cores within marine strata, and the rest containing lacustrine sediment is still in process. Sediment grain size, magnetic susceptibility, color reflectance were finished, and the magnetostratigraphic, environmental magnetism and element analysis are ongoing. More results about high-/low-latitude interaction and relative sea level will be released in three years, and anyone who has interests in cooperation will be welcome (Email: yi.liang82@gmail.com). References Chappell, J., Omura, A., Esat, T., McCulloch, M., Pandolfi, J., Ota, Y., Pillans, B., 1996. Reconciliation of late Quaternary sea levels derived from coral terraces at Huon Peninsula with deep sea oxygen isotope records. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 141, 227-236. Cheng, H., Edwards, R.L., Broecker, W.S., Denton, G.H., Kong, X., Wang, Y., Zhang, R., Wang, X., 2009. Ice Age

  16. Anthropogenic-enhanced erosion following the Neolithic Revolution in the Southern Levant: Records from the Dead Sea deep drilling core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yin; Waldmann, Nicolas; Nadel, Dani; Marco, Shmuel

    2017-04-01

    In addition to tectonics and climatic changes, humans have exerted a significant impact on surface erosion over timescales ranging from years to centuries. However, such kind of impact over millennial timescales remains unsubstantiated. The Dead Sea drainage basin offers a rare combination of well-documented substantial climate change, intense tectonics and abundant archaeological evidence for past human activity in the Southern Levant. It serves as a natural laboratory for understanding how sedimentation rates in a deep basin are related to climate change, tectonics, and anthropogenic impacts on the landscape. Here we show how basin-wide erosion rates are recorded by thicknesses of rhythmic detritus laminae and clastic sediment accumulation rates in a long core retrieved by the Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project in the Dead Sea depocenter. During the last 11.5 kyr the average detrital accumulation rate is 3-4 times that during the last two glacial cycles (MIS 7c-2), and the average thickness of detritus laminae in the last 11.6 kyr is 4.5 times that between 21.7 and 11.6 ka, implying an increased erosion rate on the surrounding slopes during the Holocene. We estimate that this intensified erosion is incompatible with tectonic and climatic regimes during the corresponding time interval and further propose a close association with the Neolithic Revolution in the Levant (beginning at 11.5 ka). We thus suggest that human impact on the landscape was the primary driver causing the intensified erosion and that the Dead Sea sedimentary record serves as a reliable recorder of this impact since the Neolithic Revolution.

  17. ESTIMATION OF FAR-FIELD TSUNAMI POTENTIAL FOR THE CARIBBEAN COAST BASED ON NUMERICAL SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narcisse Zaibo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The tsunami problem for the coast of the Caribbean basin is discussed. Briefly the historical data of tsunami in the Caribbean Sea are presented. Numerical simulation of potential tsunamis in the Caribbean Sea is performed in the framework of the nonlinear-shallow theory. The tsunami wave height distribution along the Caribbean Coast is computed. These results are used to estimate the far-field tsunami potential of various coastal locations in the Caribbean Sea. In fact, five zones with tsunami low risk are selected basing on prognostic computations, they are: the bay “Golfo de Batabano” and the coast of province “Ciego de Avila” in Cuba, the Nicaraguan Coast (between Bluefields and Puerto Cabezas, the border between Mexico and Belize, the bay “Golfo de Venezuela” in Venezuela. The analysis of historical data confirms that there was no tsunami in the selected zones. Also, the wave attenuation in the Caribbean Sea is investigated; in fact, wave amplitude decreases in an order if the tsunami source is located on the distance up to 1000 km from the coastal location. Both factors wave attenuation and wave height distribution should be taken into account in the planned warning system for the Caribbean Sea.

  18. Bacteriohopanepolyols record stratification, nitrogen fixation and other biogeochemical perturbations in Holocene sediments of the central Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Blumenberg

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Baltic Sea, one of the world's largest brackish-marine basins, established after deglaciation of Scandinavia about 17 000 to 15 000 yr ago. In the changeable history of the Baltic Sea, the initial freshwater system was connected to the North Sea about 8000 yr ago and the modern brackish-marine setting (Littorina Sea was established. Today, a relatively stable stratification has developed in the water column of the deep basins due to salinity differences. Stratification is only occasionally interrupted by mixing events, and it controls nutrient availability and growth of specifically adapted microorganisms and algae. We studied bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs, lipids of specific bacterial groups, in a sediment core from the central Baltic Sea (Gotland Deep and found considerable differences between the distinct stages of the Baltic Sea's history. Some individual BHP structures indicate contributions from as yet unknown redoxcline-specific bacteria (bacteriohopanetetrol isomer, methanotrophic bacteria (35-aminobacteriohopanetetrol, cyanobacteria (bacteriohopanetetrol cyclitol ether isomer and from soil bacteria (adenosylhopane through allochthonous input after the Littorina transgression, whereas the origin of other BHPs in the core has still to be identified. Notably high BHP abundances were observed in the deposits of the brackish-marine Littorina phase, particularly in laminated sediment layers. Because these sediments record periods of stable water column stratification, bacteria specifically adapted to these conditions may account for the high portions of BHPs. An additional and/or accompanying source may be nitrogen-fixing (cyanobacteria, which is indicated by a positive correlation of BHP abundances with Corg and δ15N.

  19. Bacteriohopanepolyols record stratification, nitrogen fixation and other biogeochemical perturbations in Holocene sediments of the Central Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Blumenberg

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Baltic Sea, one of the world's largest brackish-marine basins, established after deglaciation of Scandinavia about 17 000 to 15 000 yr ago. In the changeable history of the Baltic Sea, the initial freshwater system was connected to the North Sea about 8000 yr ago and the modern brackish-marine setting (Littorina Sea was established. Today, a relatively stable stratification developed in the water column of the deep basins due to salinity differences. Stratification is only occasionally interrupted by mixing events, and controls nutrient availability and growth of specifically adapted microorganisms and algae. We studied bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs, lipids of specific bacterial groups, in a sediment core from the Central Baltic Sea (Gotland Deep and found considerable differences between the distinct stages of the Baltic Sea's history. Individual BHP structures indicate contributions from as yet unknown redoxcline-specific bacteria (bacteriohopanetetrol isomer, methanotrophic bacteria (35-aminobacteriohopanetetrol, cyanobacteria (bacteriohopanetetrol cyclitol ether isomer and, through allochthonous input after the Littorina transgression, from soil bacteria (adenosylhopane, whereas the origin of other BHPs in the core has still to be identified. Notably high BHP abundances were observed in the deposits of the brackish-marine Littorina phase, particularly in laminated sediment layers. Because these sediments record periods of stable water column stratification, bacteria specifically adapted to these conditions may account for the high portions of BHPs. An additional and/or accompanying source may be nitrogen-fixing (cyanobacteria, which is indicated by a good correlation of BHP abundances with Corg and δ15N.

  20. Bacteriohopanepolyols record stratification, nitrogen fixation and other biogeochemical perturbations in Holocene sediments of the central Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenberg, M.; Berndmeyer, C.; Moros, M.; Muschalla, M.; Schmale, O.; Thiel, V.

    2013-04-01

    The Baltic Sea, one of the world's largest brackish-marine basins, established after deglaciation of Scandinavia about 17 000 to 15 000 yr ago. In the changeable history of the Baltic Sea, the initial freshwater system was connected to the North Sea about 8000 yr ago and the modern brackish-marine setting (Littorina Sea) was established. Today, a relatively stable stratification has developed in the water column of the deep basins due to salinity differences. Stratification is only occasionally interrupted by mixing events, and it controls nutrient availability and growth of specifically adapted microorganisms and algae. We studied bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs), lipids of specific bacterial groups, in a sediment core from the central Baltic Sea (Gotland Deep) and found considerable differences between the distinct stages of the Baltic Sea's history. Some individual BHP structures indicate contributions from as yet unknown redoxcline-specific bacteria (bacteriohopanetetrol isomer), methanotrophic bacteria (35-aminobacteriohopanetetrol), cyanobacteria (bacteriohopanetetrol cyclitol ether isomer) and from soil bacteria (adenosylhopane) through allochthonous input after the Littorina transgression, whereas the origin of other BHPs in the core has still to be identified. Notably high BHP abundances were observed in the deposits of the brackish-marine Littorina phase, particularly in laminated sediment layers. Because these sediments record periods of stable water column stratification, bacteria specifically adapted to these conditions may account for the high portions of BHPs. An additional and/or accompanying source may be nitrogen-fixing (cyano)bacteria, which is indicated by a positive correlation of BHP abundances with Corg and δ15N.

  1. Holocene hydrographical changes of the eastern Laptev Sea (Siberian Arctic) recorded in δ 18O profiles of bivalve shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Lupp, Thomas; Bauch, Henning A.; Erlenkeuser, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    Oxygen isotope profiles along the growth axis of fossil bivalve shells of Macoma calcarea were established to reconstruct hydrographical changes in the eastern Laptev Sea since 8400 cal yr B.P.. The variability of the oxygen isotopes (δ 18O) in the individual records is mainly attributed to variations in the salinity of bottom waters in the Laptev Sea with a modern ratio of 0.50‰/salinity. The high-resolution δ 18O profiles exhibit distinct and annual cycles from which the seasonal and annual salinity variations at the investigated site can be reconstructed. Based on the modern analogue approach oxygen isotope profiles of radiocarbon-dated bivalve shells from a sediment core located northeast of the Lena Delta provide seasonal and subdecadal insights into past hydrological conditions and their relation to the Holocene transgressional history of the Laptev Sea shelf. Under the assumption that the modern relationship between δ 18O w and salinity has been constant throughout the time, the δ 18O of an 8400-cal-yr-old bivalves would suggest that bottom-water salinity was reduced and the temperature was slightly warmer, both suggesting a stronger mixture of riverine water to the bottom water. Reconstruction of the inundation history of the Laptev Sea shelf indicates local sea level ˜27 m below present at this time and a closer proximity of the site to the coastline and the Lena River mouth. Due to continuing sea level rise and a southward retreat of the river mouth, bottom-water salinity increased at 7200 cal yr B.P. along with an increase in seasonal variability. Conditions comparable to the modern hydrography were achieved by 3800 cal yr B.P.

  2. A biomarker study of high resolution sedimentary records in the eastern Mediterranean Sea since the last glacial maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsouras, G.; Gogou, A.; Bouloubassi, I.; Emeis, K.-C.; Triantaphyllou, M. V.; Lykousis, V.

    2009-04-01

    Information stored in sedimentary records provides evidence on climate and environmental variability at decadal to centennial time scales. The eastern Mediterranean Sea and the related Aegean Sea exhibit high sedimentation rates in certain areas and are considered as sensitive regions to record paleo-environmental and -climatic changes. The aim of our study is to reconstruct high-frequency paleoclimatic variations and identify associated changes in the physical, chemical and biological environment in selected basins of the eastern Mediterranean Sea, using molecular biogeochemical proxies. Here we present a high-resolution multi-proxy study along two Aegean Sea cores (north (152SL) and southeast (NS-14)) and a Libyan Sea core (HCM2/22). An important time marker and indicator of remarkable climatic and environmental changes is sapropel S1, a sediment layer rich in organic carbon. Depending on the water column depth, the sediment accumulation rates and the proximity to freshwater and water formation sources, S1 deposited between ~9.8 to 6.4 kyr BP, with an apparent interruption in the S1 deposition that occurred from ~8.6 to 7.6 kyr BP. SSTs based on alkenone unsaturation index Uḱ 37, ^15tot, ^13Corg and various marine and terrestrial biomarkers are used to investigate the region's climatic variability, and the modifications in the biogeochemical functioning of the eastern Mediterranean Sea. Uḱ 37 SST distribution in our records reveals significant fluctuations in temperature over the last 20.000 yrs. Organic carbon stable isotopes values span a narrow range over the whole sequence, with values varying to typical marine origin. The distributions of land-plant biomarkers are indicative of variable terrigenous organic matter supply and the concomitant transport of nutrients to surface waters. Furthermore, the distribution patterns and characteristic ratios of marine biomarkers exhibit differences in the paleoproductivity trends and ventilation changes over the last

  3. Late Quaternary climatic events and sea-level changes recorded by turbidite activity, Dakar Canyon, NW Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierau, Roberto; Hanebuth, Till J. J.; Krastel, Sebastian; Henrich, Rüdiger

    2010-03-01

    The relationship of sea-level changes and short-term climatic changes with turbidite deposition is poorly documented, although the mechanisms of gravity-driven sediment transport in submarine canyons during sea-level changes have been reported from many regions. This study focuses on the activity of the Dakar Canyon off southern Senegal in response to major glacial/interglacial sea-level shifts and variability in the NW-African continental climate. The sedimentary record from the canyon allows us to determine the timing of turbidite events and, on the basis of XRF-scanning element data, we have identified the climate signal at a sub-millennial time scale from the surrounding hemipelagic sediments. Over the late Quaternary the highest frequency in turbidite activity in the Dakar Canyon is confined to major climatic terminations when remobilisation of sediments from the shelf was triggered by the eustatic sea-level rise. However, episodic turbidite events coincide with the timing of Heinrich events in the North Atlantic. During these times continental climate has changed rapidly, with evidence for higher dust supply over NW Africa which has fed turbidity currents. Increased aridity and enhanced wind strength in the southern Saharan-Sahelian zone may have provided a source for this dust.

  4. Structure of phytoplankton (Continuous Plankton Recorder and SeaWiFS and impact of climate in the Northwest Atlantic Shelves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Leterme

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available All marine organisms are affected to some extent by the movement and thermal properties of oceanic currents. However phytoplankton, because of its small size is most directly coupled to the physical environment. The intense hydrodynamic activity observed in the Northwest Atlantic Shelves Province makes this region especially intriguing from the point of view of physical-biological interactions. In the present work, remote sensed data of Sea Surface Height (SSH anomalies, Sea-surface chlorophyll a concentrations (SeaWiFS, and Sea Surface Temperature (SST are used to complement the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR survey that continuously sampled a route between Norfolk (Virginia, USA; 39° N, 71° W and Argentia (Newfoundland; 47° N, 54° W over the period 1995–1998. Over this period, we examined physical structures (i.e. SST and SSH and climatic forcing associated with space-time phytoplankton structure. Along this route, the phytoplankton structures were mainly impacted by the changes in surface flow along the Scotian Shelf rather than significantly influenced by the mesoscale features of the Gulf Stream. These changes in water mass circulation caused a drop in temperature and salinity along the Scotian Shelf that induced changes in phytoplankton and zooplankton abundance.

  5. Structure of phytoplankton (Continuous Plankton Recorder and SeaWiFS and impact of climate in the Northwest Atlantic Shelves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Leterme

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available All marine organisms are affected to some extent by the movement and thermal properties of oceanic currents. However phytoplankton, because of its small size is most directly coupled to the physical environment. The intense hydrodynamic activity observed in the Northwest Atlantic Shelves Province makes this region especially intriguing from the point of view of physical-biological interactions. In the present work, remote sensed data of Sea Surface Height (SSH anomalies, Sea-surface chlorophyll a concentrations (SeaWiFS, and Sea Surface Temperature (SST are used to complement the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR survey that continuously sampled a route between Norfolk (Virginia, USA; 39° N, 71° W and Argentia (Newfoundland; 47° N, 54° W over the period 1995–1998. Over this period, we examined physical structures (i.e. SST and SSH and climatic forcing associated with space-time phytoplankton structure. Along this route, the phytoplankton structures were mainly impacted by the changes in surface flow along the Scotian Shelf rather than significantly influenced by the mesoscale features of the Gulf Stream. These changes in water mass circulation caused a drop in temperature and salinity along the Scotian Shelf that induced changes in phytoplankton and zooplankton abundance.

  6. Molecular biomarker record of paleooceanographic envi-ronment in the East China Sea during the last 35000 years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG; Xianwei

    2002-01-01

    [1]Wang Pinxian, Response of western Pacific marginal seas to glacial cycles: Paleooceanographic and sedimentological features, Marine Geology, 1999, 156: 5-39.[2]Cang Shuxi, Yan Jun, Paleooceanography of Restricted Sea Area, Western Pacific Ocean (in Chinese), Qingdao: Ocean University Press, 1992, 11-32.[3]Xu Xuedong, Motoyosh, O., surface-water evolution of the eastern East China Sea during the last 36000 years, Marine Geology, 1999, 156: 285-304.[4]Yan Jun, Cang Shuxi, Evolution of the paleo-Kuroshio system and its relation to climate change since the last interglacial, Marine Geology & Quaternary Geology (in Chinese), 1995, 15: 26-40.[5]Li Peiying, Wang Yongji, Liu Zhenxia et al., Chronostratigraphy and deposition rates in the Okinawa Trough region, Science in China, Ser. D, 1999, 42(4): 408-413.[6]Liu Zhenxia, Li Tiegang, Li Peiying et al., The Paleoclimatic events and cause in the Okinawa Trough during 50ka BP, Chinese Science Bulletin, 2001, 46(2): 153-157.[7]Tang Yunqian, Zhen Shilong, Liu Kewen, Biomarker distribution in sedimentary core, South China Sea, in Sedimentation Process and Geochemical Study (in Chinese), Beijing: Ocean Press, 1993, 135-141.[8]Dong Guangrong, Wang Guiyong, Li Xiaoze et al., Paleo-monsoon evolution of sandy region in the eastern China during last interglacial, Science in China (in Chinese), Ser. D, 1996, 26(5): 437-444.[9]Pelejero, C., Grimalt, J. O., Sarnthein, M. et al., Molecular biomarker record of sea surface temperature and climatic change in the South China Sea during the last 140000 years, Marine Geology, 1999, 156: 109-121.[10]Prahl, F. G., Pinto, L. A., A geochemical study of long-chain n-alkenones in Washington coastal sediments, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 1987, 51: 1573-1582.[11]Prahl, F. G., Wakeham, S. G., Calibration of unsaturation patterns in long-chain ketone compositions for palaeo-temperature assessment, Nature, 1987, 300: 367-369.[12]Prahl, F. G., Muelhausen, L

  7. A new record of Ratan goby - Ponticola ratan (Nordmann, 1840 (Pisces: Gobiidae in the Black Sea, Romanian coastal waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Cocan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In August 2015 we managed to capture a specimen of ratan goby (Ponticola ratan in the Romanian coastal waters of the Black Sea, near the locality of Sf. Gheorghe (Tulcea County. This is the 7-th signaling for this species in Romanian coastal waters. The previous 6 specimens were recorded in the period 1960-1993, between Mangalia (Constanţa County and Sulina (Tulcea County. The species was identified by means of meristic characters (number of scales on medial line, number of spiny and soft rays, and morphological particularities (cycloid scales on the nape area and pectoral fin joint. Also, the measurements made, confirmed that the ratio between the head length and total length, which was 33% (TL=8.70 cm vs. Head Length=2.61cm. Another morphological character, specific to this species, is the lower jaw, which exceeds in length the upper jaw. Being a Ponto-Caspian endemite, with low population along the Bulgarian and Romanian coastline, we considered it important to point out this new record. Noting that, being known the trend of sporadic migration of this species, would not be excluded that global warming causes a shift from its normal distribution area, from northern and northeastern (Black Sea to south-west. Therefore, future research may bring more notifications regarding this species in south-western area of the Black Sea

  8. Sea Ice Back to 1850: A Longer Observational Record for Assimilation By Models and Use In Reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterer, Florence; Walsh, John; Chapman, William; Stewart, J. Scott

    2016-04-01

    Gridded Monthly Sea Ice Extent and Concentration, 1850 Onward is the title of a new data set available from the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center. Observations from 13 historical sources such as whaling ship logs, compilations by naval oceanographers, and analyses by national ice services cover 1850 through 1978, while 1979-2013 ice concentration fields are derived from satellite passive microwave data. The sea ice concentration and source variables are provided in a NetCDF-4 file. The observation-based data product meets a need for longer records to use in reanalysis and climate diagnostic applications. It extends the record of an earlier version of this pan-Arctic data set that is heavily used by modelers, and improves upon it by incorporating newly available historical sources, using a more accurate data set for the satellite era, and by filling temporal gaps using an analog method. The resulting sea ice concentration fields have realistic values and variability throughout the record; in earlier versions, unvarying climatological values often fill gaps. The historical data vary greatly in their observational methods and came to us as both original data (e.g. a transcription of shipboard ice observations), or as observations to which some synthesis or analysis has already been applied (e.g. the Danish Meteorological Instituted yearbooks of charts). Each required different treatment before it could be used in our product, ranging from simple regridding to digitization and interpretation. The current version spans 1850-2013. With it, we can more confidently address questions like "Is the diminished ice cover of the past few years unique to the period since 1850?" And "Is the rapidity of the retreat of ice in the years since 2000 unique in the longer historical record?" We hope to continue improving the product with refinements to the gap filling method, additional historical sources, and assessment of the consistency of pre and post satellite period data, and

  9. Punctuated sediment record resulting from channel migration in a shallow sand-dominated micro-tidal lagoon, Northern Wadden Sea, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Nielsen, Lars Henrik

    2011-01-01

    conclude that long-term (millennial timescale) sediment accumulation in the lagoon was controlled by rising sea-level, whereas short-term (centurial timescale) sediment accumulation was controlled by local erosion and depositional events caused by lateral migration of channels. Records of short-term sea...

  10. First record of the Indo-Pacific species Iphione muricata Savigny in Lamarck, 1818 (Polychaeta: Iphionidae from the Mediterranean Sea, Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. GOREN

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Indo-Pacific scaleworm Iphione muricata was observed and caught in the Mediterranean Sea along the coast of Israel. Morphological and molecular diagnostic characters of the species are discussed. This is the first record of this alien species in the Mediterranean Sea, and its previous reports in the Suez Canal suggest its introduction via Lessepsian migration.

  11. A 6,000-year sedimentary molecular record of chemocline excursions in the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinninghe Damste, J. S.; Wakeham, S. G.; Kohnen, M. E.; Hayes, J. M.; de Leeuw, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    The Black Sea is the world's largest anoxic basin; it is also a contemporary analogue of the environment in which carbonaceous shales and petroleum source beds formed. Recently, Repeta et al. reported that anoxygenic photosynthesis may be an important component of carbon cycling in the present Black Sea, owing to a shoaling of the chemocline and consequent penetration of the photic zone by anaerobic waters in the past few decades. It has been suggested that this was due to an anthropogenic decrease in freshwater input to the Black Sea, although natural causes were not ruled out. Here we report the distributions of sequestered photosynthetic pigments in eight core samples of sediments from the Black Sea ranging in age from zero to 6,200 years before the present. Our results show that photosynthetic green sulphur bacteria (Chlorobiaceae [correction of Clorobiaceae]) have been active in the Black Sea for substantial periods of time in the past. This finding indicates that the penetration of the photic zone by anaerobic waters is not a recent phenomenon, and suggests that natural causes for shoaling of the chemocline are more likely than anthropogenic ones.

  12. Assessing Stationarity in Ice Core Record-Sea Level Pressure Relationships for Yukon Territory Ice Core Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, E. P.; Wake, C. P.; Osterberg, E. C.

    2014-12-01

    We assess the stationarity of the relationship between Northern Hemisphere winter (Dec-Feb) sea-level pressure (SLP) and proxy time series (major ions, accumulation, and stable isotopes) from the Eclipse (3017 m asl) and the Mt. Logan Prospector-Russell Col (PRCol; 5340 m asl) ice cores from Yukon, Canada. We develop a novel spatial calibration procedure to identify ranges of ice core values that are associated with consistent winter SLP anomaly patterns. Each ice core variable time series was ranked and divided into groups of 13 years each. We assess stationarity by splitting the 1872-2001 analysis period in half (1872-1936 and 1937-2001) and comparing the locations and magnitudes of SLP anomaly patterns during the two periods for each group of ice core values. Northern Hemisphere monthly mean SLP from the 20th Century Reanalysis dataset are used. The high accumulation rate (1.38 m a-1) at Eclipse allows us to analyze 6-month seasonal mean values (Oct-Mar and Apr-Sep), whereas annual mean values are used from PRCol where the accumulation rate is lower (0.40 m a-1). The Eclipse cold season accumulation and PRCol annual mean sodium concentrations (Na+) exhibit the strongest correlations with winter SLP anomaly patterns. In particular, the lowest and highest 20% annual Na+ values at PRCol and lowest 10% cold season accumulation values at Eclipse exhibit stationarity with consistent SLP anomaly patterns in the North Pacific for all three time periods. A weaker Aleutian Low consistently occurred in the central to eastern North Pacific for the lowest Na+ years at PRCol and lowest accumulation cold seasons at Eclipse, although these groups of years are mostly independent. A stronger Aleutian Low occurs in the North Pacific for the highest Na+ years at PRCol. A stationary SLP anomaly pattern is not observed through all three time periods for high cold season accumulation at Eclipse. Application of this calibration procedure with other traditional calibration and

  13. Polychaeta (Annelida from Muros de Nalón (Asturias, Cantabrian Sea, with three new records for the coast of Asturias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Cepeda, Patricia Lattig

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The benthic Polychaete fauna associated with shallow water macroalgae assemblages from an Asturian littoral beach (northern Spain, central Cantabrian Sea was studied. Twenty-six species are recorded, including the first records for Myrianida brachycephala and Nudisyllis pulligera for the Asturian coasts and Nerilla mediterranea for the Cantabrian Sea. Relevant taxonomic and ecological remarks are also provided for some of the collected species.

  14. Sedimentary records of black carbon in the sea area of the Nansha Islands since the last glaciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Core 17962 taken from the sea area of the Nansha Islands recorded a sedimentary history of more than 30 000 years. The black carbon data from the core, which can inform us of the history of vegetation fires, show that during the last glaciation, especially during the last glacial maximum at about 18 kaBP, the fluctuation of the concentration and accumulation rate of the black carbon was relatively great, whereas it was small during the Holocene. The isotope composition of the black carbon indicates that the precursors of black carbon were mainly grasses from the last glaciation to the Holocene. The sub-alpine and alpine vegetation zones covered mainly with grass and bush on the lands around the southern South China Sea were probably the sources of black carbon. The altitudinal vegetation changes from the last glaciation to the Holocene gave rise to the changes of the sedimentary characteristics of black carbon.

  15. The sunspot cycle recorded in the thermoluminescence profile of the GT89/3 Ionian sea core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cini Castagnoli, G.; Bonino, G.; Taricco, C. [Turin Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Generale]|[CNR, Turin (Italy). Ist. di Cosmogeofisica

    1997-11-01

    The authors measured the thermoluminescence (TL) depth of the GT89/3 shallow-water Ionian sea core. This profile has been transformed into a time series using the accurate sedimentation rate previously determined by radiometric and tephroanalysis methods. The TL measurements were performed in samples of equal thickness of 2 mm, corresponding to a time interval of 3.096 y. The TL time series spans {approx} 1800 y. The DFT power spectral densities in the decadal periodicity range of this TL series show significant periodicities at 10.7, 11.3 and 12 y closely similar to the periodicities present in the sunspot number series. These results confirm that the TL signal in recent sea sediments faithfully records the solar variability, as we previously proposed.

  16. Hourly changes in sea surface salinity in coastal waters recorded by Geostationary Ocean Color Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rongjie; Zhang, Jie; Yao, Haiyan; Cui, Tingwei; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Lingjuan; An, Jubai

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we monitored hourly changes in sea surface salinity (SSS) in turbid coastal waters from geostationary satellite ocean color images for the first time, using the Bohai Sea as a case study. We developed a simple multi-linear statistical regression model to retrieve SSS data from Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) based on an in situ satellite matched-up dataset (R2 = 0.795; N = 41; Range: 26.4 to 31.9 psμ). The model was then validated using independent continuous SSS measurements from buoys, with the average percentage difference of 0.65%. The model was applied to GOCI images from the dry season during an astronomical tide to characterize hourly changes in SSS in the Bohai Sea. We found that the model provided reasonable estimates of the hourly changes in SSS and that trends in the modeled and measured data were similar in magnitude and direction (0.43 vs 0.33 psμ, R2 = 0.51). There were clear diurnal variations in the SSS of the Bohai Sea, with a regional average of 0.455 ± 0.079 psμ (0.02-3.77 psμ). The magnitude of the diurnal variations in SSS varied spatially, with large diurnal variability in the nearshore, particularly in the estuary, and small variability in the offshore area. The model for the riverine area was based on the inverse correlation between SSS and CDOM absorption. In the offshore area, the water mass of the North Yellow Sea, characterized by high SSS and low CDOM concentrations, dominated. Analysis of the driving mechanisms showed that the tidal current was the main control on hourly changes in SSS in the Bohai Sea.

  17. Analysis of coastal sea-level station records and implications for tsunami monitoring in the Adriatic Apulia region, southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, Lidia; Tinti, Stefano; Tallarico, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The region of Apulia, southern Italy, was theater of one of the largest tsunami disaster in Italian history (the 30 July 1627 event) and is considered to be exposed to tsunami hazard coming from local Italian sources as well as from sources on the eastern side of the Adriatic and from the Ionian sea, including the Hellenic Arc earthquakes. Scientific interest for tsunami studies and monitoring in the region is only recent and this theme was specifically addressed by the international project OTRIONS, coordinated by the University of Bari. In the frame of this project the University of Bologna contributed to the analysis of the tsunami hazard and to the evaluation of the regional tide-gauge network with the scope of assessing its adequacy for tsunami monitoring. This latter is the main topic of the present work. In eastern Apulia, facing the Adriatic sea, the sea-level data network is sufficiently dense being formed of stations of the Italian tide-gauge network (Rete Mareografica Nazionale, RMN), of four additional stations operated by the Apulia Port Authority (in Brindisi, Ischitella, Manfredonia and Porto Cesareo) and of two more stations that were installed in the harbours of Barletta and Monopoli in the frame of the project OTRIONS with real-time data transmission and 1-sec sampling period. Pre-processing of the sea-level data of these stations included quality check and spectral analysis. Where the sampling rate was adequate, the records were also examined by means of the specific tools provided by the TEDA package. This is a Tsunami Early Detection Algorithm, developed by the Tsunami Research Team of the University of Bologna, that allows one to characterize the sea-level background signal in the typical tsunami frequency window (from 1 to several minutes) and consequently to optimize TEDA parameters for an efficient tsunami detection. The results of the analysis show stability of the spectral content and seasonal variations.

  18. Oxygen isotope record of the 1997-1998 El Niño in Peruvian sea catfish (Galeichthys peruvianus) otoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrus, C. Fred T.; Crowe, Douglas E.; Romanek, Christopher S.

    2002-12-01

    Sagittal otoliths of the Peruvian sea catfish Galeichthys peruvianus were collected from the north coast of Peru during and after the 1997-1998 El Niño. The otoliths were analyzed via laser microprobe and micromilling techniques for oxygen isotope composition through ontogeny to document their use as an El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) proxy. Results were compared to theoretical calculations for the δ18O of otolith aragonite using measured sea surface temperatures (SST) and δ18O values for local seawater assuming equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionation was achieved. All otoliths recorded the 1997-1998 El Niño event as well as seasonal temperature variations. These ENSO events were recorded in otolith aragonite as significant negative excursions in δ18O that reflected the increased temperature of local marine waters. The combined otolith data were used to create a 10-year SST record, including ENSO events and local seasonal temperature variation, validating the use of otolith δ18O as a temperature proxy.

  19. A last glacial and deglacial pollen record from the northern South China Sea: New insight into coastal-shelf paleoenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shaohua; Zheng, Zhuo; Chen, Fang; Jing, Xia; Kershaw, Peter; Moss, Patrick; Peng, Xuechao; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Chixin; Zhou, Yang; Huang, Kangyou; Gan, Huayang

    2017-02-01

    This study presents a marine palynological record of the Asian summer monsoon and sea level change in the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and the deglacial period in the northern South China Sea (SCS). A fossil core STD 235 (855 cm in length) and 273 surface sediment samples from the northern SCS were pollen analysed to reconstruct the paleoenvironment of the continental shelf during the last glacial period. Results from fossil pollen show that the main pollen source region fundamentally changed from the LGM to the deglacial period as sea level rapidly rose. The modern marine surface samples show that pollen concentrations in the estuary of the Pearl River are extremely high, and modern pollen assemblages are in good agreement with the regional vegetation. However, wind transport becomes more important in the deeper ocean as the percentages of Pinus, a taxon with very high pollen production and dispersal capacity, is highest in these sediments, which otherwise have very low pollen concentrations. The concentration of total pollen between surface and fossil pollen samples is compared in order to determine the possible vegetation sources areas for the marine core. Pollen concentration as high as >100 grains/g at the LGM suggested that the paleo-shoreline was located within 80 km of the core. Consequently, pollen would mostly have derived from the exposed continental shelf in the northern SCS. By contrast, pollen concentrations were very low due to a much greater transport distance (318 km at present, core STD 235) under higher sea levels, and windblown pollen played a more important role because of the limitation of riverine input into the deep ocean during this highstand period. Such alternation of pollen flux and source distance should be repeated during all glacial-interglacial cycles, reflecting closely sea level and climate dynamics. According to fossil pollen assemblages from Core STD 235, we conclude that wetland and/or grassland communities with sparse subtropical

  20. Palaeoenvironmental changes from pollen record in deep sea core PC-1 from northern Okinawa Trough, East China Sea during the past 24 ka

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU HongYan; CHANG FengMing; LUO YunLi; SUN XiangJun

    2009-01-01

    A pollen record of core PC-1 from the northern Okinawa Trough, East China Sea (ECS), provides in-formation on vegetation and climate changes since 24 cal. kaBP. A total of 103 samples were palyno-logically analyzed at 8 cm intervals with a time resolution of 230 a. Four pollen zones are recognized: zone I (812-715 cm, 24.2-21.1 cal. kaBP), zone II (715-451 cm, 21.1 -15.2 cal. kaBP), zone Ⅲ (451 -251 cm, 15.2-10.8 cal. kaBP), zone Ⅳ (251-0 cm, 10.8-0.3 cal. kaBP), corresponding to Late MIS 3, Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), deglaciation and Holocene, respectively. The LGM is characterized by the dominance of herbs, mainly Artemisia, and high pollen influx, implying an open vegetation on the ex-posed continental shelf and e cool and dry climate. The deglaciation is a climate warming stage with Pinus percentage increased and Artemisia percentage decreased and a rapid sea-level rise. The Holo-cene is characterized by predominance of tree pollen with rapid increase in Castanea-Castanopsis in-dicating the development of mixed evergreen and deciduous broad-leaved forest and a warm, humid climate. Low pollen influx during the Holocene probably implies submergence of the continental shelf and retreat of the pollen source area. The vegetation indicated by pollen assemblage found in this up-per zone is consistent with the present vegetation found in Kyushu, Japan. Originating from the humid mountain area of North Luzon of the Philippines, Tasmania and New Zealand, Phyllocladus with spo-radic occurrence throughout PC-1 core probably suggests the influence of Palaeo-Kuroshio Current or intense summer monsoon. The observed changes in Pinus and Herbs percentage indicate fluctuations of the sea level, and high Pinus percentage corresponds to high sea level. Spectrum analysis of the pollen percentage record reveals many millennial-scale periodicities, such as periodicities of 6.8, 3.8, 2.2, 1.6 ka.

  1. Correcting the Cenozoic δ18O deep-sea temperature record

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    2004-01-01

    The oxygen isotope signal in benthic foraminifera from deep-sea cores is mainly determined by deep-ocean temperature and land ice volume. Separating the temperature and ice volume signals is a key step in understanding the evolution of Cenozoic climate. Except for the last few million years, fluctua

  2. First record of the polychaetous annelid Diopatra micrura Pires et al., 2010 in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. ARIAS

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Until now the only recognised species of the onuphid genus Diopatra in the Mediterranean Sea was D. neapolitana. This paper reports the presence of another species, D. micrura, in the western Mediterranean, occurring in shallow waters along the coasts of southeastern Spain.

  3. First record of the polychaetous annelid Diopatra micrura Pires et al., 2010 in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. ARIAS

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Until now the only recognised species of the onuphid genus Diopatra in the Mediterranean Sea was D. neapolitana. This paper reports the presence of another species, D. micrura, in the western Mediterranean, occurring in shallow waters along the coasts of southeastern Spain. 

  4. The Holocene Records of Glycerol Dialkyl Glycerol Tetraethers From the Northern Chukchi Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Nam, S.; Polyak, L. V.

    2013-12-01

    We analyzed glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) in Cores HOTRAX 05-01 JPC5 and JPC 8, and ARA02B 01-GC in the northern Chukchi Sea. All of the three cores showed a similar changing pattern in GDGT composition during the Holocene. In the beginning of early Holocene, both isoprenoid and branched GDGT concentrations were low, and BIT and CBT were relatively high. The similar composition is found in modern sediments from the western Arctic Ocean north of 75°N, suggesting that the northern Chukchi Sea was covered by perennial sea ice. GDGT concentration increased, and BIT and CBT decreased during the early Holocene and reached the same level as those in modern sediments at 8 ka. TEX86 and CBT/MBT indices showed millennial-scale variation. We interpret that these proxies did not simply indicate temperatures but were affected by the relative contribution of different sediment sources. Millennial-scale variability likely reflected changes in sediment transport in the northern Chukchi Sea.

  5. Recently studied sedimentary records from the eastern Arabian Sea: Implications to Holocene monsoonal variability

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Agnihotri, R.; Kurian, S.

    in an attempt to comprehend past monsoonal variability in Indian as well as global context are reviewed. We also focus upon different proxies used so far in the Arabian Sea, their fidelity, limitations and future scope of using novel proxies for a better...

  6. East China Sea δ18O Record Detects Millennial-Scale Changes in the East Asian Summer Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeman, E.; Clemens, S. C.; Lawman, A. E.; Kubota, Y.; Holbourn, A. E.; Martin, A.

    2015-12-01

    The East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) brings heavy summer rainfall to some of Asia's most densely-populated areas, impacting agricultural production and water resources. Sediment cores were recovered from International Ocean Drilling Program Site U1429 in the East China Sea (31° 37.04' N, 128° 59.50' E, 732 mbsl). This location receives runoff from the Yangtze River, which serves as a major drainage system for monsoon-induced precipitation. Hence, the δ18O record of planktonic foraminifera at Site U1429 reflects changes in regional, monsoon-driven salinity. The top 100 meters of core at Site U1429 were sampled at a preliminary resolution of 15 cm and processed to isolate the planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber for δ18O mass spectrometry analyses. Abrupt, millennial-scale regional climate variability in the EASM and its linkage to orbital forcings have been reconstructed using stratigraphic analysis of δ18O. The sub-orbital scale structure of the δ18O record over the past 400 kyr matches the structures of both the composite speleothem δ18O from eastern China (Sanbao and Hulu caves) and the planktonic δ18O record from northern South China Sea Site 1146. The similarities between these δ18O records indicate a strong regional response to monsoon forcing. Removal of the temperature component of the δ18O signal by using Mg/Ca (G. ruber) paleothermometry will provide a record of changes in the δ18O composition of seawater in response to Yangtze River runoff.

  7. Insight into the Pacific Sea Surface Temperature- North American Hydroclimate Connection from an Eastern Tropical North Pacific Coral Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, S. C.; Charles, C. D.; Carriquiry, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    The last few years of record-breaking climate anomalies across North America--a resilient atmospheric ridge and extreme drought over the West Coast, and severe winters across the Midwest and East Coast regions--have been linked to anomalous Pacific sea surface temperatures (Seager et al. 2014, Wang et al. 2014, Hartmann 2015). The synoptic associations prompt important questions on the relation between these unusual phenomena and extreme expressions of known Pacific decadal modes, such as the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO). These questions motivate our pursuit to document multiple realizations of decadal variability in the Pacific-North American region through periods of varied radiative forcing. Here we introduce a 178 year, seasonally resolved Porites coral record from Clarion Island (18N, 115W), the westernmost island of the Revillagigedo Archipelago, a region both highly influenced by NPGO SST and SSS variability and critical for NPGO tropical-extratropical communication via the Seasonal Footprinting Mechanism (Vimont et al. 2003). When coupled with tree ring records from the western United States (Griffin and Anchukaitis 2014, MacDonald and Case 2005) and coral records from the central tropical Pacific (Cobb et al. 2001), the δ18O signal from the Clarion coral offers an extended framework of coherent continental hydroclimate and oceanic variability across the Pacific basin beyond the instrumental record. Over the last 200 years, we find clear commonality in the timing, magnitude and spatial expression of variability (illustrated through the NADA Atlas, Cook et al. 2004) amongst the proxy records. The strong relationship between Northeastern Pacific Clarion and the Central Pacific Palmyra record with the North American hydroclimate records can be viewed within the mechanistic framework of the NPGO; this framework is then explored over the last millennium across intervals of varied radiative forcing.

  8. Rapidly spreading seagrass invades the Caribbean with unknown ecological consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Caroline S.; Willette, Demian A; Miller, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    The non-native seagrass Halophila stipulacea has spread rapidly throughout the Caribbean Sea (Willette et al. 2014); without additional research, the ecological ramifications of this invasion are difficult to predict. Biodiversity, connectivity of marine ecosystems, and recovery of degraded coral reefs could all be affected. The invasive seagrass, native to the Red Sea and Indian Ocean, has taken over sand bottoms and intermixed with or replaced native seagrasses, including Thalassia testudinum, Syringodium filiforme, and Halodule wrightii.

  9. Ciguatera fish poisoning in the Caribbean islands and Western Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottier, I; Vernoux, J P; Lewis, R J

    2001-01-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (ciguatera), a common poisoning caused by fish ingestion, is reviewed in the Western Atlantic and the Caribbean waters. It is endemic from Florida coasts (northern limit) to Martinique Island (southern limit), with outbreaks occurring from time to time. In the Caribbean, ciguatera causes a polymorphic syndrome with gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and neurological signs and symptoms. Neurological and muscular dysfunctions can be treated by intravenous injection of D-mannitol. The lipid-soluble toxins involved are ciguatoxins that are likely produced by the dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus. G. toxicus strains are endemic in the Caribbean Sea and in theWestern Atlantic. Although it is likely that blooms of G. toxicus are ingested by herbivorous fishes, they are not implicated in ciguatera in the Caribbean. Rather, large carnivores (barracudas, jacks, snappers, groupers), consumers of smaller benthic fish, are often involved in ciguatera. Fish toxicity depends on fishing area and depth, fish size and tissues, and climatic disturbances. Ciguatoxins have been isolated and purified from Caribbean fish species. The structure of two epimers, C-CTX-1 and C-CTX-2 from horse-eye jack, comprise 14 trans-fused ether-linked rings and a hemiketal in terminal ring. Caribbean ciguatoxins are mainly detected in the laboratory by chicken, mouse, mosquito, or cell bioassays, and by analytical HPLC/tandem mass spectrometry down to parts per billion (ppb). A ciguatera management plan that integrates epidemiology, treatment, and a simple method of detection is required to ensure the protection of consumers.

  10. Deep sea pollen record during 12-1.6 Ma from the southern South China Sea and its response to environmental change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO YunLi; SUN XiangJun

    2007-01-01

    Based on deep-sea pollen results (512-76 m) from ODP Site 1143 in the southern South China Sea (SCS), the climate and vegetation evolution sequence on the surrounding islands and the exposed continental shelf are discussed. The pollen records show that the pollen influx was quite low before 8.15 Ma and increased dramatically afterwards. The influx changes can be ascribed, on one side, to tectonics deformations around the southern SCS resulting in rapid uplift of islands and subsequent increase of the sediment rates and pollen influx and on the other side to climate cooling and monsoon enhancement. Around 2.63 Ma was another obvious boundary, the increasing of pollen and spores influx since this time was mainly related to global climate cooling. Spectrum analysis of pollen influx values shows that 2 Ma, 0.67 Ma, and 0.19-0.17 Ma cycles existed during 12-3.0 Ma, while 0.1 Ma and 46.9 ka cycles existed during 3.0-2.0 Ma.

  11. Carbon isotopic record of foraminifers in surface sediments from the South China Sea and its significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Xinrong; WANG Pinxian; HUANG Baoqi; LIU Chuanlian; JIAN Zhimin; ZHAO Quanhong; LI Jianru; TIAN Jun; XU Jian

    2005-01-01

    The study is based on stable carbon isotopic measurements of 112 foraminiferal samples from surface sediments at 40 sites in the South China Sea (SCS).δ13C of foraminifers and △δ13C between planktonic and benthic foraminiferal species exhibit a low value area at the northeastern and southern ends of the SCS. It is correlated with the nutrient distributional pattern in the SCS and circumjacent area, the influence of the northeastern and southwestern monsoons on water flow and water chemistry in the SCS. The monsoons have not only brought nutrients to the upper part of the sea but also disturbed water and decreased difference between the surface and bottom water. Its influence is most obvious at both ends, which resulted in the low value areas in δ13C and △δ13C at the ends. The distributional pattern of the stable carbon isotope in the SCS is a reflection of the East Asian monsoons.

  12. New at-sea records of pelagic seabirds in the South Atlantic Ocean and Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Orgeira

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available During ship-based seabird surveys in the south Atlantic and Antarctica in the austral summers of 1994/95, 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012, we documented at-sea distributions of Buller's albatross (Thalassarche bulleri, Atlantic petrel (Pterodroma incerta, soft-plumaged petrel (Pterodroma mollis, Kerguelen petrel (Lugensa brevirostris and great-winged petrel (Pterodroma macroptera. In some cases, sightings were considered as extralimital, but for other species updating their distributions in the literature seems warranted. Atlantic petrel, for example, has been regularly observed in the Drake Passage and north of the Antarctic Peninsula for about 30 years, but the distribution of this species has not been updated in the literature. The observations reported here will contribute to update the at-sea distributions of these species and to changes in their distributions.

  13. Paleoceanographic evolution recorded in the northern South China Sea since 4 Ma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Baoqi; JIAN Zhimin; WANG Pinxian

    2005-01-01

    Upper water structure over the last 4 million years in the northern South China Sea (SCS) was reconstructed by sea surface temperature (SST) and primary productivity estimated by changes in the abundance of planktonic foraminifer, planktonic foraminifer transfer function, and the accumulation rate of benthic foraminifera. Results of SST and primary productivity show that SST gradually decreased since 4 Ma, but differential seasonal temperature and primary productivity increased in steps mainly at about 3.1, 2.7, 2.1, 1.6, 0.9 and 0.5 Ma. Comparison with tectonics and orbital variations indicates that phased rising of the Tibet since 3.6 Ma, closing of Panama and Indonesian seaways, and orbital changes were responsible for the changes of upper water structure in the SCS, respectively.

  14. A stable, unbiased, long-term satellite based data record of sea surface temperature from ESA's Climate Change Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Nick; Good, Simon; Merchant, Chris

    2013-04-01

    The study of climate change demands long-term, stable observational records of climate variables such as sea surface temperature (SST). ESA's Climate Change Initiative was set up to unlock the potential of satellite data records for this purpose. As part of this initiative, 13 projects were established to develop the data records for different essential climate variables - aerosol, cloud, fire, greenhouse gases, glaciers, ice sheets, land cover, ocean colour, ozone, sea ice, sea level, soil moisture and SST. In this presentation we describe the development work that has taken place in the SST project and present new prototype data products that are available now for users to trial. The SST project began in 2010 and has now produced two prototype products. The first is a long-term product (covering mid-1991 - 2010 currently, but with a view to update this in the future), which prioritises length of data record and stability over other considerations. It is based on data from the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) and Advanced Very-High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) series of satellite instruments. The product aims to combine the favourable stability and bias characteristics of ATSR data with the geographical coverage achieved with the AVHRR series. Following an algorithm selection process, an optimal estimation approach to retrieving SST from the satellite measurements from both sensors was adopted. The retrievals do not depend on in situ data and so this data record represents an independent assessment of SST change. In situ data are, however, being used to validate the resulting data. The second data product demonstrates the coverage that can be achieved using the modern satellite observing system including, for example, geostationary satellite data. Six months worth of data have been processed for this demonstration product. The prototype SST products will be released in April to users to trial in their work. The long term product will be available as

  15. Coral reefs in the South China Sea: Their response to and records on past environmental changes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU KeFu

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews both the recent and longer-term (Holocene) ecological history of coral reefs in the South China Sea (SCS).(1) Local ecological monitoring since the 1960s shows that the coral reefs in the South China Sea have declined dramatically,reflecting the rapid decrease of living coral cover and the great loss of symbiotic zooxanthellae.Collectively,this has led to a significant decrease of annual CaCO3 production.Heavy anthropogenic activities and global warming are recognized as major triggers of the observed coral reef degradation.Observations show that the modern coral reefs in the SCS are a source of atmospheric CO2 in summer.(2) Coral reefs of the SCS have been widely used to reveal longer-term environmental variations,including Holocene high-resolution sea surface temperature (SST) and abrupt climate events,millennial-scale E1 Ni(n)o variations,millennial-and centennial-scale sea level oscillations,strong and cyclic storm activities,East Asian monsoon intensities,variation in seawater pH,and recent seawater pollution,(3) Coral reefs of the southern SCS have experienced repeated episodes of bleaching over the last 200 years due to high SST and intense E1 Ni(n)o events; coral reefs of the northern SCS suffered high levels of mortality during several abrupt winter cold-water bleaching events during the middle Holocene warm period.On average,recovery after the middle Holocene cold-bleaching took 20-30 years; recovery following other middle Holocene environmental stresses took approximately 1020 years.Such findings have significantly contributed to the understanding of the present ecological pressures faced by the coral reefs in the SCS,the histories of Holocene climate/environment changes,and the long-term models of coral reef responses to various past environmental changes.

  16. Tephrochronology of a 70 ka-long marine record in the Marsili Basin (southern Tyrrhenian Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburrino, S.; Insinga, D. D.; Pelosi, N.; Kissel, C.; Laj, C.; Capotondi, L.; Sprovieri, M.

    2016-11-01

    A sequence of tephra layers is studied in a 13.9 m-long deep-sea core (MD01-2474G) from the southern Tyrrhenian Sea. The chronology of the succession is provided by a high-resolution age-depth model based on isotope stratigraphy and AMS radiocarbon dating, which place the succession of events in a time interval spanning the last 70 ka. Based on a precise chronological framework and proximal-distal correlations, the Y-1, Y-6 and Y-7 main marker tephras were identified. Compositional data on fresh micro-pumice or glass shards of selected tephras were correlated with the coeval volcanic activity of Aeolian Arc (Vulcano and Salina), Mt. Etna, Phlegrean Fields Pantelleria and Ischia. The tephra sequence contains a number of deposits documenting recurrent activity on Vulcano Island at ca. 6.9 ka BP (MD3), ca. 16.7 ka BP (MD11), ca. 23.2 ka BP (MD14), ca. 29.6 ka BP (MD15), ca. 36.9 ka BP (MD22) and ca. 42.5 ka BP (MD27). The results presented in this study improve the southern Tyrrhenian Sea tephrostratigraphic framework and provide new insights into chemistry and dispersal area of Aeolian Arc pyroclastic deposits in this sector of the Central Mediterranean.

  17. Sea-level pressure variability around Antarctica since A.D. 1750 inferred from subantarctic tree-ring records

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalba, R. [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory]|[Departamento de Dendrocronologia e Historia Ambientol, IANIGLA, CONICET, C.C. 330, 5500 Mena (Argentina); Cook, E.R.; D`Arrigo, R.D.; Jacoby, G.C. [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; Jones, P.D. [Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); Salinger, M.J. [National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, P O Box 109-695, New market, Auckland (New Zealand); Palmer, J. [Department of Plant Science, Lincoln University, P O Box 84, Canterbury (New Zealand)

    1997-07-01

    A tree-ring chronology network recently developed from the subantarctic forests provides an opportunity to study long-term climatic variability at higher latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. Fifty long (1911-1985), homogeneous records of monthly mean sea-level pressure (MSLP) from the southern latitudes (15-65 S) were intercorrelated on a seasonal basis to establish the most consistent, long-term transpolar teleconnections during this century. Variations in summer MSLP between the South America-Antarctic Peninsula and the New Zealand sectors of the Southern Ocean are significantly correlated in a negative sense (r=-0.53, P<0.001). Climatically sensitive chronologies from Tierra del Fuego (54-55 ) and New Zealand (39-47 ) were used to develop verifiable reconstructions of summer (November to February) MSLP for both sectors of the Southern Ocean. These reconstructions, which explain between 37 and 43% of the instrumentally recorded pressure variance, indicate that inverse trends in MSLP from diametrically opposite sides of Antarctica have prevailed during the past two centuries. However, the strength of this relationship varies over time. Differences in normalized MSLP between the New Zealand and the South America-Antarctic Peninsula sectors were used to develop a summer transpolar index (STPI), which represents an index of sea-level pressure wavenumber one in the Southern Hemisphere higher latitudes. Tree-ring based reconstructions of STPI show significant differences in large-scale atmospheric circulation between the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries. (orig.). With 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Identification and analysis of shear waves recorded by three-component OBSs in northeastern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minghui Zhao; Xuelin Qiu; Shaohong Xia; Ping Wang; Kanyuan Xia; Huilong Xu

    2008-01-01

    Structure models associated with P- and S-wave velocities contain considerable amount of information on lithology and geophysical properties, which can be used to better understand the complexity of the deep crustal structure. However, records of converted shear waves are less due to the speciality of seismic survey at sea and the rigorous generated conditions. The study on shear waves has always been a weakness for studying the deep crustal structures of South China Sea (SCS). In this paper, eleven three-component OBSs were deployed along the Profile OBS-2001 in northeastern SCS. After the data processing of polarization and band-pass filter, converted Swave phases were identified in the radical component records of nine OBSs. Taking the OBS7 as an example, identification and analysis of converted shear waves were presented and discussed in detail. A few phase groups, such as PwSc, PgSs, PnSc, PmS, and PwSn, were found coming from the deep crust or Moho interface by simple theoretical model calculation and ray-tracing simulation. The results not only provide the underlying basis for studies of S-wave velocity structure and Poisson's ratio structure, but also reveal the relationship between crustal petrology and seismology, which will be of importance for making full use of S-wave information in the future.

  19. Remanence magnetic records of the recent 130 000 years from the sediments in Nansha area, South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiaoqiang; ZHOU Wenjuan; GAO Fanglei; LI Huamei

    2007-01-01

    Two hundred and eighty-one samples, collected from drilling core NS93-5 located in the Nansha area of the South China Sea, were used to study the magnetic character-istics of the sediments in the sea. Detailed rock magnetic results show that the magnetic minerals of the sediments were dominated by ferrimagnetic minerals such as magnetite,and a small contribution of hematite and maghematite also existed. The sediments recorded three negative values of remanence magnetic inclination at the depth: 191-206 cm,232-248 cm, and 292-308 cm. The corresponding ages of these negative values were 65.87-68.7 ka B.P., 73.4-80.8 ka B.P. And 108.4-113.6 ka B.P., respectively, according to stratigraphy of oxygen isotope, 14>C, and the age of a volca-nic ash layer. The negative value during 108.4-113.6 ka B.P.may be the record of a Blake event in the sediments of the Nansha area.

  20. First record of Atractoscion aequiden (Sciaenidae from the Arabian Sea Coasts of Oman and Acanthopagrus catenula (Sparidae from the Oman Sea (Gulf of Oman, northwestern Indian Ocean (Teleostei, Sciaenidae, Sparidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jawad, L. A.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The first record of Atractoscion aequidens from the Arabian Sea coasts of Oman and Acanthopagrus catenula from waters around City of Muscat on the Sea of Oman is reported based on one (671 mm in SL and ten specimens (111-257 mm SL, respectively. This account represents the second record of A. aequidens in the northern Indian Ocean and the northernmost record of A. catenula in the same ocean. Morphometric and meristic data are provided for the two species and compared with those from specimens collected from other parts of the world. The southern distribution of A. catenula is corrected in this report.

  1. Investigation of Glacial/Interglacial Periods Using IRD Flux Records from Site U1340A in the Bering Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, M. R.; Drake, M. K.; Mendoza, D.; Ravelo, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    The rate of sea level rise has increased over the last decades in part due to enhanced ice sheet melting. The purpose of my project is to study the processes that control the growth and decay of ice sheets surrounding the Bering Sea. Two major orbital cycles affect ice sheet size: precession has periodicity of ~20 thousand years (kyr) and results in changes in the Earth-sun distance during each season, and obliquity has a period of 41 kyr and results in a shift in the Earth's axial tilt by 2.5 degrees. The Milankovitch theory states that glacial-interglacial cycles were caused by changes in summertime solar radiation, which varies at both precession and obliquity periodicities of 20 and 41 kyr. However, in some geologic periods, benthic foramininfera oxygen isotope records reveal only 41 kyr variability in global ice volume. Two theories, each with different implications regarding how ice sheets respond to solar heating, have been proposed to explain this discrepancy; Raymo et al. (2006) predict that individual ice sheets vary at both 20 and 41 kyr periodicities even if the sum total of global ice volume varies only at 41 kyr, while Huybers (2008) predicts that individual ice sheets vary only at the 41 kyr periodicity. To test these theories, we created a proxy record, from ~1.3 to 1.7 myrs ago, of local ice sheet dynamics using estimates of mass accumulation and flux of Ice Rafted Debris (IRD) from IODP Site U1340A in the Bering Sea. IRD, defined as terrigenous grains greater than 250μm, is transported by icebergs, and is used as a proxy to analyze changes in ice sheet size. We find evidence for ~20 kyr variability, suggesting that local ice sheets are sensitive to the peak intensity of summertime solar forcing. This work is a step in determining how ice sheets respond to changes in seasonal and annual average heating.

  2. Caribbean Land Molluscs: Streptaxidae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venmans, L.A.W.C.

    1963-01-01

    The material on which the present paper is based consists of a small number of Streptaxidae collected by Dr. P. WAGENAAR HUMMELINCK during his visits to the Caribbean Islands and the mainland of Venezuela since 1930, and further of some specimens which, at various times, have reached the author thro

  3. Rodents of the Caribbean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Mouatt, Julia Thidamarth Vilstrup; Raghavan, Maanasa;

    2014-01-01

    The Capromyidae (hutias) are endemic rodents of the Caribbean and represent a model of dispersal for non-flying mammals in the Greater Antilles. This family has experienced severe extinctions during the Holocene and its phylogenetic affinities with respect to other caviomorph relatives are still...

  4. Temporal record of Pu isotopes in inter-tidal sediments from the northeastern Irish Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindahl, Patric, E-mail: patriclindahl@yahoo.com [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Worsfold, Paul; Keith-Roach, Miranda [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Andersen, Morten B. [Bristol Isotope Group, School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Kershaw, Peter; Leonard, Kins [The Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Lowestoft Laboratory, Pakefield Road, Suffolk NR33 0HT (United Kingdom); Choi, Min-Seok [Division of Earth and Environmental Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, 113 Gwahangno, Yusung-gu, Daejon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Boust, Dominique [Laboratoire de Radioecologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, BP 10, 50130 Cherbourg-Octeville (France); Lesueur, Patrick [University of Caen Basse Normandie, M2C UMR CNRS 6143, 14000 Caen (France)

    2011-11-01

    A depth profile of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu specific activities and isotope ratios was determined in an inter-tidal sediment core from the Esk Estuary in the northeastern Irish Sea. The study site has been impacted with plutonium through routine radionuclide discharges from the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant in Cumbria, NW England. A pronounced sub-surface maximum of {approx} 10 kBq kg{sup -1} was observed for {sup 239+240}Pu, corresponding to the peak in Pu discharge from Sellafield in 1973, with a decreasing trend with depth down to {approx} 0.04 kBq kg{sup -1} in the deeper layers. The depth profile of {sup 239+240}Pu specific activities together with results from gamma-ray spectrometry for {sup 137}Cs and {sup 241}Am was compared with reported releases from the Sellafield plant in order to estimate a reliable sediment chronology. The upper layers (1992 onwards) showed higher {sup 239+240}Pu specific activities than would be expected from the direct input of annual Sellafield discharges, indicating that the main input of Pu is from the time-integrated contaminated mud patch of the northeastern Irish Sea. The {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios ranged from {approx} 0.03 in the deepest layers to > 0.20 in the sub-surface layers with an activity-weighted average of 0.181. The decreasing {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio with depth reflects the changing nature of operations at the Sellafield plant from weapons-grade Pu production to reprocessing spent nuclear fuel with higher burn-up times in the late 1950s. In addition, recent annual {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios in winkles collected during 2003-2008 from three stations along the Cumbrian coastline showed no significant spatial or temporal differences with an overall average of 0.204, which supports the hypothesis of diluted Pu input from the contaminated mud patch. - Highlights: {yields} Depth profiles of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu determined in a northeastern Irish Sea sediment. {yields

  5. New record of Lobophora rosacea (Dictyotales; Phaeophyceae) from the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhongmin; Wang, Yongqiang; Yan, Pengcheng; Guo, Hui; Yao, Jianting; Tanaka, Jiro; Kawai, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Lobophora rosacea C.W. Vieira, Payri et De Clerck is reported from the South China Sea for the first time. Our specimens are very similar to L. rosacea recently described from New Caledonia, not only in morphology but also in rbcL and cox3 gene sequences. The fan-shaped thallus grows erectly, attaching to the substrate by a basal holdfast. The thallus is composed of a single layer of large medullary cells and three to four layers of cortical cells on both sides of the medulla. Mature sporophytes are detected, with sporangium sori scattered on both surfaces of the thallus.

  6. First record of the sipunculan worm Phascolion (Phascolion caupo Hendrix, 1975 in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M. FERRERO-VICENTE

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Specimens of the sipunculan worm Phascolion (Phascolion caupo Hendrix, 1975 have been collected for the first time in the Mediterranean Sea, thus increasing the number of known sipunculan species of up to 36 in this area. They were encountered on soft bottoms from the coast of San Pedro del Pinatar (Western Mediterranean. Thirty specimens were collected at a depth ranging from 32.6 to 37.2 m, mainly in sandy substrata with high load of silt and clays. 80% of the individuals were found inhabiting empty shells of gastropods or empty tubes of serpulid polychaetes.

  7. Remarks on the sea level records of the north Indian ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Unnikrishnan, A

    . 106, 6895-6916. Han, W., Webster, P.J., 2002. Forcing mechanisms of sea level interannual variability in the Bay of Bengal. J. Phys. Oceanogr. 32, 216-239. Jade, S., Mukul, M., Parvez, I.A., Ananda, M.B., Kumar, P.D., Gaur, V.K., Bendick, R...., Bilham, R., Blume, F., Wallace, K., Abbasi, I.A., Khan, M.A., Ulhadi, S., 2003. Pre- seismic, co-seismic and post-seismic displacements associated with the Bhuj 2001 earthquake derived from recent and historic geodetic data. Proc. Ind. Acad. Sci. (Earth...

  8. Cetacean stranding records in the Turkish Western Black Sea coast during October 2012 - September 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arda M. Tonay

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Between October 2012 and September 2013, a research has been conducted on marine mammal strandings on Turkish western Black Sea coast. In total, 54 stranded cetaceans were found, which included 22 bottlenose dolphins (41%, 19 harbour porpoises (35%, 11 common dolphins (20%, and 4% unidentified individuals. Most strandings were observed in May and June. Bycaught carcases were found especially in April, June and July. The aim of the study is to collect first-hand data on the monthly stranding rates in order to understand the seasonal variation of stranding cases in a year.

  9. New record of Lobophora rosacea (Dictyotales; Phaeophyceae) from the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhongmin; Wang, Yongqiang; Yan, Pengcheng; Guo, Hui; Yao, Jianting; Tanaka, Jiro; Kawai, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Lobophora rosacea C.W. Vieira, Payri et De Clerck is reported from the South China Sea for the first time. Our specimens are very similar to L. rosacea recently described from New Caledonia, not only in morphology but also in rbcL and cox3 gene sequences. The fan-shaped thallus grows erectly, attaching to the substrate by a basal holdfast. The thallus is composed of a single layer of large medullary cells and three to four layers of cortical cells on both sides of the medulla. Mature sporophytes are detected, with sporangium sori scattered on both surfaces of the thallus.

  10. Daily ocean monitoring since the 1860s shows record warming of northern European seas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKenzie, Brian; Schiedek, D.

    2007-01-01

    temperature more directly affects biological responses and species interactions. Here, we investigate historical variability in regional sea surface temperature in two large heavily exploited marine ecosystems and compare these variations with expected rates of temperature change for the 21st century. We use...... rate, which is expected to occur during the 21st century and summer temperatures have risen two to five times faster than those in other seasons. These warm temperatures and rates of change are due partly to an increase in the frequency of extremely warm years. The recent warming event is exceeding...

  11. The thermodynamic state of the Arctic atmosphere observed by AIRS: comparisons during the record minimum sea-ice extents of 2007 and 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Devasthale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The record sea-ice minimum (SIM extents observed during the summers of 2007 and 2012 in the Arctic are stark evidence of accelerated sea ice loss during the last decade. Improving our understanding of the Arctic atmosphere and accurate quantification of its characteristics becomes ever more crucial, not least to improve predictions of such extreme events in the future. In this context, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite provides crucial insights due to its ability to provide 3-D information on atmospheric thermodynamics.

    Here, we facilitate comparisons in the evolution of the thermodynamic state of the Arctic atmosphere during these two SIM events using a decade long AIRS observational record (2003–2012. It is shown that the meteorological conditions during 2012 were not extreme but three factors in preconditioning from winter through early summer probably played an important role in accelerating sea-ice melt. First, the marginal sea-ice zones along the central Eurasian and North Atlantic sectors remained warm throughout winter and early spring in 2012 preventing thicker ice build-up. Second, the circulation pattern favoured efficient sea-ice transport out of the Arctic in the Atlantic sector during late spring and early summer in 2012 compared to 2007. Third, additional warming over the Canadian Archipelago and southeast Beaufort Sea from May onward further contributed to accelerated sea-ice melt. All these factors may have lead already thin and declining sea-ice cover to pass below the previous sea-ice extent minimum of 2007. In sharp contrast to 2007, negative surface temperature anomalies and increased cloudiness were observed over the East Siberian and Chukchi Seas in the summer of 2012. The results suggest that satellite-based monitoring of atmospheric preconditioning could be a critical source of information in predicting extreme sea-ice melting events in the Arctic.

  12. The thermodynamic state of the Arctic atmosphere observed by AIRS: comparisons during the record minimum sea ice extents of 2007 and 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Devasthale

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The record sea ice minimum (SIM extents observed during the summers of 2007 and 2012 in the Arctic are stark evidence of accelerated sea ice loss during the last decade. Improving our understanding of the Arctic atmosphere and accurate quantification of its characteristics becomes ever more crucial, not least to improve predictions of such extreme events in the future. In this context, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite provides crucial insights due to its ability to provide 3-D information on atmospheric thermodynamics. Here, we facilitate comparisons in the evolution of the thermodynamic state of the Arctic atmosphere during these two SIM events using a decade-long AIRS observational record (2003–2012. It is shown that the meteorological conditions during 2012 were not extreme, but three factors of preconditioning from winter through early summer played an important role in accelerating sea ice melt. First, the marginal sea ice zones along the central Eurasian and North Atlantic sectors remained warm throughout winter and early spring in 2012 preventing thicker ice build-up. Second, the circulation pattern favoured efficient sea ice transport out of the Arctic in the Atlantic sector during late spring and early summer in 2012 compared to 2007. Third, additional warming over the Canadian archipelago and southeast Beaufort Sea from May onward further contributed to accelerated sea ice melt. All these factors may have lead the already thin and declining sea ice cover to pass below the previous sea ice extent minimum of 2007. In sharp contrast to 2007, negative surface temperature anomalies and increased cloudiness were observed over the East Siberian and Chukchi seas in the summer of 2012. The results suggest that satellite-based monitoring of atmospheric preconditioning could be a critical source of information in predicting extreme sea ice melting events in the Arctic.

  13. Preliminary results on Appendicularians from the Cicar (Cooperative Investigations in the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions) cruises 1970

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, de R.F.

    1974-01-01

    The Cicar-project (Cooperative Investigations in the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions project) offered an opportunity to collect epiplanktonic animals in the Southern part of the Caribbean Sea and in water north of Guyana in the Atlantic, to study the precise distribution of some groups in the area. A

  14. Fischer Plots of Wumishan Cyclothems, Precambrian Records of Third-Order Sea-Level Changes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The Mesoproterozoic Wumishan Formation ((1 310±20) Ma-(1 207±10) Ma) in Jixian, Tianjin represents a succession of 3 300 meter thick carbonate strata where are the best developed stromatolite biostromes and thrombolite bioherms. These biostromes and bioherms, together with tidal-flat dolomites and muddy dolostones, form Wumishan cyclothems with approximately symmetrical facies-succession fabrics, which belong to carbonate meter-scale cyclic sequences of peritidal type. These cyclothems are overlain by lagoon dolomitic mudstones and shales and by frequently developed paleosol layers, indicating that the boundary of Wumishan cyclothems is marked by an instantaneously-exposed punctuated surface. Viewed form the regularly vertical stacking patterns of Wumishan cyclothems in long-term sequences, 26 third-order sequences may be discerned in Wumishan Formation. These third-order sequences may also be incorporated into six second-order sequences. In order to study the variation range of third-order sea-level changes and the formation period of third-order sequence, 626 cyclothems are discerned in the middle and upper parts of Wumishan Formation where the outcrops are well developed. In terms of the total thickness and the formation period of Mesoproterozoic Wumishan Formation, the crust subsidence rate in the sedimentary period of Wumishan Formation is supposed to be 3 meters at each interval of 100 thousands years. Based on this assumption, Fischer plot might be designed to simulate the third-order sea-level changing pattern.

  15. Stranded pumice in the western Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, J. A.; Henton De Angelis, S.; Toscano, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Floating and washed-up pumices have been reported by scientific expeditions along the Caribbean Sea coast of the Central American Isthmus and the northern coast of South America since at least 1947. Local coastal communities have been utilizing this resource for many years. The rounded and buffered morphology of hand specimens is consistent with water-borne transit. The volcanically active Caribbean and Central American regions provide a number of candidates for source volcanoes and eruptions. We have attempted to identify this source using samples collected from Carrie Bow Cay and Placencia Beach, Belize; Tulum Beach, Mexico; Morrosquillo Bay, Colombia; and Galeta Point, Panama. We have tracked possible transport routes through the use of river drainage and ocean current maps. The criteria for comparing the products of potential source volcanoes (including Atitlán Caldera in Guatemala and Caribbean sources such as Mt. Pelée, Martinique and Soufrière Hills, Montserrat) were developed from the whole rock major and trace element geochemistry and the compositional and textural characteristics of pumice and their constituent minerals and glasses. The largest pumice sample collected from Carrie Bow Cay, Belize, was 18.5x12 cm with the typical, rounded morphology and distinctively stretched vesicles exhibited by this pumice collection.

  16. Aspectos tróficos y reproductivos de algunos batoideos capturados en Santa Marta, Mar Caribe de Colombia Trophic and reproductive aspects of some batoids caught at Santa Marta in the Colombian Caribbean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Grijalba-Bendeck

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan los resultados de la condición reproductiva y espectro trófico de cuatro batoideos capturados incidentalmente en la pesca artesanal de dos sectores del mar Caribe colombiano, entre agosto 2005 y septiembre 2006. Se evaluó un total 570 lances en Playa Salguero y 149 en Don Jaca, efectuándose entre 12 y 26 días de muestreo mensuales. Se obtuvo abundancias totales y relativas de los batoideos capturados y se estableció la proporción sexual, así como la representatividad de cada estado de desarrollo gonadal. De Narcine bancroffti se evaluó 176 ejemplares (127 hembras y 49 machos; 167 Rhinobatos percellens (83 hembras y 84 machos; 237 Urotrygon venezuelae (126 hembras y 111 machos y para Dasyatis guttata se evaluó 119 individuos (58 hembras y 61 machos. A pesar que los ejemplares capturados de las cuatro especies mostraron representatividad de todos los estadios de desarrollo gonadal, las etapas inmaduro (I y maduro (III, fueron las mejor representadas. Adicionalmente, por la proporción sexual obtenida, parece no haber segregación espacio-temporal marcada. La dieta en general estuvo constituida por crustáceos, anélidos y teleósteos, evidenciando preferencias alimentarias únicas, lo cual les permite evitar competencia interespecífica entre batoideos.This paper presents the reproductive condition and feeding spectrum of four batoid species caught as bycatch by artisanal fishermen in two sectors of the Colombian Caribbean Sea between August 2005 and September 2006. Specimens were evaluated from a total of 570 hauls done off Salguero beach and 149 off Don Jaca, with sampling periods of 12 to 26 days per month. The total and relative abundance of the batoids caught were determined, as were the sexual proportion and representativity of each sexual maturity stage. Specimens sampled were: 176 Narcine bancroftii (127 females, 49 males; 167 Rhinobatos percellens (83 females, 84 males; 237 Urotrygon venezuelae (126 females, 111

  17. Evaluation of Long-term Aerosol Data Records from SeaWiFS over Land and Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettenhausen, C.; Hsu, C.; Jeong, M.; Huang, J.

    2010-12-01

    Deserts around the globe produce mineral dust aerosols that may then be transported over cities, across continents, or even oceans. These aerosols affect the Earth’s energy balance through direct and indirect interactions with incoming solar radiation. They also have a biogeochemical effect as they deliver scarce nutrients to remote ecosystems. Large dust storms regularly disrupt air traffic and are a general nuisance to those living in transport regions. In the past, measuring dust aerosols has been incomplete at best. Satellite retrieval algorithms were limited to oceans or vegetated surfaces and typically neglected desert regions due to their high surface reflectivity in the mid-visible and near-infrared wavelengths, which have been typically used for aerosol retrievals. The Deep Blue aerosol retrieval algorithm was developed to resolve these shortcomings by utilizing the blue channels from instruments such as the Sea-Viewing Wide-Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to infer aerosol properties over these highly reflective surfaces. The surface reflectivity of desert regions is much lower in the blue channels and thus it is easier to separate the aerosol and surface signals than at the longer wavelengths used in other algorithms. More recently, the Deep Blue algorithm has been expanded to retrieve over vegetated surfaces and oceans as well. A single algorithm can now follow dust from source to sink. In this work, we introduce the SeaWiFS instrument and the Deep Blue aerosol retrieval algorithm. We have produced global aerosol data records over land and ocean from 1997 through 2009 using the Deep Blue algorithm and SeaWiFS data. We describe these data records and validate them with data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). We also show the relative performance compared to the current MODIS Deep Blue operational aerosol data in desert regions. The current results are encouraging and this dataset will

  18. Records of deep-sea anglerfishes (Lophiiformes: Ceratioidei) from Indonesia, with descriptions of three new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hsuan-Ching

    2016-06-09

    An examination of the ceratioid anglerfishes collected on the Indian Ocean side of Indonesia during surveys in 2004-2005 have revealed 18 species in 9 genera and 6 families, including three new species: Cryptopsaras couesii (Ceratiidae); Melanocetus johnsonii (Melanocetidae); Diceratias trilobus, Bufoceratias microcephalus sp. nov., B. thele, B. shaoi, B. cf. wedli (Diceratiidae); Himantolophus danae, H. sagamius, H. nigricornis, H. macroceratoides (Himantolophidae); Oneirodes quadrinema sp. nov., O. amaokai sp. nov., O. carlsbergi, O. cristatus, Dermatias platynogaster, Chaenophryne cf. melanorhabdus (Oneirodidae); and Linophryne parini (Linophrynidae). Of these, specimens of B. shaoi, H. macroceratoides, O. cristatus and L. parini represent the second records since the species were described. A specimen of H. nigricornis represents the third record and a specimen of Dermatias platynogaster represents the fourth record. Descriptive data and notes on the geographical distribution and morphological variation are provided for each species.

  19. The marine mammals of the Dutch Caribbean: a comparison between EEZ sectors, contrasts and concerns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debrot, A.O.; Witte, R.H.; Scheidat, M.

    2011-01-01

    We here provide a synoptic overview and preliminary update of the marine mammals of the Dutch Caribbean EEZ based on 279 cetacean sighting and stranding records. The Dutch Caribbean EEZ is composed of two distinct sectors. One is centered around the leeward Dutch islands of Aruba, Bonaire and

  20. The marine mammals of the Dutch Caribbean: a comparison between EEZ sectors, contrasts and concerns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debrot, A.O.; Witte, R.H.; Scheidat, M.

    2011-01-01

    We here provide a synoptic overview and preliminary update of the marine mammals of the Dutch Caribbean EEZ based on 279 cetacean sighting and stranding records. The Dutch Caribbean EEZ is composed of two distinct sectors. One is centered around the leeward Dutch islands of Aruba, Bonaire and Curaça

  1. Verification of the causes of glaciations and sea level changes using the records of calcite speleothems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shopov Yavor Y.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The luminescence of calcite speleothems displays an exponential dependence on soil temperature unless there is a dense cover of forest over the cave to dampen it. This relationship is determined primarily by the strength of solar visible and infrared radiation. It is suggested that, as a consequence, the microzonal variations of luminescence often found in speleothems can be used as a proxy index of Solar Insolation. The luminescence solar insolation proxy record of a speleothem from Jewel Cave, South Dakota, USA, was found to display millenial and centennial cycles in the record. It exhibits a rapid increase in solar insolation at 139 ± 5.5 kyrs. This increase precedes that suggested by the Orbital theory by about 10,000 years and is due to superimposition of the most powerful cycle in solar luminosity of 11.5 kyrs, upon the curve of orbital variations. The record from a speleothem in Duhlata Cave, Bulgaria matches that of South Dakota within the limits of dating error, indicating that both of these records (which are 10,000 km apart measure global solar insolation controls rather than local paleotemperature variations.

  2. A Century of Surface Productivity Recorded in the Skeleton of a Deep-Sea Coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B.; Risk, M. J.; Stone, R.

    2004-12-01

    "Poor understanding of the nutrient dynamics in the Gulf of Alaska results from insufficient uninterrupted, long-term observations" (PICES, 2004). Failing an instrumental record, oceanographers must increasingly rely on proxies. The utilization of deep-water corals as environmental recorders has only recently been recognized: they may fill in the many gaps present in instrumental records. Primnoa spp. is a long-lived gorgonian coral common in the northeastern Pacific. The abundance levels of \\delta15N and \\delta13C in the gorgonin portion of the skeleton have been correlated to surface productivity (Sherwood et al, 2004). Primnoa spp. can consequently be used as an historical proxy of productivity. A Primnoa specimen was obtained from 58.38 N and 148.77 W in the Gulf of Alaska. The coral was dead when collected, and died sometime after bomb testing, in the mid-1950's. Its lifespan was more than 100 years. Annual banding in the skeleton is quite clear, allowing tight dating control. Isotopic abundances of \\delta15N ranged from 10.2 to 14.4, suggesting the specimen was carnivorous, feeding primarily on zooplankton. Levels of \\delta13C ranged from -17.7 to -19.4, and exhibit decadal cyclical characteristic of the decadal patterns in the Gulf of Mexico. By matching cycles in isotopic abundances with historical data, we have been able to estimate time of death. This one coral specimen therefore extends the instrumental record by approximately 70 years.

  3. Written records of historical tsunamis in the northeastern South China Sea – challenges associated with developing a new integrated database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Y. A. Lau

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive analysis of 15 previously published regional databases incorporating more than 100 sources leads to a newly revised historical tsunami database for the northeastern (NE region of the South China Sea (SCS including Taiwan. The validity of each reported historical tsunami event listed in our database is assessed by comparing and contrasting the information and descriptions provided in the other databases. All earlier databases suffer from errors associated with inaccuracies in translation between different languages, calendars and location names. The new database contains 205 records of "events" reported to have occurred between AD 1076 and 2009. We identify and investigate 58 recorded tsunami events in the region. The validity of each event is based on the consistency and accuracy of the reports along with the relative number of individual records for that event. Of the 58 events, 23 are regarded as "valid" (confirmed events, three are "probable" events and six are "possible". Eighteen events are considered "doubtful" and eight events "invalid". The most destructive tsunami of the 23 valid events occurred in 1867 and affected Keelung, northern Taiwan, killing at least 100 people. Inaccuracies in the historical record aside, this new database highlights the occurrence and geographical extent of several large tsunamis in the NE SCS region and allows an elementary statistical analysis of annual recurrence intervals. Based on historical records from 1951–2009 the probability of a tsunami (from any source affecting the region in any given year is relatively high (33.4%. However, the likelihood of a tsunami that has a wave height >1 m, and/or causes fatalities and damage to infrastructure occurring in the region in any given year is low (1–2%. This work indicates the need for further research using coastal stratigraphy and inundation modeling to help validate some of the historical accounts of tsunamis as well as adequately evaluate

  4. PLEISTOCENE-HOLOCENE PALAEOENVIRONMENTAL RECORDS FROM PERMAFROST SEQUENCES AT THE KARA SEA COAST (NW SIBERIA, RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Streletskaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Kara Sea coasts were studied using comprehensive stratigraphic and geocryological methods. The paper presents the new analytical studies of ground ice and Quaternary deposits of Western Taymyr and presents the results of spore and pollen, foraminifera, grain-size, mineralogical, geochemical, oxygen isotopic, and other analyses. Several stratigraphic-geocryological transects from Yenisey and Gydan Bays enable us to refine the stratigraphy and palaeogeographical reconstruction of the environments and freezing of Late Pleistocene-Holocene sediments. Marine sedimentation conditions during the late Kargino time (MIS3 changed to continental conditions in MIS2 and MIS1. Marine sediments were frozen syn- and epigenetically with cryotexture and ground ice formation. Ice wedges formation corresponds to the end of the Pleistocene (MIS2 and during cooler periods of the Holocene.

  5. The thermodynamic state of the Arctic atmosphere observed by AIRS: comparisons during the record minimum sea ice extents of 2007 and 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Devasthale, A.; Sedlar, J.; T. Koenigk; E. J. Fetzer

    2013-01-01

    The record sea ice minimum (SIM) extents observed during the summers of 2007 and 2012 in the Arctic are stark evidence of accelerated sea ice loss during the last decade. Improving our understanding of the Arctic atmosphere and accurate quantification of its characteristics becomes ever more crucial, not least to improve predictions of such extreme events in the future. In this context, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite provides crucial insights ...

  6. The thermodynamic state of the Arctic atmosphere observed by AIRS: comparisons during the record minimum sea-ice extents of 2007 and 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Devasthale, A.; T. Koenigk; Sedlar, J.; E. J. Fetzer

    2013-01-01

    The record sea-ice minimum (SIM) extents observed during the summers of 2007 and 2012 in the Arctic are stark evidence of accelerated sea ice loss during the last decade. Improving our understanding of the Arctic atmosphere and accurate quantification of its characteristics becomes ever more crucial, not least to improve predictions of such extreme events in the future. In this context, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite provides crucial insights ...

  7. Forecasting OctoberNovember Caribbean hurricane days

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Philip J. Klotzbach

    2011-01-01

      Late season Caribbean hurricane activity is predictable ENSO and the AWP show skill as predictors for OctNov Caribbean activity OctoberNovember Caribbean activity can significantly impact the US...

  8. Molecular biomarker record of paleooceanographic envi-ronment in the East China Sea during the last 35000 years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟宪伟; 杜德文; 刘炎光; 刘振夏

    2002-01-01

    By reference of the d 18O and d 13C isotopic compositions of G.. sacculifer and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS)14C dates, the, and Pr/Pn in core DGKS9603 have been used to characterize the changes of paleooceanographic environment occurring in the East China Sea (ECS) during the last 35000 years. The stratigraphic records of these proxies have shown that during the last 35 ka the Okinawa Trough has gone through 7 stronger cold-climate events (C1-C7) and 9 terrigenous matter-decreasing events (e1-e9), of which, the C1 corresponds to the cold episode occurring in the middle late Holocene, C2-C4 and C7 correspond to the H1-H4 events, respectively. e1 and e3-e8 correspond to the decrease of sea surface temperature (SST), respectively. The terrigenous inputs increased when Heinrich events occurred. Climate colding resulted in the decrease of terrigenous matter transported by rivers, and the increase of that transported by winter monsoon. Heinrich events are closely related to East Asia monsoon. During the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 15.5-25.8 Cal ka BP), reduction environment fluctuated strongly, bringing forth three stronger reduction events (R1-R3) and one weaker reduction event (O), of which, R1-R3 correspond to the decrease of SST and increase of terrigenous nutrient and O corresponds to the decrease of terrigenous nutrient. The fluctuation of reduction condition must be related to the change of sea surface productivity.

  9. A new species of Coryogalops (Perciformes: Gobiidae) and the first adult record of Feia nympha from the Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovačić, Marcelo; Bogorodsky, Sergey V; Mal, Ahmad O

    2016-03-31

    A new species of the gobiid genus Coryogalops, C. nanus sp. nov. is described from the Red Sea. Coryogalops nanus sp. nov. is distinguished from congeners in having dorsal-fin rays VI + I,10; anal-fin rays I,9; pectoral-fin rays 12-14 (lowest count known for the genus), two upper rays with free tips; pelvic fins I,5, joined to form an emarginate disc, no pelvic frenum; predorsal area and narrow area at base of first dorsal fin naked; longitudinal scale series 26-29; transverse scale rows counted forward 6-7; transverse scale rows counted backward 7-8; circumpeduncular scale rows 11-12; seven transverse suborbital rows of sensory papillae; no tentacle above upper eye margin; anterior nostril tubular, without flap at its tip, posterior nostril pore-like; body semitranslucent, covered with small scattered orange-yellow spots and speckles, those in predorsal area contain black dots; an internal row of white spots along ventral part of body above anal-fin base and on caudal peduncle; head with small scattered orange to yellowish brown spots; first dorsal fin with two broad white bands at base of fin and distally, and with hyaline area densely dotted with melanophores in the middle of fin; preserved specimens opaque white to yellowish with sparse melanophores. An adult specimen of Feia nympha is recorded for the first time in the Red Sea and the lateral line system of this species is described.

  10. Historical record of lead accumulation and source in the tidal flat of Haizhou Bay, Yellow Sea: Insights from lead isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Guan, Minglei; Shu, Yujie; Shen, Liya; Chen, Xixi; Zhang, Fan; Li, Tiegang

    2016-05-15

    In order to investigate the historical records of lead contamination and source in coastal region of Haizhou Bay, Yellow Sea, a sediment core was collected from tidal flat, dated by (210)Pb and (137)Cs. Lead and its stable isotopic ratios were determined. The profiles of enrichment factor (EF) and Pb isotope ratios showed increasing trend upward throughout the core, correlating closely with the experience of a rapid economic and industrial development of the catchment. According to Pb isotopic ratios, coal combustion emission mainly contributed to the Pb burden in sediments. Based on end-member model, coal combustion emission dominated anthropogenic Pb sources in recent decades contributing from 48% to 67% in sediment. And the contribution of leaded gasoline was lower than 20%. A stable increase of coal combustion source was found in sediment core, while the contribution of leaded gasoline had declined recently, with the phase-out of leaded gasoline in China.

  11. COCONet (Continuously Operating Caribbean GPS Observational Network): Network Status and Project Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feaux, K.; Braun, J. J.; Calais, E.; Dausz, K.; Friesen, B. T.; Mattioli, G. S.; Miller, M. M.; Normandeau, J.; Seider, E.; Wang, G.

    2012-12-01

    The beauty and diversity of the Caribbean region result from geological and atmospheric processes that also pose serious threats to the large population within reach of seismic faults, hurricanes tracks, or sea-level change. The capacity to understand, prepare for, adapt to, and in some cases predict these natural hazards requires Earth observations on both large and small scales. The COCONet project was funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) with the aim of developing a large-scale geodetic and atmospheric infrastructure in the Caribbean that will form the backbone for a broad range of geoscience and atmospheric investigations and enable research on process-oriented science questions with direct relevance to geohazards. COCONet will consist of 50 new GPS and meteorological stations throughout the Caribbean region, 15 existing stations refurbished with new receivers, antennas, and meteorological instruments, and will also incorporate data from up to 61 existing operational GPS stations. Additional funding has recently been allocated to install 2 new collocated GPS and tide gauge sites and also add GPS instruments at two existing tide gauge sites in the Caribbean region. COCONet will provide free, high-quality, low-latency, open-format data and data products for researchers, educators, students, and the private sector. Data will be used by US and international scientists to study solid earth processes such as plate kinematics and dynamics as well as plate boundary interactions and deformation, with an emphasis on the earthquake cycle. COCNet will also serve atmospheric science objectives by providing more precise estimates of tropospheric water vapor and enabling better forecast of the dynamics of airborne moisture associated with the yearly Caribbean hurricane cycle. COCONet is being installed and will be maintained by UNAVCO on behalf of the science and other user communities in the United States and abroad, thus leveraging UNAVCO's proven record of

  12. Long-Term Record of Arctic and Antarctic Sea and Ice Surface Temperatures from Thermal Infrared Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, Cristina; Dybkjær, Gorm; Eastwood, Steinar; Tonboe, Rasmus; Høyer, Jacob

    2015-04-01

    Surface temperature is among the most important variables in the surface energy balance equation and it significantly affects the atmospheric boundary layer structure, the turbulent heat exchange and, over ice, the ice growth rate. Here we measure the surface temperature using thermal infrared sensors from 10-12 µm wavelength, a method whose primary limitation over sea ice is the detection of clouds. However, in the Arctic and around Antarctica there are very few conventional observations of surface temperature from buoys, and it is sometimes difficult to determine if the temperature is measured at the surface or within the snowpack, the latter of which often results in a warm bias. To reduce this bias, much interest is being paid to alternative remote sensing methods for monitoring high latitude surface temperature. We used Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) global area coverage (GAC) data to produce a high latitude sea surface temperature (SST), ice surface temperature (IST) and ice cap skin temperature dataset spanning 27 years (1982-2009). This long-term climate record is the first of its kind for IST. In this project we used brightness temperatures from the infrared channels of AVHRR sensors aboard NOAA and Metop polar-orbiting satellites. Surface temperatures were calculated using separate split window algorithms for day SST, night SST, and IST. The snow surface emissivity across all angles of the swath were simulated specifically for all sensors using an emission model. Additionally, all algorithms were tuned to the Arctic using simulated brightness temperatures from a radiative transfer model with atmospheric profiles and skin temperatures from European Centre for Medium-Range Forecasts (ECMWF) re-analysis data (ERA-Interim). Here we present the results of product quality as compared to in situ measurements from buoys and infrared radiometers, as well as a preliminary analysis of climate trends revealed by the record.

  13. Extraterrestrial Impact Event Recorded in the Late Triassic Deep-Sea Deposits from Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, H.; Shirai, N.; Ebihara, M.; Nozaki, T.; Suzuki, K.; Onoue, T.; Kiyokawa, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Late Triassic is marked by the formation of several large impact structures on the Earth, including the 90-km-diameter Manicouagan crater in Canada (Spray and Kelly, 1998). Anomalously high platinum group element (PGE) concentrations have been reported from the Upper Triassic deep-sea deposits in Japan, which have been interpreted to be derived from an extraterrestrial impact event forming the Manicouagan crater (Onoue et al., 2012; Sato et al., 2013). However, previous studies have not clarified the composition of the projectile. Here we report the PGE element ratios and osmium (Os) isotopic compositions of the Upper Triassic ejecta layers in Japan in order to understand the projectile component. Evidence for the Late Triassic impact event has been discovered in the deep-sea claystone layers at four bedded chert sections in the Japanese accretionary complex. The claystone layers contain microspherules, Ni-rich magnetite grains and high abundance of PGEs (Onoue et al., 2012). Biostratigraphic analysis of radiolarian fossils from the studied sections revealed that the claystone layers occur embedded in the upper middle Norian (Sugiyama, 1997; Onoue et al., 2012). Identification of the projectile is attempted by comparing the isotope and elemental ratios of the ejecta deposit with similar data obtained from meteorites. The Ru/Ir and Pt/Ir ratios of all the claystone samples from the study sites are plotted along the mixing line between chondrites and upper continental crust. Although chondrites cannot be distinguished from iron meteorites by using PGE/Ir ratios, the claystone layers have Cr/Ir ratios between 104-105, indicating that the claystone layers are clearly contaminated by chondritic material. The Os isotope data show an abrupt and marked negative excursion from an initial Os isotope ratio of ~0.477 to unradiogenic values of ~0.126 in a claystone layer within a middle Norian bedded chert, indicating the input of chondrite-derived Os into seawater. The

  14. INFLUENCIA DE LA FASE LUNAR EN LAS TASAS DE CAPTURA DE Selar crumenophthalmus (CARANGIDAE EN EL CARIBE DE COLOMBIA. UNA APROXIMACIÓN POR MODELOS LINEALES GENERALIZADOS Moon Phase Influence on Catch Rates of Selar crumenophthalmus (Carangidae in the Caribbean Sea off Colombia. A Generalized Linear Models Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAIRO ALTAMAR

    Full Text Available Las tasas de captura de Selar crumenophthalmus provenientes de los desembarcos registrados en el norte del mar Caribe de Colombia fueron analizadas y estandarizadas mediante Modelos Lineales Generalizados (MLG. Se utilizó información colectada entre 1994 y 2001. Los factores que se utilizaron como predictores lineales fueron: año, mes, código lunar, sector geográfico, y estrato de profundidad. Las mayores tasas de captura fueron detectadas durante los dos días de luna nueva máxima en el sector del Parque Nacional Natural Tayrona, lo cual indica que la mayor disponibilidad del recurso, dado su hábito nocturno y fototaxis positiva, está muy localizada en el tiempo. Esta condición ha de incorporarse en los esquemas de ordenamiento, una vez que facilita la implementación de mecanismos de control pesquero. Se registró una disminución de la tasa de captura en los últimos dos años del periodo examinado, tendencia que sugiere el deterioro de la abundancia poblacional de este recurso, hasta ahora considerado fuera de riesgo de sobreexplotación. En pesquerías multiespecíficas, explicar la abundancia poblacional con tasas de captura estimadas incluyendo solo datos de lances que registren la especie analizada, puede derivar en una conclusión conceptual y cuantitativamente incorrecta.Catch rates of Selar crumenophthalmus in the landings belonging from the north of the Caribbean Sea off Colombia were analyzed and standardized with Generalized Lineal Models (GLM. Information collected between 1994 and 2001 was used. The factors used as lineal predictors were: year, month, Moon phases, geographic sector, and depth. The highest catch rates were detected during the two days 100% New Moon in the Tayrona National Natural Park, which indicates that the availability of the resource, because its nocturne habit and positive phototaxis, is located in the time. This condition should be incorporates in management schemes, since facilitates the

  15. Millennial mercury records derived from ornithogenic sediment on Dongdao Island, South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Yan; Yuhong Wang; Wenhan Cheng; Liguang Sun

    2011-01-01

    Two omithogenic sediment cores,which have a time span of 1000 years and are influenced by red-footed booby (Sula sula),were collected from Dongdao Islands,South China Sea.The determined mercury concentrations of the two cores show similar and substantial fluctuations during the past millennium,and the fluctuations are most likely caused by the changes in mercury level of the ocean environment and in anthropogenic Hg emission.For the past 500 years,the mercury concentration in the red-footed booby excrement has a striking association with global anthropogenic mercury emission.The mercury concentration increased rapidly after AD 1600 in corresponding to beginning of the unparalleled gold and silver mining in South Central America that left a large volume of anthropogenic mercury pollution.Since the Industrial Revolution,the mercury level has increased at a fast pace,very likely caused by modern coal combustion,chlor-alkali and oil refining industries.The comparison of mercury profiles from different places on earth suggested that anthropogenic mercury pollution after the Industrial Revolution is more severe in Northern Hemisphere than in Antarctica.

  16. Growth rates and age at adult size of loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta in the Mediterranean Sea, estimated through capture-mark-recapture records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Casale

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Growth rates of the juvenile phase of loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta were estimated for the first time in the Mediterranean Sea from capture-mark-recapture records. Thirty-eight turtles were released from Italian coasts and re-encountered after 1.0-10.9 years in the period 1986-2007. Their mean CCL (curved carapace length ranged from 32.5 to 82.0 cm and they showed variable growth rates, ranging from 0 to 5.97 cm/yr (mean: 2.5. The association between annual growth rate and three covariates (mean year, mean size and time interval was investigated through a non-parametric modelling approach. Only mean size showed a clear effect on growth rate, described by a monotonic declining curve. Variability indicates that factors not included in the model, probably individual-related ones, have an important effect on growth rates. Based on the monotonic decreasing growth function which indicates no growth spurt, a von Bertalanffy growth function was used to estimate the time required by turtles to grow within the observed size range. The results indicate that turtles would take 16-28 years to reach 66.5-84.7 cm CCL, the average nesting female sizes observed at the most important Mediterranean nesting sites, which can be considered an approximation of the size at maturity.

  17. Recent improvements in earthquake and tsunami monitoring in the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, L.; Green, D.; McNamara, D.; Whitmore, P.; Weaver, J.; Huang, P.; Benz, H.

    2007-12-01

    Following the catastrophic loss of life from the December 26, 2004, Sumatra-Andaman Islands earthquake and tsunami, the U.S. Government appropriated funds to improve monitoring along a major portion of vulnerable coastal regions in the Caribbean Sea, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic Ocean. Partners in this project include the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN), the Seismic Research Unit of the University of the West Indies, and other collaborating institutions in the Caribbean region. As part of this effort, the USGS is coordinating with Caribbean host nations to design and deploy nine new broadband and strong-motion seismic stations. The instrumentation consists of an STS-2 seismometer, an Episensor accelerometer, and a Q330 high resolution digitizer. Six stations are currently transmitting data to the USGS National Earthquake Information Center, where the data are redistributed to the NOAA's Tsunami Warning Centers, regional monitoring partners, and the IRIS Data Management Center. Operating stations include: Isla Barro Colorado, Panama; Gun Hill Barbados; Grenville, Grenada; Guantanamo Bay, Cuba; Sabaneta Dam, Dominican Republic; and Tegucigalpa, Honduras. Three additional stations in Barbuda, Grand Turks, and Jamaica will be completed during the fall of 2007. These nine stations are affiliates of the Global Seismographic Network (GSN) and complement existing GSN stations as well as regional stations. The new seismic stations improve azimuthal coverage, increase network density, and provide on-scale recording throughout the region. Complementary to this network, NOAA has placed Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunami (DART) stations at sites in regions with a history of generating destructive tsunamis. Recently, NOAA completed deployment of 7 DART stations off the coasts of Montauk Pt, NY; Charleston, SC; Miami, FL; San Juan, Puerto Rico; New

  18. Near east paleomagnetic secular variation recorded in sediments from the Sea of Galilee (Lake Kinneret)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R.; Turner, G. M.; Stiller, M.; Kaufman, A.

    1985-03-01

    Paleomagnetic records of declination and inclination from sediments recovered from the bed of Lake Kinneret (32.4°N, 35.7°E) have been dated by radiocarbon techniques. The sediments span the last 5000 yr. The changes in inclination down the sediment cores are more pronounced than the declination fluctuations and are repeatable between the three coring sites, which are several kilometers apart. Magnetic susceptibility logs display 13 maxima in the 5-m-long sequences, with a pronounced susceptibility minimum about 1000 yr B.P. Many of the susceptibility maxima and minima can be easily correlated between coring sites and are shown to be dominantly related to changes in sediment carbonate content. The natural remanent magnetization intensity follows a similar pattern to that of susceptibility, and the natural remanence of the Kinneret sediments is presumed to reside in detrital magnetite grains carried into the lake by the river Jordan from the basalt-rich bedrock of the rift floor and the Golan Heights. The 14C chronology is strongly supported by a pollen study in which pronounced changes in the proportion of olive pollen were interpreted as being due to extensive cultivation of olives around Galilee in the Hellenistic and Byzantine periods. The Kinneret paleosecular variation records, if accurately dated, point to a complex spatial pattern of Holocene secular variation with significant variations over distances as small as 1000-2000 km.

  19. Geological records of redox change related to methane seepage in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, J.; Ryu, B.; Bahk, J.; Choi, J.; Riedel, M.

    2012-12-01

    The sediment mounds related to columnar seismic blanking zone have been reported in the basin plain, reflecting the presence of near-surface gas hydrate and authigenic carbonates in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea. The mounds commonly consist of hemipelagic sediments and buried authigenic carbonates. Recently, exposed carbonate mound (~5 m wide and 2 -3 m high) was found in the site UBGH2-11 at water depth of ~2092 m. Six push cores (70-cm-long) were collected around the area of the exposed carbonate mound using ROV manipulators. The total nitrogen (TN), total carbon (TC), total organic carbon (TOC), and their carbon dioxide (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope values of core sediments were measured to identify the spatial distribution of organic matter related to methane seepages. The trace and rare earth elements of core sediments were analyzed to determine the redox conditions in seafloor sedimentary environments around the area of cold vents. Higher TOC contents (4-8%) were observed in three cores in the area around the exposed carbonate mound, whereas TOC contents ranged from 2-3% in other three cores, about 50 m away from the exposed carbonate mound. Highly negative δ13C values (-40 to -28 ‰) of organic matters show only one core located at the side of exposed carbonate mound. Higher Mn/Ti ratios suggest that the topmost parts of the core sediments outside the exposed carbonate mound were influenced by the effects of oxygenated bottom water. At other locations, there is no evidence of oxygenated bottom water. It suggests that the surface sediments formed under oxygen-depleted condition. Variation of Mo/Al and Co/Al ratios explains by fluctuation of redox conditions around the exposed carbonate mound in the site UBGH2-11. These results indicate that redox conditions of seafloor environments were locally influenced by methane seepages of cold vents associated with columnar seismic blanking zone in the Ulleung Basin.

  20. Holocene palaeoclimate and sea level fluctuation recorded from the coastal Barker Swamp, Rottnest Island, south-western Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouramanis, C.; Dodson, J.; Wilkins, D.; De Deckker, P.; Chase, B. M.

    2012-10-01

    The Holocene palaeoclimatic history of south-western Western Australia (SWWA) has received little attention compared to south-eastern Australia, and this has resulted in conflicting views over the impact of climate variability in the region. We present here a well-dated, high-resolution record from two overlapping sediment cores obtained from the centre of Barker Swamp, Rottnest Island, offshore Perth. The records span the last 8.7 ka, with the main lacustrine phase occurring after 7.4 ka. This site preserves both pollen and several ostracod taxa. The pollen record suggests a long-term shift from the early-mid Holocene to the late Holocene to drier conditions with less shrubland and more low-ground cover and less fire activity. A salinity transfer function was developed from ostracod faunal assemblage data and trace metal ratios (Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Na/Ca) and stable isotopes (δ18O and δ13C) analysed on selected ostracod valves. These provide a detailed history of evaporation/precipitation (E/P) differences that clearly shows that the SWWA region was subjected to significant climatic shifts over the last 7.4 ka, with a broad shift towards increased aridity after 5 ka. The swamp ranged from fresh to saline as recorded in the ostracod valve chemistry and the independently-derived salinity transfer function. The ostracod record also indicates that a sea-level highstand occurred between ca. 4.5 and 4.3 ka, with probable step-wise increases at 6.75, 6.2, and 5.6 ka, with the last vestiges of salt water intrusion at ca. 1 ka. After about 2.3 ka, the fresh, groundwater lens that underlies the western portion of the island intersected the swamp depression, influencing the hydrology of the swamp. The broad climatic changes recorded in Barker Swamp are also compared with data from southern South Africa, and it is suggested that the Southern Annular Mode appears to have been the dominant driver in the climate of these regions and that the Indian Ocean Dipole is of little

  1. Vegetation evolution and millennial-scale climatic fluctuations since Last Glacial Maximum in pollen record from northern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Yunli; SUN Xiangjun

    2005-01-01

    In order to study vegetation evolution and environmental change since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), a total of 180 pollen samples with an average time resolution of 150 years were analyzed on the top parts(0-31 m, 0-27 kaBP)of deep sea sediments from ODP Site 1144 (20°3.18(N, 1170°25.14(E), northeastern SCS. The character- istic features of pollen diagram include that pine dominates in the interglacial, and herb pollen dominates with a good deal of tropical-subtropical pollen in the last glacial, and from 18 kaBP the tropical-subtropical pollen influx rose abruptly, while the herbaceous pollen influx and percentage dropped quickly, indicating that climate turned warmer and more humid, and more tropical-subtropical vegetation grew on the mainland and the emerging continental shelf, while the grassland on the shelf diminished. A detailed comparison shows an earlier change of pollen assemblages at the glacial- interglacial transition between MIS6 and 5 (Termination II) than the ice volume change indicated by the oxygen isotope record, implying that mid-low latitude climate warming preceded ice sheet retreat. Millennial-scale climatic fluctuations of vegetation change in pollen record are also discussed.

  2. Spectral Reflectance Analysis of the Caribbean Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Raúl Aguirre Gómez

    2014-01-01

    En este trabajo se analizaron curvas de reflectancia espectral mediante el método de derivada. Los espectros de derivada de la reflectancia revelaron picos ocultos tanto en curvas de reflectancia y absorción del agua del Mar Caribe y de elementos contenidos en ella. Las curvas de reflectancia mostraron un predominio del color azul (400-500 nm), el cual es característico de aguas oligotróficas del Caribe, los picos de absorción están influenciados por las propiedades ópticas de la clorofila a ...

  3. First record of Calma gobioophaga Calado and Urgorri, 2002 (Gastropoda: Nudibranchia in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. PRKIC

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Specimens of the nudibranch genus Calma were observed under stones at two Croatian localities while feeding on gobiid eggs. Some ambiguous morphological features compared with the original descriptions of the known species of the genus, C. glaucoides and C. gobioophaga, hampered an easy identification. Genetic data (COI and 16S sequences confirmed the distinction between the two species of the genus Calma, and allowed to unambiguously identify the Croatian specimens as Calma gobioophaga. This is the first record of this species for the Mediterranean and extends remarkably its distribution range. Finally, the eggs fed by the Croatian specimens have been taxonomically identified by using the 12S rDNA marker as Gobius cobitis.

  4. First record of Calma gobioophaga Calado and Urgorri, 2002 (Gastropoda: Nudibranchia in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. PRKIC

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Specimens of the nudibranch genus Calma were observed under stones at two Croatian localities while feeding on gobiid eggs. Some ambiguous morphological features compared with the original descriptions of the known species of the genus, C. glaucoides and C. gobioophaga, hampered an easy identification. Genetic data (COI and 16S sequences confirmed the distinction between the two species of the genus Calma, and allowed to unambiguously identify the Croatian specimens as Calma gobioophaga. This is the first record of this species for the Mediterranean and extends remarkably its distribution range. Finally, the eggs fed by the Croatian specimens have been taxonomically identified by using the 12S rDNA marker as Gobius cobitis.

  5. Global ice volume during MIS 3 inferred from a sea-level analysis of sedimentary core records in the Yellow River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pico, Tamara; Mitrovica, Jerry X.; Ferrier, Ken L.; Braun, Jean

    2016-11-01

    Estimates of global ice volume during the glacial phase of the most recent ice age cycle are characterized by significant uncertainty, reflecting the relative paucity of geological constraints on sea level relevant to this time interval. For example, during the middle stages of Marine Isotope Stage 3, published estimates of peak global mean sea level (GMSL) relative to the present range from -25 m to -87 m. The large uncertainty in GMSL at MIS 3 has significant implications for estimates of the rate of ice growth in the period leading to the Last Glacial Maximum (∼26 ka). We refine estimates of global ice volume during MIS 3 by employing sediment cores in the Bohai and Yellow Sea that record a migration of the paleoshoreline at ∼50-37 ka through a transition from marine to brackish conditions. In particular, we correct relative sea level at these sites for contamination due to glacial isostatic adjustment using a sea-level calculation that includes a gravitationally self-consistent treatment of sediment redistribution and compaction, and estimate a peak global mean sea level of -38 ± 7 m during the interval 50-37 ka. With suitable sedimentary core records, the approach described herein can be extended to refine existing constraints on global ice volume across the entire glacial period.

  6. Three new Nannastacidae (Crustacea: Cumacea) species from a Caribbean mesophotic ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Iorgu; Chatterjee, Tapas; Schizas, Nikolaos V

    2014-02-19

    Examination of substrata from the mesophotic reefs of Mona Island, Puerto Rico yielded 3 new species of cumaceans, all from the family Nannastacidae: Cumella achimae sp. nov., C. victoriae sp. nov. and Nannastacus craciuni sp. nov. The 3 new species bring the total of new cumacean taxa described from the mesophotic reefs of US Caribbean to 9, highlighting the potential of mesophotic reefs as a biodiversity hotspot. For the first time we report the genus Nannastacus from the Caribbean Sea

  7. A 20 year independent record of sea surface temperature for climate from Along-Track Scanning Radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Christopher J.; Embury, Owen; Rayner, Nick A.; Berry, David I.; Corlett, Gary K.; Lean, Katie; Veal, Karen L.; Kent, Elizabeth C.; Llewellyn-Jones, David T.; Remedios, John J.; Saunders, Roger

    2012-12-01

    A new record of sea surface temperature (SST) for climate applications is described. This record provides independent corroboration of global variations estimated from SST measurements made in situ. Infrared imagery from Along-Track Scanning Radiometers (ATSRs) is used to create a 20 year time series of SST at 0.1° latitude-longitude resolution, in the ATSR Reprocessing for Climate (ARC) project. A very high degree of independence of in situ measurements is achieved via physics-based techniques. Skin SST and SST estimated for 20 cm depth are provided, with grid cell uncertainty estimates. Comparison with in situ data sets establishes that ARC SSTs generally have bias of order 0.1 K or smaller. The precision of the ARC SSTs is 0.14 K during 2003 to 2009, from three-way error analysis. Over the period 1994 to 2010, ARC SSTs are stable, with better than 95% confidence, to within 0.005 K yr-1(demonstrated for tropical regions). The data set appears useful for cleanly quantifying interannual variability in SST and major SST anomalies. The ARC SST global anomaly time series is compared to the in situ-based Hadley Centre SST data set version 3 (HadSST3). Within known uncertainties in bias adjustments applied to in situ measurements, the independent ARC record and HadSST3 present the same variations in global marine temperature since 1996. Since the in situ observing system evolved significantly in its mix of measurement platforms and techniques over this period, ARC SSTs provide an important corroboration that HadSST3 accurately represents recent variability and change in this essential climate variable.

  8. Records of natural fire and climate history during the last three glacial-interglacial cycles around the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO; Yunli

    2001-01-01

    [1]Komarek, E. V. Sr., The meteorological basis for fire ecology, in Proc. Tall Timbers Fire Ecol. Conf., 1966, 35-44.[2]Gilbert, L. M., Fire as a factor in the development of vegetation types, Aust. Fores., 1962, 26: 67-70.[3]Johnston, V. R., The ecology of fire, Audubon, 1970, 72: 76-119.[4]Chen Yinshuo, Forest fire in early Holocene forest changes at Lake Barrine, Australia, Acta Botanica Sinica (in Chinese),1990, 32(1): 69-75.[5]Michael, I. B., Fire in the earth sciences, Episodes, 1997, 20(4): 223-226.[6]Herring, J. R., Charcoal flux into sediments of the north Pacific Ocean: The Cenozoic record of burning, in The carbon cycle and atmospheric CO2: Natural variations from Archean to present, Geophysical Monograph, 1985, 32:237-251.[7]Kershaw, A. P., Climatic change and aboriginal burniing in northeast Australia during the last two glacial/interglacial cy cles. Nature, 1985, 322: 47-49.[8]Hermann, B., Late Quaternary vegetation, climates and fire history from the tropical mountain region of Morrode Itapeva,SE Brazil, Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 1997, 129: 407-422.[9]Earle, C. J., Brubaker, L. B., Anderson, P. M., Charcoal in northcentral Alaskan lake sediments: Relationships to fire and late-Quaternary vegetation history, Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 1996, 92: 83-95.[10]Xuan Wang, Sander van der Karrs., Peter, K. et al., A record of fire, vegetation and climate through the last three glacial cycles from Lombok Ridge core G6-4, eastern Indian Ocean, Indonesia, Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Pa laeoecology, 1999, 147: 241-256.[11]Sander van der Kaars, Xuan Wang, Peter, K. et al., A late Quaternary palaeoecological record from the Banda Sea, Indo nesia: Patterns of vegetation, climate and biomass burning in Indonesia and northern Australia, Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 2000, 155: 135-154.[12]Isabel, F., Volker, M., A review of charcoal analysis as a tool for

  9. Drivers of Holocene sea-level change - using a global database of relative sea-level records from the Northern and Southern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Benjamin; Khan, Nicole; Ashe, Erica; Kopp, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Many factors give rise to relative sea-level (RSL) changes that are far from globally uniform. For example, spatially variable sea-level responses arise because of the exchange of mass between ice sheets and oceans. Gravitational, flexural, and rotational processes generate a distinct spatial pattern - or "fingerprint" - of sea-level change associated with each shrinking land ice mass. As a land ice mass shrinks, sea-level rise is greater in areas geographically distal to the ice mass than in areas proximal to it, in large part because the gravitational attraction between the ice mass and the ocean is reduced. Thus, the U.S. mid-Atlantic coastline experiences about 50% of the global average sea-level-rise due to Greenland Ice Sheet melt, but about 120% of the global average due to West Antarctic Ice Sheet melt. Separating the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheet contributions during the past 7,000 years requires analysis of sea-level changes from sites in the northern and southern hemisphere. Accordingly we present a global sea-level database for the Holocene to which we apply a hierarchical statistical model to: (1) estimate the Global Mean Sea Level Signal; (2) quantify rates of change; (3) compare rates of change among sites, including full quantification of the uncertainty in their differences; and (4) test hypotheses about the sources of meltwater through their sea-level fingerprints.

  10. Contemporary white-band disease in Caribbean corals driven by climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, C. J.; van Woesik, R.

    2015-04-01

    Over the past 40 years, two of the dominant reef-building corals in the Caribbean, Acropora palmata and Acropora cervicornis, have experienced unprecedented declines. That loss has been largely attributed to a syndrome commonly referred to as white-band disease. Climate change-driven increases in sea surface temperature (SST) have been linked to several coral diseases, yet, despite decades of research, the attribution of white-band disease to climate change remains unknown. Here we hindcasted the potential relationship between recent ocean warming and outbreaks of white-band disease on acroporid corals. We quantified eight SST metrics, including rates of change in SST and contemporary thermal anomalies, and compared them with records of white-band disease on A. palmata and A. cervicornis from 473 sites across the Caribbean, surveyed from 1997 to 2004. The results of our models suggest that decades-long climate-driven changes in SST, increases in thermal minima, and the breach of thermal maxima have all played significant roles in the spread of white-band disease. We conclude that white-band disease has been strongly coupled with thermal stresses associated with climate change, which has contributed to the regional decline of these once-dominant reef-building corals.

  11. Hudson River Paleoclimate, Sea Level, and Human Impact: A Record From Piermont Marsh, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdyla; Peteet, Dorothy; Liberman, Louisa; Sugar; Wong; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A 13.77 meter sediment core from Piermont Marsh, NY (40 00 N, 73 55W) records the local and regional vegetational and foraminiferal history of the Hudson Estuary. The sediments were sampled every 4 cm, which represents a decadal to centuryscale resolution. Basal sediment dating is in progress, and the 11-m depth represents about 4000 years. Changes in plant macrofossils and charcoal appear to indicate differences in salinIty and drought, suggesting changes in climate. Scirpus, Salicornia, and high levels of charcoal seem to indicate drier/more saline conditions, while lack of these macrofossils and increases in Chara/Nitella, aquatic leaves, and very little charcoal suggests wetter conditions. Other macrofossils include Carex, Juncus, Polygonum, Zanichellia, Ruppia. High resolution AMS dating of plant macrofossils is in progress, and will be compared with changes in Hudson River sediment cores offshore. Foraminiferal assemblages from key intervals of the core will be presented. Human impact in the upper sediments is visible from the influx of grass seeds, primarily Phragmites, and the ragweed pollen rise.

  12. Holocene dynamics in the Bering Strait inflow to the Arctic and the Beaufort Gyre circulation based on sedimentary records from the Chukchi Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masanobu; Nam, Seung-Il; Polyak, Leonid; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Suzuki, Kenta; Irino, Tomohisa; Shimada, Koji

    2017-09-01

    The Beaufort Gyre (BG) and the Bering Strait inflow (BSI) are important elements of the Arctic Ocean circulation system and major controls on the distribution of Arctic sea ice. We report records of the quartz / feldspar and chlorite / illite ratios in three sediment cores from the northern Chukchi Sea, providing insights into the long-term dynamics of the BG circulation and the BSI during the Holocene. The quartz / feldspar ratio, interpreted as a proxy of the BG strength, gradually decreased during the Holocene, suggesting a long-term decline in the BG strength, consistent with an orbitally controlled decrease in summer insolation. We propose that the BG rotation weakened as a result of the increasing stability of sea-ice cover at the margins of the Canada Basin, driven by decreasing insolation. Millennial to multi-centennial variability in the quartz / feldspar ratio (the BG circulation) is consistent with fluctuations in solar irradiance, suggesting that solar activity affected the BG strength on these timescales. The BSI approximation by the chlorite / illite record, despite a considerable geographic variability, consistently shows intensified flow from the Bering Sea to the Arctic during the middle Holocene, which is attributed primarily to the effect of higher atmospheric pressure over the Aleutian Basin. The intensified BSI was associated with decrease in sea-ice concentrations and increase in marine production, as indicated by biomarker concentrations, suggesting a major influence of the BSI on sea-ice and biological conditions in the Chukchi Sea. Multi-century to millennial fluctuations, presumably controlled by solar activity, were also identified in a proxy-based BSI record characterized by the highest age resolution.

  13. Three-dimensional temperature fields of the North Patagonian Sea recorded by Magellanic penguins as biological sampling platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Juan E.; Pisoni, Juan P.; Quintana, Flavio

    2017-04-01

    Temperature is a primary determinant of biogeographic patterns and ecosystem processes. Standard techniques to study the ocean temperature in situ are, however, particularly limited by their time and spatial coverage, problems which might be partially mitigated by using marine top predators as biological platforms for oceanographic sampling. We used small archival tags deployed on 33 Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus), and obtained 21,070 geo-localized profiles of water temperature, during late spring of 2008, 2011, 2012 and 2013; in a region of the North Patagonian Sea with limited oceanographic records in situ. We compared our in situ data of sea surface temperature (SST) with those available from satellite remote sensing; to describe the three-dimensional temperature fields around the area of influence of two important tidal frontal systems; and to study the inter-annual variation in the three-dimensional temperature fields. There was a strong positive relationship between satellite- and animal-derived SST data although there was an overestimation by remote-sensing by a maximum difference of +2 °C. Little inter-annual variability in the 3-dimensional temperature fields was found, with the exception of 2012 (and to a lesser extent in 2013) where the SST was significantly higher. In 2013, we found weak stratification in a region which was unexpected. In addition, during the same year, a warm small-scale vortex is indicated by the animal-derived temperature data. This allowed us to describe and better understand the dynamics of the water masses, which, so far, have been mainly studied by remote sensors and numerical models. Our results highlight again the potential of using marine top predators as biological platforms to collect oceanographic data, which will enhance and accelerate studies on the Southwest Atlantic Ocean. In a changing world, threatened by climate change, it is urgent to fill information gaps on the coupled ocean-atmosphere system

  14. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) from AVHRR Pathfinder, Version 5.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The AVHRR Pathfinder Version 5.2 Sea Surface Temperature data set (PFV52) is a collection of global, twice-daily 4km sea surface temperature data produced in a...

  15. Numerical Simulations of the 1991 Limón Tsunami, Costa Rica Caribbean Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón-Barrantes, Silvia; Zamora, Natalia

    2017-08-01

    The second largest recorded tsunami along the Caribbean margin of Central America occurred 25 years ago. On April 22nd, 1991, an earthquake with magnitude Mw 7.6 ruptured along the thrust faults that form the North Panamá Deformed Belt (NPDB). The earthquake triggered a tsunami that affected the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica and Panamá within few minutes, generating two casualties. These are the only deaths caused by a tsunami in Costa Rica. Coseismic uplift up to 1.6 m and runup values larger than 2 m were measured along some coastal sites. Here, we consider three solutions for the seismic source as initial conditions to model the tsunami, each considering a single rupture plane. We performed numerical modeling of the tsunami propagation and runup using NEOWAVE numerical model (Yamazaki et al. in Int J Numer Methods Fluids 67:2081-2107, 2010, doi: 10.1002/fld.2485 ) on a system of nested grids from the entire Caribbean Sea to Limón city. The modeled surface deformation and tsunami runup agreed with the measured data along most of the coastal sites with one preferred model that fits the field data. The model results are useful to determine how the 1991 tsunami could have affected regions where tsunami records were not preserved and to simulate the effects of the coastal surface deformations as buffer to tsunami. We also performed tsunami modeling to simulate the consequences if a similar event with larger magnitude Mw 7.9 occurs offshore the southern Costa Rican Caribbean coast. Such event would generate maximum wave heights of more than 5 m showing that Limón and northwestern Panamá coastal areas are exposed to moderate-to-large tsunamis. These simulations considering historical events and maximum credible scenarios can be useful for hazard assessment and also as part of studies leading to tsunami evacuation maps and mitigation plans, even when that is not the scope of this paper.

  16. Impact of sea-level change on the paleo Primary Productivity record in the NW African coastal upwelling area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, X.; Paul, A.

    2009-04-01

    A sea level decrease of 120 m at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) drastically modifies the shelf morphology of the North West African coastal upwelling area. Using a regional coupled circulation-ecosystem model subject to a set of boundary conditions that reflect Present Day (PD) and LGM conditions, we aim to quantify how changes in shelf morphology, as well as changes in sub-surface nutrient concentrations or local climatic conditions, influence the biological productivity and its record in the sediments. The oceanic circulation is simulated by the Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS), taking advantage of the AGRIF (Adaptive Grid Refinement in Fortran) technique to set-up an embedded grid structure. A high-resolution grid (1/10°) is centred on our study area, and is nested in a larger, coarser grid (1/2°) over the Atlantic domain. Boundary and initial conditions for PD and LGM are provided by global simulations performed with the University of Victoria Earth System-Climate Model (UVic ESCM). We used NPZD (Nutrient, Phytoplankton, Zooplankton and Detritus) biogeochemical models. We have identified the following issues in interpreting a sedimentary record at a fixed core location as an indicator of the total upwelling productivity: - Changes in the shelf morphology due to sea-level change appeared to have an impact on the productivity of the upwelling itself, but also to displace the high-productivity zone. - Comparing the Primary Production (PP) between PD and LGM at a given geographical location, or comparing the zonal mean of the PP, can show opposite results. The comparison at geographical locations assumes a direct connection between the production in the surface ocean and the underlying sediments. The comparison of the zonal mean of PP or sediment flux assumes that lateral advection of particulates and sediment transport are significant processes in producing the sedimentary signal at a given location. We illustrate the various situations, with or without

  17. Redescription of the sea anemone Bunodeopsis Pelagica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fisher, Elaine

    1976-01-01

    There are two species of sea anemone occurring on the floating sea weed Sargassum natans in the Caribbean sea: Bunodeopsis pelagica (Quoy & Gaimard) and Anemonia sargassensis Hargitt. The anemones are readily distinguished from one another by their colour and the nature of their tentacles. B.

  18. Antarctic Glacial Retreats and the Records of Sea Level Change in Deposits at the North Bank of the Shenzhen Bay,South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑洪汉; 黄宝林

    1997-01-01

    In view of the huge ice cover of 24.5×106 km3 in Antarctica,which accounts for over 90% by volume of the ice body on earth,the movement of Antarctic glaciers is a major control on global sea-level change and climatic fluctuation.As recorded in the Quaternary de posits in King George Island,West Antarctica,Three rapid ablations can be recognized at 11000,9000and 6100 years ago and the global climate within the past 6000 years is characterized by small-amplitude warm-cold fluctuation.Intertibal deposits at the north bank of the Shenzhen Bay suggest a periodic variation in sea level in about every 670 years over the last 6000 years with low sea levels recorded in the periods of 5500-4900,3900-3600,2400-2200and 1300-1200 years ago.Between these periods the sea level rised for about 80 cm on average.The modern warming climate in the last century corresponds with a rise of sea level at the rate of 2-3mm/a.

  19. Mapping Colombian Caribbean and Pacific bottom seascapes and marine ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Rozo Garzón, Daniel Mauricio; Vides C., Martha P.; Lozano R., Pilar; Reyes, Javier

    2007-01-01

    Colombia is recognized as a mega diverse country on the basis of the number of terrestrial animal and plant species occurring within its boundaries (Williams 1997). However, its privileged coasts position on both Caribbean Sea and Pacific Ocean exhibiting distinct geological, oceanographic, and climatic features could perhaps rank the country within the highest marine biological diversity in South America and among the most biodiverse in the world. An inventory of the full variety of phys...

  20. Checklist of sea turtles endohelminth in Neotropical region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werneck M. R.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a list of parasites described in sea turtles from the Neotropical region. Through the review of literature the occurrence of 79 taxa of helminthes parasites were observed, mostly consisting of the Phylum Platyhelminthes with 76 species distributed in 14 families and 2 families of the Phylum Nematoda within 3 species. Regarding the parasite records, the most studied host was the green turtle (Chelonia mydas followed by the hawksbill turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata, olive ridley turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea, loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta and leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea. Overall helminths were reported in 12 countries and in the Caribbean Sea region. This checklist is the largest compilation of data on helminths found in sea turtles in the Neotropical region.

  1. Past storminess recorded in the internal architecture of coastal formations of Estonia in the NE Baltic Sea region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tõnisson, Hannes; Vilumaa, Kadri; Kont, Are; Sugita, Shinya; Rosentau, Alar; Muru, Merle; Anderson, Agnes

    2016-04-01

    Over the past 50 years, storminess has increased in northern Europe because of the changes in cyclonic activity. The cyclone season in the Baltic Sea area has shifted from autumn to winter; this has led to intensification of shore processes (erosion, sediment transport and accumulation) and has increased pressure to the economy (land use, coastal protection measures) of the coastal regions in the Baltic states. Therefore, studing the effects of such changes on shore processes in the past is critical for prediction of the future changes along the Baltic coasts. Beach ridge plains are found worldwide, where cyclones and storm surges affect accumulation forms. These sandy shores are highly susceptible to erosion. Due to the isostatic uplift on the NE coast of the Baltic Sea, the signs of major past events are well-preserved in the internal architecture of old coastal formations (dune ridge-swale complexes). Wave-eroded scarps in beach deposits are visible in subsurface ground-penetrating radar (GPR) records, indicating the past high-energy events. Several study areas and transects were selected on the NW coast of Estonia, using high-resolution topographic maps (LiDAR). Shore-normal subsurface surveys have been conducted with a digital GSSI SIR-3000 georadar with a 270 MHz antenna at each transect. Interpretation of GPR facies was based on hand auger and window sampler coring, which provided accurate depths of key stratigraphic boundaries and bounding surfaces. Several samples for luminescence and 14C dating were collected to determine the approximate chronology of the coastal formations along the Estonian coast. We have found that changes in storminess, including the periods of high and low intensity of storms in late Holocene, are clearly reflected in the internal patterns of ancient coastal formations. The sections with small ridges with short seaward-dipped layers (interface between wave-built and aeolian deposits) in deeper horizons are probably formed during

  2. Palaeoenvironmental Evolution of Cenote Aktun Ha (Carwash) on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico and its Response to Holocene Sea-Level Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, J. J.; Reinhardt, E. G.; Peros, M. C.; Davidson, D. E.; van Hengstum, P. J.; Beddows, P. A.

    2008-12-01

    A 61-cm core was obtained from 4 metres below the water table in Cenote Aktun Ha, on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. The cenote is 8.6 km from the Caribbean coast and its formation and evolution have been largely affected by sea-level change. The base of the core dates to 6940 - 6740 cal yr BP and overlying sediments were deposited rapidly over the subsequent ~200 years. The pollen record shows that the cenote evolved from a marsh dominated by red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) and fern (Polypodiaceae) to an open-water system. These vegetation changes were controlled by water level and salinity and are thus useful indicators of past sea level. At the base, the d13C isotopic ratios reveal the influence of terrestrial vegetation (-29‰), but shift to more negative values up-core (-33‰), indicating an influence from particulate matter in the flooded cenote pool. Although microfossil populations were nearly absent through most of the core, the microfossil assemblage in the upper 6 cm of the core is dominated by juvenile Ammonia tepida and the thecamoebian genus Centropyxis. These populations indicate open-water conditions in the cenote and a major environmental shift around 6600 cal yr BP, which is related to sea-level rise in the Caribbean basin. These data fit well with previously established sea-level curves for the Caribbean Sea. Our reconstruction of the environmental history of Cenote Aktun Ha helps elucidate the floral and hydrological history of the region, and highlights the utility of cenote sediments for studying the Holocene sea-level history of the Caribbean Sea.

  3. Clay mineral records of East Asian monsoon evolution during late Quaternary in the southern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhifei; C. Colin; A. Trentesaux; D. Blamart

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution clay mineral records combined with oxygen isotopic stratigraphy over the past 190 ka during late Quaternary from core MD01-2393 off the Mekong River in the southern South China Sea are reported to reconstruct a history of East Asian monsoon evolution.The dominating clay mineral components indicate a strong glacial-interglacial cyclicity, with high glacial illite, chlorite, and kaolinite contents and high interglacial smectites content. The provenance analysis indicates the direct input of clay minerals via the Mekong River drainage basin.Illite and chlorite derived mainly from the upper reach of the Mekong River, where physical erosion of meta-sedimentary rocks is dominant. Kaolinite derived mainly from active erosion of inhered clays from reworked sediments in the middle reaches. Smectites originated mainly through bisiallitic soils in the middle to lower reaches of the Mekong River. The smectites/(illite+chlorite)and smectites/kaolinite ratios are determined as mineralogical indicators of East Asian monsoon variations. Relatively high ratios occur during interglacials and indicate strengthened summer-monsoon rainfall and weakened winter-monsoon winds; relatively lower ratios happened in glacials, indicating intensified winter monsoon and weakened summer monsoon. The evolution of the summer and winter monsoons provides an almost linear response to the summer insolation of the Northern Hemisphere, implying an astronomical forcing of the East Asian monsoon evolution.

  4. Sea surface temperature variations recorded on coralline Sr/Ca ratios during Mid-Late Holocene in Leizhou Peninsula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Gangjian; YU Kefu; ZHAO Jianxin

    2004-01-01

    High-resolution Sr/Ca ratios of two Porites cor als from Leizhou Peninsula were measured using inductively coupled plasma atomic spectrometry (ICP-AES). TIMS U-Th dating reveals that the life-spans of the two corals are 489500 AD and 539-530 BC, respectively. Monthly sea surface temperatures (SSTs) during these two periods can be reconstructed from their skeletal Sr/Ca ratios. The results reveal that SSTs during 539530 BC were roughly the same as those during 1990-2000 AD in this area, indicating a relative warm climate period. However, the period of 489-500 AD was significantly cooler, with annual mean SST, the 10-a average of minimum monthly winter SSTs and the 10-a average of maximum monthly summer SSTs being about 2, 2.9 and 1℃ lower than that in the 1990s, respectively. Such climate patterns agree well with the phenological results recorded in the historic documents in other areas of China.

  5. New distribution records of the gall crab Opecarcinus cathyae van der Meij, 2014 (Decapoda: Brachyura: Cryptochiridae) from the Red Sea, Maldives and Japan

    KAUST Repository

    Meij, Sancia E. T.

    2016-11-12

    The gall crab Opecarcinus cathyae van der Meij, 2014 has been reported from various localities in Indonesia and Malaysia. Recent surveys in the Red Sea, Maldives and Japan yielded additional specimens of O. cathyae, considerably expanding the known distribution range of this species to the east and west. The identity of O. cathyae was confirmed based on COI sequence data, revealing identical haplotypes for the Red Sea, Maldivian and Japanese material and three haplotypes in the Indonesian material. Opecarcinus cathyae has one of the widest known recorded distribution ranges for all gall crab species.

  6. Presumed filter-feeding in a deep-sea benthic shrimp (Decapoda, Caridea, Stylodactylidae, with records of the deepest occurrence of carideans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Wicksten

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer, we observed a large stylodactylid shrimp resting on a sedimented sea floor at 4826 m in the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument. The shrimp was not collected but most closely resembled Bathystylodactylus bathyalis, known previously only from a single broken specimen. Video footage shows the shrimp facing into the current and extending its upraised and fringed first and second pereopods, presumably capturing passing particles. The video footage is the first ever to show a living deep-sea stylodactylid and constitutes the deepest record for the family. We provide a list of the deepest reports of caridean shrimps world-wide.

  7. Holocene vegetation and climate changes in the central Mediterranean inferred from a high-resolution marine pollen record (Adriatic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Combourieu-Nebout

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The high-resolution multiproxy study of the Adriatic marine core MD 90-917 provides new insights to reconstruct vegetation and regional climate changes over the southcentral Mediterranean during the Younger Dryas (YD and Holocene. Pollen records show the rapid forest colonization of the Italian and Balkan borderlands and the gradual installation of the Mediterranean association during the Holocene. Quantitative estimates based on pollen data provide Holocene precipitations and temperatures in the Adriatic Sea using a multi-method approach. Clay mineral ratios from the same core reflect the relative contributions of riverine (illite and smectite and eolian (kaolinite contributions to the site, and thus act as an additional proxy with which to evaluate precipitation changes in the Holocene. Vegetation climate reconstructions show the response to the Preboreal oscillation (PBO, most likely driven by changes in temperature and seasonal precipitation, which is linked to increasing river inputs from Adriatic rivers recorded by increase in clay mineral contribution to marine sediments. Pollen-inferred temperature declines during the early–mid Holocene, then increases during the mid–late Holocene, similar to southwestern Mediterranean climatic patterns during the Holocene. Several short vegetation and climatic events appear in the record, indicating the sensitivity of vegetation in the region to millennial-scale variability. Reconstructed summer precipitation shows a regional maximum (170–200 mm between 8000 and 7000 similar to the general pattern across southern Europe. Two important shifts in vegetation occur at 7700 cal yr BP (calendar years before present and between 7500 and 7000 cal yr BP and are correlated with increased river inputs around the Adriatic Basin respectively from the northern (7700 event and from the central Adriatic borderlands (7500–7000 event. During the mid-Holocene, the wet summers lead to permanent moisture all year

  8. Estimating Arctic sea-ice freeze-up and break-up from the satellite record: A comparison of different approaches in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Johnson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available 1. Abstract The recognized importance of the annual cycle of sea ice in the Arctic to heat budgets, human behavior, and ecosystem functions, requires consistent definitions of such key events in the ice cycle as break-up and freeze-up. An internally consistent and reproducible approach to characterize the timing of these events in the annual sea-ice cycle is described. An algorithm was developed to calculate the start and end dates of freeze-up and break-up and applied to time series of satellite-derived sea-ice concentration from 1979 to 2013. Our approach builds from discussions with sea-ice experts having experience observing and working on the sea ice in the Bering, Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Applying the algorithm to the 1979–2013 satellite data reveals that freeze-up is delayed by two weeks per decade for the Chukchi coast and one week per decade for the Beaufort coast. For both regions, break-up start is arriving earlier by 5–7 days per decade and break-up end is arriving earlier by 10–12 days per decade. In the Chukchi Sea, “early” break-up is arriving earlier by one month over the 34-year period and alternates with a “late” break-up. The calculated freeze-up and break-up dates provide information helpful to understanding the dynamics of the annual sea-ice cycle and identifying the drivers that modify this cycle. The algorithm presented here, and potential refinements, can help guide future work on changes in the seasonal cycle of sea ice. The sea-ice phenology of freeze-up and break-up that results from our approach is consistent with observations of sea-ice use. It may be applied to advancing our understanding and prediction of the timing of seasonal navigation, availability of ice as a biological habitat, and assessment of numerical models.

  9. Upper Cretaceous chalk facies and depositional history recorded in the Mona-1 core, Mona Ridge, Danish North Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finn Surlyk

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The 331 m long core from the Mona-1 well in the Danish North Sea spans almost the entire Upper Cretaceous Chalk Group but only about 10% of Late Cretaceous time is represented. The succession comprises 14 facies representing pelagic deposition, turbidity flow, and mass-transport processes, including mudflow, debris flow, and slumping. Pelagic deposits vary mainly in terms of the concentration of siliciclastic material, the trace-fossil assemblage, and the presence or ab¬sence of primary sedimentary structures. Pelagic sedimentation was probably punctuated by the deposition of thin turbidites, and the resultant deposits were thoroughly bioturbated if deposited during normal oxygenation at the sea floor. Periodic benthic dysoxia resulted in the preservation of primary structures, as represented by laminated chalk which consists of thin pelagic laminae alternating with thin turbidites. In addition to the thin turbidites in the laminated chalk, four dif¬ferent turbidite facies are interpreted as representing high- to low-energy flows. Clast-supported chalk conglomerates have previously not been differentiated from other turbidites, but are here interpreted to be directly related to the down-slope evolution of debris flows. Debris flows are rep¬resented by matrix-supported conglomerates, which form one of the most common facies in the succession. High-concentration, gravity-driven suspension flows passed into dilute visco-plastic flows during the final stages of deposition and resulted in the deposition of structureless chalks. Limited shear deformation produced distinct quasi-facies from which the precursor facies can be deduced, whereas intense or continued shear deformation produced a shear-banded quasi-facies from which the precursor facies cannot be deduced in all cases. A series of major slump packages (14–18 in total are interpreted, forming over 40% of the succession; debrites appear to be the most common precursor facies involved in

  10. Upper Cretaceous chalk facies and depositional history recorded in the Mona-1 core, Mona Ridge, Danish North Sea: Plate 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surlyk, Finn

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The 331 m long core from the Mona-1 well in the Danish North Sea spans almost the entire Upper Cretaceous Chalk Group but only about 10% of Late Cretaceous time is represented. The succession comprises 14 facies representing pelagic deposition, turbidity flow, and mass-transport processes, including mudflow, debris flow, and slumping. Pelagic deposits vary mainly in terms of the concentration of siliciclastic material, the trace-fossil assemblage, and the presence or ab¬sence of primary sedimentary structures. Pelagic sedimentation was probably punctuated by the deposition of thin turbidites, and the resultant deposits were thoroughly bioturbated if deposited during normal oxygenation at the sea floor. Periodic benthic dysoxia resulted in the preservation of primary structures, as represented by laminated chalk which consists of thin pelagic laminae alternating with thin turbidites. In addition to the thin turbidites in the laminated chalk, four dif¬ferent turbidite facies are interpreted as representing high- to low-energy flows. Clast-supported chalk conglomerates have previously not been differentiated from other turbidites, but are here interpreted to be directly related to the down-slope evolution of debris flows. Debris flows are rep¬resented by matrix-supported conglomerates, which form one of the most common facies in the succession. High-concentration, gravity-driven suspension flows passed into dilute visco-plastic flows during the final stages of deposition and resulted in the deposition of structureless chalks. Limited shear deformatio