WorldWideScience

Sample records for caribbean region lignite

  1. Annotated bibliography of coal in the Caribbean region. [Lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orndorff, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of preparing this annotated bibliography was to compile information on coal localities for the Caribbean region used for preparation of a coal map of the region. Also, it serves as a brief reference list of publications for future coal studies in the Caribbean region. It is in no way an exhaustive study or complete listing of coal literature for the Caribbean. All the material was gathered from published literature with the exception of information from Cuba which was supplied from a study by Gordon Wood of the US Geological Survey, Branch of Coal Resources. Following the classification system of the US Geological Survey (Wood and others, 1983), the term coal resources has been used in this report for reference to general estimates of coal quantities even though authors of the material being annotated may have used the term coal reserves in a similar denotation. The literature ranges from 1857 to 1981. The countries listed include Colombia, Mexico, Venezuela, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, and the countries of Central America.

  2. Some Megadrili Oligochaeta from the Caribbean Region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Righi, Gilberto

    1995-01-01

    Righi, Gilberto, 1995. Some megadrili oligochaeta of the Caribbean Region. Studies Nat. Hist. Caribbean Region 72, Amsterdam, 1993: 47-53. Numerous Caribbean samples of the Megadrili – mainly peregrine anthropochorous species – are presented; and a description of Diachaeta (D) bonairensis sp. n. is

  3. Regional strategy tested in Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Barbados, St. Vincent, and St. Lucia have joined forces in the world's 1st regional Contraceptive Social Marketing (CSM) effort -- the Caribbean CSM. The Barbados Family Planning Association (BFPS) is overseeing the operation, which begins selling 2 contraceptive pills and a condom in early February. Costs and start-up times were shaved by adopting brand names and advertising materials from Jamaica's highly successful CSM project. Jamaica's popular "Panther" condom and "Perle" oral contraceptive (OC) are being used by the Caribbean CSM project. Perle's 9-year-old package has been redesigned and the Caribbean CSM project also is selling a 2nd, low-dose version called "Perle-LD." The products are manufactured in the US by Syntex as Noriday and Norminest, respectively. But the regional approach's financial gains also had a debit side, most notably a tripling of bureaucratic procedures. Part of project difficulties stem from differences among the 3 Caribbean countries. While sharing a common cultural heritage, St. Lucians speak a patois dialect in addition to the English prevalent on the other islands. The biggest hurdle was overcoming an economic disparity between Barbados and its less affluent neighbors, St. Vincent and St. Lucia. The CSM project decided to try a 2-tier product pricing strategy. In US currency, prices run $1.75 per cycle for both OCs on Barbados, but $1.26 on St. Vincent and St. Lucia. A Panther 3-pack costs 75 cents on Barbados and 42 cents on the othe 2 islands. The project is being promoted with generic family planning media advertisements. The project also has held physician orientation seminars on each island. The pilot program will be accompanied by retailer training seminars. In addition the project may introduce a spermicidal foaming tablet, once the US Food and Drug Administration approvs a new American-made product. The unique Caribbean CSM project may spread an idea as potent as the family planning message. Its success could transmit the

  4. Rotaria of the Caribbean region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, de Marg.

    1977-01-01

    1. In this paper, a study of Rotifers has been made of extensive material, collected in the Caribbean province by Dr. P. WAGENAAR HUMMELINCK, between 1930 and 1973. 2. 64 species of Rotifers have been found. For 19 of these, particulars are given on their morphology, ecology and biogeographical dist

  5. Tsunami Warning Services for the Caribbean Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, P. M.; Ferris, J. C.; Weinstein, S. A.

    2007-05-01

    Tsunami warning and watch services are currently provided to the Caribbean region through a collaborative effort between the two NOAA Tsunami Warning Centers (TWCs): the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) in Ewa Beach, Hawaii, and the West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WCATWC) in Palmer, Alaska. The WCATWC, in coordination with the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN), provides fast-response warning services to the U.S. territories of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands (PR/VI). The PTWC provides regional watch services to other countries throughout and surrounding the Caribbean Sea as part of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Caribbean Sea and Adjacent Regions. This collaboration is analogous to the TWC's responsibilities in the Pacific basin: the WCATWC provides fast-response warning services for the U.S. west coast states, Alaska, and British Columbia in Canada, while the PTWC provides regional services for countries throughout and surrounding the Pacific Ocean (as well as a fast-response service for the U.S. State of Hawaii). Caribbean seismic data are transmitted to the TWCs through several means. The PRSN directly exports data to the WCATWC, providing the Center sufficient seismic data for the PR/VI region. Additionally, the PRSN provides the TWCs with data gathered from other Caribbean nations. Using modern communication capabilities, the seismic data can be processed at the TWCs at the same time it is processed locally. Another source of high- quality seismic data is the new USGS nine-station array that circles the region. The Global Seismic Network maintains several stations in Caribbean, Central American, and South American nations which are available in real-time to the TWCs. Unfortunately, sea level data coverage is sporadic in the region. The PR/VI has a relatively dense array of coastal tide gages, but coastal tide gage coverage is very sparse for the rest of the Caribbean basin. Three deep-ocean pressure

  6. Lignite; Braunkohle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaltenbach, Erwin; Maassen, Uwe [Debriv e.V., Berlin und Koeln (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The domestic lignite is the most important and in the foreseeable future, the only domestic energy resource that is available in large quantities and economically. It makes an essential contribution to secure and competitive energy supply and has a high regional as macroeconomic importance. The required guarantied capacity for the development of renewable energy, the lignite provides under competition conditions. The flexibility of the lignite power plants is in addition to security of supply and competitiveness, a strategic added value for a reliable power supply. [German] Die heimische Braunkohle ist die wichtigste und in ueberschaubarer Zukunft auch die einzige heimische Energieressource, die in grossen Mengen und wirtschaftlich zur Verfuegung steht. Sie leistet einen unverzichtbaren Beitrag zur sicheren und wettbewerbsfaehigen Energieversorgung und hat eine hohe regional- wie gesamtwirtschaftliche Bedeutung. Die fuer den Ausbau der erneuerbaren Energien notwendige gesicherte Leistung stellt die Braunkohle unter Wettbewerbsbedingungen zur Verfuegung. Die Flexibilitaet des Braunkohlenkraftwerksparks ist neben Versorgungssicherheit und Wettbewerbsfaehigkeit ein strategischer Zusatznutzen fuer eine sichere Stromversorgung.

  7. Kinematic reconstruction of the Caribbean region since the Early Jurassic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochman, Lydian; van Hinsbergen, Douwe; Torsvik, Trond; Spakman, Wim; Pindell, James

    2014-05-01

    The Caribbean region results from a complex tectonic history governed by the interplay of the North American, South American and (Paleo-)Pacific plates, between which the Caribbean plate evolved since the early Cretaceous. During its entire tectonic evolution, the Caribbean plate was largely surrounded by subduction and transform boundaries, which hampers a quantitative integration into the global circuit of plate motions. In addition, reconstructions of the region have so far not resulted in a first order kinematic description of the main tectonic units in terms of Euler poles and finite rotation angles. Here, we present an updated, quantitatively described kinematic reconstruction of the Caribbean region back to 200 Ma integrated into the global plate circuit, and implemented with GPlates free software. Our analysis of Caribbean tectonic evolution incorporates an extensive literature review. To constrain the Caribbean plate motion between the American continents, we use a novel approach that takes structural geological observations rather than marine magnetic anomalies as prime input, and uses regionally extensive metamorphic and magmatic phenomena such as the Great Arc of the Caribbean, the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP) and the Caribbean high-pressure belt as correlation markers. The resulting model restores the Caribbean plate back along the Cayman Trough and major strike-slip faults in Guatemala, offshore Nicaragua, offshore Belize and along the Northern Andes towards its position of origin, west of the North and South American continents in early Cretaceous time. We provide the paleomagnetic reference frame for the Caribbean region by rotating the Global Apparent Polar Wander Path into coordinates of the Caribbean plate interior, Cuba, and the Chortis Block. We conclude that a plate kinematic scenario for a Panthalassa/Pacific origin of Caribbean lithosphere leads to a much simpler explanation than a Proto-Caribbean/Atlantic origin. Placing our

  8. Faults of the Caribbean Region (flt6bg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset describes faults and structural features of the Caribbean region (Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, British Virgin...

  9. Surface Geology of the Caribbean Region (geo6bg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes polygons that describe the geologic age of surface outcrops of bedrock of the Caribbean region (Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas,...

  10. Marine Biodiversity in the Caribbean: Regional Estimates and Distribution Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Miloslavich; Juan Manuel Díaz; Eduardo Klein; Juan José Alvarado; Cristina Díaz,; Judith Gobin; Elva Escobar-Briones; Juan José Cruz-Motta; Ernesto Weil; Jorge Cortés; Ana Carolina Bastidas; Ross Robertson; Fernando Zapata; Alberto Martín; Julio Castillo

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the distribution patterns of marine biodiversity and summarizes the major activities of the Census of Marine Life program in the Caribbean region. The coastal Caribbean region is a large marine ecosystem (LME) characterized by coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses, but including other environments, such as sandy beaches and rocky shores. These tropical ecosystems incorporate a high diversity of associated flora and fauna, and the nations that border the Car...

  11. VOLCANIC TSUNAMI GENERATING SOURCE MECHANISMS IN THE EASTERN CARIBBEAN REGION

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, volcanic island flank failures and underwater slides have generated numerous destructive tsunamis in the Caribbean region. Convergent, compressional and collisional tectonic activity caused primarily from the eastward movement of the Caribbean Plate in relation to the North American, Atlantic and South American Plates, is responsible for zones of subduction in the region, the formation of island arcs and the evolution of particular volcanic centers on the over...

  12. The European Union and the Caribbean Region: Situating the Caribbean Overseas Countries and Territories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Sutton

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:This paper examines one important dimension of the European Union's (EU 'regional' engagement with the Caribbean: its relations with the Overseas Countries and Territories (OCT, with a particular focus on the possibility of furthering the policy goals of greater regional integration and cooperation. It does so in three parts. The first sets out the basis for current EU policy to the OCT which has been under discussion between the EU, the OCT and the four EU member states most involved (Denmark, France, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom since 2008. It reports EU proposals for change and the responses to them by the Caribbean OCTs. The second part examines EU policy toward promoting greater regional cooperation among the Caribbean OCTs and between them and some of the other Caribbean regional organizations. Three distinct frameworks for cooperation and integration are discussed: with independent states as established in the Caribbean Community, the Caribbean Forum and the Economic Partnership Agreement; with the French departments and collectivities; and with the Caribbean OCT. In each the position of the Caribbean OCT is situated. The final part briefly discusses the creation of a 'new' framework for regional cooperation specific for the Caribbean OCT which will most closely match their interests in the Caribbean.Resumen: La Unión Europea y la Región del Caribe: Situando a los Países y Territorios de Ultramar del CaribeEste ensayo analiza una dimensión importante de la Unión Europea (UE 'regional' y su compromiso con el Caribe: de igual manera sus relaciones con los Países y Territorios de Ultramar (PTU, con un enfoque particular sobre la posibilidad de promover los objetivos de la política con una mayor integración regional y cooperación. Este proceso se desglosa en tres partes. La primera establece la base para la actual política de la UE hacia los PTU, ya que esta ha sido objeto de debate entre los mismos y los cuatro

  13. Regional Disease Vector Ecology Profile: Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    rabbits, bats and even some reptiles and amphibians . Most songbirds are not adversely affected by EEE viral infection, although domestic birds such...susceptible to infection, as well as some reptiles and amphibians . The virus produces severe morbidity and mortality in equines. Most studies have implicated...speaking Caribbean and Suriname . <http://www.uwimona.edu.jm/> 222 Appendix I. Metric Conversion Table. Metric System

  14. 78 FR 63463 - Intent To Prepare a Regional Environmental Impact Statement for Surface Coal and Lignite Mining...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... 78801. 2. Wednesday, December 4, 2013, at the Railroad and Heritage Museum, 315 W. Avenue B, Temple... and lignite mining within defined geographic regions in Texas. The REIS would facilitate future... Wildlife Service, Office of Surface Mining, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Railroad Commission...

  15. Regional diversity of amphipoda in the Caribbean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Alberto; Díaz, Yusbelly; Miloslavich, Patricia; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Guerra-García, José Manuel; Ortiz, Manuel; Valencia, Bellineth; Giraldo, Alan; Klein, Eduardo

    2013-12-01

    The order Amphipoda is one of the most diverse within Peracarids, and comprises 6950 described marine species. Amphipod research in the Caribbean Sea began in the late 1800s, but has increased significantly since 1980. In this study, we analized the amphipod biodiversity (Caprellidea, Gammaridea, Hyperiidea, and Ingolfiellidea) of the Caribbean Sea. For this, we compiled available data on species diversity of marine amphipods (data bases: WoRMS and OBIS and published species lists) into a comprehensive taxonomic list by country for the ecoregions of the Caribbean. Additionally, we analized the relative contribution of each country to regional diversity and the rate of discovery of new species. The Caribbean amphipod fauna is composed of 535 species within 236 genera and 73 families for the higher taxon. The Western Caribbean ecoregion holds the largest diversity (282 species), while the Eastern Caribbean recorded the lowest one (73). Mexico and Venezuela recorded the largest number of species with 266 and 206, respectively. Twelve countries had less than 50 species. The richest suborder is the Gammaridea with 381 species followed by the suborder Hyperiidea with 116. From the total of 535 amphipod species reported for the Caribbean region, 218 have the Caribbean as the holotype locality, and 132 are endemic (about 25% of the total). Areas of higher diversity seem to be concentrated along the Mexican Caribbean, Cuba and the Northern coast of South America (Venezuela-Colombia); however, such pattern is most likely reflecting local collection efforts and taxonomic expertise rather than actual distribution. Knowledge of amphipod species is mostly limited to shallow, near-shore waters, with little infonnation available on the deep sea fauna. Regional research priorities for this group should be focused on completing shallow water coastal inventories of species in Central America and the Greater and Lesser Antilles. In addition, sampling the deep sea ecosystems should

  16. Strengthening Coastal Pollution Management in the Wider Caribbean Region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavieren, van H.; Metcalfe, C.D.; Drouillard, K.; Sale, P.; Gold-Bouchot, G.; Reid, R.; Vermeulen, L.C.

    2011-01-01

    Control of aquatic pollution is critical for improving coastal zone management and for the conservation of fisheries resources. Countries in the Wider Caribbean Region (WCR) generally lack monitoring capacity and do not have reliable information on the levels and distribution of pollutants, particul

  17. Marine biodiversity in the Caribbean: regional estimates and distribution patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Miloslavich

    Full Text Available This paper provides an analysis of the distribution patterns of marine biodiversity and summarizes the major activities of the Census of Marine Life program in the Caribbean region. The coastal Caribbean region is a large marine ecosystem (LME characterized by coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses, but including other environments, such as sandy beaches and rocky shores. These tropical ecosystems incorporate a high diversity of associated flora and fauna, and the nations that border the Caribbean collectively encompass a major global marine biodiversity hot spot. We analyze the state of knowledge of marine biodiversity based on the geographic distribution of georeferenced species records and regional taxonomic lists. A total of 12,046 marine species are reported in this paper for the Caribbean region. These include representatives from 31 animal phyla, two plant phyla, one group of Chromista, and three groups of Protoctista. Sampling effort has been greatest in shallow, nearshore waters, where there is relatively good coverage of species records; offshore and deep environments have been less studied. Additionally, we found that the currently accepted classification of marine ecoregions of the Caribbean did not apply for the benthic distributions of five relatively well known taxonomic groups. Coastal species richness tends to concentrate along the Antillean arc (Cuba to the southernmost Antilles and the northern coast of South America (Venezuela-Colombia, while no pattern can be observed in the deep sea with the available data. Several factors make it impossible to determine the extent to which these distribution patterns accurately reflect the true situation for marine biodiversity in general: (1 highly localized concentrations of collecting effort and a lack of collecting in many areas and ecosystems, (2 high variability among collecting methods, (3 limited taxonomic expertise for many groups, and (4 differing levels of activity in the study

  18. Marine biodiversity in the Caribbean: regional estimates and distribution patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloslavich, Patricia; Díaz, Juan Manuel; Klein, Eduardo; Alvarado, Juan José; Díaz, Cristina; Gobin, Judith; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Weil, Ernesto; Cortés, Jorge; Bastidas, Ana Carolina; Robertson, Ross; Zapata, Fernando; Martín, Alberto; Castillo, Julio; Kazandjian, Aniuska; Ortiz, Manuel

    2010-08-02

    This paper provides an analysis of the distribution patterns of marine biodiversity and summarizes the major activities of the Census of Marine Life program in the Caribbean region. The coastal Caribbean region is a large marine ecosystem (LME) characterized by coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses, but including other environments, such as sandy beaches and rocky shores. These tropical ecosystems incorporate a high diversity of associated flora and fauna, and the nations that border the Caribbean collectively encompass a major global marine biodiversity hot spot. We analyze the state of knowledge of marine biodiversity based on the geographic distribution of georeferenced species records and regional taxonomic lists. A total of 12,046 marine species are reported in this paper for the Caribbean region. These include representatives from 31 animal phyla, two plant phyla, one group of Chromista, and three groups of Protoctista. Sampling effort has been greatest in shallow, nearshore waters, where there is relatively good coverage of species records; offshore and deep environments have been less studied. Additionally, we found that the currently accepted classification of marine ecoregions of the Caribbean did not apply for the benthic distributions of five relatively well known taxonomic groups. Coastal species richness tends to concentrate along the Antillean arc (Cuba to the southernmost Antilles) and the northern coast of South America (Venezuela-Colombia), while no pattern can be observed in the deep sea with the available data. Several factors make it impossible to determine the extent to which these distribution patterns accurately reflect the true situation for marine biodiversity in general: (1) highly localized concentrations of collecting effort and a lack of collecting in many areas and ecosystems, (2) high variability among collecting methods, (3) limited taxonomic expertise for many groups, and (4) differing levels of activity in the study of different

  19. Marine Biodiversity in the Caribbean: Regional Estimates and Distribution Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloslavich, Patricia; Díaz, Juan Manuel; Klein, Eduardo; Alvarado, Juan José; Díaz, Cristina; Gobin, Judith; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Weil, Ernesto; Cortés, Jorge; Bastidas, Ana Carolina; Robertson, Ross; Zapata, Fernando; Martín, Alberto; Castillo, Julio; Kazandjian, Aniuska; Ortiz, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the distribution patterns of marine biodiversity and summarizes the major activities of the Census of Marine Life program in the Caribbean region. The coastal Caribbean region is a large marine ecosystem (LME) characterized by coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses, but including other environments, such as sandy beaches and rocky shores. These tropical ecosystems incorporate a high diversity of associated flora and fauna, and the nations that border the Caribbean collectively encompass a major global marine biodiversity hot spot. We analyze the state of knowledge of marine biodiversity based on the geographic distribution of georeferenced species records and regional taxonomic lists. A total of 12,046 marine species are reported in this paper for the Caribbean region. These include representatives from 31 animal phyla, two plant phyla, one group of Chromista, and three groups of Protoctista. Sampling effort has been greatest in shallow, nearshore waters, where there is relatively good coverage of species records; offshore and deep environments have been less studied. Additionally, we found that the currently accepted classification of marine ecoregions of the Caribbean did not apply for the benthic distributions of five relatively well known taxonomic groups. Coastal species richness tends to concentrate along the Antillean arc (Cuba to the southernmost Antilles) and the northern coast of South America (Venezuela – Colombia), while no pattern can be observed in the deep sea with the available data. Several factors make it impossible to determine the extent to which these distribution patterns accurately reflect the true situation for marine biodiversity in general: (1) highly localized concentrations of collecting effort and a lack of collecting in many areas and ecosystems, (2) high variability among collecting methods, (3) limited taxonomic expertise for many groups, and (4) differing levels of activity in the study of

  20. VOLCANIC TSUNAMI GENERATING SOURCE MECHANISMS IN THE EASTERN CARIBBEAN REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Pararas-Carayannis

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, volcanic island flank failures and underwater slides have generated numerous destructive tsunamis in the Caribbean region. Convergent, compressional and collisional tectonic activity caused primarily from the eastward movement of the Caribbean Plate in relation to the North American, Atlantic and South American Plates, is responsible for zones of subduction in the region, the formation of island arcs and the evolution of particular volcanic centers on the overlying plate. The inter-plate tectonic interaction and deformation along these marginal boundaries result in moderate seismic and volcanic events that can generate tsunamis by a number of different mechanisms. The active geo-dynamic processes have created the Lesser Antilles, an arc of small islands with volcanoes characterized by both effusive and explosive activity. Eruption mechanisms of these Caribbean volcanoes are complex and often anomalous. Collapses of lava domes often precede major eruptions, which may vary in intensity from Strombolian to Plinian. Locally catastrophic, short-period tsunami-like waves can be generated directly by lateral, direct or channelized volcanic blast episodes, or in combination with collateral air pressure perturbations, nuéss ardentes, pyroclastic flows, lahars, or cascading debris avalanches. Submarine volcanic caldera collapses can also generate locally destructive tsunami waves. Volcanoes in the Eastern Caribbean Region have unstable flanks. Destructive local tsunamis may be generated from aerial and submarine volcanic edifice mass edifice flank failures, which may be triggered by volcanic episodes, lava dome collapses, or simply by gravitational instabilities. The present report evaluates volcanic mechanisms, resulting flank failure processes and their potential for tsunami generation. More specifically, the report evaluates recent volcanic eruption mechanisms of the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat, of Mt. Pel

  1. Strengthening integrated research and capacity development within the Caribbean region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewailly Eric

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Caribbean region, like other developing regions of the world, faces significant challenges in conducting research, especially in the context of limited resource capacities and capabilities. Further, due to its diverse and multiple island states, research capacity is scattered and unevenly spread within the region. The Caribbean EcoHealth Programme (CEHP is a research program that is structured to improve the capacity and capability of health professionals in the Caribbean region to respond in integrative and innovative ways to on-going and emerging environmental health challenges by means of multi-sectoral interventions. Methods Core parts of the CEHP’s mission are to (1 conduct collaborative research in areas that the region has identified as critical; (2 build and strengthening integrated approaches to research; and (3 develop and enhance basic research capacity within the Caribbean region. Fundamental to the success of the CEHP’s human and resource development mission has been its use of the Atlantis Mobile Laboratory (AML. The AML has allowed the CEHP program to move throughout the Caribbean and be able to respond to calls for specific research and capacity building opportunities. Results The CEHP’s five main research projects have generated the following results: (1 the Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs study has evaluated human exposures to POPs, heavy metals, pesticides, and zoonotic infections; (2 the Burden of Illness (BOI studies have developed protocols for the testing of foodborne microorganisms, strengthen laboratory analytical capabilities, and determined the prevalence and incidence of food-borne illness; (3 the Rainwater Harvesting (RWH study has evaluated the microbial and chemical quality of rainwater harvesting systems; (4 the Ecotoxicology Water (ETW studies have provided much needed data on the quality of recreational and drinking water supplies, and (5 the Food Safety Training Program has

  2. Cenozoic Methane-Seep Faunas of the Caribbean Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Steffen; Hansen, Bent T

    2015-01-01

    We report new examples of Cenozoic cold-seep communities from Colombia, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Trinidad, and Venezuela, and attempt to improve the stratigraphic dating of Cenozoic Caribbean seep communities using strontium isotope stratigraphy. Two seep faunas are distinguished in Barbados: the late Eocene mudstone-hosted 'Joes River fauna' consists mainly of large lucinid bivalves and tall abyssochrysoid gastropods, and the early Miocene carbonate-hosted 'Bath Cliffs fauna' containing the vesicomyid Pleurophopsis, the mytilid Bathymodiolus and small gastropods. Two new Oligocene seep communities from the Sinú River basin in Colombia consist of lucinid bivalves including Elongatolucina, thyasirid and solemyid bivalves, and Pleurophopsis. A new early Miocene seep community from Cuba includes Pleurophopsis and the large lucinid Meganodontia. Strontium isotope stratigraphy suggests an Eocene age for the Cuban Elmira asphalt mine seep community, making it the oldest in the Caribbean region. A new basal Pliocene seep fauna from the Dominican Republic is characterized by the large lucinid Anodontia (Pegophysema). In Trinidad we distinguish two types of seep faunas: the mudstone-hosted Godineau River fauna consisting mainly of lucinid bivalves, and the limestone-hosted Freeman's Bay fauna consisting chiefly of Pleurophopsis, Bathymodiolus, and small gastropods; they are all dated as late Miocene. Four new seep communities of Oligocene to Miocene age are reported from Venezuela. They consist mainly of large globular lucinid bivalves including Meganodontia, and moderately sized vesicomyid bivalves. After the late Miocene many large and typical 'Cenozoic' lucinid genera disappeared from the Caribbean seeps and are today known only from the central Indo-Pacific Ocean. We speculate that the increasingly oligotrophic conditions in the Caribbean Sea after the closure of the Isthmus of Panama in the Pliocene may have been unfavorable for such large lucinids because they

  3. Cenozoic Methane-Seep Faunas of the Caribbean Region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Kiel

    Full Text Available We report new examples of Cenozoic cold-seep communities from Colombia, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Trinidad, and Venezuela, and attempt to improve the stratigraphic dating of Cenozoic Caribbean seep communities using strontium isotope stratigraphy. Two seep faunas are distinguished in Barbados: the late Eocene mudstone-hosted 'Joes River fauna' consists mainly of large lucinid bivalves and tall abyssochrysoid gastropods, and the early Miocene carbonate-hosted 'Bath Cliffs fauna' containing the vesicomyid Pleurophopsis, the mytilid Bathymodiolus and small gastropods. Two new Oligocene seep communities from the Sinú River basin in Colombia consist of lucinid bivalves including Elongatolucina, thyasirid and solemyid bivalves, and Pleurophopsis. A new early Miocene seep community from Cuba includes Pleurophopsis and the large lucinid Meganodontia. Strontium isotope stratigraphy suggests an Eocene age for the Cuban Elmira asphalt mine seep community, making it the oldest in the Caribbean region. A new basal Pliocene seep fauna from the Dominican Republic is characterized by the large lucinid Anodontia (Pegophysema. In Trinidad we distinguish two types of seep faunas: the mudstone-hosted Godineau River fauna consisting mainly of lucinid bivalves, and the limestone-hosted Freeman's Bay fauna consisting chiefly of Pleurophopsis, Bathymodiolus, and small gastropods; they are all dated as late Miocene. Four new seep communities of Oligocene to Miocene age are reported from Venezuela. They consist mainly of large globular lucinid bivalves including Meganodontia, and moderately sized vesicomyid bivalves. After the late Miocene many large and typical 'Cenozoic' lucinid genera disappeared from the Caribbean seeps and are today known only from the central Indo-Pacific Ocean. We speculate that the increasingly oligotrophic conditions in the Caribbean Sea after the closure of the Isthmus of Panama in the Pliocene may have been unfavorable for such large

  4. Holocene Sea-Level Database For The Caribbean Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, N. S.; Horton, B.; Engelhart, S. E.; Peltier, W. R.; Scatena, F. N.; Vane, C. H.; Liu, S.

    2013-12-01

    Holocene relative sea-level (RSL) records from far-field locations are important for understanding the driving mechanisms controlling the nature and timing of the mid-late Holocene reduction in global meltwaters and providing background rates of late Holocene RSL change with which to compare the magnitude of 20th century RSL rise. The Caribbean region has traditionally been considered far-field (i.e., with negligible glacio-isostatic adjustment (GIA) influence), although recent investigations indicate otherwise. Here, we consider the spatial variability in glacio-isostatic, tectonic and local contributions on RSL records from the circum-Caribbean region to infer a Holocene eustatic sea-level signal. We have constructed a database of quality-controlled, spatially comprehensive, Holocene RSL observations for the circum-Caribbean region. The database contains over 500 index points, which locate the position of RSL in time and space. The database incorporates sea-level observations from a latitudinal range of 5°N to 25°N and longitudinal range of 55°W to 90°W. We include sea-level observations from 11 ka BP to present, although the majority of the index points in the database are younger than 8 ka BP. The database is sub-divided into 13 regions based on the distance from the former Laurentide Ice Sheet and regional tectonic setting. The index points were primarily derived from mangrove peat deposits, which in the Caribbean form in the upper half of the tidal range, and corals (predominantly Acropora palmata), the growth of which is constrained to the upper 5 m of water depth. The index points are classified on the basis of their susceptibility to compaction (e.g., intercalated, basal). The influence of temporal changes in tidal range on index points is also considered. The sea-level reconstructions demonstrate that RSL did not exceed the present height (0 m) during the Holocene in the majority of locations, except at sites in Suriname/Guayana and possibly Trinidad

  5. Mangroves Enhance Reef Fish Abundance at the Caribbean Regional Scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph E Serafy

    Full Text Available Several studies conducted at the scale of islands, or small sections of continental coastlines, have suggested that mangrove habitats serve to enhance fish abundances on coral reefs, mainly by providing nursery grounds for several ontogenetically-migrating species. However, evidence of such enhancement at a regional scale has not been reported, and recently, some researchers have questioned the mangrove-reef subsidy effect. In the present study, using two different regression approaches, we pursued two questions related to mangrove-reef connectivity at the Caribbean regional scale: (1 Are reef fish abundances limited by mangrove forest area?; and (2 Are mean reef fish abundances proportional to mangrove forest area after taking human population density and latitude into account? Specifically, we tested for Caribbean-wide mangrove forest area effects on the abundances of 12 reef fishes that have been previously characterized as "mangrove-dependent". Analyzed were data from an ongoing, long-term (20-year citizen-scientist fish monitoring program; coastal human population censuses; and several wetland forest information sources. Quantile regression results supported the notion that mangrove forest area limits the abundance of eight of the 12 fishes examined. Linear mixed-effects regression results, which considered potential human (fishing and habitat degradation and latitudinal influences, suggested that average reef fish densities of at least six of the 12 focal fishes were directly proportional to mangrove forest area. Recent work questioning the mangrove-reef fish subsidy effect likely reflects a failure to: (1 focus analyses on species that use mangroves as nurseries, (2 consider more than the mean fish abundance response to mangrove forest extent; and/or (3 quantitatively account for potentially confounding human impacts, such as fishing pressure and habitat degradation. Our study is the first to demonstrate at a large regional scale (i

  6. Lignite microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulankina, M.A.; Lysak, L.V.; Zvyagintsev, D.G. [Moscow MV Lomonosov State University, Moscow (Russian Federation). Faculty of Soil Science

    2007-03-15

    The first demonstration that samples of lignite at a depth of 10 m are considerably enriched in bacteria is reported. According to direct microscopy, the abundance of bacteria was about 10{sup 7} cells/g. About 70% of cells had intact cell membranes and small size, which points to their anabiotic state. The fungal mycelium length was no more than 1 m. Lignite inoculation onto solid glucose-yeast-peptone medium allowed us to isolate bacteria of the genera Bacillus, Rhodococcus, Arthrobacter, Micrococcus, Spirillum, and Cytophaga. Representatives of the genera Penicillium and Trichoderma were identified on Czapek medium. Moistening of lignite powder increased the microbial respiration rate and microbial and fungal abundance but did not increase their generic diversity. This finding suggests that the studied microorganisms are autochthonous to lignite.

  7. Capacity Building for Caribbean Tsunami Warnings: A Regional Training Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, A.; Robertson, R.; Kong, L.; von Hillebrandt-Andrade, C.; McCreery, C.; Yamamoto, M.; Mooney, W. D.; Lynch, L.

    2007-12-01

    Between June 25 and June 30 the Seismic Research Unit (SRU) of the University of the West Indies (UWI) hosted a Caribbean regional training program in Seismology and Tsunami Warnings. A total of 43 participants from 21 countries and territories, representing meteorological, emergency management, and seismological institutions in the region, attended this training aimed at developing their understanding of the science of tsunamis, hazard and risk assessment, preparedness, education, and outreach, and operational best practices. As an outcome of the course the participants drafted six recommendations (outlined on the poster) that they felt were priority action items for expeditious realization of a Tsunami Early Warning and Mitigation System. The program was conducted under the UNESCO IOC banner in response to a call for such a training program at the Second Session of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for Tsunami and Other Coastal Hazards Warning System for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (ICG/CARIBE-EWS II), held in Cumanã, Venezuela, March 12-14, 2007. The majority of funding for the course was provided by the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (ODFA) of the US Agency for International Development (USAID), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the Disaster Reduction Center of the UWI, and the US Geological Survey (USGS).

  8. Oil and Gas Fields of the Caribbean Region, 2004 (fld6bg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Caribbean region is part of World Energy Assessment region 6 (Central and South America). A fundamental task in the assessment is to map the locations and type...

  9. Do mining lakes in the Lusatian lignite mining region (Eastern Germany) affect regional precipitation patterns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brück, Yasemine; Pohle, Ina; Keuler, Klaus; Schaller, Eberhard; Hinz, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Due to the flooding of former open-pit mines, Europe's largest artificial lake district is created in Eastern Germany. Between 1990 and 2006 more than 80 km² of new lakes have already been formed. These large-scale land cover changes may impact regional meteorological characteristics, therefore it is of interest, whether effects of the mining lakes can already be observed. We especially focus on whether the evaporation from the mining pit lakes leads to a higher precipitation on their lee side. To detect changes in the precipitation patterns, we analysed daily precipitation data (1980-2014) of 25 stations in an area of 10 000 km² widely around the lake district. Under the assumption that the influences of the lakes should be detectable either directly as trends in the observed data or as a deviation from a general measure for precipitation we combined statistical tests and principal component analysis (PCA). We applied pre-whitening Mann-Kendall tests to detect precipitation trends and Mann-Whitney tests to detect differences between split samples (before and after the flooding of most of the lakes). The PCA was applied based on the correlation matrix of daily precipitation at the different stations. As the daily precipitation can sufficiently be explained by the first five principal components, the recombination of these five principal components was used as a general measure of precipitation in the region. By regression trees (random forests) a relationship between the eigenvectors of the first five principal components and physiogeographic characteristics of the stations (e.g. altitude) was shown. Both the observed data and the deviations between the measurements and the recombination of the first five principal components showed divergent trends with high spatial variability and also interannual variability, but a pattern consistent with the lee side of the lake could not be detected. Therefore, it has been demonstrated that the emerging lakes had no

  10. Caribbean tsunamis - Regional exposure and local risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glimsdal, S.; Harbitz, C. B.; Zamora, N.; Gour, N.; Frauenfelder, R.; Smebye, H. C.; Sverdrup-Thygeson, K.; Lovholt, F.; Bungum, H.

    2009-12-01

    Funded by the Norwegian Government, NGI and the University of the West Indies (UWI) with support from the Coastal Zone Management Unit Barbados (CZMU) have completed a two years capacity building program on natural disasters mitigation in the Caribbean, where the following is undertaken: i) preparation of regional tsunami hazard and exposure maps to identify the region’s natural disaster hot spot areas; and ii) implementation of a tsunami risk assessment demonstration project in close cooperation with the local authorities. The selected site for the demonstration project is Bridgetown, Barbados. Studies of both seismic and non-seismic tsunamigenic sources are included to provide examples of various kinds of sources with a regional distribution. Special attention is paid to the coupling between the numerical models for dispersive wave propagation and run-up models for nonlinear wave inundation. In the tsunami risk assessment demonstration project, local vulnerability and mortality risk maps are produced. The maps are based on evaluations of the tsunami inundation distance and a detailed survey of the populational pattern, buildings, and infrastructure in Bridgetown.

  11. Regional Studies Program. Extraction of North Dakota lignite: environmental and reclamation issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFevers, J.R.; Johnson, D.O.; Dvorak, A.J.

    1976-12-01

    This study, sponsored by the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration, addresses the environmental implications of extraction of coal in North Dakota. These implications are supported by details of the geologic and historical background of the area of focus, the lignite resources in the Fort Union coalfield portion. The particular concentration is on the four-county area of Mercer, Dunn, McLean, and Oliver where substantial coal reserves exist and a potential gasification plant site has been identified. The purposes of this extensive study are to identify the land use and environmental problems and issues associated with extraction; to provide a base of information for assessing the impacts of various levels of extraction; to examine the economics and feasibility of reclamation; and to identify research that needs to be undertaken to evaluate and to improve reclamation practices. The study also includes a description of the physical and chemical soil characteristics and hydrological and climatic factors entailed in extraction, revegetation, and reclamation procedures.

  12. Regional Integration Through Law: the Central American and Caribbean Cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caserta, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    . The two Court have also borrowed key jurisprudential principles from the CJEU with the goal of expanding the reach of Central American and Caribbean Community laws. Despite this, both Courts have thus far failed to foster supranationality in their respective systems. This is because the conditions...

  13. The Continuously Operating Caribbean Observational Network (COCONet): Supporting Regional Development of Geoscience Research Across the Circum-Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, J.; Miller, M. M.; Mattioli, G. S.; Wang, G.; Feaux, K.; Rowan, L.; La Femina, P. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Continuously Operating Caribbean Observational Network (COCONet) is a National Science Foundation (NSF) funded infrastructure project that stretches across the circum-Caribbean to include Central America and the northern portions of South America. Its objective is to develop a large-scale network of geodetic and atmospheric infrastructure to support a broad range of geoscience and atmospheric investigations and enable research on process-oriented science with direct relevance to geo-hazards. The network includes over 60 new and refurbished continuously operating Global Positioning System (GPS) and surface meterology stations. It will also include data from at least 60 existing stations that are being operated by one of our more than 40 regional partners. As COCONet approaches the completion of its build-out phase, it is appropriate to evaluate the activities associated with the project that facilitate capacity building. These activities include three workshops to solicit feedback from regional partners regarding science objectives, station location, and long-term network operation. COCONet graduate research fellowships have been used to support nine students, with seven from countries within the COCONet footprint. The establishment of three regional data and archive centers to foster access to data and promote free and open data standards. Lastly, two Pan American Advanced Studies Institute (PASI) workshops on topics that are central to the main goals of COCONet were also organized to engage early career scientists who are interested in working on topics that are directly relevant to the region. Perhaps the most significant effort on expanding capacity in the region is the recent deployment of a station in Camaguey, Cuba with full support from both the U.S. and Cuban governments. This presentation summarizes the activities of the COCONet project to enhance and support both the human resource development and technical capabilities within the region.

  14. nter-Regional Medical Cooperation in the Caribbean: Lessons from the Ongoing Cooperation between Martinique, St Lucia, and Dominica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Resiere

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Martinique was accepted as an associate member by the Council of Ministers of the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States. This membership constitutes a major asset in bringing Martiniquais closer to the other Caribbean populations and should play a key role as it relates to regional cooperation especially in the domain of healthcare. It is urgent for professionals in the Caribbean to discuss the possibilities of improving relationships between countries in training, development and continuous medical education. Cooperation between the French Caribbean departments and surrounding countries appears to be quite indispensable.

  15. Samplelist of the Cicar (Cooperative Investigations in the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions) cruises 1970 – 1972

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoel, van der S.; Koperdraat, M.J.

    1974-01-01

    The Royal Dutch Navy participated in the cruises of the Cooperative Investigations in the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (Cicar) from 1970 up to 1973 with H.Nl.M.S. “Luymes” and made 39 cruises. For general information on these cruises and preliminary results one is referred to the titles in the lis

  16. Quantifying 10 years of improved earthquake-monitoring performance in the Caribbean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Daniel E.; Hillebrandt-Andrade, Christa; Saurel, Jean-Marie; Huerfano-Moreno, V.; Lynch, Lloyd

    2015-01-01

    Over 75 tsunamis have been documented in the Caribbean and adjacent regions during the past 500 years. Since 1500, at least 4484 people are reported to have perished in these killer waves. Hundreds of thousands are currently threatened along the Caribbean coastlines. Were a great tsunamigenic earthquake to occur in the Caribbean region today, the effects would potentially be catastrophic due to an increasingly vulnerable region that has seen significant population increases in the past 40–50 years and currently hosts an estimated 500,000 daily beach visitors from North America and Europe, a majority of whom are not likely aware of tsunami and earthquake hazards. Following the magnitude 9.1 Sumatra–Andaman Islands earthquake of 26 December 2004, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Intergovernmental Coordination Group (ICG) for the Tsunami and other Coastal Hazards Early Warning System for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (CARIBE‐EWS) was established and developed minimum performance standards for the detection and analysis of earthquakes. In this study, we model earthquake‐magnitude detection threshold and P‐wave detection time and demonstrate that the requirements established by the UNESCO ICG CARIBE‐EWS are met with 100% of the network operating. We demonstrate that earthquake‐monitoring performance in the Caribbean Sea region has improved significantly in the past decade as the number of real‐time seismic stations available to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tsunami warning centers have increased. We also identify weaknesses in the current international network and provide guidance for selecting the optimal distribution of seismic stations contributed from existing real‐time broadband national networks in the region.

  17. Trends in children’s employment and child labour in the Latin America and Caribbean region

    OpenAIRE

    UCW

    2010-01-01

    The current report presents an overview of the child labour phenomenon in the Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) region over recent years. It represents part of a broader effort to improve understanding of how child labour is changing over time in the region, and to ensure that policies relating to child labour adequately reflect these changes. The report draws on an accompanying set of country briefs on child labour developed for 15 countries in the LAC region.

  18. Flattening of Caribbean coral reefs: region-wide declines in architectural complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Filip, Lorenzo; Dulvy, Nicholas K; Gill, Jennifer A; Côté, Isabelle M; Watkinson, Andrew R

    2009-08-22

    Coral reefs are rich in biodiversity, in large part because their highly complex architecture provides shelter and resources for a wide range of organisms. Recent rapid declines in hard coral cover have occurred across the Caribbean region, but the concomitant consequences for reef architecture have not been quantified on a large scale to date. We provide, to our knowledge, the first region-wide analysis of changes in reef architectural complexity, using nearly 500 surveys across 200 reefs, between 1969 and 2008. The architectural complexity of Caribbean reefs has declined nonlinearly with the near disappearance of the most complex reefs over the last 40 years. The flattening of Caribbean reefs was apparent by the early 1980s, followed by a period of stasis between 1985 and 1998 and then a resumption of the decline in complexity to the present. Rates of loss are similar on shallow (20 m) reefs and are consistent across all five subregions. The temporal pattern of declining architecture coincides with key events in recent Caribbean ecological history: the loss of structurally complex Acropora corals, the mass mortality of the grazing urchin Diadema antillarum and the 1998 El Nino Southern Oscillation-induced worldwide coral bleaching event. The consistently low estimates of current architectural complexity suggest regional-scale degradation and homogenization of reef structure. The widespread loss of architectural complexity is likely to have serious consequences for reef biodiversity, ecosystem functioning and associated environmental services.

  19. Preliminary results on Appendicularians from the Cicar (Cooperative Investigations in the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions) cruises 1970

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, de R.F.

    1974-01-01

    The Cicar-project (Cooperative Investigations in the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions project) offered an opportunity to collect epiplanktonic animals in the Southern part of the Caribbean Sea and in water north of Guyana in the Atlantic, to study the precise distribution of some groups in the area. A

  20. Undiscovered phosphate resources in the Caribbean region and their potential value for agricultural development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Richard Porter; Davidson, D.F.; Riggs, S.R.; Burnett, W.C.

    1985-01-01

    The countries of the world's humid tropical regions lack the soil fertility necessary for high agricultural productivity. A recently developed agricultural technology that increases soil fertility can make tropical agriculture highly productive, but the technique requires large inputs into the soil of phosphorus and other fertilizers and soil amendments. Use of fertilizers derived from phosphate rock is increasing greatly throughout the world, and fertilizer raw materials are being produced more and more frequently from phosphate rock deposits close to the areas of use. An increased understanding of the origin of phosphate rock in ancient oceans has enabled exploration geologists to target areas of potential mineral resource value and to search directly for deposits. However, because of the difficulty of prospecting for mineral deposits in forested tropical regions, phosphate rock deposits are not being explored for in the countries of the humid tropics, including most countries of the Caribbean region. As a result, the countries of the Caribbean must import phosphate rock or phosphorus fertilizer products. In the present trade market, imports of phosphate are too low for the initiation of new agricultural technology in the Caribbean and Central American region. A newly proposed program of discovery and development of undiscovered phosphate rock deposits revolves around reconnaissance studies, prospecting by core drilling, and analysis of bulk samples. The program should increase the chance of discovering economic phosphate rock deposits. The search for and evaluation of phosphate rock resources in the countries of the Caribbean region would take about 5 years and cost an average of $15 million per country. The program is designed to begin with high risk-low cost steps and end with low risk-high cost steps. A successful program could improve the foreign exchange positions of countries in the Caribbean region by adding earnings from agricultural product exports and

  1. USGS contributions to earthquake and tsunami monitoring in the Caribbean Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, D.; Caribbean Project Team, U.; Partners, C.

    2007-05-01

    USGS Caribbean Project Team: Lind Gee, Gary Gyure, John Derr, Jack Odum, John McMillan, David Carver, Jim Allen, Susan Rhea, Don Anderson, Harley Benz Caribbean Partners: Christa von Hillebrandt-Andrade-PRSN, Juan Payero ISU-UASD,DR, Eduardo Camacho - UPAN, Panama, Lloyd Lynch - SRU,Gonzalo Cruz - UNAH,Honduras, Margaret Wiggins-Grandison - Jamaica, Judy Thomas - CERO Barbados, Sylvan McIntyre - NADMA Grenada, E. Bermingham - STRI. The magnitude-9 Sumatra-Andaman Islands earthquake of December 26, 2004, increased global awareness of the destructive hazard posed by earthquakes and tsunamis. In response to this tragedy, the US government undertook a collaborative project to improve earthquake and tsunami monitoring along a major portion of vulnerable coastal regions, in the Caribbean Sea, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic Ocean. Seismically active areas of the Caribbean Sea region pose a tsunami risk for Caribbean islands, coastal areas along the Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic seaboard of North America. Nearly 100 tsunamis have been reported for the Caribbean region in the past 500 years, including 14 tsunamis reported in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Partners in this project include the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Smithsonian Institute, the National Oceanic and Aeronautic Administration (NOAA), and several partner institutions in the Caribbean region. This presentation focuses on the deployment of nine broadband seismic stations to monitor earthquake activity in the Caribbean region that are affiliated with the Global Seismograph Network (GSN). By the end of 2006, five stations were transmitting data to the USGS National Earthquake Information Service (NEIS), and regional partners through Puerto Rico seismograph network (PRSN) Earthworm systems. The following stations are currently operating: SDDR - Sabaneta Dam Dominican Republic, BBGH - Gun Hill Barbados, GRGR - Grenville, Grenada, BCIP - Barro Colorado, Panama, TGUH - Tegucigalpa

  2. South-South Cooperation and Capacity Development in Action: Regional Public Entrepreneurship in Latin America and the Caribbean

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Bocalandro; Rafael Villa; Alejandro Cruz Fano; Tara Lisa Persaud; Jorge Lamas

    2010-01-01

    This collection of five case studies examines Latin American and the Caribbean experiences in regional cooperation and institutional capacity development across various sectors, including public debt management, watershed management, public health, citizen security and social security systems.

  3. Regional Energy Integration in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-12-15

    The regional study has been conducted by the WEC Latin American Member Committees. Having identified that the weak link between existing national energy infrastructures remains a major stumbling block to strengthening regional economic integration, this study aims to propose alternative views -- primarily on the integration of electricity and natural gas markets.

  4. The impact of SLMTA in improving laboratory quality systems in the Caribbean Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Guevara

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Past efforts to improve laboratory quality systems and to achieve accreditation for better patient care in the Caribbean Region have been slow.Objective: To describe the impact of the Strengthening of Laboratory Management Toward Accreditation (SLMTA training programme and mentorship amongst five clinical laboratories in the Caribbean after 18 months.Method: Five national reference laboratories from four countries participated in the SLMTA programme that incorporated classroom teaching and implementation of improvement projects. Mentors were assigned to the laboratories to guide trainees on their improvement projects and to assist in the development of Quality Management Systems (QMS. Audits were conducted at baseline, six months, exit (at 12 months and post-SLMTA (at 18 months using the Stepwise Laboratory Quality Improvement Process Towards Accreditation (SLIPTA checklist to measure changes in implementation of the QMS during the period. At the end of each audit, a comprehensive implementation plan was developed in order to address gaps.Results: Baseline audit scores ranged from 19% to 52%, corresponding to 0 stars on the SLIPTA five-star scale. After 18 months, one laboratory reached four stars, two reached three stars and two reached two stars. There was a corresponding decrease in nonconformities and development of over 100 management and technical standard operating procedures in each of the five laboratories.Conclusion: The tremendous improvement in these five Caribbean laboratories shows that SLMTA coupled with mentorship is an effective, user-friendly, flexible and customisable approach to the implementation of laboratory QMS. It is recommended that other laboratories in the region consider using the SLMTA training programme as they engage in quality systems improvement and preparation for accreditation.

  5. The Political Economy of "Open Regionalism" and Education in Small (and Micro) States: The Construction of the Caribbean Educational Policy Space in CARICOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jules, Tavis D.

    2014-01-01

    In this era of amplified regionalisation, the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean's (ECLAC) conceptualisation of 'open regionalism' is pertinent to examine the role of regional governance mechanisms in constructing what I call the "Caribbean Educational Policy Space." With the aid of a latent content…

  6. Lignite Fuel Enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles Bullinger; Nenad Sarunac

    2010-03-31

    Pulverized coal power plants which fire lignites and other low-rank high-moisture coals generally operate with reduced efficiencies and increased stack emissions due to the impacts of high fuel moisture on stack heat loss and pulverizer and fan power. A process that uses plant waste heat sources to evaporate a portion of the fuel moisture from the lignite feedstock in a moving bed fluidized bed dryer (FBD) was developed in the U.S. by a team led by Great River Energy (GRE). The demonstration was conducted with Department of Energy (DOE) funding under DOE Award Number DE-FC26-04NT41763. The objectives of GRE's Lignite Fuel Enhancement project were to demonstrate reduction in lignite moisture content by using heat rejected from the power plant, apply technology at full scale at Coal Creek Station (CCS), and commercialize it. The Coal Creek Project has involved several stages, beginning with lignite drying tests in a laboratory-scale FBD at the Energy Research Center (ERC) and development of theoretical models for predicting dryer performance. Using results from these early stage research efforts, GRE built a 2 ton/hour pilot-scale dryer, and a 75 ton/hour prototype drying system at Coal Creek Station. Operated over a range of drying conditions, the results from the pilot-scale and prototype-scale dryers confirmed the performance of the basic dryer design concept and provided the knowledge base needed to scale the process up to commercial size. Phase 2 of the GRE's Lignite Fuel Enhancement project included design, construction and integration of a full-scale commercial coal drying system (four FBDs per unit) with Coal Creek Units 1 and 2 heat sources and coal handling system. Two series of controlled tests were conducted at Coal Creek Unit 1 with wet and dried lignite to determine effect of dried lignite on unit performance and emissions. Wet lignite was fired during the first, wet baseline, test series conducted in September 2009. The second test series was

  7. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  8. Regional overview of Latin American and Caribbean energy production, consumption, and future growth. Report series No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, K.

    1994-07-01

    The Latin American and Caribbean region - comprising Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean - is relatively well endowed with energy resources, although the distribution of these resources is uneven across countries. The region produces more energy than it consumes, and the surplus energy, which amounts to 3.6 million barrels of oil equivalent per day (boe/d), is mostly oil. While the region`s total oil (crude and products) exports decreased from 4.4 million barrels per day (b/d) in 1981 to 3.8 million b/d in 1992, its net oil exports increased from about 1.6 million b/d in 1981 to 2.8 million b/d in 1992. In 1993, the surplus oil in Latin America and the Caribbean remained at 2.8 million b/d. This report analyzes the key issues of the Latin American and Caribbean energy industry and presents the future outlook for oil, gas, coal, hydroelectricity, and nuclear power developments in the region. In addition, the status of biomass energy, geothermal, and other noncommercial energy in the region will be briefly discussed in the context of overall energy development. The rest of the report is organized as follows: Section II assesses the current situation of Latin American and Caribbean energy production and consumption, covering primary energy supply, primary energy consumption, downstream petroleum sector development, and natural gas utilization. Section III presents the results of our study of future energy growth in Latin America. Important hydrocarbons policy issues in the region are discussed in Section IV, and a summary and concluding remarks are provided in Section V.

  9. Inorganic constituents of some Turkish lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Taptik, Y.; Yavuz, R.; Kuecuekbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    1996-12-31

    In this study the mineral matter contents of two different Turkish lignite samples from Cayirhan and Tuncbilek regions were isolated by means of mild oxidation of organic matrix applying H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/HCOOH treatment. The isolated minerals were analyzed by XRD and FTIR techniques and constituents of the minerals were investigated qualitatively.

  10. Climate Change mitigation opportunities in the Energy sector for the Caribbean region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doral, Wenceslao Carrera; Chinchilla, Oscar Coto; Delgado, Ivan Relova

    opportunities), by looking in closer depth at two potential PoAs in the region. As well as many other SIDS 4, the Caribbean Countries are “heavily dependent on imported petroleum products, largely for transport and electricity generation. This is likely to continue in the short to medium term, however...... of renewable energy to the grid, the modeling of in-country energy sector development and its associated emissions for different scenarios; that include both the “business as usual” and “mitigation” due to the scaling up of Renewable Energy Technology. The study also looks at the experience from participation......, investment costs, available indigenous skills and management capabilities”. Seven of the countries in the area are currently members of the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA)5, with an additional three currently in the process of becoming members6. In this context, the electricity sector...

  11. A new species of the ant genus Bothriomyrmex Emery, 1869 (Hymenoptera: Formicidae from the Caribbean region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Prebus

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bothriomyrmex enigmaticus sp. nov. is described from the island of Hispañola based on one nest collection. This is the first collection of the genus Bothriomyrmex (Emery, 1869 from the Caribbean region, and the second species to be described from the Americas. While sharing several characters with B. paradoxus (Dubovikoff & Longino, 2004 from Costa Rica and Honduras, B. enigmaticus sp. nov. diverges in several key characters, including palp formula. However, a morphometric comparison to Palearctic species of the tribe Bothriomyrmecini suggests affinities to B. paradoxus, Chronoxenus wroughtoni (Forel, 1895 of the eastern Palearctic, and to a lesser extent an undescribed species of Arnoldius (Dubovikoff, 2005 from Australia and B. corsicus (Santschi,1923 of the western Palearctic.

  12. Molecular and morphological systematics of Elysia Risso, 1818 (Heterobranchia: Sacoglossa) from the Caribbean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Patrick J; Vendetti, Jann E; Valdés, Ángel

    2016-08-09

    The Caribbean is a biodiversity hotspot for photosynthetic sea slugs, with about 27 described species in the genus Elysia Risso, 1818. However, many species are poorly known or have complex taxonomic histories, complicating assessments of regional biodiversity and impeding studies of plastid symbiosis, speciation, and larval biology. Using an integrative approach, we address the taxonomy and systematics of Caribbean elysiids by performing robust tests of existing species hypotheses, and describe six new species. Species delimitation included DNA barcoding of up to 189 nominal conspecific specimens; nuclear gene sequences were then used to confirm that divergent lineages were genetically distinct candidate species. New synonymies and species descriptions are based on external anatomy, penial and radular morphology, developmental characters, and host ecology of all species described from the region, plus a critical review of the literature. We synonymized three species (Elysia annedupontae Ortea, Espinosa & Caballer in Ortea, Caballer, Moro & Espinosa, 2005, Elysia clarki Pierce et al. 2006, and Elysia leeanneae Caballer, Ortea & Espinosa in Ortea, Espinosa, Buske & Caballer, 2013), transfered one species from Bosellia (Elysia marcusi), and described six new species (Elysia pawliki n. sp., Elysia zemi n. sp., Elysia christinae n. sp., Elysia hamanni n. sp., Elysia taino n. sp., and Elysia buonoi n. sp.). We resurrected the name Elysia velutinus Pruvot-Fol, 1947, a senior synonym of Elysia tuca Ev. Marcus & Er. Marcus, 1967. Based on a four-gene phylogeny of 76 Elysia spp., we identified shifts in host use and penial armature that may explain patterns of endemic diversification in Elysia, invoking both ecological and non-ecological mechanisms. Non-monophyly of stylet-bearing species rejects previous attempts to classify species based on presence of a stylet (i.e., the genus Checholysia Ortea, Caballer, Moro & Espinosa, 2005). Our findings show how integrative

  13. Regional Supplier Associations as the Producers of Transnational Club Goods in Latin American and Caribbean Utility Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Horrall

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available There is growing the consensus that regional regulatory agencies provide regional club goods, however; there is little evidence of the impact of the collaborations of the utility providers themselves in the literature. Our study analyzes whether regional networks such as the Caribbean Electric Utility corporation contribute to solving energy issues in Latin America and the Caribbean. Networks of operators provide cross -border services, and operating as a single entity improves the lobbying opportunities of operators to influence policy. Results suggest that utilities that formed linkages or cooperation regionally are likely to benefit from such collaborations, but a comprehensive approach to capacity building and reform is needed to address the regions energy issues.

  14. Lignite oxidative desulphurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Volodymyr Gunka; Serhiy Pyshyev

    2014-01-01

    The process of lignite desulphurization via its treatment by an oxidant (air or air–steam mixture) has been studied. The research objective was useful determination of steam application in oxidative lignite desulphurization. It has been proved that the water steam should be included in the oxidant composition to increase the hydrogen sulphide and combustible constituent content in the gases obtained during the processes under research. The impact of factors which affect the reactions between solid (in our case–lignite) and gaseous reagent (oxidant, i.e. air and or air–steam mixture) upon the research process has been investigated, if these reactions occur in the kinetic area. Such factors are linear rate of oxidant movement and coal grain size. The values of oxidant movement linear rate and coal grain size, which the reaction transfer from pyrite sulphur and organic content of lignite from diffusion into kinetic area occurs by, have been determined. Under these‘‘transfer’’ conditions, the values of coefficients of oxidant mass transfer (b, m/s) as well as Sherwood criteria and boiling layer differences have been calculated.

  15. Biosolubilisation of Chinese lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Sudong; Tan, Zhongchao [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Schulich School of Engineering, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Tao, Xiuxiang; Shi, Kaiyi [School of Chemical Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008 (China)

    2009-06-15

    The biosolubilisation of coal is a promising coal processing technology for converting solid coal to liquid oil at ambient conditions. In this study, the biosolubilisation of Chinese lignite was studied using a fungus isolated from decaying wood. The intensity of biosolubilisation was determined by estimating the liquid formation time and by measuring the weight loss of the lignite granules gravimetrically. The biosolubilisation product (black liquid) was characterized by ultraviolet spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, element analysis, and heating value. Results showed that this fungus isolated from the decaying wood solubilised 31.83% (by weight) of Chinese lignite to black liquid within 11 days at 27.5 C. The biosolubilisation product mainly contained aromatic acids and chain hydrocarbons, and had organic function groups of hydroxyl, cyclane, carbonyl, ether linkage and aromatic rings. The heating value of the biosolubilisation product was 14 MJ/kg. Chemical analysis of the biosolubilisation product indicated that side chains of lignite were important structures in the biosolubilisation mechanism. (author)

  16. The regional response to the greenhouse issue. Latin America and the Caribbean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, F.J. [Olade - Latin-American Energy Organization, Quito (Ecuador)

    1995-06-01

    The increase in greenhouse gas emissions in Latin America and the Caribbean is not directly linked to energy consumption. It is estimated that about two thirds of the carbon compounds that are emitted annually in the Region and contribute to the greenhouse effect stem from the deforestation of 4 to 6 million hectares of forests destroyed annually by unplanned land settlement, migratory agriculture, and agribusiness. As a contribution to the debate on the global problem of increasing greenhouse effect, the present article tries to analyze the specific regional characteristics of the problem, their relation to the global issues, and the regional options for decreasing carbon compound emissions. The developing countries, will have to deal with the possibility of seeing their land converted into ecological disaster areas, where life cannot be sustained, within the next 20 years. Within this context, technology can do very little, since deforestation basically is not a technological problem since its solution rather involves the application of sustainable development models that require profound economic and social changes. (EG) 11 refs.

  17. [Modified-habitat use by tropical forest-dependent birds in the Caribbean region of Guatemala].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerezo, Alexis; Robbins, Chandler S; Dowell, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Modified-habitat use by tropical forest-dependent birds in the Caribbean region of Guatemala. As natural areas are reduced into isolated remnants, the importance of secondary habitats for species conservation will increase. Consequently, the conservation value of human-modified or created secondary habitats must be determined. In this study, we evaluated the conservation potential of three habitats associated to cattle ranching (riparian forest, live fence, and pasture) for tropical forest birds in the Caribbean region of Guatemala. We studied the bird communities of five tropical forest and riparian forest (henceforth river) sites, three live fence sites and four pasture sites, in five cattle ranches in the region, and compared the four habitats based on the following parameters: species richness, number of individuals, species composition and an index of conservation importance. A 10-point series was sampled (six repetitions of each series) in each habitat site using the point-count method, in march and april of 1998 and 1999. Although forest, river and live fence had similar mean species numbers, considering all species (111, 96 and 94 species, respectively), and river and live fence surpassed the forest in mean number of individuals (80 and 72 compared to 56 individuals), river and live fence had significantly fewer mean numbers of interior-forest resident species and individuals (56, 21 and 15 species, and 61, 19 and eight individuals in forest, river and live fence, respectively). River and live fence, when compared to forest, had no significant differences in the number of resident forest-edge species and individuals, but their edge-species composition was significantly different from forest. Those resident edge species that were relatively abundant in forest had very low abundances in the modified habitats, and those that were abundant in river and live fence were rare or absent in forest sites. With respect to migratory species, both river and live fence

  18. Diurnal warming in shallow coastal seas: Observations from the Caribbean and Great Barrier Reef regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X.; Minnett, P. J.; Berkelmans, R.; Hendee, J.; Manfrino, C.

    2014-07-01

    A good understanding of diurnal warming in the upper ocean is important for the validation of satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) against in-situ buoy data and for merging satellite SSTs taken at different times of the same day. For shallow coastal regions, better understanding of diurnal heating could also help improve monitoring and prediction of ecosystem health, such as coral reef bleaching. Compared to its open ocean counterpart which has been studied extensively and modeled with good success, coastal diurnal warming has complicating localized characteristics, including coastline geometry, bathymetry, water types, tidal and wave mixing. Our goal is to characterize coastal diurnal warming using two extensive in-situ temperature and weather datasets from the Caribbean and Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia. Results showed clear daily warming patterns in most stations from both datasets. For the three Caribbean stations where solar radiation is the main cause of daily warming, the mean diurnal warming amplitudes were about 0.4 K at depths of 4-7 m and 0.6-0.7 K at shallower depths of 1-2 m; the largest warming value was 2.1 K. For coral top temperatures of the GBR, 20% of days had warming amplitudes >1 K, with the largest >4 K. The bottom warming at shallower sites has higher daily maximum temperatures and lower daily minimum temperatures than deeper sites nearby. The averaged daily warming amplitudes were shown to be closely related to daily average wind speed and maximum insolation, as found in the open ocean. Diurnal heating also depends on local features including water depth, location on different sections of the reef (reef flat vs. reef slope), the relative distance from the barrier reef chain (coast vs. lagoon stations vs. inner barrier reef sites vs. outer rim sites); and the proximity to the tidal inlets. In addition, the influence of tides on daily temperature changes and its relative importance compared to solar radiation was quantified by

  19. An overview of food safety and bacterial foodborne zoonoses in food production animals in the Caribbean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Maria Manuela Mendes; de Almeida, Andre M; Willingham, Arve Lee

    2016-08-01

    Foodborne diseases (FBDs) in the Caribbean have a high economic burden. Public health and tourism concerns rise along with the increasing number of cases and outbreaks registered over the last 20 years. Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., and Campylobacter spp. are the main bacteria associated with these incidents. In spite of undertaking limited surveillance on FBD in the region, records related to bacterial foodborne zoonoses in food-producing animals and their associated epidemiologic significance are poorly documented, giving rise to concerns about the importance of the livestock, food animal product sectors, and consumption patterns. In this review, we report the available published literature over the last 20 years on selected bacterial foodborne zoonoses in the Caribbean region and also address other food safety-related aspects (e.g., FBD food attribution, importance, surveillance), mainly aiming at recognizing data gaps and identifying possible research approaches in the animal health sector.

  20. Biodesulfurization of Cayirhan lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guru, M.; Cubuk, M.; Dursun, S.; Demirbas, A. [Gazi University, Maltepe (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2006-04-15

    In this study, the lignite was improved oxidizing sulfur compounds by Thiobacillus thiooxidans and Thiobacillus ferrooxidans bacteria. Experiments in the batch reactors have been carried out 20% aqueous suspension of coal samples. Sugar beet molasses was used as the bacterial substrate. The maximum removal of combustible sulfur was obtained as 78.2% under the following conditions; addition 5% of T. thiooxidans and 5% T. ferrooxidans into coal suspension, 0.2 g molasses/g coal change, pH value of 3, at shaking rate of 70 rpm and at 40{sup o}C for 5 days.

  1. Perspectives of the German lignite industry in 2008; Perspektiven der deutschen Braunkohlenindustrie 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartung, M. [RWE Power AG, Koeln (Germany). Ressort Braunkohlengewinnung, -stromerzeugung und -veredlung; Milojcic, G. [Bundesverband Braunkohle (DEBRIV), Koeln (Germany)

    2008-05-15

    Lignite companies, specifically Vattenfall and RWE, have been setting out on this route, but there is still a long way to go. We intend to make the necessary efforts, and the lignite companies have a special motivation. Lignite is an increasingly valuable resource. This is shown by developments on raw-material markets. Our task is to further develop power plant engineering in order to help ensure that this remains the case tomorrow as well. So, the lignite industry's avowal of CCS is underpinned by a very tangible interest. The value of domestic lignite should be retained for the longer term. Happily, lignite extraction in all mining areas enjoys the wide acceptance of the population and regional politicians. (orig.)

  2. An impact assessment of the Child Growth, Development and Care Program in the Caribbean Region of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Alcides de J; Trujillo, Juan C

    2015-10-01

    This article aims to assess the impact of the Child Growth, Development and Care Program in the Caribbean region of Colombia by analyzing variables such as maternal childcare practices and indicators of the nutritional status and health of children under the age of five. To this end, the authors used the quasi-experimental technique Propensity Score Matching. Positive impacts included a decrease in acute diarrheal disease, and an increase in immunization and seeking treatment for acute respiratory infection or fever symptoms. However, the program had little influence on chronic and acute malnutrition in the region.

  3. An impact assessment of the Child Growth, Development and Care Program in the Caribbean Region of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcides de J. Padilla

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article aims to assess the impact of the Child Growth, Development and Care Program in the Caribbean region of Colombia by analyzing variables such as maternal childcare practices and indicators of the nutritional status and health of children under the age of five. To this end, the authors used the quasi-experimental technique Propensity Score Matching. Positive impacts included a decrease in acute diarrheal disease, and an increase in immunization and seeking treatment for acute respiratory infection or fever symptoms. However, the program had little influence on chronic and acute malnutrition in the region.

  4. Quantifying potential earthquake and tsunami hazard in the Lesser Antilles subduction zone of the Caribbean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Gavin P.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Seidman, Lily; Roger, Jean

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we quantify the seismic and tsunami hazard in the Lesser Antilles subduction zone, focusing on the plate interface offshore of Guadeloupe. We compare potential strain accumulated via GPS-derived plate motions to strain release due to earthquakes that have occurred over the past 110 yr, and compute the resulting moment deficit. Our results suggest that enough strain is currently stored in the seismogenic zone of the Lesser Antilles subduction arc in the region of Guadeloupe to cause a large and damaging earthquake of magnitude Mw ˜ 8.2 ± 0.4. We model several scenario earthquakes over this magnitude range, using a variety of earthquake magnitudes and rupture areas, and utilizing the USGS ShakeMap and PAGER software packages. Strong ground shaking during the earthquake will likely cause loss of life and damage estimated to be in the range of several tens to several hundreds of fatalities and hundreds of millions to potentially billions of U.S. dollars of damage. In addition, such an event could produce a significant tsunami. Modelled tsunamis resulting from these scenario earthquakes predict meter-scale wave amplitudes even for events at the lower end of our magnitude range (M 7.8), and heights of over 3 m in several locations with our favoured scenario (M 8.0, partially locked interface from 15-45 km depth). In all scenarios, only short lead-times (on the order of tens of minutes) would be possible in the Caribbean before the arrival of damaging waves.

  5. Quantifying potential earthquake and tsunami hazard in the Lesser Antilles subduction zone of the Caribbean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Gavin P.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Seidman, Lily; Roger, Jean

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we quantify the seismic and tsunami hazard in the Lesser Antilles subduction zone, focusing on the plate interface offshore of Guadeloupe. We compare potential strain accumulated via GPS-derived plate motions to strain release due to earthquakes that have occurred over the past 110 yr, and compute the resulting moment deficit. Our results suggest that enough strain is currently stored in the seismogenic zone of the Lesser Antilles subduction arc in the region of Guadeloupe to cause a large and damaging earthquake of magnitude Mw ∼ 8.2 ± 0.4. We model several scenario earthquakes over this magnitude range, using a variety of earthquake magnitudes and rupture areas, and utilizing the USGS ShakeMap and PAGER software packages. Strong ground shaking during the earthquake will likely cause loss of life and damage estimated to be in the range of several tens to several hundreds of fatalities and hundreds of millions to potentially billions of U.S. dollars of damage. In addition, such an event could produce a significant tsunami. Modelled tsunamis resulting from these scenario earthquakes predict meter-scale wave amplitudes even for events at the lower end of our magnitude range (M 7.8), and heights of over 3 m in several locations with our favoured scenario (M 8.0, partially locked interface from 15–45 km depth). In all scenarios, only short lead-times (on the order of tens of minutes) would be possible in the Caribbean before the arrival of damaging waves.

  6. Susceptibility to insecticides and resistance mechanisms in Aedes aegypti from the Colombian Caribbean Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre-Serrano, Ronald; Gomez-Camargo, Doris; Ponce-Garcia, Gustavo; Flores, Adriana E

    2014-11-01

    We determined the susceptibility to insecticides and the biochemical and molecular mechanisms involved in resistance in nine populations of Aedes aegypti (L.) of the Colombian Caribbean region. Bioassays were performed on larvae for susceptibility to temephos and on adults to the insecticides malathion, fenitrothion, pirimiphos-methyl, permethrin, deltamethrin, λ-cyhalothrin and cyfluthrin. The resistance ratio (RR) for each insecticide in the populations was determined, using the susceptible Rockefeller strain as a susceptible control. Additionally, we evaluated the response of the populations to the diagnostic dose (DD) of the organochlorine pesticide DDT. The following biochemical mechanisms associated with resistance were studied: α-esterases, β-esterases, mixed-function oxidases (MFO), glutathione s-transferases (GST) and insensitive acetylcholinesterase (iAChE) as well as the presence of kdr I1,016 mutation and its frequency. All populations studied showed susceptibility to the organophosphates evaluated (RR < 5-fold), except for the Puerto Colombia and Soledad populations which showed high resistance (RR 15-fold) and moderate resistance (RR 5-fold) to temephos, respectively, and Sincelejo (Sucre) with moderate resistance to pirimiphos-methyl (RR 5-fold). All populations evaluated with DD of DDT were found to be resistant with 2-28% of mortality. Variability was observed in the resistance to pyrethroids: permethrin (RR 1.2- to 30.8-fold), deltamethrin RR 0.9- to 37.8-fold), λ-cyalothrin (RR 3.4- to 83-fold) and cyfluthrin (RR 0.3- to 33.8-fold). Incipiently α-esterases and MFO levels were found in the Valledupar population; MFO showed the same profile in Cienaga and GST in the Sincelejo population, all other populations showed unaltered profiles of the enzymes evaluated. The kdr I1,016 mutation was found in all populations evaluated with variability in its allelic and genotypic frequencies.

  7. Medical tourism in the Caribbean region: a call to consider environmental health equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, R; Crooks, V A

    2013-03-01

    Medical tourism, which is the intentional travel by private-paying patients across international borders for medical treatment, is a sector that has been targeted for growth in many Caribbean countries. The international development of this industry has raised a core set of proposed health equity benefits and drawbacks for host countries. These benefits centre on the potential investment in health infrastructure and opportunities for health labour force development while drawbacks focus on the potential for reduced access to healthcare for locals and inefficient use of limited public resources to support the growth of the medical tourism industry. The development of the medical tourism sector in Caribbean countries raises additional health equity questions that have received little attention in existing international debates, specifically in regard to environmental health equity. In this viewpoint, we introduce questions of environmental health equity that clearly emerge in relation to the developing Caribbean medical tourism sector These questions acknowledge that the growth of this sector will have impacts on the social and physical environments, resources, and waste management infrastructure in countries. We contend that in addition to addressing the wider health equity concerns that have been consistently raised in existing debates surrounding the growth of medical tourism, planning for growth in this sector in the Caribbean must take environmental health equity into account in order to ensure that local populations, environments, and ecosystems are not harmed by facilities catering to international patients.

  8. Storms or cold fronts: what is really responsible for the extreme waves regime in the Colombian Caribbean coastal region?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, L. J.; Ortiz-Royero, J. C.; Ruiz-Merchan, J. K.; Higgins, A. E.; Henriquez, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the contribution and importance of cold fronts and storms to extreme waves in different areas of the Colombian Caribbean in an attempt to determine the extent of the threat posed by the flood processes to which these coastal populations are exposed. Furthermore, the study wishes to establish the actions to which coastal engineering constructions should be subject. In the calculation of maritime constructions, the most important parameter is the height of the wave. For this reason, it is necessary to establish the design wave height to which a coastal engineering structure should be resistant. This wave height varies according to the return period considered. The significant height values for the areas focused on in the study were calculated in accordance with Gumbel's extreme value methodology. The methodology was evaluated using data from the reanalysis of the spectral National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) WAVEWATCH III® (WW3) model for 15 points along the 1600 km of the Colombian Caribbean coastline (continental and insular) between the years 1979 and 2009. The results demonstrated that the extreme waves caused by tropical cyclones and those caused by cold fronts have different effects along the Colombian Caribbean coast. Storms and hurricanes are of greater importance in the Guajira Peninsula (Alta Guajira). In the central area (consisting of Baja Guajira, and the cities of Santa Marta, Barranquilla, and Cartagena), the strong impact of cold fronts on extreme waves is evident. However, in the southern region of the Colombian Caribbean coast (ranging from the Gulf of Morrosquillo to the Gulf of Urabá), the extreme values of wave heights are lower than in the previously mentioned regions, despite being dominated mainly by the passage of cold fronts. Extreme waves in the San Andrés and Providencia insular region present a different dynamic from that in the continental area due to their geographic location

  9. Burden and trends of type-specific human papillomavirus infections and related diseases in the latin america and Caribbean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, D Maxwell; Almonte, Maribel; Bruni, Laia; Clifford, Gary; Curado, Maria-Paula; Piñeros, Marion

    2008-08-19

    We present the burden of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers (cancers of the cervix, anogenital region, oral cavity and pharynx) in terms of incidence and mortality, for the countries of the Latin America and Caribbean region. The region is a high-risk area for cancer of the cervix and, although incidence has declined since the 1960s, projected demographic changes imply that the actual burden of new cases will increase by more than 75% in the next 20 years, while the average and at diagnosis will increase. Approximately 65% of cervical cancer cases and 50% of the high risk lesions are associated with HPV-16 and 18. Incidence rates of other HPV-related cancers are significantly lower. The paper also describes the estimated impact of genital warts and the limited data available on the occurrence of HPV infections of the upper aerodigestive tract in the region.

  10. Barriers to generalizability of health economic evaluations in Latin America and the Caribbean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustovski, Federico; Iglesias, Cynthia; Manca, Andrea; Drummond, Michael; Rubinstein, Adolfo; Martí, Sebastián García

    2009-01-01

    Use and acceptance of health economic evaluations (HEEs) has been much greater in developed than in developing nations. Nevertheless, while developing countries lag behind in the development of HEE methods, they could benefit from the progress made in other countries and concentrate on ways in which existing methods can be used or would need to be modified to fulfill their specific needs. HEEs, as context-specific tools, are not easily generalizable from setting to setting. Existing studies regarding generalizability and transferability of HEEs have primarily been conducted in developed countries. Therefore, a legitimate question for policy makers in Latin America and the Caribbean region (LAC) is to what extent HEEs conducted in industrialized economies and in LAC are generalizable to LAC (trans-regional) and to other LAC countries (intra-regional), respectively. We conducted a systematic review, searching the NHS Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED), Office of Health Economics Health Economic Evaluation Database (HEED), LILACS (Latin America health bibliographic database) and NEVALAT (Latin American Network on HEE) to identify HEEs published between 1980 and 2004. We included individual patient- and model-based HEEs (cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, cost-benefit and cost-consequences analyses) that involved at least one LAC country. Data were extracted by three independent reviewers using a checklist validated by regional and international experts. From 521 studies retrieved, 72 were full HEEs (39% randomized controlled trials [RCTs], 32% models, 17% non-randomized studies and 12% mixed trial-modeling approach). Over one-third of identified studies did not specifically report the type of HEE. Cost-effectiveness and cost-consequence analyses accounted for almost 80% of the studies. The three Latin American countries with the highest participation in HEE studies were Brazil, Argentina and Mexico. While we found relatively good standards of reporting the study

  11. Modeling regional coral reef responses to global warming and changes in ocean chemistry: Caribbean case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddemeier, R.W.; Lane, D.R.; Martinich, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Climatic change threatens the future of coral reefs in the Caribbean and the important ecosystem services they provide. We used a simulation model [Combo ("COral Mortality and Bleaching Output")] to estimate future coral cover in the part of the eastern Caribbean impacted by a massive coral bleaching event in 2005. Combo calculates impacts of future climate change on coral reefs by combining impacts from long-term changes in average sea surface temperature (SST) and ocean acidification with impacts from episodic high temperature mortality (bleaching) events. We used mortality and heat dose data from the 2005 bleaching event to select historic temperature datasets, to use as a baseline for running Combo under different future climate scenarios and sets of assumptions. Results suggest a bleak future for coral reefs in the eastern Caribbean. For three different emissions scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC; B1, A1B, and A1FI), coral cover on most Caribbean reefs is projected to drop below 5% by the year 2035, if future mortality rates are equivalent to some of those observed in the 2005 event (50%). For a scenario where corals gain an additional 1-1. 5??C of heat tolerance through a shift in the algae that live in the coral tissue, coral cover above 5% is prolonged until 2065. Additional impacts such as storms or anthropogenic damage could result in declines in coral cover even faster than those projected here. These results suggest the need to identify and preserve the locations that are likely to have a higher resiliency to bleaching to save as many remnant populations of corals as possible in the face of projected wide-spread coral loss. ?? 2011 The Author(s).

  12. Knowledge and perceived implementation of food safety risk analysis framework in Latin America and the Caribbean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, C; Mohr, A Hofelich; Lindsay, T; Diez-Gonzalez, F; Hueston, W; Sampedro, F

    2014-12-01

    Risk analysis is increasingly promoted as a tool to support science-based decisions regarding food safety. An online survey comprising 45 questions was used to gather information on the implementation of food safety risk analysis within the Latin American and Caribbean regions. Professionals working in food safety in academia, government, and private sectors in Latin American and Caribbean countries were contacted by email and surveyed to assess their individual knowledge of risk analysis and perceptions of its implementation in the region. From a total of 279 participants, 97% reported a familiarity with risk analysis concepts; however, fewer than 25% were able to correctly identify its key principles. The reported implementation of risk analysis among the different professional sectors was relatively low (46%). Participants from industries in countries with a long history of trade with the United States and the European Union, such as Mexico, Brazil, and Chile, reported perceptions of a higher degree of risk analysis implementation (56, 50, and 20%, respectively) than those from the rest of the countries, suggesting that commerce may be a driver for achieving higher food safety standards. Disagreement among respondents on the extent of the use of risk analysis in national food safety regulations was common, illustrating a systematic lack of understanding of the current regulatory status of the country. The results of this survey can be used to target further risk analysis training on selected sectors and countries.

  13. The problem of enriching the Visonta lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarjan, G.

    1987-01-01

    The technology suggested by the Central Institute for Mining Development is critically analyzed. The minerals accompanying the lignite seams, especially the montmorillonite and its physical peculiarities are evaluated. The Visonta lignites contain inorganic components of about 45% in addition to about 21% clay. The investment costs are much lower in case of building a preparation system for lignite cleaning than the investment costs of the power plant planned only for raw lignite.

  14. Trends and variability of daily and extreme temperature and precipitation in the Caribbean region, 1961-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, T. L.; Stephenson, T. S.; Vincent, L.; Van Meerbeeck, C.; McLean, N.

    2013-05-01

    A workshop was held at the University of the West Indies, Jamaica, in May 2012 to build capacity in climate data rescue and to enhance knowledge about climate change in the Caribbean region. Scientists brought their daily surface temperature and precipitation data for an assessment of quality and homogeneity and for the preparation of climate change indices helpful for studying climate change in their region. This study presents the trends in daily and extreme temperature and precipitation indices in the Caribbean region for records spanning the 1961-2010 and 1986-2010 intervals. Overall, the results show a warming of the surface air temperature at land stations. Region-wide, annual means of the daily minimum temperatures (+1.4°C) have increased more than the annual means of the daily maximum temperatures (+0.9°C) leading to significant decrease in the diurnal temperature range. The frequency of warm days and warm nights has increased by more than 15% while 9% fewer cool days and 13% fewer cool night were found over the 50-year interval. These frequency trends are further reflected in a rise of the annual extreme high and low temperatures by ~1°C. Changes in precipitation indices are less consistent and the trends are generally weak. Small positive trends were found in annual total precipitation, daily intensity, maximum number of consecutive dry days and heavy rainfall events particularly during the period 1986- 2010. Finally, aside from the observed climate trends, correlations between these indices and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) annual index suggest a coupling between land temperature variability and, to a lesser extent, precipitation extremes on the one hand, and the AMO signal of the North Atlantic surface sea temperatures.

  15. Evolution of Çan-Etili (Çanakkale-NW Turkey) lignite basin:Sedimentology, petrology, palynology and lignite characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mustafa Bozcu; Funda Akgün; Gülbin Gürdal; Ayşe Bozcu; Sevinç Kapan Yeşilyurt; Öznur Karaca; M. Serkan Akkiraz

    2015-01-01

    abstract This study examines the development and sedimentology of Çan-Etili lignite basin in Biga Peninsula (NW Turkey) along with the palynologic and petrographic properties of the coals in this region. The Çan-Etili lignite basin discordantly overlies Oligocene-aged Çan volcanics. The basin consists of caldera type sedimentation developed by the combined effects of volcanism and tectonics. The volcanic rocks forming the basement of the basin consist of andesitic, dacitic and basaltic lava flows as well as agglomerates, tuff and silicified tuffs, and kaolin which is their alteration product. The basement volcanic rocks cooled from high potassium and calc-alkaline magma. The trace element geochemistry of different rocks within the volcanics reveals that they are from a volcanic arc. The Çan Formation contains lignites and consists of 6 lithofacies representing alluvial, fluvial, marsh and lacustrine environments. These lithofacies are the lower volcanogenic conglomerate, the claystone, the lignite, the laminated organic claystone, the tuff intercalated sandstone–siltstone and the upper volcanogenic conglomerate. The lignite in the basin is limnic and is formed in a non-fluvial marsh and marsh-lake environment. An abundant percentage of vegetation (Engelhardia, Sapotaceae, Cyrillaceae) is compatible with temperate and subtropical climatic conditions in the basin during sedimentation of lignite.The coals of Çan-Etili basin are humic with high sulfur content (6–6.5%average) mostly containing huminite compounds belonging to the class of lignite-low bituminous (C-A) coal. Their coalification rank is between 0.38%and 0.56%Ro. The coals are formed in limnic-limnotelmatic marsh zones based on their microlithotype components. The inorganic components of the coal mostly consist of pyrite and clay. The trace elements, As, Th, U and V, are higher than international coal standards. The coal quality is adversely affected by high sulfur content and sulfur driven trace

  16. Mineralogy and geochemistry of density-separated Greek lignite fractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iordanidis, A.; Doesburg, van J.D.J.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, lignite samples were collected from the Ptolemais region, northern Greece, homogenized, crushed to less than I nun, and separated in three density fractions using heavy media. The mineralogical investigation of the density fractions showed a predominance of pyrite in the light fractio

  17. Bathymetric terrain model of the Puerto Rico Trench and the northeastern Caribbean region for marine geological investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Brian D.; ten Brink, Uri S.; Danforth, William W.; Chaytor, Jason D.; Granja Bruña, José-Luis; Llanes Estrada, Pilar; Carbó-Gorosabel, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Records were obtained for 305 wells and 1 spring in northwestern Lee and southeastern Chatham counties, NorMultibeam bathymetric data collected in the Puerto Rico Trench and northeastern Caribbean region are compiled into a seamless bathymetric terrain model for broad-scale geological investigations of the trench system. These data, collected during eight separate surveys between 2002 and 2013 and covering almost 180,000 square kilometers, are published here in large-format map sheet and digital spatial data. This report describes the common multibeam data collection and processing methods used to produce the bathymetric terrain model and corresponding data-source polygon. Details documenting the complete provenance of the data are provided in the metadata in the Data Catalog section.

  18. Bio-solubilization of Chinese lignite Ⅱ: protein adsorption onto the lignite surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Su-dong; TAO Xiu-xiang; SHI Kai-yi

    2009-01-01

    Lignite bio-solubilization is a promising technology for converting solid lignite into oil. This study concerns the adsorption of lignite-solubilizing enzymes onto the lignite surface. Adsorption capacity, infrared spectral analysis and driving forces analysis are studied as a way to help understand the bio-solubilization mechanism. The results show that the amount of lignite bio-solubilization is proportional to the amount of adsorbed lignite-solubilizing enzymes. An increase in lignite-solubilizing enzyme adsorption of 10% leads to a 7% increase in lignite bio-solubilization. However, limited amounts of enzymes can be adsorbed by the lignite, thus resulting in low percentages of bio-solubilization. Infrared spectral analysis shows that side chains, such as hydroxyl and carbonyl, of the lignite structure are the main, and necessary, structures where lignite-solubilizing enzymes attachto the lignite. Furthermore, driving force analysis indicates that the electrostatic force between lignite and enzymes is the main adsorption mechanism. The forces are influenced by solution pH levels, the zeta potential of the lignite and the isoelectric points of the enzymes.

  19. The Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act--1983: Its Impact on the Economic/Political Stabilities within the Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-25

    otherwise had been opposed by President Reagan. The final public law 98-67 is titled: "INTEREST AND DIVIDEND TAX COMPLIANCE ACT OF 1983-CARIBBEAN BASIN...ECONOMIC RECOVERY ACT". Title I Is the "INTEREST AND DIVIDEND TAX COMPLIANCE ", and Title II contains the "CARIBBEAN BASIN INITIATIVE". Title II contains

  20. The Major Project in the Field of Education in the Latin American and Caribbean Region. OREALC Bulletin 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Santiago (Chile). Regional Office for Education in Latin America and Caribbean.

    Four articles comprise this issue of the bulletin. "The Situation of Teachers in the English-Speaking Caribbean" (A. B. Alleyne) examines the position of Caribbean teachers with respect to salaries, social security, the teacher shortage, the adequacy of educational objectives and policies, preparation for the profession, and further…

  1. Caribbean development: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Sutton

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Reviews development in the Caribbean, especially since 1990 to the present, and highlights future development prospects. Author discusses 2 reports from 2005 on present developments problems in the Caribbean region: the economics-focussed 'A time to choose: Caribbean development in the 21st century' by the World Bank, and the UN ECLAC report 'The Millennium Development Goals: a Latin American and Caribbean perspective', with a broader, also social and political, development agenda. He relates what both reports recommend for the Caribbean on the basis of their evaluations of past development. The World Bank report advocates a move toward the services sector, including tourism, offshore education, ICT services, and health services as most viable. The ECLAC report notes some social and political advances in comparison to other developing countries, but also remaining problems and inequalities. The author finds that the World Bank report's neoliberal, one-size-fits-all approach is not mindful of specific Caribbean realities, while the ECLAC study is more sensitive to local realities, and espouses a mixed economy. He thus considers the ECLAC approach preferable, but argues that it needs to go further, as it excludes Cuba and Haiti as atypical states.

  2. Globalizing the English Curriculum through Caribbean Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoelman, Linda; Thomas, Katherine

    Although Caribbean (English) writers hold differing views on the effectiveness of making connections in an area of so much diversity, Caribbean literature can be connected to the English curriculum to promote diversity and understanding. V. S. Naipaul, Nobel Prize winning author from the region, presents a pessimistic view of Caribbean society in…

  3. A first look at the science-policy interface for ocean governance in the Wider Caribbean Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eMcConney

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Weak governance is a root cause of the problems constraining the sustainable management of shared living marine resources within the Wider Caribbean Region (WCR. Integral to any fully functioning policy cycle in governance is the communication of marine science data and information, through the stages of the policy cycle, ultimately for use in decision-making. The networks of ties between science and policy constitute science-policy interfaces. Connecting science to policy is a major issue confronting the world today in efforts to achieve sustainable development. In order to develop a regional science-policy interface for ocean governance in the WCR we must first understand what currently exists. In this paper we describe the process and product of an interview investigation of the marine science-policy interface in the WCR. Policy discussions that used marine science extensively were infrequent. Constraints on use of science included low capacity, science not being provided in policy-relevant format, not having easy access to databases and low policy demand for science. There is little transboundary marine science information sharing except through informal social networks. The absence of a culture of evidence-based policy-making in the region must be addressed before there will be any significant change in use of properly packaged marine science. External influences, political context, science and evidence, links and networks are used to systematize the key learning.

  4. What are cleats? Preliminary studies from the Konin lignite mine, Miocene of central Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widera, Marek

    2014-03-01

    Cleats (fractures, joints) are discontinuities in coals, including lignites. They are important in mining activity because of their gas and water permeability in hard coal, and mainly because of their water permeability in lignites. As opposed to hard-coal cleats, lignite cleats have not been studied in detail before. The present contribution does so, using as an example the 1st Middle-Polish Lignite Seam (MPLS-1) in the Jóźwin IIB opencast mine in central Poland. It should be mentioned here that any remarks in the present contribution concerning MPLS-1 refer exclusively to this lignite seam in the Jóźwin IIB opencast mine. The investigated discontinuities consist of two sets, i.e. the face and butt cleats, which are roughly oriented NW-SE and NE-SW, respectively. The mean spacing of the face cleats is ~12.4 cm, while the mean spacing of the butt cleats is ~12.8 cm. The maximum average aperture is ~4.9 mm for the face cleats and ~4.1 mm for the butt cleats. The cleat spacing and aperture do not depend on the lignite thickness, but the cleat spacing increases with increasing mineral-matter and xylite content, whereas the aperture increases when the contents decrease. The regional folding and local salt diapirism tentatively explain the formation of the orthogonal system of the lignite cleats, partly because of the parallelism of the face cleats and the major tectonic directions in central Poland.

  5. Population structure analyses and demographic history of the malaria vector Anopheles albimanus from the Caribbean and the Pacific regions of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conn Jan E

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles albimanus is an important malaria vector in some areas throughout its distribution in the Caribbean and the Pacific regions of Colombia, covering three biogeographic zones of the neotropical region, Maracaibo, Magdalena and Chocó. Methods This study was conducted to estimate intra-population genetic diversity, genetic differentiation and demographic history of An. albimanus populations because knowledge of vector population structure is a useful tool to guide malaria control programmes. Analyses were based on mtDNA COI gene sequences and four microsatellite loci of individuals collected in eight populations from the Caribbean and the Pacific regions of Colombia. Results Two distinctive groups were consistently detected corresponding to COI haplotypes from each region. A star-shaped statistical parsimony network, significant and unimodal mismatch distribution, and significant negative neutrality tests together suggest a past demographic expansion or a selective sweep in An. albimanus from the Caribbean coast approximately 21,994 years ago during the late Pleistocene. Overall moderate to low genetic differentiation was observed between populations within each region. However, a significant level of differentiation among the populations closer to Buenaventura in the Pacific region was observed. The isolation by distance model best explained genetic differentiation among the Caribbean region localities: Los Achiotes, Santa Rosa de Lima and Moñitos, but it could not explain the genetic differentiation observed between Turbo (Magdalena providence, and the Pacific region localities (Nuquí, Buenaventura, Tumaco. The patterns of differentiation in the populations from the different biogeographic provinces could not be entirely attributed to isolation by distance. Conclusion The data provide evidence for limited past gene flow between the Caribbean and the Pacific regions, as estimated by mtDNA sequences and current gene

  6. Recovery of germanium from lignite by microorganism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The recovery of Ge from lignite by microorganism includes two stages: (1) the breaking-down of Ge complex of humus in lignite into simple compounds assisted by microorganism; (2) the desorption of Ge compounds from the lignite. The recovery rate of Ge has been enhanced by 14% since the discovery of adsorption and desorption of Ge from coal. The effects of pH, leaching agents, and coal size on the recovery of Ge were experimentally investigated, and the optimized process parameters were obtained. The reaction heat of Ge adsorption and desorption in lignite was determined. It is about 23-53 kJ/mol, which reveals that the adsorption belongs to physical process. The recovery rate of Ge from lignite with direct microorganism leaching can reach about 85%, which is higher than that of 60% reported elsewhere. A potential process for leaching Ge in lignite was suggested.

  7. THE COMBUSTION CHARACTERISTICS OF LIGNITE BLENDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Jun; Zhou Junhu; Cao Xinyu; Cen Kefa

    2000-01-01

    The combustion characteristics of lignite blends were studied with a thermogravimetric analyzer (t.g.a.), at constant heating rate.The characteristic temperatures were determined from the burning profiles.It was found that the characteristic times of combustion reaction moved forward, the ignition temperature dropped and the burnout efficiency slightly changed when blending lignites.The characteristic parameters of blends could not be predicted as a linear function of the average values of the individual lignites.when blending with less reactive coal, the ignition and burnout characteristics of lignite turned worse.

  8. Design of a Regional Program for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Research and Innovation Networks in Latin America and the Caribbean

    OpenAIRE

    Décio Gazzoni; Gabriel Blanco; Isaias Macedo; Arturo Morales-Acevedo; Anibal Borroto

    2010-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study is to help foster the production and use of renewable energy in Latin America and the Caribbean and develop feasible and widely accepted energy efficiency models, by supporting R&D networks aiming to developing and transferring state of the art technology, adapted to the region, on a sustainable basis, considering environmental, economic and social aspects. The document provides an overview of several renewable energy technologies, including present status, p...

  9. Aedes aegypti (L.) in Latin American and Caribbean region: With growing evidence for vector adaptation to climate change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadee, Dave D; Martinez, Raymond

    2016-04-01

    Within Latin America and the Caribbean region the impact of climate change has been associated with the effects of rainfall and temperature on seasonal outbreaks of dengue but few studies have been conducted on the impacts of climate on the behaviour and ecology of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.This study was conducted to examine the adaptive behaviours currently being employed by A. aegypti mosquitoes exposed to the force of climate change in LAC countries. The literature on the association between climate and dengue incidence is small and sometimes speculative. Few laboratory and field studies have identified research gaps. Laboratory and field experiments were designed and conducted to better understand the container preferences, climate-associated-adaptive behaviour, ecology and the effects of different temperatures and light regimens on the life history of A. aegypti mosquitoes. A. aegypti adaptive behaviours and changes in container preferences demonstrate how complex dengue transmission dynamics is, in different ecosystems. The use of underground drains and septic tanks represents a major behaviour change identified and compounds an already difficult task to control A. aegypti populations. A business as usual approach will exacerbate the problem and lead to more frequent outbreaks of dengue and chikungunya in LAC countries unless both area-wide and targeted vector control approaches are adopted. The current evidence and the results from proposed transdisciplinary research on dengue within different ecosystems will help guide the development of new vector control strategies and foster a better understanding of climate change impacts on vector-borne disease transmission.

  10. Effectiveness of a training-of-trainers model in a HIV counseling and testing program in the Caribbean Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLaughlin Robert

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and sustainability of a voluntary counseling and testing (VCT training program based on a training-of-trainers (TOT model in the Caribbean Region, we gathered data on the percentage of participants trained as VCT providers who were providing VCT services, and those trained as VCT trainers who were conducting VCT training. Methods The VCT training program trained 3,489 providers in VCT clinical skills and 167 in VCT training skills within a defined timeframe. An information-monitoring system tracked HIV trainings conducted, along with information about course participants and trainers. Drawing from this database, a telephone survey followed up on program-trained VCT providers; an external evaluation analyzed data on VCT trainers. Results Almost 65% of trained VCT providers could be confirmed as currently providing VCT services. This percentage did not decrease significantly with time. Of the VCT trainers, 80% became certified as trainers by teaching at least one course; of these, 66% taught more than one course. Conclusion A TOT-based training program is an effective and sustainable method for rapid scale-up of VCT services and training capacity in a large-scale VCT program.

  11. An analysis of the effect of temperature on the pattern of wind energy distribution in the Caribbean region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrahams Mwasha

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The exploitation of the wind energy resource is expected to have a key role in climate change mitigation in the Caribbean region. However, wind energy is also affected by climate change. The availability and reliability of wind energy depend on the climate conditions. An evaluation based on Weibull Distribution Model is done on the average monthly wind speed variation at a standard height of 10m over a ten year period in the island of Trinidad. The variations in the Power Density Per Unit Area of the wind are examined in relation to temperature changes for the last ten year period. The temperature is examined since increased temperatures provide significant evidence of global warming. In this paper, it was found that in Piarco, Trinidad, the highest average annual Power Density Per Unit Area is 14.42Wm-2 and occurred in the year 2004 at an annual average temperature 32.1oC. By comparing these values with the Power Densities per Unit Area and temperatures for other years, the temperature did not have any significant impact on the distribution of wind energy. As such, the wind power potential in Trinidad is not jeopardized by climate change.

  12. The insulin gene region and susceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in four races; new insights from Afro-Caribbean race-specific haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijovic, C H; Penny, M A; Jenkins, D; Jacobs, K; Heward, J; Knight, S W; Lucassen, A; Morrison, E; Barnett, A H

    1997-01-01

    The IDDM2 component of the genetic susceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) has been mapped to chromosome 11p15.5. The exact identity of IDDM2 remains uncertain. It has been suggested that IDDM2 maps within the 5' VNTR (variable number tandem repeat) polymorphism upstream of the insulin gene (INS). This has not been confirmed and a contribution from other INS gene region polymorphisms cannot be excluded. We present INS region genotype data from four racial groups: the Japanese, Hong Kong Chinese, North Indian Asians and Afro-Caribbeans (two groups; one born and resident in the UK, one in Jamaica). These races have not been previously studied with the range of INS region polymorphisms included here. No INS polymorphism was associated with IDDM across all races. These data from this study thus do not identify any INS polymorphism as IDDM2. The Afro-Caribbean race showed a very different distribution of INS genotypes from the other races and novel race-specific INS haplotypes were identified. Analysis of these excluded a contribution to susceptibility to IDDM from the- 23HphI INS polymorphism. An Afro-Caribbean INS haplotype which differed only at the VNTR from the very protective INS haplotype (VPH) identified in white Caucasians was detected. Population analysis of this haplotype will allow direct assessment of the role of the VNTR in susceptibility to IDDM. In conclusion, the diverse Afro-Caribbean TH/INS/IGF2 haplotypes identified in this study will be valuable in mapping IDDM2 more precisely.

  13. Unraveling the nexus between water and food security in Latin America and the Caribbean: regional and global implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willaarts, Barbara; Garrido, Alberto; Soriano, Barbara; De Stefano, Lucia; López Gunn, Elena; Aldaya, Maite; Martínez-Santos, Pedro; Llamas, Ramon

    2014-05-01

    Latin American and the Caribbean (LAC) is a water and land abundant region, and plays a key role in meeting global food and water security. During the last decade, LAC has experience a rapid socio-economic growth, largely sustained by its competitive advantage in the production and exports of agricultural and mining products and by the high commodity prices in the global market. This study seeks to quantify the contribution of LAC's agriculture to global food and water security, i.e. virtual water trade, and evaluate the environmental and societal implications for regional development. Results show that between 2000 and 2011, LAC has increase its agricultural production 27%, and it now accounts for nearly 18% of the global agricultural market. As a result, the agricultural water footprint (WF) of LAC was augmented 65%; and yet, nearly 19% to 44% of the actual agricultural WF - depending on the countries - is virtual water exported to third countries. In fact, almost 50% of the increase in global virtual water trade during the last decade, corresponds to LAC. Such global contribution has significant implications for regional water and food security. From an environmental perspective, crop expansion (mostly rain-fed) resulted in the deforestation of nearly 1 million km2, turning this region into the second most important deforestation hotspots worldwide. This land clearing is having large impacts of ecosystem services, e.g. carbon sequestration, water quality or biodiversity conservation. From a socio-economic perspective, increasing agricultural production has improved regional food security indicators, although one every seven children is still stunted in LAC and nearly 10% of the population remains undernourished. Dietary shifts and socio-cultural factors also lag behind the growing problem of malnutrition in the region, i.e. overweight and obesity. Improvements of water access and sanitation, have had a positive impact on food security indicators, especially

  14. The Need for a Regional Security System Multinational Coast Guard Unit in the Eastern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    Islands and eight observer states: Aruba, Colombia , Curacao, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Saint Maarten (Kingdom of the Netherlands...former Prime Minister of Barbados, Owen Arthur expressed that the security concerns of the sub-region included Human Immuno- Deficiency Virus /Acquired

  15. Oceanic Area System Improvement Study (OASIS). Volume IV. Caribbean Region Air Traffic Services System Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    Departamento de Transito Aereo) of the National Airways Division (Division de Aerovias Nacionales) as the authority responsible for the general...Directorate of Air Transport and Traffic (Direccion General Sectorial de Transporte y Transito Aereo - DGTTA), which in turn falls under the authority of...Northern Coastal Region of 4 the Directorate of Engineering and Systems (Direccion de Ingenieria y Sistemas), which is responsible for maintenance of the

  16. Lignite-fired thermal power plants and SO{sub 2} pollution in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Say, Nuriye Peker [Department of Landscape Architecture, Cukurova University, 01330 Balcali, Adana (Turkey)]. E-mail: nursay@cu.edu.tr

    2006-11-15

    About 80% of the electric energy production in Turkey is provided by thermal power plants which use fossil fuels. Lignite, the most abundant domestic energy source, is consumed in most of these plants. Turkey has approximately 0.85% of the world's lignite reserves; however, the Turkish lignites have low calorific value and contain relatively higher amounts of ash, moisture, and sulfur. Nearly 80% of the lignite mined in Turkey is consumed in the thermal power plants since it is not appropriate for use in other types of industry and heating. In Turkey, 13 large-scale lignite-fired thermal power plants are responsible for a considerable amount of air pollution. Therefore, it is crucial to decide on the optimal place and technology for the future thermal power plants, and to equip the currently operating plants with newer technologies that will reduce amount of contaminants released into the air. In this study, the effects of the lignite-fired thermal power plants which have an important place in the energy politics in Turkey on the air pollution are investigated. We focused on SO{sub 2} pollution and the regions in which the SO{sub 2} emissions were concentrated and diffused. The pollutant diffusion areas were projected and mapped based on parameters such as wind data, isotherm curves, population density, and topographic features by using Geographical Information System (GIS) software, ArcView. The contribution of the thermal power plants to SO{sub 2} pollution was also examined.

  17. COFIRING BIOMASS WITH LIGNITE COAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darren D. Schmidt

    2002-01-01

    The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center, in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) biomass cofiring program, completed a Phase 1 feasibility study investigating aspects of cofiring lignite coal with biomass relative to utility-scale systems, specifically focusing on a small stoker system located at the North Dakota State Penitentiary (NDSP) in Bismarck, North Dakota. A complete biomass resource assessment was completed, the stoker was redesigned to accept biomass, fuel characterization and fireside modeling tests were performed, and an engineering economic analysis was completed. In general, municipal wood residue was found to be the most viable fuel choice, and the modeling showed that fireside problems would be minimal. Experimental ash deposits from firing 50% biomass were found to be weaker and more friable compared to baseline lignite coal. Experimental sulfur and NO{sub x} emissions were reduced by up to 46%. The direct costs savings to NDSP, from cogeneration and fuel saving, results in a 15- to 20-year payback on a $1,680,000 investment, while the total benefits to the greater community would include reduced landfill burden, alleviation of fees for disposal by local businesses, and additional jobs created both for the stoker system as well as from the savings spread throughout the community.

  18. Test results of beneficiation of lignites deriving from opencast mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacskai, G.; Schmied, L.; Szabo, I.

    1987-01-01

    The possible varieties of lignite beneficiation of Hungarian lignites as well as the experiences from abroad are discussed. Improvement of the quality of lignites includes homogenization, pre-sorting, wet sorting and pre-drying. The possibilities of producing cemented lignite briquette, of the thermal benefication are outlined. The anticipated costs and length of time necessary to establish lignite briquetting plants in Hungary under different economic conditions are listed.

  19. Toward Building a Cross-Border Integration Region among Five Caribbean Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Cristina Mantilla Valbuena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo pretende aportar insumos para proponer una zona de integración transfronteriza entre cinco países que comparten fronteras marítimo-territoriales en el c aribe: c olombia ( san andrés, Providencia y s anta c atalina, Panamá, c osta r ica, n icaragua y j amaica. s e realizó una caracterización de la zona fronteriza a partir de procesos comunes de conf iguración geohis - tórica, dinámicas de poblamiento y elementos étnicos, lingüísticos, culturales y religiosos que consolidaron la unidad sociocultural de esta región caribeña. e l desarrollo de esta caracteriza - ción permite identif icar una comunidad transfronteriza que, pese a las divisiones establecidas por los e stados, justif ica la integración regional.

  20. Separation and analysis of lignite bioconversion products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Jinghua; Xiao Lei; Wang Liqiang

    2012-01-01

    The bioconversion of coal at ambient conditions is a promising technology for coal processing,although the mechanisms of coal degradation are still not understood fully.In this work,the bioconversion of lignite was studied using a fungus isolated from decaying wood.The lignite samples were oxidized with nitric acid under moderate conditions and then the oxidized samples were placed on a potato medium with isolated fungus for lignite bioconversion.Lignite,oxidized lignite and residual products after bioconversion of lignite were sequentially extracted with petroleum ether,CS2.methanol,acetone and tetrahydrofuran (THF),and then each extract was characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS).The differences in composition and structure among the samples were inferred by comparing the differences between the extracts.The results show that aromatics with one or several benzene rings and their derivatives; and some long-chain alkanes containing oxygen decreased in the methanol-,acetone-,and THF-soluble fraction from residual lignite,whereas long chain or a few branched alkanes and small quantities of aromatic compounds increased in petroleum ether and CS2 soluble fractions.

  1. Historical and socio-political perspectives on mental health in the Caribbean region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerda Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available La historia de la región del Caribe incluye un legado de la erradicación de las poblaciones indígenas, la escalvitud y la hegemonía colonial que ha formado la economía, las estructuras sociales y culturas de cada isla/nación. Éste artículo presenta un breve análisis histórico y sociopolítico del impacto psicológico de la historia de subordinación con el intento de contextualizar las experiencias de los individuos en estas islas, cubriendo las necesidades de salud mental de la región adecuadamente. El campo de la psicología ofrece las esperanza de enfrentar el legado de colonialismo en la identidad y la subjetividad, especialmente en la producción de conocimiento interno. La Conferencia Regional del Caribe 2011 de la Psicología es un ejemplo del movimiento hacia la unificación y la propiedad de las perspectivas de la psicología del Caribe, líderes, y la próxima generación de eruditos.

  2. Bioprocessing of lignite coals using reductive microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, D.L.

    1992-03-29

    In order to convert lignite coals into liquid fuels, gases or chemical feedstock, the macromolecular structure of the coal must be broken down into low molecular weight fractions prior to further modification. Our research focused on this aspect of coal bioprocessing. We isolated, characterized and studied the lignite coal-depolymerizing organisms Streptomyces viridosporus T7A, Pseudomonas sp. DLC-62, unidentified bacterial strain DLC-BB2 and Gram-positive Bacillus megaterium strain DLC-21. In this research we showed that these bacteria are able to solubilize and depolymerize lignite coals using a combination of biological mechanisms including the excretion of coal solublizing basic chemical metabolites and extracellular coal depolymerizing enzymes.

  3. NCD Prevention and Control in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Regional Approach to Policy and Program Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospedales, C James; Barcelo, Alberto; Luciani, Silvana; Legetic, Branka; Ordunez, Pedro; Blanco, Adriana

    2012-03-01

    This article describes efforts from the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) that have supported progress in country-driven planning and implementing of actions to address noncommunicable diseases (NCD), as well as mechanisms that PAHO has supported for countries in the Americas to share and build on each other's experiences. The Regional Strategy and Plan of Action for NCD, approved by all member states in 2006, is the major frame for this work. The strategy has 4 lines of action: policy and advocacy; surveillance; health promotion and disease prevention; and integrated management of NCD and risk factors. Cross-cutting strategies include resource mobilization, communication, training, and networks and partnerships. The strategy is operationalized through biannual work plans for which countries link and commit to achieving specific objectives. PAHO then provides technical support toward achieving these plans, and countries report progress annually. The CARMEN (Collaborative Action for Risk Factor Prevention and Effective Management of NCD [Conjunto de Acciones para la Reducción y el Manejo de las Enfermedades No transmisibles]) Network provides a major platform for sharing, and the multisector Pan American Forum for Action on NCD has been launched to extend the network to include business and civil society. PAHO also supported civil society capacity building. Almost all member states have made substantial progress in implementing their national chronic disease programs, in most instances reporting exceeding the indicators of the strategic plan related to chronic diseases. From the Caribbean countries, leadership has been provided to achieve the historic UN High-Level Meeting on NCD in September 2011. The region is on track to meet the mortality reduction target set for 2013, though much remains to be done to further increase awareness of and resources for scaling up NCD prevention and control programs, given the huge health and economic burden, increasing costs

  4. Spatially distinct and regionally endemic Symbiodinium assemblages in the threatened Caribbean reef-building coral Orbicella faveolata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Dustin W.; Thornhill, Daniel J.; Rotjan, Randi D.; Iglesias-Prieto, Roberto; Fitt, William K.; Schmidt, Gregory W.

    2015-06-01

    Recently, the Caribbean reef-building coral Orbicella faveolata was listed as "threatened" under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Despite attention to this species' conservation, the extent of geographic variation within O. faveolata warrants further investigation. O. faveolata is unusual in that it can simultaneously harbor multiple genetically distinct and co-dominant species of endosymbiotic dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium. Here, we investigate the geographic and within-colony complexity of Symbiodinium- O. faveolata associations from Florida Keys, USA; Exuma Cays, Bahamas; Puerto Morelos, Mexico; and Carrie Bow Cay, Belize. We collected coral samples along intracolony axes, and Symbiodinium within O. faveolata samples was analyzed using the nuclear ITS2 region and chloroplast 23S rDNA genotyping. O. faveolata associated with species of Symbiodinium in clades A (type A3), B (B1 and B17), C (C3, C7, and C7a), and D (D1a/ Symbiodinium trenchii). Within-colony distributions of Symbiodinium species correlated with light availability, cardinal direction, and depth, resulting in distinct zonation patterns of endosymbionts within a host. Symbiodinium species from clades A and B occurred predominantly in the light-exposed tops, while species of clade C generally occurred in the shaded sides of colonies or in deeper-water habitats. Furthermore, geographic comparisons of host-symbiont associations revealed regional differences in Symbiodinium associations. Symbiodinium A3 was detected in Mesoamerican coral colonies, but not in colonies from the Florida Keys or Bahamas. Likewise, Symbiodinium B17 was unique to Mesoamerican O. faveolata, whereas Symbiodinium B1 was found at all localities sampled. However, using cp23S genotyping paired with ITS2 analysis revealed geographically endemic haplotypes among Symbiodinium clades A, B, and C. Since Symbiodinium spatial heterogeneity among this coral species is greater than most corals, a question arises as to whether all

  5. Region 2 of 8q24 is associated with the risk of aggressive prostate cancer in Caribbean men of African descent from Guadeloupe (French West Indies)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Geraldine CancelTassin; Marc Romana; Cecile Gaffory; Pascal Blanchet; Olivier Cussenot; Luc Multigner

    2015-01-01

    Multiple regions of the genome have been associated with the risk of prostate cancer in Caucasians, particularly including several polymorphisms located at 8q24. Region 2 of 8q24 has been repeatedly found to be associated with the risk of prostate cancer among men of African descent, although one study performed in the Caribbean island of Jamaica did not report this finding. In this study, the single nucleotide polymorphism rs16901979, located in region 2 of 8q24, was genotyped in 498 cases of histologically confirmed prostate cancer and 541 controls from the French Caribbean islands of Guadeloupe, where the population is largely of African descent. The AA genotype and the A allele at rs16901979 were associated with elevated risks of prostate cancer (odds ratios [ORs] = 1.84, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.26–2.69, P = 0.002 and OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.13–1.64, P = 0.001, respectively). Following stratification of the patients by disease aggressiveness, as defined by the Gleason score, the pooled genotypes AC + AA were associated with a higher risk of a Gleason score ≥7 at diagnosis (OR = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.17–2.73, P = 0.007). In summary, the A allele at rs16901979 was associated with the risk of prostate cancer in the Caribbean population of Guadeloupe, confirming its involvement in populations of African descent. Moreover, our study provides the first evidence of an association between this variant and the risk of aggressive prostate cancer.

  6. The Caribbean after-shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canak, W L; Levy, D

    1988-03-01

    The population of the Caribbean islands, is expected to double by the mid-21st century, placing new pressures on local labor markets and economic resources and increasing the need for social expenditures. Most of this growth will take place in urban areas. Emigration to the US is an increasingly important trend, especially in the Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Jamaica, and local Caribbean economies are linked with labor markets in the US through a system of family remittances. Oil price hikes, escalating debt burdens, and falling export prices have created an economic crisis in the Caribbean since the late 1970s. There has been double-digit inflation, rising unemployment, and only sporadic growth in the gross national product. The Caribbean Basin Initiative, established by the Reagan Administration, provides the Caribbean nations with duty-free export entry to the US market for 12 years and targets manufacturing, tourism, agriculture, and foreign investment for growth. Overall, however, the results of this initiative have been an effective subsidy to US investors and little stimulus for growth in locally owned businesses. Haiti and the Dominican Republic are the islands with the most poverty, while Trinidad and Tobago are the most prosperous. Puerto Rico plays an important role in the Caribbean region, serving as a link between North and South America and between cultural differences.

  7. Late Holocene marine terraces of the Cartagena region, southern Caribbean: The product of neotectonism or a former high stand in sea-level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignacio Martínez, J.; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Gomez, Andres; Delgado, Adriana; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Rendon, Esteban

    2010-03-01

    The detailed stratigraphic survey and paleontological study (mollusks, corals, foraminifera and ostracods) of four low-level, ˜3 m, marine terrace sections: Punta Canoas, Manzanillo del Mar, Playa de Oro, and Tierra Bomba Island, from the Cartagena region, southern Caribbean, supplemented with 22 radiocarbon dates, reveals that the northern terraces were deposited as parasequences in a clastic depositional system compared to the Tierra Bomba Island succession that was deposited in a carbonate depositional system between ˜3600 and ˜1700 cal yrs BP. Drier conditions and the southern location of the ITCZ at about 3 ka triggered stronger easterly Trades and more dynamic southwestward sediment drift fed by the Magdalena River mouth, thus promoting the formation of sand spits that ultimately isolated the Cienaga de Tesca coastal lagoon from the Caribbean Sea. Our estimates support the hypothesis that the present position of the terraces is the product of neotectonism rather than a higher 3 ka, sea-level. Upheaval of the terraces varies between ˜3.8 mmyr -1 at Punta Canoas and ˜2.2 mmyr -1 at Tierra Bomba to ˜1.5 mmyr -1 at Manzanillo del Mar and Playa de Oro terraces. Our study corroborates previous contentions on the role of mud diapirism and the dynamics of the Dique Fault as late Holocene upheaval mechanisms.

  8. Co-combustion of lignite with hazelnut shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykiri-Acma, H.; Yaman, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical Engineering Department

    2005-07-01

    In this study, co-combustion characteristics of a Turkish lignite sample from Elbistan region, which is a low quality coal, with hazelnut shell was investigated. For this purpose, grounded samples (-250 {mu}m) were blended in the ratios of 90/10 and 80/20. Original samples and these blends were burned using a thermogravimetric analyzer from ambient to 1173 K with a heating rate of 20 K/min under dynamic dry air atmosphere of 40 cc/min. Derivative thermogravimetric analysis curves that derived from the results of the thermogravimetric analyses were compared and interpreted. 8 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Performance of RegCM-4.3 over the Caribbean region using different configurations of the Tiedtke convective parameterization scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Martínez-Castro

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A sensitivity study about the performance of the RegCM-4.3 regional climate model, driven by ERA Interim reanalysis was conducted for a domain including the Caribbean, with horizontal resolution of 50 km from year 2000 to 2001. Sixteen configurations of the model, including variations in the parameters of the Tiedtke convective scheme were tested. The performance of the model using these configurations was compared with data and with simulations using Emanuel (EM and Grell over land-Emanuel over sea (GE convective parameterization schemes. Global datasets of temperature and precipitation and quality controlled data form the weather station networks of Cuba, Jamaica and the Dominican Republic were used as reference. After an analysis of the simulated precipitation fields, some of the configurations were discarded and four of them were chosen to evaluate the representation by the model of the main climatological features of the region. The chosen configurations simulate the general wind and precipitation patterns reasonably well, and at the same time, the seasonal diurnal cycles and the Caribbean low level jet, but they showed different skill in reproducing the particular features of the regional climate. For the rainy season GE shows the best performance, while EM and the default Tiedtke scheme (TI widely overestimate precipitation in the Pacific coast of Central America, whereas for the dry season, the Tiedtke scheme underestimates precipitation, but after tuning parameters biases were reduced. TI scheme showed the best representation of the precipitation seasonal cycle, while the diurnal circle was best reproduced by the GE scheme. Temperature fields were best simulated by Tiedtke configurations, as the area with negative bias was reduced.

  10. ACTIVATED CARBON FROM LIGNITE FOR WATER TREATMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwin S. Olson; Daniel J. Stepan

    2000-07-01

    High concentrations of humate in surface water result in the formation of excess amounts of chlorinated byproducts during disinfection treatment. These precursors can be removed in water treatment prior to disinfection using powdered activated carbon. In the interest of developing a more cost-effective method for removal of humates in surface water, a comparison of the activities of carbons prepared from North Dakota lignites with those of commercial carbons was conducted. Previous studies indicated that a commercial carbon prepared from Texas lignite (Darco HDB) was superior to those prepared from bituminous coals for water treatment. That the high alkali content of North Dakota lignites would result in favorable adsorptive properties for the very large humate molecules was hypothesized, owing to the formation of larger pores during activation. Since no standard humate test has been previously developed, initial adsorption testing was performed using smaller dye molecules with various types of ionic character. With the cationic dye, methylene blue, a carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite (HSKRC) adsorbed more dye than the Darco HDB. The carbon from the low-sodium lignite was much inferior. With another cationic dye, malachite green, the Darco HDB was slightly better. With anionic dyes, methyl red and azocarmine-B, the results for the HSKRC and Darco HDB were comparable. A humate test was developed using Aldrich humic acid. The HSKRC and the Darco HDB gave equally high adsorption capacities for the humate (138 mg/g), consistent with the similarities observed in earlier tests. A carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite from a different mine showed an outstanding improvement (201 mg/g). The carbons prepared from the low-sodium lignites from both mines showed poor adsorption capacities for humate. Adsorption isotherms were performed for the set of activated carbons in the humate system. These exhibited a complex behavior interpreted as resulting from two types

  11. Sexual dysfunction in climacteric women of African descent from the Colombian Caribbean region = Disfunción sexual en mujeres climatéricas afrodescendientes del Caribe Colombiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monterrosa Castro, Alvaro De Jesus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: After the United States and Brazil, Colombia is the third American country with the greatest population of African descent. Objective: To estimate the prevalence of sexual dysfunction (SD in climacteric women of African descent. Methods: Cross sectional study carried out with the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI, in healthy women, whose mother and father were of black race, living in municipalities from the Colombian Caribbean region, who volunteered to anonymously participate in the study, and were recruited in their communities. Higher scores correlated with better sexuality. Results: 461 women were studied; 305 (66.2% with sexual activity; 70.8% were premenopausal and 29.2%, postmenopausal. Average scores of the domains were: Sexual desire (4.1 ± 1.1, sexual arousal (4.4 ± 1.0, lubrication (4.9 ± 1.0, orgasm (4.7 ± 1.0, satisfaction (5.3 ± 1.0 and pain (4.3 ± 1.5. Average total score was 27.7 ± 4.7. Prevalence of SD was 38.4%. Smoking (OR: 3.3 [IC95%: 1.0-10.6; p = 0.041] and arterial hypertension (OR: 2.2 [IC95%:1.1-4.4; p = 0.026] increased the risk of SD, while schooling higher than ten years (OR: 0.4 [IC95%: 0.2-0.8; p = 0.003] decreased it. Prevalence of SD increased with the change in the menopausal status (p <0,001. All domains deteriorated, except pain, with the transition to the postmenopausal status (p <0.001. Conclusion: In females of African descent from the Colombian Caribbean region, one third of the premenopausal and half of the postmenopausal have SD.

  12. Thermogravimetric investigation of hydrochar-lignite co-combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengang; Quek, Augustine; Kent Hoekman, S; Srinivasan, M P; Balasubramanian, R

    2012-11-01

    Co-combustion of hydrochar with lignite was investigated by means of thermogravimetric analysis. Hydrochars were produced from coconut fibers and eucalyptus leaves under hydrothermal conditions at 250°C. The hydrochar was added in varying amounts to lignite for combustion. The results indicated that hydrothermal treatment decreased the volatile matter content and increased the fixed carbon content of the biomaterials. The elevated energy density and decreased ash content of the hydrochar improved its combustion behavior when co-fired with lignite for energy production. The hydrochars derived from coconut fiber and eucalyptus leaves had similar chemical compositions and showed similar influences on lignite combustion. Hydrochar addition increased the burnout and shortened the combustion range of the hydrochar-lignite blends. High combustion efficiency was observed due to the synergistic interactions between hydrochar and lignite during the co-combustion process. A kinetic study showed that the combustion process of hydrochar-lignite blends followed first-order reaction rates.

  13. Lignite-fired thermal power plants and SO{sub 2} pollution in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuriye Peker Say [Cukurova University, Balcali (Turkey). Department of Landscape Architecture

    2006-11-15

    About 80% of the electric energy production in Turkey is provided by thermal power plants which use fossil fuels. Lignite, the most abundant domestic energy source, is consumed in most of these plants. Turkey has approximately 0.85% of the world's lignite reserves; however, the Turkish lignites have low calorific value and contain relatively higher amounts of ash, moisture, and sulfur. Nearly 80% of the lignite mined in Turkey is consumed in the thermal power plants since it is not appropriate for use in other types of industry and heating. In Turkey, 13 large-scale lignite-fired thermal power plants are responsible for a considerable amount of air pollution. Therefore, it is crucial to decide on the optimal place and technology for the future thermal power plants, and to equip the currently operating plants with newer technologies that will reduce amount of contaminants released into the air. In this study, the effects of the lignite-fired thermal power plants which have an important place in the energy politics in Turkey on the air pollution are investigated. The authors focused on SO{sub 2} pollution and the regions in which the SO{sub 2} emissions were concentrated and diffused. The pollutant diffusion areas were projected and mapped based on parameters such as wind data, isotherm curves, population density, and topographic features by using Geographical Information System (GIS) software, ArcView. The contribution of the thermal power plants to SO{sub 2} pollution was also examined. 31 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. Pyrolysis characteristics of blends of Thai agricultural residues and woods with lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taro Sonobe; Nakorn Worasuwannarak [King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok (Thailand). Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment (JGSEE)

    2005-07-01

    The pyrolysis characteristics of Thai lignite and biomass as well as lignite/biomass blend have been investigated under slow heating rate condition by use of a TGA and a fixed bed reactor. It was found that the pyrolysis behaviors of biomass can be separated by two steps at the region of cellulose decomposition in biomass: sharp devolatilization region between 300 and 400{sup o}C at the range of cellulose decomposition, and slow devolatilization region between 400 and 600{sup o}C after the cellulose decomposition. For the co-pyrolysis of lignite/corncob blend, we have observed the slight difference between experimental and calculated char yields, which obtained from both the TGA and the fixed bed reactor. This weight loss discrepancy at above 400{sup o}C was accompanied by the significant change in the CH{sub 4} production behavior. Based on these results, synergetic effects between lignite and biomass during the co-pyrolysis were discussed. 12 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Uranium-bearing lignite and its relation to the White River and Arikaree formations in northwestern South Dakota and adjacent states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denson, N.M.; Bachman, G.O.; Zeller, H.D.

    1954-01-01

    In northwestern South Dakota and adjacent areas uranium-bearing lignite beds occur at many horizons in the Hell Creek formation of late Cretaceous age and the overlying Ludlow, Tongue River, and Sentinel Butte members of the Fort Union formation of Paleocene age. Uranium analyses of 275 surface and auger samples and about 1,000 core samples show that many of the lignite beds contain 0. 005 to 0. 02 percent uranium with concentrations of 0. 05 to 0.10 percent uranium in the lignite ash. Analytical data indicate that the region contains an aggregate of at least 47,500, 000 tons of lignite with an average grade of slightly more than .0. 008 percent containing 3, 900 tons of uranium. Almost a fifth of the estimated reserves are adapted to strip mining and are in beds averaging about 4 feet in thickness. Uranium concentrations of this magnitude in lignite indicate that these deposits upon the development of proper utilization techniques and processes may be an important future source of uranium. Recent discoveries of ore-grade deposits of autunite-bearing lignite and secondary uranium minerals in carbonaceous sandstone at Cave Hills and Slim Buttes indicate that northwestern South Dakota and adjacent areas may containimportant reserves of uranium-ore. The stratigraphic units containing the uraniferous lignite beds have a combined thickness of about 1, 500 feet and are unconformably overlapped by 300 feet or more of tuffaceous sandstone and bentonitic claystone of the White River and Arikaree formations of Oligocene and Miocene age. The stratigraphically highest lignite beds in the local sequence have the greatest concentration of uranium,, and the uranium content is greatest at the top of thick lignite beds, diminishing progressively downward to a vanishing point in their lower parts. Variations in permeability of the rock overlying the mineralized lignite beds seem to be reflected in the intensity of uranium mineralization. Most of the known uranium-bearing lignite

  16. Pyrolysis of phenols from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Ryltsova, S.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Rozental, D.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.; Martynov, V.Y.; Chilachava, K.B.

    2000-07-01

    Pyrolysis of phenols from lignite semicoking tar at 750-900 {degree}C and contact time of 0.5-6.0 s was studied. The yields of pyrocarbon, pyrolysis gas, and liquid products and the group and component composition of the liquid products and pyrolysis gas were determined. The main groups of compounds in liquid products were analysed.

  17. Fuel briquettes from biomass-lignite blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Haykiri-Acma, H.; Sesen, K.; Kuecuekbayrak, S. [Chemical Engineering Department, Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty, Istanbul Technical University, Maslak, 80626 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2001-08-01

    In this study, a western Turkish lignite (Kuetahya-Seyitoemer) was blended with some biomass samples such as molasses, pine cone, olive refuse, sawdust, paper mill waste, and cotton refuse, and these blends was used in the production of fuel briquettes. Blends were subjected to briquetting pressures between 50 and 250 MPa; the ratio of biomass to lignite was changed between 0 and 30 wt.%. The mechanical strength of obtained briquettes was investigated considering shatter index and compressive strength. Effects of the ratio of biomass to lignite and applied pressure on the strength of the briquettes were examined. This study indicated that the mechanical strength of the briquettes produced from Kuetahya-Seyitoemer lignite can be improved by adding some biomass samples. For example, the presence of paper mill waste increased the shatter index of the briquettes obtained. Similarly, sawdust and paper mill waste increased compressive strength of the briquettes. Water resistance of the briquettes can be augmented by adding olive refuse, cotton refuse, pine cone or paper mill waste.

  18. Evaluation of Kolubara lignite carbon emission characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakić Vukman V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The revised Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC guidelines for national greenhouse gas (GHG inventories recommends that more comprehensive and thus more reliable characteristics of the local fossil fuels should be used for the national GHG inventory calculations. This paper deal with the carbon emission characteristics of low-calorific lignite recovered from the Kolubara open-pit mine. The samples of coal were carefully selected in order to cover the net calorific value, ash and water content of the broad spectrum of the quality of the raw lignite supplied to the Serbian thermal power plants. Correlation analysis of the laboratory analysis data gave a linear dependency of the net calorific value on the combustible content in the coal samples. Also, linear correlation between the carbon content and the net calorific value was found. The regression analysis of experimentally determined coal characteristics implies that the carbon emission factor is dependent on the net calorific value. For the subset of raw lignite samples with the net calorific value Qdr = 6 ÷ 10 MJ/kg, that is most representative for current and near future use for power generation in Serbian thermal power plants, the linear dependency CEFr (tC/TJ = 34.407 - 0.5891×Qdr (MJ/kg was proposed. Regarding the net calorific ranges of samples examined, the raw Kolubara lignite carbon emission factor is considerably higher than those recommended by IPCC Tier 1 method of 27.6 tC/TJ.

  19. Hydrogeological Issues Concerning the Thar Lignite Prospect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. N. Singh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is concerned with the hydrogeological appraisal of the proposed mining operations in theThar lignite field in Sindh, Pakistan. The Thar coalfield covers an area of approximately 9000km2 andcontains three lignite seams lying at depth of 130m to 250 m. In the Thar lignite field, the presence ofthree main aquifers induces pore pressure in the rock mass surrounding the lignite seams and makes highwall slopes potentially unsafe. It is, therefore, necessary to dewater the rock mass before commencingmining excavations. The paper describes the proposed mine dewatering scheme to facilitatedepressurising of the rock mass surrounding the mining excavations. Inflow prediction of groundwater tothe surface mining excavation was carried out using a SEEP/W finite element software package. Thesimulation results show that the ground water inflow from the Top aquifer is 114m3/d, from theIntermediate confined aquifer is 141m3/d and from the Bottom confined aquifer is 1.28 x 105 m3 /d. Theseresults were compared with the analytical solutions which indicated that the relative error of estimation ofinflow quantities varies from 3.4 % to 6.4%.

  20. Caribbean ,More than Myths

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alice Ou

    2008-01-01

    @@ Have you ever watched the movie of Pirates of the Caribbean?This Hollywood movie hit several headlines in its time and pushed a charming and mysterious Caribbean under limelight.The Latin America and the Caribbean area caught the world's eyesight,so from China.On February 27th,the fourth session of CASS (Chinese Academy of Social Sciences)International Forum focus on Latin America and the Caribbean affairs was heldin Beijing,China.

  1. Processing the Visonta lignite for utilization in power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimpl, E.

    1985-01-01

    To utilize the Visonta lignite in power plants, laboratory, semi-industrial and industrial experiments were carried out. In the enrichment process, the parameters of the mensual quality fluctuations, the expected grain size distribution of the lignite, and the average ash content are to be known. Different enrichment processes as well as their results are discussed. In harmony with the obtained results the optimal lignite processing technology is described.

  2. (Bioprocessing of lignite coals using reductive microorganisms)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this report are to: (1) characterize selected aerobic bacterial strains for their abilities to depolymerize lignite coal polymers, and isolate and identify the extracellular enzymes responsible for depolymerization of the coal; (2) characterize selected strictly anaerobic bacteria, that were previously shown to reductively transform coal substructure model compounds, for the ability to similarly transform polymeric coal; and (3) isolate more strains of anaerobic bacteria by enrichment using additional coal substructure model compounds and coal as substrates.

  3. Pyrolysis of hydrocarbons from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Ryl' tsova, S.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Rozental, D.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.

    2000-07-01

    Pyrolysis of hydrocarbons from lignite semicoking tar in the range 750-900{degree}C at a contact time within 0.5-6.0 s was studied. The yields of pyrocarbons, pyrolysis gas, and liquid products and the group and component compositions of the liquid and gaseous products were determined. The optimal pyrolysis parameters from the viewpoint of obtaining the maximal yield of particular 'secondary' hydrocarbons were recommended.

  4. Pyrolysis of asphaltenes from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Ryl' tsova, S.V.; Rozental, D.A.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.

    2000-07-01

    Pyrolysis of asphaltenes from lignite semicoking tar in the range 750-900{degree}C at a contact time within 0.5-6.0 s was studied. The yields of pyrocarbons, pyrolysis gas, and liquid products and the group composition of the liquid products were determined. The total analysis of the major groups of compounds present in the liquid products was performed, and the optimal conditions of pyrolysis, from the viewpoint of preparation of particular compounds, were recommended.

  5. Foraminiferal biostratigraphy of lignite mines of Kutch,India:Age of lignite and fossil vertebrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pratul; Kumar; Saraswati; Sonal; Khanolkar; Dalta; Surya; Narayana; Raju; Suryendu; Dutta; Santanu; Banerjee

    2014-01-01

    The lignite deposits of Kutch, India are stratigraphically referred to the Naredi Formation and considered to be Early Eocene in age. The biostratigraphy of the older mine at Panandhro and a newly opened mine at Matanomadh has constrained the upper age limit of lignite to the early Bartonian. Its lower age may extend to the late Lutetian. Temporally the formation of lignite corresponds to the warming event of the Middle Eocene and suggests a humid climate at the onset of the warming. The previous palynological studies have already suggested dominance of tropical angiospermic pollen. A diverse assemblage of fossil whales and other vertebrates, many of them supposedly the oldest representatives, were reported from Panandhro mine. These were initially assigned to the Early Eocene and later to the Lute? tian age. The present biostratigraphic study revises their age to the Early Bartonian.

  6. Specific industrial medicine in lignite mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerlett, G.; Toussaint, R.; Hilfert, R.; Koehne, G.

    1986-11-01

    Lignite is almost exclusively mined open-cast in West Germany. Mining is carried out at present in deep open-cast mines (with depths up to 400 m) using modern mining conveyer techniques with large-scale equipment (rotary bucket excavators and thickeners) conveyer belt and railway links as well as earth-moving equipment (accessory equipment). Specific occupational diseases are not known in lignite mining. Occupational diseases in the sense of degenerative processes of the lumbar spine and avulsion fractures of spinous processes of the lower cervical spine in drivers of earth-moving equipment as a result of whole-body vibration stress have been observed. In the context of occupational disease and industrial accident prevention, close collaboration and a division of labor between industrial physicians and safety engineers of ergonomics specialists have proved to be very efficient. Industrial medical preventive examinations based on statutory regulations and the lignite mining ordinance have a long tradition and are given a great deal of space. First aid at work is organized in a largely decentralized manner owing to the extensiveness of the mining area. The industrial medical care of the employees takes place on site in the various sections (open-cast mining, workshops, brickett factories, processing units etc.). The entire medical technical diagnostics is carried out centrally in an industrial medical center.

  7. Hydrogeological assessment of the Thar lignite prospect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, R.N.; Stace, R. [Nottingham Centre of Geomechanics (United Kingdom). Dept. of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering; Pathan, A.G. [Mehran Univ. of Engineering and Technology, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Faculty of Mining, Petroleum and Geophysics; Atkins, A.S. [Staffordshire Univ., Stafford (United Kingdom). Faculty of Computing, Engineering and Technology

    2010-07-01

    This paper described a hydrogeological appraisal conducted at a proposed mine site in the Thar lignite field in Pakistan. The field contains an estimate 9 billion tonnes of lignite reserves. Three aquifers surrounding the lignite seams are inducing pore pressure in the rock mass and creating hazardous conditions at the site's high wall slopes. Groundwater inflow predictions were conducted using a finite element-based software package. The study was conducted to calculate dewatering quantities in order to ensure stability during excavation activities. Pumping tests conducted in boreholes at the bottom aquifer were used to determine permeability coefficients. Pumping rates from the 3 aquifers were calculated using the equivalent well approach. Results of the simulations were used to predict groundwater inflow from the bottom aquifer to the fully penetrating pit of the mine under steady state flow conditions. Results of the study indicated that 20 pumping out wells equipped with 150 mm diameter motor pumps will be required over a period of 10 years to achieve an overall dewatering rate of 0.6 m{sup 3}/s for the top aquifer. High head borehole pumps are needed for the intermediate and bottom-confined aquifers. 6 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  8. The state of the art of the energetic development and the sustainable development in Latin America and Caribbean region; El estado de desarrollo energetico y el desarrollo sustentable en America Latina y el Caribe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suding, Paul H. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Technische Zusammenarbeit GmbH (GTZ), Eschborn (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    This work discusses the state of the art of sustainable development in Latin America and Caribbean region. The relation among energy and sustainable development in the political, economical, social and environmental areas are presented and discussed. Also presented are the possible actions of the several actors involved in the process which will enable the aimed sustainable development in the energetic area 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Synopsis of the freshwater Triclads of the Caribbean (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida, Paludicola)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluys, Ronald

    1992-01-01

    SLUYS, R., 1992. Synopsis of the freshwater triclads of the Caribbean (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida, Paludicola). Studies Nat. Hist. Caribbean Region 71, Amsterdam, 1992: 1-23. An account is given of the five species of freshwater triclads which are known from the Caribbean region, including taxonomi

  10. The tectonic setting of the Caribbean region and the K/T turnover of the South American land-mammal fauna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz-Jaureguizar, E.; Pascual, R.

    2011-07-01

    According to the fossil record, a biotic interchange of land vertebrates (e.g. booid snakes, dinosaurs and mammals) occurred between the Americas during the Late Cretaceous-Early Palaeocene. The arrival of North American immigrants (particularly marsupials and placental) during the latest Cretaceous-earliest Palaeocene had a profound influence on the composition of the South American mammal communities. During the Late Cretaceous these communities were dominated by native groups of Pangeic lineages, which represented more than 95% of the known genera, but during the Early Palaeocene 70% of South American mammals were derived from North American immigrants that had arrived during the Late Cretaceous-earliest Palaeocene, and by the Late Palaeocene all the South American mammals (with the possible exception of the xenarthrans) were descendants of these North American immigrants. In spite of the fact that no geological evidence is currently available to support the existence of a continuous land connection between the Americas during the Late Cretaceousearly Palaeocene, the fossil record is substantial enough to point to a temporary inter-American connection that permitted the beginning of a land-mammal exchange by the end of the Cretaceous. This interpretation is supported by recent geographic reconstructions of the Caribbean region. (Author)

  11. The 89 Ma Tortugal komatiitic suite, Costa Rica: Implications for a common geological origin of the Caribbean and Eastern Pacific region from a mantle plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Guillermo E.; Denyer, Percy; Sinton, Christopher W.

    1997-05-01

    Komatiites are reported for the first time in the northern part of the Gulf of Nicoya, Costa Rica. These rocks, dated at 89.7 ± 1.4 Ma (Turonian) by 40Ar/39Ar methods, occur as a large, elongated (14 km long, 1.5 km wide) N60°W striking body in the ophiolitic Nicoya Complex. These lavas have high MgO (26% 29%), Ni, and Cr, have high CaO/Al2O3 (0.98 1.08) and moderate Al2O3/TiO2 (5.55 8.44) ratios, and are depleted in Al2O3 (4% 5.5%), K2O (0.02% 0.37%), and TiO2 (0.59% 0.9%). Although these lavas are cumulates, their geochemical composition indicates an origin from a primary komatiitic magma, with a melting temperature of 1700 °C at a depth of 150 km. Similarities in the petrology and age (88 90 Ma) of Gorgona, Curaìao, and Nicoya-Tortugal mafic and ultramafic volcanic rocks suggest that these rocks had a common origin. These occurrences suggest a single hotspot center over a large area of the Caribbean and Eastern Pacific Mesozoic region due to a major thermal anomaly in the mantle, such as a hot, rising, convective plume.

  12. Artists in and out of the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Price

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] Caribbean Art. VEERLE POUPEYE. London: Thames and Hudson, 1998. 224 pp. (Paper US$ 14.95 Transforming the Crown: African, Asian and Caribbean Artists in Britain, 1966-1996. MORA J. BEAUCHAMP-BYRD & M. FRANKLIN SIRMANS (eds.. New York: Caribbean Cultural Center, 1998. 177 pp. (Paper US$ 39.95, £31.95 "Caribbean" (like "Black British" culture is (as a Dutch colleague once said of postmodernism a bit of a slippery fish. One of the books under review here presents the eclectic artistic productions of professional artists with Caribbean identities of varying sorts - some of them lifelong residents of the region (defined broadly to stretch from Belize and the Bahamas to Curacao and Cayenne, some born in the Caribbean but living elsewhere, and others from far-away parts of the world who have lingered or settled in the Caribbean. The other focuses on artists who trace their cultural heritage variously to Lebanon, France, Malaysia, Spain, China, England, Guyana, India, the Caribbean, the Netherlands, the Philippines, and the whole range of societies in West, East, and Central Africa, all of whom meet under a single ethnic label in galleries in New York and London. Clearly, the principles that vertebrate Caribbean Art and Transforming the Crown are built on the backs of ambiguities, misperceptions, ironies, and ethnocentric logics (not to mention their stronger variants, such as racism. Yet far from invalidating the enterprise, they offer an enlightening inroad to the social, cultural, economic, and political workings of artworlds that reflect globally orchestrated pasts of enormous complexity.

  13. The Major Project in the Field of Education in the Latin American and Caribbean Region. Bulletin #13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Santiago (Chile). Regional Office for Education in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    This document addresses several of the problems of educational planning in Latin America. Emilia Ferreiro, in "Alternatives to Understanding Illiteracy in the Region," suggests that illiteracy in this region is preventing the attainment of democracy. As social inequality increases, so does the percentage of illiterate adults.…

  14. Humification processes in reclaimed open-cast lignite mine soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiros, M.C.; Gil-Sotres, F.; Ceccanti, B.; Trasar-Cepeda, M.C.; Gonzales-Sangregorio, M.V. (Facultad de Farmacia de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Departamento de Edafologia y Quimica Agraria)

    1993-10-01

    To identify the principal humification pathways which occur during the initial stages of pedogenesis, organic matter from mine soils of different ages from the Meirama lignite mine in NW Spain was subjected to a series of physicochemical and chemical fractionations. Although humic molecules of molecular weight lower than 10,000 Da were always predominant, the percentage of C associated with molecules of between 50,000 and 200,000 Da increased with soil age, as did the percentage of chemically stabilized humus and the percentage of C associated with immobile complexes. In general, these results suggest that the principal humification pathway in these soils involves abiotic condensation reactions, as in the case of natural soils of this region. The low complexed metal content of the mine soils in comparison with natural soils indicates the low degree of weathering of inorganic fraction which has occurred in the former.

  15. An overview of Turkish lignite qualities by logistic analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bulent TUTMEZ; Burak HOZATLI; A.Kemal CENGIZ

    2013-01-01

    As an indispensable energy source,lignite is almost exclusively used in power generation in Turkey.To assess the quality level of Turkish lignite,a multivariate statistical analysis was conducted.The relationship among the lignite quality parameters has been investigated using a response method that is the logistic regression method.The analysis determines the effect of multiple predictor variables such as moisture,ash and sulphur presented simultaneously to predict membership of the two calorific value categories.By this way,a reliable binary response regression structure was constructed considering all the lignite fields in Turkey.Both the experiments on identifying the influential measurements and the measure of goodness of fit indicated that the overall model has a big capability to exhibit the relationship among the parameters of the Turkish lignite.

  16. Solubilization of Australian lignites by fungi and other microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catcheside, D.E.A.; Mallett, K.J. (Flinders University, Bedford Park, SA (Australia). School of Biological Sciences)

    Lignites (brown coals) from the Latrobe Valley in Victoria are solubilized by {ital Coriolus versicolor}, {ital Phanerochaete chrysosporium}, and five other species known to be active on Leonardite and various acid-treated North America lignites. Run-of-mine coal from Morwell and Loy Yang is refractory but is soluble after pretreatment with acid. A weathered deposit at Loy Yang, like Leonardite, is susceptible to biosolubilization without pretreatment. The white rot fungi {ital Ganoderma applanatum}, {ital Perenniporia tephropora} ({ital Fomes lividus}), {ital Pleurotus ostreatus}, {ital Pycnoporus cinnabarinus}, {ital Rigidoporus ulmarius}, and {ital Xylaria hypoxylon} were found to be capable of solubilizing lignite. In contrast, brown rot fungi were weakly active or inactive under the same test conditions. Lignite-degrading fungi, actinomycetes, and other bacteria, including some active on untreated run-of-mine coal, were isolated from natural lignite exposures and mining sites. 15 refs., 5 tabs.

  17. Co - pyrolysis of biomass and Polish lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kordylewski, Wlodzimierz; Stojanowska, Grazyna [Politechnika Wroclawska, Wroclaw (Poland); Jones, Jenny [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom). Energy and Resources Research Inst.

    2006-01-15

    The paper presents results of studies of the chemical decomposition of coal, biomass and their blends during low rate heating gasification in atmosphere of air or nitrogen. Polish lignite (Turow), sawdust of pine and blends of these two fuels have been used in the research and it has been investigated the influence of ion exchanged calcium on their pyrolysis. The primary products of devolatilization provided important information for understanding subsequently the leading to toxic organic compounds and synergistic effects of these fuels. The influence of blending ratio and influence of calcium catalysts was discussed.

  18. Assessment of Clear Sky Radiative Forcing in the Caribbean Region Using an Aerosol Dispersion Model and Ground Radiometry During Puerto Rico Dust Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasso, Santiago; Qi, Qiang; Westpthal, Douglas; Reid, Jeffery; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the surface and top of the atmosphere solar radiative forcing by long-range transport of Saharan dust. The calculations of radiative forcing are based on measurements collected in the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment (PRIDE) carried out during July, 2000. The purpose of the experiment was the characterization of the Saharan dust plume, which frequently reaches the Caribbean region during the summer. The experiment involved the use of three approaches to study the plume: space and ground based remote sensing, airborne and ground based in-situ measurements and aerosol dispersion modeling. The diversity of measuring platforms provides an excellent opportunity for determination of the direct effect of dust on the clear sky radiative forcing. Specifically, comparisons of heating rates, surface and TOA fluxes derived from the Navy global aerosol dispersion model NAAPS (NRL Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System) and actual measurements of fluxes from ground and space based platforms are shown. In addition, the direct effect of dust on the clear sky radiative forcing is modeled. The extent and time of evolution of the radiative properties of the plume are computed with the aerosol concentrations modeled by NAAPS. Standard aerosol parameterizations, as well as in-situ composition and size distributions measured during PRIDE, are utilized to compute the aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo and asymmetry factor. Radiative transfer computations are done with an in-house modified spectral radiative transfer code (Fu-Liou). The code includes gas absorption and cloud particles (ice and liquid phase) and it allows the input of meteorological data. The code was modified to include modules for the aerosols contribution to the calculated fluxes. This comparison study helps to narrow the current uncertainty in the dust direct radiative forcing, as recently reported in the 2001 IPCC assessment.

  19. Gendered Perceptions of Schooling: Classroom Dynamics and Inequalities within Four Caribbean Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, Mike; Cobbett, Mary

    2014-01-01

    This paper sets out to interrogate the reality of secondary schooling in one part of the Caribbean, through a case study exploration of the "gender regimes" of four secondary schools in the small Eastern Caribbean nation state of Antigua and Barbuda. In Antigua, as in the Caribbean region more broadly, the focus of attention has been on…

  20. Lignite from South Moravia as a base material to active materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivan Koutnik; Miroslav Kaloc; Katerina Cechlova [VSB - Technical University of Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic). Faculty of Metallurgy and Material Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Lignite from Mikulcice region at South Moravia is in practice today exploited entirely for energy industry purposes. Goal of project is searching South-Moravian lignin using possibilities to sorption of chosen organic compounds contaminating waste water. The property of chosen organic compound sorption has tested in part on dried (at 105{sup o}C) and untreated lignite, in part on samples modified by reagents and by higher temperatures treatment. But no temperature in any case gets over temperature 150{sup o}C, to keep low energy intensity of modifications. Sorptive properties have been tested with phenol aqueous solution and in second phase with chosen tenside model solutions. 4 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Estimation of spatial variability of lignite mine dumping ground soil properties using CPTu results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagińska Irena

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with application of CPTu test results for the probabilistic modeling of dumping grounds. The statistical measures use results from 42 CPT test points located in the lignite mine dumping ground from the region of Central Europe. Both the tip resistance qc as well as local friction fs are tested. Based on the mean values and standard deviations of measured quantities the specific zones in the dumping site profile are distinguished. For three main zones standard deviations of linearly de-trended functions, distributions of normalized de-trended values for qc and fs are examined. Also the vertical scales of fluctuation for both measured quantities are estimated. The obtained result shows that lignite mine dumping site can be successfully described with the Random Field Theory. Additional use of fs values introduces supplementary statistical information.

  2. Relationships proximate analysis results and higher heating values of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirbas, A. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2008-07-01

    In this study, the higher heating values (HHVs) of 26 lignite samples were calculated by using the proximate and elemental analyses data. The proximate analysis results such as volatile materials (VM), fixed carbon (FC) and HHV and the elemental analysis results such as carbon, hydrogen (H), oxygen (O), nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) were determined for 26 lignite samples from different areas of Turkey. The lignite samples have been tested with particle size of 0-0.05 mm. The HHVs of 26 lignite samples obtained from different Turkish sources were determined experimentally and calculated from both ultimate and proximate analyses. HHVs of 26 the lignite samples can be calculated from the equation based modeling. The HHVs (MJ/kg) of the lignite samples as a function of fixed carbon (FC, wt%) or volatile materials (VM, %) was calculated from the following equations: HHV = 0.300FC + 11.117 (1) HHV = -0.323VM + 42.223 (2) where the correlation coefficients for Eqs. (1) and (2) were 0.9907 and 0.9862, respectively. The combustion heats calculated from Eqs. (1) and (2) showed mean differences of +3.9% and +0.3%, respectively. The HHVs (MJ/kg) of the lignite samples as a function of C, H, O, N, and S were calculated from a given equation where the correlation coefficients for the equation was 0.9891. HHVs calculated from this equation showed a mean deviation of +0.1.

  3. Drying grain using a hydrothermally treated liquid lignite fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bukurov, Z.; Cvijanovic, P.; Bukurov, M. [Univ. of Novi Sad (Yugoslavia); Ljubicic, B.R. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1995-12-01

    A shortage of domestic oil and natural gas resources in Yugoslavia, particularly for agricultural and industrial purposes, has motivated the authors to explore the possibility of using liquid lignite as an alternate fuel for drying grain. This paper presents a technical and economic assessment of the possibility of retrofitting grain-drying plants currently fueled by oil or natural gas to liquid lignite fuel. All estimates are based on lignite taken from the Kovin deposit. Proposed technology includes underwater mining techniques, aqueous ash removal, hydrothermal processing, solids concentration, pipeline transport up to 120 km, and liquid lignite direct combustion. For the characterization of Kovin lignite, standard ASTM procedures were used: proximate, ultimate, ash, heating value, and Theological analyses were performed. Results from an extensive economic analysis indicate a delivered cost of US$20/ton for the liquid lignite. For the 70 of the grain-drying plants in the province of Vojvodina, this would mean a total yearly saving of about US $2,500,000. The advantages of this concept are obvious: easy to transport and store, nonflammable, nonexplosive, nontoxic, 30%-40% cheaper than imported oil and gas, domestic fuel is at hand. The authors believe that liquid lignite, rather than an alternative, is becoming more and more an imperative.

  4. Resultaten van het plankton onderzoek met behulp van pompmonsters in het kader van Cicar (Cooperative Investigations in the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions) project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugge, W.J.

    1974-01-01

    From 1970 up to 1973 plankton sampling was executed as part of the “Cooperative Investigations in the Caribbean and Adjacent Rerions” (Cicar-project). For the stationlist one is referred to Van der Spoel & Koperdraat (1974). During the cruises 21-23, 27-29, 31-35 and 37-38 a 3 PK Stork/ Pelger vacuu

  5. Synergy in devolatilization characteristics of lignite and hazelnut shell during co-pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Haykiri-Acma; S. Yaman [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty, Chemical Engineering Department

    2007-02-15

    Coal/biomass blends were prepared in the lignite/biomass ratios of 98:2, 96:4, 94:6, 92:8, 90:10, and 80:20 using a Turkish lignite from Elbistan region and hazelnut shell. Co-pyrolysis characteristics were investigated in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) from ambient to 1173 K with a linear heating rate of 20 K/min under dynamic nitrogen flow of 40 ml/min. Char products from pyrolysis were investigated using XRD and SEM techniques. Devolatilization yields from the blends were evaluated in a synergistic manner and found that the overall yields for all the blends exceeded the expected yields which calculated from the additive behavior. As regards to devolatilization characteristics in given temperature intervals, it was concluded that there was significant synergy between 400 and 600 K, whereas additive behavior took place beyond 600 K. No evidence of synergy was observed in the activation energies. It was also concluded that the addition of hazelnut shell into lignite contributed to the sulfur fixing potential of char in the form of CaS and CaSO{sub 4}. 21 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Adsorption of an anionic dispersant on lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavuz, R.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Chemical & Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    2001-12-01

    Since coal is not a homogeneous substance but a mixture of carbonaceous materials and mineral matter, it has a variety of surface properties. Therefore, it is not easy to control the properties of coal suspensions by simply adjusting variables, such as pH and/or electrolyte. A chemical agent needs to be added to control the properties of the coal suspensions. The adsorption behavior of an anionic dispersant in the presence of a wetting agent using some Turkish lignite samples was investigated. The effects of dispersant concentration, temperature and pH on the dispersant adsorption were studied systematically, and the experimental results are presented. Pellupur B69 as a dispersant, commercial mixture of formaldehyde condensate sodium salt of naphthalene sulphonic acid, and Texapon N{sub 2}5 as a wetting agent, a sodium lauryl ether sulfate, have been used.

  7. Kinetic analysis on lignite pyrolysis,combustion and gasification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xin; WANG Zhihua; ZHOU Zhijun; YOU Zhuo; ZHOU Junhu; CEN Kefa

    2013-01-01

    Pyrolysis and combustion combined polygeneration system is a more efficient way for lignite utilization,and can also produce variety of valuable pyrolysis products.To explore the feasibility of this polygeneration system,thermo-gravimetric analysis on YM lignite and DT bituminous coal was conducted,and the characteristic parameters for pyrolysis,combustion,and gasification were obtained.Moreover,the activation energy of each reaction was calculated by Coats-Redfern method.The experimental results showed that,compared with DT bituminous coal,YM lignite pyrolysis process starts at a lower temperature,and its semi-coke reactivity during combustion and gasification was better.In addition,activation energy calculation indicated that,the apparent activation energy of gasification of both coals were much higher than that of the pyrolysis.Therefore,for lignite,pyrolysis and combustion combined polygeneration system may achieve higher efficiency and be worthy for further research.

  8. Coral Research Data from NOAA's Undersea Research Center, Caribbean Marine Research Center, NOAA's Undersea Research Program (NURP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Undersea Research Center for the Caribbean Marine Research Center, Perry Institure for Marine Science, for the Caribbean region explores and studies...

  9. Poverty, drug abuse fuel Caribbean AIDS outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleski, S F

    1998-01-01

    Hatred and fear of homosexuals, together with a fear of losing tourism revenue, drove many high-level policymakers in the Caribbean to ignore the HIV/AIDS in its infancy. With an annual incidence rate of at least 146.6 people per 100,000, the Bahamas now has one of the highest AIDS rates in the world and the highest such rate in the English-speaking Caribbean. AIDS has become the major cause of death for men and women aged 20-44 in the Bahamas. Indeed, throughout the Caribbean, countries like the Bahamas must now cope with a growing AIDS epidemic. UN AIDS Program figures indicate that at least 310,000 people in the Caribbean have either HIV infection or AIDS, and that the prevalence rate among adults is almost 2%. This compares with an estimated 7.4% of the adult population of sub-Saharan Africa which is infected and 0.6% of adults in North America. 65% of reported AIDS cases in the region result from heterosexual intercourse. While the annual number of AIDS cases has been falling in North America over the last several years and rates in Latin America have leveled off, rates in the Caribbean are increasing sharply. Poverty, the population's lack of awareness, low levels of education, internal and international migration, crack cocaine use, promiscuity, high levels of STDs, prostitution, and tourism are also facilitating the spread of HIV in the Caribbean. Social conservatism, mainly in the English-Caribbean, about discussing sex impedes the implementation and success of HIV/AIDS prevention interventions.

  10. Enhanced-hydrogen gas production through underground gasification of lignite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shu-qin; WANG Yuan-yuan; ZHAO Ke; YANG Ning

    2009-01-01

    Underground coal gasification is one of the clean technologies of in-situ coal utilization. Hydrogen production from underground gasification of lignite was investigated in this study based on simulation experiments. Pyrolysis of lignite, gasification activity, oxygen-steam gasification and the effect of groundwater influx were studied. As well, the advantages of lignite for stable underground gasification were analyzed. The results indicate that lignite has a high activity for gasification. Coal pyrolysis is an important source of hydrogen emission. Under special heating conditions, hydrogen is released from coal seams at temperatures above 350 ℃ and reaches its maximum value between 725 and 825 ℃. Gas with a hydrogen concentration of 40% to 50% can be continuously obtained by oxygen-steam injection at an optimum ratio of steam to oxygen, while lignite properties will ensure stable gasification. Groundwater influx can be utilized for hydrogen preparation under certain geological conditions through pressure control. Therefore, enhanced-hydrogen gas production through underground gasification of lignite has experimentally been proved.

  11. Comparative palynology of clastics and lignites from the Manning Formation, Jackson Group, Upper Eocene, Grimes County, TX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gennett, J.A. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The 3500 lignite seam at the Gibbons Creek Mine in Grimes County, TX was sampled for pollen and spores at 10 cm intervals. The majority of samples are dominated (to 60%) by Momipites from the Juglandaceae (walnut family), as is typical of Jackson Group sediments. Other palynomorph taxa vary systematically, with a peak of pollen of the freshwater tree Nyssa (blackgum) and associated Rboipites angustus (to 17%) occurring at the base. Higher in the seam, increase (to 55%) of Cupuliferoipollenites (a chestnut-like grain) and Cyrillaceae-pollenites? ventosus (to 7%) percentages may indicate a higher salinity environment. A Chrysophyllum (satin leaf) peak (to 25%) near the top of the seam suggests relatively shallow fresh-water conditions. Core samples from an interval above the lignites represent a transgressive-regressive cycle in inner shelf clastics. These samples were taken at 40 cm or greater intervals and reveal the regional pollen flora. Although minor changes occur, palynomorph spectra are for the most part homogenous. The dominant grain is again Momipites coryloides, but in general percentages are lower (to 35%). Cupuliferoipollenites (to 17%), Chrysophyllum (to 5%), and Rhoipites angustus (to 3%) are not less important, but do not peak as they do in the lignite spectra. Palm leaf megafossils; in one sample suggest a clastic wetland; in this sample palm pollen (mostly Arecipites, representing the modern saw palmetto) reaches 73%. Another sample contains high (26%) percentages of the fern spore Lygodiumsporites adriennis. High percentages of these two taxa do not occur in the lignite samples.

  12. An overview of lithotype associations of Miocene lignite seams exploited in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widera, Marek

    2016-09-01

    Currently, three stratigraphically distinct lignite seams of Early to Middle Miocene age are exploited in Poland, namely the third Ścinawa lignite seam (ŚLS-3), the second Lusatian lignite seam (LLS-2) and the first Mid-Polish lignite seam (MPLS-1). All of these are composed of numerous macroscopically distinguishable layers defined as lignite lithotypes. In the present paper, the lithotypes of Polish lignites are grouped into seven major lithotype associations that originated in various types of mire. Therefore, an approximate reconstruction of mire type can be based on lignite lithotypes. Within the Polish lignite seams examined, the commonest in order of importance are: xylodetritic (XDL), detroxylitic (DXL), detritic (DL) and xylitic (XL) lithotype associations, mostly with a massive (m) or horizontal (h) structure. They are particularly dominant in lignite opencasts belonging to the Konin and Adamów mines. However, in the lowermost seams at the Turów and Bełchatów mines, a substantial part of the seams comprises the bitumen-rich (BL) lithotype association. These seams also lignite lithotypes that in large quantities have a gelified (g) and/or nodular (n) structure. In contrast, lignites from the Sieniawa mine are characterised by an admixture of the best-developed lithotype associations of both fusitic (FL) and weathered (WL) lignites. Moreover, the vast majority of these lignites have a folded (fo) and/or faulted (fa) structure, because they were completely deformed by glaciotectonics.

  13. An overview of lithotype associations of Miocene lignite seams exploited in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widera Marek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently, three stratigraphically distinct lignite seams of Early to Middle Miocene age are exploited in Poland, namely the third Ścinawa lignite seam (ŚLS-3, the second Lusatian lignite seam (LLS-2 and the first Mid-Polish lignite seam (MPLS-1. All of these are composed of numerous macroscopically distinguishable layers defined as lignite lithotypes. In the present paper, the lithotypes of Polish lignites are grouped into seven major lithotype associations that originated in various types of mire. Therefore, an approximate reconstruction of mire type can be based on lignite lithotypes. Within the Polish lignite seams examined, the commonest in order of importance are: xylodetritic (XDL, detroxylitic (DXL, detritic (DL and xylitic (XL lithotype associations, mostly with a massive (m or horizontal (h structure. They are particularly dominant in lignite opencasts belonging to the Konin and Adamów mines. However, in the lowermost seams at the Turów and Bełchatów mines, a substantial part of the seams comprises the bitumen-rich (BL lithotype association. These seams also lignite lithotypes that in large quantities have a gelified (g and/or nodular (n structure. In contrast, lignites from the Sieniawa mine are characterised by an admixture of the best-developed lithotype associations of both fusitic (FL and weathered (WL lignites. Moreover, the vast majority of these lignites have a folded (fo and/or faulted (fa structure, because they were completely deformed by glaciotectonics.

  14. Future lignite mines of Serbia; Zukunftsbraunkohletagebaue in Serbien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehna, Ullrich; Schmidt, Uwe [Vattenfall Europe Mining AG, Cottbus (Germany); Pavlovic, Vladimir [Belgrade Univ. (RS). Opencast Mining Dept.

    2010-01-15

    The Pre-feasibility Study on Selection of Limitation and Opening of Open Pit Mines Radljevo and South Field with Comparative Overview of Technical and Economic Aspects of Coal Mining for the Selection of Priority Coal Supplier of CHP Kolubara B has been prepared by Vattenfall Europe Mining Consulting (VEMC) and the University of Belgrade Faculty of Mining and Geology (UB-FMG) as subcontractor. Strategic and development plans of Electric Power Industry of Serbia anticipate the construction of new thermal power plant capacities in the Kolubara region requiring the provision of necessary coal amounts. One of the essential questions which needed to be analysed and defined more precisely by this study was the question of fuel supply to these new capacities as the precondition for finding the strategic partners in the construction of new power capacities. The RB Kolubara mining company produces around 30 Mt/a of lignite mainly from the large opencast mines Field D and Tamnava-West. It supplies most of it to the existing TPP in Kolubara and TPP Nicola Tesla A and B in Obrenovac. (orig.)

  15. Permian to Triassic I to S-type magmatic switch in the northeast Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta and adjacent regions, Colombian Caribbean: Tectonic setting and implications within Pangea paleogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, A.; Valencia, V.; Garzón, A.; Montes, C.; Ojeda, G.; Ruiz, J.; Weber, M.

    2010-10-01

    The Late Paleozoic to Triassic tectonics of northwestern South America have major implications for the understanding of Laurentia-Gondwana interactions that formed Pangea, and the origin of several tectonostratigraphic terranes dispersed by the break-up of this supercontinent during the formation of the Caribbean. Two mylonitic and orthogneissic granitoid suites have been recognized in the northeastern segment of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, the lower Magdalena basin and the Guajira Serranias, within the Caribbean region of Colombia. For the Santa Marta region U/Pb LAM-ICP-MS analysis yielded zircon crystallization ages of 288.1 ± 4.5 Ma, 276.5 ± 5,1 Ma and 264.9 ± 4.0 Ma, related to the magmatic intrusion. Geochemical and modal variations show a compositional spectrum between diorite and granite, whereas LREE enrichment, Ti and Nb anomalies and geochemical discrimination suggest that this granitoid suite was formed within a magmatic arc setting. Inherited zircons suggest that this Early Permian plutonism was formed with the participation of Neoproterozoic and Grenvillian basement proximal to the South American continent. Evidence of a superimposed Early Triassic (ca. 250 Ma) deformational event in Santa Marta, together with a well defined S-type magmatism in the basement rocks from the adjacent lower Magdalena Valley and Guajira Peninsula regions are related to a major shift in the regional tectonic evolution. It's envisioned that this event records either terrane accretion or strong plate coupling during the final stages of Pangea agglutination. Connections with the main Alleghanian-Ouachitan Pangean orogen are precluded due to their timing differences. The plutons temporally and compositionally correlate with an arc found in the northern Andes and Mexican Gondwana terranes, and represent a broader magmatic event formed at the proto-Pacific margin, outside the nucleus of the Laurentia-Gondwana Alleghanian-Oachitan orogens. Evidence of lower temperature

  16. Synergies in co-pyrolysis of Thai lignite and corncob

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonobe, Taro [The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 126 Pracha-Uthit Road, Bangmod, Tungkru, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand); Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Worasuwannarak, Nakorn; Pipatmanomai, Suneerat [The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 126 Pracha-Uthit Road, Bangmod, Tungkru, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand)

    2008-12-15

    The results from TGA experiments at the temperature range of 300-600 C evidently distinguished the different pyrolysis behaviours of lignite and corncob; however, no clear synergistic effects could be observed for the mixture. The investigation of co-pyrolysis in a fixed-bed reactor, however, found significant synergies in both pyrolysis product yields and gas product compositions. The solid yield of the 50:50 lignite/corncob blend was much lower (i.e. 9%) than expected from the calculated value based on individual materials under the range of temperatures studied, and coincided with the higher liquid and gas yield. The synergistic effect in product gas composition was highly pronouncing for CH{sub 4} formation, i.e. three times higher than the calculated value at 400 C. Possible mechanisms were described including the interaction between corncob volatiles and lignite particles, and the effect of the heat profiles of lignite and corncob pyrolysis on the temperature dependent reactions. The enhanced devolatilisation of the blend was explained by the transfer of hydrogen from biomass to coal as well as the promotion of low-temperature thermal decomposition of lignite by exothermic heat released from corncob pyrolysis. Moreover, water, which was one of the major components in corncob volatiles produced mainly at around 200-375 C, can also be expected to act as a reactive agent to promote the secondary tar cracking producing more CH{sub 4}. (author)

  17. Caribbean literary theory: modernist and postmodern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. James Arnold

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] The Repeating Mand: The Caribbean and the Postmodern Perspective. ANTONIO BENITEZ-ROJO. Durham NC: Duke University Press, 1992. xi + 303 pp. (Cloth US$ 49.95, Paper US$ 15.95 Myth and History in Caribbean Fiction: Alejo Carpentier, Wilson Harris, and Edouard Glissant. BARBARA J. WEBB. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1992. x + 185 pp. (Cloth US$ 25.00 Caribbean literature has been overtaken of late by the quarrels that have pitted postmodernists against modernists in Europe and North America for the past twenty years. The modernists, faced with the fragmentation of the region that hard-nosed pragmatists and empiricists could only see as hostile to the emergence of any common culture, had sought in myth and its literary derivatives the collective impulse to transcend the divisions wrought by colonial history. Fifteen years ago I wrote a book that combined in its lead title the terms Modernism and Negritude in an effort to account for the efforts by mid-century Caribbean writers to come to grips with this problem. A decade later I demonstrated that one of the principal Caribbean modernists, Aimé Césaire, late in his career adopted stylistic characteristics that we associate with the postmodern (Arnold 1990. The example of Césaire should not be taken to suggest that we are dealing with some sort of natural evolution of modernism toward the postmodern. In fact the two terms represent competing paradigms that organize concepts and data so differently as to offer quite divergent maps of the literary Caribbean.

  18. Incorporation of island-arc rocks into a Caribbean subduction channel: Geochemical constraints from eclogite boulders and greenschist rocks, Guajira region, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, M.; Cardona, A.; Altenberger, U.; Garcia-Casco, A.; Valencia, V.; Tobón, M.; Zapata, S.

    2009-12-01

    Characterization of the protoliths of a subduction-accretion complex can provide major insights into the dynamics of the subduction channel. Geochemistry of eclogites found as boulders in a Tertiary conglomerate from the Guajira Peninsula, Colombia, indicate that these rocks are mainly metamorphosed basalts. A negative Nb-anomaly and flat to enriched REE patterns suggest that the eclogite protoliths evolved in a subduction related tectonic setting, with island arc affinities. The geochemical characteristics are similar to low-grade greenschists from the nearby Etpana Formation, which is interpreted as part of a Cretaceous intra-oceanic arc. This further supports evidence that the deposition and metamorphism of these units record the ongoing Late Cretaceous continental subduction of the South American margin beneath the advancing Caribbean arc. This gave way to an arc-continent collision between the Caribbean and the South American plates. Arc-rocks were incorporated into the subduction channel and the accretionary wedge, either though influx of tectonically eroded arc material (subduction erosion) or incorporation into the accretionary wedge during arc-continent collision.

  19. Assistance Focus: Latin America/Caribbean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-03-29

    The Clean Energy Solutions Center, an initiative of the Clean Energy Ministerial, helps countries throughout the world create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. Through the Solutions Center's no-cost 'Ask an Expert' service, a team of international experts has delivered assistance to countries in all regions of the world. High-impact examples from the Latin American/Caribbean region are featured here.

  20. Report of the Regional Meeting for Latin America and the Caribbean in Preparation for the World Conference to Review and Appraise the Achievements of the United Nations Decade for Women: Equality, Development, and Peace (Havana, Cuba, November 19-23, 1984).

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Economic and Social Council, New York, NY.

    The minutes of the regional meeting (for Latin America and the Caribbean) summarize discussions pertaining to the critical review and appraisal of the progress achieved and the formulation of strategies for the advancement of women up to the year 2000. They suggest concrete measures for overcoming obstacles to the realization of the goals and…

  1. THERMODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION METHODS IN LIGNITE POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koroneos J. Christopher; Sakiltzis Christos; Rovas C. Dimitrios [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2008-09-30

    The green house effect is a very pressing issue of our times due to the big impact it will have in the future of life in our planet. The temperature increase of the earth which is the major impact of the greenhouse effect may change forever the climate and the way of life in many countries. It may lead to the reduction of agricultural production and at the end to famine, in several nations. The minimization of CO2 emissions and the introduction of new energy sources is the only solution to the catastrophe that is coming if inaction prevails. The objective of this work is to analyze the methods of the CO2 removal from the flue gases of power plants that use solid fuels. It is especially fit to the Greek conditions where the main fuel used is lignite. Three methods have been examined and compared thermodynamically. These are: (a) Removal of CO2 from the flue gas stream by absorption, (b) The combustion of lignite with pure oxygen and (c) The gasification of lignite. The lignite used in the analysis is the Greek lignite, produced at the Western Macedonia mines. The power plant, before carbon sequestration, has an efficiency of 39%, producing 330MW of electric power. After sequestration, the CO2 is compressed to pressures between 80-110 atm, before its final disposal. In the first method, the sequestration of CO2 is done utilizing a catalyst. The operation requires electricity and high thermal load which is received from low pressure steam extracted from the turbines. Additionally, electricity is required for the compression of the CO2 to 100 bars. This leads to a lower efficiency of the power plant by by 13%. In the second method, the lignite combustion is done with pure O2 produced at an air separation unit. The flue gasses are made up of CO2 and water vapor. This method requires electricity for carbon dioxide compression and the Air Separation unit, thus, the power plant efficiency is lowered by 26%. In the lignite gasification method, the products are a mixture of

  2. Caribbean Land Molluscs: Streptaxidae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venmans, L.A.W.C.

    1963-01-01

    The material on which the present paper is based consists of a small number of Streptaxidae collected by Dr. P. WAGENAAR HUMMELINCK during his visits to the Caribbean Islands and the mainland of Venezuela since 1930, and further of some specimens which, at various times, have reached the author thro

  3. Rodents of the Caribbean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Mouatt, Julia Thidamarth Vilstrup; Raghavan, Maanasa;

    2014-01-01

    The Capromyidae (hutias) are endemic rodents of the Caribbean and represent a model of dispersal for non-flying mammals in the Greater Antilles. This family has experienced severe extinctions during the Holocene and its phylogenetic affinities with respect to other caviomorph relatives are still...

  4. Influence of oxidation in aqueous medium on the structure and properties of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    2000-05-01

    In this paper, the effect of oxygen uptake on the structure and properties of lignites was investigated using five different Turkish lignites. Lignite samples were oxidised in aqueous medium at 423 K under 1.5 MPa partial pressure of oxygen for 60 min. Relations between the oxygen uptake and the elemental compositions of the lignite samples were investigated. FT-i.r. technique was applied to the original and oxidised lignite samples to investigate functional group analyses. Mercury porosimetry analyses of the samples were carried out up to about 220 MPa. Effect of oxygen uptake on the bulk density, apparent density, porosity, and pore radius of the lignite samples were compared. Differential Thermogravimetry (DTG) technique was performed to compare the thermal reactivity of the original and oxidised lignite samples. 20 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Effects of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae on survival and growth of perennial grasses in lignite overburden in Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Call, C.A.; Davies, F.T.

    1988-12-01

    Seedlings of sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula), Indiangrass (Sorghastrum nutans), and kleingrass (Panicum coloratum) were inoculated with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi (Glomus fasciculatum and Gigaspora margarita) in a containerized system and transplanted into lignite overburden in the Post Oak Savannah region of Texas, U.S.A. After three growing seasons without cultural inputs, plants inoculated with VAM fungi had greater survival percentages, basal diameters, and above-ground biomass than noninoculated plants. Inoculated plants had higher levels of nitrogen and phosphorus in above-ground biomass than noninoculated plants. Root colonization percentages of inoculated plants remained fairly stable while noninoculated plants showed low levels of colonization over the 3-year study period. Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae enhanced the survival and growth of the 3 grass species by making effective use of limited resources in the lignite overburden. 31 refs., 3 tabs.

  6. Kinetic features of pyrolysis of asphaltenes from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Ryl' tsova, S.V.; Rozental, D.A.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.

    2000-07-01

    The kinetic features of accumulation of the main gaseous and some liquid products in pyrolysis of asphaltenes from lignite semicoking tar at 750-900{degree}C (contact time 0.5-6.0 s) were studied. The overall reaction order of accumulation of certain compounds was determined, and possible pathways for their formation were suggested.

  7. Influences of different substrates on simulated lignite biogas production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Aikuan; Qin Yong; Shao Pei

    2015-01-01

    Using lignite samples, selected from Zhaotong basin, Yunnan province, China, as the parent source, sim-ulating experiments of lignite biogas were conducted with 0.1% methanol, 5 mg/L yeast extract and 0.2 mol/L sodium acetate solutions as the exogenous substance respectively. Variation characteristics of gas production, gas composition, VFA content and activity of coenzyme F420 in the simulated process were analyzed to discuss the influence of different substrates on lignite biogas generation. The results show that 0.1%methanol and 5 mg/L yeast extract solutions increase VFA contents in the biogas gener-ation system (p <0.05) and inhibit coenzyme F420 and methanogen activities significantly, so they decrease both gas amounts (p<0.05) and CH4 contents (p<0.05). 0.2 mol/L sodium acetate solution acti-vates coenzyme F420 and methanogen activities and improves the efficiency of enzymatic reaction, so the gas quantity (p<0.05) and the CH4 content (p<0.01) increase significantly. Therefore, sodium acetate can be one kind of good exogenous substance for the generation of lignite biogenic gas.

  8. Cheap carbon sorbents produced from lignite by catalytic pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, B.N.; Schchipko, M.L. [Inst. of Chemistry of Natural Organic Materials, Akademgorodok, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-01

    Some data are presented describing the new technology of carbon sorbent production from powdered lignite in the installation with fluidized bed of catalyst. It was shown the different types of char products with extended pore structure and high sorption ability can be produced from cheap and accessible lignite of Kansk-Achinsk coal pit in pilot installation with fluidized bed of Al-Cu-Cr oxide catalyst or catalytically active slag materials. In comparison with the conventional technologies of pyrolysis the catalytic pyrolysis allows to increase by 3-5 times the process productivity and to decrease significantly the formation of harmful compounds. The latter is accomplished by complete oxidation of gaseous pyrolysis products in the presence of catalysts and by avoiding the formation of pyrolysis tars - the source of cancerogenic compounds. The technology of cheap powdered sorbent production from lignites makes possible to obtain from lignite during the time of pyrolysis only a few seconds char products with porosity up to 0.6 cm{sup 3} /g, and specific surface area more than 400 m{sup 3} /g. Some methods of powdered chars molding into carbon materials with the different shape were proved for producing of firmness sorbents. Cheap carbon sorbents obtained by thermocatalytic pyrolysis can be successfully used in purification of different industrial pollutants as one-time sorbent or as adsorbents of long-term application with periodic regeneration.

  9. Pyrolysis kinetics of phenols from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Polovetskaya, O.S.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Shavyrina, O.A. [Leo Tolstoy Tula State Pedag University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    2002-11-01

    The features of pyrolysis of phenols from lignite semicoking tar were studied. The activation energy and order of the reactions of accumulation of methane, hydrogen, carbon monoxide and dioxide, naphthalene and its methyl homologs, phenols, and isomeric cresols and dimethylphenols were determined.

  10. Sites for priority biodiversity conservation in the Caribbean Islands Biodiversity Hotspot

    OpenAIRE

    V. Anadon-Irizarry; D.C. Wege; A. Upgren; Young, R.; Boom, B; Leon, Y.M.; Y. Arias; Koenig, K.; Morales, A. L.; Burke, W.

    2012-01-01

    The Caribbean Islands Biodiversity Hotspot is exceptionally important for global biodiversity conservation due to high levels of species endemism and threat. A total of 755 Caribbean plant and vertebrate species are considered globally threatened, making it one of the top Biodiversity Hotspots in terms of threat levels. In 2009, Key Biodiversity Areas (KBAs) were identified for the Caribbean Islands through a regional-level analysis of accessible data and literature, followed by extensive nat...

  11. Surveillance of avian influenza in the Caribbean through the Caribbean Animal Health Network: surveillance tools and epidemiologic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrançois, T; Hendrikx, P; Ehrhardt, N; Millien, M; Gomez, L; Gouyet, L; Gaidet, N; Gerbier, G; Vachiéry, N; Petitclerc, F; Carasco-Lacombe, C; Pinarello, V; Ahoussou, S; Levesque, A; Gongora, H V; Trotman, M

    2010-03-01

    The Caribbean region is considered to be at risk for avian influenza (AI) due to a large backyard poultry system, an important commercial poultry production system, the presence of migratory birds, and disparities in the surveillance systems. The Caribbean Animal Health Network (CaribVET) has developed tools to implement AI surveillance in the region with the goals to have 1) a regionally harmonized surveillance protocol and specific web pages for AI surveillance on www.caribvet.net, and 2) an active and passive surveillance for AI in domestic and wild birds. A diagnostic network for the Caribbean, including technology transfer and AI virus molecular diagnostic capability in Guadeloupe (real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for the AI virus matrix gene), was developed. Between 2006 and 2009, 627 samples from four Caribbean countries were tested for three circumstances: importation purposes, following a clinical suspicion of AI, or through an active survey of wild birds (mainly waders) during the southward and northward migration periods in Guadeloupe. None of the samples tested were positive, suggesting a limited role of these species in the AI virus ecology in the Caribbean. Following low pathogenic H5N2 outbreaks in the Dominican Republic in 2007, a questionnaire was developed to collect data for a risk analysis of AI spread in the region through fighting cocks. The infection pathway of the Martinique commercial poultry sector by AI, through introduction of infected cocks, was designed, and recommendations were provided to the Caribbean Veterinary Services to improve cock movement control and biosecurity measures. The CaribVET and its organization allowed interaction between diagnostic and surveillance tools on the one hand and epidemiologic studies on the other, both of them developed in congruence with regional strategies. Together, these CaribVET activities contribute to strengthening surveillance of avian influenza virus (AIV) in the

  12. Un dilema político en la encrucijada histórica del proceso de integración regional de América Latina y el Caribe A political dilemma at the historical crossroads of the process of regional integration in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Rocha V.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A partir del análisis de las dinámicas políticas internas y externas de los esquemas de integración regional y subregional de América Latina y el Caribe se llega a la conclusión de que la región ha logrado concretar un posicionamiento débil en lo económico y disperso en lo político dentro del proceso de negociaciones para el ALCA. Esta situación de la región se complica un poco más debido a la nueva encrucijada histórica que atravieza y, en particular, por el dilema político (integración regional o integración continental que se instala en dicha encrucijada. De manera clara se plantea la hipótesis de una crisis del proyecto y del proceso de integración regional de ALyC y se formulan las ideas generales para un proyecto de integración regional alternativa.Based on the analysis of internal and external political dynamics of Latin America and the Caribbean's regional and subregional integration mechanisms, one concludes that the region has built a weak economic position and a diffused political position within the FTAA negotiation process. This situation in the region becomes even more complex due to the new historical crossroads it faces and particularly for the political dilemma (regional or continental integration that takes place in such crossroads. Clearly, we present the hypothesis of a crisis in the project of regional integration of Latin America and the Caribbean, and articulate the general ideas for a project of alternative regional integration.

  13. Emission characteristics of co-combustion of sewage sludge with olive cake and lignite coal in a circulating fluidized bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toraman, Oner Yusuf; Topal, Hüseyin; Bayat, Oktay; Atimtay, Aysel T

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) of 125 mm diameter and 1800mm height was used to find the combustion characteristics of sewage sludge (SS) produced in Turkey. Sludge + olive cake, and sludge + lignite coal mixtures were burned separately. Various sludge-to-lignite coal and sludge-to-olive cake ratios (5/95, 10/90, 15/85, 20/80) were tried. On-line concentrations of major components (O2, SO2, CO2, CO, NOx, CmHn) were measured in the flue gas, as well as temperature and pressure distributions along the bed. Combustion efficiencies of sludge + olive cake and sludge + lignite coal mixtures were calculated, and the optimum conditions for operating parameters were discussed. The results have shown that the combustion mainly takes place in the upper regions of the main column where the temperature reaches 900 degrees C. SS + Coal burn in the CFB with an efficiency of 95.14% to 96.18%, which is considered to be quite good. When burning sludge mixed with olive cake, appreciable amounts of CO and unburned hydrocarbons are formed and the combustion efficiency drops to 92.93%. CO and CmHn emissions are lower when lignite coal is mixed with various amounts of SS than the emissions when the coal is burned alone. As the %SS is increased in the fuel mixture, the SO2 emission decreases. NOx emissions are slightly higher. When burning sludge mixed with olive cake, SO2 and NOx emissions are slightly higher. CO and CmHn emissions decrease sharply when SS is mixed with 5%wt. olive cake. With increasing sludge ratio these emissions increase due to the unburned hydrocarbons. As a result of this study, it is believed that SS can be burned effectively in a CFBC together with other fuels, especially with olive cake (OC). OC will be a good additive fuel for the combustion of lower quality fuels.

  14. Grass and forb species for revegetation of mixed soil-lignite overburden in East Central Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skousen, J.G.; Call, C.A. (West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (USA). Division of Plant and Soil Sciences)

    Ten grasses and seven forbs were seeded into mixed soil-lignite overburden in the Post Oak Savannah region of Texas and monitored for establishment and growth over a 3-year period without fertilization. Buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris), green sprangletop (Leptochloa dubia), switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), and kleingrass (P. coloratum) developed monotypic stands with sufficent density, aerial cover, and aboveground biomass to stabilize the mixed soil-lignite overburden surface by the end of the first growing season. Plant mortality eliminated buffelgrass and green sprangletop stands by the end of the third growing season. Indiangrass (Sorghastrum nutans) developed a satisfactory stand by the end of the third growing season, while Oldworld bluestem (Bothriochloa X Dicanthium), yellow bluestem (Bothriochloa ischaemum), and sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula) established at a slower rate. Cover and biomass measurements from an adjacent, unfertilized stand of Coastal bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) were compared with those of seeded grasses throughout the study. Partidge pea (Cassia fasciculata) established rapidly and had the greatest cover and biomass of all seeded forbs by the end of the first growing season. Sericea lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata), Illinois bundleflower (Desmanthus illinoensis), and western indigo (Indigofera miniata) developed adequate stands for surface stabilization by the end of the third growing season, while faseanil indigo (Indigofera suffruticosa), virgata lespedeza (Lespedeza virgata), and awnless bushsunflower (Simsia calva) showed slower establishment. 27 refs., 3 tabs.

  15. [Population dynamics and development in the Caribbean].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, B

    1995-12-01

    The impact is examined of socioeconomic factors on Caribbean population dynamics. This work begins by describing the socioeconomic context of the late 1980s and early 1990s, under the influence of the economic changes and crises of the 1980s. The small size, openness, dependency, and lack of diversification of the Caribbean economies have made them vulnerable to external pressures. The Bahamas and Belize had economic growth rates exceeding 5% annually during 1981-90, but most of the countries had low or negative growth. Unemployment, poverty, the structural adjustment measures adopted in the mid-1980s, and declines in social spending exacerbated general economic conditions. In broad terms, the population situation of the Caribbean is marked by diversity of sizes and growth rates. A few countries oriented toward services and tourism had demographic growth rates exceeding 3%, while at least 7 had almost no growth or negative growth. Population growth rates reflected different combinations of natural increase and migration. Crude death rates ranged from around 5/1000 to 11/1000, except in Haiti, and all countries of the region except Haiti had life expectancies of 70 years or higher. Despite fertility decline, the average crude birth rate was still relatively high at 26/1000, and the rate of natural increase was 1.8% annually for the region. Nearly half of the regional population was under 15 or over 65 years old. The body of this work provides greater detail on mortality patterns, variations by sex, infant mortality, causes of death, and implications for policy. The discussion of fertility includes general patterns and trends, age specific fertility rates, contraceptive prevalence, levels of adolescent fertility and age factors in adolescent sexual behavior, characteristics of adolescent unions, contraceptive usage, health and social consequences of adolescent childbearing, and the search for solutions. The final section describes the magnitude and causes of

  16. The Contribution of Women's Writing to the Literature and Intellectual Achievements of the Caribbean: "Moi, Tituba Sorciere" and "Amour, Colere et Folie."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Nara

    1994-01-01

    Explores literary universe of Caribbean women writers, discusses contributions as reflective of their self-image, and examines Caribbean literature as collective identity of region. Author explains use of writing as means of linking events that reveal experiences of Caribbean women through more detailed analysis of two novels: "Moi, Tituba…

  17. Concentration of heavy metals and trace elements in soils, waters and vegetables and assessment of health risk in the vicinity of a lignite-fired power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noli, Fotini, E-mail: noli@chem.auth.gr; Tsamos, Panagiotis, E-mail: pktsamos@chem.auth.gr

    2016-09-01

    The pollution of agricultural soils, waters and products in the regions of lignite mines and fired power plants is of great importance. The concentration of As, Βa, Co, Cr, Sr, Sc, Th, U, Zn in soils and waters in the vicinity of a lignite-fired power plant in Northern Greece was determined using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. The determination frequency was every three months during a period of one year in order to evaluate the seasonal impact of the pollution to the environment. Measurements were performed in three locations around the lignite mine as well as in one reference location at a certain distance from the mine. The results, which exhibited a slight seasonal variation, were compared, where possible, with literature values from other countries. The obtained data in most of the cases did not exceed the normal levels and indicated that the investigated area was only slightly contaminated. The concentration of heavy and trace metals was also measured in three common garden crops (tomato, cucumber and parsley) grown in this area. The calculated transfer factors (TF) from soil to vegetables and health risk quotients (HQ) do not denote a health risk. - Highlights: • Seasonal variation of heavy metals concentrations in soils and waters in a lignite mining area. • The elevated concentrations detected by NAA indicating minor contamination of the studied area. • Determination of minor and trace elements in vegetables. • The transfer factors and health risk quotients indicating a possible slight contamination in the area.

  18. SOTER-based soil parameter estimates for Latin America and the Caribbean (ver. 1.0)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batjes, N.H.

    2005-01-01

    This harmonized set of soil parameter estimates for Latin America and the Caribbean was derived from a revised version of the 1:5M Soil and Terrain Database for the region (SOTERLAC, ver. 2.0) and the ISRIC-WISE soil profile database. The land surface of Latin America and the Caribbean has been char

  19. Caribbean Migration as a Structural Reality. Occasional Papers Series, Dialogues #13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maingot, Anthony P.

    Demographic and economic conditions in the Caribbean region combine with social and historical factors to create a structural migration situation: direction and magnitude of the flow might shift, pressures pushing Caribbean Islanders toward migration are constant. Five structural "pull" features encourage migration: (2) the…

  20. Intercultural-Bilingual Education for an Interethnic-Plurilingual Society? The Case of Nicaragua's Caribbean Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, Jane

    2003-01-01

    Latin American models of "intercultural-bilingual" education may be inappropriate for multilingual, interethnic regions such as Nicaragua's Caribbean Coast, where five indigenous and Afro-Caribbean minorities interact in overlapping territories. Examination of one such program and of Coast people's complex linguistic and cultural practices…

  1. Language Planning and Development in the Caribbean: Multi-Ethnic Suriname.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Hilaire, Aonghas

    1999-01-01

    Examines language planning and development in Suriname in reference to a Caribbean-wide phenomenon arising from movements of cultural nationalism in the region after the Second World War. During this period, people throughout the Caribbean began to question local supremacy of European languages and cultures and denigration of creole language and…

  2. The Application of Distance Teaching to Training in Labour Administration: The Caribbean Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, A. N.

    This presentation describes a collaborative distance education project between the University of the West Indies (UWI) and the Caribbean Labor Administration Center (CLAC) which resulted in CLAC using the UWI Distance Teaching Enterprise (UWIDITE) network to offer a training course for labor administrators in the Caribbean region. In addition, UWI…

  3. Intercultural-Bilingual Education for an Interethnic-Plurilingual Society? The Case of Nicaragua's Caribbean Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, Jane

    2003-01-01

    Latin American models of "intercultural-bilingual" education may be inappropriate for multilingual, interethnic regions such as Nicaragua's Caribbean Coast, where five indigenous and Afro-Caribbean minorities interact in overlapping territories. Examination of one such program and of Coast people's complex linguistic and cultural…

  4. Genetic relationship of flavenoids from extracts and semicoking tars of lignite with the initial vegetable matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Shrykin, A.Y.; Podshibyakin, S.I.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Shavyrina, O.A. [Lev Tolstoi State Pedagogical University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    1999-06-01

    A genetic relationship of flavonoids from extracts and semi-coking tars of lignites mined at the near-Moscow and Kansk-Achinsk fields with flavenoids of vegetable origin has been found. Paleoreconstruction of the possible species of the initial vegetable matter from which the organic matter of these lignites had originated was performed. Possible schemes of transformations of the initial natural flavonoids under conditions of lignite formation and in the course of semicoking are presented.

  5. Oxydesulfurization of a Turkish lignite using trona solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Kuecuekbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical Univ. (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    1996-06-01

    This article investigates the possibility of using trona minerals in the oxydesulfurization of coal. The experiments were performed on a Turkish lignite having high organic and high pyritic sulfur content from the Gediz area. Oxydesulfurization of the lignite sample using trona minerals was studied at 423--473 K, under 0--1 MPa oxygen partial pressure at 0--0.3 M equivalent alkalinity of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} for 2.5--60 min. Almost all of the pyritic sulfur content and, depending on the working conditions, an important part of the organic sulfur content were removed. Unless the temperature reached 473 K, solid product yield was not negatively affected. Trona minerals were seen as a suitable alkaline to use in oxydesulfurization of coal.

  6. Solubilisation of lignite during oxydesulphurization in alkaline solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Kuecuekbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical Univ., Chemical Engineering Dept. (Turkey)

    1997-12-31

    Some desulphurization processes such as oxydesulphurization in which dissolved oxygen is attached to coal particles are performed usually in alkaline solutions. Therefore, these processes are resulted in not only sulphur removal but also some solubilisation of the coal matrix. In this study three different Turkish lignite samples are subjected to various oxydesulphurization processes in which dilute solutions of NaOH, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, NH{sub 4}OH or Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} containing dissolved oxygen under pressure were applied. The experiments were performed in a magnetically stirred and electrically heated Parr autoclave. The extent of the solubilisation is varied depending on the type and concentration of the alkaline used, the applied temperature and the rank of the lignite sample used. (orig.)

  7. Sulfur removal from lignite by oxydesulfurization using fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical Engineering Dept.

    1997-01-01

    Since fly ash contains alkaline oxides, it is possible to use its water-extractable components as a desulfurization agent. This was investigated using some high-sulfur Turkish lignites. The effects of the amount of fly ash used, temperature, partial pressure of oxygen and time were studied in the range 5-40 g, 403-498 K, 0.0-1.5 MPa and 15-90 min respectively. The extents of pyritic and organic sulfur removal and recoveries of coal and calorific value were investigated for each of these variables. Reactivity and some combustion characteristics (ignition temperature, end temperature of combustion and combustion rate) of original and desulfurzed lignite samples were compared using combustion curves obtained from thermogravimetric analysis (t.g.a) results. FT-i.r. spectroscopy was used to determine the effects of the desulfurization process on the coal structure. 5 refs., 6 figs.,4 tabs.

  8. Open-pit mining of lignite in Czechoslovakia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojdar, J.

    1987-06-01

    The complicated nature of the overburden in Czechoslovakian surface mines poses considerable difficulties to the construction of dumps and the stability of overburden slopes. Operations are further hindered by the extent of the investments required to sufficiently address these problems, and to access the lignite reserves. An example of this arose when it was discovered that the town of Most was situated above a huge deposit of coal. As a result, the entire town had to be demolished, and subsequently rebuilt a few kilometers away, in order to provide access to the 90 Mt of high quality lignite with a low stripping ratio (less than 1 m/sup 3//t). A particularly large expenditure was required to relocate a precious historical monument, a 12,000 t medieval gothic church, to a site 850 m from its original location, without dismantling the building.

  9. Proximate analysis of some Turkish lignites by thermogravimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karatepe, N.; Kucukbayrak, S. (Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Faculty of Chemistry and Meteorological Engineering)

    1993-01-14

    In this study, the moisture, ash, volatile matter and fixed carbon contents of 24 lignite samples from different coal reserves in Turkey were determined by using TGA and results were compared with those obtained by the ASTM standards. The mean differences in moisture, ash, volatile matter and fixed carbon contents between the TGA and ASTM methods are 0.38%, 0.68%, 1.53% and 1.47%, respectively.

  10. Enzymatic depolymerization of low-rank coal (lignite)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofrichter, M.; Ziegenhagen, D.; Sorge, S.; Bublitz, F.; Fritsche, W. [Jena Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mikrobiologie

    1997-12-31

    Ligninolytic basidiomycetes (wood and litter decaying fungi) have the ability to degrade low-rank coal (lignite). Extracellular manganese peroxidase (MnP) is the decisive enzyme in the depolymerization process both of coal derived humic substances and native coal. The depolymerization of coal occurred via Mn{sup 3+}-ions acting as primary mediator and can be considerably enhanced by certain thiols acting as secondary mediators. The depolymerization process leads finally to complex mixtures of fulvic acid-like compounds. (orig.)

  11. JV Task 98 - Controlling Mercury Emissions for Utilities Firing Lignites from North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Benson

    2007-06-15

    This project compiled and summarized the findings and conclusions of research, development, and demonstration projects on controlling mercury from lignite coals. A significant amount of work has been conducted since 1994 on mercury in lignite, mercury measurement in flue gases, sorbent, sorbent enhancement additives, oxidation agent development, and full-scale demonstration of mercury control technologies. This report is focused on providing the lignite industry with an understanding of mercury issues associated with the combustion of lignite, as well as providing vital information on the methods to control mercury emissions in coal-fired power plants.

  12. Sulfur removal from Gediz lignite using aqueous sodium hydroxide solutions under mild oxidative conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Kuecuekbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical Univ. (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    1999-11-01

    Sulfur removal from a high-sulfur Turkish lignite (Gediz) using aqueous sodium hydroxide solutions having dissolved oxygen was investigated under mild oxidative conditions. Effects of the parameters such as sodium hydroxide/lignite weight ratio, temperature, and partial pressure of oxygen were investigated within the ranges of 0.05--0.8, 423--498 K, and 1--2 MPa, respectively. Optimum values of these parameters were determined regarding sulfur removal and coal recovery. Influences of dry oxidation of the lignite sample as a pretreatment at 573 K and subsequent washing of some treated lignite samples with 1 N HCl were investigated.

  13. Effect of biomass on burnouts of Turkish lignites during co-firing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykiri-Acma, H.; Yaman, S. [Istanbul Technical Univ., Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty, Chemical Engineering Dept., 34469 Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2009-09-15

    Co-firing of some low quality Turkish lignites with woody shells of sunflower seed was investigated via non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis method. For this purpose, Yozgat-Sorgun, Erzurum-Askale, Tuncbilek, Gediz, and Afsin-Elbistan lignites were selected, and burnouts of these lignites were compared with those of their blends. Biomass was blended as much as 10 and 20 wt.% of the lignites, and heating was performed up to 900 C at a heating rate of 40 C/min under dry air flow of 40 mL/min. This study revealed that the same biomass species may have different influences on the burnout yields of the lignites. Burnouts of Erzurum-Askale lignite increased at any temperature with the increasing ratio of biomass in the blend, whereas burnout yields of other lignites decreased to some extent. Nevertheless, the blends of Turkish lignites with sunflower seed shell did not behave in very different way, and it can be concluded that they are compatible in terms of burnouts for co-combustion in a combustion system. Although the presence of biomass in the lignite blends caused to some decreases in the final burnouts, the carbon dioxide neutral nature of biomass should be taken into account, and co-combustion is preferable for waste-to-energy-management. (author)

  14. Petrology of Panandhro Lignite deposit, Gujarat in relation to palaeodepositional condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, A.; Singh, B.D. [Birbal Sahni Institute for Paleobotany, Lucknow (India)

    2005-09-01

    Petrological investigations on Early Eocene lignite from two mine sections of Block-1 in Panandhro Lignite field, under both normal incident (white) and fluorescence (blue light excitation) modes, reveal that deposit is rich in maceral huminite content with sub-ordinate amount of liptinite and low inertinite contents. The maceral composition indicates that sub-bituminous C lignites in both the mine sections are more or less similar with minor differences. Gelification and Tissue Preservation Indices suggest the deposition of lignite in lower delta plain environment in lagoonal conditions.

  15. Toward a Caribbean psychology: an African-centered approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Marcia Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Although the Americas and Caribbean region are purported to comprise different ethnic groups, this article’s focus is on people of African descent, who represent the largest ethnic group in many countries. The emphasis on people of African descent is related to their family structure, ethnic identity, cultural, psychohistorical, and contemporary psychosocial realities. This article discusses the limitations of Western psychology for theory, research, and applied work on people of African descent in the Americas and Caribbean region. In view of the adaptations that some people of African descent have made to slavery, colonialism, and more contemporary forms of cultural intrusions, it is argued that when necessary, notwithstanding Western psychology’s limitations, Caribbean psychologists should reconstruct mainstream psychology to address the psychological needs of these Caribbean people. The relationship between theory and psychological interventions for the optimal development of people of African descent is emphasized throughout this article. In this regard, the African-centered and constructionist viewpoint is argued to be of utility in addressing the psychological growth and development of people of African descent living in the Americas and Caribbean region.

  16. NOx and SO2 emission factors for Serbian lignite Kolubara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Vladimir V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Emission factors are widely accepted tool for estimation of various pollutants emissions in USA and EU. Validity of emission factors is strongly related to experimental data on which they are based. This paper is a result of an effort to establish reliable NOx and SO2 emission factors for Serbian coals. The results of NOx and SO2 emissions estimations based on USA and EU emission factors from thermal power plants Nikola Tesla Obrenovac A and B utilizing the Serbian lignite Kolubara are compared with experimental data obtained during almost one decade (2000-2008 of emissions measurements. Experimental data are provided from regular annual emissions measurement along with operational parameters of the boiler and coal (lignite Kolubara ultimate and proximate analysis. Significant deviations of estimated from experimental data were observed for NOx, while the results for SO2 were satisfactory. Afterwards, the estimated and experimental data were plotted and linear regression between them established. Single parameter optimization was performed targeting the ideal slope of the regression line. Results of this optimization provided original NOx and SO2 emission factors for Kolubara lignite.

  17. Microscopical investigation of the transformation (diagenesis) from peat to lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ting, F.T.C.

    1977-01-01

    A silicified Palaeocene peat layer discovered in a lignite bed in western North Dakota, U.S.A., has proved to be excellent material for studying the transformation from peat to lignite. Detailed anatomical structures are well preserved in the peat and similar to the level of preservation of Carboniferous coal balls. A compaction of 4:1 results when the peat is converted to lignite. Loss in volume is primarily caused by the loss of cellular cavities and intergranular spaces and consequent loss of redistribution of moisture. Huminite formed from secondary xylem and phloem sclereids differs in appearance under the microscope from huminite derived from periderms and young cortical tissues. Resinites are formed from fillings of resin canals, secretory cells and sclereids of secondary phloem and may also originate from resinous materials occurring in the palisade and spongy mesophyll of leaves. Cutinite can form from either cuticles or from compressed cortical tissues of young roots. Charred leaves and charred secondary xylem and phloem comprise an important portion of the fusinitic and semifusinitic fractions of the coal. Pyrinite grains tend to occupy the cell cavities of early wood and ray cells. Differences between collinite and telinite developed during the peat stage, while progressive coalification tends to accentuate the lack of structure in the collinite.

  18. Radon concentrations in three underground lignite mines in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cile, S; Altinsoy, N; Celebi, N

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring of radon in underground mines is important in order to assess the radiological hazards to occupational workers. Radon concentration levels in three underground lignite mines (Tunçbilek, Omerler and Eynez) of Turkey were obtained in this study. For this reason, atmospheric radon level measurements were carried out in mines using CR-39 track detectors. Chemical etching of the detector tracks and subsequent counting were performed at Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center. The obtained results were evaluated according to the International Commission of Radiation Protection and the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority whose radon action levels for workplaces are 500-1500 and 1000 Bq(-3), respectively. The radon gas concentrations in the lignite mines were determined to be between 50 +/- 7 and 587 +/- 16 Bq m(-3). The results obtained in these experiments are far under the action levels. The computed radon doses for the mine workers of Tunçbilek, Omerler and Eynez lignite mines are 1.23, 2.44 and 1.47 mSv y(-1), respectively.

  19. Radon concentrations in three underground lignite mines in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cile, S.; Altinsoy, N.; Celebi, N. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Inst. of Energy

    2010-01-15

    Monitoring of radon in underground mines is important in order to assess the radiological hazards to occupational workers. Radon concentration levels in three underground lignite mines (Tuncbilek, Omerler and Eynez) of Turkey were obtained in this study. For this reason, atmospheric radon level measurements were carried out in mines using CR-39 track detectors. Chemical etching of the detector tracks and subsequent counting were performed at Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center. The obtained results were evaluated according to the International Commission of Radiation Protection and the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority whose radon action levels for workplaces are 500-1500 and 1000 Bq{sup -3}, respectively. The radon gas concentrations in the lignite mines were determined to be between 50 {+-} 7 and 587 {+-} 16 Bq m{sup -3}. The results obtained in these experiments are far under the action levels. The computed radon doses for the mine workers of Tuncbilek, Omerler and Eynez lignite mines are 1.23, 2.44 and 1.47 mSv y{sup -1}, respectively.

  20. Stranded pumice in the western Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, J. A.; Henton De Angelis, S.; Toscano, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Floating and washed-up pumices have been reported by scientific expeditions along the Caribbean Sea coast of the Central American Isthmus and the northern coast of South America since at least 1947. Local coastal communities have been utilizing this resource for many years. The rounded and buffered morphology of hand specimens is consistent with water-borne transit. The volcanically active Caribbean and Central American regions provide a number of candidates for source volcanoes and eruptions. We have attempted to identify this source using samples collected from Carrie Bow Cay and Placencia Beach, Belize; Tulum Beach, Mexico; Morrosquillo Bay, Colombia; and Galeta Point, Panama. We have tracked possible transport routes through the use of river drainage and ocean current maps. The criteria for comparing the products of potential source volcanoes (including Atitlán Caldera in Guatemala and Caribbean sources such as Mt. Pelée, Martinique and Soufrière Hills, Montserrat) were developed from the whole rock major and trace element geochemistry and the compositional and textural characteristics of pumice and their constituent minerals and glasses. The largest pumice sample collected from Carrie Bow Cay, Belize, was 18.5x12 cm with the typical, rounded morphology and distinctively stretched vesicles exhibited by this pumice collection.

  1. Genetic relationship of organic bases of the quinoline and isoquinoline series from lignite semicoking tars with the initial biological material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Podshibyakin, S.I.; Domogatskii, V.V.; Shvykin, A.Y.; Shavyrina, O.A.; Chilachava, K.B. [Leo Tolstoy State Pedagog University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    2002-07-01

    The genetic relationship of quinoline and isoquinoline compounds present in semicoking tars of Kimovsk lignites (near-Moscow fields) with the initial vegetable material is discussed. Transformation pathways of the native compounds in the course of lignite formation are suggested.

  2. Planning for reliable coal quality delivery considering geological variability: A case study in polish lignite mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naworyta, W.; Sypniowski, S.; Benndorf, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of coal quality control in coal mines is to supply power plants daily with extracted raw material within certain coal quality constraints. On the example of a selected part of a lignite deposit, the problem of quality control for the runof-mine lignite stream is discussed. The main goal is t

  3. Organic geochemistry of Amynteo lignite deposit, northern Greece: a Multi-analytical approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iordanidis, A.; Schwarzbauer, J.; Georgakopoulos, A.; Lagen, van B.

    2012-01-01

    Several lignite samples were collected from boreholes of the Amynteo opencast lignite mine, northern Greece. Organic geochemical characteristics were investigated with the help of various analytical techniques, comprising Gas Chromatography (GC) and Gas-chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS), Four

  4. Satellite Teleconferencing in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Hollis C.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the need for, and the development, use, and future trends of, the University of the West Indies Distance Teaching Experiment, which utilizes telephone and communications satellite technology teleconferencing to extend educational opportunities to the peoples of the Caribbean. (MBR)

  5. Laboratory experiments and analytical investigations on the transfer of organic substances from lignite into ground water and residue lakes during flooding of opencast lignite mines. Final report; Laborexperimente und analytische Untersuchungen ueber den Eintrag braunkohlebuertiger organischer Stoffe in Grundwaesser und Restseegewaesser bei der Flutung von Braunkohletagebauen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzschuh, R.; Frauendorf, H.; Herrmann, D.; Pietzsch, K.

    2000-05-01

    Lignite samples of diffrent lithotypes and composition from opencast mines of Lusatia and the region near Leipzig were submitted to weathering processes in laboratory scale experiments and the transfer of organic matter from lignite into the hydrosphere has been observed. By means of high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray mass spectrometry used in combination with data from gas chromatography/mass spectrometry numerous lignite-derived aromatic and heteroaromatic (poly-)carboxylic acids as well as aliphatic dicarboxylic acids could be characterized in the aqueous extracts. Investigations on water samples from lignite mining residue lakes cofirm these results. Furthermore, formation of chlororganic compounds like polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxine and furans (PCDD/F) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), benzenes (PCBz) and phenols (PCPh) has been investigated on different lignite samples under natural weathering conditions and thermal treatment. (orig.) [German] Braunkohlen verschiedener Lithotypen und Zusammensetzung aus Tagebauen der Lausitz und der Region um Leipzig wurden in Laborexperimenten Verwitterungsprozessen unterzogen und der Uebergang organischer Materie aus der Braunkohle in die Hydrosphaere beobachtet. Mit Hilfe der HPLC-Elektrospray-MS-Untersuchungen in Kombination mit Daten aus GC-MS-Messungen konnten zahlreiche aus der Braunkohle stammende aromatische und heteroaromatische (Poly-)Carbonsaeuren sowie aliphatische Dicarbonsaeuren in den waessrigen Extrakten charakterisiert werden. Untersuchungen an Wasserproben aus bereits gefluteten Tagebaurestseen bestaetigen diese Ergebnisse. Weiterhin wurde die Bildung chlororganischer Verbindungen, wie polychlorierter Dibenzo-p-dioxine und -furane (PCDD/F) sowie polychlorierter Biphenyle (PCB), Benzole (PCBz) und Phenole (PCPh) an unterschiedlichen Braunkohleproben unter natuerlichen Bedingungen und nach thermsicher Behandlung untersucht. (orig.)

  6. Resolving regional frequency analysis of precipitation at large and complex scales using a bottom-up approach: The Latin America and the Caribbean Drought Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, J.; Hallack-Alegría, M.; Cadena, M.

    2016-07-01

    Hydrologic frequency analysis is a statistical technique for the assessment of natural hazards, particularly the so-called water hazards caused exclusively by extreme hydrologic events. In particular, L-moments based regional frequency analysis (RFA-LM) has being adopted as the standard method for hydrologic frequency analysis in many parts of the world and for many other applications relating to hydrological extremes. However, despite the widespread use of RFA-LM, its application at large network and high and complex spatial scale conditions (LNHCSSC) has been poorly studied. The lack of studies about RFA-LM under such conditions and its use preferentially at subnational scales and areas with low number of rain gauge stations, or based on grid data, may be explained by the fact that the most difficult, less robust, and most subjective stage of RFA-LM is the delineation of homogeneous regions. This work proposes an integral procedure for the application of RFA-LM under LNHCSSC. The proposed method is applied to the study of drought event frequency in three case studies from Latin America, and incorporates innovating aspects compared to the state-of-the-art RFA-LM. These aspects are specifically (a) the decoupling of the cause of homogeneity from the regionalization stage; (b) the proposal of regionalization efficiency metrics; (c) the development of a regionalization algorithm; and (d) the development of a frequency estimation and mapping method for ungauged sites.

  7. Growth response of container-grown plants in potting media amended with lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamp, M.

    1983-01-01

    A peat-vermiculite (50/50 v/v) potting medium was amended with 25 or 33% lignite by volume to determine if this could be used as a major media component for the culture of several greenhouse crops. Lignite-amended media did not alter the growth parameters of Pelargonium at 25 and 33% lignite. With 25% lignite Philodendron selloum grew as well as controls but at 33% growth was reduced and the leaves exhibited some phytotoxocity. Ficus benjamina, Ardisia humilis, poinsettias and Chrysanthemum morifolium responded poorly to lignite-amended media and leaf phytotoxicity was observed on plants with reduced growth. Leaf phytotoxicity in Chrysanthemum and Philodendron was not related to an excess of minor element content in the leaves. 3 references.

  8. JV Task 90 - Activated Carbon Production from North Dakota Lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Benson; Charlene Crocker; Rokan Zaman; Mark Musich; Edwin Olson

    2008-03-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has pursued a research program for producing activated carbon from North Dakota lignite that can be competitive with commercial-grade activated carbon. As part of this effort, small-scale production of activated carbon was produced from Fort Union lignite. A conceptual design of a commercial activated carbon production plant was drawn, and a market assessment was performed to determine likely revenue streams for the produced carbon. Activated carbon was produced from lignite coal in both laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactors and in a small pilot-scale rotary kiln. The EERC was successfully able to upgrade the laboratory-scale activated carbon production system to a pilot-scale rotary kiln system. The activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite was superior to commercial grade DARCO{reg_sign} FGD and Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product with respect to iodine number. The iodine number of North Dakota lignite-derived activated carbon was between 600 and 800 mg I{sub 2}/g, whereas the iodine number of DARCO FGD was between 500 and 600 mg I{sub 2}/g, and the iodine number of Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product was around 275 mg I{sub 2}/g. The EERC performed both bench-scale and pilot-scale mercury capture tests using the activated carbon made under various optimization process conditions. For comparison, the mercury capture capability of commercial DARCO FGD was also tested. The lab-scale apparatus is a thin fixed-bed mercury-screening system, which has been used by the EERC for many mercury capture screen tests. The pilot-scale systems included two combustion units, both equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Activated carbons were also tested in a slipstream baghouse at a Texas power plant. The results indicated that the activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite coal is capable of removing mercury from flue gas. The tests showed that activated carbon with the greatest

  9. An Historical and Contemporary Overview of Gendered Caribbean Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Sharla Blank

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a broad overview of historical and contemporary gender and social class relations in the British, French, and Spanish Caribbean islands focusing primarily on Afro-Caribbean people. It begins with a discussion of gendered relations during slavery and then investigates gender roles post emancipation. Next, multiple aspects of contemporary West Indian family life are addressed including the prevalence of matrifocal households and child shifting. The important roles played by Caribbean female household heads are discussed in the context of patriarchy. Highlights include the significance of the maternal role over the marital, socializing youth, particular negative expectations each sex holds of the other, customary sexual behavior, as well as common relationship types. Varying aspects of women’s behavior according to social class is touched upon followed by a brief synopsis of the status of Caribbean women on measures of educational and work force participation rates; finally, a summary of the dearth of active women’s movements in the region is addressed. The paper provides an introduction to the intimate and working lives of Caribbean women and men.

  10. The Care Chain, Children's Mobility and the Caribbean Migration Tradition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Karen Fog

    2012-01-01

    Children’s mobility is analysed in this article as an important foundation of the migration tradition that has been an integral aspect of most Caribbean societies. I show that, because of their position as dependents who are not yet fully socialised and who are subject to adult authority, children...... move, and are moved, relatively easily between varying social domains and households in different locations. This migration has created a Caribbean ‘care chain’ that has played an important role in the generating and reinforcing of local, regional and transnational networks of interpersonal relations...

  11. WELFARE REGIMES IN LATIN AMERICA AND CARIBBEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa Campana-Alabarce

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a characterization of Latin American and Caribbean Welfare regimes in historiographical perspective. Firstly, it makes a review of the emergence conditions of Welfare States in Western Europe and its core features, with particular emphasis on its role as a method to regulate inequalities in industrial capitalism. Dialoguing with it, then stops in the specific configurations that welfare regimes have taken in Latin America during the course of the twentieth century. Finally, it provides a map of its contemporary features and the major challenges that the States of the region face in his capacity as right guarantors for the future.

  12. Oxydesulfurization of a Turkish hard lignite with ammonia solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Kuecuekbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical Univ. (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    1996-09-01

    In this study the desulfurization of a high pyritic and high organic sulfur lignite taken from the Gediz area (western Turkey) was investigated by the oxydesulfurization method using ammonia solutions. The influence of such parameters as the concentration of ammonia solution, partial pressure of oxygen, temperature, and reaction time were studied. The ranges of these parameters were selected as 0--10 M concentration of ammonia solution, 0--1.5 MPa partial pressure of oxygen, 403--473 K temperature, and 10--60 min reaction time. It was concluded that the use of ammonia solution as an extraction solution increased the efficiency of the oxydesulfurization process.

  13. Co-pyrolysis of lignite with hazelnut shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Haykiri-Acma, H. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical Engineering Department

    2005-07-01

    In this study, the formation rates of the apparent pyrolytic products of Elbistan lignite sample from Turkey and Turkish hazelnut shell were investigated. For this purpose, original samples and their blends were subjected to pyrolysis process using a thermogravimetric analyzer under a dynamic nitrogen atmosphere of 40 cc/min. Temperature was increased from ambient to 1173 K with a heating rate of 20 K/min. Derivative thermogravimetric analysis curves were obtained, by which the rates of pyrolysis process at different temperatures were evaluated. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Iron mineralogy across the oxycline of a lignite mine lake

    OpenAIRE

    Miot, Jennyfer; Lu, Shipeng; Morin, Guillaume; Adra, Areej,; Benzerara, Karim; Küsel, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Iron-rich pelagic aggregates of microbial origin named “iron snow” are formed in the water column of some acidic lignite mine lakes. We investigated the evolution of Fe mineralogy across the oxycline of the Lusatian lake 77, Germany at two sampling sites differing by their pH and mixing profiles. The central basin (CB) of this lake shows a dimictic water regime with a non-permanent anoxic deep layer and a homogeneous acidic pH all over the water column (pH 3). In contr...

  15. Electricity consumption and projected growth in selected Caribbean countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, B.M. [University of the West Indies, Bridgetown (Barbados). Dept. of Economics; Moseley, L. [University of the West Indies, Bridgetown (Barbados). Dept. of Computer Science, Mathematics and Physics; Sunday Osaretin Iyare [University of the West Indies, Bridgetown (Barbados). Dept. of Economics

    2007-11-15

    This paper examines two issues that are central to the understanding of the need to increase efficiency in the use, distribution, and production of energy in the Caribbean region. The empirical results of this Paper suggest the following: first, the three Caribbean countries provide evidence of short-run bi-directional Granger-causality from energy consumption to real gross domestic product per capita. Second, the forecasts with A BVAR model indicate that significant growth in energy demand could be expected in Haiti, Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago until at least 2010. Third, the increased growth in energy consumption suggests the need for long-term commitments from Caribbean countries to undertake a series of policy, economic, market, and research and development measures to advance the adoption and deployment of new energy technologies. (author)

  16. Tectonic evolution and mantle structure of the Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Benthem, S.; Govers, R.; Spakman, W.; Wortel, R.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate whether predictions of mantle structure from tectonic reconstructions are in agreement with a detailed tomographic image of seismic P wave velocity structure under the Caribbean region. In the upper mantle, positive seismic anomalies are imaged under the Lesser Antilles and Puerto Ric

  17. Library Education in the English-Speaking Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collings, Dorothy

    1973-01-01

    A library school to serve the English-speaking Caribbean has been set up with Unesco assistance at the University of the West Indies, Kingston, Jamaica. This article examines the potential demand for librarians in the region, discusses various problems facing the profession and prospects for the future. (15 references) (Author)

  18. Petroleum pollution in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botello, A V; Villanueva, S; Díaz, G

    1997-01-01

    In 1976, IOC-UNESCO and UNEP convened a meeting in Port of Spain to analyze the marine pollution problems in the region, noting that petroleum pollution was of regionwide concern and recommended initiating a research and monitoring program to determine the severity of the problem and monitor its effects. The Wider Caribbean is potentially one of the largest oil-producing areas in the world. Major production sites include Louisiana and Texas in the U.S.; the Bay of Campeche, Mexico; Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela; and the Gulf of Paria, Trinidad. All these are classified as high-risk production accident zones. Main sources of petroleum pollution in the Wider Caribbean are production, exploitation, transportation, urban and municipal discharges, refining and chemical wastes, normal loading and unloading operations, and accidental spills. About 5 million barrels of crude oil are transported daily in the Caribbean, thus generating an intense tanker traffic. It has been estimated that oil discharges from tank washings within the Wider Caribbean could be as high as 7 million barrels/yr. The results of the Caribbean Pollution Regional Program (CARIPOL) conducted between 1980 and 1987 pointed out that significant levels of petroleum pollution exist throughout the Wider Caribbean, including serious tar contamination of windward exposed beaches, high levels of floating tar within the major current systems, and very high levels of dissolved and dispersed hydrocarbons in surface waters. Major adverse effects of this type of pollution include: high tar levels on many beaches that either prevent their recreational use or require very expensive cleanup operations, distress and death for marine life, and responses in the enzyme systems of marine organisms that have been correlated with declines in reproductive success. Finally, the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in tissues of important economic species has been reported, creating a risk for public health because of

  19. Which Fishers Are Satisfied in the Caribbean? A Comparative Analysis of Job Satisfaction among Caribbean Lobster Fishers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnereau, Iris; Pollnac, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Lobster fishing (targeting the spiny lobster "Panulirus argus") is an important economic activity throughout the Wider Caribbean Region both as a source of income and employment for the local population as well as foreign exchange for national governments. Due to the high unit prices of the product, international lobster trade provides a…

  20. Large Earthquake Potential in the Southeast Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencin, D.; Mora-Paez, H.; Bilham, R. G.; Lafemina, P.; Mattioli, G. S.; Molnar, P. H.; Audemard, F. A.; Perez, O. J.

    2015-12-01

    The axis of rotation describing relative motion of the Caribbean plate with respect to South America lies in Canada near Hudson's Bay, such that the Caribbean plate moves nearly due east relative to South America [DeMets et al. 2010]. The plate motion is absorbed largely by pure strike slip motion along the El Pilar Fault in northeastern Venezuela, but in northwestern Venezuela and northeastern Colombia, the relative motion is distributed over a wide zone that extends from offshore to the northeasterly trending Mérida Andes, with the resolved component of convergence between the Caribbean and South American plates estimated at ~10 mm/yr. Recent densification of GPS networks through COLOVEN and COCONet including access to private GPS data maintained by Colombia and Venezuela allowed the development of a new GPS velocity field. The velocity field, processed with JPL's GOA 6.2, JPL non-fiducial final orbit and clock products and VMF tropospheric products, includes over 120 continuous and campaign stations. This new velocity field along with enhanced seismic reflection profiles, and earthquake location analysis strongly suggest the existence of an active oblique subduction zone. We have also been able to use broadband data from Venezuela to search slow-slip events as an indicator of an active subduction zone. There are caveats to this hypothesis, however, including the absence of volcanism that is typically concurrent with active subduction zones and a weak historical record of great earthquakes. A single tsunami deposit dated at 1500 years before present has been identified on the southeast Yucatan peninsula. Our simulations indicate its probable origin is within our study area. We present a new GPS-derived velocity field, which has been used to improve a regional block model [based on Mora and LaFemina, 2009-2012] and discuss the earthquake and tsunami hazards implied by this model. Based on the new geodetic constraints and our updated block model, if part of the

  1. Kinetic Study and Thermal Decomposition Behavior of Lignite Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Heydari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A thermogravimetric analyzer was employed to investigate the thermal behavior and extract the kinetic parameters of Canadian lignite coal. The pyrolysis experiments were conducted in temperatures ranging from 298 K to 1173 K under inert atmosphere utilizing six different heating rates of 1, 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18 K min−1, respectively. There are different techniques for analyzing the kinetics of solid-state reactions that can generally be classified into two categories: model-fitting and model-free methods. Historically, model-fitting methods are broadly used in solid-state kinetics and show an excellent fit to the experimental data but produce uncertain kinetic parameters especially for nonisothermal conditions. In this work, different model-free techniques such as the Kissinger method and the isoconversional methods of Ozawa, Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose, and Friedman are employed and compared in order to analyze nonisothermal kinetic data and investigate thermal behavior of a lignite coal. Experimental results showed that the activation energy values obtained by the isoconversional methods were in good agreement, but Friedman method was considered to be the best among the model-free methods to evaluate kinetic parameters for solid-state reactions. These results can provide useful information to predict kinetic model of coal pyrolysis and optimization of the process conditions.

  2. Exergy Analysis of Operating Lignite Fired Thermal Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Murugesan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy assessment must be made through the energy quantity as well as the quality. But the usual energy analysisevaluates the energy generally on its quantity only. However, the exergy analysis assesses the energy on quantity as well asthe quality. The aim of the exergy analysis is to identify the magnitudes and the locations of real energy losses, in order toimprove the existing systems, processes or components. The present paper deals with an exergy analysis performed on anoperating 50MWe unit of lignite fired steam power plant at Thermal Power Station-I, Neyveli Lignite Corporation Limited,Neyveli, Tamil Nadu, India. The exergy losses occurred in the various subsystems of the plant and their components havebeen calculated using the mass, energy and exergy balance equations. The distribution of the exergy losses in several plantcomponents during the real time plant running conditions has been assessed to locate the process irreversibility. The Firstlaw efficiency (energy efficiency and the Second law efficiency (exergy efficiency of the plant have also been calculated.The comparison between the energy losses and the exergy losses of the individual components of the plant shows that themaximum energy losses of 39% occur in the condenser, whereas the maximum exergy losses of 42.73% occur in the combustor.The real losses of energy which has a scope for the improvement are given as maximum exergy losses that occurredin the combustor.

  3. Co-pyrolysis of lignite and sugar beet pulp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilgin, M.; Deveci Duranay, N.; Pehlivan, D. [Firat University, Chemical Engineering Department, 23279 Elazig (Turkey)

    2010-05-15

    Today, worldwide studies have been undertaken on the biomass usage and co-conversion of biomass and coal to seek out alternative fuels for supplying energy in an environmental friendly way. The objective of this work is to study co-pyrolysis of lignite and sugar beet pulp in 50/50 (wt./wt.) ratio of blend pellets, to elucidate their thermal behaviour under pyrolysis conditions and to assess major decomposition products in terms of their yields. A special chamber, which has enabled very fast heating rates, was used in the pyrolysis experiments carried at 600 C. The results were interpreted in the light of liquid, solid and gaseous yields, resulting from thermal decomposition, and kinetics of thermogravimetric analysis. Proximate volatile matter and ash contents of the blends were different compared to those found by using individual values. Sugar beet pulp decomposed faster within a relatively narrow temperature range than lignite and underwent a significant shrinkage during pyrolysis. It was found that the chars left behind after the flash pyrolysis of these pellets at 600 C have substantial amounts of volatile matter that would evolve upon further heating. (author)

  4. Improving the effectiveness of wells for lignite mine dewatering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rude, T.R.; Banning, A. [Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Hydrogeology; Klauder, W.; Roger, S. [Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management; Vinzelberg, G. [RWE Power AG, Bergheim (Germany). Dept. of Water Resources Management

    2010-07-01

    Mine dewatering is an important factor in determining the economic feasibility of lignite open cast mining projects. Ochre formation is accelerated in open pit dewatering, as the wells have long filter lengths that allow for high oxygen flux into well screens, gravel packs, and the surrounding aquifer. Ochre formation can reduce the productivity of wells by an estimated 20 percent. This experimental study investigated the formation of ochre in different environments using well screens from the Rhenish lignite mining district in Germany. The influence of oxygen, iron (Fe{sup 2+}), pH, flow velocity, water composition, and microorganisms were considered. Samples from the mine were passed through an apparatus that supplied Fe{sup 2+} and filtered the formed Fe{sup 3+} oxide colloids. The oxygen- and iron-free water was then conditioned and treated with ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Results of the study showed that Fe{sup 3+} hydroxides quickly formed in the screen due to high Fe{sup 2+} concentrations. Results indicated that pH must be kept high in the deoxygenation unit in order to facilitate rapid oxygen consumption. The experimental study will be used to investigate abiotic conditions created by variations in flow velocity, Fe{sup 2+} concentrations, sulfate content and alkalinity. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  5. The effect of the depth and groundwater on the formation of sinkholes or ground subsidence associated with abandoned room and pillar lignite mines under static and dynamic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydan, Ö.; Ito, T.

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that some sinkholes or subsidence take place from time to time in the areas where abandoned room and pillar type mines exist. The author has been involved with the stability of abandoned mines beneath urbanized residential areas in Tokai region and there is a great concern about the stability of these abandoned mines during large earthquakes as well as in the long term. The 2003 Miyagi Hokubu and 2011 Great East Japan earthquakes caused great damage to abandoned mines and resulted in many collapses. The author presents the effect of the depth and groundwater on the formation of sinkholes or ground subsidence associated with abandoned room and pillar lignite mines under static and dynamic conditions and discusses the implications on the areas above abandoned lignite mines in this paper.

  6. Artists in and out of the Caribbean

    OpenAIRE

    Sally Price

    1999-01-01

    [First paragraph] Caribbean Art. VEERLE POUPEYE. London: Thames and Hudson, 1998. 224 pp. (Paper US$ 14.95) Transforming the Crown: African, Asian and Caribbean Artists in Britain, 1966-1996. MORA J. BEAUCHAMP-BYRD & M. FRANKLIN SIRMANS (eds.). New York: Caribbean Cultural Center, 1998. 177 pp. (Paper US$ 39.95, £31.95) "Caribbean" (like "Black British") culture is (as a Dutch colleague once said of postmodernism) a bit of a slippery fish. One of the books under ...

  7. Eocene lignites from Cambay basin, Western India:An excellent source of hydrocarbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.K. Singh; V.K. Singh; P.K. Rajak; M.P. Singh; A.S. Naik; S.V. Raju; D. Mohanty

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper lignites from the Cambay basin have been studied for their hydrocarbon potential. The samples were collected from three lignite fieldseVastan, Rajpardi and Tadkeshwar, and were investigated by petrography, chemical analyses and Rock-Eval pyrolysis. The results are well comparable with the empirically derived values. The study reveals that these‘low rank C’ lignites are exceedingly rich in reactive macerals (huminite þ liptinite) while inertinite occurs in low concentration. These high volatile lignites generally have low ash yield except in few sections. The Rock-Eval data indicates the dominance of kerogen type-III with a little bit of type-II. The study reveals that the lignites of Vastan (lower and upper seams) and Tadkeshwar upper seam are more gas-prone while Rajpardi and Tad-keshwar lower seams are oil-prone. Further, the fixed hydrocarbons are several times higher than the free hydrocarbons. The relation between TOC and fixed hydrocarbon indicates that these lignites are excellent source rock for hydrocarbon which could be obtained mainly through thermal cracking. The empirically derived values reveal a high conversion (94e96%) and high oil yield (64e66%) for these lignites.

  8. Study on the comparison of the pyrolysis gas release of lignite and its briquette

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Shi-feng; CHU Mo; ZHAO Fei-xiang

    2012-01-01

    In this experiment,lignite was refined and processed through binderless briquette preparation process from low-rank coal and became briquette.Then,lignite and its briquette were pyrolysed as materials to compare the nature of their pyrolysis.In this study,the experiment was carried out through a lab tube furnace,at a heating rate of 10 ℃/min,and the gas was analyzed and compared,which was collected at different temperatures.The results show that:in the pyrolysis temperature of 550~850 ℃,the semi-coke yield of briquette is 2%~6% higher than lignite,the tar yield of briquette is 2%~3% higher than lignite and the gas yield of briquette is 4%~9% less than lignite.The time required for complete release of the briquette is about 20 min less than lignite.The components in the pyrolysis gas of lignite and its briquette are the same,and their variation with the pyrolysis temperature is similar.

  9. Comparative study of peat and lignite on the basis of proximate and ultimate analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelkoph, G.M.; Malterer, T.J.; Steadman, E.N.

    1985-01-01

    Ultimate and proximate analytical data was used as the basis for comparisons of selected United States peats and North Dakota lignites that have formed under a variety of depositional environments, in order to better understand the transitional relationships involved in the transformation of peat to lignite. A ternary diagram of the bond-equivalents of C, O, and H can be used to represent relationships among complex chemical compounds. This method was initially developed for Australian brown coals. The rationale for adopting this method was the usefulness of the reaction trajectories in identifying the dominating chemical changes in coalification. The mass percentage of nitrogen and organic sulfur are added to the mass percentage of oxygen. The bond equivalence data implies that a relationship exists between peat and lignite by the cellulose present and the degree of decarboxylation. It has been shown elsewhere that the carboxyl content of Minnesota peat and Yalloun brown coal are greater than that of a North Dakota lignite. Collateral research at UNDERC has found virtually no cellulose in North Dakota lignite, but 5% cellulose (maf) in Minnesota peat. This relationship implies that decellulosation and decarboxylation reactions represented on the ternary diagram are occurring in the diagenesis of peat to lignite. The data further indicates that Australian brown coals are indeed intermediate in coalification between United States peat and North Dakota lignite.

  10. Eocene lignites from Cambay basin, Western India: An excellent source of hydrocarbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.K. Singh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper lignites from the Cambay basin have been studied for their hydrocarbon potential. The samples were collected from three lignite fields–Vastan, Rajpardi and Tadkeshwar, and were investigated by petrography, chemical analyses and Rock-Eval pyrolysis. The results are well comparable with the empirically derived values. The study reveals that these ‘low rank C’ lignites are exceedingly rich in reactive macerals (huminite + liptinite while inertinite occurs in low concentration. These high volatile lignites generally have low ash yield except in few sections. The Rock-Eval data indicates the dominance of kerogen type-III with a little bit of type-II. The study reveals that the lignites of Vastan (lower and upper seams and Tadkeshwar upper seam are more gas-prone while Rajpardi and Tadkeshwar lower seams are oil-prone. Further, the fixed hydrocarbons are several times higher than the free hydrocarbons. The relation between TOC and fixed hydrocarbon indicates that these lignites are excellent source rock for hydrocarbon which could be obtained mainly through thermal cracking. The empirically derived values reveal a high conversion (94–96% and high oil yield (64–66% for these lignites.

  11. Petrographic composition of lignite from the Szczerców deposit, Polish Lowlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawelec, Sandra; Bielowicz, Barbara

    2016-12-01

    Macroscopic and microscopic composition of lignite from the Szczerców deposit belonging to the Bełchatów Lignite Mine (Polish Lowlands) has been examined. The macroscopic composition was determined according to the newest lithological classification of humic coal. On this basis, it has been shown that the main lithotypes occurring in the Szczerców deposit are the detritic and xylodetritic lignites. The petrographic composition of the investigated lignite was determined microscopically for 11 samples. The examined lignite is predominantly composed of macerals from the huminite group. It is in the range from 75.2 to 86%, including atrinite (23.1-40.7%, averaging 28.9%) and densinite (18.2-41.4 %, averaging 24.9%). It also demonstrated that the statistical variability of the macerals content from the huminite group in the studied lignite is very weak in all samples. In addition, the random reflectance of ulminite was measured traditionally. The results, ranging from 0.247 to 0.282%, with the maximum permissible standard deviation < 0.07, were achieved for all analysed lignite samples.

  12. Archipelagic American Studies and the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Russell Roberts

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article, as part of the “American Studies: Caribbean Edition” Special Forum, brings specific focus to the ways in which the Caribbean and the field of Caribbean Studies insists upon a version of American Studies that sheds its post-exceptionalist anti-insularity and, in the process, emerges as transregional and archipelagic.

  13. Strengthening Caribbean Pensions : Improving Equity and Sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2010-01-01

    This report aims to provide additional insights to existing analyses of public pension and social security schemes in the Caribbean. Such analyses have been undertaken with the support of the Inter-American Development Bank, the Caribbean Development Bank, the Canadian International Development Agency, the Economic Commission for Latin America, and the Caribbean and the International Socia...

  14. Investigation of pre-drying lignite in an existing Greek power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agraniotis Michalis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of lignite pre-drying technologies in next generation of lignite power plants by utilizing low pressure steam as a drying medium instead of hot recirculated flue gas - combined with thermal utilization of the vaporized coal moisture - is expected to bring efficiency increase of 2-4 percentage points in future lignite power plants compared with today’s state of the art. The pre-drying concept is of particular importance in Greek boilers firing lignite with a high water and ash content. The combustion of Greek predried lignite has been investigated experimentally and via numerical simulations in our previous research. This study focuses on the potential integration of a lignite pre-drying system in an existing Greek power plant with dry lignite co-firing thermal share of up to 30%. The radiative and convective heat fluxes to the boiler and the overall boiler heat balance is calculated for reference and dry lignite co-firing conditions by an in-house calculation code. The overall plant’s thermal cycle is then simulated using commercial thermal cycle calculation software. The net plant efficiency is in this way determined for reference and dry coal co-firing conditions. According to the simulation results the integration of a pre-drying system and the implementation of dry lignite co-firing may bring an efficiency increase of about 1.5 percentage points in existing Greek boilers. It is therefore considered as an important measure towards improving plant efficiency and reducing specific CO2 emissions in existing plants.

  15. Water Security and Services in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Cashman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The efficient management of water resources and services continues to be a concern in many of the small island states of the Caribbean. There are growing concerns over the ability of governments in the region to ensure the good management and provision of water without jeopardizing economic growth and the maintenance of social well-being. This paper provides an overview of the major factors influencing the water security facing the Caribbean Region and how the emerging concerns are being addressed. The key challenges and vulnerabilities may be summarized as lack of data and barriers to making available what information there is. Forward planning has been largely neglected and is symptomatic of a lack of appreciation of the need for having national water policies. In this respect Jamaica’s development of a national master water plan serves as a good example of what is needed. Water service providers have to be efficient, well managed and allowed to do their job. This means that they have to be on a sound financial footing. The challenge is to find the balance between appropriate political and regulatory oversight and the autonomy of water managers and service providers.

  16. Petrological, geochemical and isotopic characteristics of lignite and calcified lignite from mining area Pesje, Velenje Basin, Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrabec, Mirijam; Markič, Miloš; Vrabec, Marko; Jaćimović, Radojko; Kanduč, Tjaša

    2014-05-01

    Lignite (organic rich) and calcified lignite (inorganic rich) samples from excavation field -50c mining area Pesje, Velenje Basin, Slovenia were investigated. During geological and structural mapping lignite and calcified lignite samples were systematically taken for determination of their petrological, geochemical and isotopic characteristics. Lignite is composed of fine detritical gelified matrix. At least five different types of calcified lignite were recognized forming laminations, calcifications after wood, petrified wood and complete replacements of lignite with carbonate. All measured parameters so far indicate geochemical processes during sedimentation of the Velenej Basin. After macroscopic description samples were split to organic and inorganic component (Ward, 1984) and powdered in an agate mortar for geochemical and isotopic analyses. Major and trace elements (As, B, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Mo, Sb, Se, Th, U, Zn) in these samples were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) using k-0 standardization method (Jaćimović et al, 2002). The isotopic composition of carbon and nitrogen was determined using a Europa 20-20 continuous flow IRMS ANCA-SL preparation module. A 1 mg amount of a sample was weighed in a tin capsule for carbon and 10 mg for nitrogen analysis. Samples for carbon analyses were pretreated with 1 M HCl to remove carbonates. Carbonate samples from carbonate-rich strata and calcified xylite were first roasted at 450 deg C (Krantz et al., 1987). Three miligrams of carbonate sample was transformed into CO2 by reaction with anhydrous H3PO4 at 55 deg C under vacuum (McCrea, 1950) and measured with GV 2003 isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Measured isotopic composition of oxygen as VPDB values was recalculated to the VSMOW reference standard to enable the comparison with data from other coal basins. SEM/EDXS of carbonate rich sediments was performed with JEOL JSM 5800 electron microanalyzer scanning electron microscope

  17. Emission characteristics of co-combustion of sewage sludge with olive cake and lignite coal in a circulating fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toraman, O.Y.; Topal, H.; Bayat, O.; Atimtay, A.T. [Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Environmental Engineering

    2004-07-01

    In this study, a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) of 125 mm diameter and 1800 trim height was used to find the combustion characteristics of sewage sludge (SS) produced in Turkey. Sludge + olive cake, and Sludge + lignite coal mixtures were burned separately. Various sludge-to-lignite coal and sludge-to-olive cake ratios (5/95, 10/90. 15/85, 20/80) were tried. On-line concentrations of major components (O{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, NOx, C{sub m}H{sub n}) were measured in the flue gas, as well as temperature and pressure distributions along the bed. Combustion efficiencies of sludge + olive cake and sludge + lignite coal mixtures were calculated, and the optimum conditions for operating parameters were discussed. The results have shown that the combustion mainly takes place in the upper regions of the main column where the temperature reaches 900 C. SS + coal burn in the CFB with an efficiency of 95.14% to 96.18%, which is considered to be quite good. When burning sludge mixed with olive cake, appreciable amounts of CO and unburned hydrocarbons are formed and the combustion efficiency drops to 92.93%. CO and C{sub m}H{sub n} emissions are lower when lignite coal is mixed with various amounts of SS than the. emissions when the coal is burned alone. As the %SS is increased in the fuel mixture, the SO{sub 2} emission decreases. NOx emissions are slightly higher. When burning sludge mixed with olive cake, SO{sub 2} and NOx emissions are slightly higher. CO and C{sub m}H{sub n} emissions decrease sharply when SS is mixed with 5%wt. olive cake. With increasing sludge ratio these emissions increase due to the unburned hydrocarbons. As a result of this study, it is believed that SS can be burned effectively in a CFBC together with other fuels, especially with olive cake (OC). OC will be a good additive fuel for the combustion of lower quality fuels.

  18. Effects of pyrolysis on the proximate and ultimate analysis of lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucukbayrak, S.; Kadioglu, E. (Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1989-12-10

    The effect of pyrolysis over the temperature range 300-1000{degree}C on the proximate and ultimate analysis of lignite has been studied and the experimental results are presented here. Seven lignite samples from different reserves in Turkey with particle diameters of 0.1-0.2 mm were subjected to pyrolysis. The volatile matter contents of the lignite samples decreased by about 90%. The fraction of the calorific value remaining in the coke produced varies from 51 to 75%. The oxygen and hydrogen content decrease the most during pyrolysis. 5 refs., 6 tabs., 1 fig.

  19. Rank evaluation of the Neyveli lignite deposit on the basis of reflectance parameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, A.; Singh, B.D. (Birbal Sahni Institute of Paleobotany, Lucknow (India))

    1994-10-01

    The Neyveli field is well known for Tertiary lignite deposits in India. The reflectance of organic constituents (huminite macerals) has been measured to find out organic maturation level (rank) of the main lignite seam lying either at same time level or at different time levels in space. The deposits are of sub-bituminous C stage (ASTM) with the mean reflectance (R[sub o,max.] in oil) range from 0.34 to 0.42% (average 0.39%). Evidence from rank study indicates that the quality of lignite deteriorates towards southern part of the field

  20. Bioprocessing of lignite coals using reductive microorganisms. Final technical report, September 30, 1988--March 29, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, D.L.

    1992-03-29

    In order to convert lignite coals into liquid fuels, gases or chemical feedstock, the macromolecular structure of the coal must be broken down into low molecular weight fractions prior to further modification. Our research focused on this aspect of coal bioprocessing. We isolated, characterized and studied the lignite coal-depolymerizing organisms Streptomyces viridosporus T7A, Pseudomonas sp. DLC-62, unidentified bacterial strain DLC-BB2 and Gram-positive Bacillus megaterium strain DLC-21. In this research we showed that these bacteria are able to solubilize and depolymerize lignite coals using a combination of biological mechanisms including the excretion of coal solublizing basic chemical metabolites and extracellular coal depolymerizing enzymes.

  1. Innovative approach to ash radioactivitiy and health impacts of lignite power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosevski, T.; Pop-Jordanova, N. [Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Skopje (Macedonia)

    1998-12-31

    In Macedonia nearly 90% of the present electricity production utilizes domestic low-calorie lignite, and this is likely to continue for the next few decades. Local and global environmental impacts of fossil fuel utilization are considered. Some innovative extensions to standard methodologies of environmental risk assessment and management are considered. They involve ash radioactivity and psychosomatic health impacts from lignite power plants. Two extensions are proposed: one comprising complete radioactive chains when determining committed effective dose from lignite ash; the other by including the psychosomatic diseases, such as peptic ulcer and arterial hypertension, due to chronic stress induced by power plants during normal operation. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Sulfomethylated lignite salt as a sacrifical agent in oil recovery processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudchadker, M.V.; Weiss, W.J.

    1978-02-07

    A process is described for recovering petroleum from oil reservoirs by secondary recovery methods. The process involves injecting via an injection well into the reservoir an aqueous solution of sulfomethylated lignite salt as a sacrificial agent to inhibit the deposition of surfactant and polymer on the reservoir matrix. The process is conducted by first injecting the lignite salt into the formation through the injection well and following it with either a polymer or a surfactant solution, which also may contain the lignite salt. The polymer or surfactant would then be followed by a drive fluid, such as water, to push the chemicals and oil to the production well. (18 claims)

  3. JV Task - 129 Advanced Conversion Test - Bulgarian Lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Swanson; Everett Sondreal; Daniel Laudal; Douglas Hajicek; Ann Henderson; Brandon Pavlish

    2009-03-27

    The objectives of this Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) project were to evaluate Bulgarian lignite performance under both fluid-bed combustion and gasification conditions and provide a recommendation as to which technology would be the most technically feasible for the particular feedstock and also identify any potential operating issues (such as bed agglomeration, etc.) that may limit the applicability of a potential coal conversion technology. Gasification tests were run at the EERC in the 100-400-kg/hr transport reactor development unit (TRDU) on a 50-tonne sample of lignite supplied by the Bulgarian Lignite Power Project. The quality of the test sample was inferior to any coal previously tested in this unit, containing 50% ash at 26.7% moisture and having a higher heating value of 5043 kJ/kg after partial drying in preparation for testing. The tentative conclusion reached on the basis of tests in the TRDU is that oxygen-blown gasification of this high-ash Bulgarian lignite sample using the Kellogg, Brown, and Root (KBR) transport gasifier technology would not provide a syngas suitable for directly firing a gas turbine. After correcting for test conditions specific to the pilot-scale TRDU, including an unavoidably high heat loss and nitrogen dilution by transport air, the best-case heating value for oxygen-blown operation was estimated to be 3316 kJ/m{sup 3} for a commercial KRB transport gasifier. This heating value is about 80% of the minimum required for firing a gas turbine. Removing 50% of the carbon dioxide from the syngas would increase the heating value to 4583 kJ/m{sup 3}, i.e., to about 110% of the minimum requirement, and 95% removal would provide a heating value of 7080 kJ/m{sup 3}. Supplemental firing of natural gas would also allow the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology to be utilized without having to remove CO{sub 2}. If removal of all nitrogen from the input gas streams such as the coal transport air were

  4. The Mimallonidae (Lepidoptera, Mimallonoidea) of the Caribbean Basin, with the descriptions of two new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Ryan A St; Mccabe, Timothy L

    2016-02-29

    Mimallonidae of the Caribbean Basin are discussed, with attention primarily given to species endemic to the Caribbean islands and the northern coast of Venezuela. The Caribbean Basin is a political term for tropical regions circumscribed by the Gulf of Mexico. Cicinnus bahamensis sp. n. is described from the Bahamas, the first species of Mimallonidae from this country. The Cuban species Cicinnus packardii (Grote, 1865), the closest relative of C. bahamensis sp. n., is figured and compared. A third, similar, species from northern coastal Venezuela, C. falcoargenteus sp. n., is described and compared to the previous two species.

  5. Co-gasification of solid waste and lignite - a case study for Western Macedonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukouzas, N; Katsiadakis, A; Karlopoulos, E; Kakaras, E

    2008-01-01

    Co-gasification of solid waste and coal is a very attractive and efficient way of generating power, but also an alternative way, apart from conventional technologies such as incineration and landfill, of treating waste materials. The technology of co-gasification can result in very clean power plants using a wide range of solid fuels but there are considerable economic and environmental challenges. The aim of this study is to present the available existing co-gasification techniques and projects for coal and solid wastes and to investigate the techno-economic feasibility, concerning the installation and operation of a 30MW(e) co-gasification power plant based on integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology, using lignite and refuse derived fuel (RDF), in the region of Western Macedonia prefecture (WMP), Greece. The gasification block was based on the British Gas-Lurgi (BGL) gasifier, while the gas clean-up block was based on cold gas purification. The competitive advantages of co-gasification systems can be defined both by the fuel feedstock and production flexibility but also by their environmentally sound operation. It also offers the benefit of commercial application of the process by-products, gasification slag and elemental sulphur. Co-gasification of coal and waste can be performed through parallel or direct gasification. Direct gasification constitutes a viable choice for installations with capacities of more than 350MW(e). Parallel gasification, without extensive treatment of produced gas, is recommended for gasifiers of small to medium size installed in regions where coal-fired power plants operate. The preliminary cost estimation indicated that the establishment of an IGCC RDF/lignite plant in the region of WMP is not profitable, due to high specific capital investment and in spite of the lower fuel supply cost. The technology of co-gasification is not mature enough and therefore high capital requirements are needed in order to set up a direct

  6. Land reclamation in the lignite open pit mining industry of Central and Eastern Europe - a comparative discourse; Rekultivierung im Braunkohlenbergbau Mittel- und Osteuropas - eine vergleichende Betrachtung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drebenstedt, C. [TU Bergakademie, Freiberg (Germany)

    2003-03-01

    This comparative discourse on land reclamation in the Central and East European lignite mining regions is based on a complex analysis of the prevailing natural, geological, technological and social conditions. Considering the above conditions, the reclaimed land in the mined-out lignite mines of Central and Eastern Europe will predominantly be used as forests, although farming is also possible under particularly suitable conditions. Some of the land is given over to recreational purposes and integrated into the relevant landscape. Large lakes in residual holes of former lignite mines have only been created in Germany so far, where the special requirements of nature preservation have also been given attention. As regards the planning and financing regulations and the regulations coordinating the use of the post-mining land, there are differences between the individual countries which must be attributed to the rather diverse legal conditions. In general, the tasks associated with recultivation are defined similarly, are based on scientific investigations and are implemented at a very high level. The exchange of experience should be continued also in the future. (orig.)

  7. Concentration of heavy metals and trace elements in soils, waters and vegetables and assessment of health risk in the vicinity of a lignite-fired power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noli, Fotini; Tsamos, Panagiotis

    2016-09-01

    The pollution of agricultural soils, waters and products in the regions of lignite mines and fired power plants is of great importance. The concentration of As, Βa, Co, Cr, Sr, Sc, Th, U, Zn in soils and waters in the vicinity of a lignite-fired power plant in Northern Greece was determined using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. The determination frequency was every three months during a period of one year in order to evaluate the seasonal impact of the pollution to the environment. Measurements were performed in three locations around the lignite mine as well as in one reference location at a certain distance from the mine. The results, which exhibited a slight seasonal variation, were compared, where possible, with literature values from other countries. The obtained data in most of the cases did not exceed the normal levels and indicated that the investigated area was only slightly contaminated. The concentration of heavy and trace metals was also measured in three common garden crops (tomato, cucumber and parsley) grown in this area. The calculated transfer factors (TF) from soil to vegetables and health risk quotients (HQ) do not denote a health risk.

  8. Aliphatic biological markers in Miocene Maritz-Iztok lignite, Bulgaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanova, M.; Magnier, C. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. of Organic Chemistry

    1997-12-31

    Chromatographic separation and mass spectral studies of bitumens extracted from lithotypes (humovitrain, xylain, liptain and humoclarain) from the Miocene Maritza-Iztok lignite reveal the following: (1) A preponderance of the {alpha}-phyllocladane skeleton over the pimaranes/abietanes. The variety of tricyclic diterpanes confirms that the generation biota included gymnosperms; (2) The presence of dicotyledonous angiosperms in the generation biota is indicated by the occurrence of widely distributed des-A-lupane structure; (3) The dominance of terpanes over steranes confirms the prevailing contribution of terrigenous input; (4) The preponderance of C{sub 27{beta}} hopane and the presence {beta}{beta} hopanes indicates a low degree of thermal maturation. 23 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Experimental Study of Hydrogasification of Lignite and Subbituminous Coal Chars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Gil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental facility for pressure hydrogasification research was adapted to the pressure of 10 MPa and temperature of 1300 K, which ensured repeatability of results and hydrogen heating to the process temperature. A hydrogasification reaction of chars produced from two rank coals was investigated at temperatures up to 1173 K, pressures up to 8 MPa, and the gas flow rates of 0.5–5 dmn3/min. Reactivity of the “Szczerców” lignite char was found to be slightly higher than that of the subbituminous “Janina” coal char produced under the same conditions. A high value of the char reactivity was observed to a certain carbon conversion degree, above which a sharp drop took place. It was shown that, to achieve proper carbon conversion, the hydrogasification reaction must proceed at a temperature above 1200 K.

  10. Combustion characteristics and emissions of Seyitomer lignite-olive cake mixture in a fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devrim B. Kaymak; Husnu Atakul; Ekrem Ekinci [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    The low quality Turkish lignites cause acute pollution problems. Therefore, energy production from biomass, which has lower polluting potential due to its consumption of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere and its low sulphur content, could be considered as an alternative solution. In this study, lignite-olive cake mixtures were burned in a fluidized bed combustor of 10 cm diameter. Temperature profiles, mechanisms of mixing and segregation, and gas emissions were investigated in the course of cocombustion. The lignite-olive cake mixture ratio and the coal particle size were selected as the experimental parameters. Temperature profiles of the fluidized bed show a lignite-olive cake flotsam rich behaviour and the effective parameter on segregation is the density difference between particles. The increase of the olive cake ratio in the mixture results in an important SO{sub 2} emissions decrease. The results also demonstrate that the NOx emissions remain at low values for all operating conditions.

  11. Nonisothermal Thermogravimetric Analysis of Thai Lignite with High CaO Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakamon Pintana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal behaviors and combustion kinetics of Thai lignite with different SO3-free CaO contents were investigated. Nonisothermal thermogravimetric method was carried out under oxygen environment at heating rates of 10, 30, and 50°C min−1 from ambient up to 1300°C. Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS methods were adopted to estimate the apparent activation energy (E for the thermal decomposition of these coals. Different thermal degradation behaviors were observed in lignites with low (14% and high (42% CaO content. Activation energy of the lignite combustion was found to vary with the conversion fraction. In comparison with the KAS method, higher E values were obtained by the FWO method for all conversions considered. High CaO lignite was observed to have higher activation energy than the low CaO coal.

  12. JV Task - 129 Advanced Conversion Test - Bulgarian Lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Swanson; Everett Sondreal; Daniel Laudal; Douglas Hajicek; Ann Henderson; Brandon Pavlish

    2009-03-27

    The objectives of this Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) project were to evaluate Bulgarian lignite performance under both fluid-bed combustion and gasification conditions and provide a recommendation as to which technology would be the most technically feasible for the particular feedstock and also identify any potential operating issues (such as bed agglomeration, etc.) that may limit the applicability of a potential coal conversion technology. Gasification tests were run at the EERC in the 100-400-kg/hr transport reactor development unit (TRDU) on a 50-tonne sample of lignite supplied by the Bulgarian Lignite Power Project. The quality of the test sample was inferior to any coal previously tested in this unit, containing 50% ash at 26.7% moisture and having a higher heating value of 5043 kJ/kg after partial drying in preparation for testing. The tentative conclusion reached on the basis of tests in the TRDU is that oxygen-blown gasification of this high-ash Bulgarian lignite sample using the Kellogg, Brown, and Root (KBR) transport gasifier technology would not provide a syngas suitable for directly firing a gas turbine. After correcting for test conditions specific to the pilot-scale TRDU, including an unavoidably high heat loss and nitrogen dilution by transport air, the best-case heating value for oxygen-blown operation was estimated to be 3316 kJ/m{sup 3} for a commercial KRB transport gasifier. This heating value is about 80% of the minimum required for firing a gas turbine. Removing 50% of the carbon dioxide from the syngas would increase the heating value to 4583 kJ/m{sup 3}, i.e., to about 110% of the minimum requirement, and 95% removal would provide a heating value of 7080 kJ/m{sup 3}. Supplemental firing of natural gas would also allow the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology to be utilized without having to remove CO{sub 2}. If removal of all nitrogen from the input gas streams such as the coal transport air were

  13. Sidney Mintz and Caribbean Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baud, M.

    2011-01-01

    Review of:Empirical Futures: Anthropologists and Historians Engage the Work of Sidney W. Mintz. George Baca, A isha Khan & Stephan Palmié (eds.). Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2009. v + 232 pp. (Paper US$ 24.95)Three Ancient Colonies: Caribbean Themes and Variations. Sidney W. Min

  14. The Utilization of Peat, Lignite and Industrial Wastes in the Production of Mineral-Organic Fertilizers

    OpenAIRE

    Krystyna Hoffmann; Józef Hoffmann

    2007-01-01

    The results of chemical analyses of the composition of peat, lignite, turkey droppings and the potato industry effluent are presented. The results indicate that the substances can be used in mineral-organic fertilizer recipes. Although lignite and peat do not contain assimilable nutrients, from the ecology and pedology point of view they are valuable components of mineral-organic fertilizers. In order to determine the optimum turkey droppings and potato industry effluent dose in fertilizer bi...

  15. Preliminary geologic investigation of the West Glendive lignite deposits, Dawson County, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banet, Arthur C.

    1979-01-01

    Four major lignite beds, all in the Fort Union Formation (Paleocene), occur in the West Glendive area, Dawson County, Montana. The Newton Ranch and Poverty Flats beds are in the Lebo Member and the Peuse and Kolberg Ranch beds are in the Tongue River Member. Correlation of the lignite beds across the area shows that the Peuse bed is the thickest and most extensive. Field mapping and drill-hole data indicate that folding and faulting are more common than previously reported.

  16. THE INFLUENCE OF INCREASING RELIABILITY OF BELT CONVEYORS UPON THE PRODUCTIVITY OF LIGNITE QUARRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FLORIN-MIHAI NIȚESCU

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available At present belt conveyors have an important role in the mines of lignite quarries because they contribute decisively to achieving an optimum production. From this point of view the management of mines should be constantly preoccupied with ensuring, in optimal conditions, the operation of these elements of fixed capital and, if it is necessary they should maintain constant reliability. In this context, this paper has as theme the relation between the reliability of conveyors and the productivity within lignite quarries.

  17. The Caribbean conundrum of Holocene sea level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Luke; Mound, Jon

    2014-05-01

    In the tropics, pre-historic sea-level curve reconstruction is often problematic because it relies upon sea-level indicators whose vertical relationship to the sea surface is poorly constrained. In the Caribbean, fossil corals, mangrove peats and shell material dominate the pre-historic indicator record. The common approach to reconstruction involves the use of modern analogues to these indicators to establish a fixed vertical habitable range. The aim of these reconstructions is to find spatial variability in the Holocene sea level in an area gradually subsiding (Holocene sea-level indicators and the other of published, modern growth rates, abundance and coverage of mangrove and coral species for different depths. We use the first catalogue to calibrate 14C ages to give a probabilistic age range for each indicator. We use the second catalogue to define a depth probability distribution function (pdf) for mangroves and each coral species. The Holocene indicators are grouped into 12 sub-regions around the Caribbean. For each sub-region we apply our sea-level reconstruction, which involves stepping a fixed-length time window through time and calculating the position (and rate) of sea-level (change) using a thousand realisations of the time/depth pdfs to define an envelope of probable solutions. We find that the sub-regional relative sea-level curves display spatio-temporal variability including a south-east to north-west 1500 year lag in the arrival of Holocene sea level to that of the present day. We demonstrate that these variations are primarily due to glacial-isostatic-adjustment induced sea-level change and that sub-regional variations (where sufficient data exists) are due to local uplift variability.

  18. Caribbean Regional Communications Service Study. Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalor, Gerald C.

    A follow-up to a limited experiment with the use of satellites in education and public service conducted by the University of the West Indies (UWI) in 1978, this study explores the feasibility of providing a number of services, which would include an extension system based on the use of the UWI telecommunications network. The study was designed to…

  19. The two great revolutions in the Caribbean, Haiti and Cuba: examples or lessons?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio PANTOJAS GARCÍA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Why did the two great revolutions of the Caribbean, Haiti and Cuba, were condemned to ostracism by its contemporaries and are presented as bad examples rather than exemplary events? These and other related questions are answered examining three arguments: revolution as a critical transition event, economic sustainability as a central challenge for revolutions, and revolution versus the ontology of the Caribbean as a subordinate region.

  20. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) generated from lignite-fired power plants in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasani, F; Shala, F; Xhixha, G; Xhixha, M K; Hodolli, G; Kadiri, S; Bylyku, E; Cfarku, F

    2014-12-01

    The energy production in Kosovo depends primarily on lignite-fired power plants. During coal combustion, huge amounts of fly ash and bottom ash are generated, which may result in enriched natural radionuclides; therefore, these radionuclides need to be investigated to identify the possible processes that may lead to the radiological exposure of workers and the local population. Lignite samples and NORMs of fly ash and bottom ash generated in lignite-fired power plants in Kosovo are analyzed using a gamma-ray spectrometry method for the activity concentration of natural radionuclides. The average activity concentrations of (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th in lignite are found to be 36 ± 8 Bq kg(-1), 9 ± 1 Bq kg(-1) and 9 ± 3 Bq kg(-1), respectively. Indications on the occurrence and geochemical behavior of uranium in the lignite matrix are suggested. The activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in fly ash and bottom ash samples are found to be concentrated from 3 to 5 times that of the feeding lignite. The external gamma-ray absorbed dose rate and the activity concentration index are calculated to assess the radiological hazard arising from ash disposal and recycling in the cement industry.

  1. Solvent refined lignite process development. Quarterly technical progress report No. 3, January--March 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severson, D.E.

    1978-07-12

    Six runs, each nominally at one week's duration, M-34 through M-39, were completed; this concludes the PDU experimental program for Project Lignite. The first three runs concluded the series to study the effects of different lignites on plant operability and product yields. Runs M-37 and M-38 were made using two Montana subbituminous coals. It was concluded that coals with the highest ash content, both lignite and subbituminous coals, gave greater overall conversion to gaseous and liquid organic products. The subbituminous coals gave lower gas yields and lower overall conversion while producing similar liquid yields when compared with lignite. Reactor solids build up rapidly during initial operations, then level off and remain constant at 29 pounds per cubic foot of reactor volume as a run proceeds. Reactor solids evidently are composed of clay minerals and large particles of pyridine insoluble organic material when processing either lignites or subbituminous coals; in addition calcium/magnesium carbonate crystals (calcite/dolomite) are present in the case of lignite. Long term, trouble-free operation of the deashing unit was not accomplished. Integration of the unit for several hours of combined operation of the process was achieved, and the product from the deashing unit contained as low as 0.6% ash and pyridine insoluble material. Solids buildup in the solids settling tower was a continuing problem.

  2. Amblyomma variegatum ticks and heartwater on three Caribbean Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachiéry, Nathalie; Jeffery, Helena; Pegram, Rupert; Aprelon, Rosalie; Pinarello, Valérie; Kandassamy, Ranleen Lloyd Yane; Raliniaina, Modestine; Molia, Sophie; Savage, Hazel; Alexander, Randolph; Frebling, Mathieu; Martinez, Dominique; Lefrançois, Thierry

    2008-12-01

    Amblyomma variegatum tick infestation, tick infection by Ehrlichia ruminantium (ER), and ER genetic diversity were studied in the Caribbean Islands of Guadeloupe, Marie-Galante, and Antigua between 2003 and 2005. Nested PCR for pCS20 was used to detect ER, while ER strains were characterized by sequencing or by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) profiles of map-1 PCR products. In 2003 in Guadeloupe, the prevalence of tick-infested herds was 35.6%. In Marie-Galante 79.1% of herds in 2003 and 73.8% in 2005 were infested, while only an average of 2.2% of the herds were infected in Antigua between this same period. In Marie-Galante, 19.1% of ticks were ER positive, and ER-infected ticks were found in 33.3% of the herds. In Antigua only 5.8% of the ticks were ER positive. High ER tick infection rate combined with a very high level of tick infestation highlight the risk of heartwater in Marie-Galante and Guadeloupe more than in Antigua. The three islands still represent a reservoir for tick and heartwater in the Caribbean. Nine different African and Caribbean map-1 ER genotypes were identified. This diversity was observed even in restricted areas, and identical map-1 genotypes were observed on all three islands. This high genetic diversity of ER strains suggests that there was a simultaneous introduction of several strains from African countries into the Caribbean region.

  3. Renewable power production in a Pan-Caribbean energy grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David

    The Small Island Developing States of the Caribbean are victims of geography and geopolitics. Lacking access to large fossil fuel reserves, they are forced to import fuel at prices they have no control over. Renewable energy resources, particularly wind, have the potential to help break the Caribbean dependency on fossil fuels and allow for increased development at the same time. Working from a sustainable development point of view, this project discusses the history of the area, the theoretical background for the idea of large scale renewable power production, the regional initiatives already in place that address both the cost of fossil fuels and the policy hurdles that need to be overcome to assist the region in gaining energy independence. Haiti is highlighted as a special case in the region and the potential use of several renewable resources are discussed, along with a potential business model based on the idea of the Internet. Power storage is covered, specifically the potential of battery operated vehicles to have a positive impact on the Caribbean region and other developing states. The role of government regulation and policy comes into play next, followed by a discussion on the need for developed states to change patterns of behavior in order to achieve sustainability. Finally, nuclear power and liquefied natural gas are reviewed and rejected as power options for the region.

  4. Genotype frequencies of C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 polymorphisms in a Colombian Caribbean population do not correspond with lactase persistence prevalence reported in the region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Antonio Villanueva

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 polymorphisms located upstream of the lactase gene are reliable predictors of lactase persistence in Caucasian-derived populations. Assessing the presence and distribution of these polymorphisms in other populations is central to developing genotyping assays and understanding the evolutionary mechanism behind this trait in several human populations.Objective: Genotyping the C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 polymorphisms in a sample of Colombian Caribbean individuals.Materials and methods: The polymorphisms were identified through Polymerase Chain Reaction/Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism. Amplified fragments were digested using Hinf I and Hha I. Arlequin v. 3.1 was used to determine allelic and genotypic frequencies, Hardy Weinberg equilibrium, and linkage disequilibrium.Results: Genotypic frequencies were CC (81.4%, CT (18.6%, and TT (0% for the C/T-13910 polymorphism. Frequencies were AA (55.5%, GA (45.5%, and GG (0% for the G/A-22018 polymorphism. No linkage disequilibrium was found between the two loci. Only the locus containing the C/T-13910 polymorphism was found in Hardy Weinberg equilibrium.Conclusion: The allelic and genotypic distributions observed in this first genotyping study in a Colombian Caribbean population indicate a distribution pattern different from the one of the North European Caucasians and do not correspond to the lactase persistence prevalence reported for Caribbean populations.

  5. Genotype frequencies of C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 polymorphisms in a Colombian Caribbean population do not correspond with lactase persistence prevalence reported in the region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Mendoza

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 polymorphisms located upstream of the lactase gene are reliable predictors of lactase persistence in Caucasian-derived populations. Assessing the presence and distribution of these polymorphisms in other populations is central to developing genotyping assays and understanding the evolutionary mechanism behind this trait in several human populations. Objective: Genotyping the C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 polymorphisms in a sample of Colombian Caribbean individuals. Materials and methods: The polymorphisms were identified through Polymerase Chain Reaction/Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism. Amplified fragments were digested using Hinf I and Hha I. Arlequin v. 3.1 was used to determine allelic and genotypic frequencies, Hardy Weinberg equilibrium, and linkage disequilibrium. Results: Genotypic frequencies were CC (81.4%, CT (18.6%, and TT (0% for the C/T-13910 polymorphism. Frequencies were AA (55.5%, GA (45.5%, and GG (0% for the G/A-22018 polymorphism. No linkage disequilibrium was found between the two loci. Only the locus containing the C/T-13910 polymorphism was found in Hardy Weinberg equilibrium. Conclusion: The allelic and genotypic distributions observed in this first genotyping study in a Colombian Caribbean population indicate a distribution pattern different from the one of the North European Caucasians and do not correspond to the lactase persistence prevalence reported for Caribbean populations.

  6. La Nueva Teoría Estratégica y la comunicación científica en la región Caribe / The New Strategic Theory and science communication in the Caribbean region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Antonio Canella López

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available La Nueva Teoría Estratégica es aplicada en investigaciones desde el Foro Iberoamericano Sobre Estrategias de Comunicación que articula acciones con redes y universidades. Vincula actores internacionales de las Universidades: Sergio Arboleda de Colombia, Autónoma de Santo Domingo, de República Dominicana y Nacional de Lomas Zamora de Argentina. Se pretende promover una estrategia para la comunicación científica en la región Caribe. El caso presentado es la realización de la Revista científica/académica, denominada Comunicaribe, (en construcción. Existe déficit de publicaciones académicas en Open Access en la región y el fomento del estimulo para animar a los autores de la región a la producción global desde lo local. Las metodologías propuestas son elaboradas desde la Nueva teoría Estratégica, centrándonos en la primera seña, conocida como el cambio de paradigma del pensamiento Complejo. Aplicamos tres conceptos para el diagnóstico del caso: el principio dialógico, el principio recursivo y el principio hologramático. Resultados: esperamos lograr la puesta en marcha de la publicación, tal como se ha realizado con una serie de ellas, en América y Europa. Conclusiones: los aspectos de la Teoría son tantos y tan abonados por las metodologías propuestas que permite articular en la diversidad de situaciones. Abstract The New Strategic Theory is applied to research from the FISEC ( Ibero-American Forum on Communication Strategies that articulates shares networks and universities. In the present case relates international actors Universities: Sergio Arboleda from Colombia, Autonomous University of Santo Domingo, the Dominican Republic, and National Lomas Zamora of Argentina. The research is conducted in order to promote a strategy for scientific communication in the Caribbean region. The case presented is to conduct scientific / academic journal called Comunicaribe currently under construction. They motivate this embodiment

  7. Characteristics of lignite seams in the Visonta opencast mine and analysis of relationships between their qualitative indices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, J.

    1985-01-01

    Intercalations among the lignite seams consisting of clays and sandy clays considerably affect the quality indices of lignites themselves. The parameters (calorific value, ash content, etc.) show no homogeneous distribution in the opencast mine, thus their spatial changes should be followed. The analysis of the relationship of these parameters, e.g. the change of density as a function of water content, provides a useful tool to rationalize the lignite production.

  8. Defining and dividing the greater Caribbean: insights from the biogeography of shorefishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, D Ross; Cramer, Katie L

    2014-01-01

    The Greater Caribbean biogeographic region is the high-diversity heart of the Tropical West Atlantic, one of four global centers of tropical marine biodiversity. The traditional view of the Greater Caribbean is that it is limited to the Caribbean, West Indies, southwest Gulf of Mexico and tip of Florida, and that, due to its faunal homogeneity, lacks major provincial subdivisions. In this scenario the northern 2/3 of the Gulf of Mexico and southeastern USA represent a separate temperate, "Carolinian" biogeographic region. We completed a comprehensive re-assessment of the biogeography of the Greater Caribbean by comparing the distributions of 1,559 shorefish species within 45 sections of shelf waters of the Greater Caribbean and adjacent areas. This analysis shows that that the Greater Caribbean occupies a much larger area than usually thought, extending south to at least Guyana, and north to encompass the entire Carolinian area. Rather than being homogenous, the Greater Caribbean is divided into three major provinces, each with a distinctive, primarily tropical fauna: (1) a central, tropical province comprising the West Indies, Bermuda and Central America; (2) a southern, upwelling-affected province spanning the entire continental shelf of northern South America; and (iii) a northern, subtropical province that includes all of the Gulf of Mexico, Florida and southeastern USA. This three-province pattern holds for both reef- and soft bottom fishes, indicating a general response by demersal fishes to major variation in provincial shelf environments. Such environmental differences include latitudinal variation in sea temperature, availability of major habitats (coral reefs, soft bottom shorelines, and mangroves), and nutrient additions from upwelling areas and large rivers. The three-province arrangement of the Greater Caribbean broadly resembles and has a similar environmental basis to the provincial arrangement of its sister biogeographic region, the Tropical Eastern

  9. Defining and dividing the greater Caribbean: insights from the biogeography of shorefishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Ross Robertson

    Full Text Available The Greater Caribbean biogeographic region is the high-diversity heart of the Tropical West Atlantic, one of four global centers of tropical marine biodiversity. The traditional view of the Greater Caribbean is that it is limited to the Caribbean, West Indies, southwest Gulf of Mexico and tip of Florida, and that, due to its faunal homogeneity, lacks major provincial subdivisions. In this scenario the northern 2/3 of the Gulf of Mexico and southeastern USA represent a separate temperate, "Carolinian" biogeographic region. We completed a comprehensive re-assessment of the biogeography of the Greater Caribbean by comparing the distributions of 1,559 shorefish species within 45 sections of shelf waters of the Greater Caribbean and adjacent areas. This analysis shows that that the Greater Caribbean occupies a much larger area than usually thought, extending south to at least Guyana, and north to encompass the entire Carolinian area. Rather than being homogenous, the Greater Caribbean is divided into three major provinces, each with a distinctive, primarily tropical fauna: (1 a central, tropical province comprising the West Indies, Bermuda and Central America; (2 a southern, upwelling-affected province spanning the entire continental shelf of northern South America; and (iii a northern, subtropical province that includes all of the Gulf of Mexico, Florida and southeastern USA. This three-province pattern holds for both reef- and soft bottom fishes, indicating a general response by demersal fishes to major variation in provincial shelf environments. Such environmental differences include latitudinal variation in sea temperature, availability of major habitats (coral reefs, soft bottom shorelines, and mangroves, and nutrient additions from upwelling areas and large rivers. The three-province arrangement of the Greater Caribbean broadly resembles and has a similar environmental basis to the provincial arrangement of its sister biogeographic region, the

  10. Validation of a FBC model for co-firing of hazelnut shell with lignite against experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulah, Gorkem [Middle East Technical University, Department of Chemical Engineering, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-07-15

    Performance of a comprehensive system model extended for modelling of co-firing of lignite and biomass was assessed by applying it to METU 0.3 MW{sub t} Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidized Bed Combustor co-firing lignite with hazelnut shell and validating its predictions against on-line temperature and concentration measurements of O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, SO{sub 2} and NO along the same test rig fired with lignite only, lignite with limestone addition and lignite with biomass and limestone addition. The system model accounts for hydrodynamics; volatiles release and combustion, char combustion, particle size distribution for lignite and biomass; entrainment; elutriation; sulfur retention and NO formation and reduction, and is based on conservation equations for energy and chemical species. Special attention was paid to different devolatilization characteristics of lignite and biomass. A volatiles release model based on a particle movement model and a devolatilization kinetic model were incorporated into the system model separately for both fuels. Kinetic parameters for devolatilization were determined via thermogravimetric analysis. Predicted and measured temperatures and concentrations of gaseous species along the combustor were found to be in good agreement. Introduction of biomass to lignite was found to decrease SO{sub 2} emissions but did not affect NO emissions significantly. The system model proposed in this study proves to be a useful tool in qualitatively and quantitatively simulating the processes taking place in a bubbling fluidized bed combustor burning lignite with biomass. (author)

  11. Surface restructuring of lignite by bio-char of Cuminum cyminum - Exploring the prospects in defluoridation followed by fuel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msagati, T. A. M.; Mamba, B. B.; Sivasankar, V.; Omine, Kiyoshi

    2014-05-01

    Recently, there has been an interest in the areas of developing new carbon materials for fluoride removal applications. The development of new carbon materials is of recent choice which involves the synthesis of hybrid carbon from various sources. In this context, the present contribution is made to focus on the study the restructured surface of lignite using a bio-material called Cuminum cyminum. The restructured lignite (RSL) was synthesized with an improved carbon content of 13% and its BET surface area was found to be 3.12 times greater than lignite (L). The amorphous nature of lignite and RSL was quite explicable from XRD studies. SEM studies exhibited a fibrous and finer surface of lignite which was well restructured into a semi-melt (5 μm) surface for RSL. Defluoridation potential of Restructured Lignite (15.8 mg g-1) was greater than the lignite (13.8 mg g-1) at pH 7.93 ± 0.03. Kinetic and isotherm parameters derived from various models helped in comprehending the nature and dynamics of fluoride sorption. Both the normal and the restructured lignite were found to be consistent with its fluoride uptake of 57% and 60% respectively even after fifth cycle of regeneration. High heating values of 22.01 MJ kg-1 and 26.90 MJ kg-1 respectively for lignite and RSL deemed their additional application as fuel materials.

  12. The effect of lignite on nitrogen mobility in a low-fertility soil amended with biosolids and urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramashivam, Dharini; Clough, Tim J; Carlton, Anna; Gough, Kelsi; Dickinson, Nicholas; Horswell, Jacqui; Sherlock, Robert R; Clucas, Lynne; Robinson, Brett H

    2016-02-01

    Lignite has been proposed as a soil amendment that reduces nitrate (NO3(-)) leaching from soil. Our objective was to determine the effect of lignite on nitrogen (N) fluxes from soil amended with biosolids or urea. The effect of lignite on plant yield and elemental composition was also determined. Batch sorption and column leaching experiments were followed by a lysimeter trial where a low fertility soil was amended with biosolids (400 kg N/ha equivalent) and urea (200 kg N/ha equivalent). Treatments were replicated three times, with and without lignite addition (20 t/ha equivalent). Lignite did not reduce NO3(-) leaching from soils amended with either biosolids or urea. While lignite decreased NO3(-) leaching from an unamended soil, the magnitude of this effect was not significant in an agricultural context. Furthermore, lignite increased cumulative N2O production from soils receiving urea by 90%. Lignite lessened the beneficial growth effects of adding biosolids or urea to soil. Further work could investigate whether coating urea granules with lignite may produce meaningful environmental benefits.

  13. A new cost-effective method to mitigate ammonia loss from intensive cattle feedlots: application of lignite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Deli; Sun, Jianlei; Bai, Mei; Dassanayake, Kithsiri B.; Denmead, Owen T.; Hill, Julian

    2015-11-01

    In open beef feedlot systems, more than 50% of dietary nitrogen (N) is lost as ammonia (NH3). Here we report an effective and economically-viable method to mitigate NH3 emissions by the application of lignite. We constructed two cattle pens (20 × 20 m) to determine the effectiveness of lignite in reducing NH3 emissions. Twenty-four steers were fed identical commercial rations in each pen. The treatment pen surface was dressed with 4.5 kg m-2 lignite dry mass while no lignite was applied in the control pen. We measured volatilised NH3 concentrations using Ecotech EC9842 NH3 analysers in conjunction with a mass balance method to calculate NH3 fluxes. Application of lignite decreased NH3 loss from the pen by approximately 66%. The cumulative NH3 losses were 6.26 and 2.13 kg N head-1 in the control and lignite treatment, respectively. In addition to the environmental benefits of reduced NH3 losses, the value of retained N nutrient in the lignite treated manure is more than $37 AUD head-1 yr-1, based on the current fertiliser cost and estimated cost of lignite application. We show that lignite application is a cost-effective method to reduce NH3 loss from cattle feedlots.

  14. Venezuelan Caribbean Sea under the threat of TBT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Villarraga, César Augusto; Castro, Italo B; Miloslavich, Patricia; Fillmann, Gilberto

    2015-01-01

    Although environmental tributyltin (TBT) contamination is considered a solved problem, imposex occurrence in Plicopurpura patula as well as butyltins (BTs) contamination in sediments and tissues were detected along 700 km of the Caribbean coastal shore. Areas under the influence of five main ports of Venezuela were covered, as well as large marinas and sites located away from expected sources. Marinas were the most contaminated areas, whilst imposex incidence and TBT levels were relatively low in areas nearby commercial harbors. Thus, it is evident that marinas have become the main source of fresh TBT to the region. This might explain why imposex incidence seems to be widely distributed along the Venezuelan coast, since leisure boats are circulating along the whole coastal region. In fact, this could be the pattern for other areas of the Caribbean Sea.

  15. Structural and geophysical interpretation of Roatan Island, Honduras, Western Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Daniel Scott

    Roatan Island is the largest of the Bay Islands of Honduras. These islands form an emergent crest off the Caribbean coast of Honduras called the Bonacca Ridge. The Bartlett Trough to the north and subsequent Bonacca Ridge were likely formed due to the transform fault system of the Motagua-Swan Islands Fault System. This fault system forms the tectonic plate boundary between the North American and Caribbean plates. Although the timing and kinematics are poorly constrained, the Bay Islands and the Bonacca Ridge were likely uplifted due to transpression along this left-lateral strike-slip system. With limited regional exposures along the adjacent tectonic boundary, this study aimed to present a structural interpretation for Roatan. This new interpretation is further explained through regional considerations for a suggested geologic history of the northwestern Caribbean. In order to better constrain the kinematics of uplift and exhumation of Roatan Island, structural, gravity, and magnetic surveys were conducted. Principal attention was directed to the structural relationship between the geologic units and their relationship to one another through deformation. Resulting geologic cross-sections from this study present the metamorphic basement exposed throughout the island to be in a normal structural order consisting of biotite schist and gneiss, with overlying units of chlorite schist, carbonate, and conglomerate. These units have relatively concordant strike and dip measurements, consistent with resultant magnetic survey readings. Additionally, large and irregular bodies of amphibolite and serpentinite throughout the island are interpreted to have been emplaced as mafic and ultra-mafic intrusions in weakness zones along Early Paleogene transform system fault planes. The interpretation and suggested geologic history from this study demonstrate the importance of transpressive tectonics both local to Roatan and regionally throughout geologic history. Consideration of

  16. Co-combustion of olive cake with lignite coal in a circulating fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aysel T. Atimtay; Huseyin Topal [Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey). Department of Environmental Engineering

    2004-05-01

    In this study, olive cake (OC) was co-fired with coal in a circulating fluidized bed of 125 mm diameter and 1800 mm height. Olive cake is a waste from olive oil production. A lignite coal that is most widely used in Turkey (Tuncbilek lignite) was used together with OC and the combustion characteristics of olive cake (OC)+coal mixture were investigated. The combustion experiments were carried out with various excess air ratios. The excess air ratio, {lambda} has been changed between 1.1 and 2.16. Temperature distribution along the bed was measured with thermocouples. On-line concentrations of O{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, NOx and total hydrocarbons were measured in the flue gas. Various runs were conducted with each mixture of OC and lignite, namely 25, 50 and 75 wt% OC mixed with lignite. These mixtures were burned with various excess air ratios. Combustion efficiencies of olive cake and lignite coal mixtures are calculated, and the optimum conditions for operating parameters are discussed. There is a sharp decrease observed in the combustion losses due to hydrocarbons and CO as the excess air ratio increases. The minimum emissions are observed at about {lambda} = 1.5. The combustion efficiency for lignite coal changes between 82 and 98% for various excess air ratios used in the study. The results suggest that OC is good fuel that can be mixed with lignite coal for cleaner energy production in small-scale industries by using CFB. Less than 50 wt% OC concentration in the fuel mixture is suggested in order to be within the EU limits for emissions. 11 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Colonization of spoil benches of an opencast lignite mine in northwest Spain by amphibians and reptiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galan, P. [University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Faculty of Biology

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses the colonization by reptiles and amphibians of the spoil benches of the Meirama opencast lignite mine in northwest Spain over 10 years, following the start of the revegetation process. At Meirama, spoil benches are initially fertilized and hydroseeded with a pasture mix, but are subject to little subsequent management and are gradually colonized by scrub vegetation characteristic of the region. Herpetofauna censuses were carried out yearly on a single 2 ha plot over 6 years following hydroseeding, and in a single year on ten 2 ha plots which had been hydroseeded between 0 and 10 years previously. In addition, censuses were carried out on three undisturbed `control` plots close to the mine. Fifteen species (nine amphibians and six reptiles) were detected in one or more of the spoil-bench plots. Recolonization was particularly rapid after the first 2-3 years post-hydroseeding, and was closely related to habitat development due to revegetation and natural succession. Species composition was most similar to that in control plots in the oldest (ten-year-old) spoil plots.

  18. Symbiodinium photosynthesis in Caribbean octocorals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake D Ramsby

    Full Text Available Symbioses with the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium form the foundation of tropical coral reef communities. Symbiodinium photosynthesis fuels the growth of an array of marine invertebrates, including cnidarians such as scleractinian corals and octocorals (e.g., gorgonian and soft corals. Studies examining the symbioses between Caribbean gorgonian corals and Symbiodinium are sparse, even though gorgonian corals blanket the landscape of Caribbean coral reefs. The objective of this study was to compare photosynthetic characteristics of Symbiodinium in four common Caribbean gorgonian species: Pterogorgia anceps, Eunicea tourneforti, Pseudoplexaura porosa, and Pseudoplexaura wagenaari. Symbiodinium associated with these four species exhibited differences in Symbiodinium density, chlorophyll a per cell, light absorption by chlorophyll a, and rates of photosynthetic oxygen production. The two Pseudoplexaura species had higher Symbiodinium densities and chlorophyll a per Symbiodinium cell but lower chlorophyll a specific absorption compared to P. anceps and E. tourneforti. Consequently, P. porosa and P. wagenaari had the highest average photosynthetic rates per cm2 but the lowest average photosynthetic rates per Symbiodinium cell or chlorophyll a. With the exception of Symbiodinium from E. tourneforti, isolated Symbiodinium did not photosynthesize at the same rate as Symbiodinium in hospite. Differences in Symbiodinium photosynthetic performance could not be attributed to Symbiodinium type. All P. anceps (n = 9 and P. wagenaari (n = 6 colonies, in addition to one E. tourneforti and three P. porosa colonies, associated with Symbiodinium type B1. The B1 Symbiodinium from these four gorgonian species did not cluster with lineages of B1 Symbiodinium from scleractinian corals. The remaining eight E. tourneforti colonies harbored Symbiodinium type B1L, while six P. porosa colonies harbored type B1i. Understanding the symbioses between gorgonian corals and

  19. Symbiodinium photosynthesis in Caribbean octocorals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsby, Blake D; Shirur, Kartick P; Iglesias-Prieto, Roberto; Goulet, Tamar L

    2014-01-01

    Symbioses with the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium form the foundation of tropical coral reef communities. Symbiodinium photosynthesis fuels the growth of an array of marine invertebrates, including cnidarians such as scleractinian corals and octocorals (e.g., gorgonian and soft corals). Studies examining the symbioses between Caribbean gorgonian corals and Symbiodinium are sparse, even though gorgonian corals blanket the landscape of Caribbean coral reefs. The objective of this study was to compare photosynthetic characteristics of Symbiodinium in four common Caribbean gorgonian species: Pterogorgia anceps, Eunicea tourneforti, Pseudoplexaura porosa, and Pseudoplexaura wagenaari. Symbiodinium associated with these four species exhibited differences in Symbiodinium density, chlorophyll a per cell, light absorption by chlorophyll a, and rates of photosynthetic oxygen production. The two Pseudoplexaura species had higher Symbiodinium densities and chlorophyll a per Symbiodinium cell but lower chlorophyll a specific absorption compared to P. anceps and E. tourneforti. Consequently, P. porosa and P. wagenaari had the highest average photosynthetic rates per cm2 but the lowest average photosynthetic rates per Symbiodinium cell or chlorophyll a. With the exception of Symbiodinium from E. tourneforti, isolated Symbiodinium did not photosynthesize at the same rate as Symbiodinium in hospite. Differences in Symbiodinium photosynthetic performance could not be attributed to Symbiodinium type. All P. anceps (n = 9) and P. wagenaari (n = 6) colonies, in addition to one E. tourneforti and three P. porosa colonies, associated with Symbiodinium type B1. The B1 Symbiodinium from these four gorgonian species did not cluster with lineages of B1 Symbiodinium from scleractinian corals. The remaining eight E. tourneforti colonies harbored Symbiodinium type B1L, while six P. porosa colonies harbored type B1i. Understanding the symbioses between gorgonian corals and Symbiodinium will

  20. Mineralogy and microstructure of sintered lignite coal fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marina Ilic; Christopher Cheeseman; Christopher Sollars; Jonathan Knight [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    2003-02-01

    Lignite coal fly ash from the 'Nikola Tesla' power plant in Yugoslavia has been characterised, milled, compacted and sintered to form monolithic ceramic materials. The effect of firing at temperatures between 1130 and 1190{sup o}C on the density, water accessible porosity, mineralogy and microstructure of sintered samples is reported. This class C fly ash has an initial average particle size of 82 {mu}m and contains siliceous glass together with the crystalline phases quartz, anorthite, gehlenite, hematite and mullite. Milling the ash to an average particle size of 5.6 m, compacting and firing at 1170{sup o}C for 1 h produces materials with densities similar to clay-based ceramics that exhibit low water absorption. Sintering reduces the amount of glass, quartz, gehlenite and anhydrite, but increases formation of anorthite, mullite, hematite and cristobalite. SEM confirms the formation of a dense ceramic at 1170{sup o}C and indicates that pyroplastic effects cause pore formation and bloating at 1190{sup o}C. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Workability and strength of lignite bottom ash geopolymer mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathonsaowaphak, Apha; Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Pimraksa, Kedsarin

    2009-08-30

    In this paper, the waste lignite bottom ash from power station was used as a source material for making geopolymer. Sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) were used as liquid for the mixture and heat curing was used to activate the geopolymerization. The fineness of bottom ash, the liquid alkaline/ash ratio, the sodium silicate/NaOH ratio and the NaOH concentration were studied. The effects of the additions of water, NaOH and napthalene-based superplasticizer on the workability and strength of the geopolymer mortar were also studied. Relatively high strength geopolymer mortars of 24.0-58.0 MPa were obtained with the use of ground bottom ash with 3% retained on sieve no. 325 and mean particle size of 15.7 microm, using liquid alkaline/ash ratios of 0.429-0.709, the sodium silicate/NaOH ratios of 0.67-1.5 and 7.5-12.5M NaOH. The incorporation of water improved the workability of geopolymer mortar more effectively than the use of napthalene-based superplasticizer with similar slight reduction in strengths. The addition of NaOH solution slightly improves the workability of the mix while maintaining the strength of the geopolymer mortars.

  2. Chemical and physical properties of opencast lignite minesoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varela, C.; Vazquez, C.; Gonzalez-Sangregorio, M.V.; Leiros, M.C.; Gil-Sotres, F. (Facultad de Farmacia de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Dept. de Edafologia y Quimica Agricola)

    1993-09-01

    The evolution of chemical and physical properties in a series of mine soils aged between 0 and 5 years, developed from spoil materials of the Meirama opencast lignite mine in Galicia (NW Spain), was studied. The soils are recovered without use of topsoil and are subject to identical management. In the surface horizon (0-7 cm), total C and N, CEC, and pyrophosphate-extracted Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3] increased with soil age. Oxalic-oxalate-extracted Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3] on the other hand, increased with soil age in all the horizons studied. Rapid recovery in terms of physical properties was also observed: bulk density dropped, while total porosity, percentage of macropores, and hydraulic conductivity increased, and aggregates showed greater stability on immersion in water. The results indicate that mineral weathering and organometallic complexation are the dominant processes at these early stages of edaphogenesis and that properties associated with gas exchange showed more rapid development than those associated with water movement. In spite of the above rapid modifications, the characteristics of the oldest soils in the series were still very different from those of native Galician soils.

  3. Effects of lignite application on ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions from cattle pens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jianlei, E-mail: su@unimelb.edu.au [Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010 (Australia); Bai, Mei [Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010 (Australia); Shen, Jianlin [Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha 410125 (China); Griffith, David W.T. [Department of Chemistry, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Denmead, Owen T. [Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010 (Australia); Hill, Julian [Ternes Agricultural Consulting Pty Ltd, Upwey, VIC 3158 (Australia); Lam, Shu Kee; Mosier, Arvin R. [Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010 (Australia); Chen, Deli, E-mail: delichen@unimelb.edu.au [Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2016-09-15

    Beef cattle feedlots are a major source of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) emissions from livestock industries. We investigated the effects of lignite surface applications on NH{sub 3} and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions from beef cattle feedlot pens. Two rates of lignite, 3 and 6 kg m{sup −2}, were tested in the treatment pen. No lignite was applied in the control pen. Twenty-four Black Angus steers were fed identical commercial rations in each pen. We measured NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2}O concentrations continuously from 4th Sep to 13th Nov 2014 using Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) NH{sub 3} analysers and a closed-path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy analyser (CP-FTIR) in conjunction with the integrated horizontal flux method to calculate NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2}O fluxes. During the feeding period, 16 and 26% of the excreted nitrogen (N) (240 g N head{sup −1} day{sup −1}) was lost via NH{sub 3} volatilization from the control pen, while lignite application decreased NH{sub 3} volatilization to 12 and 18% of the excreted N, for Phase 1 and Phase 2, respectively. Compared to the control pen, lignite application decreased NH{sub 3} emissions by approximately 30%. Nitrous oxide emissions from the cattle pens were small, 0.10 and 0.14 g N{sub 2}O-N head{sup −1} day{sup −1} (< 0.1% of excreted N) for the control pen, for Phase 1 and Phase 2, respectively. Lignite application increased direct N{sub 2}O emissions by 40 and 57%, to 0.14 and 0.22 g N{sub 2}O-N head{sup −1} day{sup −1}, for Phase 1 and Phase 2, respectively. The increase in N{sub 2}O emissions resulting from lignite application was counteracted by the lower indirect N{sub 2}O emission due to decreased NH{sub 3} volatilization. Using 1% as a default emission factor of deposited NH{sub 3} for indirect N{sub 2}O emissions, the application of lignite decreased total N{sub 2}O emissions. - Graphical abstract: Lignite application substantially decreased NH{sub 3} emissions from cattle feedlots and increased

  4. Reconstructing the population genetic history of the Caribbean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Moreno-Estrada

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Caribbean basin is home to some of the most complex interactions in recent history among previously diverged human populations. Here, we investigate the population genetic history of this region by characterizing patterns of genome-wide variation among 330 individuals from three of the Greater Antilles (Cuba, Puerto Rico, Hispaniola, two mainland (Honduras, Colombia, and three Native South American (Yukpa, Bari, and Warao populations. We combine these data with a unique database of genomic variation in over 3,000 individuals from diverse European, African, and Native American populations. We use local ancestry inference and tract length distributions to test different demographic scenarios for the pre- and post-colonial history of the region. We develop a novel ancestry-specific PCA (ASPCA method to reconstruct the sub-continental origin of Native American, European, and African haplotypes from admixed genomes. We find that the most likely source of the indigenous ancestry in Caribbean islanders is a Native South American component shared among inland Amazonian tribes, Central America, and the Yucatan peninsula, suggesting extensive gene flow across the Caribbean in pre-Columbian times. We find evidence of two pulses of African migration. The first pulse--which today is reflected by shorter, older ancestry tracts--consists of a genetic component more similar to coastal West African regions involved in early stages of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. The second pulse--reflected by longer, younger tracts--is more similar to present-day West-Central African populations, supporting historical records of later transatlantic deportation. Surprisingly, we also identify a Latino-specific European component that has significantly diverged from its parental Iberian source populations, presumably as a result of small European founder population size. We demonstrate that the ancestral components in admixed genomes can be traced back to distinct sub

  5. Influence of wet oxidation on the surface area and the porosity of some lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Karatepe, N.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    2000-07-01

    Influence of wet oxidation on the surface area and the porosity of lignites was investigated using five different Turkish lignites. Lignite samples were oxidised in aqueous medium in a 1 l Parr autoclave at 423 K under 1.5 MPa partial pressure of oxygen for 60 min. Some physical properties such as surface area, bulk density, apparent density, mean pore radius, and porosity of the original and oxidised lignite samples were determined. For this purpose, BET and mercury intrusion porosimetry techniques were performed. In order to examine the effects of oxidation on the functional groups, FT-IR technique was applied for both original and oxidised lignite samples. On the other hand, some inorganic constituents were eliminated from the samples as a result of in situ formation of sulphuric acid from oxidation of sulphur compounds. The changes taken place in the physical properties were studied considering chemical compositions of the samples and the extent of the interaction between the samples and oxygen. 6 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Evolvement behavior of microstructure and H2O adsorption of lignite pyrolysis☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingyue Teng; Shijun Lian; Quansheng Liu⁎; Yuzhe Liu; Yinmin Song; Runxia He; Keduan Zhi

    2016-01-01

    The effect of pyrolysis on the microstructure and moisture adsorption of lignite was investigated with low field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Changes in oxygen-containing groups were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and H2O adsorption mechanism on the surface of lignite pyrolysis was inferred. Two major changes in the pore structure of lignite char were observed as temperature increased in 105–200 °C and 500–700 °C. Pyrolysis temperature is a significant factor in removing carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl from lignite. Variation of ether bond content can be divided into three stages;the content initially increased, then decreased, and final y increased. The equilibrium adsorption ratio, content of oxygen-containing groups, and variation of pore volume below 700° were closely correlated with each other. The amount of adsorbed water on char pyrolyzed at 700 °C increased. Moreover, the adsorption capacity of the lignite decreased, and the adsorption state changed.

  7. Sustainable development of lignite production on open cast mines in Serbia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DANICIC Darko; MITROVIC Slobodan; PAVLOVIC Vladimir; KOVACEV Sava

    2009-01-01

    Energy sector represents a key industrial branch for national, environmental and economic success. With its exclusive access to domestic deposits, lignite industry represents a guarantor of reliable raw materials, offering long-term supply security based on verified reserves. Currently operated coalmines in Serbia (Kolubara and Kostolac) have production around 36 million tons of lignite, and over 108 million m3 of overburden. Consequently, sustainability of lignite production requires cost reduction and environmental protection, as well as capacity increase. In order to rationalise, and increase efficiency of Serbian lignite mines, it is necessary to focus the activities on major issues shown within the triangle of energy policy objectives (security of supply, competi-tive prices and environmental protection). Production process optimisation singled out several special programs. Equipment revi-talization and modernization is necessary taking into account that majority of the currently operated machinery has a life up to 25 years. Production process automation would enable high level of technical operation in the field of open cast mines management. Lack of coal quality uniformity is the permanent problem resulting by great amounts of coal reserves to be used uneconomically. Planning and training at all levels and finally cooperative software for business procedures and work order management. The measures suggested are a key precondition for maintaining competitive position of lignite production on international level.

  8. Analysis of Grid Emission Factors for the Electricity Sector in Caribbean Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinostroza, Miriam L.; Desgain, Denis DR; Perez Martín, David

    by undertaking a study to calculate standardized grid emissionfactors (GEF) for sixteen independent nations or groups of countries in the Caribbean region as a basis to the further identification of mitigation activities such as CDM PoAs or any other market-related instrument to be approved by the UNFCCC....... The study analyses the following topics: – Status of the calculation and adoption of grid emissionfactors for each country in the region. – Characteristics of electricity generation units in thedifferent Caribbean countries. – Application of the CDM methodological tool forcalculating a standardized grid......, studies of the electricity sector in the region and public information issued by electric utilities....

  9. Using DNA barcoding to assess Caribbean reef fish biodiversity: expanding taxonomic and geographic coverage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee A Weigt

    Full Text Available This paper represents a DNA barcode data release for 3,400 specimens representing 521 species of fishes from 6 areas across the Caribbean and western central Atlantic regions (FAO Region 31. Merged with our prior published data, the combined efforts result in 3,964 specimens representing 572 species of marine fishes and constitute one of the most comprehensive DNA barcoding "coverages" for a region reported to date. The barcode data are providing new insights into Caribbean shorefish diversity, allowing for more and more accurate DNA-based identifications of larvae, juveniles, and unknown specimens. Examples are given correcting previous work that was erroneous due to database incompleteness.

  10. Using DNA barcoding to assess Caribbean reef fish biodiversity: expanding taxonomic and geographic coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigt, Lee A; Baldwin, Carole C; Driskell, Amy; Smith, David G; Ormos, Andrea; Reyier, Eric A

    2012-01-01

    This paper represents a DNA barcode data release for 3,400 specimens representing 521 species of fishes from 6 areas across the Caribbean and western central Atlantic regions (FAO Region 31). Merged with our prior published data, the combined efforts result in 3,964 specimens representing 572 species of marine fishes and constitute one of the most comprehensive DNA barcoding "coverages" for a region reported to date. The barcode data are providing new insights into Caribbean shorefish diversity, allowing for more and more accurate DNA-based identifications of larvae, juveniles, and unknown specimens. Examples are given correcting previous work that was erroneous due to database incompleteness.

  11. The Diasporic Dimensions of British Caribbean Federation in the Early Twentieth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D. Duke

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available [Second and third pragraph] While much has been written on the significance of British Caribbean activists in various movements associated with black diaspora politics in the twentieth century, particularly their important roles in Pan-African struggles, little has been written on how the various British Caribbean colonies themselves were envisioned among diaspora activists and within the scope of black diaspora politics. Did such Caribbean activists, especially those interested in and connected to diasporic movements beyond the British Caribbean, and their African American and African counterparts forsake the British West Indies as a focus of political engagement for other lands and causes? If not, what was the place of “West Indian liberation” and nation building in the British Caribbean in relation to black diasporic struggles in the early twentieth century? This article address these questions through an examination of how the idea of a united “West Indian nation” (via a federation or closer union among British Caribbean colonies was envisioned within black diaspora politics from the turn of the twentieth century through the 1920s, and the ways in which racial consciousness and motivations informed conceptualizations of such a nation among black political activists of the British Caribbean and other parts of the diaspora. This study argues that efforts to create a federation in the Anglophone Caribbean were much more than simply imperial or regional nation-building projects. Instead, federation was also a diasporic, black nation-building endeavor intricately connected to notions of racial unity, racial uplift, and black self-determination.

  12. Curriculum, human development and integral formation within the colombian caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Rodríguez Akle

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the reality of the colombian Caribbean from the perspective of human development integral to start to understand that problematic situations are opportunities to enhance the transformations that allow to retrieve the subject social and collective. So the reconstruction of regional identity from the contributions of educational communities that build-oriented curriculum to become full, proactive, people with leadership and management capacity for sustainable development in a changing world. The article proposes some strategies to address alternatives to a society in which the quality of life and human dignity are the sense of the daily work in the context of the caribbean colombianidad and globalism in practice.  

  13. CARIBBEAN OFFSHORE CORPORATE STRUCTURES UNDER A SWOT ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria GEAMÃNU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tax havens have long been under the attention of numerous Governments and International Organizations which triggered the concern of an uneven playing field in the taxation area. As a result numerous amendments have been made to both their commercial and tax legislations in order to be in line with the internationally agreed tax standards. The aim of this article is to conduct a SWOT analysis on the offshore corporate structures found in the Caribbean landscape. Based on a selection process of the most commonly recognized tax havens in the Caribbean region and an analysis of their offshore companies at the level of incorporation, administration, activities conducted and costs, a set of frequently met characteristics have been identified which stand at the basis of the SWOT analysis. The results stand to present a comprehensive four dimension framework of the offshore corporate structures in regards to their strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats.

  14. Modeling of Single Lignite Particle Drying Process in Flue Gas%单颗粒褐煤烟气干燥过程模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝正虎; 吴玉新; 吕俊复; 张守玉; 王秀军; 彭定茂

    2012-01-01

    摘要:褐煤干燥对提高褐煤品质具有重要意义。为了深入研究高温烟气干燥褐煤的物理过程,在一维球坐标系下对单个球形褐煤颗粒的干燥脱水过程建立了数值模型。模型中以褐煤颗粒内的蒸发界面为基础,将褐煤颗粒分为干区和湿区,对湿区求解传热方程,对干区求解烟气传热和传质方程,模拟褐煤干燥中的水分蒸发过程。模型采用Crank-Nicolson隐式差分方法进行离散化,模拟得到单个褐煤颗粒动态蒸发的过程。利用该模型分析不同粒径褐煤干燥过程中的烟气温度、颗粒含水量、颗粒内部温度分布等变化规律。发现颗粒最高温度不超过烟气和颗粒的最终平衡温度。褐煤颗粒粒径和初始烟气温度对褐煤的干燥过程有重要影响,较高的初始烟气温度条件下所需的干燥时间短,干燥时间近似与褐煤颗粒粒径的平方成正比。%Lignite drying is very useful for improving lignite quality. In order to deeply understand lignite drying process in high temperature flue gas, a onedimensional spherical numerical model of a single lignite particle drying process in flue gas was proposed. In this model, lignite particle was divided into dry region and wet region by an evaporation interface. In the wet region, only heat transfer was considered. In the dry region, both heat transfer and mass transfer were involved to describe water evaporation. Crank-Nicolson scheme was adopted to describe the transport equations so that dynamic evaporation process can be correctly solved in a large time step. With the proposed model, gas temperature, moisture content and temperature distribution within the particle varying with the resident time were simulated during drying process. It is found that the maximum particle temperature during drying process is lower than the particleflue gas balance temperature. Particle diameter as well as initial flue gas temperature has an

  15. British African Caribbean Women and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkison-Bradley, Carla; Maynard, Donna; Johnson, Phillip; Carter, Stephaney

    2009-01-01

    Depression is a common condition among women in the United Kingdom. However, little is known about the context of depression among British African Caribbean women. This article offers a preliminary discussion regarding issues and information pertaining to depression among British African Caribbean women. Characteristics and symptoms of depression…

  16. Languages in Contemporary Anglophone Caribbean Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davids, Melva P.

    2013-01-01

    The paper Languages in Contemporary Anglophone Caribbean Societies examines how language is treated in Jamaica and other Anglophone Caribbean societies and the effects of a haphazard approach to language planning on the social dynamics of the society as well as the individual. It briefly explores how Language is handled in Francophone or…

  17. The European Union – Caribbean Relation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, Morten

    2016-01-01

    EU diplomats consider the Caribbean countries to be allies and therefore expect these countries to support the EU in international affairs – but they find that this support has been waning in recent years. Caribbean diplomats and politicians do not share the European viewpoint. Rather, they take...

  18. The CAMI Project - Weather and Climate Services for Caribbean Food Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman, Adrian; Van Meerbeeck, Cedric

    2013-04-01

    Food security is major focus of Caribbean governments, with production being of particular concern. For the past three decades, Caribbean agriculture has been declining in relative importance, both in terms of its contribution to GDP and its share of the labour force. One of the problems Caribbean agriculture faces is the destructive impacts from weather and climate extremes. These include flood, drought, extreme temperatures, and strong winds from tropical cyclones. Other potential disasters, such as from pests and diseases attacks, are also weather and climate driven. These make weather and climate information critically important to decision-making in agriculture in the Caribbean region. In an effort to help reduce weather and climate related risks to the food security sector, The Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology, along with its partners the Caribbean Agricultural Research and Development Institute, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and ten National Meteorological Services from within the Caribbean Community launched and implemented the Caribbean Agrometeorological Initiative (CAMI). From 2010 to 2013, CAMI set out to provide relevant information to farmers, and the industry in general, for decision and policy making. The project is funded by the European Union through the Science and Technology Programme of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of Countries' (ACP). The overarching objective of CAMI was to increase and sustain agricultural productivity at the farm level in the Caribbean region through improved applications of weather and climate information, using an integrated and coordinated approach. Currently, this is done through (i) provision of relevant climate information appropriately disseminated, (ii) predictions on seasonal rainfall and temperature, (iii) support for improved irrigation management, (iv) the development of strategically selected weather-driven pest and disease models, (v) use of crop simulation models

  19. Intimacy’s Politics: New Directions in Caribbean Sexuality Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Agard-Jones

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Pleasures and Perils: Girls’ Sexuality in a Caribbean Consumer Culture. Debra Curtis. New Brunswick NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2009. xii + 222 pp. (Paper US$ 23.95 Economies of Desire: Sex and Tourism in Cuba and the Dominican Republic. Amalia L. Cabezas. Philadelphia PA : Temple University Press, 2009. xii + 218 pp. (Paper US$ 24.95 Queer Ricans: Cultures and Sexualities in the Diaspora. Lawrence La Fountain-Stokes. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2009. xxvii + 242 pp. (Paper US$ 22.50 [First paragraph] Over the last ten years the field of Caribbean Studies has seen a precipitous expansion of work on sexualities, as recent review essays by Jenny Sharpe and Samantha Pinto (2006 and Kamala Kempadoo (2009 have observed. The three books under review here, all based on dissertation research and all published in 2009, make important contributions to this growing literature. While each one approaches sexual politics from a distinctive disciplinary, geographic, and theoretical vantage point, all three ask readers to take seriously the central place that sexual desires and practices occupy in the lives of Caribbean people, both at home and in the diaspora. Caribbean sexuality studies are still sometimes thought of as belonging to a domain outside of, or auxiliary to “real” politics, but these studies demonstrate without hesitation how sexuality functions as an important prism through which we might understand broader debates about ethics, politics, and economics in the region. Building from the insights of feminist theorists who connect the “private” realm to community, national, and global geopolitics, they show that sex is intimately connected to certain freedoms – be they market, corporeal, or political – as well as to their consequences. Taken together, they consider sexual subjectivity, political economy, and cultural production in unexpected ways and point to exciting new directions for the

  20. Combustion behavior of different kinds of torrefied biomass and their blends with lignite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toptas, Asli; Yildirim, Yeliz; Duman, Gozde; Yanik, Jale

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the combustion behavior of different kinds of torrefied biomass (lignocellulosic and animal wastes) and their blends with lignite was investigated via non-isothermal thermogravimetric method under air atmosphere. For comparison, combustion characteristics of raw biomasses were also determined. Torrefaction process improved the reactivity of char combustion step of biomasses. Characteristic combustion parameters for blends showed non-additivity behavior. It was found that the mixture of torrefied biomasses and lignite at a ratio of 1:1 had a lower ignition and burnout temperature than the coal-only sample. Although no interactions were observed between the lignite and torrefied biomass at initial step of combustion, a certain degree of interaction between the components occurred at char combustion step. Kinetic parameters of combustion were calculated by using the Coats Redfern model. Overall, this study showed that poultry litters can be used as a substitute fuel in coal/biomass co-firing systems by blending with lignocellulosic biomass.

  1. Thermogravimetric investigation of the co-combustion between the pyrolysis oil distillation residue and lignite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Xia, Shuqian; Ma, Peisheng

    2016-10-01

    Co-combustion of lignite with distillation residue derived from rice straw pyrolysis oil was investigated by non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The addition of distillation residue improved the reactivity and combustion efficiency of lignite, such as increasing the weight loss rate at peak temperature and decreasing the burnout temperature and the total burnout. With increasing distillation residue content in the blended fuels, the synergistic interactions between distillation residue and lignite firstly increased and then decreased during co-combustion stage. Results of XRF, FTIR, (13)C NMR and SEM analysis indicated that chemical structure, mineral components and morphology of samples have great influence on the synergistic interactions. The combustion mechanisms and kinetic parameters were calculated by the Coats Redfern model, suggesting that the lowest apparent activation energy (120.19kJ/mol) for the blended fuels was obtained by blending 60wt.% distillation residue during main co-combustion stage.

  2. Determination of optimal environmental policy for reclamation of land unearthed in lignite mines - Strategy and tactics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batzias, Dimitris F.; Pollalis, Yannis A.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, optimal environmental policy for reclamation of land unearthed in lignite mines is defined as a strategic target. The tactics concerning the achievement of this target, includes estimation of optimal time lag between each lignite site (which is a segment of the whole lignite field) complete exploitation and its reclamation. Subsidizing of reclamation has been determined as a function of this time lag and relevant implementation is presented for parameter values valid for the Greek economy. We proved that the methodology we have developed gives reasonable quantitative results within the norms imposed by legislation. Moreover, the interconnection between strategy and tactics becomes evident, since the former causes the latter by deduction and the latter revises the former by induction in the time course of land reclamation.

  3. Interaction between research and diagnosis and surveillance of avian influenza within the Caribbean animal health network (CaribVET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrançois, T; Hendrikx, P; Vachiéry, N; Ehrhardt, N; Millien, M; Gomez, L; Gouyet, L; Gerbier, G; Gongora, V; Shaw, J; Trotman, M

    2010-04-01

    The Caribbean region is considered to be at risk for avian influenza (AI) because of predominance of the backyard poultry system, important commercial poultry production, migratory birds and disparities in the surveillance systems. The Caribbean animal health network (CaribVET) has developed tools to implement AI surveillance in the region: (i) a regionally harmonized surveillance protocol, (ii) specific web pages for AI surveillance on http://www.caribvet.net, and (iii) a diagnostic network for the Caribbean including AI virus molecular diagnostic capability in Guadeloupe and technology transfer. Altogether 303 samples from four Caribbean countries were tested between June 2006 and March 2009 by real time PCR either for importation purposes or following clinical suspicion. Following AI H5N2 outbreaks in the Dominican Republic in 2007, a questionnaire was developed to collect data for risk analysis of AI spread in the region through fighting cocks. The infection pathway of Martinique commercial poultry sector by AI through introduction of infected cocks was designed and recommendations were provided to the Caribbean veterinary services to improve fighting cock movement controls and biosecurity measures. Altogether, these CaribVET activities contribute to strengthen surveillance of AI in the Caribbean region and may allow the development of research studies on AI risk analysis.

  4. Possible linkages between lignite aquifers, pathogenic microbes, and renal pelvic cancer in northwestern Louisiana, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnell, Joseph E; Tatu, Calin A; Bushon, Rebecca N; Stoeckel, Donald M; Brady, Amie M G; Beck, Marisa; Lerch, Harry E; McGee, Benton; Hanson, Bradford C; Shi, Runhua; Orem, William H

    2006-12-01

    In May and September, 2002, 14 private residential drinking water wells, one dewatering well at a lignite mine, eight surface water sites, and lignite from an active coal mine were sampled in five Parishes of northwestern Louisiana, USA. Using a geographic information system (GIS), wells were selected that were likely to draw water that had been in contact with lignite; control wells were located in areas devoid of lignite deposits. Well water samples were analyzed for pH, conductivity, organic compounds, and nutrient and anion concentrations. All samples were further tested for presence of fungi (cultures maintained for up to 28 days and colonies counted and identified microscopically) and for metal and trace element concentration by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Surface water samples were tested for dissolved oxygen and presence of pathogenic leptospiral bacteria. The Spearman correlation method was used to assess the association between the endpoints for these field/laboratory analyses and incidence of cancer of the renal pelvis (RPC) based on data obtained from the Louisiana Tumor Registry for the five Parishes included in the study. Significant associations were revealed between the cancer rate and the presence in drinking water of organic compounds, the fungi Zygomycetes, the nutrients PO(4) and NH(3), and 13 chemical elements. Presence of human pathogenic leptospires was detected in four out of eight (50%) of the surface water sites sampled. The present study of a stable rural population examined possible linkages between aquifers containing chemically reactive lignite deposits, hydrologic conditions favorable to the leaching and transport of toxic organic compounds from the lignite into the groundwater, possible microbial contamination, and RPC risk.

  5. Possible linkages between lignite aquifers, pathogenic microbes, and renal pelvic cancer in northwestern Louisiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnell, J.E.; Tatu, C.A.; Bushon, R.N.; Stoeckel, D.M.; Brady, A.M.G.; Beck, M.; Lerch, H.E.; McGee, B.; Hanson, B.C.; Shi, R.; Orem, W.H.

    2006-01-01

    In May and September, 2002, 14 private residential drinking water wells, one dewatering well at a lignite mine, eight surface water sites, and lignite from an active coal mine were sampled in five Parishes of northwestern Louisiana, USA. Using a geographic information system (GIS), wells were selected that were likely to draw water that had been in contact with lignite; control wells were located in areas devoid of lignite deposits. Well water samples were analyzed for pH, conductivity, organic compounds, and nutrient and anion concentrations. All samples were further tested for presence of fungi (cultures maintained for up to 28 days and colonies counted and identified microscopically) and for metal and trace element concentration by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Surface water samples were tested for dissolved oxygen and presence of pathogenic leptospiral bacteria. The Spearman correlation method was used to assess the association between the endpoints for these field/laboratory analyses and incidence of cancer of the renal pelvis (RPC) based on data obtained from the Louisiana Tumor Registry for the five Parishes included in the study. Significant associations were revealed between the cancer rate and the presence in drinking water of organic compounds, the fungi Zygomycetes, the nutrients PO4 and NH3, and 13 chemical elements. Presence of human pathogenic leptospires was detected in four out of eight (50%) of the surface water sites sampled. The present study of a stable rural population examined possible linkages between aquifers containing chemically reactive lignite deposits, hydrologic conditions favorable to the leaching and transport of toxic organic compounds from the lignite into the groundwater, possible microbial contamination, and RPC risk. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006.

  6. 75 FR 32081 - National Caribbean-American Heritage Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    ...#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8530 of May 28, 2010 National Caribbean-American Heritage Month, 2010 By the... geography as well as our shared past and common aspirations. During National Caribbean-American Heritage... their heritage to the Caribbean. Throughout our history, immigrants from Caribbean countries have...

  7. Genetic Diversity in the Lesser Antilles and Its Implications for the Settlement of the Caribbean Basin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jada Benn Torres

    Full Text Available Historical discourses about the Caribbean often chronicle West African and European influence to the general neglect of indigenous people's contributions to the contemporary region. Consequently, demographic histories of Caribbean people prior to and after European contact are not well understood. Although archeological evidence suggests that the Lesser Antilles were populated in a series of northward and eastern migratory waves, many questions remain regarding the relationship of the Caribbean migrants to other indigenous people of South and Central America and changes to the demography of indigenous communities post-European contact. To explore these issues, we analyzed mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome diversity in 12 unrelated individuals from the First Peoples Community in Arima, Trinidad, and 43 unrelated Garifuna individuals residing in St. Vincent. In this community-sanctioned research, we detected maternal indigenous ancestry in 42% of the participants, with the remainder having haplotypes indicative of African and South Asian maternal ancestry. Analysis of Y-chromosome variation revealed paternal indigenous American ancestry indicated by the presence of haplogroup Q-M3 in 28% of the male participants from both communities, with the remainder possessing either African or European haplogroups. This finding is the first report of indigenous American paternal ancestry among indigenous populations in this region of the Caribbean. Overall, this study illustrates the role of the region's first peoples in shaping the genetic diversity seen in contemporary Caribbean populations.

  8. A statistical study of equipment operating time in an open pit lignite mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xerokostas, D.; Polyzos, P.; Galitis, N.; Michiotis, A.; Dalakas, G. (National Technical University, Athens (Greece). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1991-08-01

    The production planning of an open pit lignite mine, as of any mining operation in general, is influenced by a series of factors. Of great importance among these factors is the operating time of the equipment used in the production process. In this paper the authors use applied statistical methods (specially comparison tests) to study the net operating time of some excavation branches of the Ptolemais lignite mining district in Greece. Thus, it is hoped that the paper will contribute to estimating and predicting equipment performance in a more accurate way. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Comparative radiocarbon dating of lignite, pottery, and charcoal samples from Babeldaob Island, Republic of Palau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, A.; Chappell, J.; Clark, G.; Phear, S. [Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    2005-07-01

    It is difficult to construct archaeological chronologies for Babeldaob, the main island of Palau (western Micronesia), because the saprolitic clays of the dominant terraced-hill sites and associated ceramic sherds often contain old carbon that originated in lignites. This has implications, as well, for chronologies of sedimentary sequences. Comparative analysis of the dating problem using lignite, pottery, and charcoal samples indicates that, in fact, there are both old and young sources of potential contamination. It is concluded that radiocarbon samples from Babeldaob need to be tested for appropriate carbon content rather than relying solely upon material identification.

  10. Co-pyrolysis of Chinese lignite and biomass in a vacuum reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Yuan, Chengyong; Xu, Jiao; Zhang, Weijiang

    2014-12-01

    A vacuum fixed bed reactor was applied to pyrolyze lignite, biomass (rice husk) and their blend with high temperature (900 °C) and low heating rate (10 °C/min). Pyrolytic products were kept in the vacuum reactor during the whole pyrolysis process, guaranteeing a long contact time (more than 2 h) for their interactions. Remarkable synergetic effects were observed. Addition of biomass obviously influenced the tar and char yields, gas volume yield, gas composition, char structure and tar composition during co-pyrolysis. It was highly possible that char gasification, gaseous phase interactions, and secondary tar cracking were facilitated when lignite and biomass were co-pyrolyzed.

  11. Resurrection of Scolopendra longipes Wood and Scolopendra cubensis Saussure from synonymy with Scolopendra alternans Leach (Chilopoda, Scolopendromorpha, Scolopendridae): an enigmatic species-group needing phylogeographic analysis, with an overview on the origin and distribution of centipedes in the Caribbean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercurio, Randy J

    2016-05-12

    Resurrection of Scolopendra longipes Wood, 1862, and Scolopendra cubensis Saussure, 1860, from junior synonymy with Scolopendra alternans Leach, 1815, is proposed. A neotype specimen of Scolopendra longipes is designated. Scolopendra longipes has a restricted range from the Dry Tortugas up through the Florida Keys of Monroe County into the mainland Florida counties of Collier and Dade southeast to the Bahamas, while Scolopendra cubensis is endemic to Cuba. Characters distinguishing S. longipes, and S. cubensis from S. alternans are illustrated and compared using digital photography, micrography and morphometric data. It is suggested that what has been considered Scolopendra alternans from southern Florida through the Caribbean and into northern South America is probably an evolving species-group that has undergone major diversification sometime during the Paleocene and early Eocene ~65.5-50 million years ago (Ma), mainly due to geographic isolation caused by a combination of plate tectonics and 100,000 year cycles of glaciation/deglaciation.

  12. The Filistatidae in the Caribbean region, with a description of the new genus Antilloides, revision of the genus Filistatoides F. O. P.-Cambridge and notes on Kukulcania Lehtinen (Arachnida, Araneae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brescovit, Antonio D; Ruiz, Alexander Sánchez; Garcia, Giraldo Alayón

    2016-07-07

    A synopsis of Caribbean filistatid diversity is recorded herein. A new genus, Antilloides, is proposed for five new species exclusively found in the Antilles: A. abeli n. sp., A. cubitas n. sp., and A. mesoliticus n. sp. from Cuba; A. haitises n. sp. from the Dominican Republic; and A. zozo n. sp. from the U. S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. The genus Filistatoides is revised and includes four species: the type species F. insignis F.O.P. Cambridge, which occurs only in Guatemala; the female is described here for the first time; F. polita Franganillo sp. reval., comb. nov., which occurs only in Cuba; F. xichu n. sp. described from Mexico; and F. milloti (Zapfe) which does not appear to belong to the genus based on morphological structures. Additionally, Kukulcania isolinae Alayón is synonymized with Kukulcania hibernalis (Hentz), and new records of its distribution are included for the Greater and Lesser Antilles.

  13. APORTES A LA BIOLOGÍA DE TIBURONES Y RAYAS DEMERSALES EN LA REGIÓN NORTE DEL CARIBE COLOMBIANO Contribution To Biology Of Demersal Sharks And Rays In The North Region Of Colombian Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FABIÁN MORENO RODRÍGUEZ

    Full Text Available El presente estudio es una contribución al conocimiento biológico de los peces cartilaginosos en la región norte del Caribe colombiano. Los ejemplares examinados se capturaron con una red demersal, se determinó su peso, longitud total y estado de madurez sexual. Adicionalmente se realizó la ubicación espacial de las capturas y la relación con las variables ambientales. Se capturaron un total de 21 individuos, colectando tres especies de rayas, Dasyatis americana, D. guttata y Rhinobatos percellens, dos de tiburones Mustelus minicanis y Rhizoprionodon porosus, la más común fue D. guttata con 56%, las tallas (longitud total fluctuaron entre los 1760 -394 mm en rayas y 595 -585 mm en tiburones. Se obtuvieron más hembras que machos para todas las especies, con predominio de estados inmaduros y en maduración, solo se registró una hembra grávida de M. minicanis con dos embriones.The present study is a contribution to the biological knowledge of cartilaginous fish from the north of Colombian Caribbean. The samples were obtained from a demersal net in the north of Colombian Caribbean, its weight, overall length and sexual maturity stage was determined. Additionally, spatial distribution and its relationships with environmental variables were explored. A total of 21 individuals were captured, three ray species were collected, Dasyatis americana, D. guttata and Rhinobatos percellens, two sharks Mustelus minicanis and Rhizoprionodon porosus, the most common was D. guttata with 56%, the sizes (total length fluctuated between 1760 - 394 mm in rays and 595 -585 mm in sharks. More females were obtained than males in all the species, with predominance of immature and in maturation states, a single pregnant female of M: minicanis with two embryos was registered.

  14. Latin American and Caribbean Urban Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christien Klaufus

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The new development agendas confirmed in the year 2015 evidence an increased global interest in cities and urban challenges. In Latin America and the Caribbean, cities have long been an established topic of study and debate. This exploration gives a brief overview of current research on urban development in the region and suggests fruitful avenues for future research. Following different ideological trends in twentieth-century urban studies, we currently see more pragmatic frameworks and a belief in technocratic solutions. Some scholars consider Latin American and Caribbean cities to be the world’s new signposts in urban development, given their role as sites of innovations in politics, architecture and urban design; we see potential here for urban scholars of the region to move beyond technocratic language. In addition, we argue for an area studies approach to these cities that uses the framework of the region as a heuristic device to unsettle global urbanist epistemologies that privilege North-to-South mobilities in both policy and theory. Resumen: El desarrollo urbano latinoamericano y caribeñoLas nuevas agendas de desarrollo confirmadas en el año 2015 reflejan un mayor interés mundial en las ciudades y en los retos urbanos. En Latinoamérica y en el Caribe, las ciudades llevan mucho tiempo siendo un tema habitual de estudio y debate. Esta exploración ofrece un resumen breve de las investigaciones actuales sobre desarrollo urbano en la región y sugiere caminos fructíferos para futuras investigaciones. Siguiendo las distintas tendencias ideológicas en los estudios urbanos del siglo XX, actualmente observamos marcos más pragmáticos y una creencia en soluciones tecnocráticas. Algunos investigadores consideran las ciudades latinoamericanas y caribeñas como los nuevos referentes mundiales en desarrollo urbano, dado su papel como centros de innovación en política, arquitectura y diseño urbano; vemos potencial para que los

  15. Between the death penalty and decriminalization : new directions for drug control in the Commonwealth Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Klein

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Traces the changes in public attitudes toward and political stances on drug control in the British Caribbean between 1980 and 2000. Author first discusses the origins of drug control, the role of US pressure, and the vulnerability of the Caribbean. He then looks at European involvement and the different plans and policies to control drugs in the region. Finally, he describes the consequences of these policy approaches on the justice system and legal reform, drug demand, and social structures in the region.

  16. Germany's lignite industry in 2012; Die deutsche Braunkohlenindustrie im Jahr 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maassen, Uwe [Bundesverband Braunkohle, Statistik der Kohlenwirtschaft e.V., Koeln (Germany); Schiffer, Hans-Wilhelm [RWE Aktiengesellschaft, Essen (Germany). CEA-W Allgemeine Wirtschaftspolitik/Wissenschaft

    2013-05-15

    From 2011 to 2012, Germany's domestic lignite output edged up to 5.1% from 176.5 mill. t to 185.4 mill. t. This figure is equivalent to a net calorific value of 57.2 mill. tce. Of the total output, 166.3 mill. t, or some 90%, was used in utility power plants for the public supply, i.e. 5.7% more than in the previous year. In addition, 15.1 mill. t was input in the factories of the lignite-mining industry to make solid products, while 3.0 mill. t was used to generate electricity in mine-mouth power plants. Other sales of raw lignite and changes in stocks accounted for 1.0 mill. t. Lignite made a 25.7% contribution toward Germany's total power generation in 2012. In 2012, lignite had a 12.1% share in primary-energy consumption balance after mineral oil (33.1%), natural gas (21.6%) and hard coal (12.2%). Renewable resources cover 11.6%, while nuclear energy accounts for 8.0% and other energy sources for 1.4%. With output of 57.2 mill. tce, lignite held a share of 38.4% in Germany's primary-energy production of some 149 mill. tce in 2012. The contributions made by other energy carriers to primary-energy production in 2012 were as follows: 11.1 mill. tce hard coal, 13.3 mill. tce gas, 3.8 mill. tce mineral oil, 54.0 mill. tce renewables, and 9.5 mill. tce other energy sources. Of the total electricity amount that Germany produced in 2012, 25.7% was accounted for by lignite. This means that lignite led the ranking of the most important input energies for electricity generation in 2012, followed by renewables with 22.1%, hard coal with 19.1%, nuclear energy with 16.1% and gas with 11.3%. Other energy sources made a 5.7% contribution to total gross power generation. The most important ratios for the contributions made by the various lignite-mining areas to Germany's energy supply are shown. CO{sub 2} emissions from lignite rose 5.1% from 173.9 mill. t in 2011 to 182.8 mill. t in 2012. In the total period from 1990 to 2012, a decline of 159.4 mill. t, or

  17. Evaluation of excess life time cancer risk due to natural radioactivity of the Lignite samples of the Nichahoma, lignite belt, North Kashmir, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashraf, Mudasir [VIT Univ., Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India). Photonic, Nuclear and Medical Physics Div.; Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Soura, Srinagar (India). Dept. of Radiological Physics and Bio-engineering; Radha, C. Anu; Ramasubramanian, V. [VIT Univ., Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India). Photonic, Nuclear and Medical Physics Div.; Ahmad, Shakeel; Masood, Sajad [Kashmir Univ., Srinagar (India). Dept. of Physics; Dar, Rayees Ahmad [Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Soura, Srinagar (India). Div. of Biostatistics

    2016-11-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides of the {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 40}K present in the lignite samples was measured by using a low-background Pb-shielded gamma spectroscopic counting assembly utilizing NaI(Tl) detector for the measurement and to evaluation the radiation hazard indices and excess life time cancer risk. The average values of specific activity concentrations in the investigated lignite samples was found to be 45.36 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra, 21.42 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th, 40.51 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K and 79.11 Bq kg{sup -1} for Ra{sub eq} respectively. The average value excess life time cancer risk was found to be relatively higher than the world average. Moreover, the correlation analysis shows the strong dependence of excess lifetime cancer risk on measured dose and the radium equivalent activity.

  18. Genetic species delineation among branching Caribbean Porites corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, C.; DeBiasse, M. B.; Neigel, J. E.; Yednock, B.; Stake, J. L.; Forsman, Z. H.; Baums, I. B.; Hellberg, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Coral species are difficult to discern because of their morphological plasticity, long generation times, and slow rates of mitochondrial DNA evolution. Among Caribbean representatives of the genus Porites are three named species ( P. divaricata, P. furcata, and P. porites) with branching colony morphologies whose validity as genetically isolated species has been debated. We present sequence data from the mitochondrial control region, nuclear ITS, and nine single-copy nuclear loci for the Caribbean Porites and a related eastern Pacific species. mtDNA sequences were nearly invariant among the three branching species and their crustose sister P. branneri, and ITS sequences from these four were intermingled. An information theoretic analysis provided no support for upholding the three named Caribbean branching species. Both a clustering analysis and an analysis of molecular variance showed that sequence variation from the three branching forms is partitioned more by geography than by taxonomy. Multi-locus coalescent phylogenetic analysis provided a calibrated estimate for the nuclear DNA substitution rate (0.14 % Ma-1) close to that for other corals. Because no generalities have emerged from genetic investigations of the validity of morphologically defined coral species, the use of single-copy nuclear data is likely to be important in testing problematic species designations.

  19. Diabetes in North America and the Caribbean: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yisahak, Samrawit F; Beagley, Jessica; Hambleton, Ian R; Narayan, K M Venkat

    2014-02-01

    The North America and Caribbean (NAC) Region faces a high burden of diabetes. In 2013, the number of children (aged 0-14 years) with type 1 diabetes was 108,600, with 16.7 new cases diagnosed per 100,000 children. Furthermore, there were 36,755,500 individuals with diabetes (mostly type 2 diabetes) in adults (20-79 years), and an additional 44,277,700 individuals had impaired glucose tolerance. The age-adjusted prevalence of diabetes in adults was 9.6%; the second highest among the seven Regions of the International Diabetes Federation. This estimate is expected to grow to 9.9% by 2035. There was some heterogeneity in the estimates within the Region with the age-adjusted prevalence for the USA estimated at 9.2%, 7.9% for Canada, 12.6% for Mexico, and 9.6% for the Caribbean islands. Mortality due to diabetes in the NAC Region is not limited to older age groups, with 37.6% of deaths occurring in people under the age of 60. The economic impact was also enormous, with healthcare expenditure due to diabetes estimated at 263.2 billion USD for 2013 - the highest of all IDF Regions. Diabetes threatens the public health and economies of countries in the NAC Region, and efforts in prevention and management must be intensified in order to surmount this growing problem.

  20. A study of removal of Pb heavy metal ions from aqueous solution using lignite and a new cheap adsorbent (lignite washing plant tailings)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Ucurum [Nigde University, Nigde (Turkey). Mining Engineering Department

    2009-08-15

    The present study determines the efficiency with which lignite and lignite washing plant tailings can adsorb Pb heavy metal ions. In the first experiment, the effect of size distribution on the absorbance capacity was investigated for the samples. Therefore, lignite sample was ground to five sizes (d{sub 80} = 0.600, 0.355, 0.250, 0.106 and 0.063 mm) under nitrogen (N{sub 2}), and the tailings sample was classified into seven fractions, along with the original state (original state: d{sub 60} = 0.063, -1 + 0.600, -0.600 + 0.355, -0.355 + 0.250, -0.250 + 0.106, -0.106 + 0.063 and -0.063 mm). The test results showed that the optimum size distributions for lignite and tailings were d{sub 80} = 0.063 mm and the original state (d{sub 60} = 0.063 mm), respectively. Simultaneously, the adsorption capacity results of the two optimum sizes were compared with each other, and the tailings sample (d{sub 60} = 0.063 mm) gave the best results, with 9.30 mg/g Pb ions adsorbed value. Therefore, in the second study, a series of laboratory experiments using 23 full factorial designs was conducted to determine the optimum pH, contact time and initial metal concentration using the original tailings sample. The experimental studies showed that pH 9, a 120 min contact time and 300 ppm initial metal concentration gave the best results, namely an adsorption of 29.92 mg Pb ions/g. 43 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Substance Use, Mental Disorders and Physical Health of Caribbeans at-Home Compared to Those Residing in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krim K. Lacey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the health conditions of domestic Caribbeans with those living in the United States to explore how national context and migration experiences might influence substance use (i.e., alcohol or drug and other mental and physical health conditions. The study is based upon probability samples of non-institutionalized Caribbeans living in the United States (1621, Jamaica (1216 and Guyana (2068 18 years of age and over. Employing descriptive statistics and multivariate analytic procedures, the results revealed that substance use and other physical health conditions and major depressive disorder and mania vary by national context, with higher rates among Caribbeans living in the United States. Context and generation status influenced health outcomes. Among first generation black Caribbeans, residing in the United States for a longer length of time is linked to poorer health outcomes. There were different socio-demographic correlates of health among at-home and abroad Caribbeans. The results of this study support the need for additional research to explain how national context, migratory experiences and generation status contribute to understanding substance use and mental disorders and physical health outcomes among Caribbean first generation and descendants within the United States, compared to those remaining in the Caribbean region.

  2. World population and energy growth: Impact on the Caribbean and the roles of energy efficiency improvements and renewable energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, J.

    1997-06-01

    This paper briefly describes population and energy use trends and their consequences, particularly to the Caribbean region. Historical trends for transitional countries show a decrease in population growth rate as annual per capita commercial energy use increases. If trends continue, an increase in per capita energy will be important to stabilizing populations of transitional countries. Energy efficiency improvements, the role of fossil energy, and the use of alternative energy sources in Caribbean nations are briefly discussed. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Diversification at the narrow sea-land interface in the Caribbean: phylogeography of endemic supralittoral Ligia isopods

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos A. Santamaria; Mateos, Mariana; Hurtado, Luis A.

    2014-01-01

    Phylogeographic studies have provided valuable insights into the evolutionary histories and biodiversity of different groups in the Caribbean, a region that harbors exceptional terrestrial and marine biodiversity. Herein, we examined phylogeographic patterns of the poorly dispersing supralittoral isopod Ligia sampled from 35 localities in the Caribbean Sea and adjacent areas, as well as from Veracruz (Gulf of Mexico), the type locality of L. baudiniana (the only currently recognized native Li...

  4. Gravity modeling of the Muertos Trough and tectonic implications (north-eastern Caribbean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja, Bruna J. L.; Munoz-Martin, A.; ten Brink, U.S.; Carbó-Gorosabel, Andrés; Llanes, Estrada P.; Martin-Davila, J.; Cordoba-Barba, D.; Catalan, Morollon M.

    2010-01-01

    The Muertos Trough in the northeast Caribbean has been interpreted as a subduction zone from seismicity, leading to infer a possible reversal subduction polarity. However, the distribution of the seismicity is very diffuse and makes definition of the plate geometry difficult. In addition, the compressive deformational features observed in the upper crust and sandbox kinematic modeling do not necessarily suggest a subduction process. We tested the hypothesized subduction of the Caribbean plate's interior beneath the eastern Greater Antilles island arc using gravity modeling. Gravity models simulating a subduction process yield a regional mass deficit beneath the island arc independently of the geometry and depth of the subducted slab used in the models. This mass deficit results from sinking of the less dense Caribbean slab beneath the lithospheric mantle replacing denser mantle materials and suggests that there is not a subducted Caribbean plateau beneath the island arc. The geologically more realistic gravity model which would explain the N-S shortening observed in the upper crust requires an overthrusted Caribbean slab extending at least 60 km northward from the deformation front, a progressive increase in the thrusting angle from 8?? to 30?? reaching a maximum depth of 22 km beneath the insular slope. This new tectonic model for the Muertos Margin, defined as a retroarc thrusting, will help to assess the seismic and tsunami hazard in the region. The use of gravity modeling has provided targets for future wide-angle seismic surveys in the Muertos Margin. ?? 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  5. Cofiring lignite with hazelnut shell and cotton residue in a pilot-scale fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuhal Gogebakan; Nevin Selcuk [Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2008-05-15

    In this study, cofiring of high ash and sulfur content lignite with hazelnut shell and cotton residue was investigated in 0.3 MWt METU Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidized Bed Combustion (ABFBC) Test Rig in terms of combustion and emission performance of different fuel blends. The results reveal that cofiring of hazelnut shell and cotton residue with lignite increases the combustion efficiency and freeboard temperatures compared to those of lignite firing with limestone addition only. CO{sub 2} emission is not found sensitive to increase in hazelnut shell and cotton residue share in fuel blend. Cofiring lowers SO{sub 2} emissions considerably. Cofiring of hazelnut shell reduces NO and N{sub 2}O emissions; on the contrary, cofiring cotton residue results in higher NO and N{sub 2}O emissions. Higher share of biomass in the fuel blend results in coarser cyclone ash particles. Hazelnut shell and cotton residue can be cofired with high ash and sulfur-containing lignite without operational problems. 32 refs., 12 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. Effect of biomass on temperatures of sintering and initial deformation of lignite ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Haykiri-Acma; S. Yama; S. Kucukbayrak [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Faculty of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering

    2010-10-15

    Sintering temperatures and the initial deformation temperatures of ashes from Turkish Elbistan lignite, and biomass species such as hazelnut shell and rice husk were investigated up to 1450{sup o}C by Heating Microscope Technique. Sintering temperatures were found 1300, 1269, and 1320{sup o}C for hazelnut shell, rice husk, and lignite, respectively, while the initial deformation temperatures were >1450, 1370, and >1450{sup o}C. Lignite/biomass blends were prepared by adding of biomass into coal in the ratios of 5 or 10 wt.%, and then effects of biomass presence on sintering temperature and the initial deformation temperature were tested. It was determined that the addition of potassium-rich hazelnut shell reduced the sintering temperatures to 919 and 730{sup o}C for the blends of 5 and 10 wt.%, respectively. Also, initial deformation temperature dropped to 788{sup o}C in case of the blend of 10 wt.%. Such a big antagonistic influence of hazelnut shell on the thermal behaviour of ash is attributed to the interaction of potassium from biomass with silicon compounds found in mineral matter of lignite. In addition, concentration of CaO may be another reason for this. On the other hand, the presence of rice husk showed limited effect on the sintering temperature as well the initial deformation temperature. 20 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Genetic relation of adamantanes from extracts and semicoking tars of lignites with the initial biological material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Shvykin, A.Y.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Podshibyakin, S.I. [Lev Tolstoi State Pedagogical University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    1999-11-01

    A genetic relation was revealed of adamantanes from extracts and semicoking tars of lignites with the relic terpenoid and steroid compounds. Probable pathways are suggested for transformation of the initial natural structures into adamantanes. The qualitative and quantitative compositions of adamantanes from crude oil and coal are compared.

  8. Distribution of various forms of organic nitrogen in a lignite macromolecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.; Shavyrina, O.A.; Ryl' tsova, S.V. [Lev Tolstoi State Pedalogical University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    The chemical composition of organic bases from tars of stepwise semicoking of lignite was studied. The features of distribution of organic nitrogen in a coal macromolecule and the most probable pathways of thermal degradation of the nitrogen-containing fragments were examined.

  9. Stepwise demineralisation and chemical isolation of the mineral matter of Goynuk lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Yavuz, R.; Kucukbayrak, S.; Taptik, Y. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Chemical & Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    2001-12-01

    The mineral matter of coal contains a number of inorganic constituents which play an important role in almost all coal utilisation systems. In this study, an alternative method was applied to separate the mineral matter content of a Turkish lignite. Goynuk lignite was treated, in sequence, with acetic acid, ammonia, hydrochloric acid, hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid at 70{sup o}C for 60 min in order to remove individual mineral species. After each stage, the lignite was treated with performic acid, the product of reaction between hydrogen peroxide and formic acid, at 50{sup o}C. The organic coal matrix was decomposed as a result of performic acid oxidation, and consequently, the recovered mineral species were isolated. Ammonia, which has the potential of chemical comminution, was used to increase the effects of the subsequent reagents and enhance the extent of separation between the organic and inorganic phases. In each mineral matter removal stage, the lignite was treated with the reagents of the previous stage, and then, a new reagent was added to investigate whether the last stage has a different effect on the mineral species. FT-IR and X-ray diffractometry techniques were used to determine the constituents of the isolated mineral matter after each stage.

  10. Possible linkages between lignite aquifers, pathogenic microbes, and renal pelvic cancer in northwestern Louisiana, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunnell, J.E.; Tatu, C.A.; Bushon, R.N.; Stoeckel, D.M.; Brady, A.M.G.; Beck, M.; Lerch, H.E.; McGee, B.; Hanson, B.C.; Shi, R.H.; Orem, W.H. [USGS, Reston, VA (United States)

    2006-12-15

    In May and September, 2002, 14 private residential drinking water wells, one dewatering well at a lignite mine, eight surface water sites, and lignite from an active coal mine were sampled in five Parishes of northwestern Louisiana, USA. Using a geographic information system (GIS), wells were selected that were likely to draw water that had been in contact with lignite; control wells were located in areas devoid of lignite deposits. Well water samples were analyzed for pH, conductivity, organic compounds, and nutrient and anion concentrations. All samples were further tested for presence of fungi (cultures maintained for up to 28 days and colonies counted and identified microscopically) and for metal and trace element concentration by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Surface water samples were tested for dissolved oxygen and presence of pathogenic leptospiral bacteria. The Spearman correlation method was used to assess the association between the endpoints for these field/laboratory analyses and incidence of cancer of the renal pelvis (RPC) based on data obtained from the Louisiana Tumor Registry for the five Parishes included in the study. Significant associations were revealed between the cancer rate and the presence in drinking water of organic compounds, the fungi Zygomycetes, the nutrients PO{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}, and 13 chemical elements. Presence of human pathogenic leptospires was detected in four out of eight (50%) of the surface water sites sampled.

  11. Planning for Reliable Coal Quality Delivery Considering Geological Variability: A Case Study in Polish Lignite Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Naworyta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of coal quality control in coal mines is to supply power plants daily with extracted raw material within certain coal quality constraints. On the example of a selected part of a lignite deposit, the problem of quality control for the run-of-mine lignite stream is discussed. The main goal is to understand potential fluctuations and deviations from production targets dependent on design options before an investment is done. A single quality parameter of the deposit is selected for this analysis—the calorific value of raw lignite. The approach requires an integrated analysis of deposit inherent variability, the extraction sequence, and the blending option during material transportation. Based on drill-hole data models capturing of spatial variability of the attribute of consideration are generated. An analysis based on two modelling approaches, Kriging and sequential Gaussian simulation, reveals advantages and disadvantages lead to conclusions about their suitability for the control of raw material quality. In a second step, based on a production schedule, the variability of the calorific value in the lignite stream has been analysed. In a third step the effect of different design options, multiple excavators and a blending bed, was investigated.

  12. Bio-liquefaction/solubilization of low-rank Turkish lignites and characterization of the products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesim Basaran; Adil Denizli; Billur Sakintuna; Alpay Taralp; Yuda Yurum [Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey). Department of Environmental Sciences

    2003-08-01

    The effect of some white-rot fungi on the bio-liquefaction/solubilization of two low-rank Turkish coals and the chemical composition of the liquid products and the microbial mechanisms of coal conversion were investigated. Turkish Elbistan and Beypazari lignites were used in this study. The white-rot fungi received from various laboratories used in the bio-liquefaction/solubilization of the lignites were Pleurotus sajor-caju, Pleurotus sapidus, Pleurotus florida, Pleurotus ostreatus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and Coriolus versicolor. FT-IR spectra of raw and treated coal samples were measured, and bio-liquefied/solubilized coal samples were investigated by FT-IR and LC-MS techniques. The Coriolus versicolor fungus was determined to be most effective in bio-liquefying/solubilizing nitric acid-treated Elbistan lignite. In contrast, raw and nitric acid-treated Beypazari lignite seemed to be unaffected by the action of any kind of white-rot fungi. The liquid chromatogram of the water-soluble bio-liquefied/solubilized product contained four major peaks. Corresponding mass spectra of each peak indicated the presence of very complicated structures. 17 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Intervenciones para la prevención del VIH e ITS en América Latina y Caribe: una revisión de la experiencia regional Interventions for HIV/STD prevention in Latin America and the Caribbean: a review of the regional experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F. Cáceres

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available La epidemia de VIH/SIDA ha cumplido dos décadas en América Latina y Caribe, siendo este último la segunda región más afectada en el mundo. En UNGASS (2001 los gobiernos renovaron su compromiso de enfrentar la epidemia con medidas de prevención y atención adecuadas. En esta revisión, partimos caracterizando la epidemia en la región como concentrada en grupos vulnerables (excepto algunas áreas de generalización. A continuación, reseñamos la experiencia en prevención en cada grupo objetivo, y contrastamos esta experiencia con el perfil epidemiológico para concluir que no se evidenció un abordaje oportuno y suficiente de la epidemia en grupos vulnerables, los cuales están vinculados a otros grupos. También señalamos condiciones que harían posible un mayor impacto de las acciones preventivas, y analizamos formas en que las actividades de prevención pueden integrarse mejor a las de reducción del impacto. Finalmente, analizamos la información disponible sobre gastos en prevención.The HIV/AIDS epidemic has completed its second decade in Latin America and the Caribbean, the latter being the second most heavily affected region in the world. In UNGASS (2001, governments renewed their commitment to confront the epidemic with adequate prevention and care. This review begins by characterizing the regional epidemic as concentrated on vulnerable groups (except for certain areas of generalization. Subsequently, we summarize the prevention work with each target group and contrast it with the epidemiological profile, concluding that the epidemic was not addressed in either timely or sufficient fashion in vulnerable groups, all of which are linked to other population groups. We also point out conditions that could foster greater impact by prevention strategies and analyze ways by which prevention activities could be better integrated with impact/reduction measures. Finally, we analyze the available information on expenditures in prevention.

  14. Total Solar Eclipse--A Caribbean Adventure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Steven; Tunstall, Louisa; Tunstall, Neil

    1999-01-01

    Describes the experiences of two high school students who traveled to the Caribbean island of Curacao to view a total solar eclipse and prepare methods for teaching classmates about the eclipse the following school year. (Author/WRM)

  15. Origin of the Caribbean Plate Conference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keith H. James; Maria Antonieta Lorente

    2006-01-01

    @@ An international research conference, entitled "Geology of the area between North and South America, with focus on the origin of the Caribbean Plate", took place in Siguenza, Spain, from May 29-June 2, 2006.

  16. Caribbean Marine Mammal Assessment Vessel Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data sets are a compilation of large vessel surveys for marine mammal stock assessments in Caribbean waters conducted during 2000-2001. These surveys were...

  17. Business Booms for Caribbean Med Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broad, William J.

    1979-01-01

    As a last chance medical haven, Caribbean medical schools are increasingly sought by U.S. students. Federal and state investigations are being run on one of these, and two former students have filed suit. (BB)

  18. Exploring the impact of reduced hydro capacity and lignite resources on the Macedonian power sector development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taseska-Gjorgievskaa Verica

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The reference development pathway of the Macedonian energy sector highlights the important role that lignite and hydro power play in the power sector, each accounting for 40% of total capacity in 2021. In 2030, this dominance continues, although hydro has a higher share due to the retirement of some of the existing lignite plants. Three sensitivity runs of the MARKAL-Macedonia energy system model have been undertaken to explore the importance of these technologies to the system, considering that their resource may be reduced with time: (1 Reducing the availability of lignite from domestic mines by 50% in 2030 (with limited capacity of imports, (2 Removing three large hydro options, which account for 310 MW in the business-as-usual case, and (3 Both of the above restrictions. The reduction in lignite availability is estimated to lead to additional overall system costs of 0.7%, compared to hydro restrictions at only 0.1%. With both restrictions applied, the additional costs rise to over 1%, amounting to 348 M€ over the 25 year planning horizon. In particular, costs are driven up by an increasing reliance on electricity imports. In all cases, the total electricity generation decreases, but import increases, which leads to a drop in capacity requirements. In both, the lignite and the hydro restricted cases, it is primarily gas-fired generation and imports that “fill the gap”. This highlights the importance of an increasingly diversified and efficient supply, which should be promoted through initiatives on renewables, energy efficiency, and lower carbon emissions.

  19. Evolution lignite mesopore structure during drying. Effect of temperature and heating time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmas, C.E.; Tsetsekou, A.H.; Hatzilyberis, K.S.; Androutsopoulos, G.P. [National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece). Chemical Process Engineering Lab.

    2001-07-01

    The knowledge of the intrinsic pore structure of coals is significant in elucidating the kinetics of mass transport and chemical reaction that leads to design of more efficient coal combustion and conversion equipment. The results of pore structure studies of Greek lignite are reported in this work. Isothermal drying of Greek lignite samples, under vacuum, caused mesopore structure evolution despite the severe (similar to 50%) particle size contraction due to heating. Mesopore volume and surface area were increased as the drying temperature was raised to 200{degree}C while further drying up to 250 {degree}C caused a mesopore volume and surface area decrease. Lignite drying at 100{degree}C for up to 3 h resulted in a monotonic increase of the mesopore structure properties while heating for a longer period i.e., 6 h, despite a slight increase of weight loss, caused pore volume and surface area reduction. Nitrogen sorption (77 K) hysteresis data obtained for partially dried samples have been processed to deduce BET surface area and pore size distributions (PSD) by using both the Roberts and a new method based on a Corrugated Pore Structure Model (CPSM-nitrogen) methods. Bimodal PSD have been detected with one peak at 3 nm and the second at 20 nm while surface area varied over the range 2.98-5.30 m{sup 2}/g, Dry Greek lignite has shown a higher mesopore volume than that of several American and Canadian coals of varying rank. Mesopore volume distribution of dry Greek lignite, obtained from nitrogen sorption data, agree well with those deduced from mercury penetration data corrected for coal compressibility.

  20. Population genetics of a trochid gastropod broadens picture of Caribbean Sea connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo Díaz-Ferguson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regional genetic connectivity models are critical for successful conservation and management of marine species. Even though rocky shore invertebrates have been used as model systems to understand genetic structure in some marine environments, our understanding of connectivity in Caribbean communities is based overwhelmingly on studies of tropical fishes and corals. In this study, we investigate population connectivity and diversity of Cittarium pica, an abundant rocky shore trochid gastropod that is commercially harvested across its natural range, from the Bahamas to Venezuela. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested for genetic structure using DNA sequence variation at the mitochondrial COI and 16S loci, AMOVA and distance-based methods. We found substantial differentiation among Caribbean sites. Yet, genetic differentiation was associated only with larger geographic scales within the Caribbean, and the pattern of differentiation only partially matched previous assessments of Caribbean connectivity, including those based on larval dispersal from hydrodynamic models. For instance, the Bahamas, considered an independent region by previous hydrodynamic studies, showed strong association with Eastern Caribbean sites in our study. Further, Bonaire (located in the east and close to the meridional division of the Caribbean basin seems to be isolated from other Eastern sites. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The significant genetic structure and observed in C. pica has some commonalities in pattern with more commonly sampled taxa, but presents features, such as the differentiation of Bonaire, that appear unique. Further, the level of differentiation, together with regional patterns of diversity, has important implications for the application of conservation and management strategies in this commercially harvested species.

  1. Characterization and effects of cold fronts in the Colombian Caribbean Coast and their relationship to extreme wave events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Ortiz-Royero

    2013-07-01

    passage of cold fronts during the last 16 yr were identified. Although the Colombian Caribbean has been affected by storms and hurricanes in the past, this research allows us to conclude that, there is a strong relationship between cold fronts and the largest waves in the Colombian Caribbean during the last 16 yr, which have caused damage to coastal infrastructure. We verified that the passage of a cold front corresponded to the most significant extreme wave event of the last two decades in the Colombian Caribbean, which caused the structural collapse of the Puerto Colombia pier, located near the city of Barranquilla, between 5 and 10 March 2009. This information is invaluable when evaluating average and extreme wave regimes for the purpose of informing the design of structures in this region of the Caribbean.

  2. Saharan dust - A carrier of persistent organic pollutants, metals and microbes to the Caribbean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, V.H.; Foreman, W.T.; Genualdi, S.; Griffin, Dale W.; Kellogg, C.A.; Majewski, M.S.; Mohammed, A.; Ramsubhag, A.; Shinn, E.A.; Simonich, S.L.; Smith, G.W.

    2006-01-01

    An international team of scientists from government agencies and universities in the United States, U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI), Trinidad & Tobago, the Republic of Cape Verde, and the Republic of Mali (West Africa) is working together to elucidate the role Saharan dust may play in the degradation of Caribbean ecosystems. The first step has been to identify and quantify the persistent organic pollutants (POPs), trace metals, and viable microorganisms in the atmosphere in dust source areas of West Africa, and in dust episodes at downwind sites in the eastern Atlantic (Cape Verde) and the Caribbean (USVI and Trinidad & Tobago). Preliminary findings show that air samples from Mali contain a greater number of pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and in higher concentrations than the Caribbean sites. Overall, POP concentrations were similar in USVI and Trinidad samples. Trace metal concentrations were found to be similar to crustal composition with slight enrichment of lead in Mali. To date, hundreds of cultureable microorganisms have been identified from Mali, Cape Verde, USVI, and Trinidad air samples. The sea fan pathogen, Aspergillus sydowii, has been identified in soil from Mali and in air samples from dust events in the Caribbean. We have shown that air samples from a dust-source region contain orders of magnitude more cultureable microorganisms per volume than air samples from dust events in the Caribbean, which in turn contain 3-to 4-fold more cultureable microbes than during non-dust conditions.

  3. Zoogeography of Elasmobranchs in the Colombian Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Felipe Navia

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In order to investigate zoogeographical patterns of the marine elasmobranch species of Colombia, species richness of the Pacific and Caribbean and their subareas (Coastal Pacific, Oceanic Pacific, Coastal Caribbean, Oceanic Caribbean was analyzed. The areas shared 10 families, 10 genera and 16 species of sharks, and eight families, three genera and four species of batoids. Carcharhinidae had the highest contribution to shark richness, whereas Rajidae and Urotrygonidae had the greatest contribution to batoid richness in the Caribbean and Pacific, respectively. Most elasmobranchs were associated with benthic and coastal habitats. The similarity analysis allowed the identification of five groups of families, which characterize the elasmobranch richness in both areas. Beta diversity indicated that most species turnover occurred between the Coastal Pacific and the two Caribbean subareas. The difference in species richness and composition between areas may be due to vicariant events such as the emergence of the Isthmus of Panama. It is unlikely that the Colombian elasmobranch diversity originated from a single colonization event. Local diversification/speciation, dispersal from the non-tropical regions of the Americas, a Pacific dispersion and an Atlantic dispersion are origin possibilities without any of them excluding the others.

  4. Latin American and Caribbean intercomparison of surface contamination monitoring equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, T S; Ramos, M M O; Laranjeira, A S; Santos, D S; Suarez, R C

    2011-03-01

    In October 2009, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) sponsored an intercomparison exercise of surface contamination monitoring equipment, which was held at the Laboratório Nacional de Metrologia das Radiações Ionizantes, from the Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria, IRD/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro. This intercomparison was performed to evaluate the calibration accessibility in Latin America and the Caribbean. Thirteen countries within the region and IAEA have sent instruments to be compared, but only five countries and IAEA were considered apt to participate. Analysis of instruments, results and discussions are presented and recommendations are drawn.

  5. Marine oil degrading bacteria related to oil inputs and surface currents in the western Caribbean Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizarraga-Partida, M.L.; Vicuna, F.B.I.; Chang, I.W. (Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada (CICESE), Ensenada (Mexico))

    1990-01-01

    The distribution of oil degrading bacteria (ODB) and its ratios to viable heterotrophic bacteria (CFU) and direct counts (AODC) were examined in relation to the surface currents of the western Caribbean Sea. High ODB/CFU and ODB/AODC ratios were found, suggesting that chronic sources of hydrocarbons in the region may have a larger impact than those in the southern Gulf of Mexico, where previous studies have been performed. It was concluded that, in western Caribbean waters, the distribution of oil degrading bacteria, or its ratios to CFU or AODC, could be useful indicators of chronic oil inputs originating at the east of the Caribbean Sea, as well as their motions afterwards. (author).

  6. A Study of Public Library Users in Some Countries of Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, Alvaro Agudo

    This user survey was part of a three-part diagnostic study that sought to obtain information on how public libraries operate in Latin America (Argentina, Colombia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Panama, and Venezuela) and the Caribbean (Barbados, Grenada, Jamaica, and Surinam) and the social role performed by this type of service in the region.…

  7. First visual record of a living basking shark Cetorhinus maximus in the Caribbean Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geelhoed, S.C.V.; Janinhoff, N.; Verdaat, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of basking sharks in the Caribbean Sea is only recently documented by satellite tagging studies, which show that some individuals migrate through the region en route from waters off the east coast of the USA to waters off northeastern South-America. The observation of a basking shark

  8. Determinants and promotion of oral hygiene behaviour in the Caribbean and Nepal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk-Werkhoven, Yvonne A. B.; Dijkstra, Arie; Bink, Pim; van Zanten, Sarah; van der Schans, Cees P.; van, Zanten S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of oral hygiene behaviour (OHB) based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) among dental care seekers in two cultural different regions: the Caribbean (Aruba/Bonaire) and Nepal. In addition, measures of oral health knowledge (OHK) and the expec

  9. 77 FR 30506 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, South Atlantic; Comprehensive Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... prepare a DEIS to assess impacts on the natural and human environment of management measures proposed in... Migratory Pelagic Resources (Coastal Migratory Pelagics FMP) in the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Region; the... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-BC22 Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of...

  10. Rehabilitation project of the Tuncbilek lignite fired power station with retrofitting of indirect to direct firing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casero, C.; Garibotto, G. [Ansaldo Energia (Italy)

    1996-09-01

    Retrofitting the lignite-fired boilers from indirect to direct firing, with the goal of increasing the availability of the plant and reducing particulate and NOx emissions, is described. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Areas of Unsolved Problems in Caribbean Active Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    I review some unsolved problems in Caribbean active tectonics. At the regional and plate scale: 1) confirm the existence of intraplate deformation zones of the central Caribbean plate that are within the margin of error of ongoing GPS measurements; 2) carry out field studies to evaluate block models versus models for distributed fault shear on the densely populated islands of Jamaica, Hispaniola, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands; 3) carry out paleoseismological research of key plate boundary faults that may have accumulated large strains but have not been previously studied in detail; 4) determine the age of onset and far-field effects of the Cocos ridge and the Central America forearc sliver; 4) investigate the origin and earthquake-potential of obliquely-sheared rift basins along the northern coast of Venezuela; 5) determine the age of onset and regional active, tectonic effects of the Panama-South America collision including the continued activation of the Maracaibo block; and 6) validate longterm rates on active subduction zones with improving, tomographic maps of subducted slabs. At the individual fault scale: 1) determine the mode of termination of large and active strike -slip faults and application of the STEP model (Septentrional, Polochic, El Pilar, Bocono, Santa Marta-Bucaramanaga); 2) improve the understanding of the earthquake potential on the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone given "off-fault" events such as the 2010 Haiti earthquake; how widespread is this behavior?; and 3) estimate size of future tsunamis from studies of historic or prehistoric slump scars and mass transport deposits; what potential runups can be predicted from this information?; and 4) devise ways to keep rapidly growing, circum-Caribbean urban populations better informed and safer in the face of inevitable and future, large earthquakes.

  12. Kinematics of the Southwestern Caribbean from New Geodetic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, G.; La Femina, P. C.; Tapia, A.; Camacho, E.; Chichaco, E.; Mora-Paez, H.; Geirsson, H.

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of the Caribbean, Cocos, Nazca, and South American plates has resulted in a complex plate boundary zone and the formation of second order tectonic blocks (e.g., the North Andean, Choco and Central America Fore Arc blocks). The Panama Region [PR], which is bounded by these plates and blocks, has been interpreted and modeled as a single tectonic block or deformed plate boundary. Previous research has defined the main boundaries: 1) The Caribbean plate subducts beneath the isthmus along the North Panama Deformed Belt, 2) The Nazca plate converges at very high obliquity with the PR and motion is assumed along a left lateral transform fault and the South Panama Deformed Belt, 3) The collision of PR with NW South America (i.e., the N. Andean and Choco blocks) has resulted in the Eastern Panama Deformed Belt, and 4) collision of the Cocos Ridge in the west is accommodated by crustal shortening, Central American Fore Arc translation and deformation across the Central Costa Rican Deformed Belt. In addition, there are several models that suggest internal deformation of this region by cross-isthmus strike-slip faults. Recent GPS observations for the PR indicates movement to the northeast relative to a stable Caribbean plate at rates of 6.9±4.0 - 7.8±4.8 mm a-1 from southern Costa Rica to eastern Panama, respectively (Kobayashi et al., 2014 and references therein). However, the GPS network did not have enough spatial density to estimate elastic strain accumulation across these faults. Recent installation and expansion of geodetic networks in southwestern Caribbean (i.e., Costa Rica, Panama, and Colombia) combined with geological and geophysical observations provide a new input to investigate crustal deformation processes in this complex tectonic setting, specifically related to the PR. We use new and existing GPS data to calculate a new velocity field for the region and to investigate the kinematics of the PR, including elastic strain accumulation on the

  13. Experimental and analytical evaluation of the drying kinetics of Belchatow lignite in relation to the size of particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Y.; Sciazko, A.; Zakrzewski, M.; Fukuda, K.; Tanaka, K.; Hashimoto, A.; Kaneko, S.; Kimijima, S.; Szmyd, JS; Kobayashi, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Water removal is a key technology for enhancing efficient utilization of lignite in power generation. An inherent characteristic of lignite, attributed to the large amount of water kept within the fuel, is the factor decreasing the thermal efficiency of lignite-fired power plants. This paper presents the research results on investigating the drying kinetics of Belchatow lignite excavated in the Central Poland in prior to developing a water removal system. Lignite drying test was conducted in superheated steam atmosphere at the temperature range of 110-170 °C. Spherically shaped samples, of which the diameter is 2.5 mm, was used. The experimental results were then analysed with previously conducted measurements of 5, 10, 30 mm samples to investigate the influence of particle size. The presented analysis shows the agreement of the evaluated drying rate at the CDRP to the experimental data. The obtained experimental results were used to predict the drying behaviour of the group of particles. The proposed investigation clarifies the size dependence of the drying characteristics of the multisize group of lignite particles.

  14. Fates and roles of alkali and alkaline earth metal species during the pyrolysis and gasification of a Victorian lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mody, D.; Wu, H.; Li, C. [Monash University, Vic. (Australia). CRC for Clean Power from Lignite, Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2000-07-01

    The transformation of alkali and alkaline earth metal (AAEM) species in a Victorian lignite during the pyrolysis and subsequent gasification in CO{sub 2} was studied in a novel quartz fluidised-bed reactor. Lignite samples prepared by physically adding NaCl and ion-exchanging Na{sup +} and Ca{sup ++} into the lignite were used to investigate the effects of chemical forms and valency of the AAEM species in the substrate lignite on their transformation during pyrolysis and gasification. Carboxyl-bound Na was found to be less volatile than Na present as NaCl, but more volatile than carboxyl-bound Ca during pyrolysis at temperatures between 400 and 900{sup o}C. However, the carboxyl-bound Na was volatilised to a much greater extent than the carboxyl-bound Ca in the same lignite during pyrolysis. It was seen that the loading of NaCl into the lignite did not significantly affect the char reactivity in the fluidised-bed reactor at 900{sup o}C.

  15. Peat swamps at Giral lignite field of Barmer basin, Rajasthan,Western India: understanding the evolution through petrological modelling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prakash K.Singh; P.K.Rajak; M.P.Singh; V.K.Singh; A.S.Naik; Alok K.Singh

    2016-01-01

    The lignite samples collected from Giral lignite field of Barmer basin have been subjected to petrological investigation.The data generated has been discussed to understand the evolution of the paleomires of these lignites.The present study reveals that these low rank C coals are chiefly composed of huminite group macerals,mainly telohuminite and detrohuminite,while liptinite and inertinite group macerals occur in subordinate amounts.Not much variation in the maceral composition from Seam-I to Seam-Ⅷ has been observed.Barmer lignites are characterized by a very high GI (>10) and moderate TPI indicating topogenous mire in the basin which was permanently flooded.The GI and TPI values and the petrography-based facies critical models indicate that these lignites originated mostly under wet forest swamp to clastic marsh having telmatic to limno-telmatic conditions with a moderate rate of subsidence and a very slow fall in ground water table.Further,the GWI and VI values are suggestive of mesotrophic to rheotrophic hydrological conditions having the dominance of herbaceous to marginal aquatic vegetation.There were spells of periodic drowning of peat especially during the formation of Seam-Ⅶ.Moderately high concentration of calcium in these lignites along with the presence of framboidal pyrite indicate enhanced sulphate-reducing bacterial activity present in carbonate and sulphate-rich waters in the basin during peat formation.

  16. Entre conservation et développement : les évolutions récentes de la politique européenne des pêches dans les régions ultrapériphériques de la Caraïbe Between conservation and development: recent developments in European fisheries policy in the outermost regions of the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Angelelli

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available L’Union Européenne opère actuellement la seconde révision de sa politique de la pêche depuis la création de celle-ci, en 1970. Instituée pour développer la pêche maritime et garantir un revenu aux pêcheurs, la politique commune de la pêche (PCP s’est orientée progressivement vers la protection des espèces et de l’environnement marin. Pour cela, elle a sacrifié une part importante du secteur productif, mais a échoué et, avec le déclin de la pêche en Europe, les régions ultrapériphériques de la Caraïbe (RUP-C ont gagné en importance relative dans ce domaine. Elles représentent aujourd’hui près de 30% de la flotte nationale et les fondements malthusiens de la PCP ne sont plus adaptés à leurs caractéristiques : ressources halieutiques, développement économique, emplois, sécurité des approvisionnements alimentaires, etc. La réforme actuellement en cours, qui devrait aboutir avant 2012, offre peut-être une alternative aux RUP-C permettant la mise en œuvre des mesures spécifiques en application de l’article 349 du Traité sur le Fonctionnement de l’Union Européenne.The European Union currently operates the second reform of its Common Fisheries Policy since its creation in 1970. Established to develop the fisheries and provide incomes for fishermen, the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP was directed gradually towards the protection of the species and the marine environment.To do this, it sacrificed a large part of the productive sector, but failed, and with the decline of fisheries in Europe, the outermost regions of the Caribbean gained relative importance in this field. They now account for nearly 30% of the national fleet and the Malthusians bases of the CFP are not suited any more to their characteristics: fisheries resources, economic development, jobs, security of food supply, etc. The ongoing reform, which should be in force before 2012, may offer an alternative to the outermost regions of the Caribbean

  17. 互花米草与褐煤共热解特性试验%Experiment on co-pyrolysis characteristics of Spartina alterniflora and lignite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李继红; 杨世关; 李晓彤

    2014-01-01

    Smooth cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora), a saltmarsh plant, has spread in intertidal flats of many regions of China since it was introduced from the USA in 1979. The application of S. alternilfora in energy has gained more attention due to its high production. However, the direct combustion of S. alternilfora was hindered due to its high potassium (K) and sodium (Na) contents. Co-pyrolysis of biomass and coal, a subject of much study in an effort to reduce greenhouse gases emission, was reported to be able to produce a synergetic effect mainly due to the catalytic function of alkali metals in biomass. S. alterniflora, rich in Na and K which are 22 683 mg/kg and 8 063 mg/kg, respectively, has great bioenergy potential as a co-pyrolysis material of coal. In order to to verify the interaction of S. alterniflora and lignite during pyrolysis, experiments were carried out with pure S. alterniflora, pure lignite, and their blends with mass ratio (S. alterniflora to lignite, S:L) of 1:4, 2:3, 3:2, and 4:1 by thermogravimetry coupled with a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TG-FTIR). S. alternilfora used in the experiments was collected from Dafeng County of Jiangsu Province, China in October 2012. Lignite was from Shanxi Province, China. Na, K, volatile, H/C, O/C, and heating value of S. alterniflora were 16 064.3 mg/kg, 6 175.7 mg/kg, 75.40%, 0.12, 0.80, and 19.08 MJ/kg, respectively. Volatile content, H/C, O/C, and heating value of lignite were 33.92%, 0.07, 0.23, and 20.47 MJ/kg, respectively. TG tests were done under an N2 flow rate of 25 mL/min and at a heating rate of 10℃/min from 30℃ to 900℃. Infrared scanning resolution was set to 4cm-1, and scanning scope varied from 4 000 cm-1 to 500 cm-1. According to TG and DTG analysis, the process of co-pyrolysis can be divided into two stages at 385℃. The pyrolysis of S. alterniflora took place mainly in the first stage of 250℃ to 385℃. The pyrolysis of lignite and fixed carbon in S. alterniflora occurred

  18. Medical tourism in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez de Arellano, Annette B

    2011-01-01

    Although travel for medical reasons has a long history, it has more recently evolved from a cottage industry to a worldwide enterprise. A number of countries are positioning themselves to attract visitors who are willing to travel to obtain health services that are more accessible, less expensive, or more available than in their countries of origin. This has in turn given rise to medical packages that combine tourism with health. Several Caribbean nations - including Cuba, Barbados, Jamaica, and Puerto Rico - hope to expand their revenues in this new market. Each country has selected specific service niches and promotes its services accordingly. While Cuba has been promoting its services to other countries for several decades, medical tourism is just beginning in the other islands. Ultimately, these nations' economic success will hinge on their comparative advantage vis-à-vis other options, while their success in terms of improving their own health care depends on the extent to which the services for tourists are also available to the islands' populations.

  19. The Utilization of Peat, Lignite and Industrial Wastes in the Production of Mineral-Organic Fertilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Hoffmann

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of chemical analyses of the composition of peat, lignite, turkey droppings and the potato industry effluent are presented. The results indicate that the substances can be used in mineral-organic fertilizer recipes. Although lignite and peat do not contain assimilable nutrients, from the ecology and pedology point of view they are valuable components of mineral-organic fertilizers. In order to determine the optimum turkey droppings and potato industry effluent dose in fertilizer biological studies using the germination tests were carried out. The demand for nutrients differs between plants. The mineral-organic fertilizer recipes were developed for sugar beet which is a highly demanding plant taking up large quantities of nutrients.

  20. Paleoenvironmental implications from biomarker and stable isotope investigations on the Pliocene Velenje lignite seam (Slovenia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel, A.; Sachsenhofer, R.F.; Markic, M.; Gratzer, R.; Lucke, A.; Puttmann, W. [Montan University of Leoben, Leoben (Austria)

    2003-07-01

    A Pliocene lignite seam up to 160 m thick occurs in the Velenje basin (Slovenia). The seam originated in a topogenous mire and evolved within a non-marine, transgressive setting. Differences in soluble organic matter yield and hydrocarbon content of borehole samples from the lignite are related to differences in the composition of free lipids of microbial origin and/or hydrocarbons derived from the biogeochemical degradation of plant tissue. Variations of the redox conditions within the mire are reflected by pristane/phytane ratios. The abundance of terpenoid biomarkers indicates the predominance of gymnosperms over angiosperms, which is consistent with palynomorphic spectra dominated by pollen of the Sequoia-Taxodium-Metasequoia plant community rather than by angiosperms. Evidence is also provided that the content of land plant derived biomarkers and the preservation of plant tissue is controlled by the input of resin-rich, decay-resistant conifers.

  1. Combustion of producer gas from gasification of south Sumatera lignite coal using CFD simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidian Fajri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of gasses from lignite coal gasification is one of alternative fuel for the boiler or gas turbine. The prediction of temperature distribution inside the burner is important for the application and optimization of the producer gas. This research aims to provide the information about the influence of excess air on the temperature distribution and combustion product in the non-premixed burner. The process was carried out using producer gas from lignite coal gasification of BA 59 was produced by the updraft gasifier which is located on Energy Conversion Laboratory Mechanical Engineering Department Universitas Sriwijaya. The excess air used in the combustion process were respectively 10%, 30% and 50%. CFD Simulations was performed in this work using two-dimensional model of the burner. The result of the simulation showed an increase of excess air, a reduction in the gas burner temperature and the composition of gas (carbon dioxide, nitric oxide and water vapor.

  2. Thermal analyses of the lignite combustion in oxygen-enriched atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiangyun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the oxygen-enriched combustion behavior of indigenous lignite was measured by a thermogravimetric analyzer (TG. Combustion tests were carried out in N2/O2 atmosphere with an oxygen content ranging from 21% to 70 vol%.The data show that the calorific value per unit time (CVT of the lignite was improved with increased oxygen concentration. In order to reveal the oxygen-enriched combustion process in detail, a new index of characteristic temperature Tc was defined to indicate the fixed carbon behavior during burning, and the combustibility indexes D’, Rw, and S were calculated to determine the combustion performance. The functional relation between CVT and oxygen concentration was determined by non-linear fitting method. The results indicated that the relationship between CVT and oxygen concentration fit the exponential function exactly.

  3. COMPLEX LONG TIME MEASUREMENTS CARRIED OUT ON LIGNITE HEAP ON SOKOLOVSKÉ UHELNÉ A.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlastimil MONI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Long time in situ measurements carried out on selected lignite (brown coal heaps in the summer and winter season of 2012 and 2013 are described in this paper. The study was prepared in the frame of the research project TAČR No. TA01020351 “Research of prediction possibilities of infusion occurrence and following brown coal fuel self-ignition” supported in the programme ALFA. The main goal is to inform about the progress in the project focused on the research, development, and verifying of the complex methodology for an early identification of the start of an irreversible infusion state of lignite (brown coal mass tending to its ignition (fire.

  4. Supercritical Water as Nanomedium for Gasification of Lignite-Water Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzh, Raisa; Bortyshevskyi, Valerii

    2016-12-01

    The gasification of an aqueous suspension of lignite from Alexandria coalfield (Ukraine) under the supercritical pressure was studied. The initial rates of the formation of hydrogen, carbon dioxide and methane were evaluated. The mutually stimulating interaction of the components of "brown coal-water-mineral matter" system was shown due to the influence of nanoscaled water medium on the formation of dipole-inductive, dispersive and ionic associates. In the temperature range of 300-450 °C, the oxygen source for gaseous products of the lignite supercritical gasification is mainly ion-associative nanoclustered water. The source of hydrogen at the subcritical temperature is the organic part of brown coal. For the supercritical water, the source of H is the nanoscale medium with ion associates. The last ones were responsible for the further transformation of coal.

  5. Kinetics of recovering germanium from lignite ash with chlorinating roasting methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Guocai; WANG Jingyan; CHENG Zhuo; ZHAO Yuna

    2008-01-01

    A process of recovering Ge by chlorinating roasting was put forward. GeCl4 was separated and recovered from lignite ash because of its low boiling point. Kinetic analysis indicates that the chlorinating roasting process fits with the unreacted-core shrinking model and the reaction rate equation corresponds to 1-2a/3-(1-a)2/3 =kt. The apparent activation energy Ea is calculated to be 22.36 kJ·mol-1. The diffusion of product layer serves as the rate-controlling step in this process. When the roasting temperature is 250℃, the roasting time is 60 min, the concentration of hydrochloric acid is 10 mol/L, and the ratio of liquid to solid is 10 (mHCl/ash=10), and 90% Ge in lignite ash can be recovered.

  6. Ash agglomeration during fluidized bed gasification of high sulphur content lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinov, V.; Marinov, S.P.; Lazarov, L.; Stefanova, M. (SRTI Energydesign, Sofia (Bulgaria))

    1992-09-01

    Intensive ash agglomeration has hampered the fluidized bed gasification of lignites from the Elhovo deposit (Bulgaria) containing 5.9 wt% sulphur in the dry state. Samples of slag and agglomerates from the pilot plant have been examined by means of chemical, X-ray analysis, IR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Pyrrhotite (FeS) and wustite (FeO) have been established in the agglomerates, where junctions between ash particles have been found to consist of magnetite, spinel and garnet grains. The chemical reactions leading to garnet formation have been studied. Centres of sintering and centres of melting during the ash agglomeration process have been distinguished. The pyrite product, an eutectic of FeS and FeO melting at 924[degree]C, is assumed to be responsible for the cessation of lignite gasification with steam and air under pressure at a bed temperature of 930[degree]. 11 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Supercritical Water as Nanomedium for Gasification of Lignite-Water Suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzh, Raisa; Bortyshevskyi, Valerii

    2016-05-01

    The gasification of an aqueous suspension of lignite from Alexandria coalfield (Ukraine) under the supercritical pressure was studied. The initial rates of the formation of hydrogen, carbon dioxide and methane were evaluated. The mutually stimulating interaction of the components of "brown coal-water-mineral matter" system was shown due to the influence of nanoscaled water medium on the formation of dipole-inductive, dispersive and ionic associates. In the temperature range of 300-450 °C, the oxygen source for gaseous products of the lignite supercritical gasification is mainly ion-associative nanoclustered water. The source of hydrogen at the subcritical temperature is the organic part of brown coal. For the supercritical water, the source of H is the nanoscale medium with ion associates. The last ones were responsible for the further transformation of coal.

  8. Combustion Characteristics of Lignite Char in a Laboratory-scale Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takahiro; Suzuki, Yoshizo

    In a dual fluidized bed gasifier, the residual char after steam gasification is burnt in riser. The objectives of this work are to clarify the effect of parameters (temperature, pressure, and particle size of lignite char) of char combustion using a laboratory-scale pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC). As a result, the burnout time of lignite char can be improved with increasing operating pressure, and temperature. In addition, the decrease in the particle size of char enhanced the effect on burnout time. The initial combustion rate of the char can be increased with increasing operating pressure. The effect was decreased with increasing operating temperature. However, the effect of operating pressure was slightly changed in small particle size, such as 0.5-1.0 mm. It takes about 20 sec to burn 50% of char in the operating pressure of 0.5 MPa and the particle size of 0.5-1.0 mm.

  9. 77 FR 33601 - National Caribbean-American Heritage Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-07

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8835 of June 1, 2012 National Caribbean-American Heritage Month, 2012 By the... their lives what they will, and during National Caribbean- American Heritage Month, we celebrate their... Caribbean-American Heritage Month. I encourage all Americans to celebrate the history and culture...

  10. 50 CFR 622.50 - Caribbean spiny lobster import prohibitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... applies to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. (1) No person may import a Caribbean spiny lobster... than Puerto Rico or the U.S. Virgin Islands. (b) Additional Caribbean spiny lobster import prohibitions... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Caribbean spiny lobster...

  11. Soil stabilisation using AMD sludge, compost and lignite: TCLP leachability and continuous acid leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Daniel C W; Olds, William E; Weber, Paul A; Yip, Alex C K

    2013-11-01

    Utilising locally available industrial by-products for in situ metal stabilisation presents a low-cost remediation approach for contaminated soil. This study explored the potential use of inorganic (acid mine drainage (AMD) sludge and zero-valent iron) and carbonaceous materials (green waste compost, manure compost, and lignite) for minimising the environmental risks of As and Cu at a timber treatment site. After 9-month soil incubation, significant sequestration of As and Cu in soil solution was accomplished by AMD sludge, on which adsorption and co-precipitation could take place. The efficacy of AMD sludge was comparable to that of zero-valent iron. There was marginal benefit of adding carbonaceous materials. However, in a moderately aggressive environment (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure), AMD sludge only suppressed the leachability of As but not Cu. Therefore, the provision of compost and lignite augmented the simultaneous reduction of Cu leachability, probably via surface complexation with oxygen-containing functional groups. Under continuous acid leaching in column experiments, combined application of AMD sludge with compost proved more effective than AMD sludge with lignite. This was possibly attributed to the larger amount of dissolved organic matter with aromatic moieties from lignite, which may enhance Cu and As mobility. Nevertheless, care should be taken to mitigate ecological impact associated with short-term substantial Ca release and continuous release of Al at a moderate level under acid leaching. This study also articulated the engineering implications and provided recommendations for field deployment, material processing, and assessment framework to ensure an environmentally sound application of reactive materials.

  12. Kinetics of lignite pyrolysis in fixed bed and entrained flow reactors. Technical report No. 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaroni, A. W.; Walker, Jr., P. L.

    1979-08-01

    A laminar flow isothermal furnace has been constructed and used to study lignite pyrolysis in nitrogen at temperatures between 700/sup 0/ and 1000/sup 0/C. Particles of a Texas lignite (Darco Seam) between 41 and 201 microns in mean diameter, are found to flow down the furnace tube with velocities approximated by the summation of the gas plug-flow velocity and particle free-fall velocities. Some particle shrinkage and density changes occur during pyrolysis. Pyrolysis rate is particle size independent and increases with increase in temperature over the range of operating conditions. Ultimate yield of volatiles in the isothermal furnace, which is calculated from the linear relationship between weight loss and change in proximate volatile matter, is 66% of the original dry-ash-free coal and is particle size independent and relatively temperature independent. Ultimate yields of volatiles from fixed beds of pulverized coal are smaller than for dispersed particles of the same size. Proximate volatile matter for the lignite is, for example, 51% of the original dry-ash-free coal. Heating rates drop from about 10,000/sup 0/C/s in the isothermal furnace to about 20/sup 0/C/s in the proximate volatile matter test. Pyrolysis rates decrease and display particle size dependency in fixed beds. This implication of physical rate control is attributed to heat transfer limitations. It is proposed that pyrolysis rate and therefore residence time of volatiles in the fixed bed are important parameters affecting the preponderance of secondary char forming reactions.Also important is the total particle external surface area in the bed. Secondary char formation is considered responsible for yields of volatiles lower than the true volatile content of the lignite as measured in the isothermal furnace.

  13. THE COMPARISION OF SOMA LIGNITE COAL AN FUEL-OIL WITH GEOTHERMAL ENERGY FOR HEATING BUILDINGS

    OpenAIRE

    GÜNTÜRKÜN, Rüstü

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a house that has four storeys and one hundred square meters flat was taken sample. Because this house can be heated with three different alternatives Soma lignite coal, fuel oil and geothermal, necessary first investment and annual heating costs were investigated. In addition, at heating building of geothermal energy whether became economic was researched. Economic analysis of used fuels at heating to a flat that is one hundred square meters been done. According to result of...

  14. Inclusive education in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa BLANCO GUIJARRO

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The region of Latin America and the Caribbean is known for being the most socially unequal in the world and for this has highly segmented societies, which affects the education, integration and social cohesion of the population. Expanding opportunities for everyone to have access to quality education and developing more inclusive schools, which would educate within and for diversity, stand out as two powerful strategies in a move towards more just and democratic societies in Latin America. This paper presents a detailed analysis of the educational situation in the region from the perspective of rights and inclusion, with particular attention paid to those individuals and groups that suffer most from the impact of inequality, exclusion and marginalization. This analysis begins with an assessment the progress and challenges still to be made regarding access, attendance, quality and equity of education in Latin America. In the second part it addresses the major issues on the agenda of Inclusion in Latin America and the Caribbean.

  15. Kinetics and mechanisms of hydroliquefaction and hydrogasification of lignite. [Cellulose, wood, manure, municipal waste, coal of various ranks, fuel oil and natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, A.H.; Kranich, W.L.; Geureuz, K.

    1981-01-01

    A high pressure, continuous, stirred-tank reactor system has been constructed for the study of the catalytic liquefaction of North Dakota lignite slurried in anthracene oil. The conversion of lignite using a cobalt-molybdenum on alumina catalyst and the distribution of products as preasphaltenes, asphaltenes, oils and gases has been studied at the following conditions: temperature, 375 to 440/sup 0/C; pressure, 1000 to 1600 psig; agitator speed, 800 to 1500 rpm; catalyst concentration, 0 to 10% (based on lignite); initial lignite concentration, 5 to 30%; and space time, 16 to 52 minutes. At reactor pressures above 1500 psig and agitator speeds above 1000 rpm, reaction rate was essentially independent of pressure. At catalyst concentrations above 1% (based on lignite), the conversion of lignite was essentially independent of catalyst concentration. Experiments were conducted above these limits to find the effect on lignite conversion rate, of initial lignite concentration, and space time, or degree of conversion. The results at constant temperature were correlated by an equation which is given in the report. The relationship between the rate constant, K, and temperature, and between the maximum conversion and temperature was established. The effect of reaction conditions on the distribution of products was studied. In the presence of catalyst, the oil yield was increased, even under conditions where the catalyst did not affect overall lignite conversion. Under the most favorable conditions the oil yield was a little better than that obtained by Cronauer in the uncatalyzed hydroliquefaction of subbituminous coal at similar temperature and pressure.

  16. Tangled roots: Kalenda and other neo-African dances in the circum-Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Gerstin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigates descriptions of Afro-Caribbean dances in early chronicles and historical material. Author focuses on choreography, as well as on musical instruments and their use. He pays special attention to descriptions of the Martinican kalenda dance. He discusses descriptions from the 18th c. of black Caribbean dance in French and other colonies, by priests and others, of the kalenda as a couple dance within a ring, and descriptions of other widespread early dances in the Caribbean, such as chica. Author notes that in these early descriptions the authors focus obsessively on eroticism, thus simplifying and exaggerating the dances as sexual, and ignoring their variety. Further, he analyses early chronicles on other widespread dances in the circum-Caribbean, such as stick-fighting dances, bamboula, djouba, and belair, comparing with present-day Caribbean dances, and on "challenge dancing" involving a dance soloist "challenged" by a lead drummer, found, for instance, in kalenda and rumba. In addition, the author focuses on the dances' musical accompaniment by drums, and the drum types and methods, specifically transverse drumming and drumming with sticks on the side of the drum, found today in kalenda, and other Caribbean styles. He points at the inaccuracy of some chronicles, mixing up dance names, and recurring superficiality and stereotypes. He nonetheless concludes from them that slaves from the Congo/Angola region probably played a crucial role in forming these early dance styles, and that their spread was connected with French colonialism and slavery and migrations from (once French colonies. He describes probable Congolese/Angolan influences, such as pelvic isolation, challenge dances, couple dancing within a circle, and transverse drumming, but indicates that these are over time combined with other African and other influences.

  17. COCONet and TLALOCNet: Multi-hazard GNSS/Met Observatories, Enhancing Geodetic Infrastructure and the Scientific Community in Mexico and the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feaux, K.; Adams, D. K.; Braun, J.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Dausz, K.; Dittmann, S. T.; Fend, M.; Galetzka, J.; Mattioli, G. S.; Miller, M. M.; Normandeau, J.; Salazar-Tlaczani, L.; Sandru, J.; Serra, Y. L.; Wang, G.

    2015-12-01

    UNAVCO manages the construction of two large NSF-funded networks of geophysical instruments in Central America and the Caribbean. COCONet (Continuously Operating Caribbean Observational Network), which consists of 83 new and refurbished cGNSS/Met stations, spans the entire Caribbean region. TLALOCNet (Trans-boundary Land and Atmospheric Long-term Observational and Collaborative Network) is a similar 24-station in Mexico. Data are being used to study solid earth processes such as plate kinematics, plate boundary deformation, and the earthquake cycle; in addition, by providing more precise estimates of tropospheric water vapor to better forecast the dynamics associated with the annual Caribbean hurricane cycle and the North American monsoon, they also address atmospheric science objectives. COCONet and TLALOCNet rely on the concept of building partnerships with a range of stakeholders that support a common goal of providing free, high-quality, low-latency, open-format data and data products. As part of COCONet, UNAVCO completed installation of sea level monitoring instruments at two locations in the Caribbean Basin. Additionally, two existing sea level stations were upgraded with co-located GNSS hardware. The locations (Jamaica, Mexico, Panama, and the Dominican Republic) enhance the coverage of tide gauge instrumentation in the Caribbean region. Each station consists of tide gauge instruments (radar and pressure gauge) on a marine pier co-located with a cGNSS/Met system. A second cGNSS system is installed nearby (Mexico and the Caribbean.

  18. Advanced power assessment for Czech lignite. Task 3.6, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sondreal, E.A.; Mann, M.D.; Weber, G.W.; Young, B.C.

    1995-12-01

    The US has invested heavily in research, development, and demonstration of efficient and environmentally acceptable technologies for the use of coal. The US has the opportunity to use its leadership position to market a range of advanced coal-based technologies internationally. For example, coal mining output in the Czech Republic has been decreasing. This decrease in demand can be attributed mainly to the changing structure of the Czech economy and to environmental constraints. The continued production of energy from indigenous brown coals is a major concern for the Czech Republic. The strong desire to continue to use this resource is a challenge. The Energy and Environmental Research Center undertook two major efforts recently. One effort involved an assessment of opportunities for commercialization of US coal technologies in the Czech Republic. This report is the result of that effort. The technology assessment focused on the utilization of Czech brown coals. These coals are high in ash and sulfur, and the information presented in this report focuses on the utilization of these brown coals in an economically and environmentally friendly manner. Sections 3--5 present options for utilizing the as-mined coal, while Sections 6 and 7 present options for upgrading and generating alternative uses for the lignite. Contents include Czech Republic national energy perspectives; powering; emissions control; advanced power generation systems; assessment of lignite-upgrading technologies; and alternative markets for lignite.

  19. The effect of mixing ratio on co-pyrolysis of lignite and rapeseed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onay, O [Anadolu Univ., Eskisehir (Turkey). Porsuk Vocational School; Usta, C.; Kockar, O.M. [Anadolu Univ., Eskisehir (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the influence of lignite on the yield and chemical structure of bio-oil produced from rapeseed using a fast pyrolysis technique. The rapeseed and lignite mixtures were pyrolyzed in a fixed bed reactor. Heating rates and temperatures were controlled by a PID controller. Char yield after pyrolysis was determined from the overall weight losses of the reactor tube, while the liquid phase was collected in a glass liner. Experiments were conducted using a range of blending ratios. While final pyrolysis temperatures were set at 550 degrees C. An elemental analyzer was used to characterize the rapeseed and pyrolysis bio-oils. Fourier transform infrared analysis (FTIR) was used to conduct functional group compositional analyses. The study showed that conversion degree increased with temperature increases. Yields of both conversion and oil increased with biomass concentration. However, distribution between conversion and oil was influenced by the blending ratio. A maximum yield of oil was obtained with a 5 per cent blending ratio of lignite. It was concluded that the co-pyrolysis of rapeseed and coal at a temperature of 550 degrees C increases production by more than 11 per cent. 14 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs.

  20. Using cement, lignite fly ash and baghouse filter waste for solidification of chromium electroplating treatment sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wantawin, C.

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to use baghouse filter waste as a binder mixed with cement and lignite fly ash to solidify sludge from chromium electroplating wastewater treatment. To save cost of solidification, reducing cement in binder and increasing sludge in the cube were focused on. Minimum percent cement in binder of 20 for solidification of chromium sludge was found when controlling lignite fly ash to baghouse filter waste at the ratio of 30:70, sludge to binder ratio of 0.5, water to mixer ratio of 0.3 and curing time of 7 days. Increase of sludge to binder ratio from 0.5 to 0.75 and 1 resulted in increase in the minimum percent cement in binder up to 30 percent in both ratios. With the minimum percent cement in binder, the calculated cement to sludge ratios for samples with sludge to binder ratios of 0.5, 0.75 and 1 were 0.4, 0.4 and 0.3 respectively. Leaching chromium and compressive strength of the samples with these ratios could achieve the solidified waste standard by the Ministry of Industry. For solidification of chromium sludge at sludge to binder ratio of 1, the lowest cost binder ratio of cement to lignite fly ash and baghouse filter waste in this study was 30:21:49. The cost of binder in this ratio was 718 baht per ton dry sludge.

  1. Synergetic use of lignite fly ash and metallurgical converter slag in geopolymer concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Mucsi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The application and utilization of the industrial wastes and by-products in the construction industry is a key issue from an environmental and economic point of view. The increased use of lignite has substantially increased the available quantities of lignite fired power plant fly ash, which can be mainly classified as class C fly ash. The utilization of such raw material however has some difficulties. In the present paper lignite fired power station fly ash and metallurgical converter slag were used for the production of geopolymer concrete. The fly ash was used as a geopolymer based binder material, and a converter slag as aggregate, thus created a geopolymer concrete which contains mainly industrial wastes. As preliminary test experimental series were carried out using andesite as aggregate. The optimal aggregate/binder ratio was determined. The effect of the amount of alkaline activator solution in the binder, the aggregate type on the geopolymer concretes’ compressive strength and density was investigated. Furthermore, the physical properties - freeze-thaw resistance and particle size distribution - of the applied aggregates were measured as well. As a result of the experiments it was found that physical properties of the andesite and converter slag aggregate was close. Therefore andesite can be replaced by converter slag in the concrete mixture. Additionally, geopolymer concrete with nearly 20 MPa compressive strength was produced from class C fly ash and converter slag.

  2. Women’s leadership in local government in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kizzann Lee Sam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Women and men are traditionally cast in different roles, with males being leaders in the workplace, home and government. In contrast, communities promote women as caregivers who support male leaders and shape future generations as mothers, mentors and teachers. In recognition of this societal view of women that often led to inequality and inequity, the UNDP listed Gender Equality and empowering women as one of eight Millennium Development Goals. The post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals, adopted by the United Nations in autumn 2015, also included gender equality and empowering women as Goal 5. In its work in the Caribbean, the Caribbean Local Economic Development Project (CARILED examined gender as it relates to micro, small and medium enterprise (MSME development in six Caribbean countries.  The findings of this study showed gender gaps for both male and female entrepreneurs in different areas of development.  Traditionally gendered roles for MSME sectors, access to financing and lack of adequate guidance or community support were some areas that affected men and women differently in the region.  The study outlines ways in which male and female leaders can address traditional gender roles by identifying priority areas for development, creating an enabling environment for start-ups and expansion, and fostering a policy and legislative base that facilitates ease of doing business.  The recommendations further describe the public–private partnerships needed to successfully meet gender gaps, and the importance of both elected officials and technocrats in inter alia community engagement and advocacy towards local economic development. The importance of gender equality among elected officials and technocrats, and the influence gender has on determining priority areas of focus within local government strategic plans for communities are also set out within this paper.

  3. Thresholds and the resilience of Caribbean coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumby, Peter J; Hastings, Alan; Edwards, Helen J

    2007-11-01

    The deteriorating health of the world's coral reefs threatens global biodiversity, ecosystem function, and the livelihoods of millions of people living in tropical coastal regions. Reefs in the Caribbean are among the most heavily affected, having experienced mass disease-induced mortality of the herbivorous urchin Diadema antillarum in 1983 and two framework-building species of coral. Declining reef health is characterized by increases in macroalgae. A critical question is whether the observed macroalgal bloom on Caribbean reefs is easily reversible. To answer this question, we must resolve whether algal-dominated reefs are an alternative stable state of the ecosystem or simply the readily reversible result of a phase change along a gradient of some environmental or ecological parameter. Here, using a fully parameterized simulation model in combination with a simple analytical model, we show that Caribbean reefs became susceptible to alternative stable states once the urchin mortality event of 1983 confined the majority of grazing to parrotfishes. We reveal dramatic hysteresis in a natural system and define critical thresholds of grazing and coral cover beyond which resilience is lost. Most grazing thresholds lie near the upper level observed for parrotfishes in nature, suggesting that reefs are highly sensitive to parrotfish exploitation. Ecosystem thresholds can be combined with stochastic models of disturbance to identify targets for the restoration of ecosystem processes. We illustrate this principle by estimating the relationship between current reef state (coral cover and grazing) and the probability that the reef will withstand moderate hurricane intensity for two decades without becoming entrained in a shift towards a stable macroalgal-dominated state. Such targets may help reef managers face the challenge of addressing global disturbance at local scales.

  4. [Echinoderms (Echinodermata) of the Mexican Caribbean].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguarda-Figueras, Alfredo; Solis-Marín, Francisco A; Durán-González, Alicia; Ahearn, Cynthia Gust; Buitrón Sánchez, Blanca Estela; Torres-Vega, Juan

    2005-12-01

    A systematic list of the echinoderms of the Mexican Caribbean based on museum specimens of the Colección Nacional de Equinodermos, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. is presented. This list reveals an important echinoderm biodiversity in the Mexican Caribbean, where five of the six echinoderm classes are represented. A total of 178 echinoderm species is recorded, distributed in 113 genera, 51 families and 22 orders. 30 new records for the Mexican Caribbean are presents: Crínoidea (three), Asteroidea (two), Ophiuroidea (eleven), Echinoidea (one), Holothuroidea (thirteen).

  5. Marine Mammals of the Northeastern Caribbean windward Dutch Islands: Saba, St. Eustatius, St. Maarten, and the Saba Bank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debrot, A.O.; Esteban, N.; Bervoets, T.; Hoetjes, P.C.; Scheidat, M.

    2013-01-01

    At least 33 native species of marine mammals have been documented from the Wider Caribbean Region (WCR). For many of these species, the waters of the region serve as primary habitat for critical activities that include feeding, mating and calving. However, relatively little remains known about their

  6. Origin and significance of high nickel and chromium concentrations in Pliocene lignite of the Kosovo Basin, Serbia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruppert, L.; Finkelman, R.; Boti, E.; Milosavljevic, M.; Tewalt, S.; Simon, M.; Dulong, F. [US Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Trace element data from 59 Pliocene lignite cores from the lignite field in the Kosovo Basin, southern Serbia, show localized enrichment of Ni and Cr (33-304 ppm and 8-176 ppm, respectively, whole-coal basis). Concentrations of both elements decrease from the western and southern boundaries of the lignite field. Low-temperature ash and polished coal pellets of selected bench and whole-coal samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analyses. These analyses show that most of the Ni and Cr are incorporated in detrital and, to a lesser degree, in authigenic minerals. The Ni- and Cr-bearing detrital minerals include oxides, chromites, serpentine-group minerals and rare mixed-layer clays. Possible authigenic minerals include Ni-Fe sulfates and sulfides. Analyses of three lignite samples by a supercritical fluid extraction technique indicate that some (1-11%) of the Ni is organically bound, Ni- and Cr-bearing oxides, mixed-layer clays, chromites and serpentine-group minerals were also identified in weathered and fresh samples of laterite developed on serpentinized Palaeozoic peridotite at the nearby Glavica and Cikatovo Ni mines. The detrital Ni- and Cr-bearing minerals identified in lignite samples from the western part of the Kosovo Basin may have been transported into the paleoswamp by rivers that drained the two Palaeocene laterites. Some Ni may have been transported directly into the paleoswamp in solution or, alternatively, Ni may have been leached from detrital minerals by acidic peat water and adsorbed onto organic matter and included into authigenic mineral phases. No minable source of Ni and Cr is known in the southern part of the lignite field; however, the mineral and chemical data from the lignite and associated rocks suggest that such a source area may exist. 15 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Enhancing Carbon Reactivity in Mercury Control in Lignite-Fired Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chad Wocken; Michael Holmes; John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Katie Brandt; Brandon Pavlish; Dennis Laudal; Kevin Galbreath; Michelle Olderbak

    2008-06-30

    This project was awarded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory Program Solicitation DE-PS26-03NT41718-01. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) led a consortium-based effort to resolve mercury (Hg) control issues facing the lignite industry. The EERC team-the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); the URS Corporation; the Babcock & Wilcox Company; ADA-ES; Apogee; Basin Electric Power Cooperative; Otter Tail Power Company; Great River Energy; Texas Utilities; Montana-Dakota Utilities Co.; Minnkota Power Cooperative, Inc.; BNI Coal Ltd.; Dakota Westmoreland Corporation; the North American Coal Corporation; SaskPower; and the North Dakota Industrial Commission-demonstrated technologies that substantially enhanced the effectiveness of carbon sorbents to remove Hg from western fuel combustion gases and achieve a high level ({ge} 55% Hg removal) of cost-effective control. The results of this effort are applicable to virtually all utilities burning lignite and subbituminous coals in the United States and Canada. The enhancement processes were previously proven in pilot-scale and limited full-scale tests. Additional optimization testing continues on these enhancements. These four units included three lignite-fired units: Leland Olds Station Unit 1 (LOS1) and Stanton Station Unit 10 (SS10) near Stanton and Antelope Valley Station Unit 1 (AVS1) near Beulah and a subbituminous Powder River Basin (PRB)-fired unit: Stanton Station Unit 1 (SS1). This project was one of three conducted by the consortium under the DOE mercury program to systematically test Hg control technologies available for utilities burning lignite. The overall objective of the three projects was to field-test and verify options that may be applied cost-effectively by the lignite industry to reduce Hg emissions. The EERC, URS, and other team members tested sorbent injection technologies for plants equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and

  8. Perspectives of the non-energetic use of lignite in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, D.; Sailer, B. [RWE Power AG, Essen (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    RWE Power AG as integral part of RWE Generation SE has been active in the development and commercialization of coal gasification routes for many years. RWE Generation SE is one of Europe's leading electricity producers and combines the expertise of the power plant specialists Essent (NL), RWE npower (UK) and RWE Power (D). A globally increasing freight traffic and accompanying fuel demand is anticipated in the future. This higher demand will probably result in an increase in crude oil price in the course of the next years. There will also be a disproportionately high increase in fuel prices additionally to the increase in the crude oil price due to an increasing treatment effort within refineries. Therefore the substitution of crude oil becomes more and more attractive in view of economical perspectives and security of supply. Crude oil is not only to be substituted as feedstock for fuels but also for the chemical industry. Coal has been and will be the most important feedstock for this. Especially its gasification enables various routes. In Germany there is also an interesting perspective for Coal-to-Liquids and Coal-to-Gas or CtL/CtG as the non-energetic use of coal is abbreviated. Lignite is available regardless of any market impacts and currently faces a change in its use for power generation due to the increasing use of renewable energies. Hence lignite is an attractive feedstock for CtL/CtG in Germany. The construction of a commercial size CtL/CtG plant means a billion Euro investment. So a reliable economic evaluation is inevitable. Today all CtL/CtG routes miss commercial competitiveness to the conventional production by some ten percents. In case the current upward price trend of crude oil continues CtL/CtG might become viable in the near future. The production of synthetic fuels appears most attractive in view of a substantial market potential. The further commercialization of gasification routes in Germany requires R and D activities especially

  9. CARIBE WAVE/LANTEX Caribbean and Western Atlantic Tsunami Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hillebrandt-Andrade, C.; Whitmore, P.; Aliaga, B.; Huerfano Moreno, V.

    2013-12-01

    Over 75 tsunamis have been documented in the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions over the past 500 years. While most have been generated by local earthquakes, distant generated tsunamis can also affect the region. For example, waves from the 1755 Lisbon earthquake and tsunami were observed in Cuba, Dominican Republic, British Virgin Islands, as well as Antigua, Martinique, Guadalupe and Barbados in the Lesser Antilles. Since 1500, at least 4484 people are reported to have perished in these killer waves. Although the tsunami generated by the 2010 Haiti earthquake claimed only a few lives, in the 1530 El Pilar, Venezuela; 1602 Port Royale, Jamaica; 1918 Puerto Rico; and 1946 Samaná, Dominican Republic tsunamis the death tolls ranged to over a thousand. Since then, there has been an explosive increase in residents, visitors, infrastructure, and economic activity along the coastlines, increasing the potential for human and economic loss. It has been estimated that on any day, upwards of more than 500,000 people could be in harm's way just along the beaches, with hundreds of thousands more working and living in the tsunamis hazard zones. Given the relative infrequency of tsunamis, exercises are a valuable tool to test communications, evaluate preparedness and raise awareness. Exercises in the Caribbean are conducted under the framework of the UNESCO IOC Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami and other Coastal Hazards Warning System for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (CARIBE EWS) and the US National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program. On March 23, 2011, 34 countries and territories participated in the first CARIBE WAVE/LANTEX regional tsunami exercise, while in the second exercise on March 20, 2013 a total of 45 countries and territories participated. 481 organizations (almost 200 more than in 2011) also registered to receive the bulletins issued by the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC), West Coast and Alaska Tsunami Warning Center and/or the Puerto Rico

  10. UNESCO-UNEVOC Regional Forum Latin America and the Caribbean: Advancing TVET for Youth Employability and Sustainable Development (San José, Costa Rica, August 27-28, 2013). Meeting Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    UNESCO-UNEVOC International Centre for Technical and Vocational Education and Training, 2013

    2013-01-01

    To strengthen global and regional harmonization for the advancement of TVET transformation through the capacities of UNEVOC's unique global Network of specialized TVET institutions and affiliated partners, the UNESCO-UNEVOC International Centre organized a series of meetings to be held in all regions of the world. The meetings are organized…

  11. Cervical cancer screening programs in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Raul; Almonte, Maribel; Pereira, Ana; Ferrer, Elena; Gamboa, Oscar A; Jerónimo, José; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo

    2008-08-19

    Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) have a significant burden of cervical cancer. Prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are an opportunity for primary prevention and new screening methods, such as new HPV DNA testing, are promising alternatives to cytology screening that should be analyzed in the context of regional preventive programs. Cytology-based screening programs have not fulfilled their expectations and coverage does not sufficiently explain the lack of impact on screening in LAC. While improved evaluation of screening programs is necessary to increase the impact of screening on the reduction of incidence and mortality, other programmatic aspects will need to be addressed such as follow-up of positive tests and quality control. The implementation of new technologies might enhance screening performance and reduce mortality in the region. The characteristics, performance and impact of cervical cancer screening programs in LAC are reviewed in this article.

  12. The cultural politics of biomedicine in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E. Brodwin

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] Healing the Masses: Cuban Health Politics at Home and Abroad. JULIE M. FEINSILVER. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993. xx + 307 pp. (Cloth US$ 45.00, Paper US$ 17.00 The Blessings of Motherhood: Health, Pregnancy and Child Care in Dominica. ANJA KRUMEICH. Amsterdam: Het Spinhuis, 1994. iii + 278 pp. (Paper NLG 47.50 Disability and Rehabilitation in Rural Jamaica: An Ethnographic Study. RONNIE LINDA LEAVITT. Rutherford NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London: Associated University Presses, 1992. 249 pp. (Cloth US$ 39.50 Based on research in three Caribbean societies, these books explore the contours of biomedicine ("Western" or scientific medicine as a cultural system and an instrument of state power. On a theoretical level, the authors take up the blurred boundaries between Western biomedicine and other forms of healing as well as the political meanings and contradictions hidden behind everyday clinical routines. Their particular research projects, however, ask what has happened to the dream of universally accessible medical care in the past twenty years in the Caribbean region. The books focus on a community-based pediatric disability program in Jamaica(Leavitt, maternal and child health care in Dominica (Krumeich, and Cuba's national project of medical modernization (Feinsilver. Specific diseases or clinical outcomes are less at issue than the cultural and political dimensions of planned health development and the social transformations it sets into motion on both local and national levels.

  13. Health expenditures in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraj, R; Chellaraj, G; Murray, C J

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study commissioned by the Latin American and Caribbean Technical Department of the World Bank to document and analyze health expenditures in Latin America and the Caribbean. In 1990, the countries of this region spent US$ 69 billion on health, with an average per capita health expenditure of US$ 162. On average, the countries spent 6.2% of their GDP on health, with the expenditures divided about equally between the public and private sectors. In both the public and private sectors, per capita health expenditures were positively and significantly correlated with per capita income. However, this relationship holds only for the public sector, when health expenditures are measured as a proportion of GDP. While several poorer countries were dependent on external assistance, with increasing income, the countries relied more on public expenditures to finance health care. Based on the limited time series data, it is evident that there was a considerable variation among countries regarding the proportion spent on capital investments, primary health care, and drugs, but not on salaries. Looking ahead, with increasing economic development, the proportion of GDP spent on health, along with public health expenditure as a proportion of total health expenditure, is likely to increase rapidly, while aid dependency is likely to decline.

  14. The status of marine turtles in Montserrat (Eastern Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin, C. S.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The status of marine turtles in Montserrat (Eastern Caribbean is reviewed following five years of monitoring (1999-2003. The mean number of nests recorded during the annual nesting season (June-October was 53 (± 24.9 SD; range: 13-43. In accordance with earlier reports, the nesting of hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata and green (Chelonia mydas turtles was confirmed on several beaches around the island. Only non-nesting emergences were documented for loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta and there was no evidence of nesting by leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea; however, it is possible that additional survey effort would reveal low density nesting by these species. Officially reported turtle capture data for 1993-2003 suggest that a mean of 0.9 turtle per year (±1.2 SD; range: 0-4 were landed island-wide, with all harvest having occurred during the annual open season (1 October to 31 May. Informed observers believe that the harvest is significantly under-reported and that fishermen avoid declaring their catch by butchering turtles at sea (both during and outside the open season. Of concern is the fact that breeding adults are potentially included in the harvest, and that the open season partially coincides with the breeding season. The present study has shown that although Montserrat is not a major nesting site for sea turtles, it remains important on a regional basis for the Eastern Caribbean.

  15. Co-firing of pine chips with Turkish lignites in 750kWth circulating fluidized bed combustion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atimtay, Aysel T; Kayahan, Ufuk; Unlu, Alper; Engin, Berrin; Varol, Murat; Olgun, Hayati; Atakul, Husnu

    2017-01-01

    Two Turkish lignites which have different sulfur levels (2-2.9% dry) and ash levels (17-25% dry) were combusted with a Turkish forest red pine chips in a 750kW-thermal capacity circulating fluidized bed combustor (CFBC) system. The combustion temperature was held at 850±50°C. Flue gas emissions were measured by Gasmet DX-4000 flue gas analyzer. Two lignites were combusted alone, and then limestone was added to lignites to reduce SO2 emissions. Ca/S=3 was used. 30% percent of red pine chips were added to the lignites for co-firing experiments without limestone in order to see the biomass effects. The results showed that with limestone addition SO2 concentration was reduced below the limit values for all lignites. CO emissions are high at low excess air ratios, gets lower as the excess air ratio increases. During co-firing experiments the temperature in the freeboard was 100-150°C higher as compared to coal combustion experiments.

  16. Reactivity of chars prepared from the pyrolysis of a Victorian lignite under a wide range of conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, H.; Mody, D.; Li, C.; Hayashi, J.; Chiba, T. [Monash University, Vic. (Australia). CRC for Clean Power from Lignite, Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2000-07-01

    A Loy Yang lignite sample was pyrolysed under a wide range of experimental conditions using a wire-mesh reactor, a fluidised-bed reactor, a drop-tube reformer and a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA). The reactivity of these char samples in CO{sub 2} and air was measured in the TGA as well as in the fluidised-bed reactor. A sample prepared by the physical impregnation of NaCl into the lignite was also used in order to investigate the effect of NaCl in the lignite on the reactivity of the resulting char. Our experimental results indicate that, due to the volatilisation of a substantial fraction of Na in the lignite substrate during pyrolysis, the true catalytic activity of the Na in the lignite substrate should be evaluated by measuring the sodium content in the char after pyrolysis. The char reactivity measured in situ in the fluidised-bed reactor was compared with that of the same char measured separately in the TGA after re-heating the char sample to the same temperature as that in the fluidised-bed. It was found that the re-heating of the char in the TGA reduced the char reactivity.

  17. Globalisation and Comparative Education: A Caribbean Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisy, Pearlette

    2001-01-01

    The phenomenon of globalization argues for a broader world view that makes allowances for cultural diversity. Caribbean states have a history of living and working with people from diverse backgrounds, and could make a contribution to the new perspective through closer engagement with the field of comparative education, which has always stressed…

  18. Distance Education for Caribbean Social Studies Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Pam

    1991-01-01

    Outlines a distance education Certificate in Education program for teachers in the Commonwealth Caribbean, administered by the University of the West Indies in association with the University of London. Highlights the learning modules of the Teaching of Social Studies option. Examines student evaluation and explores problems that arise in…

  19. Further studies on Caribbean tenebrionid beetles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcuzzi, G.

    1977-01-01

    The study of some newly collected material from the West Indies may justify a fourth paper on Caribbean Tenebrionidae in these “Studies”. Thanks to dr. P. WAGENAAR HUMMELINCK’S collecting work, the Tenebrionid fauna of the Antilles and the adjacent South American mainland shores may be considered to

  20. Feasibility Study: Colombian Caribbean Folk Dances to Increase Physical Fitness and Health-Related Quality of Life in Older Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Ernesto; Hoyos, Diana P; Watt, Willinton J; Lema, Lucía; Arango, Carlos M

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of the study were to describe the feasibility of an intervention in older women based on folk dances of the Colombian Caribbean region, and to analyze the effects of the intervention on physical fitness and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). A pilot study was conducted in a sample of 27 participants, 15 in the intervention group (IG) and 12 in the comparison group (CG). Caribbean Colombian dance rhythms were introduced as an intervention that lasted 12 weeks. Recruitment and retention was not optimal. Treatment fidelity components indicated that intervention was administered as intended. IG participants showed positive and statistically significant changes in some components of physical fitness. No significant changes were observed in HRQoL indicators for either group. In conclusion, the intervention was feasible, but recruitment and retention was challenging. Folk dances of the Colombian Caribbean region provoked significant results in physical fitness but not in HRQoL.

  1. The development of education indicators for measuring quality in the English-speaking Caribbean: how far have we come?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowe, Anica G

    2015-02-01

    Education evaluation has become increasingly important in the English-speaking Caribbean. This has been in response to assessing the progress of four regional initiatives aimed at improving the equity, efficiency, and quality of education. Both special interest groups and local evaluators have been responsible for assessing the progress of education and providing an overall synthesis and summary of what is taking place in the English-speaking Caribbean. This study employed content analysis to examine the indicators used in these education evaluation studies since the declaration of the Caribbean Plan of Action 2000-2015 to determine these indicators' appropriateness to the Caribbean context in measuring education progress. Findings demonstrate that the English-speaking Caribbean has made strides in operationalizing quality input, process, and output indicators; however quality outcome indicators beyond test scores are yet to be realized in a systematic manner. This study also compared the types of collaborative partnerships in conducting evaluation studies used by special interest groups and local evaluators and pinpointed the one that appears most suitable for special interest groups in this region.

  2. Recent improvements in earthquake and tsunami monitoring in the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, L.; Green, D.; McNamara, D.; Whitmore, P.; Weaver, J.; Huang, P.; Benz, H.

    2007-12-01

    Following the catastrophic loss of life from the December 26, 2004, Sumatra-Andaman Islands earthquake and tsunami, the U.S. Government appropriated funds to improve monitoring along a major portion of vulnerable coastal regions in the Caribbean Sea, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic Ocean. Partners in this project include the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN), the Seismic Research Unit of the University of the West Indies, and other collaborating institutions in the Caribbean region. As part of this effort, the USGS is coordinating with Caribbean host nations to design and deploy nine new broadband and strong-motion seismic stations. The instrumentation consists of an STS-2 seismometer, an Episensor accelerometer, and a Q330 high resolution digitizer. Six stations are currently transmitting data to the USGS National Earthquake Information Center, where the data are redistributed to the NOAA's Tsunami Warning Centers, regional monitoring partners, and the IRIS Data Management Center. Operating stations include: Isla Barro Colorado, Panama; Gun Hill Barbados; Grenville, Grenada; Guantanamo Bay, Cuba; Sabaneta Dam, Dominican Republic; and Tegucigalpa, Honduras. Three additional stations in Barbuda, Grand Turks, and Jamaica will be completed during the fall of 2007. These nine stations are affiliates of the Global Seismographic Network (GSN) and complement existing GSN stations as well as regional stations. The new seismic stations improve azimuthal coverage, increase network density, and provide on-scale recording throughout the region. Complementary to this network, NOAA has placed Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunami (DART) stations at sites in regions with a history of generating destructive tsunamis. Recently, NOAA completed deployment of 7 DART stations off the coasts of Montauk Pt, NY; Charleston, SC; Miami, FL; San Juan, Puerto Rico; New

  3. Caribbean mangroves adjust to rising sea level through biotic controls on change in soil elevation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, K.L.; Cahoon, D.R.; Feller, Ilka C.

    2007-01-01

    Aim The long-term stability of coastal ecosystems such as mangroves and salt marshes depends upon the maintenance of soil elevations within the intertidal habitat as sea level changes. We examined the rates and processes of peat formation by mangroves of the Caribbean Region to better understand biological controls on habitat stability. Location Mangrove-dominated islands on the Caribbean coasts of Belize, Honduras and Panama were selected as study sites. Methods Biological processes controlling mangrove peat formation were manipulated (in Belize) by the addition of nutrients (nitrogen or phosphorus) to Rhizophora mangle (red mangrove), and the effects on the dynamics of soil elevation were determined over a 3-year period using rod surface elevation tables (RSET) and marker horizons. Peat composition and geological accretion rates were determined at all sites using radiocarbon-dated cores. Results The addition of nutrients to mangroves caused significant changes in rates of mangrove root accumulation, which influenced both the rate and direction of change in elevation. Areas with low root input lost elevation and those with high rates gained elevation. These findings were consistent with peat analyses at multiple Caribbean sites showing that deposits (up to 10 m in depth) were composed primarily of mangrove root matter. Comparison of radiocarbon-dated cores at the study sites with a sea-level curve for the western Atlantic indicated a tight coupling between peat building in Caribbean mangroves and sea-level rise over the Holocene. Main conclusions Mangroves common to the Caribbean region have adjusted to changing sea level mainly through subsurface accumulation of refractory mangrove roots. Without root and other organic inputs, submergence of these tidal forests is inevitable due to peat decomposition, physical compaction and eustatic sea-level rise. These findings have relevance for predicting the effects of sea-level rise and biophysical processes on tropical

  4. [Hermit crabs (Anomura: Paguroidea) distribution patterns in the Colombian Caribbean Sea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Campos, Bibian; Hernando Campos, Néstor; Bermúdez Tobón, Adriana

    2012-03-01

    Hermit crabs represent the marine life in the Colombian Caribbean, and are important for the dynamic equilibrium maintenance in ecosystems, the ecological interactions and their impact on food web stability. Generally, in order to come up with some conservation strategies, strong bio-geographical information is needed for poll cies definition. With this aim, this study analyzed the distribution patterns of hermit crabs in the Colombian Caribbean Sea. through classification and spatial ordination multivariate analyses, using historical records from years 1916 to 2006. Besides, the world distribution of Colombian species and their geographic affinity in the Caribbean and Western Atlantic were identified. The results show deep differences between coastal and continental slope faunas, and latitudinal differences in the assemblages, with the identification of three groups: Northeast. Center and Southwest. The differences in faunal composition that support these three groups were determined. Based on maps of the Colombian marine ecosystems, it was found that the main factors affecting the distribution of hermit crabs were the Caribaná slope (depth), water-mass temperature, Guajira sea-grass beds, and particular conditions of "Coralline Archipelagos" and "Darién" eco-regions. Colombian hermit crab fauna is more related to the North Atlantic and the Antilles, than to the South Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. Additionally, geographical sub-provinces in which Colombia is included, these were found as transition zones among Northern and Austral subprovinces of the Greater Caribbean.

  5. Drivers of Holocene sea-level change in the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nicole S.; Ashe, Erica; Horton, Benjamin P.; Dutton, Andrea; Kopp, Robert E.; Brocard, Gilles; Engelhart, Simon E.; Hill, David F.; Peltier, W. R.; Vane, Christopher H.; Scatena, Fred N.

    2017-01-01

    We present a Holocene relative sea-level (RSL) database for the Caribbean region (5°N to 25°N and 55°W to 90°W) that consists of 499 sea-level index points and 238 limiting dates. The database was compiled from multiple sea-level indicators (mangrove peat, microbial mats, beach rock and acroporid and massive corals). We subdivided the database into 20 regions to investigate the influence of tectonics and glacial isostatic adjustment on RSL. We account for the local-scale processes of sediment compaction and tidal range change using the stratigraphic position (overburden thickness) of index points and paleotidal modeling, respectively. We use a spatio-temporal empirical hierarchical model to estimate RSL position and its rates of change in the Caribbean over 1-ka time slices. Because of meltwater input, the rates of RSL change were highest during the early Holocene, with a maximum of 10.9 ± 0.6 m/ka in Suriname and Guyana and minimum of 7.4 ± 0.7 m/ka in south Florida from 12 to 8 ka. Following complete deglaciation of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) by ∼7 ka, mid-to late-Holocene rates slowed to model constrains the spatial extent of the mid-Holocene highstand. RSL did not exceed the present height during the Holocene, except on the northern coast of South America, where in Suriname and Guyana, RSL attained a height higher than present by 6.6 ka (82% probability). The highstand reached a maximum elevation of +1.0 ± 1.1 m between 5.3 and 5.2 ka. Regions with a highstand were located furthest away from the former LIS, where the effects from ocean syphoning and hydro-isostasy outweigh the influence of subsidence from forebulge collapse.

  6. Intestinal helminths of Lutjanus griseus (Perciformes: Lutjanidae from three environments in Yucatán (Mexico, with a checklist of its parasites in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean region Helmintos intestinales de Lutjanus griseus (Peciformes: Lutjanidae recolectados en tres ambientes de Yucatán (México, con una lista de sus parásitos en las regiones del golfo de México y el Caribe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly Argáez-García

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A survey of intestinal helminth parasites of the gray snapper, Lutjanus griseus, collected at the estuarine coastal lagoon of Celestún and off the coast of the localities of Chelem and Progreso (Yucatán, Mexico is presented together with a checklist of gray snapper intestinal helminths in the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribben region. Twenty helminth species were found at the Yucatán localities. Eigth of these have previously been reported in the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean region and 12 are new records for L. griseus, which increases the number of species recorded for gray snapper in the region to 44. Only 8 helminth species were recorded from fishes collected inside the coastal lagoon, while all 20 were found in fishes from offshore. Differences in species composition and infection parameters of each helminth species between both habitats are presented and discussed, together with similarities in species composition of the intestinal helminth fauna of L. griseus from Yucatán with those reported for the same host species in the Atlantic coast of USA, the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean regions.En este trabajo se presentan los resultados del análisis helmintológico de los tractos digestivos de pargos Lutjanus griseus colectados en la laguna costera de Celestún y en la zona marina frente a las localidades de Chelem y Progreso (Yucatán, México junto con una lista de los helmintos intestinales registrados para esta especie de hospedero en el golfo de México y la región del Caribe. Veinte especies de helmintos fueron recuperadas en las localidades de Yucatán. Solamente 8 de éstas se han registrado previamente en el golfo de México y el mar Caribe. Doce especies de helmintos son nuevos registros para L. griseus, incrementando así a 44 el número de especies para este hospedero en la región. Solo 8 especies de helmintos se recuperaron de los peces colectados en la laguna costera, mientras que todas las 20 especies se encontraron en

  7. 褐煤及其热解产品利用现状%Utilization status of lignite and pyrolysis products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘军; 邹涛; 初茉; 畅志兵; 林益安

    2014-01-01

    为了提高褐煤利用率,介绍了国内褐煤资源的储量形态、分布。分析了目前褐煤的利用途径,包括共伴生资源的利用、直接燃烧、干燥脱水与成型、气化、液化、制水煤浆与热解。并进一步分析了褐煤热解气、液、固产品的利用方向。提出了褐煤半焦利用的新方法,即利用半焦干法气化,或将半焦和热解废水等制成水煤浆,通过湿法气化制得合成气,再通过甲烷化催化剂将合成气制成甲烷,或将合成气通过费托合成制成汽油柴油。%In order to improve the utilization rate of lignite,the lignite reserves and distribution status was introduced. The utilization ways of lignite,including associated resources utilization,lignite direct combustion,dehydration and briquetting,gasification,liquefaction,py-rolysis and coal water mixture preparation were introduced. Then the using direction of gas,liquid and solid productions of lignite pyrolysis were further investigated. The authors put forward some new utilization methods of lignitic semi-coke, including gasifying the semi-coke by the dry gasification and preparing coal water mixture ( CWM) with semi-coke and pyrolytic waste water. The CWM was gasified to pro-duce syngas by the wet gasification. Then the syngas was used to prepare methane with methanation catalysts, or compound petrol and diesel by Fischer-Tropsch synthesis.

  8. Seismicity with open pit working of a lignite field. [Poland, USA and Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozd, K.; Rybar, J.

    1983-01-01

    Cases are analyzed of oscillations in the Earth's surface associated with lignite quarries near Belkhatuv (Polish People's Republic) and with construction materials quarrels of Wappingers Falls (United States) and with Cerro de Pasco mines (Peru). In the Polish People's Republic, the quarry is located in a tectonically unstable zone. In the detritus and the slope, there are increased horizontal stresses. The slope is represented by strong limestones which are in the overhanging side of the salt overlayers. The factors causing oscillations are: extraction of the sedimentary mass of the basin; overloading of the block of rock massif beyond the edge of the quarry; outflow of a considerable quantity of water from the rock massif. To a considerable degree, similar natural conditions occur in the mentioned quarries of the United States and Peru. In the side of the north Czech lignite basin metamorphites are found and there is no salt overlay; the depth of extraction of the sedimentary mass will be greater (negative factor), the external banks and the water pumped out will be less (positive factors). The danger of the development of induced oscillations in the Earth's surface in the north Czech lignite basin will be less than in the Polish People's Republic. However, it is impossible to exclude completely their development. The following measures are recommended: construction in the basin of 2-3 complex seismic stations; construction near the deep quarries of a network of stations with geoacoustic apparatus; if possible, high external banks are not planned; increased attention is focused on studying the modern tectonic activity.

  9. The Caribbean animal health network: new tools for harmonization and reinforcement of animal disease surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongora, Victor; Trotman, Mark; Thomas, Reginald; Max, Millien; Zamora, Pastor Alfonso; Lepoureau, Maria Teresa Frias; Phanord, Siméon; Quirico, Jocelyn; Douglas, Kirk; Pegram, Rupert; Martinez, Dominique; Petitclerc, Martial; Chouin, Emilie; Marchal, Céline; Chavernac, David; Doyen, David; Vachiéry, Nathalie; Molia, Sophie; Hendrikx, Pascal; Lefrançois, Thierry

    2008-12-01

    The Caribbean Animal Health Network (CaribVET) is a collaboration of veterinary services, diagnostic laboratories, research institutes, universities, and regional/international organizations to improve animal health in the Caribbean. New tools were used by the network to develop regional animal health activities: (1) A steering committee, a coordination unit, and working groups on specific diseases or activities were established. The working group on avian influenza used a collaborative Web site to develop a regionally harmonized avian influenza surveillance protocol and performance indicators. (2) A specific network was implemented on West Nile virus (WNV) to describe the WNV status of the Caribbean countries, to perform a technology transfer of WNV diagnostics, and to establish a surveillance system. (3) The CaribVET Web site (http://www.caribvet.net) encompasses information on surveillance systems, diagnostic laboratories, conferences, bibliography, and diseases of major concern in the region. It is a participatory Web site allowing registered users to add or edit information, pages, or data. An online notification system of sanitary information was set up for Guadeloupe to improve knowledge on animal diseases and facilitate early alert.

  10. Demersal fish assemblages on seamounts and other rugged features in the northeastern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrini, Andrea M.; Demopoulos, Amanda W. J.; Singer, Randal; Roa-Varon, Adela; Chaytor, Jason D.

    2017-01-01

    Recent investigations of demersal fish communities in deep (>50 m) rugged habitats have considerably increased our knowledge of the factors that influence the assemblage structure of fishes across mesophotic to deep-sea depths. Although habitat types influence deepwater fish distribution, whether different rugged seafloor features provide functionally equivalent habitat for fishes is poorly understood. In the northeastern Caribbean, numerous rugged seafloor features (e.g., seamounts, banks, canyons) punctuate insular margins, and thus create a remarkable setting in which to examine demersal fish communities across various seafloor features. Also in this region, several water masses are vertically layered in the water column, creating strong stratification layers corresponding to specific abiotic conditions. In this study, we examined differences among fish assemblages across seafloor features (e.g., seamount, canyon, bank/ridge) and water masses at depths ranging from 98 to 4060 m in the northeastern Caribbean. We conducted 26 ROV dives across 18 sites, yielding 156 species; 42% of which had not been previously recorded from particular depths or localities in the region. While fewer species were observed at seamounts than at other habitats in the NE Caribbean, assemblage structure was similar among habitat features. Thus, similar to seamount studies in other regions, seamounts in the Anegada Passage do not harbor distinct communities from other rugged, topographic features. Species assemblages, however, differed among depths, with zonation generally corresponding to water mass boundaries in the region. High species turnover occurred at depths fish biogeography.

  11. Analysis of Turkish lignite tar by coupled LC/GC, GC/MS, and capillary SFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, I.L.; Raynor, M.W.; Urwin, D.J.; Bartle, K.D.; Tolay, M.; Ekinci, E.; Schwartz, H.E.

    1988-11-01

    This work describes the analysis of a pyrolysis product of a lignite sample obtained from the Turkish Goynuk reserve. The aliphatic, aromatic and polar compounds present in the tar are separated and identified by various chromatographic techniques: capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), on-line high performance microbore liquid chromatography/capillary gas chromatography (LC/GC) and capillary supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). The suitability of each technique for this particular application is discussed, and semi-quantitative results are presented for the major components detected. 35 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. The treatment of a deposited lignite pyrolysis wastewater by adsorption using activated carbon and activated coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiessner, A.; Remmler, M.; Kuschk, P.; Stottmeister, U. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Remediation Research

    1998-07-31

    This paper investigated activated carbon and activated coke adsorption for the treatment of highly contaminated discoloured industrial wastewater with a wide molecular size distribution of organic compounds. Lignite pyrolysis wastewater from a filled open-cast coal mine was used for continuous and discontinuous experiments. The investigations were performed using water samples taken from various depths of the deposits ponds. A comparison of the capacities of the adsorption materials used showed, that because of its large number of macro and mesopores, activated coke is more suitable for wastewater treatment and in addition cheaper than activated carbon.

  13. Lignite coke moving bed adsorber for cement plants - BAT or beyond BAT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenberger, H. [European Commission, Seville (Spain). Joint Research Center

    2011-06-15

    The IPPC Directive requires permits which must contain emission limit values and other conditions based on BAT. The BAT are characterised and the terms 'conditional BAT' and 'beyond BAT' are defined and explained. The borderline between BAT and beyond BAT is explained by means of an outstanding example which is the lignite coke moving bed adsorber for the abatement of the waste gas from a cement plant where waste for co-incineration is fed to a considerable extent is described in detail. Worldwide, this technique has been successfully applied at one cement plant for sixteen years.

  14. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 10. Gasification of Benton lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-05-01

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report is the tenth volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific report describes the gasification of Benton lignite. The period of gasification test was November 1-8, 1983. 16 refs., 22 figs., 19 tabs.

  15. Computational Chemistry Approach to Interpret the Crystal Violet Adsorption on Golbasi Lignite Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depci, Tolga; Sarikaya, Musa; Prisbrey, Keith A.; Yucel, Aysegul

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, adsorption mechanism of Crystal Violet (CV) dye from the aqueous solution on the activated carbon prepared from Golbasi lignite was explained and interpreted by a computational chemistry approach and experimental studies. Molecular dynamic simulations and Ab initio frontier orbital analysis indicated relatively high energy and electron transfer processes during adsorption, and molecular dynamics simulations showed CV dye molecules moving around on the activated carbon surface after adsorption, facilitating penetration into cracks and pores. The experimental results supported to molecular dynamic simulation and showed that the monolayer coverage occurred on the activated carbon surface and each CV dye ion had equal sorption activation energy.

  16. Aluminium speciation and phytotoxicity in minesoils of a lignite mine in NW Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monterroso, C.; Alvarez, E.; Marcos, M.L.F.; Macias, F. [University of Santiago, Lugo (Spain)

    1998-01-01

    The soil solution composition and the solution aluminium speciation were used to evaluate Al phytotoxicity risks in the reclaimed soils of the lignite mine in As Pontes, NW Spain. The vegetation decline in some soils containing sulphides appears to be related to the high acidity and salinity rising from sulphide oxidation rather than to the high aluminium concentrations. The high concentrations of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and base cations, particularly Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}, play a detoxifying role in these environments.

  17. Behavior study of trace elements in pulverized lignite, bottom ash, and fly ash of Amyntaio power station, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megalovasilis, Pavlos; Papastergios, Georgios; Filippidis, Anestis

    2013-07-01

    The Kozani-Ptolemais-Amyntaio basin constitutes the principal coal field of Greece. Approximately 50% of the total power production of Greece is generated by five power stations operating in the area. Lignite samples, together with the corresponding fly ash and bottom ash were collected, over a period of 3 months, from the power plant of Amyntaio and analyzed for their content in 16 trace elements. The results indicate that Y, Nb, U, Rb, Zr, Ni, Pb, Ba, Zn, Sr, Cu, and Th demonstrate an organic affinity during the combustion of lignite, while V has an inorganic affinity. Three elements (Co, Cr, and Sc) show an intermediate affinity.

  18. Computer resource model of the Matra-Bukkalja, Hungary, lignite deposit for production planning, inspection and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fust, A.; Zergi, I.

    1985-01-01

    For the planning of lignite surface mining, a reliable geologic model is needed which can be updated by new survey data and used for the operative control of production. A computer model is proposed to analyze control, planning and inspection of production. The model is composed of two components, one from the geologic survey data, and the other refined by the production data. The half variograms of the Matra-Bukkalja lignite deposits are presented. The model can be used for the checking of forecast data.

  19. Problems of venereal infections in Latin America and the Caribbean and means of fighting them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, H R

    1978-01-01

    Rather than providing a comprehensive overview of the sexually transmitted disease (STD) picture in the Americas, this presentation contrasts the STD problem in Latin America and the Caribbean with the situation in both less developed and more developed regions of the world. It also points out three areas of opportunity for improving preventive and curative STD services, specifically: (1) more effective utilization of social security institutions in Latin America, (2) incorporation of STD services into primary health care programs, and (3) development of pilot projects in the smaller Caribbean territories. It is noted, in addition, that the more developed countries of the region are showing increased interest in sexually transmitted diseases. Among other things, the recruitment of a PAHO epidemiologist in venereal diseases on Jamaica--to assist in the development of a national STD program--opens up a new area for PAHO technical assistance which, if successful, may be extended elsewhere.

  20. Review of genetic diversification of bats in the Caribbean and biogeographic relationships to Neotropical species based on DNA barcodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Burton K

    2017-01-01

    DNA barcoding is helping in discovering high levels of cryptic species and an underestimation of biodiversity in many groups of organisms. Although mammals are arguably the most studied and one of the least speciose taxonomic classes, the rate of species discovery is increasing and biased for small mammals on islands. An earlier study found bats in the Caribbean as a taxonomic and geographic deficiency in the International Barcode of Life initiative to establish a genetic reference database to enable specimen identification to species. Recent surveys in Dominican Republic, Jamaica, and Martinique have documented and barcoded half of the 58 bat species known from the Caribbean. I analyze all available barcode data of Caribbean bats to investigate biogeography and cryptic species in the Neotropical region. Analysis of the mitochondrial DNA gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 results in a phylogenetic tree with all but one species as well-supported and reciprocally monophyletic. With a broader sampling across the Neotropics, there are also divergent lineages that exhibit biogeographic structuring: (i) a phylogenetic split between northern and southern Dominican Republic in three species, (ii) two taxa with cryptic species associated with higher degree of island endemism, (iii) populations of two widely distributed species with deep divergence between the Caribbean and North and Central America, and (iv) one species in the Caribbean with affinities to taxa in South America.

  1. Comparative balance of border regulations in four neighboring Caribbean countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Cristina Mantilla Valbuena

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to investigate whether there is a potential for border integration among four adjoining Caribbean countries: Colombia, Nicaragua, Panama and Costa Rica. The discussion is part of the “cross-border” concept and the integration of subnational entities in two or more nation states, with particular emphasis on the role played by the societies that inhabit border regions. A comparative analysis model is used to assess border regulations in each country’s various territorial levels based on relevant legal elements, autonomous processes and decentralization. The article concludes that the more modern each country’s border regulations and constitutional, political and administrative reforms are, the greater the likelihood of cross-border integration. Colombia and Nicaragua have the highest potential for integrating their borders, whereas Panama and Costa Rica have the lowest potential.

  2. Dengue transmission in the small-island setting: investigations from the Caribbean island of Grenada

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøler, Karin Linda; Macpherson, Calum N

    2009-01-01

    The Caribbean region has experienced a major surge in dengue activity in recent decades. Yet, for many, and especially the smaller islands, the true extent and general epidemiology of dengue transmission remains unclear because of inadequate systems of surveillance and reporting. We established a...... benign dengue fever. A shift in serotype activity and modal age was evident during the noted transition, with the more densely populated south end of the island presenting the focus of transmission....

  3. Creolization redux : the plural society thesis and offshore financial services in the British Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Maurer

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Argues that the connection between political fragmentation and offshore financial services illustrate an increasingly common vision of the political and economic future among leaders of the British Caribbean who seek to carve out a place for their countries and territories in the new global economy. Their success is based on standing outside regional federations and providing services to parties wishing to conduct business between or around economic blocs.

  4. Do Minimum Wages in Latin America and the Caribbean Matter? Evidence from 19 Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Nicolai; Cunningham, Wendy

    Despite the existence of minimum wage legislation in most Latin American countries, there is little empirical evidence demonstrating its impact on the distribution of wages. In this study, cross-country data for 19 Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries is analyzed to gain an understanding ...... of the regional study "The Role of Minimum Wages in Latin America: Poverty Alleviation, Income Inequality, Employment, and Wages"....

  5. Education Management Information Systems (EMIS) in Latin America and the Caribbean: Lessons and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Cassidy

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the status of Education Management Information Systems (EMIS) in Latin American and the Caribbean. It includes a history of EMIS development efforts in the region; an outline of practical lessons learned from earlier EMIS development efforts; the identification of current and emerging challenges for developing EMIS; and the identification of promising examples of the use of better data and information to inform education policy and planning. The study was prepa...

  6. Non-Detriment Finding Regarding the Export of Queen conch (Lobatus gigas) from St Eustatius (Caribbean Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, de M.; Meijer zu Schlochteren, M.; Boman, E.

    2014-01-01

    Queen conch (Lobatus gigas (Strombidae; Gastropoda) is a large, long-lived marine gastropod that is widely distributed throughout the coastal zones of the Wider Caribbean region. Because of concern for its future the species was listed in Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endan

  7. Antennal responses of West Indian and Caribbean fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) to ammonium bicarbonate and putrescine lures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efforts to monitor and detect tephritid fruit flies in the genus Anastrepha currently involve MultiLure traps baited with two food-based synthetic attractants; ammonium acetate and putrescine (1,4-diaminobutane). These baits are used in Central America, Florida, Texas, and the Caribbean, each region...

  8. 76 FR 23930 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Snapper-Grouper Fishery of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-29

    ... Snapper and Gag Commercial Trip Limits Amendment 17B to the FMP (75 FR 82280, December 30, 2010), recently... Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Snapper-Grouper Fishery of the South Atlantic; Snapper...) to the Fishery Management Plan for the Snapper-Grouper Fishery of the South Atlantic Region...

  9. A Vanishing Rural School Advantage? Changing Urban/Rural Student Achievement Differences in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luschei, Thomas F.; Fagioli, Loris P.

    2016-01-01

    In 1997, a cross-national assessment of educational achievement in Latin America and the Caribbean found that rural schools in Colombia outperformed urban schools in tests of reading and mathematics, except in very large cities. Given a long history of urban/rural inequality in the region, Colombia's rural school advantage attracted substantial…

  10. Improving Science, Technology and Mathematics Students' Achievement: Imperatives for Teacher Preparation in the Caribbean Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunkola, Babalola J.

    2012-01-01

    The concerns of this article are the unacceptable status of Science, Technology and Mathematics (STM) Education in the Caribbean and how to improve the students' achievement in the subjects involved through the instrumentality of better preparation of teachers by the Colleges and University faculties training teachers in the region. The index for…

  11. Cenozoic rift formation in the northern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, P.; Burke, K.

    1984-01-01

    Rifts form in many different tectonic environments where the lithosphere is put into extension. An outline is provided of the distribution, orientation, and relative ages of 16 Cenozoic rifts along the northern edge of the Caribbean plate and it is suggested that these structures formed successively by localized extension as the Caribbean plate moved eastward past a continental promontory of North America. Evidence leading to this conclusion includes (1) recognition that the rifts become progressively younger westward; (2) a two-phase subsidence history in a rift exposed by upthrusting in Jamaica; (3) the absence of rifts east of Jamaica; and (4) the observation that removal of 1400 km of strike-slip displacement on the Cayman Trough fault system places the Paleogene rifts of Jamaica in an active area of extension south of Yucatan where the rifts of Honduras and Guatemala are forming today.

  12. Understanding trophic relationships among Caribbean sea urchins

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez Barreras, Ruber; Cuevas, Elvira; Cabanillas-Terán, Nancy; Branoff, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The species Echinometra lucunter, Echinometra viridis, Lytechinus variegatus, Tripneustes ventricosus, and Diadema antillarum are the most common sea urchins of littoral habitats in the Caribbean. T. ventricosus and L. variegatus are associated with seagrass beds, while the other three species usually inhabit hardground substrates. Food preferences of these species are well documented and they are commonly accepted as being primarily herbivorous-omnivorous; nevertheless, few of them have prev...

  13. Art Music by Caribbean Composers: The Bahamas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangelhoff, Christine

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The cultural identity of the Bahamas owes much to its West African and British colonial heritages and to its physical proximity to the United States. A combination of African and European elements - rhyming spirituals, anthems, rushin' music at watch-night services, wake and setting-up songs; ringplays, fire dance, jump-in-dance, quadrille music (rake-‘n’-scrape music, goombay, and junkanoo - can be seen in musical traditions throughout the Caribbean, including art music.

  14. Achieving Energy Security in the Caribbean Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    biodiesels. Ethanol is the liquid biofuel that results from the fermentation of sugar crops, or from the hydrolysis of starch or cellulose. Biodiesel...exports from 24 to 52 percent. 31 Competition from artificial and starch -based sweeteners has also damaged Caribbean exports. Diversification from...generous tax holidays and exemptions for potential biofuels investment. Some private investment has materialized. In 2002, China invested $250

  15. Combined Operations a Commonwealth Caribbean Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-03

    162 Boundaries and Objectives. C Strategy and Correlation fo Forces. C: Commonwealth Caribbean Current Security Pos tur e...ase Islas COL.OMBIA) .t.. *5lItCARAGUA) vas. i. %OSTA Boca ~RICA del Tono Colo.. -- - GO fit Panama a -aPacific PANAMA r *> Ocean-. lala del Coco...Grenada Post- Mortem : A Report That Wasn’t. Army, June 1984. 176 Cragg, D. Operation Urgent Fury: The US Army in Grenada. Army, December 1983. Hixson

  16. Art Music by Caribbean Composers: Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LeGrand, Cathleen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Haïti has by far the longest history of independence of any of its Caribbean neighbors, having gained independence from France in 1804. Haïti's tradition of classical music takes root in its colonial heritage. Haïtian classical music, "mizik savant ayisyen," is derived from that "desire to retain European standards while including local features" of indigenous musical traditions (Grenier & Averill, 2007-2011.

  17. Geochemistry of Kasnau-Matasukh lignites, Nagaur Basin,Rajasthan (India)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prakash K.Singh; Pramod K.Rajak; Mahendra P.Singh; Vijay K.Singh; Amiya S.Naik

    2016-01-01

    The distribution and verticals variation of geochemical components in the Kasnau-Matasukh lignites of Nagaur Basin,Rajasthan,were investigated using microscopy,proximate and ultimate analyses,Rock-Eval Pyrolysis,X-ray diffraction and Fourier Transform Infrared analyses,and major/minor/trace element determination.The relationship of elements with ash content and with macerals have also been discussed.These lignites are stratified,black,dominantly composed of huminite group macerals with subordinated amounts of liptinite and inertinite groups.They are classified as type-Ⅲ kerogen and are mainly gas prone in nature.The concentration (in vol%) of mineral matter is seen to increase towards upper part of seam and so is the concentration (in wt%) of the volatile matter,elemental carbon and sulphur.The common minerals present in these lignitesare mixed clay layer,chlorite,and quartz as identified by X-ray diffraction study.Compared with world average in brown coal,the bulk concentration of Cu is anomalously high in most of the samples while Cd is 2-3 times high and Zn is high in one band.Based on interrelationship,different pyrite forms are noticed to have different preferential enrichment of various elements.The concentration of disseminated pyrite is more than the other pyrite forms and is followed by discrete pyrite grains and massive pyrite.

  18. Structural degradation of Thar lignite using MW1 fungal isolate: optimization studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Rizwan; Ghauri, Muhammad A.; Jones, Elizabeth J.; Orem, William H.; SanFilipo, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Biological degradation of low-rank coals, particularly degradation mediated by fungi, can play an important role in helping us to utilize neglected lignite resources for both fuel and non-fuel applications. Fungal degradation of low-rank coals has already been investigated for the extraction of soil-conditioning agents and the substrates, which could be subjected to subsequent processing for the generation of alternative fuel options, like methane. However, to achieve an efficient degradation process, the fungal isolates must originate from an appropriate coal environment and the degradation process must be optimized. With this in mind, a representative sample from the Thar coalfield (the largest lignite resource of Pakistan) was treated with a fungal strain, MW1, which was previously isolated from a drilled core coal sample. The treatment caused the liberation of organic fractions from the structural matrix of coal. Fungal degradation was optimized, and it showed significant release of organics, with 0.1% glucose concentration and 1% coal loading ratio after an incubation time of 7 days. Analytical investigations revealed the release of complex organic moieties, pertaining to polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and it also helped in predicting structural units present within structure of coal. Such isolates, with enhanced degradation capabilities, can definitely help in exploiting the chemical-feedstock-status of coal.

  19. First year survival of barefoot and containerized hardwood tree seedlings planted in northeast Texas lignite minesoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, J.; Denman, J. [Texas Utilities Mining Company, Mt. Pleasant, TX (United States); Waxler, M.; Huber, D.A. [Weyerhaeuser, Hot Springs, AK (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Successful regeneration of hardwood tree seedlings is critical to the reclamation of quality wildlife habitat and commercial forests on lignite mines in northeast Texas. Because bareroot hardwood seedlings survival rates have often been lower than desired, the survival of containerized and bareroot hardwood tree seedlings was compared. Seven hardwood species, including six species of oaks, were planted in lignite minesoils on sites classified as bottomland, slope and upland. Three species were planted per site. Containerized seedlings were planted during the fall and winter, whereas bareroot seedlings were planted in the winter only. Survival was determined at the end of the first growing season. Results across all sites indicate that winter-planted containerized seedlings (74%) or bareroot seedlings (76%). Within the sites, the only significant difference was on upland sites where survival of winter-planted containerized seedlings (60%) was lower than bareroot seedlings (77%). Survival among species was not significantly different. There was no significant survival benefit from using more expensive containerized hardwood seedlings. The results also question the practice of planting containerized hardwood seedlings during the typical winter planting season for optimum survival.

  20. Lignite air-steam gasification in the fluidized bed of iron-containing slag catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, B.N.; Shchipko, M.L.; Golovin, Yu. [Inst. of Chemistry of Natural Organic Materials, Academgorodok, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-01

    The influence of fluidized bed of iron-containing slag particles on air-steam gasification of powdered Kansk-Achinsk lignite in entrained flow was studied in pilot installation with productivity about 60 kg per hour. Slag of Martin process and boiler slag were used as catalytic active materials until their complete mechanical attrition. Two following methods of catalytic gasification of lignite were compared: the partial gasification in stationary fluidized bed of slag particles with degree of fuel conversion 40-70% and complete gasification in circulating bed of slag particles. In the first case only the most reactive part of fuel is gasified with the simultaneously formation of porous carbon residue with good sorption ability. It was found the catalytic fluidized bed improves heat transfer from combustion to reduction zone of gas-generator and increases the rate of fuel conversion at the temperature range 900-1000{degrees}C. At these temperatures the degree of conversion is depended considerably on the duration time of fuel particles in the catalytic fluidized bed. The influence of catalytic fluidized bed height and velocity of reaction mixture on the temperature profiles in the gas-generator was studied. The optimal relationship was found between the fluidized bed height and velocity of flow which makes possible to produce the gas with higher calorific value at maximum degree of fuel conversion.

  1. Hydrologic and geochemical data for the Big Brown Lignite Mine area, Freestone County, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorsey, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    Lignite mining in east and east-central Texas is increasing in response to increased energy needs throughout the State. Associated with the increase in mining activities is a greater need to know the effects of mining activities on the water quantity and quality of near surface aquifers. One of the potential hydrologic effects of surface coal mining is a change in the quality of groundwater associated with replacement of aquifer materials by mine spoils. The purpose of this report is to compile and categorize geologic, mineralogic, geochemical, and hydrologic data for the Big Brown Lignite Mine and surrounding area in east-central Texas. Included are results of paste-extract analyses, constituent concentrations in water from batch-mixing experiments, sulfur analyses, and minerals or mineral groups detected by X-ray diffraction in 12 spoil material samples collected from 3 locations at the mine site. Also, common-constituent and trace-constituent concentrations in water from eight selected wells, located updip and downdip from the mine, are presented. Dissolved solids concentrations in water from batch-mixing experiments vary from 12 to 908 mg/L. Water from selected wells contains dissolved solids concentrations ranging from 75 to 510 mg/L. 10 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  2. Paleogeography and paleoecology of the upper Miocene Zillingdorf lignite deposit (Austria)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel, A.; Reischenbacher, D.; Sachsenhofer, R.F.; Gratzer, R. [Department Angewandte Geowissenschaften und Geophysik, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Peter-Tunner-Str. 5, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Luecke, A. [Institut fuer Chemie und Dynamik der Geosphaere V: Sedimentaere Systeme (ICG V), Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2007-02-01

    The Zillingdorf deposit formed during the late Miocene filling of Lake Pannon and contains Austria's largest lignite reserves. Two lignite seams are present and developed within frequently flooded, low-lying mires in near shore environments. High sulphur contents are due to the influence of the brackish water body of Lake Pannon. During peat accumulation a transgression forced the NW-SE trending shoreline northeastwards. Differences in soluble organic matter (SOM) yield and hydrocarbon content of borehole samples and woody macrofossils are related to differences in the content and composition of free lipids of microbial origin and/or hydrocarbons derived from the biogeochemical degradation of plant tissue. Variations of pristane/phytane ratios are interpreted to reflect differences in the redox conditions of the mire. Peatification in an acidic and aerobic environment is further reflected by the predominance of aromatic over saturated hydrocarbons, the presence of an intense complex mixture in the GC traces due to biodegradation processes, high ratios for diasterenes relative to sterenes, and high concentration ratios of hopanes to hop-17(21)-ene of the respective samples. Gelification of plant tissue is governed by microbial activity, as indicated by the positive relationship between gelification index and hopanoids concentration. The composition of terpenoid biomarkers indicates the predominance of gymnosperms over angiosperms and increasing proportions of angiosperms in the peat-forming vegetation with decreasing depth in the upper seam. From the sesqui- and diterpenoids present in the lignite and fossil wood remnants, a predominant role of species of the Coniferales families Cupressaceae/Taxodiaceae are concluded. The preservation of plant tissue is governed by the presence/absence of decay-resistant gymnosperms. A general influence of the floral assemblage on the isotopic composition of organic carbon of the lignite ({delta}{sup 13}C=-27.2 to -24.6%%) is

  3. Caribbean brackish and freshwater Cyanophyceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Joséphine Th.

    1960-01-01

    Among the extensive collections of algae made by Dr P. Wagenaar Hummelinck (Utrecht) in the Antilles and adjacent regions during the years 1930, 1936, 1937, 1948—1949, 1955, a number of chiefly brackish, but also freshwater, Cyanophyceae were incorporated. This collection was kindly committed for st

  4. Sulfur Distribution during Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Lignite, Wheat Straw and Plastic Waste in Sub-Critical Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Baofeng; Huang Yaru; Zhang Jinjun

    2015-01-01

    The distribution and transformation of sulfur in products during hydrothermal liquefaction of lignite, wheat straw and plastic waste in sub-critical water were investigated in an autoclave. The inlfuence of blending ratio, temperature, initial nitrogen pressure, residence time and additives on sulfur distribution was studied systematically. The results showed that most of sulfur existed as organic sulfur and transferred into the residue, and only a small part of sulfur transferred into oil and gas during hydrothermal liquefaction of lignite, wheat straw and plastic waste in sub-critical water. The results also showed that lower temperature (less than 300℃) was favorable for obtaining oil with low sulfur content. It can be also seen from the results that the best condition to obtain the oil with low sulfur content should be implemented at a lignite/wheat straw/plastic waste blending ratio of 5:4:1, an initial nitrogen pressure of 3 MPa and a residence time of 30 minutes. Fur-thermore, the results indicated that adding tourmaline during hydrothermal liquefaction of lignite, wheat straw and plastic waste was beneifcial to production of oil with low sulfur content.

  5. Combustion characteristics and air pollutant formation during oxy-fuel co-combustion of microalgae and lignite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Tahmasebi, Arash; Dou, Jinxiao; Yu, Jianglong

    2016-05-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion of solid fuels is seen as one of the key technologies for carbon capture to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The combustion characteristics of lignite coal, Chlorella vulgaris microalgae, and their blends under O2/N2 and O2/CO2 conditions were studied using a Thermogravimetric Analyzer-Mass Spectroscopy (TG-MS). During co-combustion of blends, three distinct peaks were observed and were attributed to C. vulgaris volatiles combustion, combustion of lignite, and combustion of microalgae char. Activation energy during combustion was calculated using iso-conventional method. Increasing the microalgae content in the blend resulted in an increase in activation energy for the blends combustion. The emissions of S- and N-species during blend fuel combustion were also investigated. The addition of microalgae to lignite during air combustion resulted in lower CO2, CO, and NO2 yields but enhanced NO, COS, and SO2 formation. During oxy-fuel co-combustion, the addition of microalgae to lignite enhanced the formation of gaseous species.

  6. BOLIVAR & GEODINOS: Investigations of the Southern Caribbean Plate Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levander, A.; Schmitz, M.; Working Groups, B.

    2006-12-01

    , and is associated with broad uplift of the coastal regions. This is likely a site of continental growth. 2) The accretionary wedge terranes of the Southern Caribbean Deformed Belt formed in the Neogene, and extend as far east as the Aves Ridge. They result from SA overriding the CAR LIP, which for a number of reasons, we do not regard as normal subduction. 3) Igneous rocks on the islands of the Leeward Antilles arc, Aruba to Los Testigos, show a steady decrease in age from west to east (94.7-37.4 Ma), suggesting that the islands have been progressively captured from the Antilles arc by the plate boundary during the prolonged island arc-continent collision. Terrane capture models thus far cannot completely explain the data. 4) High (> 6.5 km/s) P-velocity bodies are found in the shallow crust along the main strike-slip faults along much of the plate boundary. We interpret these as elements of the HP/LT metamorphic terranes found in the adjacent thrust belts of central Venezuela. This suggests to us that displacement partitioning in the trench and subsequent strike-slip both play important roles in exhumation of the HP/LT terranes. 5) Crustal thickness variations in the plate boundary region are large (> 10 km), of short spatial wavelength (< 100 km), and indicate that the highest elevations of the coastal mountain belts are not supported isostatically.

  7. Modelling of environmental impacts of 140 years of open pit lignite mining and chemical industry on groundwater contaminants in the Bitterfeld area, Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gossel, W.; Stollberg, R.; Wycisk, P. [Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany). Inst. of Geosciences, Dept. of Hydrogeology and Environmental Geology

    2010-07-01

    In this study, a groundwater flow and transport model was used to estimate the contamination of watersheds located in the Bitterfeld area in Germany. The contamination was caused by previous open pit lignite mining activities in the region as well as by contaminants from a chemical plant. A high resolution geological model of the area was used to parametrize the model. The region is geologically complex, with Pleistocene channels and gullies from the Saalenian age. The mining activities also disturbed or destroyed many geological structures in the region. A geological description was provided, as well as details of hydraulic conductivity, lithology, and hydrostratigraphy. The model was based on borehole data and maps covering a total area of 60 km{sup 2}. The time-dependent groundwater recharge and boundary conditions were set. Dispersivity and diffusivity parameters were also considered. The model accurately characterized the successive spreading of groundwater contamination over the last 100 years in the area. The study showed that the contamination will spread to nature reserve zones in the region over the next few decades. 3 refs. 1 tab., 2 figs.

  8. The Adsorption of Phenol by Lignite Activated Carbon%褐煤活性炭吸附苯酚的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕国诚; 郝娇; 刘瑠; 马鸿文; 方勤方; 吴丽梅; 魏铭泉; 张以河

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility and adsorption effect of lignite activated carbon for phenol removal from aqueous solutions were evaluated and investigated. A series of tests were performed to look into the influence of various experimental parameters such as contact time, initial phenol concentration, temperature, and pH value on the adsorption of phenol by lignite activated carbon. The experimental data were fitted well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The adsorption is an endothermic process and conforms to Freundlich thermodynamic model. The results indicate that the lignite activated carbon is suitable to be used as an adsorbent material for adsorption of phenol from aqueous solutions.

  9. Anthropogenic mortality on coral reefs in Caribbean Panama predates coral disease and bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Katie L; Jackson, Jeremy B C; Angioletti, Christopher V; Leonard-Pingel, Jill; Guilderson, Thomas P

    2012-06-01

    Caribbean reef corals have declined precipitously since the 1980s due to regional episodes of bleaching, disease and algal overgrowth, but the extent of earlier degradation due to localised historical disturbances such as land clearing and overfishing remains unresolved. We analysed coral and molluscan fossil assemblages from reefs near Bocas del Toro, Panama to construct a timeline of ecological change from the 19th century-present. We report large changes before 1960 in coastal lagoons coincident with extensive deforestation, and after 1960 on offshore reefs. Striking changes include the demise of previously dominant staghorn coral Acropora cervicornis and oyster Dendrostrea frons that lives attached to gorgonians and staghorn corals. Reductions in bivalve size and simplification of gastropod trophic structure further implicate increasing environmental stress on reefs. Our paleoecological data strongly support the hypothesis, from extensive qualitative data, that Caribbean reef degradation predates coral bleaching and disease outbreaks linked to anthropogenic climate change.

  10. Stigma toward mental illness in Latin America and the Caribbean: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Mascayano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Stigma toward individuals with mental disorders has been studied extensively. In the case of Latin America and the Caribbean, the past decade has been marked by a significant increase in information on stigma toward mental illness, but these findings have yet to be applied to mental health services in Latin America. The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic review of studies relating to stigma toward mental illness in Latin America and the Caribbean. The authors specifically considered differences in this region as compared with manifestations reported in Western European countries. Methods: A systematic search of scientific papers was conducted in the PubMed, MEDLINE, EBSCO, SciELO, LILACS, Imbiomed, and Bireme databases. The search included articles published from 2002 to 2014. Results: Twenty-six studies from seven countries in Latin America and the Caribbean were evaluated and arranged into the following categories: public stigma, consumer stigma, family stigma, and multiple stigmas. Conclusion: We identified some results similar to those reported in high-income settings. However, some noteworthy findings concerning public and family stigma differed from those reported in Western European countries. Interventions designed to reduce mental illness-related stigma in this region may benefit from considering cultural dynamics exhibited by the Latino population.

  11. What is the evidence for subduction in the Caribbean Margin of Colombia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossello, E.; Cossey, S.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the origin and evolution of the Colombian Caribbean Margin (CMC) by both academia and the petroleum industry. Conflicting hypotheses have emerged of the regional tectonic context and nature of the boundary of the Caribbean and South American plates. Many authors describe the subduction of the Caribbean plate under the South American plate with sutures and other related tectonic phenomena, such as the subsequent development of an accretionary prism. However, there is no clear surface morphological evidence such as a trench or onshore mountains to support this hypothesis. Nor is there any subsurface evidence such as a magmatic arc or dipping seismicity that is typically seen in other known subduction margins (e.g. Chile-Peru, Indonesia, Aleutians, etc). It is proposed that the CMC is a result of the dynamic balance of an early extensional margin related to a Mesozoic to Cenozoic passive margin style where the continental platform progrades onto the oceanic plate and a late transpressional inversion is associated with oblique convergence. The controversy over the tectonic setting of the CMC is extremely important because it impacts the petroleum potential of the region. It could be resolved by a incorporating tectono-sedimentary and 4D deformational analyses with recent surface and subsurface data.

  12. Characterization of Future Caribbean Rainfall and Temperature Extremes across Rainfall Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Melissa McLean

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available End-of-century changes in Caribbean climate extremes are derived from the Providing Regional Climate for Impact Studies (PRECIS regional climate model (RCM under the A2 and B2 emission scenarios across five rainfall zones. Trends in rainfall, maximum temperature, and minimum temperature extremes from the RCM are validated against meteorological stations over 1979–1989. The model displays greater skill at representing trends in consecutive wet days (CWD and extreme rainfall (R95P than consecutive dry days (CDD, wet days (R10, and maximum 5-day precipitation (RX5. Trends in warm nights, cool days, and warm days were generally well reproduced. Projections for 2071–2099 relative to 1961–1989 are obtained from the ECHAM5 driven RCM. Northern and eastern zones are projected to experience more intense rainfall under A2 and B2. There is less consensus across scenarios with respect to changes in the dry and wet spell lengths. However, there is indication that a drying trend may be manifest over zone 5 (Trinidad and northern Guyana. Changes in the extreme temperature indices generally suggest a warmer Caribbean towards the end of century across both scenarios with the strongest changes over zone 4 (eastern Caribbean.

  13. 78 FR 32623 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC706 Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Caribbean Fishery Management Council's Scientific and ] Statistical Committee (SSC) will hold meetings. DATES: The SSC meetings will be held June...

  14. 78 FR 64200 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC933 Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Caribbean Fishery Management Council's (Council) Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC) will hold meetings. DATES: The SSC meetings will...

  15. Diversification at the narrow sea-land interface in the Caribbean: phylogeography of endemic supralittoral Ligia isopods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana eMateos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Phylogeographic studies have provided valuable insights into the evolutionary histories and biodiversity of different groups in the Caribbean, a region that harbors exceptional terrestrial and marine biodiversity. Herein, we examined phylogeographic patterns of the poorly dispersing supralittoral isopod Ligia sampled from 35 localities in the Caribbean Sea and adjacent areas, as well as from Veracruz (Gulf of Mexico, the type locality of L. baudiniana (the only currently recognized native Ligia species in the Caribbean. We conducted Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of four mitochondrial genes (Cytb, 16S rDNA, 12S rDNA and COI and Parsimony analyses of one nuclear gene (NaK. We found a well-supported and highly divergent clade of Ligia that is distributed in the Caribbean Sea, Bahamas, southern Florida, Bermuda, and the Pacific coast of Central America and Colombia, but not in the Gulf of Mexico. A characteristic appendix masculina distinguishes this clade from other lineages of Ligia. Large divergences within this clade suggest that it constitutes a cryptic species complex. Genetically and morphologically, the specimens from the type locality of L. baudiniana were indistinguishable from the non-native species L. exotica. Some phylogeographic patterns of Ligia in the study area may be consistent with the proto-Antillean or GAARlandia vicariant hypotheses, but uncertainty concerning divergence times and aspects of the geological history precludes stronger biogeographical inferences. Passive overwater dispersal appears to have played an important role in shaping phylogeographic patterns of Ligia in the Caribbean Sea. These patterns, however, do not correspond with predicted biogeographic patterns based on population connectivity of marine organisms with larval dispersal, and do not reflect the southeast to northwest colonization pattern that has been proposed for the colonization of the Caribbean from South America by some

  16. An ecosystem approach to evaluate restoration measures in the lignite mining district of Lusatia/Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Lignite mining in Lusatia has a history of over 100 years. Open-cast mining directly affected an area of 1000 km2. Since 20 years we established an ecosystem oriented approach to evaluate the development and site characteristics of post-mining areas mainly restored for agricultural and silvicultural land use. Water and element budgets of afforested sites were studied under different geochemical settings in a chronosequence approach (Schaaf 2001), as well as the effect of soil amendments like sewage sludge or compost in restoration (Schaaf & Hüttl 2006). Since 10 years we also study the development of natural site regeneration in the constructed catchment Chicken Creek at the watershed scale (Schaaf et al. 2011, 2013). One of the striking characteristics of post-mining sites is a very large small-scale soil heterogeneity that has to be taken into account with respect to soil forming processes and element cycling. Results from these studies in combination with smaller-scale process studies enable to evaluate the long-term effect of restoration measures and adapted land use options. In addition, it is crucial to compare these results with data from undisturbed, i.e. non-mined sites. Schaaf, W., 2001: What can element budgets of false-time series tell us about ecosystem development on post-lignite mining sites? Ecological Engineering 17, 241-252. Schaaf, W. and Hüttl, R. F., 2006: Direct and indirect effects of soil pollution by lignite mining. Water, Air and Soil Pollution - Focus 6, 253-264. Schaaf, W., Bens, O., Fischer, A., Gerke, H.H., Gerwin, W., Grünewald, U., Holländer, H.M., Kögel-Knabner, I., Mutz, M., Schloter, M., Schulin, R., Veste, M., Winter, S. & Hüttl, R.F., 2011: Patterns and processes of initial terrestrial-ecosystem development. Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, 174, 229-239. Schaaf, W., Elmer, M., Fischer, A., Gerwin, W., Nenov, R., Pretsch, H. and Zaplate, M.K., 2013: Feedbacks between vegetation, surface structures and hydrology

  17. Lignite Drying and Dewatering Technologies%褐煤干燥脱水技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟顺; 孙绍增; 赵广播

    2013-01-01

    With a high water content, lignite has a low efficiency for direct combustion power generation. The lignite drying and dewatering technology can effectively lower the water content of lignite- and enhance its competitive power. On this basis, the authors studied and analyzed the principles of the following technologies, namely, flue gas drying technology , steam drying technology (tube type drying and fluidized bed steam drying) , hydrothermal dewatering technology, mechanical thermal dehydration (MTE) technology and upgraded brown coal (UBC) technology. Moreover,they also contrasted and analyzed the pressure, temperature, removing state, dewatering effectiveness, pore structure and re-absorption characteristics of various drying and dewatering technologies. The mechanical thermal dehydration technology can change the pore structure of brown coal and prevent from re-absorption, thus achieving a relatively high dewatering efficiency with a low energy consumption rate. It is of major significance for China to develop novel drying and dewatering technologies with due consideration of the brown coal distribution features of China to lower the water content of coal from its source, realize an economic transportation of coal and enhance the power generation efficiency of power plants.%褐煤含水量高,直接燃烧发电效率低.褐煤干燥脱水技术能有效降低褐煤含水量,提高其竞争力.研究介绍了烟气干燥技术、蒸汽干燥(管式干燥,流化床蒸汽干燥)、水热脱水技术、机械热力脱水技术(MTE)和热油干燥技术(UBC)5种褐煤干燥脱水技术的原理;对比分析了不同干燥脱水技术的压力、温度、脱除状态、脱水效率、孔隙结构和重吸收特性;机械热力脱水技术(MTE)可以改变褐煤孔隙结构、防止重吸收、脱水效率较高和能耗低.结合我国褐煤分布特点,开发新型干燥脱水技术,在源头降低煤的水分含量,实现煤的经济运输,提高电厂的发电效率.

  18. Renewable Energy Country Profiles. Caribbean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-15

    IRENA Renewable Energy Country Profiles take stock of the latest developments in the field of renewables at country level around the world. Each profile combines analysis by IRENA's specialists with the latest available country data and additional information from a wide array of sources. The resulting reports provide a brief yet comprehensive picture of the situation with regard to renewable energy, including energy supply, electrical generation and grid capacity, and access. Energy policies, targets and projects are also considered, along with each country's investment climate and endowment with renewable energy resources. The energy statistics presented here span the period from 2009 until 2012, reflecting varying timelines in the source material. Since data availability differs from country to country, wider regional comparisons are possible only for the latest year with figures available for every country included. Despite the time lag in some cases, the evident differences and disparities between countries and regions around the world remain striking. The current package of country profiles is just a starting point. The geographic scope will continue to expand, and existing profiles will be enhanced with new indicators, with the whole series maintained as a live product on the IRENA website (www.irena.org)

  19. Systems Science for Caribbean Health: the development and piloting of a model for guiding policy on diabetes in the Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guariguata, L.; Guell, C.; Samuels, T.A.; Rouwette, E.A.J.A.; Woodcock, J.; Hambleton, I.R.; Unwin, N.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND : Diabetes is highly prevalent in the Caribbean, associated with a high morbidity and mortality and is a recognised threat to economic and social development. Heads of Government in the Caribbean Community came together in 2007 and declared their commitment to reducing the burden of non-

  20. COCONet (Continuously Operating Caribbean GPS Observational Network): Network Status and Project Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feaux, K.; Braun, J. J.; Calais, E.; Dausz, K.; Friesen, B. T.; Mattioli, G. S.; Miller, M. M.; Normandeau, J.; Seider, E.; Wang, G.

    2012-12-01

    The beauty and diversity of the Caribbean region result from geological and atmospheric processes that also pose serious threats to the large population within reach of seismic faults, hurricanes tracks, or sea-level change. The capacity to understand, prepare for, adapt to, and in some cases predict these natural hazards requires Earth observations on both large and small scales. The COCONet project was funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) with the aim of developing a large-scale geodetic and atmospheric infrastructure in the Caribbean that will form the backbone for a broad range of geoscience and atmospheric investigations and enable research on process-oriented science questions with direct relevance to geohazards. COCONet will consist of 50 new GPS and meteorological stations throughout the Caribbean region, 15 existing stations refurbished with new receivers, antennas, and meteorological instruments, and will also incorporate data from up to 61 existing operational GPS stations. Additional funding has recently been allocated to install 2 new collocated GPS and tide gauge sites and also add GPS instruments at two existing tide gauge sites in the Caribbean region. COCONet will provide free, high-quality, low-latency, open-format data and data products for researchers, educators, students, and the private sector. Data will be used by US and international scientists to study solid earth processes such as plate kinematics and dynamics as well as plate boundary interactions and deformation, with an emphasis on the earthquake cycle. COCNet will also serve atmospheric science objectives by providing more precise estimates of tropospheric water vapor and enabling better forecast of the dynamics of airborne moisture associated with the yearly Caribbean hurricane cycle. COCONet is being installed and will be maintained by UNAVCO on behalf of the science and other user communities in the United States and abroad, thus leveraging UNAVCO's proven record of

  1. Restricted gene flow in the Caribbean staghorn coral Acropora cervicornis: implications for the recovery of endangered reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Steven V; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2007-01-01

    Coral reef conservation requires information about the distance over which healthy reefs can rescue damaged reefs through input of coral larvae. This information is desperately needed in the Caribbean where the 2 dominant shallow water corals Acropora cervicornis and Acropora palmata have suffered unprecedented declines. Here we compare the population genetic structure in the staghorn coral A. cervicornis across the greater Caribbean using DNA sequence data from 1 mitochondrial and 3 nuclear genes. Data from 160 individuals from 22 populations and 9 regions show that A. cervicornis exhibits significant population genetic structure across the greater Caribbean in both the mitochondrial (Phi(st) = 0.130) and nuclear data (Phi(st) = 0.067). The highest population structure was observed in the species' own, native mtDNA haplotypes (Phi(st) = 0.235). Introgressed alleles from A. palmata tempered higher population structure in A. cervicornis over regional scales but in some cases generated highly localized "introgression hot spots" and fine-scale genetic structure among reefs separated by as few as 2 km. These data show that larval dispersal over moderate or long distances (>500 km) is limited for this threatened species and in some cases locally limited as well. Thus, the endangered Caribbean staghorn corals require local source populations for their recovery and targeted conservation efforts over spatial scales much smaller than the hundreds to thousands of kilometers usually proposed for marine reserves.

  2. Uncertainty estimation by Bayesian approach in thermochemical conversion of walnut hull and lignite coal blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyukada, Musa

    2017-05-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to incorporate the uncertainties in the thermal behavior of walnut hull (WH), lignite coal, and their various blends using Bayesian approach. First of all, thermal behavior of related materials were investigated under different temperatures, blend ratios, and heating rates. Results of ultimate and proximate analyses showed the main steps of oxidation mechanism of (co-)combustion process. Thermal degradation started with the (hemi-)cellulosic compounds and finished with lignin. Finally, a partial sensitivity analysis based on Bayesian approach (Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations) were applied to data driven regression model (the best fit). The main purpose of uncertainty analysis was to point out the importance of operating conditions (explanatory variables). The other important aspect of the present work was the first performance evaluation study on various uncertainty estimation techniques in (co-)combustion literature.

  3. Raman spectroscopic study of amorphous and crystalline hydrocarbons from soils, peats and lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jehlicka, J.; Edwards, H.G.M.; Villar, S.E.J.; Pokorny, J. [Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. for Geochemical Mineral & Mineral Resources

    2005-08-01

    FT-Raman spectra were obtained from the natural hydrocarbon mixtures ozokerite and hatchettite as well as from the terpenoid minerals fichtelite (norabietane) and hartite (alpha-phyllocladane). Some of these hydrocarbons occur in soil and peat environments of Holocene age. However, hartite occurs in lignite, in fossilised Glyptostrobus (Taxodiaceae) trees and in pelosiderites of the Bilina Miocene series (about 20 Ma); it represents the accumulated and crystallised product of diagenetic transformation of precursor biogenic terpenoids. Raman spectra of earth waxes investigated confirm their dominantly aliphatic character and oxidative degradation (related to weathering and/or subaerial alteration in museum cabinets). Vibrational assignments are proposed and differences in Raman spectra of fichtelite and hartite discussed. Some of the individual features can be used for discrimination (e.g., hartite bands at 1480, 1310, 1287, 1041, 729 and 693 cm{sup -1} and fichtelite bands at 1302, 836, 717 and 533 cm{sup -1}).

  4. Environmental policy instruments towards lignite-fired power plants in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    A proposition is made that Turkey considers a pilot emission trading system for SO{sub 2}, Nox and/or PM emissions from its coal and lignite fired power plant in the efforts to comply with the EU Integrated Pollution Prevention Control (IPPC), the Large Combustion Plant (LCP) and the National Emissions Ceiling (NEC) Directives. Model calculations indicate that this could yield substantial cost savings compared to a traditional command and control approach. However, requirements in the IPPC Directive would be a major obstacle against emissions trading. The Turkish emission permitting system needs a major overhaul, including improving monitoring and enforcement practices to comply with the directives and to be able to implement and operate an emission trading system.

  5. The flora of the Early Miocene Brandon Lignite, Vermont, USA. 8 Caldesia (Alismastaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggard, K.K.; Tiffney, B.H. [University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Geological Science

    1997-02-01

    Caldesia, a genus of aquatic monocotyledons, is represented by four living species, which are widely distributed in the temperate and tropical Old World. The genus has an extensive Oligocene through Pleistocene fossil record in Eurasia. This paper surveys the morphology of the extant and fossil fruits of the Alismataceae, and provides a detailed review of the morphology and anatomy of living and fossil Caldesia fruits. The latter exhibit substantial similarity, making the recognition of separate species on the basis of fruit morphology difficult. A new species Caldesia brandoniana is erected from the Early Miocene Brandon Lignite of Vermont primarily on the basis of its geographic isolation; careful revision of all fossil fruiting material of Caldesia might require placement of the Brandon specimens in a more inclusive form species. Together with leaves of Caldesia from the Miocene Clarkia flora of Idaho, this occurrence indicates that Caldesia was in the New World as recently as the Early Miocene.

  6. Rheological aspects of dense lignite-water suspensions; structure development on consecutive flow loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudoulas, Thomas B.; Kastrinakis, Eleftherios G.; Nychas, Stavros G. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Department of Chemical Engineering, Univ. Box 453, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2007-01-15

    Aspects of dense lignite-water slurries (LWS) rheology were investigated using controlled stress and controlled strain rheometers with parallel disks and Couette geometries. During the preparation of the slurries, the achieved solids volume fractions were up to 0.425 and the particle size distributions were polydispersed with sizes up to 300 {mu}m. In the ascending parts of consecutive flow loops, a slope transition of the flow curve was observed and studied in relation to the solids volume fraction. The obtained results with the different geometries and rheometers were qualitatively the same. By following the model proposed by Cheng (Rheol Acta 42:372-382, 2003) for thixotropic fluids, and taking into account the yield stress appearance, a suitable correlation for LWS is proposed, which is consistent with the experimental flow curves. (orig.)

  7. Analysis of gas-phase mercury sorption with coke and lignite dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marczak Marta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the problem of mercury emission became a widely discussed topic. Its high impact is caused by its toxicity and ability to accumulate in living organisms, properties that justified the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA to classify mercury as hazardous pollutant. The problem of mercury emission is crucial for countries like Poland, where the most of the emission is caused by coaldepended energy sector. Current technology of mercury removal utilizes adsorption of mercury on the surface of activated carbon. Due to high price of activated carbon, this technological approach seems to be uneconomical and calls for cheaper alternative. One possible solution can be usage of other sorptive materials obtained from thermal processes like coke production. Example of such material is coke dust obtained from dry quenching of coke. The aim of this work was to analyse the sorption potential of lignite and coke dust and determine parameters influencing mercury behaviour during combustion.

  8. Fluid bed drying as upgrading technology for feasible treatment of Kolubara lignite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erić Milić D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview of the current status of low-rank coal upgrading technologies is presented in the paper, particularly with respect to drying and dewatering procedures. In order to calculate the significant parameters of the moisture removal process, a model of convective coal drying in a fluid bed, based on the two-phase (bubbling fluidization model proposed by Kunii and Levenspiel, is developed and presented. Product-specific data (intraparticle mass transfer, gas-solid moisture equilibrium related to the particular coal variety addressed here (Kolubara lignite are obtained through preliminary investigations. Effective thermal conductivity of the packed bed as defined by Zehner/Bauer/Schlünder is used to define heat transfer mechanisms occurring in the suspension phase of the fluid bed. A completely new set of experimental data obtained has been successfully used to validate the model additionally. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR33050 i III42010

  9. Nitrogen forms in 1- to 7-year-old opencast lignite mine soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil-Sotres, F.; Leiros, M.C.; Trasar-Cepeda, M.C.; Saa, A.; Gonzalez-Sangregorio, M.V. (Facultad de Farmacia, Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Dept. de Edafologia y Quimica Agricola)

    1993-08-01

    The distribution of different forms of N was studied in very young (0- to 7-year-old) soils from the Meirama lignite mine in northwest Spain. Total N increased rapidly with soil age, largely in the humic acid-associated fraction. Acid hydrolysis indicated that amino acid N and a hydrolysable unknown form of N increased with soil age. The fractionation reported by Bettany et al. (1980) indicated that alkali/pyrophosphate-extractable humus increased with soil age. All these data suggest that there is rapid stabilization of organic N during the first few years of evolution of these mine soils, to the extent that distribution of N forms in the 7-year old soil is very similar to that in native soils. 23 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Modifications of the phosphorus cycle with development of lignite mine soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trasar Cepeda, M.C.; Deblas, E.; Garcia Rodeja, I.; Leiros, M.C.; Gil Sotres, F. (Universidad de Santiago, Santiago (Spain). Departamento de Edafologia y Quimica Agricola)

    1993-10-01

    Various aspects of the P cycle in four and seven year old soils from the Meirama lignite mine (northwest Spain) were studied. With increasing soil age, the organic P (P(o)) content increased in parallel with the organic matter content. The observed increase in secondary inorganic P is related to the increase in the retention capacity for P with soil age. The observed increase in the HCl-P fraction can be attributed to a gradual dissolution of the non-extractable forms of P produced from fertilizers added in the course of spoil management. Both the C:P(o) ratio and phosphatase activity also increased with soil age, suggesting that biochemical mineralization processes are taking place and indicating a need for the hydrolysis of phosphate esters to ensure an adequate phosphorus supply to plants. All these findings suggest that in the long term plants may suffer a pronounced P deficiency.

  11. Biofunctional characteristics of lignite fly ash modified by humates: a new soil conditioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassapis, Konstantinos; Roulia, Maria; Vrettou, Evangelia; Fili, Despina; Zervaki, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Fly ash superficially modified with humic substances from the Megalopolis lignitic power plant was prepared and evaluated for agricultural uses. UV-vis spectrophotometry and IR spectroscopy revealed that fly ash shows high sorption efficiency towards humic substances. Adsorption proceeds stepwise via strong Coulombic and hydrophophic forces of attraction between guest and host materials. Langmuir, Freundlich, BET, Harkins-Jura, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models were employed to evaluate the ongoing adsorption and shed light to the physicochemical properties of the sorbent-adsorbate system. Humic substances desorption and microbial cultivation experiments were also carried out to examine the regeneration of the humates under washing and explore the possibility of this material acclimatizing in real soil conditions, both useful for biofunctional agricultural applications.

  12. VITRIFICATION OF LIGNITE FLY ASH AND METAL SLAGS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Karamberi; A.Moutsatsou

    2006-01-01

    This work focuses on the production of glass and glass-ceramics by using industrial wastes or by-products,e.g., two fly ashes from the combustion of lignite, a slag from the production of Fe-Ni and a slag from the making of steel.Vitrification took place at 1 350°-1 450℃ and crystallization was achieved by heat treatment at 900, 950 and 1 000℃.The capability of the waste to be vitrified and subsequently devitrified was determined by XRD techniques. The crystalline phase depends greatly on the structure of the by-product and the heat treatment. The final products showed low leachability and good hardness.

  13. Analysis of renewable energy sources and electric vehicle penetration into energy systems predominantly based on lignite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedinec, A.; Jovanovski, B.; Gajduk, A.; Markovska, N.; Kocarev, L.

    2016-05-01

    We consider an integration of renewable energy into transport and electricity sectors through vehicle to grid (V2G) technologies for an energy system that is predominantly based on lignite. The national energy system of Macedonia is modeled using EnergyPLAN which integrates energy for electricity, transport and heat, and includes hourly fluctuations in human needs and the environment. We show that electric-vehicles can provide the necessary storage enabling a fully renewable energy profile for Macedonia that can match the country's growing demand for energy. Furthermore, a large penetration of electric vehicles leads to a dramatic reduction of 47% of small particles and other air pollutants generated by car traffic in 2050.

  14. Analysis of renewable energy sources and electric vehicle penetration into energy systems predominantly based on lignite

    CERN Document Server

    Dedinec, Aleksandar; Gajduk, Andrej; Markovska, Natasa; Kocarev, Ljupco

    2016-01-01

    We consider an integration of renewable energy into transport and electricity sectors through vehicle to grid (V2G) technologies for an energy system that is predominantly based on lignite. The national energy system of Macedonia is modeled using EnergyPLAN which integrates energy for electricity, transport and heat, and includes hourly fluctuations in human needs and the environment. We show that electric-vehicles can provide the necessary storage enabling a fully renewable energy profile for Macedonia that can match the country's growing demand for energy. Furthermore, a large penetration of electric vehicles leads to a dramatic reduction of 47% of small particles and other air pollutants generated by car traffic in 2050.

  15. Advanced power assessment for Czech lignite task 3.6. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sondreal, E.A.; Mann, M.D.; Weber, G.W.; Young, B.C.

    1995-12-01

    Major reforms in the Czech energy sector have been initiated to reverse 40 years of central planning, subsidized energy pricing, unchecked pollution from coal-fired plants, concerns over nuclear safety and fuel cycle management, and dependence on the former U.S.S.R. for oil, gas, and nuclear fuel processing. Prices for electricity, heat, and natural gas paid by industry are close to western levels, but subsidized prices for households are as much as 40% lower and below economic cost. State control of major energy enterprises is being reduced by moving toward government-regulated, investor-owned companies to raise needed capital, but with a strategic stake retained by the state. Foreign firms will participate in privatization, but they are not expected to acquire a controlling interest in Czech energy companies. Economic conditions in the Czech Republic are now improving after the disruptions caused by restructuring since 1989 and separation of the former Czech and Slovak Federal Republics in January 1993. The downturn in the economy after 1989 was concentrated in energy-intensive heavy industry, and recovery is paced by consumer trade, services, light industry and construction. Energy use in relation to gross domestic product (GDP) has declined, but it is still significantly higher than in OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries. The GDP increased by 2% in 1994 after dropping 22% between 1989 and 1993. A positive balance of payments has been achieved, with foreign investment offsetting a small trade deficit. The government`s external debt is only 4% of GDP. This report studies the application of lignite resources within the newly formulated energy policies of the republic, in light of a move toward privatization and stronger air pollution regulations. Lignite has represented the major energy source for the country.

  16. More efficient cleaning concepts for stepping up availability of lignite-fired power plants (Ligpower)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Wiechers; B. Wessel; S. Goudanis; F. Kluger; G. Riley [RWE Power AG, Koeln (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The quality of lignite extracted in various deposits differs considerably in part. The impact of changed major coal quality parameters on steam generator operation became evident in the form of increased deposit formation on the boiler's heating surfaces. Successful countermeasures were launched, but the bottleneck of the problem continues to be the cleaning of the first convection heating surfaces downstream of the furnace. As the cleaning facilities available so far (soot blowers) have not proved sufficient for these areas of application despite all optimisation efforts made, new processes have to be developed. In contrast to the methods applied so far, these processes do not use the common cleaning medium steam but work on the basis of alternative cleaning media. Within the scope of the Ligpower project, such alternative cleaning methods were selected and subjected to extensive testing on commercial utility boilers. Since a more intensive cleaning of superheater tubes involves increased stress of the tube material, we developed new, more resistant, superheater designs and installed these in a 600 MW unit. The transferability of the findings made was ensured by a comparison of the lignites used. To permit the cleaning device to be controlled as needed, we developed a programme that analyses the degree of fouling of the boiler and generates suggestions for its cleaning. In addition, a tube-fin superheater design was calculated and optimised in terms of fluid dynamics. The extensive tests showed which cleaning methods have suitable approaches to cleaning. By testing them over several years, we gained important information about equipment design. The superheater design could be tested only to a limited degree. Thus, we obtained additional findings in tests using a test heating surface that was mounted on a 300 MW boiler. 77 figs., 5 tabs., 3 apps.

  17. Rise of China in the Caribbean: Impacts for Regional Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    Financing FY Financial Year HIV Human Immunodeficiency Virus IADB Inter-American Development Bank ICBC Industrial and Commercial Bank of China IMET......American market, cocaine is typically transported from Colombia to Mexico or Central America by sea, and then onwards by land to the US and Canada; with

  18. Geologic Provinces of the Caribbean Region, 2004 (prv6bg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes a modified subset of polygon features that describe U.S. Geological Survey's defined geologic provinces of the World. Each province has a set...

  19. An assessment of global warming stress on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwood, D.K.; Hendec, J.C.; Mendez, A. (NOAA, Miami, FL (USA). Atlantic Oceanography and Meteorology Laboratory)

    1992-07-01

    There is evidence that stress on coral reef ecosystems in the Caribbean region is increasing. Recently numerous authors have stated that the major stress results from 'abnormally high' seasonal sea surface temperatures (SST) and have implicated global warming as a cause, stating that recent episodes of coral bleaching result therefrom. However, an analysis of available SST data sets shows no discernible warming trend that could cause an increase in coral bleaching. Given the lack of long-term records synoptic with observations of coral ecosystem health, there is insufficient evidence available to label temperatures observed in coincidence with recent regional bleaching events as 'abnormally' high.

  20. Native predators do not influence invasion success of pacific lionfish on Caribbean reefs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Hackerott

    Full Text Available Biotic resistance, the process by which new colonists are excluded from a community by predation from and/or competition with resident species, can prevent or limit species invasions. We examined whether biotic resistance by native predators on Caribbean coral reefs has influenced the invasion success of red lionfishes (Pterois volitans and Pterois miles, piscivores from the Indo-Pacific. Specifically, we surveyed the abundance (density and biomass of lionfish and native predatory fishes that could interact with lionfish (either through predation or competition on 71 reefs in three biogeographic regions of the Caribbean. We recorded protection status of the reefs, and abiotic variables including depth, habitat type, and wind/wave exposure at each site. We found no relationship between the density or biomass of lionfish and that of native predators. However, lionfish densities were significantly lower on windward sites, potentially because of habitat preferences, and in marine protected areas, most likely because of ongoing removal efforts by reserve managers. Our results suggest that interactions with native predators do not influence the colonization or post-establishment population density of invasive lionfish on Caribbean reefs.

  1. Sites for priority biodiversity conservation in the Caribbean Islands Biodiversity Hotspot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Anadon-Irizarry

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Caribbean Islands Biodiversity Hotspot is exceptionally important for global biodiversity conservation due to high levels of species endemism and threat. A total of 755 Caribbean plant and vertebrate species are considered globally threatened, making it one of the top Biodiversity Hotspots in terms of threat levels. In 2009, Key Biodiversity Areas (KBAs were identified for the Caribbean Islands through a regional-level analysis of accessible data and literature, followed by extensive national-level stakeholder consultation. By applying the Vulnerability criterion, a total of 284 Key Biodiversity Areas were defined and mapped as holding 409 (54% of the region’s threatened species. Of these, 144 (or 51% overlapped partially or completely with protected areas. Cockpit Country, followed by Litchfield Mountain - Matheson’s Run, Blue Mountains (all Jamaica and Massif de la Hotte (Haiti were found to support exceptionally high numbers of globally threatened taxa, with more than 40 such species at each site. Key Biodiversity Areas, building from Important Bird Areas, provide a valuable framework against which to review the adequacy of existing national protected-area systems and also to prioritize which species and sites require the most urgent conservation attention.

  2. Before e-Governance and e-Government, Back to Basics! The Case of the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearson A. Broome

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This conceptual article discusses the opportunities and challenges presented by e-government and e-governance in the Caribbean. An understanding of the issues inherent in these phenomena is crucially important, particularly for the governance systems of small island developing states in the Caribbean. In practice, however, they are rarely discussed,—not least because their complexity is often misunderstood or inappropriately unacknowledged as new directions by political scientists and policy planners. Moreover, the foundational debate on information and communication technologies (ICTs and their impact on governance and the wider implications for development remain muted owing to the theatrical commotion in other “pressing” aspects of Caribbean political life. As a consequence, this article contextualizes the debate by bringing to the fore a discussion on the importance of understanding the broader political, social, and economic issues and the implications of the use of ICTs and development. In the analysis, a balance is struck to avoid the often disproportionate technocratic parables of a future technological cornucopia being peddled by some international development agencies and officials in the region. Such a macro discussion is necessary if as development advocates and citizens, we are to realize any gains while acknowledging the limitations an enabling e-government and e-governance environment could portend.

  3. Molecular Detection of Theileria spp. in Livestock on Five Caribbean Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jilei; Kelly, Patrick; Li, Jing; Xu, Chuanling; Wang, Chengming

    2015-01-01

    Theileria spp. are tick-transmitted, intracellular apicomplexan protozoan parasites infecting a wide range of animals. As there is very limited information on the prevalence of Theileria spp. in the Caribbean we used the recently described genus-specific pan-Theileria FRET-qPCR to identify infected animals in the region and a standard 18S rRNA gene PCR and sequencing to determine the species involved. We found Theileria spp. in 9% of the convenience samples of animals (n = 752) studied from five Caribbean islands. Donkeys (20.0%: 5/25) were most commonly infected, followed by sheep (17.4%, 25/144), cattle (6.8%; 22/325), goats (5.0%; 12/238), and horses (5.0%; 1/20). Six species of Theileria were identified: T. equi (donkeys, cattle, goats, and sheep), Theileria sp. OT3 (sheep and goats), Theileria sp. NG-2013a (cattle), Theileria sp. YW-2014 (donkeys), Theileria sp. B15a (goats), and Babesia vulpes or a closely related organism (sheep and goats). Only T. equi has been previously reported in the Caribbean. Our findings expand the known host ranges of Theileria spp. and the known distribution of the organisms around the world.

  4. Molecular Detection of Theileria spp. in Livestock on Five Caribbean Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jilei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Theileria spp. are tick-transmitted, intracellular apicomplexan protozoan parasites infecting a wide range of animals. As there is very limited information on the prevalence of Theileria spp. in the Caribbean we used the recently described genus-specific pan-Theileria FRET-qPCR to identify infected animals in the region and a standard 18S rRNA gene PCR and sequencing to determine the species involved. We found Theileria spp. in 9% of the convenience samples of animals (n=752 studied from five Caribbean islands. Donkeys (20.0%: 5/25 were most commonly infected, followed by sheep (17.4%, 25/144, cattle (6.8%; 22/325, goats (5.0%; 12/238, and horses (5.0%; 1/20. Six species of Theileria were identified: T. equi (donkeys, cattle, goats, and sheep, Theileria sp. OT3 (sheep and goats, Theileria sp. NG-2013a (cattle, Theileria sp. YW-2014 (donkeys, Theileria sp. B15a (goats, and Babesia vulpes or a closely related organism (sheep and goats. Only T. equi has been previously reported in the Caribbean. Our findings expand the known host ranges of Theileria spp. and the known distribution of the organisms around the world.

  5. Ciguatera fish poisoning and sea surface temperatures in the Caribbean Sea and the West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tester, Patricia A; Feldman, Rebecca L; Nau, Amy W; Kibler, Steven R; Wayne Litaker, R

    2010-10-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is a circumtropical disease caused by ingestion of a variety of reef fish that bioaccumulate algal toxins. Distribution and abundance of the organisms that produce these toxins, chiefly dinoflagellates of the genus Gambierdiscus, are reported to correlate positively with water temperature. Consequently, there is growing concern that increasing temperatures associated with climate change could increase the incidence of CFP. This concern prompted experiments on the growth rates of six Gambierdiscus species at temperatures between 18 degrees C and 33 degrees C and the examination of sea surface temperatures in the Caribbean and West Indies for areas that could sustain rapid Gambierdiscus growth rates year-round. The thermal optimum for five of six Gambierdiscus species tested was >/=29 degrees C. Long-term SST data from the southern Gulf of Mexico indicate the number of days with sea surface temperatures >/=29 degrees C has nearly doubled (44 to 86) in the last three decades. To determine how the sea surface temperatures and Gambierdiscus growth data correlate with CFP incidences in the Caribbean, a literature review and a uniform, region-wide survey (1996-2006) of CFP cases were conducted. The highest CFP incidence rates were in the eastern Caribbean where water temperatures are warmest and least variable.

  6. The boreal winter Madden-Julian Oscillation's influence on summertime precipitation in the greater Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Scott; Gamble, Douglas W.

    2016-07-01

    Precipitation totals in the greater Caribbean are known to be affected by interannual variability. In particular, dry conditions in the spring-summer have been physically linked to the positive phase of North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) in the literature. In this study, it was found through regression analysis that an active Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) in winter geographically focused over the Maritime Continent contributes to a positive NAO in March via the generation of Rossby waves in the Northern Hemisphere. Specifically, a negative Pacific-North American pattern develops in the winter and transitions to an Atlantic pattern in spring. The positive NAO is a transient feature of this evolving wave train, but a center of significant positive 200 hPa geopotential heights is entrenched over the southeast U.S. throughout the February to May time period and is manifested as high pressure at the surface. The southern flank of this system increases the speeds of the trade winds and leads to a cooling of the Caribbean sea surface temperatures and, thus, convection suppression and reduced precipitation. Thus, this study advances our understanding of the climate of the greater Caribbean by using climate teleconnections to relate the MJO to rainfall in the region.

  7. Education and health care in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaroop, V

    1997-06-01

    Primary and secondary education and preventive health care are essential to the well-being of the poor in developing countries. Average expenditures on education and health care as a percentage of the gross domestic product in Caribbean countries exceed those in other developing countries. Such investment has resulted in high literacy rates and steady declines in infant mortality. Barbados, which has provided free and universal primary and secondary education since 1985, ranks first among developing countries in human development indicators (e.g., life expectancy and income). There are concerns, however, that the poor are not benefiting from this public sector investment. Government subsidies for tertiary-level services (e.g., university education and hospital-based curative care) disproportionately benefit higher-income urban families who could afford to pay a substantial portion of the cost of such services. Although primary and secondary school attendance rates are impressive in Caribbean countries, schools in rural areas tend to provide poor instruction and lack appropriate educational materials. Public sector funding should focus on basic services to maximize the returns to society. If the public sector is the primary provider of tertiary services, charges should be introduced to facilitate cost recovery from high-income users.

  8. Current status of marine protected areas in latin america and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarderas, A Paulina; Hacker, Sally D; Lubchenco, Jane

    2008-12-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs), including no-take marine reserves (MRs), play an important role in the conservation of marine biodiversity. We document the status of MPAs and MRs in Latin America and the Caribbean, where little has been reported on the scope of such protection. Our survey of protected area databases, published and unpublished literature, and Internet searches yielded information from 30 countries and 12 overseas territories. At present more than 700 MPAs have been established, covering more than 300,000 km(2) or 1.5% of the coastal and shelf waters. We report on the status of 3 categories of protection: MPAs (limited take throughout the area), MRs (no-take throughout the area), and mixed-use (a limited-take MPA that contains an MR). The majority of protected areas in Latin America and the Caribbean are MPAs, which allow some or extensive extractive activities throughout the designated area. These 571 sites cover 51,505 km(2) or 0.3% of coastal and shelf waters. There are 98 MRs covering 16,862 km(2) or 0.1% of the coastal and shelf waters. Mixed-use MPAs are the fewest in number (87), but cover the largest area (236,853 km(2), 1.2%). Across Latin America and the Caribbean, many biogeographic provinces are underrepresented in these protected areas. Large coastal regions remain unprotected, in particular, the southern Pacific and southern Atlantic coasts of South America. Our analysis reveals multiple opportunities to strengthen marine conservation in Latin America and the Caribbean by improving implementation, management, and enforcement of existing MPAs; adding new MPAs and MRs strategically to enhance connectivity and sustainability of existing protection; and establishing new networks of MPAs and MRs or combinations thereof to enhance protection where little currently exists.

  9. Security, insecurity, and the U.S. presence in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William O. Walker

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] Bay of Pigs Declassified: The Secret CIA Report on the Invasion of Cuba. PETER KORNBLUH (ed.. New York: The New Press, 1998. viii + 339 pp. (Paper US$17.95 Psywar on Cuba: The Declassified History of U.S. Anti-Castro Propaganda. JON ELLISTON (ed.. Melbourne: Ocean Press, 1999. 320 pp. (Paper US$ 21.95 Intelligence and the Cuban Missile Crisis. JAMES G. BLIGHT & DAVID A. WELCH (eds.. London: Frank Cass, 1998. x + 234 pp. (Cloth US$ 47.50 Live by the Sword: The Secret WarAgainst Castro and the Death of JFK. Gus Russo. Baltimore MD: Bancroft Press, 1998. xvi + 619 pp. (Cloth US$ 26.95 From Pirates to Drug Lords: The Post-Cold War Caribbean Security Environment. MICHAEL C. DESCH, JORGE I. DOMI'NGUEZ & ANDRÉS SERBIN (eds.. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1998. viii + 161 pp. (Paper US$ 19.95 Cuba, the Caribbean, and the United States have been frequently and intimately linked for more than a century. Because of the status of the United States as a global power, viewing their common histories from the vantage point of the United States is understandable. Such a perspective consigns the Caribbean, and to a lesser extent Cuba, to the role of passive actors in the making of much of their own histories. Several recent publications, though written for very different purposes, permit us to ask whether Cuba and the Caribbean have not been more active participants in their recent histories than U.S. predominance in the region would seem to allow.

  10. Status and trends of Caribbean coral reefs: 1970-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jeremy; Donovan, Mary; Cramer, Katie; Lam, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    vigorously communicate results in simple and straightforward terms to foster more effective conservation and management. This and subsequent reports will focus on separate biogeographic regions in a stepwise fashion and combine all of the results for a global synthesis in the coming years. We began in the wide Caribbean region because the historical data are so extensive and to refine methods of analysis before moving on to other regions. This report documents quantitative trends for Caribbean reef corals, macroalgae, sea urchins, and fishes based on data from 90 reef locations over the past 43 tears. This is the first report to combine all these disparate kinds of data in a single place to explore how the different major components of coral reef ecosystems interact on a broadly regional oceanic scale. We obtained data from more than 35,000 ecological surveys carried out by 78 principal investigators (PIs) and some 200 colleagues working in 34 countries, states, and territories throughout the wide Caribbean region. We conducted two workshops in Panama and Brisbane, Australia to bring together people who provided the data to assist in data quality control, analysis, and synthesis. The first workshop at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in the Republic of Panama 29 April to 5 May, 2012 included scientists from 18 countries and territories to verify and expand the database and to conduct exploratory analyses of status and trends. Preliminary results based on the Panama workshop were presented to the DC Marine Community and Smithsonian Institution Senate of Scientists in May 2012 and at the International Coral Reef Symposium (ICRS) and annual ICRI meeting in Cairns, Australia in July 2012. The second workshop in Brisbane, Australia in December 2012 brought together eight coral reef scientists for more detailed data analysis and organization of results for this report and subsequent publications. Subsequent presentations to solicit comments while the report was

  11. PEPFAR Transitions to Country Ownership: Review of Past Donor Transitions and Application of Lessons Learned to the Eastern Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogus, Abigail; Graff, Kylie

    2015-01-01

    The US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has shifted from an emergency response to a sustainable, country-owned response. The process of transition to country ownership is already underway in the Eastern Caribbean; the Office of the US Global AIDS Coordinator (OGAC) has advised the region that PEPFAR funding is being redirected away from the Eastern Caribbean toward Caribbean countries with high disease burden to strengthen services for key populations. This article seeks to highlight and apply lessons learned from other donor transitions to support a successful transition of HIV programs in the Eastern Caribbean. Based on a rapid review of both peer-reviewed and gray literature on donor transitions to country ownership in family planning, HIV, and other areas, we identified 48 resources that addressed key steps in the transition process and determinants of readiness for transition. Analysis of the existing literature revealed 6 steps that could help ensure successful transition, including developing a clear roadmap articulated through high-level diplomacy; investing in extensive stakeholder engagement; and supporting monitoring and evaluation during and after the transition to adjust course as needed. Nine specific areas to assess a country's readiness for transition include: leadership and management capacity, political and economic factors, the policy environment, identification of alternative funding sources, integration of HIV programs into the wider health system, the institutionalization of processes, the strength of procurement and supply chain management, identification of staffing and training needs, and engagement of civil society and the private sector. In the Caribbean, key areas requiring strengthening to ensure countries in the region can maintain the gains made under PEPFAR include further engaging civil society and the private sector, building the capacity of NGOs to take on essential program functions, and maintaining donor

  12. Measurement of gas species, temperatures, coal burnout, and wall heat fluxes in a 200 MWe lignite-fired boiler with different overfire air damper openings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jianping Jing; Zhengqi Li; Guangkui Liu; Zhichao Chen; Chunlong Liu [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China). School of Energy Science and Engineering

    2009-07-15

    Measurements were performed on a 200 MWe, wall-fired, lignite utility boiler. For different overfire air (OFA) damper openings, the gas temperature, gas species concentration, coal burnout, release rates of components (C, H, and N), furnace temperature, and heat flux and boiler efficiency were measured. Cold air experiments for a single burner were conducted in the laboratory. The double-swirl flow pulverized-coal burner has two ring recirculation zones starting in the secondary air region in the burner. As the secondary air flow increases, the axial velocity of air flow increases, the maxima of radial velocity, tangential velocity and turbulence intensity all increase, and the swirl intensity of air flow and the size of recirculation zones increase slightly. In the central region of the burner, as the OFA damper opening widens, the gas temperature and CO concentration increase, while the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and coal particles ignite earlier. In the secondary air region of the burner, the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and the gas temperature and CO concentration vary slightly. In the sidewall region, the gas temperature, O{sub 2} concentration, and NOx concentration decrease, while the CO concentration increases and the gas temperature varies slightly. The furnace temperature and heat flux in the main burning region decrease appreciably, but increase slightly in the burnout region. The NOx emission decreases from 1203.6 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 0% to 511.7 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 80% and the boiler efficiency decreases from 92.59 to 91.9%. 15 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Co-pyrolysis of pine sawdust and lignite in a thermogravimetric analyzer and a fixed-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuyao; Tahmasebi, Arash; Yu, Jianglong

    2014-12-01

    Co-pyrolysis characteristics of lignite and pine sawdust were studied in a TGA and a fixed-bed reactor. The effects of pyrolysis temperature and blending ratio on the yield and composition of pyrolysis products (gas, tar, and char) were investigated. TGA experiments showed that pine sawdust decomposition took place at lower temperatures compared to lignite. With increasing the pine sawdust content in the blend, the DTG peaks shifted towards lower temperatures due to synergetic effect. In fixed-bed experiments, the synergetic effect increased the yield of volatile matter compared to the calculated values. The major gases released at low temperatures were CO2 and CO. However, hydrogen was the primary gaseous product at higher temperatures. During co-pyrolysis, concentrations of benzene, naphthalene, and hydrocarbons in the tar decreased, accompanied by an increase in phenols and guaiacol concentrations. With increasing pyrolysis temperature, the OH, aliphatic CH, CO, and CO functional groups in char decomposed substantially.

  14. Evaluation of radioactive emissions of lignite-fired power plants in Turkey using the Analytic Hierarchy Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueke, Tayfun [Mugla Sitki Kocman Univ., Mugla (Turkey). Dept. of Energy Systems Engineering

    2013-11-15

    Radioactive emissions of 13 lignite-fired power plants in Turkey are of great concern to the public and to scientists alike. The purpose of this study is to evaluate these power plants, according to their radioactive emissions by using the Analytic Hierarchy Process. Control criteria are in particular {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K and {sup 238}U emissions from the power plants. These control criteria are weighted according to the objective assessment. The calculations are repeated for three different objective assessments of control criteria namely the mortality risk coefficients for inhalation, ingestion, external exposure of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K and {sup 238}U. It has been calculated that the Can lignite-fired power plant is ranking first while the Soma-B plant is ranking last according to the radioactive emissions of the power plants when the average of three different objective control criteria are used in the calculations. (orig.)

  15. Eastern Caribbean Circulation and Island Mass Effect on St. Croix, US Virgin Islands: A Mechanism for Relatively Consistent Recruitment Patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Marcel Chérubin

    Full Text Available The northeastern Caribbean Sea is under the seasonal influence of the Trade Winds but also of the Orinoco/Amazon freshwater plume. The latter is responsible for intensification of the Caribbean Current in general and of its eddy activity in the northern part of the Caribbean Sea. More importantly, we show in this study that the front of the freshwater plume drives a northward flow that impinges directly on the island of St. Croix in the United States Virgin Islands. The angle of incidence of the incoming flow controls the nature of the wake on both sides and ends of the island, which changes from cyclonic to anticylonic wake flow, with either attached or shed eddies. Using an off-line bio-physical model, we simulated the dispersal and recruitment of an abundant Caribbean coral reef fish, the bluehead wrasse (Thalassoma bifasciatum in the context of the wake flow variability around St. Croix. Our results revealed the role played by the consistent seasonal forcing of the wake flow on the recruitment patterns around the island at the interannual scale. The interannual variability of the timing of arrival and northward penetration of the plume instead controls the nature of the wake, hence the regional spatial recruitment patterns.

  16. Improvements for the Western North Atlantic, Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico ADCIRC Tidal Database (EC2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Szpilka

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This research details the development and validation of an updated constituent tidal database for the Western North Atlantic, Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico (WNAT region, referred to as the EC2015 database. Regional databases, such as EC2015, provide much higher resolution than global databases allowing users to more accurately define the tidal forcing on smaller sub-region domains. The database last underwent major updates in 2001 and was developed using the two-dimensional, depth-integrated form of the coastal hydrodynamic model, ADvanced CIRCulation (ADCIRC, which solves the shallow-water equations in the generalized wave continuity equation form. Six main areas of improvement are examined: (1 placement of the open ocean boundary; (2 higher coastal resolution using Vertical Datum (VDatum models; (3 updated bathymetry from global databases; (4 updated boundary forcing compared using two global tidal databases; (5 updated bottom friction formulations; and (6 improved model physics by incorporating the advective terms in ADCIRC. The skill of the improved database is compared to that of its predecessor and is calculated using harmonic data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (NOAA CO-OPS stations and historic International Hydrographic Organization (IHO data. Overall, the EC2015 database significantly reduces errors realized in the EC2001 database and improves the quality of coastal tidal constituents available for smaller sub-regional models in the Western North Atlantic, Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico (WNAT region.

  17. Geochemical and Mineralogical Characteristics of Pleistocene Lignites and Associated Sediments of Marathousa Coal Field,Central Peloponnese,Greece

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.E.KELEPERTSIS; E.KONTIS

    1997-01-01

    The mineralogy and geochemistry data are presented for thirty-seven shales,four concretions,two carbonate sediments and seven lignites from the Marathousa coal field of the Megalopolis Basin in Greece.The argillaceous rocks consist of chlorite,illite,kaolinte,albite,quartz.opal-A,calcite and dolomite;the concretions of aragonite,gypsum and pyrite;and the carbonate rocks of calcite,quartz and illite.The mineral matter in the lignites consists of gypsum,quartz,albite,chlorite,illite,opal-A,dolomite,pyrite,and rarely calcite and kaolinite Athree-factor model explains the total variaition of major and trace elements in the argillaceous sediments.The first factor is an aluminosilicate factor and involves the following elements:Al,Si,Mg,Na,K,Ti,Mn,Nb,Y,Rb,Zn,Cu,Ni,Cr,Nband V,associated with chlorite,albite and illite.The second factor involves the elements Ca,Sr,Ba,Znand Sc and is related to carbonate lithology and mainly the carbonate concretions with gypsum.The third factor involves Fe and Ce with a weak association with Mn.The diagenesis of the Marathousa sediments and lignites was not very advanced as indicated by (a) the total thickness of the sequence (500m),(b) the presence of biogenic silica(opal-A) and (c) the age of the deposit(Pleistocene).FOr these reasons the rpresence of chlorite,illite and kaolinite in the sediments and lignite is due not to diagenetic reactions but to weathering of the flysch and metamorphic rocks at the edges of the Megalopolis Basin and transport of the weathering products(illite,chlorite,kaolinite)into the basin of deposition.The diagenetic minerals of the Marathousa sequence include pyrite,gypsum,dolomite and aragonite.

  18. Large-Scale Mercury Control Technology Testing for Lignite-Fired Utilities - Oxidation Systems for Wet FGD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven A. Benson; Michael J. Holmes; Donald P. McCollor; Jill M. Mackenzie; Charlene R. Crocker; Lingbu Kong; Kevin C. Galbreath

    2007-03-31

    Mercury (Hg) control technologies were evaluated at Minnkota Power Cooperative's Milton R. Young (MRY) Station Unit 2, a 450-MW lignite-fired cyclone unit near Center, North Dakota, and TXU Energy's Monticello Steam Electric Station (MoSES) Unit 3, a 793-MW lignite--Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal-fired unit near Mt. Pleasant, Texas. A cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber are used at MRY and MoSES for controlling particulate and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions, respectively. Several approaches for significantly and cost-effectively oxidizing elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in lignite combustion flue gases, followed by capture in an ESP and/or FGD scrubber were evaluated. The project team involved in performing the technical aspects of the project included Babcock & Wilcox, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and URS Corporation. Calcium bromide (CaBr{sub 2}), calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}), magnesium chloride (MgCl{sub 2}), and a proprietary sorbent enhancement additive (SEA), hereafter referred to as SEA2, were added to the lignite feeds to enhance Hg capture in the ESP and/or wet FGD. In addition, powdered activated carbon (PAC) was injected upstream of the ESP at MRY Unit 2. The work involved establishing Hg concentrations and removal rates across existing ESP and FGD units, determining costs associated with a given Hg removal efficiency, quantifying the balance-of-plant impacts of the control technologies, and facilitating technology commercialization. The primary project goal was to achieve ESP-FGD Hg removal efficiencies of {ge}55% at MRY and MoSES for about a month.

  19. A realistic EU vision of a lignite-based energy system in transition: Case study of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batas-Bjelić Ilija

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several Contracting Parties to the Treaty establishing the Energy Community of the South East Europe, currently in energy transition, have electricity production dominantly based on lignite which contrasts their new reality. Planning approach to designing a new feasible energy policy is presented in this paper. This novel approach in using EnergyPLAN tool stems from analysis of market operation of lignite thermal power plants on hourly basis, and quantification of the feasibility of the energy policy and its alignment with EU vision, and is presented in few scenarios. It was found out that the Serbian energy system is highly sensitive to the electricity market and CO2 tax increase, because the marginal costs for lignite generation will increase to more than 50€/MWh. Shifting in the merit order will be observed even at lower CO2 tax levels, because of the intensity of the emission of the electricity sector (calculated to be higher than 700gCO2/kWhel, according to current energy policy. Based on the increased use of renewable energy sources and more efficient energy conversion technologies, socio-economic and energy policy feasibility would be increased, while long-term marginal costs would be improved by 2€/MWh and emission intensity by 258 gCO2/kWhel, compared to the current energy policy. These contributions, shown in the Serbian case, are of general importance for other lignite dominated Contracting Parties to Treaty establishing the Energy Community. [Projekat Ministartsva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 42009

  20. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the inactive uraniferous lignite processing sites at Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota. [UMTRA Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beranich, S.; Berger, N.; Bierley, D.; Bond, T.M.; Burt, C.; Caldwell, J.A.; Dery, V.A.; Dutcher, A.; Glover, W.A.; Heydenburg, R.J.; Larson, N.B.; Lindsey, G.; Longley, J.M.; Millard, J.B.; Miller, M.; Peel, R.C.; Persson-Reeves, C.H.; Titus, F.B.; Wagner, L.

    1989-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), to clean up the Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota, uraniferous lignite processing sites to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at these sites. Remedial action at these sites must be performed in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) standards promulgated for the remedial action and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the state of North Dakota. The inactive Belfield uraniferous lignite processing site is one mile southeast of Belfield, North Dakota. The inactive Bowman uraniferous lignite processing site at the former town of Griffin, is seven miles northwest of Bowman, North Dakota and 65 road miles south of Belfield. Lignite ash from the processing operations has contaminated the soils over the entire 10.7-acre designated Belfield site and the entire 12.1-acre designated Bowman site. Dispersion of the ash has contaminated an additional 20.6 acres surrounding the Belfield processing site and an additional 59.2 acres surrounding the Bowman processing site. The proposed remedial action is to relocate the contaminated materials at the Belfield processing site to the Bowman processing/disposal site for codisposal with the Bowman contaminated soils. The environmental impacts assessed in this EA were evaluated for the proposed remedial action and the no action alternative and demonstrate that the proposed action would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment and would be performed in compliance with applicable environmental laws. The no action alternative would not be consistent with the intent of Public Law 95-604 and would not comply with the EPA standards. 48 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.