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Sample records for care volume ii

  1. Cerebral Palsy and Related Disorders Prevention and Early Care: An Annotated Bibliography. Volume II, Part Two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembolt, Raymond R., Comp.; Roth, Beth, Comp.

    Presented alphabetically by author's name in the second of the two volume annotated bibliography are 483 abstracts of scientific and public education literature on cerebral palsy published through 1971. The entries are said to focus on children under 2 years of age whose development has been delayed by the condition. The bibliography is explained…

  2. A Study in Child Care (Case Study from Volume II-A): "A Rolls-Royce of Day Care." Day Care Programs Reprint Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Farrell, Brigid

    The Amalgamated Day Care Center is an independent trust established through a collective bargaining agreement between the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America, AFL-CIO, and the employers of the garment industry. The free center, open from 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., is located near the Chicago garment industries to minimize transportation problems…

  3. DART II documentation. Volume III. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    The DART II is a remote, interactive, microprocessor-based data acquistion system suitable for use with air monitors. This volume of DART II documentation contains the following appendixes: adjustment and calibration procedures; mother board signature list; schematic diagrams; device specification sheets; ROM program listing; 6800 microprocessor instruction list, octal listing; and cable lists. (RWR)

  4. Reading Authentic Polish, Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczynski, Waldemar

    The second volume on reading authentic Polish is the continuation of a supplementary textbook to be used either in the classroom or in independent study. The materials included in it are unaltered authentic texts from Polish newspapers, magazines, and other mass media that provide exposure to the context and format of everyday reading matter. The…

  5. Culture of Schools. Final Report. Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Anthropological Association, Washington, DC.

    Volume II of this 4-volume report contains the second half of a report on the Conference on the Culture of Schools held at Greystone, New York, (the first half of the conference report appears in Vol. I, SP 003 900), and the first part of a report on the Colloquium on the Culture of Schools held at the New School for Social Research in 1966. (The…

  6. Site Environmental Report for 2007 Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lackner, Regina E; Baskin, David; Fox, Robert; Jelinski, John; Pauer, Ron; Thorson, Patrick; Wahl, Linnea; Wyrick, Steve

    2008-09-15

    The Site Environmental Report for 2007 is an integrated report on the environmental programs at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and satisfies the requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities.

  7. DART II documentation. Volume III. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-05-23

    The DART II is a data acquisition system that can be used with air pollution monitoring equipment. This volume contains appendices that deal with the following topics: adjustment and calibration procedures (power supply adjustment procedure, ADC calibration procedure, analog multiplexer calibration procedure); mother board signature list; schematic diagrams; device specification sheets (microprocessor, asynchronous receiver/transmitter, analog-to-digital converter, arithmetic processing unit, 5-volt power supply, +- 15-volt power supply, 24-volt power supply, floppy disk formater/controller, random access static memory); ROM program listing; 6800 microprocessor instruction set, octal listing; and cable lists. (RR)

  8. Chiropractic Health Care: A National Study of Cost of Education, Service Utilization, Number of Practicing Doctors of Chiropractic, and Other Key Policy Issues. Volumes I-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kuster, Thomas, Jr.

    Results from the first federally sponsored study of the chiropractic health care profession are presented, and a broad range of facts and issues of concern to policy-makers, the profession, and the public are described. The two-year project included three national surveys of: service providers (doctors of chiropractic in practice more than two…

  9. Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggieri, Michael

    2006-07-07

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting''. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2005'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2005. (Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab'', ''the Laboratory'', ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory'', and ''LBNL''.) The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains an overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. This year's Volume I text body is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters. The report's structure has been reorganized this year, and it now includes a chapter devoted to environmental management system topics. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities. The ''Site Environmental Report'' is distributed by releasing it on the Web from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services Group (ESG) home page, which is located at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. Many of the documents cited in this report also are accessible from the ESG Web page. CD and printed copies of this Site Environmental Report are available upon request. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are also reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements, because the non-SI system is referenced by several current

  10. Photovoltaic module encapsulation design and materials selection. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuddihy, E.

    1984-06-01

    This is Volume II of Photovoltaic Module Encapsulation Design and Materials Selection: a periodically updated handbook of encapsulation technology, developed with the support of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project (FSA), managed for the Department of Energy (DOE) by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Volume II describes FSA encapsulation technology developed between June 1, 1982, and January 1, 1984. Emphasis during this period shifted from materials development to demonstration of reliability and durability in an outdoor environment; the updated information in this volume reflects the developing technology base related to both reliability and encapsulation process improvements.

  11. Bibliography of Utah radioactive occurrences. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doelling, H.H. (comp.)

    1983-07-01

    The references in this bibliography were assembled by reviewing published bibliographies of Utah geology, unpublished reports of the US Geological Survey and the Department of Energy, and various university theses. Each of the listings is cross-referenced by location and subject matter. This report is published in two volumes.

  12. Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-10-01

    This volume contains extensive data for the following chapters: (1) solid breeder tritium recovery, (2) solid breeder blanket designs, (3) alternate blanket concept screening, and (4) safety analysis. The following appendices are also included: (1) blanket design guidelines, (2) power conversion systems, (3) helium-cooled, vanadium alloy structure blanket design, (4) high wall loading study, and (5) molten salt safety studies. (MOW)

  13. Preliminary CALS Phase II Architecture. Volume 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-03

    IDEF ICAM Definition Languages 5 IDEFO ICAM Definition Language: Activity Modeling IDEFIX ICAM Definition Language: Data Modeling 3 IDS Integrated Design...level. At the Conceptual Description level, data are defined by an integrated semantic data model, such as those produced using the IDEFIX modeling...Architecture with the dominate focus on the data dictionary for the IWSDB, represented by an IDEFIX semantic data model. It is at this level that CALS Phase II

  14. International Photovoltaic Program Plan. Volume II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, D.; Koontz, R.; Posner, D.; Heiferling, P.; Carpenter, P.; Forman, S.; Perelman, L.

    1979-12-01

    This second volume of a two-part report on the International Photovoltaic Program Plan contains appendices summarizing the results of analyses conducted in preparation of the plan. These analyses include compilations of relevant statutes and existing Federal programs; strategies designed to expand the use of photovoltaics abroad; information on the domestic photovoltaic plan and its impact on the proposed international plan; perspectives on foreign competition; industry views on the international photovoltaic market and ideas about how US government actions could affect this market; international financing issues; and information on issues affecting foreign policy and developing countries.

  15. National Aviation Fuel Scenario Analysis Program (NAFSAP). Volume I. Model Description. Volume II. User Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    TESI CHART NATIONAI RUREAt (F ANDA[)Rt 1V4 A NATIONAL. AVIATION ~ FUEL SCENARIO.. ANALYSIS PROGRAM 49!! VOLUM I: MODEL DESCRIA~v 4<C VOLUME II: tr)ER...executes post processor which translates results of the graphics program to machine readable code used by the pen plotter) cr (depressing the carriage

  16. Draft Strategic Laboratory Missions Plan. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This volume described in detail the Department`s research and technology development activities and their funding at the Department`s laboratories. It includes 166 Mission Activity Profiles, organized by major mission area, with each representing a discrete budget function called a Budget and Reporting (B & R) Code. The activities profiled here encompass the total research and technology development funding of the laboratories from the Department. Each profile includes a description of the activity and shows how the funding for that activity is distributed among the DOE laboratories as well as universities and industry. The profiles also indicate the principal laboratories for each activity, as well as which other laboratories are involved. The information in this volume is at the core of the Strategic Laboratory Mission Plan. It enables a reader to follow funds from the Department`s appropriation to a specific activity description and to specific R & D performing institutions. This information will enable the Department, along with the Laboratory Operations Board and Congress, to review the distribution of R & D performers chosen to execute the Department`s missions.

  17. Immunobiology of natural killer cells. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotzova, E.; Herberman, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides a review of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated immunity in humans and experimental animal system. Topics for the volume include: In vivo activities of NK cells against primary and metastatic tumors in experimental animals; involvement of NK cells in human malignant disease; impaired NK cell profile in leukemia patients; in vivo modulation of NK activity in cancer patients; implications of aberrant NK cell activity in nonmalignant, chronic diseases; NK cell role in regulation of the growth and functions of hemopoietic and lymphoid cells; NK cells active against viral, bacterial, protozoan, and fungal infections; cytokine secretion and noncytotoxic functions of human large granular lymphocytes; augmentation of NK activity; regulation of NK cell activity by suppressor cells; NK cell cloning technology and characteristics of NK cell clones; comparison of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and NK activity, and index.

  18. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring; Volume II of II, Completion Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michak, Patty

    1991-12-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) initiated the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring project in 1986. This project was a five year interagency project involving fish rearing agencies in the Columbia Basin. Participating agencies included: Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). This is the final data report for the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring project. Data collected and sampling results for 1990 and 1991 are presented within this report. An evaluation of this project can be found in Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, Volume 1, Completion Report.'' May, 1991. Pathogen detection methods remained the same from methods described in Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, Annual Report 1989,'' May, 1990. From January 1, 1990 to June 30, 1991 fish health monitoring sampling was conducted. In 1990 21 returning adult stocks were sampled. Juvenile pre-release exams were completed on 20 yearling releases, and 13 sub-yearling releases in 1990. In 1991 17 yearling releases and 11 sub-yearling releases were examined. Midterm sampling was completed on 19 stocks in 1990. Organosomatic analysis was performed at release on index station stocks; Cowlitz spring and fall chinook, Lewis river early coho and Lyons Ferry fall chinook.

  19. Survey of biomass gasification. Volume II. Principles of gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, T.B. (comp.)

    1979-07-01

    Biomass can be converted by gasification into a clean-burning gaseous fuel that can be used to retrofit existing gas/oil boilers, to power engines, to generate electricity, and as a base for synthesis of methanol, gasoline, ammonia, or methane. This survey describes biomass gasification, associated technologies, and issues in three volumes. Volume I contains the synopsis and executive summary, giving highlights of the findings of the other volumes. In Volume II the technical background necessary for understanding the science, engineering, and commercialization of biomass is presented. In Volume III the present status of gasification processes is described in detail, followed by chapters on economics, gas conditioning, fuel synthesis, the institutional role to be played by the federal government, and recommendations for future research and development.

  20. Listening to PS II: enthalpy, entropy, and volume changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Harvey J M; Mauzerall, David

    2011-01-01

    Photosystem II, located in the thylakoid membranes of green plants, algae, and cyanobacteria, uses sunlight to split water into protons, electrons, and a dioxygen molecule. The mechanism of its electron transfers and oxygen evolution including the structure of the protein and rates of the S-state cycle has been extensively investigated. Substantial progress has been made; however, the thermodynamics of PS II electron transfer and of the oxygen cycle are poorly understood. Recent progress in thermodynamic measurements in photosynthesis provides novel insights on the enthalpic and entropic contribution to electron transfer in proteins. In this review the thermodynamic parameters including quantum yield, enthalpy, entropy, and volume changes of PS II photochemistry determined by photoacoustics and other laser techniques are summarized and evaluated. Light-driven volume changes via electrostriction are directly related to the photoreaction in PS II and thus can be a useful measurement of PS II activity and function. The enthalpy changes of the reactions observed can be directly measured by photoacoustics. The apparent reaction entropy can also be estimated when the free energy is known. Dissecting the free energy of a photoreaction into enthalpic and entropic components provides critical information about mechanisms of PS II function. Potential limitations and future direction of the study of the thermodynamics of PS II electron transfer and oxygen evolution are presented.

  1. Tokamak experimental power reactor conceptual design. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-08-01

    Volume II contains the following appendices: (1) summary of EPR design parameters, (2) impurity control, (3) plasma computational models, (4) structural support system, (5) materials considerations for the primary energy conversion system, (6) magnetics, (7) neutronics penetration analysis, (8) first wall stress analysis, (9) enrichment of isotopes of hydrogen by cryogenic distillation, and (10) noncircular plasma considerations. (MOW)

  2. National Environmental Policy Act compliance guide. Volume II (reference book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    This document (Volume II of the National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Guide) contains current copies of regulations and guidance from the Council on Environmental Quality, the Department of Energy, the Department of State, and the Environmental Protection Agency, related to compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA).

  3. S-1 project. Volume II. Hardware. 1979 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    This volume includes highlights of the design of the Mark IIA uniprocessor (SMI-2), and the SCALD II user's manual. SCALD (structured computer-aided logic design system) cuts the cost and time required to design logic by letting the logic designer express ideas as naturally as possible, and by eliminating as many errors as possible - through consistency checking, simulation, and timing verification - before the hardware is built. (GHT)

  4. Mechanical Behaviour of Materials Volume II Fracture Mechanics and Damage

    CERN Document Server

    François, Dominique; Zaoui, André

    2013-01-01

    Designing new structural materials, extending lifetimes and guarding against fracture in service are among the preoccupations of engineers, and to deal with these they need to have command of the mechanics of material behaviour. This ought to reflect in the training of students. In this respect, the first volume of this work deals with elastic, elastoplastic, elastoviscoplastic and viscoelastic behaviours; this second volume continues with fracture mechanics and damage, and with contact mechanics, friction and wear. As in Volume I, the treatment links the active mechanisms on the microscopic scale and the laws of macroscopic behaviour. Chapter I is an introduction to the various damage phenomena. Chapter II gives the essential of fracture mechanics. Chapter III is devoted to brittle fracture, chapter IV to ductile fracture and chapter V to the brittle-ductile transition. Chapter VI is a survey of fatigue damage. Chapter VII is devoted to hydogen embrittlement and to environment assisted cracking, chapter VIII...

  5. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-14

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume II contains the proceedings for the Short Course on Seismic Base Isolation held in Berkeley, California, August 10-14, 1992.

  6. Recovery of Navy distillate fuel from reclaimed product. Volume II. Literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, D.W.; Whisman, M.L.

    1984-11-01

    In an effort to assist the Navy to better utilize its waste hydrocarbons, NIPER, with support from the US Department of Energy, is conducting research designed to ultimately develop a practical technique for converting Reclaimed Product (RP) into specification Naval Distillate Fuel (F-76). This first phase of the project was focused on reviewing the literature and available information from equipment manufacturers. The literature survey has been carefully culled for methodology applicable to the conversion of RP into diesel fuel suitable for Navy use. Based upon the results of this study, a second phase has been developed and outlined in which experiments will be performed to determine the most practical recycling technologies. It is realized that the final selection of one particular technology may be site-specific due to vast differences in RP volume and available facilities. A final phase, if funded, would involve full-scale testing of one of the recommended techniques at a refueling depot. The Phase I investigations are published in two volumes. Volume 1, Technical Discussion, includes the narrative and Appendices I and II. Appendix III, a detailed Literature Review, includes both a narrative portion and an annotated bibliography containing about 800 references and abstracts. This appendix, because of its volume, has been published separately as Volume 2.

  7. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewig, H. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R. (Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Clement, B. (IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Los Alamos, NM); Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard (Ohio State University, Columbus, OH); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Ohno, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Miyhara, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Farmer, M. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wade, D. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Grandy, C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d' %C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache, Cea, France); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Carbajo, Juan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI); Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Porter D. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Lambert, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Hayes, S. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Sackett, J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.

    2012-05-01

    Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

  8. Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 2001 Annual Update (Volumes I and II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, B.

    2001-04-30

    The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity scheduled milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions. Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

  9. Bedside ultrasonography-Applications in critical care: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Chacko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Point of care ultrasonography, performed by acute care physicians, has developed into an invaluable bedside tool providing important clinical information with a major impact on patient care. In Part II of this narrative review, we describe ultrasound guided central venous cannulation, which has become standard of care with internal jugular vein cannulation. Besides improving success rates, real-time guidance also significantly reduces the incidence of complications. We also discuss compression ultrasonography - a quick and effective bedside screening tool for deep vein thrombosis of the lower extremity. Abdominal ultrasound offers vital clues in the emergency setting; in the unstable trauma victim, a focused examination may provide immediate answers and has largely superseded diagnostic peritoneal lavage in diagnosing intraperitoneal bleed. From estimation of intracranial pressure to transcranial Doppler studies, ultrasound is becoming increasingly relevant to neurocritical care. Ultrasound may also help with airway management in several situations, including percutaneous tracheostomy. Clearly, bedside ultrasonography has become an indispensable part of intensive care practice - in the rapid assessment of critically ill-patients as well as in enhancing the safety of invasive procedures.

  10. The African Experience. Volume I: Syllabus Lectures; Volume II: Bibliographic References; Volume IIIA: Introductory Essays; Volume IIIB: Introductory Essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paden, John N.; Soja, Edward W.

    In response to demands for more and better teaching about Africa in American higher education, the US Office of Education requested that the Program of African Studies at Northwestern University generate a set of teaching materials which could be used in introductory undergraduate courses. Included in these volumes, these materials provide…

  11. Multi-Rate Digital Control Systems with Simulation Applications. Volume II. Computer Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    34 ~AFWAL-TR-80-31 01 • • Volume II L IL MULTI-RATE DIGITAL CONTROL SYSTEMS WITH SIMULATiON APPLICATIONS Volume II: Computer Algorithms DENNIS G. J...29 Ma -8 - Volume II. Computer Algorithms ~ / ’+ 44MWLxkQT N Uwe ~~ 4 ~jjskYIF336l5-79-C-369~ 9. PER~rORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS IPROG AMEL...additional options. The analytical basis for the computer algorithms is discussed in Ref. 12. However, to provide a complete description of the program, some

  12. An Independent Scientific Assessment of Well Stimulation in California Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Jane C.S. [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Feinstein, Laura C. [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Bachmann, Corinne E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Camarillo, Mary Kay [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Domen, Jeremy K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Foxall, William [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Houseworth, James [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Jin, Ling [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Jordan, Preston D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Maddalena, Randy L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); McKone, Thomas E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Millstein, Dev E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Reagan, Matthew T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sandelin, Whitney L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Stringfellow, William T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Varadharajan, Charuleka [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cooley, Heather [Pacific Inst., Oakland, CA (United States); Donnelly, Kristina [Pacific Inst., Oakland, CA (United States); Heberger, Matthew G. [Pacific Inst., Oakland, CA (United States); Hays, Jake [PSE Healthy Energy, Berkeley, CA (United States); Shonkoff, Seth B.C. [PSE Healthy Energy, Berkeley, CA (United States); Brandt, Adam [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Englander, Jacob G. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Hamdoun, Amro [Univ. of California of San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Nicklisch, Sascha C.T. [Univ. of California of San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Harrison, Robert J. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Wettstein, Zachary S. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Banbury, Jenner [California State Univ. Stanislaus, Turlock, CA (United States); Cypher, Brian L. [California State Univ. Stanislaus, Turlock, CA (United States); Phillips, Scott E. [California State Univ. Stanislaus, Turlock, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This study is issued in three volumes. Volume I, issued in January 2015, describes how well stimulation technologies work, how and where operators deploy these technologies for oil and gas production in California, and where they might enable production in the future. Volume II, the present volume, discusses how well stimulation could affect water, atmosphere, seismic activity, wildlife and vegetation, and human health. Volume II reviews available data, and identifies knowledge gaps and alternative practices that could avoid or mitigate these possible impacts. Volume III, also issued in July 2015, presents case studies that assess environmental issues and qualitative risks for specific geographic regions. A final Summary Report summarizes key findings, conclusions and recommendations of all three volumes.

  13. Heavy Duty Mechanics Apprenticeship Training, Module One. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Leslie A.; Abercrombie, Richard, Ed.

    This training manual, the second of two volumes, comprises the final three blocks in a nine-block in-service training course for apprentices working in heavy duty mechanics. Addressed in the individual blocks included in this volume are engines, basic electricity, and winches. Each block contains a section on parts theory that gives the purpose,…

  14. La Experiencia Mexicana (The Mexican Experience). Volumes I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finer, Neal B.

    Designed to be used as part of a comprehensive social studies program on Mexican culture, this two-volume manual, written in Spanish, offers an instructional package on Mexican culture, stressing an art-architecture perspective, which can be used at the secondary, college and adult levels. The teacher's guide, Volume I, includes a discussion of a…

  15. Industrial Maintenance, Volume II-B. Post Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Raymond H.; And Others

    This volume is the third of four volumes that comprise a curriculum guide for a postsecondary industrial maintenance program. It contains part of section 3 of the guide which contains the unit guides for 10 of the 12 duties included in the course. Each of the 247 tasks included in these 10 duties is presented on a separate page and contains the…

  16. Industrial Maintenance, Volume II-A. Post Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Raymond H.; And Others

    This volume is the second of four volumes that comprise a curriculum guide for a postsecondary industrial maintenance program. It contains part of section 3 of the guide which contains the unit guides for two of the 12 duties included in the course. Each of the 197 tasks included in these two duties is presented on a separate page and contains the…

  17. Atlas of Ohio Aquatic Insects: Volume II, Plecoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Scott A.; Armitage, Brian J.; Baumann, Richard W.; Clark, Shawn M.; Bolton, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background We provide volume II of a distributional atlas of aquatic insects for the eastern USA state of Ohio. This treatment of stoneflies (Plecoptera) is companion to Armitage et al. (2011) on caddisflies (Trichoptera). We build on a recent analysis of Ohio stonefly diversity patterns based on large drainages (DeWalt et al. 2012), but add 3717 new records to the data set. We base most analyses on the United States Geological Survey Hierarchical Unit Code eight (HUC8) drainage scale. In addition to distributional maps for each species, we provide analyses of species richness versus HUC8 drainage area and the number of unique locations in a HUC8 drainage, species richness versus Ohio counties, analyze adult presence phenology throughout the year, and demonstrate stream size range affiliation for each species. New information This work is based on a total of 7797 specimen records gathered from 21 regional museums, agency data, personal collections, and from the literature Table 1. To our knowledge this is the largest stonefly data set available for a similarly sized geopolitical area anywhere in the world. These data are made available as a Darwin Core Archive supported by the Pensoft Integrated Publishing Toolkit (DeWalt et al. 2016b). All known published papers reporting stoneflies from Ohio are detailed in Suppl. material 1. We recovered 102 species from Ohio, including all nine Nearctic families Table 2​. Two species were removed from the DeWalt et al. (2012) list and two new state records added. Perlidae (32 spp.) was most speciose, compared to the low diversity Pteronarcyidae (2 spp.) and Peltoperlidae (1 sp.). The richest HUC8 drainages occurred in northeastern, south-central, and southern regions of the state where drainages were heavily forested, had the highest slopes, and were contained within or adjacent to the unglaciated Allegheny and Appalachian Plateaus. Species poor drainages occurred mainly in the northwestern region where Wisconsinan

  18. Human Rehabilitation Techniques. Disability Analyses: Behavioral Disabilities. Volume II, Part B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigelman, C.; And Others

    Volume II, Section B of a six-volume final report (which covers the findings of a research project on policy and technology related to rehabilitation of disabled individuals) presents a review of literature on three types of behavior disabilities--epilepsy, mental retardation, and schizophrenia. Individual chapters on each disability cover the…

  19. A Curriculum Activities Guide to Water Pollution and Environmental Studies, Volume II - Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, John T., Ed.; And Others

    This publication, Volume II of a two volume set of water pollution studies, contains seven appendices which support the studies. Appendix 1, Water Quality Parameters, consolidates the technical aspects of water quality including chemical, biological, computer program, and equipment information. Appendix 2, Implementation, outlines techniques…

  20. Human Rehabilitation Techniques. Disability Analyses: Chronic Disease Disabilities. Volume II, Part C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigelman, C.; And Others

    Volume II, Section C of a six-volume final report (which covers the findings of a research project on policy and technology related to rehabilitation of disabled individuals) presents a review of literature on six types of chronic disease disabilities--rheumatoid arthritis, coronary heart disease, emphysema, carcinoma of the colon/rectum, kidney…

  1. Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP), Volumes I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Amelio, J.

    1994-08-30

    Site Treatment Plans (STP) are required for facilities at which the DOE generates or stores mixed waste. This Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP) the second step in a three-phase process, identifies the currently preferred options for treating mixed waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) or for developing treatment technologies where technologies do not exist or need modification. The DSTP reflects site-specific preferred options, developed with the state`s input and based on existing available information. To the extent possible, the DSTP identifies specific treatment facilities for treating the mixed waste and proposes schedules. Where the selection of specific treatment facilities is not possible, schedules for alternative activities such as waste characterization and technology assessment are provided. All schedule and cost information presented is preliminary and is subject to change. The DSTP is comprised of two volumes: this Compliance Plan Volume and the Background Volume. This Compliance Plan Volume proposes overall schedules with target dates for achieving compliance with the land disposal restrictions (LDR) of RCRA and procedures for converting the target dates into milestones to be enforced under the Order. The more detailed discussion of the options contained in the Background Volume is provided for informational purposes only.

  2. Consolidation of Military Pay and Personnel Functions (Copper). Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-05-01

    as in any system, the commander and staff must perform their roles in providing information in a timely and accurate manner. a. Concepts pertaining to...feminine genders . Exceptions to this use of the words "he" or "his" will be so noted. 8. RECOMMENDED CHANGES AND COMMENTS. Users of this manual are...II-lO-Aq3 S NO CAH TR TION NCL IN 0’ SECTION 2 co P ? PAGE YES YES II-10-A43 MAKE CORRECTIONS LOG IN OTL SEPARATE DOCUMENTS Orl, OTL DOCUMENTS ORIG

  3. An Annotated Bibliography on Refugee Mental Health. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Susan C.; And Others

    The second volume of this annotated bibliography contains primarily materials in published scientific literature on refugee mental health. References have been grouped into five major sections. Section 1, Understanding Refugees in Context, provides important background material in five categories: cultural and related information about different…

  4. Environmental law and climate change : Volumes I & II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuuren, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Two volume set that brings together 54 of the most influential and important scientific journal articles in the field of climate law, thematically grouped together as follows: introducing climate law, theories and approaches, climate change mitigation, climate change adaptation, climate justice, lia

  5. MANUAL: BIOVENTING PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE VOLUME II. BIOVENTING DESIGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    The results from bioventing research and development efforts and from the pilot-scale bioventing systems have been used to produce this two-volume manual. Although this design manual has been written based on extensive experience with petroleum hydrocarbons (and thus, many exampl...

  6. Quantitative Indicators for Defense Analysis. Volume II. Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-01

    34*"WTOiw«* piB ^ r- ••’ ’ ’■’.WH""" - "«.JH QUAURANT II Hot War JIoL ]War land i Cold I |Criscs War iThreaten ed - Crisis 1...34The Political Analysis of Negotiations," World Politics 26. 3 (April). ^(1971) The Politics of Trade Negotiations Between Africa and the EEC

  7. Predictive value of SAPS II and APACHE II scoring systems for patient outcome in a medical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Godinjak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim is to determine SAPS II and APACHE II scores in medical intensive care unit (MICU patients, to compare them for prediction of patient outcome, and to compare with actual hospital mortality rates for different subgroups of patients. Methods. One hundred and seventy-four patients were included in this analysis over a oneyear period in the MICU, Clinical Center, University of Sarajevo. The following patient data were obtained: demographics, admission diagnosis, SAPS II, APACHE II scores and final outcome. Results. Out of 174 patients, 70 patients (40.2% died. Mean SAPS II and APACHE II scores in all patients were 48.4±17.0 and 21.6±10.3 respectively, and they were significantly different between survivors and non-survivors. SAPS II >50.5 and APACHE II >27.5 can predict the risk of mortality in these patients. There was no statistically significant difference in the clinical values of SAPS II vs APACHE II (p=0.501. A statistically significant positive correlation was established between the values of SAPS II and APACHE II (r=0.708; p=0.001. Patients with an admission diagnosis of sepsis/septic shock had the highest values of both SAPS II and APACHE II scores, and also the highest hospital mortality rate of 55.1%. Conclusion. Both APACHE II and SAPS II had an excellent ability to discriminate between survivors and non-survivors. There was no significant difference in the clinical values of SAPS II and APACHE II. A positive correlation was established between them. Sepsis/septic shock patients had the highest predicted and observed hospital mortality rate.

  8. Performance assessment of the SOFA, APACHE II scoring system, and SAPS II in intensive care unit organophosphate poisoned patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Hwan; Yeo, Jung Hoon; Kang, Mun Ju; Lee, Jun Ho; Cho, Kwang Won; Hwang, SeongYoun; Hong, Chong Kun; Lee, Young Hwan; Kim, Yang Weon

    2013-12-01

    This study assessed the ability of the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) and Acute Physiology, Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scoring systems, as well as the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II method to predict group mortality in intensive care unit (ICU) patients who were poisoned with organophosphate. The medical records of 149 organophosphate poisoned patients admitted to the ICU from September 2006 to December 2012 were retrospectively examined. The SOFA, APACHE II, and SAPS II were calculated based on initial laboratory data in the Emergency Department, and during the first 24 hr of ICU admission. The probability of death was calculated for each patient based on the SOFA score, APACHE II score, and SAPS II equations. The ability to predict group mortality by the SOFA score, APACHE II score, and SAPS II method was assessed using two by two decision matrices and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. A total of 131 patients (mean age, 61 yr) were enrolled. The sensitivities, specificities, and accuracies were 86.2%, 82.4%, and 83.2% for the SOFA score, respectively; 65.5%, 68.6%, and 67.9% for the APACHE II scoring system, respectively; and 86.2%, 77.5%, and 79.4% for the SAPS II, respectively. The areas under the curve in the ROC curve analysis for the SOFA score, APACHE II scoring system, and SAPS II were 0.896, 0.716, and 0.852, respectively. In conclusion, the SOFA, APACHE II, and SAPS II have different capability to discriminate and estimate early in-hospital mortality of organophosphate poisoned patients. The SOFA score is more useful in predicting mortality, and easier and simpler than the APACHE II and SAPS II.

  9. Research Papers Sponsored by the Commission on Private Philanthropy and Public Needs. Volume II: Philanthropic Fields of Interest, Part II-Additional Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of the Treasury, Washington, DC.

    Twelve papers discuss future changes and trends in philanthropic giving and activities. The report is Volume II, Part II of a five volume series examining the relationship between nonprofit institutions and their donors. The opening paper reviews the needs for better definition of the government's role in contracting and grant making, and for…

  10. Condylar volume and condylar area in class I, class II and class III young adult subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saccucci Matteo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim Aim of this study was to compare the volume and the shape of mandibular condyles in a Caucasian young adult population, with different skeletal pattern. Material and methods 200 Caucasian patients (15–30 years old, 95 male and 105 females were classified in three groups on the base of ANB angle: skeletal class I (65 patients, skeletal class II (70 patients and skeletal class III (65 patients. Left and right TMJs of each subject were evaluated independently with CBCT (Iluma. TMJ evaluation included: condylar volume; condylar area; morphological index (MI. Condylar volumes were calculated by using the Mimics software. The condylar volume, the area and the morphological index (MI were compared among the three groups, by using non-parametric tests. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann Whitney test revealed that: no significant difference was observed in the whole sample between the right and the left condylar volume; subjects in skeletal class III showed a significantly higher condylar volume, respect to class I and class II subjects (p 3 in males and 663.5 ± 81.3 mm3 in females; p 2 in males and 389.76 ± 61.15 mm2 in females; p  Conclusion Skeletal class appeared to be associated to the mandibular condylar volume and to the mandibular condylar area in the Caucasian orthodontic population.

  11. Proceedings of the 1995 U.S. DOE hydrogen program review. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The 1995 US DOE Hydrogen Program Review was held April 18-21, 1995 in Coral Gables, FL. Volume II of the Proceedings contains 8 papers presented under the subject of hydrogen storage and 17 papers presented on hydrogen production. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  12. HYDRA-II: A hydrothermal analysis computer code: Volume 3, Verification/validation assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCann, R.A.; Lowery, P.S.

    1987-10-01

    HYDRA-II is a hydrothermal computer code capable of three-dimensional analysis of coupled conduction, convection, and thermal radiation problems. This code is especially appropriate for simulating the steady-state performance of spent fuel storage systems. The code has been evaluated for this application for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. HYDRA-II provides a finite difference solution in cartesian coordinates to the equations governing the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. A cylindrical coordinate system may also be used to enclose the cartesian coordinate system. This exterior coordinate system is useful for modeling cylindrical cask bodies. The difference equations for conservation of momentum are enhanced by the incorporation of directional porosities and permeabilities that aid in modeling solid structures whose dimensions may be smaller than the computational mesh. The equation for conservation of energy permits modeling of orthotropic physical properties and film resistances. Several automated procedures are available to model radiation transfer within enclosures and from fuel rod to fuel rod. The documentation of HYDRA-II is presented in three separate volumes. Volume I - Equations and Numerics describes the basic differential equations, illustrates how the difference equations are formulated, and gives the solution procedures employed. Volume II - User's Manual contains code flow charts, discusses the code structure, provides detailed instructions for preparing an input file, and illustrates the operation of the code by means of a model problem. This volume, Volume III - Verification/Validation Assessments, provides a comparison between the analytical solution and the numerical simulation for problems with a known solution. This volume also documents comparisons between the results of simulations of single- and multiassembly storage systems and actual experimental data. 11 refs., 55 figs., 13 tabs.

  13. Managing the care of health and the cure of disease--Part II: Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glouberman, S; Mintzberg, H

    2001-01-01

    The development of appropriate levels of integration in the system of health care and disease cure will require stronger collective cultures and enhanced communication among the key actors. Part II of this paper uses this line of argument to reframe four major issues in this system: coordination of acute cure and of community care, and collaboration in institutions and in the system at large.

  14. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1980. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinga, K.R. (ed.)

    1981-07-01

    Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume I, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-Q; Part 2 contains Appendices R-MM. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  15. Mg II Absorption Characteristics of a Volume-Limited Sample of Galaxies at z ~ 0.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Cooke, Jeff

    2009-12-01

    We present an initial survey of Mg II absorption characteristics in the halos of a carefully constructed, volume-limited subsample of galaxies embedded in the spectroscopic part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We observed quasars near sightlines to 20 low-redshift (z ~ 0.1), luminous (M r + 5log h background quasar within a projected 75 h -1 kpc of its center, although we preferentially sample galaxies with lower impact parameters and slightly more star formation within this range. Of the observed systems, six exhibit strong (W eq(2796) >= 0.3 Å) Mg II absorption at the galaxy's redshift, six systems have upper limits which preclude strong Mg II absorption, while the remaining observations rule out very strong (W eq(2796) >= 1-2 Å) absorption. The absorbers fall at higher impact parameters than many non-absorber sightlines, indicating a covering fraction fc lsim 0.4 for >=0.3 Å absorbers at z ~ 0.1, even at impact parameters Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  16. HYDRA-II: A hydrothermal analysis computer code: Volume 2, User's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCann, R.A.; Lowery, P.S.; Lessor, D.L.

    1987-09-01

    HYDRA-II is a hydrothermal computer code capable of three-dimensional analysis of coupled conduction, convection, and thermal radiation problems. This code is especially appropriate for simulating the steady-state performance of spent fuel storage systems. The code has been evaluated for this application for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. HYDRA-II provides a finite-difference solution in cartesian coordinates to the equations governing the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. A cylindrical coordinate system may also be used to enclose the cartesian coordinate system. This exterior coordinate system is useful for modeling cylindrical cask bodies. The difference equations for conservation of momentum incorporate directional porosities and permeabilities that are available to model solid structures whose dimensions may be smaller than the computational mesh. The equation for conservation of energy permits modeling of orthotropic physical properties and film resistances. Several automated methods are available to model radiation transfer within enclosures and from fuel rod to fuel rod. The documentation of HYDRA-II is presented in three separate volumes. Volume 1 - Equations and Numerics describes the basic differential equations, illustrates how the difference equations are formulated, and gives the solution procedures employed. This volume, Volume 2 - User's Manual, contains code flow charts, discusses the code structure, provides detailed instructions for preparing an input file, and illustrates the operation of the code by means of a sample problem. The final volume, Volume 3 - Verification/Validation Assessments, provides a comparison between the analytical solution and the numerical simulation for problems with a known solution. 6 refs.

  17. Infarct volume predicts critical care needs in stroke patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faigle, Roland; Marsh, Elisabeth B.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Urrutia, Victor C. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wozniak, Amy W. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-10-26

    Patients receiving intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IVT) for ischemic stroke are monitored in an intensive care unit (ICU) or a comparable unit capable of ICU interventions due to the high frequency of standardized neurological exams and vital sign checks. The present study evaluates quantitative infarct volume on early post-IVT MRI as a predictor of critical care needs and aims to identify patients who may not require resource intense monitoring. We identified 46 patients who underwent MRI within 6 h of IVT. Infarct volume was measured using semiautomated software. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis were used to determine factors associated with ICU needs. Infarct volume was an independent predictor of ICU need after adjusting for age, sex, race, systolic blood pressure, NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and coronary artery disease (odds ratio 1.031 per cm{sup 3} increase in volume, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.004-1.058, p = 0.024). The ROC curve with infarct volume alone achieved an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.766 (95 % CI 0.605-0.927), while the AUC was 0.906 (95 % CI 0.814-0.998) after adjusting for race, systolic blood pressure, and NIHSS. Maximum Youden index calculations identified an optimal infarct volume cut point of 6.8 cm{sup 3} (sensitivity 75.0 %, specificity 76.7 %). Infarct volume greater than 3 cm{sup 3} predicted need for critical care interventions with 81.3 % sensitivity and 66.7 % specificity. Infarct volume may predict needs for ICU monitoring and interventions in stroke patients treated with IVT. (orig.)

  18. Simulation model for wind energy storage systems. Volume II. Operation manual. [SIMWEST code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, A.W.; Edsinger, R.W.; Burroughs, J.D.

    1977-08-01

    The effort developed a comprehensive computer program for the modeling of wind energy/storage systems utilizing any combination of five types of storage (pumped hydro, battery, thermal, flywheel and pneumatic). An acronym for the program is SIMWEST (Simulation Model for Wind Energy Storage). The level of detail of SIMWEST is consistent with a role of evaluating the economic feasibility as well as the general performance of wind energy systems. The software package consists of two basic programs and a library of system, environmental, and load components. Volume II, the SIMWEST operation manual, describes the usage of the SIMWEST program, the design of the library components, and a number of simple example simulations intended to familiarize the user with the program's operation. Volume II also contains a listing of each SIMWEST library subroutine.

  19. Energy extension service pilot program evaluation report: the first year. Volume II: pilot state reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    Volume II of the Energy Extension Service Evaluation presents a discussion of the operations of the ten EES pilot-state programs during the period from October 1, 1977 through September 30, 1978. Each of the ten pilot states - Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming - received a grant of approximately $1.1 million to develop and implement a 19-month program beginning on October 1, 1977. Volume II provides a case-study description of the operations of the pilot program in each state, with special attention given to the two programs selected in each state for more detailed study and survey research. Some survey data and analysis are presented for the emphasis programs.

  20. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-17

    Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. The document, Volume II - Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part A contains definitions, baseline revisions, test plans, and energy utilization sections.

  1. Condylar volume and condylar area in class I, class II and class III young adult subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Saccucci Matteo; D’Attilio Michele; Rodolfino Daria; Festa Felice; Polimeni Antonella; Tecco Simona

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aim Aim of this study was to compare the volume and the shape of mandibular condyles in a Caucasian young adult population, with different skeletal pattern. Material and methods 200 Caucasian patients (15–30 years old, 95 male and 105 females) were classified in three groups on the base of ANB angle: skeletal class I (65 patients), skeletal class II (70 patients) and skeletal class III (65 patients). Left and right TMJs of each subject were evaluated independently with CBCT (Iluma). ...

  2. Results of site validation experiments. Volume II. Supporting documents 5 through 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Volume II contains the following supporting documents: Summary of Geologic Mapping of Underground Investigations; Logging of Vertical Coreholes - ''Double Box'' Area and Exploratory Drift; WIPP High Precision Gravity Survey; Basic Data Reports for Drillholes, Brine Content of Facility Internal Strata; Mineralogical Content of Facility Interval Strata; Location and Characterization of Interbedded Materials; Characterization of Aquifers at Shaft Locations; and Permeability of Facility Interval Strate.

  3. Lung protection: an intervention for tidal volume reduction in a teaching intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briva, Arturo; Gaiero, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of feedback and education regarding the use of predicted body weight to adjust tidal volume in a lung-protective mechanical ventilation strategy. Methods The study was performed from October 2014 to November 2015 (12 months) in a single university polyvalent intensive care unit. We developed a combined intervention (education and feedback), placing particular attention on the importance of adjusting tidal volumes to predicted body weight bedside. In parallel, predicted body weight was estimated from knee height and included in clinical charts. Results One hundred fifty-nine patients were included. Predicted body weight assessed by knee height instead of visual evaluation revealed that the delivered tidal volume was significantly higher than predicted. After the inclusion of predicted body weight, we observed a sustained reduction in delivered tidal volume from a mean (standard error) of 8.97 ± 0.32 to 7.49 ± 0.19mL/kg (p < 0.002). Furthermore, the protocol adherence was subsequently sustained for 12 months (delivered tidal volume 7.49 ± 0.54 versus 7.62 ± 0.20mL/kg; p = 0.103). Conclusion The lack of a reliable method to estimate the predicted body weight is a significant impairment for the application of a worldwide standard of care during mechanical ventilation. A combined intervention based on education and repeated feedbacks promoted sustained tidal volume education during the study period (12 months). PMID:27925055

  4. Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 3. The Hanna II, Phase I field test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

    1985-08-01

    This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project, and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phase I was conducted during the spring and summer of 1975, at a site about 700 feet up dip (to the southwest) of the Hanna I test. The test was conducted in two stages - Phase IA and IB. Phase IA consisted of linking and gasification operations between Wells 1 and 3 and Phase IB of linking from the 1-3 gasification zone to Well 2, followed by a short period of gasification from Well 2 to Well 3 over a broad range of air injection rates, in order to determine system turndown capabilities and response times. This report covers: (1) site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operational testing; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 7 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Phase II and phase III.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cilke, John F.; Parks, Raymond C.; Funkhouser, Donald Ray; Tebo, Michael A.; Murphy, Martin D.; Hightower, Marion Michael; Gallagher, Linda K.; Craft, Richard Layne, II; Garcia, Rudy John

    2004-04-01

    In Phase I of this project, reported in SAND97-1922, Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. The effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements and an economic analysis model for development of care pathway costs for two conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Phases II and III of this project, which are presented in this report, were directed at detailing the parameters of telemedicine that influence care delivery costs and quality. These results were used to identify and field test the communication, interoperability, and security capabilities needed for cost-effective, secure, and reliable health care via telemedicine.

  6. Social support in type II diabetes care: a case of too little, too late

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadasivan S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Amudha Kadirvelu, Sivalal Sadasivan, Shu Hui NgSchool of Medicine and Health Sciences, Monash University Sunway Campus, Selangor, MalaysiaAbstract: Coping with type II diabetic patients is increasingly posing large financial burdens, sorely felt especially by growing economies. Self-management has been found to be an effective approach towards maintaining good control in diabetics. However, although efforts at implementing self-management have had initial success, there has been a lack of sustainability. This review examines the different components impinging on self-care among type II diabetic patients. These include the critical role of social support, the need for support from health care providers, the value of support from family and friends, the influence of sex and cultural factors in self-care behavior, the benefits of peer support, and the role of literacy in diabetes self-care. Despite the mounting evidence for the effectiveness of social support in diabetes care, and the various stakeholders including this in their clinical guidelines, there has only been a lukewarm response from policy-makers towards ensuring its implementation. Hence, more effort is required from health care providers in moving away from just understanding the effects of new drugs and subsequently putting their patients on these drugs, and going back to the basics of communicating with the patients, understanding their woes, and helping to motivate/empower their patients. This paper analyzes the various components of social support, their influence on diabetes self-care, and how health care providers can help in this process.Keywords: type II diabetes mellitus, social support, self-management/self-care

  7. Competition in the Dutch hospital sector: an analysis of health care volume and cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabbe-Alkemade, Y J F M; Groot, T L C M; Lindeboom, M

    2017-03-01

    This paper evaluates the impact of market competition on health care volume and cost. At the start of 2005, the financing system of Dutch hospitals started to be gradually changed from a closed-end budgeting system to a non-regulated price competitive prospective reimbursement system. The gradual implementation of price competition is a 'natural experiment' that provides a unique opportunity to analyze the effects of market competition on hospital behavior. We have access to a unique database, which contains hospital discharge data of diagnosis treatment combinations (DBCs) of individual patients, including detailed care activities. Difference-in-difference estimates show that the implementation of market-based competition leads to relatively lower total costs, production volume and number of activities overall. Difference-in-difference estimates on treatment level show that the average costs for outpatient DBCs decreased due to a decrease in the number of activities per DBC. The introduction of market competition led to an increase of average costs of inpatient DBCs. Since both volume and number of activities have not changed significantly, we conclude that the cost increase is likely the result of more expensive activities. A possible explanation for our finding is that hospitals look for possible efficiency improvements in predominantly outpatient care products that are relatively straightforward, using easily analyzable technologies. The effects of competition on average cost and the relative shares of inpatient and outpatient treatments on specialty level are significant but contrary for cardiology and orthopedics, suggesting that specialties react differently to competitive incentives.

  8. Hydrocarbonization process evaluation report. Volume II. Evaluation of process feasibility. [49 refs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, J.M.; Dyslin, D.A.; Edwards, M.S.; Joy, D.S.; Peterson, G.R.

    1977-07-01

    Volume II of a two-volume study concerning the preliminary design and economic evaluation of a Hydrocarbonization Facility includes: (1) a review of the current status of the major processing units, (2) an assessment of operating problems, (3) considerations of possible process alternatives, (4) an evaluation of the overall process feasibility, and (5) recommendations for future process development. Results of the study emphasize the need for testing the evaluated process, which is based on the Clean Coke Process, in a continuous pilot plant using a wide variety of highly caking bituminous coals as feed material. A program suggested for the pilot plant would encompass: (1) development of improved methods for the prevention of agglomeration of highly caking coals during hydrocarbonization, (2) optimization of the yields of coal liquids, (3) investigation of a single-stage high-temperature hydrocarbonizer optimized for char production, and (4) optimization of beneficiation ratios employed during coal preparation.

  9. Integrating model of the Project Independence Evaluation System. Volume VI. Data documentation. Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, B J

    1979-02-01

    This documentation describes the PIES Integrating Model as it existed on January 1, 1978. This Volume VI of six volumes is data documentation, containing the standard table data used for the Administrator's Report at the beginning of 1978, along with the primary data sources and the office responsible. It also contains a copy of a PIES Integrating Model Report with a description of its content. Following an overview chapter, Chapter II, Supply and Demand Data Tables and Sources for the Mid-range Scenario for Target Years 1985 and 1990, data on demand, price, and elasticity; coal; imports; oil and gas; refineries; synthetics, shale, and solar/geothermal; transportation; and utilities are presented. The following data on alternate scenarios are discussed: low and high demand; low and high oil and gas supply; refinery and oil and gas data assuming a 5% annual increase in real world oil prices. Chapter IV describes the solution output obtained from an execution of PIES.

  10. World Energy Data System (WENDS). Volume II. Country data, CZ-KS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-06-01

    The World Energy Data System contains organized data on those countries and international organizations that may have critical impact on the world energy scene. Included in this volume, Vol. II, are Czechoslovakia, Denmark, Egypt, Finland, France, Germany (East), Germany (West), Greece, Guinea, India, Indonesia, Iran, Italy, Japan, and Korea (South). The following topics are covered for most of the countries: economic, demographic, and educational profiles; energy policy; indigenous energy resources and uses; forecasts, demand, exports, imports of energy supplies; environmental considerations of energy use; power production facilities; energy industries; commercial applications of energy; research and development activities of energy; and international activities.

  11. Function of cGMP-dependent protein kinase II in volume load-induced diuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Andrea; Schinner, Elisabeth; Huettner, Johannes P; Kees, Frieder; Tauber, Philipp; Hofmann, Franz; Schlossmann, Jens

    2014-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)/cGMPs cause diuresis and natriuresis. Their downstream effectors beyond cGMP remain unclear. To elucidate a probable function of cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII), we investigated renal parameters in different conditions (basal, salt diets, starving, water load) using a genetically modified mouse model (cGKII-KO), but did not detect any striking differences between WT and cGKII-KO. Thus, cGKII is proposed to play only a marginal role in the adjustment of renal concentration ability to varying salt loads without water restriction or starving conditions. When WT mice were subjected to a volume load (performed by application of a 10-mM glucose solution (3% of BW) via feeding needle), they exhibited a potent diuresis. In contrast, urine volume was decreased significantly in cGKII-KO. We showed that AQP2 plasma membrane (PM) abundance was reduced for about 50% in WT upon volume load, therefore, this might be a main cause for the enhanced diuresis. In contrast, cGKII-KO mice almost completely failed to decrease AQP2-PM distribution. This significant difference between both genotypes is not induced by an altered p-Ser256-AQP2 phosphorylation, as phosphorylation at this site decreases similarly in WT and KO. Furthermore, sodium excretion was lowered in cGKII-KO mice during volume load. In summary, cGKII is only involved to a minor extent in the regulation of basal renal concentration ability. By contrast, cGKII-KO mice are not able to handle an acute volume load. Our results suggest that membrane insertion of AQP2 is inhibited by cGMP/cGKII.

  12. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Volume II. Commercial plant design (Deliverable Nos. 15 and 16)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    This report presents a Conceptual Design and Evaluation of Commercial Plant report in four volumes as follows: I - Executive Summary, II - Commercial Plant Design, III - Economic Analyses, IV - Demonstration Plant Recommendations. Volume II presents the commercial plant design and various design bases and design analyses. The discussion of design bases includes definition of plant external and internal considerations. The basis is described for process configuration selection of both process units and support facilities. Overall plant characteristics presented include a summary of utilities/chemicals/catalysts, a plant block flow diagram, and a key plot plan. Each process unit and support facility is described. Several different types of process analyses are presented. A synopsis of environmental impact is presented. Engineering requirements, including design considerations and materials of construction, are summarized. Important features such as safety, startup, control, and maintenance are highlighted. The last section of the report includes plant implementation considerations that would have to be considered by potential owners including siting, coal and water supply, product and by-product characteristics and uses, overall schedule, procurement, construction, and spare parts and maintenance philosophy.

  13. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 3: Specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. Volume 3 is a compilation of the construction specifications that will constitute the Title II materials and performance specifications. This volume contains CSI specifications for non-equipment related construction material type items, performance type items, and facility mechanical equipment items. Data sheets are provided, as necessary, which specify the equipment overall design parameters.

  14. The performance of customised APACHE II and SAPS II in predicting mortality of mixed critically ill patients in a Thai medical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khwannimit, B; Bhurayanontachai, R

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the performance of customised Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation HII (APACHE II) and Simplified Acute Physiology Score HII (SAPS II) in predicting hospital mortality of mixed critically ill Thai patients in a medical intensive care unit. A prospective cohort study was conducted over a four-year period. The subjects were randomly divided into calibration and validation groups. Logistic regression analysis was used for customisation. The performance of the scores was evaluated by the discrimination, calibration and overall fit in the overall group and across subgroups in the validation group. Two thousand and forty consecutive intensive care unit admissions during the study period were split into two groups. Both customised models showed excellent discrimination. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the customised APACHE II was greater than the customised SAPS II (0.925 and 0.892, P APACHE II in overall populations and various subgroups but insufficient calibration for the customised SAPS II. The customised SAPS II showed good calibration in only the younger, postoperative and sepsis patients subgroups. The overall performance of the customised APACHE II was better than the customised SAPS II (Brier score 0.089 and 0.109, respectively). Our results indicate that the customised APACHE II shows better performance than the customised SAPS II in predicting hospital mortality and could be used to predict mortality and quality assessment in our unit or other intensive care units with a similar case mix.

  15. Environmental control implications of generating electric power from coal. Technology status report. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-12-01

    This is the first in a series of reports evaluating environmental control technologies applicable to the coal-to-electricity process. The technologies are described and evaluated from an engineering and cost perspective based upon the best available information obtained from utility experience and development work in progress. Environmental control regulations and the health effects of pollutants are also reviewed. Emphasis is placed primarily upon technologies that are now in use. For SO/sub 2/ control, these include the use of low sulfur coal, cleaned coal, or flue-gas desulfurization systems. Electrostatic precipitators and fabric filters used for the control of particulate matter are analyzed, and combustion modifications for NO/sub x/ control are described. In each area, advanced technologies still in the development stage are described briefly and evaluated on the basis of current knowledge. Fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) is a near-term technology that is discussed extensively in the report. The potential for control of SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ emissions by use of FBC is analyzed, as are the resulting solid waste disposal problems, cost estimates, and its potential applicability to electric utility systems. Volume II presents the detailed technology analyses complete with reference citations. This same material is given in condensed form in Volume I without references. A brief executive summary is also given in Volume I.

  16. Current and future industrial energy service characterizations. Volume II. Energy data on the US manufacturing subsector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

    1980-10-01

    In order to characterize industrial energy service, current energy demand, its end uses, and cost of typical energy applications and resultant services in the industrial sector were examined and a projection of state industrial energy demands and prices to 1990 was developed. Volume II presents in Section 2 data on the US manufacturing subsector energy demand, intensity, growth rates, and cost for 1971, 1974, and 1976. These energy data are disaggregated not only by fuel type but also by user classifications, including the 2-digit SIC industry groups, 3-digit subgroups, and 4-digit SIC individual industries. These data characterize typical energy applications and the resultant services in this subsector. The quantities of fuel and electric energy purchased by the US manufacturing subsector were converted to British thermal units and reported in billions of Btu. The conversion factors are presented in Table 4-1 of Volume I. To facilitate the descriptive analysis, all energy cost and intensity data were expressed in constant 1976 dollars. The specific US industrial energy service characteristics developed and used in the descriptive analysis are presented in Volume I. Section 3 presents the computer program used to produce the tabulated data.

  17. Preliminary evaluation of alternative waste form solidification processes. Volume II. Evaluation of the processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    This Volume II presents engineering feasibility evaluations of the eleven processes for solidification of nuclear high-level liquid wastes (HHLW) described in Volume I of this report. Each evaluation was based in a systematic assessment of the process in respect to six principal evaluation criteria: complexity of process; state of development; safety; process requirements; development work required; and facility requirements. The principal criteria were further subdivided into a total of 22 subcriteria, each of which was assigned a weight. Each process was then assigned a figure of merit, on a scale of 1 to 10, for each of the subcriteria. A total rating was obtained for each process by summing the products of the subcriteria ratings and the subcriteria weights. The evaluations were based on the process descriptions presented in Volume I of this report, supplemented by information obtained from the literature, including publications by the originators of the various processes. Waste form properties were, in general, not evaluated. This document describes the approach which was taken, the developent and application of the rating criteria and subcriteria, and the evaluation results. A series of appendices set forth summary descriptions of the processes and the ratings, together with the complete numerical ratings assigned; two appendices present further technical details on the rating process.

  18. Evaluation of nosocomial infection risk using APACHE II scores in the neurological intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Ying; Li, Shu-Juan; Yang, Nan; Hu, Wen-Li

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of using the Acute Physiology, Age and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scoring system for predicting the risk of nosocomial infection in the neurological intensive care unit (NICU), 216 patients transferred to NICU within 24hours of admission were retrospectively evaluated. Based on admission APACHE II scores, they were classified into three groups, with higher APACHE II scores representing higher infectious risk. The device utilization ratios and device-associated infection ratios of NICU patients were analyzed and compared with published reports on patient outcome. Statistical analysis of nosocomial infection ratios showed obvious differences between the high-risk, middle-risk and low-risk groups (pAPACHE II model in predicting the risk of nosocomial infection was 0.81, which proved to be reliable and consistent with the expectation. In addition, we found statistical differences in the duration of hospital stay (patient-days) and device utilization (device-days) between different risk groups (pAPACHE II scoring system was validated in predicting the risk of nosocomial infection, duration of patient-days and device-days, and providing accurate assessment of patients' condition, so that appropriate prevention strategies can be implemented based on admission APACHE II scores.

  19. Coal liquefaction: A research and development needs assessment: Final report, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, H.D.; Burke, F.P.; Chao, K.C.; Davis, B.H.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Klier, K.; Kruse, C.W.; Larsen, J.W.; Lumpkin, R.E.; McIlwain, M.E.; Wender, I.; Stewart, N.

    1989-03-01

    Volume II of this report on an assessment of research needs for coal liquefaction contains reviews of the five liquefaction technologies---direct, indirect, pyrolysis, coprocessing, and bioconversion. These reviews are not meant to be encyclopedic; several outstanding reviews of liquefaction have appeared in recent years and the reader is referred to these whenever applicable. Instead, these chapters contain reviews of selected topics that serve to support the panel's recommendations or to illustrate recent accomplishments, work in progress, or areas of major research interest. At the beginning of each of these chapters is a brief introduction and a summary of the most important research recommendations brought out during the panel discussions and supported by the material presented in the review. A review of liquefaction developments outside the US is included. 594 refs., 100 figs., 60 tabs.

  20. Proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2: Public Involvement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-01-01

    In regard to the proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project, the goal of the Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) public involvement process is to determine the issues to be examined and pertinent analyses to be conducted and to solicit comments on the content and quality of information presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). Comments and questions are solicited from the public and government agencies during the scoping process and during the comment period and public hearing on the DEIS, to find out what is of most concern to them. The end product of the public involvement process is the Comment Report which follows in part of this volume on Public Involvement.

  1. APACHE II: preliminary report on 100 intensive care unit cases in University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, G S; Mah, K K; abd Majid, S; Streram; Yee, M K

    1991-03-01

    A good overall assessment of the severity of illnesses of patients admitted to a general intensive care unit (ICU) is not without problems. The APACHE (acute physiology and chronic health evaluation) prognostic scoring system enables us to stratify acutely ill patients and compare efficiency of ICU therapy in different hospitals. This preliminary study carried out on 100 consecutive admissions to the ICU in University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur showed the spectrum of ICU admissions and the direct relationship between APACHE II score and mortality.

  2. Infinite dilution partial molar volumes of platinum(II) 2,4-pentanedionate in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Chang Yi; Siratori, Tomoya; Funazukuri, Toshitaka; Wang, Guosheng

    2014-10-03

    The effects of temperature and density on retention of platinum(II) 2,4-pentanedionate in supercritical fluid chromatography were investigated at temperatures of 308.15-343.15K and pressure range from 8 to 40MPa by the chromatographic impulse response method with curve fitting. The retention factors were utilized to derive the infinite dilution partial molar volumes of platinum(II) 2,4-pentanedionate in supercritical carbon dioxide. The determined partial molar volumes were small and positive at high pressures but exhibited very large and negative values in the highly compressible near critical region of carbon dioxide.

  3. Planning manual for energy resource development on Indian lands. Volume II. Management and contractual arrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-01

    This volume explores options for strengthening tribal control of energy-resource-development activities on their reservations. These options fall into two major categories: improvement of the tribe's internal administrative capability to plan, monitor, and regulate development activities; Part I of this volume addresses how this can be done. Another option deals with stronger and more-explicit contract terms in the development, agreement, and enforcement of those terms; Part II deals with this subject. In order to develop an effective control system, a tribe must be concerned with both of these areas. Contract stipulations will not be effective unless the tribe can ensure that they are enforced. Likewise, in monitoring and regulating company activities, a tribe is in a stronger position if it is backed up by contract terms governing operations on the reservation. The Tribes participating in this study have different levels of managerial capability and technical expertise in the energy field. Their interest in stronger controls on development varies. Therefore, a range of options is suggested.

  4. Blade system design studies volume II : preliminary blade designs and recommended test matrix.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Dayton A. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC, Kirkland, WA)

    2004-06-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program, Global Energy Concepts, LLC is performing a Blade System Design Study (BSDS) concerning innovations in materials, processes and structural configurations for application to wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt range. The BSDS Volume I project report addresses issues and constraints identified to scaling conventional blade designs to the megawatt size range, and evaluated candidate materials, manufacturing and design innovations for overcoming and improving large blade economics. The current report (Volume II), presents additional discussion of materials and manufacturing issues for large blades, including a summary of current trends in commercial blade manufacturing. Specifications are then developed to guide the preliminary design of MW-scale blades. Using preliminary design calculations for a 3.0 MW blade, parametric analyses are performed to quantify the potential benefits in stiffness and decreased gravity loading by replacement of a baseline fiberglass spar with carbon-fiberglass hybrid material. Complete preliminary designs are then presented for 3.0 MW and 5.0 MW blades that incorporate fiberglass-to-carbon transitions at mid-span. Based on analysis of these designs, technical issues are identified and discussed. Finally, recommendations are made for composites testing under Part I1 of the BSDS, and the initial planned test matrix for that program is presented.

  5. THE MOUNTAIN IRON DIFFUSION PROGRAM: PHASE 1 SOUTH VANDENBERG: VOLUME II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinds, W. T.; Nickola, P. W.

    1968-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine an empirical diffusion equation for South Vandenberg. The scope of the operation included 1) tracer releases from two sites near two launch points and collection of diffusion and meteorological data over South Vandenberg; 2) reduction and analysis of diffusion and meteorological data for South Vandenberg. This Volume II contains a detailed discussion of techniques and data analysis. A description of the physical setting of South Vandenberg is contained in both volumes, to provide geographical nomenclature and relationships to the readers. Chapter 2 describes the experimental technique, meteorological support, and some of the problems involved in the program. A summary of the test conditions and data reduction methods is also included. In Chapter 3, a brief presentation of the theory of turbulent diffusion is given. Chapter 4 deals with data aquisition and reduction. Chapter 5 presents the diffusion data in summary form, and discusses the methods used for estimating plume growth. The integration of the data into theoretical relationships is discussed in Chapter 6. The results of brief investigations into other aspects of the Mountain Iron data, such as short-term releases and traj ectory determination, are discussed in Chapter 7. Finally, to lend confidence to use of the data and resulting equations, the Mountain Iron data are compared in several ways in Chapter 8 to earlier data from North Vandenberg and Hanford. Appendices contain a tabulation of the basic diffusion data, a listing of terminology and units, and aircraft sampling results.

  6. A Fire Safety Certification System for Board and Care Operators and Staff. SBIR Phase II: Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Bonnie L.

    This report describes Phase II of a project which developed a system for delivering fire safety training to board and care providers who serve adults with developmental disabilities. Phase II focused on developing and pilot testing a "train the trainers" workshop for instructors and field testing the provider's workshop. Evaluation of the 2-day…

  7. Implementing AORN recommended practices for a safe environment of care, part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Lynne

    2014-09-01

    Construction in and around a working perioperative suite is a challenge beyond merely managing traffic patterns and maintaining the sterile field. The AORN "Recommended practices for a safe environment of care, part II" provides guidance on building design; movement of patients, personnel, supplies, and equipment; environmental controls; safety and security; and control of noise and distractions. Whether the OR suite evolves through construction, reconstruction, or remodeling, a multidisciplinary team of construction experts and health care professionals should create a functional plan and communicate at every stage of the project to maintain a safe environment and achieve a well-designed outcome. Emergency preparedness, a facility-wide security plan, and minimization of noise and distractions in the OR also help enhance the safety of the perioperative environment.

  8. Tiotropium bromide in the routine care of GOLD stage II COPD patients: a pharmaeconomic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orietta Zaniolo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: a secondary pre-specified analysis of the UPLIFT cohort demonstrated that the inclusion of tiotropium bromide in the routine care of GOLD stage II (moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients is associated with stronger improvements of survival, quality of life, and exacerbation rate than those shown in the total cohort; in this subgroup, tiotropium furthermore induces a significant reduction in the rate of FEV1 decline.Objective: to adapt the Spiriva® model, originally built to evaluate cost-effectiveness of tiotropium inclusion in the general COPD population, to GOLD II patients.Methods: the Spiriva® model is a probabilistic Markov patient-level simulation developed over a lifetime horizon to compare outcomes associated with the inclusion of tiotropium in routine care (RC for COPD treatment with those obtained with RC alone. Patients are characterised by gender, age, height, smoking status and FEV1. Model structure and sources have been maintained unvaried, except for demographic characteristics, specific for GOLD II patients, as extrapolated from an Italian observational study, and tiotropium efficacy, based on the secondary analysis of GOLD II UPLIFT patients. As in the original model, only direct health care costs are considered.Results: patients treated with tiotropium on average (95% CI gain 0.70 (0.00/7.23 LYs or 0.77 (0.02/4.67 QALYs compared to RC. The incremental lifetime cost is € 3,520 (-6,391/26,686, meaning that the incremental cost required to gain a QALY (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio – ICER is equal to € 4,548. Sensitivity analysis shows that tiotropium has a 50% probability of being cost-effective for a willingness-to-pay (WTP around 4,600 €/QALY; 100% probability is achieved with a WTP of € 9,300.Conclusions: the adoption of a strategy based on the inclusion of tiotropium from the early COPD stages represents good value for money in Italy, as the ICER estimated for GOLD II

  9. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 4: Project cost estimate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. This volume represents the total estimated costs for the W113 facility. Operating Contractor Management costs have been incorporated as received from WHC. The W113 Facility TEC is $19.7 million. This includes an overall project contingency of 14.4% and escalation of 17.4%. A January 2001 construction contract procurement start date is assumed.

  10. Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program: Phase I, Volume II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    This Volume II of Phase I of the Energy Economic Data Base Program contains appendices. Appendix A-1 provides the site and environmental data, derived from Appendix A of Guide for Economic Evaluation of Nuclear Reactor Plant Designs, USAEC Report NUS-531, modified to reflect current requirements. These data form the bases of the criteria used for designing the facility and for evaluating the routine and accidental release of radioactive liquids and gases to the environment. Appendix A-2 provides the site and environmental data as derived from Appendix A of NUS-531, and modified to reflect coal-plant siting, forming the bases of the criteria used for designing the facility and for evaluating the release of liquids and gases to the environment. A description of the topography of the hypothetical city, Middletown, is given. Appendix B provides an overall summary of the conclusions of NUS' work on all NUS tasks in support of the nuclear fuel-cycle work in Phase I. Appendix C-1 introduces the concepts involved and addresses methods of calculation of fixed charges applicable to investor-owned utilities, as used in the EEDB. Appendix C-2 consists of review and revision of each plant's fuel cycle and operating and maintenance costs in accordance with the EEDB update procedures. In Appendix D, NSSS Capital Costs for a Mature LMFBR Industry, much information is provided on plant description, cost estimate, comparison and discussion, drawings, and equipment list. (MCW)

  11. Critical Infrastructure Protection II, The International Federation for Information Processing, Volume 290.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Mauricio; Shenoi, Sujeet

    The information infrastructure -- comprising computers, embedded devices, networks and software systems -- is vital to day-to-day operations in every sector: information and telecommunications, banking and finance, energy, chemicals and hazardous materials, agriculture, food, water, public health, emergency services, transportation, postal and shipping, government and defense. Global business and industry, governments, indeed society itself, cannot function effectively if major components of the critical information infrastructure are degraded, disabled or destroyed. Critical Infrastructure Protection II describes original research results and innovative applications in the interdisciplinary field of critical infrastructure protection. Also, it highlights the importance of weaving science, technology and policy in crafting sophisticated, yet practical, solutions that will help secure information, computer and network assets in the various critical infrastructure sectors. Areas of coverage include: - Themes and Issues - Infrastructure Security - Control Systems Security - Security Strategies - Infrastructure Interdependencies - Infrastructure Modeling and Simulation This book is the second volume in the annual series produced by the International Federation for Information Processing (IFIP) Working Group 11.10 on Critical Infrastructure Protection, an international community of scientists, engineers, practitioners and policy makers dedicated to advancing research, development and implementation efforts focused on infrastructure protection. The book contains a selection of twenty edited papers from the Second Annual IFIP WG 11.10 International Conference on Critical Infrastructure Protection held at George Mason University, Arlington, Virginia, USA in the spring of 2008.

  12. Energy Extension Service Pilot Program: evaluation report after two years. Volume II. State reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-04-01

    This report, Vol. II, presents a discussion of the operations of the ten EES pilot state programs during the period from October 1, 1977 through September 30, 1979. Each of the ten pilot states - Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming - received a grant of approximately $1.1 million to develop and implement an 18-month program beginning on October 1, 1977. In September 1978, each State received an additional $370,000 for service-delivery programs for the extension of the pilot program, April 1979 through September 1979. A case-study description of the operations of the pilot program in each State is provided here, with special attention given to the two programs selected in each State for more-detailed study and survey research. Although the thrust of this volume is descriptive, some survey data and analyses are presented for the emphasis programs. Two telephone surveys of clients and a non-client sample were conducted, one at the end of the first year of the pilot program (October 1977 - September 1978) and one at the end of the second year (October 1978 - September 1979).

  13. Interview-based Qualitative Research in Emergency Care Part II: Data Collection, Analysis and Results Reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, Megan L; Meisel, Zachary F; Choo, Esther K; Garro, Aris C; Sasson, Comilla; Morrow Guthrie, Kate

    2015-09-01

    Qualitative methods are increasingly being used in emergency care research. Rigorous qualitative methods can play a critical role in advancing the emergency care research agenda by allowing investigators to generate hypotheses, gain an in-depth understanding of health problems or specific populations, create expert consensus, and develop new intervention and dissemination strategies. In Part I of this two-article series, we provided an introduction to general principles of applied qualitative health research and examples of its common use in emergency care research, describing study designs and data collection methods most relevant to our field (observation, individual interviews, and focus groups). Here in Part II of this series, we outline the specific steps necessary to conduct a valid and reliable qualitative research project, with a focus on interview-based studies. These elements include building the research team, preparing data collection guides, defining and obtaining an adequate sample, collecting and organizing qualitative data, and coding and analyzing the data. We also discuss potential ethical considerations unique to qualitative research as it relates to emergency care research.

  14. State Assessment and Testing Programs: An Annotated ERIC Bibliography. Volume I: General References. Volume II: Individual State Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Deborah Elena; Wildemuth, Barbara

    There is a growing body of literature in the ERIC data base pertaining to state educational assessment and testing programs. Volume I of this bibliography includes abstracts of 39 documents and journal articles describing the design and implementation of programs, as well as the technical and political issues which have been addressed by the…

  15. Energy development in the Southwest: problems of water, fish, and wildlife in the Upper Colorado River Basin. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spofford, W.O. Jr.; Parker, A.L.; Kneese, A.V. (eds.)

    1980-01-01

    The two-volume set is based primarily on an RFF forum held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, in October 1976. Most of the papers in the book were presented at this forum. All of them were revised and updated after the forum; some were partly or even wholly rewritten. Some of the papers depend directly on research results reported in others, and therefore major revisions were necessary to integrate these papers. Two new papers were added after the forum was held, as was the appendix, and five new discussions. This volume, Vol. II, contains the 10 other papers (chapters) of the set; a separate abstract was prepared for each.

  16. River Protection Project Integrated safety management system phase II verification report, volumes I and II - 8/19/99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SHOOP, D.S.

    1999-09-10

    The Department of Energy policy (DOE P 450.4) is that safety is integrated into all aspects of the management and operations of its facilities. In simple and straightforward terms, the Department will ''Do work safely.'' The purpose of this River Protection Project (RPP) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase II Verification was to determine whether ISMS programs and processes are implemented within RFP to accomplish the goal of ''Do work safely.'' The goal of an implemented ISMS is to have a single integrated system that includes Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) requirements in the work planning and execution processes to ensure the protection of the worker, public, environment, and federal property over the RPP life cycle. The ISMS is comprised of the (1) described functions, components, processes, and interfaces (system map or blueprint) and (2) personnel who are executing those assigned roles and responsibilities to manage and control the ISMS. Therefore, this review evaluated both the ''paper'' and ''people'' aspects of the ISMS to ensure that the system is implemented within RPP. Richland Operations Office (RL) conducted an ISMS Phase I Verification of the TWRS from September 28-October 9, 1998. The resulting verification report recommended that TWRS-RL and the contractor proceed with Phase II of ISMS verification given that the concerns identified from the Phase I verification review are incorporated into the Phase II implementation plan.

  17. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

  18. Final Safety Analysis Addenda to Hazards Summary Report, Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II): upgrading of plant protection system. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, N. L.; Keeton, J. M.; Sackett, J. I. [comps.

    1980-06-01

    This report is the second in a series of compilations of the formal Final Safety Analysis Addenda (FSAA`s) to the EBR-II Hazard Summary Report and Addendum. Sections 2 and 3 are edited versions of the original FSAA`s prepared in support of certain modifications to the reactor-shutdown-system portion of the EBR-II plant-protection system. Section 4 is an edited version of the original FSAA prepared in support of certain modifications to a system classified as an engineered safety feature. These sections describe the pre- and postmodification system, the rationale for the modification, and required supporting safety analysis. Section 5 provides an updated description and analysis of the EBR-II emergency power system. Section 6 summarizes all significant modifications to the EBR-II plant-protection system to date.

  19. DICTIONARY OF OCCUPATIONAL TITLES, 1965. VOLUME II, OCCUPATIONAL CLASSIFICATION AND INDUSTRY INDEX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Employment Security (DOL), Washington, DC.

    VOLUME 2 COMPLEMENTS VOLUME 1 (VT 003 654) BY PROVIDING A CLASSIFICATION STRUCTURE WHICH GROUPS JOBS HAVING THE SAME BASIC OCCUPATIONAL, INDUSTRIAL, OR WORKER CHARACTERISTICS. THE SECTIONS ARE (1) THE OCCUPATIONAL CATEGORIES, DIVISIONS, AND GROUPS, (2) AN ALPHABETIC ARRANGEMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL DIVISIONS AND GROUPS, (3) THE OCCUPATIONAL GROUP…

  20. An Evaluation of the Nutrition Services for the Elderly. Volume II. Analytic Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM.

    This document is part of a five-volume nationwide study of Nutrition Service operations and elderly citizens participating in congregate dining and home delivery services authorized by Title III-C of the Older Americans' Act. This volume contains the analytic report, which presents the major findings of the evaluation. Chapter 1 gives a report…

  1. Moving NSDC's Staff Development Standards into Practice: Innovation Configurations, Volume II. [CD-ROMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Staff Development Council, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The second volume of "Moving NSDC's Staff Development Standards into Practice: Innovation Configurations" builds on the work that began with the first volume published in 2003. An Innovation Configuration map is a device that identifies and describes the major components of a new practice such as the standards and details of how it would look in…

  2. Cost Analysis of Correctional Standards: Institutional-Based Programs and Parole. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Neil M.; Wright, Virginia B.

    This second of two volumes provides cost guidelines and cost estimation techniques for use by jurisdictions in assessing costs of their own ongoing or contemplated correctional program activities. (Volume I is a companion summary published as a separate document for use by criminal justice policy-makers in need of a reference to the policy issues…

  3. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Strategic Target System. Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    mm 110 Deranken, Marchelle 111 Guerra, Raquel mm 112 Kolder, Teri mim 113 Nakahara, Joyce m<-- 115 Gulliksen, Gary mm 116 Byrd, Jaime <mlm 117...1:| ii iis 13J 111 :W : ::::I| ill 497 Alvarez , Patrick mfm 499 Granda, Chia mim 501 Hilbonson, M. 1 iii 502 Damron, Mark H. 111 504 Stayton

  4. The Amsterdam Studies of Acute Psychiatry - II (ASAP-II: a comparative study of psychiatric intensive care units in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Venrooij Janine

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of patients in whom mental illness progresses to stages in which acute, and often forced treatment is warranted, is on the increase across Europe. As a consequence, more patients are involuntarily admitted to Psychiatric Intensive Care Units (PICU. From several studies and reports it has become evident that important dissimilarities exist between PICU's. The current study seeks to describe organisational as well as clinical and patient related factors across ten PICU's in and outside the Amsterdam region, adjusted for or stratified by level of urbanization. Method/Design This paper describes the design of the Amsterdam Studies of Acute Psychiatry II (ASAP-II. This study is a prospective observational cohort study comparing PICU's in and outside the Amsterdam region on various patient characteristics, treatment aspects and recovery related variables. Dissimilarities were measured by means of collecting standardized forms which were filled out in the framework of care as usual, by means of questionnaires filled out by mental health care professionals and by means of extracting data from patient files for every consecutive patient admitted at participating PICU's during a specific time period. Urbanization levels for every PICU were calculated conform procedures as proposed by the Dutch Central Bureau for Statistics (CBS. Discussion The current study may provide a deeper understanding of the differences between psychiatric intensive care units that can be used to promote best practice and benchmarking procedures, and thus improve the standard of care.

  5. Research safety vehicle program (Phase II) specification review. Volume II. Final technical report, Jul 1975--Nov 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugliese, S.M.

    1977-02-01

    In Phase I of the Research Safety Vehicle Program (RSV), preliminary design and performance specifications were developed for a mid-1980's vehicle that integrates crashworthiness and occupant safety features with material resource conservation, economy, and producibility. Phase II of the program focused on development of the total vehicle design via systems engineering and integration analyses. As part of this effort, it was necessary to continuously review the Phase I recommended performance specification in relation to ongoing design/test activities. This document contains the results of analyses of the Phase I specifications. The RSV is expected to satisfy all of the producibility and safety related specifications, i.e., handling and stability systems, crashworthiness, occupant protection, pedestrian/cyclist protection, etc.

  6. Association of over-the-counter pharmaceutical sales with influenza-like-illnesses to patient volume in an urgent care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Timothy Y; Sanders, Jason L; Tsui, Fu-Chiang; Espino, Jeremy U; Dato, Virginia M; Suyama, Joe

    2013-01-01

    We studied the association between OTC pharmaceutical sales and volume of patients with influenza-like-illnesses (ILI) at an urgent care center over one year. OTC pharmaceutical sales explain 36% of the variance in the patient volume, and each standard deviation increase is associated with 4.7 more patient visits to the urgent care center (p<0.0001). Cross-correlation function analysis demonstrated that OTC pharmaceutical sales are significantly associated with patient volume during non-flu season (p<0.0001), but only the sales of cough and cold (p<0.0001) and thermometer (p<0.0001) categories were significant during flu season with a lag of two and one days, respectively. Our study is the first study to demonstrate and measure the relationship between OTC pharmaceutical sales and urgent care center patient volume, and presents strong evidence that OTC sales predict urgent care center patient volume year round.

  7. SNAP II and SNAPPE II as Predictors of Neonatal Mortality in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit: Does Postnatal Age Play a Role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirta Noemi Mesquita Ramirez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In developing countries, a lack of decentralization of perinatal care leads to many high-risk births occurring in facilities that do not have NICU, leading to admission to a PICU. Objective. To assess SNAP II and SNAPPE II as predictors of neonatal death in the PICU. Methodology. A prospective study of newborns divided into 3 groups according to postnatal age: Group 1 (G1, of 0 to 6 days; Group 2 (G2 of 7 to 14 days; and Group 3 (G3, of 15 to 28 days. Variables analyzed were SNAP II, SNAPPE II, perinatal data, and known risk factors for death. The Hosmer-Lemeshow test and the receiver operating characteristics (ROC curve were used with SPSS 17.0 for statistical analysis. An Alpha error <5% was considered significant. Results. We analyzed 290 newborns, including 192 from G1, 41 from G2, and 57 from G3. Mortality was similar in all 3 groups. Median SNAP II was higher in newborns that died in all 3 groups (P<0.05. The area under the ROC curve for SNAP II for G1 was 0.78 (CI 95% 0.70–0.86, for G2 0.66 (CI 95% 0.37–0.94, and for G3 0.74 (CI 95% 0.53–0.93. The area under the ROC curve for SNAPPE II for G1 was 0.76 (CI 95% 0.67–0.85, for G2 0.60 (CI 95% 0.30–0.90, and for G3 0.74 (CI 95% 0.52–0.95. Conclusions. SNAP II and SNAPPE II showed moderate discrimination in predicting mortality. The results are not strong enough to establish the correlation between the score and the risk of mortality.

  8. Method for Determining Language Objectives and Criteria. Volume II. Methodological Tools: Computer Analysis, Data Collection Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-05-25

    This volume presents (1) Methods for computer and hand analysis of numerical language performance data (includes examples) (2) samples of interview, observation, and survey instruments used in collecting language data. (Author)

  9. Fixed site neutralization model programmer's manual. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engi, D.; Chapman, L.D.; Judnick, W.; Blum, R.; Broegler, L.; Lenz, J.; Weinthraub, A.; Ballard, D.

    1979-12-01

    This report relates to protection of nuclear materials at nuclear facilities. This volume presents the source listings for the Fixed Site Neutralization Model and its supporting modules, the Plex Preprocessor and the Data Preprocessor. (DLC)

  10. Conceptual design and systems analysis of photovoltaic systems. Volume II. Study results. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirpich, A.

    1977-03-19

    This investigation of terrestrial PV systems considered the technical and economic feasibility for systems in three size categories: a small system of about 12 kW peak output for on-site residential use; a large 1500 MW central power plant contributing to the bulk energy of a utility system power grid; and an intermediate size system of about 250 kW for use on public or commercial buildings. In each category, conceptual designs were developed, performance was analyzed for a range of climatic regions, economic analyses were performed, and assessments were made of pertinent institutional issues. The report consists of three volumes. Volume I contains a Study Summary of the major study results. This volume contains the detailed results pertaining to on-site residential photovoltaic systems, central power plant photovoltaic systems, and intermediate size systems applied to commercial and public buildings. Volume III contains supporting appendix material. (WHK)

  11. Proceedings of the 1984 workshop on high-energy excitations in condensed matter. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, R.N. (comp.)

    1984-12-01

    This volume covers electronic excitations, momentum distributions, high energy photons, and a wrap-up session. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  12. Assessment of control technology for stationary sources. Volume II: control technology data tables. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minicucci, D.; Herther, M.; Babb, L.; Kuby, W.

    1980-02-01

    This report, the Control Technology Data Tables, is the second volume of the three-volume final report for the contract. It presents in tabular format, qualitative descriptions of control options for the various sources and quantitative information on control technology cost, efficiency, reliability, energy consumption, other environmental impacts and application status. Also included is a code list which classifies the stationary sources examined by industry, process, and emission source.

  13. Automating the Exchange of Military Personnel Data Among Selected Army Organizations. Volume II. Appendices,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-30

    76.9 .D3 153 v.3- 4 . 6. Cardenas , Alfonso. "Evaluation and Selection of File Orangi- zation - A Model and System". Communications of the ACM. Volume 16...Decisions. Volume 8; Number 6; June 1976; 36-40. Georgia Tech Call Number: QA 76 .C5625 v.8. 20. Knottek, Nancy E. "Selecting A Distributed...Nahouraii, E.; Brooks, L.0; and Cardenas , A.F. "An Approach to Data Communication Between Different Generalized Data Base Management Systems

  14. Heterogeneous Concurrent Modeling and Design in Java (Volume 1: Introduction to Ptolemy II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    which receives support from the National Science Foundation (NSF awards #0720882 ( CSR -EHS: PRET), #0647591 ( CSR -SGER), and #0720841 ( CSR -CPS)), the U...Foundation (NSF awards #0720882 ( CSR -EHS: PRET), #0647591 ( CSR -SGER), and #0720841 ( CSR -CPS)), the U. S. Army Research Office (ARO #W911NF-07-2...Ptolemy II configuration [26]. The ability to create such separately branded and packaged subsets of Ptolemy II is a major feature. The semantics of hybrid

  15. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Uncertainty Analysis-Exploration of Core Melt Progression Uncertain Parameters-Volume II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denman, Matthew R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brooks, Dusty Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has conducted an uncertainty analysi s (UA) on the Fukushima Daiichi unit (1F1) accident progression wit h the MELCOR code. Volume I of the 1F1 UA discusses the physical modeling details and time history results of the UA. Volume II of the 1F1 UA discusses the statistical viewpoint. The model used was developed for a previous accident reconstruction investigation jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The goal of this work was to perform a focused evaluation of uncertainty in core damage progression behavior and its effect on key figures - of - merit (e.g., hydrogen production, fraction of intact fuel, vessel lower head failure) and in doing so assess the applicability of traditional sensitivity analysis techniques .

  16. Solar/hydrogen systems technologies. Volume II (Part 2 of 2). Solar/hydrogen systems assessment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, W. J.D.; Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Hanson, J. A.

    1980-06-02

    Volume II of the Solar/Hydrogen Systems Assessment contract report (2 volumes) is basically a technological source book. Relying heavily on expert contributions, it comprehensively reviews constituent technologies from which can be assembled a wide range of specific solar/hydrogen systems. Covered here are both direct and indirect solar energy conversion technologies; respectively, those that utilize solar radiant energy input directly and immediately, and those that absorb energy from a physical intermediary, previously energized by the sun. Solar-operated hydrogen energy production technologies are also covered in the report. The single most prominent of these is water electrolysis. Utilization of solar-produced hydrogen is outside the scope of the volume. However, the important hydrogen delivery step is treated under the delivery sub-steps of hydrogen transmission, distribution and storage. An exemplary use of the presented information is in the synthesis and analysis of those solar/hydrogen system candidates documented in the report's Volume I. Moreover, it is intended that broad use be made of this technology information in the implementation of future solar/hydrogen systems. Such systems, configured on either a distributed or a central-plant basis, or both, may well be a major significance in effecting an ultimate transition to renewable energy systems.

  17. Solar/hydrogen systems technologies. Volume II (Part 1 of 2). Solar/hydrogen systems assessment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, W. J.D.; Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Hanson, J. A.

    1980-06-02

    Volume II of the Solar/Hydrogen Systems Assessment contract report (2 volumes) is basically a technological source book. Relying heavily on expert contributions, it comprehensively reviews constituent technologies from which can be assembled a wide range of specific solar/hydrogen systems. Covered here are both direct and indirect solar energy conversion technologies; respectively, those that utilize solar radiant energy input directly and immediately, and those that absorb energy from a physical intermediary, previously energized by the sun. Solar-operated hydrogen energy production technologies are also covered in the report. The single most prominent of these is water electrolysis. Utilization of solar-produced hydrogen is outside the scope of the volume. However, the important hydrogen delivery step is treated under the delivery sub-steps of hydrogen transmission, distribution and storage. An exemplary use of the presented information is in the synthesis and analysis of those solar/hydrogen system candidates documented in the report's Volume I. Morever, it is intended that broad use be made of this technology information in the implementation of future solar/hydrogen systems. Such systems, configured on either a distributed or a central-plant basis, or both, may well be of major significance in effecting an ultimate transition to renewable energy systems.

  18. GENII (Generation II): The Hanford Environmental Radiation Dosimetry Software System: Volume 3, Code maintenance manual: Hanford Environmental Dosimetry Upgrade Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, B.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Strenge, D.L.; Ramsdell, J.V.

    1988-09-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dosimetry Upgrade Project was undertaken to incorporate the internal dosimetry models recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in updated versions of the environmental pathway analysis models used at Hanford. The resulting second generation of Hanford environmental dosimetry computer codes is compiled in the Hanford Environmental Dosimetry System (Generation II, or GENII). This coupled system of computer codes is intended for analysis of environmental contamination resulting from acute or chronic releases to, or initial contamination of, air, water, or soil, on through the calculation of radiation doses to individuals or populations. GENII is described in three volumes of documentation. This volume is a Code Maintenance Manual for the serious user, including code logic diagrams, global dictionary, worksheets to assist with hand calculations, and listings of the code and its associated data libraries. The first volume describes the theoretical considerations of the system. The second volume is a Users' Manual, providing code structure, users' instructions, required system configurations, and QA-related topics. 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume II: Cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle cost estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This document contains Volume II of the Closure Study for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Calcined Solids Storage Facility. This volume contains draft information on cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle costs for the four options described in Volume I: (1) Risk-Based Clean Closure; NRC Class C fill, (2) Risk-Based Clean Closure; Clean fill, (3) Closure to landfill Standards; NRC Class C fill, and (4) Closure to Landfill Standards; Clean fill.

  20. German Emergency Care in Neurosurgery and Military Neurology during World War II, 1939-1945.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahnisch, Frank W

    2016-01-01

    A critical analysis of the historical involvement of neurology and neurosurgery in military emergency care services enables us to better contextualize and appreciate the development of modern neurology at large. Wartime neurosurgery and civil brain science during the German Nazi period tightly coalesced in examining the specific injury types, which military neurosurgeons such as Wilhelm Toennis, Klaus Joachim Zuelch, and Georg Merrem encountered and treated based on their neurophysiological understanding gained from earlier peacetime research. Collaborative associations with Dr. Toennis in particular proved to be highly beneficial to other military neurologists and neurosurgeons during World War II and beyond. This article also discusses the prewar developments and considers the fate of German neurosurgeons and military neurologists after the war. The envisaged dynamic concepts of fast action, reaction, and recycling, which contemporary physicians had intensively studied in the preceding scientific experiments in their neurophysiological laboratories, had already been introduced into neurological surgery during the interwar period. In retrospect, World War II emergency rescue units greatly strengthened military operations through an active process of 'recycling' indispensable army personnel. Neurosurgical emergency chains thereby introduced another decisive step in the modernization of warfare, in that they increased the momentum of military mobility in the field. Notwithstanding the violence of warfare and the often inhumane ways in which such knowledge in the field of emergency neurology was gained, the protagonists among the group of experts in military neurology and neurosurgery strongly contributed to the postwar clinical neuroscience community in Germany. In differing political pretexts, this became visible in both East Germany and West Germany after the war, while the specific military and political conditions under which this knowledge of emergency medicine

  1. Correlation of APACHE II and SOFA scores with length of stay in various surgical intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milić, Morena; Goranović, Tatjana; Holjevac, Jadranka Katancić

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of using Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score as the predictors of length of stay (LOS) in various surgical intensive care units (ICUs) and to test the hypothesis that the significance of scoring for predicting LOS is greater in specialized surgical ICUs. We scored patients in a non-specialized general surgical ICU (n = 328) and in a specialized cardiosurgical ICU (n = 158) consecutively on admission (APACHE II-1st day; SOFA-1st day) and on third day of stay (APACHE II-3rd day; SOFA-3rd day) in a 4-month period. LOS and APACHE II/SOFA scores were significantly correlated both on admission and on third day of stay in the general surgical ICU (APACHE II-1st day r = 0.289; SOFA-1st day r = 0.306; APACHE II-3rd day r = 0.728; SOFA-3rd day r = 0.725). LOS and APACHE II on admission were not significantly correlated in the cardiosurgical ICU (APACHE II-1st day r = 0.092), while SOFA on admission and APACHE II and SOFA on third day were significantly correlated (SOFA-1st day r = 0.258; APACHE II-3rd day r = 0.716; SOFA-3rd day r = 0.719). Usefulness of scoring for predicting LOS in ICU varied between different surgical ICUs. Contrary to our hypothesis, scoring had greater value for predicting LOS in the non-specialized general surgical ICU. APACHE II score on admission had no value for predicting LOS in the cardiosurgical ICU.

  2. Survey of fish impingement at power plants in the United States. Volume II. Inland waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, III, Richard F.; Sharma, Rajendra K.

    1977-03-01

    Impingement of fish at cooling-water intakes of 33 power plants located on inland waters other than the Great Lakes has been surveyed and data are presented. Descriptions of site, plant, and intake design and operation are provided. Reports in this volume summarize impingement data for individual plants in tabular and histogram formats. Information was available from differing sources such as the utilities themselves, public documents, regulatory agencies, and others. Thus, the extent of detail in the reports varies greatly from plant to plant. Histogram preparation involved an extrapolation procedure that has inadequacies. The reader is cautioned in the use of information presented in this volume to determine intake-design acceptability or intensity of impacts on ecosystems. No conclusions are presented herein; data comparisons are made in Volume IV.

  3. Profile and severity of the patients of intensive care units: prospective application of the APACHE II index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Freitas, Eliane Regina Ferreira Sernache

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to understand the profile and severity of patients in physiotherapy treatment after their admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) by applying the APACHE II index. One hundred and forty six subjects, with a mean age of 60.5 +/- 19.2 years, were evaluated. The APACHE II index was applied in the first 24 hours to evaluate the severity and mortality risk score. Patients were monitored until hospital discharge or death. The mean APACHE II score was 20+/-7.3 with an estimated risk of death of 32.4% and observed mortality of 58.2%. The mean hospital stay was 27.8+/-25.2 days. The patients in physiotherapy at the institution studied were predominantly male, elderly, from the emergency service for treatment (non-surgical), and had clear severity, suggested by the APACHE II score and the observed mortality.

  4. Reproductive behavior following evacuation to foster care duringWorld War II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Santavirta

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Family disruption and separation form parents during childhood may have long-lasting effects on the child. Previous literature documents associations between separation from parents and cognitive ability, educational attainment, and health, but little is known about effects on subsequent reproductive behavior. Objective: We evaluate the associations between unaccompanied evacuation to foster care and subsequent marriage and fertility behavior by comparing Finnish children who were evacuated to Swedish foster families during World War II to their non-evacuated siblings. Methods: In total, some 49,000 children were evacuated for a period ranging from months to years. We analyze a nationally representative sample of 2,009 evacuees born in 1933-1944 by combining data collected from war time government records with 1950 and 1971 censuses and 1971-2011 population registers. Results: Comparison of evacuated and nonevacuated same-sex siblings suggests no associations between evacuation and the probability of ever marrying, timing of first birth, and completed family size, although some associations are found in na¨ıve means comparisons. This difference in results across models is suggestive of negative selection of evacuee families. Conclusions: We do not find consistent evidence of any causal effect of family disruption on family formation and reproductive behavior. The results are sensitive to controlling for unobserved selection and suggest that some of the adverse outcomes documented in earlier literature could change if selection was accounted for.

  5. Microbial Risk and Health Care Associated Infections Diseases at Dok II Hospital Jayapura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yermia Yermia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the best parameter to evaluate the quality of indoor environment is the air microorganisms. It has been found various types of microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, viruses, and amoebae. Bacteria that cause healthcare associated infections can live and thrive in a hospital environment either in air, water, floor, food and medical or non-medical objects. The general objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between quality airborne bacteria in the treatment room with the incidence of healthcare-associated infections t the General Hospital of DOK II Jayapura. This study was an observational analytic with cross sectional study, observation directly performed to determine the state of the environment and the maintenance room operating room, equipment used by doctors and nurses to treat patients and see whether the services carried out hygienically. Results indicated that a type of bacteria commonly found were Bacillus sp group and Staphylococcus sp are almost found in every treatment room. There are several bacterial pathogens were identified in the treatment room include Staphylococcus sp. Furthermore, respondents who potentially Related Infections Health Services more than that is not potentially; 27 patients (25.0% and that no potential 81 patients (75.0%. Chi Square test results demonstrate the value of research p-value of 0.000 (0.000 <0.05 means that Ho is rejected, it means that there is a relationship between the presence of bacteria in the air with the potential Health Care Associated Infections.

  6. Animal Science Technology. An Experimental Developmental Program. Volume II, Curriculum Course Outlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brant, Herman G.

    This volume, the second of a two part evaluation report, is devoted exclusively to the presentation of detailed course outlines representing an Animal Science Technology curriculum. Arranged in 6 terms of study (2 academic years), outlines are included on such topics as: (1) Introductory Animal Science, (2) General Microbiology, (3) Zoonoses, (4)…

  7. Dancetime! 500 Years of Social Dance. Volume II: 20th Century. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 50-minute VHS videotape is the second in a 2-volume series that presents 500 years of social dance, music, and fashion. It features dance and music of the 20th century, including; 1910s: animal dances, castle walk, apache, and tango; 1920s: black bottom and charleston; 1930s: marathon, movie musicals, big apple, and jitterbug; 1940s: rumba;…

  8. Engineering Drawing Practices - Volume I of II: Aerospace and Ground Support Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    This manual establishes the essential requirements and reference documents for the preparation and revision of digital product definition data sets prepared for or by NASA at KSC. This volume is only applicable to KSC in-house programs/projects. These requirements do not apply to the preparation of illustrations, artwork, or figures in technical publications.

  9. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants: A Field Study Training Program. Volume II. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    This manual was prepared by experienced wastewater collection system workers to provide a home study course to develop new qualified workers and expand the abilities of existing workers. This volume emphasizes material needed by intermediate-level operators and stresses the operation and maintenance of conventional treatment plants. This volume…

  10. State In-Service Training for Correctional Personnel. Final Report. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, George W.

    This is part of the final report on a project that focused on the inservice training needs of correctional personnel in the Illinois penal system. Most of this volume is devoted to an overview of existing staff training for line personnel and parole agents; an assessment of unmet training needs; group discussion and other demonstration projects in…

  11. Developing maintainability for tokamak fusion power systems. Phase I report. Volume II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahn, H.S.

    1977-10-01

    This volume contains the following appendices: (1) baseline large module time estimates, (2) baseline intermediate module time estimates, (3) baseline small module time estimates, (4) alternate concept estimates, (5) maintenance equipment concepts, (6) additional reactor design definition, and (7) TOCOMO supplements. (MOW)

  12. Technical Reports (Part II). End of Project Report, 1968-1971, Volume IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Nevada Regional Education Center, Lovelock.

    The pamphlets included in this volume are technical reports prepared as outgrowths of the Student Information System of the Western Nevada Regional Education Center funded by a Title III grant under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. These reports demonstrate the use of the stored data; methods of interpreting the printouts from…

  13. Systems Book for a Student Information System. End of Project Report, 1968-1971, Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Nevada Regional Education Center, Lovelock.

    The necessary handbooks for use of the Student Information System (SIS), developed and tested by the Western Nevada Regional Education Center under a 1968-71 Title III (Elementary and Secondary Education Act) grant, are presented in this volume. As noted, the purpose of the SIS is to supply data and information to persons or organizations who make…

  14. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) platform configuration and integration. Volume II. Conceptual design. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    The purpose of this project is to evaluate six candidate hullforms as candidates for the OTEC commercial plant. This volume is a summary of the conceptual design including facility requirements, cost, schedule, and site sensitivity. Two OTEC commercial plant configurations are considered in this study: the ship and the semi-submersible. Engineering drawings are presented. (WHR)

  15. Savannah River Plant - Project 8980 engineering and design history. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-01-01

    This volume provides an engineering and design history of the 100 area of the Savannah River Plant. This site consisted of five separate production reactor sites, 100-R, P, L, K, and C. The document summarizes work on design of the reactors, support facilities, buildings, siting, etc. for these areas.

  16. AEROBIC AND ANAEROBIC TREATMENT OF C.I. DISPERSE BLUE 79 - VOLUME II, APPENDICES

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted to determine the fate of C.I. Disperse Blue 79, one of the largest production volume dyes, and select biodegradation products in a conventionally operated activated sludge process and an anaerobic sludge digestion system. To achieve this objective, a pilo...

  17. Behavior Modification for Persons with Developmental Disabilities: Treatments and Supports. Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Johnny L., Ed.; Laud, Rinita B., Ed.; Matson, Michael L., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This book represents the second of two volumes that is designed to update readers on some of the more recent developments in the field of dual diagnosis, as applied to those with intellectual disabilities. While the last few decades have boasted newer and better advances in the field, particularly in terms of assessment devices and treatment…

  18. SOLVENT-BASED TO WATERBASED ADHESIVE-COATED SUBSTRATE RETROFIT - VOLUME II: PROCESS OVERVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    This volume presents initial results of a study to identify the issues and barriers associated with retrofitting existing solvent-based equipment to accept waterbased adhesives as part of an EPA effort to improve equipment cleaning in the coated and laminated substrate manufactur...

  19. Hypophosphatemia on the intensive care unit: individualized phosphate replacement based on serum levels and distribution volume.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bech, A.; Blans, M.; Raaijmakers, M.; Mulkens, C.; Telting, D.; Boer, H. de

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypophosphatemia occurs in about 25% of patients admitted to the intensive care unit. To date, a safe and validated phosphate replacement protocol is not available. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate an individualized phosphate replacement regimen. DESIGN: Fifty consecutive intensive care unit patie

  20. Impact of geothermal technology improvements on royalty collections on federal lands: Volume II: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-10-01

    This volume contains the appendices for the ''Impact of Geothermal Technology Improvements on Royalty Collections on Federal Lands, Final Report, Volume I.'' The material in this volume supports the conclusions presented in Volume I and details each Known Geothermal Resource Area's (KGRA's) royalty estimation. Appendix A details the physical characteristics of each KGRA considered in Volume I. Appendix B supplies summary narratives on each state which has a KGRA. The information presented in Appendix C shows the geothermal power plant area proxies chosen for each KGRA considered within the report. It also provides data ranges which fit into the IMGEO model for electric energy cost estimates. Appendix D provides detailed cost information from the IMGEO model if no Geothermal Program RandD goals were completed beyond 1987 and if all the RandD goals were completed by the year 2000. This appendix gives an overall electric cost and major system costs, which add up to the overall electric cost. Appendix E supplies information for avoided cost projections for each state involved in the study that were used in the IMGEO model run to determine at what cost/kWh a 50 MWe plant could come on line. Appendix F supplies the code used in the determination of royalty income, as well as, tabled results of the royalty runs (detailed in Appendix G). The tabled results show royalty incomes, assuming a 10% discount rate, with and without RandD and with and without a $0.01/kWh transmission cost. Individual data sheets for each KGRA royalty income run are presented in Appendix G.

  1. Heterogeneous Concurrent Modeling and Design in Java (Volume 2: Ptolemy II Software Architecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    the State of California Micro Program, and the following companies: Agilent, Bosch, HSBC , Lockheed-Martin, National Instruments, and Toyota. PTOLEMY II...FA9550-06-0312), the Air Force Research Lab (AFRL), the State of California Micro Program, and the following companies: Agilent, Bosch, HSBC , Lockheed

  2. Heterogeneous Concurrent Modeling and Design in Java (Volume 3: Ptolemy II Domains)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-15

    State of California Micro Program, and the following companies: Agilent, Bosch, HSBC , Lockheed-Martin, National Instruments, and Toyota. PTOLEMY II...MURI #FA9550-06-0312), the Air Force Research Lab (AFRL), the State of California Micro Program, and the following companies: Agi- lent, Bosch, HSBC

  3. A Report on Longitudinal Evaluations of Preschool Programs. Volume II: Is Early Intervention Effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfenbrenner, Urie

    This document is the second part in a report on longitudinal evaluations of preschool programs. Part I reviewed long-term, controlled studies in order to generally assess the impact of preschool intervention. Part II reviews follow-up data in order to resolve the following five questions: (1) Do children in experimental programs continue to gain…

  4. TIBER II/ETR final design report: Volume 1, 1. 0 Introduction; 2. 0 plasma engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.D. (ed.)

    1987-09-01

    This paper discusses the design of the TIBER II tokamak test reactor. Specific topics discussed are the physics objectives for Tiber, magnetics, baseline operating point, pulsed inductive operation, edge physics and impurity control, fueling, disruption control, vertical stability and impurity flow reversal. (LSP)

  5. Design of Studies for Development of BPA Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Accounting Policy Phase II, Volume II, 1985-1988 Technical Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneese, Allen V.

    1988-08-01

    The incremental costs of corrective measures to lessen the environmental impacts of the hydroelectric system are expected to increase and difficult questions to arise about the costs, effectiveness, and justification of alternative measures and their systemwide implications. The BPA anticipate this situation by launching a forward-looking research program aimed at providing methodological tools and data suitable for estimating the productivity and cost implications of mitigation alternatives in a timely manner with state-of-the-art accuracy. Resources for the Future (RFF) agreed at the request of the BPA to develop a research program which would provide an analytical system designed to assist the BPA Administrator and other interested and responsible parties in evaluating the ecological and economic aspects of alternative protection, enhancement, and mitigation measures. While this progression from an ecological understanding to cost-effectiveness analyses is straightforward in concept, the complexities of the Columbia River system make the development of analytical methods far from simple in practice. The Phase 2 final report outlines the technical issues involved in developing an analytical system and proposes a program of research to address these issues. The report is presented in the Summary Report (Volume 1), and the present volume which consists of three technical reports: Part I, Modeling the Salmon and Steelhead Fisheries of the Columbia River Basin; Part II, Models for Cost-Effectiveness Analysis; and Part III, Ocean Fisheries Harvest Management.

  6. Food and Nutrition. Volume II. Units VI-VIII: Fruit, Fats, Vegetables, Legumes, Grains, Meats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honse, Elizabeth Linsenbardt

    These instructional materials are intended as a guide for the instructor of a secondary home economics course in food and nutrition. Topics covered in the three units are time, energy, and resource management; selection, care, preparation, and storage of food (seven lessons on dairy foods; fats and oils; cereals and breads; fruits and vegetables;…

  7. Demonstration, testing, & evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume II: Appendices A to E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-02-12

    This document is a draft final report for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report This document is Volume II, containing appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120{degrees}to 130{degrees}C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow.

  8. Short transmembrane domains with high-volume exoplasmic halves determine retention of Type II membrane proteins in the Golgi complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Rodrigo; Trenchi, Alejandra; González Montoro, Ayelén; Valdez Taubas, Javier; Maccioni, Hugo J F

    2013-12-01

    It is still unclear why some proteins that travel along the secretory pathway are retained in the Golgi complex whereas others make their way to the plasma membrane. Recent bioinformatic analyses on a large number of single-spanning membrane proteins support the hypothesis that specific features of the transmembrane domain (TMD) are relevant to the sorting of these proteins to particular organelles. Here we experimentally test this hypothesis for Golgi and plasma membrane proteins. Using the Golgi SNARE protein Sft1 and the plasma membrane SNARE protein Sso1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae as model proteins, we modified the length of their TMDs and the volume of their exoplasmic hemi-TMD, and determined their subcellular localization both in yeast and mammalian cells. We found that short TMDs with high-volume exoplasmic hemi-TMDs confer Golgi membrane residence, whereas TMDs with low-volume exoplasmic hemi-TMDs, either short or long, confer plasma membrane residence to these proteins. Results indicate that the shape of the exoplasmic hemi-TMD, in addition to the length of the entire TMD, determine retention in the Golgi or exit to the plasma membrane of Type II membrane proteins.

  9. The Open Method of Coordination on health care after the Lisbon Strategy II: Towards a neoliberal framing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Flear

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper undertakes a content analysis of the discourse on the Open Method of Coordination on Health Care (OMC/HC in order to show how equity and solidarity are increasingly linked to optimisation and, as such, how neoliberalism increasingly frames health care. Some of the side-effects of this reframing for politics are highlighted: legitimating and extending European Union governance, reducing the space for oppositional formations and limited citizenship. The analysis begins by interrogating the broader context of the Lisbon Strategy II, after which the techniques of the OMC/HC and its substantive outputs are analysed.

  10. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume II. Plant specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, R. E.

    1983-12-31

    The specifications and design criteria for all plant systems and subsystems used in developing the preliminary design of Carrisa Plains 30-MWe Solar Plant are contained in this volume. The specifications have been organized according to plant systems and levels. The levels are arranged in tiers. Starting at the top tier and proceeding down, the specification levels are the plant, system, subsystem, components, and fabrication. A tab number, listed in the index, has been assigned each document to facilitate document location.

  11. Force Management Methods Task II. Volume I. Summary and Analysis Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-01

    iiDi’stLII.J TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION PAGE INTRODUCTION 1 2 FORCE MANAGEMENT OVERVIEW 2 K 2.1 FORCE MANAGEMENT DEFINITION 4 2.2 FORCE MANAGEMENT ELEMENTS...34A w toIW W" r z a . 0a to, to co f. go-I I % at,, o" -, .... w a 1.45.4 -- - to~1.. S. h - .ar.. ]h. 2.1 FORCE MANAGEMENT DEFINITION The MIL-STD-1530A

  12. Do-it-yourself managed care. Case study I: Randall's Medical Network. Case study II: Hershey's Managed Care Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Employers, who pay for much of the healthcare in this country, are not waiting for government to restructure the healthcare system. In this cover story, PROFILES examines how two firms formed their own managed care networks to control healthcare cost and quality, and what hospitals did to become players. By understanding the employer' point of view, hospital marketers can better anticipate their needs and develop a marketing strategy to form closer relationships with employers, provide quality care at a lower cost, and increase their market share.

  13. Type II diabetes patients in primary care: profiles of healthcare utilization obtained from observational data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Dijk Christel E

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high burden of diabetes for healthcare costs and their impact on quality of life and management of the disease have triggered the design and introduction of disease management programmes (DMPs in many countries. The extent to which diabetes patients vary with regard to their healthcare utilisation and costs is largely unknown and could impact on the design of DMPs. The objectives of this study are to develop profiles based on both the diabetes-related healthcare utilisation and total healthcare utilisation in primary care, to investigate which patient and disease characteristics determine ‘membership’ of each profile, and to investigate the association between these profiles. Methods Data were used from electronic medical records of 6721 known type II diabetes patients listed in 48 Dutch general practices. Latent Class Analyses were conducted to identify profiles of healthcare and regression analyses were used to analyse the characteristics of the profiles. Results For both diabetes-related healthcare utilisation and total healthcare utilisation three profiles could be distinguished: for the diabetes-related healthcare utilisation these were characterised as ‘high utilisation and frequent home visits’ (n=393, ‘low utilisation, GP only’ (n=3231 and ‘high utilisation, GP and nurse’ (n=3097. Profiles differed with respect to the patients’ age and type of medication; the oldest patients using insulin were dominant in the ‘high utilisation, GP and nurse’ profile. High total healthcare utilisation was not associated with high diabetes-related healthcare utilisation. Conclusions Healthcare utilisation of diabetes patients is heterogeneous. This challenges the development of distinguishable DMPs.

  14. Kilowatt isotope power system. Phase II plan. Volume V. Safety, quality assurance and reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-15

    The development of a Kilowatt Isotope Power System (KIPS) was begun in 1975 for the purpose of satisfying the power requirements of satellites in the 1980's. The KIPS is a /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled organic Rankine cycle turbine power system to provide a design output of 500 to 2000 W. Included in this volume are: launch and flight safety considerations; quality assurance techniques and procedures to be followed through system fabrication, assembly and inspection; and the reliability program made up of reliability prediction analysis, failure mode analysis and criticality analysis. (LCL)

  15. MX Siting Investigation. Geotechnical Evaluation. Verification Study - Lake Valley, Nevada. Volume II. Geotechnical Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-31

    Graphic representation of the soil and rock Jtypes. I Et E-TR-27-LV-II 75 I G. USCS - Unified Soil Classification System (see Table 11-6-1 for...Dry Density and Moisture Content - The boring logs include a graphical display of laboratory test results for dry den- sity (ASTM D 2937-71) in...cikrreous; n nOnith 65 14 21 Gsi t ; little fine to cwse send: trace cob- 2 .a *o dese ble to 6" size; stae’M caliche (1.0’ - 2 , , ,2.01; stge"caliche (2.0Y

  16. Cultural Resources Investigations at Redstone Arsenal, Madison County, Alabama. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    I ARTIFACTI I U TEsI PI T. . AUGER HOLES " II IGIJRE 3t. fRIQIJLNCIY (HONIOUR MAP OF SITE IMa14?a SHOWING LOCATION OF rVI ; PITS AND AUGER HOLES.1 19...40 Mr 23. Doctoral Dissertation, University of North Carolina. 191h The Rose Island Site and bifurcate point tradition. Department of Anthropology...D. 11. 1q64a The Moundsville Phase and its position in Southeastern prehistory. Doctoral Dissertation, Harvard University. 1964b Houses of the

  17. DOT/FAA Human Factors Workshop on Aviation. Transcript. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-25

    tboe me o :k phese. 0-696614.6 0550 11 ,41. 11i evosts l~ w-osVo @0..1rJ I.I Clff * tIG5,05 5..* 0. 0.6 r- I 2S. resec Sa F*L16554 5 leo ..N 5ts~oleOS...Industry and manufac. transport aircraft. Capt Frits Brouwer , In calculating the probability of an turers support the view that human chairman of the...procedures Brouwer rests hi% argument on an *Influence of economic events demonstrates performance pro- assumed superiority of a three-man upon the

  18. Hot-gas cleanup system model development. Volume II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushimaru, K.; Bennett, A.; Bekowies, P.J.

    1982-11-01

    Under Contract to the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), Flow Industries, Inc., has developed computer models to simulate the physical performance of five hot-gas cleanup devices for pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC), combined-cycle power plants. Separate cost models have also been developed to estimate the cost of each device. The work leading to the development of these models is described in Volume I of this report. This volume contains the user's manuals for both the physical and cost models. The manuals for the physical models are given first followed by those for the cost models. Each manual is a complete and separate document. The model names and devices and their respective subroutine names are: (1) Moving Granular Bed Filter by Combustion Power Company, USRCGB, QFCOST; (2) Ceramic Bag Filter by Acurex, USRACB, QDCOST; (3) Electrostatic Granular Bed Filter by General Electric, USRGGB, QACOST; (4) Electrostatic Precipitator by Research Cottrell, USRCEP, QECOST; and (5) Electrocyclone by General Electric, USRGCY, QBCOST.

  19. Medical Care for Interned Enemy Aliens: A Role for the US Public Health Service in World War II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiset, Louis

    2003-01-01

    During World War II, the US Public Health Service (USPHS) administered health care to 19 000 enemy aliens and Axis merchant seamen interned by the Justice Department through its branch, the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). The Geneva Prisoners of War Convention of 1929, which the United States applied to civilian internees, provided guidelines for belligerent nations regarding humanitarian treatment of prisoners of war, including for their health. The INS forged an agreement with the USPHS to meet these guidelines for the German, Italian, and Japanese internees and, in some cases, their families. Chronic shortages and crowded camps continuously challenged USPHS administrators. Nevertheless, the USPHS offered universal access to care and provided treatment often exceeding care received by many American citizens. PMID:14534217

  20. Intravenous Solutions in the Care of Patients With Volume Depletion and Electrolyte Abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severs, David; Rookmaaker, Maarten B.; Hoorn, Ewout J.

    2015-01-01

    Infusion fluids are often given to restore blood pressure (volume resuscitation), but may also be administered to replace ongoing losses, match insensible losses, correct electrolyte or acid-base disorders, or provide glucose. The development of new infusion fluids has provided clinicians with a wid

  1. Cerebral Palsy and Related Disorders, Prevention and Early Care: An Annotated Bibliography. Volume I, Part One.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembolt, Raymond R., Comp.; Roth, Beth, Comp.

    Presented alphabetically by author's name in the first of a two volume annotated bibliography are 602 abstracts of scientific and public education literature on cerebral palsy published through 1971. The entries are said to focus on children under 2 years of age whose development has been delayed by the condition. The bibliography is explained to…

  2. Proceedings of the sixth international conference on fluidized bed combustion. Volume II. Technical sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-08-01

    The Sixth International Conference on Fluidized Bed Combustion was held April 9-11, 1980, at the Atlanta Hilton, Atlanta, Georgia. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The papers covered recent developments in atmospheric and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion, especially the design, operation and control of pilot and demonstration plants. The cleanup of combustion products and the erosion, corrosion and fouling of gas turbines was emphasized also. Fifty-five papers from Volume 2 of the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA; five papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  3. Solvent-refined-coal (SRC) process. Volume II. Sections V-XIV. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-05-01

    This report documents the completion of development work on the Solvent Refined Coal Process by The Pittsburgh and Midway Coal Mining Co. The work was initiated in 1966 under Office of Coal Research, US Department of Interior, Contract No. 14-01-0001-496 and completed under US Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC05-79ET10104. This report discusses work leading to the development of the SRC-I and SRC-II processes, construction of the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant for the successful development of these processes, and results from the operation of this pilot plant. Process design data generated on a 1 ton-per-day Process Development Unit, bench-scale units and through numerous research projects in support of the design of major demonstration plants are also discussed in summary form and fully referenced in this report.

  4. Department of Defense Contractor Establishment Code (CEC). Alphabet Listing. Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Cix I_ C- hi W 2 2. hi 0 0 4Y -: IWO~z m- hi C.> :3 . U-4 0h 0q 1 i >0 0 1 -_ .. i.-I 0 4 34~~N 0 .-. 0 .- I- Z ChiCO 0.0W 00hi ir 02 0. v4 co ~ 0 -3Y0...go ot~zm ." .8 ~ 6 A:3" 6i22 44 W 04> < j02~ .Z0 0-4>. w .- O- g4) L)C U) 0 ba. 04 4c’J N 0 oo0ul i 4c4 coB 2,W a. lcj i 4 LOLA 0 8. W. iO E 0 0-coi

  5. Analysis of the permitting processes associated with exploration of Federal OCS leases. Final report. Volume II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-11-01

    Under contract to the Office of Leasing Policy Development (LPDO), Jack Faucett Associates is currently undertaking the description and analysis of the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) regulatory process to determine the nature of time delays that affect OCS production of oil and gas. This report represents the results of the first phase of research under this contract, the description and analysis of regulatory activity associated with exploration activities on the Federal OCS. Volume 1 contains the following three sections: (1) study results; (2) Federal regulatory activities during exploration of Federal OCS leases which involved the US Geological Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, US Coast Guard, Corps of Engineers, and National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration; and (3) state regulatory activities during exploration of Federal OCS leases of Alaska, California, Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Jersey, North Carolina and Texas. Volume II contains appendices of US Geological Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, Coast Guard, Corps of Engineers, the Coastal Zone Management Act, and Alaska. The major causes of delay in the regulatory process governing exploration was summarized in four broad categories: (1) the long and tedious process associated with the Environmental Protection Agency's implementation of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit; (2) thelack of mandated time periods for the completion of individual activities in the permitting process; (3) the lack of overall coordination of OCS exploratory regulation; and (4) the inexperience of states, the Federal government and industry relating to the appropriate level of regulation for first-time lease sale areas.

  6. Portable microcomputer for the analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. Volume II. Software description and listings. [IAEAPU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhter, W.D.

    1984-05-01

    A portable microcomputer has been developed and programmed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. The unit includes a 16-bit LSI-11/2 microprocessor, 32-K words of memory, a 20-character display for user prompting, a numeric keyboard for user responses, and a 20-character thermal printer for hard-copy output of results. The unit weights 11 kg and has dimensions of 33.5 x 30.5 x 23.0 cm. This compactness allows the unit to be stored under an airline seat. Only the positions of the 148-keV /sup 241/Pu and 208-keV /sup 237/U peaks are required for spectral analysis that gives plutonium isotopic ratios and weight percent abundances. Volume I of this report provides a detailed description of the data analysis methodology, operation instructions, hardware, and maintenance and troubleshooting. Volume II describes the software and provides software listings.

  7. Assessment of the health and environmental effects of power generation in the Midwest. Volume II. Ecological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvorak, A J; Pentecost, E D

    1977-04-01

    This report presents an initial evaluation of the major health and environmental issues associated with increased coal use in the six Midwestern states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. Using an integrated assessment approach, the evaluation proceeds from a base-line scenario of energy demand and facility siting for the period 1975 to 2020. Emphasis is placed on impacts from coal extraction, land reclamation, coal combustion for electrical generation, and coal gasification. The range of potential impacts and constraints is illustrated by a second scenario that represents an expected upper limit for coal utilization in Illinois. Volume I of the report includes a characterization of the energy demand and siting scenarios, coal related technologies, and coal resources, and the related impacts on air quality, water quality, and human health. Volume II includes background information on the native ecosystems, climate, soils, and agricultural land use and a description of the ecological impacts expected from coal utilization in southern Illinois, which as ecosystems representative of a large segment of the six-state area.

  8. Technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed augmented compressed air energy-storage system. Volume II. Introduction and technology assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giramonti, A.J.; Lessard, R.D.; Merrick, D.; Hobson, M.J.

    1981-09-01

    The results are described of a study subcontracted by PNL to the United Technologies Research Center on the engineering feasibility and economics of a CAES concept which uses a coal fired, fluidized bed combustor (FBC) to heat the air being returned from storage during the power production cycle. By burning coal instead of fuel oil, the CAES/FBC concept can completely eliminate the dependence of compressed air energy storage on petroleum fuels. The results of this assessment effort are presented in three volumes. Volume II presents a discussion of program background and an in-depth coverage of both fluid bed combustion and turbomachinery technology pertinent to their application in a CAES power plant system. The CAES/FBC concept appears technically feasible and economically competitive with conventional CAES. However, significant advancement is required in FBC technology before serious commercial commitment to CAES/FBC can be realized. At present, other elements of DOE, industrial groups, and other countries are performing the required R and D for advancement of FBC technology. The CAES/FBC will be reevaluated at a later date when FBC technology has matured and many of the concerns now plaguing FBC are resolved. (LCL)

  9. External validation of Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IV in Dutch intensive care units and comparison with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II and Simplified Acute Physiology Score II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Brinkman; F. Bakhshi-Raiez; A. Abu-Hanna; E. de Jonge; R.J. Bosman; L. Peelen; N.F. de Keizer

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to validate and compare the performance of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) IV in the Dutch intensive care unit (ICU) population to the APACHE II and Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II. Materials and Methods: This is a prospectiv

  10. Site characterization report for the basalt waste isolation project. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-11-01

    The reference location for a repository in basalt for the terminal storage of nuclear wastes on the Hanford Site and the candidate horizons within this reference repository location have been identified and the preliminary characterization work in support of the site screening process has been completed. Fifteen technical questions regarding the qualification of the site were identified to be addressed during the detailed site characterization phase of the US Department of Energy-National Waste Terminal Storage Program site selection process. Resolution of these questions will be provided in the final site characterization progress report, currently planned to be issued in 1987, and in the safety analysis report to be submitted with the License Application. The additional information needed to resolve these questions and the plans for obtaining the information have been identified. This Site Characterization Report documents the results of the site screening process, the preliminary site characterization data, the technical issues that need to be addressed, and the plans for resolving these issues. Volume 2 contains chapters 6 through 12: geochemistry; surface hydrology; climatology, meteorology, and air quality; environmental, land-use, and socioeconomic characteristics; repository design; waste package; and performance assessment.

  11. LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project. Final report, volume II: Project performance and economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This publication discusses the demonstration of the LIFAC sorbent injection technology at Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program. LIFAC is a sorbent injection technology capable of removing 75 to 85 percent of a power plant`s SO{sub 2} emissions using limestone at calcium to sulfur molar ratios of between 2 and 2.5 to 1. The site of the demonstration is a coal-fired electric utility power plant located in Richmond, Indiana. The project is being conducted by LIFAC North America (LIFAC NA), a joint venture partnership of Tampella Power Corporation and ICF Kaiser Engineers, in cooperation with DOE, RP&L, and Research Institute (EPRI), the State of Indiana, and Black Beauty Coal Company. The purpose of Public Design Report Volume 2: Project Performance and Economics is to consolidate, for public use, the technical efficiency and economy of the LIFAC Process. The report has been prepared pursuant to the Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-90PC90548 between LIFAC NA and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  12. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.II: Accelerator Baseline Design

    CERN Document Server

    Adolphsen, Chris; Barish, Barry; Buesser, Karsten; Burrows, Philip; Carwardine, John; Clark, Jeffrey; Durand, Helene Mainaud; Dugan, Gerry; Elsen, Eckhard; Enomoto, Atsushi; Foster, Brian; Fukuda, Shigeki; Gai, Wei; Gastal, Martin; Geng, Rongli; Ginsburg, Camille; Guiducci, Susanna; Harrison, Mike; Hayano, Hitoshi; Kershaw, Keith; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kuchler, Victor; List, Benno; Liu, Wanming; Michizono, Shinichiro; Nantista, Christopher; Osborne, John; Palmer, Mark; Paterson, James McEwan; Peterson, Thomas; Phinney, Nan; Pierini, Paolo; Ross, Marc; Rubin, David; Seryi, Andrei; Sheppard, John; Solyak, Nikolay; Stapnes, Steinar; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Toge, Nobu; Walker, Nicholas; Yamamoto, Akira; Yokoya, Kaoru

    2013-01-01

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to incr...

  13. Feasibility evaluation solar heated textile process water. Volume II. Appendices. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hester, J. C.; Beard, J. N.; Robinson, G. F.; Harnett, R. M.

    1977-02-01

    The general objectives of this study are to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the use of solar energy for heating waters in the textile industry and to develop a plan for efforts beyond this feasibility study phase. Specific objectives include (1) determine the industry requirements for heated process water, (2) assess particular schemes and their economic impact, (3) study the total cost environment for solar water heating in this industry, and (4) recommend future experiments. This volume contains the appendices: (A) fiber distribution and end use data; (B) computer model description for textile plant energy balances; (C) computer model description to generate local solar potential; (D) computer model description for system synthesis and analysis; (E) computer model to determine pressure drop, flow distribution and plumbing components; (F) area requirement plots for various use rates, temperature levels, seasons, orientations and collector types for textile operations; (G) computer model description of economic variables for COSMO1 and COSMO2; (H) rate of return plots for various textile applications and energy cost scenerios; and (I) data base for efficiency curves for six collector types. (WHK)

  14. Evaluation of line focus solar central power systems. Volume II. Systems evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-15

    An evaluation was completed to ascertain the applicability of line focus technologies to electrical power applications and to compare their performance and cost potential with point focus central receiver power systems. It was concluded that although the high temperature line focus (SRI) and fixed mirror line focus (GA) concepts duplicate the heat source characteristics and power conversion technology of the central receiver concepts these configurations do not offer a sufficient improvement in cost to warrant full scale development. The systems are, however, less complex than their point focus counterpart and should the central receiver system development falter they provide reasonable technology alternatives. The parabolic trough concept (BDM) was found to provide a low temperature technology alternative to the central receiver concept with promising performance and cost potential. Its continued development is recommended, with special emphasis on lower temperature (< 700/sup 0/F) applications. Finally, a variety of new promising line focus power system configurations were identified for a range of utility and industrial applications and recommendations were made on their implementation. This volume contains the detailed report. (WHK)

  15. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.II: Accelerator Baseline Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, Chris [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); et al.

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  16. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 2, Rev. 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This appendix determines the effective G values for payload shipping categories of contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste materials, based on the radiolytic G values for waste materials that are discussed in detail in Appendix 3.6.8 of the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package. The effective G values take into account self-absorption of alpha decay energy inside particulate contamination and the fraction of energy absorbed by nongas-generating materials. As described in Appendix 3.6.8, an effective G value, G{sub eff}, is defined by: G{sub eff} - {Sigma}{sub M} (F{sub M} x G{sub M}) F{sub M}-fraction of energy absorbed by material maximum G value for a material where the sum is over all materials present inside a waste container. The G value itself is determined primarily by the chemical properties of the material and its temperature. The value of F is determined primarily by the size of the particles containing the radionuclides, the distribution of radioactivity on the various materials present inside the waste container, and the stopping distance of alpha particles in air, in the waste materials, or in the waste packaging materials.

  17. A Report to Congress on Long-Term Stewardship. Volume II, Site Summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2001-01-01

    During World War II and the Cold War, the Federal government developed and operated a vast network of industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as for other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over a 100 sites in 30 States and one U.S. Territory. Hundreds of thousand of acres of residually contaminated soils, contaminated groundwater, surface water and sediment contamination, and contaminated buildings are present at many sites across the country. These sites range in size from less than one acre, containing only a single facility, to large sites spanning over 100,000 acres with huge uranium enrichment plants and plutonium processing canyons. Since 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) program has made significant progress in addressing this environmental legacy. Millions of cubic meters of waste have been removed, stabilized, or disposed of, resulting in significant risk and cost reduction. In addition, DOE began disposing of transuranic (i.e., plutonium-contaminated) waste in the nation’s first deep geologic repository – the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. DOE is now carrying out its long-term stewardship obligations at dozens of sites, including smaller sites where DOE has completed cleanup work for the entire site and many larger sites where DOE has remediated portions of the site.

  18. Energy use in the marine transportation industry: Task II. Regulations and Tariffs. Final report, Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    The evaluation of the energy impacts of regulations and tariffs is structured around three sequential steps: identification of agencies and organizations that impact the commercial marine transportation industry; identification of existing or proposed regulations that were perceived to have a significant energy impact; and quantification of the energy impacts. Following the introductory chapter, Chapter II describes the regulatory structure of the commercial marine transportation industry and includes a description of the role of each organization and the legislative basis for their jurisdiction and an identification of major areas of regulation and those areas that have an energy impact. Chapters III through IX each address one of the 7 existing or proposed regulatory or legislative actions that have an energy impact. Energy impacts of the state of Washington's tanker regulations, of tanker segregated ballast requirements, of inland waterway user charges, of cargo pooling and service rationalization, of the availability of intermodal container transportation services, of capacity limitations at lock and dam 26 on the Mississippi River and the energy implications of the transportation alternatives available for the West Coast crude oil supplies are discussed. (MCW)

  19. Anaerobic fermentation of agricultural residue: potential for improvement and implementation. Final report, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jewell, W. J.; Dell' orto, S.; Fanfoni, K. J.; Hayes, T. D.; Leuschner, A. P.; Sherman, D. F.

    1980-04-01

    Earlier studies have shown that although large quantities of agricultural residues are generated on small farms, it was difficult to economically justify use of conventional anaerobic digestion technology, such as used for sewage sludge digestion. A simple, unmixed, earthen-supported structure appeared to be capable of producing significant quantities of biogas at a cost that would make it competitive with many existing fuels. The goal of this study was to define and demonstrate a methane fermentation technology that could be practical and economically feasible on small farms. This study provides the first long term, large scale (reactor volumes of 34 m/sup 3/) parallel testing of the major theory, design, construction, and operation of a low cost approach to animal manure fermentation as compared to the more costly and complex designs. The main objectives were to define the lower limits for successful fermentor operation in terms of mixing, insulation, temperature, feed rate, and management requirements in a cold climate with both pilot scale and full scale fermentors. Over a period of four years, innovative fermentation processes for animal manures were developed from theoretical concept to successful full scale demonstration. Reactors were sized for 50 to 65 dairy animals, or for the one-family dairy size. The results show that a small farm biogas generation system that should be widely applicable and economically feasible was operated successfully for nearly two years. Although this low cost system out-performed the completely mixed unit throughout the study, perhaps the greatest advantage of this approach is its ease of modification, operation, and maintenance.

  20. Status of volcanic hazard studies for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, B.M.; Wohletz, K.H.; Vaniman, D.T.; Gladney, E.; Bower, N.

    1986-01-01

    Volcanic hazard investigations during FY 1984 focused on five topics: the emplacement mechanism of shallow basalt intrusions, geochemical trends through time for volcanic fields of the Death Valley-Pancake Range volcanic zone, the possibility of bimodal basalt-rhyolite volcanism, the age and process of enrichment for incompatible elements in young basalts of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) region, and the possibility of hydrovolcanic activity. The stress regime of Yucca Mountain may favor formation of shallow basalt intrusions. However, combined field and drill-hole studies suggest shallow basalt intrusions are rare in the geologic record of the southern Great Basin. The geochemical patterns of basaltic volcanism through time in the NTS region provide no evidence for evolution toward a large-volume volcanic field or increases in future rates of volcanism. Existing data are consistent with a declining volcanic system comparable to the late stages of the southern Death Valley volcanic field. The hazards of bimodal volcanism in this area are judged to be low. The source of a 6-Myr pumice discovered in alluvial deposits of Crater Flat has not been found. Geochemical studies show that the enrichment of trace elements in the younger rift basalts must be related to an enrichment of their mantle source rocks. This geochemical enrichment event, which may have been metasomatic alteration, predates the basalts of the silicic episode and is, therefore, not a young event. Studies of crater dimensions of hydrovolcanic landforms indicate that the worst case scenario (exhumation of a repository at Yucca Mountain by hydrovolcanic explosions) is unlikely. Theoretical models of melt-water vapor explosions, particularly the thermal detonation model, suggest hydrovolcanic explosion are possible at Yucca Mountain. 80 refs., 21 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Policy challenges for the pediatric rheumatology workforce: Part II. Health care system delivery and workforce supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrickson Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The United States pediatric population with chronic health conditions is expanding. Currently, this demographic comprises 12-18% of the American child and youth population. Affected children often receive fragmented, uncoordinated care. Overall, the American health care delivery system produces modest outcomes for this population. Poor, uninsured and minority children may be at increased risk for inferior coordination of services. Further, the United States health care delivery system is primarily organized for the diagnosis and treatment of acute conditions. For pediatric patients with chronic health conditions, the typical acute problem-oriented visit actually serves as a barrier to care. The biomedical model of patient education prevails, characterized by unilateral transfer of medical information. However, the evidence basis for improvement in disease outcomes supports the use of the chronic care model, initially proposed by Dr. Edward Wagner. Six inter-related elements distinguish the success of the chronic care model, which include self-management support and care coordination by a prepared, proactive team. United States health care lacks a coherent policy direction for the management of high cost chronic conditions, including rheumatic diseases. A fundamental restructure of United States health care delivery must urgently occur which places the patient at the center of care. For the pediatric rheumatology workforce, reimbursement policies and the actions of health plans and insurers are consistent barriers to chronic disease improvement. United States reimbursement policy and overall fragmentation of health care services pose specific challenges for widespread implementation of the chronic care model. Team-based multidisciplinary care, care coordination and self-management are integral to improve outcomes. Pediatric rheumatology demand in the United States far exceeds available workforce supply. This article reviews the career

  2. Fuel Quality/Processing Study. Volume II. Appendix, Task I, literature survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, J B; Bela, A; Jentz, N E; Klumpe, H W; Kessler, R E; Kotzot, H T; Loran, B I

    1981-04-01

    This activity was begun with the assembly of information from Parsons' files and from contacts in the development and commercial fields. A further more extensive literature search was carried out using the Energy Data Base and the American Petroleum Institute Data Base. These are part of the DOE/RECON system. Approximately 6000 references and abstracts were obtained from the EDB search. These were reviewed and the especially pertinent documents, approximately 300, were acquired in the form of paper copy or microfiche. A Fuel Properties form was developed for listing information pertinent to gas turbine liquid fuel properties specifications. Fuel properties data for liquid fuels from selected synfuel processes, deemed to be successful candidates for near future commercial plants were tabulated on the forms. The processes selected consisted of H-Coal, SRC-II and Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) coal liquefaction processes plus Paraho and Tosco shale oil processes. Fuel properties analyses for crude and distillate syncrude process products are contained in Section 2. Analyses representing synthetic fuels given refinery treatments, mostly bench scale hydrotreating, are contained in Section 3. Section 4 discusses gas turbine fuel specifications based on petroleum source fuels as developed by the major gas turbine manufacturers. Section 5 presents the on-site gas turbine fuel treatments applicable to petroleum base fuels impurities content in order to prevent adverse contaminant effects. Section 7 relates the environmental aspects of gas turbine fuel usage and combustion performance. It appears that the near future stationary industrial gas turbine fuel market will require that some of the synthetic fuels be refined to the point that they resemble petroleum based fuels.

  3. Task Descriptions in Diagnostic Radiology. Research Report No. 7. Volume 2, Radiologic Technologist Tasks Dealing with Patient Procedures. Part II: Tasks 387 through 526.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilpatrick, Eleanor

    Part II of the second of four volumes in Research Report No. 7 of the Health Services Mobility Study (HSMS), this book is the remainder of Chapter 3, which contains 76 task descriptions covering most of the medical activities carried out by radiologic technologists. The steps of the task descriptions are presented in logical sequence in…

  4. Prediction of Supersonic Store Separation Characteristics Including Fuselage and Stores of Noncircular Cross Section, Volume IV. Appendices C and D, Details of Program II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-01

    VOLUME IV - APPENDICES C AND D, DETAILS OF PROGRAM II Joseph Mullen, Jr. Frederick K. Goodwin Marnix F. E. Dillenius Nielsen Engineering & Research...location in store source panel coordinates of leading edge of wing, feet RAZ semi-axis in vertical direction of elliptic body, feet RBY semi-axis in

  5. TECHNICAL REPORT ON TECHNOLOGICALLY ENHANCED NATURALLY OCCURRING RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS FROM URANIUM MINING, VOLUME II: INVESTIGATION OF POTENTIAL HEALTH, GEOGRAPHIC, AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES OF ABANDONED URANIUM MINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volume II investigates the potential radiogenic risks from abandoned uranium mines and evaluates which may pose the greatest hazards to members of the public and to the environment. The intent of this report is to identify who may be most likely to be exposed to wastes at small a...

  6. ARPA-E Impacts: A Sampling of Project Outcomes, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohlfing, Eric [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E)

    2017-02-27

    The Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) is demonstrating that a collaborative model has the power to deliver real value. The Agency’s first compilation booklet of impact sheets, published in 2016, began to tell the story of how ARPA-E has already made an impact in just seven years—funding a diverse and sophisticated research portfolio on advanced energy technologies that enable the United States to tackle our most pressing energy challenges. One year later our research investments continue to pay off, with a number of current and alumni project teams successfully commercializing their technologies and advancing the state of the art in transformative areas of energy science and engineering. There is no single measure that can fully illustrate ARPA-E’s success to date, but several statistics viewed collectively begin to reveal the Agency’s impact. Since 2009, ARPA-E has provided more than $1.5 billion in funding for 36 focused programs and three open funding solicitations, totaling over 580 projects. Of those, 263 are now alumni projects. Many teams have successfully leveraged ARPA-E’s investment: 56 have formed new companies, 68 have partnered with other government agencies to continue their technology development, and 74 teams have together raised more than $1.8 billion in reported funding from the private sector to bring their technologies to market. However, even when viewed together, those measures do not capture ARPA-E’s full impact. To best understand the Agency’s success, the specific scientific and engineering challenges that ARPA-E project teams have overcome must be understood. This booklet provides concrete examples of those successes, ranging from innovations that will bear fruit in the future to ones that are beginning to penetrate the market as products today. Importantly, half of the projects highlighted in this volume stem from OPEN solicitations, which the agency has run in 2009, 2012, and 2015. ARPA-E’s OPEN programs

  7. The Effect of Group Counseling on Physiological Aspect of Self-care and HbA1C Level of Patients with Diabetes Type II

    OpenAIRE

    Seyedreza Mazlom; Mahbobeh Firooz; Farzane Hasanzade; Seyedali Kimiaee; Aliakbar Raoufsaeb

    2015-01-01

    Background: The most important underlying cause of death in diabetic patients is poor self-care. The effect of education on self-care promotion has been widely investigated; however, the advisory role and impact of the treatment team have been scarcely investigated.  Aim: Determining the effect of group counseling on the psychological aspect of self-care and level of glycosylated hemoglobin in the patients with diabetes type II. Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 73 patients with type I...

  8. Activation volume measurement for C[bond]H activation. Evidence for associative benzene substitution at a platinum(II) center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procelewska, Joanna; Zahl, Achim; van Eldik, Rudi; Zhong, H Annita; Labinger, Jay A; Bercaw, John E

    2002-06-03

    The reaction of the platinum(II) methyl cation [(N-N)Pt(CH(3))(solv)](+) (N-N = ArN[double bond]C(Me)C(Me)[double bond]NAr, Ar = 2,6-(CH(3))(2)C(6)H(3), solv = H(2)O (1a) or TFE = CF(3)CH(2)OH (1b)) with benzene in TFE/H(2)O solutions cleanly affords the platinum(II) phenyl cation [(N-N)Pt(C(6)H(5))(solv)](+) (2). High-pressure kinetic studies were performed to resolve the mechanism for the entrance of benzene into the coordination sphere. The pressure dependence of the overall second-order rate constant for the reaction resulted in Delta V(++) = -(14.3 +/- 0.6) cm(3) mol(-1). Since the overall second order rate constant k = K(eq)k(2), Delta V(++) = Delta V degrees (K(eq)) + Delta V(++)(k(2)). The thermodynamic parameters for the equilibrium constant between 1a and 1b, K(eq) = [1b][H(2)O]/[1a][TFE] = 8.4 x 10(-4) at 25 degrees C, were found to be Delta H degrees = 13.6 +/- 0.5 kJ mol(-1), Delta S degrees = -10.4 +/- 1.4 J K(-1) mol(-1), and Delta V degrees = -4.8 +/- 0.7 cm(3) mol(-1). Thus DeltaV(++)(k(2)) for the activation of benzene by the TFE solvento complex equals -9.5 +/- 1.3 cm(3) mol(-1). This significantly negative activation volume, along with the negative activation entropy for the coordination of benzene, clearly supports the operation of an associative mechanism.

  9. Practice improvement, part II: collaborative practice and team-based care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roett, Michelle A; Coleman, Mary Thoesen

    2013-11-01

    The Institute of Medicine recommends interprofessional teams to address patients' complex needs. Team care should be structured in a way that uses the highest training levels of its members. Team communication is enhanced through regular meetings (eg, team huddles), and office efficiency is improved through identifying and solving underlying system-level issues (ie, second-order problem solving). Inclusive leadership principles are used to strengthen team practices and meet chronic care model goals. Setting clear goals with measurable outcomes, creating clinical and administrative systems, establishing a clear division of labor among team members who have occupational diversity, and providing ongoing training all facilitate team building. Increasing opportunities for team members to work together, such as with group visits, and providing interprofessional education are ways to encourage adoption of interprofessional practice. Reimbursement for team care includes per member per month payments for such services as care management, pay-for-performance benchmark payments, and payment for non-face-to-face services.

  10. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-10-01

    Volume II of the programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) is a comment and response document; it is the collection of the comments received on the draft PElS. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) response to each comment is provided after each comment. If the comment resulted in a change to the PElS, the affected section number of the PElS is provided in the response. Comments 1 through 259 were received at public hearings. The name of the hearing at which the comment was received is listed after each comment. Comments were recorded on flip charts and by notetakers. DOE representatives were present to hear the comments and respond to them. The DOE's written response is provided after each comment. Comments 260 through 576 were received in writing at the hearings, and from various federal, tribal, and state agencies and from individuals during the public comment period. Copies of the written comments follow the comments and responses.

  11. Cardiac tamponade due to low-volume effusive constrictive pericarditis in a patient with uncontrolled type II autoimmune polyglandular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, William C; Kurklinsky, Andrew; Lane, Gary; Ussavarungsi, Kamonpun; Blackshear, Joseph L

    2014-03-01

    Type II autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS), a relatively common endocrine disorder, includes primary adrenal insufficiency coupled with type 1 diabetes mellitus and/or autoimmune primary hypothyroidism. Autoimmune serositis, an associated disease, may present as symptomatic pericardial effusion. We present a case of a 54-year old male with APS who developed pericarditis leading to cardiac tamponade with a subacute loculated effusion. After urgent pericardiocentesis intrapericardial pressure dropped to 0, while central venous pressures remain elevated, consistent with acute effusive constrictive pericarditis. Contrast computerized tomography confirmed increased pericardial contrast enhancement. The patient recovered after prolonged inotropic support and glucocorticoid administration. He re-accumulated the effusion 16 days later, requiring repeat pericardiocentesis. Effusive-constrictive pericarditis, an uncommon pericardial syndrome, is characterized by simultaneous pericardial inflammation and tamponade. Prior cases of APS associated with cardiac tamponade despite low volumes of effusion have been reported, albeit without good demonstration of hemodynamic findings. We report a case of APS with recurrent pericardial effusion due to pericarditis and marked hypotension with comprehensive clinical and hemodynamic assessment. These patients may require aggressive support with pericardiocentesis, inotropes, and hormone replacement therapy. They should be followed closely for recurrent tamponade.

  12. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 2 (Appendices I, section 5 and II, section 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 2 contains the last section of Appendix I, Radiative heat transfer in kraft recovery boilers, and the first section of Appendix II, The effect of temperature and residence time on the distribution of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen between gaseous and condensed phase products from low temperature pyrolysis of kraft black liquor.

  13. Comparison the effect of two ways of tube feeding including bolus and continuous infusion on gastric residual volume and diarrhea in patients hospitalized in Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriari M

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Proper nutritional support is one of the important caring aspects in patients who were hospitalized in Intensive Care Unit. Although the several studies have been done concerning the selection of proper nutrition method for patients, but there is no agreement on this issue. The aim of current study was the compare the effect of two ways of tube feeding including bolus and continuous infusion on gastric residual volume and diarrhea in patients hospitalized in Intensive Care Unit.  Materials and Method: The current clinical trial was conducted on patients who were hospitalized in intensive care unit in Alzahra hospital in Isfahan, 2013. Fifty patients were selected through convenient sampling and were randomly assigned into two groups of 25 people of intervention and control. Nutrition was done through infusion pump in intervention group and by bolus in control group. Gastric residual volume and diarrhea was assessed each four hours for four days. Data were gathered through checklist and were analyzed by SPSS18 using descriptive and inferential statistics including independent T-test, Fisher's exact test and repeated measures ANOVA.  Results: The results showed that the mean of gastric residual volume in control group was more than the intervention group on the third day (p=0.04. Also, the mean of gastric residual volume did not show significant difference at different times in intervention group, but the mean of gastric residual volume was significantly increased in control group at different times (p=0.04. Fisher's exact test showed no significant difference between two groups concerning the diarrhea frequency.  Conclusion: In nutritional support with continuous infusion method, gastric residual volume was not increased and gastric emptying rate was not diminished. Therefore, this method can be used as an appropriate nutritional support in intensive care unit.

  14. Critical Care Nurses Inadequately Assess SAPS II Scores of Very Ill Patients in Real Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Perren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Reliable ICU severity scores have been achieved by various healthcare workers but nothing is known regarding the accuracy in real life of severity scores registered by untrained nurses. Methods. In this retrospective multicentre audit, three reviewers independently reassessed 120 SAPS II scores. Correlation and agreement of the sum-scores/variables among reviewers and between nurses and the reviewers’ gold standard were assessed globally and for tertiles. Bland and Altman (gold standard—nurses of sum scores and regression of the difference were determined. A logistic regression model identifying risk factors for erroneous assessments was calculated. Results. Correlation for sum scores among reviewers was almost perfect (mean ICC = 0.985. The mean (±SD nurse-registered SAPS II sum score was 40.3±20.2 versus 44.2±24.9 of the gold standard (32 points scores. The lowest agreement was found in high SAPS II tertiles for haemodynamics (k = 0.45–0.51. Conclusions. In real life, nurse-registered SAPS II scores of very ill patients are inaccurate. Accuracy of scores was not associated with nurses’ characteristics.

  15. Causes of death in intensive care patients with a low APACHE II score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkel, A. van; Lieshout, J.v.; Hellegering, J.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Pickkers, P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the actual causes of death of patients with a low APACHE II score, but iatrogenic reasons may play a role. The aim of this study was to evaluate the demographics, course of disease, and causes of death in this specific group of ICU patients. Methods: For this retros

  16. Medical Education: Barefoot Doctors, Health Care, Health Education, Nursing Education, Pharmacy Education, Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Franklin

    1987-01-01

    This is Part II of a two-part annotated bibliography of selected references on medical education in the People's Republic of China. The references date from 1913 to 1982. Most of the references are from the 1960's and 1970's. (RH)

  17. The influence of volume and intensive care unit organization on hospital mortality in patients admitted with severe sepsis: a retrospective multicentre cohort study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peelen, L.; Keizer, N.F. de; Peek, N.; Scheffer, G.J.; Voort, P.H. van der; Jonge, E. de

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of the study was to assess the influence of annual volume and factors related to intensive care unit (ICU) organization on in-hospital mortality among patients admitted to the ICU with severe sepsis. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using the database of the

  18. Tribological Technology. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    TABLE 7 PRESSURE-VISCOSITY COEFFICIENTS (REF. 11) I - . ..- 445 103 -- 02 -s 10 00 A04wCm eve * oPe’-re’ -.* : ;-T’ enl mne-SI C. oC-ftht’E 050 100...821745~r A𔃿 32 l C 225 Mt25 5 12 o60 310 it 34C 6 85 io 11 * 3f5 . 295 t~ri~ Lortoing.~ eve lrsi~in4635 W-ongor St. K-o,- CrY. Wi~- 84 112 -7.BLE 11...forming on the surfaces and this phenomenon has been used by March and Rabinowicz (1976) for incipient fatigu 6 investigations using a rolling four-ball

  19. Volume II: Compendium Abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    canards, and by measuring the reflected laser light’s location, one can use trigonometry to find the angle that the canard is at and calibrate it... obstacles to process integration are discussed. The author wishes to acknowledge the mentorship of Eugene Zakar. 32 A Projectile/Target Interaction...survivability, and sustainability. Using laser detection and ranging (LADAR) for robot navigation and obstacle avoidance is an active area of

  20. On the Edge of Life, II: House Officer Struggles Recorded in an Intensive Care Unit Journal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Stern, Theodore A.

    2002-10-01

    BACKGROUND: In a general hospital, few clinical settings match the intensity of the intensive care unit (ICU) experience. Clinical rotations in ICUs elicit and emphasize the struggles house officers face on a daily basis throughout their training. METHOD: These struggles were recorded by hundreds of residents in a journal maintained in one Medical ICU for the past 20 years. We systematically reviewed these unsolicited entries to develop categories that define and illustrate common stressors. RESULTS: Stressors for house officers include isolation, insecurity, care for the terminally ill, sleep deprivation, and long work weeks. CONCLUSION: By placing the struggles of house staff in context, trainees and their residency training programs can be prepared for the intensity of the experience and for work in clinical practice settings that follows completion of training.

  1. Predictive Performance of the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II and the Initial Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) Score in Acutely Ill Intensive Care Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granholm, Anders; Møller, Morten Hylander; Krag, Mette;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Severity scores including the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score are used in intensive care units (ICUs) to assess disease severity, predict mortality and in research. We aimed to assess the predictive performance of SAPS II...... compared the discrimination of SAPS II and initial SOFA scores, compared the discrimination of SAPS II in our cohort with the original cohort, assessed the calibration of SAPS II customised to our cohort, and compared the discrimination for 90-day mortality vs. in-hospital mortality for both scores....... Discrimination was evaluated using areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves (AUROC). Calibration was evaluated using Hosmer-Lemeshow's goodness-of-fit Ĉ-statistic. RESULTS: AUROC for in-hospital mortality was 0.80 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.77-0.83) for SAPS II and 0.73 (95% CI 0...

  2. Autonomy, consent and responsibility. Part II. Informed consent in medical care and in the law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado, J M

    Legal recognition of patient's rights aspired to change clinical relationship and medical lex artis. However, its implementation has been hampered by the scarcity of resources and the abundance of regulations. For several years, autonomy, consent, and responsibility have formed one of the backbones of the medical profession. However, they have sparked controversy and professional discomfort. In the first part of this article, we examine the conceptual and regulatory limitations of the principle of autonomy as the basis of informed consent. We approach the subject from philosophical, historical, legal, bioethical, deontological, and professional standpoints. In the second part, we cover the viability of informed consent in health care and its relationship with legal responsibility.

  3. Thermodynamics of electron transfer in oxygenic photosynthetic reaction centers: volume change, enthalpy, and entropy of electron-transfer reactions in manganese-depleted photosystem II core complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, J M; Boichenko, V A; Diner, B A; Mauzerall, D

    2001-06-19

    We have previously reported the thermodynamic data of electron transfer in photosystem I using pulsed time-resolved photoacoustics [Hou et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 7109-7116]. In the present work, using preparations of purified manganese-depleted photosystem II (PS II) core complexes from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, we have measured the DeltaV, DeltaH, and estimated TDeltaS of electron transfer on the time scale of 1 micros. At pH 6.0, the volume contraction of PS II was determined to be -9 +/- 1 A3. The thermal efficiency was found to be 52 +/- 5%, which corresponds to an enthalpy change of -0.9 +/- 0.1 eV for the formation of the state P680+Q(A-) from P680*. An unexpected volume expansion on pulse saturation of PS II was observed, which is reversible in the dark. At pH 9.0, the volume contraction, the thermal efficiency, and the enthalpy change were -3.4 +/- 0.5 A3, 37 +/- 7%, and -1.15 +/- 0.13 eV, respectively. The DeltaV of PS II, smaller than that of PS I and bacterial centers, is assigned to electrostriction and analyzed using the Drude-Nernst equation. To explain the small DeltaV for the formation of P680+Q(A-) or Y(Z*)Q(A-), we propose that fast proton transfer into a polar region is involved in this reaction. Taking the free energy of charge separation of PS II as the difference between the energy of the excited-state P680* and the difference in the redox potentials of the donor and acceptor, the apparent entropy change (TDeltaS) for charge separation of PS II is calculated to be negative, -0.1 +/- 0.1 eV at pH 6.0 (P680+Q(A-)) and -0.2 +/- 0.15 eV at pH 9.0 (Y(Z*)Q(A-)). The thermodynamic properties of electron transfer in PS II core reaction centers thus differ considerably from those of bacterial and PS I reaction centers, which have DeltaV of approximately -27 A3, DeltaH of approximately -0.4 eV, and TDeltaS of approximately +0.4 eV.

  4. Self-Care Program With Multimedia Software Support Effect on Quality of Life in Patients With Diabetes Type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Abumasoudi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Different studies have shown that health level, performance statutes and quality of life in chronic patients are less than the expected level especially in patients with diabetes. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a self-care program with a multimedia software support on quality of life in patients with diabetes type II. Patients and Methods This study was a randomized controlled clinical trial in which 60 patients who had been referred to the diabetes clinic of Arak city were randomly divided to experimental (n = 30 and control (n = 30 groups. Diabetes Quality of Life Brief Clinical Inventory was used for determining the quality of life. Data were collected before and two months after the intervention for both groups. An educational program with equal content was conducted for both the experimental group (self-care program with multimedia software support in two sessions and control group (lecture and presentation with PowerPoint in one session. Data analysis was made by the SPSS 16 software. Results There were no significant differences between the two groups in mean scores of quality of life before the intervention (P = 0.97 while after the intervention, the difference between the two groups was significant (P = 0.029. Applying the self-care program with software support improved quality of life of the experimental group after the intervention (P < 0.0001 while there was no significant difference in mean score of quality of life in the control group after eight weeks (P = 0.051. Conclusions According to the results of this study, the examined method is a simple, cheap, effective and attractive intervention program for patients with diabetes.

  5. Inventory of Federal energy-related environment and safety research for FY 1977. Volume II. Project listings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-07-01

    This volume contains Biomedical and Environmental Research, Environmental Control Technology Research, and Operational and Environmental Safety Research project listings. The projects are ordered numerically by log number.

  6. Standards of specialized diabetes care. Edited by Dedov II, Shestakova MV (6th edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ivanovich Dedov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dear Colleagues!We are glad to present the 6th Edition of Standards of Diabetes Care. These evidence-based guidelines were designed to standardize and facilitate diabetes care in all regions of the Russian Federation. The Standards are updated on the regular basis to incorporate new data and relevant recommendations from national and international clinical societies, including World Health Organization Guidelines (WHO, 2011, International Diabetes Federation (IDF, 2011, American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2013, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE, 2009, International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD, 2009 and Russian Association of Endocrinologists (RAE, 2011, 2012. Current edition of the “Standards” also integrates results of completed randomized clinical trials (ADVANCE, ACCORD, VADT, UKPDS, etc., as well as findings from the national studies of diabetes mellitus (DM, conducted in close partnership with a number of Russian hospitals.Latest data indicates that prevalence of DM increased during the last decade more than two-fold, reaching some 371 million patients by 2013. According to the current estimation by the International Diabetes Federation, every tenth inhabitant of the planet will be suffering from DM by 2030. These observations resulted in the UN Resolution 61/225 passed on 20.12.2006 that encouraged all Member States “to develop national policies for the prevention, treatment and care of diabetes”.Like many other countries, Russian Federation experiences a sharp rise in the prevalence of DM. According to Russian State Diabetes Register, there are at least 3.799 million patients with DM in this country. However, the epidemiological survey conducted by the Federal Endocrinology Research Centre during 2002-2010 suggests that actual prevalence is 3 to 4 times greater than the officially recognized and, by this estimate, amounts to 9-10 million persons, comprising 7% of the

  7. Contemporary American Success Stories. Famous People of Asian Ancestry. Volume II. A Mitchell Lane Multicultural Biography Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvis, Barbara J.

    As part of a five-volume series this volume presents biographical sketches of persons of Asian American heritage who have made contributions to American life. Asian Americans have often been subjected to racial and ethnic prejudice as have other easily identifiable groups of Americans. The series, written at a reading level of grades 5 to 6, but…

  8. Preventing Cancer in the Workplace and Community. Volume II. Cancer, the Worker and the Community. An Independent Study Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Virginia C., Ed.; And Others

    This second volume of a two-volume set on prevention of cancer in the workplace is a self-instructional manual designed for independent study by students who consult on a regular basis with an instructor. The manual follows a consistent format. The narrative text in each of three sections presents current knowledge about the subject and refers to…

  9. [Level of knowledge of patients with type II diabetes mellitus in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeiro Chonsa, F; Lara Valdivielso, E; Muñoz Cacho, P; Herrera Plaza, T; Rodríguez Cordero, R; Mayo Alastrey, M A

    1991-01-01

    A personal interview to 148 patients was carried out with the aim of getting to know the level of information of type II diabetic patients at an Urban Health Center in Santander. A validated questionnaire made up of 14 questions on general aspects of diabetis, dietetic habits and capability to handle complications was used. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of questionnaire was 0.69. The correct answer average was 6.3 (IC = 5.9-6.5). Patients were best informed about general aspects and had much less information with regard to the handling of complications and to their diet. The differences among these three sections of questions were significative (p less than 0.001). The patients under diet treatment obtained worse results than those treated with oral hipoglucemiants and insulin. Our results are worse than those reported by other similar populations at a national level. Also, and due to the differences in knowledge within this group, we believe that the establishment of groups and subgroups when educating diabetic patients is possible and also highly recommended.

  10. Overview of patient care issues and treatment in bipolar spectrum and bipolar II disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Joseph R

    2008-06-01

    Recent studies have reported lifetime prevalence estimates of 1.0% for bipolar I disorder, 1.1% for bipolar II disorder, and 2.4% to 4.7% for subthreshold bipolar disorder, illustrating the need for consensus definitions of bipolar spectrum disorders. These definitions will aid researchers in studying viable treatments options, as well as help clinicians in the differential diagnosis of patients. Broader definitions of bipolar spectrum disorders would also allow clinicians to more accurately diagnose patients, rather than placing them in the catchall category of bipolar disorder not otherwise specified. Bipolar symptoms that are currently labeled as subthreshold symptoms are becoming increasingly recognized as having relevant clinical implications. Despite diagnostic controversy, screening for the presence of mania in patients who present with depressive symptoms is a critical step in the appropriate treatment of bipolar spectrum disorders. Identifying the early onset of bipolar symptoms as manifested in prodromal disorders such as childhood major depressive disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is also important for possible early intervention and improved outcomes.

  11. Halo Gas and Galaxy Disk Kinematics of a Volume-Limited Sample of MgII Absorption-Selected Galaxies at z~0.1

    CERN Document Server

    Kacprzak, G G; Barton, E J; Cooke, J

    2011-01-01

    We have directly compared MgII halo gas kinematics to the rotation velocities derived from emission/absorption lines of the associated host galaxies. Our 0.096volume-limited sample comprises 13 ~L* galaxies, with impact parameters of 12-90 kpc from background quasars sight-lines, associated with 11 MgII absorption systems with MgII equivalent widths 0.3< W_r(2796)<2.3A. For only 5/13 galaxies, the absorption resides to one side of the galaxy systemic velocity and trends to align with one side of the galaxy rotation curve. The remainder have absorption that spans both sides of the galaxy systemic velocity. These results differ from those at z~0.5, where 74% of the galaxies have absorption residing to one side of the galaxy systemic velocity. For all the z~0.1 systems, simple extended disk-like rotation models fail to reproduce the full MgII velocity spread, implying other dynamical processes contribute to the MgII kinematics. In fact 55% of the galaxies are "counter-rotating" with respect ...

  12. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) as a neuropeptide: Interaction with angiotensin II on volume control and renal sodium handling

    OpenAIRE

    Unger, Th.; Badoer, E.; Gareis, C.; Girchev, R.; Kotrba, M.; Qadri, F; Rettig, R.; Rohmeiss, P

    1990-01-01

    1 Angiotensin II (ANG II) and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) are functionally antagonistic circulating hormones involved in blood pressure and body fluid regulation. An inappropriate atrial secretion of ANP has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension, but clinical and experimental results on the role of ANP in hypertension are still conflicting.

  13. Absorbent alginate fibres modified with hydrolysed chitosan for wound care dressings--II. Pilot scale development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, I R; Miraftab, M; Collyer, G

    2014-02-15

    Fibres have been used extensively in wound dressing applications as they provide a high surface area for absorption, ease of fabrication and softness. It is common practice for commercial wound dressings to be produced from natural materials, such a marine polysaccharides, as they are predominantly biocompatible, non-toxic, and often display bioactive properties, such as inherent antimicrobial activity. In this study hydrolysed chitosans were utilised as a sole coagulant for the production of alginate-chitosan fibres via a one-step, direct wet-spinning extrusion process. The levels of chitosan incorporated into the fibres were analysed quantitatively via elemental analysis and qualitatively by staining using Amido Black 10B. It was estimated that the fibres contained between 4.50 and 5.10% (wt.%) chitosan. The presence of chitosan improved tensile properties such as elongation and tenacity of the base alginate fibres. The increased incorporation of chitosan into the fibres also improved the absorption of the fibres in both saline and distilled water; reaching maximum of >30 g/g and >50 g/g, respectively. This work suggests that the observed hydrolysed chitosan content within the fibre may be optimal for the preparation of a novel fibre for wound care application.

  14. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 22, Number 4, July-August 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Garakani, Tahereh, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  15. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 23, Number 3, May-June 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Garakani, Tahereh, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of this newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  16. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 23, Number 4, July-August 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Garakani, Tahereh, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment…

  17. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 22, Number 5, September-October 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Garakani, Tahereh, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment…

  18. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 22, Number 6, November-December 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Garakani, Tahereh, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment…

  19. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 23, Number 1, January-February 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Garakani, Tahereh, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment…

  20. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 22, Number 2, March-April 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Garakani, Tahereh, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  1. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 23, Number 2, March-April 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Garakani, Tahereh, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment…

  2. The Eldicus prospective, observational study of triage decision making in European intensive care units. Part II: Intensive care benefit for the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprung, Charles L; Artigas, Antonio; Kesecioglu, Jozef

    2012-01-01

    RATIONALE:: Life and death triage decisions are made daily by intensive care unit physicians. Admission to an intensive care unit is denied when intensive care unit resources are constrained, especially for the elderly. OBJECTIVE:: To determine the effect of intensive care unit triage decisions...... for intensive care unit admission. INTERVENTIONS:: Admission or rejection to intensive care unit. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:: Demographic, clinical, hospital, physiologic variables, and 28-day mortality were obtained on consecutive patients. There were 8,472 triages in 6,796 patients, 5,602 (82%) were...... on mortality and intensive care unit benefit, specifically for elderly patients. DESIGN:: Prospective, observational study of triage decisions from September 2003 until March 2005. SETTING:: Eleven intensive care units in seven European countries. PATIENTS:: All patients >18 yrs with an explicit request...

  3. MDRl/P-Glycoprotein Function. II. Effect of Hypotonicity and Inhibitors on Cl- Efflux and Volume Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    ability of MDR1-expressing vs. parental cells multidrug resistance; P-glycoprotein; chloride channel. chlo- to carry out a regulatory volume decrease...NIH/ fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator ( CFTR ), 3T3MDR murine fibroblasts, FEM-X and FEM-XvMDR which is a Cl- channel (20). The MDR1...the fact chloride channels in volume regulation by T lymphocytes. In: that valinomycin is also an inhibitor of MDR1 trans- Cell Physiology of Blood

  4. Central receiver solar thermal power system. Phase 1. CDRL item 2; Pilot Plant preliminary design report. Volume II. System decription and system analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

    1977-10-01

    An active system analysis and integration effort has been maintained. These activities have included the transformation of initial program requirements into a preliminary system design, the evolution of subsystem requirements which lay the foundation for subsystem design and test activity, and the overseeing of the final preliminary design effort to ensure that the subsystems are operationally compatible and capable of producing electricity at the lowest possible cost per unit of energy. Volume II of the Preliminary Design Report presents the results of the overall system effort that went on during this contract. The effort is assumed to include not only the total system definition and design but also all subsystem interactions.

  5. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume II. Proliferation resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this volume is limited to an assessment of the relative effects that particular choices of nuclear-power systems, for whatever reasons, may have on the possible spread of nuclear-weapons capabilities. This volume addresses the concern that non-nuclear-weapons states may be able to initiate efforts to acquire or to improve nuclear-weapons capabilities through civilian nuclear-power programs; it also addresses the concern that subnational groups may obtain and abuse the nuclear materials or facilities of such programs, whether in nuclear-weapons states (NWS's) or nonnuclear-weapons states (NNW's). Accordingly, this volume emphasizes one important factor in such decisions, the resistance of nuclear-power systems to the proliferation of nuclear-weapons capabilities.

  6. Installation Restoration Program. Phase II. Confirmation/Quantification. Stage 1. Volume 2. Appendices A-M. Cannon AFB, New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    VOLUME 2-APPENDICES A-M CANNON AFB, NEW MEXICO 88103 RADIAN CORPORATION 8501 MO-PAC BLVD. RO. BOX 9948 AUSTIN, TEXAS 78766 September 1986 FINAL REPORT FOR...QUANTIFICATION STAGE 1 FINAL REPORT FOR CANNON APB, NEW MEXICO VOLUME 2. APPENDICES A-M HEADQUARTERS TACTICAL AIR COMMAND COMMAND SURGEON’S OFFICE (HQ TAC...C. 0~ 0 -E 0 < a. c- C L CL C L C -a CD F- c - -4 c 0 0 =3-L44 0 - C - a- L a. a _ C. a - ZEE L.j "N nU - c -C r) -n -- --.----- 01 -) I <i z < "U ca

  7. Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume II. System description and system analysis. CDRL item 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-05-01

    Honeywell conducted a parametric analysis of the 10-MW(e) solar pilot plant requirements and expected performance and established an optimum system design. The main analytical simulation tools were the optical (ray trace) and the dynamic simulation models. These are described in detail in Books 2 and 3 of this volume under separate cover. In making design decisions, available performance and cost data were used to provide a design reflecting the overall requirements and economics of a commercial-scale plant. This volume contains a description of this analysis/design process and resultant system/subsystem design and performance.

  8. Contemporary American Success Stories: Famous People of Hispanic Heritage. Volume II. A Mitchell Lane Multicultural Biography Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvis, Barbara J.

    The biographies in this projected eight volume series for elementary school children represent the diversity of Hispanic heritage in the United States. Those featured are contemporary figures with national origins in the United States or Latin America, with careers that cover many aspects of contemporary life. Every person profiled in the series…

  9. An Evaluation of the Mulligan Stew 4-H Television Series for Extension Service, USDA. Volume II: Report of the Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Sydelle Stone; And Others

    Conducted on over 3,000 fourth, fifth, and sixth grade children in six states, this study documents changes in nutrition-related knowledge and behaviors which can be related to participating in the Mulligan Stew television series. This volume is a detailed elaboration of the study findings as well as a description of the study design,…

  10. Entrepreneurship Education for Agriculture. Phase "O" Planning Project Report. Performance Report. Volume II: Bibliography and Storyboard Scripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee and Associates, Starkville, MS.

    Volume 2 of this report is supplementary and contains three bibliographies: (1) Annotated Bibliography on Minority Entrepreneurship in Agriculture; (2) Annotated Bibliography on Entrepreneurship Education in Agriculture; (3) Bibliography on Entrepreneurship. The next section presents three storyboard scripts for instructional videotapes on…

  11. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE TRAINING AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS OF INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY MAINTENANCE WORKERS. VOLUME II. FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LYNN, FRANK

    THE APPENDIXES FOR "AN INVESTIGATION OF THE TRAINING AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS OF INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY MAINTENANCE WORKERS, FINAL REPORT, VOLUME I" (VT 004 006) INCLUDE (1) TWO LETTERS FROM PLANT ENGINEERS STRESSING THE IMPORTANCE OF TRAINING MACHINERY MAINTENANCE WORKERS, (2) A DESCRIPTION OF THE MAINTENANCE TRAINING SURVEY, A SAMPLE QUESTIONNAIRE,…

  12. Stage 2 Report for Reformulation Phase I General Design Memorandum, Cleveland Harbor, Ohio. Volume II. Appendices. Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    difficult conditions for entering the harbor for this plan. The vessel masters were manimous in their preference for this plan over the modified "L...were completed on land and borings B-5 and B-Z9 in the lake. The samples obtained were subjected to a testing and evaluation program. A careful review of...Thus, we belleve that a 30 ft. pile of pellets may be achieved along the Cuyahoga River. As stated pre- viously, a careful monitoring system would have

  13. The Joint Logistics-over-the-Shore (LOTS) Test and Evaluation Report. Volume II. Analysis of Test Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-05

    II with one minor exception in the case of two privately owned U.S. ships requisitioned during the 1958 Lebanon crisis .2 For the Korean conflict ships...system the barge-TCDF has a critica ! deployment weakness due to its size and weight and it is sea state sensitive. However, it is highly productive in

  14. Antibacterial resistances in uncomplicated urinary tract infections in women: ECO·SENS II data from primary health care in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamenski Gustav

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI are a frequent reason for consultation of women in primary health care. To avoid therapy failure and development of resistances, the choice of an antibiotic should be based on the knowledge of recent local resistance data but these data are scarce for the Austrian primary health care sector. Within the context of the ECO·SENS II study it was the aim to obtain appropriate and relevant local resistance data and describe the changes in the resistance pattern in comparison to the ECO·SENS study. Methods 23 GPs from different parts of Austria participated in the study between July 2007 and November 2008. According to the defined inclusion- and exclusion criteria female patients with symptoms of an uncomplicated UTI were included and a midstream urine sample was collected. In case of significant bacteriuria susceptibility testing of E. coli against 14 antibiotics was performed. Descriptive statistical methods were used. Results In 313 patients included in the study, a total of 147 E. coli isolates (47% were detected and tested. The resistance rates were in %: Mecillinam (0.0, nitrofurantoin (0.7, fosfomycin trometamol (0.7, gentamycin (1.4, cefotaxime (2.7, ceftazidime (2.7, Cephadroxil (4.1 and ciprofloxacin (4.1. Higher resistance rates were found in amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (8.9, nalidixic acid (9.6, trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole (14.4, trimethoprim (15.8, sulphamethoxazole (21.2 and ampicillin (28.8. Additionally, the comparison of these results with the results of the ECO·SENS study demonstrated an increase in resistance rates of ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin. Conclusions The resistance data for E. coli in uncomplicated UTIs in women gained by this study are the most recent data for this disease in Austria at the moment. The increased resistance rates of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid should be

  15. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Standards Development. Phase II Final Report. Volume 1: Concepts of Use, Initial System Requirements, Architecture, and AeroMACS Design Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Edward; Isaacs, James; Henriksen, Steve; Zelkin, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    This report is provided as part of ITT s NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: New ATM Requirements-Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development and was based on direction provided by FAA project-level agreements for New ATM Requirements-Future Communications. Task 7 included two subtasks. Subtask 7-1 addressed C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface data communications standards development, systems engineering, test bed and prototype development, and tests and demonstrations to establish operational capability for the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). Subtask 7-2 focused on systems engineering and development support of the L-band digital aeronautical communications system (L-DACS). Subtask 7-1 consisted of two phases. Phase I included development of AeroMACS concepts of use, requirements, architecture, and initial high-level safety risk assessment. Phase II builds on Phase I results and is presented in two volumes. Volume I (this document) is devoted to concepts of use, system requirements, and architecture, including AeroMACS design considerations. Volume II describes an AeroMACS prototype evaluation and presents final AeroMACS recommendations. This report also describes airport categorization and channelization methodologies. The purposes of the airport categorization task were (1) to facilitate initial AeroMACS architecture designs and enable budgetary projections by creating a set of airport categories based on common airport characteristics and design objectives, and (2) to offer high-level guidance to potential AeroMACS technology and policy development sponsors and service providers. A channelization plan methodology was developed because a common global methodology is needed to assure seamless interoperability among diverse AeroMACS services potentially supplied by multiple service providers.

  16. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Standards Development. Phase II Final Report. Volume 2: Test Bed Performance Evaluation and Final AeroMACS Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Edward; Magner, James

    2011-01-01

    This report is provided as part of ITT s NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: New ATM Requirements-Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development and was based on direction provided by FAA project-level agreements for New ATM Requirements-Future Communications. Task 7 included two subtasks. Subtask 7-1 addressed C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface data communications standards development, systems engineering, test bed and prototype development, and tests and demonstrations to establish operational capability for the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). Subtask 7-2 focused on systems engineering and development support of the L-band digital aeronautical communications system (L-DACS). Subtask 7-1 consisted of two phases. Phase I included development of AeroMACS concepts of use, requirements, architecture, and initial high-level safety risk assessment. Phase II builds on Phase I results and is presented in two volumes. Volume I is devoted to concepts of use, system requirements, and architecture, including AeroMACS design considerations. Volume II (this document) describes an AeroMACS prototype evaluation and presents final AeroMACS recommendations. This report also describes airport categorization and channelization methodologies. The purposes of the airport categorization task were (1) to facilitate initial AeroMACS architecture designs and enable budgetary projections by creating a set of airport categories based on common airport characteristics and design objectives, and (2) to offer high-level guidance to potential AeroMACS technology and policy development sponsors and service providers. A channelization plan methodology was developed because a common global methodology is needed to assure seamless interoperability among diverse AeroMACS services potentially supplied by multiple service providers.

  17. Comparative ranking of 0. 1-10 MW/sub e/ solar thermal electric power systems. Volume II. Supporting data. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kriz, T.A.

    1980-07-01

    This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1-10 MW/sub e/, operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW/sub e/, a range that is attractive to industrial and other nonutility applications. Volume I summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/sub e/. Volume II presents data on the performance and cost and ranking methodology.

  18. Inventory of Federal energy-related environment and safety research for FY 1978. Volume II. Project listings and indexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-12-01

    This volume contains summaries of FY-1978 government-sponsored environment and safety research related to energy. Project summaries were collected by Aerospace Corporation under contract with the Department of Energy, Office of Program Coordination, under the Assistant Secretary for Environment. Summaries are arranged by log number, which groups the projects by reporting agency. The log number is a unique number assigned to each project from a block of numbers set aside for each agency. Information about the projects is included in the summary listings. This includes the project title, principal investigators, research organization, project number, contract number, supporting organization, funding level if known, related energy sources with numbers indicating percentages of effort devoted to each, and R and D categories. A brief description of each project is given, and this is followed by subject index terms that were assigned for computer searching and for generating the printed subject index in Volume IV.

  19. Inventory of Federal energy-related environment and safety research for FY 1979. Volume II. Project listings and indexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-01

    This volume contains summaries of FY 1979 government-sponsored environment and safety research related to energy arranged by log number, which groups the projects by reporting agency. The log number is a unique number assigned to each project from a block of numbers set aside for each contributing agency. Information elements included in the summary listings are project title, principal investigators, research organization, project number, contract number, supporting organization, funding level, related energy sources with numbers indicating percentages of effort devoted to each, and R and D categories. A brief description of each project is given, and this is followed by subject index terms that were assigned for computer searching and for generating the printed subject index in the back of this volume.

  20. Smolt Monitoring Program, Volume II, Migrational Characteristics of Columbia Basin Salmon and Steelhead Trout, 1986 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish Passage Center

    1987-02-01

    Smolt Monitoring Program Annual Report, 1986, Volume I, describes the results of travel time monitoring and other migrational characteristics of yearling and sub-yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). This volume presents the data from Fish Passage Center freeze brands used in the analysis of travel time for Lewiston, Lower Granite, Lower Monumental, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day dams. Summary of data collection procedures and explanation of data listings are presented in conjunction with the mark recapture data. Data for marked fish not presented in this report will be provided upon request. Daily catch statistics (by species), flow, and sample parameters for the smolt monitoring sites, Clearwater, Lewiston, Lower Granite, Lower Monumental, Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville also will be provided upon request.

  1. Development of a community energy conservation program. Volume II. Energy saving techniques for use by local governments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-11-26

    This volume contains technical material related to community energy conservation programs, and supplements the organizational material in Volume I. It is in looseleaf format so that sections related to specific topics can be easily copied or transferred to individuals responsible for various sorts of conservation, such as carpooling programs, building improvements, and community outreach. Three technical chapters are included, discussing topics in the areas of: internal city and county operations; community powers and regulations, and outreach programs. In the first, the concern is with what the community can do to reduce energy use in its own operations, an effective first step in promoting comprehensive energy conservation. The second chapter analyzes ways that the police power and fiscal powers of the community can be used for energy conservation, through building codes, zoning, and similar measures. In the final chapter, ways to promote energy conservation in the community are discussed: programs include outreach to households and firms, carpool promotion, waste oil recycling, etc.

  2. Potential use of geothermal resources in the Snake River Basin: an environmental overview. Volume II. Annotated bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, S.G.; Russell, B.F.; Sullivan, J.F. (eds.)

    1979-09-01

    This volume is a partially annotated bibliography of reference materials pertaining to the seven KGRA's. The bibliography is divided into sections by program element as follows: terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, heritage resources, socioeconomics and demography, geology, geothermal, soils, hydrology and water quality, seismicity, and subsidence. Cross-referencing is available for those references which are applicable to specific KGRA's. (MHR)

  3. MX Siting Investigation. Geotechnical Evaluation of Luke Bombing and Gunnery Range. Geotechnical Report, Lechuguilla Desert, Arizona. Volume II. Appendix A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-20

    on the depth scale. 6000 22000 24000 26000 1000 eoo K L LOCATION MAP 36 ______ 10 380 0 36:500,36 30 10 20 0 1002 NAUTICAL, 00E 0 10 20 NI LOll E AS...gi 4900 144 ?.;Co 701 7 tAT4 400 - iSO I17 -17 Qo C 2A 1 7 lp s 17 1AQ4 TT Wi *1* * a. * * hI *t **,#l A eli *1* it~ a.** * hl il h,),i * * ii i ii, a...sp 96 ss320 - -- -- - -- - ISO A -- ~ 7Z~ ~ - - A- S. c-f .- - * .~---- -~ -- I - i WAS- -2 UPS COLLE 24 W4ELL PROJEI 38 BORI~d ELEVAI STATE COUNTI

  4. 150 kWe solar-powered deep well irrigation facility. Volume II. Main report. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-08-30

    The screening, selection, and detailed optimized design of a 150 kW solar-powered irrigation facility for construction on a farm in Arizona are described. The heliostat/central receiver collector system was selected, and a steam Rankine cycle power system using molten salt heat transfer fluid was chosen. Systems analyses and detailed designs of the subsystems are presented. Cost estimates are included, and the Phase II program plan is detailed. (WHK)

  5. Field Surveys, IOC Valleys. Volume III, Part II. Cultural Resources Survey, Pine and Wah Wah Valleys, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    including horse, camel, mammoth, Ertm E-TR-48-III-II 20 musk ox, and certain species of bison, goat, and bear, which had previously inhabited the marsh and...34 - - -9,$.. 𔄃 Im I I I Si to * Location lype/Contents Affiliation 42B@644 rid e over cr ek - P/J depression, cleared areas, Fr elon (f4-5-18-92) ground

  6. Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Volume II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloomquist, R. Gordon

    1985-06-01

    This volume contains appendices on: (1) resource assessment - electrical generation computer results; (2) resource assessment summary - direct use computer results; (3) electrical generation (high temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (4) direct utilization (low temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (5) electrical generation computer program CENTPLANT and related documentation; (6) electrical generation computer program WELLHEAD and related documentation; (7) direct utilization computer program HEATPLAN and related documentation; (8) electrical generation ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; (9) direct utilization ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; and (10) life cycle cost analysis computer program and related documentation. (ACR)

  7. Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume II, energy requirements. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    This project analyzed the application of solar total energy systems to appropriate segments of the residential sector and determined their market penetration potential. This volume covers the work done on energy requirements definition and includes the following: (1) identification of the single-family and multi-family market segments; (2) regionalization of the United States; (3) electrical and thermal load requirements, including time-dependent profiles; (4) effect of conservation measures on energy requirements; and (5) verification of simulated load data with real data.

  8. Hepatic transplantation outcomes for carefully selected cirrhotic patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: experience at a small- to medium-volume centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Qasim, A

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatic transplantation outcomes for cirrhotic patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) at a small- to medium-volume centre are not fully known due to relative novelty of patient selection criteria. AIM: To determine hepatic transplantation outcomes for HCC at a small- to medium-volume centre. Patients and methods Hepatocellular carcinoma patients were listed for transplantation according to the International Guideline and further categorized as those fulfilling or exceeding Milan or University of San Francisco (UCSF) criteria on explanted liver morphology. Outcomes including mortality, retransplantation, and tumour recurrence rate were analysed. RESULTS: Twenty-six patients had HCC and on explanted liver morphology, Milan and UCSF criteria met 15 and 18 patients, respectively. Patients and graft survival at 3 months, 1 and 5 years were 100, 96, 84, and 88, 84, 77%, respectively. Outcomes favoured Milan criteria but did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS: Hepatic transplantation for HCC at a small-to medium-volume transplant centre had comparable survival outcomes to high-volume centres.

  9. Structured assessment approach version 1. License submittal document content and format for material control and accounting assessment. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parziale, A.A.; Sacks, I.J.

    1979-10-01

    A methodology, the Structured Assessment Approach, has been developed for the assessment of the effectiveness of material control and accounting (MC and A) safeguards systems at nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This methodology has been refined into a computational tool, the SAA Version 1 computational package, that was used first to analyze a hypothetical fuel cycle facility and used more recently to assess operational nuclear plants. The Version 1 analysis package is designed to analyze safeguards systems that prevent the diversion of special nuclear material (SNM) from nuclear fuel cycle facilities and to provide assurance that diversion has not occurred. This report is the second volume, the License Submittal Document Content and Format for Material Control and Accounting Assessment, of a four-volume document. It presents the content and format of the LSD necessary for Material Control and Accounting (MC and A) assessment with the SAA Version 1. The LSD is designed to provide the necessary data input to perform all four stages of analyses associated with the SAA. A full-size but Hypothetical Fuel Cycle Facility (HFCF) is used as an example to illustrate the required input data content and data format and to illustrate the procedure for generating the LSD. Generation of the LSD is the responsibility of the nuclear facility licensee applicant.

  10. Alkaline Waterflooding Demonstration Project, Ranger Zone, Long Beach Unit, Wilmington Field, California. Fourth annual report, June 1979-May 1980. Volume 3. Appendices II-XVII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmichael, J.D.

    1981-03-01

    Volume 3 contains Appendices II through XVII: mixing instructions for sodium orthosilicate; oil displacement studies using THUMS C-331 crude oil and extracted reservoir core material from well B-110; clay mineral analysis of B-827-A cores; sieve analysis of 4 Fo sand samples from B-110-IA and 4 Fo sand samples from B-827-A; core record; delayed secondary caustic consumption tests; long-term alkaline consumption in reservoir sands; demulsification study for THUMS Long Beach Company, Island White; operating plans and instructions for DOE injection demonstration project, alkaline injection; caustic pilot-produced water test graphs; well test irregularities (6/1/79-5/31/80); alkaline flood pump changes (6/1/79-5/31/80); monthly DOE pilot chemical waterflood injection reports (preflush injection, alkaline-salt injection, and alkaline injection without salt); and caustic safety procedures-alkaline chemicals.

  11. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume II. Physical and chemical oceanography. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01

    This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which is located in southwestern Louisiana, and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Contents of Volume II include: introduction; physical oceanography; estuarine hydrology and hydrography; analysis of discharge plume; and water and sediment quality.

  12. Interim report on the development and application of environmental mapped data digitization, encoding, analysis, and display software for the ALICE system. Volume II. [MAP, CHAIN, FIX, and DOUT, in FORTRAN IV for PDP-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amiot, L.W.; Lima, R.J.; Scholbrock, S.D.; Shelman, C.B.; Wehman, R.H.

    1979-06-01

    Volume I of An Interim Report on the Development and Application of Environmental Mapped Data Digitization, Encoding, Analysis, and Display Software for the ALICE System provided an overall description of the software developed for the ALICE System and presented an example of its application. The scope of the information presented in Volume I was directed both to the users and developers of digitization, encoding, analysis, and display software. Volume II presents information which is directly related to the actual computer code and operational characteristics (keys and subroutines) of the software. Volume II will be of more interest to developers of software than to users of the software. However, developers of software should be aware that the code developed for the ALICE System operates in an environment where much of the peripheral hardware to the PDP-10 is ANL/AMD built. For this reason, portions of the code may have to be modified for implementation on other computer system configurations. 11 tables.

  13. It serves you right. Hassle-free health care builds loyalty, volume--and the bottom line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, H

    Zero barriers to care, zero waiting times: Tough as those targets sound, today's stars of customer service are scoring direct hits. "It's not a change in the services that are delivered," says one patient satisfaction pro. "It's a change in the way they're being delivered."

  14. Artificial heart development program. Volume II. System support. Phase III summary report, July 1, 1973--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Volume 2 covers major activities of the Artificial Heart Development program that supported the design, fabrication, and test of the system demonstration units. Section A.1.0 provides a listing beyond that of the body of the report on the components needed for an implantation. It also presents glove box sterilization calibration results and results of an extensive mock circulation calibration. Section A.2.0 provides detailed procedures for assembly, preparing for use, and the use of the system and major components. Section A.3.0 covers the component research and development activities undertaken to improve components of the existing system units and to prepare for a future prototype system. Section A.4.0 provides a listing of the top assembly drawings of the major systems variations fabricated and tested.

  15. Compliance problems of small utility systems with the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978: volume II - appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    A study of the problems of compliance with the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978 experienced by electric utility systems which have a total generating capacity of less than 2000 MW is presented. This volume presents the following appendices: (A) case studies (Farmington, New Mexico; Lamar, Colorado; Dover, Delaware; Wolverine Electric Cooperative, Michigan; Central Telephone and Utilities, Kansas; Sierra Pacific Power Company, Nevada; Vero Beach, Florida; Lubbock, Texas; Western Farmers Cooperative, Oklahoma; and West Texas Utilities Company, Texas); (B) contacts and responses to study; (C) joint action legislation chart; (D) Texas Municipal Power Agency case study; (E) existing generating units jointly owned with small utilities; (F) future generating units jointly owned with small utilities; (G) Federal Register Notice of April 17, 1980, and letter of inquiry to utilities; (H) small utility responses; and (I) Section 744, PIFUA. (WHK)

  16. Mammalian Toxicological Evaluation of TNT Wastewaters. Volume II. Acute and Subacute Mammalian Toxicity of TNT and LAP Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-06-01

    I I I- - ZN l~B MI L.. I- C 0 0 0 0 ; 0 : a, 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 E- 1, 0I M -1 - z 93. I -*9 + +14 1+l.I1 +I,++1 +1 1++1 +11+I1 +1+1 +1 + m.. I0 m 44 u... Spermatozoa Report bacteria as few, moderate, or many. 42 •: ’ 421 E "Appendix A x STATISTICAL METHODS A common tabular format has been developed to...in00 ~ 0 g - II cc V -- - - WA 41 L X.j th t 0 ti N Z IQ ONI .C0 0 000 N 0- 0000000 0 010 c +4 . .44. .. . .. 6 z-cZ L)hJ~hrj~ in 0 L00000 - ZN O

  17. Phase II final report and second update of the energy economic data base (EEDB) program. Volume 1 of 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-01

    The Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program deals with the development of cost data for nuclear and comparison electric power generating stations. The objective of the USDOE EEDB Program is to provide periodic updates of technical and cost (capital, fuel and operating and maintenance) information of significance to the US Department of Energy. This information is intended to be used by USDOE in evaluating and monitoring US Civilian nuclear power programs, and to provide them with a consistent means of evaluating the nuclear option against alternatives. This report presents the Second Update of the EEDB for a cost and regulation date of January 1, 1979, prepared during Phase II of the EEDB Program. The Second Update is the first of a series of periodic updates marking the beginning of the next step in meeting the objective of the EEDB Program.

  18. Parametric Investigation of Radome Analysis Methods. Volume II. Computer-Aided Radome Analysis Using Geometrical Optics and Lorentz Reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    Read :ind \\’r it e TI’LE aceordi nq to, 18A.1 foiina t Li tier e 5-67: R-. nif iiitt dat a uO i ug free-field format. Line o : CORnII)’t " si no of the of...comjiut e C1 , L.’’ 17-1_1e,: c’all RXMIT and complUte tab, (it t iecsl.o-.ffi - coint ; versus sine of incidenice iiq. fl i rst c:il I to RXMIT bulx ds...0ZZ X x .j L c1 - X. -4 N p Z Z 4, -a a .0) a 4 wL- Z V~-X x 0* 1- /) 4 ty IC * Z 6. n .~ -4A14. 6 .- l-- IA I- w -4 >( ffa) CL L U-> Z~ z z z0D3- V

  19. VOLUMES OF ACTIVATION FOR DISSOCIATION OF THE CATIONS OF [TRIS-2,2'-BIPYRIDYL]IRON(II), [TRIS-1,10-PHENANTHROLINE]IRON(II) AND OF OTHER DIIMINE IRON(II) COMPLEXES IN AQUEOUS-SOLUTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BURGESS, J; GALEMA, SA; HUBBARD, CD

    1991-01-01

    The kinetics of dissociation of several iron(II) diimine complexes by aqueous hydroxide ions have been studied spectrophotometrically at atmospheric pressure and elevated pressures, at 298.2 K. Values of DELTA-V* are between + 10 and + 16 cm3 mol-1, and are interpreted as arising from a significant

  20. Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume II of III; Data Summaries, 1978-1983 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slatick, Emil; Ringe, R.R.; Zaugg, Waldo S. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

    1988-02-02

    The main functions of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) aquaculture task biologists and contractual scientists involved in the 1978 homing studies were primarily a surveillance of fish physiology, disease, and relative survival during culture in marine net-pens, to determine if there were any unusual factors that might affect imprinting and homing behavior. The studies were conducted with little background knowledge of the implications of disease and physiology on imprinting and homing in salmonids. The health status or the stocks were quite variable as could be expected. The Dworshak and Wells Hatcheries steelhead suffered from some early stresses in seawater, probably osmoregulatory. The incidences of latent BKD in the Wells and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead and Kooskia Hatchery spring chinook salmon were extremely high, and how these will affect survival in the ocean is not known. Gill enzyme activity in the Dworshak and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead at release was low. Of the steelhead, survival in the Tucannon Hatchery stock will probably be the highest, with Dworshak Hatchery stock the lowest. This report contains the data for the narratives in Volume I.

  1. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 3 (Appendices II, sections 2--3 and III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 3 contains the following appendix sections: Formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides in recovery boilers; Sintering and densification of recovery boiler deposits laboratory data and a rate model; and Experimental data on rates of particulate formation during char bed burning.

  2. Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume II. Preliminary design. Part 1. System criteria and design description. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1979-01-01

    This volume documents the preliminary design developed for the Solar Total Energy System to be installed at Fort Hood, Texas. Current system, subsystem, and component designs are described and additional studies which support selection among significant design alternatives are presented. Overall system requirements which form the system design basis are presented. These include program objectives; performance and output load requirements; industrial, statutory, and regulatory standards; and site interface requirements. Material in this section will continue to be issued separately in the Systems Requirements Document and maintained current through revision throughout future phases of the project. Overall system design and detailed subsystem design descriptions are provided. Consideration of operation and maintenance is reflected in discussion of each subsystem design as well as in an integrated overall discussion. Included are the solar collector subsystem; the thermal storage subsystem, the power conversion sybsystem (including electrical generation and distribution); the heating/cooling and domestic hot water subsystems; overall instrumentation and control; and the STES building and physical plant. The design of several subsystems has progressed beyond the preliminary stage; descriptions for such subsystems are therefore provided in more detail than others to provide complete documentation of the work performed. In some cases, preliminary design parameters require specific verificaton in the definitive design phase and are identified in the text. Subsystem descriptions will continue to be issued and revised separately to maintain accuracy during future phases of the project. (WHK)

  3. Proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1: Environmental Analysis and Technical Appendices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-01-01

    BPA is considering whether to purchase electrical power from a proposed privately-owned combustion-turbine electrical generation plant in Washington. The plant would be fired by natural gas and would use combined-cycle technology to generate 240 average megawatts (aMW) of energy. The plant would be developed, owned, and operated by Tenaska Washington Partners II, L.P. The project would be located about 19 kilometers (12 miles) southeast of downtown Tacoma in the Frederickson Industrial Area, Pierce County. The proposed plant would occupy about half of a 6.4-hectare (16-acre) parcel and would be consistent with the industrial character of its surroundings. The proposed site is currently undeveloped and zoned for industrial use by the county. Main environmental concerns identified in the scoping process and in comments on the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) include: (1) potential air quality impacts, such as emissions and their contribution to the {open_quotes}greenhouse{close_quotes} effect; (2) potential health and safety impacts, such as nuisance odors, plant safety, visibility and heat-emission systems which may affect low-flying planes and potential health effects of electric and magnetic fields; and (3) potential water quality and quantity impacts, such as the amount of wastewater to be discharged, the source and amount of water required for plant operation. These and other issues are discussed in detail in the EIS. The proposed project already includes many features designed to reduce environmental impacts. Based on investigations performed for the EIS, no significant unavoidable adverse environmental impacts associated with the proposed project were identified, and no evidence emerged to suggest that the proposed action is controversial. The EIS is being mailed to numerous agencies, groups, and individuals (see Section 8.0). There will be a 30-day no-action period before any decisions are made and the Record of Decision is signed.

  4. Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume II; Oregon Subbasins Above Bonneville Dam, 1992 CIS Summary Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Eric; Pierce, Paige (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR); Hatch, Keith (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

    1993-05-01

    An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fixtion of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and fedend fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions am based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CM project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports follows. This report (Roger 1992) summarizes and integrates the results of the next five reports and relates them to deliverables identified in the Phase II cooperative agreement. Broader issues of organization and operation which are not appropriate for the more focused reports are also discussed. This report should be viewed as an executive summary for the CM project to date. If one wants a quick overview of the CIS project, this report and the project plan

  5. COMMUNITTY HEALTH II – SUBJECT THAT PROMOTES THE LEARNING- SERVING-COMUNITTY INTERACTION AIMING THE PROMOTION OF HEALTH, CARE AND COMFORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onã Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the context of the teaching and learning process, the communication between the fields of study and their subjects is important, once such integration reflects on the formation and the learning-serving-community triad. This pedagogical basis figures in the syllabi of the subjects Community Health II and its Training Course, offered by the Nursing Program. Objective: Reporting the teaching and learning process for the academic subject Community Health II, as being an inclusive part of learning-serving-community triad, with regards of developing care for the health of individuals, family and community, according to the reports of the experiences of this author during the training course. Methodological Description: It was reported the events dealing with the data experienced by the author over the second term of 2012. The following places were used in that report. In the academic environment and in the training course which took place in one of the administrative regions of Distrito Federal. The pedagogical theoretical basis was made on Paulo Freire. Data were collected from the studied subjects, legislation, theoretical and practical meetings, communication materials on the virtual environment among other sources. Results and discussion: this experience revealed that the subject CH-II presents an interdisciplinary, multiprofessional and inclusive view of learning-serving-community triad. The participants mediated by the problematization contributed for the construction of theoretical and practical knowledge using reflections, debates, and discussions according to the Pedagogy of Autonomy. The teaching and learning methods permitted the development of independence, competencies and abilities contained in the political project. Conclusion: The training course experienced in the environment of CH-II was an unique experience, generating benefits to all the people involved in the process, besides the resignification of their practices

  6. Ultrasensitive and low-volume point-of-care diagnostics on flexible strips – a study with cardiac troponin biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Nandhinee Radha; Muthukumar, Sriram; Prasad, Shalini

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate a flexible, mechanically stable, and disposable electrochemical sensor platform for monitoring cardiac troponins through the detection and quantification of cardiac Troponin-T (cTnT). We designed and fabricated nanostructured zinc oxide (ZnO) sensing electrodes on flexible porous polyimide substrates. We demonstrate ultrasensitive detection is capable at very low sample volumes due to the confinement phenomenon of target species within the ZnO nanostructures leading to enhancement of biomolecular binding on the sensor electrode surface. The performance of the ZnO nanostructured sensor electrode was evaluated against gold and nanotextured ZnO electrodes. The electrochemical sensor functions on affinity based immunoassay principles whereby monoclonal antibodies for cTnT were immobilized on the sensor electrodes using thiol based chemistry. Detection of cTnT in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and human serum (HS) buffers was achieved at low sample volumes of 20 μL using non-faradaic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Limit of detection (LOD) of 1E-4 ng/mL (i.e. 1 pg/mL) at 7% CV (coefficient of variation) for cTnT in HS was demonstrated on nanostructured ZnO electrodes. The mechanical integrity of the flexible biosensor platform was demonstrated with cyclic bending tests. The sensor performed within 12% CV after 100 bending cycles demonstrating the robustness of the nanostructured ZnO electrochemical sensor platform.

  7. A retrospective study using the pressure ulcer scale for healing (PUSH) tool to examine factors affecting stage II pressure ulcer healing in a Korean acute care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Hee

    2014-09-01

    Stage II pressure ulcers (PUs) should be managed promptly and appropriately in order to prevent complications. To identify the factors affecting Stage II PU healing and optimize care, the electronic medical records of patients with a Stage II PU in an acute care hospital were examined. Patient and ulcer characteristics as well as nutritional assessment variables were retrieved, and ulcer variables were used to calculate Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) scores. The effect of all variables on healing status (healed versus nonhealed) and change in PUSH score for healing rate were compared. Records of 309 Stage II PUs from 155 patients (mean age 61.2 ± 15.2 [range 5-89] years, 182 [58.9%] male) were retrieved and analyzed. Of those, 221 healed and 88 were documented as not healed at the end of the study. The variables that were significantly different between patients with PUs that did and did not heal were: major diagnosis (P = 0.001), peripheral arterial disease (P = 0.007), smoking (P = 0.048), serum albumin ( Braden scale score (P = 0.003), and mean arterial pressure (MAP, mm Hg) (P = 0.026). The Cox proportional hazard model showed a significant positive difference in PUSH score change -indicative of healing - when pressure-redistribution surfaces were used (P <0.001, HR = 2.317), PU size was small (≤3.0 cm2, P = 0.006, HR = 1.670), MAP (within a range of 52-112 mm Hg) was higher P = 0.010, HR = 1.016), and patients were provided multivitamins (P = 0.037, HR=1.431). The results of this study suggest strategies for healing Stage II PUs in the acute care setting should include early recognition of lower-stage PUs, the provision of static pressure-redistribution surfaces and multivitamins, and maintaining higher MAP may facilitate healing and prevent deterioration. Further prospective research is warranted to verify the effect of these interventions.

  8. Fibronectin type II-module proteins in the bovine genital tract and their putative role in cell volume control during sperm maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Evrim; Petrunkina, Anna M; Ekhlasi-Hundrieser, Mahnaz; Hettel, Christiane; Waberski, Dagmar; Harrison, Robin A P; Töpfer-Petersen, Edda

    2009-01-01

    The male reproductive tract of ungulates contains two protein families bearing tandemly arranged fibronectin II (Fn2) modules; one (small Fn2 proteins) bears two modules (e.g. BSP-A1/2), the other (long Fn2 proteins) bears four (e.g. epididymal sperm-binding protein 1 (ELSPBP1)). While it is well known that small Fn2 proteins are present in bull semen, nothing is known about long Fn2 proteins. In the present study, the presence of ELSPBP1 proteins in the bull epididymis and their association with maturing spermatozoa were investigated using a specific antibody against canine ELSPBP1. Analysis of western blots showed ELSPBP1 to be present in the caput, corpus and cauda regions of the epididymis. The protein, which bound phosphorylcholine (PC) strongly, appeared to associate with the spermatozoa during maturation because it was absent from caput spermatozoa but present on cauda spermatozoa. Immunocytochemistry of cauda spermatozoa showed the protein to be bound to the post-acrosomal and midpiece regions. ELSPBP1 could not be detected on freshly ejaculated spermatozoa but was revealed after a capacitating treatment. Our previous studies have shown differences between bovine caput and cauda spermatozoa in terms of their ability to control cell volume. Because of the close homology of BSP-A1/2 PC binding regions with Fn2 regions in ELSPBP1, BSP-A1/2 was used as a model to investigate the effect of a PC-binding Fn2 protein on cell volume control. While the protein had no effect on cauda spermatozoa, it caused caput spermatozoa to swell more in response to hypotonic stress, similarly to untreated cauda spermatozoa.

  9. Incidence, microbiological profile of nosocomial infections, and their antibiotic resistance patterns in a high volume Cardiac Surgical Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar Sahu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nosocomial infections (NIs in the postoperative period not only increase morbidity and mortality, but also impose a significant economic burden on the health care infrastructure. This retrospective study was undertaken to (a evaluate the incidence, characteristics, risk factors and outcomes of NIs and (b identify common microorganisms responsible for infection and their antibiotic resistance profile in our Cardiac Surgical Intensive Care Unit (CSICU. Patients and Methods: After ethics committee approval, the CSICU records of all patients who underwent cardiovascular surgery between January 2013 and December 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. The incidence of NI, distribution of NI sites, types of microorganisms and their antibiotic resistance, length of CSICU stay, and patient-outcome were determined. Results: Three hundred and nineteen of 6864 patients (4.6% developed NI after cardiac surgery. Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs accounted for most of the infections (44.2% followed by surgical-site infection (SSI, 11.6%, bloodstream infection (BSI, 7.5%, urinary tract infection (UTI, 6.9% and infections from combined sources (29.8%. Acinetobacter, Klebsiella, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus were the most frequent pathogens isolated in patients with LRTI, BSI, UTI, and SSI, respectively. The Gram-negative bacteria isolated from different sources were found to be highly resistant to commonly used antibiotics. Conclusion: The incidence of NI and sepsis-related mortality, in our CSICU, was 4.6% and 1.9%, respectively. Lower respiratory tract was the most common site of infection and Gram-negative bacilli, the most common pathogens after cardiac surgery. Antibiotic resistance was maximum with Acinetobacter spp.

  10. A Phase II randomised controlled trial assessing the feasibility, acceptability and potential effectiveness of Dignity Therapy for older people in care homes: Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Alison

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although most older people living in nursing homes die there, there is a dearth of robust evaluations of interventions to improve their end-of-life care. Residents usually have multiple health problems making them heavily reliant on staff for their care, which can erode their sense of dignity. Dignity Therapy has been developed to help promote dignity and reduce distress. It comprises a recorded interview, which is transcribed, edited then returned to the patient, who can bequeath it to people of their choosing. Piloting has suggested that Dignity Therapy is beneficial to people dying of cancer and their families. The aims of this study are to assess the feasibility, acceptability and potential effectiveness of Dignity Therapy to reduce psychological and spiritual distress in older people reaching the end of life in care homes, and to pilot the methods for a Phase III RCT. Methods/design A randomised controlled open-label trial. Sixty-four residents of care homes for older people are randomly allocated to one of two groups: (i Intervention (Dignity Therapy offered in addition to any standard care, and (ii Control group (standard care. Recipients of the "generativity" documents are asked their views on taking part in the study and the therapy. Both quantitative and qualitative outcomes are assessed in face-to-face interviews at baseline and at approximately one and eight weeks after the intervention (equivalent in the control group. The primary outcome is residents' sense of dignity (potential effectiveness assessed by the Patient Dignity Inventory. Secondary outcomes for residents include depression, hopefulness and quality of life. In view of the relatively small sample size, quantitative analysis is mainly descriptive. The qualitative analysis uses the Framework method. Discussion Dignity Therapy is brief, can be done at the bedside and could help both patients and their families. This detailed exploratory research shows if

  11. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 2: Solid waste retrieval facilities -- Phase 1, detail design drawings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. Volume 2 provides the complete set of the Detail Design drawings along with a listing of the drawings. Once approved by WHC, these drawings will be issued and baselined for the Title 3 construction effort.

  12. International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (Volumes 1 through 4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison M.

    2013-03-27

    The design report consists of four volumes: Volume 1, Executive Summary; Volume 2, Physics; Volume 3, Accelerator (Part I, R and D in the Technical Design Phase, and Part II, Baseline Design); and Volume 4, Detectors.

  13. Management of invasive candidiasis and candidemia in adult non-neutropenic intensive care unit patients: Part II. Treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guery, B.P.; Arendrup, M.C.; Auzinger, G.; Azoulay, E.; Borges Sa, M.; Johnson, E.M.; Muller, E.; Putensen, C.; Rotstein, C.; Sganga, G.; Venditti, M.; Zaragoza Crespo, R.; Kullberg, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Invasive candidiasis and candidemia are frequently encountered in the nosocomial setting particularly in the intensive care unit (ICU). OBJECTIVE AND METHODS: To review the current management of invasive candidiasis and candidemia in non-neutropenic adult ICU patients based on a review o

  14. The effects of national health care reform on local businesses--part II: study methodology and primary research questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, Aaron; Rotarius, Timothy; Perez, Bianca

    2012-01-01

    This is the second part of a 3-part examination of what may be potentially expected from the 2010 national health care reform legislation. Political researchers and pundits have speculated endlessly on the many changes mandated by the 2010 national health care reform legislation, styled the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. A review and assessment of this legislation at several levels (federal, state, state agency, local region, and individual business leaders) were undertaken. The results of this expanded analysis suggest strongly that, nationally, members of the business community and their employees will benefit from the legislation early on (years 1 through 3) and then likely will be impacted adversely as the payment mechanisms driving the legislation are tightened by new federal regulations (year 4 onward). As a result of this research, it is surmised that businesses will be immediately impacted by the legislation, with small business owners being the prime beneficiaries of the new legislation, owing to the availability of coverage to approximately 32 million individuals who previously had no access to coverage. In that regard, the soon-to-be-newly insured population also will be a prime beneficiary of the legislation as the limitations on chronic illnesses and other preexisting conditions will be reduced or eliminated by the legislation.

  15. Post-renal-transplant hypertension. Urine volume, free water clearance and plasma concentrations of arginine vasopressin, angiotensin II and aldosterone before and after oral water loading in hypertensive and normotensive renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, E B; Danielsen, H; Knudsen, F; Nielsen, A H; Jensen, T; Kornerup, H J; Madsen, M

    1986-09-01

    Urine volume (V), free water clearance (CH2O) and plasma concentrations of arginine vasopressin (AVP), angiotensin II (A II) and aldosterone (Aldo) were determined before and three times during the first 5 h after an oral water load of 20 ml/kg body wt in 19 patients with post-renal-transplant hypertension (group I), in 13 normotensive renal transplant recipients (group II) and in 20 control subjects (group III). Both V and CH2O increased significantly in all groups, but considerably less in groups I and II than in group III. When CH2O was related to glomerular filtration rate no differences existed between patients and control subjects. Basal AVP was the same in groups I (3.3 pmol/l, median) and II (3.0 pmol/l), but significantly (p less than 0.01) higher than in group III (1.9 pmol/l). Basal A II was significantly (p less than 0.01) elevated in group I (18 pmol/l) when compared to both groups II (10 pmol/l) and III (11 pmol/l), and the level was independent of the presence of native kidneys. Basal Aldo was the same in all groups. During loading, AVP was reduced in all groups, A II was almost unchanged, and Aldo was increased in groups I and II and reduced in group III depending on alterations in serum potassium. Thus urinary diluting ability is reduced in renal transplant recipients due to a reduced glomerular filtration rate. The enhanced A II in hypertensive renal transplant recipients gives further evidence for the point of view that hypertension is angiotensin-dependent in most of these patients.

  16. Korean Advanced Course: Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This is the second of seven readers, prepared by the Defense Language Institute, for continuation training in Korean after the Basic Course. The 20 reading lessons, printed in Korean script, have been drawn from several readers published by the Ministry of Education of the Republic of Korea in 1970. Each unit concludes with a set of questions and…

  17. Patent Abstract Digest. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    ae.Nihh pgdSa. a.o~~nraypto aciJng an baVl. aUla tts0vman as. ylaiiyraligfo aws. o namta atia Iniisdsaa,,o wtanaIga us sah Ea ta piaal wndJoea.JT 09 AFC...D.C. High molecular weight enyne polysulfone thermoplas- [21] Appi. No: 946.291 tics are prepared by the reaction of alkali metal salts of 1,4-bis(3

  18. Child protection and adult depression: evaluating the long-term consequences of evacuating children to foster care during World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santavirta, Nina; Santavirta, Torsten

    2014-03-01

    This paper combined data collected from war time government records with survey data including background characteristics, such as factors that affected eligibility, to examine the adult depression outcomes of individuals who were evacuated from Finland to temporary foster care in Sweden during World War II. Using war time government records and survey data for a random sample of 723 exposed individuals and 1321 matched unexposed individuals, the authors conducted least squares adjusted means comparison to examine the association between evacuation and adult depression (Beck Depression Inventory). The random sample was representative for the whole population of evacuees who returned to their biological families after World War II. The authors found no statistically significant difference in depressive symptoms during late adulthood between the two groups; for example, the exposed group had a 0.41 percentage points lower average Beck Depression Inventory score than the unexposed group (p = 0.907). This study provides no support for family disruption during early childhood because of the onset of sudden shocks elevating depressive symptoms during late adulthood.

  19. Family Caregiver Palliative Care Intervention in Supporting Caregivers of Patients With Stage II-IV Gastrointestinal, Gynecologic, and Urologic Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-13

    Healthy, no Evidence of Disease; Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Urethral Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Rectal

  20. Emtonjeni-A Structural Intervention to Integrate Sexual and Reproductive Health into Public Sector HIV Care in Cape Town, South Africa: Results of a Phase II Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantell, J E; Cooper, D; Exner, T M; Moodley, J; Hoffman, S; Myer, L; Leu, C-S; Bai, D; Kelvin, E A; Jennings, K; Stein, Z A; Constant, D; Zweigenthal, V; Cishe, N; Nywagi, N

    2017-03-01

    Integration of sexual and reproductive health within HIV care services is a promising strategy for increasing access to family planning and STI services and reducing unwanted pregnancies, perinatal HIV transmission and maternal and infant mortality among people living with HIV and their partners. We conducted a Phase II randomized futility trial of a multi-level intervention to increase adherence to safer sex guidelines among those wishing to avoid pregnancy and adherence to safer conception guidelines among those seeking conception in newly-diagnosed HIV-positive persons in four public-sector HIV clinics in Cape Town. Clinics were pair-matched and the two clinics within each pair were randomized to either a three-session provider-delivered enhanced intervention (EI) (onsite contraceptive services and brief milieu intervention for staff) or standard-of-care (SOC) provider-delivered intervention. The futility analysis showed that we cannot rule out the possibility that the EI intervention has a 10 % point or greater success rate in improving adherence to safer sex/safer conception guidelines than does SOC (p = 0.573), indicating that the intervention holds merit, and a larger-scale confirmatory study showing whether the EI is superior to SOC has merit.

  1. Current approaches to treatments for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, part II: psychosocial interventions and patient-focused perspectives in psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Wai Tong; Leung, Sau Fong; Yeung, Frederick Kk; Wong, Wai Kit

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a disabling psychiatric illness associated with disruptions in cognition, emotion, and psychosocial and occupational functioning. Increasing evidence shows that psychosocial interventions for people with schizophrenia, as an adjunct to medications or usual psychiatric care, can reduce psychotic symptoms and relapse and improve patients' long-term outcomes such as recovery, remission, and illness progression. This critical review of the literature was conducted to identify the common approaches to psychosocial interventions for people with schizophrenia. Treatment planning and outcomes were also explored and discussed to better understand the effects of these interventions in terms of person-focused perspectives such as their perceived quality of life and satisfaction and their acceptability and adherence to treatments or services received. We searched major health care databases such as EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PsycLIT and identified relevant literature in English from these databases. Their reference lists were screened, and studies were selected if they met the criteria of using a randomized controlled trial or systematic review design, giving a clear description of the interventions used, and having a study sample of people primarily diagnosed with schizophrenia. Five main approaches to psychosocial intervention had been used for the treatment of schizophrenia: cognitive therapy (cognitive behavioral and cognitive remediation therapy), psychoeducation, family intervention, social skills training, and assertive community treatment. Most of these five approaches applied to people with schizophrenia have demonstrated satisfactory levels of short- to medium-term clinical efficacy in terms of symptom control or reduction, level of functioning, and/or relapse rate. However, the comparative effects between these five approaches have not been well studied; thus, we are not able to clearly understand the superiority of any of these interventions. With the

  2. Developing a plan for primary health care facilities in Soweto, South Africa. Part II: Applying locational criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, J; Rispel, L; Webb, N

    1996-12-01

    This article is the second of a two-part series describing the development of a ten-year plan for primary health care facility development in Soweto. The first article concentrated on the political problems and general methodological approach of the project. This second article describes how the technical problem of planning in the context of scanty information was overcome. The reasoning behind the various assumptions and criteria which were used to assist the planning of the location of facilities is explained, as well as the process by which they were applied. The merits and limitations of this planning approach are discussed, and it is suggested that the approach may be useful to other facility planners, particularly in the developing world.

  3. [Guideline 'Diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in adults'. II. Special situations and organisation of medical care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Gerard; Derijks, Luc J J; Houwert, Govert J; Wolf, Hans; van Bodegraven, Ad A

    2010-01-01

    The Dutch national practice guideline 'Diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in adults' describes the multidisciplinary approach for adult patients with (suspected) IBD, recommended following analysis of the literature according to the principles of evidence based guideline development. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are associated with temporary or permanent extra-intestinal disorders: reactive inflammatory conditions, associated conditions, and those arising as a consequence of long standing, inflammatory, intestinal disease. Treatment is aimed first at the IBD disease process and subsequently at the specific extra-intestinal conditions if complaints persist. The fertility of women with IBD who have not been operated is comparable with those without this complaint. With the exception of methotrexate in both sexes and of sulfasalazine in men, none of the usual medicines for IBD is known to adversely influence fertility. Fertility decreases following abdominal surgery. IBD patients are advised to restrict onset of pregnancy to a longstanding, quiet phase of the disease (ideally > 1 year). The risk of complications during pregnancy is not elevated when IBD is in remission, but is increased during active disease. Nulliparae with an ileoanal pouch have approximately 50% long term risk of developing faecal incontinence; a planned full-term Caesarean section may be beneficial in such cases. Complicated perianal disease is similarly an indication for non-vaginal delivery. The life expectancy for patients with ulcerative colitis is normal, but is slightly lower in patients with Crohn's disease. These positive findings have not yet been incorporated into the practice of life insurance providers. The diversity of IBD patient health care and its delivery by many professionals places stringent requirements on the organisation of care by hospitals and those providing treatment. The transfer process from paediatric specialist to gastroenterologist

  4. Residual limb volume change: Systematic review of measurement and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan E. Sanders, PhD

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Management of residual limb volume affects decisions regarding timing of fit of the first prosthesis, when a new prosthetic socket is needed, design of a prosthetic socket, and prescription of accommodation strategies for daily volume fluctuations. This systematic review assesses what is known about measurement and management of residual limb volume change in persons with lower-limb amputation. Publications that met inclusion criteria were grouped into three categories: group I: descriptions of residual limb volume measurement techniques; group II: studies investigating the effect of residual limb volume change on clinical care in people with lower-limb amputation; and group III: studies of residual limb volume management techniques or descriptions of techniques for accommodating or controlling residual limb volume. We found that many techniques for the measurement of residual limb volume have been described but clinical use is limited largely because current techniques lack adequate resolution and in-socket measurement capability. Overall, limited evidence exists regarding the management of residual limb volume, and the evidence available focuses primarily on adults with transtibial amputation in the early postoperative phase. While we can draw some insights from the available research about residual limb volume measurement and management, further research is required.

  5. Current approaches to treatments for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, part II: psychosocial interventions and patient-focused perspectives in psychiatric care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien WT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Wai Tong Chien, Sau Fong Leung, Frederick KK Yeung, Wai Kit Wong School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong Abstract: Schizophrenia is a disabling psychiatric illness associated with disruptions in cognition, emotion, and psychosocial and occupational functioning. Increasing evidence shows that psychosocial interventions for people with schizophrenia, as an adjunct to medications or usual psychiatric care, can reduce psychotic symptoms and relapse and improve patients' long-term outcomes such as recovery, remission, and illness progression. This critical review of the literature was conducted to identify the common approaches to psychosocial interventions for people with schizophrenia. Treatment planning and outcomes were also explored and discussed to better understand the effects of these interventions in terms of person-focused perspectives such as their perceived quality of life and satisfaction and their acceptability and adherence to treatments or services received. We searched major healthcare databases such as EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PsycLIT and identified relevant literature in English from these databases. Their reference lists were screened, and studies were selected if they met the criteria of using a randomized controlled trial or systematic review design, giving a clear description of the interventions used, and having a study sample of people primarily diagnosed with schizophrenia. Five main approaches to psychosocial intervention had been used for the treatment of schizophrenia: cognitive therapy (cognitive behavioral and cognitive remediation therapy, psychoeducation, family intervention, social skills training, and assertive community treatment. Most of these five approaches applied to people with schizophrenia have demonstrated satisfactory levels of short- to medium-term clinical efficacy in terms of symptom control or reduction, level of

  6. Phase II Trial of Radiosurgery to Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy-Defined High-Risk Tumor Volumes in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einstein, Douglas B., E-mail: douglas.einstein@khnetwork.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Wessels, Barry [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Bangert, Barbara [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Fu, Pingfu [Department of Biostatistics, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Nelson, A. Dennis [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Cohen, Mark [Department of Pathology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Sagar, Stephen [Department of Neurology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Lewin, Jonathan [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Sloan, Andrew [Department of Neurosurgery, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Zheng Yiran; Williams, Jordonna; Colussi, Valdir; Vinkler, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Maciunas, Robert [Department of Neurosurgery, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) boost to areas of high risk determined by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) functional imaging in addition to standard radiotherapy for patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients in this prospective Phase II trial underwent surgical resection or biopsy for a GBM followed by SRS directed toward areas of MRS-determined high biological activity within 2 cm of the postoperative enhancing surgical bed. The MRS regions were determined by identifying those voxels within the postoperative T2 magnetic resonance imaging volume that contained an elevated choline/N-acetylaspartate ratio in excess of 2:1. These voxels were marked, digitally fused with the SRS planning magnetic resonance image, targeted with an 8-mm isocenter per voxel, and treated using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group SRS dose guidelines. All patients then received conformal radiotherapy to a total dose of 60 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Results: The median survival for the entire cohort was 15.8 months. With 75% of recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class 3 patients still alive 18 months after treatment, the median survival for RPA Class 3 has not yet been reached. The median survivals for RPA Class 4, 5, and 6 patients were 18.7, 12.5, and 3.9 months, respectively, compared with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiotherapy-alone historical control survivals of 11.1, 8.9, and 4.6 months. For the 16 of 35 patients who received concurrent temozolomide in addition to protocol radiotherapeutic treatment, the median survival was 20.8 months, compared with European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer historical controls of 14.6 months using radiotherapy and temozolomide. Grade 3/4 toxicities possibly attributable to treatment were 11%. Conclusions: This represents the first prospective trial using selective MRS-targeted functional SRS

  7. RETINOPATHY OF PREMATURITY SCREENING OF 500 INFANTS IN A LEVEL II NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT AT A MEDICAL COLLEGE HOSPITAL IN SOUTHERN KARNATAKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keerthi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP is the leading cause of infant blindness and predominantly affects premature, low birth weight babies.1 India and other middle-income countries are said to be suffering from the ‘third epidemic’. ROP is multi-factorial and early detection and treatment of threshold ROP with timely laser treatment results in excellent outcome.3-8 OBJECTIVES: 1. To determine the yield of ROP in a level II neonatal intensive care unit (NICU at a Government Medical College Hospital in Mandya district. 2. To determine disease characteristics and outcome of treatment. METHODOLOGY: The study is a prospective analysis of infants admitted during March 1st 2009 and November 30th, 2011(33 months at the NICU of Mandya Institute of Medical Sciences (MIMS Hospital. All infants weighing care, a collaborative, timely and appropriate screening strategy is necessary in the community to prevent ROP blindness in rural infants.

  8. Management strategies to effect change in intensive care units: lessons from the world of business. Part II. Quality-improvement strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershengorn, Hayley B; Kocher, Robert; Factor, Phillip

    2014-03-01

    The success of quality-improvement projects relies heavily on both project design and the metrics chosen to assess change. In Part II of this three-part American Thoracic Society Seminars series, we begin by describing methods for determining which data to collect, tools for data presentation, and strategies for data dissemination. As Avedis Donabedian detailed a half century ago, defining metrics in healthcare can be challenging; algorithmic determination of the best type of metric (outcome, process, or structure) can help intensive care unit (ICU) managers begin this process. Choosing appropriate graphical data displays (e.g., run charts) can prompt discussions about and promote quality improvement. Similarly, dashboards/scorecards are useful in presenting performance improvement data either publicly or privately in a visually appealing manner. To have compelling data to show, ICU managers must plan quality-improvement projects well. The second portion of this review details four quality-improvement tools-checklists, Six Sigma methodology, lean thinking, and Kaizen. Checklists have become commonplace in many ICUs to improve care quality; thinking about how to maximize their effectiveness is now of prime importance. Six Sigma methodology, lean thinking, and Kaizen are techniques that use multidisciplinary teams to organize thinking about process improvement, formalize change strategies, actualize initiatives, and measure progress. None originated within healthcare, but each has been used in the hospital environment with success. To conclude this part of the series, we demonstrate how to use these tools through an example of improving the timely administration of antibiotics to patients with sepsis.

  9. Prenatal Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Office for Maternal and Child Health Services.

    This booklet is the first in a series of publications designed to provide parents with useful information about childrearing. Contents are organized into three parts. Part I focuses on the pregnancy, prenatal care, development of the baby, pregnant lifestyles, nutrition, common discomforts, and problems of pregnancy. Part II provides information…

  10. Derivation of parameters necessary for the evaluation of performance of sites for deep geological repositories with particular reference to bedded salt, Livermore, California. Volume II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, J.P.; Rawlings, G.E.; Soto, C.A.; Wood, D.F.; Chorley, D.W.

    1979-12-01

    The method of selection of parameters to be considered in the selection of a site for underground disposal of radioactive wastes is reported in volume 1. This volume contains the appendix to that report. The topics include: specific rock mechanics tests; drilling investigation techniques and equipment; geophysical surveying; theoretical study of a well text in a nonhomogeneous aquifer; and basic statistical and probability theory that may be used in the derivation of input parameters.

  11. NURE aerial gamma-ray and magnetic reconnaissance survey, Colorado-Arizona area: Salton Sea NI II-9, Phoenix NI 12-7, El Centro NI II-12, AJO NI 12-10, Lukeville NH 12-1 quadrangles. Volume I. Narrative report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-01

    A rotary-wing reconnaissance high sensitivity radiometric and magnetic survey, encompassing several 1:250,000 quadrangles in southwestern Arizona and southeastern California, was performed. The surveyed area consisted of approximately 9300 line miles. The radiometric data were corrected and normalized to 400 feet terrain clearance. The data were identified as to rock type by correlating the data samples with existing geologic maps. Statistics defining the mean and standard deviation of each rock type are presented as listings in Volume I of this report. The departure of the data from its corresponding mean rock type is computed in terms of standard deviation units and is presented graphically as anomaly maps in Volume II and as computer listings in microfiche form in Volume I. Profiles of the normalized averaged data are contained in Volume II and include traces of the potassium, uranium and thorium count rates, corresponding ratios, and several ancilliary sensor data traces, magnetometer, radio altimeter and barometric pressure height. A description of the local geology is provided, and a discussion of the magnetic and radiometric data is presented together with an evaluation of selected uranium anomalies.

  12. II-VI semiconductor compounds

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    For condensed matter physicists and electronic engineers, this volume deals with aspects of II-VI semiconductor compounds. Areas covered include devices and applications of II-VI compounds; Co-based II-IV semi-magnetic semiconductors; and electronic structure of strained II-VI superlattices.

  13. PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebner, H.W. (ed.)

    1980-01-01

    Volume 2 contains papers from the following sessions: Safeguards-Related Problems; Neutronics and Criticality; Operations and Systems Experience II; Plutonium Systems; Intermediate Storage in Casks; Operations and Systems Planning; Institutional Issues; Structural and Thermal Evaluation I; Poster Session B; Extended Testing I; Structural and Thermal Evaluation II; Extended Testing II; and Emergency Preparedness and Response. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

  14. Developing Successful Proposals in Women's Educational Equity, Volume I: The Guide = Desarrollo de propuestas exitosas relacionadas con la equidad educativa de la mujer, volumen I: La guia. Volume II: The Supplement. Volume III: The Swipe File. Volume IV: Workshop Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Walter R.; And Others

    Four volumes present materials and a training workshop on proposal writing. The materials aim to give people the skills and resources with which to translate their ideas into fully developed grant proposals for projects related to educational equity for women. However, the information is applicable to most other funding procedures. The first…

  15. The 5th World Congress of chemical engineering: Technologies critical to a changing World. Volume II: Agriculture, food biotechnology biomedical electric power process safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Volume 2 of the proceedings from the 5th World Congress of Chemical Engineering covers four major topic areas from which papers were selected for the database: Agriculture, Food; Biotechnology; Electric Power, and Process Safety. Pertinent subtopics include: Renewable Resource Engineering; Special Processes in the Food Industry; Advances in Metabolite Production; Advances in Fermentation and Cell Culture Engineering; Coal and Nuclear Central Station Power Plants; Large Natural Gas Fired Power Stations; Distributed Generation; Potential Impact of Biomass Energy; and Chemical Hazards in Plant Design. 29 papers were selected from Volume 1 for the database.

  16. Saving Lives on the Battlefield (Part II) - One Year Later: A Joint Theater Trauma System and Joint Trauma System Review of Prehospital Trauma Care in Combined Joint Operations Area-Afghanistan (CJOA-A)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    medical and dental treatment facili- ties. Likewise, though not excluding medical care in the prehospital battlefield environment, none of the...authorized to carry IV/IM ketorolac in trauma but not TCCC Guideline analgesia . Saving Lives on the Battlefield (Part II) 41 35. Add IV saline lock and IV... dental technician became a PA and deployed straight out of IPAP and is the sole provider in an isolated FOB. He admits his inadequacies for combat

  17. Personality and Biography: Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on the History of Adult Education. Volume II: Biographies of Adult Educators from Five Continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedenthal-Haase, Martha, Ed.

    This volume contains 36 biographies: "I.T.A. Wallace-Johnson and Radical Adult Education (AE) in Sierra Leone in the Years 1938/1939" (Turay); "Frank C. Laubach as the Father of the Adult Literacy Movement in India" (Ghosh); "A Historical Study on the Theory and Practice of Social and AE in Korea" (Lee); "Integrative Adult Educators" (Yaron);…

  18. Analysis and Approach to the Development of an Advanced Multimedia Instructional System. Volume II. Appendix III. Media Cost Data. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode, William E.; And Others

    Basic cost estimates for selected instructional media are tabled in this document, Part II (Appendix III) of the report "Analysis and Approach to the Development of an Advanced Multimedia Instructional System" by William E. Rhode and others. Learning materials production costs are given for motion pictures, still visuals, videotapes, live…

  19. Satellite Infrared (SIRE) Sensor Data Processing Perspective and Definition. Volume II. Appendix A. Survey of Available IR Data Processing Options for SIRE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-12-31

    International Imaging System’s (12S) System 101, CDC’s Cyber- Ikon System, the Bendix Multispectral Data Analysis System, General Electric’s DIPS...Vision I Cyber- Ikon ESL IDIMS II Number installed 4 installed 40 installed New product 9 installed Processor DCC PDP-11/35 DEC LSI-l Cyber 18/20 HP

  20. META II: Formal Co-Verification of Correctness of Large-Scale Cyber-Physical Systems During Design (Mod 0006). Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Page Figure 1. Global PLM Market Size...functions provided in one 
 integrated tool chain • Integration with leading product lifecycle management ( PLM ) and computer- aided engineering (CAE...META and META-II programs fall under the category of Product Lifecycle Management ( PLM ) tools. The PLM term came into use about 15 years ago to

  1. Applied research on energy storage and conversion for photovoltaic and wind energy systems. Volume II. Photovoltaic systems with energy storage. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    This volume of the General Electric study was directed at an evaluation of those energy storage technologies deemed best suited for use in conjunction with a photovoltaic energy conversion system in utility, residential and intermediate applications. Break-even cost goals are developed for several storage technologies in each application. These break-even costs are then compared with cost projections presented in Volume I of this report to show technologies and time frames of potential economic viability. The form of the presentation allows the reader to use more accurate storage system cost data as they become available. The report summarizes the investigations performed and presents the results, conclusions and recommendations pertaining to use of energy storage with photovoltaic energy conversion systems. Candidate storage concepts studied include (1) above ground and underground pumped hydro, (2) underground compressed air, (3) electric batteries, (4) flywheels, and (5) hydrogen production and storage. (WHK)

  2. Primary care nurses: effects on secondary care referrals for diabetes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, C.E. van; Verheij, R.A.; Hansen, J.; Velden, L. van der; Nijpels, G.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Bakker, D.H. de

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary care nurses play an important role in diabetes care, and were introduced in GP-practice partly to shift care from hospital to primary care. The aim of this study was to assess whether the referral rate for hospital treatment for diabetes type II (T2DM) patients has changed with t

  3. Primary care nurses : effects on secondary care referrals for diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, C.E. van; Verheij, R.A.; Hansen, J.; Velden, L. van der; Nijpels, G.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Bakker, D.H. de

    2010-01-01

    Background: Primary care nurses play an important role in diabetes care, and were introduced in GP-practice partly to shift care from hospital to primary care. The aim of this study was to assess whether the referral rate for hospital treatment for diabetes type II (T2DM) patients has changed with t

  4. FAKTOR-FAKTOR YANG MEMPENGARUHI PERILAKU PERAWATAN KEHAMILAN (ANTE NATAL CARE (ANC IBU HAMIL : Studi Di Wilayah Kerja Puskesmas Gondanglegi Kabupaten Dati II Malang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paiman Soeparmanto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to study the factors that influenced the behaviour of prenatal care. Its conducted to 180 samples of pregnan­ cies. There were 3 stages of sampling regent (kabupaten, district (kecamatan/Health Centre and village. All pregnancies in selected villages were samples (cluster. The data collection was conducted using interview guide and analized using multiple linier regression. The results were: that variable with strongest influence to the prenatal care behaviour was level of pregnancy care knowledge. Other variables were accesibility to health fasilities and health education par­ticipation.   Keyword: Ante natal care

  5. Research and Development in Natural Language Understanding as Part of the Strategic Computing Program. Volume 3. A Guide to IRUS-II Application Development. Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-01

    Section 26 4.2.1 Variable Binding List 26 4.2.2 [Rule Body 27 4.2.3 IRule Examples 28 4.3 Creating !Rules 30 4.3.1 Using IRACQ 30 4.3.2 An IRACQ session...representing a user’s input) i; addition contains fields for the parse tree, WML, discourse entities, and anaphor resolution information for that input...more than one possible referent is found for an anaphor , the options are presented to the user, who indicates which to use. 2.2 IRUS-II Capabilities

  6. Prediction of Six-Degree-of-Freedom Store Separation Trajectories at Speeds up to the Critical Speed. Volume II. Users Manual for the Computer Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    NUMSTR( J ) store number; different for each store and < 99 NSHAPE(J) shape number of store; < 99 SLTHC(J) length of store, feet SRMAX(J) maximum radius...chord leading edge immediately above store, feet; positive below SIC( J ) store incidence angle measured relative to wing root i chord...the j store th 192 Table II-8 Concluded, SXL(K,J) XLEL(I) XSNC(J) XSNI(J) XWSOI(J) Yd) YWSO(J) YSN(J) ZLEL(I) ZSN(J) ZWSO(J) array

  7. Toward an Educated Health Consumer: Mass Communication and Quality in Medical Care. Fogarty International Series on the Teaching of Preventive Medicine. Volume 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Carter L.

    Focus in this preventive medicine monograph for health professionals is on consumer health education and the current and potential effects of mass communication on the quality of medical care. Following an introduction, the content is presented in four chapters. Chapter 1 covers the state of the art in consumer health education and discusses three…

  8. Fuzziness and medicine philosophical reflections and application systems in health care a companion volume to Sadegh-Zadeh’s handbook of analytical philosophy of medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Tabacchi, Marco

    2013-01-01

    This book is a collection of contributions written by philosophers and scientists active in different fields, such as mathematics, logics, social sciences, computer sciences and linguistics. They comment on and discuss various parts of and subjects and propositions introduced in the Handbook of Analytical Philosophy of Medicine from Kazem Sadegh-Zadeh, published by Springer in 2012. This volume reports on the fruitful exchange and debate that arose in the fuzzy community upon the publication of the Handbook. This was not only very much appreciated by the community but also seen as a critical starting point for beginning a new discussion. The results of this discussion, which involved many different perspectives from science and the humanities and was warmly encouraged by Kazem Sadegh-Zadeh himself, are accurately reported in this volume, which is intended to be a critical companion to Kazem Sadegh-Zadeh´s handbook.   Rudolf Seising is currently an adjoint researcher at the European Centre for Soft Computing...

  9. I. Excluded Volume Effects in Ising Cluster Distributions and Nuclear Multifragmentation II. Multiple-Chance Effects in α-Particle Evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breus, Dimitry Eugene [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-05-16

    In Part 1, geometric clusters of the Ising model are studied as possible model clusters for nuclear multifragmentation. These clusters may not be considered as non-interacting (ideal gas) due to excluded volume effect which predominantly is the artifact of the cluster's finite size. Interaction significantly complicates the use of clusters in the analysis of thermodynamic systems. Stillinger's theory is used as a basis for the analysis, which within the RFL (Reiss, Frisch, Lebowitz) fluid-of-spheres approximation produces a prediction for cluster concentrations well obeyed by geometric clusters of the Ising model. If thermodynamic condition of phase coexistence is met, these concentrations can be incorporated into a differential equation procedure of moderate complexity to elucidate the liquid-vapor phase diagram of the system with cluster interaction included. The drawback of increased complexity is outweighted by the reward of greater accuracy of the phase diagram, as it is demonstrated by the Ising model. A novel nuclear-cluster analysis procedure is developed by modifying Fisher's model to contain cluster interaction and employing the differential equation procedure to obtain thermodynamic variables. With this procedure applied to geometric clusters, the guidelines are developed to look for excluded volume effect in nuclear multifragmentation. In part 2, an explanation is offered for the recently observed oscillations in the energy spectra of α-particles emitted from hot compound nuclei. Contrary to what was previously expected, the oscillations are assumed to be caused by the multiple-chance nature of α-evaporation. In a semi-empirical fashion this assumption is successfully confirmed by a technique of two-spectra decomposition which treats experimental α-spectra has having contributions from at least two independent emitters. Building upon the success of the multiple-chance explanation of the oscillations, Moretto's single

  10. Development of a Portable Sensitive Equipment Decontamination System. Volume 1: Commercial Candidates Materials Evaluation (Chemical Agent Studies)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    construction materials for the wiping systems are given in Volume II of this report. The instruction manuals for the two wiping systems, prepared by...034d-f P&G Swifter wipes ss disks HD 010503-1 10 mg HFE-7200 Micro-Care Manual rotary J906-038a-c Polyester felt nonwoven ss disks HD 010503-1 10 mg...HFE-7200 Micro-Care Manual rotary J906-038d-f Polyester felt nonwoven ss disks HD 010503-1 10 mg HFE-7200 Micro-Care Manual rotary J906-042a-c

  11. Volume Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Astuti, Valerio; Rovelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Building on a technical result by Brunnemann and Rideout on the spectrum of the Volume operator in Loop Quantum Gravity, we show that the dimension of the space of the quadrivalent states --with finite-volume individual nodes-- describing a region with total volume smaller than $V$, has \\emph{finite} dimension, bounded by $V \\log V$. This allows us to introduce the notion of "volume entropy": the von Neumann entropy associated to the measurement of volume.

  12. Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume II, Book 1. Conceptual design, Sections 1 through 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    The overall, long-term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System program is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumption, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume presents in detail the market analysis, parametric analysis, and the selection process for the preferred system. (WHK)

  13. The Cool ISM in Elliptical Galaxies. II. Gas Content in the Volume - Limited Sample and Results from the Combined Elliptical and Lenticular Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Welch, Gary A; Young, Lisa M

    2010-01-01

    We report new observations of atomic and molecular gas in a volume limited sample of elliptical galaxies. Combining the elliptical sample with an earlier and similar lenticular one, we show that cool gas detection rates are very similar among low luminosity E and SO galaxies but are much higher among luminous S0s. Using the combined sample we revisit the correlation between cool gas mass and blue luminosity which emerged from our lenticular survey, finding strong support for previous claims that the molecular gas in ellipticals and lenticulars has different origins. Unexpectedly, however, and contrary to earlier claims, the same is not true for atomic gas. We speculate that both the AGN feedback and merger paradigms might offer explanations for differences in detection rates, and might also point towards an understanding of why the two gas phases could follow different evolutionary paths in Es and S0s. Finally we present a new and puzzling discovery concerning the global mix of atomic and molecular gas in ear...

  14. A novel porous bioceramics scaffold by accumulating hydroxyapatite spherulites for large bone tissue engineering in vivo. II. Construct large volume of bone grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Wei; Zhang, Cong; Duan, Ke; Li, Xiaohong; Qu, Shuxin; Wang, Jianxin; Zhu, Zhuoli; Huang, Peng; Xia, Tian; Liao, Ga; Weng, Jie

    2014-08-01

    In vivo engineering of bone autografts using bioceramic scaffolds with appropriate porous structures is a potential approach to prepare autologous bone grafts for the repair of critical-sized bone defects. This study investigated the evolutionary process of osteogenesis, angiogenesis, and compressive strength of bioceramic scaffolds implanted in two non-osseous sites of dogs: the abdominal cavity and the dorsal muscle. Hydroxyapatite (HA) sphere-accumulated scaffolds with controlled porous structures were prepared and placed in the two sites for up to 6 months. Analyses of retrieved scaffolds found that osteogenesis and angiogenesis were faster in scaffolds implanted in dorsal muscles compared with those placed in abdominal cavities. The abdominal cavity, however, can accommodate larger bone grafts with designed shape. Analyses of scaffolds implanted in abdominal cavities [an environment of a low mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) density] further demonstrated that angiogenesis play critical roles during osteogenesis in the scaffolds, presumably by supplying progenitor cells and/or MSCs as seed cells. This study also examined the relationship between the volume of bone grafts and the physiological environment of in vivo bioreactor. These results provide basic information for the selection of appropriate implanting sites and culture time required to engineer autologous bone grafts for the clinical bone defect repair. Based on these positive results, a pilot study has applied the grafts constructed in canine abdominal cavity to repair segmental bone defect in load-bearing sites (limbs).

  15. User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal-energy storage oupled with district-heating or cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

    1982-04-01

    A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. the AQUASTOR Model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two prinicpal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains all the appendices, including supply and distribution system cost equations and models, descriptions of predefined residential districts, key equations for the cooling degree-hour methodology, a listing of the sample case output, and appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

  16. Evaluating an evidence-based curriculum in undergraduate palliative care education: piloting a phase II exploratory trial for a complex intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulz Christian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background By 2013 Palliative Care will become a mandatory examination subject in the medical curriculum in Germany. There is a pressing need for effective and well-designed curricula and assessment methods. Debates are on going as how Undergraduate Palliative Care Education (UPCE should be taught and how knowledge and skills should be assessed. It is evident by this time that the development process of early curricula in the US and UK has led to a plethora of diverse curricula which seem to be partly ineffective in improving the care for the seriously ill and dying offered by newly qualified doctors, as is demonstrated in controlled evaluations. The goals of this study were to demonstrate an evidence-based approach towards developing UPCE curricula and investigate the change in medical students’ self-perceived readiness to deal with palliative care patients and their families. Methods To evaluate the effects of the UPCE curriculum we chose a prospective, controlled, quasi-experimental, pre, retrospective-pre, post study design. A total of n = 37 3rd and 4th –year medical students were assigned to the intervention group (n = 15; 4th -year and to the control group (n = 22; 3rd-year. Resting on the self-efficacy concept of Bandura the measurement was conducted by a refined test-battery based on two independent measurements (the revised Collet-Lester-Fear-of-Death-Scale and the instrument of the “Program in Palliative Care Education and Practice” at Harvard Medical School including 68 items altogether in a five-point Likert-scale. These items were designed to test elementary skills in caring for the dying and their relatives as perceived by medical undergraduates. Datasets from both groups were analysed by paired and independent two-sample t-test. The TREND statement for reporting non-randomized evaluations was applied for reporting on this quasi-experimental study. Results Three constructs showed statistically

  17. Final Report: Design & Evaluation of Energy Efficient Modular Classroom Structures Phase II / Volume I-VII, January 17, 1995 - October 30, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-10-30

    We are developing innovations to enable modular builders to improve the energy performance of their classrooms with no increase in first cost. The Modern Building Systems' (MBS) classroom building conforms to the stringent Oregon energy code, and at $18/ft{sup 2} ($1.67/m{sup 2}) (FOB the factory) it is at the low end of the cost range for modular classrooms. We have investigated daylighting, cross-ventilation, solar preheat of ventilation air, air-to-air heat exchanger, electric lighting controls, and down-sizing HVAC systems as strategies to improve energy performance. We were able to improve energy performance with no increase in first cost in all climates examined. Two papers and a full report on Phase I of this study are available. The work described in this report is from the second phase of the project. In the first phase we redesigned the basic modular classroom to incorporate energy strategies including daylighting, cross-ventilation, solar preheating of ventilation air, and insulation. We also explored thermal mass but determined that it was not a cost-effective strategy in the five climates we examined. Energy savings ranged from 6% to 49% with an average of 23%. Paybacks ranged from 1.3 years to 23.8 years, an average of 12.1 years. In Phase II the number of baseline buildings was expanded by simulating buildings that would be typical of those produced by Modern Building Systems, Inc. (MBS) for each of the seven locations/climates. A number of parametric simulations were performed for each energy strategy. Additionally we refined our previous algorithm for a solar ventilation air wall preheater and developed an algorithm for a roof preheater configuration. These algorithms were coded as functions in DOE 2.1E. We were striving for occupant comfort as well as energy savings. We performed computer analyses to verify adequate illumination on vertical surfaces and acceptable glare levels when using daylighting. We also used computational fluid dynamics

  18. Increased mortality associated with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in the intensive care unit: results from the EPIC II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanberger, H.; Walther, S.; Leone, M.; Barie, P.S.; Rello, J.; Lipman, J.; Marshall, J.C.; Anzueto, A.; Sakr, Y.; Pickkers, P.; Felleiter, P.; Engoren, M.; Vincent, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Controversy continues regarding whether the presence of meticillin resistance increases mortality risk in Staphylococcus aureus infections. In this study, we assessed the role of meticillin resistance in survival of patients with S. aureus infection included in the EPIC II point-prevalence study of

  19. Development and evaluation of a patient-centered cardiovascular health education program among insured primary care patients with hypertension in rural Nigeria: The QUICK-II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odusola, A.O.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are increasingly common in Nigeria and sub Saharan Africa (SSA). Poverty is rampant and quality of primary care substandard. Moreover adherence capacity for prescribed anti-hypertensive treatment is limited and blood pressure (BP) control consequently poor.

  20. Sequential (gemcitabine/vinorelbine and concurrent (gemcitabine radiochemotherapy with FDG-PET-based target volume definition in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: first results of a phase I/II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanzel Sven

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to determine the maximal tolerated dose (MTD of gemcitabine every two weeks concurrent to radiotherapy, administered during an aggressive program of sequential and simultaneous radiochemotherapy for locally advanced, unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and to evaluate the efficacy of this regime in a phase II study. Methods 33 patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were enrolled in a combined radiochemotherapy protocol. 29 patients were assessable for evaluation of toxicity and tumor response. Treatment included two cycles of induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine (1200 mg/m2 and vinorelbine (30 mg/m2 at day 1, 8 and 22, 29 followed by concurrent radiotherapy (2.0 Gy/d; total dose 66.0 Gy and chemotherapy with gemcitabine every two weeks at day 43, 57 and 71. Radiotherapy planning included [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET based target volume definition. 10 patients were included in the phase I study with an initial gemcitabine dose of 300 mg/m2. The dose of gemcitabine was increased in steps of 100 mg/m2 until the MTD was realized. Results MTD was defined for the patient group receiving gemcitabine 500 mg/m2 due to grade 2 (next to grade 3 esophagitis in all patients resulting in a mean body weight loss of 5 kg (SD = 1.4 kg, representing 8% of the initial weight. These patients showed persisting dysphagia 3 to 4 weeks after completing radiotherapy. In accordance with expected complications as esophagitis, dysphagia and odynophagia, we defined the MTD at this dose level, although no dose limiting toxicity (DLT grade 3 was reached. In the phase I/II median follow-up was 15.7 months (4.1 to 42.6 months. The overall response rate after completion of therapy was 64%. The median overall survival was 19.9 (95% CI: [10.1; 29.7] months for all eligible patients. The median disease-free survival for all patients was 8.7 (95% CI: [2.7; 14.6] months. Conclusion

  1. Cirurgia cardíaca em uma sociedade multiétnica: a experiência do Caribbean Heart Care Cardiac surgery in a multi-ethnic low volume service: the Caribbean Heart Care Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Burgos-Irazabal

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A população do Caribe constitui uma sociedade multiétnica, incluindo caucasianos, afro-caribenhos, indianos, asiáticos, hispânicos, europeus e nativos, com uma grande variabilidade de padrões socioeconômicos. A incidência e os tipos de doenças cardíacas também variam significativamente entre essas etnias. Relatamos aqui a experiência (em pacientes adultos e pediátricos em um serviço de cirurgia cardíaca de baixo volume em Trinidad e Tobago, no Caribe. MÉTODO: O programa de cirurgia cardíaca de adultos começou em novembro de 1993, são reportados os dados de 878 pacientes (629 homens, idade entre 18 e 88 anos, com média de 67 anos. Destes, 39,4% eram diabéticos e 46,5% hipertensos. Os procedimentos incluíram cirurgia de revascularização miocárdica (CRM, reparo e substituição de valvas e cirurgias da aorta. O programa de cirurgia cardíaca pediátrica (idades entre duas semanas e 21 anos começou em setembro de 1998, tendo sido realizado um total de 279 operações. RESULTADOS: Adultos - a mortalidade total foi de 3,8%. A maioria dos procedimentos foi CRM (82,3% com mortalidade total de 2,8% (0% em 2004. A técnica sem circulação extracorpórea foi empregada em 43% dos procedimentos de CRM (71,2% em 2004. A cirurgia de valva aórtica foi feita em 49 pacientes, e a substituição/reparo da valva mitral em 96 doentes. Pediátricos - a maioria dos procedimentos foi correção de comunicação interventricular (111, comunicação interatrial (57, tetralogia de Fallot (23, e 88 outros (com mortalidade de 1,5%. CONCLUSÃO: Cirurgia cardíaca em um serviço multiétnico de baixo volume pode ser realizada com excelentes resultados, comparáveis com padrões internacionais de qualidade.INTRODUCTION: The Caribbean is a multi-ethnic society, including Caucasian, Afro-Caribbean, East Indians, Asians, Hispanics, European and natives, which has a broad range of living standards. The incidence and types of heart diseases

  2. Memoir and Scientific Correspondence of the Late Sir George Gabriel Stokes, Bart. 2 Volume Paperback Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, George Gabriel; Larmor, Joseph

    2010-06-01

    Volume 1: Preface; Part I. Personal and Biographical; Part II. General Scientific Career; Part IIIa. Special Scientific Correspondence; Appendix; Index. Volume 2: Part. III. Special Scientific Correspondence; Index.

  3. Physical illness in patients with severe mental disorders. II. Barriers to care, monitoring and treatment guidelines, plus recommendations at the system and individual level

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE HERT, MARC; COHEN, DAN; BOBES, JULIO; CETKOVICH-BAKMAS, MARCELO; LEUCHT, STEFAN; M. NDETEI, DAVID; W. NEWCOMER, JOHN; UWAKWE, RICHARD; ASAI, ITSUO; MÖLLER, HANS-JURGEN; GAUTAM, SHIV; DETRAUX, JOHAN; U. CORRELL, CHRISTOPH

    2011-01-01

    Physical disorders are, compared to the general population, more prevalent in people with severe mental illness (SMI). Although this excess morbidity and mortality is largely due to modifiable lifestyle risk factors, the screening and assessment of physical health aspects remains poor, even in developed countries. Moreover, specific patient, provider, treatment and system factors act as barriers to the recognition and to the management of physical diseases in people with SMI. Psychiatrists can play a pivotal role in the improvement of the physical health of these patients by expanding their task from clinical psychiatric care to the monitoring and treatment of crucial physical parameters. At a system level, actions are not easy to realize, especially for developing countries. However, at an individual level, even simple and very basic monitoring and treatment actions, undertaken by the treating clinician, can already improve the problem of suboptimal medical care in this population. Adhering to monitoring and treatment guidelines will result in a substantial enhancement of physical health outcomes. Furthermore, psychiatrists can help educate and motivate people with SMI to address their suboptimal lifestyle, including smoking, unhealthy diet and lack of exercise. The adoption of the recommendations presented in this paper across health care systems throughout the world will contribute to a significant improvement in the medical and related psychiatric health outcomes of patients with SMI. PMID:21633691

  4. The METAL System. Volume I and Volume II. Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    embryology , plan pathology* iSystematic names (aiae, daisy, fern. etc.) PM plant names] BV beverages - brewing*, bottlin;, distilllng*, liquors*, wine...conflict with MD-I), serology) MD-Q ost eopa thy lD-R embryology (devclopmental animal biology) !D-S si rgery 11-142 MD-T opthalmology :,D-V veterinary... ethics *, logic*, schools of phil., metaphysics* PL__ political science -- > civics, diplomatics*, government, political parties, political economy

  5. Encounter Decision Aid vs. Clinical Decision Support or Usual Care to Support Patient-Centered Treatment Decisions in Osteoporosis: The Osteoporosis Choice Randomized Trial II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie LeBlanc

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis Choice, an encounter decision aid, can engage patients and clinicians in shared decision making about osteoporosis treatment. Its effectiveness compared to the routine provision to clinicians of the patient's estimated risk of fracture using the FRAX calculator is unknown.Patient-level, randomized, three-arm trial enrolling women over 50 with osteopenia or osteoporosis eligible for treatment with bisphosphonates, where the use of Osteoporosis Choice was compared to FRAX only and to usual care to determine impact on patient knowledge, decisional conflict, involvement in the decision-making process, decision to start and adherence to bisphosphonates.We enrolled 79 women in the three arms. Because FRAX estimation alone and usual care produced similar results, we grouped them for analysis. Compared to these, use of Osteoporosis Choice increased patient knowledge (median score 6 vs. 4, p = .01, improved understanding of fracture risk and risk reduction with bisphosphonates (p = .01 and p<.0001, respectively, had no effect on decision conflict, and increased patient engagement in the decision making process (OPTION scores 57% vs. 43%, p = .001. Encounters with the decision aid were 0.8 minutes longer (range: 33 minutes shorter to 3.0 minutes longer. There were twice as many patients receiving and filling prescriptions in the decision aid arm (83% vs. 40%, p = .07; medication adherence at 6 months was no different across arms.Supporting both patients and clinicians during the clinical encounter with the Osteoporosis Choice decision aid efficiently improves treatment decision making when compared to usual care with or without clinical decision support with FRAX results.clinical trials.gov NCT00949611.

  6. Issues of Commonality. Volume II. Issue Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    53000 752-:l, 14 IS? 1S2-535𔃼) 32000 1942 A7M NEW ’IIPAN ’N DEVELOPMENT CFMU CPFeS& 22-24000 1979 DC-C ..-.-. TECHNOILOGY DEVELOPMENT Of NASA En.9, 011...291350Z, January 1980. 7. Assistant Deputy of Staff/Plans, "National Airlift Act--Its Relationship to Air Mobility ," Headquarters, Military Airlift Ommand

  7. Aircraft Simulator Data Requirements Study. Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    23143 ( Wep ), "Data, Technical Aircraft; for the Design of Aviation Training Devices," was to be used as a guide for the preparation of the new standard. 2...made, displays, etc., utilizing the "hot mockup ." The really useful data can only result from flight tests and can be obtained at any time after tile... mockup " and the preliminary tactical tape used in the tests. It will represent the best system data that will generally be obtained. k The last data

  8. Annual Progress Report FY-82. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    aspects of the burnout syndrome as des- cribed by Maslach and Jackson (1981). The three aspects were: emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP), and...a significance level of .05 was used. The means of the total group were compared, using the t Test, to the normative data of Maslach and Jackson ...burnout, the subjects demonstrated a level of burnout which was moderate when compared with the normative scores reported by Maslach and Jackson

  9. Least Cost Test Profile. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    16 0 FORDING 4.6.32 * 2,500 3 19ROOF ACCESS STEPS 4.6.28 200 1 16 DROPS 4.6.23 0 16 24 0 DOES NOT IN- CLUDE COST OF EMI DUMMY LOADS. SUPPRESSION...Adks, 0.L and ,aWe em, J.C., "niouveB Sonding fwr Sheltems," University * ~~Of ORYto Rsearch Institute Interim Technsical Report. Contract Mse. F=1S

  10. Texas Emergency Resource Management. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-30

    systemic disorders such a, arthritis, heart disease, diabetes or kidney trouble. May treat bone, muscle and joint disorders limits to feet and be kno...dis- orders such as arthritis, heart disease, diabetes or kidney trouble. May treat bone, muscle and joint disorders limited to feet and be known as

  11. Recipe Book for Communication Skills. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiana State Dept. of Public Instruction, Indianapolis. Div. of Reading Effectiveness.

    Intended for classroom use, this book presents language arts activities for either the elementary or the secondary level. The first section contains speaking, listening, reading, and writing activities for elementary school students, with activities that are also appropriate for students at the secondary level. The second section, for the…

  12. Factors influencing electric utility expansion. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masud, E. [ed.

    1977-01-01

    This report, Vol. 2, submitted by the General Electric Co., identifies factors that should be considered in planning interconnected systems and discusses how these factors relate to one another. The objective is to identify all the factors and classify them by their use and importance in arriving at a decision. Chapter 2 discusses the utility system and its system behavior characteristics, emphasizing behavior that affects the planning of the bulk-power generation and transmission system. Chapter 3 introduces interconnection planning by discussing the new system characteristics brought to operation and planning. Forty-two factors associated with cost, reliability, constraints, and coordination are related to each other by factor trees. Factor trees display the relationship of one factor such as reliability to more-detailed factors which in turn are further related to individual characteristics of facilities. These factor trees provide a structure to the presentation. A questionnaire including the 42 factors was completed by 52 system planners from utility companies and government authorities. The results of these questionnaires are tabulated and presented with pertinent discussion of each factor. Chapter 4 deals with generation planning, recognizing the existence of interconnections. Chapter 5 addresses transmission planning, questions related to reliability and cost measures and constraints, and factors related to both analytical techniques and planning procedures. The chapter ends with a discussion of combined generation-transmission planning. (MCW)

  13. Electric power annual 1995. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    This document summarizes pertinent statistics on various aspects of the U.S. electric power industry for the year and includes a graphic presentation. Data is included on electric utility retail sales and revenues, financial statistics, environmental statistics of electric utilities, demand-side management, electric power transactions, and non-utility power producers.

  14. Electric Power annual 1996: Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This document presents a summary of electric power industry statistics. Data are included on electric utility retail sales of electricity, revenues, environmental information, power transactions, emissions, and demand-side management.

  15. 9433 Design Pointing Anomaly. Volume II. Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-30

    e at-orfr7ed mixork. 7--7-V-5O64ai �-SI-30?O, R~~MRGMLRCR COPY 0- /Z𔄁,r REWORK TREATMENT TRW BEARINGS P/N 32708-1 & -3 inse all bearing...form of the Knudsen Equation (4) based on kinetic theory of gases to predict vacuum flow rates. Using the Salmon and Apt form for comparison, we get G2

  16. Force Method Optimization II. Volume II. User’s Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    our maillng list, or if the addressee is no longer employed by your organization please notify AFWAL/ FIBRA , W-PAFB, OH 45433 to help us maintain a...Unit 230714518 11. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Flight Dynamics Laboratory ( FIBRA ) -Aovem’ber 1982 AF Wright Patterson...S. Khot, Project Engineer of the Structures & Dynamics Division ( FIBRA ). The contracted work was performed between August 1980 and December 1982

  17. Site Environmental Report for 2009, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Suying

    2010-08-19

    Volume II of the Site Environmental Report for 2009 is provided by Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as a supplemental appendix to Volume I, which contains the body of the report. Volume II contains the environmental monitoring and sampling data used to generate summary results of routine and nonroutine sampling at the Laboratory, except for groundwater sampling data, which may be found in the reports referred to in Chapter 4 of Volume I. The results from sample collections are more comprehensive in Volume II than in Volume I: for completeness, all results from sample collections that began or ended in calendar year (CY) 2009 are included in this volume. However, the samples representing CY 2008 data have not been used in the summary results that are reported in Volume I. (For example, although ambient air samples collected on January 6, 2009, are presented in Volume II, they represent December 2008 data and are not included in Table 4-2 in Volume I.) When appropriate, sampling results are reported in both conventional and International System (SI) units. For some results, the rounding procedure used in data reporting may result in apparent differences between the numbers reported in SI and conventional units. (For example, stack air tritium results reported as < 1.5 Bq/m3 are shown variously as < 39 and < 41 pCi/m3. Both of these results are rounded correctly to two significant digits.)

  18. Assistência domiciliaria ao idoso: perfil do cuidador formal - parte II Asistencia domiciliar al anciano: perfil del cuidador formal - parte II The home care of elderly: caregiver profile - part two

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozue Kawasaki

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available O idoso fragilizado, mantido em seu domicílio, requer cuidados específicos, os quais são realizados muitas vezes por pessoas contratadas pela família para tal, denominadas cuidadores formais. Frente o aumento da oferta de trabalho destas pessoas e a escassez de literatura nacional sobre seu perfiL, desenvolvemos um estudo com 41 pessoas que ofereceram seus serviços através de anúncios em dois jornais de maior circulação no município de Campinas, São Paulo. Tal estudo teve por objetivos: 1. caracterizar estes cuidadores (este objetivo foi contemplado com um artigo publicado anteriormente e 2. verificar as atividades propostas para a assistência ao idoso. No presente trabalho serão apresentados os dados referentes ao segundo objetivo.El anciano debilitado, mantenido en su habitación, carece de cuidados específicos, los cuales han sido realizados muchas veces por personas contratadas, denominadas cuidadores formales. Frente al aumento de oferta de trabajo de estas personas y a la escasez de literatura sobre el perfil, desarrollamos un estudio con 41 anunciantes que ofrecieron sus servicios dos periódicos de grande circulación en el municipio de Campinas, San Pablo, con los siguientes objetivos: 1. caracterizar estos cuidadores y 2. verificar las actividades propuestas para la asistencial al anciano. El presente trabajo presenta los datos referentes a lo secundo objetivo.The frail elderly, maintained in its home, request specific cares, which are accomplished many times by people contracted, denominated formal caregivers. With the increase of the offer of these people's work and the shortage literature on its profile, we developed a study with 41 advertisers that offered their services in two newspapers of larger circulation in the city of Campinas, São Paulo, with the following objectives: 1. to characterize these caregivers and 2. to verify the activities proposals for care to the elderly. In the present work the referring data

  19. A multi-stage compartmental model for HIV-infected individuals: II--application to insurance functions and health-care costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billard, L; Dayananda, P W A

    2014-03-01

    Stochastic population processes have received a lot of attention over the years. One approach focuses on compartmental modeling. Billard and Dayananda (2012) developed one such multi-stage model for epidemic processes in which the possibility that individuals can die at any stage from non-disease related causes was also included. This extra feature is of particular interest to the insurance and health-care industries among others especially when the epidemic is HIV/AIDS. Rather than working with numbers of individuals in each stage, they obtained distributional results dealing with the waiting time any one individual spent in each stage given the initial stage. In this work, the impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on several functions relevant to these industries (such as adjustments to premiums) is investigated. Theoretical results are derived, followed by a numerical study.

  20. Evaluation of a laboratory system intended for use in physicians' offices. II. Reliability of results produced by health care workers without formal or professional laboratory training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsey, R; Vandenbark, M; Goitein, R K; Baer, D M

    1987-07-17

    The Kodak DT-60 tabletop chemistry analyzer was evaluated with standardized protocols to determine the system's precision and accuracy when operated by four volunteers (a secretary, a licensed practical nurse, and two family medicine residents) in a simulated office laboratory. The variability of the results was found to be significantly greater than the variability of results produced by medical technologists who analyzed the same samples during the same study period with another DT-60 placed in the hospital laboratory. The source(s) of increased variance needs to be identified so the system can be modified or new control procedures can be developed to ensure the reliability of results used in patient care. Prospective purchasers, manufacturers, and patients need this kind of objective information about the reliability of results produced by systems intended for use in physicians' office laboratories.

  1. Prospects for a genuine revival of primary health care--through the visible hand of social justice rather than the invisible hand of the market: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Alison Rosamund

    2010-01-01

    This second part of a two-part article explores the prospects for genuine revival of primary health care (PHC) as announced by the WHO in 2008, with reference, briefly, to Global Health Watch 2, published by the People's Health Movement, Medact, and Equity Gauge Alliance, and, in more depth, to the positions of social and people's movements most closely aligned with the original values and principles of Alma-Ata and the structural foundations of the PHC project. The author argues that the social justice struggle for health cannot be limited to curbing capitalism's excesses. The multiple crises of today--in energy, water, food, the environment, finance, science, information, and democracy--must be recognized as capitalist crises and addressed as such. Particular attention is given to ideology, including the distortion of human nature and society under neoliberal capitalism, and to moral foundations of Health for All. Not only must the invisible hand of the market be replaced by the visible hand of social justice, but the single ideology proclaiming the "end of history" and, by implication, the end of politics and political struggle must be exposed and rejected as neoliberal, totalitarian propaganda. In line with the spirit and intention of the U.N. Charter, PHC remains a political project for a fair and safe world in which Health for All is both possible and necessary.

  2. Slurry combustion. Volume 2: Appendices, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essenhigh, R. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1993-06-01

    Volume II contains the following appendices: coal analyses and slurryability characteristics; listings of programs used to call and file experimental data, and to reduce data in enthalpy and efficiency calculations; and tabulated data sets.

  3. Critical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critical care helps people with life-threatening injuries and illnesses. It might treat problems such as complications ... a team of specially-trained health care providers. Critical care usually takes place in an intensive care ...

  4. Tracheostomy care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory failure - tracheostomy care; Ventilator - tracheostomy care; Respiratory insufficiency - tracheostomy care ... Before you leave the hospital, health care providers will teach you how ... and suction the tube Keep the air you breathe moist Clean ...

  5. The issue of penal and legal protection of the intensive care unit physician within the context of patient's consent to treatment. Part II: unconscious patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewiera, Jacek; Kübler, Andrzej; Filipowska, Monika; Trnka, Jakub; Zamaro-Michalska, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Cultural changes in Western societies, as well as the rapid development of medical technology during the last quarter of a century, have led to many changes in the relationship between a physician and a patient. During this period, the patient's consent to treatment has proven to be an essential component of any decision relating to the patient's health. The patient's will component, as an essential element of the legality of the treatment process, is also reflected in the Polish legislation. The correct interpretation of the legal regulations and the role the patient's will plays in the therapeutic decision-making process within the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) requires the consideration of both the good of the patient and the physician's safety in terms of his criminal responsibility. Clinical experience indicates that the physicians' decisions result in the choice of the best treatment strategy for a patient only if they are based on current medical knowledge and an assessment of therapeutic opportunities. The good of the patient must be the sole objective of the physician's actions, and as a result of the current state of medical knowledge and the medical prognosis, all the conditions of the legal safety of a physician taking decisions must be met. In this paper, the authors have set out how to obtain consent (substantive consent) to treat an unconscious patient in the ICU in light of the current Polish law, as well as a physician's daily practice. The solutions proposed in the text of the publication are aimed at increasing the legal safety of the ICU physicians when making key decisions relating to the strategy of the treatment of ICU patients.

  6. PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebner, H.W. (ed.)

    1980-01-01

    Volume 1 contains papers from the following sessions: Plenary Session; Regulations, Licensing and Standards; LMFBR Systems Concepts; Risk/Safety Assessment I; Systems and Package Design; US Institutional Issues; Risk/Safety Assessment II; Leakage, Leak Rate and Seals; Poster Session A; Operations and Systems Experience I; Manufacturing Processes and Materials; and Quality Assurance and Maintenance. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

  7. Zooplankton biomass (displacement and settled volume) data collected during the International Cooperative Investigations of the Tropical Atlantic EQUALANT I, EQUALANT II, and EQUALANT III projects from 1963-02-15 to 1964-07-09 (NODC Accession 0071432)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton biomass (displacement and settled volume) data collected during the International Cooperative Investigations of the Tropical Atlantic EQUALANT I,...

  8. Culture of Schools. Final Report. Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Anthropological Association, Washington, DC.

    The third volume of this 4-volume report contains the last two speeches, on educational philosophy and the role of reason in society, from the Colloquium on the Culture of Schools held at the New School for Social Research (preceding speeches are in Vol. II, SP 003 901), reports on conferences on the culture of schools held in Pittsburgh and…

  9. Nuclear volume and prognosis in ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O.; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Bichel, P.;

    1992-01-01

    The prognostic value of the volume-weighted mean nuclear volume (MNV) was investigated retrospectively in 100 ovarian cancer patients with FIGO-stage IB-II (n = 51) and stage III-IV (n = 49) serous tumors. No association was demonstrated between the MNV and the survival or between the MNV and two...

  10. Transition from neonatal intensive care unit to special care nurseries: Experiences of parents and nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helder, O.K.; Verweij, J.C.M.; Staa, A.L. van

    2011-01-01

    To explore parents' and nurses' experiences with the transition of infants from the neonatal intensive care unit to a special care nursery. Qualitative explorative study in two phases. Level IIID neonatal intensive care unit in a university hospital and special care nurseries (level II) in five comm

  11. Hospice Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospice care is end-of-life care. A team of health care professionals and volunteers provides it. ... can remain as alert and comfortable as possible. Hospice programs also provide services to support a patient's ...

  12. Palliative Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palliative care is treatment of the discomfort, symptoms, and stress of serious illness. It provides relief from distressing symptoms ... of the medical treatments you're receiving. Hospice care, care at the end of life, always includes ...

  13. Mosquito Management on National Wildlife Refuges, Ecosystem Effects Study. Phase II, Part 1 - Effects of Ultra Low Volume Applications of Pyrethrin, Malathion and Permethrin on Macro-Invertebrates in the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Mosquito control districts often use ultra-low volume (ULV) applications of insecticides to control adult mosquitoes. Few field studies have tested the effects of...

  14. Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II (MIMIC-II)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The objective of this Bioengineering Research Partnership is to focus the resources of a powerful interdisciplinary team from academia (MIT), industry (Philips...

  15. Relationship between stroke volume and pulse pressure during blood volume perturbation: a mathematical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bighamian, Ramin; Hahn, Jin-Oh

    2014-01-01

    Arterial pulse pressure has been widely used as surrogate of stroke volume, for example, in the guidance of fluid therapy. However, recent experimental investigations suggest that arterial pulse pressure is not linearly proportional to stroke volume. However, mechanisms underlying the relation between the two have not been clearly understood. The goal of this study was to elucidate how arterial pulse pressure and stroke volume respond to a perturbation in the left ventricular blood volume based on a systematic mathematical analysis. Both our mathematical analysis and experimental data showed that the relative change in arterial pulse pressure due to a left ventricular blood volume perturbation was consistently smaller than the corresponding relative change in stroke volume, due to the nonlinear left ventricular pressure-volume relation during diastole that reduces the sensitivity of arterial pulse pressure to perturbations in the left ventricular blood volume. Therefore, arterial pulse pressure must be used with care when used as surrogate of stroke volume in guiding fluid therapy.

  16. Hanford spent nuclear fuel project recommended path forward, volume III: Alternatives and path forward evaluation supporting documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulton, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    Volume I of the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project - Recommended Path Forward constitutes an aggressive series of projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to safely retrieve, package, transport, process, and store K Basins fuel and sludge. Volume II provided a comparative evaluation of four Alternatives for the Path Forward and an evaluation for the Recommended Path Forward. Although Volume II contained extensive appendices, six supporting documents have been compiled in Volume III to provide additional background for Volume II.

  17. The Nature of Reinforcement: Part I. (Volume I), Part II. (Volume II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Robert, Ed.

    Part One of this report describes the first half of a conference, designed to examine the nature of reinforcement, which was held at the University of Pittsburgh in June 1969. The topics discussed include: "Reward in Human Learning: Theoretical Issues and Strategic Choice Points"; "Are Reinforcement Concepts Able to Provide Reinforcement for…

  18. Solid phase extraction of Cu(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Cd(II) and Mn(II) ions with 1-(2-thiazolylazo)-2-naphthol loaded Amberlite XAD-1180.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokalioğlu, Serife; Yilmaz, Vedat; Kartal, Senol

    2009-05-01

    A new method for separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of Cu(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Cd(II) and Mn(II) ions in various matrices was proposed. The method is based on the adsorption and chelation of the metal ions on a column containing Amberlite XAD-1180 resin impregnated with 1-(2-thiazolylazo)-2-naphthol (TAN) reagent prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The effect of pH, type, concentration and volume of eluent, sample volume, flow rates of sample and elution solutions, and interfering ions have been investigated. The optimum pH for simultaneous retention of all the metal ions was 9. Eluent for quantitative elution was 20 ml of 2 mol l(-1) HNO(3). The optimum sample and eluent flow rates were found as 4 ml min(-1), and also sample volume was 500 ml, except for Mn (87% recovery). The sorption capacity of the resin was found to be 0.77, 0.41, 0.57, and 0.30 mg g(-1) for Cu(II), Ni(II), Cd(II), and Mn(II), respectively. The preconcentration factor of the method was 200 for Cu(II), 150 for Pb(II), 100 for Cd(II) and Ni(II), and 50 for Mn(II). The recovery values for all of the metal ions were > or = 95% and relative standard deviations (RSDs) were < or = 5.1%. The detection limit values were in the range of 0.03 and 1.19 microg l(-1). The accuracy of the method was confirmed by analysing the certified reference materials (TMDA 54.4 fortified lake water and GBW 07605 tea samples) and the recovery studies. This procedure was applied to the determination of Cu(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Cd(II) and Mn(II) in waste water and lake water samples.

  19. Palliative Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you are a partner with the palliative care team as you all work toward the same goal — providing the best quality of life for your child for as ... Care for Children With Terminal Illness Managing Home Health Care Taking Care of You: Support ...

  20. Hospice care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... family a break (called respite care). Doctor services. Nursing care. Home health aide and homemaker services. Counseling. Medical ... may be given in other locations, including: A nursing home A ... in charge of care is called the primary care giver. This may ...

  1. Recovery of Navy distillate fuel from reclaimed product. Volume I. Technical discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, D.W.; Whisman, M.L.

    1984-11-01

    In an effort to assist the Navy to better utilize its waste hydrocarbons, NIPER, with support from the US Department of Energy, is conducting research designed to ultimately develop a practical technique for converting Reclaimed Product (RP) into specification Naval Distillate Fuel (F-76). The first phase of the project was focused on reviewing the literature and available information from equipment manufacturers. The literature survey has been carefully culled for methodology applicable to the conversion of RP into diesel fuel suitable for Navy use. Based upon the results of this study, a second phase has been developed and outlined in which experiments will be performed to determine the most practical recycling technologies. It is realized that the final selection of one particular technology may be site-specific due to vast differences in RP volume and available facilities. A final phase, if funded, would involve full-scale testing of one of the recommended techniques at a refueling depot. The Phase I investigations are published in two volumes. Volume 1, Technical Discussion, includes the narrative and Appendices I and II. Appendix III, a detailed Literature Review, includes both a narrative portion and an annotated bibliography containing about 800 referenvces and abstracts. This appendix, because of its volume, has been published separately as Volume 2. 18 figures, 4 tables.

  2. Analysis of the structural parameters that influence gas production from the Devonian shale. Annual progress report, 1979-1980. Volume II. Data repository and reports published during fiscal year 1979-1980: regional structure, surface structure, surface fractures, hydrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negus-De Wys, J.; Dixon, J. M.; Evans, M. A.; Lee, K. D.; Ruotsala, J. E.; Wilson, T. H.; Williams, R. T.

    1980-10-01

    This volume comprises appendices giving regional structure data, surface structure data, surface fracture data, and hydrology data. The fracture data covers oriented Devonian shale cores from West Virginia, Ohio, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Kentucky. The subsurface structure of the Eastern Kentucky gas field is also covered. (DLC)

  3. Special Education Teacher Computer Literacy Training. Project STEEL. A Special Project To Develop and Implement a Computer-Based Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory. Volume II. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Theodore W.; And Others

    The document is part of the final report on Project STEEL (Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory) intended to extend the utilization of technology in the training of preservice special education teachers. This volume focuses on the second of four project objectives, the development of a special education teacher computer literacy…

  4. Renormalized Volume

    CERN Document Server

    Gover, A Rod

    2016-01-01

    For any conformally compact manifold with hypersurface boundary we define a canonical renormalized volume functional and compute an explicit, holographic formula for the corresponding anomaly. For the special case of asymptotically Einstein manifolds, our method recovers the known results. The anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, but the coefficients of divergences do. We give explicit formulae for these divergences valid for any choice of regulating hypersurface; these should be relevant to recent studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies. The anomaly is expressed as a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. We show that the variation of these energy functionals is exactly the obstruction to solving a singular Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the...

  5. The Role of Data in Health Care Disparities in Medicaid...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to findings reported in The Role of Data in Health Care Disparities in Medicaid Managed Care, published in Volume 2, Issue 4 of the Medicare and Medicaid...

  6. Integration home care in the care chain: results from the EURHOMAP study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genet, N.; Boerma, W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Demand for home care is expected to rise sharply across Europe as a result of trends of reduced institutional care and the ageing of populations. The increased volume and complexity in home care will challenge the coordination of services delivered in the home situation and the coordinat

  7. Graphics gems II

    CERN Document Server

    Arvo, James

    1991-01-01

    Graphics Gems II is a collection of articles shared by a diverse group of people that reflect ideas and approaches in graphics programming which can benefit other computer graphics programmers.This volume presents techniques for doing well-known graphics operations faster or easier. The book contains chapters devoted to topics on two-dimensional and three-dimensional geometry and algorithms, image processing, frame buffer techniques, and ray tracing techniques. The radiosity approach, matrix techniques, and numerical and programming techniques are likewise discussed.Graphics artists and comput

  8. Pin care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/pubmed/24302374 . Nagy K. Discharge instructions for wound cares. The American Association of the Surgery of Trauma. www.aast.org/discharge-instructions-for-wound-cares . Accessed May 13, 2016.

  9. Palliative Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... possessions to others, write a letter or a poem or compose a song, or decide what they ... One Year Off Treatment Transitioning to Adult Care Long-Term Follow-Up Care Coping With Cancer Overview ...

  10. Mobile Intensive Care Unit: Technical and clinical aspects of interhospital critical care transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lieshout, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    The Mobile Intensive Care Unit (MICU) is a combination of i) a team of critical care nurse, physician and ambulance driver, ii) a MICU-trolley (i.e. equipped with cardiovascular monitor, mechanical ventilator, syringe pumps etc. indispensable for safe transport and iii) an Intensive Care ambulance.

  11. Container II

    OpenAIRE

    Baraklianou, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Container II, self-published artists book.\\ud The book was made on the occasion of the artists residency at the Banff Arts Centre, in Alberta Canada. \\ud \\ud Container II is a performative piece, it worked in conjunction with the photographic installation "Stage Set: Cool Tone" . (photographic floor installation, Reclaimed wood, frames, 130x145cm, 2016) \\ud The photographic installation was also part of the artists residency titled "New Materiality" at the Banff Arts Centre. \\ud \\ud Limited E...

  12. Comparing Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evert Pommer; Isolde Woittiez; John Stevens

    2007-01-01

    Home care is one of the most important means of compensating for disabilities and ensuring continuity in people's daily functioning. Home care services in the Netherlands have recently been transferred from a national social security provision for long-term care to a local social service. In most ot

  13. Sequential (gemcitabine/vinorelbine) and concurrent (gemcitabine) radiochemotherapy with FDG-PET-based target volume definition in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: first results of a phase I/II study

    OpenAIRE

    Stanzel Sven; Kaiser Hans J; Krohn Thomas; Reinartz Patrick; Pinkawa Michael; Piroth Marc; Gagel Bernd; Breuer Christian; Asadpour Branka; Schmachtenberg Axel; Eble Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the study was to determine the maximal tolerated dose (MTD) of gemcitabine every two weeks concurrent to radiotherapy, administered during an aggressive program of sequential and simultaneous radiochemotherapy for locally advanced, unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to evaluate the efficacy of this regime in a phase II study. Methods 33 patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were enrolled in a combined radiochemotherapy protocol. 29 patien...

  14. Commencement Bay Study. Volume IV. Invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-31

    RIBUTION ST ATEMtNT (0( Cho oe&sclmt oe.d in stockŔ, of Aftterut hw fePor) IS. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Volume I Summary and Synthesis Volume V Water Quality...FINFISH FOOD SPICIES /HABITAT TYPE/ 77 OCCURRENCE OF FINFISH SPECIES 3.6.1 Juvenile Salmon 77 3.6.2 Marine Fish so 4.0 CONCLUSIONS 82 5.0 REFEREICES 84 ii

  15. Preconception Care and Prenatal Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at risk for complications? How does stress affect pregnancy? NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Preconception Care and Prenatal Care: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is preconception ...

  16. Virtual care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Annette; Aaløkke Ballegaard, Stinne

    of retrenchment, promising better quality, empowerment of citizens and work that is smarter and more qualified. Through ethnographic field studies we study the introduction of virtual home care in Danish elderly care, focusing on the implications for relational work and care relations. Virtual home care entails...... and professionals, and they instigate change in organization and professional identities. Studies, which more specifically deal with telecare, stress how virtualization alters the character of the observations care workers are able to make, and how the validity of the patients’ own measurements and observations...... point out how issues of trust and surveillance, which are always negotiated in care relations, are in fact accentuated in this kind of virtual care work. Moreover, we stress that the contemporary institutional context, organization and time schedules have a vast impact on the practices developed....

  17. Who Cares for Care Leavers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askew, Julie; Rodgers, Paul; West, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes a programme of learning and development at the University of Sheffield, United Kingdom, to support looked-after children and care leavers (youth previously provided care outside or beyond family) throughout the student lifecycle. In this context, looked-after children are those cared for by a town/city authority where…

  18. AngleⅡ类错患者髁突表面积与体积三维重建测量%Three-dimensional reconstruction study of condyle volume and surface area in Angle′s class II malocclusion patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨珊; 何科; 任嫒姝; 戴红卫

    2012-01-01

    目的 运用锥束CT(CBCT)测量AngleⅡ类错患者髁突的表面积和体积,探讨AngleⅡ类错患者髁突形态大小的特点.方法 选择该院正畸科就诊患者中年龄为20~28岁的AngleⅡ类错患者66例(男33例,女33例)进行CBCT检查,运用Mimics10.0软件对左、右两侧髁突进行三维重建,测量其表面积与体积,计算髁突形态指数.并与AngleⅠ类错患者髁突大小进行比较.结果 AngleⅡ类错患者男性的髁突体积与表面积均大于女性(P0.05).结论 AngleⅡ类错患者的髁突大小与性别和髁突位置有关.且AngleⅡ类错患者髁突小于AngleⅠ类错患者.%Objective To measure the condyle volume and surface area in the patients with Angle s class Ⅱ malocclusion by cone beam CT(CBCT) and to study the characteristics of mandibular condylar size. Methods 66 young patients with Angle's class Ⅱ malocclusion were chosen from our hospital(aged 20 - 28 years;33 males and 33 females). All patients received CBCT examina tion,the CT slice used the Mimics 10. 0 software for three dimensional reconstruction of the condyle to measure the condyle vol ume,surface area and shape index(ratio of volume and surface area). The comparison between class Ⅱ malocclusion patients and class Ⅰ malocclusion patients was performed. Results The condyle volume and surface area in male patients with class Ⅱ maloc elusion were significantly greater than those in female patients(P0. 05). Conclusion The condyle volume is related to the genders and condyle position. The size of man dibular condyle in class Ⅱ malocclusion patients is smaller than class Ⅰ malocclusion patients.

  19. NURE aerial gamma-ray and magnetic reconnaissance survey of portions of New Mexico, Arizona and Texas. Volume II. New Mexico-Las Cruces NI 13-10 Quadrangle. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-09-01

    The results of a high-sensitivity, aerial gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey of the Las Cruces two degree quadrangle, New Mexico, are presented. Instrumentation and methods are described in Volume 1 of this final report. The work was done by Carson Helicopters, Inc., and International Exploration, Inc. The work was performed for the US Department of Energy - National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Analysis of this radiometric data yielded 192 statistically significant eU anomalies. Of this number, thirty-nine were considered to be of sufficient strength to warrant further investigation.

  20. Advance care directives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... advance directive; Do-not-resuscitate - advance directive; Durable power of attorney - advance care directive; POA - advance care directive; Health care agent - advance care directive; Health care proxy - ...

  1. Access and care issues in urban urgent care clinic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Jill C

    2009-12-01

    the potential increase in urgent care volume in a universal healthcare system. Additionally, this study adds to the body of literature supporting the important role of timely primary care in healthcare maintenance.

  2. Blending of hydrogen in natural gas distribution systems. Volume II. Combustion tests of blends in burners and appliances. Final report, June 1, 1976--August 30, 1977. [8, 11, 14, 20, 22, 25, and 31% hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-10-01

    The emerging ''hydrogen economy'' is a strong contender as one method to supplement or extend the domestic natural gas supply. This volume of the subject study ''Blending Hydrogen in Natural Gas Distribution Systems'' describes combustion studies to determine the maximum amount of hydrogen that can be blended in natural gas and utilized satisfactorily in typical appliances with no adjustment or conversion. Eleven pilot burners and twenty-three main burners typical of those in current use were operated on hydrogen-natural gas mixtures containing approximately 8, 11, 14, 20, 22, 25, and 31 percent, by volume, hydrogen. The eleven pilot burners and thirteen main burners were tested outside the appliance they were a part of. Ten main burners were tested in their respective appliances. Performance of the various burners tested are as follows: (1) Gas blends containing more than 6 to 11% hydrogen are the limiting mixtures for target type pilot burners. (2) Gas blends containing more than 20 to 22% hyrogen are the limiting mixtures for main burners operating in the open. (3) Gas blends containing more than 22 to 25% hydrogen are the limiting mixtures for main burners tested in appliances. (4) Modification of the orifice in target pilots or increasing the supply pressure to a minimum of 7 inches water column will permit the use of gas blends with 20% hydrogen.

  3. Status and Habitat Requirements of the White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam Volume II; Supplemental Papers and Data Documentation, 1986-1992 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beamesderfer, Raymond C.; Nigro, Anthony A. [Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR (US)

    1995-01-01

    This is the final report for research on white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus from 1986--92 and conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF). Findings are presented as a series of papers, each detailing objectives, methods, results, and conclusions for a portion of this research. This volume includes supplemental papers which provide background information needed to support results of the primary investigations addressed in Volume 1. This study addresses measure 903(e)(1) of the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Fish and Wildlife Program that calls for ''research to determine the impact of development and operation of the hydropower system on sturgeon in the Columbia River Basin.'' Study objectives correspond to those of the ''White Sturgeon Research Program Implementation Plan'' developed by BPA and approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council in 1985. Work was conducted on the Columbia River from McNary Dam to the estuary.

  4. INTRA/Mod3.2. Manual and code description. Volume 2 - User`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Jenny; Edlund, O.; Hermann, J.; Johansson, Lise-Lotte

    1999-01-01

    The INTRA Manual consists of two volumes. Volume I of the manual is a thorough description of the code INTRA, the physical modelling of INTRA and the ruling numerics, and volume II, the User`s Manual is an input description. This document, the User`s Manual, Volume II, contains a detailed description of how to use INTRA, how to set up an input file, how to run INTRA and also post-processing

  5. Translating person-centered care into practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoffmann, Vibeke; Hörnsten, Åsa; Storbækken, Solveig

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Person-centred care [PCC] can engage people in living well with a chronic condition. However, translating PCC into practice is challenging. We aimed to compare the translational potentials of three approaches: motivational interviewing [MI], illness integration support [IIS] and guided......) health care professionals' background and training; (7) fidelity assessment; (8) reported effects. RESULTS: Although all approaches promoted autonomous motivation, they differed in other ways. Their original settings explain why IIS and GSD strive for life-illness integration, whereas MI focuses...

  6. TBscore II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolf, Frauke; Lemvik, Grethe; Abate, Ebba;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: The TBscore, based on simple signs and symptoms, was introduced to predict unsuccessful outcome in tuberculosis patients on treatment. A recent inter-observer variation study showed profound variation in some variables. Further, some variables depend on a physician assessing...... them, making the score less applicable. The aim of the present study was to simplify the TBscore. Methods: Inter-observer variation assessment and exploratory factor analysis were combined to develop a simplified score, the TBscore II. To validate TBscore II we assessed the association between start...

  7. Helium II level measurement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, D.; Hilton, D. K.; Zhang, T.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, a survey of cryogenic liquid level measurement techniques applicable to superfluid helium (He II) is given. The survey includes both continuous and discrete measurement techniques. A number of different probes and controlling circuits for this purpose have been described in the literature. They fall into one of the following categories: capacitive liquid level gauges, superconducting wire liquid level gauges, thermodynamic (heat transfer-based) liquid level gauges, resistive gauges, ultrasound and transmission line-based level detectors. The present paper reviews these techniques and their suitability for He II service. In addition to these methods, techniques for measuring the total liquid volume and mass gauging are also discussed.

  8. Coal liquefaction and gas conversion: Proceedings. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions: Indirect Liquefaction (oxygenated fuels); and Indirect Liquefaction (Fischer-Tropsch technology). Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  9. Integration of thermal and food processing residuals into a system for commercial culture of freshwater shrimp. (power plant waste heat utilization in aquaculture). Volume II. Final report Jul 74--Oct 76

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eble, A.F.

    1977-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that all life-cycle stages of the tropical freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, can be cultured successfully using waste-heat effluents of the Mercer Generating Station, Trenton, N.J. Further, high-density culture of the prawn is possible and practical. Rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) culture has also been successfully demonstrated utilizing the waste-heat discharges of an electric generating station. Efficient systems have been designed for intensive annual two-crop production. Postlarval prawns are grown in indoor heated nurseries in early spring, and placed in outdoor ponds in mid-May at sizes of 5 to 6cm and harvested in late October as 11 to 12cm adults. Experiments culturing the American eel (Anguilla rostrata) in waste-heat discharge waters of the generating system have been successful. Presented in Volume 2 is the research work conducted in this study. (Portions of this document are not fully legible)

  10. Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River Estuary. Volume II. Impingement impact analyses, evaluations of alternative screening devices, and critiques of utility testimony relating to density-dependent growth, the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock, and the LMS real-time life cycle model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnthouse, L. W.; Van Winkle, W.; Golumbek, J.; Cada, G. F.; Goodyear, C. P.; Christensen, S. W.; Cannon, J. B.; Lee, D. W.

    1982-04-01

    This volume includes a series of four exhibits relating to impacts of impingement on fish populations, together with a collection of critical evaluations of testimony prepared for the utilities by their consultants. The first exhibit is a quantitative evaluation of four sources of bias (collection efficiency, reimpingement, impingement on inoperative screens, and impingement survival) affecting estimates of the number of fish killed at Hudson River power plants. The two following exhibits contain, respectively, a detailed assessment of the impact of impingement on the Hudson River white perch population and estimates of conditional impingement mortality rates for seven Hudson River fish populations. The fourth exhibit is an evaluation of the engineering feasibility and potential biological effectiveness of several types of modified intake structures proposed as alternatives to cooling towers for reducing impingement impacts. The remainder of Volume II consists of critical evaluations of the utilities' empirical evidence for the existence of density-dependent growth in young-of-the-year striped bass and white perch, of their estimate of the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock in the Hudson River, and of their use of the Lawler, Matusky, and Skelly (LMS) Real-Time Life Cycle Model to estimate the impact of entrainment and impingement on the Hudson River striped bass population.

  11. Coal slurry combustion and technology. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions of the Coal Slurry Combustion and Technology Symposium: (1) bench-scale testing; (2) pilot testing; (3) combustion; and (4) rheology and characterization. Thirty-three papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (ATT)

  12. Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lackner, Regina; Baskin, David; Fox, Robert; Jelinski, John; Pauer, Ron; Thorson, Patrick; Wahl, Linnea; Xu, Suying

    2009-09-21

    The Site Environmental Report for 2008 is an integrated report on the environmental programs at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and satisfies the requirements of DOE order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities

  13. Multi-Objective Optimization of Two-Stage Helical Gear Train Using NSGA-II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Sanghvi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gears not only transmit the motion and power satisfactorily but also can do so with uniform motion. The design of gears requires an iterative approach to optimize the design parameters that take care of kinematics aspects as well as strength aspects. Moreover, the choice of materials available for gears is limited. Owing to the complex combinations of the above facts, manual design of gears is complicated and time consuming. In this paper, the volume and load carrying capacity are optimized. Three different methodologies (i MATLAB optimization toolbox, (ii genetic algorithm (GA, and (iii multiobjective optimization (NSGA-II technique are used to solve the problem. In the first two methods, volume is minimized in the first step and then the load carrying capacities of both shafts are calculated. In the third method, the problem is treated as a multiobjective problem. For the optimization purpose, face width, module, and number of teeth are taken as design variables. Constraints are imposed on bending strength, surface fatigue strength, and interference. It is apparent from the comparison of results that the result obtained by NSGA-II is more superior than the results obtained by other methods in terms of both objectives.

  14. Accountable primary care a critical investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley, Marc D; Anderson, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Primary care physicians today can be expected to capture between 2,000 and 5,000 active patients who consider that physician to be "my physician." The geographic location of primary care physicians affects the payer mix of the hospital and its affiliated subspecialists. Hospital and health system CFOs would be wise to advocate investment in primary care physicians to secure market share. They should also develop compensation plans with a value-volume balance and establish ways to actively manage referrals.

  15. 1987 Oak Ridge model conference: Proceedings: Volume 2, Environmental protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    See the abstract for Volume I for general information on the conference. Topics discussed in Volume II include data management techiques for environmental protection efforts, the use of models in environmental auditing, in emergency plans, chemical accident emergency response, risk assessment, monitoring of waste sites, air and water monitoring of waste sites, and in training programs. (TEM)

  16. Health care engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Frize, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Part II of Health Care Engineering begins with statistics on the occurrence of medical errors and adverse events, and includes some technological solutions. A chapter on electronic medical records follows. The knowledge management process divided into four steps is described; this includes a discussion on data acquisition, storage, and retrieval. The next two chapters discuss the other three steps of the knowledge management process (knowledge discovery, knowledge translation, knowledge integration and sharing). The last chapter briefly discusses usability studies and clinical trials.This two-

  17. Inside ISIS II

    CERN Multimedia

    1981-01-01

    ISIS stands for Identification of Secondaries by Ionization Sampling. It was a drift chamber with an active volume of about 40 m3 built by Oxford University as a particle identifier for the European Hybrid Spectrometer (EHS). The photo shows the electrostatic grading structure and the central anode-wire plane, with Roger Giles standing just under it (Annual Report 1981 p. 57, Fig. 4). ISIS-II differed from the prototype ISIS-I only in the depth of the track (4 m instead of 1 m) thus extending the momentum range for particle identification to 50 GeV/c. See Nucl. Instr. and Meth. 224 (1984) 396, and Nucl. Instr. and Meth. 258 (1987) 26.

  18. CARES Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... today and CARES will receive 5% of your purchase! THEIR HISTORY: In 2001, Lauren’s Hope introduced the ... Go to the staff directory Find Us on Facebook Recent Tweets In case you missed it! http:// ...

  19. Dysarthria - care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speech and language disorder - dysarthria care; Slurred speech - dysarthria; Articulation disorder - dysarthria ... Dysarthria is a condition that occurs when there are problems with the muscles that help you talk. ...

  20. Residential Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Last name: Email: * Zip: * *required We will not sell or share your name. Residential Care Tweet Bookmark ... for the future. Use Alzheimer's Navigator ™ - our free online tool - to guide you as you map out ...

  1. Caring Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Alyson

    2012-01-01

    Children with autism may seem to not care about things or have the same range of emotions as those of us who see them and care for them. But they do have empathy and they can be taught how to communicate it, says the author, a teacher of children with autism. We simply need to listen to them, watch them, and be with them in their moment.

  2. Felipe II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Restrepo Canal

    1962-04-01

    Full Text Available Como parte de la monumental Historia de España que bajo la prestante y acertadísima dirección de don Ramón Menéndez Pidal se comenzó a dar a la prensa desde 1954 por la Editorial Espasa Calpe S. A., aparecieron en 1958 dos tomos dedicados al reinado de Felipe II; aquella época en que el imperio español alcanzó su unidad peninsular juntamente con el dilatado poderío que le constituyó en la primera potencia de Europa.

  3. How Academic Psychiatry Can Better Prepare Students for Their Future Patients: Part II--A Course in Ultra-Brief Initial Diagnostic Screening Suitable for Future Primary Care Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, C. Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Depression is inadequately treated in primary care (PC), primarily because of a failure to recognize symptoms of depression. The results can be catastrophic and include death by suicide. The prevention of suicide is a critical function of physicians. The recognition of depression is the first step to preventing suicide because suicide…

  4. Keeping the Edge. Air Force Materiel Command Cold War Context (1945-1991). Volume 3: Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    485 The Architects Collaborative (Harvard University) see Gropius , Walter , under Architects and Engineers, across the Department of Defense The...Sons (Newark, New Jersey) Volume II: 250 Graham, Anderson, Probst & White (Chicago) Volume II: 392, 455, 460, 461,475 Gropius , Walter ...models for Air Force research and development centers Gropius , Walter (The Architects Collaborative) see Architects and Engineers, across the

  5. Site Environmental Report for 1999 - Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggieri, M

    2000-08-12

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1. The Site Environmental Report for 1999 is intended to summarize Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterize environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlight significant programs and efforts for calendar year 1999. The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summary results from surveillance and monitoring activities. Each chapter in Volume I begins with an outline of the sections that follow, including any tables or figures found in the chapter. Readers should use section numbers (e.g., {section}1.5) as navigational tools to find topics of interest in either the printed or the electronic version of the report. Volume II contains the individual data results from monitoring programs.

  6. Urosepsis: from the intensive care viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, G; Reinhart, K

    2008-02-01

    A recent survey conducted by the Competence Network Sepsis (SepNet) revealed that severe sepsis and/or septic shock occurs in 75000 inhabitants (110 per 100,000) and sepsis occurs in 79000 inhabitants (116 per 100,000) in Germany annually. The prevalence of urosepsis in this survey was 7%. Early diagnosis of sepsis prior to the onset of clinical deterioration is of particular interest because this would increase the possibility of early and specific treatment, which in turn is the major determining factor of mortality in septic patients. Treatment of urosepsis consists of source control, early antimicrobial therapy as well as supportive and adjunctive therapy. For supportive therapy, adequate volume loading is the most important step in the treatment of patients with urosepsis in order to restore and maintain oxygen transport and tissue oxygenation. Therefore, supportive treatment should focus on adequate volume resuscitation and appropriate use of inotropes/vasopressors. The PROWESS study is the first investigation demonstrating the decrease in mortality in patients with sepsis following administration of activated protein C (APC). Thus, administration of APC to patients with two-organ failure or an APACHE II score > or =25 within the first 24 h after the first sepsis-induced organ failure is a part of adjunctive therapy. Additionally, current data support low-dose hydrocortisone therapy in patients with vasopressor-dependent severe septic shock. Time to initiation of therapy is crucial for surviving sepsis. Implementing new medical evidence in this context into daily clinical intensive care remains a major hurdle.

  7. Integrating Palliative Care into Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Rosemary D

    2016-09-01

    Improved quality of life, care consistent with patient goals of care, and decreased health care spending are benefits of palliative care. Palliative care is appropriate for anyone with a serious illness. Advances in technology and pharmaceuticals have resulted in increasing numbers of seriously ill individuals, many with a high symptom burden. The numbers of individuals who could benefit from palliative care far outweighs the number of palliative care specialists. To integrate palliative care into primary care it is essential that resources are available to improve generalist palliative care skills, identify appropriate patients and refer complex patients to specialist palliative care providers.

  8. Ovarian volume throughout life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelsey, Thomas W; Dodwell, Sarah K; Wilkinson, A Graham

    2013-01-01

    cancer. To date there is no normative model of ovarian volume throughout life. By searching the published literature for ovarian volume in healthy females, and using our own data from multiple sources (combined n=59,994) we have generated and robustly validated the first model of ovarian volume from...... to about 2.8 mL (95% CI 2.7-2.9 mL) at the menopause and smaller volumes thereafter. Our model allows us to generate normal values and ranges for ovarian volume throughout life. This is the first validated normative model of ovarian volume from conception to old age; it will be of use in the diagnosis...

  9. Quality-quantity decomposition of income elasticity of U.S. hospital care expenditure using state-level panel data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiwei; Okunade, Albert; Lubiani, Gregory G

    2014-11-01

    Economic theory suggests that income growth could lead to changes in consumption quantity and quality as the spending on a commodity changes. Similarly, the volume and quality of healthcare consumption could rise with incomes because of demographic changes, usage of innovative medical technologies, and other factors. Hospital healthcare spending is the largest component of aggregate US healthcare expenditures. The novel contribution of our paper is estimating and decomposing the income elasticity of hospital care expenditures (HOCEXP) into its quantity and quality components. By using a 1999-2008 panel dataset of the 50 US states, results from the seemingly unrelated regressions model estimation reveal the income elasticity of HOCEXP to be 0.427 (std. error=0.044), with about 0.391 (calculated std. error=0.044) arising from care quality improvements and 0.035 (std. error=0.050) emanating from the rise in usage volume. Our novel research findings suggest the following: (i) the quantity part of hospital expenditure is inelastic to income change; (ii) almost the entire income-induced rise in hospital expenditure comes from care quality changes; and (iii) the 0.427 income elasticity of HOCEXP, the largest component of total US healthcare expenditure, makes hospital care a normal commodity and a much stronger technical necessity than aggregate healthcare. Policy implications are discussed.

  10. Telementoring Primary Care Clinicians to Improve Geriatric Mental Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Elisa; Hasselberg, Michael; Conwell, Yeates; Weiss, Linda; Padrón, Norma A; Tiernan, Erin; Karuza, Jurgis; Donath, Jeremy; Pagán, José A

    2017-01-20

    Health care delivery and payment systems are moving rapidly toward value-based care. To be successful in this new environment, providers must consistently deliver high-quality, evidence-based, and coordinated care to patients. This study assesses whether Project ECHO(®) (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) GEMH (geriatric mental health)-a remote learning and mentoring program-is an effective strategy to address geriatric mental health challenges in rural and underserved communities. Thirty-three teleECHO clinic sessions connecting a team of specialists to 54 primary care and case management spoke sites (approximately 154 participants) were conducted in 10 New York counties from late 2014 to early 2016. The curriculum consisted of case presentations and didactic lessons on best practices related to geriatric mental health care. Twenty-six interviews with program participants were conducted to explore changes in geriatric mental health care knowledge and treatment practices. Health insurance claims data were analyzed to assess changes in health care utilization and costs before and after program implementation. Findings from interviews suggest that the program led to improvements in clinician geriatric mental health care knowledge and treatment practices. Claims data analysis suggests that emergency room costs decreased for patients with mental health diagnoses. Patients without a mental health diagnosis had more outpatient visits and higher prescription and outpatient costs. Telementoring programs such as Project ECHO GEMH may effectively build the capacity of frontline clinicians to deliver high-quality, evidence-based care to older adults with mental health conditions and may contribute to the transformation of health care delivery systems from volume to value.

  11. Analysis II

    CERN Document Server

    Tao, Terence

    2016-01-01

    This is part two of a two-volume book on real analysis and is intended for senior undergraduate students of mathematics who have already been exposed to calculus. The emphasis is on rigour and foundations of analysis. Beginning with the construction of the number systems and set theory, the book discusses the basics of analysis (limits, series, continuity, differentiation, Riemann integration), through to power series, several variable calculus and Fourier analysis, and then finally the Lebesgue integral. These are almost entirely set in the concrete setting of the real line and Euclidean spaces, although there is some material on abstract metric and topological spaces. The book also has appendices on mathematical logic and the decimal system. The entire text (omitting some less central topics) can be taught in two quarters of 25–30 lectures each. The course material is deeply intertwined with the exercises, as it is intended that the student actively learn the material (and practice thinking and writing ri...

  12. Misalignment between medicare policies and depression care in home health care: home health provider perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuhua; Eggman, Ashley A; Richardson, Joshua E; Bruce, Martha L

    2014-07-01

    Semistructured interviews with nurses working for home health care agencies in five states raise serious questions about the deleterious effects of Medicare policies and procedures on depression care. The agencies have strong incentives to limit nursing time in a given payment episode and to increase volume, making it difficult to provide high-quality depression care for homebound patients. Some nurses felt forced to "abandon" many patients with depression. The authors call for incremental policy changes in several key areas.

  13. Innovation in Health Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Alok D; Schroeder, Gregory D; West, Michael E; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2016-02-01

    As reimbursement transitions from a volume-based to a value-based system, innovation in health care delivery will be needed. The process of innovation begins with framing the problem that needs to be solved along with the strategic vision that has to be achieved. Similar to scientific testing, a hypothesis is generated for a new solution to a problem. Innovation requires conducting a disciplined form of experimentation and then learning from the process. This manuscript will discuss the different types of innovation, and the key steps necessary for successful innovation in the health care field.

  14. National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research quarterly technical report, July 1--September 30, 1992. Volume 2, Energy production research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    Volume II includes: chemical flooding--supporting research; gas displacement--supporting research; thermal recovery--supporting research; geoscience technology; resource assessment technology; and microbial technology.

  15. Mean nuclear volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O.; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Bichel, P.

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the following nine parameters with respect to their prognostic value in females with endometrial cancer: four stereologic parameters [mean nuclear volume (MNV), nuclear volume fraction, nuclear index and mitotic index], the immunohistochemical expression of cancer antigen (CA125...

  16. Wound Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsa, Ingrid M; Culp, William T N

    2015-09-01

    Wound care requires an understanding of normal wound healing, causes of delays of wound healing, and the management of wounds. Every wound must be treated as an individual with regard to cause, chronicity, location, and level of microbial contamination, as well as patient factors that affect wound healing. Knowledge of wound care products available and when negative pressure wound therapy and drain placement is appropriate can improve outcomes with wound healing. Inappropriate product use can cause delays in healing. As a wound healing progresses, management of a wound and the bandage material used must evolve.

  17. Estudio de la prevalencia de trastorno mental grave (TMG en los centros penitenciarios de Puerto I, II y III del Puerto de Santa María (Cádiz: nuevas estrategias en la asistencia psiquiátrica en las prisiones Study of the prevalence of severe mental disorder in the penitentiaries Puerto I, II and III of Puerto de Santa María (Cádiz: new strategies of psychiatric care in prison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Marín-Basallote

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Se pretende estudiar la prevalencia de TMG (trastorno mental grave en los internos recluidos en las tres prisiones de Cádiz (España que solicitaron asistencia psiquiátrica. Material y método: Estudio transversal que analiza la demanda asistencial psiquiátrica en los centros penitenciarios de Puerto I, II y III del Puerto de Santa María (Cádiz durante un año. Resultados: Se estudian 128 pacientes. Los diagnósticos psiquiátricos más prevalentes fueron los trastornos de personalidad (F60-69 (35.2%, el grupo de esquizofrenia, trastorno esquizotípico y trastorno de ideas delirantes (F20-29 (25.8% y los trastornos mentales y del comportamiento debidos al consumo de sustancias psicótropas (F10-19 (16.4%. El 46.1% corresponden a trastornos mentales graves (TMG. Discusión: Se confirma que hay una alta prevalencia de TMG en los presos de Cádiz, por lo que se precisa una elevada asignación de recursos para atender este grupo de enfermedades.Introduction: In recent years it has been observed that there is a high level of severe mental disorder within the Spanish prison system. Methods and Materials: A one year descriptive and transversal study of the psychiatric health care demand in the prisons Puerto I, II and III of Puerto de Santa Maria (Cadiz. Results: Of the 128 patients studied, the psychiatric diagnostics with highest prevalence were personality disorders (F60-69 at 35.16%, the next group was psychosis (F20-29 at 25.78%, and in third place mental and behaviour disorders due to use of psychotropic substances (F10-19 at 16.41%. 46.09% suffered conditions which are categorised as severe mental disorders. Discussion: This study confirms the high levels of severe mental disorder in prisons located in the area of the Puerto Real Hospital. We are making efforts to improve on psychiatric health care provided to these patients by working closely with the Prison system.

  18. Quality indicators for colorectal cancer surgery and care according to patient-, tumor-, and hospital-related factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathoulin-Pélissier Simone

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer (CRC care has improved considerably, particularly since the implementation of a quality of care program centered on national evidence-based guidelines. Formal quality assessment is however still needed. The aim of this research was to identify factors associated with practice variation in CRC patient care. Methods CRC patients identified from all cancer centers in South-West France were included. We investigated variations in practices (from diagnosis to surgery, and compliance with recommended guidelines for colon and rectal cancer. We identified factors associated with three colon cancer practice variations potentially linked to better survival: examination of ≥12 lymph nodes (LN, non-use and use of adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II and stage III patients, respectively. Results We included 1,206 patients, 825 (68% with colon and 381 (32% with rectal cancer, from 53 hospitals. Compliance was high for resection, pathology report, LN examination, and chemotherapy use for stage III patients. In colon cancer, 26% of stage II patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and 71% of stage III patients. 84% of stage US T3T4 rectal cancer patients received pre-operative radiotherapy. In colon cancer, factors associated with examination of ≥12 LNs were: lower ECOG score, advanced stage and larger hospital volume; factors negatively associated were: left sided tumor location and one hospital district. Use of chemotherapy in stage II patients was associated with younger age, advanced stage, emergency setting and care structure (private and location; whereas under-use in stage III patients was associated with advanced age, presence of comorbidities and private hospitals. Conclusions Although some changes in practices may have occurred since this observational study, these findings represent the most recent report on practices in CRC in this region, and offer a useful methodological approach for assessing quality of care

  19. INTRA/Mod3.2. Manual and Code Description. Volume I - Physical Modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Jenny; Edlund, O.; Hermann, J.; Johansson, Lise-Lotte

    1999-01-01

    The INTRA Manual consists of two volumes. Volume I of the manual is a thorough description of the code INTRA, the Physical modelling of INTRA and the ruling numerical methods and volume II, the User`s Manual is an input description. This document, the Physical modelling of INTRA, contains code characteristics, integration methods and applications

  20. Hospice Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hospice is a combination of services designed to address not only the physical needs of patients, but also the psychosocial needs of patients, their loved ones. Hospice combines pain control, symptom ... plan to address each patient’s individual needs. The hospice care team ...

  1. Respite Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... provided in a home, an adult day-care program or over a weekend in a nursing home or an assisted living facility. For more information on the NFCSP visit the Administration on Aging website at http://www.aoa.gov/ ...

  2. No-migration variance petition. Volume 3, Revision 1: Appendix B, Attachments A through D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    Volume III contains the following attachments: TRUPACT-II content codes (TRUCON); TRUPACT-II chemical list; chemical compatibility analysis for Rocky Flats Plant waste forms (Appendix 2.10.12 of TRUPACT-II safety analysis report); and chemical compatibility analyses for waste forms across all sites.

  3. Temperature dependence of polyhedral cage volumes in clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakoumakos, B.C.; Rawn, C.J.; Rondinone, A.J.; Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Ishii, Y.; Jones, C.Y.; Toby, B.H.

    2003-01-01

    The polyhedral cage volumes of structure I (sI) (carbon dioxide, methane, trimethylene oxide) and structure II (sII) (methane-ethane, propane, tetrahydrofuran, trimethylene oxide) hydrates are computed from atomic positions determined from neutron powder-diffraction data. The ideal structural formulas for sI and sII are, respectively, S2L6 ?? 46H2O and S16L???8 ?? 136H2O, where S denotes a polyhedral cage with 20 vertices, L a 24-cage, and L??? a 28-cage. The space-filling polyhedral cages are defined by the oxygen atoms of the hydrogen-bonded network of water molecules. Collectively, the mean cage volume ratio is 1.91 : 1.43 : 1 for the 28-cage : 24-cage : 20-cage, which correspond to equivalent sphere radii of 4.18, 3.79, and 3.37 A??, respectively. At 100 K, mean polyhedral volumes are 303.8, 227.8, and 158.8 A??3 for the 28-cage, 24-cage, and 20-cage, respectively. In general, the 20-cage volume for a sII is larger than that of a sI, although trimethylene oxide is an exception. The temperature dependence of the cage volumes reveals differences between apparently similar cages with similar occupants. In the case of trimethylene oxide hydrate, which forms both sI and sII, the 20-cages common to both structures contract quite differently. From 220 K, the sII 20-cage exhibits a smooth monotonic reduction in size, whereas the sI 20-cage initially expands upon cooling to 160 K, then contracts more rapidly to 10 K, and overall the sI 20-cage is larger than the sII 20-cage. The volumes of the large cages in both structures contract monotonically with decreasing temperature. These differences reflect reoriented motion of the trimethyelene oxide molecule in the 24-cage of sI, consistent with previous spectroscopic and calorimetric studies. For the 20-cages in methane hydrate (sI) and a mixed methane-ethane hydrate (sII), both containing methane as the guest molecule, the temperature dependence of the 20-cage volume in sII is much less than that in sI, but sII is overall

  4. Estimation of the water volume to be managed in the infrastructure of phase II of the artificial recharge plant in the El Carracillo region, Segovia (western area); Determinacion de los volumenes de agua a gestionar en las infraestructuras de la fase II del proyecto de recarga artificial del acuifero cuaternario de la comarca de El Carracillo, Segovia (sector occidental)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macias Antequera, C.; Martinez Gamo, R.; Martinez Rubio, J.

    2014-10-01

    The first hydrogeological investigation for the definition of the Carracillo aquifer (Segovia) was carried out in order to plan the best possible artificial recharge works provided for within the framework of the Royal Decree- Law 9/1998 El Carracillo Aquifer Recharge. Intake and Pipeline Work, Infiltration and Irrigation Adequacy (Segovia) These studies revealed the existence of two regions hydro geologically favourable for water storage from flows derived from the river Cega: the first known as the paleo-landform site located within the irrigation area, and the second area called the storage area located in the eastern sector of the district. In order to exactly estimate the minimum and maximum volume of water that has to be managed in the paleo-landform site over a period of five years, the Tragsa Group has carried out, at the request of the Ministry of Agriculture Fisheries and Food, some of the hydrogeological work, which included the exhaustive follow up of the piezometric behaviour of the aquifer and the detailed analysis of each of the external actions that have a direct influence upon it, such as the useful rain, the artificial recharge, the extraction by pumping, and the overland flow, amongst others. (Author)

  5. Are care plans suitable for the management of multiple conditions?

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Charlotte E.; Boyle, Frances M; Allyson J Mutch

    2016-01-01

    Background: Care plans have been part of the primary care landscape in Australia for almost two decades. With an increasing number of patients presenting with multiple chronic conditions, it is timely to consider whether care plans meet the needs of patients and clinicians. Objectives: To review and benchmark existing care plan templates that include recommendations for comorbid conditions, against four key criteria: (i) patient preferences, (ii) setting priorities, (iii) identifying conflict...

  6. Structure and characteristics of community-based multidisciplinary wound care teams in Ontario: an environmental scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamyan, Lusine; Wong, Josephine; Pham, Ba'; Trubiani, Gina; Carcone, Steven; Mitsakakis, Nicholas; Rosen, Laura; Rac, Valeria E; Krahn, Murray

    2015-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team approach is an essential component of evidence-based wound management in the community. The objective of this study was to identify and describe community-based multidisciplinary wound care teams in Ontario. For the study, a working definition of a multidisciplinary wound care team was developed, and a two-phase field evaluation was conducted. In phase I, a systematic survey with three search strategies (environmental scan) was conducted to identify all multidisciplinary wound care teams in Ontario. In phase II, the team leads were surveyed about the service models of the teams. We identified 49 wound care teams in Ontario. The highest ratio of Ontario seniors to wound team within each Ontario health planning region was 82,358:1; the lowest ratio was 14,151:1. Forty-four teams (90%) participated in the survey. The majority of teams existed for at least 5 years, were established as hospital outpatient clinics, and served patients with chronic wounds. Teams were heterogeneous in on-site capacity of specialized diagnostic testing and wound treatment, team size, and patient volume. Seventy-seven percent of teams had members from three or more disciplines. Several teams lacked essential disciplines. More research is needed to identify optimal service models leading to improved patient outcomes.

  7. FastStats: Hospice Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Day Services Centers Home Health Care Hospice Care Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Screenings Mammography Pap Tests Disability ... Care National Study of Long-Term Care Providers Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Centers for Medicare and Medicaid ...

  8. Small Diameter Bomb Increment II (SDB II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Bomb Increment II (SDB II) DoD Component Air Force Joint Participants Department of the Navy Responsible Office References SAR Baseline ( Production ...Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-439 Small Diameter Bomb Increment II (SDB II) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense...Funding 19 Low Rate Initial Production 31 Foreign Military Sales 32 Nuclear Costs 32 Unit Cost 33 Cost Variance 36 Contracts

  9. Elizabeth II uus kunstigalerii

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    Tähistamaks oma troonile asumise 50. aastapäeva, avab Elizabeth II 6. II 2002 Buckinghami palees uue kunstigalerii, mis ehitatakse palee tiibhoonena. Arhitekt John Simpson. Elizabeth II kunstikogust

  10. Caring during clinical practice: Midwives’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mmajapi E. Chokwe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caring forms the core of nursing and midwifery. Despite caring being an important emotional aspect of midwifery and nursing, there are general public complaints about uncaring behaviour in midwifery. Therefore, there is a need to explore caring from midwives’ point of view with the hope of identifying solutions and recommendations for midwifery practice. Furthermore, the study aimed to stimulate debate and discussion about the caring behaviour of midwives.Objective: To explore caring during clinical practice as perceived and experienced by midwives.Method: The study was contextual, exploratory and qualitative. The participants were midwives working in state and private hospitals in Tshwane,South Africa where BTech II and III midwifery learners were allocated for work integrated learning (WIL. Data collection was carried out through self-report using a questionnaire and focus group. Questionnaires were distributed to 40 midwives at private and state hospitals in Tshwane. This was followed by two focus group sessions to ensure that data is enriched. The hermeneutic interpretive approach was used to analyse data, and analysis continued until saturation.Results: Themes of caring and uncaring related to patient care and midwives emerged. Thefindings illustrated that the midwives had excellent theoretical knowledge of caring, but someof them did not display caring behaviour during clinical practice.Conclusion: Some of the midwives did not display caring behaviour. Implication for practicewas provided based on the research findings. Recommendations included measures of improving caring behaviours during midwifery practice.

  11. Biotechnology in China II. Chemicals, energy and environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsao, G.T. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Lab. Renewable Resources Engineering; Ouyang, Pingkai [Nanjing Univ. of Technology (China). College of Life Science and Pharmaceutical Engineering; Chen, Jian (eds.) [Jiangnan Univ., Wuxi (China). School of Biotechnology

    2010-07-01

    The biochemical engineering and biotechnology is now becoming the most important industry all over the world. China, as a country that has more than 1.3 billion people, has become one of the fastest growing countries in the world during the last several decades. Both the Chinese government and companies pay more and more attention on the research and the application of biotechnology. In the 11th five-year plan (2006-2010), Chinese government unprecedented enhanced the support on the biotechnology in both policy and finance. Currently, the biotechnology gains the most R and D funding in China. With the great support and the increasingly frequent exchanges from abroad, the biotechnology in China becomes more and more important in the world. In recognition of the enormous advances in biotechnology in China, we are pleased to present the second volume of Advances in Biochemical Engineering/ Biotechnology: Biotechnology in China II, edited by P. K. Ouyang, J. Chen and G. T. Tsao, relatively soon after the introduction of the first volume of this multivolume comprehensive books. Since the previous volume was extremely well accepted by the scientific community, we have maintained the overall goal of creating a number of chapters, each devoted to a certain topic by several Chinese research groups working in the field, which provide scientists in academia and public institutions with a well-balanced and comprehensive overview of this growing field in China. We have fully revised the volume and expanded it from bioreaction, bioseparation and bioremediation to more extensive issues in order to cover all recent developments in China into account as much as possible. The new volume of Advances in Biochemical Engineering/Biotechnology: Biotechnology in China II is a comprehensive description of the state-of-the-art in China, and a guide to the understanding the work of Chinese biochemical engineering and biotechnology researchers. It is specifically directed to microbiologists

  12. Transformation Volume Effects on Shape Memory Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kosogor

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that the martensitic transformations (MTs in the shape memory alloys (SMAs are mainly characterized by the shear deformation of the crystal lattice that arises in the course of MT, while a comparatively small volume change during MT is considered as the secondary effect, which can be disregarded when the basic characteristics of MTs and functional properties of SMAs are analyzed. This point of view is a subject to change nowadays due to the new experimental and theoretical findings. The present article elucidates (i the newly observed physical phenomena in different SMAs in their relation to the volume effect of MT; (ii the theoretical analysis of the aforementioned volume-related phenomena.

  13. Volume Regulated Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjær

    - serves a multitude of functions in the mammalian cell, regulating the membrane potential (Em), cell volume, protein activity and the driving force for facilitated transporters giving Cl- and Cl- channels a major potential of regulating cellular function. These functions include control of the cell cycle...... of volume perturbations evolution have developed system of channels and transporters to tightly control volume homeostasis. In the past decades evidence has been mounting, that the importance of these volume regulated channels and transporters are not restricted to the defense of cellular volume......, controlled cell death and cellular migration. Volume regulatory mechanisms has long been in focus for regulating cellular proliferation and my thesis work have been focusing on the role of Cl- channels in proliferation with specific emphasis on ICl, swell. Pharmacological blockage of the ubiquitously...

  14. 2nd International Conference on Health Care Systems Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sahin, Evren; Li, Jingshan; Guinet, Alain; Vandaele, Nico

    2016-01-01

    In this volume, scientists and practitioners write about new methods and technologies for improving the operation of health care organizations. Statistical analyses play an important role in these methods with the implications of simulation and modeling applied to the future of health care. Papers are based on work presented at the Second International Conference on Health Care Systems Engineering (HCSE2015) in Lyon, France. The conference was a rare opportunity for scientists and practitioners to share work directly with each other. Each resulting paper received a double blind review. Paper topics include: hospital drug logistics, emergency care, simulation in patient care, and models for home care services. Discusses statistical analysis and operations management for health care delivery systems based on real case studies Papers in this volume received a double blind review Brings together the work of scientists, practitioners, and clinicians to unite research and practice in the future of these systems Top...

  15. Long Hard Road: Volume II -- NCO Experiences in the Surge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    prove the flow of reports and analysis from the Commander in the field, imple- ment them to assist the commander in analyzing what is happening in his...have added numerous acronyms to our military lingo . For the purposes of brevity and clarity, this paper will focus on one: Forward Operating Base...terrain platoon, which was located in Heidelberg under V Corps. The unit provided topographic informa- tion through terrain and geospatial analysis

  16. Final Technical Report - Kotzebue Wind Power Project - Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana Zucchi, Global Energy Concepts, LLC; Brad Reeve, Kotzebue Electric Association; DOE Project Officer - Doug Hooker

    2007-10-31

    The Kotzebue Wind Power Project is a joint undertaking of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); Kotzebue Electric Association (KEA); and the Alaska Energy Authority (AEA). The goal of the project is to develop, construct, and operate a wind power plant interconnected to a small isolated utility grid in an arctic climate in Northwest Alaska. The primary objective of KEA’s wind energy program is to bring more affordable electricity and jobs to remote Alaskan communities. DOE funding has allowed KEA to develop a multi-faceted approach to meet these objectives that includes wind project planning and development, technology transfer, and community outreach. The first wind turbines were installed in the summer of 1997 and the newest turbines were installed in the spring of 2007. The total installed capacity of the KEA wind power project is 1.16 MW with a total of 17 turbines rated between 65 kW and 100 kW. The operation of the wind power plant has resulted in a wind penetration on the utility system in excess of 35% during periods of low loads. This document and referenced attachments are presented as the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant agreement DE-FG36-97GO10199. Interim deliverables previously submitted are also referenced within this document and where reasonable to do so, specific sections are incorporated in the report or attached as appendices.

  17. Annotated Bibliography for Lake Erie. Volume II. Chemical,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    Kennedy. 1970. Chlorinated hydrocarbon, microparticulate effects on microorganisms isolated from Lake Erie. Internat. Assoc. Great Lakes Res. Proc...nitrogen, ninhydrin- positive compounds, and protein amino acid concentration. Thon, J. - See: W. A. Steggles, No. 302. Traversy, W. J. - See: V. K...works, textile, glue, tanning and chemical industries, canneries, milk plants, laundries, garbage and other wastes of lesser importance. Waldron, A. C

  18. Preventive Medicine in World War II. Volume 2. Environmental Hygiene

    Science.gov (United States)

    1955-01-01

    carried out; or the losses from disease would have been so great as to require excessively large forces to perform a mission. In the Sicilian campaign...of wheat . Introduction of breeding stock and of herds from abroad into previously unaffected areas brought with them such economically disastrous...Dept of Agriculture to Chief Prev Med Serv 800. 8 May 45. 111): 720.4 DA. (2) The Hessian fly, which has been rept rted to damaga the wheat crop of

  19. Delays in nuclear power plant construction. Volume II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, G.E.; Larew, R.E.; Borcherding, J.D.; Okes, S.R. Jr.; Rad, P.F.

    1977-12-14

    The report identifies barriers to shortening nuclear power plant construction schedules and recommends research efforts which should minimize or eliminate the identified barriers. The identified barriers include (1) Design and Construction Interfacing Problems; (2) Problems Relating to the Selection and Use of Permanent Materials and Construction Methods; (3) Construction Coordination and Communication Problems; and (4) Problems Associated with Manpower Availability and Productivity.

  20. Emplacement hole drill evaluation and specification study. Volume II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-09-30

    This appendix contains pertinent data sheets, drawings, and photographs provided by the drill manufacturers Acker Drill Co, Calweld, Dresser Industries, Gus Pech, Hughes Tool, Ingersoll-Rand, Robbins, and Subterranean Tools.

  1. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume II - Military Aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future role in aeronautics. The findings and recommendations of the Panel on Military…

  2. Force Method Optimization II. Volume I. Theoretical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    be removed from our mailing list, or if the addressee is no longer employed by your organization please notify AFWAL/ FIBRA , W-PAFB, OH 45433 to help...2307 "N’ ~~Buffalo, New York 14240Tak20N 11. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS12REOTDE Flight Dynamics Laboratory ( FIBRA ) November 1982 AF Wright...Structures and Dynamics Division ( FIBRA ). The contracted work was performed between August 1980 and December 1982. The work was performed in the Structures and

  3. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 1999. Volume II: Life Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaussi, Rolf; Gschwend, Beatrice [eds.

    2000-07-01

    The existing activities of the Department of Life Sciences have grown out of the specific know how and the unique experimental possibilities available at PSI. Primarily, these have been and are complex facilities for using particle beams (protons, neutrons) on the one hand and know how in the production, handling and chemistry of radionuclides on the other. The common theme of the department has thus been the study and use of various types of radiation in therapy and diagnostics of human disease and in particular of cancer. The four units active in this area are: The major activity in the Radiation Medicine unit is Proton Therapy, which aims to further develop and optimise the world-wide unique spot scanning facility for irradiating malignant tumours with minimal damage to surrounding healthy tissues, including the established OPTIS program for the treatment of eye tumours. The Centre for Radiopharmaceutical Science represents a joint activity of PSI with the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETHZ) and the University of Zurich. Its major goals are the development of novel tumour targeted radioconjugates for cancer diagnosis and therapy and the production and evaluation of new PET (positron emission tomography) radiotracers for various applications in neuro physiology and drug development. The Institute of Medical Radiobiology analyses questions of the molecular biology of DNA repair. It is a joint activity of PSI and the University of Zurich. The Structural Biology unit is currently being established. A strong in-house research activity in macromolecular crystallography will complement the more user-oriented protein crystallography beam line, which is being built at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). In particular, tumour targeting by molecular vehicles and DNA repair are areas where structural information can provide important insights. Progress in 1999 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 1999 is also provided.

  4. Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2001. Volume II: Life Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaussi, R.; Gschwend, B. (eds.)

    2002-03-01

    The IMR group investigated some new approaches to tumour therapy. Several candidate molecules for targeting the tumour vasculature have been identified and are being produced for in vivo studies in tumour-bearing mice. The liposome technology is well established in this group and the goal is to produce suitably tagged liposomes for delivering a variety of cytotoxic agents to tumours. The Centre for Radiopharmaceutical Science, a joint venture with the ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich, pursues a number of projects that should eventually lead to novel radiopharmaceuticals for tumour diagnosis and therapy. Functionally, these radioactive drugs consist of a tumour targeting part, a radionuclide and a linking moiety, which stably connects the two. Optimisation of the components and their combination in terms of in vitro and in vivo properties as well as the efficient large-scale production of promising candidates for eventual first clinical trials is a demanding task. The major emphasis is still on using antibodies, antibody derivatives or peptides as tumour targeting vehicles. In collaboration with the Queens Medical Centre Nottingham, the first patients were treated with a {sup 67}Cu labelled antibody targeting bladder carcinomas. When completed, these studies should give us important information on the usefulness of {sup 67}Cu as a therapeutic radionuclide. Neuropeptides such as neurotensin and bombesin are promising starting points for tumour targeting as their receptors are over expressed on certain tumour cells. Presently, the efforts concentrate on preparing for further clinical studies with neurotensin derivatives (diagnosis of pancreatic tumours using {sup 99m}Tc) and further improving the stability and pharmacological properties of bombesin derivatives. In both these projects the ultimate goal is to label the optimised compounds with {sup 186}Re, a therapeutic radionuclide that can be attached in the stable tricarbonyl form which is easily accessible by a procedure developed in this laboratory. In vivo molecular imaging methods have important applications in disease diagnosis, in drug development and, increasingly, in monitoring the expression of genes introduced through gene therapy vectors. The PET tracer group of the Center for Radiopharmaceutical Science has successfully started operation of the new HIDAC camera, which is optimally suited to study new tracers during their development in small animals. Presently, the major efforts are in developing tracers for imaging glutamatergic and nicotinergic receptors of the brain as well as for amyloid plaques, the characteristic markers of Alzheimer disease. In the division of radiation medicine 27 patients have been treated on the Spot Scanning Gantry in this fifth beam period. In the OPTIS program, nearly 200 patients were treated for ocular tumours in 2001. A list of scientific publications in 2000 is also provided.

  5. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar Motwani

    2011-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  6. Advanced Weapon System (AWS) Sensor Prediction Techniques Study. Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    these lemmas can be found in [ll 32]. The latter property is called the circle criterion . It is often used as a rule for constructing a triangulation...points adjacent to the endpoints of the lower common tangent are examined. Using the circle criterion , we either connect: (i) the left endpoint (in VL...have a choice of either connecting L1 to R or R1 to L. Step 19 chooses the correct edge by applying the circle criterion . In Fig. 7 , KL contains R1

  7. Presque Isle Peninsula, Frie, Pennsylvania. Volume II. Appendices. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-01

    With the advent of the St. Lawrence Seaway, Erie has become available to the world market . Most of Erie’s foreign trade is with the United Kingdom...d. Labor Force 12.15 The Erie area has traditionally been a labor market oriented toward Industrial employment. Over the last 20 years, some 40-50...reservation encourages such activities as hunting, fishing, and birdwatching . Future plans envision a muneum and restaurant complex near the Perry Mo~nument on

  8. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 2000. Volume II: Life Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaussi, Rolf; Gschwend, Beatrice [eds.

    2001-07-01

    The existing activities of the Department of Life Sciences have grown out of the specific know-how and the unique experimental possibilities available at PSI. Primarily, these have been and are complex facilities for using particle beams (protons, neutrons) on the one hand and know-how in the production, handling and chemistry of radionuclides on the other. The common theme of the department has thus been the study and use of various types of radiation in therapy and diagnostics of human disease and in particular of cancer. The four units active in this area are: The major activity in the Radiation Medicine unit is Proton Therapy, which aims to further develop and optimise the world-wide unique spot scanning facility for irradiating malignant tumours with minimal damage to surrounding healthy tissues, including the established OPTIS program for the treatment of eye tumours. The Centre for Radiopharmaceutical Science represents a joint activity of PSI with the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETHZ) and the University of Zurich. Its major goals are the development of novel tumour targeted radioconjugates for cancer diagnosis and therapy and the production and evaluation of new PET (positron emission tomography) radiotracers for various applications in neuro physiology and drug development. The Institute of Medical Radiobiology analyses questions of the molecular biology of DNA repair. It is a joint activity of PSI and the University of Zurich. The newly established Structural Biology group is still in the build-up phase. A strong in-house research activity in macromolecular crystallography will complement the more user-oriented protein crystallography beam line, which is being built at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). In particular, tumour targeting by molecular vehicles and DNA repair are areas where structural information can provide important insights. Progress in 2000 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 2000 is also provided.

  9. Commencement Bay Study. Volume II. Land and Water Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-31

    the production of food, fiber, income, and public enjoyment . . . and develop and improve produc- tion and harvesting of seaweeds and sealife attached...to or growing on aquatic land or contained in aquaculture containers." -so- 2.3.1.4 State Environmental Policy Act of 1971 (SEPA) (RCW 43.21) SEPA...These Include: (1) aquaculture ; (2) cotmercial development; (3) marinas and boat launch facilities; (4) mineral extraction (excluding dredging); (5

  10. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 1998. Volume II: Life Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gschwend, Beatrice; Jaussi, Rolf [eds.

    1999-09-01

    The Department of Life Sciences, is aiming to perform high quality research in biosciences focused primarily on oncology and in close interaction with the technical facilities at PSI e.g. proton therapy, SINQ, SLS, and the national and international bioscience community. Within this department, the Division of Radiation Protection and Radioactive Waste Treatment is responsible for the radiological safety of the personnel, the installations and the environment at PSI, and it is charged with dismantling obsolete nuclear installations at PSI. The principal research and development activities of this division concern novel methods for neutron dosimetry, and the study of presence and pathways of natural and man made radioactivity in humans and in the environment. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  11. Census Report, Volume II, 1967 through 1974. Sanitized Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    3 068854 0601 WILBER , ALBERT D. 2 0607 WILBER , LES C. 3 095872 0693 81 Personnel Dose Information- 1967 GAMMA BETA ID ID ORG. DOSE DOSE NAME CODE...ROBERT 0. 2 1 0637 MCCLYMONDS, KEN A. 3 -- ;-- 09925i 0728 MCCOLPIN, FREDDY J. 3 100993 0599 120 Personnel Dose Information- 1968 GAMMA BETA ID ID ORG...WHITSETT, GEORGE A. 2 0636 WHITTAKER, ROBERT L. 2 0680 WIEL, STEPHEN 3 097571 0728 WIKNER, NILS F. 3 068854 0601 WIKSTROM, CHAS 3. 3 097743 0602 WILBER

  12. USAF Summer Faculty Research Program. 1981 Research Reports. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    triazines are widely employed as dyestuffs, and the much used melamine - formaldehyde resins are formed from 2,4,6-triamino-s- 2 triazines. The high...Acetylene Terminated Systems: Quinoxalines and Dr. William A. Feld Isomeric Sulfones 24 A Simulation Framework for the Evaluation ot D~r. John A. Fleming...reaction of hydrazine and its derivatives with salicylaldehyde, indanedione, p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde, 1,2-naphthoquinone-4 sulfonate , 2,3-dichloro-l,4

  13. Optics in Atmospheric Propagation and Adaptive Systems II. Volume 3219

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Fig. 4: Functional diagram of IRBLEM 57 For the meteorology data shown before and for the sensors we used, IRBLEM was run. The raytracing diagrams are...10 15 20 25 30 Range in km 17. July 1996 Waveband 8...12 um i i i i i i 35 40 45 Fig. 5: Raytracing diagrams for both...25 30 Range in km 35 40 45 15 20 25 30 Range in km Fig. 6: Raytracing diagrams for both wavebands on July 22, local time 20

  14. Internal Medicine in World War II. Volume 2. Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963-01-01

    of chronic valvular heart disease . The experience of the author and his associates was similar in unpublished studies of a smaller group of patients...iiueu- mat ic fever inl y ugl adults. Chronic valvular heart disease was the most ser110ios VOIiiiplicit ion. t[al 3sosIhat aort ic iufhevwas (demon...rheumatic fever in these individuals than valvular heart disease . Only a few of the study group described were disabled and nearly all were in school or were

  15. Solar energy research and development: program balance. Annex, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-02-01

    Each of the seven solar energy technologies that have been assessed in the study are treated: photovoltaic devices, solar thermal power systems, wind energy systems, solar heating and cooling systems, agricultural and industrial heat processes, biomass conversion technologies, and ocean thermal energy conversion systems. A brief technical overview of storage for solar electric technologies is presented and some principles concerning how different levels of success on electrical storage can affect the commercial viability of solar electric options are discussed. A description is given of the solar penetration model that was developed and applied as an analytical tool in the study. This computer model has served the primary purpose of evaluating the competiveness of the solar energy systems in the markets in which they are expected to compete relative to that of the alternative energy sources. This is done under a variety of energy supply, demand, and price conditions. The seven sections treating the solar energy technologies contain discussions on each of six subject areas: description of the technology; economic projections; the potential contribution of the technology in different marketplaces; environmental considerations; international potential; and the present and possible future emphases within the RD and D program. The priority item for each of the technology sections has been the documentation of the economic projections.

  16. Taxonomic Approaches to Enlisted Occupational Classification. Volume II,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    various media and about the social implications of the more pervasive of these, there is little of communication theory that is useful to those who...Ram (Hydraulic) 153 20.8 MK-48 System: MK-15 MOD-0 Otto Fuel Detector 153 20.8 Drip Pan 151 20.5 Oscilloscope 149 20.3 Hypodermic Needle 148 20.1...methods since important characteristics of a set of data may be overlooked if a single clustering method is used. Bretz, R. A taxonomy of communication

  17. Domestic Base Factors, Fiscal Year 1979. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    0 ZL L40u a N it. < - -Z 0* (a L - 1O 4 i U-<_j-q a i 0-- 01LO00 _;O L’ 0L 0 W I 01< LU0. ’- < 0 C)0- vI EZW - OZLJ -ou 0 - j a: -3- nd4 0- 0 P...I CD N F,0( OC0G DNCO- I-1. 0.0 0 V 000 voomGq~ SW WO-C No (L C IL N N C0 0COMCN a a I -c 0-- U 0 N en 0 N0 00 V 0qU- CL-O Z C 3 ~- EZW I- 4. - 0

  18. Lanchester-Type Models of Warfare. Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    verification of combat models are as follows: 594 (1) principle of uniformitarianism does not hold, (2) systems are only partially observable, (3...the principle of uniformitarianism , which holds that physical and biological process- es, conditions, and operations do not change over time (i.e. uni

  19. Advanced Composite Cost Estimating Manual. Volume II. Appendix

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-08-01

    0~~~~~~; - -m- O1 .,a 0 j in N j "s w f 0 0 Av .s 00 4 164 "i’ 3. -%’ 1*4*J. - N w 0-uo 16 fo moNi o w w -Q * * 0 h" v 0 a rq)E 4.1 w 0 -0 S p4 4 4...REkMOVE CHAIS 0.00J32 06COC43 I I 34 OPIN LC-OR 0*01402 o.ci’r2 I 31 PELEA *. 1.L. L JAO4 000035 22 36 RILtLA5E VAC. LINES 0.0031 !I kfMOVF lPAIk Ptk OVL...0 - NO 1- YES Ia YES INSERTS: 0 - NO 1 - YES 59 a *1 ACCEM-S COST PROJECTION CAM I UNIT MNER~aJboo~ AVE , LOT SIZiTYPE OF ESTIMATE UNIT COST aL. 21

  20. Site locality identification study: Hanford Site. Volume II. Data cataloging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-07-01

    Data compilation and cataloging for the candidate site locality identification study were conducted in order to provide a retrievable data cataloging system for the present siting study and future site evaluation and licensng processes. This task occurred concurrently with and also independently of other tasks of the candidate site locality identification study. Work in this task provided the data utilized primarily in the development and application of screening and ranking processes to identify candidate site localities on the Hanford Site. The overall approach included two steps: (1) data acquisition and screening; and (2) data compilation and cataloging. Data acquisition and screening formed the basis for preliminary review of data sources with respect to their probable utilization in the candidate site locality identification study and review with respect to the level of completeness and detail of the data. The important working assumption was that the data to be used in the study be based on existing and available published and unpublished literature. The data compilation and cataloging provided the basic product of the Task; a retrievable data cataloging system in the form of an annotated reference list and key word index and an index of compiled data. The annotated reference list and key word index are cross referenced and can be used to trace and retrieve the data sources utilized in the candidate site locality identification study.

  1. Snohomish Estuary Wetlands Study. Volume II. Basic Information and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-01

    moorage and may be used by boat,ýrs or swimmers . A boom is basically a floating log, moored a:t each end, the purpose o’ which is to enclose an area of...ndpbl ting or environment In which thle imt . humain safety, health and welfart’:; and 239.14 Application of XO to Civil Works ural functions of the

  2. The world made by Noble prize : chemistry volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-06-15

    This book has two parts of items related chemistry. The contents of the first part are Preface, Alfred Bemhard Nobel, Pioneers without Nobel Prize, Garbage Bag, Non-sticky Frying Pan, Nylon Stockings, Plastic Electricity, Synthetic Dyestuff, Gin and Tonic, Soccer Ball, Fertilizer, DDT, Dentifrice, Kimchi, Makgeolli, Ice cream, Anodyne, and firefly. The contents of the second part are PET-MRI, Color photo, Holography, Art diamond, an incandescent lamp and Neon Sign, Imitation works, Alchemy, Nuclear Power plant, Synthetic Oil and Sugar, Propane gas, Water Car, Estate agency Mars, and reference.

  3. COMPUTER PROGRAMMING TECHNIQUES FOR INTELLIGENCE ANALYST APPLICATION. VOLUME II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    COMPUTER PROGRAMMING , STATISTICAL PROCESSES), (*MAN MACHINE SYSTEMS, DISPLAY SYSTEMS), GRAPHICS, INFORMATION RETRIEVAL, DATA PROCESSING, SYSTEMS ENGINEERING, MILITARY INTELLIGENCE, CLASSIFICATION, AIR FORCE PERSONNEL.

  4. Handbook of International alloy Compositions and Designations. Volume II. Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-12-01

    Metallurgie, Paris, France (June 1977) 17 pp. 24. Conditions Generales de Recette et d’emploi des Aciers et Alliages Corroyes Resistant a Chaud Utilises...Company Name and City U C-0193 Uddeholmstahl GmbH, 4010 Hilden, West Germany 0-0020 Ugine, Aciers Electriques de Ugine, (Div. of PUG)13’, Savole...Republic Steel Corporation, Special Metals Div., Massillon, Ohio 44646 C-0020 Ugine, Aciers Electriques de Ugine, (Div. of PUG), Savoie, France (See

  5. Secretary's annual report to Congress. Volume II. Budget highlights, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    DOE budget requests for FY 1982 is summarized and then detailed. Budget highlights of the energy programs include: conservation; research, development, and applications (fossil energy, solar, electric energy and energy storage systems, magnetic fusion, nuclear fission, environment); regulation and energy information; direct energy production, and strategic petroleum reserves. Additional programs and their budget requests are given for: general science, defense activities, and departmental administration. The FY 1981 supplemental and recission request is indicated. Special budget analyses are given for Federal fossil, Federal solar, nuclear waste, conservation, and alternative fuels activities programs. The organizational table is presented. Extensive statistics are presented in the appendix. (MCW)

  6. HTGR plant availability and reliability evaluations. Volume II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwallader, G.J.; Hannaman, G.W.; Jacobsen, F.K.; Stokely, R.J.

    1976-12-01

    Information is presented in the following areas: methodology of identifying components and systems important for availability studies, failure modes and effects analyses, quantitative evaluations, comparison with experience, estimated cost of plant unavailability, and probabilistic use of interest formulas for rare events. (DG)

  7. Thailand--Secondary Education for Employment, Volume II: Background Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Bank, Washington, DC.

    This report, a series of three background papers, was prepared as part of the Thailand Secondary Vocational Education Sector Study. The first background paper, "Intro Changing Workplaces, Changing Skills: Views from the Thai Private Sector on Work-Organization, Employee Recruitment and Selection" (Charles Abelmann, Lee Kian Chang, Pinchuda…

  8. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

    1993-06-01

    A two dimensional, steady-state model for describing a variety of reactive and nonreactive flows, including pulverized coal combustion and gasification, is presented. The model, referred to as 93-PCGC-2 is applicable to cylindrical, axi-symmetric systems. Turbulence is accounted for in both the fluid mechanics equations and the combustion scheme. Radiation from gases, walls, and particles is taken into account using a discrete ordinates method. The particle phase is modeled in a lagrangian framework, such that mean paths of particle groups are followed. A new coal-general devolatilization submodel (FG-DVC) with coal swelling and char reactivity submodels has been added.

  9. Volunteer Roadmaps Update. Volume II. Figures and Tables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-10

    Tennessee 7-West South Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Central Texas Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, 8-Mountain Nevada, New Mexico , Utah, Wyoming 4...South Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Central Texas Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana,8-Mountain Nevada, New Mexico , Utah, Wyoming 4-West 4-Westi Alaska...Ne England 2 - Kid. Atlantic 3 - N. Cntral 6 - 4 - W. N. Central 5 - S. Atlantic 6 - E. S. Central 4 7 - W. S. Central S u Mocas 1 9 - Pciifc 8 10

  10. Static Tests of Segments of Tunnel Linings. Volume II. Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-06-30

    Naval Postgraduate School ATTN: Code 0142 Deputy Chief of Staff for Ops, & Plans Department of the Army Naval Research Laboratory ATTN: MOCA -ADL ATTN...Continued) Electromechanical Sys. of New Mexico , Inc. Rand Corporation ATTN: R. Shunk ATTN: A. Laupa Eric H. Wang R & D Associates Civil Engineering Rsch. Fac

  11. Research on Secure Systems and Automatic Programming. Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-10-14

    palTfibox SUOS;.rdmoo 30 .zequnu orq; A~qvzQPTsuo3 avnpoz OZ 0Tqv aq PKnom IT UOiIVTG OUT -zopio 042 30 AZIATITSu.1; 012 jnoqv aula ssooid BUT~rlI0UQS...iaLCCrapLrt.taLuoi i: possible only when there is a unique way of executinq * tic A~jS 4d i. .4 A u&iCiTION OF CASNET IN .103,,JUNE 1975,, Page b5

  12. ACII 2009, Affective Computing & Intelligent Interaction : Proceedings Volume II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mühl, Christian; Heylen, Dirk; Nijholt, Anton

    2009-01-01

    These are the proceedings of ABCI 2009, Affective Brain Computer Interfaces, a workshop that was organized in conjunction with ACII 2009, the International Conference on Affective Computation and Intelligent Interaction, held in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, September 2009. The workshop took place on

  13. Reference Book for the Nitrogen Industry Worker. Volume II,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-19

    ammonia-air mixture. This makes it possible to considerably reduce the time for activa - tion of the catalyst. The USSR makes the most frequent use of the...347.26 + 46.10 + 1115.8 = 1509.16 kg). TABLE 11-69. MATERIAL BALANCE OF GRANULATION TOWER (3) (5) PAC K__o_,__ 1HoxnO"CHTM Tcasom L) u pausa rpanyam blue

  14. Volume and surface photoemission from tungsten. II. Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feuerbacher, B.; Egede Christensen, N.

    1974-01-01

    Energy-distribution spectra of photoelectrons emitted normal to three single-crystal faces of tungsten have been measured for photon energies between 7.7 and 21.2 eV. The results are interpreted in terms of one-dimensional electronic properties along the symmetry lines in k space that correspond...

  15. Preventive Medicine in World War II. Volume 9, Special Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    overnment hospital was within easy distance by ambu lance. It was often used instead as a physiotherapy room. In smaller dispensaries, the X-ray apparatus...recognized: heat exhaustion, heat stroke , and heat cramps. Heat exhaustion.-Characterized by symptoms of lassitude, headache, nausea, mild cramps...admission rate for heat exhaustion in the total Army was 0.71 per 1,000, and the case fatality rate was 0.20 percent. Heat stroke .-High body temperature

  16. USAF Summer Faculty Research Program. 1980. Research Reports. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    Myhre, and R. F. Stribley, "Physiological and Psycological Effects of Heat Stress Simulating Cockpit Conditions," Aviat. Space Environ. Med., Vol...esteem and prestigue. The fourth responsibility of leadership involves capitalizing upon the individuality of the 62-7 members through problem solving

  17. Multiple Microprocessor System (MMS) Design Study. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    to configure a new TS, he then "grocery shops " through the library of emulated hardware modules and proceeds to build a TS of one or more computer...SRI SR3 = SRI Figure Z0.4.1-1 Beginning Details of the IEC for INTEL 808C 10-35 FETCH ROUTINE FETCH: IF(PCLOCK.EQ.1) Interrupt PEXE for COFF

  18. Operational Modelling of the Aerospace Propagation Environment. Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-11-01

    form is given in Equation 4. Equation 5 represents the temperature dependence of ihe line intensity. S C k - S5. +al S-; kdv (4) where 01 * Co R Apart...for the solution of the radiative transfer equation in a plane parallel or sphericalshell atmosphere with absorbing and scattering constituents. One...absorption and scattering coefficients approach to unity, which means that the extinction cross-section is twice the geometrical one. The numerical solution

  19. Geopressured geothermal bibliography. Volume II (geopressure thesaurus). Second Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepehrnoori, K.; Carter, F.; Schneider, R.; Street, S.; McGill, K.

    1983-05-01

    This thesaurus of terminology associated with the geopressured geothermal energy field has been developed as a part of the Geopressured Geothermal Information System data base. It is a compilation of terms displaying synomymous, hierarchical, and other relationships between terms. These terms, which are called descriptors, constitute the special language of the information retrieval system - the system vocabulary. The function of this thesaurus is to provide a standardized vocabulary for the information storage and retrieval system to facilitate both the indexing and subject-searching processes. In indexing, a thesaurus is used to translate the natural language of the document to be indexed into the standardized system vocabulary and to place the document at the appropriate level of generality or specificity in relation to the other documents in the data base. In subject retrieval, the thesaurus is used to match the natural language used in search requests with the system vocabulary and to find the most appropriate term to represent a concept.

  20. Impact of Chronic Conditions on the Cost of Cancer Care...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to findings reported in Impact of Chronic Conditions on the Cost of Cancer Care for Medicaid Beneficiaries, published in Volume 2, Issue 4 of the Medicare...

  1. Medicare Post-Acute Care Episodes and Payment Bundling

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Published in Volume 4, Issue 1, of Medicare and Medicaid Research Review, this paper provides an overview of results examining alternative Medicare post-acute care...

  2. Precision volume measurement system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Erin E.; Shugard, Andrew D.

    2004-11-01

    A new precision volume measurement system based on a Kansas City Plant (KCP) design was built to support the volume measurement needs of the Gas Transfer Systems (GTS) department at Sandia National Labs (SNL) in California. An engineering study was undertaken to verify or refute KCP's claims of 0.5% accuracy. The study assesses the accuracy and precision of the system. The system uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) in a temperature and computer controlled environment to ratio a known volume to an unknown volume.

  3. Increased incidence of neonatal respiratory distress in infants with mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II, Hunter syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodsworth, Charlotte; Burton, Barbara K

    2014-02-01

    Records were reviewed on all patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome) seen at a single institution from 1999 to 2013 to identify those with a history of neonatal intensive care. Eleven of 34 patients were in a neonatal intensive care unit and all had respiratory distress with 8 diagnoses of respiratory distress syndrome and 3 of transient tachypnea of the newborn. None of the infants were premature; four were delivered by cesarean section. These findings suggest that respiratory distress is more commonly observed in neonates with MPS II than in the general population. This may reflect airway disease already present in this disorder at the time of birth.

  4. Research on the association between physical activity volume and medical care cost in a community-based elderly population aged 70 years and over in Japan%日本仙台鹤谷地区70岁以上老年人运动量与医疗费用的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨光; 白翠瑾; 牛凯军; 永富良一

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨日本仙台鹤谷地区70岁以上老年人不同运动量与医疗费用之间的关系.方法 以日本仙台鹤谷地区70岁以上缴纳国民医疗保险的494名老年人为调查对象,通过现场问卷调查对不同运动量与医疗费用的关系进行分析. 结果 通过25个月对医疗费用的前瞻性研究发现.在运动时间一定的情况下,Ⅰ级运动量组平均每人每个月所消耗的住院医疗费、住院天数、门诊医疗费、门诊次数及总医疗费分别为(196.7±72.1)美元、(0.7±0.3)d、(308.7±54.4)美元、(6.2±1.1)次、(506.9±94.2)美元;Ⅱ级运动量组分别为(139.8±72.1)美元、(0.5±0.3)d、(295.3±54.6)美元、(6.1±1.1)次、(437.8±94.5)美元;Ⅲ级运动量组分别为(134.1±72.5)美元、(0.4±0.3)d、(278.8±54.9)美元、(5.8±1.1)次、(418.1±95.0)美元,3组老年人随运动量的不同,住院医疗费及总医疗费差异有统计学意义(F=5.85、8.11,均P=0.01). 结论 在运动时间一定的条件下,维持相对较高运动量与低医疗费有很高的相关性.%Objective To investigate the association between physical activity volume and medical care cost in elderly persons aged 70 years and over in Crane Valley, Sendal, Japan. Methods A total of 494 community-dwelling Japanese elderly persons living in residential area of Sendai City in northern Japan completed a self-administered questionnaire that included questions on physical activity. We ascertained total medical care costs through computerized linkage with claims lodged between November 2002 and December 2004 from the Miyagi National Health Insurance Association.Results After multivariate adjustment for potential confounders, the average monthly medical costs of hospitalization, hospital days, outpatient medical expenses, out-patient numbers and the total medical expenses in grade Ⅰ exercise volume group were (196.7±72.1) U.S. dollars, (0. 7±0.3) d, (308. 7±54.4) U.S. dollars, (6.2±1.1) times and (506

  5. Eight light flavors on large lattice volumes

    CERN Document Server

    Schaich, David

    2013-01-01

    I present first results from large-scale lattice investigations of SU(3) gauge theory with eight light flavors in the fundamental representation. Using leadership computing resources at Argonne, we are generating gauge configurations with lattice volumes up to $64^3\\times128$ at relatively strong coupling, in an attempt to access the chiral regime. We use nHYP-improved staggered fermions, carefully monitoring finite-volume effects and other systematics. Here I focus on analyses of the light hadron spectrum and chiral condensate, measured on lattice volumes up to $48^3\\times96$ with fermion masses as light as m=0.004 in lattice units. We find no clear indication of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in these observables. I discuss the implications of these initial results, and prospects for further physics projects employing these ensembles of gauge configurations.

  6. Use of APACHE II and SAPS II to predict mortality for hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Byeong Hoo; Park, Sang Kyu; Jang, Dong Kyu; Jang, Kyoung Sool; Kim, Jong Tae; Han, Yong Min

    2015-01-01

    We studied the applicability of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) and Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II) in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with acute stroke and compared the results with the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). We also conducted a comparative study of accuracy for predicting hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke mortality. Between January 2011 and December 2012, ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke patients admitted to the ICU were included in the study. APACHE II and SAPS II-predicted mortalities were compared using a calibration curve, the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and the results were compared with the GCS and NIHSS. Overall 498 patients were included in this study. The observed mortality was 26.3%, whereas APACHE II and SAPS II-predicted mortalities were 35.12% and 35.34%, respectively. The mean GCS and NIHSS scores were 9.43 and 21.63, respectively. The calibration curve was close to the line of perfect prediction. The ROC curve showed a slightly better prediction of mortality for APACHE II in hemorrhagic stroke patients and SAPS II in ischemic stroke patients. The GCS and NIHSS were inferior in predicting mortality in both patient groups. Although both the APACHE II and SAPS II systems can be used to measure performance in the neurosurgical ICU setting, the accuracy of APACHE II in hemorrhagic stroke patients and SAPS II in ischemic stroke patients was superior.

  7. Careful science?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Astrid P; Bønnelycke, Julie; Eriksen, Hanne Hellerup

    2014-01-01

    Concern about obesity has prompted numerous public health campaigns that urge people to be more physically active. The campaigns often include normative statements and attempt to impose restrictions on individuals' lives without considering the complexities of daily life. We suggest that broadening...... into different exercise groups. In this article we analyse the scientific work of the trial as representing entangled processes of bodywork, where data are extracted and objectified bodies are manipulated and care practices address the emotional, social and mundane aspects of the participants' everyday lives...

  8. Medical Care during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Medical Care During Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care During Pregnancy A ... both moms and their babies. Prenatal Care Before Pregnancy Prenatal care should start before you get pregnant. ...

  9. Home Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care is care that allows a person with special needs stay in their home. It might be for people who are getting ... chronically ill, recovering from surgery, or disabled. Home care services include Personal care, such as help with ...

  10. What is palliative care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comfort care; End of life - palliative care; Hospice - palliative care ... The goal of palliative care is to help people with serious illnesses feel better. It prevents or treats symptoms and side effects of disease and ...

  11. Electric power annual 1994. Volume 2, Operational and financial data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-28

    This year, the annual is published in two volumes. Volume I focused on US electric utilities and contained final 1994 data on net generation, fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost. This Volume II presents annual 1994 summary statistics for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are preliminary data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on form EIA-861) and for electric utility financial statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, and demand- side management. Final 1994 data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity and gross generation, as well as supply and disposition information, are also provided in Volume II. Technical notes and a glossary are included.

  12. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2017 Rates; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers; Graduate Medical Education; Hospital Notification Procedures Applicable to Beneficiaries Receiving Observation Services; Technical Changes Relating to Costs to Organizations and Medicare Cost Reports; Finalization of Interim Final Rules With Comment Period on LTCH PPS Payments for Severe Wounds, Modifications of Limitations on Redesignation by the Medicare Geographic Classification Review Board, and Extensions of Payments to MDHs and Low-Volume Hospitals. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-22

    making technical corrections and changes to regulations relating to costs to related organizations and Medicare cost reports; we are providing notice of the closure of three teaching hospitals and the opportunity to apply for available GME resident slots under section 5506 of the Affordable Care Act. We are finalizing the provisions of interim final rules with comment period that relate to a temporary exception for certain wound care discharges from the application of the site neutral payment rate under the LTCH PPS for certain LTCHs; application of two judicial decisions relating to modifications of limitations on redesignation by the Medicare Geographic Classification Review Board; and legislative extensions of the Medicare-dependent, small rural hospital program and changes to the payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals.

  13. Variable volume combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostebee, Heath Michael; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-01-17

    The present application provides a variable volume combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The variable volume combustor may include a liner, a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles positioned within the liner, and a linear actuator so as to maneuver the micro-mixer fuel nozzles axially along the liner.

  14. Site Environmental Report for 2012, Volumes 1& 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauer, Ron; Baskin, David; Bauters, Tim; Borglin, Ned; Fox, Robert; Horst, Blair; Jelinski, John; Lackner, Ginny; Philliber, Jeff; Thorson, Patrick; Wahl, Linnea; Wehle, Petra; Xu, Suying; None

    2013-09-30

    This report provides a comprehensive summary of the environmental program activities at LBNL for the calendar year 2012. Volume I is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters that include an overview of LBNL, a discussion of its Environmental Management System (EMS), the status of environmental programs, summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities, and quality assurance (QA) measures. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities.

  15. Investigation of Class I, II and III Integrons among Acinetobacter Strains Isolated from Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia Patients in Intensive Care Unit of Rasoul Akram Hospital in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Mohammadi-Barzelighi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multi-drug resistant strains of Acinetobacter spp. have created therapeutic problems worldwide. The objective of this study was to detect integrons  in Acinetobacter  spp. isolates  from Ventilator-Associated  Pneu- monia patients using PCR method.Methods: A total 51 Bronchoalveolar lavage samples were obtained from pa-tients in ICU and examined for Acinetobacter spp. infection by biochemical and PCR methods using blaOXA51-like primers. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using disk diffusion and MIC methods.Results: Among 51 patients with VAP (62.7% males, 35.2% females, mean age 53 year, 50 (98% were positive, with a high prevalence of gram-nega- tive bacteria, mainly Acinetobacter spp. (70%, from which A. baumani was detected in 34 (68% and A. lwoffii in 1 (2% of isolates. More than 90% of isolates were resistant to imipenem,  piperacillin+tazobactam,  third genera- tion cephalosporins and gentamicin, while the most effective antibiotic was colistin (100%. The correlation coefficient between disk diffusion and MIC was 0.808 (p = 0.001. Three Acinetobacter isolates (8% harbored integrase I gene but none of isolates contained Class II or III integrons.Conclusion: The results showed that colistin was an effective antibiotic andcan be used for treatment  of patients in ICU. Due to the high number of MDR isolates lacking Integrons it can be concluded that although class I in- tegrons are important among clinical isolates of A. baumannii, they have no significant  role  in  dissemination  of  antibiotic  resistance  genes  in  Rasoul Akram  Hospital in Tehran, Iran. The presence of IntI in A. lwoffii may be related to transfer of integron to A. baumannii which can be considered as an important threat for hospitalized patients.

  16. Intensive care patient diaries in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Storli, Sissel Lisa; Åkerman, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Critical illness and intensive care therapy are often followed by psychological problems such as nightmares, hallucinations, delusions, anxiety, depression, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress. Intensive care patient diaries have been kept by nurses and the patients' family since the early 1990s...... from a pragmatic practice to an evidence-based domain of inquiry propelled by academically prepared nurses. Several schools of thought were identified in our study: diaries as (i) a therapeutic instrument, (ii) an act of caring, (iii) an expression of empathy, and (iv) a hybrid of the above. Diaries...

  17. Palliative wound care: principles of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Barbara; Emmons, Kevin R

    2014-01-01

    Home care nursing occurs in a complex care environment. Nurses working in this setting care for a wide array of individuals who often are sicker and more complex than ever before. The high prevalence of wounds among these individuals requires that home care nurses have a certain level of knowledge to provide excellent care. Many times, individuals with wounds do not have the capacity to heal or are burdened with numerous symptoms affecting quality of life. In these cases, the home care nurse must understand concepts of palliative wound care to alleviate symptoms with the goal of improving quality of life.

  18. Spinal level of myelomeningocele lesion as a contributing factor in posterior fossa volume, intracranial cerebellar volume, and cerebellar ectopia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweeney, Kieron J

    2013-02-01

    McLone and Knepper\\'s unified theory of Chiari malformation Type II (CM-II) describes how the loss of CSF via the open posterior neuropore fails to create adequate distending pressure for the developing rhomboencephalic vesicle. The authors of the present article describe the relationship between the posterior fossa volume and intracranial cerebellar volume as being related to the distance from the obex of the fourth ventricle to the myelomeningocele lesion using a common mathematical model, the Hagen-Poiseuille law.

  19. Brookhaven National Laboratory 2008 Site Environment Report Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    2009-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in this volume in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the full report.

  20. Care in context: Becoming an STS researcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson-Graham, Melissa; Kenney, Martha; Ladd, Kelly; Murray, Cameron Michael; Simmonds, Emily Astra-Jean

    2015-10-01

    This collaborative article, written by graduate students who attended the Politics of Care in Technoscience Workshop, brings the themes in this volume to bear on their own developing science and technology study projects and research practices. Exploring the contours of five specific moments where questions of care have arisen in the course of their everyday research, they do not find a single or untroubled definition of care; instead, care is often a site of ambivalence, tension, and puzzlement. However, despite this uneasiness, they argue that taking the time to reflect on the multiple, sometimes conflicting, forms and definitions of care within a specific research context can inform the way that science and technology studies scholars envision and conduct their work.