WorldWideScience

Sample records for caregivers

  1. Caregiver Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will not sell or share your name. Caregiver Depression Tweet Bookmark this page | Email | Print Many caregivers ... depression See your doctor Treatment Coping Symptoms of depression Caregiving is hard — and can lead to feelings ...

  2. Help for the Caregiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... patient needs the caregiver to do, but also what the caregiver is willing and able to do. Caregiver strain ... be caused by the cancer or the treatments. What the caregiver is expected to do Caregivers report that they ...

  3. LGBT Caregiver Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    LGBT CAREGIVER CONCERNS IMPORTANT CONSIDERATIONS FOR LGBT CAREGIVERS LGBT CAREGIVER CONSIDERATIONS As a caregiver for someone with Alzheimer’s disease, you will face various challenges. Some are common among all ...

  4. Caregiving and travel patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This study explored the impact of caregiving for older adults on mobility and travel : patterns. Specifically, the focus was on how caregivers managed trips on behalf of : another who receives care. Caregiving is becoming increasingly common as the :...

  5. Late-Stage Caregiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregiving Middle-Stage Caregiving Late-Stage Caregiving Behaviors Aggression & Anger Anxiety & Agitation Depression Hallucinations Memory Loss & Confusion Repetition Sleep Issues & Sundowning Suspicion & Delusions Wandering Abuse Start Here What You Need to Know Online ...

  6. Middle-State Caregiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregiving Middle-Stage Caregiving Late-Stage Caregiving Behaviors Aggression & Anger Anxiety & Agitation Depression Hallucinations Memory Loss & Confusion Repetition Sleep Issues & Sundowning Suspicion & Delusions Wandering Abuse Start Here What You Need to Know Online ...

  7. Early-Stage Caregiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregiving Middle-Stage Caregiving Late-Stage Caregiving Behaviors Aggression & Anger Anxiety & Agitation Depression Hallucinations Memory Loss & Confusion Repetition Sleep Issues & Sundowning Suspicion & Delusions Wandering Abuse Start Here What You Need to Know Online ...

  8. Family Caregiver Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on your schedule. Look for our launch soon! FAMILY CARE NAVIGATOR ─ Click on Your State AL AK ... AiA18 Smart Patients Caregivers Community In partnership with Family Caregiver Alliance Learn more Caregiver Research Studies show ...

  9. Family caregiving in bipolar disorder: caregiver consequences, caregiver coping styles, and caregiver distress.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, P.J.J.; Wijngaarden, B. van; Knoppert-van der Klein, E.A.M.; Achterberg, T. van

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: This study investigated the consequences caregivers of outpatients with bipolar disorder are confronted with, the distress they experience and their coping styles. METHODS: Caregivers (n = 115) were asked to complete the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire (IEQ) to measure caregivers'

  10. Caregiver Health and Wellness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain and headaches Stress and depression As a caregiver, what can I do to take care of my ... caregiving. Accept that there is a limit to what you can do as a caregiver. Recognize when you feel overwhelmed or are physically ...

  11. Tacit definitions of informal caregiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrubel, J; Richards, T A; Folkman, S; Acree, M C

    2001-01-01

    This study describes three tacit definitions of informal caregiving and explores the extent to which differences in these tacit definitions explain variation in caregivers' negative mood over time. There is a growing need to understand the sources of stress and gratification for informal caregivers. Tacit definitions of informal caregiving refer to caregivers' understanding of what caregiving entails. These definitions are tacit because they arise from caregivers' taken-for-granted understanding rather than formally articulated positions concerning caregiving. A random sample of 60 men, all of whom were caregiving partners of men with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), was drawn from a larger cohort of 253 participants in the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Coping Project (1990-1997). The caregivers were assessed bimonthly for 2 years with procedures that included a semi-structured interview focusing on a recent stressful event involving caregiving, and quantitative measures of well-being. Interpretive phenomenological case studies of the narrative accounts of the 60 caregivers produced three tacit definitions of caregiving - engagement, conflict and distance. These three tacit definitions were distinguished by differences in learning about caregiving, involvement in health care decisions, caregiving activities and reported sources of stress. The three groups differed on measures of dyadic adjustment, depression, anger and anxiety. Better understanding of caregivers' tacit definitions can facilitate and enhance effective support and interventions for caregivers.

  12. Moving beyond caregiver burden: identifying helpful interventions for family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrell, Jeanne M

    2014-03-01

    Family members serving as informal caregivers for loved ones often experience physical, psychological, emotional, social, and financial consequences that can be conceptualized as caregiver burden. As the number of older adults in our society continues to increase, there will be even more demand for family caregivers. It is important to move beyond a focus on the statistics and characteristics of caregiver burden and identify helpful interventions to reduce this burden. Interventions that decrease caregiver burden can enable family caregivers to delay placement of the individual in an institutional setting and improve quality of life for both the caregiver and care recipient. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. More caregiving, less working: caregiving roles and gender difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeonjung; Tang, Fengyan

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the relationship of caregiving roles to labor force participation using the nationally representative data from the Health and Retirement Study. The sample was composed of men and women aged 50 to 61 years (N = 5,119). Caregiving roles included caregiving for spouse, parents, and grandchildren; a summary of three caregiving roles was used to indicate multiple caregiving roles. Bivariate analysis using chi-square and t tests and binary logistic regression models were applied. Results show that women caregivers for parents and/or grandchildren were less likely to be in the labor force than non-caregivers and that caregiving responsibility was not related to labor force participation for the sample of men. Findings have implication for supporting family caregivers, especially women, to balance work and caregiving commitments. © The Author(s) 2013.

  14. Repetitive Questioning Exasperates Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Hamdy MD

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive questioning is due to an impaired episodic memory and is a frequent, often presenting, problem in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (amnestic type. It is due to the patients’ difficulties learning new information, retaining it, and recalling it, and is often aggravated by a poor attention span and easy distractibility. A number of factors may trigger and maintain repetitive questioning. Caregivers should try to identify and address these triggers. In the case discussion presented, it is due to the patient’s concerns about her and her family’s safety triggered by watching a particularly violent movie aired on TV. What went wrong in the patient/caregiver interaction and how it could have been avoided or averted are explored. Also reviewed are the impact of repetitive questioning, the challenges it raises for caregivers, and some effective intervention strategies that may be useful to diffuse the angst that caregivers experience with repetitive questioning.

  15. Depression and Caregiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FCA - A A + A You are here Home Depression and Caregiving Order this publication Printer-friendly version ... a more serious depression over time. Symptoms of Depression People experience depression in different ways. Some may ...

  16. Caregiving in Indian Country

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-12-23

    This podcast discusses the role of caregivers in Indian County and the importance of protecting their health. It is primarily targeted to public health and aging services professionals.  Created: 12/23/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/23/2009.

  17. Physical disability contributes to caregiver stress in dementia caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, David G; Paley, Glenys A; Nichols, Pamela; Roberts, David; Underwood, Peter J; Schaper, Frank

    2005-03-01

    Previous findings of studies on the impact of physical illness on caregiver health have been inconsistent. The authors wanted to determine whether physical disability, as determined by the SF-12 survey that provides information on both physical and mental health problems, contributes to caregiver stress. The authors interviewed 91 primary caregivers (aged 38-85 years) of persons with dementia who had been referred by their family physicians for the first time for formal support services or memory evaluation. Caregivers completed the SF-12 version of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form Health Survey that generates Mental Component Summary (MCS) and Physical Component Summary (PCS) scores and reported on caregiver stress and concurrent medical conditions and medications. Most caregivers reported stress (76.9%), having medical conditions (72.4%), or taking medications (67%). The MCS but not the PCS scores were significantly lower than community norms, indicating an excess of disability due to mental health problems. Nevertheless, 40.7% had PCS scores indicating some degree of physical disability. Using multiple logistic regression analysis, PCS scores but not the presence of medical problems were independently associated with caregiver stress. Chronic disability as assessed by SF-12 PCS scores is independently associated with caregiver stress. These data suggest that caregivers of persons with dementia should be assessed for disabling physical conditions and mental health problems. In addition, reducing the impact of physical disability could ameliorate caregiver stress.

  18. Cancer caregiving tasks and consequences and their associations with caregiver status and the caregiver's relationship to the patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Line; Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten Aagaard

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Seriously ill patients often depend on their informal caregivers to help and support them through the disease course. This study investigated informal cancer caregivers' experiences of caregiving tasks and consequences and how caregiver status (primary vs. non-primary caregiver) and t...

  19. Taking Care of You: Support for Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Parents / Taking Care of You: Support for Caregivers What's in this article? The Caregiver's Dilemma Tips for Caregivers More Tips Getting Help ... there are moments when the sheer magnitude of what you're up against is so ... not alone. The Caregiver's Dilemma When you're the caregiver of a ...

  20. Family caregiving in schizophrenia: domains and distress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schene, A. H.; van Wijngaarden, B.; Koeter, M. W.

    1998-01-01

    This article focuses on (1) the dimensionality of the caregiving concept; (2) the relation between the identified caregiving dimensions and characteristics of the patient, the caregiver, and their relationship; and (3) the relation between caregiving dimensions and caregiver distress. Findings are

  1. "I Do the Best I Can": Caregivers' Perceptions of Informal Caregiving for Older Adults in Belize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroman, Kerryellen; Morency, Jamme

    2011-01-01

    In this first study of informal caregiving for older adults in Belize, 29 caregivers described their experiences of caregiving, how they perceived and managed the role, and what critical resources they needed. The three main themes identified in the caregiver interviews were "the experiences of caregivers, the rewards of caregiving, and…

  2. Caregiving Appraisal in Family Caregivers of Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Farhadi

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Caregiving appraisal is a multidimensional concept, which has positive and negative aspects. By taking into account all aspects of this concept, one can better understand and ultimately has a more comprehensive assessment of the status of caregivers, and implement effective interventions towards improving the health of this group.

  3. Caregiver burden and correlates among caregivers of children and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Child and Adolescent Mental Health ... Data on socio-demographic factors, psychiatric morbidity among caregivers, and level of caregiver burden was collected using a researcher-designed socio-demographic questionnaire, Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, and Zarit burden interview, respectively.

  4. Concept Analysis: Alzheimer's Caregiver Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llanque, Sarah; Savage, Lynette; Rosenburg, Neal; Caserta, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article was to analyze the concept of caregiver stress in the context of caring for a person with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. Currently, there are more than 15 million unpaid caregivers for persons suffering from Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. This unpaid care can be stressful for caregivers due to the chronic nature of the disease process, as well as other factors. The paper incorporates the modified method of Wilson's concept analysis procedure to analyze the concept of caregiver stress. A review of the literature was undertaken using the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Google Scholar, and PubMed. A theoretical definition of caregiver stress is provided, and the defining attributes, related concepts, antecedents, and consequences of caregiver stress are proposed, and case studies are presented. The analysis demonstrates that caregiver stress is the unequal exchange of assistance among people who stand in close relationship to one another, which results in emotional and physical stress on the caregiver. Implications for future nursing research and practice conclude the paper. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Rural women caregivers in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosato, Kay E; Leipert, Beverly

    2006-01-01

    Informal caregiving within rural contexts in Canada is increasing. This is due in part to a number of factors related to the restructuring of the Canadian health care system, the regionalization of services to urban locations, the increased population of people 65 years and older, and the desire of this population to age within their rural homes. Most often, the informal caregiving role is assumed by rural women. Women tend to fall into the role of informal caregiver to elders because of the many societal and gender expectations and values that are present within the rural culture. The purpose of this literature review is to identify the context in which women provide care for an elder in rural Canada. Illustrating these issues will help to uncover challenges and barriers rural women face when providing care and highlight recommendations and implications for rural women caregivers and nurses employed within rural settings. Many rural women share similar caregiving experiences as urban informal caregivers, but rural women are faced with additional challenges in providing quality care for an elder. Rural women caregivers are faced with such issues as limited access to adequate and appropriate healthcare services, culturally incongruent health care, geographical distance from regionalized centers and health services, transportation challenges, and social/geographical isolation. In addition to these issues, many rural women are faced with the multiple role demands that attend being a wife, mother, caregiver and employee. The pile up of these factors leaves rural women caregivers susceptible to additional stresses and burn out, with limited resources on which to depend. Through reviewing pertinent literature, appropriate implications and recommendations can be made that may assist rural women caregivers and rural nurses. Nurses working within rural communities are in ideal settings to work collaboratively in building supportive relationships with rural women in order to

  6. Caregiving burden and psychological distress in Chinese spousal caregivers: gender difference in the moderating role of positive aspects of caregiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Daniel Fu Keung; Ng, Ting Kin; Zhuang, Xiao Yu

    2018-05-21

    This study endeavors to advance the current literature by examining the gender differences in the caregiving experiences and the stress-buffering role of positive aspects of caregiving (PAC) among Chinese spousal caregivers of frail elders in Hong Kong. Forty-nine husband caregivers and 121 wife caregivers of frail elders in Hong Kong (N = 170) responded to the Positive Aspects of Caregiving (PAC) scale, the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI), the 21-item Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales (DASS-21), and demographic questions. These spousal caregivers were diverse in age, and their care receivers were diverse in terms of age and health condition. As predicted, there were significant gender differences in the moderating effects of PAC on the relationships of caregiving burden to depression, anxiety, and overall psychological distress. While PAC significantly buffered the effects of caregiving burden on depression, anxiety, and overall psychological distress for wife caregivers, the moderating effects of PAC were not significant for husband caregivers. Unexpectedly, wife caregivers reported lower PAC, higher caregiving burden, and higher psychological distress. As these findings suggest that PAC is lower but more beneficial for Chinese wife caregivers than Chinese husband caregivers, helping professionals are recommended to use strengths-based interventions that target PAC when working with Chinese wife caregivers.

  7. Compassionate Love in Individuals With Alzheimer's Disease and Their Spousal Caregivers: Associations With Caregivers' Psychological Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monin, Joan K; Schulz, Richard; Feeney, Brooke C

    2015-12-01

    To examine whether compassionate love in both individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and their spousal caregivers related to less caregiving burden, more positive caregiving appraisals, and less depressive symptoms for caregivers. Fifty-eight individuals with AD and their spousal caregivers participated in interviews in which both partners reported their compassionate love for their partner, and caregivers self-reported burden, positive appraisals of caregiving, and depressive symptoms. As hypothesized, both AD individuals' and caregivers' compassionate love were associated with less burden and more positive appraisals of caregiving. Also, care givers' compassionate love mediated the association between AD individuals' compassionate love and caregivers' burden as well as the association between AD individuals' compassionate love and caregivers' positive appraisals of caregiving. Finally, there was a marginally significant association between caregivers' compassionate love and less caregiver depressive symptoms. Results suggest that AD individuals' compassionate love is related to compassionate love in caregivers, which in turn relates to reduced burden but not significantly less depressive symptoms for caregivers. Assessing caregivers' and AD individuals' feelings of compassionate love may be useful in identifying caregivers who are resilient and those who are at a heightened risk for caregiving burden. Also, interventions that enhance both partners' compassionate love may benefit caregivers. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Leisure activities, caregiving demands and catecholamine levels in dementia caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattillion, Elizabeth A; Mausbach, Brent T; Roepke, Susan K; von Känel, Roland; Mills, Paul J; Dimsdale, Joel E; Allison, Matthew; Ziegler, Michael G; Patterson, Thomas L; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Grant, Igor

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether satisfaction from leisure activities moderates the relationship between caregiving demands (i.e., hours per day spent caring for a spouse with dementia) and resting levels of the catecholamines norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI). Spousal caregivers (n = 107; mean age = 73.95 ± 8.12 years) were assessed in home for plasma levels of NE and EPI, amount of care provided, and leisure satisfaction. Regression was used to determine whether leisure satisfaction moderated the relationship between hours providing care per day and catecholamine levels. A significant interaction was found between hours caregiving and leisure satisfaction for NE, but not for EPI. Post hoc regressions were conducted for both NE and EPI. At low leisure satisfaction, time spent caring for a spouse was positively associated with plasma NE (β = 0.41; p = 0.005) and EPI (β = 0.44; p = 0.003). In contrast, at high levels of satisfaction, time caregiving was not significantly associated with plasma NE (β = -0.08; p = 0.57) or EPI (β = 0.23; p = 0.12). These findings suggest that leisure satisfaction may protect caregivers from increases in catecholamines, which have been implicated in cardiovascular risk. Further support for these findings may impact psychological treatments for distressed caregivers.

  9. The relationship between family functioning and caregiving appraisal of dementia family caregivers: caregiving self-efficacy as a mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Lian-Hua

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore caregiving self-efficacy as a mediator for the association between family functioning and caregiving appraisal of dementia family caregivers in Taiwan. This study adopted a cross-sectional correlational design. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 115 dyads of dementia patients and family caregivers from the outpatient neurological clinics of two hospitals in northern Taiwan. Data were gathered through interviews with a structured questionnaire, which included demographic characteristics for caregivers and patients, family functioning, caregiving self-efficacy, as well as positive and negative aspects of caregiving appraisal. Family functioning, patients' activities of daily living score, Neuropsychiatric Inventory caregiver distress, and three domains of self-efficacy were significantly associated with caregiver burden. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that self-efficacy for obtaining respite (SE-OR) significantly explained 20.5% of the variance in caregiver esteem. Caregiver perceived worsened health status, family functioning, and SE-OR significantly explained 59% of the variance in caregiver burden. The mediation test only supported the partially mediating role of SE-OR on the relationship between family functioning and caregiver burden, while the mediating effect of self-efficacy for responding to disruptive behaviours and controlling upsetting thoughts were insignificant. Our findings provided preliminary evidence for health professionals recommending that future studies should assess the family dynamic and health problems of caregivers, and develop appropriate family-centred interventions that focus on strengthening interfamily support and respite services to alleviate caregiver burden.

  10. What Are the Caregiver's Rights?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANSWERS by heart Lifestyle + Risk Reduction Caregiving What Are the Caregiver’s Rights? Caring for someone you love after a heart or stroke can be hard. The responsibilities and the emotional stress can cause you ...

  11. For Caregivers: Coping with Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Community Advocate Get Involved Donate Coping With Burnout Being a caregiver of someone with ALS is ... Solutions in Dealing with Burnout Common Causes of Burnout Perfectionism: A perfectionist continually focuses on what needs ...

  12. Depression and caregiver burden experienced by caregivers of Jordanian patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Andaleeb Abu; Bond, A Elaine; Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan

    2012-04-01

    Many stroke survivors will be cared for at home, primarily by their relatives. Providing care to a family member with a chronic disabling disease can be both emotionally and physically distressing for the caregivers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between patients' characteristics, duration of caregiving, daily caregiving time, caregiver's characteristics, caregiver depression and burden in caregivers of patients with stroke. A cross-sectional design was used with a convenience sample of 116 subjects. The Center of Epidemiologic Studies of Depression and the Caregiver Strain Index were used to identify caregiver depression and burden, respectively. Logistic regression analysis identified the influence of independent variables on caregiver depression and caregiver burden. Caregivers had high scores for depression and burden indices. Caregivers' health, receiving professional home health care and caregivers' burden were related to caregiver depression. Functional disabilities of patients with stroke and depression of caregivers were related to caregiver burden. To decrease caregiver depression and burden, nurses must provide caregivers with instructions for home management of patients with stroke. Development of specialized stroke home health services in Jordan that targets patients with stroke and their caregivers are recommended. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Gender Differences in Dementia Spousal Caregiving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna Maria Pöysti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The proportion of male caregivers is rapidly increasing. However, there are few large scale studies exploring gender differences in the burden or coping with caregiving. We investigated this among caregivers of patients with dementia. The study cohort consisted of 335 dyads of wife-husband couples from two studies including dementia patients and their spousal caregivers. Baseline mini-mental state examination (MMSE, clinical dementia rating scale (CDR, neuropsychiatric inventory (NPI, cornell depression scale and charlson comorbidity index (CCI were used to describe patients with dementia, Zarit burden scale and geriatric depression scale were used to measure experienced burden and depression of caregivers. Mean age of caregivers was 78 years. There were no differences in depression, satisfaction with life, or loneliness according to caregivers' gender. Male caregivers had more comorbidities than females (CCI 1.9 versus 1.1, P<0.001, and the wives of male caregivers had a more severe stage of dementia than husbands of female caregivers (CDR, P=0.048; MMSE14.0 versus 17.7, P<0.001. However, the mean Zarit burden scale was significantly lower among male than female caregivers (31.5 versus 37.5; P<0.001. Lower education of male caregivers tended to be associated with less experienced burden. In conclusion, male caregivers of dementia experienced lower burden than female caregivers despite care recipients' more severe disease.

  14. Death representation of caregivers in hospice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andruccioli, Jessica; Russo, Maria Maffia; Bruschi, Angela; Pedrabissi, Luigi; Sarti, Donatella; Monterubbianesi, Maria Cristina; Rossi, Sabina; Rocconi, Sabina; Raffaeli, William

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we investigated caregiver's death representation in hospice. The results presented here are a further analysis of the data collected in our previous study, concerning the evaluation of the caregiver in hospice. The data analysis of 24 caregivers of patients hospitalized in Rimini Hospice (Italy) underlined that caregivers avoiding death representation of the patient admitted to hospice had fewer protective factors (52.3%) and more risk factors (47.7%) than caregivers nonavoiding (66.5% and 33.5%, respectively). Caregivers avoiding death representation, moreover, experienced a greater distress (58%) than those nonavoiding (42%).

  15. Influence of caregiver personality on the burden of family caregivers of terminally ill cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha-Hyun; Kim, Seon-Young; Kim, Jae-Min; Kim, Sung-Wan; Shin, Il-Seon; Shim, Hyun-Jeong; Hwang, Jun-Eul; Chung, Ik-Joo; Yoon, Jin-Sang

    2016-02-01

    To determine the influence of caregiver personality and other factors on the burden of family caregivers of terminally ill cancer patients. We investigated a wide range of factors related to the patient-family caregiver dyad in a palliative care setting using a cross-sectional design. Caregiver burden was assessed using the seven-item short version of the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI-7). Caregiver personality was assessed using the 10-item short version of the Big Five Inventory (BFI-10), which measures the following five personality dimensions: extroversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness. Patient- and caregiver-related sociodemographic and psychological factors were included in the analysis because of their potential association with caregiver burden. Clinical patient data were obtained from medical charts or by using other measures. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to identify the independent factors associated with caregiver burden. We analyzed 227 patient-family caregiver dyads. The multivariate analysis revealed that caregiver extroversion was protective against caregiver burden, whereas depressive symptoms in caregivers were related to increased burden. Neuroticism was positively correlated with caregiver burden, but this relationship was nonsignificant following adjustment for depressive symptoms. Patient-related factors were not significantly associated with caregiver burden. Evaluating caregiver personality traits could facilitate identification of individuals at greater risk of high burden. Furthermore, depression screening and treatment programs for caregivers in palliative care settings are required to decrease caregiver burden.

  16. Informal Caregivers Assisting People with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chunfeng

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify characteristics of informal caregivers, caregiving, and people with multiple sclerosis (MS) receiving this assistance that are associated with the strength of the care-giver/care recipient relationship. Data were collected in a national survey of informal caregivers and analyzed using an ordered logistic regression model to identify factors associated with caregiver perceptions of the strength of the relationship with the person with MS. The overall health of the person with MS was significantly associated with caregiver perceptions that providing assistance strengthened the caregiver/care recipient relationship, with poor health having a negative impact on the relationship. A spousal relationship between the caregiver and the person with MS was associated with significantly lower perceptions of a strengthened relationship. Conversely, caregiver perceptions that MS symptoms interfered with the independence of the person with MS in daily life were associated with caregiver perceptions of a strengthened relationship. Longer duration of caregiving and more hours per week spent providing assistance also were associated with a stronger relationship. In contrast, we found a significant negative association between caregiver perceptions that assisting the person with MS was burdensome and the strength of the relationship. Similarly, higher levels of education among caregivers tended to have a significantly negative impact on the caregiver/care recipient relationship. Our findings highlight the importance of addressing the needs and concerns of spousal caregivers. Health professionals who treat informal caregivers, as well as those treating people with MS, should be sensitive to the impact caregiving has on caregivers, especially spouses providing assistance. PMID:24453723

  17. An organizing framework for informal caregiver interventions: detailing caregiving activities and caregiver and care recipient outcomes to optimize evaluation efforts

    OpenAIRE

    Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Voils, Corrine I; Weinberger, Morris

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Caregiver interventions may help improve the quality of informal care. Yet the lack of a systematic framework specifying the targets and outcomes of caregiver interventions hampers our ability to understand what has been studied, to evaluate existing programs, and to inform the design of future programs. Our goal was to develop an organizing framework detailing the components of the caregiving activities and the caregiver and care recipient outcomes that should be affected...

  18. Informal Caregiving for Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romito, Francesca; Goldzweig, Gil; Cormio, Claudia; Hagedoorn, Mariët; Andersen, Barbara L.

    2013-01-01

    According to the recent worldwide estimation by the GLOBOCAN project, in total, 12.7 million new cancer cases and 7.6 million cancer deaths occurred in 2008. The worldwide number of cancer survivors within 5 years of diagnosis has been estimated at be almost 28.8 million. Informal caregivers, such as family members and close friends, provide essential support to cancer patients. The authors of this report provide an overview of issues in the study of informal caregivers for cancer patients and long-term survivors in the United States and Europe, characterizing the caregivers commonly studied; the resources currently available to them; and their unmet needs, their psychosocial outcomes, and the psychosocial interventions tailored to their special circumstances. A broad overview of the state of research and knowledge, both in Europe and the United States, and observations on the directions for future research are provided. PMID:23695928

  19. Caregiving Isn't a Solo Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sport Follow us Caregiving Isn't a Solo Sport Leeza Gibbons is a leading TV talk show ... go it alone. Caregiving is not a solo sport. Identify who’s on your team. Delegate, forgive, regroup, ...

  20. Long-Term Effects of Bereavement and Caregiver Intervention on Dementia Caregiver Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, William E.; Bergman, Elizabeth J.; Roth, David L.; McVie, Theresa; Gaugler, Joseph E.; Mittelman, Mary S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the joint effects of bereavement and caregiver intervention on caregiver depressive symptoms. Design and Methods: Alzheimer's caregivers from a randomized trial of an enhanced caregiver support intervention versus usual care who had experienced the death of their spouse (n = 254) were repeatedly…

  1. Self- Efficacy and Caregiver Strain in Alzheimer\\'s Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Mohamadi Shahbalaghi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This study with a co relational design has conducted to determine relationship between caregiving strain and self-efficacy in family caregiver of patient with Alzheimer. Accessible sample of the study consisted of 81 family caregivers that all of them were member of Iranian Alzheimer Association. Data was gathered by demographic, self-efficacy and care giving strain questioners. Findings showed the most of the subjects were female (%60, spouse of care giving recipient (56%, married (64%, reside in same household (55%, 49% under high school education, 45% of them haven't taken formal courses about the care of the patients, 53% of them were satisfied about providing of care, 36% reported bad health status. The most important caring needs consisted education for better care providing. the Mean of self-efficacy was 66/96 (29-106 and strain 39/43 (17-65. There were not any relations between strain and self-efficacy with demographic variables. There was positive significant Pearson correlation (r=0/539, p=O/ 01 between self-efficacy and strain. Findings indicated that self-efficacy and care giving strain are subjective and individualized concepts. Care giving to elderly patients is a stressful event but moderate co-relationship shows that caregivers apprise the stress of care giving as a constructive and controllable manner.

  2. Cancer Caregiver: Perceived Benefits of Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapid, Maria I; Atherton, Pamela J; Clark, Matthew M; Kung, Simon; Sloan, Jeff A; Rummans, Teresa A

    2015-11-01

    The burden associated with caregiving has been well documented. Caregivers have multiple responsibilities, and technology may be accessible as a potential burden-alleviating resource. We surveyed cancer caregivers regarding current technology use and willingness to use technology for easing burden or distress. Because age has been associated with technology use, responses were compared between geriatric (≥65 years old) and nongeriatric (18-64 years old) caregivers. We had 112 respondents. Based on nonmissing responses, 66% (n=71) were women, 95% (n=106) were white, and 84% (n=91) had post-high school education. Almost all caregivers reported having Internet (105 [94%]) and e-mail (102 [91%]) access. Nongeriatric caregivers indicated more willingness to access Internet-based tools that help caregivers (54 [93%] versus 41 [76%]; p=0.04) and were more frequent users of social media (37 [64%] versus 16 [30%]; p=0.01), smartphones (33 [57%] versus 16 [30%]; p=0.01), and other mobile wireless devices (42 [72%] versus 19 [35%]; p<0.001) than geriatric caregivers. They also more frequently expected technologies to improve their own quality of life (p=0.009), increase their feelings of being effective as a caregiver (p=0.02), and save time (p=0.003). Regardless of age, a majority of caregivers (67 [62%]) endorsed the potential benefit of caregiving technologies in preventing burnout. Most caregivers have high access to and use of technology. Geriatric and nongeriatric caregivers were receptive to technology-based tools to help with their caregiving roles. Although nongeriatric caregivers expected to derive more benefit from such tools, both groups believed that caregiving technologies could reduce burden.

  3. The Relationship Between Caregiving and Mortality After Accounting for Time-Varying Caregiver Status and Addressing the Healthy Caregiver Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredman, Lisa; Lyons, Jennifer G; Cauley, Jane A; Hochberg, Marc; Applebaum, Katie M

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies have shown inconsistent associations between caregiving and mortality. This may be due to analyzing caregiver status at baseline only, and that better health is probably related to taking on caregiving responsibilities and continuing in that role. The latter is termed The Healthy Caregiver Hypothesis, similar to the Healthy Worker Effect in occupational epidemiology. We applied common approaches from occupational epidemiology to evaluate the association between caregiving and mortality, including treating caregiving as time-varying and lagging exposure up to 5 years. Caregiving status among 1,068 women (baseline mean age = 81.0 years; 35% caregivers) participating in the Caregiver-Study of Osteoporotic Fractures study was assessed at five interviews conducted between 1999 and 2009. Mortality was determined through January 2012. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals adjusted for sociodemographics, perceived stress, and functional limitations. A total of 483 participants died during follow-up (38.8% and 48.7% of baseline caregivers and noncaregivers, respectively). Using baseline caregiving status, the association with mortality was 0.77, 0.62-0.95. Models of time-varying caregiving status showed a more pronounced reduction in mortality in current caregivers (hazard ratios = 0.54, 0.38-0.75), which diminished with longer lag periods (3-year lag hazard ratio = 0.68, 0.52-0.88, 5-year lag hazard ratios = 0.76, 0.60-0.95). Overall, caregivers had lower mortality rates than noncaregivers in all analyses. These associations were sensitive to the lagged period, indicating that the timing of leaving caregiving does influence this relationship and should be considered in future investigations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. How Caregivers Make Meaning of Child Mental Health Problems: Toward Understanding Caregiver Strain and Help Seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayberry, Lindsay S; Heflinger, Craig Anne

    Family caregivers' conceptualizations of their child's emotional and behavioral problems (EBP) influence help-seeking for the child and caregiver strain. We analyzed 21 interviews with caregivers to explore their conceptualizations about the cause of their child's EBP, their experiences of strain, and their reported help-seeking behaviors. Caregivers had divergent conceptualizations of their child's EBP: 12 caregivers viewed the EBP as caused by a disorder and described the onset of symptoms as the central stressful event, whereas 9 caregivers described their child's problems as a response to an earlier stressor (e.g. trauma, abuse, divorce). Different patterns of caregiver strain and help-seeking were associated with caregiver conceptualization. All caregivers voiced a need for peer-to-peer support for caregivers and youth with EBP.

  5. Caregiver and expecting caregiver support for early peanut introduction guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhawt, Matthew; Chan, Edmond S; Fleischer, David M; Hicks, Allison; Wilson, Rachel; Shaker, Marcus; Venter, Carina; Stukus, David

    2018-03-07

    Recent guidelines recommend early peanut introduction (EPI) beginning around 4 to 6 months of age in infants with severe eczema and/or egg allergy and around 6 months for all other infants. Caregiver preferences for such practices are unknown. We explored preferences for EPI and in-office allergy risk assessment (IRA) through a nationally representative survey of expecting (n = 1,000) and new caregivers of infants younger than 1 year (n = 1,000). Among a primarily female (99.7%), married (80.3%), and white (74.4%) sample, 29% had no or vague awareness of the new guidelines, 61% had no or minimal concern for their child developing food allergy, but 54% felt timing of food introduction has moderate to strong importance for developing food allergy. Only 31% expressed willingness for EPI before or around 6 months of age, with 40% reporting willingness to introduce peanut after 11 months of age, similar to tree nuts and seafood. However, 60% reported willingness to introduce egg before 8 months of age. A total of 51% and 56.8% were unwilling to allow IRA methods, such as skin testing and oral challenge, before 11 months of age, respectively. Odds of willingness to delay peanut introduction (odds ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-0.96) and undergo challenge (odds ratio, 0.67; 95% confidence interval, 0.54-0.82) after 6 months of age were lower among expecting caregivers. Among new and expecting caregivers, there is poor current willingness and questionable support for early allergenic solid food recommendations, including IRA before introduction. Willingness was better among expecting vs current caregivers. These trends underscore a need for broader formal implementation planning to facilitate early allergen introduction and maximize its preventive benefits. Copyright © 2018 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Medically Complex Home Care and Caregiver Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorman, Sara M.; Macdonald, Cameron

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the study: To examine (a) whether the content of caregiving tasks (i.e., nursing vs. personal care) contributes to variation in caregivers' strain and (b) whether the level of complexity of nursing tasks contributes to variation in strain among caregivers providing help with such tasks. Design and methods: The data came from the Cash…

  7. Widening the Generational Circle: Family Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bert Kruger

    This document addresses the dilemma faced by families with an aging or disabled member and the stress associated with the role of family caregiver. Emotions experienced by family caregivers, especially when the caregiver is an adult child caring for an elderly or frail parent, are discussed and feelings of desertion, dependence, and sibling…

  8. Family Caregiver Identity: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eifert, Elise K.; Adams, Rebecca; Dudley, William; Perko, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the multitude of available resources, family caregivers of those with chronic disease continually underutilize support services to cope with the demands of caregiving. Several studies have linked self-identification as a caregiver to the increased likelihood of support service use. Purpose: The present study reviewed the…

  9. Family Caregivers: Psychosocial Impacts and Clinical Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daire, Andrew P.; Torres, Jennifer; Edwards, Nivischi N.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe how 3 groups of family caregivers (spouses, daughters, and sons) are affected by the caregiving role. In addition, clinical considerations and interventions for mental health professionals working with these different groups of family caregivers are discussed. A clinical case example is also presented. (Contains 2 tables.)

  10. Balancing competing needs mediates the association of caregiving demand with caregiver role strain and depressive symptoms of dementia caregivers: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsin-Yun; Yang, Ching-Tzu; Wang, Yu-Nu; Hsu, Wen-Chuin; Huang, Tzu-Hsin; Lin, Yueh-E; Liu, Chin-Yi; Shyu, Yea-Ing L

    2017-12-01

    To examine the role of balancing competing needs in the relationship between caregiving demand and caregiving outcomes (caregivers' role strain and depressive symptoms). Caregivers who do not balance competing needs are more likely to experience negative caregiving outcomes, suggesting that balance mediates between caregiving demand and caregiving outcomes. Identifying a mediator of negative caregiving effects may help in developing tailored interventions for family caregivers of persons with dementia. A cross-sectional, correlational design. Data were collected from family caregivers' self-completed questionnaires between March 2013 - April 2014. A convenience sample of 120 family caregivers and care receivers with dementia was enrolled. We examined whether balance mediated the relationship between caregiving demand and caregiving outcomes (caregivers' role strain and depressive symptoms) by multiple regression analysis. To evaluate the significance of the indirect effect of caregiver balance, we used the Sobel test and Monte Carlo method, an alternative approach to testing mediation. Balancing competing needs completely mediated the association of caregiving demand with depressive symptoms and partially mediated the association of caregiving demand with role strain. Assessing caregivers' self-perceived sense of balance may help to identify caregivers at high risk for role strain and depressive symptoms. Interventions to enhance caregivers' perceived sense of balance between competing needs may provide a strategy for reducing the negative effects of caregiving. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Promoting improved family caregiver health literacy: evaluation of caregiver communication resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg, Elaine; Goldsmith, Joy; Ferrell, Betty; Ragan, Sandra L

    2017-07-01

    Family caregivers of cancer patients have a vital role in facilitating and sharing information about cancer, revealing a need to develop caregiver health literacy skills to support caregiver communication. The goal of this study was to investigate caregiver print materials and develop and assess a new caregiver communication resource titled A Communication Guide for Caregivers TM . Using a model of six domains of caregiver health literacy skills, print cancer education materials were collected and evaluated for caregiver communication support. A new caregiver communication resource was also developed and assessed by caregivers and healthcare providers. Caregivers reviewed content and assessed utility, relatability, and reading quality. Healthcare providers also assessed whether the material would be understandable and usable for cancer caregivers. Only three of the 28 print materials evaluated were written at the recommended sixth grade reading level and only five addressed all six caregiver health literacy skills. Readability scores for A Communication Guide for Caregivers TM were at the sixth grade level, and caregivers reported its contents were relatable, useful, and easy to read. Healthcare providers also rated the material as easy for patient/family members of diverse backgrounds and varying levels of literacy to understand and use. Existing print-based caregiver education materials do not address caregivers' health literacy skill needs and are aimed at a highly literate caregiving population. A Communication Guide for Caregivers TM meets health literacy standards and family caregiver and provider communication needs. The findings are relevant for healthcare professionals who provide cancer education. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Validation of a model of family caregiver communication types and related caregiver outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg, Elaine; Kravits, Kate; Goldsmith, Joy; Ferrell, Betty; Fujinami, Rebecca

    2017-02-01

    Caring for the family is included as one of the eight domains of quality palliative care, calling attention to the importance of the family system and family communications about cancer during care and treatment of the disease. Previously, a model of family caregiver communication defined four caregiver communication types-Manager, Carrier, Partner, Lone-each with a unique communication pattern. The purpose of the present study was to extend the model of family caregiver communication in cancer care to further understand the impact of family communication burden on caregiving outcomes. This mixed-method study employed fieldnotes from a family caregiver intervention focused on quality of life and self-reported caregiver communication items to identify a specific family caregiver type. Caregiver types were then analyzed using outcome measures on psychological distress, skills preparedness, family inventory of needs, and quality-of-life domains. Corroboration between fieldnotes and self-reported communication for caregivers (n = 21, 16 women, mean age of 53 years) revealed a definitive classification of the four caregiver types (Manager = 6, Carrier = 5, Partner = 6, Lone = 4). Mean scores on self-reported communication items documented different communication patterns congruent with the theoretical framework of the model. Variation in caregiver outcomes measures confirmed the model of family caregiver communication types. Partner and Lone caregivers reported the lowest psychological distress, with Carrier caregivers feeling least prepared and Manager caregivers reporting the lowest physical quality of life. This study illustrates the impact of family communication on caregiving and increases our knowledge and understanding about the role of communication in caregiver burden. The research provides the first evidence-based validation for a family caregiver communication typology and its relationship to caregiver outcomes. Future research is needed to develop and test

  13. An employee assistance program for caregiver support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mains, Douglas A; Fairchild, Thomas J; René, Antonio A

    2006-01-01

    The Comprehensive Caregiver Choices Program provided support for employee caregivers of elderly people for employees at a hospital in Fort Worth, Texas. Key informant interviews and focus groups provided direction for program development and implementation. A full-time MSW and professionals with expertise in gerontology/geriatrics provided education and care coordination services to caregivers. Approximately 4% of the hospital's workforce participated in the program. Attendees evaluated educational sessions and follow-up interviews were conducted with program participants. Caregiver support programs must continue to seek innovative and creative marketing and service delivery methods to reach out and assist working caregivers in need of support.

  14. Willingness to express emotions to caregiving spouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monin, Joan K; Martire, Lynn M; Schulz, Richard; Clark, Margaret S

    2009-02-01

    This study examined the association between care-recipients' willingness to express emotions to spousal caregivers and caregiver's well-being and support behaviors. Using self-report measures in the context of a larger study, 262 care-recipients with osteoarthritis reported on their willingness to express emotions to caregivers, and caregivers reported on their stress and insensitive responding to care-recipients. Results revealed that care-recipients' willingness to express happiness was associated with less insensitive caregiver responding, and willingness to express interpersonal emotions (e.g., compassion, guilt) was associated with less caregiving stress. There were also gender differences, such that caregiving wives, in particular, benefited from their husband's willingness to express vulnerable (e.g., anxiety, sadness) and interpersonal emotions. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved

  15. From spouse to caregiver and back

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ågård, Anne Sophie; Egerod, Ingrid; Tønnesen, Else

    2015-01-01

    and rehabilitation in general hospital wards, rehabilitation facilities and at home. Consequently, millions of spouses become informal caregivers. Little is known, however, about the concrete challenges spouses face in post-intensive care unit everyday life. DESIGN: Explorative, qualitative grounded theory study...... their role from spouse to caregiver and back' was identified as the core category of the study. The role shifts progressed in a dynamic process involving four elements: (1) committing to caregiving; (2) acquiring caregiving skills; (3) negotiating level of caregiving and (4) gradually leaving the caregiver...... role. Post-ICU caregiving comprised five patient dimensions: observing, assisting, coaching, advocating and managing activities. CONCLUSIONS: Spouses play a vital and multifaceted role in post-intensive care unit recovery. The findings can inform healthcare professionals in their efforts to prepare...

  16. Subjective Caregiver Burden and Caregiver Satisfaction: The Role of Partner Relationship Quality and Reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tough, Hannah; Brinkhof, Martin W; Siegrist, Johannes; Fekete, Christine

    2017-10-01

    To explore the effect of relationship quality and reciprocity in partnerships on subjective caregiver burden and caregiver satisfaction in partners of persons with a severe physical disability (spinal cord injury). Cross-sectional, observational. Community setting. Caregiving partners of persons with spinal cord injury (N=118). Not applicable. Subjective caregiver burden measured by the Zarit Burden Interview (short form) and caregiver satisfaction measured by a single item on feelings of satisfaction resulting from the caregiver role. Caregiving partners who rated their relationship quality as high encountered less subjective caregiver burden (β=-1.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.47 to -0.72; Psatisfaction (odds ratio [OR], 1.18; 95% CI, 1.01-1.45; P=.049). These associations persisted even after controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, lesion severity of the care receiver, and objective caregiver burden. Partners who indicated high reciprocity in their relationship to the care receiver indicated less subjective caregiver burden and more caregiver satisfaction when relationship quality was excluded from the final models; however, the effect of reciprocity on subjective burden (β=-.38; 95% CI, -3.71 to 2.95; P=.82) and caregiver satisfaction (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 0.28-5.22; P=.80) disappeared when including relationship quality. Results highlight the importance of relationship quality as a target for couple interventions aimed at reducing subjective caregiver burden and increasing satisfaction in the caregiving role. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Family caregiving challenges in advanced colorectal cancer: patient and caregiver perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Catherine E; Adams, Rebecca N; Helft, Paul R; O'Neil, Bert H; Shahda, Safi; Rattray, Nicholas A; Champion, Victoria L

    2016-05-01

    Family caregivers of advanced colorectal cancer patients may be at increased risk for psychological distress. Yet their key challenges in coping with the patient's illness are not well understood. Soliciting both patient and caregiver perspectives on these challenges would broaden our understanding of the caregiving experience. Thus, the purpose of this research was to identify caregivers' key challenges in coping with their family member's advanced colorectal cancer from the perspective of patients and caregivers. Individual, semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 23 advanced colorectal cancer patients and 23 primary family caregivers. Interview data were analyzed via thematic analysis. In nearly all cases, patient and caregiver reports of the caregiver's key challenge were discrepant. Across patient and caregiver reports, caregivers' key challenges included processing emotions surrounding the patient's initial diagnosis or recurrence and addressing the patient's practical and emotional needs. Other challenges included coping with continual uncertainty regarding the patient's potential functional decline and prognosis and observing the patient suffer from various physical symptoms. Findings suggest that eliciting the perspectives of both patients and caregivers regarding caregivers' challenges provides a more comprehensive understanding of their experience. Results also point to the need to assist caregivers with the emotional and practical aspects of caregiving.

  18. Factors Associated With Higher Caregiver Burden Among Family Caregivers of Elderly Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Lixia; Mordiffi, Siti Zubaidah

    Caring for elderly cancer patients may cause multidimensional burden on family caregivers. Recognition of factors associated with caregiver burden is important for providing proactive support to caregivers at risk. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with high caregiver burden among family caregivers of elderly cancer patients. A systematic search of 7 electronic databases was conducted from database inception to October 2014. The identified studies were screened, and full text was further assessed. The quality of included studies was assessed using a checklist, and relevant data were extracted using a predeveloped data extraction form. Best-evidence synthesis model was used for data synthesis. The search yielded a total of 3339 studies, and 7 studies involving 1233 family caregivers were included after screening and full assessment of 116 studies. Moderate evidence supported that younger caregivers, solid tumors, and assistance with patient's activities of daily living were significantly associated with high caregiver burden. Eighteen factors were supported by limited evidence, and 1 was a conflicting factor. The scientific literature to date proved that caregiver burden was commonly experienced by family caregivers of elderly cancer patients. The evidence indicated that family caregivers who were at younger age, caring for solid tumor patients, and providing assistance with patient's activities of daily living reported high caregiver burden. The data provide evidence in identifying family caregivers at high risk of high caregiver burden. More high-quality studies are needed to clarify and determine the estimates of the effects of individual factors.

  19. Positive aspects of caregiving and its correlates in caregivers of schizophrenia: a study from north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kate, N; Grover, S; Kulhara, P; Nehra, R

    2013-06-01

    OBJECTIVE. To study the positive aspects of caregiving and its correlates in primary caregivers of patients with schizophrenia. METHODS. A total of 100 patients with schizophrenia and their primary caregivers were evaluated. Regarding the caregivers, their positive aspects of caregiving were assessed on the Scale for Positive Aspects of Caregiving Experience (SPACE). To examine the correlates of positive aspects of caregiving, they were also assessed on the Family Burden Interview (FBI) Schedule, the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire (IEQ), coping checklist, the Social Support Questionnaire, the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (Hindi version), the WHO Quality of Life-Spirituality, Religiousness and Personal Beliefs Scale, as well as the General Health Questionnaire-12. The patients were assessed on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale. RESULTS. On the SPACE, the highest mean score was seen in the domain of motivation for the caregiving role (2.7), followed by that of caregiver satisfaction (2.4) and caregiver gains (2.3). The mean score was least for the domain of self-esteem and social aspect of caring (1.9). The SPACE domain of caregiver satisfaction correlated negatively with many aspects of burden as assessed by FBI Schedule and coping as assessed by the coping checklist; whereas the self-esteem and social aspect of caring domain correlated positively with worrying-urging II domain and the total IEQ score. No significant correlations between the SPACE and socio-demographics as well as most of the clinical variables were noted. Motivation for the caregiving had a positive correlation with the PANSS negative symptom scale. Multiple correlations were found between the SPACE and quality of life, suggesting that higher positive caregiving experience was associated with better quality of life in caregivers. CONCLUSION. Caregivers of patients with schizophrenia do enjoy positive aspects of

  20. Family caregivers' attributions about care-recipient behaviour: does caregiver relationship satisfaction mediate the attribution-distress relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Siu-Kuen Azor; Elliott, Timothy R; Martin, Roy; Uswatte, Gitendra

    2011-09-01

    The relations of caregiver attributions about care-recipient's problem behaviour to caregiving relationship satisfaction and caregiver distress were examined. This is a cross sectional study. Seventy-five family caregivers of individuals diagnosed with various disabling health conditions were recruited and interviewed. Caregiver attributions (internality, intentionality, responsibility, and controllability), caregiving relationship satisfaction, and caregiver distress variables were measured. Structural equation techniques tested an a priori model of the latent constructs of caregiver attributions and caregiver relationship satisfaction to caregiver distress. Maladaptive caregiver attributions (i.e., more trait, higher intentionality, higher responsibility, and higher controllability) about care-recipients' problem behaviours predicted lower caregiving relationship satisfaction, which in turn was predictive of higher caregiver distress. Unexpectedly, caregiver attributions were not directly related to caregiver distress. However, attributions had an indirect effect on distress through relationship satisfaction. Younger caregivers experienced higher caregiver distress. Caregivers' explanations about care-recipient's problem behaviour are indicative of their satisfaction in the relationship with the care recipient, and poor caregiving relationship satisfaction is predictive of caregiver distress. Caregiver attributions and relationship quality may be considered in interventions with family caregivers. ©2010 The British Psychological Society.

  1. Caregivers' compliance with referral advice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lal, Sham; Ndyomugenyi, Richard; Paintain, Lucy

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several malaria endemic countries have implemented community health worker (CHW) programmes to increase access to populations underserved by health care. There is considerable evidence on CHW adherence to case management guidelines, however, there is limited evidence on the compliance...... in the control arm were trained to treat malaria with ACTs based on fever symptoms. Caregivers' referral forms were linked with CHW treatment forms to determine whether caregivers complied with the referral advice. Factors associated with compliance were examined with logistic regression. RESULTS: CHW saw 18......,497 child visits in the moderate-to-high transmission setting and referred 15.2% (2815/18,497) of all visits; in the low-transmission setting, 35.0% (1135/3223) of all visits were referred. Compliance to referral was low, in both settings

  2. Caregivers' burden in patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravitlles, Marc; Peña-Longobardo, Luz María; Oliva-Moreno, Juan; Hidalgo-Vega, Álvaro

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a very prevalent and invalidating disease. The aim of this study was to analyze the burden borne by informal caregivers of patients with COPD. We used the Survey on Disabilities, Personal Autonomy, and Dependency Situations (Encuesta sobre Discapacidad, Autonomía personal y Situaciones de Dependencia [EDAD]-2008) to obtain information on the characteristics of disabled individuals with COPD and their caregivers in Spain. Additionally, statistical multivariate analyses were performed to analyze the impact that an increase in dependence would have on the problems for which caregivers provide support, in terms of health, professional, and leisure/social dimensions. A total of 461,884 individuals with one or more disabilities and with COPD were identified, and 220,892 informal caregivers were estimated. Results showed that 35% of informal caregivers had health-related problems due to the caregiving provided; 83% had leisure/social-related problems; and among caregivers of working age, 38% recognized having profession-related problems. The probability of a problem arising was significantly associated with the degree of dependence of the patient receiving care. Caregivers of patients with great dependence showed a 39% higher probability of presenting health-related problems, 27% more professional problems, and 23% more leisure problems compared with those with nondependent patients. The results show the large impact on society in terms of the welfare of informal caregivers of patients with COPD. A higher level of dependence was associated with more severe problems in caregivers, in all dimensions.

  3. Urban caregiver empowerment: Caregiver nativity, child asthma symptoms and emergency department use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Maria Teresa; Kopel, Sheryl J.; Williams, Brittney; Dansereau, Katie; Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study examines the associations between caregiver empowerment, child asthma symptoms, and emergency department use in a sample of school aged urban children with asthma. We examined differences in caregiver empowerment, and in the associations among caregiver empowerment, proportion of days with child asthma symptoms, and emergency department use as a function of caregiver nativity. Methods Participants for this study were part of a larger longitudinal study and included Latino, African American and non-Latino White urban caregivers and their children with asthma (ages 7–9; N=130). Caregiver empowerment was assessed within family, asthma services, and community domains. Results Children whose caregivers reported greater empowerment within the family (knowledge and ability to care for their family) presented with fewer asthma symptoms. Children whose caregivers reported greater empowerment within asthma services (ability to collaborate with asthma providers and healthcare system), presented with more asthma symptoms. Foreign-born caregivers endorsed greater empowerment within the family, while US-born caregivers reported greater empowerment within asthma services. For foreign-born caregivers, higher levels of empowerment in the family were associated with fewer child asthma symptoms. For US-born caregivers, higher levels of empowerment in asthma services were associated with more child asthma symptoms. Discussion Results suggest that caregivers who feel more confident and better able to manage problems within their family may better manage their child's asthma more effectively navigate the asthma healthcare system and manage their child's asthma. PMID:27632543

  4. Predictors of caregiving satisfaction in informal caregivers of people with dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Labra, Carmen; C. Millan Calenti, Jose; Buján, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The prevalence of dementia is increasing and consequently the demands from families, institutions and healthcare system. Although a substantial amount of research on caregiving has emphasized the negative aspects of caregiving, specifically on caregiver burden and depression, less...... attention has been paid to the positive aspects of caregiving. The aim of the present work was to study the phenomenon of caregiving satisfaction in informal caregivers of people with dementia by assessing their likely predictors. Methods: A stress process model was used to study caregiver’s satisfaction...... (measured using the Revised Caregiving Satisfaction Scale) on 101 informal caregivers of patients with dementia in relation to the caregiver’s background and context, stress-related factors, and mediators. Results: The regression model has an adjusted R2 of 0.20, which indicates that having a consanguinity...

  5. Willingness to Express Emotions to Caregiving Spouses

    OpenAIRE

    Monin, Joan K.; Martire, Lynn M.; Schulz, Richard; Clark, Margaret S.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the association between care-recipients’ willingness to express emotions to spousal caregivers and caregiver’s well-being and support behaviors. Using self-report measures in the context of a larger study, 262 care-recipients with osteoarthritis reported on their willingness to express emotions to caregivers, and caregivers reported on their stress and insensitive responding to care-recipients. Results revealed that care-recipients’ willingness to express happiness was ass...

  6. Does Formal Employment Reduce Informal Caregiving?

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Daifeng; McHenry, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Using the Survey of Income and Program Participation, we examine the impact of formal employment on informal caregiving. We instrument for individual work hours with state unemployment rates. We find that, among women of prime caregiving ages (40-64 years), working 10% more hours per week reduces the probability of providing informal care by about 2 percentage points. The effects are stronger for more time-intensive caregiving and if care recipients are household members. Our results imply that work-promoting policies have the unintended consequence of reducing informal caregiving in an aging society. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Distress in cancer patients and their caregivers and association with the caregivers' perception of dyadic communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Markus W; Sklenarova, Halina; Brechtel, Anette; Herzog, Wolfgang; Hartmann, Mechthild

    2014-01-01

    Discrepancies within cancer-affected couples can disrupt security within the dyadic relationship during cancer treatment. This study investigated the patients' and caregivers' distress and associations between the caregivers' perception of the patients' degree of open communication and their distress. In a cross-sectional survey, 189 pairs of cancer patients (31% gastrointestinal, 34% lung, 35% urological cancers) and their partners were assessed for distress (QSC-R10), depression and anxiety (PHQ-2/GAD-2). The caregivers also reported their perception of the patients' degree of disclosure regarding cancer-relevant topics (CCAT-F Disclosure subscale), caregiver strain (CSI), and unmet needs (SCNS-P&C). Prevalences of clinically significant distress were calculated. Associations were calculated between the caregivers' and the patients' ratings and between the caregivers' distress and their perception of the patients' degree of disclosure. 33% of the caregivers and 25% of the patients exhibited significant anxiety, with a tendency towards a higher frequency in the caregivers (p = 0.10). The prevalence of depression was lower but equally high in caregivers and patients. The caregivers' perceived non-disclosure by the patients was primarily associated with their anxiety (r = 0.31), disease-specific distress (r = 0.32), and psychological/emotional needs (r = 0.35). The identification of caregivers reporting problems in communicating with patients should be pursued in clinical practice as this might indicate that caregivers are particularly burdened. © 2014 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  8. Caregiving Styles: A Cognitive and Behavioral Typology Associated with Dementia Family Caregiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Mary A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: An increasing number of elderly individuals are diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and related disorders (ADRD), many of whom receive daily caregiving from spouse or adult child. Caregiving is a "cultural activity," and as such it is strongly influenced by sociocultural beliefs about caregiving and how it should be enacted.…

  9. Perceived Social Support and Caregiver Strain in Caregivers of Children with Tourette's Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeder, Chrystal Edge; Remer, Rory

    2007-01-01

    The research on Tourette's disorder (TD), a neuropsychological disorder consisting of motor and phonic tics, has largely focused on individuals with TD and not on the caregivers of children with TD. We investigated the effects of several variables on caregiver strain of caregivers of children with TD, including perceived social support, caregiver…

  10. Caregiving for Dementia in Family Members: Caregiving Burden and Prospects for Effective Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiden, Robert J.; And Others

    Caring for a family member with dementia is a major source of stress for the caregiver. To assess the impact of caring for an impaired family member and to evaluate the effectiveness of intervention programs, 34 caregivers of relatives with dementia completed an amended form of the Philadelphia Geriatric Center's Caregiver Survey and two…

  11. The mediating effect of caregiver burden on the caregivers' quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yeon-Gyu; Jeong, Yeon-Jae; Kim, Won-Cheol; Kim, Jeong-Soo

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] Quality of life (QoL) can be closely related to caregiver burden, which may be a potential mediating effect on the relationships among stroke patient caregivers. This study investigated the predictors of caregiver's QoL based on patient and caregiver characteristics, with caregiver burden as a mediator. [Methods] This study was conducted using surveys, a literature review, and interviews. Survey data were collected from 238 subjects, who were diagnosed with stroke, and their family caregivers from October 2013 to April 2014. [Results] Caregiver health status, income, spouses caring for patients, and duration of hospitalization were identified as significant predictors of caregivers' QoL with a mediating effect of caregiver burden. The time spent on caregiving per day and patient education level were the only direct predictors of caregivers' QoL. [Conclusion] The responsibility of caring for patients with stroke, in particular for a spouse, must be administered by means of a holistic family-centered rehabilitation program. In addition, financial support and availability of various health and social service programs must be comprehensively provided in order to maintain caregivers' well-being.

  12. Needs of informal caregivers across the caregiving course in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a qualitative analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Galvin, Miriam

    2018-01-27

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neuron disease (MND), is a debilitating terminal condition. Informal caregivers are key figures in ALS care provision. The physical, psychological and emotional impact of providing care in the home requires appropriate assistance and support. The objective of this analysis is to explore the needs of informal ALS caregivers across the caregiving course.

  13. Caregiver Café: Providing Education and Support to Family Caregivers of Patients With Cancer
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Joanne P

    2018-02-01

    The many burdens faced by caregivers of patients with cancer are well documented. Caregivers are asked to perform procedures, make assessments, coordinate care, and communicate with healthcare providers at an increasingly complex level. A caregiver quality improvement project, in the form of a Caregiver Café, was instituted at a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center.
. The objectives of the café are to (a) provide respite and a place for caregivers to relax and be nurtured, (b) provide a place for caregivers to meet and support each other, (c) provide answers to caregiver questions, and (d) recommend appropriate caregiver resources.
. The weekly Caregiver Café is led by an advanced practice nurse, and the format varies depending on the needs of the caregivers who attend.
. Caregivers have verbalized the importance of the café in helping them cope with their loved ones' cancers and treatments, and many attend on a regular basis. The Caregiver Café provides support and information and a place to get away from it all.

  14. Correlates of caregiver burden among family caregivers of older Korean Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, Banghwa; Sacco, Paul

    2012-05-01

    Despite the rapid growth of older ethnic minority populations, knowledge is limited about informal caregiving among these groups. Our aim was to identify correlates of caregiver burden among family caregivers of older Korean Americans (KAs). A cross-sectional survey collected data from 146 KA caregivers. Using a modified stress-appraisal model, we examined background and context characteristics (caregiver sex, relationship to care recipient, college education, English proficiency, time in caregiving role, family support network, friend support network), a primary stressor (care recipient functional dependency), a primary appraisal (caregiving hours), and resources (family agreement, care management self-efficacy, service use self-efficacy) as potential correlates of caregiver burden. Interactions between the primary stressor, primary appraisal, and resources were also tested. Being female and the care recipient's spouse were associated with higher burden. Conversely, a larger family support network, greater family agreement, and greater care management self-efficacy were associated with lower burden. A significant interaction was detected between functional dependency and family agreement; higher levels of family agreement moderated the association between care recipient functional dependency and caregiver burden. Interventions to reduce caregiver burden in KA caregivers may be more effective if they include approaches specifically designed to build family support, improve family agreement, and increase caregivers' self-efficacy.

  15. Modifiable factors associated with caregiver burden among family caregivers of terminally ill Korean cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seok-Joon; Kim, Jong-Sung; Jung, Jin-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Soo; Kim, Samyong

    2014-05-01

    Higher caregiver burden is associated with poor quality of life among family caregivers. However, in Korea, very few studies have examined factors associated with caregiver burden. The present study investigated factors associated with caregiver burden among family caregivers of terminally ill Korean cancer patients, particularly modifiable factors as a potential target of intervention strategies. A cross-sectional study using self-administered questionnaires was performed. Sixty-four family caregivers of terminally ill cancer patients who were admitted to the hospice-palliative care unit of a university hospital in South Korea were included. To identify caregiver burden, the Caregiver Reaction Assessment scale (CRA) was used in this study. Time spent in providing care per day, number of visits per week from other family members, family functioning, and a positive subscale, self-esteem, of the CRA were deemed as modifiable factors. Other sociodemographic, caregiving characteristics of the subjects were non-modifiable factors. Longer time spent providing care per day, fewer weekly visits from other family members, poor family functioning, and low self-esteem were considered as modifiable factors associated with caregiver burden. Low monthly income and the spouse being the family caregiver were non-modifiable factors. Our study has practical significance in that it identifies modifiable factors that can be used to devise intervention strategies. Developing and applying such intervention strategies for alleviating the factors associated with high caregiver burden could be important for improving the quality of life of both patients and their families.

  16. Measuring negative and positive caregiving experiences: A psychometric analysis of the Caregiver Strain Index Expanded

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruithof, WJ; Post, MWM; Meily, JMA

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the psychometric properties of the Caregiver Strain Index Expanded with those of the original Caregiver Strain Index among partners of stroke patients. Design and subjects: Cross-sectional validation study among 173 caregivers of stroke patients six months post-stroke. Main

  17. Taking Care of You: Self-Care for Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Taking Care of YOU: Self-Care for Family Caregivers Order this publication Printer-friendly version First, Care ... 25 26 27 28 29 30 Smart Patients Caregivers Community In partnership with Family Caregiver Alliance Learn ...

  18. Positive Aspects of Caregiving and Its Correlates among Caregivers of Bipolar Affective Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, S; Kate, N; Chakrabarti, S; Avasthi, A

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the positive aspects of caregiving and its correlates (socio-demographic and clinical variables, caregiver burden, coping, quality of life, psychological morbidity) in the primary caregivers of patients with bipolar affective disorder (BPAD). A total of 60 primary caregivers of patients with a diagnosis of BPAD were evaluated on the Scale for Positive Aspects of Caregiving Experience (SPACE) and the Hindi version of Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire, Family Burden Interview Schedule (FBIS), modified Hindi version of Coping Checklist, shorter Hindi version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF), and Hindi translated version of 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). Caregivers of patients with BPAD had the highest mean score in the SPACE domain of Motivation for caregiving role (2.45), followed by Caregiver satisfaction (2.38) and Caregiving personal gains (2.20). The mean score was the lowest for the domain of Self-esteem and social aspect of caring (2.01). In terms of correlations, age of onset of BPAD had a negative correlation with various domains of SPACE. The mean number of total lifetime affective and depressive episodes correlated positively with Self-esteem and social aspect of caring. Caregiver satisfaction correlated negatively with FBIS domains of Disruption of routine family activities, Effect on mental health of others, and subjective burden. Coercion as a coping mechanism correlated positively with domains of Caregiving personal gains, Caregiver satisfaction, and the total score on SPACE. Three (Physical health, Psychological health, Environment) out of 5 domains of the WHOQOL-BREF correlated positively with the total SPACE score. No association was noted between GHQ-12 and SPACE scores. Positive caregiving experience in primary caregivers of patients with BPAD is associated with better quality of life of the caregivers.

  19. Family demands, social support and caregiver burden in Taiwanese family caregivers living with mental illness: the role of family caregiver gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chiu-Yueh

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess gender effects on family demands, social support and caregiver burden as well as to examine contributing factors of caregiver burden in caring for family members with mental illness. Providing continued care and support for people with mental illness is demanding and challenging. Findings of earlier caregiving studies on the role of caregiver gender in response to caregiver burden and caregiving-related factors have been inconsistent. Little research has been undertaken to examine gender effect on family demands, social support and caregiver burden in Taiwanese family caregivers of individuals with mental illness. Cross-sectional, descriptive correlation design. Data from 43 families, including at least one male and female family caregiver in each family, were analysed using descriptive statistics, principal component analysis and mixed linear modelling. Demographic data, Perceived Stress Scale, Perceived Social Support and Caregiver Burden Scale-Brief were used to collect data. Female family caregivers perceived less social support and experienced higher degrees of caregiver burden compared with male family caregivers. In contrast, no significant gender effect was associated with family demands. Family caregivers with greater family demands and less social support experienced higher degrees of caregiver burden. The results reinforced those of previously published studies that caregiver burden is highly prevalent among female family caregivers. Caregiver gender appears to be highly valuable for explaining family demands, social support and caregiver burden. Health care professionals should continue to collaborate with family caregivers to assess potential gender effects on available support and design gender-specific interventions to alleviate caregiver burden. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. The Effect of Cancer Patients' and Their Family Caregivers' Physical and Emotional Symptoms on Caregiver Burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Safora; Cvancarova, Milada; Ruland, Cornelia

    Although there is significant evidence that the family caregivers (FCs) of cancer patients can experience significant caregiver burden and symptoms, less is known about the relationships between FCs and patient characteristics that influence caregiver burden. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of cancer patients' and FCs' symptoms and demographic characteristics on caregiver burden at initiation of the patients' radiation treatment. Two hundred eighty-one dyads of FCs and cancer patients who received a diagnosis of breast, prostate, melanoma, lymphoma, and head and neck cancers were recruited at the beginning of the patients' radiation treatment. Measures of depression, sleep disturbance, fatigue, social support, and self-efficacy were obtained from both FCs and cancer patients. The family caregivers were also assessed for caregiver burden. Associations between patients' and caregivers' symptoms and demographic characteristics and caregiver burden were investigated using multivariate analyses. There were significant associations between caregiver burden and the patient-related variables such as self-efficacy (P = .02), sleep disturbance (P = .03), and social support (P = .04). Among FC-related variables, higher scores of depression (P caregiver burden. Being a female, either as a patient or FC, increased the likelihood of experiencing fatigue and sleep disturbance. Caregiver burden in FCs is influenced by interplay of patients' and their own symptoms and problems. These interdependencies exist from the beginning of treatment. Nurses should systematically assess the problems and symptoms of the patients and FCs and support them from the time of diagnosis to help prevent symptom development and deterioration.

  1. Alzheimer's aggression: influences on caregiver coping and resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, Scott E; Little, Kristina G; Gough, Heather R; Spurlock, Wanda J

    2011-04-01

    This study assessed impact of Alzheimer's patients' aggressive behavior (AD aggression) on caregiver coping strategies (task-, emotion-, and avoidance-focused) and caregiver resilience, and examined whether coping strategy moderated the AD aggression-caregiver resilience relationship. Informal caregivers across Louisiana (N = 419) completed surveys with measures of demographics, AD aggression, caregiver coping strategies, and caregiver resilience. Task-focused coping positively related to resilience. Aggression negatively predicted caregiver resilience. Emotion- and avoidance-focused coping strategies separately interacted with aggression and increased its negative relationship to caregiver resilience. Task-focused coping showed no moderation. Implications for social work professionals are discussed.

  2. How to Assemble a Caregiving Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ph.D., author of Elder Care Made Easier . What many caregivers fail to realize is that if they don’ ... the doctor’s. Whatever you do, be clear about what you need them to do and how ... caregivers. The ElderCare Locator , sponsored by the Area Agencies ...

  3. Promote the health of dementia caregivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mark, R.E.

    2016-01-01

    Caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s dementia (AD) will become increasingly important as governments across the world cut health care funding. The vast majority of the care for people with AD is and will be carried out by informal caregivers, in other words, their spouses, children, and friends,

  4. Understanding Your Doctors and Other Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can you do if you don’t understand what your caregiver is saying? Tell them you don’t understand. ... to do and what is happening to you. What if the caregiver is rushed and doesn’t have time to ...

  5. What Knowledge and Skills Do Caregivers Need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Given, Barbara; Sherwood, Paula R.; Given, Charles W.

    2008-01-01

    Patients with chronic illnesses and multiple comorbid conditions have intricate treatment protocols that require caregiver involvement, further complicating this already-difficult care. Because better treatments have extended the life spans of most patients with chronic illnesses, caregiver involvement often is required for several years. Many…

  6. Informal caregivers in hospitals: Opportunities and threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiresmaili, Mohammadreza; Emrani, Zahra

    2018-05-20

    High hospital costs are a challenge that health system face. Additionally, studies identified manpower deficiency as a problem in health system. Hospital is a place where patients with different physical and mental conditions come to. Their families and friends' companionship can facilitate this situation for them. This study illustrates the roles of informal caregivers in hospital. This is a phenomenological qualitative study. Data were gathered through semistructured interviews. We interviewed 22 informal caregivers and 9 nurse staffs from different departments of hospital. They were selected through purposeful and snowball sampling approach. The framework method was used for data analysis. We found 3 main themes including (a) roles of informal caregivers, (b) opportunities of presence of the informal caregivers in the hospital, and (c) threats of presence of informal caregivers. This study shows some roles for informal caregivers including mental supports, consultation, decision-making, and care roles. Concerning the shortage of manpower in Iran's hospitals, nurses have less time to take care of each patient; therefore, using informal caregivers as an implicit strategy to overcome nursing shortage and to reduce hospital costs seems to be beneficial. We suggest that an appropriate plan is necessary to make use of them for filling this gap to some extent, as well as providing training sessions and facilities for companions acting as informal caregivers. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Accessing antiretroviral therapy for children: Caregivers' voices

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Margaret (Maggie) Williams

    ScienceDirect journal homepage: http://ees.elsevier.com/hsag/default.asp ... inability of their caregivers to travel the distance requisite to accessing ... and describe the experiences of caregivers accessing ART for .... In this study credibility was facilitated by the researchers ensuring that .... educational assets to assist them.

  8. Concept Analysis: Alzheimer’s Caregiver Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llanque, Sarah; Savage, Lynette; Rosenburg, Neal; Honor’s, BA; Caserta, Michael

    2015-01-01

    AIM The aim of this article was to analyze the concept of caregiver stress in the context of caring for a person with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. BACKGROUND Currently, there are more than 15 million unpaid care-givers for persons suffering from Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. This unpaid care can be stressful for caregivers due to the chronic nature of the disease process, as well as other factors. METHOD The paper incorporates the modified method of Wilson’s concept analysis procedure to analyze the concept of caregiver stress. DATA SOURCES A review of the literature was undertaken using the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Google Scholar, and PubMed. RESULTS A theoretical definition of caregiver stress is provided, and the defining attributes, related concepts, antecedents, and consequences of caregiver stress are proposed, and case studies are presented. CONCLUSIONS The analysis demonstrates that caregiver stress is the unequal exchange of assistance among people who stand in close relationship to one another, which results in emotional and physical stress on the caregiver. Implications for future nursing research and practice conclude the paper. PMID:24787468

  9. Understanding psychological distress among pediatric cancer caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Gina E; Warner, Echo L; Morreall, Deborah K; Kirchhoff, Anne C; Kinney, Anita Y; Fluchel, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Few studies have examined distress in caregivers of pediatric cancer patients. We evaluated the association of socioeconomic, demographic, and patient clinical factors on caregivers' self-reported psychological distress associated with having a child with cancer. N = 366 pediatric cancer caregivers completed a self-administered questionnaire from July 2010 to July 2012. The Impact of Event Scale (IES), along with two subscales "intrusion" and "avoidance" measured caregiver cancer-specific distress, with higher scores indicating greater distress. Multivariable linear regression models were used to calculate coefficients (β) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) of IES by socioeconomic, demographic, and clinical factors. Average caregiver IES score was 31.2 (standard deviation (SD) = 16.9, range 0-75). Mean intrusion score was 18.1 (SD 9.8, range 0-35) and avoidance score was 12.8 (SD 9.0, range 0-40). Caregivers with household incomes psychological distress for caregivers of pediatric oncology patients. These findings underscore the importance of developing and testing interventions aimed at evaluating and addressing the psychosocial needs for high-risk caregivers in addition to those of patients.

  10. Benefit finding and resilience in child caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Tony; Giles, Melanie; McLaughlin, Marian

    2014-09-01

    A substantial number of children are involved in informal caregiving and make a significant contribution to health care delivery. While this places high levels of demand on their coping resources, there is some evidence that these children find benefit in their caring role. A survey design using questionnaire data collection was used with a sample of 442 children (174 boys and 268 girls) between the ages of 12 and 16. The role of benefit finding and resilience was explored within a stress and coping model of the impact of caregiving. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis (HMRA) identified resilience and benefit finding as accounting for significant amounts of variance in positive health and mediating the impact of caregiving. In regard to negative health, only benefit finding played a significant role. Young caregivers do experience benefit finding and exhibit resilience although the relationship with caregiving burden was inverse. Benefit finding seems to be related to social recognition of the caregiving role and to family support. What is already known on this subject? There is some emerging evidence that child caregivers experience some positive effects or benefits from their caring in spite of the demands of the role. However, the main focus has been on reducing negative outcomes rather than on building resilience. What this study adds? This study provides evidence that young caregivers do experience benefit finding in situations where the role demand is not overly excessive and where the role is socially recognized. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  11. [Biopsychosocial approach to caregiving burden: Why should we care about caregivers' health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leurs, Antoine; Trojak, Benoit; Ponavoy, Eddy; Bonin, Bernard; Chauvet-Gelinier, Jean-Christophe

    2018-06-11

    There are 11 million family caregivers in France and some estimates indicate that there will be 17 million in 2020. Caregiving is a source of chronic stress that requires adaptation and coping strategies. Caregiving may benefit the health of a caregiver with a positive coping style and altruistic goals. However, the caregiver's burden is frequently associated with negative effects in terms of biopsychosocial imbalance and medical conditions, with frequent anxiety and depression. The management of the caregiving burden starts with the recognition of health professionals - caregivers may benefit from consultation-liaison psychiatry and multidisciplinary medico-social strategies, in addition to constant support from their GPs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Traumatic brain injury: caregivers' problems and needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, S T S; Khaw, W F; Rosna, A R; Husna, J

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an increasingly major world health problem. This short review using the most pertinent articles on TBI caregiving problems and needs highlights the pressing issues. Articles focusing on both TBI-caregivers' problems and needs are rarely found, especially for developing countries. Most TBI-caregiving is done by family members, whose altered lives portend burden and stresses which add to the overwhelming demand of caring for the TBI-survivor. Lack of information, financial inadequacy, anxiety, distress, coping deficits, poor adaptability, inadequate knowledge and skills, and a poor support system comprise the major problems. Dysfunctional communication between caregivers and care-receivers has been little researched. The major needs are focused on health and rehabilitation information, financial advice and assistance, emotional and social support, and positive psychological encouragement. In time, health information needs may be met, but not emotional support. Information on TBI caregiving problems and unmet needs is critical to all relevant healthcare stakeholders.

  13. An organizing framework for informal caregiver interventions: detailing caregiving activities and caregiver and care recipient outcomes to optimize evaluation efforts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Houtven Courtney

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caregiver interventions may help improve the quality of informal care. Yet the lack of a systematic framework specifying the targets and outcomes of caregiver interventions hampers our ability to understand what has been studied, to evaluate existing programs, and to inform the design of future programs. Our goal was to develop an organizing framework detailing the components of the caregiving activities and the caregiver and care recipient outcomes that should be affected by an intervention. In so doing, we characterize what has been measured in the published literature to date and what should be measured in future studies to enable comparisons across interventions and across time. Methods Our data set comprises 121 reports of caregiver interventions conducted in the United States and published between 2000 and 2009. We extracted information on variables that have been examined as primary and secondary outcomes. These variables were grouped into categories, which then informed the organizing framework. We calculated the frequency with which the interventions examined each framework component to identify areas about which we have the most knowledge and under-studied areas that deserve attention in future research. Results The framework stipulates that caregiver interventions seek to change caregiving activities, which in turn affect caregiver and care recipient outcomes. The most frequently assessed variables have been caregiver psychological outcomes (especially depression and burden and care recipient physical and health care use outcomes. Conclusions Based on the organizing framework, we make three key recommendations to guide interventions and inform research and policy. First, all intervention studies should assess quality and/or quantity of caregiving activities to help understand to what extent and how well the intervention worked. Second, intervention studies should assess a broad range of caregiver and care recipient

  14. Caregiving experiences predict changes in spiritual well-being among family caregivers of cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Rebecca N; Mosher, Catherine E; Cannady, Rachel S; Lucette, Aurelie; Kim, Youngmee

    2014-10-01

    Although enhanced spiritual well-being has been linked to positive mental health outcomes among family caregivers of cancer patients, little is known regarding predictors of spiritual well-being in this population. The current study aimed to examine caregiving experiences as predictors of change in family caregivers' spiritual well-being during the initial months following the patient's cancer diagnosis. Seventy family caregivers of newly diagnosed cancer patients (74% female, mean age = 59 years) participated in this longitudinal survey. Caregivers completed baseline questionnaires shortly before staying with the patient at an American Cancer Society Hope Lodge. Baseline questionnaires assessed caregiving experiences (i.e., self-esteem related to caregiving, family support for providing care, impact of caregiving on finances, and impact of caregiving on one's schedule). In addition, caregivers' spiritual well-being (i.e., meaning in life, peace, and faith) was assessed at baseline and 4-month follow-up. In univariate analyses, all caregiving experiences studied were associated with one or more aspects of spiritual well-being at 4-month follow-up. However, in the multivariate analysis, the only caregiving experience associated with aspects of spiritual well-being at 4-month follow-up was caregivers' perceptions of family support. Specifically, lack of family support was associated with lower levels of meaning and peace. Findings point to the importance of family support in facilitating the search for meaning and peace shortly after a loved one's cancer diagnosis and suggest that interventions targeting caregivers' support system may enhance their spiritual well-being. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Urban caregiver empowerment: Caregiver nativity, child-asthma symptoms, and emergency-department use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Maria Teresa; Kopel, Sheryl J; Williams, Brittney; Dansereau, Katie; Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we examined the associations between caregiver empowerment, child-asthma symptoms, and emergency-department (ED) use in a sample of school-age urban children with asthma. We examined differences in caregiver empowerment, and in the associations among caregiver empowerment, proportion of days with child-asthma symptoms, and ED use as a function of caregiver nativity. Participants for this study were part of a larger longitudinal study and included Latino, African American and non-Latino White urban caregivers and their children with asthma (ages 7-9; N = 130). Caregiver empowerment was assessed within family, asthma services, and community domains. Children whose caregivers reported greater empowerment within the family (i.e., possessing sufficient knowledge and ability to care for their families) presented with fewer asthma symptoms. Children whose caregivers reported greater empowerment within asthma services (i.e., the ability to collaborate with asthma providers and the health-care system), presented with more asthma symptoms. Foreign-born caregivers endorsed greater empowerment within the family, whereas U.S.-born caregivers reported greater empowerment within asthma services. For foreign-born caregivers, higher levels of empowerment in the family were associated with fewer child-asthma symptoms. For U.S.-born caregivers, higher levels of empowerment in asthma services were associated with more child-asthma symptoms. Results suggest that caregivers who feel more confident and better able to manage problems within their families may better manage their children's asthma symptoms. Foreign-born caregivers may benefit from increased support to more effectively navigate the asthma health-care system and manage their children's asthma. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Factors of caregiver burden and family functioning among Taiwanese family caregivers living with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chiu-Yueh; Tsai, Yun-Fang

    2015-06-01

    To assess the degree of caregiver burden and family functioning among Taiwanese primary family caregivers of people with schizophrenia and to test its association with demographic characteristics, family demands, sense of coherence and family hardiness. Family caregiving is a great concern in mental illness. Yet, the correlates of caregiver burden and family functioning in primary family caregivers of individuals with schizophrenia still remain unclear. A cross-sectional descriptive study. A convenience sample of 137 primary family caregivers was recruited from two psychiatric outpatient clinics in Taiwan. Measures included a demographic information sheet and the Chinese versions of the Family Stressors Index, Family Strains Index, 13-item Sense of Coherence Scale, 18-item Caregiver Burden Scale, Family Hardiness Index and Family Adaptability, Partnership, Growth, Affection, and Resolve Index. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficients, t-test, one-way analysis of variance and a stepwise multiple linear regression. Female caregivers, additional dependent relatives, increased family demands and decreased sense of coherence significantly increased caregiver burden, whereas siblings as caregivers reported lower degrees of burden than parental caregivers. Family caregivers with lower family demands, increased family hardiness and higher educational level had significantly enhanced family functioning. Sense of coherence was significantly correlated with family hardiness. Our findings highlighted the importance of sense of coherence and family hardiness in individual and family adaptation. Special attention needs to focus on therapeutic interventions that enhance sense of coherence and family hardiness, thereby improving the perception of burden of care and family functioning. Given the nature of family caregiving in schizophrenia, understanding of correlates of caregiver burden and family functioning would help

  17. Determinants of caregiving experiences and mental health of partners of cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, C; Triemstra, M; Sanderman, R; van den Bos, GAM

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Research regarding informal caregiving showed considerable individual variation in responses to cancer caregiving. The current longitudinal study examined determinants of caregiver outcomes in terms of caregiver experiences at 3 months and caregiver's mental health at 6 months after

  18. Determinants of caregiving experiences and mental health of partners of cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, C.; Triemstra, M.; Tempelaar, R.; Sanderman, R.; van den Bos, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    Research regarding informal caregiving showed considerable individual variation in responses to cancer caregiving. The current longitudinal study examined determinants of caregiver outcomes in terms of caregiver experiences at 3 months and caregiver's mental health at 6 months after hospital

  19. Caregiving Practice Patterns of Asian, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic White American Family Caregivers of Older Adults Across Generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Christina E

    2016-03-01

    This study is a cross-sectional investigation of caregiving practice patterns among Asian, Hispanic and non-Hispanic White American family caregivers of older adults across three immigrant generations. The 2009 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) dataset was used, and 591 Asian, 989 Hispanic and 6537 non-Hispanic White American caregivers of older adults were selected. First, descriptive analyses of caregivers' characteristics, caregiving situations and practice patterns were examined by racial/ethnic groups and immigrant generations. Practice patterns measured were respite care use, hours and length of caregiving. Three hypotheses on caregiving patterns based on assimilation theory were tested and analyzed using logistic regression and generalized linear models by racial/ethnic groups and generations. Caregiving patterns of non-Hispanic White caregivers supported all three hypotheses regarding respite care use, caregiving hours and caregiving duration, showing less caregiving involvement in later generations. However, Asian and Hispanic counterparts showed mixed results. Third generation Asian and Hispanic caregivers used respite care the least and spent the most caregiving hours per week and had the longest caregiving duration compared to earlier generations. These caregiving patterns revealed underlying cultural values related to filial responsibility, even among later generations of caregivers of color. Findings suggest the importance of considering the cultural values of each racial/ethnic group regardless of generation when working with racially and ethnically diverse populations of family caregivers of older adults.

  20. A study on caregiver burden: stressors, challenges, and possible solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialon, Laura Nelson; Coke, Sallie

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore factors impacting caregiver burden and to explore possible solutions for family caregivers of terminally ill patients. The majority of caregivers reported experiencing role conflict and inadequate stress management. Caregivers who worked outside the home, those who cared for two parents concurrently, those with the least amount of outside assistance, and caregivers who spent a longer period of time caregiving reported the highest levels of health problems and overall burden. Caregivers stated a need for more support from Hospice agencies, more education on caregiver training, and more public education about Hospice services. Faith played a positive role in alleviating caregiver burden. Early identification, intervention, education and coordination of services may help to alleviate caregiver burden, which will improve quality of life for both patient and caregiver.

  1. Caregiving burden and its determinants in Polish caregivers of stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaracz, Krystyna; Grabowska-Fudala, Barbara; Górna, Krystyna; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2014-10-27

    Despite the growing body of literature on the consequences of providing non-professional care to stroke survivors, the determinants of caregiving burden are still not fully recognized. Identification of significant determinants can facilitate caregiver intervention programs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of burden borne by caregivers of stroke patients and to identify the most important determinants of burden at 6 months after hospitalization. Data were collected from 150 pairs of stroke patients/caregivers. Caregiver burden was assessed on the Caregiver Burden scale (CB). Several characteristics were measured as potential predictors of the burden. Special attention was paid to the caregiver's sense of coherence (SOC) and anxiety. Regression analysis was employed to test the hypothesized relationships between these variables and the burden. Forty-seven percentage of the caregivers reported a substantial burden (severe or moderate). Caregiver SOC (p emotional state and the level of patients' dependency, as these are the vital and modifiable factors affecting caregiver burden following stroke.

  2. Needs of informal caregivers across the caregiving course in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a qualitative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Sile; Corr, Bernie; Mays, Iain; Pender, Niall; Hardiman, Orla

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neuron disease (MND), is a debilitating terminal condition. Informal caregivers are key figures in ALS care provision. The physical, psychological and emotional impact of providing care in the home requires appropriate assistance and support. The objective of this analysis is to explore the needs of informal ALS caregivers across the caregiving course. Design In an open-ended question as part of a semistructured interview, caregivers were asked what would help them in their role. Interviews took place on three occasions at 4-month to 6-month intervals. Demographic, burden and quality of life data were collected, in addition to the open-ended responses. We carried out descriptive statistical analysis and thematic analysis of qualitative data. Setting and participants Home interviews at baseline (n=81) and on two further occasions (n=56, n=41) with informal caregivers of people with ALS attending the National ALS/MND Clinic at Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. Results The majority of caregivers were family members. Hours of care provided and caregiver burden increased across the interview series. Thematic analysis identified what would help them in their role, and needs related to external support and services, psychological-emotional factors, patient-related behaviours, a cure and ‘nothing’. Themes were interconnected and their prevalence varied across the interview time points. Conclusion This study has shown the consistency and adaptation in what caregivers identified as helpful in their role, across 12–18 months of a caregiving journey. Support needs are clearly defined, and change with time and the course of caregiving. Caregivers need support from family, friends and healthcare professionals in managing their tasks and the emotional demands of caregiving. Identifying the specific needs of informal caregivers should enable health professionals to provide tailored supportive interventions

  3. Predictors of caregiver burden in Iranian family caregivers of cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsoleymani, Seyed Reza; Rohani, Camelia; Matbouei, Mahsa; Nasiri, Malihe; Vasli, Parvaneh

    2017-01-01

    Caregiver burden threatens the psychological, emotional, functional and even physical health of caregivers. The aims of this study were to determine caregiver burden and family distress and the relationship between them, also to explore predictors of caregiver burden in a sample of Iranian family caregivers of cancer patients. This is a cross-sectional study with correlational design. A total of 104 family caregivers of cancer patients were asked to respond to the Caregiver Burden Inventory (CBI) and the Family Distress Index (FDI) together with a sociodemographic questionnaire. For evaluating the relationship between CBI and FDI scores, the Pearson's product-moment correlation was used. In addition, multiple linear regression analysis was applied to explore the predictive factors of caregiver burden. A high burden was experienced by almost half of the caregivers (48.1%). The FDI mean score was 9.76 ± 5.40 ranged from 0 to 24. A strong positive correlation was found between the caregiver burden and family distress ( r = 0.76). Multiple linear regression results showed the predictive role of FDI score (β = 0.71, P = 0.001), patient's gender (β = -0.25, P = 0.001), and early cancer diagnosis (β =0.13, P = 0.027) in caregiver burden. They could explain 65% of variance in the level of burden in family caregivers. Family nurses should consider the caregivers burden and vulnerability of families with cancer patient, especially if the patient is a male or has a new diagnosis. They should also design special programs for the whole family as a system that family can adapt to the new situation.

  4. Caregiving burden and the quality of life of family caregivers of cancer patients: the relationship and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rha, Sun Young; Park, Yeonhee; Song, Su Kyung; Lee, Chung Eun; Lee, Jiyeon

    2015-08-01

    Family caregivers of cancer patients become responsible for many elements of cancer care, usually without preparation or training in provision of care. Their efforts of care generate caregiving burden, which could deteriorate caregivers' quality of life (QOL). A secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted to describe the influence of caregiving burden on the QOL of family caregivers of cancer patients with consideration of correlates (N = 212). The Korean versions of Zarit Burden Interview and the World Health Organization QOL BREF were used. Multiple regression analyses were applied to analyze the relationship between the caregiving burden and QOL. Caregiving burden explained 30.3% of variance of the QOL (β = -0.534, p < 0.001). Caregivers caring for patients with functional deterioration experienced higher burden. Caregivers providing care for hospitalized patients demonstrated lower QOL. The caregiver's educational level was a positively contributing factor for the QOL. Caregiving burden was the influential, negatively affecting factor for the QOL. Assessment of caregiving burden with special attention being paid to caregivers caring for patients with functional decline would help to identify caregivers in need of support. Supportive care needs to be sought to alleviate caregiving burden and improve the QOL of caregivers, especially for the caregivers of hospitalized patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Work Stress, Caregiving, and Allostatic Load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dich, Nadya; Lange, Theis; Head, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Studies investigating health effects of work and family stress usually consider these factors in isolation. The present study investigated prospective interactive effects of job strain and informal caregiving on allostatic load (AL), a multisystem indicator of physiological......). Regardless of job strain, participants with low caregiving burden (below sample median) had lower subsequent AL levels than did non-caregivers (b = -0.22, 95% confidence interval = -0.06--0.37). CONCLUSIONS: The study provides some evidence for adverse effects of stress at work combined with family demands...

  6. Combining Employment and Caregiving: An Intricate Juggling Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guberman, Nancy; Maheu, Pierre

    1999-01-01

    The process that allows family caregivers to combine employment and elder care was examined in interviews with 25 caregivers. The effects of elder care on employment are the result of the degree to which caregivers manage to maintain balance between different life spheres: personal and social life, family life, caregiving, and employment. (53…

  7. A Pilot Evaluation of the Family Caregiver Support Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya-Mei; Hedrick, Susan C.; Young, Heather M.

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate a federal and state-funded Family Caregiver Support Program (FCSP) and explore what types of caregiver support service are associated with what caregiver outcomes. Information was obtained on a sample of 164 caregivers' use of eleven different types of support service. Descriptive and comparative…

  8. Typical and Atypical Dementia Family Caregivers: Systematic and Objective Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Linda O.; Martindale-Adams, Jennifer; Burns, Robert; Graney, Marshall J.; Zuber, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    This systematic, objective comparison of typical (spouse, children) and atypical (in-law, sibling, nephew/niece, grandchild) dementia family caregivers examined demographic, caregiving and clinical variables. Analysis was of 1,476 caregivers, of whom 125 were atypical, from the Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer's Caregivers Health (REACH I and II)…

  9. Symptoms of depression in non-routine caregivers: the role of caregiver strain and burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Anna C; Gallagher, Stephen; Hunt, Kate; Der, Geoff; Carroll, Douglas

    2009-11-01

    The origins and persistence of psychological morbidity in caregivers are not fully understood. The present analysis examined the relationship between the strain and burden of caregiving and depression and anxiety in a large community sample. Social support and sleep quality were investigated as potential mediators. Cross-sectional and prospective observational study. Individuals caring for someone other than their own child (N=393) were identified from a population of 2,079. Caregiving strain and burden, social support, and sleep quality were assessed. Participants completed the hospital anxiety and depression scale at the same time and 5 years later. Caregiving strain and burden were associated with depression and anxiety symptoms cross-sectionally, and with a worsening of symptoms 5 years later. Sleep quality appeared to mediate the cross-sectional relationships. The demands of caregiving and associated sleep disruption contribute to symptoms of depression and anxiety in caregivers.

  10. Validity and reliability of Turkish Caregiver Burden Scale among family caregivers of haemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cil Akinci, Ayse; Pinar, Rukiye

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the validity and reliability of the Caregiver Burden Scale in family members who provide primary care for haemodialysis patients. In Turkey, there is a need for a multi-dimensional instrument to evaluate the caregiver burden in people who provide care for patients with chronic diseases. A methodological study. The study sample consisted of 161 family members who provide primary care for haemodialysis patients. The forward-backward translation method was used to develop the Turkish Caregiver Burden Scale. The reliability was based on internal consistency investigated by Cronbach's alpha and item-total correlation. The factorial construct validity of the scale was tested with confirmatory factor analysis. By means of convergent and divergent validity, correlation between Caregiver Burden Scale and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and correlation between Caregiver Burden Scale and the Maslach Burnout Scale were investigated. Cronbach's alpha and item-total correlations results suggested that there was good internal reliability. We found five underlying factors similar to original Scale's five-factor solution. The confirmatory factor analysis five-factor model represented an acceptable fit. Factor loadings were significant, with standardised loadings ranging from 0·43-0·81. By means of divergent validity, all sub-dimension scores and the total score of the Caregiver Burden Scale were negatively correlated with the SF-36, whereas there was a positive correlation with the emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation subscales of the Maslach Burnout Scale as expected. These results suggest that the Caregiver Burden Scale is a reliable and valid instrument which can be used with confidence in Turkish caregivers for haemodialysis patients to screen caregiver burden. The burden experienced by people who provide care for patients with chronic diseases can be evaluated with the Caregiver Burden Scale. Additionally, the Caregiver Burden Scale can be used

  11. Finding care for the caregiver? Active participation in online health forums attenuates the negative effect of caregiver strain on wellbeing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanis, M.A.; Das, E.; Fortgens-Sillmann, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on how online health forums may benefit the wellbeing of caregivers. An online questionnaire of caregivers assessed caregiver strain, forum use, and mental and physical wellbeing. Results show a positive relation between caregiver strain and using online health forums to seek

  12. A randomised controlled trial of benefit finding in caregivers: The Building Resources in Caregivers Study Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Brand

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Caregivers may engage in benefit finding, that is, an increase in perceived positive growth, as a cognitive strategy for coping with stress. The Building Resources in Caregivers study will compare effects of a brief benefit finding writing intervention with a control intervention. Caregivers of people with mental and physical disabilities will be randomised into either a benefit-writing group or a neutral writing group. Caregivers will complete measures relating to themselves and care-recipients (e.g. sociodemographics and illness type and psychometric measures of benefit finding, distress and quality of life at three time points. Additionally, qualitative commentary on participation experiences will be gathered.

  13. Family Caregiver's Perception of Alzheimer's disease and caregiving in Chinese culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Baozhen; Mao, Zongfu; Wu, Bei; Mei, Y John; Levkoff, Sue; Wang, Huali

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the perception of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and caregiving among family caregivers of individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD in China. In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted with 46 family caregivers of individuals with cognitive impairment in 2009 in Wuhan and Beijing, China. Participants included 38 spouses, 7 adult children, and 1 sibling, aged between 41 and 85 years old. The findings showed that all family caregivers thought the Chinese terminology of AD laonian chidai, brought discrimination to individuals with cognitive impairment. Caregivers of individuals with AD experienced burden and desired an increase of formal services. Traditional beliefs of respecting elders and caring for extended family members were held among family caregivers of individuals with cognitive impairment, and there was nearly no difference found between caregivers of AD and those of MCI. It implied that traditional culture provided positive influences on caring for elders with cognitive impairment. An alternative term for MCI may contribute to further reducing the discrimination brought by the old Chinese terminology of AD laonian chidai. Development of formal services for elders with cognitive impairment may contribute to reducing caregivers' worries about future caregiving.

  14. Family caregiver communication in oncology: advancing a typology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Joy; Wittenberg, Elaine; Platt, Christine Small; Iannarino, Nicholas T; Reno, Jenna

    2016-04-01

    The quality of communication between the patient and family caregiver impacts quality of life and well-being for the two; however, providers have few tools to understand communication patterns and assess the communication needs and preferences of caregivers. The aims of this study were to examine family communication patterns among oncology patients and their caregivers and to identify common characteristics among four different types of family caregivers. Nurses recruited oncology patient-caregiver dyads through a large cancer treatment center in the Southeast. Patients and caregivers were separated from one another and interviewed during chemotherapeutic infusions. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, coded, and thematized. A sample of 24 patients and their caregivers (n = 48) were interviewed. The majority of dyads (21, 88%) shared the same family communication pattern. Common caregiver communication features support previous work identifying four caregiver communication types: Manager, Carrier, Partner, and Lone caregivers. Manager caregivers lead patients by utilizing extensive medical knowledge, whereas Carrier caregivers were led by patients and described tireless acts to maintain the family and avoid difficult conversations. Partner caregivers facilitated family involvement and open communication on a variety of topics, while Lone caregivers focused solely on biomedical matters and a hope for cure. Caregiver communication types were corroborated by patient-caregiver descriptions of caregiving. However, more information is needed to ascertain the variables associated with each caregiver type. Future work to improve identification of caregiver types and create targeted caregiver care plans will require further study of health literacy levels and tested communication interventions per type. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Family caregivers' experiences in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohne, Vibeke; Høy, Bente; Wilhelm Rehnsfeldt, Arne

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study is focusing on dignity in nursing homes from the perspective of family caregivers. Dignity is a complex concept and central to nursing. Dignity in nursing homes is a challenge, according to research. Family caregivers are frequently involved in their family members’ daily...... experiences at the nursing home. This Scandinavian application study has a descriptive and explorative design. Twenty-nine family caregivers were included. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach was used to understand the meaning of the narrated text. The interpretations revealed two main themes: “One should......, but still important in nursing homes. It seems therefore important to further investigate experiences of family caregivers in the context of nursing homes....

  16. Hands-On Skills for Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A + A You are here Home Hands-On Skills for Caregivers Printer-friendly version When you’re ... therapist who can help you develop your transferring skills. Allow for their reality Remember to accept your ...

  17. Caregiver information search behavior for alternative transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Numerous factors contribute to cessation of driving, ranging from a decline in cognitive : capability to a decrease in overall physical health. When driving cessation occurs, : responsibility often falls on adult child caregivers to extend the person...

  18. Caregiving for Alzheimer's Disease or Other Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button Caregiving for Person with Alzheimer's Disease or a related Dementia Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What is Alzheimer’s Disease? Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form ...

  19. Advice for Loved Ones and Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... constitutes the most effective, supportive and beneficial care partnership for you both. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES FOR LOVED ONES AND CAREGIVERS Our community on social media has recommended the below resources. Aging Parents and ...

  20. Otitis Media and Caregiver Quality of Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidemann, Christian Hamilton; Godballe, Christian; Kjeldsen, Anette Drøhse

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Otitis media in children may have a considerable impact on caregiver quality of life. The disease-specific Caregiver Impact Questionnaire is designed to assess caregiver quality of life in relation to child otitis media. Assessment of the psychometric properties of this instrument...... is limited. This study assesses the psychometric properties of this instrument including validity, reproducibility, responsiveness, and interpretability. STUDY DESIGN: Longitudinal validation study. SETTING: Secondary care units. METHODS: Analyses were based on data from 435 families. Validity was assessed...... Danish version of the Caregiver Impact Questionnaire is a valid and reproducible measurement tool that is also sensitive to measuring change in the current setting. A change score representing minimal important change as perceived by the respondent is proposed. Results of this study support the use...

  1. Presenting the Prenatal Caregiving Experiences Questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røhder, Katrine; Trier, Christopher Høier; Brennan, Jessica

    to the child´s attachment system. The Prenatal Caregiving Experiences Questionnaire (PCEQ) (Brennan, George, & Solomon, 2013) is the first questionnaire that directly assesses prenatal caregiving representation. This poster presentation brings together different researchers who use the instrument in ongoing...... longitudinal research projects. The poster includes a description of the development of the PCEQ questionnaire, the theoretical background, as well as preliminary data on future mothers and fathers from the WARM study....

  2. Care respite: taking care of the caregivers

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Fernando; Baró, Xavier; Escalera, Sergio; Gonzàlez, Jordi; MacKay, Martha; Serrahima, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: With an ageing population, the issue of care provision is becoming increasingly critical. Since the aspiration of the majority of older people is to live safely and well at home, housing monitoring will be part of health & care integration in the next decades. As a consequence, a higher proportion of people will have to rely on family, friends or neighbours as their informal caregivers, providing that this group already count as around 80% of all caregivers in the EU). The v...

  3. Caregiver psychoeducation for first-episode psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McWilliams, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    International best-practice guidelines for the management of first-episode psychosis have recommended the provision of psychoeducation for multifamily groups. While there is ample evidence of their efficacy in multiepisode psychosis, there is a paucity of evidence supporting this approach specifically for first-episode psychosis. We sought to determine whether a six-week caregiver psychoeducation programme geared specifically at first-episode psychosis improves caregiver knowledge and attitudes.

  4. When LVAD Patients Die: The Caregiver's Mourning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi Ferrario, Silvia; Omarini, Pierangela; Cerutti, Paola; Balestroni, Giangluigi; Omarini, Giovanna; Pistono, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have progressively evolved, particularly in the last 10 years, to serve patients affected by severe heart failure as a bridge to transplant or destination therapy. The survival rate and quality of life of pre- and postimplant patients, as well as caregivers' perceptions and distress, are under investigation by the scientific community. But what caregivers think and feel after the loss of their loved one has not so far been examined. We contacted 16 principal caregivers of deceased LVAD patients by telephone. They were asked to evaluate their experience with LVADs and were administered a specific questionnaire about their mourning, the Caregiver Mourning Questionnaire (CMQ), to evaluate their perceptions of the physical, emotional, and social support-related problems that they had experienced during the previous 3 months. Positive aspects reported by the caregivers were the patient's overall subjective well-being and increased survival. Negative aspects were the difficulty to manage infections and the driveline, and the incomplete autonomy of the patient. Half of the caregivers reported not being preadvised about many of the problems they would face. The CMQ revealed that numerous caregivers had health problems, difficulty in sleeping, eating disorders, lack of energy, and loneliness. Use of psychotropic drugs and regrets about how they assisted their loved one also emerged. In conclusion, caregivers of LVAD patients may experience complicated mourning. Our data support in particular the need for an early intervention of palliative care which could prevent or reduce complicated mourning. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Caregiver Burden in Alcohol Dependence Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanujam Vaishnavi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Alcoholism is a major threat to the individual as well as the society and the maximum burden of the illness is borne by the family. Aim. The study is aimed at assessing the pattern of burden on the caregivers of alcohol dependent patients and at assessing the relationship between the severity of dependence and the burden on caregivers. Settings and Design. Cross-sectional descriptive study conducted in the Department of Psychiatry, Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional assessment was done in 200 patients with alcohol dependence and their caregivers. The severity of dependence and the pattern of burden on caregivers were assessed. Statistical Analysis. The data thus collected was analyzed using SPSS version 20. Results. The study demonstrates that caregivers of alcohol dependent patients reported significant objective burden and subjective burden. Furthermore, the severity of alcohol dependence and the domains of burden such as financial burden, disruption of family interaction, and disruption of family routine activities were positively correlated with high level of significance. Conclusion. The current study has illustrated that all the caregivers experienced significant amount of burden which has to be addressed for better treatment outcome of the patients.

  6. Family Caregivers and Consumer Health Information Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Jennifer L; Darer, Jonathan D; Larsen, Kevin L

    2016-01-01

    Health information technology has been embraced as a strategy to facilitate patients' access to their health information and engagement in care. However, not all patients are able to access, or are capable of using, a computer or mobile device. Although family caregivers assist individuals with some of the most challenging and costly health needs, their role in health information technology is largely undefined and poorly understood. This perspective discusses challenges and opportunities of engaging family caregivers through the use of consumer-oriented health information technology. We compile existing evidence to make the case that involving family caregivers in health information technology as desired by patients is technically feasible and consistent with the principles of patient-centered and family-centered care. We discuss how more explicit and purposeful engagement of family caregivers in health information technology could advance clinical quality and patient safety by increasing the transparency, accuracy, and comprehensiveness of patient health information across settings of care. Finally, we describe how clarifying and executing patients' desires to involve family members or friends through health information technology would provide family caregivers greater legitimacy, convenience, and timeliness in health system interactions, and facilitate stronger partnerships between patients, family caregivers, and health care professionals.

  7. Randomized controlled trial of caregiver training for HIV-infected child neurodevelopment and caregiver well being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Judith K; Opoka, Robert; Familiar, Itziar; Nakasujja, Noeline; Sikorskii, Alla; Awadu, Jorem; Givon, Deborah; Shohet, Cilly; Murray, Sarah M; Augustinavicius, Jura; Mendelson, Tamar; Boivin, Michael

    2017-08-24

    HIV infection places children at neurodevelopmental risk; for young children in poverty, risk is compounded by compromised caregiving quality. The mediational intervention for sensitizing caregivers (MISC) program trained caregivers on fostering daily interactions with young children. We hypothesized that MISC could enhance neurodevelopment of rural Ugandan HIV-infected children and improve mental health outcomes of their caregivers, which might mediate improved caregiving quality. A randomized trial of HIV-infected young children (ages 2-5 years) and their female caregivers; cluster randomization was to MISC or a nutrition curriculum. A total of 18 geographic clusters in rural Uganda. Children and caregivers were evaluated at baseline, 6 months, 1 year, and 1-year post-training. Mullen Scales of Early Learning, the Color-Object Association Test for memory, the Early Childhood Vigilance Test of attention, and the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function for the children. Caregivers completed measures of depression and anxiety symptoms and daily functioning. MISC had a significant impact on postintervention receptive language (adjusted mean difference = 3.13, 95% confidence interval 0.08, 6.18) that persisted at 1-year follow-up. MISC caregivers reported significantly less functional impairment postprogram (adjusted mean difference = -0.15, 95% confidence interval -0.28, -0.01). Other outcomes were NS. Both intervention conditions resulted in improvements in the study children over time. MISC showed additional impacts on child language and caregiver well-being. Future directions that include assessing the extent enhanced language development resulting from improved caregiving may better prepare impoverished children for school.

  8. Exploring caregiver burden experienced by family caregivers of patients with End-Stage Renal Disease in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yemisi Okikiade Oyegbile

    Full Text Available Background: Family caregivers in many African countries bear the burden of caregiving alone, with the paucity of research, especially for caregivers of End-Stage Renal Disease patients, having concealed their needs. Aim: To explore the caregiver burden of family caregivers of End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD patients in South-West Nigeria. Design: Following a complementary mixed method data collection strategy, the quantitative data was collected using the Zarit Burden Interview questionnaire to measure the burden of caregiving. Qualitative data was thereafter obtained through in-depth, individual interviews and was analysed using content analysis. Settings: The three research settings consisted of two state hospitals and one private hospital that provide renal care in South-West Nigeria. Result: The mean burden of caregiving for the sample was 50.18 thus indicating that family caregivers experienced moderate to severe burden, which is high compared to the other studies. The participants’ experiences of caregiving revealed the following categories: total dependence, acceptance of caregiving role, competing responsibilities, financial sacrifice and “not making mistakes”. Conclusion: Understanding the extent of caregiver burden, what constitutes burden to family caregivers in low/middle-income countries, and the difficulties associated with caregiving for care-recipients with ESRD, allows appropriate strategies and interventions to be developed. Keywords: End Stage Renal Disease, Family caregivers, Caregiver burden, Complementary mixed methods, Nigeria

  9. Psychometric Properties of the Caregiver Strain Questionnaire (CGSQ) among Caregivers of Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Rahul; Madhavan, S. Suresh; Smith, Michael J.; Tworek, Cindy; Patrick, Julie H.; Becker-Cottrill, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the Caregiver Strain Questionnaire (CGSQ) among caregivers of children with autism. The CGSQ was originally developed to assess burden experienced by parents of children and adolescents with serious emotional and behavioral disorders. Study data was collected from 304 primary…

  10. Predictors of Alzheimer's Disease Caregiver Depression and Burden: What Noncaregiving Adults Can Learn from Active Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayslip, Bert, Jr.; Han, GiBaeg; Anderson, Cristina L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined similarities and differences between active caregivers (adult children and spouses whose family member had Alzheimer's disease) and not-as-yet caregiving adults (adult children and spouses whose family members are older, but do not as yet suffer from Alzheimer's disease). The objective was to determine what factors predict…

  11. Perceptions of family caregivers of cancer patients about the challenges of caregiving: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Shahnaz; Rassouli, Maryam; Ilkhani, Mahnaz; Baghestani, Ahmad Reza

    2018-03-01

    The experience of caring for a family member with cancer is associated with several care-related problems and challenges for the caregiver. The comprehensive and in-depth understanding of the trials and tribulations of caregiving can be a step towards resolving the problems faced by family caregivers of these patients. The present study aimed to explore challenges faced by Iranian family caregivers of cancer patients. The present qualitative study was conducted through in-depth semi-structured interviews held with 21 family caregivers of cancer patients selected through purposive sampling. Interviews continued until saturation of data. All interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed through conventional content analysis. The codes extracted from interviews produced four main themes, including 'confusion', 'uncertainty', 'disintegration' and 'setback', which collectively caused suffering for family caregivers. Care provided in an atmosphere of suffering and discontent diminishes caregiver's quality of life and quality of patient care. Health planners should therefore consider the challenges and sufferings faced by family caregivers and should seek to obviate them through appropriate plans. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  12. Conveying empathy to hospice family caregivers: team responses to caregiver empathic communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Debra, Parker Oliver; Demiris, George; Rankin, Anna; Shaunfield, Sara; Kruse, Robin L

    2012-10-01

    The goal of this study was to explore empathic communication opportunities presented by family caregivers and responses from interdisciplinary hospice team members. Empathic opportunities and hospice team responses were analyzed from bi-weekly web-based videoconferences between family caregivers and hospice teams. The authors coded the data using the Empathic Communication Coding System (ECCS) and identified themes within and among the coded data. Data analysis identified 270 empathic opportunity-team response sequences. Caregivers expressed statements of emotion and decline most frequently. Two-thirds of the hospice team responses were implicit acknowledgements of caregiver statements and only one-third of the team responses were explicit recognitions of caregiver empathic opportunities. Although hospice team members frequently express emotional concerns with family caregivers during one-on-one visits, there is a need for more empathic communication during team meetings that involve caregivers. Hospice clinicians should devote more time to discussing emotional issues with patients and their families to enhance patient-centered hospice care. Further consideration should be given to training clinicians to empathize with patients and family caregivers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Impact of Family Functioning on Caregiver Burden among Caregivers of Veterans with Congestive Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Crystal Dea

    2010-01-01

    A cross-sectional study of 76 family caregivers of older veterans with congestive heart failure utilized the McMaster model of family functioning to examine the impact of family functioning variables (problem solving, communication, roles, affective responsiveness, and affective involvement) on caregiver burden dimensions (relationship burden,…

  14. Burden of informal caregiving for stroke patients: Identification of caregivers at risk of adverse health effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Exel, N.J.A. van; Koopmanschap, M.A.; Berg, B. van den; Brouwer, W.B.F.; Bos, G.A.M. van den

    2005-01-01

    Background: We assessed the objective and subjective burden of caregiving for stroke patients and investigated which characteristics of the patient, the informal caregiver and the objective burden contribute most to subjective burden and to the condition of feeling substantially burdened. Methods:

  15. Caregivers' attentional bias to pain : does it affect caregiver accuracy in detecting patient pain behaviors?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, Somayyeh; Dehghani, Mohsen; Khatibi, Ali; Sanderman, Robbert; Hagedoorn, Mariet

    Attentional bias to pain among family caregivers of patients with pain may enhance the detection of pain behaviors in patients. However, both relatively high and low levels of attentional bias may increase disagreement between patients and caregivers in reporting pain behaviors. This study aims to

  16. Family caregivers' health in connection with providing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlingsson, Christen L; Magnusson, Lennart; Hanson, Elizabeth

    2012-05-01

    Our aim was to investigate connections between Swedish family caregivers' health and providing care for an ill relative by conducting a systematic search and synthesis of previous research. We analyzed 31 articles using first qualitative content analysis then hermeneutic analysis. Analysis resulted in three derived themes-sliding sideways into caregiving, caregiving in reciprocity, and caregiving in disintegration-and a main interpretation and conceptual model of Swedish family caregivers' health-caregiving in a sphere of beliefs. Results indicated that Swedish family caregivers' beliefs, experiences of reciprocity, or nonsupport, together with quality of interpersonal relationships and feelings of responsibility and guilt, have a profound impact on their health. These results point to the value and importance of nurses gaining an understanding of family caregivers' beliefs and experiences of reciprocity or nonsupport to effectively promote family caregivers' health.

  17. Exploring conflict between caregiving and work for caregivers of elders with dementia: a cross-sectional, correlational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Nu; Shyu, Yea-Ing Lotus; Tsai, Wen-Che; Yang, Pei-Shan; Yao, Grace

    2013-05-01

    To report the moderating effects of work-related conditions and interactive family-care-giving variables, including mutuality and preparedness, on caregiver role strain and mental health for family caregivers of patients with dementia. Few studies have examined the interrelationships among caregivers' working conditions, care-giving dynamics and caregiver well-being. Cross-sectional, correlational study. Data were collected by self-completed questionnaires from 176 primary family caregivers of patients with dementia in Taiwan from May 2005-January 2006. Caregiver role strain and mental health were analysed by multiple regressions using a hierarchical method to enter independent variables and two- and three-way interaction terms after controlling for caregiver age and gender, employment status, and work flexibility and the simple effect of each independent variable. More preparedness was associated with less role strain for family caregivers with less work/care-giving conflict. More care-giving demand was associated with poorer mental health only for caregivers with low work/care-giving conflict and with average and low preparedness, but not high preparedness. For family caregivers with less work/care-giving conflict, more preparedness decreased role strain and maintained mental health even when care-giving demand was high. These results provide a knowledge base for understanding complex family caregiver phenomena and serve as a guide for developing interventions. Future studies with longitudinal follow-ups are suggested to explore actual causal relationships. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Caregivers in schizophrenia: A cross Cultural Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, Prashant; Matheiken, Shevonne Tresa

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia not only influences the lives of those affected but also those around them, especially the caregivers. This study examines the different determinants that are likely to contribute to the caregivers' perception of burden of care across different countries namely Malaysia and India, using the burden assessment schedule. The goals for this study were, to study the psychosocial and demographic aspects of patients suffering from schizophrenia, to study the levels of perceived burden of the Malaysian and Indian families caring for a relative with schizophrenia, and to study the determinants that contributes to the caregivers' perception of burden of care. The study was conducted in private hospitals, both in Malaysia as well as Mangalore after obtaining the necessary approval. 50 schizophrenia patients and their caregivers in Malaysia and India were chosen using the purposive sampling technique. The inclusion criteria were a minimum of 5 years since diagnosis of schizophrenia. Although the Indian caregivers perceived difficulties in several areas such as finance, family relationship, well-being and health, they still perceived burden to be lesser compared to Malaysian counterpart. Intensified community based care can reduce burden.

  19. Influence of home care services on caregivers' burden and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Young; Yeom, Hyun-E

    2016-06-01

    To examine the factors affecting the burden and satisfaction of family caregivers, focusing on the beneficial impacts of home care service use. Long-term care for older patients is a multifaceted process that brings both burden and satisfaction to family caregivers. It is expected that home care services offered by the Korean long-term care insurance may contribute to decreasing the burden of family caregivers and enhancing their satisfaction by assisting with practical caregiving tasks. A cross-sectional study. A convenience sample of 157 family caregivers was recruited from five home care service agencies in South Korea. Information about the caregivers, caregiving history, older care recipients and use of home care services was assessed. The effects of home care service use on caregiving burden and satisfaction were tested using hierarchical multiple regression analyses after adjusting for the characteristics of the caregivers, caregiving history and older care recipients. There was no significant influence of home care service use on reducing caregiving burden or on increasing caregivers' satisfaction. Although several factors were associated with caregiving burden and satisfaction, family functioning was the most unique factor to significantly affect both caregiving burden and satisfaction. Home care services might not automatically have a positive impact on caregivers' burden and satisfaction, but maintaining healthy family functioning is an important issue for family caregivers. The findings highlight the important need to reconsider ways to provide home care services and to develop nursing interventions to reinforce supportive family functioning. Practical strategies for providing home care services should be developed through a concrete assessment of the family dynamics and the needs of family caregivers. Health professionals should play a pivotal role in performing the assessment and in developing interventions to strengthen supportive family functioning

  20. Mental Health in Rural Caregivers of Persons With Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra J. Werntz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Informal caregiving for dementia is common and often affects caregiver mental health. In addition to typical stressors faced by caregivers of persons with dementia (PWDs, rural caregivers often face additional stressors associated with living in more remote locations; unfortunately, this group is largely understudied. Ninety-three caregiver–PWD dyads completed measures of social support, perceived control, self-efficacy, burden, and cognitive functioning. Measures of PWD activities of daily living and mental functioning were also collected. These variables were hypothesized to predict caregiver self-reported symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress. Contrary to predictions, only caregiving-related self-efficacy and caregiver burden predicted the caregiver’s mental health. Future interventions for improving rural caregiver self-reported mental health should target cognitions associated with caregiving self-efficacy and caregiver burden. Health care providers for rural families should focus on ways to reduce feelings of caregiver burden and provide caregivers with useful skills and tools for caregiving.

  1. Family Caregivers in Cancer: Roles and Challenges (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Family caregivers, also called informal caregivers, play an important role in treatment planning, decision making, and managing cancer care. Get comprehensive information on the importance of caregiver roles and concerns and helpful interventions for caregivers in this summary for clinicians.

  2. Latino caregiver experiences with asthma health communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Antonio; Ocasio, Agueda; Tiyyagura, Gunjan; Krumeich, Lauren; Ragins, Kyle; Thomas, Anita; Trevino, Sandra; Vaca, Federico E

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we analyze qualitative data from a purposeful sample of limited English proficiency (LEP) asthma health caregivers. We used ethnically concordant, semistructured, in-depth Spanish-language interviews and a follow-up focus group to explore issues related to communication during pediatric asthma encounters in medical settings. Inductive coding of Spanish transcripts by a bilingual research team was performed until thematic saturation was reached. Several key findings emerged. LEP caregivers encountered significant asthma burdens related to emotional stress, observed physical changes, and communication barriers. Language-discordant communication and the use of ad hoc interpreters were common. This finding is complex, and was influenced by perceptions of interpreter availability, delays in care, feelings of mistrust toward others, and individual emotional responses. Language-concordant education and suitable action plans were valued and desired. We discuss a revealing depiction of the LEP caregiver experience with asthma health communication and recommend areas for further inquiry. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Powerful Tools for Caregivers, a Group Psychoeducational Skill-Building Intervention for Family Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M. Rosney

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Care providers consistently report negative consequences to their mental health as a direct result of their caregiving responsibilities. Specifically, they describe higher levels of distress, mental health problems, and depressive symptoms compared to their non-caregiving matched controls. Powerful Tools for Caregivers (PTC is a national program that aims to empower caregivers to better care for themselves and enhance their self-efficacy. The purpose of the present study was to determine and quantify the effectiveness of the PTC program through pre/post data analysis. Methods: PTC intervention was evaluated at two questionnaire time points: pre-PTC and post-PTC between June 30, 2004 and Oct 16, 2013. Paired sample t-tests (n=409 were conducted using SPSS Statistics Version 22 (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY. Results: PTC increased caregivers who conducted self-care behaviors, who demonstrated self-efficacy, management of depressing emotions and those who used community resources. Conclusion: PTC results in caregivers reporting that they are taking better care of themselves, reacting to their emotions in a healthier manner, gaining more confidence in their caregiving abilities and coping skills, and becoming more knowledgeable about receiving assistance from their community resources.

  4. Elder care and the impact of caregiver strain on the health of employed caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, Linda; Higgins, Christopher; Smart, Rob

    2011-01-01

    As the baby-boom generation moves towards middle age, and their parents toward old age, the number of employees who combine care for an elderly dependant and work will increase in number. These employees are "at risk" of experiencing caregiver strain. This paper advances our understanding of these trends by examining the relationship between caregiver strain and the health of employed caregivers. Our study involved the analysis of data from the 2001 Canadian National Work, Family and Lifestyle Study (N= 31,517). MANOVA was used to determine the relationship between caregiver strain and three situational factors: (1) gender; (2) where the care recipient lives compared to the caregiver; and, (3) family type. Regression was used to determine the relationship between caregiver strain and mental health. We found that caregiver strain depends on gender, family type and location of care. Emotional strain was a significant predictor of mental health. These findings support the need for organizations to expand their thinking around work-life balance to include employees who have eldercare responsibilities.

  5. Self-stigma among caregivers of people with mental illness: toward caregivers' empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girma, Eshetu; Möller-Leimkühler, Anne Maria; Dehning, Sandra; Mueller, Norbert; Tesfaye, Markos; Froeschl, Guenter

    2014-01-01

    In addition to economic and material burdens, caregivers of people with mental illness are exposed to psychosocial challenges. Self-stigma is among the psychological challenges that can be exacerbated by intrinsic and/or extrinsic factors. Caregivers' self-stigma can negatively influence the patients' treatment and rehabilitation process. The objective of this study was to measure the level and correlates of self-stigma among caregivers of people with mental illness. An interviewer-administered cross-sectional study was conducted in the Jimma University Specialized Hospital Psychiatry Clinic in Ethiopia on a sample of 422 caregivers. Data were collected by trained nurses working in the clinic using a pretested questionnaire. Multivariate linear regression was performed to identify the correlates of self-stigma among caregivers of people with mental illness. The majority (70.38%) of the caregivers were male. On a scale of 0 to 15, with 0 being low and 15 being high, the average self-stigmatizing attitude score was 4.68 (±4.11). A statistically significant difference in mean self-stigma score was found between urban and rural respondents (t=3.95, PSelf-stigma of caregivers showed significant positive correlation with perceived signs of mental illness (r=0.18, Pself-stigma was perceived supernatural explanation of mental illness (standardized β=0.22, Pself-stigma in this study was significantly correlated with perceived supernatural explanation of mental illness. Since caregivers' self-stigma may negatively influence patients' treatment-seeking, adherence, and rehabilitation processes, programs that enhance coping strategies by strengthening self-esteem and empowerment by health care providers and establish family support groups may be helpful to tackle self-stigma among caregivers of people with mental illness.

  6. Caregiver burden and coping strategies in caregivers of patients with Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iavarone A

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Alessandro Iavarone,1,2 Antonio Rosario Ziello,3,4 Francesca Pastore,3 Angiola Maria Fasanaro,3 Carla Poderico5 1Neurological and Stroke Unit, CTO Hospital, 2Italian Association on Alzheimer's Disease (AIMA, 3Memory Clinic, Neurological Unit, AORN Cardarelli Hospital, Naples, Italy; 4Clinical Research, Telemedicine and Telepharmacy Centre, University of Camerino, Camerino, Italy; 5Department of Psychology, Second University of Naples, Caserta, Italy Background: Alzheimer’s disease (AD causes considerable distress in caregivers who are continuously required to deal with requests from patients. Coping strategies play a fundamental role in modulating the psychologic impact of the disease, although their role is still debated. The present study aims to evaluate the burden and anxiety experienced by caregivers, the effectiveness of adopted coping strategies, and their relationships with burden and anxiety. Methods: Eighty-six caregivers received the Caregiver Burden Inventory (CBI and the ­State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI Y-1 and Y-2. The coping strategies were assessed by means of the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS, according to the model proposed by Endler and Parker in 1990.Results: The CBI scores (overall and single sections were extremely high and correlated with dementia severity. Women, as well as older caregivers, showed higher scores. The trait anxiety (STAI-Y-2 correlated with the CBI overall score. The CISS showed that caregivers mainly adopted task-focused strategies. Women mainly adopted emotion-focused strategies and this style was related to a higher level of distress. Conclusion: AD is associated with high distress among caregivers. The burden strongly correlates with dementia severity and is higher in women and in elderly subjects. Chronic anxiety affects caregivers who mainly rely on emotion-oriented coping strategies. The findings suggest providing support to families of patients with AD through tailored

  7. Caregiver burden and nonachievement of healthy lifestyle behaviors among family caregivers of cardiovascular disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochari-Greenberger, Heidi; Mosca, Lori

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether caregiver burdens are associated with lifestyle behaviors 1 year following the hospitalization of a family member with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Prospective follow-up study of National Heart Lung and Blood Institute sponsored Family Intervention Trial for Heart Health participants. Hospital-based recruitment/baseline visit with 1-year follow-up. Family members of hospitalized CVD patients (N  =  423; 67% female; 36% racial/ethnic minority; mean age 49 years). Systematic evaluation at 1 year to determine heart-healthy diet (defined as caregiver burdens (five domains: employment, financial, physical, social, and time; Caregiver Strain Questionnaire). Logistic regression adjusted for covariates. Heart-healthy diet was less frequent among caregivers citing feeling overwhelmed (odds ratio [OR]  =  .50; 95% confidence interval [CI]  =  .26-.97), sleep disturbance (OR  =  .51; 95% CI  =  .27-.96), financial strain (OR  =  .41; 95% CI  =  .20-.86), upsetting behavior (OR  =  .48; 95% CI  =  .25-.92), and/or time demands (OR  =  .47; 95% CI  =  .26-.85) as burdens. Physical activity was less frequent among caregivers reporting financial strain (OR  =  .32; 95% CI  =  .13-.81) or upsetting patient behavior (OR  =  .33; 95% CI  =  .15-.76) as burdens. The most commonly cited caregiver burdens included changes in personal plans (39%), time demands (38%), and sleep disturbance (30%). Caregiver burdens were associated with nonachievement of heart-healthy diet and physical activity behaviors among family caregivers 1 year after patient discharge. When developing heart-health promotion interventions, caregiver burden should be considered as a possible barrier to prevention among family members of CVD patients.

  8. Protecting Against Influenza (Flu): Advice for Caregivers of Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Protecting Against Influenza (Flu): Advice for Caregivers of Young Children Language: English ( ... from the flu. Advice on How to Prevent Flu for Caregivers of Young Children 1. Take Time ...

  9. Caregiver experiences and perceptions of stroke | Thomas | Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prominent themes associated with caregiving included: role changes and relationship disruptions within the family, occupational and social implications, fatigue, anxiety, depression, loneliness, frustration as well as financial problems. Caregiver experiences were exacerbated by the inadequate support structures available.

  10. Caregivers' resilience is independent from the clinical symptoms of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Rachel; Simões-Neto, José Pedro; Santos, Raquel Luiza; Sousa, Maria Fernanda Barroso de; Baptista, Maria Alice Tourinho; Lacerda, Isabel Barbeito; Kimura, Nathalia Ramos Santos; Dourado, Marcia Cristina Nascimento

    2016-12-01

    Resilience is the capacity for successful adaptation when faced with the stress of adversity. We aimed to investigate the relationship between caregivers' resilience and the sociodemographic and clinical factors of people with dementia. Cross-sectional assessment of 58 people with dementia and their caregiver dyads showed that most caregivers were female adult children. The caregivers reported moderate to higher levels of resilience, lower levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms and moderate levels of burden. Resilience was not related to the caregiver's gender (p = 0.883), nor clinical (p = 0.807) or emotional problems (p = 0.420). The regression showed that resilience was related to the caregiver's quality of life (p caregivers' resilience and the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of people with dementia. We can assume that resilience is an individual characteristic. Support groups should also focus on the factors that may increase resilience among caregivers.

  11. Caregiver Stigma and Burden in Memory Disorders: An Evaluation of the Effects of Caregiver Type and Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phoebe V. Kahn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite considerable gains in public awareness of dementia, dementia patients and their caregivers continue to be stigmatized. Previous work has explored stigma and burden among adult children of persons with dementia in Israel, but no similar data exist for spousal caregivers or caregivers in general in the United States. This study examines the differences in stigma and burden experienced by spousal and adult child caregivers and male and female caregivers of persons with dementia. Eighty-two caregivers were given the Zarit Burden Inventory Short Form (ZBI and the Caregiver Section of the Family Stigma in Alzheimer’s Disease Scale (FS-ADS-C. Scores on the FS-ADS-C and ZBI were positively correlated (rs=.51, p<.001. Female caregivers reported experiencing more stigma on the FS-ADS-C (t(80 = −4.37, p<.001 and more burden on the ZBI (t(80 = −2.68, p=.009 compared to male caregivers, and adult child caregivers reported experiencing more stigma on the FS-ADS-C (t(30.8 = −2.22, p=.034 and more burden on the ZBI (t(80 = −2.65, p=.010 than spousal caregivers. These results reinforce the importance of support for caregivers, particularly adult child and female caregivers who may experience higher levels of stigma and burden.

  12. Assistance received by employed caregivers and their care recipients: who helps care recipients when caregivers work full time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharlach, Andrew E; Gustavson, Kristen; Dal Santo, Teresa S

    2007-12-01

    This study examined the association among caregiver labor force participation, employees' caregiving activities, and the amount and quality of care received by care recipients. Telephone interviews were conducted with 478 adults who were employed full time and 705 nonemployed adults who provided care to a family member or friend aged 50 or older, identified through random sampling of California households. We assessed care recipient impairment and service problems; the amounts and types of assistance received from caregivers, family and friends, and paid providers; and caregiver utilization of support services. Care recipients of caregivers employed full time were less likely to receive large amounts of care from their caregivers, more likely to receive personal care from paid care providers, more likely to use community services, and more likely to experience service problems than were care recipients of nonemployed caregivers. Employed caregivers were more likely to use caregiver support services than were nonemployed caregivers. Accommodation to caregiver full-time employment involves selective supplementation by caregivers and their care recipients, reflecting increased reliance on formal support services as well as increased vulnerability to service problems and unmet care recipient needs. These findings suggest the need for greater attention to the well-being of disabled elders whose caregivers are employed full time.

  13. Caregiver Burden, Quality Of Life And Vulnerability Towards Psychopathology In Caregivers Of Patients With Dementia/alzheimer's Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawood, S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify caregivers' burden, evaluate quality of life in them; and predict anxiety and depression in caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Neurology and Psychiatry Department of Lahore General Hospital (LGH), from January to December, 2013. Methodology: A purposive sample of 60 caregivers, who had been taking care of patients with AD for more than one year, were recruited from the study centre. The Zarit Burden Interview was used to assess caregiver burden. The brief version of World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale to assess quality of life and anxiety and depression subscales of symptom checklist-revised were administered to assess caregivers' vulnerability towards psychopathology. Results: There were 6 males and 54 females caregivers with mean age of 37.60 ± 14.87 years. The burden of caregiving had negative relationship (-0.57; -0.50; -0.48; and -0.50, respectively) with physical, psychological, social, and environmental domains of quality of life. Neither caregiver burden nor quality of life predicted for anxiety and depression in the caregivers. Conclusion: Caregiver burden may impair quality of life of caregivers but results imply the need to identify the interpersonal and intrapersonal characteristics of caregivers that buffered the adverse effects of caregiver burden and impaired the quality of life on psychological well being of the patients with AD. (author)

  14. Facilitating out-of-home caregiving through health information technology: survey of informal caregivers' current practices, interests, and perceived barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulman, Donna M; Piette, John D; Jenchura, Emily C; Asch, Steven M; Rosland, Ann-Marie

    2013-07-10

    Many patients with chronic conditions are supported by out-of-home informal caregivers-family members, friends, and other individuals who provide care and support without pay-who, if armed with effective consumer health information technology, could inexpensively facilitate their care. We sought to understand caregivers' use of, interest in, and perceived barriers to health information technology for out-of-home caregiving. We conducted 2 sequential Web-based surveys with a national sample of individuals who provide out-of-home caregiving to an adult family member or friend with a chronic illness. We queried respondents about their use of health information technology for out-of-home caregiving and used multivariable regression to investigate caregiver and care-recipient characteristics associated with caregivers' technology use for caregiving. Among 316 out-of-home caregiver respondents, 34.5% (109/316) reported using health information technology for caregiving activities. The likelihood of a caregiver using technology increased significantly with intensity of caregiving (as measured by number of out-of-home caregiving activities). Compared with very low intensity caregivers, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of technology use was 1.88 (95% CI 1.01-3.50) for low intensity caregivers, 2.39 (95% CI 1.11-5.15) for moderate intensity caregivers, and 3.70 (95% CI 1.62-8.45) for high intensity caregivers. Over 70% (149/207) of technology nonusers reported interest in using technology in the future to support caregiving. The most commonly cited barriers to technology use for caregiving were health system privacy rules that restrict access to care-recipients' health information and lack of familiarity with programs or websites that facilitate out-of-home caregiving. Health information technology use for out-of-home caregiving is common, especially among individuals who provide more intense caregiving. Health care systems can address the mismatch between caregivers' interest

  15. Advancing Care for Family Caregivers of persons with dementia through caregiver and community partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Carole L; Overbaugh, Kristen J; Pickering, Carolyn E Z; Piernik-Yoder, Bridgett; James, Debbie; Patel, Darpan I; Puga, Frank; Ford, Lark; Cleveland, James

    2018-01-01

    There are currently 15 million Americans who provide over 80% of the care required by their family members with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. Yet care for caregivers continues to be fragmented and few evidence-based interventions have been translated into routine clinical care and therefore remain inaccessible to most family caregivers. To address this gap, the Caring for the Caregiver program is being developed at UT Health San Antonio, School of Nursing to improve support services and health outcomes for family caregivers. Our purpose is to describe the engagement process undertaken to assess caregiver and community needs and how findings are informing program development. We are using a model of public engagement that consists of communication of information, collection of information from stakeholders, and collaboration where stakeholders are partners in an exchange of information to guide program activities. An assessment of the community was undertaken to identify resources/services for family caregivers. Subsequently, stakeholders were invited to a community-academic forum to discuss strategies to build on existing strengths for family caregiving and to identify gaps in care. Detailed notes were taken and all discussions were recorded and transcribed for analysis. Data were analyzed using thematic content analysis. We conducted site visits with 15 community agencies, interviewed 13 family caregivers, and attended community events including support groups and health and senior fairs. Fifty-three diverse stakeholders attended the community-academic forum. Participants identified existing assets within our community to support family caregivers. Consistent among groups was the need to increase awareness in our community about family caregivers. Themes identified from the discussion were: making the invisible visible, you don't know what you don't know, learning too late, and anticipating and preparing for the future. Incorporating caregiver and

  16. Culture, role conflict and caregiver stress: The lived experiences of family cancer caregivers in Nairobi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Githaiga, Jennifer Nyawira

    2017-10-01

    This article explores the experiences of a small group of Nairobi women caring for a family cancer patient at home. On the basis of literature on women as caregivers in Africa, and on other literature more broadly, it was anticipated that issues around generational roles, gender and women's cultural role would be relevant. Seven women participated in semi-structured in-depth interviews, while thirteen women participated in four mini focus groups. Data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Findings underscore the socio-cultural complexities of caregiving as a basis for evidence-based culturally appropriate structures to support family caregivers.

  17. Experienced emotional burden in caregivers: psychometric properties of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire in caregivers of brain injured patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurtsen, Gert J.; Meijer, Ron; van Heugten, Caroline M.; Martina, Juan D.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the psychometric properties (internal consistency, discriminant validity, and responsiveness) of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire for Brain Injury measuring emotional burden in caregivers of patients with chronic acquired brain injury. Inception cohort study. Caregivers of chronic

  18. Burden in family caregivers of the elderly: prevalence and association with characteristics of the elderly and the caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara de Sa Neves Loureiro

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional, epidemiological study aimed to estimate the prevalence of burden among family caregivers of impaired elderly residents in the city of João Pessoa, and to identify associations between the mean burden and social and demographic characteristics of the elderly and the caregivers. A total number of 240 elderly residents in a previously drawn census tract participated in this research. The sample was composed of 52 elderly and their caregivers. For data collection, a questionnaire was applied with questions on social and demographic characteristics of elderly and caregivers, and the Burden Interview Scale was used. Results showed a high prevalence of burden among caregivers (84.6%, in which a statistically significant association was found with the following characteristics: retired elderly, elderly as head of family, spousal caregivers, and caregivers with less education. The findings of this study may contribute to the development of activities focused on formal and emotional support for the caregivers.

  19. Family caregivers of individuals with frontotemporal dementia: examining the relationship between coping and caregiver physical and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Cindy C; Wallhagen, Margaret I

    2014-01-01

    To identify strategies to assist family caregivers of individuals with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in dealing with their caregiving demands, nurses must understand these family members' unique needs and how they currently deal with their demands. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between coping and caregiver physical and mental health among FTD family caregivers. Participants were primary caregivers of individuals with FTD (with behavioral symptoms) living at home (N = 61). A small positive association was noted between problem-focused coping and caregiver physical health (r = 0.29, p caregiver mental health (r = 0.21, p = 0.10). However, multiple regression analysis showed that emotion-focused coping (β = 0.46, p caregiver mental health and explained approximately 14% of its variance. These findings support the potential value of emotion-focused coping strategies when dealing with behavioral symptoms manifested by individuals with FTD. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Caregiver Burden Among Caregivers of Individuals With Severe Mental Illness: Testing the Moderation and Mediation Models of Resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulud, Zamzaliza Abdul; McCarthy, Geraldine

    2017-02-01

    The association between the socio-demographic characteristics of caregivers, such as gender and caregiver burden, is well documented; however, the process underlying this relationship is poorly understood. Based on the stress process model, we designed a cross-sectional study to examine the mediating and moderating effect of resilience on the relationship between gender and caregiver burden. Caregivers of individuals with severe mental illness (n=201) were recruited in two psychiatric outpatient clinics in Malaysia. The relationship between the gender of the caregiver and caregiver burden was mediated by resilience, thus supporting the stress process model. The findings from the present research contribute to the growing evidence of the interaction between socio-demographic variables of caregivers and resilience, and caregiver burden. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The interaction between informal cancer caregivers and health care professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Line; Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten Aagaard

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: In order to meet the caregiving challenges, informal caregivers often need a substantial level of interaction with health care professionals (HCPs). This study investigated to which extent the cancer caregivers' needs regarding the interaction with HCPs are met and the associations betwe...

  2. Caregiver Sensitivity, Contingent Social Responsiveness, and Secure Infant Attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunst, Carl J.; Kassow, Danielle Z.

    2008-01-01

    Findings from two research syntheses of the relationship between caregiver sensitivity and secure infant attachment and one research synthesis of factors associated with increased caregiver use of a sensitive interactional style are presented. The main focus of analysis was the extent to which different measures of caregiver contingent social…

  3. What Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia Affect Caregiver Burnout?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyoshi-Taniguchi, Kazuko; Becker, Carl B; Kinoshita, Ayae

    2018-01-01

    Patients' irritability and aggression have been linked to caregiver depression, but the behaviors that most burden caregivers are not yet definitively identified. This study examines the connection between behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) and the burnout of caregivers caring for home-dwelling elders with dementia symptoms in Japan. 80 Japanese rural and urban family caregivers completed detailed questionnaires about their experiences in caring for demented family members. We statistically analyzed the results for correlations between types of dementia, Pines Burnout, and Caregiver Distress. BPSD symptom severity significantly correlated with caregiver distress. The dementia symptoms most strongly correlated with caregiver burnout were: aggression, irritability, abnormal motor behavior, and hallucinations. Among the commonest symptoms, apathy, anxiety, and depression did not seriously aggravate caregiver burnout. Caregivers displayed higher burnout facing agitation/aggression, irritability, aberrant motor behavior, and hallucinations. Caregivers' reported distress was surprisingly dissimilar to their burnout scores; patients' delusions and anxiety led to higher distress reporting but not to burnout. Advance diagnosis of BPSD symptoms should be helpful to support nurses and caregivers of dementia patients. Particular support should be considered for caregivers and nurses of patients expressing aggression, irritability, abnormal motor behavior, and hallucination.

  4. Prevalence and correlates of psychiatric morbidity among caregivers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The caregivers were administered a sociodemographic questionnaire, GHQ-12, Zarit Burden interview, and the Columbia Impairment Scale. Results: Most caregivers observed in this study were females (80.5%) with mothers of the patients accounting for 78% of all the caregivers. A higher percentage of the patients were ...

  5. Bereaved Caregivers to Patients With High-Grade Glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piil, Karin; Jarden, Mary

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: The disease and treatment trajectory of patients with high-grade glioma is a burdensome period for the patients' closest relatives who become informal caregivers. Caregivers experiencing this demanding shift in role are at risk of developing symptoms such as depression. Few studies have...... care planning within neuro-oncology caregiving to establish evidence-based practice guidelines and recommendations....

  6. Cancer Communication and Family Caregiver Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Wittenberg

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Family caregivers have enormous communication responsibilities tied to caregiving, such as sharing the patient’s medical history with providers, relaying diagnosis and prognosis to other family members, and making decisions about care with the patient. While caregiver stress and burden has been widely documented in the caregiving literature, little is known about how communication burden, real or perceived communication challenges, impacts caregiver quality of life. In family caregiving, the City of Hope (COH Quality of Life model proposes that the caregiving experience is reciprocal to the patient experience, impacting physical, social, psychological, and spiritual quality of life. We used data from a pilot study testing a communication coaching call intervention with family caregivers of lung cancer patients to analyze caregiver reported communication burden and quality of life. We found variances in each quality of life domain, suggesting that caregiver interventions should range from self-care skill building for physical care to psycho-educational interventions that support caregiver coping and communication skill building. These findings demonstrate the importance of caregiver assessment and attention to communication burden in quality cancer care.

  7. Caregiver burden in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, Jessica; Bakker, Leonhard A; van Groenestijn, Annerieke C; van den Berg, Leonard H; Schröder, Carin D; Visser-Meily, Johanna Ma; Beelen, Anita

    BACKGROUND: Informal caregivers of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis experience increased levels of caregiver burden as the disease progresses. Insight in the factors related to caregiver burden is needed in order to develop supportive interventions. AIM: To evaluate the evidence on

  8. 78 FR 66617 - National Family Caregivers Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... National Family Caregivers Month, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation... is one we must recognize and support. During National Family Caregivers Month, we thank these...' family caregivers also receive access to health care. Just as our loved ones celebrate with us in our...

  9. 76 FR 68621 - National Family Caregivers Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... National Family Caregivers Month, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation... exemplify the best of the American spirit. During National Family Caregivers Month, we pay tribute to the... our Nation's family caregivers assist seniors and people with disabilities to help improve their...

  10. Patterns of caregiver experiences among partners of cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijboer, C; Triemstra, M; Mulder, M; Sanderman, R; van den Bos, GAM

    2000-01-01

    This study describes patterns of caregiving experiences in partners of patients with cancer (N=148) over a 6-month period. Caregiving experiences were assessed by means of the Caregiver Reaction Assessment Scale (CRA), which consists of four negative dimensions and one positive subscale: Disrupted

  11. 77 FR 66525 - National Family Caregivers Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-06

    ... National Family Caregivers Month, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Our... hours to providing care to their relatives or loved ones. During National Family Caregivers Month, we... veterans and their family caregivers through financial support; access to health insurance, mental health...

  12. The phenomenology of bodily care: caregivers' experiences with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... caregivers were identified with the help of HIV/AIDS counsellors at two hospitals where AIDS patients received medical treatment. The thematic analysis shows that a patient's body was central in caregiving experiences. Social interaction in caregiving was mediated through seeing and touching the bodies of the patients.

  13. Adult caregiving among American Indians: the role of cultural factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goins, R Turner; Spencer, S Melinda; McGuire, Lisa C; Goldberg, Jack; Wen, Yang; Henderson, Jeffrey A

    2011-06-01

    With a sample of American Indian adults, we estimated the prevalence of adult caregiving, assessed the demographic and cultural profile of caregivers, and examined the association between cultural factors and being a caregiver. This is the first such study conducted with American Indians. Data came from a cross-sectional study of 5,207 American Indian adults residing on 2 closely related Lakota Sioux reservations in the Northern Plains and one American Indian community in the Southwest. Cultural factors included measures of cultural identity and traditional healing practices. Seventeen percent of our sample reported being caregivers. In both the Northern Plains and Southwest, caregiving was positively correlated with younger age, being a woman, larger household size, attending and participating in Native events, and endorsement of traditional healing practices. In both regions, attendance and participation in Native events and engagement in traditional healing practices were associated with increased odds of caregiving after adjusting for covariates. Only in the Northern Plains did we find that speaking some Native language at home was associated with increased odds of being a caregiver. Examination of interaction terms indicated some sex differences in the association between cultural factors and caregiving in the Northern Plains but not in the Southwest. Our findings indicate that greater cultural identity and engagement in traditional healing practices are related to caregiving in American Indian populations. Caregiving research, intervention efforts, and caregiving programs and services in Native communities should pay special attention to the dynamics of culture and caregiving.

  14. Exploring factors and caregiver outcomes associated with feelings of preparedness for caregiving in family caregivers in palliative care: a correlational, cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Anette; Årestedt, Kristofer

    2013-07-01

    Family caregivers in palliative care often report feeling insufficiently prepared to handle the caregiver role. Preparedness has been confirmed as a variable that may actually protect family caregiver well-being. Preparedness refers to how ready family caregivers perceive they are for the tasks and demands in the caregiving role. The aim of this study was to explore factors associated with preparedness and to further investigate whether preparedness is associated with caregiver outcomes. This was a correlational study using a cross-sectional design. The study took place in three specialist palliative care units and one haematology unit. A total of 125 family caregivers of patients with life-threatening illness participated. Preparedness was significantly associated with higher levels of hope and reward and with a lower level of anxiety. In contrast, preparedness was not associated with depression or health. Being female and cohabiting with the patient were significantly associated with a higher level of preparedness. The relationship to the patient was significantly associated with preparedness, while social support, place of care, time since diagnosis and age of the patients showed no association. Feelings of preparedness seem to be important for how family caregivers experience the unique situation when caring for a patient who is severely ill and close to death. Our findings support the inclusion of preparedness in support models for family caregivers in palliative care. Psycho-educational interventions could preferably be designed aiming to increase family caregiver's preparedness to care, including practical care, communication and emotional support.

  15. Caregiving and Its Resulting Effects—The Care Study to Evaluate the Effects of Caregiving on Caregivers of Patients with Advanced Cancer in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Kai Ting Chua

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Informal caregivers (IC are key to enabling home deaths, where preferred, at the end-of-life. Significant morbidity from advanced cancer can make caregiving burdensome. However, knowledge about the nature of the caregiving burden for caregivers in Singapore is limited. Hence, the key objective in this study was to examine the impact of the caregiving burden on quality of life (QOL, mental health and work capacity among local ICs. Eligible English-speaking ICs of hospitalized advanced cancer patients were recruited through non-random sampling. The Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI, Caregiver Quality of Life Index—Cancer (CQOLC, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale—Revised (CESD-R, and Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire (WPAI were interviewer-administered to eligible ICs. Altogether, 16 ICs were surveyed. The mean age of ICs was 43.8 years. Most were children of patients (43.8%, and eight ICs had high burden (ZBI > 17. Those with ZBI > 17 had lower QOL, higher depression scores as well as greater work and activity impairment. In conclusion, high caregiver burden has adverse effects on QOL, mental health and work productivity. Non-physical elements of caregiving (particularly financial and decision-making and increased number of care roles undertaken by a single IC contribute to high burden. Future interventions for caregiving burden in Singapore should also address the financial and decision-making aspects of caregiving. Outsourcing selected aspects of the caregiving role to community services may reduce the number of caregiving aspects undertaken by a single IC and caregiver burden.

  16. Caregiving and Its Resulting Effects-The Care Study to Evaluate the Effects of Caregiving on Caregivers of Patients with Advanced Cancer in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Cheryl Kai Ting; Wu, Jun Tian; Wong, Yin Yee; Qu, Limin; Tan, Yung Ying; Neo, Patricia Soek Hui; Pang, Grace Suyin

    2016-11-15

    Informal caregivers (IC) are key to enabling home deaths, where preferred, at the end-of-life. Significant morbidity from advanced cancer can make caregiving burdensome. However, knowledge about the nature of the caregiving burden for caregivers in Singapore is limited. Hence, the key objective in this study was to examine the impact of the caregiving burden on quality of life (QOL), mental health and work capacity among local ICs. Eligible English-speaking ICs of hospitalized advanced cancer patients were recruited through non-random sampling. The Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI), Caregiver Quality of Life Index-Cancer (CQOLC), Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale-Revised (CESD-R), and Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire (WPAI) were interviewer-administered to eligible ICs. Altogether, 16 ICs were surveyed. The mean age of ICs was 43.8 years. Most were children of patients (43.8%), and eight ICs had high burden (ZBI > 17). Those with ZBI > 17 had lower QOL, higher depression scores as well as greater work and activity impairment. In conclusion, high caregiver burden has adverse effects on QOL, mental health and work productivity. Non-physical elements of caregiving (particularly financial and decision-making) and increased number of care roles undertaken by a single IC contribute to high burden. Future interventions for caregiving burden in Singapore should also address the financial and decision-making aspects of caregiving. Outsourcing selected aspects of the caregiving role to community services may reduce the number of caregiving aspects undertaken by a single IC and caregiver burden.

  17. Psychometric properties of the Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview administered to caregivers to patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a Rasch analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfeldt, Erik; Mayhew, Anna; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Katharine; Lochmüller, Hanns; Lindgren, Peter

    2017-12-18

    To explore the psychometric properties of the full 22-item English (UK and US) version of the Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview administered to caregivers to patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Caregivers to patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy from the United Kingdom and the United States, recruited through the TREAT-NMD network, completed the Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview online. The psychometric properties of the Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview were examined using Rasch analysis. A total of 475 caregivers completed the Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview. Model misfit was identified for 9 of 22 items (mean item fit residual 0.061, SD: 2.736) and 13 of 22 items displayed disordered thresholds. The overall item-trait interaction chi-square value was 499 (198 degrees of freedom, p Interview fails to fully operationalize a quantitative conceptualization of caregiver burden among caregivers to patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy from the United Kingdom and the United States. Further research is needed to understand the psychometric properties of the Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview in other populations and settings. Implications for Rehabilitation Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a terminal disease characterized by progressive muscle degeneration resulting in substantial disability and a significant burden on family caregivers. The Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview is one of the most widely applied measures of caregiver burden. Our Rasch analysis suggests that the Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview is not fit for purpose to measure burden in UK and US caregivers to patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Clinicians and decision-makers should interpret Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview data from these populations with caution.

  18. The Impact of Respite Programming on Caregiver Resilience in Dementia Care: A Qualitative Examination of Family Caregiver Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Emily; Struckmeyer, Kristopher M.

    2018-01-01

    Family members with a relative with dementia often experience what has been called the “unexpected career of caregiver” and face multifaceted, complex, and stressful life situations that can have important consequences. This exploratory study was designed to address this major public health challenge through the lens of caregiver resilience and caregiver respite programming. While many caregivers report that they derive significant emotional and spiritual rewards from their caregiving role, m...

  19. Effect of Caregiver Family Status on Care Recipient Symptom Severity and Caregiver Stress at Nursing Home Intake

    OpenAIRE

    Paulson, Daniel; Lichtenberg, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    The present research investigates differences between primary informal caregivers who were in the care recipient’s immediate family (adult children or spouses) versus those primary caregivers who were outside the immediate family. Measurement occurred at the time of admission of the care recipient to an urban nursing home. We hypothesized that immediate family caregivers would report greater behavioral disturbance among care recipients and increased caregiver depression and stress. Data were ...

  20. Family caregiving for older adults : gendered roles and caregiver burden in emigrant households of Kerala, India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ugargol, Allen Prabhaker; Bailey, Ajay

    2018-01-01

    The Indian state of Kerala leads the demographic transition and characteristically showcases emigration of predominantly male adult children, leaving behind parents, spouses and children. When men emigrate, gendered contexts burden women, especially spouses and daughters-in-law, with caregiving

  1. Resilience in caregivers of persons with Alzheimer's disease: A human condition to overcome caregiver vulnerability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardino Fernández-Calvo

    Full Text Available Abstract In general, the experience of providing assistance to and dealing with the complications experienced by a person with Alzheimer's disease puts caregivers in a situation of high risk, vulnerability, and stress, causing serious physical and emotional problems. However, some caregivers adopt a resilient mindset, which helps them to experience and express positive feelings as well as lower their burden in relation to the care. This positive experience occurs because caregivers perceive the process of caring as less adverse. They face the situation of care with a more positive mindset and are able to resist and maintain adaptive functioning. The objective of the present narrative literature review was to emphasize the need to develop intervention programs for caregivers based on salutogenic models of resilience, resistance, and personal growth to promote positive individual, family, and community resources.

  2. Caregiving burden and depression in paid caregivers of hospitalized patients: a pilot study in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Dan Liang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caregiving burden and depression in family caregivers have been investigated, but little is known about how they affect paid caregivers. The aim of this study was to investigate caregiving burden and depression in paid caregivers of hospitalized patients. Methods A cross-sectional survey study was conducted in a tertiary referral hospital (Chengdu, China that enrolled 108 paid caregivers who worked in the inpatient department. The Caregiver Burden Inventory (CBI and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D scale were incorporated into a self-developed questionnaire to gather demographic information on the following four aspects: general, work, income, and family. Results The mean total CBI score was 29.7 ± 12.5. The time-dependence burden had the highest score of 15.3 ± 4.0, which was followed by the physical burden score of 6.5 ± 4.6, developmental burden score of 3.7 ± 4.0, social burden score of 3.2 ± 4.0, and emotional burden score of 2.4 ± 3.1. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that a higher CBI was associated with a longer time as a paid caregiver [β=7.041, 95% Confidence Interval (CI:1.935 to 12.974, p = 0.009], lower income satisfaction (β= − 6.573, 95% CI: -11.248 to −3.020, p = 0.001, and higher frequency of meeting with their relatives (β=7.125, 95% CI: 2.019 to 12.456, p = 0.006. The mean CES-D score was 11.9 ± 8.7, and significant depression was found in 28 (25.9% paid caregivers according to the CES-D score ≥ 16 cut-off. There was a moderate positive correlation between the CBI and CES-D scores (Pearson’s r = 0.452, p < 0.001. Conclusions A high caregiving burden was commonly observed in paid caregivers of hospitalized patients in China, as was a high prevalence of depression symptoms. Several associated factors were identified that could be areas for future interventions.

  3. A Program for Caregivers in the Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll-Dayton, Berit; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Four demonstration sites offered educational seminar series to employed caregivers, followed by choice of service options (care planning, support group, buddy system). Increase in absenteeism and knowledge of aging services was associated with attendance at seminars. Among service options, only care planning and support groups were used by…

  4. Caregiver psychoeducation for schizophrenia: is gender important?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McWilliams, Stephen

    2007-07-01

    Females care for individuals with chronic illness more commonly than males and have different attitudes to illness. Additionally, they experience greater burden and reduced quality of life, when compared to their male counterparts. Since knowledge has been shown to be related to burden, we sought to determine whether there were gender differences in knowledge acquisition during a six-week caregiver psychoeducation programme (CPP).

  5. Self-care for the caregiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radziewicz, R M

    2001-12-01

    Palliative care nurses can face unique stressors and compassion fatigue working in their field. Working with the dying and their families, communicating with other health care professionals, and handling ethical issues are often sources of stress in palliative care. The biochemistry and theory of stress are discussed. Various strategies to cope with caregiver stress are explained.

  6. Family Caregiver Research and the HIPAA Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Steven M.; Levine, Carol

    2005-01-01

    Research in family caregiving recently has become more challenging because of the strict protection of privacy mandated in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996. We ask when should Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) follow HIPAA rules to the letter and when might they use the waiver option? What is the appropriate…

  7. Families with Special Needs: Caregiving Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Look for memorable events and achievements to honor family members with special needs. Take care of yourself. Stay healthy for yourself and those you care for. Work to maintain your personal interests, hobbies, and friendships. Balance is key. Set reasonable expectations about caregiving. This ...

  8. Protecting the Health of Family Caregivers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-12-23

    This podcast discusses role of family caregivers and the importance of protecting their health. It is primarily targeted to public health and aging services professionals.  Created: 12/23/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/23/2009.

  9. Caregiving process and caregiver burden: Conceptual models to guide research and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brehaut Jamie

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parental care for a child with a developmental disability is an enormous responsibility, one that can far exceed that of typical parental care. While most parents adapt well to the situation of caring for a child with a disability, some do not. To understand parents' adaptations to their children's disabilities, the complex nature of stress processes must be accounted for and the constructs and factors that play a role in the caregiving must be considered. Discussion Evidence suggests that there is considerable variation in how caregivers adapt to their caregiving demands. Many studies have sought to qualify the association between caregiving and health outcomes of the caregivers. Contextual factors such as SES, child factors such as child behaviour problems and severity of disability, intra-psychic factors such as mastery and self-esteem, coping strategies and social supports have all been associated with psychological and/or physical outcome or parents or primary caregivers. In reviewing these issues, the literature appears to be limited by the use of traditional analytic approaches which examine the relationship between a factor and an outcome. It is clear, however, that changes to single factors, as represented in these studies, occur very rarely even in the experimental context. The literature has also been limited by lack of reliance on specific theoretical frameworks. Summary This conceptual paper documents the state of current knowledge and explores the current theoretical frameworks that have been used to describe the caregiving process from two diverse fields, pediatrics and geriatrics. Integration of these models into one comprehensive model suitable for this population of children with disabilities and their caregivers is proposed. This model may guide future research in this area.

  10. Caregiving process and caregiver burden: Conceptual models to guide research and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, Parminder; O'Donnell, Maureen; Schwellnus, Heidi; Rosenbaum, Peter; King, Gillian; Brehaut, Jamie; Russell, Dianne; Swinton, Marilyn; King, Susanne; Wong, Micheline; Walter, Stephen D; Wood, Ellen

    2004-01-01

    Background Parental care for a child with a developmental disability is an enormous responsibility, one that can far exceed that of typical parental care. While most parents adapt well to the situation of caring for a child with a disability, some do not. To understand parents' adaptations to their children's disabilities, the complex nature of stress processes must be accounted for and the constructs and factors that play a role in the caregiving must be considered. Discussion Evidence suggests that there is considerable variation in how caregivers adapt to their caregiving demands. Many studies have sought to qualify the association between caregiving and health outcomes of the caregivers. Contextual factors such as SES, child factors such as child behaviour problems and severity of disability, intra-psychic factors such as mastery and self-esteem, coping strategies and social supports have all been associated with psychological and/or physical outcome or parents or primary caregivers. In reviewing these issues, the literature appears to be limited by the use of traditional analytic approaches which examine the relationship between a factor and an outcome. It is clear, however, that changes to single factors, as represented in these studies, occur very rarely even in the experimental context. The literature has also been limited by lack of reliance on specific theoretical frameworks. Summary This conceptual paper documents the state of current knowledge and explores the current theoretical frameworks that have been used to describe the caregiving process from two diverse fields, pediatrics and geriatrics. Integration of these models into one comprehensive model suitable for this population of children with disabilities and their caregivers is proposed. This model may guide future research in this area. PMID:14723791

  11. Validation of the Caregiver Guilt Questionnaire (CGQ) in a sample of British dementia caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Louise; Laidlaw, Ken; Gillanders, David; Quinn, Kathryn

    2013-12-01

    Depression is well documented as a key outcome variable for dementia caregivers; however, guilt has been under-researched, which may be in part due to the lack of an appropriate measure. The Caregiver Guilt Questionnaire (CGQ) was originally developed and piloted with a Spanish population but has not yet been tested in an English-speaking population. A cross-sectional postal survey was undertaken with a sample of 221 dementia caregivers in the UK, as part of a larger study of dementia caregiver outcome measures. The five-factor structure identified for the CGQ in the Spanish sample was replicated in this study. The five factors, "guilt about doing wrong by the care recipient," "guilt about failing to meet the challenges of caregiving," 'guilt over experience of negative emotions in relation to caregiving," "guilt about self-care," and "guilt about neglecting other relatives" accounted for 60% of the variance. Internal consistencies for the whole scale and factors were acceptable, and convergent validity was established with the Zarit Burden Interview guilt factor. A higher score on the CGQ was associated with a higher score on the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CES-D) and a new cut-off score of 22 was established, which predicted a clinical score on the CES-D with 80.0% sensitivity and 61.5% specificity. The replication of the five-factor structure suggests that these are relevant themes within the feelings of guilt to both Hispanic and British dementia caregivers. The CGQ has been demonstrated to be a valid measure for use with British dementia caregivers and is likely to be of use in clinical and research settings.

  12. Caregiver experiences and perceptions of stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Thomas

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing prevalence of people in developing countries who suffer strokes, the long-term care of people who have had a stroke and who are living with disabilities has substantial consequences for caregivers and their respective families. As the caregiver plays a pivotal role in the rehabilitation of the people who have had a stroke, the objectives of this study constitute an investigation into the complexities of caregiving, including both perceptions and experiences of the healthcare system. Semi-structured interviews were utilised to elicit post-stroke experiences of six caregivers. The challenge the South African context adds to these experiences was probed. The data were analysed qualitatively by thematic and content analysis. Prominent themes associated with caregiving included: role changes and relationship disruptions within the family, occupational and social implications, fatigue, anxiety, depression, loneliness, frustration as well as financial problems. Caregiver experiences were exacerbated by the inadequate support structures available. The results are interpreted within a biopsychosocial approach, concluding with the concerns raised by caregivers on the support they require from the healthcare system in order to provide home-based care. Opsomming Met die toenemende voorkoms van beroerte in ontwikkelende lande bring die langdurige versorging van pasiënte met gestremdheid beduidende gevolge vir sorggewers en hulle onderskeie gesinne mee. Aangesien die sorggewer ‘n sleutelrol in die rehabilitasie van die beroertepasiënt speel, behels die doelstellings van hierdie studie ‘n ondersoek na die verwikkeldhede van versorging, wat sowel persepsies as ondervinding van die gesondheidsorgstelsel insluit. Semi- gestruktureerde onderhoude is aangewend om die na-beroerte ondervindings van ses sorggewers te peil. Die uitdaging wat die Suid- Afrikaanse konteks tot hierdie ondervindings meebring is ondersoek. Die data is kwalitatief

  13. The emotional impact of psychiatric symptoms in dementia on partner caregivers: do caregiver, patient, and situation characteristics make a difference?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meiland, F.J.M.; Kat, M.G.; van Tilburg, W.; Jonker, C.; Dr�es, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the emotional impact of psychiatric symptoms of patients with dementia on their caregiving partners, and to explore if caregiver, patient, and situation factors predict this emotional impact on caregivers. A cross-sectional design was used. Partners of patients with

  14. Caregiver burden in Alzheimer's disease: Moderation effects of social support and mediation effects of positive aspects of caregiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhixin; Ma, Caiyun; Han, Hongjuan; He, Runlian; Zhou, Liye; Liang, Ruifeng; Yu, Hongmei

    2018-06-01

    Although there are many studies on the relationship between patient-related factors and negative caregiver outcomes, the specifics of this relationship are poorly understood. We aimed to examine whether caregiver social support moderated the relationship between patient factors and negative outcomes for caregivers of community-dwelling older adults with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and whether positive aspects of caregiving mediated this relationship. We conducted a cross-sectional study of patients diagnosed with AD from 2 hospitals and 3 communities in Taiyuan, China, and their caregivers. Latent moderated structural equations and the bias-corrected percentile bootstrap method were used to estimate the parameters of moderating and mediating effects, respectively. Social support significantly moderated the effects of AD patient cognitive function (P mediated the association between patient depression and caregiver burden (P = 0.006), caregiver anxiety (P = 0.007), and caregiver depression (P = 0.034). The findings identify social support as a moderator and positive aspects of caregiving as a mediator of the relationship between patient-related factors and negative caregiver outcomes. The results suggest that health care providers must offer more effective social support for caregivers. In addition, prompt identification of patient and caregiver emotional states could help to improve quality of life. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. The predictive factors for perceived social support among cancer patients and caregiver burden of their family caregivers in Turkish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oven Ustaalioglu, Basak; Acar, Ezgi; Caliskan, Mecit

    2018-03-01

    We aimed to identify the predictive factors for the perceived family social support among cancer patients and caregiver burden of their family caregivers. Participants were 302 cancer patients and their family caregivers. Family social support scale was used for cancer patients, burden interview was used for family caregivers.All subjects also completed Beck depression invantery. The related socio-demographical factors with perceived social support (PSS) and caregiver burden were evaluated by correlation analysis. To find independent factors predicting caregiver burden and PSS, logistic regression analysis were conducted. Depression scores was higher among patients than their family caregivers (12.5 vs. 8). PSS was lower in depressed patients (p Family caregiver burden were also higher in depressive groups (p family caregiver role was negatively correlated (p caregiver burden. Presence of depression was the independent predictor for both, lower PSS for patients and higher burden for caregivers. The results of this study is noteworthy because it may help for planning any supportive care program not only for patients but together with their caregiver at the same time during chemotherapy period in Turkish population.

  16. Certified Nursing Assistants Balancing Family Caregiving Roles: Health Care Utilization Among Double- and Triple-Duty Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePasquale, Nicole; Bangerter, Lauren R; Williams, Jessica; Almeida, David M

    2016-12-01

    This study examines how certified nursing assistants (CNAs) balancing family caregiving roles-child care (double-duty child caregivers), elder care (double-duty elder caregivers), and both child and elder care (triple-duty caregivers)-utilize health care services relative to nonfamily caregiving counterparts (formal-only caregivers). A sample of 884 CNAs from the Work, Family and Health Study was drawn on to assess the number of acute care (i.e., emergency room or urgent care facility) and other health care (i.e., outpatient treatment or counseling) visits made during the past 6 months. Double-duty elder and triple-duty caregivers had higher acute care utilization rates than formal-only caregivers. CNAs with and without family caregiving roles had similar rates of other health care visits. CNAs providing informal care for older adults have higher acute care visit rates. Given the increasing need for family caregivers and the vital importance of the health of the nursing workforce for the health of others, future research on how double- and triple-duty caregivers maintain their health amidst constant caregiving should be a priority. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Reducing the distance in distance-caregiving by technology innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazelle E Benefield

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Lazelle E Benefield1, Cornelia Beck21College of Nursing, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA; 2Pat & Willard Walker Family Memory Research Center, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USAAbstract: Family caregivers are responsible for the home care of over 34 million older adults in the United States. For many, the elder family member lives more than an hour’s distance away. Distance caregiving is a growing alternative to more familiar models where: 1 the elder and the family caregiver(s may reside in the same household; or 2 the family caregiver may live nearby but not in the same household as the elder. The distance caregiving model involves elders and their family caregivers who live at some distance, defined as more than a 60-minute commute, from one another. Evidence suggests that distance caregiving is a distinct phenomenon, differs substantially from on-site family caregiving, and requires additional assistance to support the physical, social, and contextual dimensions of the caregiving process. Technology-based assists could virtually connect the caregiver and elder and provide strong support that addresses the elder’s physical, social, cognitive, and/or sensory impairments. Therefore, in today’s era of high technology, it is surprising that so few affordable innovations are being marketed for distance caregiving. This article addresses distance caregiving, proposes the use of technology innovation to support caregiving, and suggests a research agenda to better inform policy decisions related to the unique needs of this situation.Keywords: caregiving, family, distance, technology, elders

  18. Transnational caregiving: Part 1, caring for family relations across nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, V Erica

    2011-01-01

    This article concerns how globalization and the aging of the world's population are affecting the already complex issue of intergenerational transnational caregiving. Globalization has caused an increase in workforce mobility with large numbers of individuals seeking employment overseas. This, coupled with increased longevity globally, has resulted in many workers leaving their elderly parents in need of care in their home countries. This has spawned caregiving across national borders, or caring for family relations across nations. Currently in the United States, not enough emphasis is given to family caregiving. Data compiled by AARP and the National Alliance for Caregiving estimate the economic value for this group of family caregivers in 2007 to be $375 billion, accounting for 34-52 million family caregivers per given year. This does not include those families who are transnational caregivers. The seminal work in this emerging field has been done by social anthropologists Loretta Baldassar, Cora Velekoop Baldock, and Raelene Wilding, who have defined the components of transnational caregiving based on an ethnographic study using qualitative data to study nine immigrant communities in Western Australia. Although their research focused on caregiving from a distance, additional work has been added to the discussion by introducing the element of "care drain" and further cultural perspectives. Therefore, this research is an exploratory study on intergenerational transnational caregiving within the context of the changing world and its demographics. Within the context of globalization and global aging, the following questions are addressed: What is the significance of family caregiving? What is a transnational? How has technology changed "transnationalism" today? What are the elements that comprise transnational caregiving? How does culture play a role in transnational caregiving? What are some of the national initiatives undertaken by governments to aid in workforce

  19. Family caregivers of patients with frontotemporal dementia: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceres, Billy A; Frank, Mayu O; Jun, Jin; Martelly, Melissa T; Sadarangani, Tina; de Sales, Paloma Cesar

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this integrative review is to: (1) identify the characteristics of family caregivers of patients with frontotemporal dementia, (2) explore the impact of providing care on family caregivers' health and well-being, and (3) identify coping strategies used by family caregivers. Frontotemporal dementia is thought to be the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimer's disease. Family caregivers of patients with frontotemporal dementia face unique challenges due to its early onset, behavioral symptoms, and slow progression of decline. However, there is a dearth of research evaluating the health and wellbeing of family caregivers of patients with frontotemporal dementia. An integrative review was conducted using the Whittemore and Knafl methodology. An electronic search of the literature was conducted using four electronic databases: PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and Web of Science. The Crowe Critical Appraisal tool was used to evaluate the quality of the selected articles. Findings of 11 articles informed this integrative review. Family caregivers of patients with frontotemporal dementia identify behavioral disturbances as most troubling. Spouses and female caregivers experience greater caregiver burden, distress, increased rates of depression, as well as decreased sleep related to behavior disturbances. Though less explored, providing care to those with behavioral disturbances may also impact caregiver physical health. Additionally, female caregivers are most likely to employ coping strategies, most commonly, adaptation and reframing. Effective interventions to reduce family caregiver burden are poorly understood but family caregivers suggest education and internet-based support groups are most helpful. Family caregivers of patients with frontotemporal dementia experience significant distress, which impacts their health and wellbeing. It is important for healthcare providers who care for patients with frontotemporal dementia to recognize the unique

  20. Informal and Formal Social Support and Caregiver Burden: The AGES Caregiver Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Koichiro; Kondo, Naoki; Kondo, Katsunori

    2016-01-01

    Background We examined the associations of informal (eg, family members and friends) and formal (eg, physician and visiting nurses) social support with caregiver’s burden in long-term care and the relationship between the number of available sources of social support and caregiver burden. Methods We conducted a mail-in survey in 2003 and used data of 2998 main caregivers of frail older adults in Aichi, Japan. We used a validated scale to assess caregiver burden. Results Multiple linear regression demonstrated that, after controlling for caregivers’ sociodemographic and other characteristics, informal social support was significantly associated with lower caregiver burden (β = −1.59, P support was not (β = −0.30, P = 0.39). Evaluating the associations by specific sources of social support, informal social supports from the caregiver’s family living together (β = −0.71, P social support was associated with lower caregiver burden only if it was from family physicians (β = −0.56, P = 0.001). Compared to caregivers without informal support, those who had one support (β = −1.62, P supports (β = −1.55, P support. Conclusions Social support from intimate social relationships may positively affect caregivers’ psychological wellbeing independent of the receipt of formal social support, resulting in less burden. PMID:27180934

  1. Caregiver Stress and Mental Health: Impact of Caregiving Relationship and Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penning, Margaret J; Wu, Zheng

    2016-12-01

    This study compared the stress and mental health implications of caregiving to a spouse, children, siblings, other family members, friends, and others among middle-aged and older male and female caregivers. Multivariate regression analyses were conducted using 2007 Canadian General Social Survey data collected on a subsample of caregivers aged 45 and older. Our analyses revealed that for women, caring for a spouse or children was more stressful and detrimental to mental health than caring for parents or others. Similarly, for men, caring for a spouse and for children was more stressful than caring for others but did not adversely affect overall mental health. The findings suggest that spousal and child caregiving tend to be more rather than less stressful and detrimental to middle-aged and older caregivers' mental health than is caregiving to most others but that gender differences need to be considered. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Persona Development and Educational Needs to Support Informal Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Awar, Zeina; Kuziemsky, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Informal caregivers are playing an increasing role in community based care delivery. Research is needed that looks at the educational needs of informal caregivers as a precursor to HIT design to support community care delivery. A challenge is informal caregivers have very diverse educational needs. Personas are an approach to describe user characteristics as part of systems design and this approach could be used to understand and categorize the various educational needs of informal caregivers. This paper addresses this research need and provides a method for persona development and the identification of educational needs for informal caregivers.

  3. A caregiver educational program improves quality of life and burden for cancer patients and their caregivers: a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgacem, Bénédicte; Auclair, Candy; Fedor, Marie-Christine; Brugnon, David; Blanquet, Marie; Tournilhac, Olivier; Gerbaud, Laurent

    2013-12-01

    The French setting, including laws and guidelines, advocates greater involvement of informal caregivers in the care of cancer patients to protect the caregivers from depression, distress, and a decrease in their quality of life. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a caregiver educational programme by measuring two outcomes: patients' and caregivers' quality of life and caregivers' burden. A multicentre randomised controlled trial was performed in six oncology wards in French hospitals. Eligible patients had a cancer, a main caregiver, allowed their caregivers' involvement, and received an inclusion agreement by a doctor/psychologist dyad. The experimental group participated in an educational programme performed by nurses to improve their skills in meal support, nursing care, welfare care, or symptom management. The SF36 and the Zarit burden scales were used to measure quality of life and caregivers' burden at the beginning and at the end of the study. 67 patients were randomised and 33 were included in the experimental group. Evolution scores, which measured the difference between baseline and final scores, showed an improvement in patients' and caregivers' quality of life and an alleviated burden for experimental group caregivers. An educational programme for caregivers encourages the involvement of patients, informal caregivers and health-care providers in a triangular relationship which enhances the quality of life of patients and caregivers alike and decreases caregivers' burden. Care organisation should therefore be rethought as a triangular relationship between patients, caregivers and health-care providers, with nurses as the mainstay. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of older men's caregiving roles for wives with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström, Ingrid; Håkanson, Cecilia; Eriksson, Henrik; Sandberg, Jonas

    2017-12-01

    This secondary analysis of qualitative interviews describes how older Swedish men approach the caregiver role for a wife with dementia, over time. An increasing number of male caregivers will become primary caregivers for partners living with dementia at home, and they will likely be caregivers for an extended period of time. It has been stated that caregiving experiences influence how older men think of themselves. The theoretical starting point is a constructivist position, offering an understanding of older caregiving men's constructions and reconstructions of themselves and their caregiver roles. Seven men, who were cohabiting with their wives, were interviewed on up to five occasions at home during a 5- to 6-year period. The findings comprise three themes; me and it, me despite it, it is me, depict how these men gradually take on and normalise the caregiving tasks, and how they develop and internalise a language based on their caring activities. The results provide understanding about the relationship between men as caregivers and how this influences them as individuals. By careful attention to each caregiving man's individual needs rather than making gendered assumptions about men and caring, the aim of the caregiver support for men might best target men's own meaning to the caring in their the everyday practices. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  5. Impact of Noncaregiving-Related Stressors on Informal Caregiver Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austrom, Mary Guerriero; Lu, Yvonne Yueh-Feng; Perkins, Anthony J; Boustani, Malaz; Callahan, Christopher M; Hendrie, Hugh C

    2014-08-01

    Caregivers of persons with dementia are stressed. Stressors not related to care recipients' needs impact caregiver outcomes, yet are seldom reported. The purpose of this study was to report the most stressful events experienced by spouse caregivers of older adults with Alzheimer s disease during a 6-month period. 31 caregivers completed the Most Stressful Event form, Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Revised Memory Behavioral Problem Checklist (R-MBPC). Fisher's exact test and two-sample t-test were used to compare Most Stressful Events between caregivers. ANOVA model tested whether the PHQ-9 and R-MBPC subscales differed by stressor. Caregivers reported no stressors 21.5% of the time, 1-2 stressors 25% of the time, and 3 stressors 53% of the time with 318 stressors reported in total. Care recipient needs (30.2%), caregiver needs (26.7%), and decision-making (16.7%) were the most frequently reported stressors. Using a mixed effects model, there were associations between the Most Stressful Events and depression (p = 0.016), mobility (p = 0.024) and caregiver issues (p = 0.009) subscales of R-MBPC. Results can be used to develop targeted intervention and support strategies for spouse caregivers experiencing non-caregiving related stressorsas well as the traditional challenges with caregiving related issues. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Potentially preventable hospitalizations in dementia: family caregiver experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadak, Tatiana; Foster Zdon, Susan; Ishado, Emily; Zaslavsky, Oleg; Borson, Soo

    2017-07-01

    Health crises in persons living with dementia challenge their caregivers to make pivotal decisions, often under pressure, and to act in new ways on behalf of their care recipient. Disruption of everyday routines and heightened stress are familiar consequences of these events. Hospitalization for acute illness or injury is a familiar health crisis in dementia. The focus of this study is to describe the lived experience of dementia family caregivers whose care recipients had a recent unplanned admission, and to identify potential opportunities for developing preventive interventions. Family caregivers (n = 20) of people with dementia who experienced a recent hospitalization due to an ambulatory care sensitive condition or fall-related injury completed phone interviews. Interviews used semi-structured protocols to elicit caregivers' reactions to the hospitalization and recollections of the events leading up to it. Analysis of interview data identified four major themes: (1) caregiver is uncertain how to interpret and act on the change; (2) caregiver is unable to provide necessary care; (3) caregiver experiences a personal crisis in response to the patient's health event; (4) mitigating factors may prevent caregiver crises. This study identifies a need for clinicians and family caregivers to work together to avoid health crises of both caregivers and people with dementia and to enable caregivers to manage the health of their care recipients without sacrificing their own health and wellness.

  7. Commitment to personal values and guilt feelings in dementia caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Alberto, Laura; Losada, Andrés; Márquez-González, María; Romero-Moreno, Rosa; Vara, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Caregivers' commitment to personal values is linked to caregivers' well-being, although the effects of personal values on caregivers' guilt have not been explored to date. The goal of this study is to analyze the relationship between caregivers´ commitment to personal values and guilt feelings. Participants were 179 dementia family caregivers. Face-to-face interviews were carried out to describe sociodemographic variables and assess stressors, caregivers' commitment to personal values and guilt feelings. Commitment to values was conceptualized as two factors (commitment to own values and commitment to family values) and 12 specific individual values (e.g. education, family or caregiving role). Hierarchical regressions were performed controlling for sociodemographic variables and stressors, and introducing the two commitment factors (in a first regression) or the commitment to individual/specific values (in a second regression) as predictors of guilt. In terms of the commitment to values factors, the analyzed regression model explained 21% of the variance of guilt feelings. Only the factor commitment to family values contributed significantly to the model, explaining 7% of variance. With regard to the regression analyzing the contribution of specific values to caregivers' guilt, commitment to the caregiving role and with leisure contributed negatively and significantly to the explanation of caregivers' guilt. Commitment to work contributed positively to guilt feelings. The full model explained 30% of guilt feelings variance. The specific values explained 16% of the variance. Our findings suggest that commitment to personal values is a relevant variable to understand guilt feelings in caregivers.

  8. Sex disparities in access to caregiving in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahodwala, Nabila; Shah, Krunal; He, Ying; Wu, Samuel S; Schmidt, Peter; Cubillos, Fernando; Willis, Allison W

    2018-01-02

    To compare access to caregiving between men and women with Parkinson disease (PD). This was a cross-sectional and longitudinal study among participants with PD enrolled in the National Parkinson Foundation Parkinson's Outcomes Project from 2009 to 2014 at 21 international sites. The primary outcome measures were presence of a caregiver at the baseline visit, caregiver burden as measured by the Multidimensional Caregiver Strain Index (MCSI) at baseline, and time to first paid caregiver. A total of 7,209 participants (63% men, 37% women) with PD were evaluated. Men had a mean age of 66.0 (SD 9.8) years, and women had a mean age of 66.9 (SD 9.7) years. More men than women had a caregiver (88.4% vs 79.4%, p men reported greater strain than those of women (MCSI score 19.9 vs 16.4, p women compared to men (odds ratio 0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.67-0.86), and women had a faster rate to using a paid caregiver than men (hazard ratio 1.76, 95% CI 1.35-2.28) after controlling for potential confounders. Informal caregiving resources are lower for women than men with PD, despite the finding that their caregivers report less strain than those of men. In addition, women are more likely to use formal, paid caregivers. Strategies to improve access to caregiving, particularly for women, are needed. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Quality of life in family caregivers of schizophrenia patients in Spain: caregiver characteristics, caregiving burden, family functioning, and social and professional support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribé, José M; Salamero, Manel; Pérez-Testor, Carles; Mercadal, Josep; Aguilera, Concepción; Cleris, Margarida

    2018-03-01

    Caregivers experience physical and mental stress that ends up lowering their quality of life (QoL). Our goal was to research (a) the level of caregivers QoL; (b) the relationships between the demographic characteristics of the caregivers, their caregiving burden, their family functioning, their social and professional support and their QoL and (c) the best predictors of caregivers QoL. 100 key caregivers (70% parents, 8% spouses, 17% siblings and 5% children) were studied using the world health organization quality of life-Bref (WHOQOL-BREF) to research their QoL, the Zarit Scale to assess their perception of their caregiving burden, the Social Network Questionnaire to examine their social support, the Family APGAR to assess the satisfaction with social support from the family and a professional support scale (Escala de Apoyo Profesional) to determine the professional support received by caregivers was performed. Scores on the WHOQOL-BREF in the Physical, Psychological, Social and Environment domains were 15.0 (SD = 3.7), 13.3 (SD = 4.2), 11.0 (SD = 4.7) and 13.5 (SD = 3.1), respectively. Through bivariate analysis, the dimensions that showed a positive significant association with QoL were being a young male caregiver who was a working father with a high educational level and help from other family members. Caregivers of patients who were older and had a later onset of the illness, a lower score on the Zarit Scale and a high score on the Social Network Questionnaire, Family APGAR and Escala de Apoyo Profesional showed higher QoL. Many of these variables made a unique contribution in the multivariate analysis. There is a significant association between the caregiver's burden and their QoL. Regression analysis showed that the best predictors of QoL were caregiving burden, social support and professional support.

  10. Perceived Stress in Family Caregivers of Individuals With Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masa'Deh, Rami

    2017-06-01

    The current study aimed to measure the stress levels of family caregivers of individuals with mental illness and compare their stress levels according to the diagnosis and other sociodemographic characteristics. The sample comprised 310 family caregivers of individuals with mental illness in Jordan. Family caregivers completed a demographic checklist and the Arabic version of the Perceived Stress Scale 10-Item (PSS-10) questionnaire. A significant difference was found in PSS-10 levels among family caregivers according to gender, diagnosis of their family member, and time since diagnosis. Female caregivers reported significantly higher stress levels than male caregivers. Family members of individuals with schizophrenia reported the highest stress levels (p family caregivers and time since diagnosis. Investigating stress levels in family members of individuals with mental illness may be helpful when designing interventions to reduce such stress. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(6), 30-35.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Cross-cultural caregiving and the temporal dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escandon, Socorro

    2013-11-01

    The caregiving research literature has explored and documented findings from psychological, clinical, and policy/program perspectives, but little is known regarding the contextual perspectives of caregiving. Temporal factors influence the structure and functioning of the caregiving family. The proposed paradigm adaptation extends a contextual perspective that addresses the exploration of the caregiving process as a temporal, dynamic, progressive process over time, in which decisions made by caregivers may not always be based on observable tasks but, nevertheless, may have important consequences. When cultures cross, attitudes and behaviors are modified, resulting from contact with a different set of values and beliefs. Cross-cultural research aims to explore these changes that take place over time. Future research should consider the inclusion of measures that assess the temporal aspect of caregiving and the acculturation considerations of family caregivers. These measures are especially needed because of the increased influence of international migration, economic globalization, and political conflicts in today's multicultural societies.

  12. An Exploration of Volition: Caregiver Perceptions of Persons with Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Raber, PhD, OTR/L

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to understand what formal caregivers know about the volition of older adults with moderate dementia. A qualitative approach was used at one assisted living facility. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with formal caregivers to gain their perceptions of residents’ volition or motivation for occupation. Volition of resident participants was assessed using the Volitional Questionnaire (VQ. Caregiver interviews and resident VQ’s were analyzed using van Manen’s phenomenological approach to examine their congruence with regard to the volitional abilities of residents. Thematic analysis yielded two broad themes: (a Caregivers possess varying layers of insight regarding the volitional abilities of the older adults with dementia, and (b caregivers develop a script regarding the volitional abilities of the older adults with dementia. Caregivers possess knowledge about volitional abilities of older adults with dementia. Further research is needed to understand how these perceptions affect their care-giving behaviors.

  13. [Ressignification of life of caregivers of elderly patients with cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Anjos, Anna Cláudia Yokoyama; Zago, Márcia Maria Fontão

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to analyze the process of becoming a caregiver of elderly patients with cancer, in chemotherapy, in the home context. This is an exploratory study with theoretical and methodological orientation of interpretative anthropology and ethnographic case study. Data were collected from January to September 2009, with four caregivers through semi-structured interviews, observation and consultation records. With data analysis were built four units of meaning. In this paper 'we are focusing the thematic unity "The ressignification of caregiver's life", composed by positive aspects of caregiving activities and of helping to overcome difficulties, such as union, solidarity, opportunity for reapproximation. The difficulties were more evident, especially being unprepared to care at home, which led to changes in the caregiver's familiar and social relationships, resulting in impairment of physical, emotional and social aspects. The nurse, as an agent of care, must provide adequate qualification to the caregivers, helping them in coping with the disease and improving the patient-caregiver-service relationship.

  14. Acculturation level and caregiver outcomes from a randomized intervention trial to enhance caregivers' health: evidence from REACH II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Oanh L; Liu, Xiaoyan Lucia; Tancredi, Daniel; Ramirez, A Susana; Schulz, Richard; Hinton, Ladson

    2018-06-01

    Latinos comprise a growing segment of the caregiver population and vary widely in acculturation, yet little is known regarding how acculturation might affect caregiver stress or intervention outcomes. This study examined the relationship between acculturation and burden, bother, and depression in Latino dementia caregivers at baseline and following an intervention. This was a secondary data analysis of 211 Latino caregivers of older adults with dementia from Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer's Caregiver Health (REACH) II, a multisite randomized trial of caregiver interventions. Baseline and follow-up data were used to run mixed-effects models examining the main and moderating effect of acculturation on caregiver stress. No significant main effect of acculturation was found for any of the outcome measures, controlling for demographic covariates. Acculturation moderated the effect of the intervention on caregiver burden: those who were more acculturated benefited more from the intervention. Differential acculturation for Latino caregivers was not directly associated with caregiver burden, bother, or depression, but was associated with reducing burden from the intervention. Future research should explore by what mechanism acculturation influences caregiver burden following an intervention.

  15. Caring for frail elders with musculoskeletal conditions and family caregivers' subjective well-being: The role of multidimensional caregiver burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Nan; Liu, Jinyu; Lou, Vivian W Q

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the unique set of correlates of each dimension of the burden experienced by family caregivers of frail elders with musculoskeletal (MSK) conditions in China, and the role of caregiver burden in between caregiver stressors and subjective well-being. The data was derived from a community sample of 494 elder-caregiver dyads from six urban districts of Shanghai (China). The elders were aged 75 or above, needed assistance in activities of daily living (ADL) and had MSK conditions. The family caregivers were these elders' primary caregivers and at the age of 18 or older. Path analysis was used to examine the proposed model. Care recipients' functional health, cognitive status and behavioral problems affected the multiple dimensions of caregiver burden differently. These three stressors also indirectly affected caregivers' subjective well-being through physical, social and developmental burden. The findings highlighted the mediator role of caregiver burden in between caregiver stressors and subjective well-being, which supported burden-as-mediator theory in understanding family caregiving for frail elders with musculoskeletal conditions in a Chinese context. The focus of intervention should be varied according to the levels of the primary stressors. Policy and intervention implications with regard to the ways of helping Chinese families care for their frail elders with MSK conditions were discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The moderating effect of religiosity on caregiving burden and depressive symptoms in caregivers of patients with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Kyung Hee; Moon, Yoo Sun; Lee, Yunhwan; Choi, Seong Hye; Moon, So Young; Seo, Sang Won; Park, Kyung Won; Ku, Bon D; Han, Hyun Jeong; Park, Kee Hyung; Han, Seol-Heui; Kim, Eun-Joo; Lee, Jae-Hong; Park, Sun A; Shim, Yong S; Kim, Jong Hun; Hong, Chang Hyung; Na, Duk L; Ye, Byoung Seok; Kim, Hee Jin; Moon, Yeonsil; Lee, Sang Soo; Kim, Do Hoon

    2018-01-01

    This study explored whether religiosity/spirituality has a protective role against negative caregiving outcomes, in a large multicenter nationwide sample of caregivers of patients with dementia in South Korea. Additionally, this study was the first to examine whether religiosity/spirituality could affect caregiving outcomes according to the various religious affiliations of caregivers. The study was conducted on a sample of 476 caregivers of patients with dementia participated in the Clinical Research Center for Dementia of South Korea (CREDOS). We examined the moderating effect of each of the three dimensions of religiosity/spirituality (organizational religious activity, ORA; non-organizational religious activity, NORA; intrinsic religiosity, IR) on the relationship between activities of daily living (ADL) of patients with dementia and caregiving burden and depressive symptoms of caregivers, using a series of hierarchical regression analyses. In addition, these analyses were conducted according to the religious affiliations of the caregivers. ORA, NORA, and IR of religiosity/spirituality alleviated the effect of ADL of patients on caregiving burden. ORA and IR moderated the relationship between ADL of patients and depressive symptoms of caregivers. These moderating effects of religiosity on caregiving outcomes were different according to various religious groups. We have identified religiosity/spirituality as a protective factor for caregivers of patients with dementia. The sub-dimensions of religiosity as moderators were different by religious affiliations of caregivers. Further studies are needed to investigate the specific religiosity-related factors which could positively impact the mental health of the caregivers of patients with dementia by religions.

  17. Leisure, gender, and kinship in dementia caregiving: psychological vulnerability of caregiving daughters with feelings of guilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Moreno, Rosa; Losada, Andrés; Marquez, María; Laidlaw, Ken; Fernández-Fernández, Virginia; Nogales-González, Celia; López, Javier

    2014-07-01

    The moderator role of guilt on the effect of leisure activities on dementia caregivers' depressive symptoms was analyzed, considering differences by kinship and guilt as a multidimensional construct. Participants were 351 caregivers (58.97% daughters, 10.54% sons, 19.66% wives, and 10.83% husbands). Measures included frequency of leisure activities, depressive symptoms, and guilt (total scale and 5 factors). A moderator role of guilt was found only for daughters. Specifically, significant interactions between guilt and frequency of leisure activities were found for the total scale and for the Factors 1 (guilt about doing wrong by the care recipient), 2 (guilt about failing to meet the challenges of caregiving), and 3 (guilt about self-care). For those daughters who reported lower levels of leisure activities, showing higher levels of guilt was associated with higher scores in depressive symptoms, whereas those with lower levels of guilt showed lower depressive symptoms scores. Feelings of guilt may have different consequences on caregivers' distress depending on caregivers' gender and kinship. Daughters with higher levels of guilt who do not engage in leisure activities may be especially vulnerable to suffering psychological distress. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Psychosocial impact of early onset dementia among caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália R. S. Kimura

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is growing recognition of early onset dementia (EOD as a significant clinical and social problem because of its effects on physical and mental health of people with dementia (PWD and their caregivers. Objective: To analyze the psychosocial impact of EOD in family caregivers. Methods: The study design was qualitative. Nine EOD caregivers (7 women were recruited at a service for Alzheimer's disease and assessed using semi-structured interviews. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyze caregivers' reports. Results: Five themes emerged from the narratives: psychological and emotional impact; physical impact; financial and professional impact; social impact and need for support services. The majority of the caregivers of people with EOD perceived their emotional wellbeing as poor or extremely poor. Carers reported poor physical health, which tends to be longer-lasting than mental health problems. Two caregivers had to retire after the disclosure of the dementia diagnosis, and seven reduced their work loads because they had to look after PWD. Preserving the abilities of PWD is essential to maintain their self-esteem, dignity and sense of utility. For the caregivers, interventions and stimulating activities make PWD feel worthwhile and contribute to improving life. Conclusion: The caregivers of people with EOD assume the role of caregiver prematurely and need to balance this activity with other responsibilities. There is a need for more studies of EOD in order to improve understanding of the impact of this disease and to enable development of adequate services for PWD and their caregivers.

  19. Psychosocial impact of early onset dementia among caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Nathália R S; Maffioletti, Virgínia L R; Santos, Raquel L; Baptista, Maria Alice Tourinho; Dourado, Marcia C N

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition of early onset dementia (EOD) as a significant clinical and social problem because of its effects on physical and mental health of people with dementia (PWD) and their caregivers. To analyze the psychosocial impact of EOD in family caregivers. The study design was qualitative. Nine EOD caregivers (7 women) were recruited at a service for Alzheimer's disease and assessed using semi-structured interviews. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyze caregivers' reports. Five themes emerged from the narratives: psychological and emotional impact; physical impact; financial and professional impact; social impact and need for support services. The majority of the caregivers of people with EOD perceived their emotional wellbeing as poor or extremely poor. Carers reported poor physical health, which tends to be longer-lasting than mental health problems. Two caregivers had to retire after the disclosure of the dementia diagnosis, and seven reduced their work loads because they had to look after PWD. Preserving the abilities of PWD is essential to maintain their self-esteem, dignity and sense of utility. For the caregivers, interventions and stimulating activities make PWD feel worthwhile and contribute to improving life. The caregivers of people with EOD assume the role of caregiver prematurely and need to balance this activity with other responsibilities. There is a need for more studies of EOD in order to improve understanding of the impact of this disease and to enable development of adequate services for PWD and their caregivers.

  20. Religious Involvement and Adaptation in Female Family Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Harold G; Nelson, Bruce; Shaw, Sally F; Saxena, Salil; Cohen, Harvey Jay

    2016-03-01

    To examine the relationship between religious involvement (RI) and adaptation of women caring for family members with severe physical or neurological disability. Two-site cross-sectional study. Community. A convenience sample of 251 caregivers was recruited. RI and caregiver adaptation (assessed by perceived stress, caregiver burden, and depressive symptoms) were measured using standard scales, along with caregiver characteristics, social support, and health behaviors. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to identify relationships and mediating and moderating factors. Religious involvement (RI) was associated with better caregiver adaptation independent of age, race, education, caregiver health, care recipient's health, social support, and health behaviors (B = -0.09, standard error = 0.04, t = -2.08, P = .04). This association was strongest in caregivers aged 58-75 and spouses and for perceived stress in blacks. Religious involvement (RI) in female caregivers is associated with better caregiver adaptation, especially for those who are older, spouses of the care recipients, and blacks. These results are relevant to the development of future interventions that provide support to family caregivers. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  1. Experiences and challenges of informal caregiving for Korean immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hae-Ra; Choi, Yun Jung; Kim, Miyong T; Lee, Jong Eun; Kim, Kim B

    2008-09-01

    This paper is a report of a study designed to explore the caregiving experiences of Korean Americans. Increasing numbers of older people in the Asian population place important long-term care demands on Asian caregivers, yet minimal attention has been given to the issue of caregiving in this group. The current study attempts to fill the gap by describing Korean American caregivers' unique caregiving experiences from their perspectives. A qualitative research design using a focus group approach was employed to discuss caregiving experiences in a cultural context. Data were collected over an 8-month period in 2005. Twenty-four informants, mostly women, at varying points surrounding caregiving participated in a focus group interview. Each focus group lasted about 1 (1/2)-2 hours. Thematic analysis was conducted by two bilingual researchers. Three key themes were identified: the caregiver role - competing priorities and beliefs, the extent and impact of caregiving, and the need for education and culturally-tailored support systems. Ten subthemes were identified within the three major themes: (1) facing double challenges; (2) changing attitudes about filial piety (Hyo); (3) providing care; (4) feeling out of control; (5) going through changing family dynamics; (6) being connected vs. providing connection; (7) paying back; (8) learning by themselves; (9) recognizing differences and (10) reconsidering geriatric care systems. The caregiving experiences described by Korean American families point to the need to identify and develop more focused outreach programmes as well as more culturally appropriate support services for this rapidly increasing population.

  2. [The system of informal caregiving as inequality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Calvente, María del Mar; Mateo-Rodríguez, Inmaculada; Eguiguren, Ana P

    2004-05-01

    In our setting, it is families, not the health and social services, who play the greatest role in providing continuous care to persons in need of such services. Informal health care poses two key questions with regard to the issue of equity: differences in the burdens borne by men and women, which contribute to gender inequality and, depending on their educational and socio-economic level, inequities in their ability to choose and gain access to needed resources and support services, thus contributing to social class inequalities. Distributing the burden of caregiving between men and women, and between the family and the state, constitutes a crucial debate in public health. This study analyzes the concept and characteristics of informal care, provides data on its dimensions in our setting, and analyzes the profile of caregivers, as well as the work they do and the impact it has on their lives. Finally, it presents currently existing models and support strategies for informal caregivers. It is largely women who assume the principal role of providing informal care, undertaking the most difficult and demanding tasks and dedicating the largest share of their time to them. As a result, women bear an elevated cost in their lives in terms of health, quality of life, access to employment and professional development, social relations, availability of time for themselves, and economic repercussions. Unemployed, under-educated women from the least privileged social classes constitute the largest group of informal caregivers in our country. Any policies aimed at supporting those who provide such care should keep in mind the unequal point from which they start and be evaluated in terms of their impact on gender and social class inequality.

  3. The Burden of Schizophrenia on Caregivers

    OpenAIRE

    Filiz Adana; Hulya Arslantas

    2011-01-01

    Caregivers’ burden in schizophrenia is a complex concept often with negative connotations. The concept refers to the impact of having a schizophrenia patient in the family including emotional, psychological, physical, economic distress and feelings of shame, embarrassment, guilt, and self-blame expe-rienced by the caregivers. There are objective and subjective aspects of care-givers’ burden. The objective burden refers to observed and verifiable impact of the diseased person in the family suc...

  4. Exploring oral literacy in communication with hospice caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Goldsmith, Joy; Oliver, Debra Parker; Demiris, George; Kruse, Robin L; Van Stee, Stephanie

    2013-11-01

    Low oral literacy has been identified as a barrier to pain management for informal caregivers who receive verbal instructions on pain medication and pain protocols. To examine recorded communication between hospice staff and informal caregivers and explore caregiver experiences. Using transcripts of interactions (n = 47), oral literacy features were analyzed by examining the generalized language complexity using the Flesch-Kincaid grading scale and the dialogue interactivity defined by talking turns and interaction time. Means for longitudinal follow-up measures on caregiver anxiety, quality of life, perception of pain management, knowledge and comfort providing pain medication, and satisfaction were examined to explore their relationship to oral literacy. Communication between team members and caregivers averaged a fourth-grade level on the Flesch-Kincaid scale, indicating that communication was easy to understand. Reading ease was associated (r = 0.67, P < 0.05) with caregiver understanding of and comfort with pain management. Perceived barriers to caregiver pain management were lower when sessions had increased use of passive sentences (r = 0.61, P < 0.01), suggesting that passive voice was not an accurate indicator of language complexity. Caregiver understanding and comfort with administering pain medications (r = -0.82, P < 0.01) and caregiver quality of life (r = -0.49, P < 0.05) were negatively correlated with dialogue pace. As the grade level of talk with caregivers and hospice teams increased, associated caregiver anxiety increased. Caregivers with higher anxiety also experienced greater difficulty in understanding pain medication and its management. Specific adjustments that hospice teams can make to improve caregiver experiences are identified. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Caregiver reports of patient-initiated violence in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwumere, Juliana; Grice, Sarah; Garety, Philippa; Bebbington, Paul; Dunn, Graham; Freeman, Daniel; Fowler, David; Kuipers, Elizabeth

    2014-07-01

    Aggressive behaviour in psychosis is not uncommon. Community provision for people with psychosis has left informal caregivers to take on a greater role in their care. However, few studies have explored links between patient-initiated violence in mental health caregiving relationships and caregiver functioning. Our study investigated caregiver reports of aggressive acts committed by their relative with psychosis and their links to caregiver appraisals of the caregiving relationship and caregiver outcomes. Caregivers of patients with a recent relapse of psychosis, recruited to a psychological therapy trial, completed the audiotaped Camberwell Family Interview at baseline. This semi-structured interview includes questions on the quality of the relationship between caregiver and patient, and patient history of violence. Seventy-two transcripts of interviews were assessed for reports of patient-initiated violence. One-half of the caregiver sample (52.9%) reported an incident of patient-initiated violence during their interview; 62.2% of these involved violence toward themselves, and 24.3% toward property. Reports of patient violence were associated with caregiver ratings of hostility expressed toward patients, lower self-esteem, and emotion-focused coping. People caring on their own were more likely to report incidents of patient violence. Younger patients, males, and inpatients were more frequently identified as having a history of this kind of violence. Our findings suggested that caregiver reports of patient-initiated violence in psychosis are not uncommon. Mental health staff need to be aware of the risks of such violence for caregivers of people with psychosis, and consider appropriate procedures for minimizing it.

  6. Accessing antiretroviral therapy for children: Caregivers' voices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret (Maggie Williams

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite efforts to scale up access to antiretroviral therapy (ART, particularly at primary health care (PHC facilities, antiretroviral therapy (ART continues to be out of reach formany human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive children in sub-Saharan Africa. In resource limited settings decentralisation of ART is required to scale up access to essential medication. Traditionally, paediatric HIV care has been provided in tertiary care facilities which have better human and material resources, but limited accessibility in terms of distance for caregivers of HIV-positive children. The focus of this article is on the experiences of caregivers whilst accessing ART for HIV-positive children at PHC (decentralised care facilities in Nelson Mandela Bay (NMB in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual research design was used. The target population comprised caregivers of HIV-positive children. Data were collected by means of indepth individual interviews, which were thematically analysed. Guba's model was usedto ensure trustworthiness. Barriers to accessing ART at PHC clinics for HIV-positive children included personal issues, negative experiences, lack of support and finance, stigma and discrimination. The researchers recommend standardised programmes be developed and implemented in PHC clinics to assist in providing treatment, care and support for HIV positive children.

  7. Accessing antiretroviral therapy for children: Caregivers' voices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret (Maggie Williams

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite efforts to scale up access to antiretroviral therapy (ART, particularly at primary health care (PHC facilities, antiretroviral therapy (ART continues to be out of reach for many human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive children in sub-Saharan Africa. In resource limited settings decentralisation of ART is required to scale up access to essential medication. Traditionally, paediatric HIV care has been provided in tertiary care facilities which have better human and material resources, but limited accessibility in terms of distance for caregivers of HIV-positive children. The focus of this article is on the experiences of caregivers whilst accessing ART for HIV-positive children at PHC (decentralised care facilities in Nelson Mandela Bay (NMB in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual research design was used. The target population comprised caregivers of HIV-positive children. Data were collected by means of in-depth individual interviews, which were thematically analysed. Guba's model was used to ensure trustworthiness. Barriers to accessing ART at PHC clinics for HIV-positive children included personal issues, negative experiences, lack of support and finance, stigma and discrimination. The researchers recommend standardised programmes be developed and implemented in PHC clinics to assist in providing treatment, care and support for HIV-positive children.

  8. Illness denial questionnaire for patients and caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi Ferrario, Silvia; Giorgi, Ines; Baiardi, Paola; Giuntoli, Laura; Balestroni, Gianluigi; Cerutti, Paola; Manera, Marina; Gabanelli, Paola; Solara, Valentina; Fornara, Roberta; Luisetti, Michela; Omarini, Pierangela; Omarini, Giovanna; Vidotto, Giulio

    2017-01-01

    Interest in assessing denial is still present, despite the criticisms concerning its definition and measurement. We tried to develop a questionnaire (Illness Denial Questionnaire, IDQ) assessing patients' and caregivers' denial in relation to their illness/disturbance. After a preliminary study, a final version of 24 dichotomous items (true/false) was selected. We hypothesized a theoretical model with three dimensions: denial of negative emotions, resistance to change, and conscious avoidance, the first two composing the actual Denial and the last representing an independent component of the illness denial behavior. The IDQ was administered to 400 subjects (219 patients and 181 caregivers) together with the Anxiety-Depression Questionnaire - Reduced form (AD-R), in order to assess concurrent validity. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), internal consistency indices (Cronbach's α and McDonald's ω), and test-retest analysis were performed. CFA and internal consistency indices (Cronbach's α: 0.87-0.96) indicated a clear and meaningful three-factor structure of IDQ, for both patients and caregivers. Further analyses showed good concurrent validity, with Denial and its subscale negatively associated with anxiety and depression and avoidance positively associated with anxiety and depression. The IDQ also showed a good stability ( r from 0.71 to 0.87). The IDQ demonstrated good psychometric properties. Denial of negative emotions and resistance to change seem to contribute to a real expression of denial, and conscious avoidance seems to constitute a further step in the process of cognitive-affective elaboration of the illness.

  9. Gendering Guilt among Dependent Family Members' Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea, Maria-Teresa; Albar, María-Jesús; Casado-Mejia, Rosa

    2016-11-17

    This study analyzes guilt among family caregivers of dependent patients, from a gender perspective. A qualitative design was used, conducting in-depth interviews and focus groups. Using purposive sampling, we selected 73 family caregivers and 23 health professionals (family medicine, community nursing, and social work) from the Primary Care District of Seville. The content of the information collected was analyzed in terms of the following categories: a) guilt for abandoning family and friends; b) guilt for the relationship with the dependent person; and c) guilt for placing the relative in a nursing home. To validate the findings, data sources, methodological techniques, and researchers' disciplines were all triangulated. Results indicated that women report more guilt than men for abandoning family and friends, and because of their relationship with the dependent person. However, with respect to nursing home placement, no difference was observed as a function of gender. The high incidence of caregiver guilt needs to be addressed by health professionals to avoid the emergence of other mental health issues.

  10. Personhood-Based Dementia Care: Using the Familial Caregiver as a Bridging Model for Professional Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gabriel Fetterolf

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available With biomedicine at the forefront of our culture's understanding of illness, true healing is often neglected. It has become common practice to place elderly persons with Alzheimer's disease in nursing homes or long-term care facilities that do not always regard the sufferers' well-being as a top priority. This article draws from familial caregiving roles as a basis for understanding personhood, which I take to be a bridge between the world of a caregiver and the world of an Alzheimer's sufferer. Furthermore, through the modeling of professional caregiving strategies, I show how one might form meaningful relationships in long-term care facilities, and likewise provide the aging and afflicted person with forms of healing.

  11. Dementia caregiver burden: reliability of the Brazilian version of the Zarit caregiver burden interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taub Anita

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of this article is to examine the reliability of the Brazilian version of the Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview (ZBI. The instrument is a 22-item scale assessing the extent to which caregivers view their responsibilities as having an adverse impact on their social life, health, emotional well-being, and finances. We assessed 50 primary informal caregivers of demented patients coming from 3 different health care centers, using the test-retest method. Analysis of the results showed an intraclass reliability coefficient of 0.88, while Cronbach's coefficient alpha was 0.77 for the test and 0.80 for the retest items. The Brazilian version of ZBI shows sufficient reliability, comparable to the original version.

  12. Moderating role of positive aspects of caregiving in the relationship between depression in persons with Alzheimer's disease and caregiver burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Haihong; Zhai, Junwei; He, Runlian; Zhou, Liye; Liang, Ruifeng; Yu, Hongmei

    2018-03-01

    Improving caregivers' positive perception of their role may be important in reducing their subjective burden when caring for Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients with depression. The purpose of present study was to explore the moderating role of the positive aspects of caregiving (PAC) on the subjective burden on family caregivers when managing depressive behaviors. We conducted a cross-sectional study including 200 pairs of patients with mild AD and their caregivers from three communities and two hospitals in Taiyuan, China in October 2014. The latent variable interaction model based on a two stage least squares (2SLS) regression was fitted. A significant moderating effect of the PAC was found on the relationship between depression in patients with AD and the caregiver burden they cause. Caregivers dealing with patients with low levels of depression but with high levels of the PAC had significantly lower levels of caregiver burden compared to those caregivers with the low levels of PAC. Continuously detecting the patient's mental state combined with caregivers having an optimistic attitude towards life may improve the quality of life for both patients and caregivers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Use of psychotropic medications by caregivers of elderly patients with dementia: is this a sign of caregiver burden?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einstein Francisco Camargos

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the consumption of psychotropic medications by caregivers of elderly patients with or without dementia. This was a cross-sectional study conducted at all geriatric units in Brasília, Brazil, during a two-month period. Structured interviews were performed with 311 caregivers of people with or without dementia and they completed questionnaires. Among the caregivers, 196 (63% were caregivers of patients with dementia and 115 (37% were caregivers of patients without dementia. Forty-four caregivers (14.1% were taking psychotropic drugs (benzodiazepines or antidepressants, and this usage was more frequent among caregivers of patients with dementia (p<0.01. Twenty-two caregivers of patients with dementia (11.4% had used sleeping pills after beginning care, compared with only five (4.3% caregivers of patients without dementia (p<0.01. In conclusion, this study found that caregivers of patients with dementia took psychotropic drugs (benzodiazepines and antidepressants more frequently than the ones of patients without dementia.

  14. The effect of caregiver support interventions for informal caregivers of community-dwelling frail elderly: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Lopez Hartmann

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Informal caregivers are important resources for community-dwelling frail elderly. But caring can be challenging. To be able to provide long-term care to the elderly, informal caregivers need to be supported as well. The aim of this study is to review the current best evidence on the effectiveness of different types of support services targeting informal caregivers of community-dwelling frail elderly. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed in Medline, PsychINFO, Ovid Nursing Database, Cinahl, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and British Nursing Index in september 2010. Results: Overall, the effect of caregiver support interventions is small and also inconsistent between studies. Respite care can be helpful in reducing depression, burden and anger. Interventions at the individual caregivers' level can be beneficial in reducing or stabilizing depression, burden, stress and role strain. Group support has a positive effect on caregivers' coping ability, knowledge, social support and reducing depression. Technology-based interventions can reduce caregiver burden, depression, anxiety and stress and improve the caregiver's coping ability. Conclusion: Integrated support packages where the content of the package is tailored to the individual caregivers' physical, psychological and social needs should be preferred when supporting informal caregivers of frail elderly. It requires an intense collaboration and coordination between all parties involved.

  15. Caregiver burden of Mexican dementia patients: the role of dysexecutive syndrome, sleep disorders, schooling and caregiver depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Carrasco, Óscar; Guerra-Silla, María de Guadalupe; Torres-Arreola, Laura Del Pilar; García-Peña, Carmen; Escamilla-Jiménez, Cristopher Isaac; González-González, César

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the accelerated growth of the elderly population, reconfiguration of families and member roles, and the increase of mental disorders, it is necessary to investigate the effects of this set of factors on the caregivers of patients with dementia in Mexico. Mental disorders of individuals have a negative impact on their physical and emotional quality of life, leading to greater dependence and making the caring experience a heavy burden. Several studies (none in Mexico) have used either the characteristics of the patient or caregiver to determine the burden, but few studies have included both profiles within a single study. The objective of the present study was to analyze the characteristics of the patients and caregivers associated with caregiver burden. A multicenter study was carried out in six health institutions located in Mexico City, including 175 patients (and their caregivers) diagnosed with different types of dementia. We used the Spanish Caregiver Burden Screen. Descriptive analysis and logistic regressions were used to estimate the effect of the covariates on the caregiver burden. The results showed that patient variables have a greater impact on caregiver burden than caregiver-associated variables. Dysexecutive syndrome, sleep disorders, schooling and caregiver depression are associated with a higher level of caregiver burden. Caregiver burden is a complex phenomenon. The results of the present study showed the need to implement multifactorial interventions targeting the caregiver to reduce the burden, strengthen the skills for patient management to avoid depression, improve patient health, and diminish functional dependence and future hospitalization. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  16. Caregiver burden among primary caregivers of patients undergoing peripheral blood stem cell transplantation: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgul, Nur; Ozdemir, Leyla

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to identify caregiver burden and influencing factors on the burden in primary caregivers of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation patients within 2-12 months following transplant, indicating early recovery period after discharge. This descriptive cross sectional study was carried out at hematopoietic stem cell transplantation outpatient units of three university hospitals in Turkey. A total of 55 patient and caregiver dyads were recruited and interviewed. The data were collected using questionnaires developed by the researchers and caregiver burden was measured with the Zarit Burden Interview. The mean score of Zarit Burden Interview was 28.41 (SD = 13.90). Patients' symptoms including nausea and self depreciation feeling were related to greater caregiver burden. Self-depreciation was referred to feeling undervalued. The mean score of the tool was significantly higher in caregivers who have not been educated beyond primary school and also caregivers who had lower income. Caregivers who supported their patients to fulfill physical needs and who did not receive help for meeting patients' psychological needs had statistically more elevated levels of burden. Moreover, the extent of care giving activities undertaken was positively correlated with caregiver burden scores. While positive impact of the care giving process on family relations decreased caregiver burden; negative effect increased the burden. This study suggests that caregiver burden of primary caregivers caring for peripheral blood stem cell transplantation patients varies by education, income status, and the extent of care giving activities undertaken. Changes in family ties and relations due to care giving effected caregiver burden. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Family caregivers' adjustment to nursing home placement of older relatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Szu-Yao; Davies, Elizabeth

    2007-06-01

    The literature on the impact of nursing home placement of older parents on family caregivers is still incomplete. Family caregivers experience stress, shock, anxiety, fear, resistance, and guilt in the process of decision making. The literature has demonstrated that family caregivers continue to experience stress and problems after placing older relatives into a long term care facility. Cultural values impact on people's attitudes, values and expectations. Culture will therefore affect the care-giving experience. Relatively little information is available from Asian and multicultural societies. Identifying family caregiver experiences after nursing home placement can alert professionals to the need for family guidance prior to nursing home placement and assist in early identification of potential problems. This article reviews the literature and discusses the impact on family caregivers of making a decision for nursing home placement and dealing with the stress and challenges that persist after nursing home admission.

  18. Religious and Spiritual Dimensions of the Vietnamese Dementia Caregiving Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Ladson; Tran, Jane NhaUyen; Tran, Cindy; Hinton, Devon

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the role of religion and spirituality in dementia caregiving among Vietnamese refugee families. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with nine Vietnamese caregivers of persons with dementia, then tape-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed for emergent themes. Caregivers related their spirituality/religion to three aspects of caregiving: (1) their own suffering, (2) their motivations for providing care, and (3) their understanding of the nature of the illness. Key terms or idioms were used to articulate spiritual/religious dimensions of the caregivers’ experience, which included sacrifice, compassion, karma, blessings, grace and peace of mind. In their narratives, the caregivers often combined multiple strands of different religions and/or spiritualities: Animism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism and Catholicism. Case studies are presented to illustrate the relationship between religion/spirituality and the domains of caregiving. These findings have relevance for psychotherapeutic interventions with ethnically diverse populations. PMID:20930949

  19. Communication Coaching: A Case Study of Family Caregiver Burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg, Elaine; Ferrell, Betty; Koczywas, Marianna; Ferraro, Catherine

    2017-04-01

    Problematic communication among providers, patients, and their family members can affect the quality of patient care, causing stress to all parties involved and decreased opportunities for collaborative decision making.
. The purpose of this article is to present one case from a pilot study of a family caregiver intervention focused on communication. 
. The nurse-delivered communication intervention includes a written communication guide for family caregivers, as well as a one-time nurse communication coaching call. The call is aimed at identifying caregiver communication concerns, providing communication education, and role playing problematic communication.
. Psychological distress and caregiver confidence in communication were improved for the caregiver. Data presented from the case study demonstrate the need for family caregiver communication support and training and the potential benefits of such training.

  20. Resilience of family caregivers of elderly with Alzheimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlene Souza Silva Manzini

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Resilience is the capacity that people have to cope positively with adversities. A cross-sectional, quantitative study, that aimed to assess factors associated with the resilience of family caregivers of elderly with Alzheimer’s disease. Sixty-six caregivers composed the sample, who were accompanied in a neurology ambulatory. Most caregivers presented moderate resilience. Linear regression showed that some factors interfered with caregivers’ resilience, being those: overload, the increment of days dedicated to caregiving, the level of kinship daughter-in-law/son-in-law or spouse, and practice of other activities besides caregiving. The findings can be useful in care-related areas, once we identified variables interfering in resilience, and those can be worked and improved to benefit the caregiver and the patient.

  1. Exploring youth and caregiver preferences for asthma education video content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geryk, Lorie L; Arrindell, Courtney C; Sage, Adam J; Blalock, Susan J; Reuland, Daniel S; Coyne-Beasley, Tamera; Lee, Charles; Sleath, Betsy L; Carpenter, Delesha M

    2016-01-01

    This study examines (1) whether youth and their caregivers have different preferences for asthma education video topics and (2) if education topic preferences vary by youth and caregiver sociodemographic characteristics. Youth (n = 83) ages 7-17 years with persistent asthma and their caregivers were recruited at two pediatric practices in North Carolina. Sociodemographic information and youth and caregiver preferences for nine asthma video education topics were collected during in-person interviews. Bonferroni-corrected Chi-square or McNemar tests (α = 0.0056) were used to compare youth and caregivers differences in topic preferences and topic preferences by youth and caregiver sociodemographic characteristics, including gender, race, ethnicity, and age. Youth were primarily male (52%) and from low-income families (74%; caregiver annual income less than $30,000) and many were Hispanic (45%). Youth and parents expressed the most interest in the following two topics: "how to deal with triggers" (90% and 95%, respectively) and "how to keep asthma under control" (87% and 96%, respectively). Caregivers and children were discordant for two topics: "the difference between a rescue and controller medicine" and "how to [help your child] talk to your [his/her] friends about asthma." No differences were found between youth and caregiver sociodemographic characteristics and video topic preferences. Youth with persistent asthma and their caregivers differed in their asthma education topic preferences, but preferences did not vary by caregiver or youth sociodemographic characteristics. Studies examining the effectiveness of interventions tailored to differences in educational preferences of youth with asthma and their caregivers are needed.

  2. [Caregivers of people with neurodegenerative diseases: from help to delegation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzescaux, Sabine; Blondel, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Being a caregiver is difficult, even more so when it comes to helping people with a neurodegenerative disease. These caregivers, either family members or close friends, are confronted with an unexpected delegation which can prove to be highly complex as the pitfalls can indeed be significant. Moreover, the support the caregivers can provide depends on the support they can get for themselves. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparisons Between Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Informal Caregivers

    OpenAIRE

    Nancy J. Karlin; Joyce Weil; James Gould

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on understanding similarities and differences between non-Hispanic White and Hispanic informal caregivers of those with Alzheimer’s disease. Comparisons take place between caregivers reporting high levels of burden as indicated by the Zarit Burden Inventory. Data suggest similarities and differences between Hispanic (n = 17) and non-Hispanic White (n = 17) caregivers in this study in several areas. H...

  4. Fatigue in family caregivers of adult intensive care unit survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, JiYeon; Tate, Judith A; Hoffman, Leslie A; Schulz, Richard; Ren, Dianxu; Donahoe, Michael P; Given, Barbara A; Sherwood, Paula R

    2014-09-01

    Family caregivers are a vital resource in the recovery of intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. Of concern, the stress associated with this role can negatively affect caregiver health. Fatigue, an important health indicator, has been identified as a predictor of various illnesses, greater use of health services, and early mortality. Examining the impact of fatigue on caregivers' physical health can assist in identifying critical time points and potential targets for intervention. To describe self-reported fatigue in caregivers of ICU survivors from patients' ICU admission to ≤ 2 weeks, two- and four-months post-ICU discharge. Patient-caregiver pairs were enrolled from a medical ICU. Caregiver fatigue was measured using the Short-Form 36 Health Survey Vitality subscale (SF-36 Vitality). Caregiver psychobehavioral stress responses included depressive symptoms, burden, health risk behaviors, and sleep quality. Patient data included self-reported physical symptoms and disposition (home vs. institution). Forty-seven patient-caregiver pairs were initially enrolled. Clinically significant fatigue (SF-36 Vitality ≤ 45) was reported by 43%-53% of caregivers across the time points, and these caregivers reported worse scores in measures of depressive symptoms, burden, health risk behaviors and sleep quality, and patients' symptom burden. In 26 caregivers with data for all time points (55% of the total sample), SF-36 Vitality scores showed trends of improvement when the patient returned home and greater impairment when institutionalization continued. In caregivers of ICU survivors, fatigue is common and potentially linked with poor psychobehavioral responses. Worsening fatigue was associated with greater symptom distress and long-term patient institutionalization. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Resilience of family caregivers of elderly with Alzheimer

    OpenAIRE

    Carlene Souza Silva Manzini; Francisco Assis Carvalho Vale

    2016-01-01

    Resilience is the capacity that people have to cope positively with adversities. A cross-sectional, quantitative study, that aimed to assess factors associated with the resilience of family caregivers of elderly with Alzheimer’s disease. Sixty-six caregivers composed the sample, who were accompanied in a neurology ambulatory. Most caregivers presented moderate resilience. Linear regression showed that some factors interfered with caregivers’ resilience, being those: overload, the increment of...

  6. Leisure Time Activities and Mental Health in Informal Dementia Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüz, Benjamin; Czerniawski, Alana; Davie, Nicola; Miller, Lisa; Quinn, Michael G; King, Carolyn; Carr, Andrea; Elliott, Kate-Ellen J; Robinson, Andrew; Scott, Jenn L

    2015-07-01

    Dementia prevalence and the demand for dementia care are increasing. Informal caregiving accounts for a large proportion of dementia care, but can come at high cost for caregivers. Informal dementia caregivers are at higher risk for mental health problems than the general population. This study examines whether perceived change in leisure activities is one working mechanism linking stress and burden experience in dementia caregiving to lower mental health (depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and reduced satisfaction with life), and whether there are group-based leisure activities that can buffer this detrimental effect. A total of 346 informal Australian dementia caregivers (88.15% female, age 18-82 years) participated in an online study. Mediation and moderation analyses using multiple regression demonstrated that perceived changes in leisure activities linked caregiving stress and burden to lower mental health, and that membership in groups engaging in affiliation or social activities attenuates negative effects of caregiving. Informal dementia caregivers benefit from satisfying leisure activities. In particular, engaging in social activities and self-help groups buffered the negative impact of caregiving. © 2015 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  7. A Problem Solving Intervention for hospice caregivers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiris, George; Oliver, Debra Parker; Washington, Karla; Fruehling, Lynne Thomas; Haggarty-Robbins, Donna; Doorenbos, Ardith; Wechkin, Hope; Berry, Donna

    2010-08-01

    The Problem Solving Intervention (PSI) is a structured, cognitive-behavioral intervention that provides people with problem-solving coping skills to help them face major negative life events and daily challenges. PSI has been applied to numerous settings but remains largely unexplored in the hospice setting. The aim of this pilot study was to demonstrate the feasibility of PSI targeting informal caregivers of hospice patients. We enrolled hospice caregivers who were receiving outpatient services from two hospice agencies. The intervention included three visits by a research team member. The agenda for each visit was informed by the problem-solving theoretical framework and was customized based on the most pressing problems identified by the caregivers. We enrolled 29 caregivers. Patient's pain was the most frequently identified problem. On average, caregivers reported a higher quality of life and lower level of anxiety postintervention than at baseline. An examination of the caregiver reaction assessment showed an increase of positive esteem average and a decrease of the average value of lack of family support, impact on finances, impact on schedules, and on health. After completing the intervention, caregivers reported lower levels of anxiety, improved problem solving skills, and a reduced negative impact of caregiving. Furthermore, caregivers reported high levels of satisfaction with the intervention, perceiving it as a platform to articulate their challenges and develop a plan to address them. Findings demonstrate the value of problem solving as a psycho-educational intervention in the hospice setting and call for further research in this area.

  8. [Resilience in caregivers of patients with dementia: A preliminary study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Lansac, Violeta; Crespo López, María; Cáceres, Rebeca; Rodríguez-Poyo, María

    2012-01-01

    Caring for a relative with dementia often has negative effects on the caregiver's physical and psychological health. However, many caregivers successfully cope with the stress factors arising from care, and even have uplifts during their experience, showing high resilience levels. This study presents a preliminary analysis of resilience in caregivers of patients with dementia, exploring its relationship with different variables. Resilience was assessed (by CD-RISC) in 53 family caregivers of patients with dementia. Resilience was correlated to the following variables: caregiving context, stressors (e.g., cognitive impairment), appraisals (e.g., burden), moderators (e.g., personality traits and resources), and caregiving consequences (physical and psychological health). The participants showed moderate scores on resilience. Resilience was associated with poor emotional and physical status (significant inverse correlations with anxiety, depression, psycho-active drug use, health habits…). High resilience scores were significantly correlated to burden, neuroticism and extraversion, self-efficacy, self-esteem and less use of emotion focused coping strategies. Higher resilience relates to a good emotional and physical status in caregivers. Moreover, resilience is more associated with caregiver variables (e.g., appraisal and coping with care, personality features), than to situational variables. The data highlight the strengthening of these types of appraisal and coping as a way to improve caregivers' resilience and, consequently, their health. Copyright © 2011 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. The Effects of Caregiving Resources on the Incidence of Depression over One Year in Family Caregivers of Disabled Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    矢嶋, 裕樹

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the over-time effects of physical, psychological and social resources on the incidence of depression in family caregivers of the disabled elderly. Data were collected twice at a one-year interval from 1,141 primary caregivers of a disabled older person in an urban area of Japan using a self-reported questionnaire survey. The questionnaire included physical health as an indicator of physical resources, caregiving satisfaction and intention to care as...

  10. The effects of caregiving resources on the incidence of depression over one year in family caregivers of disabled elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Yajima, Yuki; Tsutsui, Takako; Nakajima, Kazuo; Li, Hui-Ying; Takigawa, Tomoko; Wang, Da-Hong; Ogino, Keiki

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the over-time effects of physical, psychological and social resources on the incidence of depression in family caregivers of the disabled elderly. Data were collected twice at a one-year interval from 1,141 primary caregivers of a disabled older person in an urban area of Japan using a self-reported questionnaire survey. The questionnaire included physical health as an indicator of physical resources, caregiving satisfaction and intention to care as...

  11. Factors associated with the caregiver burden among family caregivers of patients with heart failure in southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaolin; Dolansky, Mary A; Hu, Xiuying; Zhang, Fengying; Qu, Moying

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the status of caregiver burden and identified the factors related to caregiver burden among family caregivers of patients with heart failure in southwest China. A cross-sectional descriptive design with a convenience sample was adopted. Patient and family caregiver dyads (n = 226) in four hospitals in Chengdu, China were recruited from June 2013 to July 2014. The instruments used in this study included the Social Support Rating Scale, the Zarit Burden Interview, and the General Self-Efficacy Scale. Multivariate analysis was used to identify the factors associated with caregiver burden. Forty-four percent of the variance of the caregiver burden was explained by the payment type for treatment, monthly family income, relationship to the patient, caregivers' self-efficacy, and social support. The caregiver burden in southwest China was higher than studies conducted in developed areas. Specific to southwest China, the financial burden and insufficient resources are the main factors associated with caregiver burden. The results suggest that self-efficacy and social support in underdeveloped areas are potential areas for future intervention. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Voices of Informal Caregivers and Community Stakeholders: Whether and How to Develop an Informal Caregiver Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Sara S; Ragas, Daiva M; Tom, Laura S; Hajjar, Nadia; Dong, XinQi; Simon, Melissa A

    2016-06-01

    Our primary objective was to gather pilot data from caregivers and stakeholders to guide the development of a training program to assist informal caregivers in re-entering the job market. The goal of the program would be to help caregivers rebound from their incurred economic burden by transitioning into a paid caregiving or other health-service role. The economic burden they bear often necessitates a return to the workforce following caregiving; yet the act of returning is complicated by an extended absence from the workforce and a lack of experience in other verifiably skilled and paid roles. We interviewed 37 stakeholders and 25 caregivers of a chronically or terminally ill family member or friend in a suburban collar county close to Chicago. The interview questions considered the economic impact of illness, as well as the feasibility, logistics, and options of a training program for caregivers. Our data gathered from caregivers and leaders within this community support the acceptability of such a training program for informal caregivers, and also provide practical advice for development and implementation related to training cost, length, content, and instructional practices.

  13. Older Caregiving Parents: Division of Household Labor, Marital Satisfaction, and Caregiver Burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essex, Elizabeth Lehr; Hong, Jinkuk

    2005-01-01

    Based on a sample of 126 families, this study investigated how division of household labor is related to marital satisfaction and caregiving burden among older married parents caring for adult children with intellectual disabilities. For mothers, greater spousal participation in household work and satisfaction with the division of labor were…

  14. A preliminary typology of caregivers and effects on service utilization of caregiver counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Renee; Williams, Ashley A; Anderson, Lindsay N; Qualls, Sara H

    2013-01-01

    Caregivers (CGs) of older adults have unique and diverse needs for intervention. The present studies describe the characteristics of CGs and caregiving situations and how these relate to CG therapy utilization patterns in a community mental health setting. Study 1: Through chart review, the researchers explored service utilization patterns and identified preliminary typologies of Caregiver Family Therapy (CFT) clients, N = 23. Study 2: By conducting a second chart review, the researchers sought to determine whether the categories that emerged in Study 1 applied to a second group of CFT clients, N = 36. Study 1: Four distinct categories of CGs emerged: High-Distress (high disorganization, high complexity), Resourceful but At-Risk (low disorganization, high complexity), Non-Committal (high disorganization, low complexity), and Model CGs (low disorganization, low complexity). Study 2: While the ability to classify CGs into category proved to have some inconsistencies, preliminary evidence suggests the ability to predict utilization once CGs were placed into category was good. In Study 2 a fifth category emerged: High Functioning but Static, which suggests CGs were on a continuum ranging from high to low on family organizational style and CG situation complexity. While caregiving situations vary widely among families and across time, this article provides a preliminary typology of CGs that may assist clinicians in tailoring CG interventions to meet the needs of their clients based on information garnered early in therapy, perhaps as early as the intake process.

  15. Caregivers' job satisfaction and empowerment before and after an intervention focused on caregiver empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engström, Maria; Wadensten, Barbro; Häggström, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate a training programme aimed at strengthening caregivers' self-esteem and empowering them, and also to study correlations between psychological empowerment and job satisfaction. Structural and psychological empowerment have received increased attention in nursing management, yet few intervention studies on this topic, based on theoretical assumptions, have been conducted in elderly care. Data on self-assessed psychological empowerment and job satisfaction were collected in an intervention (n = 14) and a comparison group (n = 32), before and after the intervention. When compared over time in the respective groups, there were significant improvements in the intervention group regarding the factor criticism (job satisfaction scale). There were no statistically significant differences in the comparison group. Total empowerment and all factors of empowerment correlated positively with total job satisfaction. Six out of eight factors of job satisfaction correlated positively with total empowerment. Caregivers' perception of criticism can improve through an intervention aimed at strengthening their self-esteem and empowering them. Implications for nursing management Intervention focused on psychological empowerment and especially caregivers' communication skills seems to be beneficial for caregivers. Recommendations are to increase the programme's length and scope and to include all staff at the unit. However, these recommendations need to be studied further.

  16. Relationships between Caregiver Violence Exposure, Caregiver Depression, and Youth Behavioral Health among Homeless Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire-Schwartz, Mandy; Small, Latoya A.; Parker, Gary; Kim, Patricia; McKay, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Homelessness affects a large and increasing number of families in the United States, and exposure to violence and other potentially traumatic events is common among homeless families. It is important to understand more about this population and, more specifically, about the relationship between youth mental health and caregiver mental health and…

  17. Life Course Stage and Social Support Mobilization for End-of-Life Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaValley, Susan A; Gage-Bouchard, Elizabeth A

    2018-04-01

    Caregivers of terminally ill patients are at risk for anxiety, depression, and social isolation. Social support from friends, family members, neighbors, and health care professionals can potentially prevent or mitigate caregiver strain. While previous research documents the importance of social support in helping end-of-life caregivers cope with caregiving demands, little is known about differences in social support experiences among caregivers at different life course stages. Using life course theory, this study analyzes data from in-depth interviews with 50 caregivers of patients enrolled in hospice services to compare barriers to mobilizing social support among caregivers at two life course stages: midlife caregivers caring for parents and older adult caregivers caring for spouses/partners. Older adult caregivers reported different barriers to mobilizing social support compared with midlife caregivers. Findings enhance the understanding of how caregivers' life course stage affects their barriers to mobilization of social support resources.

  18. Attitudes and dilemmas of caregivers supporting people with intellectual disabilities who have diabetes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardol, M.; Rijken, M.; Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, H. van

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore how professional caregivers in communal living arrangements support people with a mild or moderate intellectual disability (ID) who have diabetes. Methods: A qualitative study, 13 caregivers participated in semi-structured interviews. Results: Professional caregiver support in

  19. 77 FR 50548 - Agency Information Collection: (PACT Qualitative Evaluation: Patient & Caregiver Interviews...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    ... Collection: (PACT Qualitative Evaluation: Patient & Caregiver Interviews); Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans... ``OMB Control No. 2900-New (Patient & Caregiver). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: PACT Qualitative Evaluation: Patient & Caregiver Interviews. OMB Control Number: 2900--New Type of Review: New data collection...

  20. Attitudes and dilemmas of caregivers supporting people with intellectual disabilities who have diabetes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardol, M.; Rijken, M.; Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, H.M. van

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore how professional caregivers in communal living arrangements support people with a mild or moderate intellectual disability (ID) who have diabetes. METHODS: A qualitative study, 13 caregivers participated in semi-structured interviews. RESULTS: Professional caregiver support in

  1. Caregiver's Feeding Styles Questionnaire. Establishing cutoff points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Sheryl O; Cross, Matthew B; Hennessy, Erin; Tovar, Alison; Economos, Christina D; Power, Thomas G

    2012-02-01

    Researchers use the Caregiver's Feeding Styles Questionnaire (CFSQ) to categorize parent feeding into authoritative, authoritarian, indulgent, and uninvolved styles. The CFSQ assesses self-reported feeding and classifies parents using median splits which are used in a substantial body of parenting literature and allow for direct comparison across studies on dimensions of demandingness and responsiveness. No national norms currently exist for the CFSQ. This paper establishes and recommends cutoff points most relevant for low-income, minority US samples that researchers and clinicians can use to assign parents to feeding styles. Median scores for five studies are examined and the average across these studies reported. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Depression in Main Caregivers of Dementia Patients: Prevalence and Predictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Omranifard

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common neurodegenerative disease is dementia. Family of dementia patients says that their lives have been changed extensively after happening of dementia to their patients. One of the problems of family and caregivers is depression of the caregiver. In this study, we aimed to find the prevalence of depression and factors can affect depression in the dementia caregivers. Materials and Methods: This study was cross-sectional study with convenient sampling method. Our society was 96 main caregivers of dementia patients in the year 2015 in Iran. We had two questionnaires, a demographic and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. BDI Cronbach's alpha is 0.86 for psychiatric patients and 0.81 for nonpsychiatric persons, and Beck's scores are between 0 and 64. We used SPSS version 22 for statistical analysis. Results: According to Beck depression test, 69.8% (n = 67 out of 96 of all caregivers had scores in the range of depression. In bivariate analysis, we found higher dementia severity and lower support of other family members from the caregiver can predict higher depression in the caregiver. As well, in regression analysis using GLM model, we found higher age and lower educational level of the caregiver can predict higher depression in the caregiver. Moreover, regression analysis approved findings about severity and support of other family members in bivariate analysis. Conclusion: High-level depression is found in caregivers of dementia patients. It needs special attention from healthcare managers, clinicians and all of health-care personnel who deals with dementia patients and their caregivers.

  3. Caregiver perceptions about mental health services after child sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Hiu-fai; Bennett, Colleen E; Mondestin, Valerie; Scribano, Philip V; Mollen, Cynthia; Wood, Joanne N

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe caregiver perceptions about mental health services (MHS) after child sexual abuse (CSA) and to explore factors that affected whether their children linked to services. We conducted semi-structured, in-person interviews with 22 non-offending caregivers of suspected CSA victims<13 years old seen at a child advocacy center in Philadelphia. Purposive sampling was used to recruit caregivers who had (n=12) and had not (n=10) linked their children to MHS. Guided by the Health Belief Model framework, interviews assessed perceptions about: CSA severity, the child's susceptibility for adverse outcomes, the benefits of MHS, and the facilitators and barriers to MHS. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, coded, and analyzed using modified grounded theory. Recruitment ended when thematic saturation was reached. Caregivers expressed strong reactions to CSA and multiple concerns about adverse child outcomes. Most caregivers reported that MHS were generally necessary for children after CSA. Caregivers who had not linked to MHS, however, believed MHS were not necessary for their children, most commonly because they were not exhibiting behavioral symptoms. Caregivers described multiple access barriers to MHS, but caregivers who had not linked reported that they could have overcome these barriers if they believed MHS were necessary for their children. Caregivers who had not linked to services also expressed concerns about MHS being re-traumatizing and stigmatizing. Interventions to increase MHS linkage should focus on improving communication with caregivers about the specific benefits of MHS for their children and proactively addressing caregiver concerns about MHS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Projecting social support needs of informal caregivers in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Bakar, Siti Hajar; Weatherley, Richard; Omar, Noralina; Abdullah, Fatimah; Mohamad Aun, Nur Saadah

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the findings of a self-report study of the consequences of being an informal caregiver in Malaysia. The aim of this exploratory study was to examine Malaysian efforts in assisting informal caregivers, based on an analysis of the issues and concerns raised by the caregivers themselves. Data were obtained from a cross-sectional survey of informal caregivers in 2009. This sample comprised parents, spouses and/or adult siblings, and adult children, caring for their children, spouses or siblings and parents who were chronically ill and/or had a disability. Of 300 prospective participants, only 175 could be located (58%), but all those contacted agreed to participate. Respondents were randomly selected and interviewed using a structured questionnaire to identify the emotional, financial, social and physical issues consequent upon being a caregiver. Most respondents reported that their care-giving responsibilities had impacted their emotional, financial, social and/or physical well-being. Inadequate and/or uncertain income was by far the greatest concern followed in descending order by social, physical and emotional consequences. The one-way analysis of variance showed significant differences among the three categories of caregivers with respect to physical and emotional consequences. The findings show that care-giving has detrimental effects on the lives of informal caregivers, and that they are in significant need of social support to help them deal with care-giving tasks and responsibilities. Based on the findings, an integrated social support programme is proposed, tailored to the needs of informal caregivers. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Family caregivers in rural Uganda: the hidden reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipp, Walter; Tindyebwa, Denis; Rubaale, Tom; Karamagi, Ednah; Bajenja, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    We conducted 16 in-depth interviews with family caregivers of AIDS patients in three rural districts in western Uganda. They were selected from a client visitation list of the home-based care program for AIDS patients, based on volunteer participation. Family caregivers reported huge problems associated with providing the necessary psychological, social, and economic care. They also said that the physical and emotional demands of caregiving are overwhelming daily challenges. Most support to AIDS patients provided by family, friends, and the churches. The study highlights the great burden of caregivers, in sub-Saharan Africa who most often are elderly women and young girls. This study examine, the burden and related health issues of family caregivers, primarily women, for AIDS patients in Uganda. It was part of a broad research project using qualitative methods on family caregiving in the home environment in sub-Saharan Africa. As the requirements for family care giving are often overwhelming for women under the conditions as they exist in Uganda and in other developing countries, it constitutes a gender issue of great importance that has not been appreciated fully in the international literature. Family caregiving is also of international relevance, as HIV/AIDS is a global pandemic of previously unknown proportions. In many poor countries, family caregiving is the most common and often the only care that AIDS patients receive, because clinic-based care often is not available close to home or is not affordable. Therefore, family caregiver support programs to alleviate this burden are essential for all those countries where HIV/AIDS is prevalent. Family caregiver burden encompasses medical, social, and economic issues at the household level, which requires an interdisciplinary approach in order to fully understand and appreciate the different dimensions of the family caregiver burden and its negative impact on the lives of so many women in so many countries.

  6. Differences in impact of long term caregiving for mentally ill older adults on the daily life of informal caregivers: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Zegwaard, Marian I; Aartsen, Marja J; Grypdonck, Mieke HF; Cuijpers, Pim

    2013-01-01

    Background: Owing to the policy of extramuralization of care in most Western countries older people with severe mental illness have to rely more and more on informal caregivers for daily care. Caregivers themselves are often aged, and although caregiving implies an impact on daily life that exceeds the boundaries of usual informal care, the impact differs across caregivers. Some caregivers seem to suffer more than others, and the differences cannot be fully understood by factors currently kno...

  7. A comparative study to identify factors of caregiver burden between baby boomers and post baby boomers: a secondary analysis of a US online caregiver survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heejung; Lee, Sangeun; Cheon, Jooyoung; Hong, Soyun; Chang, Mido

    2018-05-02

    Baby boomers' position in the caregiving context is shifting from caregiver to care recipient as the population ages. While the unique characteristics of baby boomer caregivers are well established in caregiving literature, there is limited information about the next caregiving group after the baby boomers. In this study, the sociodemographic and caregiving-related characteristics of the two generations are compared and specific factors contributing to caregiver burden between baby boomer and post baby boomer caregivers are identified. This cross-sectional and correlational study used secondary analysis of data from the National Alliance for Caregiving and the American Association of Retired Persons. A structured online survey was conducted in 2014 with randomly selected samples (n = 1069) in the United States focusing on sociodemographics, caregiving-related characteristics, and burden of care. Descriptive statistics, multivariate linear regression analyses, and Steiger's Z-test were used to identify group differences in multivariate factors related to caregiver burden in two generational groups. Baby boomers and post baby boomers experienced caregiver burden to a similar degree. Caregiving-related factors are more likely to increase burden of care than sociodemographics in both groups. Caregiving without choice and spending longer hours on caregiving tasks were common factors that increased the burden in both generational groups (all p values baby boomer caregivers reported additional challenges, such as unemployment during caregiving, the dual responsibility of both adult and child care, and a family relationship with the care recipient. Due to the aging population of baby boomers, post baby boomers encounter different challenges related to caregiving burden, which is often considered an additional workload in their life course. Current policy and program tailored to baby boomers should be re-designed to meet the different needs of emerging caregivers

  8. Understanding Family Caregiver Communication to Provide Family-Centered Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg, Elaine; Buller, Haley; Ferrell, Betty; Koczywas, Marianna; Borneman, Tami

    2017-12-01

    To describe a family caregiver communication typology and demonstrate identifiable communication challenges among four caregiver types: Manager, Carrier, Partner, and Lone. Case studies based on interviews with oncology family caregivers. Each caregiver type demonstrates unique communication challenges that can be identified. Recognition of a specific caregiver type will help nurses to adapt their own communication to provide tailored support. Family-centered cancer care requires attention to the communication challenges faced by family caregivers. Understanding the challenges among four family caregiver communication types will enable nurses to better address caregiver burden and family conflict. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Quality of life in caregivers providing care for lung transplant candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefaiver, Cheryl A; Keough, Vicki A; Letizia, Marijo; Lanuza, Dorothy M

    2009-06-01

    Caregivers are essential members of the health care team who provide care, valued at more than $250 billion each year, to millions of persons who require assistance with health and daily care. Patients with respiratory diseases who are waiting for a lung transplant are required to have an identified caregiver. The caregivers are rarely studied. To explore the relationships among the health status of caregivers of lung transplant candidates, caregivers' reaction to caregiving, and caregivers' perceived quality of life. This descriptive study examined the quality of life of lung transplant caregivers from a multidimensional perspective. Twenty-nine dyads of lung transplant candidates and their caregivers were recruited from a Midwestern medical center. Data were collected by self-report: caregivers completed the Quality of Life Index, SF-12 health survey, Profile of Mood States-Short Form, and the Caregiver Reaction Assessment. Caregivers reported favorable levels of quality of life, physical health, and mood during the pretransplant waiting phase. However, problem areas for caregivers during this time included fatigue, depression, and the financial impact of the transplant. Data analyses indicated that depression, caregiver general health, impact on finances, and lack of family support had the greatest effect on caregivers' quality of life. Nurses are urged to recognize the role of caregivers in the transplant process, ask about and listen to caregivers' needs, and include caregivers in the plan of care.

  10. Impact of caregivers' unmet needs for supportive care on quality of terminal cancer care delivered and caregiver's workforce performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Min; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Samyong; Choi, Jong Soo; Lim, Ho-Yeong; Choi, Youn Seon; Hong, Young Seon; Kim, Si-Young; Heo, Dae Seog; Kang, Ki Moon; Jeong, Hyun Sik; Lee, Chang Geol; Moon, Do Ho; Choi, Jin-Young; Kong, In Sik; Yun, Young Ho

    2010-06-01

    Family caregivers play an important role in caring for cancer patients, but the impact of caregivers' unmet needs on the quality of end-of-life (EOL) care they deliver and on their workplace performance are less understood. We identified 1,662 family caregivers of cancer patients who had died at any of 17 hospitals in Korea during 2004. The caregivers answered a telephone questionnaire about needs that were not met when they delivered terminal cancer care and how those unmet their needs affected their workplace performance; they also answered the Quality Care Questionnaire-End of Life (QCQ-EOL). Compared with caregivers who did not have unmet needs, caregivers who had unmet needs for symptom management, financial support, or community support showed poorer QCQ-EOL scores (P < 0.01). Caregivers who had unmet needs for financial support (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 7.55; 95% confidential interval (CI) 3.80-15.00), psychosocial support (aOR = 6.24; 95% CI 2.95-13.05), symptom management (aOR = 3.21; 95% CI 2.26-4.54), community support (aOR = 3.82; 95% CI 2.38-6.11), or religious support (aOR = 4.55; 95% CI 1.84-11.26) were more likely to experience work limitations. Caregivers of patients receiving conventional hospital care were more likely to have unmet needs for symptom management (aOR = 1.21; 95% CI 1.00-1.47), psychosocial support (aOR = 1.99; 95% CI 1.37-2.88), and religious support (aOR = 1.73; 95% CI 1.08-2.78) than those of patients receiving palliative hospice care. Caregivers' unmet needs negatively affected both the quality of EOL care they delivered and their workplace performance. More investment in caregiver support and public policies that meet caregiver needs are needed, and hospice use should be encouraged.

  11. Prevalence and correlates of psychiatric morbidity among caregivers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sacrifices made by family caregivers, the adverse ... disorders seen among caregivers, depression was reported to be one of ... In a study of over 2000 families caring for a family member .... deficit/hyperactivity disorder [16.2%]; autism [6.8%]; mood disorder ... with a spectrum of disorders including depression, age-related.

  12. Caregiver burden among relatives of patients with schizophrenia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    both patients and their caregivers.1,2 Caregiver burden in mental illness can either be ... with chronic mental illness.9 Consequently, there is a need to study the burden of ..... References. 1. Kung W. The illness, stigma, culture or immigration?

  13. The relationship between family obligation and religiosity on caregiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epps, Fayron

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between family obligation and religiosity on the positive appraisal of caregiving among African-American, Hispanic and non-Hispanic Caucasian family caregivers of older adults. Roy's adaptation model guided formulation of the aims and study design. A cross-sectional, correlational study design was employed to examine the relationship amongst variables for the family caregiver participants. Study participants (N = 69) completed a demographic tool and four instruments the: (1) Katz index, (2) obligation scale, (3) Duke University religion index, and (4) positive appraisal of care scale. There was a significant correlation between family obligation and positive appraisal of caregiving. However, there was no relationship between the family caregiver's religiosity and positive appraisal of caregiving overall. Demographic variables were also examined to show a higher marginal mean for Hispanic primary caregivers in relation to the positive appraisal of caregiving. Future studies should consider replicating these findings in a larger sample to provide health care professionals with substantial evidence to incorporate culturally sensitive interventions aimed at promoting positive outcomes and healthy family behaviors. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Caregivers' attitudes regarding portion size served to Head Start children

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to identify caregivers' attitudes regarding amounts and types of foods served to Head Start preschoolers using qualitative methods. Researchers conducted 8 focus groups (4 African American; 4 Hispanic) with 33 African American and 29 Hispanic Head Start caregivers. Mode...

  15. Emotional distress among caregivers of patients with epilepsy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Caregivers of patients with epilepsy experience considerable emotional distress. The study aimed to assess the magnitude of the problem in a developing country. Method: A total 166 patients-caregivers were enrolled for the study. They were interviewed using a socio-demographic data collecting sheet and the ...

  16. 75 FR 67903 - National Family Caregivers Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ... can enable workers with caregiver responsibilities to balance work and family obligations more easily... generations of family members. Their efforts are vital to the quality of life of countless American seniors... independent living, as well as compensate family caregivers for their devoted work. Our businesses and...

  17. Determinants of Effective Caregiver Communication After Adolescent Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobart-Porter, Laura; Wade, Shari; Minich, Nori; Kirkwood, Michael; Stancin, Terry; Taylor, Hudson Gerry

    2015-08-01

    To characterize the effects of caregiver mental health and coping strategies on interactions with an injured adolescent acutely after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Multi-site, cross-sectional study. Outpatient setting of 3 tertiary pediatric hospitals and 2 tertiary general medical centers. Adolescents (N = 125) aged 12-17 years, 1-6 months after being hospitalized with complicated mild to severe TBI. Data were collected as part of a multi-site clinical trial of family problem-solving therapy after TBI. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine the relationship of caregiver and environmental characteristics to the dimensions of effective communication, warmth, and negativity during caregiver-adolescent problem-solving discussions. Adolescent and caregiver interactions, as measured by the Iowa Family Interaction Rating Scales. Caregivers who utilized problem-focused coping strategies were rated as having higher levels of effective communication (P teen interactions. Problem-focused coping strategies are associated with higher levels of effective communication and lower levels of caregiver negativity during the initial months after adolescent TBI, suggesting that effective caregiver coping may facilitate better caregiver-adolescent interactions after TBI. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Long-Term Adaptation to Institutionalization in Dementia Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaugler, Joseph E.; Pot, Anne Margriet; Zarit, Steven H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Longitudinal research in dementia has acknowledged the importance of transitions during the course of family caregiving. However, long-term adaptation to institutionalization has received little attention. This study attempts to describe caregivers' adaptation (changes in stress, well-being, and psychosocial resources) to placement up to…

  19. Highly-Valued Reasons Muslim Caregivers Choose Evangelical Christian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbaugh, Andrew E.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated what were the most highly-valued reasons among Muslim caregivers for sending their children to Lebanese evangelical Christian schools. Muslim caregivers (N = 1,403) from four Lebanese evangelical Christian schools responded to determine what were the most highly-valued reasons for sending their children to an evangelical…

  20. Christianity and Resilience as Experienced by Caregivers of Dementia Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackey, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role and relationship of the practice of Christian beliefs and resilience in the context of dementia patient caregivers' lives. The guiding question was "What is the relational nature of the practice of Christian beliefs and resilience in the lived experiences of caregivers of dementia…

  1. Sociodemographic Variation of Caries Risk Factors in Toddlers and Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Eckert

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Dental caries is the most common chronic childhood disease, with numerous identified risk factors. Risk factor differences could indicate the need to target caregiver/patient education/preventive care intervention strategies based on population and/or individual characteristics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate caries risk factors differences by race/ethnicity, income, and education. Methods. We enrolled 396 caregiver-toddler pairs and administered a 105-item questionnaire addressing demographics, access to care, oral bacteria transmission, caregiver's/toddler's dental and medical health practices, caregiver's dental beliefs, and caregiver's/toddler's snacking/drinking habits. Logistic regressions and ANOVAs were used to evaluate the associations of questionnaire responses with caregiver's race/ethnicity, income, and education. Results. Caregivers self-identified as Non-Hispanic African-American (44%, Non-Hispanic White (36%, Hispanic (19%, and “other” (1%. Differences related to race/ethnicity, income, and education were found in all risk factor categories. Conclusions. Planning of caregiver/patient education/preventive care intervention strategies should be undertaken with these caries risk factor differences kept in mind.

  2. The Prince Henry Hospital dementia caregivers' training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodaty, H; Gresham, M; Luscombe, G

    1997-02-01

    To describe the theory, elements and practice of a successful caregiver training programme; and report the 8-year outcome. Prospective, randomized control trial and longitudinal follow-up over approximately 8 years. Psychiatry unit, general teaching hospital, Sydney, Australia. 96 persons less than 80 years old with mild to moderate dementia and their cohabiting caregivers. All patients received a 10-day structured memory retraining and activity programme. Caregivers in the immediate and wait-list caregiver training groups received a structured, residential, intensive 10-day training programme, boosted by follow-ups and telephone conferences over 12 months. Those in the wait-list group entered the programme after waiting 6 months. The third group of caregivers received 10 days' respite (while patients underwent their memory retraining programme) and 12 months booster sessions as for the other groups. Nursing home admission; time until patient death. 64% of patients whose caregivers were in the immediate training group, 53% of wait-list group patients and 70% of memory retraining patients had died. Nursing home admission had occurred in 79% of the immediate training, 83% of the delayed and 90% of the memory retraining group. Eight-year survival analysis indicated that patients whose caregivers received training stayed at home significantly longer (p = 0.037) and tended to live longer (p = 0.08). Caregiver training programmes demonstrably can delay institutionalization of people with dementia.

  3. Caregiving and Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Affected by Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtenay, Ken; Jokinen, Nancy S.; Strydom, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Authors conducted a systematic review of the available Dutch, English, and German language literature for the period 1997-2008 on the current knowledge on social-psychological and pharmacological caregiving with respect to older adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) affected by dementia. Authors note that caregiving occurs on a personal level…

  4. Caregiver burden among relatives of patients with schizophrenia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Caring for patients with schizophrenia places an enormous burden on the caregivers. The magnitude of this problem remains largely unknown in sub-Saharan Africa. Objective. The objective of this study was to determine the nature of the burden reported by caregiving relatives of patients with schizophrenia.

  5. Intestinal Helminths in caregivers working in Orphanages in Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health knowledge and health care practices of caregivers are important determinants of quality of care of any child. These caregivers in closed institutions such as the orphanages could be a sourceof environmental contamination and transmission of diseases including intestinal helminthic infections.This study was carried ...

  6. Supporting home hospice family caregivers: Insights from different perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Lee; Cloyes, Kristin G; Xu, Jiayun; Bellury, Lanell; Berry, Patricia H; Reblin, Maija; Clayton, Margaret F

    2018-04-01

    ABSTRACTObjective:Our intention was to describe and compare the perspectives of national hospice thought leaders, hospice nurses, and former family caregivers on factors that promote or threaten family caregiver perceptions of support. Nationally recognized hospice thought leaders (n = 11), hospice nurses (n = 13), and former family caregivers (n = 14) participated. Interviews and focus groups were audiotaped and transcribed. Data were coded inductively, and codes were hierarchically grouped by topic. Emergent categories were summarized descriptively and compared across groups. Four categories linked responses from the three participant groups (95%, 366/384 codes): (1) essentials of skilled communication (30.6%), (2) importance of building authentic relationships (28%), (3) value of expert teaching (22.4%), and (4) critical role of teamwork (18.3%). The thought leaders emphasized communication (44.6%), caregivers stressed expert teaching (51%), and nurses highlighted teamwork (35.8%). Nurses discussed teamwork significantly more than caregivers (z = 2.2786), thought leaders discussed communication more than caregivers (z = 2.8551), and caregivers discussed expert teaching more than thought leaders (z = 2.1693) and nurses (z = 2.4718; all values of p nurses, and thought leaders. Hospice teams may benefit from further education and training to help cross the schism of family-centered hospice care as a clinical ideal to one where hospice team members can fully support and empower family caregivers as a hospice team member.

  7. [Gift giving and the ethics of the caregiver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassin, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Modern societies establish relationships on a contract basis, but the caregiver relationship invariably involves the notion of a gift. Caring engages the giving / receiving / giving back circle of reciprocity. The caregiving relationship requires a gift ethic which gives meaning to the nurse/patient contract.

  8. Academic Achievement among Adolescents in Cambodia: Does Caregiver Trauma Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Sothy; Mulsow, Miriam; Cleveland, Harrington; Hart, Sybil L.

    2009-01-01

    How will hostilities occurring around today's world influence future generations in affected areas? Cambodia may be one place where this question can be answered, and academic achievement is one way to measure these effects. Cambodian adolescent/caregiver dyads (n=288) were examined for links between caregiver trauma history and adolescent…

  9. Physical and Mental Health Effects of Family Caregiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Richard; Sherwood, Paula R.

    2008-01-01

    The associations between physical and psychological health and being an informal caregiver are well established. In this article, "caregiving" denotes care that is provided by a family member or friend rather than by a professional who is reimbursed for services. Clinical observation and early empirical research showed that assuming a caregiving…

  10. Caregiver Attitudes to Gynaecological Health of Women with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Lin, Jin-Ding; Chu, Cordia M.; Chen, Li-Mei

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is little information available related to the reproductive health of people with intellectual disability (ID). The aims of the present study are to describe caregiver attitudes and to examine determinants of gynaecological health for women with ID. Method: We recruited 1152 caregivers (response rate = 71.87%) and analysed their…

  11. Perceptions among primary caregivers about the etiology of delirium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study caregivers' perceptions about the cause of delirium and their distress caused by symptoms of delirium. Method: Adult caregivers of patients with delirium, who gave consent, were asked about their perceptions of the cause of delirium. Patients were assessed for delirium by using the delirium rating ...

  12. Caregiver Life Satisfaction: Relationship to Youth Symptom Severity through Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athay, M. Michele

    2012-01-01

    This study utilized the Satisfaction with Life Scale to investigate the life satisfaction of caregivers for youth receiving mental health services (N = 383). Specifically, this study assessed how caregiver life satisfaction relates to youth symptom severity throughout treatment. Hierarchical linear modeling with a time-varying covariate was used…

  13. Relationships between quality of life and family function in caregiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Marcos Manuel Á

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are caregivers who see their quality of life (QoL impaired due to the demands of their caregiving tasks, while others manage to adapt and overcome the crises successfully. The influence of the family function in the main caregiver's situation has not been the subject of much evaluation. The aim of this study is to analyse the relationship between the functionality of the family and the QoL of caregivers of dependent relatives. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study including 153 caregivers. Setting: Two health centers in the city of Salamanca(Spain. Caregiver variables analysed: demographic characteristics, care recipient features; family functionality (Family APGAR-Q and QoL (Ruiz-Baca-Q perceived by the caregiver. Five multiple regressions are performed considering global QoL and each of the four QoL dimensions as dependent variables. The Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA was used to study the influence of the family function questionnaire on QoL. Results Family function is the only one of the variables evaluated that presented an association both with global QoL and with each of the four individual dimensions (p Conclusion We find an association between family functionality and the caregiver's QoL. This relation holds for both the global measure of QoL and each of its four individual dimensions.

  14. Clinical Efficacy of Psychoeducational Interventions with Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limiñana-Gras, Rosa M.; Colodro-Conde, Lucía; Cuéllar-Flores, Isabel; Sánchez-López, M. Pilar

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the efficacy of psychoeducational interventions geared to reducing psychological distress for caregivers in a sample of 90 family caregivers of elderly dependent (78 women and 12 men). We conducted an analysis of the statistical and clinical significance of the changes observed in psychological health…

  15. Caregiver Asthma in Urban Families: Implications for School Absenteeism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Robin S.; Miller, Sarah; Leibach, Gillian G.; Dahl, Alexandra L.; Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne

    2018-01-01

    Asthma is a significant contributor to missed school days, especially for children living in urban settings. This preliminary study examined the impact of caregiver asthma on school absenteeism in a sample of 102 urban children with asthma from African American, Latino, and non-Latino White backgrounds. Caregivers and children participated in a…

  16. Family Stigma and Caregiver Burden in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Perla; Mittelman, Mary S.; Goldstein, Dovrat; Heinik, Jeremia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The stigma experienced by the family members of an individual with a stigmatized illness is defined by 3 dimensions: caregiver stigma, lay public stigma, and structural stigma. Research in the area of mental illness suggests that caregivers' perception of stigma is associated with increased burden. However, the effect of stigma on…

  17. 38 CFR 52.71 - Participant and family caregiver responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....71 Participant and family caregiver responsibilities. The program management has a written statement of participant and family caregiver responsibilities that are posted in the facility and provided to... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Participant and family...

  18. Comparisons Between Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Informal Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy J. Karlin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on understanding similarities and differences between non-Hispanic White and Hispanic informal caregivers of those with Alzheimer’s disease. Comparisons take place between caregivers reporting high levels of burden as indicated by the Zarit Burden Inventory. Data suggest similarities and differences between Hispanic (n = 17 and non-Hispanic White (n = 17 caregivers in this study in several areas. Hispanic caregivers indicated fewer sources of income, had less investment money for family member’s treatment, reported caregiving as a greater interference with life’s accomplishments, and indicated a lesser percentage of the total care cost provided by the family member. Non-Hispanic White caregivers reported having completed a higher level of formal education and that organized religion’s importance prior to becoming a caregiver was not quite as important as compared with the Hispanic care provider. With current trends, of demographic and cultural changes, it is crucial to fully understand the changing role and needs of both Hispanic and non-Hispanic White caregivers.

  19. Family Caregivers' Patterns of Positive and Negative Affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Suzanne M.; Zarit, Steven H.; Duncan, Larissa G.; Rovine, Michael J.; Femia, Elia E.

    2007-01-01

    Stressful and positive family caregiving experiences were examined as predictors of caregivers' patterns of positive and negative affect in a sample of families providing care for a relative with dementia (N = 234). Four affect pattern groups were identified: (a) Well Adjusted (i.e., high positive affect, low negative affect); (b) Ambiguous (i.e.,…

  20. How Do Family Caregivers Describe Their Needs for Professional Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedidia, Michael J.; Tiedemann, Amy

    2008-01-01

    How aligned are the needs of family caregivers with the professional supports available to them? This article presents the results of the first phase of a study, in which four focus group interviews were conducted with a total of 40 family caregivers to elicit their views of the kinds of assistance they expect from nurses and social workers. The…

  1. Positive and negative caregiver experiences in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Jens Einar; Lysaker, Paul H.; Harder, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    influenced their reports of both positive and negative caregiving experiences. Design A prospective consecutive cross-sectional study. Methods Forty caregivers of patients with first-episode psychosis were interviewed using semi-structured interview and questionnaires. Results Greater levels of distress...

  2. Burnout and reactions to social comparison information among volunteer caregivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Zee, K.I.; Bakker, A.B.; Buunk, Abraham (Bram)

    2001-01-01

    The present study focused on social comparison processes among volunteer caregivers of terminally ill patients in relation to burnout. First, caregivers' (N = 80) affective reactions to a bogus interview with fellow volunteer workers who were either coping better or worse were considered. Upward

  3. Health Providers' Counselling of Caregivers in the Integrated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Health providers performed well in assessing the child's problem (85%); listening (100%); use of simple language (95%); use of kind tone of voice (99%); showing interest in caregivers (99%); giving feeding ... Keywords: Child, preschool; infant; health-provider; caregiver; counselling; IMCI-counselling; Uganda

  4. Family Conflict as a Mediator of Caregiver Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharlach, Andrew; Li, Wei; Dalvi, Tapashi B.

    2006-01-01

    The present study used structural equation modeling to examine the potential mediating effect of family conflict on caregiver strain in a randomly drawn household sample of 650 adults with primary care responsibility for an adult age 50 or older with a mental disability. Caregiver strain was directly influenced by the conflict, disagreements, and…

  5. Family Dynamics and Personal Strengths among Dementia Caregivers in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnasseh, Aaliah G.; Trujillo, Michael A.; Peralta, Silvina Victoria; Stolfi, Miriam E.; Morelli, Eliana; Perrin, Paul B.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether healthier family dynamics were associated with higher personal strengths of resilience, sense of coherence, and optimism among dementia caregivers in Argentina. Caregivers are usually required to assist individuals with dementia, and family members have typically fulfilled that role. Personal strengths such as resilience, sense of coherence, and optimism have been shown to protect caregivers from some of the negative experiences of providing care, though the family-related variables associated with these personal strengths are largely unknown. Hierarchical multiple regressions investigated the extent to which family dynamics variables are associated with each of the caregiver personal strengths after controlling for demographic and caregiver characteristics. A sample of 105 caregivers from Argentina completed a set of questionnaires during a neurologist visit. Family dynamics explained 32% of the variance in resilience and 39% of the variance in sense of coherence. Greater family empathy and decreased family problems were uniquely associated with higher resilience. Greater communication and decreased family problems were uniquely associated with higher sense of coherence. Optimism was not found to be significantly associated with family dynamics. These results suggest that caregiver intervention research focused on the family may help improve caregiver personal strengths in Argentina and other Latin American countries. PMID:27413574

  6. Family Dynamics and Personal Strengths among Dementia Caregivers in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaliah G. Elnasseh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined whether healthier family dynamics were associated with higher personal strengths of resilience, sense of coherence, and optimism among dementia caregivers in Argentina. Caregivers are usually required to assist individuals with dementia, and family members have typically fulfilled that role. Personal strengths such as resilience, sense of coherence, and optimism have been shown to protect caregivers from some of the negative experiences of providing care, though the family-related variables associated with these personal strengths are largely unknown. Hierarchical multiple regressions investigated the extent to which family dynamics variables are associated with each of the caregiver personal strengths after controlling for demographic and caregiver characteristics. A sample of 105 caregivers from Argentina completed a set of questionnaires during a neurologist visit. Family dynamics explained 32% of the variance in resilience and 39% of the variance in sense of coherence. Greater family empathy and decreased family problems were uniquely associated with higher resilience. Greater communication and decreased family problems were uniquely associated with higher sense of coherence. Optimism was not found to be significantly associated with family dynamics. These results suggest that caregiver intervention research focused on the family may help improve caregiver personal strengths in Argentina and other Latin American countries.

  7. Greater Caregiving Risk, Better Infant Memory Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifkin-Graboi, Anne; Quan, Jeffry; Richmond, Jenny; Goh, Shaun Kok Yew; Sim, Lit Wee; Chong, Yap Seng; Francois-Bureau, Jean; Chen, Helen; Qiu, Anqi

    2018-04-16

    Poor early life care often relates to cognitive difficulties. However, newer work suggests that in early-life, adversity may associate with enhanced or accelerated neurodevelopment. We examine associations between postnatal caregiving risks (i.e., higher self-reported postnatal-anxiety and lower observed maternal sensitivity) and infant relational memory (i.e. via deferred imitation and relational binding). Using subsamples of 67-181 infants (aged 433-477 post-conceptual days, or roughly five to seven months since birth) taking part in the GUSTO study, we found such postnatal caregiving risk significantly predictive of "better" performance on a relational binding task following a brief delay, after Bonferroni adjustments. Subsequent analyses suggest that the association between memory and these risks may specifically be apparent amongst infants spending at least 50% of their waking hours in the presence of their mothers. Our findings echo neuroimaging research concerning similar risk exposure and larger infant hippocampal volume, and likewise underscore the importance of considering developmental context in understanding early life experience. With this in mind, these findings caution against the use of cognitive outcomes as indices of experienced risk. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Clinical photography among African cleft caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Babatunde Olaitan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this paper is to document the practice of photography among clinicians whose daily work depends and is influenced so much by medical photography. Materials and Methods: Questionnaires documenting the bio data, place of practice, and experience of cleft caregivers with clinical photography were distributed. Knowledge of rules guiding clinical photography and adherence to them were also asked. Types of camera used were documented and knowledge of the value of clinical photographs were also inquired. Results: Plastic surgeons constitute the highest proportion of 27 (38.6%, followed by Oral and Maxillofacial surgeons with 14 (20.0%. Twenty one (30.0% of the respondents always, 21 (30.0% often, 12 (17.1% frequently, while 9 respondents sometimes took photographs of their patients. Suggested uses of clinical photographs included training, 52 (74.3%, education, 51 (72.9%, medicolegal, 44 (62.9% and advertisement, 44 (62.9% among others. Twenty two (31.4% did not know that there were standard guidelines for taking clinical photographs. Twenty three (32.9% of them did not seek the consent of the patients before taking clinical photographs. Conclusion: While the practice of clinical photography is high among African cleft caregivers, there is a need for further education on the issues of standard rules and obtaining consent from patients.

  9. The Burden of Schizophrenia on Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Adana

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Caregivers’ burden in schizophrenia is a complex concept often with negative connotations. The concept refers to the impact of having a schizophrenia patient in the family including emotional, psychological, physical, economic distress and feelings of shame, embarrassment, guilt, and self-blame expe-rienced by the caregivers. There are objective and subjective aspects of care-givers’ burden. The objective burden refers to observed and verifiable impact of the diseased person in the family such as the patients disturbing behaviors, economic difficulties, and loss of income, restricted social activities, distressed household atmosphere, and undesirable influences on physical and mental health of the family members. The subjective burden refers to the extent of emotional distress caused by the objective burden. The data in the pertinent literature suggest an association between caregivers’ burden and sex, ethnicity, culture, caregivers’ health and quality of life, social support, and the symptomatology as presented by the patient. In order to promote mental health of schizophrenia patients along with their caregivers, the mental health workers should strive to find the means of supporting, informing, and cooperating with the family members. Psychosocial interventions designed for families and psychosocial rehabilitations programs designed for schizophrenia patients are effective means of easing caregivers’ burden.

  10. Stressors and life goals of caregivers of individuals with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raver, Sharon A; Michalek, Anne P M; Gillespie, Amy M

    2011-01-01

    Caregivers of individuals with disabilities can experience stress as they manage caregiving responsibilities while they attempt to balance family, work, and the satisfaction of their personal goals. In this pilot study, 31 caregivers of individuals with a variety of disabilities completed a quantitative-qualitative survey. A statistically significant relationship was found between the age and severity of disability of the family member receiving care, the length of time care had been provided, the educational level and the relationship of the caregiver to the family member and reported feelings of optimism, humbleness, quality of family relationships, financial concerns, loss of control, and hope. When life goals were probed, the most common reported were achieving financial stability, having a strong, healthy family, and experiencing happiness. The implications for supporting caregivers and their families are discussed.

  11. Teaching Caregivers to Administer Eye Drops, Transdermal Patches, and Suppositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindauer, Allison; Sexson, Kathryn; Harvath, Theresa A

    2017-05-01

    : This article is the third in a series, Supporting Family Caregivers: No Longer Home Alone, published in collaboration with the AARP Public Policy Institute. Results of focus groups conducted as part of the AARP Public Policy Institute's No Longer Home Alone video project supported evidence that family caregivers aren't being given the information they need to manage the complex care regimens of their family members. This series of articles and accompanying videos aims to help nurses provide caregivers with the tools they need to manage their family member's medications. Each article explains the principles nurses should consider and reinforce with caregivers and is accompanied by a video for the caregiver to watch. The third video can be accessed at http://links.lww.com/AJN/A76.

  12. Caregiving: The impact on emotional support for single women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnley, C S

    1987-01-01

    Even though filial caregivers are typically daughters rather than sons, examinations of caregiving have not adequately considered the impact of gender and marital status differences on the support systems that mediate the strain of caring. Because of competing demands on time and energy, caregivers make many changes in their personal activities while maintaining work and immediate family responsibilities. The friendships that provide emotional support for singles are perceived as less important than familial relationships. Therefore, the assumption is made that the single adult daughter has less to give up as compared to her married siblings. The parallel emotional support systems of the married and single caregivers go unrecognized. This study of never-married women over age 30 reveals that these caregivers essentially foreclosed social relationships in order to provide care. Copyright © 1987. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Private prayer among Alzheimer's caregivers: mediating burden and resiliency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, Scott E; Vonk, M Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    This study examined whether the coping method of private prayer served as a protective factor of resiliency among a sample (N = 304) of Alzheimer's caregivers. Participants in caregiver support groups completed questionnaires that assessed a number of constructs, including caregiving burden; prayer frequency; use of private prayer as a means of coping; and perceived resiliency. The sample averaged a moderate level of burden and a great extent of prayer usage. Caregiving burden had positively affected the extent of prayer usage and negatively influenced perceived resiliency. Findings from hierarchical regression analysis showed that caregiving burden and private prayer significantly influenced variation in perceived resiliency scores. Results from a regression equation series and path analysis provided support for prayer as a mediator between burden and perceived resiliency. Implications for social work practice and education are discussed.

  14. Caregiver roles in families affected by Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røthing, Merete; Malterud, Kirsti; Frich, Jan C

    2013-01-01

    AIM: The objective of this study was to explore family caregivers' experiences with the impact of Huntington's disease (HD) on the family structure and roles in the family. METHODOLOGY: We interviewed 15 family caregivers in families affected by HD, based on a semi-structured interview guide...... for impairments by taking on adult responsibilities, and in some families, a child had the role as main caregiver. The increasing need for care could cause conflicts between the role as family member and family caregiver. The burden of care within the family could fragment and isolate the family. CONCLUSIONS......: Huntington's disease has a major impact on family systems. Caregiver roles are shaped by impairments in the affected family member and corresponding dynamic adoption and change in roles within the family. Making assessments of the family structure and roles, professionals may understand more about how...

  15. CAREGIVER BURDEN AMONG PEOPLE CARING FOR PATIENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Bansal

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Caregivers of patients suffering from mental illness report burden in different areas including effects on family functioning, psychological problems, financial problems and health. The aim of the study is to determine the sociodemographic profile and caregiver burden among caregivers of persons with schizophrenia and to study the effect of patients’ psychopathology on caregiver burden scale. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study was conducted in the Psychiatry Department, Government Medical College, Amritsar. A sample size of 34 was taken who were primary caregivers (preferably parents or spouse of schizophrenia patients diagnosed using ICD10. Measures included caregiver’s demographic variables and caregiver’s burden using the Zarit burden interview and PANSS scale in patients. Statistical Analysis- Data was analysed using SPSS software version 21. RESULTS The mean age of the caregiver was 42 SD (12.16 years. The majority of the caregivers were parents, married and employed. The mean average score of the responses to Zarit burden interview was (SD=59.52 ± 20.92. Majority of the caregivers experienced severe burden (52.9%, 9 (26.4% caregivers had reported moderate burden and 6 (17.6% had reported mild burden. The mean duration of illness was 6.89 (SD=5.03 years. The level of burden experienced was significantly associated with total PANSS score, negative symptoms, positive symptoms, general psychopathology score and duration of schizophrenia illness (p=0.00. CONCLUSION There is need for psychological assistance and social support for the vulnerable caregivers to help them reduce the burden levels and employ positive coping strategies.

  16. Bullying at school: Agreement between caregivers' and children's perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Lucas G; Scherñuk Schroh, Jordán C; Panizoni, Estefanía P; Jouglard, Ezequiel F; Serralunga, M Gabriela; Esandi, M Eugenia

    2017-02-01

    Bullying at school is usually kept secret from adults, making them unaware of the situation. To describe caregivers' and children's perception and assess their agreement in terms of bullying situations. Cross-sectional study in children aged 8-12 years old attending public schools and their caregivers. The questionnaire on preconceptions of intimidation and bullying among peers (PRECONCIMEI) (child/caregiver version) was used. Studied outcome measures: Scale of bullying, causes of bullying, child involvement in bullying, communication in bullying situations. Univariate and bivariate analyses were done and agreement was estimated using the Kappa index. A total of 529 child/caregiver dyads participated. Among caregivers, 35% stated that bullying occurred in their children's schools. Among children, 133 (25%) admitted to being involved: 70 (13%) were victims of bullying, 40 (8%) were bullies, and 23 (4%) were bullied and perpetrated bullying. Among the 63 caregivers of children who admitted to be bullies, 78% did not consider their children capable of perpetrating bullying. Among children who were bullied or who both suffered bullying and bullied others, 69.9% (65/93) indicated that "if they were the victims of bullying, they would tell their family." However, 89.2% (83/93) of caregivers considered that their children would tell them if they were ever involved in these situations. Agreement was observed in terms of a positive communication (Kappa = -0.04) between 62.6% (57/91) of the child/caregiver dyads school bullying. Disagreement was observed between children and their caregivers in relation to the frequency and communication of bullying situations. Few caregivers whose children admitted to being involved in these situations believed it was a possibility. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría

  17. Treatment motivation among caregivers and adolescents with substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, T; Earnshaw, V A; Menino, D; Bogart, L M; Levy, S

    2017-04-01

    Substance use disorders (SUDs) in adolescence have negative long-term health effects, which can be mitigated through successful treatment. Caregivers play a central role in adolescent treatment involvement; however, studies have not examined treatment motivation and pressures to enter treatment in caregiver/adolescent dyads. Research suggests that internally motivated treatment (in contrast to coerced treatment) tends to lead to better outcomes. We used Self-determination theory (SDT) to examine intersecting motivational narratives among caregivers and adolescents in SUD treatment. Relationships between motivation, interpretation of caregiver pressures, adolescent autonomy, and relatedness were also explored. Adolescents in SUD treatment and their caregivers (N Dyads =15) were interviewed about treatment experiences. Interviews were coded for treatment motivation, including extrinsic (e.g., motivated by punishment), introjected (e.g., motivated by guilt), and identified/integrated motivation (e.g., seeing a behavior as integral to the self). Internalization of treatment motivation, autonomy support/competence (e.g., caregiver support for adolescent decisions), and relatedness (e.g., acceptance and support) were also coded. Four dyadic categories were identified: agreement that treatment was motivated by the adolescent (intrinsic); agreement that treatment was motivated by the caregiver (extrinsic); agreement that treatment was motivated by both, or a shift towards adolescent control (mixed/transitional); and disagreement (adolescents and caregivers each claimed they motivated treatment; conflicting). Autonomy support and relatedness were most prominent in intrinsic dyads, and least prominent in extrinsic dyads. The mixed/transitional group was also high in autonomy support and relatedness. The extrinsic group characterized caregiver rules as an unwelcome mechanism for behavioral control; caregivers in the other groups saw rules as a way to build adolescent

  18. Reciprocity, Elder Satisfaction, and Caregiver Stress and Burden: The Exchange of Aid in the Family Caregiving Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Jeffrey W.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examined how older mother's reciprocation of assistance provided by caregiving daughter simultaneously influences satisfaction of mother and stress/burden of caregiver in 135 mother-daughter dyads. Results indicated that reciprocity did not directly or indirectly affect mother's satisfaction but did significantly reduce stress/burden of daughters.…

  19. Associations of Caregiver Stress with Working Conditions, Caregiving Practices, and Child Behaviour in Home-Based Child Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusby, Julie C.; Jones, Laura Backen; Crowley, Ryann; Smolkowski, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Home-based child caregivers face unique stressors related to the nature of their work. One hundred and fifty-five home-based child care providers in Oregon, USA, participated in this cross-sectional correlational study. We investigated associations between indicators of caregiver stress and child care working conditions, the quality of caregiver…

  20. Psychosocial experiences and needs of Australian caregivers of people with stroke: prognosis messages, caregiver resilience, and relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Masry, Yasmeen; Mullan, Barbara; Hackett, Maree

    2013-01-01

    Despite stroke being the most common form of cerebrovascular disease, there has been relatively little attention paid to the psychosocial experiences and needs of Australian caregivers of people who have had a stroke. Twenty Australian informal caregivers and 10 stroke survivors participated in individual semi-structured qualitative interviews covering all aspects of caregiving, including stroke survivors' views on their caregiver's experiences. The 5 interrelated topics most discussed were changes in relationships and support services, including being told to expect a poor outcome; caregiver attributes and coping strategies; stroke survivor limitations; external employment and financial stressors; and unexpected positive changes in relationships and priorities. Caring for a stroke survivor involves a complex interaction of these factors that appear to be moderated by the quality of the pre-existing stroke survivor-caregiver relationship and the poststroke coping strategies used. Particular attention should be paid to how prognosis is conveyed and whether appropriate outpatient services are available. Clinicians should also consider discussing appropriate caregiver coping strategies and the quality of the relationship between the stroke survivor and caregiver.

  1. The Impact of Respite Programming on Caregiver Resilience in Dementia Care: A Qualitative Examination of Family Caregiver Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Emily; Struckmeyer, Kristopher M.

    2018-01-01

    Family members with a relative with dementia often experience what has been called the “unexpected career of caregiver” and face multifaceted, complex, and stressful life situations that can have important consequences. This exploratory study was designed to address this major public health challenge through the lens of caregiver resilience and caregiver respite programming. While many caregivers report that they derive significant emotional and spiritual rewards from their caregiving role, many also experience physical and emotional problems directly related to the stress and demands of daily care. One way to alleviate these demands is the growing respite care field, providing services in a variety of settings for caregiver. Through qualitative analysis from face-to-face interviews with 33 family caregivers of individuals with dementia, several themes emerged describing the path to caregiver resilience which include family dynamics, isolation, financial struggles, seeking respite, and acceptance. While much research focuses on a caregiving burden perspective, the innovation of the present study is applying the resilience framework to outcomes from respite programming. PMID:29424252

  2. Combined life satisfaction of persons with stroke and their caregivers: associations with caregiver burden and the impact of stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Koch Lena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the life satisfaction of the person with stroke combined with their caregiver, i.e. the dyad, despite the fact that life satisfaction is an important rehabilitation outcome. The aim of this study was to describe the dyads combined life satisfaction and to understand this in relationship to the perceived impact of stroke in everyday life and caregiver burden. Methods In this cross-sectional study, the life satisfaction of persons and their informal caregivers was measured in 81 dyads one year post stroke. Their global life satisfaction, measured with LiSat-11, was combined to a dyad score and the dyads were then categorized as satisfied, dissatisfied or discordant. The groups were compared and analyzed regarding levels of caregiver burden, measured with the Caregiver Burden scale, and the perceived impact of stroke in everyday life, measured with the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS. Results The satisfied dyads comprised 40%, dissatisfied 26% and those that were discordant 34%. The satisfied dyads reported a significantly lower impact of the stroke in everyday life compared with the dyads that were not satisfied. As expected, dyads that were not satisfied reported a significantly greater caregiver burden compared with the satisfied dyads. The discordant group was further broken down into a group of dissatisfied and satisfied caregivers. The caregivers that were not satisfied in the discordant group perceived a significantly greater level of caregiver burden compared with the satisfied group. Even caregivers who were satisfied with life but whose care recipients were not satisfied reported caregiver burden. Conclusions Measuring combined life satisfaction provides a unique focus and appears to be a feasible way of attaining the dyads' perspective. The findings suggest that those dyads with a discordant life satisfaction could be vulnerable because of the caregivers' reported caregiver burden. These findings

  3. Child-rearing practices of primary caregivers of children with sickle cell disease: the perspective of professionals and caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, R B; McKellop, J M; Vannatta, K; Kalinyak, K

    1998-04-01

    To obtain caregiver and medical professional opinions regarding the child-rearing practices of caregivers of children with sickle cell diseases (SCD). We obtained self-reports of parenting practices from 48 caregivers of children with SCD and 48 caregivers of matched classroom comparison peers using the Child-Rearing Practices Report (CRPR). CRPR ratings were also obtained from 12 experts in pediatric SCD regarding their predictions of how a parent of a child with SCD would respond. The experts predicted differences in protectiveness, discipline, and excessive worry. Objective interim and lifetime illness severity scores were obtained for the children with SCD. Caregivers showed similarity between the two groups, disagreement with the experts, and minimal relationship to illness severity. Experts who work with children with chronic illnesses such as SCD seem to have stereotyped ideas that do not correspond with parental reports of their child-rearing practices, suggesting the need for careful clinical evaluations.

  4. Factors Underpinning Caregiver Burden in Frontotemporal Dementia Differ in Spouses and their Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaizik, Cassandra; Caga, Jashelle; Camino, Julieta; O’Connor, Claire M.; McKinnon, Colleen; Oyebode, Jan R.; Piguet, Olivier; Hodges, John R.; Mioshi, Eneida

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this observational study were to (1) compare spousal and child caregiver burden; (2) compare co-resident and live-out child caregiver burden; and (3) investigate factors influencing spousal and child caregiver burden. Data was collected from 90 caregivers of people with frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) recruited from the Frontotemporal Dementia Research Group (Frontier) at Neuroscience Research, Australia. Of this caregiver group, 43 were spousal caregivers and 47 were child caregivers. Caregiver burden and emotional state were evaluated using the short Zarit Burden Interview and the short version of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-21. The Social Network Index was applied to ascertain the social network of the caregiver, while the Intimate Bond Measure was used to evaluate the current quality of the relationship between the caregiver and the person with dementia. The Frontotemporal Dementia Rating Scale was used to assess severity of dementia. Spousal and child caregivers experienced similar levels of burden, depression, anxiety, and stress, regardless of disease severity. Co-resident child caregivers had smaller social networks and greater burden than live-out caregivers. Dementia severity was key in spousal caregiver burden, whereas caregiver depression was most important in child caregiver burden. Child and spousal caregivers of individuals with FTD share similar levels of burden, influenced by different factors. Future interventions need to account for these differences. PMID:28106550

  5. The burden on informal caregivers of people with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Alan D; Morant, Nicola; Goodwin, Guy M

    2005-01-01

    Caregivers of people with bipolar disorder may experience a different quality of burden than is seen with other illnesses. A better understanding of their concerns is necessary to improve the training of professionals working with this population. Conceptualizing caregiver burden in a conventional medical framework may not focus enough on issues important to caregivers, or on cultural and social issues. Perceptions of caregivers about bipolar disorder have important effects on levels of burden experienced. It is important to distinguish between caregivers' experience of this subjective burden and objective burden as externally appraised. Caregivers' previous experiences of health services may influence their beliefs about the illness. Caregiver burden is associated with depression, which affects patient recovery by adding stress to the living environment. The objective burden on caregivers of patients with bipolar disorder is significantly higher than for those with unipolar depression. Caregivers of bipolar patients have high levels of expressed emotion, including critical, hostile, or over-involved attitudes. Several measures have been developed to assess the care burden of patients with depressive disorders, but may be inappropriate for patients with bipolar disorder because of its cyclical nature and the stresses arising from manic and hypomanic episodes. Inter-episode symptoms pose another potential of burden in patients with bipolar disorder. Subsyndromal depressive symptoms are common in this phase of the illness, resulting in severe and widespread impairment of function. Despite the importance of assessing caregiver burden in bipolar disorder, relevant literature is scarce. The specific effects of mania and inter-episode symptoms have not been adequately addressed, and there is a lack of existing measures to assess burden adequately, causing uncertainty regarding how best to structure family interventions to optimally alleviate burden. The relatively few

  6. EFFECTS OF REHABILITATION SERVICES ON ANXIETY, DEPRESSION, CARE-GIVING BURDEN AND PERCEIVED SOCIAL SUPPORT OF STROKE CAREGIVERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Yavuz Karahan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few data are available on the specific care giving-related problems of stroke patient’s caregivers and factors that influence the burden of these caregivers. Aim: To study the influences of the active rehabilitation process on anxiety, depression, care burden and perceived social support level of stroke patients caregivers. Design: A prospective clinical trial. Setting: Patients and caregivers entering a rehabilitation program at a university hospital in Turkey. Populations: Ninety patients with a first episode of stroke and 90 caregivers responsible for their care were recruited for our study. Methods: Patients and caregivers were assessed before and after the active rehabilitation process. The functional disability level of the patients was assessed by Functional Independence Measure (FIM. The Beck Anxiety Scale (BAS and the Beck Depression Scale (BDS were used for anxiety and depression assessment, the Zarit Care Burden Scale (ZCBS for care burden assessment and the Multi-Dimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MDSPSS for perceived social support assessment. Results: A statistically significant rise is observed in the special person sub-assessment of MDSPSS in both female and male caregivers. Also, a significant decrease in care burden, anxiety and depression levels of caregivers was noted after the rehabilitation program (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Caregivers accept the rehabilitation period as important social support in addition to the support provided by family and friends. Also, our positive results were associated with an improvement in the patients’ functional level and an increase in the acquisition of knowledge and skill required of caregivers in order to provide care during rehabilitation. Clinical Rehabilitation Impact: The rehabilitation team should be aware of the fact that the perceived care burden may be greater due to the lack of knowledge concerning available resources and due to the inability to cope with

  7. Family caregivers as partners in care transitions: The caregiver advise record and enable act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Eric A

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this Perspective was to provide guidance to hospitalists and hospital clinical leadership on how to implement the Caregiver Advise Record and Enable (CARE) Act, which has been passed into law in 30 US states and territories. Specifically, the objective is 3-fold: (1) increase awareness among hospitalists and encourage them to begin to prepare for implementation, (2) explore the impetus for this legislation, and (3) provide a list of suggested resources geared to both family caregivers and healthcare professionals that may be helpful in preparation for implementing the CARE Act. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2015;11:883-885. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  8. CAREGIVERS' KNOWLEDGE AND HOME MANAGEMENT OF FEVER IN CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koech, P J; Onyango, F E; Jowi, C

    2014-05-01

    Fever is one of the most common complaints presented to the Paediatric Emergency Unit (PEU). It is a sign that there is an underlying pathologic process, the most common being infection. Many childhood illnesses are accompanied by fever, many of which are treated at home prior to presentation to hospital. Most febrile episodes are benign. Caregivers are the primary contacts to children with fever. Adequate caregivers' knowledge and proper management of fever at home leads to better management of febrile illnesses and reduces complications. To determine the caregivers' knowledge and practices regarding fever in children. A cross-sectional study. Peadiatric Emergency Unit at Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) SUBJECTS: Two hundred and fifty caregivers of children under 12 years presenting with fever in August to October 2011 to the PEU. Three quarters of the caregivers' defined fever correctly. Their knowledge on the normal body was at 47.6%. Infection was cited as the leading cause of fever (95.2%). Brain damage (77.6%) and dehydration (65.6%) were viewed as the most common complication. Fever was treated at home by 97.2% of caregivers, most of them used medication. Fever was defined correctly by 75.2% of the study participants and a majority of them used touch to detect fever. Fever was managed at home with medications. Public Health Education should be implemented in order to enlighten caregivers on fever and advocate for the use of a clinical thermometer to monitor fever at home.

  9. Family caregivers: Competence in the care of the chronically ill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Marina Vega Angarita

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Because of the high demand and costs of care, chronic diseases have shown an increasing number of caregivers who develop their role without the required training and skill. Objective: To describe the capacity for home care of caregivers of patients with chronic illness in a service provider institution of San José de Cúcuta. Materials and methods: Descriptive quantitative cross-sectional study, developed in the fi rst half of 2017. The sample was composed by 360 caregivers of patients with chronic disease. We used the instruments developed by the Chronic Patient Care Group of the Faculty of Nursing of the National University of Colombia called: GCPC-UN-C © - technical characterization chart for family caregivers of patients with chronic non-transferable disease and the instrument “Caring” - short version to measure the competence of care at home. Results: In the study, low and medium levels of competence of the caregivers were reported in the exercise of their role, and the categories Knowledge and Enjoyment (Welfare were more affected. It is important to note that caregivers with a high level of competence were not reported. Conclusion: The results show that the need for nursing intervention in strengthening the competence of caregivers remains an important constant of professional performance.

  10. Caregiver coping with the mentally ill: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azman, Azlinda; Jamir Singh, Paramjit Singh; Sulaiman, Jamalludin

    2017-04-01

    Mental illness is a disease that affects millions of people every year. It not only causes stress to the mentally ill patients, but also for the family members who provide them the care. The family caregivers, therefore need some form of coping strategies in dealing with their mentally ill family members. This qualitative study aims at identifying and analysing the coping strategies adopted by the family caregivers in dealing with their mentally ill family members. A total of 15 family caregivers from the state of Kedah, Malaysia participated in the face-to-face semi structured interview. The study findings identified an array of coping strategies used by the family caregivers, including religious coping, emotional coping, acceptance, becoming engaged in leisure activities, and the use of traditional healing to help them cope with their mentally ill members. Suggestions and conclusions: Study suggests that the family caregivers should engage themselves in social support groups to learn about and obtain the positive coping strategies used by other caregivers who have similar experiences in caring for the mentally ill. Study also suggests that they should get appropriate training from the mental health professionals in order to enhance the caregivers' coping skills.

  11. [The profile of caregivers to pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Stella Pegoraro; Bueno, Denise

    2018-05-01

    The scope of this study was to establish the profile of caregivers of pediatric patients diagnosed with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). It was a cross-sectional, descriptive and prospective study in which the caregivers of fibrocystic patients were interviewed during pharmaceutical consultation in a reference center of a University Hospital in southern Brazil. General information was obtained about the caregivers and about their understanding of the disease, drug consumption and dynamics of treatment at home and at school. Seventy-five caregivers were interviewed. Most of them were female, 37.3 years old on average, mothers of the patients who did not work outside the home. Seventy-one caregivers declared difficulties in drug acquisition and patient support associations were highlighted as the main alternative to avoid the interruption of treatment. Another fact observed was the overload of the caregiving process on the shoulders of only one caregiver resulting in social and economic impacts and changes to the family's daily routine. This fact emphasizes the need of intervention by a qualified multidisciplinary team to identify and alleviate difficulties, investing in interpersonal relations and administering care.

  12. Teaching Family Caregivers to Assist Safely with Mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell-Cope, Gail; Pippins, Karla M; Young, Heather M

    2017-12-01

    : This article is part of a series, Supporting Family Caregivers: No Longer Home Alone, published in collaboration with the AARP Public Policy Institute. Results of focus groups, conducted as part of the AARP Public Policy Institute's No Longer Home Alone video project, supported evidence that family caregivers aren't given the information they need to manage the complex care regimens of family members. This series of articles and accompanying videos aims to help nurses provide caregivers with the tools they need to manage their family member's health care at home.The articles in this new installment of the series explain principles for promoting safe mobility that nurses should reinforce with family caregivers. Each article also includes an informational tear sheet-Information for Family Caregivers-that contains links to instructional videos. To use this series, nurses should read the article first, so they understand how best to help family caregivers, and then encourage the caregivers to watch the videos and ask questions. For additional information, see Resources for Nurses.

  13. Challenges and Strategies for Hospice Caregivers: A Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Debra Parker; Demiris, George; Washington, Karla T; Clark, Carlyn; Thomas-Jones, Deborah

    2017-08-01

    Family caregivers of hospice patients are responsible for the day-to-day care of their loved ones during the final months of life. They are faced with numerous challenges. The purpose of this study was to understand the challenges and coping strategies used by hospice caregivers as they care for their family members. This study is a secondary analysis of data from an attention control group in a large randomized controlled trial testing a cognitive behavioral intervention with hospice caregivers. Audiotaped interviews were coded with initial themes and combined into final categories of caregiving challenges and strategies for managing the hospice caregiving experience. Caregivers shared narratives discussing challenges that included their frustrations with patient care issues, emotional challenges, frustrations with various health care systems, financial problems, and personal health concerns. They also discussed coping strategies involving patient care, self-care, and emotional support. The coping techniques were both problem and emotion based. There is a need for interventions that focus on strengthening both problem-based and emotional-based coping skills to improve the caregiving experience. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Caregiver burden in Alzheimer's disease patients in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Longobardo, Luz María; Oliva-Moreno, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease constitutes one of the leading causes of burden of disease, and it is the third leading disease in terms of economic and social costs. To analyze the burden and problems borne by informal caregivers of patients who suffer from Alzheimer's disease in Spain. We used the Survey on Disabilities, Autonomy and Dependency to obtain information on the characteristics of disabled people with Alzheimer's disease and the individuals who provide them with personal care. Additionally, statistical multivariate analyses using probit models were performed to analyze the burden placed on caregivers in terms of health, professional, and leisure/social aspects. 46% of informal caregivers suffered from health-related problems as a result of providing care, 90% had leisure-related problems, and 75% of caregivers under 65 years old admitted to suffering from problems related to their professional lives. The probability of a problem arising for an informal caregiver was positively associated with the degree of dependency of the person cared for. In the case of caring for a greatly dependent person, the probability of suffering from health-related problems was 22% higher, the probability of professional problems was 18% higher, and there was a 10% greater probability of suffering from leisure-related problems compared to non-dependents. The results show a part of the large hidden cost for society in terms of problems related to the burden lessened by the caregivers. This information should be a useful tool for designing policies focused toward supporting caregivers and improving their welfare.

  15. Pediatric acute gastroenteritis: understanding caregivers' experiences and information needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Lauren; Hartling, Lisa; Scott, Shannon D

    2017-05-01

    Pediatric acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a common condition with high health care utilization, persistent practice variation, and substantial family burden. An initial approach to resolve these issues is to understand the patient/caregiver experience of this illness. The objective of this study was to describe caregivers' experiences of pediatric AGE and identify their information needs, preferences, and priorities. A qualitative, descriptive study was conducted. Caregivers of a child with AGE were recruited for this study in the pediatric emergency department (ED) at a tertiary hospital in a major urban centre. Individual interviews were conducted (n=15), and a thematic analysis of interview transcripts was completed using a hybrid inductive/deductive approach. Five major themes were identified and described: 1) caregiver management strategies; 2) reasons for going to the ED; 3) treatment and management of AGE in the ED; 4) caregivers' information needs; and 5) additional factors influencing caregivers' experiences and decision-making. A number of subthemes within each major theme were identified and described. This qualitative descriptive study has identified caregiver information needs, preferences, and priorities regarding pediatric AGE. This study also identified inconsistencies in the treatment and management of pediatric AGE at home and in the ED that influence health care utilization and patient outcomes related to pediatric AGE.

  16. Social support moderates caregiver life satisfaction following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergh, Tanya C; Hanks, Robin A; Rapport, Lisa J; Coleman, Renee D

    2003-12-01

    Social support is an important determinant of adjustment following traumatic brain injury (TBI) sustained by a family member. The present study examined the extent to which social support moderates the influence of characteristics of the person with injury on caregiver subjective well-being. Sixty pairs of individuals who had sustained a moderate to severe TBI and their caregivers (N=120) participated. Years postinjury ranged from 0.3 to 9.9 ( M=4.8, SD=2.6). Cognitive, functional, and neurobehavioral functioning of participants with TBI were assessed using neuropsychological tests and rating scales. Caregiver life satisfaction and perceived social support were assessed using self-report questionnaires. Results indicated that time since injury was unrelated to life satisfaction. Neurobehavioral disturbances showed an inverse relation with life satisfaction. Social support emerged as an important moderator of life satisfaction. Only among caregivers with low social support was cognitive dysfunction adversely related to life satisfaction. Similarly, a trend suggested that patient unawareness of deficit was associated with caregiver life dissatisfaction only among caregivers with low social support. In contrast, these characteristics were unrelated to life satisfaction among caregivers with adequate social support.

  17. Experiences and challenges of informal caregiving for Korean immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hae-Ra; Choi, Yun Jung; Kim, Miyong T.; Lee, Jong Eun; Kim, Kim B.

    2010-01-01

    Aim This paper is a report of a study designed to explore the caregiving experiences of Korean Americans. Background Increasing numbers of older people in the Asian population place important long-term care demands on Asian caregivers, yet minimal attention has been given to the issue of caregiving in this group. The current study attempts to fill the gap by describing Korean American caregivers’ unique caregiving experiences from their perspectives. Method A qualitative research design using a focus group approach was employed to discuss caregiving experiences in a cultural context. Data were collected over an 8-month period in 2005. Twenty-four informants, mostly women, at varying points surrounding caregiving participated in a focus group interview. Each focus group lasted about 1 ½-2 hours. Thematic analysis was conducted by two bilingual researchers. Findings Three key themes were identified: the caregiver role – competing priorities and beliefs, the extent and impact of caregiving, and the need for education and culturally-tailored support systems. Ten subthemes were identified within the three major themes: (1) facing double challenges; (2) changing attitudes about filial piety (Hyo); (3) providing care; (4) feeling out of control; (5) going through changing family dynamics; (6) being connected vs. providing connection; (7) paying back; (8) learning by themselves; (9) recognizing differences and (10) reconsidering geriatric care systems. Conclusion The caregiving experiences described by Korean American families point to the need to identify and develop more focused outreach programmes as well as more culturally appropriate support services for this rapidly increasing population. PMID:18727754

  18. Recruitment strategies for caregivers of children with mental health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruche, Ukamaka M; Gerkensmeyer, Janis E; Austin, Joan K; Perkins, Susan M; Scott, Eric; Lindsey, Laura M; Mullins, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe strategies for recruiting participants into an intervention study that focused on improving problem-solving skills in caregivers of children with mental health problems. Caregivers of children with mental health problems report feeling physically and psychologically overwhelmed and have high rates of depression because of the demands of caregiving. Research on the needs of these caregivers and interventions to ameliorate their stress is needed. However, recruiting this population can be particularly difficult because of the stigma of mental illness. Available literature on recruitment of caregivers of persons with physical illness cannot be transferred to caregivers of children with mental health problems because of the different caregiving situations. There is a need to identify effective recruitment strategies to reduce cost and answer research questions. Clinical nurse specialists have the skills to facilitate the recruitment of research participants. We revised and expanded health system referrals, community outreach, and recruiting advertisement (ads). When these strategies did not increase recruitment, radio ads were used. The Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Utilization was selected as a guiding framework. Radio ads were the most effective strategy for recruiting caregivers of children with mental health problems for this study. Recruitment was ultimately successful because we were flexible and made decisions consistent with the Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Utilization. Clinical nurse specialists who study this population of caregivers should really consider the use of radio ads and systematically track which recruitment strategies lead to the greatest number of participants screened, eligible, and enrolled into studies.

  19. Family Typology and Appraisal of Preschoolers' Behavior by Female Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coke, Sallie P; Moore, Leslie C

    2015-01-01

    Children with vulnerable caregivers may be at risk for being labeled as having behavior problems when typical behaviors are viewed by their caregivers as problematic, and therefore, research examining the accuracy of the caregivers' perceptions of children's behaviors is needed. The purpose of this study was to use the resiliency model of family stress, adjustment, and adaptation as the theoretical foundation to explore family factors associated with the primary female caregiver's appraisal of her child's behavior, the extent to which the primary female caregiver's appraisal of her child's behavior may be distorted, and the child's level of risk of having a behavioral problem. A cross-sectional, correlational design was used. Data were collected from female caregivers of preschoolers (N = 117). Family factors, demographic characteristics, comfort in parenting, appraisal of behaviors, daily stress, parenting stress, depressive symptoms, social support, ratings of children's behaviors, and distortion in the ratings were measured. Associations were studied using ANOVA, ANCOVA, and chi-squared tests. Family typology was not associated with the female caregiver's appraisals of her child's behavior (p = .31). Distortion of the caregiver's rating of her child's behavior was not associated with family hardiness (high or low; p = .20.) but was associated with having a child with an elevated risk for behavioral problems (p < .01). Families classified as vulnerable were significantly more likely to have a child with elevated risks of having behavioral problems than families classified as secure or regenerative. Findings emphasized the association between family factors (hardiness and coherence) and young children's behaviors. Additional research is needed into how these factors affect the young child's behavior and what causes a caregiver to have a distorted view of her child's behavior.

  20. Paid caregiver motivation, work conditions, and falls among senior clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Lee A; Tam, Karen; Friesema, Elisha; Martin, Gary J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the motivation of paid non-familial caregivers of seniors, understand more about their work conditions, and identify any links to negative outcomes among their senior clients. Ninety-eight paid caregivers (eighty-five female and thirteen male), recruited from multiple sites (i.e. senior centers, shopping malls, local parks, lobbies of senior apartments, caregiver agency meetings) completed face-to-face questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. We found that 60.7% of participants chose to become a caregiver because they enjoyed being with seniors while 31.7% were unable to obtain other work, and 8.2% stated it was a prerequisite to a different health related occupation. Caregivers stated that the most challenging conditions of their work were physical lifting (24.5%), behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (24.5%), senior depression/mood changes (18.4%), attachment with impending death (8.2%), missing injuries to client (5.1%), lack of sleep (4.1%), and lack of connection with outside world (3.1%). Caregivers who reported that the best part of their job was the salary, flexible hours, and ease of work were significantly more likely to have clients who fell and fractured a bone than those who enjoyed being with seniors (job characteristics, 62.5% vs. senior enjoyment, 25.6%; pmotivated commonly by their love of seniors and also by their lack of other job opportunities. Paid caregivers frequently face challenging work conditions. When seeking a caregiver for a senior, motivation of the caregiver should be considered when hiring. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of primary caregivers' perceptions on home trampoline use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Singh

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Trampolines are widely used by children, but trampoline injuries can be severe and may require hospital care or even surgery. This pilot study examined the effectiveness of an educational intervention on caregivers' perceptions of trampoline use and safety for their children.Primary caregivers were recruited from the orthopedic clinic at the Children's Hospital at our institution in 2015. Caregivers were asked to complete a survey at two time points, initially in clinic and one week post educational intervention. The educational intervention was a pamphlet outlining trampoline safety data. Data analysis occurred in 2016.From the 100 primary caregivers recruited, 39 caregivers owned a trampoline, and 10 had presented to the emergency department with their child for an injury related to trampoline use. After educational intervention, caregivers had higher rating of perceived danger associated with trampolines (6/10 vs. 8/10, p < 0.001. Additionally, a greater number of caregivers were more knowledgeable on the safe age of trampoline use (56% vs. 91%, p < 0.001 and safe number of jumpers (45% vs. 86%, p < 0.001. Finally, there was a 29% increase in the proportion of caregivers who at least agreed that trampolines are dangerous (pre: 44% vs. post: 73%, p < 0.001, however 50% of caregivers would still allow their child to use a trampoline.Overall, the results of this study show that a simple educational intervention can help to increase knowledge around safe trampoline practices and increase awareness of injury. Further, this study can act as initial evidence for future studies to implement this type of intervention long-term. Keywords: Pediatrics, Trampoline, Injury, Orthopedics, Children

  2. Facebook or Twitter?: Effective recruitment strategies for family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbell, Kayla; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A

    2018-06-01

    This brief details recent recruitment insights from a large all-online study of family caregivers that aimed to develop a measure to assess how family caregivers manage daily stresses. Online recruitment strategies included the use of Twitter and Facebook. Overall, 800 individuals responded to the recruitment strategy; 230 completed all study procedures. The most effective online recruitment strategy for targeting family caregivers was Facebook, yielding 86% of the sample. Future researchers may find the use of social media recruitment methods appealing because they are inexpensive, simple, and efficient methods for obtaining National samples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Information-seeking at a caregiving website: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernisan, Leslie P; Sudore, Rebecca L; Knight, Sara J

    2010-07-28

    The Internet is widely used for health information, yet little is known about the online activity of family caregivers of elders, a rapidly growing group. In order to better understand the online information-seeking activity of "e-caregivers" and other visitors at a caregiving website, we undertook a qualitative analysis of survey data from a website marketed as a comprehensive resource for adults caring for aging parents. The objectives were to better understand what types of information are sought by those visiting a website focused on elder-care issues and to identify overarching themes that might inform future development of Internet resources related to caregiving and aging. From March 2008 to March 2009, a 5-question pop-up survey was offered 9662 times and completed 2161 times. For 1838 respondents, included was a free text answer to the question "What were you looking for?" and 1467 offered relevant and detailed responses. The survey also asked about satisfaction with the site, gender of the respondent, and relationship to the individual being cared for. Content analysis was used to develop a coding dictionary, to code responses into information-seeking categories, and to identify overarching themes. Of the respondents (76% of whom were female), 50% indicated they were caring for parents, 17% for themselves only, and 31% for others. Over half (57%) reported finding what they were looking for, and 46% stated they were extremely likely to recommend the website. Frequently mentioned information-seeking categories included "health information," "practical caregiving," and "support." Respondents also requested information related to housing, legal, insurance, and financial issues. Many responses referred to multiple comorbid conditions and complex caregiving situations. Overarching themes included (1) a desire for assistance with a wide range of practical skills and information and (2) help interpreting symptoms and behavior, such as knowing what life impacts to

  4. Family medical leave as a resilience resource for family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanke, Jayme; Zeman, Laura Dreuth

    2009-01-01

    Case managers mobilize family networks to care for patients. Family medical leave can be a resource for case managers who seek to enhance resilience among family caregivers. The Family Medical Leave Act, passed in 1993, was the first U.S. policy to regulate employee leaves from work for family care purposes (29 CFR 825.102). This policy offers family caregivers increased flexibility and equality. Current and emerging policies also can reduce financial strain. The discussion examines how case managers can integrate family medical leave into best-practice models to support patients and family caregivers.

  5. Maternal Caregiving Strain as a Mediator in the Relationship between Child and Mother Mental Health Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Esther; Greeno, Catherine; Shear, M. Katherine; Anderson, Carol

    2004-01-01

    This study examined whether the general stress--caregiver strain--mental health outcome model may be as appropriate for caregivers of minor-age children as it has been for caregivers of adults with chronic illness. The authors examined whether children's behavioral problems are related to mothers' caregiving strains, which then is related to…

  6. The initial development of the 'Cancer Caregiving Tasks, Consequences and Needs Questionnaire' (CaTCoN)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Line; Ross, Lone; Grønvold, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    To develop a questionnaire for cancer patients' informal caregivers, measuring the caregiving tasks and consequences, and the caregivers' needs with a main focus on the interaction with the health care professionals. Such an instrument is needed to evaluate the efforts directed towards caregivers...

  7. Information Needs of Family Caregivers of Persons with Cognitive versus Physical Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Kelly N.; Steiner, Victoria; Pierce, Linda L.

    2011-01-01

    This study compared information needs of caregivers of persons with dementia with caregivers of those who received rehabilitation treatment. Caregivers were provided a 48-item survey and asked to choose their top ten information needs. Dementia caregivers' (n = 33) top needs were dealing with forgetfulness/confusion (91%) and repeating…

  8. The role of attitudes and culture in family caregiving for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anngela-Cole, Linda; Hilton, Jeanne M

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated cultural differences in attitudes toward caregiving and the stress levels of family caregivers. Participants included 98 Japanese American and 86 Caucasian American family caregivers caring for frail elders. Analyses using MANOVA and multiple regression analyses revealed that the Caucasian caregivers had more positive attitudes and provided more hours of care than the Japanese caregivers but that both groups had elevated levels of caregiver stress. The stress that family caregivers currently experience could lead to a future generation of care recipients who enter old age in worse condition than their predecessors. Professionals need to work together to develop culturally appropriate, evidence-based interventions to address this issue.

  9. Using Narrative Approach for Anticipatory Grief Among Family Caregivers at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Hiroko; Honda, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Family caregivers of patients with terminal-stage cancer have numerous roles as caregivers, which can influence their anticipatory grief. The purpose of this study was to clarify how talking to family caregivers of patients with terminal illness using the narrative approach can influence such caregivers’ process of anticipatory grief. We conducted the narrative approach as an intervention with two family caregivers several times and qualitatively analyzed their narratives. The results indicated that these family caregivers had two primary roles—family member and caregiver—and that family caregivers felt trapped in their caregiver role. The narrative approach helped them transition into the role needed for coping with the loss. PMID:28462354

  10. Grandparent Caregiving and Psychological Well-Being Among Chinese American Older Adults-The Roles of Caregiving Burden and Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ling; Tang, Fengyan; Li, Lydia W; Dong, Xin Qi

    2017-07-01

    Though ample research on grandparent caregiving and psychological well-being outcomes exist in Western literature, little attention has been focused on Chinese American grandparents. Based on role enhancement and role strain theories, this study examined grandparent caregiving and psychological well-being among Chinese American older adults and tested whether caregiving burden or pressure from adult children moderated such association. We used the data from the Population Study of ChINese Elderly in Chicago (PINE), a population-based survey of community-dwelling Chinese older adults in the Greater Chicago area. Grandparents with grandchildren younger than 16 years old were selected for present study (N = 2,775). Negative binominal regression and logistic regression models were used to test the relationships of grandparent caregiving time and psychological well-being measured by depressive symptoms and quality of life. Grandparents reported an average of 11.96 hours a week for caring for grandchildren. Caregiving time had a significantly negative association with depressive symptoms, but not with quality of life. The association between grandparent caregiving and depressive symptoms was moderated by the perception of caregiving burden. No moderating effect of caregiving pressure from adult children was found. More time spending on grandparent caregiving is generally beneficial to Chinese American grandparents' psychological well-being, thus supporting role enhancement theory. However, this association depends on whether this experience is a burden to the grandparents, therefore role strain theory is also supported. Policies and programs are discussed to address the grandparenting experience in the Chinese American older adults. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Association of impairments of older persons with caregiver burden among family caregivers: Findings from rural South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajay, Shweta; Kasthuri, Arvind; Kiran, Pretesh; Malhotra, Rahul

    In India, owing to cultural norms and a lack of formal long-term care facilities, responsibility for care of the older person falls primarily on the family. Based on the stress process model, we assessed the association of type and number of impairments of older persons (∼primary stressors) with caregiver burden among their family caregivers in rural South India. All impaired older persons (aged ≥60, with impairment in activities of daily living (ADL) or cognition or vision or hearing) residing in 8 villages in Bangalore district, Karnataka, India, and their primary informal caregivers were interviewed. Caregiver burden was measured using the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI; higher score indicating greater perceived burden). Linear regression models, adjusting for background characteristics of older persons and caregivers, assessed the association of type of impairment (physical [Yes/No], cognitive [Yes/No], vision [Yes/No] and hearing [Yes/No]) and number (1 or 2 or 3 or 4) of older person impairments with caregiver burden. A total of 140 caregivers, caring for 149 older persons, were interviewed. The mean (standard deviation) ZBI score was 21.2 (12.9). Of the various older person impairments, ZBI score was associated only with physical impairment (β=6.6; 95% CI: 2.1-11.1). Relative to caregivers of older person with one impairment, those caring for an older person with all 4 impairments had significantly higher ZBI score (β=13.9; CI: 2.5-25.4). Caregivers of older persons with multiple impairments, especially physical impairment, are vulnerable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of rehabilitation services on anxiety, depression, care-giving burden and perceived social support of stroke caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Ali Yavuz; Kucuksen, Sami; Yilmaz, Halim; Salli, Ali; Gungor, Tayfun; Sahin, Muhammed

    2014-01-01

    Few data are available on the specific care giving-related problems of stroke patient's caregivers and factors that influence the burden of these caregivers. To study the influences of the active rehabilitation process on anxiety, depression, care burden and perceived social support level of stroke patients caregivers. A prospective clinical trial. Patients and caregivers entering a rehabilitation program at a university hospital in Turkey. Ninety patients with a first episode of stroke and 90 caregivers responsible for their care were recruited for our study. Patients and caregivers were assessed before and after the active rehabilitation process. The functional disability level of the patients was assessed by Functional Independence Measure (FIM). The Beck Anxiety Scale (BAS) and the Beck Depression Scale (BDS) were used for anxiety and depression assessment, the Zarit Care Burden Scale (ZCBS) for care burden assessment and the Multi-Dimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MDSPSS) for perceived social support assessment. A statistically significant rise is observed in the special person sub-assessment of MDSPSS in both female and male caregivers. Also, a significant decrease in care burden, anxiety and depression levels of caregivers was noted after the rehabilitation program (p social support in addition to the support provided by family and friends. Also, our positive results were associated with an improvement in the patients' functional level and an increase in the acquisition of knowledge and skill required of caregivers in order to provide care during rehabilitation. The rehabilitation team should be aware of the fact that the perceived care burden may be greater due to the lack of knowledge concerning available resources and due to the inability to cope with stress effectively.

  13. Identifying Sociodemographic Characteristics Associated With Burden Among Caregivers of the Urban Homebound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ania Wajnberg MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Limited research has explored whether the burden associated with caring for homebound patients varies across racial groups or by relationship status. We examined these variations for this vulnerable population. Patients self-identified informal caregivers and caregiver burden/depression were assessed using the Zarit Caregiver Burden Scale and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies–Depression scale (CES-D. Forty-nine informal caregivers completed the interview. Mean age was 58 ( SD = 14, 78% were female, 37% Black, 35% Hispanic, and 46% had completed high school. Over 60% of caregivers had moderate or severe caregiver burden and 30% had significant depression. White caregivers had greater burden than Black and Hispanic caregivers ( p = .02. Mean caregiver burden was higher among spouse/partner caregivers, versus those who identified as children or other family or friends ( p = .004. Additional research is needed to better understand the experience of racial and ethnic minorities and spouses in providing informal care to homebound adults.

  14. Stakeholder Meeting: Integrated Knowledge Translation Approach to Address the Caregiver Support Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna M; McMillan, Jacqueline; Jette, Nathalie; Brémault-Phillips, Suzette C; Duggleby, Wendy; Hanson, Heather M; Parmar, Jasneet

    2017-03-01

    Family caregivers are an integral and increasingly overburdened part of the health care system. There is a gap between what research evidence shows is beneficial to caregivers and what is actually provided. Using an integrated knowledge translation approach, a stakeholder meeting was held among researchers, family caregivers, caregiver associations, clinicians, health care administrators, and policy makers. The objectives of the meeting were to review current research evidence and conduct multi-stakeholder dialogue on the potential gaps, facilitators, and barriers to the provision of caregiver supports. A two-day meeting was attended by 123 individuals. Three target populations of family caregivers were identified for discussion: caregivers of seniors with dementia, caregivers in end-of-life care, and caregivers of frail seniors with complex health needs. The results of this meeting can and are being used to inform the development of implementation research endeavours and policies targeted at providing evidence-informed caregiver supports.

  15. Association of Filial Responsibility, Ethnicity, and Acculturation Among Japanese American Family Caregivers of Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Christina E

    2017-03-01

    Challenges of filial caregiving practices by 1st-generation immigrants due to differences in caregiving values between their home and host countries are well documented. This study explored the filial responsibility of later generation Japanese American caregivers of older adults. Acculturation and filial responsibility were measured using the Suinn-Lew Asian Self Identity Acculturation scale and Filial Values Index, respectively. A qualitative interview guide was developed using Gordon's assimilation theory, and 21 caregivers ( M age = 68 years, 86% female, seven in each generation) were interviewed. Despite the 3rd-generation caregivers' high acculturation level, their filial responsibility scores remained high. Qualitative interviews also revealed later generation caregivers' strong filial responsibility and continued caregiving involvement. Unexpectedly, caregivers' own future expectancy of care included placement in mainstream residential facilities rather than ethnic-specific settings. Findings point to the need to develop caregiver services that consider later generation caregivers' culture and level of assimilation.

  16. Trajectories of caregiver burden in families of adult cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtaszczyk, Ann; Glajchen, Myra; Portenoy, Russell K; Berdella, Maria; Walker, Patricia; Barrett, Malcolm; Chen, Jack; Plachta, Amy; Balzano, Julie; Fresenius, Ashley; Wilder, Kenya; Langfelder-Schwind, Elinor; Dhingra, Lara

    2017-10-17

    Little is known about the experience of family caregivers of adults with cystic fibrosis (CF). This information is important for the identification of caregivers at risk for burden. This was a longitudinal analysis of survey data obtained from caregivers of adult CF patients participating in an early intervention palliative care trial. Caregivers completed the validated Brief Assessment Scale for Caregivers (BASC) repeatedly over a 28-month period. Mixed-effects modeling evaluated multivariate associations with positive and negative caregiver perceptions over time. Of the 54 caregivers, 47.9% were spouses. The mean age was 50.9 years (SD = 13.2); 72.2% were women; 75.9% were married; and 63.0% were employed. At baseline, the BASC revealed large variations in positive and negative perceptions of caregiving. Although average scores over time were unchanging, variation was greater across caregivers than within caregivers (0.49 vs. 0.27, respectively). At baseline, the positive impact of caregiving in the sample was higher than the negative impact. Multivariate analysis revealed that patients' baseline pulmonary function and their full-time employment status predicted caregiver burden over time. Caregivers of CF patients varied in their positive and negative caregiving experiences, although burden levels in individual caregivers were stable over time. When the disease was advanced, caregivers of CF patients experienced more overall burden but also more positive impact. This suggests that the role of caregivers may become more meaningful as disease severity worsens. In addition, full-time patient employment was associated with lower caregiver burden regardless of disease severity. This suggests that burden in CF caregivers may be predicted by financial strain or benefits conferred by patient employment. These associations require further investigation to determine whether highly burdened caregivers can be identified and assisted using tailored interventions.

  17. Dog owner interaction style: the transmission of working models in human/non-human caregiving relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Taggart, Jill Monica

    2011-01-01

    A model of parental sensitivity in caregiving informs later romantic relationships and is transmitted in caregiving behaviours to children. Differences in parental caregiving contribute to individual differences in infant attachment style. The owner/dog bond mirrors this relationship as dog careseeking activates owner caregiving. The aim of this thesis was to investigate the role of individual differences in owner caregiving on dog attachment style.The first study defined dog attachment style...

  18. Leveraging the Experiences of Informal Caregivers to Create Future Healthcare Workforce Options

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Sara S.; Ragas, Daiva M.; Hajjar, Nadia; Tom, Laura S.; Dong, XinQi; Simon, Melissa A.

    2016-01-01

    Our primary objective was to gather pilot data from informal caregivers regarding the potential for a training program to assist current or past caregivers in re-entering the job market, offering a pathway to economic resilience. In an effort that could foster a sustainable and competent caregiving market to help meet the needs of an aging America, we explored whether training informal caregivers might help them transition into a paid caregiving or other health-service role. We interviewed 55...

  19. The experiences of family caregivers concerning their care of HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although government and non-government organisations have responded by ... most of Africa's orphans have been absorbed into extended family networks. ... social workers and home-based caregivers be trained on available social support.

  20. The presence of a primary male caregiver affects children's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    caregiver has an influence, direct or indirect, on children's language skills. Keywords: ... the presence/absence of a father figure on language development were mainly conducted in ... centres via the classroom teachers or day mothers.

  1. Family caregiver recruitment via social media: challenges, opportunities and lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Dana; Sheehan, Denice K; Stephenson, Pam

    2017-02-02

    Illness blogs are a way seriously ill people communicate publicly about their illness journey. As communication about serious illness increases on social media, it is important to evaluate how this affects the family caregiver. However, identifying and accessing family caregivers remains challenging, especially via social media. The aim of this article is to report the opportunities, challenges and lessons learned from using social media to recruit family caregivers. Recruitment methods included posting study invitations on illness blogs, advertising through Facebook and placing study fliers in the community. Using social media to recruit was inexpensive and provided a wide geographical reach. One important finding was discovering the importance of using language in the recruitment materials that family caregivers could identify with to help deem themselves as eligible to participate in the study.

  2. Women's caregiving and paid work: causal relationships in late midlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavalko, E K; Artis, J E

    1997-07-01

    Care of an ill or disabled family member or friend is disproportionately done by women and typically is done in late midlife. Because this is-also a time in the life course when women's labor force participation peaks, many women faced with caregiving demands have to decide how to balance them with their employment. In this study we use the National Longitudinal Survey (NLS) of Mature Women to examine the causal relationship between employment and caring for an ill or disabled friend or relative over a three-year period. We find that employment does not affect whether or not women start caregiving, but that women who do start are more likely to reduce employment hours or stop work. Thus, the causal relationship between employment and caregiving in late midlife is largely unidirectional, with women reducing hours to meet caregiving demands.

  3. Adapters, strugglers, and case managers: a typology of spouse caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Linda Lindsey; Chestnutt, Deborah; Molloy, Margory; Deshefy-Longhi, Tess; Shim, Bomin; Gilliss, Catherine L

    2014-11-01

    Although family home care problems are frequently described in the health care literature, the ways in which families and other informal caregivers manage those problems are not often addressed. We conducted a descriptive analysis of interviews in which spouses caring for a partner with Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease were asked to describe difficult home care problems and how they managed those problems. Analysis of these interviews indicated three recurring management styles. Adapters told stories about applying pre-existing skills to manage home care problems. Strugglers told stories of reoccurring home care problems for which they had few or no management strategies. Case managers' interview stories focused on the challenges of finding and coordinating home care services. These findings suggest that caregiving burden might be influenced more by the caregiver's management style than the demands of the care situation. Suggestions for tailoring support programs for the three types of caregivers are proposed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Knowledge and perception of mothers and caregivers on childhood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lmboera

    malaria, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and tuberculosis (TB) combined ... mothers/caregivers on childhood diarrhoea focusing on three main aspects viz. .... no formal education while 37 (53%) and 11 (15.7%) had primary and ...

  5. What factors affect caregiver communication in psychogeriatric care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Weert, J.C.M.; van Dulmen, A.M.; Bensing, J.M.; Visser, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Dementia among nursing home residents is often accompanied by high care dependency and behavioral disturbances, possibly resulting in increased workload, increased stress reactions and decreased job satisfaction. This might result in negative caregiver behaviour. Until now, little is

  6. A comparison of clinician and caregiver assessment of functioning in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    N=155) were consecutively recruited over a 1-month period. The caregivers were requested to fill in a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Columbia Impairment Scale (CIS), the 12- item version of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) ...

  7. Dementia caregivers' responses to 2 Internet-based intervention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziali, Elsa; Garcia, Linda J

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact on dementia caregivers' experienced stress and health status of 2 Internet-based intervention programs. Ninety-one dementia caregivers were given the choice of being involved in either an Internet-based chat support group or an Internet-based video conferencing support group. Pre-post outcome measures focused on distress, health status, social support, and service utilization. In contrast to the Chat Group, the Video Group showed significantly greater improvement in mental health status. Also, for the Video Group, improvements in self-efficacy, neuroticism, and social support were associated with lower stress response to coping with the care recipient's cognitive impairment and decline in function. The results show that, of 2 Internet-based intervention programs for dementia caregivers, the video conferencing intervention program was more effective in improving mental health status and improvement in personal characteristics were associated with lower caregiver stress response.

  8. Caregivers' satisfaction and supervision of primary health care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Caregivers' satisfaction and supervision of primary health care services in Nnewi, ... made in the reduction of childhood health indicators in the previous decade, ... supervision of PHCs should also improve the quality of child health services.

  9. Accuracy of Caregiver Proxy Reports of Home Care Service Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Neena L; Kadlec, Helena

    2016-12-01

    Although much of the research on service use by older adults with dementia relies on proxy reports by informal caregivers, little research assesses the accuracy of these reports, and that which does exist, does not focus on home care services. This brief report compares proxy reports by family caregivers to those with dementia with provincial Ministry of Health records collected for payment and monitoring. The four home care services examined include home nursing care, adult day care, home support, and respite care. Data come from a province-wide study of caregivers in British Columbia, Canada. Caregiver reports are largely consistent with Ministry records, ranging from 81.0% agreement for home support to 96.6% for respite care. Spouses living with the care recipient (the vast majority of the sample) are the most accurate. Others, whether living with the care recipient or not, have only a 50-50 chance of being correct.

  10. Children's caregiving of HIV-infected parents accessing treatment in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Children's caregiving of HIV-infected parents accessing treatment in western Kenya: challenges and ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... The research draws attention to the difficulties and opportunities of strengthening ...

  11. The experiences of family caregivers concerning their care of HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-11-13

    AIDS) are ... lead to depression and burnout. According to Gale ... on-one interview technique in which family caregivers of HIV/AIDS orphans were ..... and the orphan's grandmother was that there was no formal agreement of who ...

  12. The Invisible Women: Gender and Caregiving in Francophone Newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Marier

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This contribution analyses the importance given to gender in articles related to caregiving for older adults in five francophone newspapers (Le Soir, Le Devoir, Figaro, Libération and La Presse across three countries (Belgium, France and Canada. Out of the 254 articles in our sample, less than a fifth (49 made any mention of gender. A closer analysis of the gender related contributions reveal that only 18 articles devote more than a line to the interaction between gender and caregiving activities and its multiple socio-economic consequences. This is highly surprising since women provide the bulk of caregiving efforts and are the ones facing difficulties due to the lack of governmental actions to assist with these functions. These consequences are well documented in the scientific literature and feature caregiving burnout, loss of employment and economic insecurity. This contribution features an analysis and some extracts from the 18 articles in question.

  13. Do anticipatory grief and preparedness affect distress in bereaved caregivers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Kjærgaard

    Objective Family caregivers of terminally ill patients are in a vulnerable position, and previous studies show that bereaved caregivers are at risk of psychological distress. Pre-loss grief symptoms seem to predict post-loss psychological distress, while preparedness for a looming loss tends...... to decrease distress. The aim of this nation-wide study was to investigate the association of both anticipatory grief symptoms and preparedness with psychological distress in bereaved family caregivers. Methods A list of all adult patients in Denmark receiving drug reimbursement for terminal illness...... was retrieved from the Danish Health and Medicines Authority on a weekly basis during 2012. All newly registered patients were requested by letter to pass on an enclosed baseline questionnaire to their closest relative. Responding caregivers bereaved within six months received a follow-up questionnaire six...

  14. Health education and caregivers' management of Malaria among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health education and caregivers' management of Malaria among under fives in Ede North L.G.A., Osun State of Nigeria. ... about the dose and regimen of chloroquine drug and (e) had a better attitude towards the management of malaria.

  15. Cardiometabolic risk factors and health behaviors in family caregivers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyson Ross

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare components of cardiometabolic risk and health behaviors of 20 family caregivers of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients to those of age, gender, and race/ethnicity-matched controls. A prospective, repeated measures design was used to compare cardiometabolic risk and health behaviors in caregivers and controls at three time-points: pre-transplantation, discharge, and six weeks post-discharge. Measures included components of metabolic syndrome, Reynolds Risk Score, NMR serum lipoprotein particle analyses, and the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II (HPLP-II. Mixed-model repeated measure analyses were used. There were no between or within group differences in LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides. There was a significant interaction effect between time and role in large VLDL concentration (VLDL-P (F (2, 76 = 4.36, p = .016, with the trajectory of large VLDL-P increasing over time in caregivers while remaining stable in controls. Within caregivers, VLDL particle size (VLDL-Z was significantly larger at time-point three compared to time-points one (p = .015 and two (p = .048, and VLDL-Z was significantly larger in caregivers than in controls at time point three (p = .012. HPLP-II scores were lower in caregivers than controls at all time-points (p < .01. These findings suggest that caregiving may have a bigger impact on triglycerides than on other lipids, and it is through this pathway that caregivers may be at increased cardiometabolic risk. More sensitive measurement methods, such as NMR lipoprotein particle analyses, may be able to detect early changes in cardiometabolic risk.

  16. Hospitalized elders and family caregivers: a typology of family worry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the kinds of worry that family caregivers experience when their older relatives are hospitalized. Little is known about what kinds of worries family caregivers may have in association with the hospitalizations of older relatives. An understanding of the different patterns of family worry may help health care teams intervene more effectively to meet family caregiver's needs by reducing their anxiety. A qualitative descriptive design with Loftland and Loftland (1984) approach for the study of a phenomenon occurring in a social setting was used. A purposeful sample of 10 participants was obtained that included six family caregivers and four nurses. Participants were recruited from two hospitals in the northwest US. Intensive interviews and participant observations were used for data collection, and Loftland and Loftland's (1984) qualitative approach was used for data analysis. Family worry was defined as family caregivers' felt difficulty in fulfilling their roles because of worry. Four categories of family worry were identified as a result of this study: (i) worry about the patient's condition; (ii) worry about the patient's care received from the health care team; (iii) worry about future care for the patient provided by the family caregiver; and (iv) worry about finances. The findings of this pilot study provide nurses with the initial knowledge of the typology of family worry associated with elderly relatives' hospitalizations. The findings of this study may sensitize the nurses to more precisely evaluate family caregivers' worry about their hospitalized elders and provide more effective nursing interventions to improve outcomes of both patients and their family caregivers.

  17. Risk factors for burnout among caregivers working in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandelman, Nadia; Mazars, Thierry; Levy, Antonin

    2018-01-01

    (i) To assess the level of burnout in nursing home caregivers within a unique healthcare network in France and (ii) to evaluate potential risk factors in this population. Burnout syndrome occurs frequently among nursing home caregivers and has strong detrimental effects on the quality of health care for residents. We used an observational survey to study burnout in nursing home caregivers. The survey was used to quantify burnout level (Maslach Burnout Inventory) and potential risk factors and was implemented from October 2013-April 2014. A logistic regression was used to explore the association between burnout and its risk factors. Three hundred and sixty questionnaires were delivered to caregivers in 14 nursing homes within a unique healthcare network. The response rate was 37% (132/360), and 124/132 (94%) surveys were analysed. Caregiver burnout rate was 40% (49/124). Median age was 41 years (range, 20-70) and most caregivers were female. The most common profession (n = 54; 44%) was nurse caregiver and 90% (n = 112) had an antecedent of bullying by a resident. Risk factors identified were as follows: the presence of institutional protocols (death announcement [OR: 3.7] and pain assessment [OR: 2.8]), working in a profit-making establishment (OR: 2.6) and the antecedent of bullying by a resident (OR: 6.2). Factors most negatively associated with burnout included: practising pastimes (OR: 0.4) and working as a nurse (OR: 0.3). The only significant risk factor in the multivariate analysis was the antecedent of bullying by a resident (OR: 5.3). Several specific risk factors for burnout in nursing home caregivers were identified. In high-risk populations of healthcare professionals, screening and management of risk factors is crucial for preventing burnout. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Feasibility of central meditation and imagery therapy for dementia caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Felipe A; Nazarian, Nora; Lavretsky, Helen

    2014-08-01

    Family dementia caregivers are at high risk of depression and burnout. We assessed the feasibility of Central Meditation and Imagery Therapy for Caregivers (CMIT-C), a novel 8-week group meditation and guided imagery group therapy program, for dementia caregivers reporting stress because of caregiving responsibilities. Twelve family dementia caregivers enrolled in CMIT-C. Primary outcomes included depression and anxiety, and secondary outcomes included insomnia, quality of life, and mindfulness. Changes over the study and 3 month follow-up were analyzed with non-parametric related samples tests. Correlations of feeling state changes from meditation diaries at 1 week were made with symptom changes post meditation training. Ten participants completed the study. Completers came to an average of 7 ± 1 sessions out of a possible 8 sessions, and turned in home practice logs of 90 ± 10% of the time. Anxiety, depression, and insomnia symptoms decreased, and mindfulness ratings improved with large effects (all p meditation practice was associated with subsequent home meditation practice, anxiety change at 8 weeks, and endpoint satisfaction with CMIT-C. Central Meditation and Imagery Therapy for Caregivers is a feasible intervention for dementia caregivers. Results suggest that this therapeutic technique can reduce symptoms of anxiety, depression, and insomnia, and increase levels of mindfulness. Early response to meditation practice predicted those with the greatest short-term benefits, and this may inform future studies of meditation. Larger controlled efficacy studies of CMIT-C for dementia caregivers are warranted. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Give me a break! Informal caregiver attitudes towards respite care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Exel, Job; de Graaf, Gjalt; Brouwer, Werner

    2008-10-01

    Because informal health care is now recognized to be indispensable to health care systems, different forms of respite care have been developed and publicly funded that supposedly alleviate caregivers' perceived burdens and help prolong the care giving task. Nonetheless, the use of respite care services is low even among substantially strained caregivers. To throw light on this low usage, this paper explores the associations between attitudes towards respite care, characteristics of the care giving situation, and the need and use of respite care. The survey, administered to a sample of 273 informal caregivers, addressed caregiver, care recipient, and care giving situation characteristics, as well as the familiarity and use of respite care services. It also included a sub-set of 12 statements eliciting attitudes towards respite care from an earlier study [Van Exel NJA, De Graaf G, Brouwer WBF. Care for a break? An investigation of informal caregivers' attitudes toward respite care using Q-methodology. Health Policy 2007;83(2/3):332-42]. Associations between variables were measured using univariate statistics and multinomial logistic regression. We found three caregiver attitudes, distributed fairly equally in the sample, that are apparently associated with caregiver educational level, employment status, health and happiness, as well as care recipient gender, duration and intensity of care giving, relationship, co-residence, need for surveillance, and subjective burden and process utility of care giving. However, the relation between attitude and familiarity with and use of respite care services is ambiguous. Although further exploration is needed of the mix of Q-methodology and survey analysis, the overall results indicate that a considerable portion of the caregiver population needs but does not readily ask for support or respite care. This finding has important policy implications in the context of an ageing population.

  20. Orientation to the Caregiver Role Among Latinas of Mexican Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez-Luck, Carolyn A.; John Geldhof, G.; Anthony, Katherine P.; Neil Steers, W.; Mangione, Carol M.; Hays, Ron D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: To develop the Caregiver Orientation Scale for Mexican-Origin Women and evaluate its psychometric properties. Design and Methods: We developed a questionnaire to measure domains of cultural orientation to the caregiver role based on formative research and on the Cultural Justifications for Caregiving Scale. We conducted a series of exploratory factor analyses (EFAs) on data collected from 163 caregivers. We estimated internal consistency reliability (Cronbach’s coefficient alpha) and assessed construct validity by estimating correlations between all latent factors and self-rated health, interview language, and weekly hours of care. Results: EFAs suggested four factors representing familism, obligation, burden, and caregiving intensity that displayed good fit (χ2 (df = 63) = 70.52, p = .24; RMSEA = .03 [90% CI: 0.00, 0.06]; comparative fit index = .99). Multi-item scales representing the four domains had coefficient alphas ranging from .68 to .86. Obligation was positively associated with burden (.46, p < .001) and intensity (.34, p < .01), which were themselves positively correlated (.63, p < .001). Familism was positively associated with obligation (.25, p < .05) yet negatively associated with burden (−.35, p < .01) and intensity (−.22, p < .05). Weekly hours of care were positively associated with burden (.26, p < .01) and intensity (.18, p < .05), whereas self-rated health and burden (−.21, p < .05) and Spanish language and intensity (−.31, p < .001) were negatively correlated. Implications: The study shows that Mexican-origin caregiver orientation is multidimensional and that caregivers may have conflicting motivations for caregiving. PMID:27342443

  1. Resilience in family caregivers of persons with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Las Hayas, Carlota; López de Arroyabe, Elena; Calvete, Esther

    2015-08-01

    The authors' purpose was to develop the Questionnaire of Resilience in Caregivers of Acquired Brain Injury (QRC-ABI) and explore its psychometric properties The QRC-ABI was developed to measure the process of resilience, including resilient factors that, according to the literature, are the most relevant for caregivers. This is a cross-sectional study of Spanish primary caregivers of individuals with ABI. It included 237 caregivers (77.6% women and 21.1% men) who completed the QRC-ABI, the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (Weiss & Berger, 2006), the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (Skevington, Lotfy, O'Connell, & the WHOQOL Group, 2004) assessment, and the Positive Aspects of Caregiving (Tarlow et al., 2004) assessment. An item pool of 36 items was developed, from which 17 were finally selected based on a consensus among researchers and adequate symmetry indexes and kurtoses. Confirmatory factor analysis of the QRC-ABI confirmed a hierarchical solution in which 4 resilience dimensions were explained by a broader general resilience factor. The internal consistency of each scale was >.80. Convergent validity was supported through positive correlations of the QRC-ABI with quality of life, positive aspects of caregiving, and posttraumatic growth, and a negative correlation with perceived burden. The new QRC-ABI showed good reliability and validity. Our results are consistent with previous studies that have argued that resilient qualities are important for a healthy and positive adaptation to the challenging adversities faced by caregivers of individuals with ABI. Future interventions based on resilience should promote these factors in caregivers. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. A Resilience Training Module for Caregivers of Dementia Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Huey Wah Tze; Hashim Shahabuddin

    2015-01-01

    As life span increases, society is facing an aging population and one of the major aging problems is dementia. Caregivers of dementia patients are usually family members who juggle work, family commitments and caring for the patients. The caregivers are at risk of depression, suicide and abusing their patients. As resilience has a positive relationship with surviving life crises, enhancing resilience will provide them with skills to cope and decrease depression. The purpose of this article is...

  3. Illness denial questionnaire for patients and caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Ferrario S

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Silvia Rossi Ferrario,1 Ines Giorgi,2 Paola Baiardi,3 Laura Giuntoli,4 Gianluigi Balestroni,1 Paola Cerutti,1 Marina Manera,2 Paola Gabanelli,2 Valentina Solara,5 Roberta Fornara,6 Michela Luisetti,1 Pierangela Omarini,1 Giovanna Omarini,1 Giulio Vidotto4 1Psychology Unit, Istituti Clinici Scientifici Maugeri SpA SB, Veruno, NO, Italy; 2Psychology Unit, 3Scientific Direction, Istituti Clinici Scientifici Maugeri SpA SB, Pavia, Italy; 4Department of General Psychology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy; 5Department of Neurology, ALS Centre, “Maggiore della Carita`” University Hospital, Novara, Italy; 6Psychology Unit, SS Trinità Hospital, Borgomanero, NO, Italy Purpose: Interest in assessing denial is still present, despite the criticisms concerning its definition and measurement. We tried to develop a questionnaire (Illness Denial Questionnaire, IDQ assessing patients’ and caregivers’ denial in relation to their illness/disturbance. Patients and methods: After a preliminary study, a final version of 24 dichotomous items (true/false was selected. We hypothesized a theoretical model with three dimensions: denial of negative emotions, resistance to change, and conscious avoidance, the first two composing the actual Denial and the last representing an independent component of the illness denial behavior. The IDQ was administered to 400 subjects (219 patients and 181 caregivers together with the Anxiety–Depression Questionnaire – Reduced form (AD-R, in order to assess concurrent validity. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA, internal consistency indices (Cronbach’s α and McDonald’s ω, and test–retest analysis were performed. Results: CFA and internal consistency indices (Cronbach’s α: 0.87–0.96 indicated a clear and meaningful three-factor structure of IDQ, for both patients and caregivers. Further analyses showed good concurrent validity, with Denial and its subscale negatively associated with anxiety and depression and

  4. Stigma, disclosure, and depressive symptoms among informal caregivers of people living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Mary M; Knowlton, Amy

    2009-08-01

    Informal care receipt is associated with better HIV treatment outcomes among patients vulnerable to treatment failure. Yet, informal caregiving can be highly stressful, leading to distress and cessation of caregiving. Research on factors contributing to informal caregivers' psychological distress may advance our understanding of how to improve caregivers' well-being and sustained HIV caregiving for a vulnerable population. We examined relationships among caregiver stigma, disclosure, and depressive symptoms in a cross-sectional sample of 207 informal caregivers of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHAs) in Baltimore, Maryland. Caregivers were primarily African American, low-income, urban adults participating in the Action, Resources, and Knowledge (ARK) study (2003-2005), which recruited urban PLWHAs and their main supporters. Results indicated that among caregivers, HIV caregiving-related stigma was associated with more depressive symptoms, while disclosure of caregiving status was associated with fewer symptoms. We also explored the buffering effect of disclosure in the relationship between stigma and depressive symptoms. Results indicated that among those who reported greater stigma, there was a significant decrease in depressive symptoms as the number of disclosures increased. In contrast, participants who indicated lower stigma had consistently fewer depressive symptoms regardless of number of disclosures. These results suggest the need for interventions to address high levels of depressive symptoms among informal HIV caregivers, particularly those who report greater caregiving stigma and less disclosure of their caregiver status. In addition, future research should examine these relationships further using longitudinal data from informal caregivers and their care recipients.

  5. [Evaluation of the primary caregiver syndrome when caring for elderly adults with immobility syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Cariño, Elizabeth María; Jiménez-Herrera, Blanca L; Serrano-Miranda, Tirzo A

    2012-01-01

    Caregiver syndrome may develop in caregivers of elderly adults. To evaluate the repercussions of the immobility syndrome present in elderly adults on their primary caregivers as well as to determine the clinical and socio-demographic characteristics of the elderly adult and caregiver. The study population included patients over 65 recruited in the Geriatric Rehabilitation Department, with the diagnosis of immobility syndrome and that required a primary caregiver. A questionnaire including socio-demographic variables was applied to all patients and caregivers, and the Zarit scale was also applied to caregivers in order to determine the presence of caregiver syndrome. Analysis was performed with descriptive statistical methods; Student's t test and Fisher's test were used for comparisons between strata. 75 patients and their caregivers were evaluated; patient average age was 75.9 years and 85.3% were female. 50.7% (38 cases) had mild immobility. The average caregiver's age was 50.6%, 70.7% were female and 57.3% were the patient's daughter. Caregiver syndrome was detected in 60% of them: 57.7% had mild symptoms and in 42.2%, symptoms were moderate to severe. No statistically significant association was established between the development of caregiver syndrome and the degree of patient immobility. Caregivers of patients with immobility syndrome are at high risk of developing caregiver syndrome, thus underscoring the need to include primary caregiver support programs.

  6. Well-being of Sibling Caregivers: Effects of Kinship Relationship and Race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkung, Eun Ha; Greenberg, Jan S; Mailick, Marsha R

    2017-08-01

    This study examined whether caregiving has a differential effect on the well-being of sibling caregivers relative to other caregiving groups and whether race moderates this effect. Using the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States, 631 family caregivers (including 61 sibling caregivers) and 4,944 noncaregivers were identified. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to estimate the effect of the caregiver-care recipient relationship and its interaction with race on caregivers' well-being (i.e., depressive symptoms, self-rated health, life satisfaction, and perceived control over life). Caregivers in general reported poorer well-being than noncaregivers, but sibling caregivers were less affected by caregiving than parent or spouse caregivers. Among sibling caregivers, caregiving took a significantly greater toll on non-Hispanic White caregivers than those from minority groups with respect to depressive symptoms and life satisfaction. The findings suggest that the experience of sibling caregivers is significantly shaped by their cultural background. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Meaning creation and employee engagement in home health caregivers.

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    Nielsen, Mette Strange; Jørgensen, Frances

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to contribute to an understanding on how home health caregivers experience engagement in their work, and specifically, how aspects of home healthcare work create meaning associated with employee engagement. Although much research on engagement has been conducted, little has addressed how individual differences such as worker orientation influence engagement, or how engagement is experienced within a caregiving context. The study is based on a qualitative study in two home homecare organisations in Denmark using a think-aloud data technique, interviews and observations. The analysis suggests caregivers experience meaning in three relatively distinct ways, depending on their work orientation. Specifically, the nature of engagement varies across caregivers oriented towards being 'nurturers', 'professionals', or 'workers', and the sources of engagement differ for each of these types of caregivers. The article contributes by (i) advancing our theoretical understanding of employee engagement by emphasising meaning creation and (ii) identifying factors that influence meaning creation and engagement of home health caregivers, which should consequently affect the quality of services provided home healthcare patients. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  8. A Systematic Review of Psychosocial Interventions to Cancer Caregivers

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    Fang Fu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To systematically review the effect of psychosocial interventions on improving QoL, depression and anxiety of cancer caregivers.Methods: We conducted a systematic review of psychosocial interventions among adult cancer caregivers published from 2011 to 2016. PsycINFO, PubMed, Proquest, Cochrane Library, Embase, Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts (ASSIA, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI and EBSCO, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI and WANFANG were searched. Inclusion criteria were: randomized controlled trails (RCTs; psychosocial intervention to cancer caregivers; psychosocial health indicators including quality of life, depression or anxiety.Results: 21 studies out of 4,666 identified abstracts met inclusion criteria, including 19 RCTs. The intervention modes fell into the following nine categories: family connect intervention, self-determination theory-based intervention (SDT, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT, emotion-focused therapy (EFT, comprehensive health enhancement support system (CHESS, FOCUS programme, existential behavioral therapy (EBT, telephone interpersonal counseling (TIP-C, problem-solving intervention (COPE.Conclusion: paired-intervention targeting self-care and interpersonal connections of caregivers and symptom management of patients is effective in improving quality of life and alleviating depression of cancer caregivers while music therapy is helpful for reducing anxiety of cancer caregivers.

  9. Mutual altruism: evidence from Alzheimer patients and their spouse caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Markus; Pfarr, Christian; Zweifel, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Preferences of both Alzheimer patients and their spouse caregivers are related to a willingness-to-pay (WTP) measure which is used to test for the presence of mutual (rather than conventional unilateral) altruism. Contingent valuation experiments were conducted in 2000-2002, involving 126 Alzheimer patients and their caregiving spouses living in the Zurich metropolitan area (Switzerland). WTP values for three hypothetical treatments of the demented patient were elicited. The treatment Stabilization prevents the worsening of the disease, bringing dementia to a standstill. Cure restores patient health to its original level. In No burden, dementia takes its normal course while caregiver's burden is reduced to its level before the disease. The three different types of therapies are reflected in different WTP values of both caregivers and patients, suggesting that moderate levels of Alzheimer's disease still permit clear expression of preference. According to the WTP values found, patients do not rank Cure higher than No burden, implying that their preferences are entirely altruistic. Caregiving spouses rank Cure before Burden, reflecting less than perfect altruism which accounts for some 40 percent of their total WTP. Still, this constitutes evidence of mutual altruism. VALUE: The evidence suggests that WTP values reflect individuals' preferences even in Alzheimer patients. The estimates suggest that an economically successful treatment should provide relief to caregivers, with its curative benefits being of secondary importance.

  10. Gratitude and coping among familial caregivers of persons with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Bobo Hi-Po; Cheng, Cecilia

    2017-04-01

    Gratitude is widely perceived as a key factor to psychological well-being by different cultures and religions. The relationship between gratitude and coping in the context of familial dementia caregiving has yet to be investigated. This study is the first to examine the associations among gratitude, coping strategies, psychological resources and psychological distress using a structural equation modelling approach. Findings with 101 Chinese familial caregivers of persons with dementia (mean age = 57.6, range = 40-76; 82% women) showed that gratitude was related to the greater use of emotion-focused coping (positive reframing, acceptance, humour, emotional social support seeking, religious coping) and psychological resources (caregiving competence and social support). Psychological resources and emotion-focused coping in turn explained the association between gratitude and lower levels of psychological distress (caregiving burden and depressive symptoms). The present results indicate the beneficial role of gratitude on coping with caregiving distress and provide empirical foundation for incorporating gratitude in future psychological interventions for caregivers.

  11. Evaluation of primary caregivers' perceptions on home trampoline use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Supriya; Coriolano, Kamary; Davidson, Jacob; Cashin, Megan; Carey, Timothy; Bartley, Debra

    2018-06-01

    Trampolines are widely used by children, but trampoline injuries can be severe and may require hospital care or even surgery. This pilot study examined the effectiveness of an educational intervention on caregivers' perceptions of trampoline use and safety for their children. Primary caregivers were recruited from the orthopedic clinic at the Children's Hospital at our institution in 2015. Caregivers were asked to complete a survey at two time points, initially in clinic and one week post educational intervention. The educational intervention was a pamphlet outlining trampoline safety data. Data analysis occurred in 2016. From the 100 primary caregivers recruited, 39 caregivers owned a trampoline, and 10 had presented to the emergency department with their child for an injury related to trampoline use. After educational intervention, caregivers had higher rating of perceived danger associated with trampolines (6/10 vs. 8/10, p trampoline use (56% vs. 91%, p trampolines are dangerous (pre: 44% vs. post: 73%, p trampoline. Overall, the results of this study show that a simple educational intervention can help to increase knowledge around safe trampoline practices and increase awareness of injury. Further, this study can act as initial evidence for future studies to implement this type of intervention long-term.

  12. Caregiver resilience in palliative care: a research protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limardi, Stefano; Stievano, Alessandro; Rocco, Gennaro; Vellone, Ercole; Alvaro, Rosaria

    2016-02-01

    To describe a research protocol designed to formulate a conceptual framework of informal caregiver resilience in palliative care. Resilience is the ability to adapt or to improve one's own conditions following experiences of adversity. The end-of-life care provided by informal caregivers is a form of adversity because it entails objective difficulties, emotional involvement and deep levels of introspection that have been stimulated by the death event. Resilience has not yet been addressed in association with end-of-life care. This is a multicentre cross-sectional study. We will administer a questionnaire to a sample of informal end-of-life caregivers to collect data about the main psychological, behavioural and healthcare factors that impact resilience. Data analysis will include descriptive and correlational statistical techniques, multiple linear regressions and structural equation modelling. Data will be collected in multiple palliative care centres and statistical analysis will be carried out using software: SPSS version 19.0 and MPlus version 7.3. The study is supported by a grant from the Centre of Excellence for Nursing Scholarship in Italy (Research Grant number 2.13.10) that was awarded in March 2013. The study seeks to identify the predictive, mediating and moderating roles of select variables: caregivers' self-efficacy, burdens of caregiving, depression and resilience. The results of this analysis will impact the theoretical study of resilience in palliative care and will have practical implications for interventions aimed at supporting caregivers through healthcare teams. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The experiences of family caregiving in a chronic care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myung Ok

    2005-12-01

    The main purpose of this critical ethnography was to examines the process and discourses through which family caregivers experience while caring for their sick family member in a hospital. This was achieved by conducting in-depth interviews with 12 family caregivers, and by observing their caring activities and daily lives in natural settings. The study field was a unit for neurologic patients. Data was analyzed using taxonomy, discourse analysis, and proxemics. All research work was iteratively processed from March 2003 to December 2004. Constant comparative analysis of the data yielded the process of becoming a successful family caregiver: encountering the differences and chaos as novice; constructing their world of skilled caregivers; and becoming a hospital family as experienced caregivers. During the process of becoming an experienced hospital family, the discourse of family centered idea guided their caring behaviors and daily lives. The paternalistic family caregivers struggled, cooperated, and harmonized with the patriarchal world of professional health care system. During this process of becoming hospital family, professional nurses must act as cultural brokers between the lay family caring system and the professional caring system.

  14. [The current perspectives regarding the burden on mental health caregivers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Lucilene; Vieira, Mariana Verderoce; Ricci, Maira Aparecida Malagutti; Mazza, Rafael Severio

    2012-04-01

    A systematic literature review was performed regarding the burden on mental health caregivers. The studies were selected from the Virtual Health Library - Biblioteca Virtual de Saúde (BVS), using the keyword caregiver burden. The main criteria for this study were: full-text articles published between 2000 and 2010, in Portuguese, English or Spanish; indexed on the BVS databases; which investigated the burden of mental health caregivers, and had caregivers as the main subject. The analysis was performed considering the following: title, year of publication, objectives, methodological approach, instruments and main results. The analysis of 114 full-text articles showed the predominant objectives were the burden on informal caregivers and the validation of psychometric scales, particularly the Zarit Scale. Some studies showed an association between high levels of burden, feelings of guilt and depressive symptoms. On the other hand, psycho-educational interventions were indicated as having a positive impact. This theme has a growing scientific interest and there is a need for deeper studies addressing formal caregivers.

  15. Caregivers' support needs and factors promoting resiliency after brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitter, Bryony; Sharman, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the challenges, support needs and coping strategies of caregivers of people with an acquired brain injury (ABI). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with caregivers (n = 20) to explore their support services received, access barriers, utility of services, needed supports, coping strategies and factors promoting life satisfaction. The team recorded, transcribed verbatim and inductively analysed all interviews. Through thematic data analysis, three central themes were revealed: (a) barriers impeding quality-of-life, (b) support needed to improve quality-of-life and (c) factors enabling quality-of-life. All perspectives from the participants involved are synthesized to provide a rich depiction of caregivers' support needs and coping strategies. Two specific findings of interest include a negative association between severity of brain injury and caregiver's desire to direct treatment, as well as a distinct service gap in assistance for caregivers who are caring for someone with violent/offending behaviours. This study recommends short- and long-term changes, given Australia's upcoming National Disability Insurance Scheme, to increase caregiver quality-of-life, which will ultimately affect the rehabilitation outcomes of persons with ABI.

  16. Impacts of care-giving and sources of support: a comparison of end-of-life and non-end-of-life caregivers in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allison M; Wang, Li; Kitchen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    This is the second in a series of papers that deal with care-giving in Canada, as based on data available from the Canadian General Social Survey (2007). Building on the first paper, which reviewed the differences between short-term, long-term and end-of-life (EOL) caregivers, this paper uniquely examines the caregiver supports employed by EOL caregivers when compared to non-EOL caregivers (short-term and long-term caregivers combined). Both papers employ data from Statistics Canada's General Social Survey (GSS Cycle 21: 2007). The GSS includes three modules, where respondents were asked questions about the unpaid home care assistance that they had provided in the last 12 months to someone at EOL or with either a long-term health condition or a physical limitation. The objective of this research paper was to investigate the link between the impact of the care-giving experience and the caregiver supports received, while also examining the differences in these across EOL and non-EOL caregivers. By way of factor analysis and regression modelling, we examine differences between two types of caregivers: (i) EOL and (ii) non-EOL caregivers. The study revealed that with respect to socio-demographic characteristics, health outcomes and caregiver supports, EOL caregivers were consistently worse off. This suggests that although all non-EOL caregivers are experiencing negative impacts from their care-giving role, comparatively greater supports are needed for EOL caregivers. © 2015 The Authors. Health and Social Care in the Community Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Experienced emotional burden in caregivers: psychometric properties of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire in caregivers of brain injured patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurtsen, G.J.; Meijer, R.; Heugten, C.M. van; Martina, J.D.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the psychometric properties (internal consistency, discriminant validity, and responsiveness) of the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire for Brain Injury measuring emotional burden in caregivers of patients with chronic acquired brain injury. DESIGN: Inception cohort study.

  18. Cross-cultural adaptation of the Caregiver Reaction Assessment for use in Brazil with informal caregivers of the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Rochelly do Nascimento Mota

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to carry out the cross-cultural adaptation of the Caregiver Reaction Assessment CRA for use in Brazil with informal caregivers of dependent elderly METHOD A methodological study, of five steps: initial translation, synthesis of translations, retro-translation, evaluation by a judge committee and a pre-test, with 30 informal caregivers of older persons in Fortaleza, Brazil. Content validity was assessed by five experts in gerontology and geriatrics. The cross-cultural adaptation was rigorously conducted, allowing for inferring credibility. RESULTS The Brazilian version of the CRA had a simple and fast application (ten minutes, easily understood by the target audience. It is semantically, idiomatically, experimentally and conceptually equivalent to the original version, with valid content to assess the burden of informal caregivers for the elderly (Content Validity Index = 0.883. CONCLUSION It is necessary that other psychometric properties of validity and reliability are tested before using in care practice and research.

  19. Social relationships among family caregivers: a cross-cultural comparison between Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic White caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Linda R; Crist, Janice

    2008-10-01

    Sometimes, clinicians assume caregivers in cultural groups believed to have large social networks and strong social support need little intervention from health professionals. This longitudinal study tests five hypotheses about the social relationships of Mexican American compared to non-Hispanic White caregivers and whether negative changes in social support affect perceived health. The sample includes 66 Mexican American and 92 non-Hispanic White caregivers. Findings show that social networks and social support are similar at baseline and similarly stable for 1 year. Negative changes in social support are correlated with poorer health perceptions. Findings underscore the importance of designing interventions that are culturally competent based on what the caregiver is experiencing rather than cultural stereotypes.

  20. Female caregivers and stroke severity determines caregiver stress in stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu Menon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke is among the major causes of short- and long-term disability. This study aimed to understand the caregivers (CGs stress in stroke survivors. Materials and Methods: A 22-item questionnaire was administered to 201 CGs of stroke survivors. The variables tested were physical and mental health, social support, financial, and personal problems. CGs were divided into Group A (Barthel index [BI] 75 according to patient's BI, according to gender (male and female CG and relation; spouses (wife, husband, daughters, sons, daughter-in-law, grandchildren, and rest (father, mother, brother, sister, and in-laws. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version–21. Data were analyzed to determine which variables of the patient effects the CG stress. Results: Majority of the CGs (74.62% were females. 65% of CGs graded their burden as moderate to severe. 81% of CGs had left their work for caregiving. More than half of the CGs felt sleep disturbance and physical strain. Psychological instability and financial burdens were reported in 3/4th of CGs. Group A CGs faced more sleep, financial, health, and social life disturbance. Patient's bladder and bowel problems, shoulder pain, patients noncooperative attitude for medication administration, and physiotherapy were more upsetting for Group A CGs. Female CGs were subjected to more sleep disturbance, physical and psychological stress, faced more difficulty regarding the patient's bladder, bowel, personal hygiene needs, and physiotherapy. Female CGs felt less motivated in caregiving than male CGs. Wives and daughters-in-law experienced more burden. Time spent and burden perceived was more by female CGs (χ2 = 15.199, P = 0.002 than males (χ2 = 11.931, P = 0.018; wives and daughters than other relations (χ2 = 32.184, P = 0.000, (χ2 = 35.162, P = 0.019. Conclusion: Our study showed that caregiving burden was predominantly shouldered by females CGs. CGs faced physical, psychological, and socioeconomic

  1. Subjective caregiver burden: validity of the 10-item short version of the Burden Scale for Family Caregivers BSFC-s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graessel, Elmar; Berth, Hendrik; Lichte, Thomas; Grau, Hannes

    2014-02-20

    Subjective burden is a central variable describing the situation encountered by family caregivers. The 10-item short version of the Burden Scale for Family Caregivers (BSFC-short/BSFC-s) was developed to provide an economical measure of this variable. The present study examined the reliability and validity of the BSFC-s. Comprehensive data from "the IDA project" were the basis of the calculations, which included 351 dyads and examined medical data on people with dementia, interview data from their family caregivers, and health insurance data. A factor analysis was performed to explore the structure of the BSFC-s; Cronbach's alpha was used to evaluate the internal consistency of the scale. The items were analyzed to determine the item difficulty and the discriminatory power. Construct validity was tested with five hypotheses. To establish the predictive validity of the BSFC-s, predictors of institutionalization at a follow-up time of 2.5 years were analyzed (binary logistic regression). The BSFC-s score adhered to a one-factor structure. Cronbach's alpha for the complete scale was .92. A significant increase in the BSFC-s score was observed when dementia progressed, disturbing behavior occurred more frequently, care requirements increased, and when caregivers were diagnosed with depression. Caregiver burden was the second strongest predictor of institutionalization out of a total of four significant predictors. All hypotheses that referred to the construct validity were supported. The BSFC-short with its ten items is a very economical instrument for assessing the caregiver's total subjective burden in a short time frame. The BSFC-s score has predictive validity for the institutionalization of people with dementia. Therefore it is an appropriate outcome measure to evaluate caregiver interventions. The scale is available for free in 20 languages (http://www.caregiver-burden.eu). This availability facilitates the comparison of international research findings.

  2. Psychometrics of the Zarit Burden Interview in Caregivers of Patients With Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawashdeh, Sami Y; Lennie, Terry A; Chung, Misook L

    Identification of family caregivers who are burdened by the caregiving experience is vital to prevention of poor outcomes associated with caregiving. The Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI), a well-known measure of caregiving burden in caregivers of patients with dementia, has been used without being validated in caregivers of patients with heart failure (HF). The purpose of this study is to examine the reliability and validity of the ZBI in caregivers of patients with HF. A total of 124 primary caregivers of patients with HF completed survey questionnaires. Caregiving burden was measured by the ZBI. Reliability was examined using Cronbach's α and item-total/item-item correlations. Convergent validity was examined using correlations with the Oberst Caregiving Burden Scale. Construct validity was demonstrated by exploratory factor analysis and known hypothesis testing (ie, the hypothesis of the association between caregiving burden and depressive symptoms). Cronbach's α for the ZBI was .921. The ZBI had good item-total (r = 0.395-0.764) and item-item (mean r = 0.365) correlations. Significant correlations between the ZBI and the Oberst Caregiving Burden Scale (r = 0.466 for the caregiving time subscale and 0.583 for the caregiving task difficulty subscale; P < .001 for both) supported convergent validity. Four factors were identified (ie, consequences of caregiving, patient's dependence, exhaustion with caregiving and uncertainty, and guilt and fear for the patient's future) using factor analysis, which are consistent with previous studies. Caregivers with high burden scores had significantly higher depressive symptoms than did caregivers with lower burden scores (7.0 ± 6.8 vs 3.1 ± 4.3; P < .01). The findings provide evidence that the ZBI is a reliable and valid measure for assessing burden in caregivers of patients with HF.

  3. Challenges associated with transition to caregiver role following diagnostic disclosure of Alzheimer disease: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharme, Francine; Lévesque, Louise; Lachance, Lise; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne; Coulombe, Renée

    2011-09-01

    The prevalence of Alzheimer's disease is rising. The large number of new cases identified each year means that many new families will set upon a long trajectory of caring for a relative with dementia. Diagnostic disclosure of Alzheimer's disease marks the official transition to the caregiver role, yet this early period of the caregiver career have rarely been studied. Based on Meleis's theoretical framework for role transition, the objectives of this study were to document the characteristics of the caregiving context during the transition to the caregiver role following diagnostic disclosure of Alzheimer's disease and to compare these characteristics by caregiver gender and kinship tie to the relative. A descriptive design was used. Data were collected using standardized measures selected in accordance with the role transition theoretical framework. The sample recruited in Quebec (Canada) cognition clinics comprised 122 caregivers of an elderly relative diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in the past nine months. Findings reveal the context of care to be marked by several challenges for caregivers. The majority of caregivers receives little informal support, has poor knowledge of available formal services, and has difficulty planning ahead for the relative's future care needs. Caregivers themselves report a lack of preparedness to provide care. Compared with men caregivers, women seem to have more problems controlling disturbing thoughts about their new caregiver role and to experience more family conflicts and psychological distress. Compared with offspring caregivers, spouse caregivers are less able to respond to the relative's disruptive behaviors, make less use of problem-solving strategies, and report fewer family conflicts. The challenges faced by caregivers during the transition to the caregiver role are sensitive to nursing interventions. Pro-active interventions from the outset of the caregiving career, such as early assessment of caregiver needs for

  4. The relationship between caregiving self-efficacy and depressive symptoms in family caregivers of patients with Alzheimer disease: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grano, Caterina; Lucidi, Fabio; Violani, Cristiano

    2017-07-01

    Caregiving for a relative with dementia has been associated with negative consequences for mental health. Self-efficacy has been shown to correlate negatively with depression but the long-term association between caregiver burden, caregiver self-efficacy, and depressive symptoms, remains still largely unexplored. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether different self-efficacy domains partially mediated the relationship between caregiving burden and depression. A three-wave design was used, with initial assessment and follow-ups three months later and one year later. One hundred seventy caregivers of patients with AD responded to measures of caregiver burden, caregiving self-efficacy, and depressive symptoms. Data were analyzed by means of structural equation models. The tested model provided support for the guiding hypothesis. Burden at the time of the first assessment (T1) significantly influenced depression one year later and the relationship between burden at time one and depressive symptoms one year later was partially mediated by self-efficacy for controlling upsetting thoughts. The findings of the present study provide evidence that, along a considerable length of time, the effects of caregiver burden on depressive symptoms can be explained by the caregivers' efficacy beliefs in controlling upsetting thoughts related to the caregiving tasks. Interventions for caregivers of patients with AD may help them in tackling negative thoughts about the caregiving role.

  5. Reconciling work and family caregiving among adult-child family caregivers of older people with dementia: effects on role strain and depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Nu; Shyu, Yea-Ing Lotus; Chen, Min-Chi; Yang, Pei-Shan

    2011-04-01

    This paper is a report of a study that examined the effects of work demands, including employment status, work inflexibility and difficulty reconciling work and family caregiving, on role strain and depressive symptoms of adult-child family caregivers of older people with dementia. Family caregivers also employed for pay are known to be affected by work demands, i.e. excessive workload and time pressures. However, few studies have shown how these work demands and reconciliation between work and family caregiving influence caregivers' role strain and depressive symptoms. For this cross-sectional study, secondary data were analysed for 119 adult-child family caregivers of older people with dementia in Taiwan using hierarchical multiple regression. After adjusting for demographic characteristics, resources and role demands overload, family caregivers with full-time jobs (β=0.25, Pwork and caregiving roles (β=0.36, Pworking part-time or unemployed. Family caregivers with more work inflexibility reported more depressive symptoms (β=0.29, PWork demands affected family caregivers' role strain and depressive symptoms. Working full-time and having more difficulty reconciling work and caregiving roles predicted role strain; work inflexibility predicted depressive symptoms. These results can help clinicians identify high-risk groups for role strain and depression. Nurses need to assess family caregivers for work flexibility when screening for high-risk groups and encourage them to reconcile working with family-care responsibilities to reduce role strain. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Differences in impact of long term caregiving for mentally ill older adults on the daily life of informal caregivers: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegwaard, M.I.; Aartsen, M.J.; Grypdonck, M.H.F.; Cuijpers, P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Owing to the policy of extramuralization of care in most Western countries older people with severe mental illness have to rely more and more on informal caregivers for daily care. Caregivers themselves are often aged, and although caregiving implies an impact on daily life that exceeds

  7. The impact of cardiac arrest on the long-term wellbeing and caregiver burden of family caregivers: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijnen, Helena Gfm; Rasquin, Sascha Mc; van Heugten, Caroline M; Verbunt, Jeanine A; Moulaert, Véronique Rm

    2017-09-01

    The purpose was to gain insight in the functioning of caregivers of cardiac arrest survivors at 12 months after a cardiac arrest. Secondly, the course of the wellbeing of the caregivers during the first year was studied. Finally, factors that are associated with a higher care burden at 12 months after the cardiac arrest were investigated. A total of 195 family caregivers of cardiac arrest survivors were included. Quality of life (SF-36, EuroQol-VAS), caregiver strain (CSI) and emotional functioning (HADS, IES) were measured at two weeks, three months and one year after the cardiac arrest. Thereby, the caregiver was asked to fill out the cognitive failure questionnaire (CFQ) to evaluate their view on the cognitive status of the patient. Caregiver strain was high in 16 (15%) of the caregivers at 12 months. Anxiety was present in 33 (25%) caregivers and depression in 18 (14%) caregivers at 12 months. The repeated measures MANOVA showed that during the first year the following variables improved significantly: SF-36 domains social and mental health, role physical, role emotional and vitality, caregiver strain, HADS and IES ( Pcaregiver strain correlated significantly (explained variance 63%, P=0.03) with caregiver HADS ( P=0.01), EuroQol-VAS ( P=0.02), and the CFQ ( Pcaregivers improves during the first year up to normal levels, but caregivers with emotional problems or perceived cognitive problems at 12 months are at risk for developing a higher care burden.

  8. Validation of the Italian Version of the Caregiver Abuse Screen among Family Caregivers of Older People with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchiorre, Maria Gabriella; Di Rosa, Mirko; Barbabella, Francesco; Barbini, Norma; Lattanzio, Fabrizia; Chiatti, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Introduction . Elder abuse is often a hidden phenomenon and, in many cases, screening practices are difficult to implement among older people with dementia. The Caregiver Abuse Screen (CASE) is a useful tool which is administered to family caregivers for detecting their potential abusive behavior. Objectives . To validate the Italian version of the CASE tool in the context of family caregiving of older people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to identify risk factors for elder abuse in Italy. Methods . The CASE test was administered to 438 caregivers, recruited in the Up-Tech study. Validity and reliability were evaluated using Spearman's correlation coefficients, principal-component analysis, and Cronbach's alphas. The association between the CASE and other variables potentially associated with elder abuse was also analyzed. Results . The factor analysis suggested the presence of a single factor, with a strong internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.86). CASE score was strongly correlated with well-known risk factors of abuse. At multivariate level, main factors associated with CASE total score were caregiver burden and AD-related behavioral disturbances. Conclusions . The Italian version of the CASE is a reliable and consistent screening tool for tackling the risk of being or becoming perpetrators of abuse by family caregivers of people with AD.

  9. Differences in impact of long term caregiving for mentally ill older adults on the daily life of informal caregivers: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegwaard, Marian I; Aartsen, Marja J; Grypdonck, Mieke Hf; Cuijpers, Pim

    2013-03-27

    Owing to the policy of extramuralization of care in most Western countries older people with severe mental illness have to rely more and more on informal caregivers for daily care. Caregivers themselves are often aged, and although caregiving implies an impact on daily life that exceeds the boundaries of usual informal care, the impact differs across caregivers. Some caregivers seem to suffer more than others, and the differences cannot be fully understood by factors currently known to exacerbate the burden of caregiving. In order to help caregivers reduce the impact of caregiving it is important to gain a deeper understanding of factors influencing the burden and its impact on the caregiver's life. With this in mind, the aim of the study is to explore and understand differences in the impact of long-term caregiving on the quality of life of caregivers who look after older adults with severe mental illness. A qualitative, associative, inductive strategy and continuous simultaneous coding were used to interpret the data of 19 semi-structured interviews. We identified an underlying psychological factor "perceived freedom of choice" which explains the gross differences in impact, leading to a definition of two main types of caregivers. Depending on how people perceive freedom of choice to provide care, the consequences of caregiving can be characterized as a process of gain (type 1) or loss (type 2). Four influential factors deepen the impact of caregiving for the type 2 caregivers, and two subtypes are identified for this category. Consequences of caregiving are most readily seen in a deteriorating quality of the relationship with the care recipient and in the psychosocial well-being of the caregiver. The concept of freedom of choice adds to our understanding of the differences and explains the variation in impact on the caregivers' life. The type 1 caregiver generally experiences gain whereas type 2 generally experiences loss, which puts the latter group typically

  10. Recruitment of Older Adult Patient-Caregiver Dyads for an Online Caregiver Resource Program: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahm, Eun-Shim; Orwig, Denise; Resnick, Barbara; Magaziner, Jay; Bellantoni, Michele; Sterling, Robert

    2012-01-12

    Hip fracture is a significant health problem for older adults and generally requires surgery followed by intensive rehabilitation. Informal caregivers (CGs) can provide vital assistance to older adults recovering from hip fracture. Caregiving is a dyadic process that affects both CGs and care recipients (CRs). In a feasibility study, we assessed the effects of using a theory-based online hip fracture resource program for CGs on both CGs and CRs. In this article, we discuss our recruitment process and the lessons learned. Participants were recruited from six acute hospitals, and CGs used the online resource program for 8 weeks. A total of 256 hip fracture patients were screened, and 164 CRs were ineligible. CG screening was initiated when CRs were determined to be eligible. Among 41 eligible dyads, 36 dyads were recruited. Several challenges to the recruitment of these dyads for online studies were identified, including a low number of eligible dyads in certain hospitals and difficulty recruiting both the CR and the CG during the short hospital stay. Field nurses often had to make multiple trips to the hospital to meet with both the CR and the CG. Thus, when a subject unit is a dyad recruited from acute settings, the resources required for the recruitment may be more than doubled. These challenges could be successfully alleviated with careful planning, competent field staff members, collaboration with hospital staff members, and efficient field operations.

  11. The Objective and Subjective Caregiving Burden and Caregiving Behaviours of Parents of Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhind, Charlotte; Salerno, Laura; Hibbs, Rebecca; Micali, Nadia; Schmidt, Ulrike; Gowers, Simon; Macdonald, Pamela; Goddard, Elizabeth; Todd, Gillian; Tchanturia, Kate; Lo Coco, Gianluca; Treasure, Janet

    2016-07-01

    The study aimed to examine caregiving burden and levels of distress, accommodating behaviours, expressed emotion (EE) and carers' skills, in parents of adolescents with anorexia nervosa. A semi-structured interview assessed the objective burden (time spent across caregiving tasks) in parents (n = 196) of adolescents (n = 144) receiving outpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa. Subjective burden (carers' distress), accommodating behaviours, EE and carers' skills were measured by self-report. Mothers, on average, spent 2.5 h/day of care, mainly providing food and emotional support, compared with 1 h/day by fathers. The level of distress and accommodating behaviour was significantly lower in fathers than in mothers. Accommodating behaviours mediated the relationship between objective burden and subjective burden in mothers, whereas EE and carers' skills did not mediate this relationship for either parent. The objective burden for most mothers is high. In order to reduce subjective burden, it may be helpful to target accommodating behaviours. ISRCTN83003225 - Expert Carers Helping Others (ECHO). Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  12. [Caregiver's health: adaption and validation in a Spanish population of the Experience of Caregiving Inventory (ECI)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Maraver, Mariacruz; Doval, Eduardo; Fernández-Castro, Jordi; Giménez-Salinas, Jordi; Prat, Gemma; Bonet, Pere

    2018-04-04

    To adapt and to validate the Experience of Caregiving Inventory (ECI) in a Spanish population, providing empirical evidence of its internal consistency, internal structure and validity. Psychometric validation of the adapted version of the ECI. One hundred and seventy-two caregivers (69.2% women), mean age 57.51 years (range: 21-89) participated. Demographic and clinical data, standardized measures (ECI, suffering scale of SCL-90-R, Zarit burden scale) were used. The two scales of negative evaluation of the ECI most related to serious mental disorders (disruptive behaviours [DB] and negative symptoms [NS]) and the two scales of positive appreciation (positive personal experiences [PPE], and good aspects of the relationship [GAR]) were analyzed. Exploratory structural equation modelling was used to analyze the internal structure. The relationship between the ECI scales and the SCL-90-R and Zarit scores was also studied. The four-factor model presented a good fit. Cronbach's alpha (DB: 0.873; NS: 0.825; PPE: 0.720; GAR: 0.578) showed a higher homogeneity in the negative scales. The SCL-90-R scores correlated with the negative ECI scales, and none of the ECI scales correlated with the Zarit scale. The Spanish version of the ECI can be considered a valid, reliable, understandable and feasible self-report measure for its administration in the health and community context. Copyright © 2018 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of the situational context and interactional process on the quality of family caregiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, L R; Morrison, E; Steffl, B; Chae, Y M; Cromwell, S L; Russell, C K

    1995-06-01

    A staged theoretical model designed to explain the quality of elder caring by family members was tested. The model posits how the situational context, interactional process, and caregiving burden perceived by the caregiver affect the quality of elder caring. The purpose was to determine the amount of variance explained by the interactional process beyond that explained by the situational context and caregiving burden. Data were collected from 209 elder-caregiver dyads using interviews, observations, and caregiver self-reports. The strongest predictors of caregiving burden were the caregiver's stressful negative life events (situational context) and discrepancy between past and present image of elder (interactional process). The strongest predictors of quality of elder caring were the caregiver's perception of subjective burden and a monitoring role definition on the part of the caregiver (interactional process).

  14. The Burden Endured by Caregivers of Patients With Morquio A Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian J. Hendriksz MD

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This international survey performed by direct personal interview or mail evaluated the global burden among primary caregivers of patients with Morquio A syndrome. Collected outcomes included self-reported time spent on caregiving, proportion of daily activities (from the Mucopolysaccharidosis Health Assessment Questionnaire requiring caregiver assistance, and how the patient’s age and wheelchair use affect these. In addition, the impact of caregiving on the caregivers’ relationship with family and friends, physical and mental health, and employment status and income was evaluated. Caregiver burden increased with disease progression. Adult patients always using a wheelchair required substantially more caregiving time and complete assistance with a larger proportion of daily activities than more mobile patients. In children, this was less apparent. Caregivers suffered physically and emotionally and their family and social life and financial situation were considerably impacted. Improvements in patient mobility may substantially reduce the level of caregiver support and the burden of caregiving.

  15. High perceived caregiver burden for relatives of patients following hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariza-Vega, Patrocinio; Ortiz-Piña, Mariana; Kristensen, Morten Tange

    2018-01-01

    treatment strategies such as the support and training of the caregivers in patient handling during hospital stay could be carried out to reduce caregiver burden. Implications for rehabilitation The main caregiver of a hip fracture patient is usually a woman who is the daughter of the patient, and reducing...... her burden of care should be included as one of the objectives of rehabilitation treatment. The caregivers of hip fracture patients must be considered as part of the treatment during the patient's recovery period, and patient handling training should be provided to the caregivers of hip fracture......PURPOSE: To determine the profile of the main informal caregivers, the evolution of the caregiver burden, and the influencing factors of caregiver burden at 1-year after hip fracture surgery. METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, a total of 172 informal caregivers of patients were interviewed...

  16. Caregiver preference for reinforcement-based interventions for problem behavior maintained by positive reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor, Anne M; Fritz, Jennifer N; Roath, Christopher T; Rothe, Brittany R; Gourley, Denise A

    2016-06-01

    Social validity of behavioral interventions typically is assessed with indirect methods or by determining preferences of the individuals who receive treatment, and direct observation of caregiver preference rarely is described. In this study, preferences of 5 caregivers were determined via a concurrent-chains procedure. Caregivers were neurotypical, and children had been diagnosed with developmental disabilities and engaged in problem behavior maintained by positive reinforcement. Caregivers were taught to implement noncontingent reinforcement (NCR), differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA), and differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO), and the caregivers selected interventions to implement during sessions with the child after they had demonstrated proficiency in implementing the interventions. Three caregivers preferred DRA, 1 caregiver preferred differential reinforcement procedures, and 1 caregiver did not exhibit a preference. Direct observation of implementation in concurrent-chains procedures may allow the identification of interventions that are implemented with sufficient integrity and preferred by caregivers. © 2016 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  17. Family functioning is associated with depressive symptoms in caregivers of acute stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein-Lubow, Gary P; Beevers, Christopher G; Bishop, Duane S; Miller, Ivan W

    2009-06-01

    To determine whether family functioning is uniquely associated with caregiver depressive symptoms in the immediate aftermath of stroke. Cross-sectional data from the baseline assessment of an intervention study for stroke survivors and their families. Neurology inpatient service of a large urban hospital. Stroke survivors (n=192), each with a primary caregiver. The mean age of stroke survivors was 66 years, and most, 57%, were men (n=110). The mean age of caregivers was 57 years, and 73% (n=140) of the caregivers were women. Eighty-five percent of caregivers were white. Not applicable. Measures were chosen to assess caregivers' depressive symptoms (Centers for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale), family functioning (Family Assessment Device), and additional factors such as health status (Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey) and stroke survivors' cognitive abilities (modified Mini-Mental State Examination) and functional impairments (FIM and Frenchay Activities Index). Depressive symptoms were mild to moderate in 14% and severe in 27% of caregivers. Family functioning was assessed as unhealthy in 34% of caregiver-patient dyads. In statistical regression models, caregiver depression was associated with patients' sex, caregivers' general health, and family functioning. Forty-one percent of caregivers experienced prominent depressive symptoms after their family member's stroke. Higher depression severity in caregivers was associated with caring for a man, and having worse health and poor family functioning. After stroke, the assessment of caregivers' health and family functioning may help determine which caregivers are most at risk for a depressive syndrome.

  18. A multinational review of recent trends and reports in dementia caregiver burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torti, Frank M; Gwyther, Lisa P; Reed, Shelby D; Friedman, Joëlle Y; Schulman, Kevin A

    2004-01-01

    This systematic review of the literature focuses on the influence of ethnic, cultural, and geographic factors on the caregivers of patients with dementia. In particular, we explore the impact of cultural expectations on five important questions: 1) Do the characteristics of dementia affect caregiver burden? 2) Do characteristics of the caregiver independently predict burden? 3) Does the caregiver affect patient outcomes? 4) Does support or intervention for caregiver result in reduced caregiver burden or improved patient outcomes? 5) Finally, do patient interventions result in reduced caregiver burden or improved patient outcomes? Our findings suggest that noncognitive, behavioral disturbances of patients with dementia result in increased caregiver burden and that female caregivers bear a particularly heavy burden across cultures, particularly in Asian societies. Caregiver burden influences time to medical presentation of patients with dementia, patient condition at presentation, and patient institutionalization. Moreover, interventions designed to reduce caregiver burden have been largely, although not universally, unsuccessful. Pharmacological treatments for symptoms of dementia were found to be beneficial in reducing caregiver burden. The consistency of findings across studies, geographic regions, cultural differences, and heathcare delivery systems is striking. Yet, there are critical differences in cultural expectations and social resources. Future interventions to reduce caregiver burden must consider these differences, identify patients and caregivers at greatest risk, and develop targeted programs that combine aspects of a number of interventional strategies.

  19. The impact of relationships, motivations, and meanings on dementia caregiving outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Catherine; Clare, Linda; McGuinness, Ted; Woods, Robert T

    2012-11-01

    Numerous theoretical models have been developed to explore how caregiving can impact on caregiving outcomes. However, limited attention has been given to the effects of caregivers' motivations for providing care, the meaning they find in caregiving, and the nature of their relationship with the care-recipient. The current study explored the associations between intrinsic and extrinsic motivations, ability to find meaning in caregiving, and pre-caregiving and current relationship quality, and the way in which these variables interact to influence caregiving outcomes. This was a cross-sectional questionnaire study, in which the respondents were 447 caregivers of people with dementia who were in receipt of a specialist nursing service. The results showed that intrinsic motivations, meaning, and pre-caregiving and current relationship quality were significantly related to each other, while extrinsic motivations were only related to intrinsic motivations and meaning. All these factors were significantly related to caregiving outcomes as measured by caregiver burden, role captivity, and competence. Based on these findings, it is recommended that interventions aimed at reducing caregiving stress should take into account the impact of the quality of the relationship and the caregivers' motivations for providing care. More longitudinal research is needed to explore how meanings, motivations, and relationship quality change over the caregiving career.

  20. The education of family caregivers as an ethical issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennacchini, M; Tartaglini, D

    2014-01-01

    Family caregiving represents the first and predominant source of care for 75% to 80% of people with chronic illness in industrialized countries. They have a fundamental role in assisting, providing care, and support to their relatives throughout all the history of the illness. Despite the significant value of informal caregiving, studies consistently report unmet needs among informal caregivers, particularly with regard to obtaining the information and education necessary to care for an older adult experiencing a chronic health condition. Health care professionals talk to patients and their relatives about their disease and about how to manage them daily, forgetting to consider the healthy component that still accompanies their disease though to differing degrees. In the twentieth century some philosophers highlighted that health is still very frequently a hidden asset, an asset that human beings forget not only to possess, but mostly to guard. This paper argues that the family can be an entity responsible not only for the treatment and care of a sick person, but also to building the health of this and the other members Family caregivers can build families capable of "building health" even when caring for a chronically ill. Therefore the education of family caregivers is an important ethical issue. Health care providers should be supportive of family caregivers and help them acquire knowledge and skills in order to maximize quality care. In addition, it is very important that family caregivers: 1. acquire the ability to direct the family's attitude to the enhancement of the health of a sick person, 2. lead the family and not just the sick person to have an adequate and proper life style in order to manage both his/her pathology and his/her health; 3. contribute to improve the quality of life both of the patient and of the family considered as a "unit of care"

  1. Caregivers of older persons with multiple sclerosis: determinants of health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhse, Marijean; Della Ratta, Carol; Galiczewski, Janet; Eckardt, Patricia

    2015-04-01

    This study was conducted to determine which factors (clinical and demographic) are associated with mental and physical health-related quality of life (HRQOL) for caregivers of older persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). The Andersen's Healthcare Utilization Model guided this study. Knowledge of identified predictors of HRQOL may prompt nurses who care for persons with MS to address these issues and provide supportive care. A cross-sectional descriptive design was used to examine the relationship between patient with MS and caregiver clinical and demographic factors with caregiver physical and mental HRQOL. Patients with MS aged 60 years or older and their caregivers from four MS centers on Long Island, New York, self-selected into this study (n = 102). A caregiver survey was administered that collected demographic information and included validated questionnaires measuring HRQOL, caregiver burden, and caregiver perception of risk for neuropsychological impairment of patients with MS. Patient surveys collected demographic information and validated questionnaires measuring cognition, depression, and disability. Multivariate linear regression was used to examine patient and caregiver variables to explain caregiver physical and mental HRQOL. The caregivers in this study were older (mean age = 61 years) with existing comorbidities. We found that caregiver mental HRQOL was negatively associated with patient depression and, surprisingly, positively associated with caregiver burden and caregiver comorbidity of heart disease. Caregiver physical HRQOL was negatively associated with caregiver comorbidities of arthritis and diabetes and lower household income. The challenges older caregivers face when caring for older persons with MS have been shown to affect their mental and physical QOL. Nurses who care for older patients with MS will increasingly rely on older caregivers to provide patient-centered interventions. This descriptive study, based on the Anderson theoretical

  2. Women and AIDS caregiving: women's work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songwathana, P

    2001-01-01

    In this ethnographic study, I examine personal, kinship, and social obligations and the role of women in the traditional Thai family. Under what circumstances do women take on the responsibility to care or not care, and how do they cope with the disease and care when they are also infected? Fifteen women who were afflicted or affected by HIV/AIDS participated in in-depth interviews and participant observations. Analysis employed mainly qualitative methods following Spradley. I show that women who are responsible for caring for both themselves and others, including members of their immediate families or extended family members, face a double jeopardy by virtue of their inferior role and status. When HIV-infected women experience illness, sometimes they feel split; they are incapable of functioning normally, yet they are obligated to do "What they've got to do." Women as carers feel that they have to care because they want to free someone else from suffering despite the fact that they are also suffering. Women roles as family carers seem to be both psychologically and socially constructed. AIDS care is not just a labour of love, but also is done in the spirit of work following Buddhist beliefs of karma and metta. In conclusion, traditional, persistent gender imbalances and inequalities influence women's sexuality, vulnerability, responsibility, and caregiving. When women become infected with HIV and sick with AIDS, their quality of life drops because of the physical, psychological, cultural value, and economic burdens of care they face. AIDS then necessitates rather than prevents women from fulfilling their multiple roles. Consequently, there is a need for greater support especially among Thai women who are afflicted and affected with AIDS.

  3. Factors associated with resident aggression toward caregivers in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Adelheid; Dassen, Theo; Kok, Gerjo; Needham, Ian; Halfens, Ruud J G

    2012-09-01

    Caregivers in nursing homes often experience aggressive behavior of residents. The aim of this study was to explore the caregivers' experiences with aggressive behavior from residents and to identify environmental factors as well as caregiver and resident characteristics related to aggressive behavior in Swiss nursing homes. A retrospective cross-sectional survey was conducted between November 2010 and April 2011 with a sample of caregivers working in various nursing homes in the German-speaking part of Switzerland. In total, 814 caregivers (response rate 51.8%) of 21 nursing homes participated in the study. Data were collected using the German version of the Survey of Violence Experienced by Staff (SOVES-G-R). Standard descriptive statistics were used to describe and summarize the date. To identify risk factors related to the experience of aggression by residents, multilevel logistic regression analysis was applied. The prevalence of participants reporting an aggressive incident during the 12-month period prior to data collection was 81.6%. Of these, 76.5% had experienced verbal aggression, 27.6% threats, and 54.0% physical aggression. The predictive variables in the multiple regression model for physical aggression were: staff education level (odds ratio [OR]= 1.82), gender (OR = 1.82), age ( 45 years: OR = 2.13), and confidence in managing physical aggression (OR = 1.49). The predictive variables for threatening behavior were staff education level (registered nurses vs. non-registered nurses: OR = 1.70; nonstudent vs. student: OR = 1.89) and age ( 45 years: OR = 2.04). Caregivers in nursing homes are at high risk for experiencing aggressive behavior. The identified risk factors are in line with earlier investigations, but some contradictory results also were observed. The high risk for registered nurses exposed to aggressive behavior and the increased risk for caregivers who feel confident in managing aggressive behavior cast a critical light on the content and

  4. Psychometric properties of Persian version of the Caregiver Burden Scale in Iranian caregivers of patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajzadeh, Ata; Akbarfahimi, Malahat; Maroufizadeh, Saman; Rostami, Hamid Reza; Kohan, Amir Hassan

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the psychometric properties of the Persian version of Caregiver Burden Scale (CBS) in caregivers of patients with spinal cord injury. This is a cross-sectional study. After a forward-backward translation, the CBS was administered to 110 caregivers of patients with spinal cord injury (men = 60, women = 50). Factor structure was evaluated by confirmatory factor analysis. The Internal consistency and test-retest reliability of the CBS were examined using Cronbach's α and the intraclass correlation coefficient, respectively. Construct validity was assessed by examining the relationship among CBS and the World Health Organization Quality of Life, and the Beck Depression Inventory. The results of confirmatory factor analysis provided support for a five-factor model of CBS. All subscales of CBS revealed acceptable internal consistency (0.698-0.755), except for environment subscale (0.559). The CBS showed adequate test-retest reliability for its subscales (0.745-0.900). All subscales of CBS significantly correlated with both Beck Depression Inventory and World Health Organization Quality of Life, confirming construct validity. The Persian version of the CBS is a valid and reliable measure for assessing burden of care in caregivers of patients with spinal cord injury. Implications for Rehabilitation Spinal cord injury leads to depression, high levels of stress and diminished quality of life due to the high physical, emotional, and social burdens in caregivers. Persian version of the Caregiver Burden Scale is a valid and reliable tool for assessing burden in Iranian caregivers of patients with spinal cord injury.

  5. Perceptions of burden of caregiving by informal caregivers of cancer patients attending University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpan-Idiok, Paulina Ackley; Anarado, Agnes Nonye

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cancer care is devastating to families. This research studied the informal caregivers’ perceptions of burden of caregiving to cancer patients attending University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar. Methods The research adopted a cross-sectioned descriptive design and 210 caregivers providing care to advanced cancer patients were purposively selected. Data were collected using a researcher developed questionnaire and standardized Zarit Burden Interview scale (ZBIS). Data collected were analysed using descriptive and chi-square statistics with the help of SPSS 18.0 and PAS 19.0 softwares. Results The results indicated that the caregivers were in their youthful and active economic age, dominated by females, Christians, spouses, partners and parents. The burden levels experienced by the caregivers were as follows: severe (46.2%), moderate (36.2%) and trivial of no burden (17.6%). The forms of burden experienced were physical (43.4%), psychological (43.3%), financial (41.1%) and social (46.7%), quite frequently and nearly always. Psychological and social forms of burden had the highest weighted score of 228 in terms of magnitude of burden. The result further showed that there was a significant (P = 0.001) and inverse association between caregivers’ burden and the care receivers’ functional ability. The level of burden also increased significantly (P = 0.000) with the duration of care, while there was also a significant (P = 0.01) relationship between caregivers’ experience of burden and their desire to continue caregiving. Conclusion Caregiving role can be enhanced by provision of interventions such as formal education programme on cancer caregiving, oncology, home services along side with transmural care. PMID:25419297

  6. Support groups for dementia caregivers - Predictors for utilisation and expected quality from a family caregiver's point of view: A questionnaire survey PART I*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luttenberger Katharina

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Support groups have proved to be effective in reducing the burden on family caregivers of dementia patients. Nevertheless, little is known about the factors that influence utilisation or quality expectations of family caregivers. These questions are addressed in the following paper. Methods The cross-sectional study was carried out as an anonymous written survey of family caregivers of dementia patients in Germany. Qualitative and quantitative data from 404 caregivers were analysed using content analysis and binary logistic regression analysis. Results The only significant predictor for utilisation is assessing how helpful support groups are for the individual care situation. Family caregivers all agree that psycho-educative orientation is a priority requirement. Conclusions In order to increase the rate of utilisation, family caregivers must be convinced of the relevant advantages of using support groups. Support groups which offer an exchange of experiences, open discussion, information and advice meet the requirements of family caregivers.

  7. Review of informal care. Discovering the primary caregiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Pilar Catalán Edo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The concept of informal care is complex and multidimensional. Caring involves tasks, relationships, feelings and costs. Women socialization as family welfare providers become them into “health agents” but not “health subjects”. Method. A cross-sectional study regarding the informal care situation during the last decade was performed. The profile of the caregiver and how this role had influenced in his the quality of life was analyzed. Several searches were performed at the following electronic databases: Cochrane Plus, Pubmed, OSM, ODS, RISG, IMSERSO, using the following terms: Gender identity, caregivers, inequality, and home care services. 40 articles were included. Results. The primary caregiver profile is a middle-aged woman, housewife, with low education level and ties of kinship with the person who is cared. It is the daughter who mostly takes this role, followed by the spouse. They perceive that their life is conditioned by this task. Care activity has important health implications for people who perform it, pointing out the negative impact on psychological health, which causes stress and anxiety and overload. Social support is directly related to psychological welfare, and it affects positively to their quality of life. Caring causes positive effects on the caregiver but they are rarely studied. Discussion. The landscape of care in the last ten years has changed a little. Formal services’ is minority. Studies focused exclusively on female caregivers generate biased information.

  8. Caregiving, perceptions of maternal favoritism, and tension among siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suitor, J Jill; Gilligan, Megan; Johnson, Kaitlin; Pillemer, Karl

    2014-08-01

    Studies of later-life families have revealed that sibling tension often increases in response to parents' need for care. Both theory and research on within-family differences suggest that when parents' health declines, sibling relations may be affected by which children assume care and whether siblings perceive that the parent favors some offspring over others. In the present study, we explore the ways in which these factors shape sibling tension both independently and in combination during caregiving. In this article, we use data collected from 450 adult children nested within 214 later-life families in which the offspring reported that their mothers needed care within 2 years prior to the interview. Multilevel analyses demonstrated that providing care and perceiving favoritism regarding future caregiving were associated with sibling tension following mothers' major health events. Further, the effects of caregiving on sibling tension were greater when perceptions of favoritism were also present. These findings shed new light on the conditions under which adult children are likely to experience high levels of sibling tension during caregiving. Understanding these processes is important because siblings are typically the individuals to whom caregivers are most likely to turn for support when assuming care of older parents, yet these relationships are often a major source of interpersonal stress. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Formal caregivers of older adults: reflection about their practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Picazzio Perez Batista

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To understand the job function of caregivers of older adults and contribute to the debate on the consolidation of this professional practice. METHODOLOGICAL PROCEDURES This is a descriptive, qualitative, and exploratory study. Four focal group sessions were performed in 2011 with 11 elderly companions, formal caregivers of older adults in the Programa Acompanhante de Idosos (Program for Caregivers of Older Adults, Sao Paulo, SP, Southeastern Brazil. These sessions, guided by a semi-structured script, were audio-recorded and fully transcribed. Data were analyzed using the Content Analysis technique, Thematic Modality. RESULTS In view of considering the caregivers of older adults as a new category of workers, it was difficult to define their duties. The elderly companions themselves as well as the care receivers, their families, and the professionals that comprised the team were unclear about their duties. The professional practice of these formal caregivers has been built on the basis of constant discussions and negotiations among them and other team members in Programa Acompanhante de Idosos during daily work. This was achieved via a recognition process of their job functions and by setting apart other workers’ exclusive responsibilities. CONCLUSIONS The delimitation of specific job functions for elderly companions is currently one of the greatest challenges faced by these workers to develop and consolidate their professional role as well as improve Programa Acompanhante de Idosos.

  10. Attachment avoidance, but not anxiety, minimizes the joys of caregiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson-Coffey, S Katherine; Borelli, Jessica L; River, Laura M

    2017-10-01

    Perhaps unlike other social roles that people may hold, caring for children offers opportunities for both immense joy and incredible frustration. Yet what predicts how parents will feel during caregiving experiences? In the current study, we examined parents' (N = 152) positive emotion, negative emotion, and felt meaning during caregiving using the Day Reconstruction Method. In addition, we tested attachment anxiety and avoidance as predictors of parents' emotion during caregiving relative to their other daily experiences. We found that attachment avoidance was associated with elevated negative emotion and reduced positive emotion and meaning in life across the entire day, whereas attachment anxiety was associated with elevated negative emotion and marginally greater meaning in life, but not positive emotion, across the entire day. Furthermore, caregiving was associated with greater positive emotion and meaning, but not negative emotion, compared to parents' other daily activities. Finally, attachment avoidance, but not anxiety, was associated with lower levels of positive emotion, negative emotion, and felt meaning during caregiving compared to other daily activities. These findings are consistent with other evidence that attachment avoidance is associated with deactivation of emotion in close relationships and suggest that attachment avoidance minimizes the joys of parenting.

  11. Dementia Caregiver Burden: a Research Update and Critical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sheung-Tak

    2017-08-10

    This article provides an updated review of the determinants of caregiver burden and depression, with a focus on care demands and especially the differential effects of various neuropsychiatric symptoms or symptom clusters. Moreover, studies on caregivers for frontotemporal and Lewy body dementias were referred to in order to identify differences and similarities with the mainstream literature based largely on Alzheimer caregivers. As a group, neuropsychiatric symptoms are most predictive of caregiver burden and depression regardless of dementia diagnosis, but the effects appear to be driven primarily by disruptive behaviors (e.g., agitation, aggression, disinhibition), followed by delusions and mood disturbance. Disruptive behaviors are more disturbing partly because of the adverse impact on the emotional connection between the caregiver and the care-recipient and partly because they exacerbate difficulties in other domains (e.g., caring for activities of daily living). In behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia, not only are these disruptive behaviors more prominent but they are also more disturbing due to the care-recipient's insensitivity to others' feelings. In Lewy body dementia, visual hallucinations also appear to be distressing. The disturbing nature of disruptive behaviors cuts across dementia conditions, but the roles played by symptoms that are unique or particularly serious in a certain condition need to be explored further.

  12. Care for a break? An investigation of informal caregivers' attitudes toward respite care using Q-methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Exel, J.; de Graaf, G.; Brouwer, W.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate informal caregivers' attitudes toward respite care. Method: Interviews with informal caregivers during open-house support groups (three) for informal caregivers, conducted late 2004 at Informal Care Support Centres in the city of Rotterdam, The Netherlands. A

  13. Concordance of patient and caregiver reports in evaluating quality of life in patients with malignant gliomas and an assessment of caregiver burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Daniel I.; Kumthekar, Priya; Stell, Becky V.; Grimm, Sean A.; Rademaker, Alfred W.; Rice, Laurie; Chandler, James P.; Muro, Kenji; Marymont, MaryAnne; Helenowski, Irene B.; Wagner, Lynne I.; Raizer, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Given the neurocognitive impairment experienced by many patients with malignant gliomas, caregiver reports can be critical in assessing the quality of life (QOL) of these patients. In this study, we explored whether assessment of patient QOL by the primary caregiver shows concordance with the patient's self-reported QOL, and we quantified the burden faced by caregivers. Methods QOL of 45 patients was evaluated by both the patient and primary caregiver on 3 or more separate occasions using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain (FACT-Br) instrument, and concordance between the 2 reports was evaluated. Caregiver burden was measured using the Caregiver Quality of Life Index-Cancer (CQOL-C) instrument. Results Overall, good concordance was observed between the patient and caregiver FACT-Br reports (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.74). Patient-reported FACT-Br scores were 4.75 (95% CI, 1.44–8.05) points higher than paired caregiver reports on the 200-point scale (P = .008); however, this difference did not achieve clinical significance. Caregiver burden, as measured by the CQOL-C, was significantly greater among caregivers in this study than those previously reported for caregivers of patients with lung, breast, or prostate cancer (P < .001). Conclusions Despite minor discrepancies in caregiver assessments of patient QOL relative to patient self-reports, our results suggest that the caregiver assessments can serve as adequate proxies for patient reports. Our results also illustrate the particularly heavy burden faced by caregivers of patients with malignant glioma. Further research into both of these areas is warranted. PMID:26034616

  14. Exploring the influence of Internet-based caregiver support on experiences of isolation for older spouse caregivers in rural areas: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blusi, Madeleine; Kristiansen, Lisbeth; Jong, Mats

    2015-09-01

    Many older spouse caregivers are tied to the home by their caring duties and feel isolated. The values of supporting older caregivers are well known. In rural areas with long distances and decline in essential services, attending caregiver support groups can be difficult. Using Internet-based services can provide an opportunity for rural caregivers to participate in caregiver support, regardless of geographical distances and without the need for physical presence. This study aimed to explore how Internet-based caregiver support may influence the experience of isolation among older spouse caregivers in rural areas. An intervention study where 63 older rural caregivers received an Internet-based caregiver support service. A qualitative interview study based on 31 interviews with open-ended questions, analysed using latent content analysis. Two themes represent the findings from the study: Expanding the concept of place and Developing networks. Even though participants still spent their days in the house, they experienced that daily life was being spent in a variety of places, both physically, virtually and emotionally. The Internet-based support service provided them with a tool to reconnect with family and develop new friends. Internet-based caregiver support may reduce the experience of isolation for spouse caregivers in rural areas. Nurses played a crucial part in the development, by encouraging, educating and inspiring caregivers and supporting their independence. Internet-based services ought to be an option for caregiver support in rural areas as it may reduce feelings of isolation for older spouse caregivers. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Family and Other Unpaid Caregivers and Older Adults with and without Dementia and Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffin, Catherine; Van Ness, Peter H; Wolff, Jennifer L; Fried, Terri

    2017-08-01

    To estimate the number of caregivers providing assistance to community-dwelling older persons with and without dementia and with or without substantial disability; to describe the characteristics of caregivers and care recipients in these groups; to characterize the health-related tasks that caregivers provide; and to estimate associations between the numbers of tasks and caregiver burden. Nationally representative surveys of caregivers and older adults in the United States. 2011 National Health and Aging Trends Study and National Study of Caregiving. Community-dwelling older adults and their family caregivers, who were selected on the basis of having assisted with mobility, self-care, household activities, transportation, or medical tasks. Caregiver burden (emotional, physical, financial difficulties) and restrictions on social participation. Although much larger proportions of older adults with dementia and disability (98.4%, n = 1.0 million) and dementia but not disability (95.5%, n = 1.3 million) received caregiving assistance, the largest absolute number of individuals receiving assistance were older adults without dementia or disability (4.0 million). Within each caregiver group, caregivers provided assistance with at least one task across domains of activity of daily living and instrumental activity of daily living-related assistance (>98%), health systems logistics (>70%), and health management (>50%). There was a significant linear association between number of tasks provided and risk of burden in virtually all caregiver groups and domains of assistance. Caregivers of care recipients without dementia or disability accounted for the largest absolute number of helpers. These caregivers, similar to caregivers of care recipients with dementia or disability, delivered a broad spectrum of health-related tasks and experienced caregiver burden and restrictions on social participation. Findings support the need for interventions that address the needs of caregivers

  16. Antecedents and consequences of caregiving structure on young mothers and their infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Anna; Lewis, Jessica; Maximovich, Alexey; Ickovics, Jeannette; Kershaw, Trace

    2011-10-01

    This study describes the multigenerational caregiving structure of infants born to young women, the prenatal predictors of caregiving structure, and the effects of caregiving structure on the health of young mothers and their infants 6 months postpartum. The sample consisted of 784 young mothers involved in a longitudinal study in two U.S. cities. Women were classified into eight caregiving structure groups based on the mother's report of herself as a caregiver and her selection of the baby's father and/or grandparents as caregivers. ANCOVA analyses identified predictors and 6 month postpartum outcomes of caregiving structure. Planned comparisons explored the relationships among caregiving structure groups. A majority of women reported caregiving structures other than herself and the father as caregivers (87.1%). Grandparents were indicated as caregivers by most women (62.2%). Postpartum caregiving groups differed on prenatal social support, self-esteem, attachment avoidance and anxiety, relationship status, and living with the baby's father. While mother's self esteem significantly predicted father involvement, there were no differences on predictors between when the mother and father were caregivers, versus when the mother and grandparents were caregivers. Differences existed between groups on mother and child outcomes, including parenting stress, distress, and child dysfunction. Women reported significantly less parenting stress, child dysfunction, and negative child emotions when she and the father were caregivers, versus when she and grandparents were caregivers. The family system and the intergenerational dynamics within a multigenerational caregiving structure are critical to the health and well-being of both mothers and their children.

  17. Gender Differences in Caregiving at End of Life: Implications for Hospice Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Karla T; Pike, Kenneth C; Demiris, George; Parker Oliver, Debra; Albright, David L; Lewis, Alexandria M

    2015-12-01

    Researchers have identified important gender differences in the experience of caring for a family member or friend living with advanced disease; however, trends suggest that these differences may be diminishing over time in response to changing gender roles. In addition, while many studies have found caregiving experiences and outcomes to be poorer among female caregivers, noteworthy exceptions exist. The primary aim of this exploratory study was to determine how, if at all, current day caregiving at end of life varies by gender. We conducted a secondary analysis of data from a multisite randomized controlled trial of a family caregiving intervention performed between 2010 and 2014. We compared female and male hospice family caregivers on baseline variables using χ(2) tests for association of categorical variables and t-tests for continuous variables. Our sample included 289 family caregivers of individuals receiving services from one of two hospice agencies located in the northwestern United States. Demographic data and other categorical variables of interest were provided via caregiver self-report using an instrument created specifically for this study. Reaction to caregiving and caregiving burden were measured using the Caregiver Reaction Assessment (CRA). As it related to caregiving, females had significantly lower self-esteem and more negative impact on their schedule, health, and family support than males. No gender differences were detected with regard to the impact of caregiving on individuals' finances. Despite changing social expectations, pronounced gender differences persist in caregiving at the end of life.

  18. Caregiver Self-Esteem as a Predictor of Patient Relationship Satisfaction: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Emily L; Poulin, Michael J; Grant, Pei C; Depner, Rachel M; Breier, Jennifer; Byrwa, David J; Wright, Scott T

    2018-03-01

    Longitudinal assessment of patient-caregiver relationships will determine whether caregiver self-esteem determines patient relationship satisfaction at end of life. Research on close relationships and caregiving supports the idea that informal caregivers' self-esteem may influence their relationships with their terminally ill loved ones. However, this connection has not yet been investigated longitudinally, nor has it been applied specifically to care recipients' relationship satisfaction. A sample of 24 caregivers and 24 patients in a hospice home care program were recruited. Multiple patient and caregiver interviews were used to conduct a longitudinal study to measure fluctuations in patient health, changes in patient and caregiver relationship satisfaction, and self-esteem over a three-month period. An interaction between caregiver self-esteem and patient relationship satisfaction demonstrated the role that self-esteem plays between caregivers and patients enrolled in hospice care. Specifically, for patients with caregivers with low self-esteem, patient relationship satisfaction significantly decreased as the patient's physical health decreased, whereas for patients whose caregivers had high self-esteem, patient relationship satisfaction marginally increased during poorer physical health. High self-esteem may allow caregivers to overcome feelings of burden and maladaptive anticipatory grief to remain satisfied in their relationship with the patient. Caregiver self-esteem appears to play a role in fostering patient relationship satisfaction at the end of life.

  19. The lived experience of caregivers of persons with heart failure: A phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruzzo, Antonio; Paturzo, Marco; Naletto, Monica; Cohen, Marlene Z; Alvaro, Rosaria; Vellone, Ercole

    2017-10-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients need to follow a strict pharmacological and nonpharmacological regimen in order to counteract the burden of the disease, and informal caregivers are an important resource for HF patients in managing and coping with their disease. Few studies have examined the lived experience of these caregivers with a rigorous phenomenological approach, and none have been conducted in Italy. To describe the lived experience of the caregivers of HF patients. A hermeneutic phenomenological method was used. Caregivers were enrolled in a HF clinic in central Italy. Interviews were analysed using a phenomenological approach. Credibility, dependability, confirmability and transferability were adopted in order to strengthen trustworthiness. Thirty HF caregivers (mean age: 53 years) were enrolled. Of these, 63% of the caregivers were female and 80% were patients' spouses or children. Six themes emerged: (1) fear and worry related to the illness; (2) life changes and restrictions; (3) burden due to caregiving; (4) uncertainty about illness management; (5) helping patients to cope with the illness; and (6) love and affection towards the patient. The findings of our study may help providers to guide interventions for HF caregivers. Providers should be supportive of caregivers and provide them with education in order to reduce their fears and worries about the illness and to handle the course of HF and its symptoms. An empathetic and practical approach with caregivers that considers the patient-caregiver relationship may help caregivers to cope with the changes and restrictions that caregiving brings to their lives and to reduce their burden.

  20. Psychometrics of the AAN Caregiver Driving Safety Questionnaire and contributors to caregiver concern about driving safety in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Janessa O; Springate, Beth; Bernier, Rachel A; Davis, Jennifer

    2018-03-01

    ABSTRACTBackground:The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) updated their practice parameters in the evaluation of driving risk in dementia and developed a Caregiver Driving Safety Questionnaire, detailed in their original manuscript (Iverson Gronseth, Reger, Classen, Dubinsky, & Rizzo, 2010). They described four factors associated with decreased driving ability in dementia patients: history of crashes or citations, informant-reported concerns, reduced mileage, and aggressive driving. An informant-reported AAN Caregiver Driving Safety Questionnaire was designed with these elements, and the current study was the first to explore the factor structure of this questionnaire. Additionally, we examined associations between these factors and cognitive and behavioral measures in patients with mild cognitive impairment or early Alzheimer's disease and their informants. Exploratory factor analysis revealed a four-component structure, consistent with the theory behind the AAN scale composition. These four factor scores also were significantly associated with performance on cognitive screening instruments and informant reported behavioral dysfunction. Regressions revealed that behavioral dysfunction predicted caregiver concerns about driving safety beyond objective patient cognitive dysfunction. In this first known quantitative exploration of the scale, our results support continued use of this scale in office driving safety assessments. Additionally, patient behavioral changes predicted caregiver concerns about driving safety over and above cognitive status, which suggests that caregivers may benefit from psychoeducation about cognitive factors that may negatively impact driving safety.

  1. Non-pharmacological interventions for caregivers of stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Lynn A; Quinn, Terry J; Mahmood, Fahd; Weir, Christopher J; Tierney, Jayne; Stott, David J; Smith, Lorraine N; Langhorne, Peter

    2011-10-05

    A substantial component of care is provided to stroke survivors by informal caregivers. However, providing such care is often a new and challenging experience and has been linked to a number of adverse outcomes. A range of interventions targeted towards stroke survivors and their family or other informal caregivers have been tested in randomised controlled trials (RCTs).  To evaluate the effect of interventions targeted towards informal caregivers of stroke survivors or targeted towards informal caregivers and the care recipient (the stroke survivor). We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (March 2011), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library Issue 2010, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1950 to August 2010), EMBASE (1980 to December 2010), CINAHL (1982 to August 2010), AMED (1985 to August 2010), PsycINFO (1967 to August 2010) and 11 additional databases. In an effort to identify further published, unpublished and ongoing studies, we searched conference proceedings and trials registers, scanned reference lists of relevant articles and contacted authors and researchers. There were no language restrictions. We included RCTs if they evaluated the effect of non-pharmacological interventions (compared with no care or routine care) on informal caregivers of stroke survivors. We included trials of interventions delivered to stroke survivors and informal caregivers only if the stroke survivor and informal caregiver were randomised as a dyad. We excluded studies which included stroke survivors and caregivers if the stroke survivors were the primary target of the intervention. Two review authors selected studies for inclusion, independently extracted data and assessed methodological quality. We sought original data from trialists. We categorised interventions into three groups: support and information, teaching procedural knowledge/vocational training type interventions, and psycho-educational type interventions. The primary outcome was caregivers' stress or strain. We resolved

  2. Self-transcendence and family caregivers of adults with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, G J; Wright, K B

    2000-06-01

    Research has documented that caring for a family member with dementia is stressful and burdensome. However, difficult life experiences such as fear, loss, and grief may help persons move beyond a concern for self toward a larger perspective and concern for others. Both positive and negative experiences can promote positive movement toward growth and development. This movement has been described as self-transcendence, or the ability to look beyond the self and present difficulties, to extend concern to others, and to find personal meaning and wholeness in the context of life-changing events. The family caregiving experience with its inherent difficulties might provide the impetus for such a movement toward self-transcendence. The purpose of this article is to examine the concept of self-transcendence, explore its linkages to the caregiving experience, and suggest potential strategies to assist family caregivers to achieve self-transcendence.

  3. Caregiving and early infant crying in a danish community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Marissa

    2004-04-01

    Maternal caregiving and fussing/crying in Danish infants at 3, 6, and 12 weeks were examined using self-report scales and 24-hour behavior diaries. Mothers reported practices commonly associated with responsive caregiving: frequent feeding, prompt response to infant cries, and considerable time holding the infant. Fuss/cry durations peaked in the first 2 months, were highest in evenings, and decreased approximately 50% by 12 weeks. Fussing was the majority behavior, and 9.2% of the infants fussed and cried more than 3 hours per day. In contrast with other Western studies, 24-hour fuss/cry durations were lower, and fussing accounted for up to 80% of total distress. Danish caregiving practices may partially explain the lower durations of infant distress and the lower ratio of cry to fuss. However, some infants fuss/cry a great deal despite sensitive care, which may reflect individual differences in infant maturation of behavior regulation.

  4. Social network of family caregivers of disabled and dependent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Hitomi Yamashita

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cross-sectional study that used the Social Network Index and the genogram to assess the social network of 110 family caregivers of dependent patients attended by a Home Care Service in São Paulo, Brazil. Data were analyzed using the test U of Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis and Spearman correlation. Results were considered statistically significant when p<0,05. Few caregivers participated in activities outside the home and the average number of people they had a bond was 4,4 relatives and 3,6 friends. Caregivers who reported pain and those who had a partner had higher average number of relatives who to trust. The average number of friends was higher in the group that reported use of medication for depression. Total and per capita incomes correlated with the social network. It was found that family members are the primary caregiver’s social network.

  5. Family caregivers' views on coordination of care in Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røthing, Merete; Malterud, Kirsti; Frich, Jan C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Collaboration between family caregivers and health professionals in specialised hospitals or community-based primary healthcare systems can be challenging. During the course of severe chronic disease, several health professionals might be involved at a given time, and the patient......'s illness may be unpredictable or not well understood by some of those involved in the treatment and care. AIM: The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and expectations of family caregivers for persons with Huntington's disease concerning collaboration with healthcare professionals. METHODS......: To shed light on collaboration from the perspectives of family caregivers, we conducted an explorative, qualitative interview study with 15 adult participants experienced from caring for family members in all stages of Huntington's disease. Data were analysed with systematic text condensation, a cross...

  6. Intelligibility assessment in developmental phonological disorders: accuracy of caregiver gloss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, J; Shriberg, L D

    1992-10-01

    Fifteen caregivers each glossed a simultaneously videotaped and audiotaped sample of their child with speech delay engaged in conversation with a clinician. One of the authors generated a reference gloss for each sample, aided by (a) prior knowledge of the child's speech-language status and error patterns, (b) glosses from the child's clinician and the child's caregiver, (c) unlimited replays of the taped sample, and (d) the information gained from completing a narrow phonetic transcription of the sample. Caregivers glossed an average of 78% of the utterances and 81% of the words. A comparison of their glosses to the reference glosses suggested that they accurately understood an average of 58% of the utterances and 73% of the words. Discussion considers the implications of such findings for methodological and theoretical issues underlying children's moment-to-moment intelligibility breakdowns during speech-language processing.

  7. Predictors of PTSD symptoms in caregivers of pediatric burn survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Del Carmen Quezada Berumen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Facing a severe injury in the children is one of the most devastating experiences that parents may face. The aim of this study was to explore the role of resilience showed by fathers and mothers of children with burns, the TBSA burned, age at the time of the burn and time since the burn in PTSD symptoms in caregivers. It was a cross-sectional study where fathers, mothers and guardians of 51 burn patients were evaluated. Results showed that the higher strength and confidence in caregivers, less severity in PTSD symptoms. The post-burn reactions of parents and guardians can affect the responses and welfare of their children. Therefore, a better understanding of factors related to the adaptation in caregivers, better attention by health services.

  8. Psychometric evaluation of the shortened resilience scale among Alzheimer's caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, Scott E

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate psychometric properties of the shortened Resilience Scale (15-item version RS15) among a sample of Alzheimer's caregivers. Self-reported data were collected from 229 participants at 2 Alzheimer's caregiver conferences. RS15 principal axis factoring indicated a single-dimensional solution with all items loaded. Reliability was strong. Convergent validity for the RS15 was suggested through its correlations with stress, family support, and friend support. Odds ratios showed significant likelihoods of high resilience given low stress and high social support. The results confirmed the RS15 to be a psychometrically sound measure that can be used to appraise the efficacy of adaptability among Alzheimer's caregivers.

  9. [Burden, empathy, and resilience in dependent people caregivers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Abal, Yolanda; López-López, María José; Climent-Rodríguez, José Antonio; Gómez-Salgado, Juan

    2018-02-10

    To analyse the differences in perceived burden between family caregivers who are users of patient associations and those who are not; to assess the relationship between burden, resilience, and empathy levels. Retrospective ex post facto study of two groups, one of them quasi control. The sample was composed of 155 informal caregivers (28 men and 155 women); 109 of them were users of patient relatives' associations and 46 were not. Both descriptive and bivariate comparative analyses were carried out. Caregivers who were members of patient associations showed lower burden and empathy levels than those who were not. This highlighted that the higher their level of perceived burden, the lower their level of resilience. Belonging to carers' associations results in a lower level of perceived burden and a lower risk of developing compassion fatigue syndrome. Copyright © 2018 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Child-caregiver interaction in two remote Indigenous Australian communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Jill; Wigglesworth, Gillian; Loakes, Deborah; Disbray, Samantha; Moses, Karin

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a study in two remote multilingual Indigenous Australian communities: Yakanarra in the Kimberley region of Western Australia and Tennant Creek in the Barkly region of the Northern Territory. In both communities, processes of language shift are underway from a traditional language (Walmajarri and Warumungu, respectively) to a local creole variety (Fitzroy Valley Kriol and Wumpurrarni English, respectively). The study focuses on language input from primary caregivers to a group of preschool children, and on the children's productive language. The study further highlights child-caregiver interactions as a site of importance in understanding the broader processes of language shift. We use longitudinal data from two time-points, approximately 2 years apart, to explore changes in adult input over time and developmental patterns in the children's speech. At both time points, the local creole varieties are the preferred codes of communication for the dyads in this study, although there is some use of the traditional language in both communities. Results show that for measures of turn length (MLT), there are notable differences between the two communities for both the focus children and their caregivers. In Tennant Creek, children and caregivers use longer turns at Time 2, while in Yakanarra the picture is more variable. The two communities also show differing trends in terms of conversational load (MLT ratio). For measures of morphosyntactic complexity (MLU), children and caregivers in Tennant Creek use more complex utterances at Time 2, while caregivers in Yakanarra show less complexity in their language at that time point. The study's findings contribute to providing a more detailed picture of the multilingual practices at Yakanarra and Tennant Creek, with implications for understanding broader processes of language shift. They also elucidate how children's language and linguistic input varies diachronically across time. As such, we contribute to

  11. Child-Caregiver Interaction in Two Remote Indigenous Australian Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill eVaughan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a study in two remote multilingual Indigenous Australian communities: Yakanarra in the Kimberley region of Western Australia and Tennant Creek in the Barkly region of the Northern Territory. In both communities, processes of language shift are underway from a traditional language (Walmajarri and Warumungu respectively to a local creole variety (Fitzroy Valley Kriol and Wumpurrarni English respectively. The study focuses on language input from primary caregivers to a group of preschool children, and on the children’s productive language. The study further highlights child-caregiver interactions as a site of importance in understanding the broader processes of language shift. We use longitudinal data from two time-points, approximately two years apart, to explore changes in adult input over time and developmental patterns in the children’s speech.At both time points, the local creole varieties are the preferred codes of communication for the dyads in this study, although there is some use of the traditional language in both communities. Results show that for measures of turn length (MLT, there are notable differences between the two communities for both the focus children and their caregivers. In Tennant Creek, children and caregivers use longer turns at Time 2, while in Yakanarra the picture is more variable. The two communities also show differing trends in terms of conversational load (MLT ratio. For measures of morphosyntactic complexity (MLU, children and caregivers in Tennant Creek use more complex utterances at Time 2, while caregivers in Yakanarra show less complexity in their language at that time point. The study’s findings contribute to providing a more detailed picture of the multilingual practices at Yakanarra and Tennant Creek, with implications for understanding broader processes of language shift. They also elucidate how children’s language and linguistic input varies diachronically across time. As

  12. Social support for diabetes illness management: supporting adolescents and caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idalski Carcone, April; Ellis, Deborah A; Weisz, Arlene; Naar-King, Sylvie

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this research study was to examine the relationship between 4 sources of social support (support for the adolescent from family, support for the adolescent from friends, support for the caregiver from another adult, and support to the family from the health care provider) and adolescents' diabetes outcomes (illness management behavior and health status) using a diverse sample of urban adolescents. One hundred forty-one adolescents with insulin-managed diabetes and their primary caregivers completed questionnaires assessing social support and illness management behavior. Glucose meters were downloaded and hemoglobin A1c assays were obtained. Structural equation modeling was used to test a model social support informed by social ecological theory. The results of the structural equation modeling indicated that support for the caregiver from another adult was directly and positively related to support for the adolescent from family and indirectly related to better illness management. Support for the adolescent from family was directly related to better diabetes management and, through better management, to better diabetes health. Support to the family from the health care provider was not related to support for the adolescent and support to the adolescent from friends was not related to illness management, as hypothesized. This study identifies a novel target for social support intervention to improve adolescents' illness management behavior-the caregivers of adolescents with diabetes. By enhancing the social support caregivers receive from other adults in their lives, caregivers' ability to support their adolescent children with diabetes might also be improved which, in turn, improves adolescents' illness outcomes.

  13. The Anxiety Level of Caregivers of Neurological Patients with Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serel Arslan, Selen; Demir, Numan; Karaduman, A Ayşe

    2017-08-01

    We aimed to investigate anxiety level of caregivers of neurological patients with dysphagia, and the relationship of patient-related factors to anxiety level of dysphagia caregivers. A total of 103 adult neurological patients with dysphagia (study group), 30 without dysphagia (control group), and their primary caregivers were included. Types of feeding, condition of dependency in eating and drinking, dysphagia duration, and history of previous dysphagia treatment were recorded for study group. In study group, the Turkish version of the Eating Assessment Tool-10 (T-EAT-10) was used to determine dysphagia symptom severity. Penetration and aspiration severity was determined with the penetration-aspiration scale (PAS). The Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) that has two subscales including state anxiety (S-STAI) and trait anxiety (T-STAI) was used to determine anxiety level of caregivers. There was no difference between groups in terms of age, gender, weight, and height. The mean S-STAI was 42.56 ± 10.10 for the study group and 29.20 ± 6.64 for the control group (p dysphagia treatment (p = 0.01, r = 0.25). No correlation was found between STAI (in terms of both S-STAI and T-STAI) and T-EAT-10, PAS, types of feeding, condition of dependency in eating and drinking, dysphagia duration (p > 0.05). Caregivers of neurological patients with dysphagia have greater anxiety level than caregivers of neurological patients without dysphagia.

  14. [Evaluation of a functional plan for caregivers in hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñoz-Gallardo, M Dolores; Vellido-González, Concepción; Rivas-Campos, Antonio; Martín-Berrido, Mercedes; González-Guerrero, Leticia; Vellido-González, Dolores; Nieto-Poyato, Rosa María; Corral-Rubio, M Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The care of dependent persons has increased, as such that healthcare reforms are taking caregivers into account. A functional plan in hospitalization was developed for caregivers, and his study aims to investigate its implementation, identifying the strengths and weaknesses that promote changes between the formal and informal system. A qualitative study was designed, using nursing professionals and caregivers identified in the hospital as subjects. A focus group technique was used with 8 people selected for each segment. Two scripts were developed with questions on the evaluation criteria included in the plan: identification/recruitment, reception, rest, diet, health care, information/health education, management and implementation of the plan and other proposals. The data were collected during May 2011. Difficulties were encountered in identifying caregivers, as an initial evaluation was not made. As regards the reception, in some cases the information brochure was not given. Rest was not possible as the caregivers did not want to move away from the patient. Diet was the main cause of the conflict, highlighting the lack of health education to continue in home care. Circuits of preferential care in emergency were positively valuated. Nurses consider the plan as an extra task. The strengths and weaknesses identified should enable improvements to be made in the implementation of the plan, in order to achieve changes in specific aspects such as information/education, health, rest and diet of the caregivers. We emphasize the need to enhance the model change. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Mental health and sleep of older wife caregivers for spouses with Alzheimer's disease and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willette-Murphy, Karen; Todero, Catherine; Yeaworth, Rosalee

    2006-10-01

    This descriptive study examined sleep and mental health variables in 37 older wife caregivers for spouses with dementia compared to 37 age-matched controls. The relationships among selected caregiving variables (behavioral problems, caregiving hours, and years of caregiving), appraisal of burden, self-reported sleep efficiency for the past week, and mental health outcomes were examined. Lazarus and Folkman's stress and coping framework guided the study. Mental health and sleep were poorer for caregivers. Caregiving and appraisal of burden variables showed direct and indirect effects on mental health. However, caregiving and appraisal of burden variables were not significant for predicting sleep efficiency. Sleep efficiency was a good predictor of mental health in this sample of wife caregivers.

  16. "It's like we're grasping at anything": caregivers' education needs and preferred learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastel-Smith, Beth; Stanley-Hermanns, Melinda

    2012-07-01

    In this qualitative descriptive study, we explored caregivers' educational needs and preferred methods of information delivery. Descriptions are based on five focus groups (N = 29) conducted with ethnically diverse, current and past family caregivers, including those who had previously attended a structured educational program. Themes arose from verbatim data transcriptions and coded themes. Four categories of educational needs were identified: (a) respite, (b) caregiving essentials, (c) self-care, and (d) the emotional aspects of caregiving. Advantages and disadvantages of learning methods are discussed, along with reasons for and outcomes of attending caregiver workshops. An informed caregiver model is proposed. Health care providers must assess educational needs and strive to provide appropriate information as dictated by the care recipient's condition and caregiver's expressed desires. Innovative methods of delivering information that are congruent with different caregiving circumstances and learning preferences must be developed and tested.

  17. Caregiver Burden, Care Recipient Depressive Symptomology, and Social Exchange: Does Race Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejem, Deborah; Bauldry, Shawn; Bakitas, Marie; Drentea, Patricia

    2018-04-01

    Informal caregivers play a vital role in supporting seriously ill patients. However, informal caregiving is burdensome and can lead to negative health outcomes for the caregiver and the care recipient. The study's aim was to evaluate relationships among caregiver burden, care recipient depressive symptomology, and race. Guided by the social exchange perspective, we examined cross-sectional dyadic data from the National Long-Term Care Survey (N = 1279). Using ordinal logistic regression, we found that higher caregiver-reported objective burden was associated with higher care recipient depressive symptoms ( P exchange of the social good "helpful company" with a caregiver. These findings illustrate the importance of supporting reciprocal exchange as a promising component of maintaining balanced caregiver-care recipient relationships among black older adults and their informal caregivers.

  18. How Can an Emergency Department Assist Patients and Caregivers at the End of Life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... And Caregivers At The End Of Life? How Can An Emergency Department Assist Patients And Caregivers At ... your family. Five ways that the Emergency Department can help 1. Assist in the recognition and understanding ...

  19. Health self-perception by dementia family caregivers: sociodemographic and clinical factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letice Ericeira Valente

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Caring for a demented family member has been associated with burden. Studies concerning health self-perception of family caregivers are still scarce. OBJECTIVE: To investigate caregivers perceived health and to look into relationships with patients and caregivers' sociodemographic and clinical data. METHOD: Dyads of dementia outpatients and family caregivers (n=137 were assessed with Mini Mental State Examination, Functional Activities Questionnaire, Neuropsychiatric Inventory and Clinical Dementia Rating. Caregivers answered Sociodemographic Questionnaire, Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories, Zarit Burden Interview and Maslach Burnout Inventory. RESULTS: Caregivers poor perceived health was associated with emotional exhaustion, burden, depression and anxiety. Logistic regression analyses revealed caregivers' age, anxiety and physical problem as the main predictors of health self-perception. CONCLUSION: Aged family caregivers with anxiety who also report physical problem characterize a group at risk for poor self-perceived health. Evaluation of health self-perception may be useful for designing interventions to improve anxiety and physical health.

  20. Collective Care: Multiple Caregivers and Multiple Care Recipients in Mexican American Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Bronwynne C; Coon, David W; Belyea, Michael J; Ume, Ebere

    2017-07-01

    Specific stressors associated with caregiving in Mexican American (MA) families are not well documented, yet caregiving issues are paramount because informal care for parents is central to their culture. Although MA families who band together to provide care for one member are not unique, the literature does not describe the phenomenon of collective caregiving, which may be widespread but unrecognized. This article describes these understudied families who are poorly served by contemporary health systems because their characteristics are unknown. Descriptive, multisite, longitudinal mixed-methods study of MA caregiving families. We identified three types of collective caregivers: those providing care for multiple family members simultaneously, those providing care successively to several family members, and/or those needing care themselves during their caregiving of others. Collective caregiving of MA elders warrants further investigation. Exploration of collective caregiving may provide a foundation for tailored family interventions.

  1. The cortisol awakening response in caregivers of schizophrenic offspring shows sensitivity to patient status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Bono, Esperanza; De Andres-Garcia, Sara; Moya-Albiol, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Taking care of offspring during a prolonged period of time is probably one of the most stressful life experiences for parents. The present study compares the cortisol awakening response (CAR) in 38 long-term caregivers (mothers and fathers of schizophrenic relatives) with a control group of 32 non-caregivers. Factors such as general stress, caregiver burden, patient severity, and institutionalization were studied. Although a blunted CAR was observed in caregivers in comparison with controls, this difference was not significant. Among caregivers, the absence of institutionalization for the patient is associated with a lack of CAR in caregivers in comparison with caregivers of institutionally supported patients. General stress, caregiver burden, and patient severity themselves did not favor significant changes in CAR. CAR shows greater sensitivity to institutional support than patient severity and perceived stress. Further research is needed to explain the impact of these factors on health and the psychological factors involved.

  2. Case Study: Caregiver Perception of Pediatric Multidisciplinary Feeding Outpatient Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F. Fisher PhD, OT, FAOTA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the perception of satisfaction of caregivers who attended a feeding clinic at a large pediatric hospital in the midwest. The clinic is designed for a multidisciplinary team to meet with the child and the caregiver. Thirty-five participants were involved in the study. Results indicated that most participants were satisfied with the clinic experience. However, there were areas of care not covered by the members of the feeding team, which indicates a need. It is suggested that this need could be filled by occupational therapists.

  3. Psychological distress of female caregivers of significant others with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Cassidy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the role of time since diagnosis and whether the care recipient was a child, a parent, or a spouse, on caregiver’s perceptions of the caring role, with a group of 269 female cancer caregivers. Questionnaire measures were used to explore psychological and social resources and psychological distress. Analysis of variance and hierarchical multiple regression were used and identified significant effects of time since diagnosis and care recipient. This study concludes that a more tailored approach to understanding the needs of caregivers is required particularly in terms of time since diagnosis and care recipient, in order to provide more effective support.

  4. Bereaved caregivers of patients with high-grade glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piil, Karin; Nordentoft, Sara; Larsen, Anders

    2018-01-01

    )) experience and manage their life situation after the death of the patient. METHODS: A systematic literature search was carried out in December 2016 and revised in September 2017. The following six databases were searched: PubMed, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Excerpta Medica...... and their role as caregiver. Moreover, they experienced depressive symptoms and fatigue, resulting in a reduced work capability and social network. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that bereaved informal caregivers experience psychosocial consequences and emotional reactions after bereavement, resulting in feelings...

  5. Filipino American grandparent caregivers' roles, acculturation, and perceived health status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka-Yahiro, Merle R

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to describe the relationships between roles, acculturation, and perceived health status among 47 FA grandparent caregivers who were providing extensive caregiving to their grandchildren. Role satisfaction was significantly related to perceived health status. Role occupancy was significantly related to years lived in the U.S. and employment. Role integration and role stress were significantly related to gender and income. Acculturation was significantly related to role involvement, years lived in the U.S., language spoken, and education. The findings of this health disparities research study will lead to more contextual work in this area of study.

  6. Prevalence of stress, anxiety and depression in with Alzheimer caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Vito Elisabetta

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease presents a social and public health problem affecting millions of Italians. Those affected receive home care from caregivers, subjected to risk of stress. The present investigation focuses on stress, anxiety and depression in caregivers. Methods Data on 200 caregivers and their patients were collected using a specific form to assess cognitive, behavioural, functional patient (MMSE, and ADL-IAD and caregiver stress (CBI. The relationship between stress, depression and disease has been assessed by means of a linear regression, logistic analysis which reveals the relationship between anxiety, stress and depression and cognitive problems, age, the patient's income. Results The caregivers are usually female (64%, mean age of 56.1 years, daughters (70.5%, pensioners and housewives (30%, who care for the sick at home (79%. Of these, 53% had little time for themselves, 55% observed worsening of health, 56% are tired, 51% are not getting enough sleep. Overall, 55% have problems with the patient's family and/or their own family, 57% at work. Furthermore, 29% feel they are failing to cope with the situation as they wish to move away from home. The increase in the degree of anxiety and depression is directly proportional to the severity of the illness, affecting the patient (r = 0.3 stress and depression r = 0.4 related to CBI score. The memory disorders (OR = 8.4, engine problems (OR = 2.6, perception disorders (OR = 1.9 sick of the patient with Alzheimer's disease are predictive of caregiver stress, depression is associated with the presence of other disorders, mainly behavioural (OR = 5.2, low income (OR = 3.4, patients Conclusion The quality of life of caregivers is correlated with the severity of behavioural disorders and duration of the Alzheimer's disease. The severity of the disease plays an important role in reorganization of the family environment in families caring for patients not institutionalised. It is

  7. Five-Factor Personality Traits and Subjective Health Among Caregivers: The Role of Caregiver Strain and Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löckenhoff, Corinna E.; Duberstein, Paul R.; Friedman, Bruce; Costa, Paul T.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the association among caregivers’ five-factor personality traits and subjective health with particular emphasis on the role of two theoretically implicated mediators: multi-domain self-efficacy and caregiver strain. The sample comprised 536 informal caregivers (mean age = 62.9 years, SD = 19.9, 72% female, 98% White) of community-dwelling older adults with multiple functional impairments. Both physical health and mental health were negatively associated with neuroticism and positively associated with extraversion and conscientiousness. Agreeableness and openness were associated with better subjective mental health and physical health, respectively. Multiple mediation analyses indicated that self-efficacy mediated all observed associations between personality and subjective health, whereas caregiver strain selectively mediated the associations of neuroticism and agreeableness with mental health. PMID:21417534

  8. Validation of the Chinese version of the Modified Caregivers Strain Index among Hong Kong caregivers: an initiative of medical social workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wallace Chi Ho; Chan, Christopher L F; Suen, Margaret

    2013-11-01

    Family caregivers may often experience caregiving stress and burden. To systematically assess this issue, medical social workers may need to use a brief and valid measurement in their practice. In the Hong Kong Chinese context, one additional challenge is to examine whether a measurement developed in the West is valid for Hong Kong Chinese caregivers. Thus, medical social workers in Hong Kong initiated this research study to validate the Chinese version of the Modified Caregiver Strain Index (C-M-CSI). A total of 223 Chinese caregivers of patients with various chronic illnesses were recruited for this validation study. C-M-CSI demonstrated good reliability (Cronbach's alpha coefficient = .91), concurrent validity with the Chinese version of the Caregiver Burden Inventory, and discriminant validity with the Chinese version of the Meaning in Life Questionnaire. Factor analysis yielded a single factor as the original M-CSI, which explained 49 percent of variance. Construct validity was shown by differentiating spousal and nonspousal caregivers, as well as caregivers of patients with and without behavioral problems. C-M-CSI is recommended as a brief and valid measurement that can be used by medical social workers in assessing the caregiving strain of Chinese caregivers of patients in Hong Kong.

  9. Informing Informal Caregivers About Dementia Through an Experience-Based Virtual Reality Game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Jensen, Jette; Hageman, Michelle; Bang Løyche Lausen, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    In 2017 it was believed that nearly 50mio people suffered from dementia. Besides the actual patients, the group that is mostly affected by this disease are informal caregivers. Informal caregivers -- people without a formal education in the field of health care -- can suffer from severe physical-......-based Virtual Reality game and how it can inform informal caregivers about symptoms of dementia. Our initial exploration demonstrates the potential that such a game holds in supporting informal caregivers....

  10. Agreement Between Teenager and Caregiver Responses to Questions About Teenager’s Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, Christine L.M.; Havstad, Suzanne; Johnson, Christine C.; Vinuya, Rick; Ownby, Dennis R.

    2006-01-01

    It is unknown if teenagers and caregivers give similar responses when interviewed about the teen’s asthma. We analyzed data for 63 urban African-American teen-caregiver pairs. Caregivers underestimated teen smoking by 30%, gave lower estimates for teen exposure to passive smoke, and disagreed with teens on controller medication usage. Teen-caregiver responses were not significantly different for estimates of symptom-days, activity limitations, or nights awakened; nor were they significantly d...

  11. The Burden Endured by Caregivers of Patients With Morquio A Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Christian J. Hendriksz MD; Christine Lavery; Mahmut Coker MD; Sema Kalkan Ucar MD; Mohit Jain PhD; Lisa Bell PhD; Christina Lampe MD

    2014-01-01

    This international survey performed by direct personal interview or mail evaluated the global burden among primary caregivers of patients with Morquio A syndrome. Collected outcomes included self-reported time spent on caregiving, proportion of daily activities (from the Mucopolysaccharidosis Health Assessment Questionnaire) requiring caregiver assistance, and how the patient’s age and wheelchair use affect these. In addition, the impact of caregiving on the caregivers’ relationship with fami...

  12. Emotional and social perception of main caregiver in a rural health district

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiola Yonte Huete; María Belén Yonte Huete; Mª Teresa Meneses Jiménez

    2012-01-01

    Cross-sectional observational study of 50 caregivers of dependent patient immobilized. We analyzed the sociodemographic characteristics, type and characteristics of care, social, emotional and quality of life of main caregivers. Sociodemographic and care characteristics related to dependent patient immobilized was also studied. Objective: Describing the profile of dependent patient immobilized and their caregiver, and the emotional and social characteristics perceived by the main caregiver. R...

  13. Conceptual challenges in the study of caregiver-care recipient relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingler, Jennifer Hagerty; Sherwood, Paula R; Crighton, Margaret H; Song, Mi-Kyung; Happ, Mary Beth

    2008-01-01

    In the literature on family caregiving, care receiving and caregiving are generally treated as distinct constructs, suggesting that informal care and support flow in a unidirectional manner from caregiver to care recipient. Yet, informal care dynamics are fundamentally relational and often reciprocal, and caregiving roles can be complex and overlapping. To illustrate ways care dynamics may depart from traditional notions of dyadic unidirectional family caregiving and to stimulate a discussion of the implications of complex relational care dynamics for caregiving science. Exemplar cases of informal care dynamics were drawn from three ongoing and completed investigations involving persons with serious illness and their family caregivers. The selected cases provide examples of three unique, but not uncommon, care exchange patterns: (a) care dyads who are aging, are chronically ill, and who compensate for one another's deficits in reciprocal relationships; (b) patients who present with a constellation of family members and other informal caregivers, as opposed to one primary caregiver; and (c) family care chains whereby a given individual functions as a caregiver to one relative or friend and care recipient to another. These cases illustrate such phenomena as multiple caregivers, shifting and shared caregiving roles, and care recipients as caregivers. As caregiving science enters a new era of complexity and maturity, there is a need for conceptual and methodological approaches that acknowledge, account for, and support the complex, web-like nature of family caregiving configurations. Research that contributes to, and is informed by, a broader understanding of the reality of family caregiving will yield findings that carry greater clinical relevance than has been possible previously.

  14. Mediators and Moderators of Dementia Caregiver Depression and CVD Risk Outcomes in the Pleasant Events Program

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Jennefer S.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Alzheimer’s disease caregivers demonstrate significant elevations in depression compared with noncaregivers. Addressing caregiver depression is of high public health importance due to its ties with overall wellbeing, increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and ability to sustain caregiving duties. Improving caregiver mental and physical health may not only decrease healthcare costs, but it may also delay institutionalization of Alzheimer’s disease patients. Despite existi...

  15. Living With Dementia: An Exploratory Study of Caregiving in a Chinese Family Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Oi Ling; Kwong, Ping Sum; Ho, Candis Ka Yan; Chow, Susanna Miu Yee; Kwok, Timothy; Wong, Bel; Ho, Vennus; Lau, Andrew; Ho, Florence

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study explored themes that described families taking care of elderly relatives with dementia in Chinese society. Ten families were invited for two in-depth family interviews involving spousal caregivers, child caregivers, and care recipients. Five themes resulted: positive affection as coping strategies, power and control in the caregiving relationship, adult children's involvement in caregiving, sibling rivalry, and intergenerational conflicts. The ways these themes functioned and helped in dementia care, the research implications, and limitations are discussed.

  16. The Mediating Role of Sleep Quality on Well-Being Among Japanese Working Family Caregivers

    OpenAIRE

    Honda, Ayumi; Iwasaki, Yoshie; Honda, Sumihisa

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the well-being of caregivers is mediated by the association between behavioral and psychological symptoms in elderly relatives and the quality of sleep experienced by caregivers using a mediational model. The participants were 105 working family caregivers in Japan. We assessed well-being based on the Kessler Scale 10, self-rated health, and satisfaction in daily life. Our results showed that the well-being in working family caregivers was ...

  17. Family Caregiver Factors Associated with Unmet Needs for Care of Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Scott R; Schulz, Richard

    2017-03-01

    To examine caregiver factors associated with unmet needs for care of older adults. Population-based surveys of caregivers and older adult care recipients in the United States in 2011. 2011 National Health and Aging Trends Study and National Study of Caregiving. Family caregivers (n = 1,996) of community-dwelling older adults with disabilities (n = 1,366). Disabled care recipient reports of unmet needs for care in the past month with activities of daily living (ADLs; e.g., wet or soiled clothing), mobility (e.g., have to stay inside), or instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs; e.g., medication errors). Caregiver reported sociodemographic characteristics, caregiving intensity and tasks performed, health, and psychosocial effects. Of the care recipients, 44.3% reported at least one unmet need for care in the past month (38.2% ADL related, 14.6% IADL related). Younger caregivers, caregiving sons, caregivers not living with care recipients, and having supplemental paid caregivers were associated with more unmet needs. Caregivers with recipients reporting two or more unmet needs were more likely to spend more than 100 hours per month caregiving, help with skin care and wounds, report caregiving as emotionally and physically difficult, and report restricted participation in valued activities (all P family caregivers. Caregivers experiencing high levels of burden, stress, and negative physical and psychosocial impacts may provide substandard or poor care to older adults, which may be a risk factor for neglect. Clinicians caring for disabled older adults should assess their unmet needs and the capacity of caregivers to address them. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  18. The influence of Chinese culture on family caregivers of stroke survivors: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xichenhui; Sit, Janet W H; Koo, Fung Kuen

    2018-01-01

    To explore and describe the caregiving experiences of Chinese stroke caregivers. Previous research has indicated that culture can have a significant impact on the stroke caregiving experience. Moreover, scant research exists on stroke caregivers' experience within the Chinese culture. A qualitative descriptive design was used. In-depth, semistructured interviews were conducted with 25 family caregivers of stroke survivors. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and analysed. Content analysis was also performed. Twenty-five family caregivers of stroke survivors were recruited for the study. On average, respondents were 66 years old (range 45-82 years). Of 25 interviewees, 76% were female, 64% were spouse-caregivers and 36% were children-caregivers. Three themes reflecting the influence of Chinese culture on stroke caregiving emerged from the interviews. (i) Caregiving role perception. Informants accepted caregiving for the sick family member as an expected part of life, a culturally prescribed obligation and an expression of reciprocal love. (ii) Coping strategies. Connecting with family resources and connecting with inner strength were frequently reported coping strategies. (iii) Self-sacrifice. Informants identified self-reliance and feeling of restraint in their utilisation or access of formal caregiving service. Chinese caregivers sacrifice themselves for the care recipients regardless of the hardships and the neglect of their own health. Our findings provide a comprehensive and culturally sensitive perspective in understanding the experience of stroke caregivers in Chinese communities. Cultural and religious backgrounds were found to influence Chinese stroke caregivers' experience, coping strategies and self-sacrifice behaviour in idiosyncratic ways. Research on the practice of culture can serve as a basis for the formulation of specific policies and effective interventions for supporting stroke caregivers of different cultural backgrounds. © 2017 John

  19. From serving in the military to serving loved ones: unique experiences of older veteran caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monin, Joan K; Levy, Becca R; Pietrzak, Robert H

    2014-06-01

    We examined whether older caregiving veterans differ from noncaregiving veterans in terms of health and psychosocial factors and how these factors and caregiving aspects (i.e., hours, relationship type) relate to caregiving strain and reward. We also evaluated two hypotheses: (1) combat exposure provides protection from emotional caregiving strain, and (2) grandparenting is particularly rewarding. We used a cross-sectional web survey of a nationally representative sample of older veterans in the United States. Data were drawn from the National Health and Resilience in Veterans Study, and participants were 2,025 U.S. veterans aged 60 or older (mean: 71.0; SD: 7.1; range: 60-96). Participants completed measures of caregiving status, sociodemographic characteristics, combat exposure, physical and mental health, cognitive status, and psychosocial characteristics. Caregivers reported caregiving hours, caregiving type, emotional and physical strain, and reward. A total of 20.4% of U.S. older veterans are caregivers. As predicted, among the veteran caregivers, (1) combat exposure was associated with less emotional caregiving strain (odds ratio [OR]: 0.57), and (2) grandparenting was associated with increased perception of caregiving reward (OR: 5.28). Resilience was negatively associated with physical strain, whereas depressive symptoms were associated with greater emotional strain; gratitude, happiness, and social support were additionally associated with greater reward. Caregivers were more likely to be married and highly educated than noncaregivers but did not differ with respect to health or psychosocial characteristics. One in five older U.S. veterans is a caregiver. Older veterans' combat exposure may decrease the emotional demands of caregiving, and grandparenting is perceived as particularly rewarding. Results suggest that older veterans are an important caregiving resource that deserves tailored resources. Copyright © 2014 American Association for Geriatric

  20. Resilience of caregivers of people with dementia: a systematic review of biological and psychosocial determinants

    OpenAIRE

    Dias,Rachel; Santos,Raquel Luiza; Sousa,Maria Fernanda Barroso de; Nogueira,Marcela Moreira Lima; Torres,Bianca; Belfort,Tatiana; Dourado,Marcia Cristina Nascimento

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Although caregivers of people with dementia may face difficulties, some positive feelings of caregiving may be associated with resilience.Objective: This study systematically reviewed the definitions, methodological approaches and determinant models associated with resilience among caregivers of people with dementia.Methods: Search for articles published between 2003 and 2014 in ISI, PubMed/MEDLINE, SciELO and Lilacs using the search terms resilience, caregivers and dementia.Res...

  1. Understanding differences between caregivers and non-caregivers in completer rates of Chronic Disease Self-Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, J; McCallion, P; Ferretti, L A

    2017-06-01

    The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) was developed to advance participants' self-care of chronic illness and may be offered to both individuals with chronic conditions and their caregivers. Previous studies of CDSMP have identified multiple resulting health benefits for participants as well as factors associated with participants' completion rates. This study investigated differences on these issues between caregiving and non-caregiving participants. Secondary analysis using regression analysis to predict the outcome. Baseline data were collected directly from adult (over 18 years) participants of CDSMP workshops in New York State from 2012 to 2015 (n = 2685). Multi-level logistic regression analysis was used to compare the difference on completion of workshops (attended four or more of sessions) and contributing factors with the independent variable of whether participants provided care/assistance to a family member or friends with long-term illness or disability. Additional individual-level variables controlled for in the model were age, gender, race/ethnicity, living arrangement, education, the number of chronic conditions and disabilities; as were workshop-level characteristics of class size, language used, workshop leader experience, location urbanity and delivery site type. Participants who provided care to family or friends were 28% more likely to complete the workshop compared with those who did not (odds ratio = 1.279, P < 0.05). Different factors influenced the completion of CDSMP workshop for caregivers and non-caregivers. People who provide care to others appeared to have stronger motivation to complete the workshops with greater benefits. Agencies offering CDSMP should encourage caregivers to attend. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Accessible Support for Family Caregivers of Seniors with Chronic Conditions: From Isolation to Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Miriam; Barnfather, Alison; Neufeld, Anne; Warren, Sharon; Letourneau, Nicole; Liu, Lili

    2006-01-01

    Accessible support programs can improve health outcomes for family caregivers of older relatives with a chronic condition. Over the course of 6 months, 27 experienced family caregivers provided weekly support via the telephone to 66 individuals, either new family caregivers of seniors recently diagnosed with stroke or newly vulnerable family…

  3. Fighting the odds: strategies of female caregivers of disabled children in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Mark, E.J.; Verrest, H.

    2014-01-01

    Caregivers of disabled children face numerous challenges in meeting their child’s needs. Research on Zimbabwean caregivers of disabled children is limited. Yet the difficult socio-economic, political and institutional context is expected to complicate the caregiving task. This article examines the

  4. Caregiver Involvement in the Education of Youth in Foster Care: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisse, Kay; Tyre, Ashli

    2013-01-01

    This study was an exploratory investigation of caregiver involvement in the education of youth in foster care. In this study, foster caregivers reported that they are involved in the education of children in their care and participate in at-home involvement activities more often than at-school involvement activities. Caregivers in this study…

  5. Child, Maternal and Demographic Factors Influencing Caregiver-Reported Autistic Trait Symptomatology in Toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, D. A.; Gan, D.; Kung, J.; Baron-Cohen, S.; Allison, C.; Chen, H.; Saw, S. M.; Chong, Y. S.; Rajadurai, V. S.; Tan, K. H.; Shek, P. C. L.; Yap, F.; Broekman, B. F. P.; Magiati, I.

    2018-01-01

    Current research on children's autistic traits in the general population relies predominantly on caregiver-report, yet the extent to which individual, caregiver or demographic characteristics are associated with informants' ratings has not been sufficiently explored. In this study, caregivers of 396 Singaporean two-year-olds from a birth cohort…

  6. Compliance and Caregiver Satisfaction in Alzheimer’s Disease: Results from the AXEPT Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bernabei

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: According to experimental data, a transdermal application is preferred by caregivers of Alzheimer’s disease (AD patients compared with oral medications. The AXEPT study compared compliance to treatment among community-dwelling patients with mild-to-moderate AD treated with transdermal application compared to oral medications and caregiver satisfaction in a real clinical setting. Methods: Data from 45 memory clinics in Italy were collected between September 8, 2010 and January 31, 2011. Compliance to treatment and caregiver satisfaction were measured using the Caregiver Medication Interview. Results: A total of 855 AD patients and their caregivers participated in the study. Nearly 80% of caregivers of patients on patch were not concerned about adherence to treatment compared with 64% of caregivers of patients on oral drugs. Among caregivers of patients on patch, 94% did not report any difficulties in remembering to administer treatment compared with 73% of caregivers of patients on oral medications. The highest level of compliance and satisfaction was reported by caregivers of patients on transdermal application. Conclusion: Caregivers of patients treated with a transdermal application appeared to be more satisfied and reported a higher level of compliance than caregivers of patients receiving anti-AD oral medications.

  7. Quality of Life of Caregivers of Children with Autism in Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheir, Nadir; Ghoneim, Ola; Sandridge, Amy L.; Al-Ismail, Muna; Hayder, Sara; Al-Rawi, Fadhila

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Caring for a child diagnosed with autism could affect the quality of life of the caregiver in various different ways. No previous research has assessed the quality of lives of caregivers of children with autism in Qatar. Methods: Caregivers of a child with autism between 3 and 17 years old were recruited from child rehabilitation…

  8. Treatment of childhood tuberculosis: caregivers' practices and perceptions in Cape Town, South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bélard, Sabine; Isaacs, Washiefa; Black, Faye; Bateman, Lindy; Madolo, Lucia; Munro, Jacinta; Workman, Lesley; Grobusch, Martin P.; Zar, Heather J.

    2015-01-01

    A child's caregiver is key to the successful drug delivery and outcome of tuberculosis (TB) treatment. Understanding caregivers' practices and perceptions is important in the management of childhood TB. To investigate caregivers' practices and perceptions regarding TB treatment of children. A

  9. Characteristics of the spouse caregiving experience: Comparison between early- and late-onset dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrziczny, Emilie; Berna, Guillaume; Ducharme, Francine; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne; Pasquier, Florence; Antoine, Pascal

    2017-06-20

    To investigate the characteristics of the caregiving experience according to age at onset of dementia to adapt support programs. Fifty-seven spouse caregivers of persons with early-onset dementia (PEOD) and 93 spouse caregivers of persons with late-onset dementia (PLOD) participated. The characteristics of the caregiving experience were assessed using questionnaires. We compared the two groups according to age at onset of the disease using a multivariate test, Pillai's Trace test. The analysis showed that there were similarities and differences between the two groups of spouse caregivers. All spouse caregivers were confident in their caregiving role and fairly well prepared for future needs and reported mild depressive and anxious symptoms. However, they lacked informal support, had low confidence in requesting respite care and reported effects on their health. Compared to spouse caregivers of PLOD, spouse caregivers of PEOD had more severe perceptions of the cognitive disorders of persons with dementia (PWD) and had a better sense of preparedness and knowledge of services. Spouse caregivers of PLOD were more confident in their ability to control disturbing thoughts. The results suggest that programs should provide information on support networks to improve preparedness for spouse caregivers of PLOD as well as emphasizing positive coping strategies for caregivers of PEOD to maintain good-quality relationships with PWD, which influences the perception of the symptoms. For both groups, family relationships should be considered.

  10. Caregiver Coaching Strategies for Early Intervention Providers: Moving toward Operational Definitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Mollie; Woods, Juliann; Salisbury, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Early intervention (EI) providers increasingly coach and collaborate with caregivers to strengthen and support caregiver-child interactions. The EI providers learning to coach other adults benefit from knowing what, exactly, they should do to support caregivers. This article serves two purposes. First, it proposes an operationally defined,…

  11. What really matters: An inquiry into the relative importance of dimensions of informal caregiver burden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Exel, N.J.A. van; Brouwer, W.B.F.; Berg, B. van den; Koopmanschap, M.A.; Bos, G.A.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Prevailing measures of subjective caregiver burden either have no overall summary score or do not consider the relative importance caregivers attach to different dimensions of burden. Our aim was to assess which dimensions informal caregivers perceive as being important to their overall

  12. What really matters: an inquiry into the relative importance of dimensions of informal caregiver burden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Exel, N. J. A.; Brouwer, W. B. F.; van den Berg, B.; Koopmanschap, M. A.; van den Bos, G. A. M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Prevailing measures of subjective caregiver burden either have no overall summary score or do not consider the relative importance caregivers attach to different dimensions of burden. Our aim was to assess which dimensions informal caregivers perceive as being important to their overall

  13. Patient Suffering and Caregiver Compassion: New Opportunities for Research, Practice, and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Richard; Hebert, Randy S.; Dew, Mary Amanda; Brown, Stephanie L.; Scheier, Michael F.; Beach, Scott R.; Czaja, Sara J.; Martire, Lynn M.; Coon, David; Langa, Kenneth M.; Gitlin, Laura N.; Stevens, Alan B.; Nichols, Linda

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to stimulate discussion and research about patient suffering and caregiver compassion. It is our view that these constructs are central to understanding phenomena such as family caregiving, and that recognizing their unique role in the caregiving experience provides new directions for intervention research, clinical…

  14. Older and Younger Family Caregivers of Adults with Intellectual Disability: Factors Associated with Future Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yueh-Ching; Lee, Yue-Chune; Lin, Li-Chan; Kroger, Teppo; Chang, Ai-Ning

    2009-01-01

    A structured interview survey was conducted in a major city in Taiwan to explore and compare older and younger family primary caregivers' well being and their future caregiving plans for these adults with intellectual disability. The sample size was 315 caregivers who were 55 years or older and who cared for adults with intellectual disability and…

  15. Educational Support Group in Changing Caregivers' Psychological Elder Abuse Behavior toward Caring for Institutionalized Elders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Hsiu-Fang; Wang, Jing-Jy; Yen, Maiofen; Liu, Tzu-Ti

    2009-01-01

    Institutionalized elderly who are frail and dependent are vulnerable to be abused by overwhelmed caregivers especially caregiver psychological abusive behavior is a growing but hidden problem with few evidence-based interventions. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an educational support group in alleviating caregiver's…

  16. Self-reported burden among caregivers of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shaloo; Goren, Amir; Phillips, Amy L; Stewart, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are chronic and progressive diseases that may impose a significant burden on caregivers and patients' immediate families. Extensive research shows MS and AD caregiver burden on physical and mental health, but no direct comparisons between MS and AD caregivers have been reported in the literature. The objective of this study was to examine the extent of MS caregiver burden compared with that of noncaregivers and AD caregivers. Data were obtained from the 2009 National Health and Wellness Survey administered online to a US representative adult sample (N = 75,000). Respondents reported health status, quality of life, work productivity, health-care utilization, and caregiver status. Multivariable regressions, adjusting for key characteristics (eg, age, gender, marital status, depression), were conducted to explore differences between MS caregivers (n = 215) and noncaregivers (n = 69,224) and between MS caregivers and AD caregivers (n = 1341). The results indicated that MS caregivers had significantly greater activity impairment (P = .01), poorer mental (P = .015) and physical (P = .002) health status, lower health utility scores (P = .002), and more traditional health-care provider visits (P productivity differences were not observed across groups, possibly owing to fewer employed respondents. Thus, in this study, MS caregivers had significantly more burden than noncaregivers, and for some measures, even AD caregivers. The results reveal the hidden toll on those providing care for MS patients and highlight the need for health-care providers to recognize their burden so that appropriate measures can be implemented.

  17. “They laugh when I sing”: perceived effects of caregiver social ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Social support provided to caregivers of children has been shown to be protective for caregiver health, parenting and child psychosocial outcomes. However, little work in Southern Africa provides insight on the relationship between caregiver social support and child wellbeing. This report discusses exploratory ...

  18. Caregivers' Cortisol Levels and Perceived Stress in Home-Based and Center-Based Childcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeneveld, Marleen G.; Vermeer, Harriet J.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Linting, Marielle

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined professional caregivers' perceived and physiological stress, and associations with the quality of care they provide. Participants were 55 female caregivers from childcare homes and 46 female caregivers from childcare centers in the Netherlands. In both types of settings, equivalent measures and procedures were used. On…

  19. Falls and Hospitalizations Among Persons With Dementia and Associated Caregiver Emotional Difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, Amanda N; Polenick, Courtney A; Maust, Donovan T; Kales, Helen C

    2018-03-19

    Falls and hospitalizations are adverse health events commonly experienced by persons with dementia (PWDs). These events often require urgent care from a family caregiver and may increase caregiver stress. We examine falls and hospitalizations among PWDs as predictors of caregivers' reported care-related emotional difficulty, in addition to care-related stressors. Cross-sectional telephone survey of 652 informal caregivers for PWDs. A multinomial logistic regression examined falls (last month) and hospitalizations (prior year) experienced by PWDs as predictors of caregivers' care-related emotional difficulty, accounting for demographic characteristics and primary and secondary caregiving stressors. Over 20% of caregivers reported high levels of care-related emotional difficulty. Controlling for demographic characteristics and primary and secondary caregiving stressors, the PWD's prior month fall was significantly associated with greater care-related emotional difficulty; the PWD's hospitalizations were not associated with care-related emotional difficulty. Approximately 30% of PWDs had experienced a past year hospitalization and prior month fall, and one in five caregivers reported high emotional difficulty related to care. Although secondary strains and resources of caregiving were strong predictors of care-related emotional difficulty, PWDs' falls represent a significant stressor that increases odds of caregiver emotional difficulty over and above other strains. Consequently, a fall experienced by a PWD may represent a key time for clinicians to assess caregiver well-being.

  20. Health-Related Quality of Life in the Family Caregivers of Stroke Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yangkun

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to identify the factors associated with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of family caregivers of Chinese stroke patients. One hundred and twenty-three stroke patients consecutively admitted to a stroke clinic and their 123 family caregivers were recruited. The caregivers' HRQOLs were assessed…