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Sample records for care units theory

  1. 'Intensive care unit survivorship' - a constructivist grounded theory of surviving critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, Susanne; Salisbury, Lisa G; Rattray, Janice; Walsh, Timothy S; Huby, Guro; Ramsay, Pamela

    2017-10-01

    To theorise intensive care unit survivorship after a critical illness based on longitudinal qualitative data. Increasingly, patients survive episodes of critical illness. However, the short- and long-term impact of critical illness includes physical, psychological, social and economic challenges long after hospital discharge. An appreciation is emerging that care needs to extend beyond critical illness to enable patients to reclaim their lives postdischarge with the term 'survivorship' being increasingly used in this context. What constitutes critical illness survivorship has, to date, not been theoretically explored. Longitudinal qualitative and constructivist grounded theory. Interviews (n = 46) with 17 participants were conducted at four time points: (1) before discharge from hospital, (2) four to six weeks postdischarge, (3) six months and (4) 12 months postdischarge across two adult intensive care unit setting. Individual face-to-face interviews. Data analysis followed the principles of Charmaz's constructivist grounded theory. 'Intensive care unit survivorship' emerged as the core category and was theorised using concepts such as status passages, liminality and temporality to understand the various transitions participants made postcritical illness. Intensive care unit survivorship describes the unscheduled status passage of falling critically ill and being taken to the threshold of life and the journey to a life postcritical illness. Surviving critical illness goes beyond recovery; surviving means 'moving on' to life postcritical illness. 'Moving on' incorporates a redefinition of self that incorporates any lingering intensive care unit legacies and being in control of one's life again. For healthcare professionals and policymakers, it is important to realise that recovery and transitioning through to survivorship happen within an individual's time frame, not a schedule imposed by the healthcare system. Currently, there are no care pathways or policies in

  2. Core measures for developmentally supportive care in neonatal intensive care units: theory, precedence and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Mary; Gibbins, Sharyn; Hoath, Steven

    2009-10-01

    This paper is a discussion of evidence-based core measures for developmental care in neonatal intensive care units. Inconsistent definition, application and evaluation of developmental care have resulted in criticism of its scientific merit. The key concept guiding data organization in this paper is the United States of America's Joint Commission's concept of 'core measures' for evaluating and accrediting healthcare organizations. This concept is applied to five disease- and procedure-independent measures based on the Universe of Developmental Care model. Electronically accessible, peer reviewed studies on developmental care published in English were culled for data supporting the selected objective core measures between 1978 and 2008. The quality of evidence was based on a structured predetermined format that included three independent reviewers. Systematic reviews and randomized control trials were considered the strongest level of evidence. When unavailable, cohort, case control, consensus statements and qualitative methods were considered the strongest level of evidence for a particular clinical issue. Five core measure sets for evidence-based developmental care were evaluated: (1) protected sleep, (2) pain and stress assessment and management, (3) developmental activities of daily living, (4) family-centred care, and (5) the healing environment. These five categories reflect recurring themes that emerged from the literature review regarding developmentally supportive care and quality caring practices in neonatal populations. This practice model provides clear metrics for nursing actions having an impact on the hospital experience of infant-family dyads. Standardized disease-independent core measures for developmental care establish minimum evidence-based practice expectations and offer an objective basis for cross-institutional comparison of developmental care programmes.

  3. Strange and scary memories of the intensive care unit: a qualitative, longitudinal study inspired by Ricoeur's interpretation theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Helle; Egerod, Ingrid; Dreyer, Pia

    2016-01-01

    of patient experiences in intensive care unit, but large-scale studies are also needed to inform intensive care unit follow-up. Methods: The study had a qualitative design using phenomenological hermeneutic analysis inspired by Ricoeur's interpretive theory. Patients were assessed with Confusion Assessment...

  4. [Development of a program theory as a basis for the evaluation of a dementia special care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlbrecht, Laura; Bartholomeyczik, Sabine; Mayer, Hanna

    2018-06-01

    Background: An existing dementia special care unit should be evaluated. In order to build a sound foundation of the evaluation a deep theoretical understanding of the implemented intervention is needed, which has not been explicated yet. One possibility to achieve this is the development of a program theory. Aim: The aim is to present a method to develop a program theory for the existing living and care concept of the dementia special care unit, which is used in a larger project to evaluate the concept theory-drivenly. Method: The evaluation is embedded in the framework of van Belle et al. (2010) and an action model and a change model (Chen, 2015) is created. For the specification of the change model the contribution analysis (Mayne, 2011) is applied. Data were collected in workshops with the developers and the nurses of the dementia special care unit and a literature research concerning interventions and outcomes was carried out. The results were synthesized in a consens workshop. Results: The action model describes the interventions of the dementia special care unit, the implementers, the organization and the context. The change model compromises the mechanisms through which interventions achieve outcomes. Conclusions: The results of the program theory can be employed to choose data collection methods and instruments for the evaluation. On the basis of the results of the evaluation the program theory can be refined and adapted.

  5. [United theory of aging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubitsyn, A G

    2012-01-01

    In attempts to develop a means of life prolongation the humankind has created more than three hundred theories of the aging; each of them offers the original cause of aging. However, none of them has given practical result by now. The majority of the theories have now only historical interest. There are several different theories that are mainly under consideration currently. They are based on reliable, proven evidence: the free radical theory, the protein error theory, the replicative senescence theory, the theory of reparation weakening, the immunological theory, several versions of neuroendocrinal theories, and programmed aging theory. The theory presented here is based on conception that the life as the phenomenon represents many of the interconnected physical and chemical processes propelled by energy of the mitochondrial bioenergetical machine. Gradual degradation of all vital processes is caused by the programmed decrease in level of bioenergetics. This theory unites all existing theories of aging constructed on authentic facts: it is shown, that such fundamental phenomena accompanying aging process as the increase in level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the decrease in the general level of protein synthesis, the limitation of cellular dividing (Haiflick limit), decrease in efficiency of reparation mechanisms are caused by bioenergetics attenuation. Each of these phenomena in turn generates a number of harmful secondary processes. Any of the theories bases on one of these destructive phenomena or their combination. Hence, each of them describes one of sides of process of the aging initially caused by programmed decrease of level of bioenergetics. This united theory gives the chance to understand the nature of aging clock and explains a phenomenon of increase in longevity at the condition of food restriction. Failures of attempts to develop means from aging are explained by that the manipulations with the separate secondary phenomena of attenuation of

  6. Negotiated reorienting: a grounded theory of nurses' end-of-life decision-making in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Ann; Bousso, Regina Szylit; McCarthy, Joan; Kohlen, Helen; Andrews, Tom; Paganini, Maria Cristina; Abu-El-Noor, Nasser Ibrahim; Cox, Anna; Haas, Margit; Arber, Anne; Abu-El-Noor, Mysoon Khalil; Baliza, Michelle Freire; Padilha, Katia Grillo

    2015-04-01

    Intensive care units (ICUs) focus on treatment for those who are critically ill and interventions to prolong life. Ethical issues arise when decisions have to be made regarding the withdrawal and withholding of life-sustaining treatment and the shift to comfort and palliative care. These issues are particularly challenging for nurses when there are varying degrees of uncertainty regarding prognosis. Little is known about nurses' end-of-life (EoL) decision-making practice across cultures. To understand nurses' EoL decision-making practices in ICUs in different cultural contexts. We collected and analysed qualitative data using Grounded Theory. Interviews were conducted with experienced ICU nurses in university or hospital premises in five countries: Brazil, England, Germany, Ireland and Palestine. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 51 nurses (10 in Brazil, 9 in England, 10 in Germany, 10 in Ireland and 12 nurses in Palestine). They were purposefully and theoretically selected to include nurses having a variety of characteristics and experiences concerning end-of-life (EoL) decision-making. The study used grounded theory to inform data collection and analysis. Interviews were facilitated by using key questions. The comparative analysis of the data within and across data generated by the different research teams enabled researchers to develop a deeper understanding of EoL decision-making practices in the ICU. Ethical approval was granted in each of the participating countries and voluntary informed consent obtained from each participant. The core category that emerged was 'negotiated reorienting'. Whilst nurses do not make the 'ultimate' EoL decisions, they engage in two core practices: consensus seeking (involving coaxing, information cuing and voice enabling); and emotional holding (creating time-space and comfort giving). There was consensus regarding the core concept and core practices employed by nurses in the ICUs in the five countries. However

  7. A meta-ethnography and theory of parental ethical decision making in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Sara A; Nolan, Marie T

    2013-07-01

    To synthesize the existing qualitative literature about parent ethical decision making in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and to investigate the potential impact of culture on parents' decision making experiences. PubMed, CINAHL plus, and PsychInfo using the search terms parental decision making, culture, race, decision making, and parental decisions. Qualitative research studies investigating decision making for infants in the NICU from the parents' perspective were included. Studies involving older pediatric populations were excluded. Ten primary qualitative research articles were included. The primary author read all manuscripts and tabulated themes related to parents' ethical decision making. Study findings were synthesized using meta-ethnography involving translating concepts of separate studies into one another, exploring contradictions, and organizing these concepts into new theories. Key themes included parent involvement in decision making, parental role, necessity of good information, need for communication, desire for hope and compassion conveyed by providers, decision making satisfaction, and trust in caregiving team. A preliminary theoretical framework of ethical parent decision making was modeled based on the proposed relationships between the themes. Parent preferences for their involvement in decision making, their perceptions of communication with providers, and their relationships with providers are all important factors in the experience of making decisions for their infants. Needs of parents were the same regardless the ethnic or racial diversity of study participants. © 2013 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  8. Care management in nursing within emergency care units

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Juliane Tono de Oliveira; Patrícia Madalena Vieira Hermida; Fernanda Hannah da Silva Copelli; José Luís Guedes dos Santos; Alacoque Lorenzini Erdmann; Selma Regina de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Objective.Understand the conditions involved in the management of nursing care in emergency care units. Methodology. Qualitative research using the methodological framework of the Grounded Theory. Data collection occurred from September 2011 to June 2012 through semi-structured interviews with 20 participants of the two emergency care units in the city of Florianopolis, Brazil. Results. Hindering factors to care management are: lack of experience and knowledge of professionals in emergency se...

  9. Care management in nursing within emergency care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Juliane Tono de Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective.Understand the conditions involved in the management of nursing care in emergency care units. Methodology. Qualitative research using the methodological framework of the Grounded Theory. Data collection occurred from September 2011 to June 2012 through semi-structured interviews with 20 participants of the two emergency care units in the city of Florianopolis, Brazil. Results. Hindering factors to care management are: lack of experience and knowledge of professionals in emergency services; inadequate number of professionals; work overload of emergency care units in the urgent care network; difficulty in implementing nursing care systematization, and need for team meetings. Facilitating factors are: teamwork; importance of professionals; and confidence of the nursing technicians in the presence of the nurse. Conclusion. Whereas the hindering factors in care management are related to the organizational aspects of the emergency care units in the urgency care network, the facilitating ones include specific aspects of teamwork.

  10. Care management in nursing within emergency care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tono de Oliveira, Roberta Juliane; Vieira Hermida, Patrícia Madalena; da Silva Copelli, Fernanda Hannah; Guedes Dos Santos, José Luís; Lorenzini Erdmann, Alacoque; Regina de Andrade, Selma

    2015-12-01

    Understand the conditions involved in the management of nursing care in emergency care units. Qualitative research using the methodological framework of the Grounded Theory. Data collection occurred from September 2011 to June 2012 through semi-structured interviews with 20 participants of the two emergency care units in the city of Florianopolis, Brazil. Hindering factors to care management are: lack of experience and knowledge of professionals in emergency services; inadequate number of professionals; work overload of emergency care units in the urgent care network; difficulty in implementing nursing care systematization, and need for team meetings. Facilitating factors are: teamwork; importance of professionals; and confidence of the nursing technicians in the presence of the nurse. Whereas the hindering factors in care management are related to the organizational aspects of the emergency care units in the urgency care network, the facilitating ones include specific aspects of teamwork.

  11. Intensive Care Unit Delirium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsuk Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Delirium is described as a manifestation of acute brain injury and recognized as one of the most common complications in intensive care unit (ICU patients. Although the causes of delirium vary widely among patients, delirium increases the risk of longer ICU and hospital length of stay, death, cost of care, and post-ICU cognitive impairment. Prevention and early detection are therefore crucial. However, the clinical approach toward delirium is not sufficiently aggressive, despite the condition’s high incidence and prevalence in the ICU setting. While the underlying pathophysiology of delirium is not fully understood, many risk factors have been suggested. As a way to improve delirium-related clinical outcome, high-risk patients can be identified. A valid and reliable bedside screening tool is also needed to detect the symptoms of delirium early. Delirium is commonly treated with medications, and haloperidol and atypical antipsychotics are commonly used as standard treatment options for ICU patients although their efficacy and safety have not been established. The approaches for the treatment of delirium should focus on identifying the underlying causes and reducing modifiable risk factors to promote early mobilization.

  12. Sustaining a "culture of silence" in the neonatal intensive care unit during nonemergency situations: a grounded theory on ensuring adherence to behavioral modification to reduce noise levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swathi, S; Ramesh, A; Nagapoornima, M; Fernandes, Lavina M; Jisina, C; Rao, P N Suman; Swarnarekha, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to generate a substantive theory explaining how the staff in a resource-limited neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of a developing nation manage to ensure adherence to behavioral modification components of a noise reduction protocol (NsRP) during nonemergency situations. The study was conducted after implementation of an NsRP in a level III NICU of south India. The normal routine of the NICU is highly dynamic because of various categories of staff conducting clinical rounds followed by care-giving activities. This is unpredictably interspersed with very noisy emergency management of neonates who suddenly fall sick. In-depth interviews were conducted with 36 staff members of the NICU (20 staff nurses, six nursing aides, and 10 physicians). Group discussions were conducted with 20 staff nurses and six nursing aides. Data analysis was done in line with the reformulated grounded theory approach, which was based on inductive examination of textual information. The results of the analysis showed that the main concern was to ensure adherence to behavioral modification components of the NsRP. This was addressed by using strategies to "sustain a culture of silence in NICU during nonemergency situations" (core category). The main strategies employed were building awareness momentum, causing awareness percolation, developing a sense of ownership, expansion of caring practices, evolution of adherence, and displaying performance indicators. The "culture of silence" reconditions the existing staff and conditions new staff members joining the NICU. During emergency situations, a "noisy culture" prevailed because of pragmatic neglect of behavioral modification when life support overrode all other concerns. In addition to this, the process of operant conditioning should be formally conducted once every 18 months. The results of this study may be adapted to create similar strategies and establish context specific NsRPs in NICUs with resource constraints.

  13. [A theory on care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svandra, Philippe

    2008-12-01

    Trying to define the nature of care when you are a health care professional, means, inevitably, going back to the very source of your professional commitment. Caring, an essential form of responsibility for the other, is thus revealed as a way of behaving towards other people, as an active and concrete commitment testifying as much to the humanity of the one who gives it as to that of the one who receives it. Starting with the notion of the phenomenology of human capacity, Paul Ricoeur thinks of independence in terms of capacity. He calls upon work of the Indian economist Amartya Sen published in the 1980s on the notion of capabilities. This leads to conceiving disease or disability as a lack of elementary or basic capacity. According to Ricoeur, this notion of capacity can only be understood by looking at its contrary: vulnerability. In this way, only a weakened frail person can be called upon to become independent. Thus the human being, and particularly the ill human being, must be looked upon as both vulnerable, and thus suffering, and capable, and thus active.

  14. Applying organizational behavior theory to primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullangi, Samyukta; Saint, Sanjay

    2017-03-01

    Addressing the mounting primary care shortage in the United States has been a focus of educators and policy makers, especially with the passage of the Affordable Care Act in 2010 and the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act in 2015, placing increased pressure on the system. The Association of American Medical Colleges recently projected a shortage of as many as 65,000 primary care physicians by 2025, in part because fewer than 20% of medical students are picking primary care for a career. We examined the issue of attracting medical students to primary care through the lens of organizational behavior theory. Assuming there are reasons other than lower income potential for why students are inclined against primary care, we applied various principles of the Herzberg 2-factor theory to reimagine the operational flow and design of primary care. We conclude by proposing several solutions to enrich the job, such as decreasing documentation requirements, reducing the emphasis on specialty consultations, and elevating physicians to a supervisory role.

  15. The Motivation-Facilitation Theory of Prenatal Care Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillippi, Julia C; Roman, Marian W

    2013-01-01

    Despite the availability of services, accessing health care remains a problem in the United States and other developed countries. Prenatal care has the potential to improve perinatal outcomes and decrease health disparities, yet many women struggle with access to care. Current theories addressing access to prenatal care focus on barriers, although such knowledge is minimally useful for clinicians. We propose a middle-range theory, the motivation-facilitation theory of prenatal care access, which condenses the prenatal care access process into 2 interacting components: motivation and facilitation. Maternal motivation is the mother's desire to begin and maintain care. Facilitation represents the goal of the clinic to create easy, open access to person-centered beneficial care. This simple model directs the focus of research and change to the interface of the woman and the clinic and encourages practice-level interventions that facilitate women entering and maintaining prenatal care. © 2013 by the American College of Nurse‐Midwives.

  16. Noddings's caring ethics theory applied in a paediatric setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Anita; Nilstun, Tore

    2009-04-01

    Since the 1990s, numerous studies on the relationship between parents and their children have been reported on in the literature and implemented as a philosophy of care in most paediatric units. The purpose of this article is to understand the process of nurses' care for children in a paediatric setting by using Noddings's caring ethics theory. Noddings's theory is in part described from a theoretical perspective outlining the basic idea of the theory followed by a critique of her work. Important conceptions in her theory are natural caring (reception, relation, engrossment, motivational displacement, reciprocity) and ethical caring (physical self, ethical self, and ethical ideal). As a nurse one holds a duty of care to patients and, in exercising this duty, the nurse must be able to develop a relationship with the patient including giving the patient total authenticity in a 'feeling with' the patient. Noddings's theory is analysed and described in three examples from the paediatrics. In the first example, the nurse cared for the patient in natural caring while in the second situation, the nurse strived for the ethical caring of the patient. In the third example, the nurse rejected the impulse to care and deliberately turned her back to ethics and abandoned her ethical caring. According to the Noddings's theory, caring for the patient enables the nurse to obtain ethical insights from the specific type of nursing care which forms an important contribution to an overall increase of an ethical consciousness in the nurse.

  17. Understanding nursing units with data and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diers, Donna; Hendrickson, Karrie; Rimar, Joan; Donovan, Donna

    2013-01-01

    Nursing units are social systems whose function depends on many variables. Available nursing data, combined with a theory of organizational diagnosis, can be used to understand nursing unit performance. One troubled unit served as a case study in organizational diagnosis and treatment using modern methods of data mining and performance improvement. Systems theory did not prescribe how to fix an underbounded system. The theory did suggest, however, that addressing the characteristics of overbounded and underbounded systems can provide some order and structure and identify helpful resources. In this instance, the data analysis served to help define the unit's problems in conjunction with information gained from talking with the nurses and touring the unit, but it was the theory that gave hints for direction for change.

  18. Nutritional Care in Iranian Intensive Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Intensive care units (ICUs) provides intensive treatment medicine to avoid complications such as malnutrition, infection and even death. As very little is currently known about the nutritional practices in Iranian ICUs, this study attempted to assess the various aspects of current nutrition support practices in Iranian ICUs. We conducted a cross-sectional study on 150 critically ill patients at 18 ICUs in 12 hospitals located in 2 provinces of Iran from February 2015 to March 2016. Data were collected through interview with supervisors of ICUs, medical record reviews and direct observation of patients during feeding. Our study showed that hospital-prepared enteral tube feeding formulas are the main formulas used in Iranian hospitals. None of the dietitians worked exclusively an ICU and only 30% of patients received diet counselling. Regular monitoring of nutritional status, daily energy and protein intake were not recorded in any of the participating ICUs. Patients were not monitored for anthropometric measurements such as mid-arm circumference (MAC) and electrolyte status. The nasogastric tube was not switched to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy or jejunostomy (PEG/PEGJ) in approximately 85% of patients receiving long-term enteral nutrition (EN) support. Our findings demonstrated that the quality of nutritional care was inappropriate in Iranian ICUs and improvement of nutritional care services within Iranian ICUs is necessary. PMID:29713622

  19. Sleep in intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyko, Yuliya; Jennum, Poul; Nikolic, Miki

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine if improving intensive care unit (ICU) environment would enhance sleep quality, assessed by polysomnography (PSG), in critically ill mechanically ventilated patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Randomized controlled trial, crossover design. The night intervention "quiet routine...... Medicine) sleep scoring criteria were insufficient for the assessment of polysomnograms. Modified classification for sleep scoring in critically ill patients, suggested by Watson et al. (Crit Care Med 2013;41:1958-1967), was used. RESULTS: Sound level analysis showed insignificant effect...... patients. We were not able to further reduce the already existing low noise levels in the ICU and did not find any association between the environmental intervention and the presence of normal sleep characteristics in the PSG....

  20. Attachment Theory and Neuroscience for Care Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Thomas J; Dziadosz, Gregory M

    2016-09-01

    This article describes a model for care managers that is based on attachment theory supplemented by knowledge from neuroscience. Together, attachment theory and basic knowledge from neuroscience provide for both an organizing conceptual framework and a scientific, measureable approach to assessment and planning interventions in a care plan.

  1. The Living, Dynamic and Complex Environment Care in Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Marli Terezinha Stein; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Büscher, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    to understand the meaning of the Adult Intensive Care Unit environment of care, experienced by professionals working in this unit, managers, patients, families and professional support services, as well as build a theoretical model about the Adult Intensive Care Unit environment of care. Grounded Theory, both for the collection and for data analysis. Based on theoretical sampling, we carried out 39 in-depth interviews semi-structured from three different Adult Intensive Care Units. built up the so-called substantive theory "Sustaining life in the complex environment of care in the Intensive Care Unit". It was bounded by eight categories: "caring and continuously monitoring the patient" and "using appropriate and differentiated technology" (causal conditions); "Providing a suitable environment" and "having relatives with concern" (context); "Mediating facilities and difficulties" (intervenienting conditions); "Organizing the environment and managing the dynamics of the unit" (strategy) and "finding it difficult to accept and deal with death" (consequences). confirmed the thesis that "the care environment in the Intensive Care Unit is a living environment, dynamic and complex that sustains the life of her hospitalized patients".

  2. The Living, Dynamic and Complex Environment Care in Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marli Terezinha Stein Backes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to understand the meaning of the Adult Intensive Care Unit environment of care, experienced by professionals working in this unit, managers, patients, families and professional support services, as well as build a theoretical model about the Adult Intensive Care Unit environment of care.METHOD: Grounded Theory, both for the collection and for data analysis. Based on theoretical sampling, we carried out 39 in-depth interviews semi-structured from three different Adult Intensive Care Units.RESULTS: built up the so-called substantive theory "Sustaining life in the complex environment of care in the Intensive Care Unit". It was bounded by eight categories: "caring and continuously monitoring the patient" and "using appropriate and differentiated technology" (causal conditions; "Providing a suitable environment" and "having relatives with concern" (context; "Mediating facilities and difficulties" (intervenienting conditions; "Organizing the environment and managing the dynamics of the unit" (strategy and "finding it difficult to accept and deal with death" (consequences.CONCLUSION: confirmed the thesis that "the care environment in the Intensive Care Unit is a living environment, dynamic and complex that sustains the life of her hospitalized patients".

  3. The process of implementation of emergency care units in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Gisele; Konder, Mariana Teixeira; Reciputti, Luciano Pereira; Lopes, Mônica Guimarães Macau; Agostinho, Danielle Fernandes; Alves, Gabriel Farias

    2017-12-11

    To analyze the process of implementation of emergency care units in Brazil. We have carried out a documentary analysis, with interviews with twenty-four state urgency coordinators and a panel of experts. We have analyzed issues related to policy background and trajectory, players involved in the implementation, expansion process, advances, limits, and implementation difficulties, and state coordination capacity. We have used the theoretical framework of the analysis of the strategic conduct of the Giddens theory of structuration. Emergency care units have been implemented after 2007, initially in the Southeast region, and 446 emergency care units were present in all Brazilian regions in 2016. Currently, 620 emergency care units are under construction, which indicates expectation of expansion. Federal funding was a strong driver for the implementation. The states have planned their emergency care units, but the existence of direct negotiation between municipalities and the Union has contributed with the significant number of emergency care units that have been built but that do not work. In relation to the urgency network, there is tension with the hospital because of the lack of beds in the country, which generates hospitalizations in the emergency care unit. The management of emergency care units is predominantly municipal, and most of the emergency care units are located outside the capitals and classified as Size III. The main challenges identified were: under-funding and difficulty in recruiting physicians. The emergency care unit has the merit of having technological resources and being architecturally differentiated, but it will only succeed within an urgency network. Federal induction has generated contradictory responses, since not all states consider the emergency care unit a priority. The strengthening of the state management has been identified as a challenge for the implementation of the urgency network.

  4. The process of implementation of emergency care units in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele O'Dwyer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze the process of implementation of emergency care units in Brazil. METHODS We have carried out a documentary analysis, with interviews with twenty-four state urgency coordinators and a panel of experts. We have analyzed issues related to policy background and trajectory, players involved in the implementation, expansion process, advances, limits, and implementation difficulties, and state coordination capacity. We have used the theoretical framework of the analysis of the strategic conduct of the Giddens theory of structuration. RESULTS Emergency care units have been implemented after 2007, initially in the Southeast region, and 446 emergency care units were present in all Brazilian regions in 2016. Currently, 620 emergency care units are under construction, which indicates expectation of expansion. Federal funding was a strong driver for the implementation. The states have planned their emergency care units, but the existence of direct negotiation between municipalities and the Union has contributed with the significant number of emergency care units that have been built but that do not work. In relation to the urgency network, there is tension with the hospital because of the lack of beds in the country, which generates hospitalizations in the emergency care unit. The management of emergency care units is predominantly municipal, and most of the emergency care units are located outside the capitals and classified as Size III. The main challenges identified were: under-funding and difficulty in recruiting physicians. CONCLUSIONS The emergency care unit has the merit of having technological resources and being architecturally differentiated, but it will only succeed within an urgency network. Federal induction has generated contradictory responses, since not all states consider the emergency care unit a priority. The strengthening of the state management has been identified as a challenge for the implementation of the

  5. Seeking Humanizing Care in Patient-Centered Care Process: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali; Esmaeili, Maryam; Salsali, Mahvash

    Patient-centered care is both a goal in itself and a tool for enhancing health outcomes. The application of patient-centered care in health care services globally however is diverse. This article reports on a study that sought to introduce patient-centered care. The aim of this study is to explore the process of providing patient-centered care in critical care units. The study used a grounded theory method. Data were collected on 5 critical care units in Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Purposive and theoretical sampling directed the collection of data using 29 semistructured interviews with 27 participants (nurses, patients, and physician). Data obtained were analyzed according to the analysis stages of grounded theory and constant comparison to identify the concepts, context, and process of the study. The core category of this grounded theory is "humanizing care," which consisted of 4 interrelated phases, including patient acceptance, purposeful patient assessment and identification, understanding patients, and patient empowerment. A core category of humanizing care integrated the theory. Humanizing care was an outcome and process. Patient-centered care is a dynamic and multifaceted process provided according to the nurses' understanding of the concept. Patient-centered care does not involve repeating routine tasks; rather, it requires an all-embracing understanding of the patients and showing respect for their values, needs, and preferences.

  6. Integrated care: theory to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Jonathan; Checkland, Kath; Kristensen, Søren Rud

    2016-10-01

    'Integrated care' is pitched as the solution to current health system challenges. In the literature, what integrated care actually involves is complex and contested. Multi-disciplinary team case management is frequently the primary focus of integrated care when implemented internationally. We examine the practical application of integrated care in the NHS in England to exemplify the prevalence of the case management focus. We look at the evidence for effectiveness of multi-disciplinary team case management, for the focus on high-risk groups and for integrated care more generally. We suggest realistic expectations of what integration of care alone can achieve and additional research questions. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Incidence of intravenous drug incompatibilities in intensive care units

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machotka, O.; Maňák, J.; Kuběna, Aleš Antonín; Vlček, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 159, č. 4 (2015), s. 652-656 ISSN 1213-8118 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : medical error * graph theory * graph coloring * drug administration * drug incompatibilities * applied combinatorics * decision theory * medical * medication safety * intensive care units Subject RIV: FN - Epidemiology, Contagious Diseases ; Clinical Immunology Impact factor: 0.924, year: 2015 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/E/kubena-0437509.pdf

  8. Spiritual Care in the Intensive Care Unit: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jim Q; Nguyen, Christopher D; Lopes, Richard; Ezeji-Okoye, Stephen C; Kuschner, Ware G

    2018-05-01

    Spiritual care is an important component of high-quality health care, especially for critically ill patients and their families. Despite evidence of benefits from spiritual care, physicians and other health-care providers commonly fail to assess and address their patients' spiritual care needs in the intensive care unit (ICU). In addition, it is common that spiritual care resources that can improve both patient outcomes and family member experiences are underutilized. In this review, we provide an overview of spiritual care and its role in the ICU. We review evidence demonstrating the benefits of, and persistent unmet needs for, spiritual care services, as well as the current state of spiritual care delivery in the ICU setting. Furthermore, we outline tools and strategies intensivists and other critical care medicine health-care professionals can employ to support the spiritual well-being of patients and families, with a special focus on chaplaincy services.

  9. Culture Care Theory: a proposed practice theory guide for nurse practitioners in primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Marilyn M; Eipperle, Marilyn K

    2008-04-01

    Leininger's Theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality is presented as a foundational basis for the educational preparation, primary care contextual practice, and outcomes-focused research endeavours of advanced practice nursing. Discussion emphasises the value of care and caring as the essence of advanced practice nursing through the use of three modes of care, use of the Sunrise and other enablers, and the ethnonursing method. Education, research, practice, and key concepts of the theory are connected as essential components toward the provision of culturally congruent care to meet the healthcare needs of diverse individuals, families, groups, and communities by family nurse practitioners.

  10. Sustaining a “culture of silence” in the neonatal intensive care unit during nonemergency situations: A grounded theory on ensuring adherence to behavioral modification to reduce noise levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Swathi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to generate a substantive theory explaining how the staff in a resource-limited neonatal intensive care unit (NICU of a developing nation manage to ensure adherence to behavioral modification components of a noise reduction protocol (NsRP during nonemergency situations. The study was conducted after implementation of an NsRP in a level III NICU of south India. The normal routine of the NICU is highly dynamic because of various categories of staff conducting clinical rounds followed by care-giving activities. This is unpredictably interspersed with very noisy emergency management of neonates who suddenly fall sick. In-depth interviews were conducted with 36 staff members of the NICU (20 staff nurses, six nursing aides, and 10 physicians. Group discussions were conducted with 20 staff nurses and six nursing aides. Data analysis was done in line with the reformulated grounded theory approach, which was based on inductive examination of textual information. The results of the analysis showed that the main concern was to ensure adherence to behavioral modification components of the NsRP. This was addressed by using strategies to “sustain a culture of silence in NICU during nonemergency situations” (core category. The main strategies employed were building awareness momentum, causing awareness percolation, developing a sense of ownership, expansion of caring practices, evolution of adherence, and displaying performance indicators. The “culture of silence” reconditions the existing staff and conditions new staff members joining the NICU. During emergency situations, a “noisy culture” prevailed because of pragmatic neglect of behavioral modification when life support overrode all other concerns. In addition to this, the process of operant conditioning should be formally conducted once every 18 months. The results of this study may be adapted to create similar strategies and establish context specific NsRPs in NICUs

  11. Patient stoma care: educational theory in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jenny

    Patients undergoing stoma formation encounter many challenges including psychosocial issues, relationship concerns and fear of leakage. Leakage, inappropriate product usage and poor patient adaptation post stoma formation has cost implications for the NHS. Developing good, practical stoma care skills has been identified as improving patient outcomes, promoting the provision of quality care and improving efficiency within the NHS. However, a thorough literature search indicated that there is little research available on patient stoma care education. This is considered surprising by Metcalf (1999), O'Connor (2005) and the author of this article. This article considers and adapts generic educational theory to make it pertinent to patient stoma care education in order to bridge the gap between theory and practice.

  12. Frequency of candidemias in a tertiary care intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaqub, K.M.; Usman, J.; Zaidi, S.B.H.; Khalil, A.; Noor, N.; Gill, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of fungal infections in intensive care unit (ICU) of Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, a tertiary care health facility. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Intensive Care Department of Military Hospital Rawalpindi from 01 Jan 2012 to 30 Jun 2012. Methodology: A total of 89 patients were screened with stay of more than 5 days in intensive care unit. Thirty cases were enrolled in the study for investigation of fungal infections that had fever even after 05 days of being on broad spectrum antibiotics. Culture was done on blood, urine and catheter tip samples as per clinical condition of a patient. Results: Candida infection was found in 23.4% of study cases. The mean age of study patients was 41.2 +- 20.0 years while 63.4% were female patients as compared to 36.7% males. Conclusion: Fungal infections especially candidemias are quite frequent in the intensive care units. (author)

  13. Teamwork in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Vanessa Maziero

    2013-01-01

    Medical and technological advances in neonatology have prompted the initiation and expansion of developmentally supportive services for newborns and have incorporated rehabilitation professionals into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) multidisciplinary team. Availability of therapists specialized in the care of neonates, the roles of…

  14. Performance and burnout in intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, GJ; Schaufeli, WB; LeBlanc, P; Zwerts, C; Miranda, DR

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between three different performance measures and burnout was explored in 20 Dutch Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Burnout (i.e. emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) proved to be significantly related to nurses' perceptions of performance as well as to objectively assessed unit

  15. Dementia Special Care Units in Residential Care Communities: United States, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on Vital and Health Statistics Annual Reports Health Survey Research Methods Conference Reports from the National Medical Care Utilization ... dementia special care units, or in a more traditional setting where these residents are integrated with residents ...

  16. Patient stress in intensive care: comparison between a coronary care unit and a general postoperative unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Douglas de Sá; Resende, Mariane Vanessa; Diniz, Gisele do Carmo Leite Machado

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and compare stressors identified by patients of a coronary intensive care unit with those perceived by patients of a general postoperative intensive care unit. Methods This cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted in the coronary intensive care and general postoperative intensive care units of a private hospital. In total, 60 patients participated in the study, 30 in each intensive care unit. The stressor scale was used in the intensive care units to identify the stressors. The mean score of each item of the scale was calculated followed by the total stress score. The differences between groups were considered significant when p < 0.05. Results The mean ages of patients were 55.63 ± 13.58 years in the coronary intensive care unit and 53.60 ± 17.47 years in the general postoperative intensive care unit. For patients in the coronary intensive care unit, the main stressors were “being in pain”, “being unable to fulfill family roles” and “being bored”. For patients in the general postoperative intensive care unit, the main stressors were “being in pain”, “being unable to fulfill family roles” and “not being able to communicate”. The mean total stress scores were 104.20 ± 30.95 in the coronary intensive care unit and 116.66 ± 23.72 (p = 0.085) in the general postoperative intensive care unit. When each stressor was compared separately, significant differences were noted only between three items. “Having nurses constantly doing things around your bed” was more stressful to the patients in the general postoperative intensive care unit than to those in the coronary intensive care unit (p = 0.013). Conversely, “hearing unfamiliar sounds and noises” and “hearing people talk about you” were the most stressful items for the patients in the coronary intensive care unit (p = 0.046 and 0.005, respectively). Conclusion The perception of major stressors and the total stress score were similar between patients

  17. Health professionals' perceptions about their clinical performance and the influence of audit and feedback on their intentions to improve practice: a theory-based study in Dutch intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gude, Wouter T; Roos-Blom, Marie-José; van der Veer, Sabine N; Dongelmans, Dave A; de Jonge, Evert; Francis, Jill J; Peek, Niels; de Keizer, Nicolette F

    2018-02-17

    Audit and feedback aims to guide health professionals in improving aspects of their practice that need it most. Evidence suggests that feedback fails to increase accuracy of professional perceptions about clinical performance, which likely reduces audit and feedback effectiveness. This study investigates health professionals' perceptions about their clinical performance and the influence of feedback on their intentions to change practice. We conducted an online laboratory experiment guided by Control Theory with 72 intensive care professionals from 21 units. For each of four new pain management indicators, we collected professionals' perceptions about their clinical performance; peer performance; targets; and improvement intentions before and after receiving first-time feedback. An electronic audit and feedback dashboard provided ICU's own performance, median and top 10% peer performance, and improvement recommendations. The experiment took place approximately 1 month before units enrolled into a cluster-randomised trial assessing the impact of adding a toolbox with suggested actions and materials to improve intensive care pain management. During the experiment, the toolbox was inaccessible; all participants accessed the same version of the dashboard. We analysed 288 observations. In 53.8%, intensive care professionals overestimated their clinical performance; but in only 13.5%, they underestimated it. On average, performance was overestimated by 22.9% (on a 0-100% scale). Professionals similarly overestimated peer performance, and set targets 20.3% higher than the top performance benchmarks. In 68.4% of cases, intentions to improve practice were consistent with actual gaps in performance, even before professionals had received feedback; which increased to 79.9% after receiving feedback (odds ratio, 2.41; 95% CI, 1.53 to 3.78). However, in 56.3% of cases, professionals still wanted to improve care aspects at which they were already top performers. Alternatively

  18. Antibiotic Policies in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nese Saltoglu

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial management of patients in the Intensive Care Units are complex. Antimicrobial resistance is an increasing problem. Effective strategies for the prevention of antimicrobial resistance in ICUs have focused on limiting the unnecessary use of antibiotics and increasing compliance with infection control practices. Antibiotic policies have been implemented to modify antibiotic use, including national or regional formulary manipulations, antibiotic restriction forms, care plans, antibiotic cycling and computer assigned antimicrobial therapy. Moreover, infectious diseases consultation is a simple way to limit antibiotic use in ICU units. To improve rational antimicrobial using a multidisiplinary approach is suggested. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(4.000: 299-309

  19. The mourning before: can anticipatory grief theory inform family care in adult intensive care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Maureen A

    2010-12-01

    Although anticipatory grief is a much-debated and critiqued bereavement concept, it does offer a way of understanding and exploring expected loss that may be helpful in certain situations. In end-of-life care in adult intensive care units, families often act as proxy decision makers for patients in the transition from curative treatment efforts to planned treatment withdrawal. Despite there being a developed evidence base to inform care of families at this time, few of the clinical studies that provided this evidence were underpinned by bereavement theory. Focusing on end-of-life intensive care practices, this paper integrates work on anticipatory grief and family interventions to present a family-centred framework of care. Through this it is argued that the complex needs of families must be more comprehensively understood by doctors and nurses and that interventions must be more systematically planned to improve quality end-of-life care for families in this setting.

  20. Polygenetic Aspect of Unit Theory Oil Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galant, Yuri

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of a unified theory Oil Generation one of important moments is the consideration of the distribution of oil in the Earth's Crust. Analysis of the distribution of oil deposits in the Earth's Crust showed that oil distributed throughout the stratigraphic section from ancient to modern sediments and from a depth of 12 kilometers to the Earth's surface. The distribution of oil almost meets all stages of metamorphism of rocks. Correlation of the section of oil distribution to genetic types of ore deposits showed that each genetic type ore deposits has its analogue oil field . So it is possible to classify oil fields on 1) endogenous: the actual magmatic, post-magmatic, contact-metasomatic (skarn), hydrothermal, exhalation, carbonatite, pegmatite, 2) exogenous: weathering, oxidation, sedimentary,3) metamorphogenic: metamorphosed, metamorphic. Model of such distribution of oil deposits can be a process of successive formation of oil deposits of mantle degassing tube. Thus oil is polygenic by way of formation of deposits, but their source is united.

  1. [Medication errors in Spanish intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, P; Martín, M C; Alonso, A; Gutiérrez, I; Alvarez, J; Becerril, F

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the incidence of medication errors in Spanish intensive care units. Post hoc study of the SYREC trial. A longitudinal observational study carried out during 24 hours in patients admitted to the ICU. Spanish intensive care units. Patients admitted to the intensive care unit participating in the SYREC during the period of study. Risk, individual risk, and rate of medication errors. The final study sample consisted of 1017 patients from 79 intensive care units; 591 (58%) were affected by one or more incidents. Of these, 253 (43%) had at least one medication-related incident. The total number of incidents reported was 1424, of which 350 (25%) were medication errors. The risk of suffering at least one incident was 22% (IQR: 8-50%) while the individual risk was 21% (IQR: 8-42%). The medication error rate was 1.13 medication errors per 100 patient-days of stay. Most incidents occurred in the prescription (34%) and administration (28%) phases, 16% resulted in patient harm, and 82% were considered "totally avoidable". Medication errors are among the most frequent types of incidents in critically ill patients, and are more common in the prescription and administration stages. Although most such incidents have no clinical consequences, a significant percentage prove harmful for the patient, and a large proportion are avoidable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  2. Agonizing care: care ethics, agonistic feminism and a political theory of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloyes, Kristin G

    2002-09-01

    'Care' is central to nursing theory and practice, and has been described in a variety of ways. Intense conversations about care have been developing in other fields of study as well, from the social sciences to the humanities. Care ethics has grown out of intellectual exchange between feminist thought, moral theory and the critique of traditional western political philosophy. However, care ethics is not without its critics, as these accounts of care have also sparked vigorous challenges. This paper traces the construct of care through nursing theory, care ethics, feminist critiques of moral and political theory and agonistic feminism to outline a set of problematics that a political theory of care should engage. It discusses how care is conventionally posited in more or less essentialist, universalizing and naturalizing terms. It introduces the ideas of feminist theorists who resist dichotomizing care and the political, and situate care in the context of power and politics. The tensions between care feminism and agonistic feminism are highlighted in order to explore the potential of theorizing both care and nursing in political terms.

  3. [Primary care in the United Kingdom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-03-01

    The inadequate planning of health professionals in Spain has boosted the way out of doctors overseas. The United Kingdom is one of the countries chosen by Spanish doctors to develop their job. The National Health Service is a health system similar to the Spanish one. Health care services are financing mainly through taxes. The right to health care is linked to the citizen condition. The provision of health care is a mix-up of public and private enterprises. Primary Care is much closed to Spanish Primary Care. Doctors are "self-employed like" professionals. They can set their surgeries in a free area previously designed by the government. They have the right to make their own team and to manage their own budget. Medical salary is linked to professional capability and curriculum vitae. The main role of a General Practitioner is the prevention. Team work and coordination within primary and specialised care is more developed than in Spain. The access to diagnostic tests and to the specialist is controlled through waiting lists. General Practitioners work as gate-keepers. Patients may choose freely their doctor and consultations and hospital care are free at the point of use. Within the United Kingdom there are also health regions with problems due to inequalities to access and to treatment. There is a training path and the access to it is by Curricula. The number of training jobs is regulated by the local needs. Continuing education is compulsory and strictly regulated local and nationally. The National Health Service was the example for the Spanish health reform in 1986. While Spanish Primary health care is of quality, the efficiency of the health system would improve if staff in Primary Care settings were managed in a similar way to the British's. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Theory X/Y in the Health Care Setting: Employee Perceptions, Attitudes, and Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prottas, David J; Nummelin, Mary Rogers

    Douglas McGregor's conceptualization of Theory X and Theory Y has influenced management practices for almost six decades, despite the relative paucity of empirical support. This empirical study examined the relationships between health care employees' perceptions of (1) manager Theory Y and Theory X orientations; (2) work unit psychological safety, organizational citizenship behavior, and service quality; and (3) the employing entity. The study used survey data from more than 3500 employees of a large US health care system and analyzed them using confirmatory factor and hierarchical regression analyses. Results indicate that McGregor's conceptualization is best considered as two separate constructs-Theory Y and Theory X-rather than as one-dimensional X/Y construct. This study's three dependent variables were positively related to Theory Y and negatively related to Theory X, with larger Theory Y effect sizes. Psychological safety partially mediated the relationship between Theory Y and the dependent variables Y. Practical implications are presented.

  5. Hand hygiene in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschudin-Sutter, Sarah; Pargger, Hans; Widmer, Andreas F

    2010-08-01

    Healthcare-associated infections affect 1.4 million patients at any time worldwide, as estimated by the World Health Organization. In intensive care units, the burden of healthcare-associated infections is greatly increased, causing additional morbidity and mortality. Multidrug-resistant pathogens are commonly involved in such infections and render effective treatment challenging. Proper hand hygiene is the single most important, simplest, and least expensive means of preventing healthcare-associated infections. In addition, it is equally important to stop transmission of multidrug-resistant pathogens. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and World Health Organization guidelines on hand hygiene in health care, alcohol-based handrub should be used as the preferred means for routine hand antisepsis. Alcohols have excellent in vitro activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including multidrug-resistant pathogens, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a variety of fungi, and most viruses. Some pathogens, however, such as Clostridium difficile, Bacillus anthracis, and noroviruses, may require special hand hygiene measures. Failure to provide user friendliness of hand hygiene equipment and shortage of staff are predictors for noncompliance, especially in the intensive care unit setting. Therefore, practical approaches to promote hand hygiene in the intensive care unit include provision of a minimal number of handrub dispensers per bed, monitoring of compliance, and choice of the most attractive product. Lack of knowledge of guidelines for hand hygiene, lack of recognition of hand hygiene opportunities during patient care, and lack of awareness of the risk of cross-transmission of pathogens are barriers to good hand hygiene practices. Multidisciplinary programs to promote increased use of alcoholic handrub lead to an increased compliance of healthcare

  6. Infection control in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Mohamed F; Askari, Reza

    2014-12-01

    It is critical for health care personnel to recognize and appreciate the detrimental impact of intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired infections. The economic, clinical, and social expenses to patients and hospitals are overwhelming. To limit the incidence of ICU-acquired infections, aggressive infection control measures must be implemented and enforced. Researchers and national committees have developed and continue to develop evidence-based guidelines to control ICU infections. A multifaceted approach, including infection prevention committees, antimicrobial stewardship programs, daily reassessments-intervention bundles, identifying and minimizing risk factors, and continuing staff education programs, is essential. Infection control in the ICU is an evolving area of critical care research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dermatology in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The intensive care unit (ICU represents a special environment for patients. We analyzed patients in the ICU/ high care unit (HCU with respect to dermatology counselling and skin problems.Setting: Academic Teaching Hospital over a 10 month period.Methods: The total number of patients of the ICU was 1,208 with a mean stay of 4.1 days. In the HCU the mean stay was 16 days. Diagnosis leading to admission were analyzed. All files of dermatological counselling were evaluated in detail.Results: Fifty-five patients with dermatologic problems were identified: 19 women and 26 males. The age ranged from 22 to 90 years of life (mean ± standard deviation: 67.2 ± 17.4 years. The total number of consultations were 85. The range of repeated dermatological consultation ranged from two to ten. The major reasons were skin and soft tissue infections, adverse drug reactions, chronic wounds including pressure sores and skin irritation or dermatitis. Pre-existing skin conditions may complicate the treatment and care during ICU/HCU stay.Conclusion: A tight collaboration between of the medical staff of ICU/HCU and dermatology department will ensure a rapid diagnosis and treatment of various skin conditions in the ICU, without increasing the costs significantly. Interdisciplinary education of nursing staff contributes to improved skin care in the ICU/HCU and helps to prevent acute skin failure.

  8. Intensive care unit audit: invasive procedure surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariama Amaral Michels

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale and objective: currently, Healthcare-associated Infections (HAIs constitute a serious public health problem. It is estimated that for every ten hospitalized patients, one will have infection after admission, generating high costs resulting from increased length of hospitalization, additional diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. The intensive care unit (ICU, due to its characteristics, is one of the most complex units of the hospital environment, a result of the equipment, the available technology, the severity of inpatients and the invasive procedures the latter are submitted to. The aim of the study was to evaluate the adherence to specifi c HAI prevention measures in invasive ICU procedures. Methods: This study had a quantitative, descriptive and exploratory approach. Among the risk factors for HAIs are the presence of central venous access, indwelling vesical catheter and mechanical ventilation, and, therefore, the indicators were calculated for patients undergoing these invasive procedures, through a questionnaire standardized by the Hospital Infection Control Commission (HICC. Results: For every 1,000 patients, 15 had catheter-related bloodstream infection, 6.85 had urinary tract infection associated with indwelling catheter in the fi rst half of 2010. Conclusion: most HAIs cannot be prevented, for reasons inherent to invasive procedures and the patients. However, their incidence can be reduced and controlled. The implementation of preventive measures based on scientifi c evidence can reduce HAIs signifi cantly and sustainably, resulting in safer health care services and reduced costs. The main means of prevention include the cleaning of hands, use of epidemiological block measures, when necessary, and specifi c care for each infection site. KEYWORDS Nosocomial infection. Intensive care units.

  9. Challenges encountered by critical care unit managers in the large intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlakala, Mokgadi C; Bezuidenhout, Martie C; Botha, Annali D H

    2014-04-04

    Nurses in intensive care units (ICUs) are exposed regularly to huge demands interms of fulfilling the many roles that are placed upon them. Unit managers, in particular, are responsible for the efficient management of the units and have the responsibilities of planning, organising, leading and controlling the daily activities in order to facilitate the achievement of the unit objectives. The objective of this study was to explore and present the challenges encountered by ICU managers in the management of large ICUs. A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study was conducted at five hospital ICUs in Gauteng province, South Africa. Data were collected through individual interviews from purposively-selected critical care unit managers, then analysed using the matic coding. Five themes emerged from the data: challenges related to the layout and structure of the unit, human resources provision and staffing, provision of material resources, stressors in the unit and visitors in the ICU. Unit managers in large ICUs face multifaceted challenges which include the demand for efficient and sufficient specialised nurses; lack of or inadequate equipment that goes along with technology in ICU and supplies; and stressors in the ICU that limit the efficiency to plan, organise, lead and control the daily activities in the unit. The challenges identified call for multiple strategies to assist in the efficient management of large ICUs.

  10. Challenges encountered by critical care unit managers in the large intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokgadi C. Matlakala

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses in intensive care units (ICUs are exposed regularly to huge demands interms of fulfilling the many roles that are placed upon them. Unit managers, in particular, are responsible for the efficient management of the units and have the responsibilities of planning, organising, leading and controlling the daily activities in order to facilitate the achievement of the unit objectives. Objectives: The objective of this study was to explore and present the challenges encountered by ICU managers in the management of large ICUs. Method: A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study was conducted at five hospital ICUs in Gauteng province, South Africa. Data were collected through individual interviews from purposively-selected critical care unit managers, then analysed using the matic coding. Results: Five themes emerged from the data: challenges related to the layout and structure of the unit, human resources provision and staffing, provision of material resources, stressors in the unit and visitors in the ICU. Conclusion: Unit managers in large ICUs face multifaceted challenges which include the demand for efficient and sufficient specialised nurses; lack of or inadequate equipment that goes along with technology in ICU and supplies; and stressors in the ICU that limit the efficiency to plan, organise, lead and control the daily activities in the unit. The challenges identified call for multiple strategies to assist in the efficient management of large ICUs.

  11. Delirium in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Arumugam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Delirium is characterized by impaired cognition with nonspecific manifestations. In critically ill patients, it may develop secondary to multiple precipitating or predisposing causes. Although it can be a transient and reversible syndrome, its occurrence in Intensive Care Unit (ICU patients may be associated with long-term cognitive dysfunction. This condition is often under-recognized by treating physicians, leading to inappropriate management. For appropriate management of delirium, early identification and risk factor assessment are key factors. Multidisciplinary collaboration and standardized care can enhance the recognition of delirium. Interdisciplinary team working, together with updated guideline implementation, demonstrates proven success in minimizing delirium in the ICU. Moreover, should the use of physical restraint be necessary to prevent harm among mechanically ventilated patients, ethical clinical practice methodology must be employed. This traditional narrative review aims to address the presentation, risk factors, management, and ethical considerations in the management of delirium in ICU settings.

  12. Physiotherapy patients in intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Miszewska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of the Minister of Health dated 20/12/2012 on medical standards of conduct in the field of Anaesthesiology and intensive therapy, for carrying out the activities of healing in section § 2.2 intense therapy defines as: "any proceedings to maintain vital functions, and treatment of patients in life-threatening States, caused by potentially reversible renal failure one or more basic body systems, in particular the respiration, cardiovascular, central nervous system". However, in point § 12.1. We read that "Treatment of patients under intensive care in the hospital is an interdisciplinary". Annex 1 to this regulation refers to the work of physiotherapist in the ICU (INTENSIVE CARE UNITS and reads as follows: "the equivalent of at least 0.5 FTE-physical therapist-up to a range of benefits to be performed (the third reference level". [6

  13. Nurses' care practices at the end of life in intensive care units in Bahrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Catherine S; Yaqoob, Maryam; Faraj, Sumaya; O'Neill, Carla L

    2017-12-01

    The process of dying in intensive care units is complex as the technological environment shapes clinical decisions. Decisions at the end of life require the involvement of patient, families and healthcare professionals. The degree of involvement can vary depending on the professional and social culture of the unit. Nurses have an important role to play in caring for dying patients and their families; however, their knowledge is not always sought. This study explored nurses' care practices at the end of life, with the objective of describing and identifying end of life care practices that nurses contribute to, with an emphasis on culture, religious experiences and professional identity. Research Design and context: Grounded theory was used. In all, 10 nurses from intensive care unit in two large hospitals in Bahrain were participated. Ethical Considerations: Approval to carry out the research was given by the Research Ethics Committee of the host institution, and the two hospitals. A core category, Death Avoidance Talk, was emerged. This was supported by two major categories: (1) order-oriented care and (2) signalling death and care shifting. Death talk was avoided by the nurses, doctors and family members. When a decision was made by the medical team that a patient was not to be resuscitated, the nurses took this as a sign that death was imminent. This led to a process of signalling death to family and of shifting care to family members. Despite the avoidance of death talk and nurses' lack of professional autonomy, they created awareness that death was imminent to family members and ensured that end of life care was given in a culturally sensitive manner and aligned to Islamic values.

  14. Families' experiences of intensive care unit quality of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Irene; Gerritsen, Rik T; Koopmans, Matty

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of the study is to adapt and provide preliminary validation for questionnaires evaluating families' experiences of quality of care for critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study took place in 2 European ICUs. Based on literature...... validity. RESULTS: A total of 110 family members participated. Response rate was 87%. For all questions, a median of 97% (94%-99%) was assessed as relevant, and a median of 98% (97%-100%), as understandable. Median ceiling effect was 41% (30%-47%). There was a median of 0% missing data (0%-1%). Test......-retest reliability showed a median weighted κ of 0.69 (0.53-0.83). Validation showed significant correlation between total scores and key questions. CONCLUSIONS: The questions were assessed as relevant and understandable, providing high face and content validity. Ceiling effects were comparable to similar...

  15. Critical incidents connected to nurses’ leadership in Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Cantarella Lima

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The goal of this study is to analyze nurses’ leadership in intensive care units at hospitals in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, in the face of positive and negative critical incidents. Method: Exploratory, descriptive study, conducted with 24 nurses by using the Critical Incident Technique as a methodological benchmark. Results: Results were grouped into 61 critical incidents distributed into categories. Researchers came to the conclusion that leadership-related situations interfere with IC nurses’ behaviors. Among these situations they found: difficulty in the communication process; conflicts in the daily exercise of nurses’ activities; people management; and the setting of high quality care targets. Final considerations: Researchers identified a mixed leadership model, leading them to the conclusion that nurses’ knowledge and practice of contemporary leadership theories/styles are crucial because they facilitate the communication process, focusing on behavioral aspects and beliefs, in addition to valuing flexibility. This positively impacts the organization’s results.

  16. Intensive Care Unit Nurses' Beliefs About Delirium Assessment and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterhouse, Kimberly J; Vincent, Catherine; Foreman, Marquis D; Gruss, Valerie A; Corte, Colleen; Berger, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    Delirium, the most frequent complication of hospitalized older adults, particularly in intensive care units (ICUs), can result in increased mortality rates and length of stay. Nurses are neither consistently identifying nor managing delirium in these patients. The purpose of this study was to explore ICU nurses' identification of delirium, actions they would take for patients with signs or symptoms of delirium, and beliefs about delirium assessment and management. In this cross-sectional study using qualitative descriptive methods guided by the theory of planned behavior, 30 ICU nurses' responses to patient vignettes depicting different delirium subtypes were explored. Descriptive and content analyses revealed that nurses did not consistently identify delirium; their actions varied in different vignettes. Nurses believed that they needed adequate staffing, balanced workload, interprofessional collaboration, and established policy and protocols to identify and manage delirium successfully. Research is needed to determine if implementing these changes increases recognition and decreases consequences of delirium. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  17. Nutrition in the neurocritical care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swagata Tripathy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of intensive care is to support the physiology of the body till the treatment or the reparative process of the body kicks in to the rescue. Maintaining an adequate nutrition during this period is of vital importance to counteract the catabolic effect of the critical disease process. The guidelines for nutritional care in the neuro intensive care unit (ICU are sparse. This article collates the current evidence and best practice recommendations as applicable to the critically ill patient in the neuro ICU. The use of screening tests to identify patients at a risk of malnutrition and related complications is presently recommended for all patients with an emphasis on early initiation of caloric support. Over-aggressive feeding in an attempt to revert the catabolic effects of critical illness have not proven beneficial, just as the attempts to improve patient outcomes by altering the routes of nutrition administration. Special patient population such as traumatic brain injury, stroke, subarachnoid haemorrhage or spinal cord injury may have varying nutritional requirements; individualised approach in the neurocritical ICU with the help of the intensivist, nutritionist and pharmacology team may be of benefit.

  18. United States and Canadian approaches to justice in health care: a comparative analysis of health care systems and values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jecker, N S; Meslin, E M

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare and contrast the basic ethical values underpinning national health care policies in the United States and Canada. We use the framework of ethical theory to name and elaborate ethical values and to facilitate moral reflection about health care reform. Section one describes historical and contemporary social contract theories and clarifies the ethical values associated with them. Sections two and three show that health care debates and health care systems in both countries reflect the values of this tradition; however, each nation interprets the tradition differently. In the U.S., standards of justice for health care are conceived as a voluntary agreement reached by self-interested parties. Canadians, by contrast, interpret the same justice tradition as placing greater emphasis on concern for others and for the community. The final section draws out the implications of these differences for future U.S. and Canadian health care reforms.

  19. Parental perceptions of clown care in paediatric intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortamet, Guillaume; Merckx, Audrey; Roumeliotis, Nadia; Simonds, Caroline; Renolleau, Sylvain; Hubert, Philippe

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to report family satisfaction with regards to the presence of clowns in the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU). This is a single-centre survey-based study, conducted over 4 months in a 12-bed third level PICU in a university hospital. All parents present at the bedside of their child during clowning were considered as potential participants. Eligible parents were approached by one of the two intensivists as investigators and asked to complete a survey within the 48 h following the clowns' intervention. Thirty-three parents consented to complete the survey. Median age of children was 14 months (15 days to 16 years) and median Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction (PELOD) score was 1 (0-22). Twenty-four (72.7%) were considered as clinically stable while the clowns intervened. Twenty-eight parents (84.8%) and 27 (81.8%) considered that clowns had a positive effect on themselves and on their child, respectively. Clown care was considered as necessary in 19 cases (57.6%), optional in 13 (39.4%) and unnecessary in 1 (3.0%). The degree of parental satisfaction was not significantly associated with the child's clinical stability. We suggested that medical clowning in the PICU is well accepted by parents, regardless of severity of their child's condition. This study supports the adoption of medical clowning in PICUs as a patient- and family-centred care practice. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  20. Critical race theory as a tool for understanding poor engagement along the HIV care continuum among African American/Black and Hispanic persons living with HIV in the United States: a qualitative exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Robert; Gwadz, Marya Viorst; Silverman, Elizabeth; Kutnick, Alexandra; Leonard, Noelle R; Ritchie, Amanda S; Reed, Jennifer; Martinez, Belkis Y

    2017-03-24

    African American/Black and Hispanic persons living with HIV (AABH-PLWH) in the U.S. evidence insufficient engagement in HIV care and low uptake of HIV antiretroviral therapy, leading to suboptimal clinical outcomes. The present qualitative study used critical race theory, and incorporated intersectionality theory, to understand AABH-PLWH's perspectives on the mechanisms by which structural racism; that is, the macro-level systems that reinforce inequities among racial/ethnic groups, influence health decisions and behaviors. Participants were adult AABH-PLWH in New York City who were not taking antiretroviral therapy nor well engaged in HIV care (N = 37). Participants were purposively sampled for maximum variation from a larger study, and engaged in semi-structured in-depth interviews that were audio-recorded and professionally transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using a systematic content analysis approach. We found AABH-PLWH experienced HIV care and medication decisions through a historical and cultural lens incorporating knowledge of past and present structural racism. This contextual knowledge included awareness of past maltreatment of people of color in medical research. Further, these understandings were linked to the history of HIV antiretroviral therapy itself, including awareness of the first HIV antiretroviral regimen; namely, AZT (zidovudine) mono-therapy, which was initially prescribed in unacceptably high doses, causing serious side effects, but with only modest efficacy. In this historical/cultural context, aspects of structural racism negatively influenced health care decisions and behavior in four main ways: 1) via the extent to which healthcare settings were experienced as overly institutionalized and, therefore, dehumanizing; 2) distrust of medical institutions and healthcare providers, which led AABH-PLWH to feel pressured to take HIV antiretroviral therapy when it was offered; 3) perceptions that patients are excluded from the health

  1. The Culture Care theory and the Old Order Amish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, A F

    1991-11-01

    This chapter discussed knowledge about culture care and culture context in relation to Old Order Amish culture. Leininger's theory of Cultural Care Diversity and Universality and Hall's concept of high-context culture were used to study culture care of the Old Order Amish. This study provided new findings about the culture, especially as related to culture care and high context. These findings also are important to guide nurses and other health care professionals in providing culture-specific care to the Old Order Amish. Leininger's Cultural Care theory has provided a comprehensive theoretical framework to explicate embedded care constructs and patterns of daily living within this culture. Hall's concepts helped to value and discover the importance of high context within the Old Order Amish culture and its relation to the phenomenon of care.

  2. Informed consent for anaesthesiological and intensive care unit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-04

    Mar 4, 2013 ... care unit research: a South African perspective. De Roubaix JAM, MBChB, .... (g) the development of new applications of health technology. The last two items .... Consent in emergency and ICU care: SA regulatory guidelines.

  3. Measuring the quality of therapeutic apheresis care in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussmane, Jeffrey B; Torbati, Dan; Gitlow, Howard S

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to measure the quality of care provided in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) during Therapeutic Apheresis (TA). We described the care as a step by step process. We designed a flow chart to carefully document each step of the process. We then defined each step with a unique clinical indictor (CI) that represented the exact task we felt provided quality care. These CIs were studied and modified for 1 year. We measured our performance in this process by the number of times we accomplished the CI vs. the total number of CIs that were to be performed. The degree of compliance, with these clinical indicators, was analyzed and used as a metric for quality by calculating how close the process is running exactly as planned or "in control." The Apheresis Process was in control (compliance) for 47% of the indicators, as measured in the aggregate for the first observational year. We then applied the theory of Total Quality Management (TQM) through our Design, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control (DMAIC) model. We were able to improve the process and bring it into control by increasing the compliance to > 99.74%, in the aggregate, for the third and fourth quarter of the second year. We have implemented TQM to increase compliance, thus control, of a highly complex and multidisciplinary Pediatric Intensive Care therapy. We have shown a reproducible and scalable measure of quality for a complex clinical process in the PICU, without additional capital expenditure. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Complexity Leadership Theory: A United States Marine Corps Historical Overlay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    DD-MM-YYYY) 23-04-2017 2. REPORT TYPE Master’s Thesis 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) JUN 2016 – MAY 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Complexity...Monograph Title : Complexity Leadership Theory : A United States Marine Corps Historical Overlay Approved by...General Ridgway’s Success in Korea.” Master’s thesis , United States Army Command and General Staff College, 2010. Diana, Gabriel. “Vision, Education

  5. Auditing an intensive care unit recycling program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicki, Mark A; McGain, Forbes; O'Shea, Catherine J; Bates, Samantha

    2015-06-01

    The provision of health care has significant direct environmental effects such as energy and water use and waste production, and indirect effects, including manufacturing and transport of drugs and equipment. Recycling of hospital waste is one strategy to reduce waste disposed of as landfill, preserve resources, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and potentially remain fiscally responsible. We began an intensive care unit recycling program, because a significant proportion of ICU waste was known to be recyclable. To determine the weight and proportion of ICU waste recycled, the proportion of incorrect waste disposal (including infectious waste contamination), the opportunity for further recycling and the financial effects of the recycling program. We weighed all waste and recyclables from an 11-bed ICU in an Australian metropolitan hospital for 7 non-consecutive days. As part of routine care, ICU waste was separated into general, infectious and recycling streams. Recycling streams were paper and cardboard, three plastics streams (polypropylene, mixed plastics and polyvinylchloride [PVC]) and commingled waste (steel, aluminium and some plastics). ICU waste from the waste and recycling bins was sorted into those five recycling streams, general waste and infectious waste. After sorting, the waste was weighed and examined. Recycling was classified as achieved (actual), potential and total. Potential recycling was defined as being acceptable to hospital protocol and local recycling programs. Direct and indirect financial costs, excluding labour, were examined. During the 7-day period, the total ICU waste was 505 kg: general waste, 222 kg (44%); infectious waste, 138 kg (27%); potentially recyclable waste, 145 kg (28%). Of the potentially recyclable waste, 70 kg (49%) was actually recycled (14% of the total ICU waste). In the infectious waste bins, 82% was truly infectious. There was no infectious contamination of the recycling streams. The PVC waste was 37% contaminated

  6. Transition from neonatal intensive care unit to special care nurseries: Experiences of parents and nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. A.L. van Staa; O.K. Helder; J.C.M. Verweij

    2011-01-01

    To explore parents' and nurses' experiences with the transition of infants from the neonatal intensive care unit to a special care nursery. Qualitative explorative study in two phases. Level IIID neonatal intensive care unit in a university hospital and special care nurseries (level II) in five

  7. Invasive candidiasis in pediatric intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Sunit; Deep, Akash

    2009-10-01

    Candidemia and disseminated candidiasis are major causes of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients especially in the intensive care units (ICU). The incidence of invasive candidasis is on a steady rise because of increasing use of multiple antibiotics and invasive procedures carried out in the ICUs. Worldwide there is a shifting trend from C. albicans towards non albicans species, with an associated increase in mortality and antifungal resistance. In the ICU a predisposed host in one who is on broad spectrum antibiotics, parenteral nutrition, and central venous catheters. There are no pathognomonic signs or symptoms. The clinical clues are: unexplained fever or signs of severe sepsis or septic shock while on antibiotics, multiple, non-tender, nodular erythematous cutaneous lesions. The spectrum of infection with candida species range from superficial candidiasis of the skin and mucosa to more serious life threatening infections. Treatment of candidiasis involves removal of the most likely source of infection and drug therapy to speed up the clearance of infection. Amphotericin B remains the initial drug of first choice in hemodynamically unstable critically ill children in the wake of increasing resistance to azoles. Evaluation of newer antifungal agents and precise role of prophylactic therapy in ICU patients is needed.

  8. Intelligent ventilation in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigal Sviri

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Automated, microprocessor-controlled, closed-loop mechanical ventilation has been used in our Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU at the Hadassah Hebrew-University Medical Center for the past 15 years; for 10 years it has been the primary (preferred ventilator modality. Design and setting. We describe our clinical experience with adaptive support ventilation (ASV over a 6-year period, during which time ASV-enabled ventilators became more readily available and were used as the primary (preferred ventilators for all patients admitted to the MICU. Results. During the study period, 1 220 patients were ventilated in the MICU. Most patients (84% were ventilated with ASV on admission. The median duration of ventilation with ASV was 6 days. The weaning success rate was 81%, and tracheostomy was required in 13%. Sixty-eight patients (6% with severe hypoxia and high inspiratory pressures were placed on pressure-controlled ventilation, in most cases to satisfy a technical requirement for precise and conservative administration of inhaled nitric oxide. The overall pneumothorax rate was less than 3%, and less than 1% of patients who were ventilated only using ASV developed pneumothorax. Conclusions. ASV is a safe and acceptable mode of ventilation for complicated medical patients, with a lower than usual ventilation complication rate.

  9. Airborne fungi in an intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Gonçalves

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The presence of airborne fungi in Intensive Care Unit (ICUs is associated with increased nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was the isolation and identification of airborne fungi presented in an ICU from the University Hospital of Pelotas – RS, with the attempt to know the place’s environmental microbiota. 40 Petri plates with Sabouraud Dextrose Agar were exposed to an environment of an ICU, where samples were collected in strategic places during morning and afternoon periods for ten days. Seven fungi genera were identified: Penicillium spp. (15.18%, genus with the higher frequency, followed by Aspergillus spp., Cladosporium spp., Fusarium spp., Paecelomyces spp., Curvularia spp., Alternaria spp., Zygomycetes and sterile mycelium. The most predominant fungi genus were Aspergillus spp. (13.92% in the morning and Cladosporium spp. (13.92% in the afternoon. Due to their involvement in different diseases, the identified fungi genera can be classified as potential pathogens of inpatients. These results reinforce the need of monitoring the environmental microorganisms with high frequency and efficiently in health institutions.

  10. Pharmacovigilance in Intensive Care Unit - An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bimla Sharma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The drug related complications are on the rise warranting special attention towards patient safety in Intensive Care Unit (ICU setup. Pharmacovigilance is the science about the detection, assessment and prevention of drug related problems. This review is aimed to highlight significant problems arising from medication errors with emphasis on special drugs used in ICU (oxygen, antibiotics, sedatives, analgesics and neuromuscular blocking drugs and their risk reduction strategies in ICU utilizing practice of pharmacovigilance. Human error, lack of communication among various health providers, inadequate knowledge about drugs, failure to follow protocols or recommended guidelines are important causes of drug related problems in ICU. It is imperative that ICU administrators and medical directors of hospitals consider adverse drug events (ADEs as system failures. Pharmacovigilance, an observational science is the need of the hour for patients admitted in ICUs. We need to give more emphasis on prevention rather than treating the potentially fatal complications arising from ADEs. Eternal vigilance is the key. Protocol based management, improvement of medication system, frequent audits, improved communication, good team work, a blame free environ-ment, inclusion of a pharmacist, leadership involvement and use of information technology in the ICU are possible solutions.

  11. Patient outcomes for the chronically critically ill: special care unit versus intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudy, E B; Daly, B J; Douglas, S; Montenegro, H D; Song, R; Dyer, M A

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a low-technology environment of care and a nurse case management case delivery system (special care unit, SCU) with the traditional high-technology environment (ICU) and primary nursing care delivery system on the patient outcomes of length of stay, mortality, readmission, complications, satisfaction, and cost. A sample of 220 chronically critically ill patients were randomly assigned to either the SCU (n = 145) or the ICU (n = 75). Few significant differences were found between the two groups in length of stay, mortality, or complications. However, the findings showed significant cost savings in the SCU group in the charges accrued during the study period and in the charges and costs to produce a survivor. The average total cost of delivering care was $5,000 less per patient in the SCU than in the traditional ICU. In addition, the cost to produce a survivor was $19,000 less in the SCU. Results from this 4-year clinical trial demonstrate that nurse case managers in a SCU setting can produce patient outcomes equal to or better than those in the traditional ICU care environment for long-term critically ill patients.

  12. Use of culture care theory with Anglo- and African American elders in a long-term care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, M R

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to discover the care expressions, practices, and patterns of elderly Anglo- and African American elders. The domain of inquiry was the cultural care of elderly residents within the environmental context of a long-term care institution. The ethnonursing qualitative research method was used to conduct the study which was conceptualized within Leininger's theory of culture care diversity and universality. Four major themes were discovered: (a) Residents expressed and lived generic care to maintain their preadmission lifeways; (b) The nursing staff provided aspects of professional care to support satisfying lifeways for residents; (c) Institutional care patterns and expressions were viewed as a continuing life experience but with major differences between the apartment section and nursing home units; and (d) An institutional culture of the retirement home was discovered which reflected unique lifeways and shared care and health expressions and practices. These themes substantiated the culture care theory and revealed new modes of care for the elderly in an institutional setting.

  13. Desenvolvimento e validação de teoria fundamentada em dados sobre o ambiente de unidade de terapia intensiva Desarrollo y validación de la teoría fundamentada sobre el medio ambiente de la unidad de cuidado intensivo Development and validation of the theory based on data about the environment of the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marli Terezinha Stein Backes

    2011-12-01

    diferentes tecnologías y profesionales cualificados, que trabajan en equipo, vivir con familiares angustiados, con tensión y conflictos, y con la dificultad para hacer frente a la muerte.Qualitative study, merged from the issue: how the theories and models of nursing care have being constructed, focusing on the process of building a substantive theory based on the Thesis that had as objectives to comprehend the meaning of the environment of care in the Intensive Care Unit and to construct a theoretical model about it. The method used was the Grounded Theory. Thirty-nine interviews were conducted with forty-seven differentiated subjects from three Adult Intensive Care Units in Florianópolis/SC, Santa Maria/RS and Pelotas/RS between June of 2009 and September of 2010. It was possible to construct the theory "Sustaining life in the complex care environment of the Intensive Care Unit", delimited by eight categories. Sustain life on the environment of care in the Intensive Care Unit means investing intensively in the care of patients admitted who are in an unstable situation, with the help of different technologies and skilled professionals who work in teams, coexists with relatives distressed, with stress and conflict, and the difficulty to deal with the death.

  14. Repertoire of intensive care unit pneumonia microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Bousbia

    Full Text Available Despite the considerable number of studies reported to date, the causative agents of pneumonia are not completely identified. We comprehensively applied modern and traditional laboratory diagnostic techniques to identify microbiota in patients who were admitted to or developed pneumonia in intensive care units (ICUs. During a three-year period, we tested the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL of patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia, community-acquired pneumonia, non-ventilator ICU pneumonia and aspiration pneumonia, and compared the results with those from patients without pneumonia (controls. Samples were tested by amplification of 16S rDNA, 18S rDNA genes followed by cloning and sequencing and by PCR to target specific pathogens. We also included culture, amoeba co-culture, detection of antibodies to selected agents and urinary antigen tests. Based on molecular testing, we identified a wide repertoire of 160 bacterial species of which 73 have not been previously reported in pneumonia. Moreover, we found 37 putative new bacterial phylotypes with a 16S rDNA gene divergence ≥ 98% from known phylotypes. We also identified 24 fungal species of which 6 have not been previously reported in pneumonia and 7 viruses. Patients can present up to 16 different microorganisms in a single BAL (mean ± SD; 3.77 ± 2.93. Some pathogens considered to be typical for ICU pneumonia such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus species can be detected as commonly in controls as in pneumonia patients which strikingly highlights the existence of a core pulmonary microbiota. Differences in the microbiota of different forms of pneumonia were documented.

  15. Safety of milrinone use in neonatal intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Samiee-Zafarghandy; S.R. Raman (Sudha R.); J.N. van den Anker (John); K. McHutchison (Kerstin); C.P. Hornik; R.H. Clark; P.B. Smith; D.K. Benjamin (Daniel K.); K. Berezny (Katherine); J. Barrett (Jeffrey); E.V. Capparelli (Edmund); M. Cohen-Wolkowiez (Michael); G.L. Kearns (Greg); M. Laughon (Matthew); A. Muelenaer (Andre); T. Michael O'Shea; I.M. Paul (Ian M.); K. Wade (Kelly); T.J. Walsh (Thomas J.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Milrinone use in the neonatal intensive care unit has increased over the last 10. years despite a paucity of published safety data in infants. We sought to determine the safety of milrinone therapy among infants in the neonatal intensive care unit. Methods: We conducted a

  16. Politics and care: a study of Czech Americans within Leininger's theory of culture care diversity and universality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J

    1997-01-01

    The domain of inquiry for this study was the influence of the American political environmental context on professional and generic care patterns, expressions, and meanings of Czech American immigrants. The purpose of the research was to document, describe, interpret, and analyze the diversities and universalities of professional and generic care for this cultural group, to provide culturally congruent care to Czech Americans, and to explicate the role of politics as an influence on care patterns, health, and well being. The researcher's former transcultural ethnonursing study in Prague, Czechoslovakia in 1991 served as a stimulus for this in-depth study on politics and care. Twelve key and twenty general informants were interviewed. Five major themes were identified. The researcher discovered that the capitalist economic market structure of the United States influenced informant lifeways in all dimensions of Leininger's Theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality, as depicted in the Sunrise Model. Specific care patterns discovered included care as choice, care as responsibility, and care as helping each other. Findings related to professional and generic care supported researcher predictions that generic culture care patterns would be important to immigrants. Provisions for culturally congruent nursing care were articulated based on research findings.

  17. Guideline for stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbaek; Lorentzen, Kristian; Clausen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is commonly used in the intensive care unit (ICU), and is recommended in the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines 2012. The present guideline from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine sums...

  18. Trauma-informed care in the newborn intensive care unit: promoting safety, security and connectedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, M R; Hall, S L

    2018-01-01

    Both babies and their parents may experience a stay in the newborn intensive care unit (NICU) as a traumatic or a 'toxic stress,' which can lead to dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and ultimately to poorly controlled cortisol secretion. Toxic stresses in childhood or adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are strongly linked to poor health outcomes across the lifespan and trauma-informed care is an approach to caregiving based on the recognition of this relationship. Practitioners of trauma-informed care seek to understand clients' or patients' behaviors in light of previous traumas they have experienced, including ACEs. Practitioners also provide supportive care that enhances the client's or patient's feelings of safety and security, to prevent their re-traumatization in a current situation that may potentially overwhelm their coping skills. This review will apply the principles of trauma-informed care, within the framework of the Polyvagal Theory as described by Porges, to care for the NICU baby, the baby's family and their professional caregivers, emphasizing the importance of social connectedness among all. The Polyvagal Theory explains how one's unconscious awareness of safety, danger or life threat (neuroception) is linked through the autonomic nervous system to their behavioral responses. A phylogenetic hierarchy of behaviors evolved over time, leveraging the mammalian ventral or 'smart' vagal nucleus into a repertoire of responses promoting mother-baby co-regulation and the sense of safety and security that supports health and well-being for both members of the dyad. Fostering social connectedness that is mutual and reciprocal among parents, their baby and the NICU staff creates a critical buffer to mitigate stress and improve outcomes of both baby and parents. Using techniques of trauma-informed care, as explained by the Polyvagal Theory, with both babies and their parents in the NICU setting will help to cement a secure relationship

  19. Patients' and Health Care Providers' Perception of Stressors in the Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuatiq, Alham

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study is first, to investigate intensive care patients' perceptions of stressors; second, to investigate the health care provider's perception of what constitutes a stressor from the patient's perspective; and third, to describe how health care providers manage their patients' stressors. This was a mixed-methods study; the quantitative section replicated Cornock's 1998 study of stress in the intensive care unit (ICU), with difference in sampling to include all health care providers in the ICU, in addition to nurses. The qualitative section added information to the current literature by describing how health care providers manage their patient's stressors. This article reports the quantitative findings of this study, as the qualitative section is presented in a separate article. It is important to describe ICU patients' stressful experiences to assess patient's stressors, provide holistic care to eliminate stressors, and provide feedback to health care providers. There is a need to describe the clinical practice related to stress perception and management of stressors in the critical care environment. A mixed-methods comparative descriptive design was used for the quantitative section, and a phenomenological approach guided the qualitative section. Lazarus and Folkman's theory formed the bases for integrating all variables investigated in this study. The sample included 70 ICU patients and 70 ICU health care providers. After consenting to participate in this study, subjects were given a demographic form and a paper-based tool, the Environmental Stressors graphic data form Questionnaire. Questionnaires were filled out by subjects anonymously in the ICU and returned to the researcher in the same setting. Descriptive statistics were analyzed using SPSS data analysis software. The top 3 most stressful items ranked by the patients included "being in pain," followed by "not being able to sleep" and "financial worries"; on the other hand, health care

  20. Orthogonal polynomials on the unit circle part 2 spectral theory

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Barry

    2013-01-01

    This two-part book is a comprehensive overview of the theory of probability measures on the unit circle, viewed especially in terms of the orthogonal polynomials defined by those measures. A major theme involves the connections between the Verblunsky coefficients (the coefficients of the recurrence equation for the orthogonal polynomials) and the measures, an analog of the spectral theory of one-dimensional Schrödinger operators. Among the topics discussed along the way are the asymptotics of Toeplitz determinants (Szegő's theorems), limit theorems for the density of the zeros of orthogonal po

  1. Orthogonal polynomials on the unit circle part 1 classical theory

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    This two-part book is a comprehensive overview of the theory of probability measures on the unit circle, viewed especially in terms of the orthogonal polynomials defined by those measures. A major theme involves the connections between the Verblunsky coefficients (the coefficients of the recurrence equation for the orthogonal polynomials) and the measures, an analog of the spectral theory of one-dimensional Schrodinger operators. Among the topics discussed along the way are the asymptotics of Toeplitz determinants (Szegő's theorems), limit theorems for the density of the zeros of orthogonal po

  2. Predictors of intensive care unit refusal in French intensive care units: a multiple-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrouste-Orgeas, Maité; Montuclard, Luc; Timsit, Jean-François; Reignier, Jean; Desmettre, Thibault; Karoubi, Philippe; Moreau, Delphine; Montesino, Laurent; Duguet, Alexandre; Boussat, Sandrine; Ede, Christophe; Monseau, Yannick; Paule, Thierry; Misset, Benoit; Carlet, Jean

    2005-04-01

    To identify factors associated with granting or refusing intensive care unit (ICU) admission, to analyze ICU characteristics and triage decisions, and to describe mortality in admitted and refused patients. Observational, prospective, multiple-center study. Four university hospitals and seven primary-care hospitals in France. None. Age, underlying diseases (McCabe score and Knaus class), dependency, hospital mortality, and ICU characteristics were recorded. The crude ICU refusal rate was 23.8% (137/574), with variations from 7.1% to 63.1%. The reasons for refusal were too well to benefit (76/137, 55.4%), too sick to benefit (51/137, 37.2%), unit too busy (9/137, 6.5%), and refusal by the family (1/137). In logistic regression analyses, two patient-related factors were associated with ICU refusal: dependency (odds ratio [OR], 14.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.27-38.25; p refused patients, and 1.03 (95% CI, 0.28-1.75) for later-admitted patients. ICU refusal rates varied greatly across ICUs and were dependent on both patient and organizational factors. Efforts to define ethically optimal ICU admission policies might lead to greater homogeneity in refusal rates, although case-mix variations would be expected to leave an irreducible amount of variation across ICUs.

  3. [Ethic rounds in intensive care. Possible instrument for a clinical-ethical assessment in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffold, N; Paoli, A; Gross, J; Riemann, U; Hennersdorf, M

    2012-10-01

    Ethical problems, such as medical end-of-life decisions or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment are viewed as an essential task in intensive care units. This article presents the ethics rounds as an instrument for evaluation of ethical problems in intensive care medicine units. The benchmarks of ethical reflection during the ethics rounds are considerations of ethical theory of principle-oriented medical ethics. Besides organizational aspects and the institutional framework, the role of the ethicist is described. The essential evaluation steps, as a basis of the ethics rounds are presented. In contrast to the clinical ethics consultation, the ethicist in the ethics rounds model is integrated as a member of the ward round team. Therefore ethical problems may be identified and analyzed very early before the conflict escalates. This preventive strategy makes the ethics rounds a helpful instrument in intensive care units.

  4. COPD self-management supportive care: chaos and complexity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornforth, Amber

    This paper uses the emergent theories of chaos and complexity to explore the self-management supportive care of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients within the evolving primary care setting. It discusses the concept of self-management support, the complexity of the primary care context and consultations, smoking cessation, and the impact of acute exacerbations and action planning. The author hopes that this paper will enable the acquisition of new insight and better understanding in this clinical area, as well as support meaningful learning and facilitate more thoughtful, effective and high quality patient-centred care within the context of primary care.

  5. Personalized health care: from theory to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyderman, Ralph

    2012-08-01

    The practice of medicine stands at the threshold of a transformation from its current focus on the treatment of disease events to an emphasis on enhancing health, preventing disease and personalizing care to meet each individual's specific health needs. Personalized health care is a new and strategic approach that is driven by personalized health planning empowered by personalized medicine tools, which are facilitated by advances in science and technology. These tools improve the capability to predict health risks, to determine and quantify the dynamics of disease development, and to target therapeutic approaches to the needs of the individual. Personalized health care can be implemented today using currently available technologies and know-how and thereby provide a market for the rational introduction of new personalized medicine tools. The need for early adoption of personalized health care stems from the necessity to reduce the egregious and wasteful burden of preventable chronic diseases, which is not effectively addressed by our current approach to care. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Nursing theory and the delivery of compassionate care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Louisa

    2016-02-10

    Compassionate care is a priority in current healthcare policy. However, its definition is amorphous, leading to difficulties standardising it in practice. This article discusses how nursing theory is central to the delivery of compassionate care. It emphasises the need to develop a theoretical framework that reflects the eclectic and pragmatic nature of nursing practice, and the importance of using patient feedback as an indicator of the quality of care and as a basis for adapting theoretical hypotheses.

  7. Nursing management and organizational ethics in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlody, Ginger Schafer

    2007-02-01

    This article describes organizational ethics issues involved in nursing management of an intensive care unit. The intensive care team and medical center management have the dual responsibility to create an ethical environment in which to provide optimum patient care. Addressing organizational ethics is key to creating that ethical environment in the intensive care unit. During the past 15-20 yrs, increasing costs in health care, competitive markets, the effect of high technology, and global business changes have set the stage for business and healthcare organizational conflicts that affect the ethical environment. Studies show that critical care nurses experience moral distress and are affected by the ethical climate of both the intensive care unit and the larger organization. Thus, nursing moral distress may result in problems related to recruitment and retention of staff. Other issues with organizational ethics ramifications that may occur in the intensive care unit include patient safety issues (including those related to disruptive behavior), intensive care unit leadership style, research ethics, allocation of resources, triage, and other economic issues. Current organizational ethics conflicts are discussed, a professional practice model is described, and multidisciplinary recommendations are put forth.

  8. Bringing quality improvement into the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Tracy R; Hyzy, Robert C

    2007-02-01

    During the last several years, many governmental and nongovernmental organizations have championed the application of the principles of quality improvement to the practice of medicine, particularly in the area of critical care. To review the breadth of approaches to quality improvement in the intensive care unit, including measures such as mortality and length of stay, and the use of protocols, bundles, and the role of large, multiple-hospital collaboratives. Several agencies have participated in the application of the quality movement to medicine, culminating in the development of standards such as the intensive care unit core measures of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. Although "zero defects" may not be possible in all measurable variables of quality in the intensive care unit, several measures, such as catheter-related bloodstream infections, can be significantly reduced through the implementation of improved processes of care, such as care bundles. Large, multiple-center, quality improvement collaboratives, such as the Michigan Keystone Intensive Care Unit Project, may be particularly effective in improving the quality of care by creating a "bandwagon effect" within a geographic region. The quality revolution is having a significant effect in the critical care unit and is likely to be facilitated by the transition to the electronic medical record.

  9. Sleep and sedation in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carno, Margaret-Ann; Connolly, Heidi V

    2005-09-01

    Sleep is an important and necessary function of the human body. Somatic growth and cellular repair occur during sleep. Critically ill children have disturbed sleep while in the pediatric intensive care unit related both to the illness itself and to light, noise, and caregiver activities disrupting an environment conducive to sleep. Medications administered in the pediatric intensive care unit can also disrupt sleep. This article reviews what is known about sleep in the pediatric intensive care unit and the effects of common sedation medications on sleep.

  10. Vigilance as a caring expression and Leininger's theory of cultural care diversity and universality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, J M

    1998-01-01

    Vigilance, or the close, protective involvement of families caring for hospitalized relatives, was explored in this study using holistic ethnography. Leininger's theory of cultural care diversity and universality provided direction for the researcher to generate substantive data about the meanings, patterns, and day-to-day experience of vigilance. Five categories of meaning were derived from the data: commitment to care, emotional upheaval, dynamic nexus, transition, and resilience. The research findings expand understanding of vigilance as a caring expression, suggest direction for nursing practice, and contribute to Leininger's theory of cultural care diversity and universality and the development of nursing science.

  11. The need for pharmaceutical care in an intensive care unit at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interventions to assess therapy ... and trauma intensive care unit (ICU) at Steve Biko Academic Hospital. ... of programme success, such as improving the quality of service by .... saving and extra quality assurance opportunity for the unit.[11].

  12. A comparison of private and public sector intensive care unit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    achieving the optimal physical structure that facilitates the care of ... patients with varying levels of need in terms of ICU equipment. As part of .... Prevention and Control Unit and is based on the R158 regulations, ..... and organizational aspects.

  13. Health care in the United States: organization, management, and policy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greenwald, Howard P

    2010-01-01

    "Health Care in the United States discusses the basic structures and operations of the U.S. health system. This resource includes examples, tables, and a glossary with key terms and acronyms to help understand important concepts...

  14. Incidence of constipation in an intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra, Tatiana Lopes de Souza; Mendonça, Simone Sotero; Guimarães Marshall, Norma

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the incidence of constipation in critical patients on enteral nutrition in a hospital intensive care unit and to correlate this incidence with the variables found for critical patients. Methods The present investigation was a retrospective analytical study conducted in the intensive care unit of Hospital Regional da Asa Norte (DF) via the analysis of medical records of patients admitted during the period from January to December 2011. Data on the incidence of constipati...

  15. Nurse management skills required at an emergency care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Montezeli, Juliana Helena; Peres, Aida Maris; Bernardino, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify the management skills needed for this professional at an emergency care unit. Method: An exploratory descriptive qualitative study conducted with eight nurses in which semi-structured interviews with nonparticipating systematic observation were conducted; the data was processed by content analysis. Results: The categories which emerged from the content analysis served as a list of management skills necessary to their work at the emergency care unit: leadership, decision...

  16. The role of anaesthetists in paediatric intensive care units

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    to various surgical and critical care disciplines, the usefulness of a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) rotation was investigated. A brief overview of the experiences of anaesthetic registrars at a. South African teaching hospital rotating through a PICU is pre- sented, as well as the potential advantages for both trainees and.

  17. Magnesium, calcium and phosphorus in the intensive care unit: Do ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Magnesium, calcium and phosphorus are important electrolytes involved in the regulation of homeostasis. However the utility in monitoring them in critically ill patients is still unclear. We therefore undertook a prospective, non-interventional, single center study in the intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital in ...

  18. Empowerment of parents in the neonatal intensive care unit by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parents of infants who are admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) need to be empowered to improve bonding, attachment and care-giving skills. Neonatal nurses play a critical role in the empowerment of such parents, but often find it difficult due to a lack of clarity on how it has to be done. A qualitative contextual ...

  19. Neonatal intensive care unit: Reservoirs of Nosocomial pathogens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improvement in the care and treatment of neonates had contributed to their increased survival. Nosocomial infection remains an important problem in intensive care units. Hospital wards had been shown to act as reservoirs of pathogenic microorganisms associated with infection. To assess the prevalence of pathogenic ...

  20. Clinical risk assessment in intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Asefzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical risk management focuses on improving the quality and safety of health care services by identifying the circumstances and opportunities that put patients at risk of harm and acting to prevent or control those risks. The goal of this study is to identify and assess the failure modes in the ICU of Qazvin′s Social Security Hospital (Razi Hospital through Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA. Methods: This was a qualitative-quantitative research by Focus Discussion Group (FDG performed in Qazvin Province, Iran during 2011. The study population included all individuals and owners who are familiar with the process in ICU. Sampling method was purposeful and the FDG group members were selected by the researcher. The research instrument was standard worksheet that has been used by several researchers. Data was analyzed by FMEA technique. Results: Forty eight clinical errors and failure modes identified, results showed that the highest risk probability number (RPN was in respiratory care "Ventilator′s alarm malfunction (no alarm" with the score 288, and the lowest was in gastrointestinal "not washing the NG-Tube" with the score 8. Conclusions: Many of the identified errors can be prevented by group members. Clinical risk assessment and management is the key to delivery of effective health care.

  1. Environmental Design for Patient Families in Intensive Care Units

    OpenAIRE

    Mahbub Rashid

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to define the role of environmental design in improving family integration with patient care in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). It argues that it is necessary to understand family needs, experience and behavioral responses in ICUs to develop effective models for family integration. With its two components—the “healing culture” promoting effective relationships between caregivers and care seekers, and the “environmental design” supporting the healing culture—a “healin...

  2. Seeking optimal renal replacement therapy delivery in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocjan, Marinka; Brunet, Fabrice P

    2010-01-01

    Globally, critical care environments within health care organizations strive to provide optimal quality renal replacement therapy (RRT), an artificial replacement for lost kidney function. Examination of RRT delivery model literature and a case study review of the multidisciplinary-mixed RRT delivery model utilized within a closed medical surgical intensive care unit illustrates the organizational and clinical management of specialized resource and multidisciplinary roles. The successful utilization of a specific RRT delivery model is dependent upon resource availability.

  3. [The coma awakening unit, between intensive care and rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimouni, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    After intensive care and before classic neurological rehabilitation is possible, patients in an altered state of consciousness are cared for at early stages in so-called coma awakening units. The care involves, on the one hand, the complex support of the patient's awakening from coma as a neurological and existential process, and on the other, support for their families. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Improved nurse-parent communication in neonatal intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, Janne; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Egerod, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    of a busy neonatal care unit. Promoting practice uptake was initially underestimated, but nurse guided family-centred care training was improved by increasing the visibility of the study in the unit, demonstrating intervention progress to the nurses and assuring a sense of ownership among nurse leaders...... and adjustment of nurse adherence to guided family-centred care was conducted by monitoring (1) knowledge, (2) delivery, (3) practice uptake and (4) certification. RESULTS: Implementation was improved by the development of a strategic framework and by adjusting the framework according to the real-life context...

  5. Sleep in the Intensive Care Unit measured by polysomnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J H; Boesen, Hans Christian Toft; Olsen, Karsten Skovgaard

    2013-01-01

    Sleep deprivation has deleterious effects on most organ systems. Patients in the Intensive care unit (ICU) report sleep deprivation as the second worst experience during their stay only superseded by pain. The aim of the review is to provide the clinician with knowledge of the optimal sleep-frien......-friendly care and environment.......Sleep deprivation has deleterious effects on most organ systems. Patients in the Intensive care unit (ICU) report sleep deprivation as the second worst experience during their stay only superseded by pain. The aim of the review is to provide the clinician with knowledge of the optimal sleep...

  6. Patterns of research utilization on patient care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lander Janice

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organizational context plays a central role in shaping the use of research by healthcare professionals. The largest group of professionals employed in healthcare organizations is nurses, putting them in a position to influence patient and system outcomes significantly. However, investigators have often limited their study on the determinants of research use to individual factors over organizational or contextual factors. Methods The purpose of this study was to examine the determinants of research use among nurses working in acute care hospitals, with an emphasis on identifying contextual determinants of research use. A comparative ethnographic case study design was used to examine seven patient care units (two adult and five pediatric units in four hospitals in two Canadian provinces (Ontario and Alberta. Data were collected over a six-month period by means of quantitative and qualitative approaches using an array of instruments and extensive fieldwork. The patient care unit was the unit of analysis. Drawing on the quantitative data and using correspondence analysis, relationships between various factors were mapped using the coefficient of variation. Results Units with the highest mean research utilization scores clustered together on factors such as nurse critical thinking dispositions, unit culture (as measured by work creativity, work efficiency, questioning behavior, co-worker support, and the importance nurses place on access to continuing education, environmental complexity (as measured by changing patient acuity and re-sequencing of work, and nurses' attitudes towards research. Units with moderate research utilization clustered on organizational support, belief suspension, and intent to use research. Higher nursing workloads and lack of people support clustered more closely to units with the lowest research utilization scores. Conclusion Modifiable characteristics of organizational context at the patient care unit

  7. Scope of Nursing Care in Polish Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Wysokiński

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The TISS-28 scale, which may be used for nursing staff scheduling in ICU, does not reflect the complete scope of nursing resulting from varied cultural and organizational conditions of individual systems of health care. Aim. The objective of the study was an attempt to provide an answer to the question what scope of nursing care provided by Polish nurses in ICU does the TISS-28 scale reflect? Material and Methods. The methods of working time measurement were used in the study. For the needs of the study, 252 hours of continuous observation (day-long observation and 3.697 time-schedule measurements were carried out. Results. The total nursing time was 4125.79 min. (68.76 hours, that is, 60.15% of the total working time of Polish nurses during the period analyzed. Based on the median test, the difference was observed on the level of χ2=16945.8, P<0.001 between the nurses’ workload resulting from performance of activities qualified into the TISS-28 scale and load resulting from performance of interventions within the scopes of care not considered in this scale in Polish ICUs. Conclusions. The original version of the TISS-28 scale does not fully reflect the workload among Polish nurses employed in ICUs.

  8. Advancing Neurologic Care in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with a Neonatal Neurologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkey, Sarah B.; Swearingen, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal neurology is a growing sub-specialty area. Given the considerable amount of neurologic problems present in the neonatal intensive care unit, a neurologist with expertise in neonates is becoming more important. We sought to evaluate the change in neurologic care in the neonatal intensive care unit at our tertiary care hospital by having a dedicated neonatal neurologist. The period post-neonatal neurologist showed a greater number of neurology consultations (Pneurology encounters per patient (Pneurology became part of the multi-disciplinary team providing focused neurologic care to newborns. PMID:23271754

  9. Role of oral care to prevent VAP in mechanically ventilated Intensive Care Unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP is the most common nosocomial infection in Intensive Care Unit. One major factor causing VAP is the aspiration of oral colonization because of poor oral care practices. We feel the role of simple measure like oral care is neglected, despite the ample evidence of it being instrumental in preventing VAP.

  10. Role of oral care to prevent VAP in mechanically ventilated Intensive Care Unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A; Gupta, A; Singh, T K; Saxsena, A

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common nosocomial infection in Intensive Care Unit. One major factor causing VAP is the aspiration of oral colonization because of poor oral care practices. We feel the role of simple measure like oral care is neglected, despite the ample evidence of it being instrumental in preventing VAP.

  11. Role of oral care to prevent VAP in mechanically ventilated Intensive Care Unit patients

    OpenAIRE

    A Gupta; A Gupta; T K Singh; A Saxsena

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common nosocomial infection in Intensive Care Unit. One major factor causing VAP is the aspiration of oral colonization because of poor oral care practices. We feel the role of simple measure like oral care is neglected, despite the ample evidence of it being instrumental in preventing VAP.

  12. Nurses' work environments, care rationing, job outcomes, and quality of care on neonatal units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochefort, Christian M; Clarke, Sean P

    2010-10-01

    This paper is a report of a study of the relationship between work environment characteristics and neonatal intensive care unit nurses' perceptions of care rationing, job outcomes, and quality of care. International evidence suggests that attention to work environments might improve nurse recruitment and retention, and the quality of care. However, comparatively little attention has been given to neonatal care, a specialty where patient and nurse outcomes are potentially quite sensitive to problems with staffing and work environments. Over a 6-month period in 2007-2008, a questionnaire containing measures of work environment characteristics, nursing care rationing, job satisfaction, burnout and quality of care was distributed to 553 nurses in all neonatal intensive care units in the province of Quebec (Canada). A total of 339 nurses (61.3%) completed questionnaires. Overall, 18.6% were dissatisfied with their job, 35.7% showed high emotional exhaustion, and 19.2% rated the quality of care on their unit as fair or poor. Care activities most frequently rationed because of insufficient time were discharge planning, parental support and teaching, and comfort care. In multivariate analyses, higher work environment ratings were related to lower likelihood of reporting rationing and burnout, and better ratings of quality of care and job satisfaction. Additional research on the determinants of nurse outcomes, the quality of patient care, and the impact of rationing of nursing care on patient outcomes in neonatal intensive care units is required. The Neonatal Extent of Work Rationing Instrument appears to be a useful tool for monitoring the extent of rationing of nursing care in neonatal units. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Taxonomy for complexity theory in the context of maternity care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuize, M.; Downe, S.; Gottfreðsdóttir, H.; Rijnders, M.; Preez, A. du; Vaz Rebelo, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background The linear focus of ‘normal science’ is unable toadequately take account of the complex interactions that direct health care systems. There is a turn towards complexity theory as a more appropriate framework for understanding system behaviour. However, a comprehensive taxonomy for

  14. Theory in Practice: Helping Providers Address Depression in Diabetes Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Chandra Y.; Kozak, Cindy; Wagner, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: A continuing education (CE) program based on the theory of planned behavior was designed to understand and improve health care providers' practice patterns in screening, assessing, and treating and/or referring patients with diabetes for depression treatment. Methods: Participants completed assessments of attitudes, confidence,…

  15. Dominance of paternalism in family-centered care in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU): an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasli, Parvaneh; Dehghan-Nayeri, Nahid; Borim-Nezhad, Leili; Vedadhir, AbouAli

    2015-06-01

    This article examines the culture of family-centered care (FCC) in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) using focused ethnography. Data collection strategy was participant observation, fieldwork, and interviews with main actors of the PICU, namely supervisors, nurses, and parents. This study took place in one PICU in a hospital in Tehran, Iran. The results were in the main named as paternalism and were presented as five themes: "non-possessed environment," "separation of the children from their parents," non-interactive communication," "limited participation," and "affection and sympathy combined with superiority." In conclusion, the prevailing atmosphere in care was paternalistic as there was a huge gap between conceptually or theoretically accepted application of FCC in PICU and what is practically administrated. Bridging such a gap between theory and practice can be helpful in improving social, environment, and organizational culture for the children, their parents, and health care providers as well as their performance in the context of PICU.

  16. The pediatric intensive care unit business model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleien, Charles L

    2013-06-01

    All pediatric intensivists need a primer on ICU finance. The author describes potential alternate revenue sources for the division. Differentiating units by size or academic affiliation, the author describes drivers of expense. Strategies to manage the bottom line including negotiations for hospital services are covered. Some of the current trends in physician productivity and its described metrics, with particular focus on clinical FTE management is detailed. Methods of using this data to enhance revenue are discussed. Some of the other current trends in the ICU business related to changes at the federal and state level as well as in the insurance sector, moving away from fee-for-service are covered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Oral communication between colleagues in geriatric care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury-Zing, Céline

    2014-01-01

    Transmitting information orally between colleagues in gerontology care units. While the only certified method of transmitting nursing information is in writing, the oral tradition remains firmly rooted in the practice of health care providers. Professionals caring for elderly patients need to exchange information--whether it be considered important or trivial-, anywhere and at any time. In this article, professionals describe how they were able to identify which configurations of players and teams enable information to flow and benefit the care of elderly patients.

  18. Distribution of specialized care centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henry E; Yealy, Donald M

    2012-11-01

    As a recommended strategy for optimally managing critical illness, regionalization of care involves matching the needs of the target population with available hospital resources. The national supply and characteristics of hospitals providing specialized critical care services is currently unknown. We seek to characterize the current distribution of specialized care centers in the United States. Using public data linked with the American Hospital Association directory and US Census, we identified US general acute hospitals providing specialized care for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) (≥40 annual primary percutaneous coronary interventions reported in Medicare Hospital Compare), stroke (The Joint Commission certified stroke centers), trauma (American College of Surgeons or state-designated, adult or pediatric, level I or II), and pediatric critical care (presence of a pediatric ICU) services. We determined the characteristics and state-level distribution and density of specialized care centers (centers per state and centers per state population). Among 4,931 acute care hospitals in the United States, 1,325 (26.9%) provided one of the 4 defined specialized care services, including 574 STEMI, 763 stroke, 508 trauma, and 457 pediatric critical care centers. Approximately half of the 1,325 hospitals provided 2 or more specialized services, and one fifth provided 3 or 4 specialized services. There was variation in the number of each type of specialized care center in each state: STEMI median 7 interquartile range (IQR 2 to 14), stroke 8 (IQR 3 to 17), trauma 6 (IQR 3 to 11), pediatric specialized care 6 (IQR 3 to 11). Similarly, there was variation in the number of each type of specialized care center per population: STEMI median 1 center per 585,135 persons (IQR 418,729 to 696,143), stroke 1 center per 412,188 persons (IQR 321,604 to 572,387), trauma 1 center per 610,589 persons (IQR 406,192 to 917,588), and pediatric critical care 1 center per 665

  19. Sistematização da Assistência de Enfermagem em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva sustentada pela Teoria de Wanda Horta Sistematización de la asistencia de enfermería en una unidad de terapia intensiva basada en la Teoría de Wanda Horta Nursing care systematization at the intensive care unit (ICU based on Wanda Horta's theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Nazareth Amante

    2009-03-01

    desarrollo calificado del cuidado de enfermería.The purpose of this study was to implement the Nursing Care Systematization - Sistematização da Assistência de Enfermagem (SAE - with Wanda Aguiar Horta's Theory of Basic Human Necessities and the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association's (NANDA Nursing Diagnosis as its references. The starting point was the evaluation of the knowledge of the nursing team about the SAE, including their participation in this process. This is a qualitative study, performed in the Intensive Care Unit in a hospital in the city of Brusque, Santa Catarina, from October, 2006 to March, 2007. It was observed that the nursing professionals know little about SAE, but they are greatly interested in learning and developing it in their daily practice. In conclusion, it was possible to execute the healthcare systematization in an easy way, with the use of simple brochures that provided all the necessary information for the qualified development of nursing care.

  20. Geriatric patient profile in the cardiovascular surgery intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhan, Esra Akin; Hakverdioglu, Gulendam; Ozlem, Maryem; Ozlem, Maryem; Yurekli, Ismail; Gurbuz, Ali; Alp, Nilgun Akalin

    2013-11-01

    To determine hospitalization durations and mortalities of elderly in the Cardiovascular Surgery Intensive Care Unit. The retrospective study was conducted in a Cardiovascular Surgery Intensive Care Unit in Turkey and comprised patient records from January 1 to December 31, 2011. Computerized epicrisis reports of 255, who had undergone a cardiac surgery were collected. The patients were grouped according to their ages, Group I aged 65-74 and Group II aged 75 and older. European society for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation scores of the two groups were compared using SPSS 17. Overall, there were 80 (31.37%) females and 175 (68.62%) males. There were 138 (54.1%) patients in Group I and 117 (45.9%) in Group II. Regarding their hospitalization reasons, it was determined that 70 (27.5%) patients in Group I and 79 (30.9%) patients in Group II were treated with the diagnosis ofcoronary artery disease. The average hospitalization duration of patients in the intensive care unit was determined to be 11.57 +/- 0.40 days. Regarding the EuroSCORE score intervals of patients, 132 (51.8%) had 3-5 and 225 (88.2%) patients were transferred to the Cardiovascular Surgery and then all of them were discharged; 5 (4.1%) had a mortal course; and 11 (7.7%) were transferred to the anaesthesia intensive care unit. The general mortality rates are very low in the Cardiovascular Surgery Intensive Care Unit and the patients have a good prognosis.

  1. Caring as emancipatory nursing praxis: the theory of relational caring complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Marilyn A; Turkel, Marian C

    2014-01-01

    In the culture of health care, nurses are challenged to understand their values and beliefs as humanistic within complex technical and economically driven bureaucratic systems. This article outlines the language of social justice and human rights and the advance of a Theory of Relational Caring Complexity, which offers insights into caring as emancipatory nursing praxis. Recommendations provide knowledge of the struggle to balance economics, technology, and caring. As nurses practice from a value-driven, philosophical, and ethical social justice framework, they will find "their voice" and realize the full potential that the power of caring has on patient and organizational outcomes.

  2. Transfusional profile in different types of intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilusca Cardoso de Paula

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: anemia is a common clinical finding in intensive care units. The red blood cell transfusion is the main form of treatment, despite the associated risks. Thus, we proposed to evaluate the profile of transfusional patients in different intensive care units. Methods: prospective analysis of patients admitted in the intensive care units of a tertiary university hospital with an indication for transfusion of packed red blood cells. Demographic profile and transfusional profile were collected, a univariate analysis was done, and the results were considered significant at p = 0.05. Results: 408 transfusions were analyzed in 71 patients. The mean hemoglobin concentration on admission was 9.7 ± 2.3 g/dL and the pre-transfusional concentration was 6.9 ± 1.1 g/dL. The main indications for transfusion were hemoglobin concentration (49% and active bleeding (32%. The median number of units transfused per episode was 2 (1-2 and the median storage time was 14 (7-21 days. The number of patients transfused with hemoglobin levels greater than 7 g/dL and the number of bags transfused per episode were significantly different among intensive care units. Patients who received three or more transfusions had longer mechanical ventilation time and intensive care unit stay and higher mortality after 60 days. There was an association of mortality with disease severity but not with transfusional characteristics. Conclusions: the practice of blood products transfusion was partially in agreement with the guidelines recommended, although there are differences in behavior between the different profiles of intensive care units. Transfused patients evolved with unfavorable outcomes. Despite the scarcity of blood in blood banks, the mean storage time of the bags was high.

  3. An economic analysis of payment for health care services: the United States and Switzerland compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweifel, Peter; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2009-06-01

    This article seeks to assess whether physician payment reforms in the United States and Switzerland were likely to attain their objectives. We first introduce basic contract theory, with the organizing principle being the degree of information asymmetry between the patient and the health care provider. Depending on the degree of information asymmetry, different forms of payment induce "appropriate" behavior. These theoretical results are then pitted against the RBRVS of the United States to find that a number of its aspects are not optimal. We then turn to Switzerland's Tarmed and find that it fails to conform with the prescriptions of economic contract theory as well. The article closes with a review of possible reforms that could do away with uniform fee schedules to improve the performance of the health care system.

  4. Is there a Role of Palliative Care in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in India?

    OpenAIRE

    Dighe, Manjiri P; Muckaden, Maryann A; Manerkar, Swati A; Duraisamy, Balaji P

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in medical care have improved the survival of newborn babies born with various problems. Despite this death in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is an inevitable reality. For babies who are not going to "get better," the health care team still has a duty to alleviate the physical suffering of the baby and to support the family. Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to relieve the physical, psycho social, and spiritual suffering of patients and their families. P...

  5. Communication and Decision-Making About End-of-Life Care in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Laura Anne; Manias, Elizabeth; Nicholson, Patricia

    2017-07-01

    Clinicians in the intensive care unit commonly face decisions involving withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining therapy, which present many clinical and ethical challenges. Communication and shared decision-making are key aspects relating to the transition from active treatment to end-of-life care. To explore the experiences and perspectives of nurses and physicians when initiating end-of-life care in the intensive care unit. The study was conducted in a 24-bed intensive care unit in Melbourne, Australia. An interpretative, qualitative inquiry was used, with focus groups as the data collection method. Intensive care nurses and physicians were recruited to participate in a discipline-specific focus group. Focus group discussions were audio-recorded, transcribed, and subjected to thematic data analysis. Five focus groups were conducted; 17 nurses and 11 physicians participated. The key aspects discussed included communication and shared decision-making. Themes related to communication included the timing of end-of-life care discussions and conducting difficult conversations. Implementation and multidisciplinary acceptance of end-of-life care plans and collaborative decisions involving patients and families were themes related to shared decision-making. Effective communication and decision-making practices regarding initiating end-of-life care in the intensive care unit are important. Multidisciplinary implementation and acceptance of end-of-life care plans in the intensive care unit need improvement. Clear organizational processes that support the introduction of nurse and physician end-of-life care leaders are essential to optimize outcomes for patients, family members, and clinicians. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  6. Nursing workload in a trauma intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Loppi Goulart

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Severely injured patients with multiple and conflicting injuries present themselves to nursing professionals at critical care units faced with care management challenges. The goal of the present study is to evaluate nursing workload and verify the correlation between workload and the APACHE II severity index. It is a descriptive study, conducted in the Trauma Intensive Care Unit of a teaching hospital. We used the Nursing Activities Score and APACHE II as instruments. The sample comprised 32 patients, of which most were male, young adults, presenting polytrauma, coming from the Reference Emergency Unit, in surgical treatment, and discharged from the ICU. The average obtained on the Nursing Activities Score instrument was 72% during hospitalization periods. The data displayed moderate correlation between workload and patient severity. In other words, the higher the score, the higher the patient’s mortality risk. doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i2.22922.

  7. A mobility program for an inpatient acute care medical unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Winnie; Tschannen, Dana; Trotsky, Alyssa; Grunawalt, Julie; Adams, Danyell; Chang, Robert; Kendziora, Sandra; Diccion-MacDonald, Stephanie

    2014-10-01

    For many patients, hospitalization brings prolonged periods of bed rest, which are associated with such adverse health outcomes as increased length of stay, increased risk of falls, functional decline, and extended-care facility placement. Most studies of progressive or early mobility protocols designed to minimize these adverse effects have been geared toward specific patient populations and conducted by multidisciplinary teams in either ICUs or surgical units. Very few mobility programs have been developed for and implemented on acute care medical units. This evidence-based quality improvement project describes how a mobility program, devised for and put to use on a general medical unit in a large Midwestern academic health care system, improved patient outcomes.

  8. Is there a role of palliative care in the neonatal intensive care unit in India?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjiri P Dighe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in medical care have improved the survival of newborn babies born with various problems. Despite this death in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU is an inevitable reality. For babies who are not going to "get better," the health care team still has a duty to alleviate the physical suffering of the baby and to support the family. Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to relieve the physical, psycho social, and spiritual suffering of patients and their families. Palliative care provision in the Indian NICU settings is almost nonexistent at present. In this paper we attempt to "build a case" for palliative care in the Indian NICU setting.

  9. [From humanism to nihilism: dialectics on Jean Watson's caring theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Pawel J; Lavoie, Mireille

    2015-09-01

    nursing today is heir to values that have developed over many years. In addition to the values of human care, present-day nursing embraces values that shape our modern world. This dialectical study first traces the evolution of a number of the traditional values associated with human care that nursing has retained. It goes on to show how some of the values of human care have been cast aside in favour of modern--neoliberal, technocratic and bureaucratic--values which have in turn given rise to disturbing problems of instrumentalization. Watson's theory of caring proposes two ways to remedy such instrumentalization: espousing a transcendental, metaphysical mode of thought and adopting an altruistic humanism. However, many critics have questioned the theoretical consistency and very legitimacy of the theory as a means of dealing with instrumentalization. this study analyses Watson's proposals, using a Nietzschean dialectic approach to test them and to suggest possible solutions. Significant problems in terms of both consistency and relevance are brought to light, tending to refute Watson's notions. the study findings suggest that the application of Watson's theory may paradoxically perpetuate dualism and nihilism and, rather than curb their invasive impact, lead inevitably to a conversion to instrumental values. it's suggested an alternative, ethics-of-life approach based on the synthesis of our dialectics that would foster a return to, and respect for, humanity's essential nature.

  10. The Application of Gaming Theory in Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzein, Ashley; Drenkard, Karen; Deyo, Patricia; Swartwout, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    As the US health care system moves rapidly toward a population health management focus in communities and care settings, the chief nursing officer has an opportunity to lead innovation efforts for patient care. One innovative strategy for use to influence patient behavior change, ongoing clinical education, and prelicensure education is the application of gaming theory into learning strategies. With the ever-increasing emphasis the general public is placing on social media and online gaming, there has been a significant push by the health sector in recent years to harness this medium for use in health management, education, and behavior change. A number of organizations and insurers have dedicated significant resources to researching and developing games and apps to help patients manage diseases, track self-management activities, and motivate behavior change for healthy lifestyles. This article shares information about gaming theory and its application to health care including a review of the science behind the theory, the use of technology, and gaming education strategies for both patients and clinicians.

  11. Impact of Noise on Nurses in Pediatric Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J'ai; Kinstler, Angela; Vidonish, William P; Wagner, Michael; Lin, Li; Davis, Kermit G; Kotowski, Susan E; Daraiseh, Nancy M

    2015-09-01

    Excessive exposure to noise places nurses at risk for safety events, near-misses, decreased job performance, and fatigue. Noise is particularly a concern in pediatric intensive care units, where highly skilled providers and vulnerable patients require a quiet environment to promote healing. To measure noise levels and noise duration on specialty pediatric intensive care units to explore sources of noise and its effects on the health of registered nurses. In a cross-sectional pilot study, levels and sources of noise in 3 different specialty pediatric intensive care units were assessed. Fifteen nurses were observed for 4-hour sessions during a 24-hour period. Sound pressure levels (noise) and heart rate were measured continuously, and stress ratings were recorded. Descriptive statistics were calculated for noise (level, source, location, and activity), heart rate, and stress. The Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated to analyze the relationship between heart rate and noise. Mean noise level was 71.9 (SD, 9.2) dBA. Mean heart rate was 85.2/min (SD, 15.8/min) and was significantly associated with noise, unit, within-unit location, nurse sources, and noise activities. The most frequent sources of noise were patients' rooms, care activities, and staff communications. Noise levels in pediatric intensive care units exceed recommended thresholds and require immediate attention through effective interventions. Although noise was not associated with stress, a significant correlation with increased heart rate indicates that noise may be associated with adverse health outcomes. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  12. Prevalence of nursing diagnoses in an intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicia de Holanda Cabral

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify the main nursing diagnostic titles used in the care of critically ill patients hospitalized in an Intensive Care Unit, verifying the presence thereof in the diagnoses of NANDA International’s Taxonomy II. Methods: descriptive and documental study, in which 69 medical records of patients aged over 18 years were consulted. Results: 22 nursing diagnostic titles were found; the most frequent was risk for infection (99.0%, risk for skin integrity (75.0% and risk for aspiration (61.0%. Most diagnoses were in the domains safety/ protection (43.0% and activity/rest (26.5%. Conclusions: authors identified the main nursing diagnostic titles used in the care of critically ill patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit and the presence thereof in the diagnoses of NANDA International’s Taxonomy II.

  13. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy in Intensive Care Unit: Prevention, Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis of Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy has substantial prognostic implications in an intensive care unit, given its increased mortality risk and association with life-threatening complications. This report seeks to discuss diagnostic modalities that can be useful in accurately differentiating Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy from Acute Coronary Syndrome, and also briefly discuss prevention and management of this cardiomyopathy in an intensive care unit. For critically ill Takotsubo patients, intensive clinicians can consider establishment of diagnosis by specific electrocardiograph changes, distinctive marked release of cardiac enzymes, characteristic echocardiograph findings, as well as invasive coronary angiography or noninvasive cardiac magnetic imaging.

  14. Home iv antibiotic therapy through a medical day care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Gourdeau, Marie; Deschênes, Louise; Caron, Martine; Desmarais, Marc

    1993-01-01

    An out-patient parenteral antibiotic therapy program provided through a medical day care unit was evaluated in a tertiary care hospital. From July 11, 1988 to December 31, 1990, 122 patients were treated either on site at the unit or at home with self-administered intravenous antibiotics. In all, 142 courses of parenteral antibiotics (mostly cephalosporins and clindamycin) were given for a total of 124 infections, mostly bone and soft tissue infections (67 of 124, 54%). The duration of out-pa...

  15. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Nienke L; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; van Duijn, Pleun J; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to classical infection prevention protocols and surveillance programs, counterintuitive interventions, such as selective decontamination with antibiotics and antibiotic rotation have been applied and investigated to control the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review provides an overview of selective oropharyngeal and digestive tract decontamination, decolonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic rotation as strategies to modulate antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit.

  16. Safety of milrinone use in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiee-Zafarghandy, Samira; Raman, Sudha R; van den Anker, John N; McHutchison, Kerstin; Hornik, Christoph P; Clark, Reese H; Brian Smith, P

    2015-01-01

    Milrinone use in the neonatal intensive care unit has increased over the last 10 years despite a paucity of published safety data in infants. We sought to determine the safety of milrinone therapy among infants in the neonatal intensive care unit. We conducted a retrospective data analysis, identifying all infants who were exposed to milrinone and discharged from 322 neonatal intensive care units managed by the Pediatrix Medical Group from 1997-2010. We identified adverse events (AEs) during milrinone exposure. The unit of observation for clinical AEs was the first course of milrinone and for laboratory AEs it was an infant-day of exposure to milrinone. Overall, 1446 of 716,821 (0.2%) infants received milrinone for a total of 6894 infant-days. The proportion of infants exposed to milrinone increased from 0 in 1997 to 4/1000 infant cases in 2010. Persistent pulmonary hypertension (40%) was the most commonly reported diagnosis at the start of milrinone administration. Overall, 606/1446 (42%) of infants had at least 1 clinical AE recorded during milrinone therapy. Hypotension requiring pressors and thrombocytopenia (milrinone therapy. Among infants hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care unit, there was an increase in the use of milrinone over the past 13 years. The safety, dosing, and efficacy of milrinone in infants should be determined in prospective clinical trials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nurses' autonomy in end-of-life situations in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganini, Maria Cristina; Bousso, Regina Szylit

    2015-11-01

    The intensive care unit environment focuses on interventions and support therapies that prolong life. The exercise by nurses of their autonomy impacts on perception of the role they assume in the multidisciplinary team and on their function in the intensive care unit context. There is much international research relating to nurses' involvement in end-of-life situations; however, there is a paucity of research in this area in Brazil. In the Brazilian medical scenario, life support limitation generated a certain reluctance of a legal nature, which has now become unjustifiable with the publication of a resolution by the Federal Medical Council. In Brazil, the lack of medical commitments to end-of-life care is evident. To understand the process by which nurses exercise autonomy in making end-of-life decisions in intensive care units. Symbolic Interactionism and Corbin and Strauss theory methodology were used for this study. Data were collected through single audio-recorded qualitative interviews with 14 critical care nurses. The comparative analysis of the data has permitted the understanding of the meaning of nurse's experience in exercising autonomy relating to end-of-life decision-making. Institutional ethics approval was obtained for data collection. Participants gave informed consent. All data were anonymized. The results revealed that nurses experience the need to exercise autonomy in intensive care units on a daily basis. Their experience expressed by the process of increase opportunities to exercise autonomy is conditioned by the pressure of the intensive care unit environment, in which nurses can grow, feel empowered, and exercise their autonomy or else can continuously depend on the decisions made by other professionals. Nurses exercise their autonomy through care. They work to create new spaces at the same time that they acquire new knowledge and make decisions. Because of the complexity of the end-of-life situation, nurses must adopt a proactive attitude

  18. Gravitational theory in atomic scale units in Dirac cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, W.

    1984-01-01

    The implication of Dirac's large numbers hypothesis (LNH) that there are two cosmological space-time metrics, gravitational (E) and atomic (A), is used to formulate the gravitational laws for a general mass system in atomic scale units within such a cosmology. The gravitational laws are illustrated in application to the case of a single spherical mass immersed in the smoothed out expanding universe. The condition is determined for such a metric to apply approximately just outside a typical member of a cosmic distribution of such masses. Conversely, the condition is given when the influence of the universe as a whole can be neglected outside such a mass. In the latter situation, which applies in particular to stars, a Schwarzschild-type metric is derived which incorporates variable G in accordance with the LNH. The dynamics of freely moving particles and photons in such a metric are examined according to the theory and observational tests are formulated. (author)

  19. Stroke Mortality in Intensive Care Unit from Tertiary Care Neurological Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lekhjung Thapa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stroke is the second most common cause of death and major cause of disability worldwide. About a quarter of stroke patients are dead within a month, about a third by 6 months, and a half by 1 year. Although the most substantial advance in stroke has been the routine management of patients in stroke care units, intensive care unit has remained the choice for stroke patients’ care in developing countries. This study explores the mortality of stroke patients in intensive care unit setting in tertiary care neurological centre in a developing country. Methods: We collected data of stroke patients admitted in our ICU from August 2009 to Aug 2010 and analyzed. Results: Total 44 (10.25% patients were admitted for acute stroke. Age ranged from 17-93 years. Low GCS (Glasgow Coma Scale, uncontrolled hypertension and aspiration pneumonia were common indications for admission in ICU. Total 23 (52.3% patients had hemorrhagic stroke and 21(47.7% patients had ischemic stroke. 13 (29.54% patients of stroke died within 7 days, 9 (69.23% patients of hemorrhagic stroke died within 6 days, and 4 patients (30.76% of ischemic stroke died within 7 days. 6 (13.63% patients left hospital against medical advice. All of these patients had ischemic stroke. Conclusions: Stroke mortality in intensive care unit remains high despite of care in tertiary neurological center in resource poor settings. Stroke care unit, which would also help dissemination of knowledge of stroke management, is an option for improved outcome in developing countries Keywords: intensive care unit; mortality; stroke; stroke care unit.

  20. Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Units: Combining Intensive Care and Family Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Shunsuke; Saito, Tomoko; Ichikawa, Saori; Saito, Kaori; Takada, Tsuzumi; Noguchi, Satoko; Yamada, Miki; Nakagawa, Fumi

    Advances in treatment in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) for preterm and sick newborns have improved the mortality rate of patients, but admission to the NICU may disrupt parent-infant interaction, with adverse consequences for infants and their families because of physical, psychological, and emotional separation. The concept of family centered care (FCC), in which family members are part of the care team and infants are close to the family, is important and has become popular in NICU. In 2013, we created a team called "Kodomo-Kazoku Mannaka" to promote FCC in Japan, and visited the NICU at Uppsala University Hospital in Sweden, which is internationally famous for FCC. Since this fruitful visit, we have been promoting FCC in Japan by exhibitions and presentations of the FCC ideas at academic conferences and using internet services. A questionnaire survey conducted in 2015 revealed that the importance and the benefits of FCC in NICU are recognized, although there are some barriers to FCC in each facility. It is hard to change facilities and social systems right away, but it is easier and more important to change people's minds. Our role is to spread the concept of FCC and to help each facility find its own way to adopt it. We will continue to make efforts encourage to promote FCC in Japan.

  1. [Sedation and analgesia practices among Spanish neonatal intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Alvarez, A; Carbajal, R; Courtois, E; Pertega-Diaz, S; Muñiz-Garcia, J; Anand, K J S

    2015-08-01

    Pain management and sedation is a priority in neonatal intensive care units. A study was designed with the aim of determining current clinical practice as regards sedation and analgesia in neonatal intensive care units in Spain, as well as to identify factors associated with the use of sedative and analgesic drugs. A multicenter, observational, longitudinal and prospective study. Thirty neonatal units participated and included 468 neonates. Of these, 198 (42,3%) received sedatives or analgesics. A total of 19 different drugs were used during the study period, and the most used was fentanyl. Only fentanyl, midazolam, morphine and paracetamol were used in at least 20% of the neonates who received sedatives and/or analgesics. In infusions, 14 different drug prescriptions were used, with the most frequent being fentanyl and the combination of fentanyl and midazolam. The variables associated with receiving sedation and/or analgesia were, to have required invasive ventilation (P3 (P=.023; OR=2.26), the existence of pain evaluation guides in the unit (Pneonates admitted to intensive care units receive sedatives or analgesics. There is significant variation between Spanish neonatal units as regards sedation and analgesia prescribing. Our results provide evidence on the "state of the art", and could serve as the basis of preparing clinical practice guidelines at a national level. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Guideline for stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbaek; Lorentzen, Kristian; Clausen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is commonly used in the intensive care unit (ICU), and is recommended in the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines 2012. The present guideline from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine sums...... critically ill patients in the ICU outside the context of randomized controlled trials (GRADE 1C). No robust evidence supports recommendations for subpopulations in the ICU such as septic, burn, trauma, cardiothoracic or enterally fed patients. However, if SUP is considered clinically indicated in individual...

  3. Nurse-Patient Communication Interactions in the Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happ, Mary Beth; Garrett, Kathryn; Thomas, Dana DiVirgilio; Tate, Judith; George, Elisabeth; Houze, Martin; Radtke, Jill; Sereika, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Background The inability to speak during critical illness is a source of distress for patients, yet nurse-patient communication in the intensive care unit has not been systematically studied or measured. Objectives To describe communication interactions, methods, and assistive techniques between nurses and nonspeaking critically ill patients in the intensive care unit. Methods Descriptive observational study of the nonintervention/usual care cohort from a larger clinical trial of nurse-patient communication in a medical and a cardiothoracic surgical intensive care unit. Videorecorded interactions between 10 randomly selected nurses (5 per unit) and a convenience sample of 30 critically ill adults (15 per unit) who were awake, responsive, and unable to speak because of respiratory tract intubation were rated for frequency, success, quality, communication methods, and assistive communication techniques. Patients self-rated ease of communication. Results Nurses initiated most (86.2%) of the communication exchanges. Mean rate of completed communication exchange was 2.62 exchanges per minute. The most common positive nurse act was making eye contact with the patient. Although communication exchanges were generally (>70%) successful, more than one-third (37.7%) of communications about pain were unsuccessful. Patients rated 40% of the communication sessions with nurses as somewhat difficult to extremely difficult. Assistive communication strategies were uncommon, with little to no use of assistive communication materials (eg, writing supplies, alphabet or word boards). Conclusions Study results highlight specific areas for improvement in communication between nurses and nonspeaking patients in the intensive care unit, particularly in communication about pain and in the use of assistive communication strategies and communication materials. PMID:21362711

  4. 76 FR 13209 - United States and State of Texas v. United Regional Health Care System; Proposed Final Judgment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... of Texas v. United Regional Health Care System, Civil Action No. 7:11-cv- 00030-O. On February 25..., ambulatory surgery center or radiology center in [a] 15 mile radius of United Regional Health Care System... 95% of billed charges for all inpatient and outpatient services at United Regional Health Care System...

  5. The Leapfrog initiative for intensive care unit physician staffing and its impact on intensive care unit performance: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperino, James

    2011-10-01

    The field of critical care has changed markedly in recent years to accommodate a growing population of chronically critically ill patients. New administrative structures have evolved to include divisions, departments, and sections devoted exclusively to the practice of critical care medicine. On an individual level, the ability to manage complex multisystem critical illnesses and to introduce invasive monitoring devices defines the intensivist. On a systems level, critical care services managed by an intensivist-led multidisciplinary team are now recognized by their ability to efficiently utilize hospital resources and improve patient outcomes. Due to the numerous cost and quality issues related to the delivery of critical care medicine, intensive care unit physician staffing (IPS) has become a charged subject in recent years. Although the federal government has played a large role in regulating best practices by physicians, other third parties have entered the arena. Perhaps the most influential of these has been The Leapfrog Group, a consortium representing 130 employers and 65 Fortune 500 companies that purchase health care for their employees. This group has proposed specific regulatory guidelines for IPS that are purported to result in substantial cost containment and improved quality of care. This narrative review examines the impact of The Leapfrog Group's recommendations on critical care delivery in the United States. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Advance Care Planning in palliative care: a qualitative investigation into the perspective of Paediatric Intensive Care Unit staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sarah; Dale, Jeremy

    2015-04-01

    The majority of children and young people who die in the United Kingdom have pre-existing life-limiting illness. Currently, most such deaths occur in hospital, most frequently within the intensive care environment. To explore the experiences of senior medical and nursing staff regarding the challenges associated with Advance Care Planning in relation to children and young people with life-limiting illnesses in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit environment and opportunities for improvement. Qualitative one-to-one, semi-structured interviews were conducted with Paediatric Intensive Care Unit consultants and senior nurses, to gain rich, contextual data. Thematic content analysis was carried out. UK tertiary referral centre Paediatric Intensive Care Unit. Eight Paediatric Intensive Care Unit consultants and six senior nurses participated. Four main themes emerged: recognition of an illness as 'life-limiting'; Advance Care Planning as a multi-disciplinary, structured process; the value of Advance Care Planning and adverse consequences of inadequate Advance Care Planning. Potential benefits of Advance Care Planning include providing the opportunity to make decisions regarding end-of-life care in a timely fashion and in partnership with patients, where possible, and their families. Barriers to the process include the recognition of the life-limiting nature of an illness and gaining consensus of medical opinion. Organisational improvements towards earlier recognition of life-limiting illness and subsequent Advance Care Planning were recommended, including education and training, as well as the need for wider societal debate. Advance Care Planning for children and young people with life-limiting conditions has the potential to improve care for patients and their families, providing the opportunity to make decisions based on clear information at an appropriate time, and avoid potentially harmful intensive clinical interventions at the end of life. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Care zoning in a psychiatric intensive care unit: strengthening ongoing clinical risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Antony; Drinkwater, Vincent; Lewin, Terry J

    2014-03-01

    To implement and evaluate the care zoning model in an eight-bed psychiatric intensive care unit and, specifically, to examine the model's ability to improve the documentation and communication of clinical risk assessment and management. Care zoning guides nurses in assessing clinical risk and planning care within a mental health context. Concerns about the varying quality of clinical risk assessment prompted a trial of the care zoning model in a psychiatric intensive care unit within a regional mental health facility. The care zoning model assigns patients to one of 3 'zones' according to their clinical risk, encouraging nurses to document and implement targeted interventions required to manage those risks. An implementation trial framework was used for this research to refine, implement and evaluate the impact of the model on nurses' clinical practice within the psychiatric intensive care unit, predominantly as a quality improvement initiative. The model was trialled for three months using a pre- and postimplementation staff survey, a pretrial file audit and a weekly file audit. Informal staff feedback was also sought via surveys and regular staff meetings. This trial demonstrated improvement in the quality of mental state documentation, and clinical risk information was identified more accurately. There was limited improvement in the quality of care planning and the documentation of clinical interventions. Nurses' initial concerns over the introduction of the model shifted into overall acceptance and recognition of the benefits. The results of this trial demonstrate that the care zoning model was able to improve the consistency and quality of risk assessment information documented. Care planning and evaluation of associated outcomes showed less improvement. Care zoning remains a highly applicable model for the psychiatric intensive care unit environment and is a useful tool in guiding nurses to carry out routine patient risk assessments. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons

  8. Is Postoperative Intensive Care Unit Care Necessary following Cranial Vault Remodeling for Sagittal Synostosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfswinkel, Erik M; Howell, Lori K; Fahradyan, Artur; Azadgoli, Beina; McComb, J Gordon; Urata, Mark M

    2017-12-01

    Of U.S. craniofacial and neurosurgeons, 94 percent routinely admit patients to the intensive care unit following cranial vault remodeling for correction of sagittal synostosis. This study aims to examine the outcomes and cost of direct ward admission following primary cranial vault remodeling for sagittal synostosis. An institutional review board-approved retrospective review was undertaken of the records of all patients who underwent primary cranial vault remodeling for isolated sagittal craniosynostosis from 2009 to 2015 at a single pediatric hospital. Patient demographics, perioperative course, and outcomes were recorded. One hundred ten patients met inclusion criteria with absence of other major medical problems. Average age at operation was 6.7 months, with a mean follow-up of 19.8 months. Ninety-eight patients (89 percent) were admitted to a general ward for postoperative care, whereas the remaining 12 (11 percent) were admitted to the intensive care unit for preoperative or perioperative concerns. Among ward-admitted patients, there were four (3.6 percent) minor complications; however, there were no major adverse events, with none necessitating intensive care unit transfers from the ward and no mortalities. Average hospital stay was 3.7 days. The institution's financial difference in cost of intensive care unit stay versus ward bed was $5520 on average per bed per day. Omitting just one intensive care unit postoperative day stay for this patient cohort would reduce projected health care costs by a total of $540,960 for the study period. Despite the common practice of postoperative admission to the intensive care unit following cranial vault remodeling for sagittal craniosynostosis, the authors suggest that postoperative care be considered on an individual basis, with only a small percentage requiring a higher level of care. Therapeutic, III.

  9. [Nurses' perception, experience and knowledge of palliative care in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedrafita-Susín, A B; Yoldi-Arzoz, E; Sánchez-Fernández, M; Zuazua-Ros, E; Vázquez-Calatayud, M

    2015-01-01

    Adequate provision of palliative care by nursing in intensive care units is essential to facilitate a "good death" to critically ill patients. To determine the perceptions, experiences and knowledge of intensive care nurses in caring for terminal patients. A literature review was conducted on the bases of Pubmed, Cinahl and PsicINFO data using as search terms: cuidados paliativos, UCI, percepciones, experiencias, conocimientos y enfermería and their alternatives in English (palliative care, ICU, perceptions, experiences, knowledge and nursing), and combined with AND and OR Boolean. Also, 3 journals in intensive care were reviewed. Twenty seven articles for review were selected, most of them qualitative studies (n=16). After analysis of the literature it has been identified that even though nurses perceive the need to respect the dignity of the patient, to provide care aimed to comfort and to encourage the inclusion of the family in patient care, there is a lack of knowledge of the end of life care in intensive care units' nurses. This review reveals that to achieve quality care at the end of life, is necessary to encourage the training of nurses in palliative care and foster their emotional support, to conduct an effective multidisciplinary work and the inclusion of nurses in decision making. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  10. Critical incidents connected to nurses' leadership in Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Elaine Cantarella; Bernardes, Andrea; Baldo, Priscila Lapaz; Maziero, Vanessa Gomes; Camelo, Silvia Helena Henriques; Balsanelli, Alexandre Pazetto

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study is to analyze nurses' leadership in intensive care units at hospitals in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, in the face of positive and negative critical incidents. Exploratory, descriptive study, conducted with 24 nurses by using the Critical Incident Technique as a methodological benchmark. Results were grouped into 61 critical incidents distributed into categories. Researchers came to the conclusion that leadership-related situations interfere with IC nurses' behaviors. Among these situations they found: difficulty in the communication process; conflicts in the daily exercise of nurses' activities; people management; and the setting of high quality care targets. Researchers identified a mixed leadership model, leading them to the conclusion that nurses' knowledge and practice of contemporary leadership theories/styles are crucial because they facilitate the communication process, focusing on behavioral aspects and beliefs, in addition to valuing flexibility. This positively impacts the organization's results. Analisar a liderança do enfermeiro em Centros de Terapia Intensiva de hospitais localizados no interior do estado de São Paulo, diante de incidentes críticos positivos e negativos. Estudo exploratório, descritivo, realizado com 24 enfermeiros, que utilizou a Técnica do Incidente Crítico como referencial metodológico. Os resultados foram agrupados em 61 incidentes críticos distribuídos em categorias. Identificou-se que situações relacionadas à liderança interferem no comportamento do enfermeiro de Terapia Intensiva, dentre elas: dificuldade no processo de comunicação, conflitos existentes no dia a dia do exercício profissional, gerenciamento de pessoas e estabelecimento de metas para o alcance da assistência qualificada. Encontrou-se um modelo misto de liderança, o que permite concluir que o conhecimento e a prática dos enfermeiros acerca de teorias/estilos contemporâneos de liderança tornam-se fundamentais, pois

  11. General surgical admissions in the intensive care unit in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives:The Intensive Care Unit (ICU) has improved patient outcome in complex surgeries while the costs of maintaining services are high. ICU services in developing countries are often inadequate due to lack of funds. This study reviews the pattern and outcomes of General Surgical patients admitted to the ICU of our ...

  12. Management of Tracheostomy: A Survey of Dutch Intensive Care Units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veelo, Denise P.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Phoa, Kai Y. N.; Dongelmans, Dave A.; Binnekade, Jan M.; Spronk, Peter E.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine tracheostomy-management practices in Dutch intensive care units (ICUs) and post-ICU step-down facilities. METHODS: We surveyed the physician medical directors of all Dutch nonpediatric ICUs that have : 5 beds suitable for mechanical ventilation. The survey asked for

  13. Seasonal and recurrent intensive care unit admissions for acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Life-threatening attacks of asthma requiring intensive care unit (ICU) management at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital in Cape Town were noted to occur in some patients in the same or adjacent months of different years. A retrospective case-controlled study was performed of 21 such 'seasonal' patients who ...

  14. Preterm Admissions in a Special Care Baby Unit: The Nnewi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A review of all preterm admissions into the Special Care Bay Unit of the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH), Nnewi, over a period of 29 months (May 1998 October 2000) was carried out. Out of a total of 699 neonatal admissions, 133 (19 percent) were preterms with gestational ages ranging from 24 to ...

  15. Pet Care Teaching Unit: 1st-3rd Grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peninsula Humane Society, San Mateo, CA.

    Activities in this unit are designed to familiarize primary grade students with the responsibilities involved in pet ownership. Teaching plans are provided for a total of 12 lessons involving social studies, language arts, math, and health sciences. Activities adaptable for readers and non-readers focus on pet overpopulation, care of pets when…

  16. Hypoxaemia on arrival in a multidisciplinary intensive care unit | de ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is, however, potentially preventable. Objective. To determine the incidence of hypoxaemia on arrival in a tertiary multidisciplinary intensive care unit (ICU) and to identify risk factors for this complication. Method. A retrospective observational study was conducted at King Edward VIII Hospital, Durban, South Africa, from May ...

  17. [Benefits of aromatherapy in dementia special care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilien, Corinne; Depas, Nathalie; Delaporte, Ghislaine; Baptiste, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Aromatherapy is classed as a non-pharmacological treatment, recognised as a therapy for certain disorders. This practice was the subject of a study in a special care unit for patients with dementia. The objective was to demonstrate the benefit of aromatherapy diffusion on major behavioural disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Intelligent ventilation in the intensive care unit | Sviri | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. Automated, microprocessor-controlled, closed-loop mechanical ventilation has been used in our Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU) at the Hadassah Hebrew-University Medical Center for the past 15 years; for 10 years it has been the primary (preferred) ventilator modality. Design and setting. We describe our ...

  19. Assessment of delirium in the intensive care unit | Kallenbach ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Delirium poses a significant burden on our healthcare, with patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) at an increased risk for developing this disorder. In addition, the ICU environment poses unique challenges in the assessment of delirium. It is paramount that the healthcare provider has an understanding of delirium in ICU, ...

  20. Discomfort and factual recollection in intensive care unit patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Leur, JP; van der Schans, CP; Loef, BG; Deelman, BG; Geertzen, JHB; Zwaveling, JH

    2004-01-01

    Introduction A stay in the intensive care unit (ICU), although potentially life-saving, may cause considerable discomfort to patients. However, retrospective assessment of discomfort is difficult because recollection of stressful events may be impaired by sedation and severe illness during the ICU

  1. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, Nienke L.; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; Van Duijn, Pleun J.; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to

  2. [Palliative care in the intensive cardiac care unit: a new competence for the cardiac intensivist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanò, Massimo; Bertona, Roberta; Zorzoli, Federica; Villani, Rosvaldo

    2017-10-01

    Admissions to the intensive care unit at the end of life of patients with chronic non-malignant diseases are increasing. This involves the need for the development of palliative care culture and competence, also in the field of intensive cardiology. Palliative care should be implemented in the treatment of all patients with critical stages of disease, irrespective of prognosis, in order to improve the quality of care at the end of life.This review analyzes in detail the main clinical, ethical and communicational issues to move toward the introduction of basics of palliative care in cardiac intensive care units. It outlines the importance of shared decision-making with the patient and his family, with special attention to withholding/withdrawing of life-sustaining treatments, palliative sedation, main symptom control, patient and family psychological support.

  3. Parental involvement and kangaroo care in European neonatal intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallás-Alonso, Carmen R; Losacco, Valentina; Maraschini, Alice

    2012-01-01

    To compare, in a large representative sample of European neonatal intensive care units, the policies and practices regarding parental involvement and holding babies in the kangaroo care position as well as differences in the tasks mothers and fathers are allowed to carry out....

  4. Review of noise in neonatal intensive care units - regional analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez Abril, A [National Technological University, Regional Bioengineering Institute, Mendoza (Argentina); Terron, A; Boschi, C [National Technological University, Regional Bioengineering Institute, Mendoza (Argentina); Gomez, M [National Technological University, La Rioja (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    This work is about the problem of noise in neonatal incubators and in the environment in the neonatal intensive care units. Its main objective is to analyse the impact of noise in hospitals of Mendoza and La Rioja. Methodology: The measures were taken in different moments in front of higher or lower severity level in the working environment. It is shown that noise produces severe damages and changes in the behaviour and the psychological status of the new born babies. Results: The noise recorded inside the incubators and the neonatal intensive care units together have many components but the noise of motors, opening and closing of access gates have been considered the most important ones. Values above 60 db and and up to 120 db in some cases were recorded, so the need to train the health staff in order to manage the new born babies, the equipment and the instruments associated with them very carefully is revealed.

  5. Patients’ Admissions in Intensive Care Units: A Clustering Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ribeiro

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Intensive care is a critical area of medicine having a multidisciplinary nature requiring all types of healthcare professionals. Given the critical environment of intensive care units (ICUs, the need to use information technologies, like decision support systems, to improve healthcare services and ICU management is evident. It is proven that unplanned and prolonged admission to the ICU is not only prejudicial to a patient's health, but also such a situation implies a readjustment of ICU resources, including beds, doctors, nurses, financial resources, among others. By discovering the common characteristics of the admitted patients, it is possible to improve these outcomes. In this study clustering techniques were applied to data collected from admitted patients in an intensive care unit. The best results presented a silhouette of 1, with a distance to centroids of 6.2 × 10−17 and a Davies–Bouldin index of −0.652.

  6. Review of noise in neonatal intensive care units - regional analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez Abril, A; Terron, A; Boschi, C; Gomez, M

    2007-01-01

    This work is about the problem of noise in neonatal incubators and in the environment in the neonatal intensive care units. Its main objective is to analyse the impact of noise in hospitals of Mendoza and La Rioja. Methodology: The measures were taken in different moments in front of higher or lower severity level in the working environment. It is shown that noise produces severe damages and changes in the behaviour and the psychological status of the new born babies. Results: The noise recorded inside the incubators and the neonatal intensive care units together have many components but the noise of motors, opening and closing of access gates have been considered the most important ones. Values above 60 db and and up to 120 db in some cases were recorded, so the need to train the health staff in order to manage the new born babies, the equipment and the instruments associated with them very carefully is revealed

  7. Geriatric patient profile in the cardiovascular surgery intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korha, E.A.; Hakverdioglu, G.; Ozlem, M.; Yurekli, I.; Gurbuz, A.; Alp, N.A

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine hospitalization durations and mortalities of elderly in the Cardiovascular Surgery Intensive Care Unit. Methods: The retrospective study was conducted in a Cardiovascular Surgery Intensive Care Unit in Turkey and comprised patient records from January 1 to December 31, 2011. Computerized epicrisis reports of 255, who had undergone a cardiac surgery were collected. The patients were grouped according to their ages, Group I aged 65-74 and Group II aged 75 and older. European society for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation scores of the two groups were compared using SPSS 17. Results: Overall, there were 80 (31.37%) females and 175 (68.62%) males. There were 138 (54.1%) patients in Group I and 117 (45.9%) in Group II. Regarding their hospitalization reasons, it was determined that 70 (27.5%) patients in Group I and 79 (30.9%) patients in Group II were treated with the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. The average hospitalization duration of patients in the intensive care unit was determined to be 11.57+-10.40 days. Regarding the EuroSCORE score intervals of patients, 132 (51.8%)had 3-5 and 225 (88.2%) patients were transferred to the Cardiovascular Surgery and then all of them were discharged; 5 (4.1%) had a mortal course; and 11 (7.7%) were transferred to the anaesthesia intensive care unit Conclusions: The general mortality rates are very low in the Cardiovascular Surgery Intensive Care Unit and the patients have a good prognosis. (author)

  8. Patient's dignity in intensive care unit: A critical ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidabadi, Farimah Shirani; Yazdannik, Ahmadreza; Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining patient's dignity in intensive care units is difficult because of the unique conditions of both critically-ill patients and intensive care units. The aim of this study was to uncover the cultural factors that impeded maintaining patients' dignity in the cardiac surgery intensive care unit. The study was conducted using a critical ethnographic method proposed by Carspecken. Participants and research context: Participants included all physicians, nurses and staffs working in the study setting (two cardiac surgery intensive care units). Data collection methods included participant observations, formal and informal interviews, and documents assessment. In total, 200 hours of observation and 30 interviews were performed. Data were analyzed to uncover tacit cultural knowledge and to help healthcare providers to reconstruct the culture of their workplace. Ethical Consideration: Ethical approval for the study from Ethics committee of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences was obtained. The findings of the study fell into the following main themes: "Presence: the guarantee for giving enough attention to patients' self-esteem", "Instrumental and objectified attitudes", "Adherence to the human equality principle: value-action gap", "Paternalistic conduct", "Improper language", and "Non-interactive communication". The final assertion was "Reductionism as a major barrier to the maintaining of patient's dignity". The prevailing atmosphere in subculture of the CSICU was reductionism and paternalism. This key finding is part of the biomedical discourse. As a matter of fact, it is in contrast with dignified care because the latter necessitate holistic attitudes and approaches. Changing an ICU culture is not easy; but through increasing awareness and critical self-reflections, the nurses, physicians and other healthcare providers, may be able to reaffirm dignified care and cure in their therapeutic relationships.

  9. Theory of Inpatient Circadian Care (TICC): A Proposal for a Middle-Range Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo-Sanchez, Andrés; Niño, Carmen L; Sánchez, Leonardo; Echeverri, Sonia; Gutiérrez, Diana P; Duque, Andrés F; Pianeta, Oscar; Jaramillo-Gómez, Jenny A; Pilonieta, Martin A; Cataño, Nhora; Arboleda, Humberto; Agostino, Patricia V; Alvarez-Baron, Claudia P; Vargas, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The circadian system controls the daily rhythms of a variety of physiological processes. Most organisms show physiological, metabolic and behavioral rhythms that are coupled to environmental signals. In humans, the main synchronizer is the light/dark cycle, although non-photic cues such as food availability, noise, and work schedules are also involved. In a continuously operating hospital, the lack of rhythmicity in these elements can alter the patient’s biological rhythms and resilience. This paper presents a Theory of Inpatient Circadian Care (TICC) grounded in circadian principles. We conducted a literature search on biological rhythms, chronobiology, nursing care, and middle-range theories in the databases PubMed, SciELO Public Health, and Google Scholar. The search was performed considering a period of 6 decades from 1950 to 2013. Information was analyzed to look for links between chronobiology concepts and characteristics of inpatient care. TICC aims to integrate multidisciplinary knowledge of biomedical sciences and apply it to clinical practice in a formal way. The conceptual points of this theory are supported by abundant literature related to disease and altered biological rhythms. Our theory will be able to enrich current and future professional practice. PMID:25767632

  10. Artificial intelligence applications in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, C W; Marshall, B E

    2001-02-01

    To review the history and current applications of artificial intelligence in the intensive care unit. The MEDLINE database, bibliographies of selected articles, and current texts on the subject. The studies that were selected for review used artificial intelligence tools for a variety of intensive care applications, including direct patient care and retrospective database analysis. All literature relevant to the topic was reviewed. Although some of the earliest artificial intelligence (AI) applications were medically oriented, AI has not been widely accepted in medicine. Despite this, patient demographic, clinical, and billing data are increasingly available in an electronic format and therefore susceptible to analysis by intelligent software. Individual AI tools are specifically suited to different tasks, such as waveform analysis or device control. The intensive care environment is particularly suited to the implementation of AI tools because of the wealth of available data and the inherent opportunities for increased efficiency in inpatient care. A variety of new AI tools have become available in recent years that can function as intelligent assistants to clinicians, constantly monitoring electronic data streams for important trends, or adjusting the settings of bedside devices. The integration of these tools into the intensive care unit can be expected to reduce costs and improve patient outcomes.

  11. Cultural care of older Greek Canadian widows within Leininger's theory of culture care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, J N

    1990-01-01

    Cultural care themes were abstracted from a large scale study of older Greek Canadian widows conceptualized within Leininger's theory of Cultural Care Diversity and Universality. Ethnonursing, ethnographic, and life health-care history methods were used. Data were collected using observation-participation and interviews in three Greek Canadian communities with 12 widowed key informants and 30 general informants. Enabling tools used were interview inquiry guides, Leininger's Life History Health Care Protocol, Leininger's Acculturation Rating and Profile Scale of Traditional and Non-Traditional Lifeways, and field journal recordings. Data were analyzed using Leininger's phases of analysis for qualitative data. The two major cultural care themes which were abstracted from the raw data and patterns were: (1) Cultural care for Greek Canadian widows meant responsibility for, reciprocation, concern, love, companionship, family protection, hospitality, and helping, primarily derived from their kinship, religious, and cultural beliefs, and values, and (2) Cultural care continuity diminished the spousal care void and contributed to the health of Greek Canadian widows. These findings will stimulate future nursing research related to cultural care of diverse populations and guide nursing practice to provide culturally congruent care which will assist widows to reduce their spousal care void. The author thanks Dr. Madeleine Leininger, Dr. Judith Floyd, Dr. Marjorie Isenberg, and Dr. Bernice Kaplan for their guidance in completing the large scale study on which this article is based.

  12. Environmental Design for Patient Families in Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbub Rashid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to define the role of environmental design in improving family integration with patient care in Intensive Care Units (ICUs. It argues that it is necessary to understand family needs, experience and behavioral responses in ICUs to develop effective models for family integration. With its two components—the “healing culture” promoting effective relationships between caregivers and care seekers, and the “environmental design” supporting the healing culture—a “healing environment of care” can be an effective family integration model. This paper presents evidence showing how environmental design may affect families in ICUs, and proposes design recommendations for creating a healing environment of care promoting family integration in ICUs.

  13. [Environmental noise levels in 2 intensive care units in a tertiary care centre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornelas-Aguirre, José Manuel; Zárate-Coronado, Olivia; Gaxiola-González, Fabiola; Neyoy-Sombra, Venigna

    2017-04-03

    The World Health Organisation (WHO) has established a maximum noise level of 40 decibels (dB) for an intensive care unit. The aim of this study was to compare the noise levels in 2 different intensive care units at a tertiary care centre. Using a cross-sectional design study, an analysis was made of the maximum noise level was within the intensive coronary care unit and intensive care unit using a digital meter. A measurement was made in 4 different points of each room, with 5minute intervals, for a period of 60minutes 7:30, 14:30, and 20:30. The means of the observations were compared with descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney U. An analysis with Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to the mean noise level. The noise observed in the intensive care unit had a mean of 64.77±3.33dB (P=.08), which was similar to that in the intensive coronary care unit, with a mean of 60.20±1.58dB (P=.129). Around 25% or more of the measurements exceeded the level recommended by the WHO by up to 20 points. Noise levels measured in intensive care wards exceed the maximum recommended level for a hospital. It is necessary to design and implement actions for greater participation of health personnel in the reduction of environmental noise. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Critical Thinking in Critical Care: Five Strategies to Improve Teaching and Learning in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Margaret M; Chatterjee, Souvik; Schwartzstein, Richard M

    2017-04-01

    Critical thinking, the capacity to be deliberate about thinking, is increasingly the focus of undergraduate medical education, but is not commonly addressed in graduate medical education. Without critical thinking, physicians, and particularly residents, are prone to cognitive errors, which can lead to diagnostic errors, especially in a high-stakes environment such as the intensive care unit. Although challenging, critical thinking skills can be taught. At this time, there is a paucity of data to support an educational gold standard for teaching critical thinking, but we believe that five strategies, routed in cognitive theory and our personal teaching experiences, provide an effective framework to teach critical thinking in the intensive care unit. The five strategies are: make the thinking process explicit by helping learners understand that the brain uses two cognitive processes: type 1, an intuitive pattern-recognizing process, and type 2, an analytic process; discuss cognitive biases, such as premature closure, and teach residents to minimize biases by expressing uncertainty and keeping differentials broad; model and teach inductive reasoning by utilizing concept and mechanism maps and explicitly teach how this reasoning differs from the more commonly used hypothetico-deductive reasoning; use questions to stimulate critical thinking: "how" or "why" questions can be used to coach trainees and to uncover their thought processes; and assess and provide feedback on learner's critical thinking. We believe these five strategies provide practical approaches for teaching critical thinking in the intensive care unit.

  15. Competence of nurses in the intensive cardiac care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobahar, Monir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Competence of nurses is a complex combination of knowledge, function, skills, attitudes, and values. Delivering care for patients in the Intensive Cardiac Care Unit (ICCU) requires nurses’ competences. This study aimed to explain nurses’ competence in the ICCU. Methods This was a qualitative study in which purposive sampling with maximum variation was used. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 23 participants during 2012–2013. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by using the content-analysis method. Results The main categories were “clinical competence,” comprising subcategories of ‘routine care,’ ‘emergency care,’ ‘care according to patients’ needs,’ ‘care of non-coronary patients’, as well as “professional competence,” comprising ‘personal development,’ ‘teamwork,’ ‘professional ethics,’ and ‘efficacy of nursing education.’ Conclusion The finding of this study revealed dimensions of nursing competence in ICCU. Benefiting from competence leads to improved quality of patient care and satisfaction of patients and nurses and helps elevate nursing profession, improve nursing education, and clinical nursing. PMID:27382450

  16. Assessment of Delirium in Intensive Care Unit Patients: Educational Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Judith M; Van Aman, M Nancy; Schneiderhahn, Mary Elizabeth; Edelman, Robin; Ercole, Patrick M

    2017-05-01

    Delirium is an acute brain dysfunction associated with poor outcomes in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Critical care nurses play an important role in the prevention, detection, and management of delirium, but they must be able to accurately assess for it. The Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit (CAM-ICU) instrument is a reliable and valid method to assess for delirium, but research reveals most nurses need practice to use it proficiently. A pretest-posttest design was used to evaluate the success of a multimodal educational strategy (i.e., online learning module coupled with standardized patient simulation experience) on critical care nurses' knowledge and confidence to assess and manage delirium using the CAM-ICU. Participants (N = 34) showed a significant increase (p education. No statistical change in knowledge of delirium existed following the education. A multimodal educational strategy, which included simulation, significantly added confidence in critical care nurses' performance using the CAM-ICU. J Contin Nurs Educ. 2017;48(5):239-244. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. How the United States exports managed care to developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitzkin, H; Iriart, C

    2001-01-01

    As their expansion slows in the United States, managed care organizations will continue to enter new markets abroad. Investors view the opening of managed care in Latin America as a lucrative business opportunity. As public-sector services and social security funds are cut back, privatized, and reorganized under managed care, with the support of international lending agencies such as the World Bank, the effects of these reforms on access to preventive and curative services will hold great importance throughout the developing world. Many groups in Latin America are working on alternative projects that defend health as a public good, and similar movements have begun in Africa and Asia. Increasingly, this organizing is being recognized not only as part of a class struggle but also as part of a struggle against economic imperialism--which has now taken on the new appearance of rescuing less developed countries from rising health care costs and inefficient bureaucracies through the imposition of neoliberal managed-care solutions exported from the United States.

  18. Status of neonatal intensive care units in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez A

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal mortality in India accounts for 50% of infant mortality, which has declined to 84/1000 live births. There is no prenatal care for over 50% of pregnant women, and over 80% deliver at home in unsafe and unsanitary conditions. Those women who do deliver in health facilities are unable to receive intensive neonatal care when necessary. Level I and Level II neonatal care is unavailable in most health facilities in India, and in most developing countries. There is a need in India for Level III care units also. The establishment of neonatal intensive care units (NICUs in India and developing countries would require space and location, finances, equipment, staff, protocols of care, and infection control measures. Neonatal mortality could be reduced by initially adding NICUs at a few key hospitals. The recommendation is for 30 NICU beds per million population. Each bed would require 50 square feet per cradle and proper climate control. Funds would have to be diverted from adult care. The largest expenses would be in equipment purchase, maintenance, and repair. Trained technicians would be required to operate and monitor the sophisticated ventilators and incubators. The nurse-patient ratio should be 1:1 and 1:2 for other infants. Training mothers to work in the NICUs would help ease the problems of trained nursing staff shortages. Protocols need not be highly technical; they could include the substitution of radiant warmers and room heaters for expensive incubators, the provision of breast milk, and the reduction of invasive procedures such as venipuncture and intubation. Nocosomial infections should be reduced by vacuum cleaning and wet mopping with a disinfectant twice a day, changing disinfectants periodically, maintaining mops to avoid infection, decontamination of linen, daily changing of tubing, and cleaning and sterilizing oxygen hoods and resuscitation equipment, and maintaining an iatrogenic infection record book, which could be used to

  19. Embedding effective depression care: using theory for primary care organisational and systems change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Jane M; Palmer, Victoria J; Dowrick, Christopher F; Herrman, Helen E; Griffiths, Frances E; Kokanovic, Renata; Blashki, Grant A; Hegarty, Kelsey L; Johnson, Caroline L; Potiriadis, Maria; May, Carl R

    2010-08-06

    Depression and related disorders represent a significant part of general practitioners (GPs) daily work. Implementing the evidence about what works for depression care into routine practice presents a challenge for researchers and service designers. The emerging consensus is that the transfer of efficacious interventions into routine practice is strongly linked to how well the interventions are based upon theory and take into account the contextual factors of the setting into which they are to be transferred. We set out to develop a conceptual framework to guide change and the implementation of best practice depression care in the primary care setting. We used a mixed method, observational approach to gather data about routine depression care in a range of primary care settings via: audit of electronic health records; observation of routine clinical care; and structured, facilitated whole of organisation meetings. Audit data were summarised using simple descriptive statistics. Observational data were collected using field notes. Organisational meetings were audio taped and transcribed. All the data sets were grouped, by organisation, and considered as a whole case. Normalisation Process Theory (NPT) was identified as an analytical theory to guide the conceptual framework development. Five privately owned primary care organisations (general practices) and one community health centre took part over the course of 18 months. We successfully developed a conceptual framework for implementing an effective model of depression care based on the four constructs of NPT: coherence, which proposes that depression work requires the conceptualisation of boundaries of who is depressed and who is not depressed and techniques for dealing with diffuseness; cognitive participation, which proposes that depression work requires engagement with a shared set of techniques that deal with depression as a health problem; collective action, which proposes that agreement is reached about how

  20. The Chinese family-centered care survey for adult intensive care unit: A psychometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Ling; Feng, Jui-Ying; Wang, Chi-Jen; Chen, Jing-Huei

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to develop a family-centered care survey for Chinese adult intensive care units and to establish the survey's psychometric properties. Family-centered care (FCC) is widely recognized as an ideal model of care. Few studies have explored FCC perceptions among family members of adult critical care patients in Asian countries, and no Chinese FCC measurement has been developed. An English version of the 3-factor family-centered care survey for adult intensive care units (FCCS-AICU) was translated into Chinese using a modified back translation procedure. Based on the literature review, two additional concepts, information and empowerment, were added to the Chinese FCCS-AICU. The psychometric properties of the Chinese FCCS-AICU were determined with 249 family members from a medical center in Taiwan and were tested for construct and convergent validity, and internal consistency. Both the monolingual and bilingual equivalence tests of the English and Chinese versions of the 3-factor FCCS-AICU were supported. Exploratory factor analysis supported the 5-factor structure of the Chinese FCCS-AICU with a total explained variance of 58.34%. The Chinese FCCS-AICU was correlated with the Chinese Critical Care Family Needs Inventory. Internal consistency, determined by Cronbach's α, for the overall scale was .94. The Chinese FCCS-AICU is a valid and reliable tool for measuring perceptions of FCC by family members of adult intensive care patients within Chinese-speaking communities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Digital remote viewing system for coronary care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, P.S.; Tillisch, J.; Huang, H.K.

    1987-01-01

    A digital remote viewing system developed for the coronary care unit at the UCLA Medical Center has been in clinical operation since March 1, 1987. The present system consists of three 512-line monitors, VAX 11/750, Gould IP8500 image processor and a broad-band communication system. The patients' images are acquired with a computed radiography system and are transmitted to the coronary care unit, which is five floors above the radiology department. This exhibit presents the architecture and the performance characteristics of the system. Also, the second-generation system, which consists of an intelligent local work station with three 1,024-line monitors and a fast digital communication network, will be introduced

  2. Constipation in intensive care unit: incidence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Antonio Paulo; da Silva, Fernanda Maria Queiroz; de Cleva, Roberto

    2009-12-01

    Although gastrointestinal motility disorders are common in critically ill patients, constipation and its implications have received very little attention. We aimed to determine the incidence of constipation to find risk factors and its implications in critically ill patients During a 6-month period, we enrolled all patients admitted to an intensive care unit from an universitary hospital who stayed 3 or more days. Patients submitted to bowel surgery were excluded. Constipation occurred in 69.9% of the patients. There was no difference between constipated and not constipated in terms of sex, age, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II, type of admission (surgical, clinical, or trauma), opiate use, antibiotic therapy, and mechanical ventilation. Early (constipation, a finding that persisted at multivariable analysis (P Constipation was not associated with greater intensive care unit or mortality, length of stay, or days free from mechanical ventilation. Constipation is very common among critically ill patients. Early enteral nutrition is associated with earlier return of bowel function.

  3. Inpatient Dialysis Unit Project Development: Redesigning Acute Hemodialysis Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Executive leaders of an acute care hospital performed a market and financial analysis, and created a business plan to establish an inpatient hemodialysis unit operated by the hospital to provide safe, high-quality, evidence-based care to the population of individuals experiencing end stage renal disease (ESRD) within the community. The business plan included a SWOT (Strengths - Weaknesses - Opportunities - Threats) analysis to assess advantages of the hospital providing inpatient hemodialysis services versus outsourcing the services with a contracted agency. The results of the project were a newly constructed tandem hemodialysis room and an operational plan with clearly defined key performance indicators, process improvement initiatives, and financial goals. This article provides an overview of essential components of a business plan to guide the establishment of an inpatient hemodialysis unit. Copyright© by the American Nephrology Nurses Association.

  4. Post-traumatic stress disorder in intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiuby, Andrea Vannini Santesso; Andreoli, Paola Bruno de Araújo; Andreoli, Sergio Baxter

    2010-03-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder has been detected in patients after treatment in intensive care unit. The main goal of this study is to review the psychological aspects and therapeutic interventions on those patients after their treatment on intensive care unit. Thirty eight articles have been included. The prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder has varied from 17% up to 30% and the incidence from 14% to 24%. The risk factors were: previous anxiety historic, depression or panic, having delusional traumatic memories (derived from psychic formations as dreams and delirium), belief effects, depressive behavior, stressing experiences and mechanical ventilation. High doses of opiates, symptoms caused by sedation or analgesia reduction and the use of lorazepam were related with the increase of delirium and delusional memory. The disorder sintomatology can be reduced with hydrocortisone administration, with daily sedation interruption. No other effectiveness psychological intervention study was found.

  5. Implementation of enteral feeding protocol in an intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padar, Martin; Uusvel, Gerli; Starkopf, Liis

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effects of implementing an enteral feeding protocol on the nutritional delivery and outcomes of intensive care patients. METHODS: An uncontrolled, observational before-and-after study was performed in a tertiary mixed medical-surgical intensive care unit (ICU). In 2013......, a nurse-driven enteral feeding protocol was developed and implemented in the ICU. Nutrition and outcome-related data from patients who were treated in the study unit from 2011-2012 (the Before group) and 2014-2015 (the After group) were obtained from a local electronic database, the national Population...... the groups. Patients in the After group had a lower 90-d (P = 0.026) and 120-d (P = 0.033) mortality. In the After group, enteral nutrition was prescribed less frequently (P = 0.039) on day 1 but significantly more frequently on all days from day 3. Implementation of the feeding protocol resulted in a higher...

  6. Teamwork as a nursing competence at Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Helena Henriques Camelo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim in this study was to identify how Intensive Care Unit nurses perceive professional competences in thecare team. Methodology. Qualitative multiple case study with an exploratory focus. The sample consisted of 24 nurses from Intensive Care Units (ICU at two large hospitals. To collect the information, direct observation and - structured, non-structuredand participant - interviews were used. Results. Ninety-six percent of the participants were women, 79% were less than 40 years old, and 63% possessed less than five years of professional experience in ICU. Data analysis revealed three study categories: teamwork as a nursing management tool, improving teamwork, and interpersonal communication for teamwork. Conclusion. At the ICU where the nurses work, a teamwork strategy is observed, which demands cooperation and participation by other disciplines.

  7. ISO 9001 in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitner, Gad; Nadir, Erez; Feldman, Michael; Yurman, Shmuel

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the process for approving and certifying a neonatal intensive care unit to ISO 9001 standards. The process started with the department head's decision to improve services quality before deciding to achieve ISO 9001 certification. Department processes were mapped and quality management mechanisms were developed. Process control and performance measurements were defined and implemented to monitor the daily work. A service satisfaction review was conducted to get feedback from families. In total, 28 processes and related work instructions were defined. Process yields showed service improvements. Family satisfaction improved. The paper is based on preparing only one neonatal intensive care unit to the ISO 9001 standard. The case study should act as an incentive for hospital managers aiming to improve service quality based on the ISO 9001 standard. ISO 9001 is becoming a recommended tool to improve clinical service quality.

  8. Assessing the Impact of Telemedicine on Nursing Care in Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinpell, Ruth; Barden, Connie; Rincon, Teresa; McCarthy, Mary; Zapatochny Rufo, Rebecca J

    2016-01-01

    Information on the impact of tele-intensive care on nursing and priority areas of nursing care is limited. To conduct a national benchmarking survey of nurses working in intensive care telemedicine facilities in the United States. In a 2-phased study, an online survey was used to assess nurses' perceptions of intensive care telemedicine, and a modified 2-round Delphi study was used to identify priority areas of nursing. In phase 1, most of the 1213 respondents agreed to strongly agreed that using tele-intensive care enables them to accomplish tasks more quickly (63%), improves collaboration (65.9%), improves job performance (63.6%) and communication (60.4%), is useful in nursing assessments (60%), and improves care by providing more time for patient care (45.6%). Benefits of tele-intensive care included ability to detect trends in vital signs, detect unstable physiological status, provide medical management, and enhance patient safety. Barriers included technical problems (audio and video), interruptions in care, perceptions of telemedicine as an interference, and attitudes of staff. In phase 2, 60 nurses ranked 15 priority areas of care, including critical thinking skills, intensive care experience, skillful communication, mutual respect, and management of emergency patient care. The findings can be used to further inform the development of competencies for tele-intensive care nursing, match the tele-intensive care nursing practice guidelines of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, and highlight concepts related to the association's standards for establishing and sustaining healthy work environments. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  9. Bloodstream Infections in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Sah Ipek

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To determine the pattern of bloodstream infections (BSIs) and antimicrobial susceptibility of pathogens in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).Material and Method: Positive hemoculture of neonates diagnosed with nosocomial sepsis from March 2011 to March 2014 in the NICU of Diyarbakir Maternity and Children%u2019s Hospital, in the southeastern region of Anatolia, Turkey, were retrospectively reviewed. Results: A total of 148 pathogens were isolated in 142 neonates. The most common micr...

  10. Strategies to address management challenges in larger intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlakala, M C; Bezuidenhout, M C; Botha, A D H

    2015-10-01

    To illustrate the need for and suggest strategies that will enhance sustainable management of a large intensive care unit (ICU). The challenges faced by intensive care nursing in South Africa are well documented. However, there appear to be no strategies available to assist nurses to manage large ICUs or for ICU managers to deal with problems as they arise. Data sources to illustrate the need for strategies were challenges described by ICU managers in the management of large ICUs. A purposive sample of managers was included in individual interviews during compilation of evidence regarding the challenges experienced in the management of large ICUs. The challenges were presented at the Critical Care Society of Southern Africa Congress held on 28 August to 2 September 2012 in Sun City North-West province, South Africa. Five strategies are suggested for the challenges identified: divide the units into sections; develop a highly skilled and effective nursing workforce to ensure delivery of quality nursing care; create a culture to retain an effective ICU nursing team; manage assets; and determine the needs of ICU nurses. ICUs need measures to drive the desired strategies into actions to continuously improve the management of the unit. Future research should be aimed at investigating the effectiveness of the strategies identified. This research highlights issues relating to large ICUs and the strategies will assist ICU managers to deal with problems related to large unit sizes, shortage of trained ICU nurses, use of agency nurses, shortage of equipment and supplies and stressors in the ICU. The article will make a contribution to the body of nursing literature on management of ICUs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Human-centered environment design in intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Y.; Albayrak, A.; Goossens, R.H.M.; Xiao, D.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Because of high risk and instability of the patients in Intensive care unit(ICU), the design of ICU is very difficult. ICU design, auxiliary building design, lighting design, noise control and other aspects can also enhance its management. In this paper, we compare ICU design in China and Holland based on related standards. We also premeditate the indoor environment from planning perspective, analyze patients, their families, medical staff and space requirement to conduct research in ICU desi...

  12. Nutritional support of children in the intensive care unit.

    OpenAIRE

    Seashore, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Nutritional support is an integral and essential part of the management of 5-10 percent of hospitalized children. Children in the intensive care unit are particularly likely to develop malnutrition because of the nature and duration of their illness, and their inability to eat by mouth. This article reviews the physiology of starvation and the development of malnutrition in children. A method of estimating the nutritional requirements of children is presented. The techniques of nutritional su...

  13. Health care development: integrating transaction cost theory with social support theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajli, M Nick; Shanmugam, Mohana; Hajli, Ali; Khani, Amir Hossein; Wang, Yichuan

    2014-07-28

    The emergence of Web 2.0 technologies has already been influential in many industries, and Web 2.0 applications are now beginning to have an impact on health care. These new technologies offer a promising approach for shaping the future of modern health care, with the potential for opening up new opportunities for the health care industry as it struggles to deal with challenges including the need to cut costs, the increasing demand for health services and the increasing cost of medical technology. Social media such as social networking sites are attracting more individuals to online health communities, contributing to an increase in the productivity of modern health care and reducing transaction costs. This study therefore examines the potential effect of social technologies, particularly social media, on health care development by adopting a social support/transaction cost perspective. Viewed through the lens of Information Systems, social support and transaction cost theories indicate that social media, particularly online health communities, positively support health care development. The results show that individuals join online health communities to share and receive social support, and these social interactions provide both informational and emotional support.

  14. Parents' experiences with neonatal home care following initial care in the neonatal intensive care unit: a phenomenological hermeneutical interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellenmark-Blom, Michaela; Wigert, Helena

    2014-03-01

    A descriptive study of parents' experiences with neonatal home care following initial care in the neonatal intensive care unit. As survival rates improve among premature and critically ill infants with an increased risk of morbidity, parents' responsibilities for neonatal care grow in scope and degree under the banner of family-centred care. Concurrent with medical advances, new questions arise about the role of parents and the experience of being provided neonatal care at home. An interview study with a phenomenological hermeneutic approach. Parents from a Swedish neonatal (n = 22) home care setting were extensively interviewed within one year of discharge. Data were collected during 2011-2012. The main theme of the findings is that parents experience neonatal home care as an inner emotional journey, from having a child to being a parent. This finding derives from three themes: the parents' experience of leaving the hospital milieu in favour of establishing independent parenthood, maturing as a parent and processing experiences during the period of neonatal intensive care. This study suggests that neonatal home care is experienced as a care structure adjusted to incorporate parents' needs following discharge from a neonatal intensive care unit. Neonatal home care appears to bridge the gap between hospital and home, supporting the family's adaptation to life in the home setting. Parents become empowered to be primary caregivers, having nurse consultants serving the needs of the whole family. Neonatal home care may therefore be understood as the implementation of family-centred care during the transition from NICU to home. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The experiences of family caregiving in a chronic care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myung Ok

    2005-12-01

    The main purpose of this critical ethnography was to examines the process and discourses through which family caregivers experience while caring for their sick family member in a hospital. This was achieved by conducting in-depth interviews with 12 family caregivers, and by observing their caring activities and daily lives in natural settings. The study field was a unit for neurologic patients. Data was analyzed using taxonomy, discourse analysis, and proxemics. All research work was iteratively processed from March 2003 to December 2004. Constant comparative analysis of the data yielded the process of becoming a successful family caregiver: encountering the differences and chaos as novice; constructing their world of skilled caregivers; and becoming a hospital family as experienced caregivers. During the process of becoming an experienced hospital family, the discourse of family centered idea guided their caring behaviors and daily lives. The paternalistic family caregivers struggled, cooperated, and harmonized with the patriarchal world of professional health care system. During this process of becoming hospital family, professional nurses must act as cultural brokers between the lay family caring system and the professional caring system.

  16. Meaning of caring in pediatric intensive care unit from the perspective of parents: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Janet Yvonne; Arman, Maria; Castren, Maaret; Forsner, Maria

    2014-12-01

    When children are critically ill, parents still strive to be present and participate in the care of their child. Pediatric intensive care differs from other realms of pediatric care as the nature of care is technically advanced and rather obstructing than encouraging parental involvement or closeness, either physically or emotionally, with the critically ill child. The aim of this study was to elucidate the meaning of caring in the pediatric intensive care unit from the perspective of parents. The design of this study followed Benner's interpretive phenomenological method. Eleven parents of seven children participated in observations and interviews. The following aspects of caring were illustrated in the themes arising from the findings: being a bridge to the child on the edge, building a sheltered atmosphere, meeting the child's needs, and adapting the environment for family life. The overall impression is that the phenomenon of caring is experienced exclusively when it is directed toward the exposed child. The conclusion drawn is that caring is present when providing expert physical care combined with fulfilling emotional needs and supporting continuing daily parental care for the child in an inviting environment. © The Author(s) 2013.

  17. [Developmental centered care. Situation in Spanish neonatal units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Maestro, M; Melgar Bonis, A; de la Cruz-Bertolo, J; Perapoch López, J; Mosqueda Peña, R; Pallás Alonso, C

    2014-10-01

    Developmental centered care (DC) is focused on sensorineural and emotional development of the newborns. In Spain we have had information on the application of DC since 1999, but the extent of actual implementation is unknown. To determine the level of implementation of DC in Spanish neonatal units where more than 50 infants weighing under 1500g were cared for in 2012. A comparison was made with previous data published in 2006. A descriptive observational cross-sectional study was performed using a survey with seven questions as in the 2006 questionnaire. The survey was sent to 27 units. The response rate was 81% in 2012 versus 96% in 2006. Noise control measures were introduced in 73% of units in 2012 versus 11% in 2006 (P<.01). The use of saccharose was 50% in 2012 versus 46% in 2006 (P=.6). Parents free entry was 82% in 2012 versus 11% in 2006 (P<.01). Kangaroo care was used without restriction by 82% in 2012 compared to 31% in 2006 (P<.01). The implementation of the DC in Spain has improved. There is still room for improvement in areas, such as the use of saccharose or noise control. However, it is important to highlight the positive change that has occurred in relation to unrestricted parental visits. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Health care units and human resources management trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Adriana Maria; Ciampone, Maria Helena Trench; Santelle, Odete

    2013-02-01

    To identify factors producing new trends in basic health care unit management and changes in management models. This was a prospective study with ten health care unit managers and ten specialists in the field of Health in São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, in 2010. The Delphi methodology was adopted. There were four stages of data collection, three quantitative and the fourth qualitative. The first three rounds dealt with changing trends in management models, manager profiles and required competencies, and the Mann-Whitney test was used in the analysis. The fourth round took the form of a panel of those involved, using thematic analysis. The main factors which are driving change in basic health care units were identified, as were changes in management models. There was consensus that this process is influenced by the difficulties in managing teams and by politics. The managers were found to be up-to-date with trends in the wider context, with the arrival of social health organizations, but they are not yet anticipating these within the institutions. Not only the content, but the professional development aspect of training courses in this area should be reviewed. Selection and recruitment, training and assessment of these professionals should be guided by these competencies aligned to the health service mission, vision, values and management models.

  19. Home iv Antibiotic Therapy through a Medical Day Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Gourdeau

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available An out-patient parenteral antibiotic therapy program provided through a medical day care unit was evaluated in a tertiary care hospital. From July 11, 1988 to December 31, 1990, 122 patients were treated either on site at the unit or at home with self-administered intravenous antibiotics. In all, 142 courses of parenteral antibiotics (mostly cephalosporins and clindamycin were given for a total of 124 infections, mostly bone and soft tissue infections (67 of 124, 54%. The duration of out-patient therapy ranged from two to 62 days with a mean duration of 9.4 days if treated at the unit, or 13.2 days in the home care model (1476 patient-days. Vein access was peripheral and catheters remained functional for an average of 4.9 days (range 0.5 to 22 days. Only two patients experienced adverse drug reactions that necessitated modification of treatment. One other case was readmitted to the hospital for surgical debridement. The average cost per patient-day was $66 compared with $375 for in-hospital therapy. This program proved to be safe, efficient, and cost-effective.

  20. Reflecting on healthcare and self-care in the Intensive Care Unit: our story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Peterkin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Health care professionals working in Intensive Care Units (ICUs are exposed to high levels of stress-provoking stimuli. Some may unconsciously employ negative coping skill s which may contribute to burnout and negatively affect patient care. We chose to explore ways of facilitating and encouraging self-reflective practice in an effort to increase empathic traits and enhance communication. A narrative medicine series, which included six sessions that were focused on different narrative approaches, was organized for staff of an academic teaching hospital. Totally, 132 interdisciplinary ICU staff attended the sessions. They were generally open to exploring the selected approaches and discussing their reflections within the interdisciplinary environment. The narrative medicine series provided tools for health care professionals to enhance self-reflective skills utilizing a team-based learning approach. The anticipated outcomes were improved self-care, increased empathy and communication skills, enhanced team functioning, which all contribute to better patient care at the bedside.

  1. Intensive care bereavement practices across New Zealand and Australian intensive care units: a qualitative content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Maureen; Mitchell, Marion; James, Stephen; Wetzig, Krista

    2017-10-01

    End-of-life and bereavement care is an important consideration in intensive care. This study describes the type of bereavement care provided in intensive care units across Australia and New Zealand. Inductive qualitative content analysis was conducted on free-text responses to a web-based survey exploring unit-based bereavement practice distributed to nurse managers in 229 intensive care units in New Zealand and Australia. A total of 153 (67%) surveys were returned with 68 respondents making free-text responses. Respondents were mainly Australian (n = 54, 85·3%), from the public sector (n = 51, 75%) and holding Nurse Unit Managers/Charge Nurse roles (n = 39, 52·9%). From the 124 free-text responses, a total of 187 individual codes were identified focussing on bereavement care practices (n = 145, 77·5%), educational provision to support staff (n = 15, 8%) and organisational challenges (n = 27, 14·4%). Bereavement care practices described use of memory boxes, cultural specificity, annual memorial services and use of community support services. Educational provision identified local in-service programmes, and national bereavement courses for specialist bereavement nurse coordinators. Organisational challenges focussed on lack of funding, especially for provision of bereavement follow-up. This is the first Australasian-wide survey, and one of the few international studies, describing bereavement practices within intensive care, an important aspect of nursing practice. However, with funding for new bereavement services and education for staff lacking, there are continued challenges in developing bereavement care. Given knowledge about the impact of these areas of care on bereaved family members, this requires review. Nurses remain committed to supporting bereaved families during and following death in intensive care. With limited resource to support bereavement care, intensive care nurses undertake a range of bereavement care practices at time of death

  2. United theory of planet formation (i): Tandem regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu; Imaeda, Yusuke

    2017-07-01

    The present paper is the first one of a series of papers that present the new united theory of planet formation, which includes magneto-rotational instability and porous aggregation of solid particles in an consistent way. We here describe the ;tandem; planet formation regime, in which a solar system like planetary systems are likely to be produced. We have obtained a steady-state, 1-D model of the accretion disk of a protostar taking into account the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) and and porous aggregation of solid particles. We find that the disk is divided into an outer turbulent region (OTR), a MRI suppressed region (MSR), and an inner turbulent region (ITR). The outer turbulent region is fully turbulent because of MRI. However, in the range, rout(= 8 - 60 AU) from the central star, MRI is suppressed around the midplane of the gas disk and a quiet area without turbulence appears, because the degree of ionization of gas becomes low enough. The disk becomes fully turbulent again in the range rin(= 0.2 - 1 AU), which is called the inner turbulent region, because the midplane temperature become high enough (>1000 K) due to gravitational energy release. Planetesimals are formed through gravitational instability at the outer and inner MRI fronts (the boundaries between the MRI suppressed region (MSR) and the outer and inner turbuent regions) without particle enhancement in the original nebula composition, because of the radial concentration of the solid particles. At the outer MRI front, icy particles grow through low-velocity collisions into porous aggregates with low densities (down to ∼10-5 gcm-3). They eventually undergo gravitational instability to form icy planetesimals. On the other hand, rocky particles accumulate at the inner MRI front, since their drift velocities turn outward due to the local maximum in gas pressure. They undergo gravitational instability in a sub-disk of pebbles to form rocky planetesimals at the inner MRI front. They are likely

  3. X-ray investigations in intensive care units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokieser, H.

    1981-10-01

    From special care following surgery and from arteficial respiration of polio patients the modern and very special intensive medical care has developed. At the same time the provisional bedside radiology was improved to one branch of clinical radiology with special organisation and methods of investigation. Importance and urgency of radiological information are requiring close cooperation of all medical branches. Functions of these different groups have to be defined. The movable X-ray apparatus of 20 kV output is necessary for every intensive care unit. Hard beam technique for lung X-rays, scattered radiation grids and adequate positioning of the patient are important to get the same high quality pictures than from the radiological department.

  4. X-ray investigations in intensive care units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokieser, H.

    1981-01-01

    From special care following surgery and from arteficial respiration of polio patients the modern and very special intensive medical care has developed. At the same time the provisional bedside radiology was improved to one branch of clinical radiology with special organisation and methods of investigation. Importance and urgency of radiological information are requiring close cooperation of all medical branches. Functions of these different groups have to be defined. The movable X-ray apparatus of 20 kV output is necessary for every intensive care unit. Hard beam technique for lung X-rays, scattered radiation grids and adequate positioning of the patient are important to get the same high quality pictures than from the radiological department. (orig.) [de

  5. Stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Morten Brøgger; Perner, A; Wetterslev, J

    2013-01-01

    Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is regarded as standard of care in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, recent randomized, clinical trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses have questioned the rationale and level of evidence for this recommendation. The aim of the present systematic review was to evaluate...... incidence of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding varies considerably. Data on the incidence and severity of GI bleeding in general ICUs in the developed world as of today are lacking. The best intervention for SUP is yet to be settled by balancing efficacy and harm. In essence, it is unresolved if intensive care...... patients benefit overall from SUP. The following clinically research questions are unanswered: (1) What is the incidence of GI bleeding, and which interventions are used for SUP in general ICUs today?; (2) Which criteria are used to prescribe SUP?; (3) What is the best SUP intervention?; (4) Do intensive...

  6. Provision of bereavement care in neonatal units in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Meredith J P; Aldridge, Anne; Curley, Anna E

    2011-05-01

    To establish what bereavement care services are available in neonatal units in the United Kingdom and to establish the availability to staff (doctors, nurses, and chaplains) of bereavement education, training, communication, and multicultural support. For families who lose a baby in the neonatal period, the support they receive from hospital staff can be pivotal in their ability to cope with their grief. Hospital staff are not always trained to provide this support. Limited evidence is available regarding hospital-based bereavement care in neonatology or its impact on outcome. Questionnaire survey of selected doctors, nurses, and chaplains in 200 neonatal units in the United Kingdom. We had responses from 100% of neonatal units surveyed. Of 600 individuals, 320 responded; 11% of doctors had never received any formal training in bereavement care, compared with 0.8% of nurses and 1.2% and chaplains. In addition, 31% of respondents thought the training they received was inadequate. Knowledge of grief theorists was poor. Up to 99% of units were helping parents create memories through photographs or handprints. Parents were uniformly given the chance to be with their baby at the time of death (99% overall). Siblings were encouraged to be present 71% of the time; 75% of respondents felt that information about the needs of different faith groups was available. Formal psychological support was offered to 45% of families after bereavement. Studies have shown that parents value clear communication, education about grieving, and demonstrated emotional support by staff. Our study has shown that there are deficiencies in staff training and education in this area. Educators must promote the inclusion of content on bereavement/end-of-life care. Additional education on cultural issues would be helpful. Managing the bereavement process well to minimize morbidity for families and healthcare providers is an important challenge for the future.

  7. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Layout and Nurses' Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doede, Megan; Trinkoff, Alison M; Gurses, Ayse P

    2018-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) remain one of the few areas in hospitals that still use an open bay (OPBY) design for patient stays greater than 24 hr, housing multiple infants, staff, and families in one large room. This creates high noise levels, contributes to the spread of infection, and affords families little privacy. These problems have given rise to the single-family room NICU. This represents a significant change in the care environment for nurses. This literature review answers the question: When compared to OPBY layout, how does a single family room layout impact neonatal nurses' work? Thirteen studies published between 2006 and 2015 were located. Many studies reported both positive and negative effects on nurses' work and were therefore sorted by their cited advantages and disadvantages. Advantages included improved quality of the physical environment; improved quality of patient care; improved parent interaction; and improvements in nurse job satisfaction, stress, and burnout. Disadvantages included decreased interaction among the NICU patient care team, increased nurse workload, decreased visibility on the unit, and difficult interactions with family. This review suggests that single-family room NICUs introduce a complex situation in which trade-offs occur for nurses, most prominently the trade-off between visibility and privacy. Additionally, the literature is clear on what elements of nurses' work are impacted, but how the built environment influences these elements, and how these elements interact during nurses' work, is not as well understood. The current level of research and directions for future research are also discussed.

  8. Fathers' Needs and Masculinity Dilemmas in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noergaard, Betty; Ammentorp, Jette; Fenger-Gron, Jesper; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Johannessen, Helle; Thibeau, Shelley

    2017-08-01

    Most healthcare professionals in neonatal intensive care units typically focus on the infants and mothers; fathers often feel powerless and find it difficult to establish a father-child relationship. In family-centered healthcare settings, exploring fathers' experiences and needs is important because men's roles in society, especially as fathers, are changing. To describe fathers' needs when their infants are admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit and to discuss these needs within a theoretical framework of masculinity to advance understanding and generate meaningful knowledge for clinical practices. This qualitative study used participant observation, interviews, multiple sequential interviews, and a focus group discussion. Data were analyzed using grounded theory principles. Analysis of the fathers' needs generated 2 primary themes: (1) Fathers as caregivers and breadwinners and (2) fathers and emotions. Fathers wished to be involved and to take care of their infants but have to balance cultural and social norms and expectations of being breadwinners with their wishes to be equal coparents. Health professionals in neonatal intensive care units must be aware of fathers' need and desire to be equal coparents. Nurses should play a key role by, for example, showing that fathers are as important to their infants as are the mothers, helping them become involved in childcare, and ensuring that they are directly informed about their children's progress. Further research in other cultural settings would contribute to knowledge regarding fatherhood and the role of fathers in childcare.

  9. [Application and evalauation of care plan for patients admitted to Intensive Care Units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzco Cabellos, C; Guasch Pomés, N

    2015-01-01

    Assess whether the use of the nursing care plans improves outcomes of nursing care to patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). The study was conducted in a University Hospital of Barcelona in Spain, using a pre- and post-study design. A total of 61 patient records were analysed in the pre-intervention group. A care plan was applied to 55 patients in the post-intervention group. Specific quality indicators in a medical intensive care unit to assess the clinical practice of nursing were used. Fisher's exact test was used to compare the degree of association between quality indicators in the two groups. A total of 116 records of 121 patients were evaluated: 61 pre-intervention and 55 post-intervention. Fisher test: The filling of nursing records, p=.0003. Checking cardiorespiratory arrest equipment, p <.001. Central vascular catheter related bacteraemia (B-CVC) p=.622. Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) p=.1000. Elevation of the head of the bed more than 30° p=.049, and the pain management in non-sedated patients p=.082. The implementation of nursing care plans in patients admitted to the intensive care area may contribute to improvement in the outcomes of nursing care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  10. Improved nurse-parent communication in neonatal intensive care unit: evaluation and adjustment of an implementation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Janne; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Egerod, Ingrid

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate and adjust systematic implementation of guided family-centred care in a neonatal intensive care unit. Family-centred care is valued in neonatal intensive care units internationally, but innovative strategies are needed to realise the principles. Guided family-centred care was developed to facilitate person-centred communication by bridging the gap between theory and practice in family-centred care. Main mechanisms of guided family-centred care are structured dialogue, reflection and person-centred communication. Qualitative and quantitative data were used to monitor participatory implementation of a systematic approach to training and certification of nurses delivering guided family-centred care. Systematic implementation of guided family-centred care included workshops, supervised delivery and certification. Evaluation and adjustment of nurse adherence to guided family-centred care was conducted by monitoring (1) knowledge, (2) delivery, (3) practice uptake and (4) certification. Implementation was improved by the development of a strategic framework and by adjusting the framework according to the real-life context of a busy neonatal care unit. Promoting practice uptake was initially underestimated, but nurse guided family-centred care training was improved by increasing the visibility of the study in the unit, demonstrating intervention progress to the nurses and assuring a sense of ownership among nurse leaders and nonguided-family-centred-care-trained nurses. An adjusted framework for guided family-centred care implementation was successful in overcoming barriers and promoting facilitators. Insights gained from our pioneering work might help nurses in a similar context to reach their goals of improving family-centred care. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Implementing Family Meetings Into a Respiratory Care Unit: A Care and Communication Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeslie, Vicki; Abcejo, Ma Sunnimpha; Anderson, Claudia; Leibenguth, Emily; Mielke, Cathy; Rabatin, Jeffrey

    Substantial evidence in critical care literature identifies a lack of quality and quantity of communication between patients, families, and clinicians while in the intensive care unit. Barriers include time, multiple caregivers, communication skills, culture, language, stress, and optimal meeting space. For patients who are chronically critically ill, the need for a structured method of communication is paramount for discussion of goals of care. The objective of this quality improvement project was to identify barriers to communication, then develop, implement, and evaluate a process for semistructured family meetings in a 9-bed respiratory care unit. Using set dates and times, family meetings were offered to patients and families admitted to the respiratory care unit. Multiple avenues of communication were utilized to facilitate attendance. Utilizing evidence-based family meeting literature, a guide for family meetings was developed. Templates were developed for documentation of the family meeting in the electronic medical record. Multiple communication barriers were identified. Frequency of family meeting occurrence rose from 31% to 88%. Staff satisfaction with meeting frequency, meeting length, and discussion of congruent goals of care between patient/family and health care providers improved. Patient/family satisfaction with consistency of message between team members; understanding of medications, tests, and dismissal plan; and efficacy to address their concerns with the medical team improved. This quality improvement project was implemented to address the communication gap in the care of complex patients who require prolonged hospitalizations. By identifying this need, engaging stakeholders, and developing a family meeting plan to meet to address these needs, communication between all members of the patient's care team has improved.

  12. Confronting youth gangs in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    Youth gang violence has continued its upward trend nationwide. It was once thought that gangs convened only in selected areas, which left churches, schools, and hospitals as "neutral" territory. Unfortunately, this is a fallacy. The results of gang violence pour into hospitals and into intensive care units regularly. The media portrays California as having a gang violence problem; however, throughout the United States, gang violence has risen more than 35% in the past year. Youth gang violence continues to rise dramatically with more and more of our youth deciding to join gangs each day. Sadly, every state has gangs, and the problem is getting much worse in areas that would never have thought about gangs a year ago. These "new generation" of gang members is younger, much more violent, and staying in the gang longer. Gangs are not just an urban problem. Gang activity is a suburban and rural problem too. There are more than 25 500 gangs in the United States, with a total gang membership of 850 000. Ninety-four percent of gang members are male and 6% are female. The ethnic composition nationwide includes 47% Latino, 31% African American, 13% White, 7% Asian, and 2% "mixed," according to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention of the U.S. Department of Justice. As a result of the ongoing proliferation of youth street gangs in our communities, it is imperative that critical care nurses and others involved with the direct care become educated about how to identify gang members, their activities, and understand their motivations. Such education and knowledge will help provide solutions to families and the youth themselves, help eradicate the problem of gang violence, and keep health care professionals safe.

  13. Insurance coverage for male infertility care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, James M

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a common condition experienced by many men and women, and treatments are expensive. The World Health Organization and American Society of Reproductive Medicine define infertility as a disease, yet private companies infrequently offer insurance coverage for infertility treatments. This is despite the clear role that healthcare insurance plays in ensuring access to care and minimizing the financial burden of expensive services. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of how male infertility care is covered by insurance in the United States. We begin with an appraisal of the costs of male infertility care, then examine the state insurance laws relevant to male infertility, and close with a discussion of why insurance coverage for male infertility is important to both men and women. Importantly, we found that despite infertility being classified as a disease and males contributing to almost half of all infertility cases, coverage for male infertility is often excluded from health insurance laws. Excluding coverage for male infertility places an undue burden on their female partners. In addition, excluding care for male infertility risks missing opportunities to diagnose important health conditions and identify reversible or irreversible causes of male infertility. Policymakers should consider providing equal coverage for male and female infertility care in future health insurance laws.

  14. Benchmarking and audit of breast units improves quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, P A; Verkinderen, L; Hauspy, J; Vermeulen, P; Dirix, L; Huizing, M; Altintas, S; Papadimitriou, K; Peeters, M; Tjalma, W

    2013-01-01

    Quality Indicators (QIs) are measures of health care quality that make use of readily available hospital inpatient administrative data. Assessment quality of care can be performed on different levels: national, regional, on a hospital basis or on an individual basis. It can be a mandatory or voluntary system. In all cases development of an adequate database for data extraction, and feedback of the findings is of paramount importance. In the present paper we performed a Medline search on "QIs and breast cancer" and "benchmarking and breast cancer care", and we have added some data from personal experience. The current data clearly show that the use of QIs for breast cancer care, regular internal and external audit of performance of breast units, and benchmarking are effective to improve quality of care. Adherence to guidelines improves markedly (particularly regarding adjuvant treatment) and there are data emerging showing that this results in a better outcome. As quality assurance benefits patients, it will be a challenge for the medical and hospital community to develop affordable quality control systems, which are not leading to excessive workload.

  15. No Exit: Identifying Avoidable Terminal Oncology Intensive Care Unit Hospitalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantel, Andrew; Wroblewski, Kristen; Balachandran, Jay S.; Chow, Selina; DeBoer, Rebecca; Fleming, Gini F.; Hahn, Olwen M.; Kline, Justin; Liu, Hongtao; Patel, Bhakti K.; Verma, Anshu; Witt, Leah J.; Fukui, Mayumi; Kumar, Aditi; Howell, Michael D.; Polite, Blase N.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Terminal oncology intensive care unit (ICU) hospitalizations are associated with high costs and inferior quality of care. This study identifies and characterizes potentially avoidable terminal admissions of oncology patients to ICUs. Methods: This was a retrospective case series of patients cared for in an academic medical center’s ambulatory oncology practice who died in an ICU during July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2013. An oncologist, intensivist, and hospitalist reviewed each patient’s electronic health record from 3 months preceding terminal hospitalization until death. The primary outcome was the proportion of terminal ICU hospitalizations identified as potentially avoidable by two or more reviewers. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to identify characteristics associated with avoidable terminal ICU hospitalizations. Results: Seventy-two patients met inclusion criteria. The majority had solid tumor malignancies (71%), poor performance status (51%), and multiple encounters with the health care system. Despite high-intensity health care utilization, only 25% had documented advance directives. During a 4-day median ICU length of stay, 81% were intubated and 39% had cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Forty-seven percent of these hospitalizations were identified as potentially avoidable. Avoidable hospitalizations were associated with factors including: worse performance status before admission (median 2 v 1; P = .01), worse Charlson comorbidity score (median 8.5 v 7.0, P = .04), reason for hospitalization (P = .006), and number of prior hospitalizations (median 2 v 1; P = .05). Conclusion: Given the high frequency of avoidable terminal ICU hospitalizations, health care leaders should develop strategies to prospectively identify patients at high risk and formulate interventions to improve end-of-life care. PMID:27601514

  16. Nursing care of the newborn in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taysa Costa da Silva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To verify the main measures of care for the newborn in the neonatal intensive care unit. Method: This is an integrative review, in which, it is possible to identify, analyze and synthesize research results with the inclusion of experimental and non-experimental studies. A total of 133 articles were collected. After reading titles, exclusion criteria and reading resumes, 10 were left, in which the sample was composed. Results: The selected publications were placed in 3 thematic categories: The importance of knowledge in nursing care, to the internal NB in ​​NICU; Nursing evaluation and care used for pain relief in NB; Main factors and adverse events that may lead to the hospitalization of the newborn and the increase of morbidity and mortality in an NICU. Conclusion: The analysis of the aforementioned study exposes the importance and main nursing care that can be administered in newborns in a NICU, so that the reduction of neonatal mortality can be provided. Descriptors: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit; Nursing care; Newborn.

  17. Racial differences in parental satisfaction with neonatal intensive care unit nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A E; D'Agostino, J A; Passarella, M; Lorch, S A

    2016-11-01

    Nurses provide parental support and education in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), but it is unknown if satisfaction and expectations about nursing care differ between racial groups. A prospective cohort was constructed of families with a premature infant presenting to primary care between 1 January 2010 and 1 January 2013 (N=249, 52% white, 42% black). Responses to questions about satisfaction with the NICU were analyzed in ATLAS.ti using the standard qualitative methodology. One hundred and twenty (48%) parents commented on nursing. Fifty-seven percent of the comments were positive, with black parents more negative (58%) compared with white parents (33%). Black parents were most dissatisfied with how nurses supported them, wanting compassionate and respectful communication. White parents were most dissatisfied with inconsistent nursing care and lack of education about their child. Racial differences were found in satisfaction and expectations with neonatal nursing care. Accounting for these differences will improve parental engagement during the NICU stay.

  18. Leadership theory: implications for developing dental surgeons in primary care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcocks, S

    2011-02-12

    The development of leadership in healthcare has been seen as important in recent years, particularly at the clinical level. There have been various specific initiatives focusing on the development of leadership for doctors, nurses and other health care professions: for example, a leadership competency framework for doctors, the LEO programme and the RCN clinical leadership programme for nurses. The NHS has set up a Leadership Council to coordinate further developments. However, there has not been the same focus in dentistry, although the recent review of NHS dental services (Steele review) has proposed a need for leadership initiatives in NHS dentistry as a medium-term action. Central to this will be a need to focus on the leadership role for dental surgeons. Leadership is all the more important in dentistry, given the change of government and the policy of retrenchment, major public sector reform, the emergence of new organisations such as new commissioning consortia, possible changes to the dental contract, new ways of working, and changes to the profession such as the requirements for the revalidation of dental surgeons. The question is: which leadership theory or approach is best for dental surgeons working in primary care? This paper builds on earlier work exploring this question in relation to doctors generally, and GPs, in particular, and planned work on nurses. It will seek to address this question in relation to dental surgeons working in primary care.

  19. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in a Scottish intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Sean

    2010-01-01

    I reflected on the training I had on an extraordinary treatment for profound respiratory failure. The result of training enabled us to successfully treat a young female with the influenza A virus with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). I report the positive outcome that occurred, while continuing to run a busy general intensive care unit (ICU). She was the first of six patients who were all successfully treated with ECMO. Ten trained and experienced critical care nurses and two doctors attended the ECMO training course provided by the national centre in the UK. Five patients had already received ECMO therapy in the Scottish specialist unit (over the period of 8 years). As our Scottish specialist unit purchased exactly the same equipment as the national centre, it was easier for the multidisciplinary team to utilize their new-found knowledge and treat future patients with ECMO. With the predicted swine flu (H1N1) pandemic and the subsequent demand for critical care beds, funding was obtained to facilitate ECMO training. The potential need for increased provision of ECMO therapies was highlighted by recent events in Australia and New Zealand. Their most recent winter produced 68 patients requiring ECMO, whereas the previous year had manifested only three. Using our new equipment and adapted protocols from the national centre, we used these new skills to treat our first patient in October 2009. Johns' reflective practice tool was used to evaluate the care provided. Our patient was on ECMO for 9 days. She went on to make a remarkable recovery and was discharged from the ICU 1 week after ECMO was discontinued. She was discharged to the cardiothoracic high-dependency unit, where she was successfully rehabilitated. We were able to successfully treat a young lady, while providing the care for all other patients. This was a complex treatment, one that uses many resources including time and finance. Now that we have all the equipment, the necessary training and the

  20. Protective mechanical ventilation in United Kingdom critical care units: A multicentre audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Christopher P; Martin, Matthew J; Richardson, Neil; Bourdeaux, Christopher P

    2017-05-01

    Lung protective ventilation is becoming increasingly used for all critically ill patients being mechanically ventilated on a mandatory ventilator mode. Compliance with the universal application of this ventilation strategy in intensive care units in the United Kingdom is unknown. This 24-h audit of ventilation practice took place in 16 intensive care units in two regions of the United Kingdom. The mean tidal volume for all patients being ventilated on a mandatory ventilator mode was 7.2(±1.4) ml kg -1 predicted body weight and overall compliance with low tidal volume ventilation (≤6.5 ml kg -1 predicted body weight) was 34%. The mean tidal volume for patients ventilated with volume-controlled ventilation was 7.0(±1.2) ml kg -1 predicted body weight and 7.9(±1.8) ml kg -1 predicted body weight for pressure-controlled ventilation ( P  < 0.0001). Overall compliance with recommended levels of positive end-expiratory pressure was 72%. Significant variation in practice existed both at a regional and individual unit level.

  1. Game Theoretic Approach for Systematic Feature Selection; Application in False Alarm Detection in Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Afghah

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Intensive Care Units (ICUs are equipped with many sophisticated sensors and monitoring devices to provide the highest quality of care for critically ill patients. However, these devices might generate false alarms that reduce standard of care and result in desensitization of caregivers to alarms. Therefore, reducing the number of false alarms is of great importance. Many approaches such as signal processing and machine learning, and designing more accurate sensors have been developed for this purpose. However, the significant intrinsic correlation among the extracted features from different sensors has been mostly overlooked. A majority of current data mining techniques fail to capture such correlation among the collected signals from different sensors that limits their alarm recognition capabilities. Here, we propose a novel information-theoretic predictive modeling technique based on the idea of coalition game theory to enhance the accuracy of false alarm detection in ICUs by accounting for the synergistic power of signal attributes in the feature selection stage. This approach brings together techniques from information theory and game theory to account for inter-features mutual information in determining the most correlated predictors with respect to false alarm by calculating Banzhaf power of each feature. The numerical results show that the proposed method can enhance classification accuracy and improve the area under the ROC (receiver operating characteristic curve compared to other feature selection techniques, when integrated in classifiers such as Bayes-Net that consider inter-features dependencies.

  2. The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Environmental Stressors and Supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kristen G; Patel, Kayla T; Stausmire, Julie M; Bridges, Christy; Mathis, Mary W; Barkin, Jennifer L

    2018-01-03

    The relationship between maternal mental health and infant development has been established in the literature. The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is a particularly challenging environment for new mothers as several natural processes are disrupted. The objective of this study is to elucidate protective factors and environmental deficits associated with the NICU. The experiences of forty-six ( n = 46) mothers of infants admitted to a Level III NICU in the Midwestern United States, who responded to a related open-ended question, were analyzed thematically. Five themes related to the NICU environment emerged as being either stressful or helpful: (1) amount and quality of communication with medical staff, (2) bedside manner of medical staff, (3) feeling alienated from infant's care, (4) support from other NICU mothers and families, and (5) NICU Physical Environment and Regulations. There is a need for medical staff training on awareness, communication, empathy, and other behaviors that might improve maternal (and parental) experiences in the NICU. The physical environment, including rules and regulations of the NICU, should be reexamined with family comfort in mind in addition to the clinical care of the infant.

  3. Incremental cost of PACS in a medical intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlotz, Curtis P.; Cleff, Bridget; Even-Shoshan, Orit; Bozzo, Mary T.; Redfern, Regina O.; Brikman, Inna; Seshadri, Sridhar B.; Horii, Steven C.; Kundel, Harold L.

    1995-05-01

    Our purpose is to determine the incremental costs (or savings) due to the introduction of picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) and computed radiology (CR) in a medical intensive care unit (MICU). Our economic analysis consists of three measurement methods. The first method is an assessment of the direct costs to the radiology department, implemented in a spreadsheet model. The second method consists of a series of brief observational studies to measure potential changes in personnel costs that might not be reflected in administrative claims. The third method (results not reported here) is a multivariate modeling technique which estimates the independent effect of PACS/CR on the cost of care (estimated from administrative claims data), while controlling for clinical case- mix variables. Our direct cost model shows no cost savings to the radiology department after the introduction of PACS in the medical intensive care unit. Savings in film supplies and film library personnel are offset by increases in capital equipment costs and PACS operation personnel. The results of observational studies to date demonstrate significant savings in clinician film-search time, but no significant change in technologist time or lost films. Our model suggests that direct radiology costs will increase after the limited introduction of PACS/CR in the MICU. Our observational studies show a small but significant effect on clinician film search time by the introduction of PACS/CR in the MICU, but no significant effect on other variables. The projected costs of a hospital-wide PACS are currently under study.

  4. Noise, stress, and annoyance in a pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Wynne E; Haas, Ellen C; Shaffner, Donald H; Garrett, Elizabeth S; Fackler, James C

    2003-01-01

    To measure and describe hospital noise and determine whether noise can be correlated with nursing stress measured by questionnaire, salivary amylase, and heart rate. Cohort observational study. Tertiary care center pediatric intensive care unit. Registered nurses working in the unit. None. Eleven nurse volunteers were recruited. An audiogram, questionnaire data, salivary amylase, and heart rate were collected in a quiet room. Each nurse was observed for a 3-hr period during patient care. Heart rate and sound level were recorded continuously; saliva samples and stress/annoyance ratings were collected every 30 mins. Variables assessed as potential confounders were years of nursing experience, caffeine intake, patients' Pediatric Risk of Mortality Score, shift assignment, and room assignment. Data were analyzed by random effects multiple linear regression using Stata 6.0. The average daytime sound level was 61 dB(A), nighttime 59 dB(A). Higher average sound levels significantly predicted higher heart rates (p =.014). Other significant predictors of tachycardia were higher caffeine intake, less nursing experience, and daytime shift. Ninety percent of the variability in heart rate was explained by the regression equation. Amylase measurements showed a large variability and were not significantly affected by noise levels. Higher average sound levels were also predictive of greater subjective stress (p =.021) and annoyance (p =.016). In this small study, noise was shown to correlate with several measures of stress including tachycardia and annoyance ratings. Further studies of interventions to reduce noise are essential.

  5. Nursing diagnosis in intensive care unit: the Turkey experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhan, Esra Akn; Yönt, Gülendam Hakverdioğlu; Erdemir, Firdevs; Müller-Staub, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine intensive care unit nurses diagnostic abilities and diagnoses that they provide. A vignette study was performed. The vignette contained a patient's history, treatment, and signs/symptoms of 18 nursing diagnoses based on NANDA-I as the criterion standard. Turkish intensive care unit nurses (N = 45) stated nursing diagnoses described by patient data in the vignette. The resulting nursing diagnoses were grouped into Gordon's Functional Health Patterns, and descriptive analyses were performed. One-way analysis of variance was used to detect possible differences in diagnostic abilities based on nurses' education levels. Nurses identified 14 nursing diagnoses. Four of the predetermined psychosocial nursing diagnoses were not identified. The highest percentage of diagnoses was risk for impaired skin integrity (62.2%) and impaired oral mucous membrane (60.0%). The lowest number of diagnoses was impaired verbal communication (2.2%). A statistically significant difference was found between the educational level of nurses and their abilities to determine nursing diagnoses (P < .05). The findings are important for nursing education. They demonstrate the need to focus on patients as complete human beings, covering not only biological aspects but also cultural and social values, as well as emotional and spiritual care needs.

  6. Teamwork in a coronary care unit: facilitating and hindering aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethania Ferreira Goulart

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To identify, within a multidisciplinary team, the facilitating and hindering aspects for teamwork in a coronary care unit. METHOD A descriptive study, with qualitative and quantitative data, was carried out in the coronary care unit of a public hospital. The study population consisted of professionals working in the unit for at least one year. Those who were on leave or who were not located were excluded. The critical incident technique was used for data collection, by means of semi-structured interviews. For data analysis, content analysis and the critical incident technique were applied. RESULTS Participants were 45 professionals: 29 nursing professionals; 11 physicians; 4 physical therapists; and 1 psychologist. A total of 49 situations (77.6% with negative references; 385 behaviors (54.2% with positive references; and 182 consequences emerged (71.9% with negative references. Positive references facilitate teamwork, whereas negative references hinder it. A collaborative/communicative interprofessional relationship was evidenced as a facilitator; whereas poor collaboration among agents/inadequate management was a hindering aspect. CONCLUSION Despite the prevalence of negative situations and consequences, the emphasis on positive behaviors reveals the efforts the agents make in order to overcome obstacles and carry out teamwork.

  7. Radiofrequency exposure in the Neonatal Medium Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvente, I; Vázquez-Pérez, A; Fernández, M F; Núñez, M I; Múñoz-Hoyos, A

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize electromagnetic fields of radiofrequency (RF-EMF) levels generated in a Neonatal Medium Care Unit and to analyze RF-EMF levels inside unit's incubators. Spot and long-term measurements were made with a dosimeter. The spot measurement mean was 1.51±0.48V/m. Higher values were found in the proximity to the window and to the incubator evaluated. Mean field strength for the entire period of 17h was 0.81 (±0.07)V/m and the maximum value was 1.58V/m for long-term RF-EMF measurements in the incubator. Values found during the night period were higher than those found during the day period. It is important to consider RF-EMF exposure levels in neonatal care units, due to some evidence of adverse health effects found in children and adults. Characterization of RF-EMF exposure may be important to further investigate the mechanisms and underlying effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) on infant health. A prudent avoidance strategy should be adopted because newborns are at a vulnerable stage of development and the actual impact of EMF on premature infants is unknown. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Improvement in intensive care unit: Effect on mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeniyi Adesida

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Lagos University Teaching Hospital's Intensive Care Unit (ICU was founded in 1975. It was designed as an eight-bedded ICU, a previous review of outcome of surgical admissions in the ICU in 2002 placed mortality at 40.3%, however, presently run as a five-bed unit with new ICU equipment procured in 2012, arterial blood gas machines, patient monitors, and ventilators with sustained multidisciplinary approach to patient management. We compared the number of admissions, mortality, and discharges to the ward 1 year before (Period I and after the upgrade of the ICU facilities (Period II. Methods: This was a retrospective study of all patients admitted into the ICU between June 2011 and May 2013. We looked at the admission register of the ICU and retrieved biometric data, diagnosis, age, pattern of units admitting patients into ICU, length of stay (LOS, and outcome of ICU care whether the patient died in ICU or was discharged to the ward. Results: There were 122 patients admitted into the ICU in Period I and 156 patients were admitted in Period II with a mean LOS of 6.3 ± 5.4 days and 7.8 ± 7.3 days, respectively. Mortality rate in Period I was 74.6% while mortality fell to 57.7% in Period II (P = 0.005. Conclusion: There was a significant improvement in the ICU outcome with the upgrade of the ICU facilities.

  9. Accounting for health-care outcomes: implications for intensive care unit practice and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Roslyn; Iedema, Rick

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the environment of health care, and how clinicians and managers respond in terms of performance accountability. A qualitative method was used in a tertiary metropolitan teaching intensive care unit (ICU) in Sydney, Australia, including interviews with 15 clinical managers and focus groups with 29 nurses of differing experience. The study found that a managerial focus on abstract goals, such as budgets detracted from managing the core business of clinical work. Fractures were evident within clinical units, between clinical units and between clinical and managerial domains. These fractures reinforced the status quo where seemingly unconnected patient care activities were undertaken by loosely connected individual clinicians with personalized concepts of accountability. Managers must conceptualize health services as an interconnected entity within which self-directed teams negotiate and agree objectives, collect and review performance data and define collective practice. Organically developing regimens of care within and across specialist clinical units, such as in ICUs, directly impact upon health service performance and accountability.

  10. Acute Cardiovascular Care Association Position Paper on Intensive Cardiovascular Care Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnefoy-Cudraz, Eric; Bueno, Hector; Casella, Gianni

    2018-01-01

    , the recommended management structure, the optimal number of staff, the need for specially trained cardiologists and cardiovascular nurses, the desired equipment and architecture, and the interaction with other departments in the hospital and other intensive cardiovascular care units in the region...

  11. Theory of perceived access to breast health care in African American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmon, Sandra C

    2012-01-01

    The theory presented in this article proposes an alternative view of access to care on the basis of an African American woman's perception of the necessity, availability, and appropriateness of breast health care. The theory of perceived access to breast health care in African American women may also be useful in framing future research studies exploring the relationship between access to care and utilization of primary, secondary, and tertiary clinical preventive services related to breast health care.

  12. Application of theory to family-centered care: a role for social workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Family-centered care is an emerging trend in health care settings today. An explanation, principles, and a definition of family-centered care are offered and discussed. A theoretical framework, Balance Theory of Coordination, which can be utilized by social workers to develop and enhance family-centered care practices, is explained and discussed. Various family-centered care practices are examined within the context of Balance Theory of Coordination as examples.

  13. The anatomy of health care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Hamilton; Matheson, David H M; Dorsey, E Ray; George, Benjamin P; Sadoff, David; Yoshimura, Satoshi

    2013-11-13

    Health care in the United States includes a vast array of complex interrelationships among those who receive, provide, and finance care. In this article, publicly available data were used to identify trends in health care, principally from 1980 to 2011, in the source and use of funds ("economic anatomy"), the people receiving and organizations providing care, and the resulting value created and health outcomes. In 2011, US health care employed 15.7% of the workforce, with expenditures of $2.7 trillion, doubling since 1980 as a percentage of US gross domestic product (GDP) to 17.9%. Yearly growth has decreased since 1970, especially since 2002, but, at 3% per year, exceeds any other industry and GDP overall. Government funding increased from 31.1% in 1980 to 42.3% in 2011. Despite the increases in resources devoted to health care, multiple health metrics, including life expectancy at birth and survival with many diseases, shows the United States trailing peer nations. The findings from this analysis contradict several common assumptions. Since 2000, (1) price (especially of hospital charges [+4.2%/y], professional services [3.6%/y], drugs and devices [+4.0%/y], and administrative costs [+5.6%/y]), not demand for services or aging of the population, produced 91% of cost increases; (2) personal out-of-pocket spending on insurance premiums and co-payments have declined from 23% to 11%; and (3) chronic illnesses account for 84% of costs overall among the entire population, not only of the elderly. Three factors have produced the most change: (1) consolidation, with fewer general hospitals and more single-specialty hospitals and physician groups, producing financial concentration in health systems, insurers, pharmacies, and benefit managers; (2) information technology, in which investment has occurred but value is elusive; and (3) the patient as consumer, whereby influence is sought outside traditional channels, using social media, informal networks, new public sources

  14. Fathers' Stress in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noergaard, Betty; Ammentorp, Jette; Garne, Ester

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Healthcare professionals in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) tend to focus attention on the mothers and the newborn infants. Thus, fathers may find it difficult to establish an optimal father-child relationship and their stress may increase and persist during hospitalization...... and expect fathers to be involved, and support them to establish a father-child relationship, although they might become more stressed. IMPLICATIONS FOR RESEARCH: More adequate outcome measures are needed to determine the effect of interventions on paternal stress.This is an open-access article distributed....... PURPOSE: To investigate the impact of a more father-friendly NICU on paternal stress and their participation in childcare. METHODS: A quasiexperimental design was conducted on Danish-speaking fathers of newborn infants 28 or more weeks' gestational age. The Parental Stressor Scale: Neonatal Intensive Care...

  15. Medical staffing in Ontario neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes, B; Mitchell, A; Hunsberger, M; Blatz, S; Watts, J; Dent, P; Sinclair, J; Southwell, D

    1989-06-01

    Advances in technology have improved the survival rates of infants of low birth weight. Increasing service commitments together with cutbacks in Canadian training positions have caused concerns about medical staffing in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in Ontario. To determine whether an imbalance exists between the supply of medical personnel and the demand for health care services, in July 1985 we surveyed the medical directors, head nurses and staff physicians of nine tertiary level NICUs and the directors of five postgraduate pediatric residency programs. On the basis of current guidelines recommending an ideal neonatologist:patient ratio of 1:6 (assuming an adequate number of support personnel) most of the NICUs were understaffed. Concern about the heavy work pattern and resulting lifestyle implications has made Canadian graduates reluctant to enter this subspecialty. We propose strategies to correct staffing shortages in the context of rapidly increasing workloads resulting from a continuing cutback of pediatric residency positions and restrictions on immigration of foreign trainees.

  16. Urinary catheter related nosocomial infections in paediatric intensive care unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tullu M

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The present prospective study was carried out in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU of a tertiary care teaching hospital in Mumbai. The objective was to determine the incidence, risk factors, mortality and organisms responsible for urinary catheter related infections (UCRI. Colonization and/or bacteriuria was labelled as urinary catheter related infection (UCRI. Forty-four patients with 51 urinary catheters were studied. Incidence of UCRI was 47.06%. Age, female sex and immunocompromised status did not increase the risk of UCRI. Duration of catheter in-situ and duration of stay in the PICU were associated with higher risk of UCRI. The mortality was not increased by UCRI. Commonest organism isolated in UCRI was E. coli, which had maximum susceptibility to nitrofurantoin and amikacin.

  17. Respiratory virology and microbiology in intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østby, Anne-Cathrine; Gubbels, Sophie; Baake, Gerben

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the frequency of 12 common respiratory viruses in patients admitted to intensive care units with respiratory symptoms, evaluate the clinical characteristics and to compare the results to routine microbiological diagnostics. Throat swabs from 122 intensive care-patients >18...... years with acute respiratory symptoms were collected upon admission and analysed with multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction, for 12 community respiratory viruses. Blood and respiratory tract specimens were analysed for bacteria and fungi upon clinicians' request. Clinical and paraclinical data...... were collected. Viruses were detected in 19 (16%) of the 122 study patients. Five virus-positive patients (26%) had possible clinically relevant bacteria or fungi co-detected. Patients with exacerbation in COPD were associated with a viral infection (p = 0.02). Other comorbidities, clinical...

  18. [Factors affecting the recovery in the intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkov, P N; Nikitin, V V; Antsupova, M A; Podkopaev, V N; Panfilova, R P; Ivanova, I N; Nesterova, L I

    2013-01-01

    Urgency of the problem is defined by economical, regulatory and legislative acts, regional social and moral factors. There is critical situation in Russian Pediatric Healthcare system. This situation is due to inadequate funding, high medical technologies inaccessibility for some Russian children, their adverse health state. The article presents a retrospective analysis of intensive therapy and resuscitation outcomes with technical equipment and work environment assessment in the intensive care unit of Tushinskaya city pediatric clinic for the period from 2007 to 2011. Anaesthetic and emergency care quality and safety depend on several factors: permanent equipment improvement, comprehensive analysis of every fatal case and full implementation of "Anti-epidemic (prophylactic) actions plan" and "Program of monitoring compliance with the sanitary norms".

  19. Effective leadership within hospice and specialist palliative care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, L

    2000-01-01

    In this study the Repertory Grid interview technique was used to investigate constructs of leadership held by a group of male and female senior managers from within hospice and Specialist Palliative Care Units (SPCUs) in the UK. The themes that emerged were compared with those from existing research models of leadership. Men and women in these roles describe different constructs of effective leadership. The women's constructs that emerged were predominantly transformational, whilst the men's were predominantly transactional. Themes were also identified in this study, which differed from previous studied, i.e. those of political and environment awareness and the valuing of others' views regardless of their status. These themes do not feature highly in other research, and may be in response to the environment within which hospice and specialist palliative care functions.

  20. Nurses Empathy and Family Needs in the Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Moghaddasian

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The patients’ families in intensive care units (ICUs experience excessive stress which may disrupt their performance in daily life. Empathy is basic to the nursing role and has been found to be associated with improved patient outcomes and greater satisfaction with care in patient and his/her family. However, few studies have investigated the nursing empathy with ICU patients. This study aimed to assess nursing empathy and its relationship with the needs, from the perspective of families of patients in ICU.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 418 subjects were selected among families of patients admitted to ICUs in Tabriz, Iran, by convenience sampling, from May to August 2012. Data were collected through Barrett-Lennard Relationship inventory (BLRI empathy scale and Critical Care Family Needs Intervention (CCFNI inventories and were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistical tests. Results: Findings showed that most of the nurses had high level of empathy to the patients (38.8%. There was also statistically significant relationship between nurses’ empathy and needs of patients’ families (p < 0.001. Conclusion: In this study we found that by increasing the nurse’s empathy skills, we would be able to improve providing family needs. Through empathic communication, nurses can encourage family members to participate in planning for the care of their patients. However, further studies are necessary to confirm the results.

  1. The Social Work in the Continuous Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita dos Santos de Pina Duarte

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Social Worker is a qualified professional who, by proper training intervention and by research and analysis of social reality, is ready to act, execute and evaluate services, programs and social policies aiming to preserve, protect and expand human rights and social justice. The Portuguese National Network of Integrated Continuous Care (RNCCI emerged in 2006 considering the health care needs with the recognition that the system could not cope with the rehabilitation needs of the different groups of patients. Thus, this health structure was created to establish an intermediary between health and social care and as a way to connect hospitalization and clinical discharge, as well as re-integration into the community. The primary goal was to clearly assess the importance of the social service in one Continuous Care Unit by using, as methodology, questioner applications for different professionals (social service team and other health team members. The results were helpful and positive, allowing us to conclude that the social service area is valued by the team members at different levels with a fundamental goal of supporting patients, families / caregivers and the other health professionals in their interventions.

  2. Occupational Therapy in the Intensive Care Unit: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreich, Mark; Herman, Jennifer; Dickason, Stephanie; Mayo, Helen

    2017-07-01

    This paper is a synthesis of the available literature on occupational therapy interventions performed in the adult intensive care unit (ICU). The databases of Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Library, ClinicalTrials.gov and CINAHL databases were systematically searched from inception through August 2016 for studies of adults who received occupational therapy interventions in the ICU. Of 1,938 citations reviewed, 10 studies met inclusion criteria. Only one study explicitly discussed occupational therapy interventions performed and only one study specifically tested the efficacy of occupational therapy. Future research is needed to clarify the specific interventions and role of occupational therapy in the ICU and the efficacy of these interventions.

  3. Glucocorticoid-induced myopathy in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eddelien, Heidi Shil; Hoffmeyer, Henrik Westy; Lund, Eva Charlotte Løbner

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are used for intensive care unit (ICU) patients on several indications. We present a patient who was admitted to the ICU due to severe respiratory failure caused by bronchospasm requiring mechanical ventilation and treated with methylprednisolone 240 mg/day in addition...... to antibiotics and bronchiolytics. When the sedation was lifted on day 10, the patient was awake but quadriplegic. Blood samples revealed elevated muscle enzymes, electromyography showed myopathy, and a muscle biopsy was performed. Glucocorticoid-induced myopathy was suspected, GC treatment was tapered...

  4. Magnetic fields in a neonatal intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aasen, S.E.; Johansson, A.; Cristensen, T.

    1995-06-01

    In this study the magnetic flux density in and around the infant incubators of a neonatal intensive care unit were registered and mapped. The mean 50 Hz magnetic flux densities in an incubator was typically in the region 0.2 - l μT, with maximum values around 1.5μT. The field levels are quite varying dependent on type of incubator, position in the incubator, position of the electronic surveillance and treatment equipment and the position of the 220 V main plugs. 8 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Respiratory Acid-Base Disorders in the Critical Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Kate

    2017-03-01

    The incidence of respiratory acid-base abnormalities in the critical care unit (CCU) is unknown, although respiratory alkalosis is suspected to be common in this population. Abnormal carbon dioxide tension can have many physiologic effects, and changes in Pco 2 may have a significant impact on outcome. Monitoring Pco 2 in CCU patients is an important aspect of critical patient assessment, and identification of respiratory acid-base abnormalities can be valuable as a diagnostic tool. Treatment of respiratory acid-base disorders is largely focused on resolution of the primary disease, although mechanical ventilation may be indicated in cases with severe respiratory acidosis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Reinventing primary care: lessons from Canada for the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starfield, Barbara

    2010-05-01

    Canada is, in many respects, culturally and economically similar to the United States, and until relatively recently, the two countries had similar health systems. However, since passage of the Canada Health Act in the 1970s, that nation's health statistics have become increasingly superior. Although the costs of Canada's health system are high by international standards, they are much lower than U.S. costs. This paper describes several factors likely to be responsible for Canada's better health at lower cost: universal financial coverage through a so-called single payer; features conducive to a strong primary care infrastructure; and provincial autonomy under general principles set by national law.

  7. Comparative study of 2 oral care protocols in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ory, Jérôme; Raybaud, Evelyne; Chabanne, Russell; Cosserant, Bernard; Faure, Jean Sébastien; Guérin, Renaud; Calvet, Laure; Pereira, Bruno; Mourgues, Charline; Guelon, Dominique; Traore, Ousmane

    2017-03-01

    The quality of oral care is important in limiting the emergence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in intubated patients. Our main objective was to measure the quality improvement in oral care following the implementation of a new oral care protocol. We also monitored VAP rates. This was a cohort study of patients in 5 adult ICUs covering different specialties. During period 1, caregivers used a foam stick for oral care and during period 2 a stick and tooth brushing with aspiration. Oral chlorhexidine was used during both periods. The caregivers rated improvement in oral health on the basis of 4 criteria (tongue, mucous membranes, gingivae, and teeth). Caregiver satisfaction was also assessed. The incidence of VAP was monitored. A total of 2,030 intubated patients admitted to intensive care units benefited from oral care. The patient populations during the 2 periods were similar with regard to demographic data and VAP potential risk factors. Oral health was significantly better from the third day of oral care in period 2 onward (period 1, 6.4 ± 2.1; period 2, 5.6 ± 1.8; P = .043). Caregivers found the period 2 protocol easier to implement and more effective. VAP rates decreased significantly between the 2 periods (period 1, 12.8%; period 2, 8.5%; P = .002). Our study showed that the implementation of a simple strategy improved the quality of oral care of patients in intensive care units, and decreased VAP rates. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Burnout in the intensive care unit professionals: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chien-Huai; Tseng, Pei-Chi; Lin, Chun-Yu; Lin, Kuan-Han; Chen, Yen-Yuan

    2016-12-01

    Burnout has been described as a prolonged response to chronic emotional and interpersonal stress on the job that is often the result of a period of expending excessive effort at work while having too little recovery time. Healthcare workers who work in a stressful medical environment, especially in an intensive care unit (ICU), may be particularly susceptible to burnout. In healthcare workers, burnout may affect their well-being and the quality of professional care they provide and can, therefore, be detrimental to patient safety. The objectives of this study were: to determine the prevalence of burnout in the ICU setting; and to identify factors associated with burnout in ICU professionals. The original articles for observational studies were retrieved from PubMed, MEDLINE, and Web of Science in June 2016 using the following MeSH terms: "burnout" and "intensive care unit". Articles that were published in English between January 1996 and June 2016 were eligible for inclusion. Two reviewers evaluated the abstracts identified using our search criteria prior to full text review. To be included in the final analysis, studies were required to have employed an observational study design and examined the associations between any risk factors and burnout in the ICU setting. Overall, 203 full text articles were identified in the electronic databases after the exclusion of duplicate articles. After the initial review, 25 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The prevalence of burnout in ICU professionals in the included studies ranged from 6% to 47%. The following factors were reported to be associated with burnout: age, sex, marital status, personality traits, work experience in an ICU, work environment, workload and shift work, ethical issues, and end-of-life decision-making. The impact of the identified factors on burnout remains poorly understood. Nevertheless, this review presents important information, suggesting that ICU professionals may suffer from a high level

  9. Clinical decision making on the use of physical restraint in intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinqian Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Physical restraint is a common nursing intervention in intensive care units and nurses often use it to ensure patients' safety and to prevent unexpected accidents. However, existing literature indicated that the use of physical restraint is a complex one because of inadequate rationales, the negative physical and emotional effects on patients, but the lack of perceived alternatives. This paper is aimed to interpret the clinical decision-making theories related to the use of physical restraint in intensive care units in order to facilitate our understanding on the use of physical restraint and to evaluate the quality of decisions made by nurses. By reviewing the literature, intuition and heuristics are the main decision-making strategies related to the use of physical restraint in intensive care units because the rapid and reflexive nature of intuition and heuristics allow nurses to have a rapid response to urgent and emergent cases. However, it is problematic if nurses simply count their decision-making on experience rather than incorporate research evidence into clinical practice because of inadequate evidence to support the use of physical restraint. Besides that, such a rapid response may lead nurses to make decisions without adequate assessment and thinking and therefore biases and errors may be generated. Therefore, despite the importance of intuition and heuristics in decision-making in acute settings on the use of physical restraint, it is recommended that nurses should incorporate research evidence with their experience to make decisions and adequate assessment before implementing physical restraint is also necessary.

  10. Incidence of constipation in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Tatiana Lopes de Souza; Mendonça, Simone Sotero; Marshall, Norma Guimarães

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of constipation in critical patients on enteral nutrition in a hospital intensive care unit and to correlate this incidence with the variables found for critical patients. The present investigation was a retrospective analytical study conducted in the intensive care unit of Hospital Regional da Asa Norte (DF) via the analysis of medical records of patients admitted during the period from January to December 2011. Data on the incidence of constipation and enteral nutritional support, gastrointestinal changes, stool frequency, ventilatory support, and outcomes were collected and analyzed. The initial sample consisted of 127 patients admitted to the unit during the period from January to December 2011. Eighty-four patients were excluded, and the final sample consisted of 43 patients. The incidence of constipation, defined as no bowel movement during the first 4 days of hospitalization, was 72% (n=31). The patients were divided into a control group and a constipated group. The group of constipated patients reached the caloric target, on average, at 6.5 days, and the control group reached the caloric target in 5.6 days (p=0.51). Constipation was not associated with the length of hospital stay, suspension of nutritional support, or outcome of hospitalization. There was an association between evacuation during hospitalization and a longer duration of hospitalization for a subgroup of patients who did not evacuate during the entire period (p=0.009). The incidence of constipation in the unit studied was 72%. Only the absence of evacuation during hospitalization was associated with longer hospital stays. Constipation was not associated with the length of hospital stay, suspension of nutritional support, or outcome of hospitalization.

  11. Two-factor theory – at the intersection of health care management and patient satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohm, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Using data obtained from the 2004 Joint Canadian/United States Survey of Health, an analytic model using principles derived from Herzberg’s motivational hygiene theory was developed for evaluating patient satisfaction with health care. The analysis sought to determine whether survey variables associated with consumer satisfaction act as Hertzberg factors and contribute to survey participants’ self-reported levels of health care satisfaction. To validate the technique, data from the survey were analyzed using logistic regression methods and then compared with results obtained from the two-factor model. The findings indicate a high degree of correlation between the two methods. The two-factor analytical methodology offers advantages due to its ability to identify whether a factor assumes a motivational or hygienic role and assesses the influence of a factor within select populations. Its ease of use makes this methodology well suited for assessment of multidimensional variables. PMID:23055755

  12. Two-factor theory - at the intersection of health care management and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohm, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Using data obtained from the 2004 Joint Canadian/United States Survey of Health, an analytic model using principles derived from Herzberg's motivational hygiene theory was developed for evaluating patient satisfaction with health care. The analysis sought to determine whether survey variables associated with consumer satisfaction act as Hertzberg factors and contribute to survey participants' self-reported levels of health care satisfaction. To validate the technique, data from the survey were analyzed using logistic regression methods and then compared with results obtained from the two-factor model. The findings indicate a high degree of correlation between the two methods. The two-factor analytical methodology offers advantages due to its ability to identify whether a factor assumes a motivational or hygienic role and assesses the influence of a factor within select populations. Its ease of use makes this methodology well suited for assessment of multidimensional variables.

  13. Redesigned geriatric emergency care may have helped reduce admissions of older adults to intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudzen, Corita; Richardson, Lynne D; Baumlin, Kevin M; Winkel, Gary; Davila, Carine; Ng, Kristen; Hwang, Ula

    2015-05-01

    Charged with transforming geriatric emergency care by applying palliative care principles, a process improvement team at New York City's Mount Sinai Medical Center developed the GEDI WISE (Geriatric Emergency Department Innovations in Care through Workforce, Informatics, and Structural Enhancements) model. The model introduced workforce enhancements for emergency department (ED) and adjunct staff, including role redefinition, retraining, and education in palliative care principles. Existing ED triage nurses screened patients ages sixty-five and older to identify those at high risk of ED revisit and hospital readmission. Once fully trained, these nurses screened all but 6 percent of ED visitors meeting the screening criteria. Newly hired ED nurse practitioners identified high-risk patients suitable for and desiring palliative and hospice care, then expedited referrals. Between January 2011 and May 2013 the percentage of geriatric ED admissions to the intensive care unit fell significantly, from 2.3 percent to 0.9 percent, generating an estimated savings of more than $3 million to Medicare. The decline in these admissions cannot be confidently attributed to the GEDI WISE program because other geriatric care innovations were implemented during the study period. GEDI WISE programs are now running at Mount Sinai and two partner sites, and their potential to affect the quality and value of geriatric emergency care continues to be examined. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  14. Extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii outbreak cross-transmitted in an intensive care unit and respiratory intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jin'e; Han, Shaoshan; Wu, Wenjing; Wang, Xue; Xu, Jiru; Han, Lei

    2016-11-01

    Extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (XDRAB) is a great threat in intensive care units (ICUs). The aim of this study was to describe an XDRAB outbreak which was cross-transmitted in the ICU and respiratory intensive care unit (RICU) in a tertiary care hospital from January-March 2013. Patient and environmental surveillances were performed. Isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. Genotypes were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A series of enhanced strategies were implemented to control the outbreak. A total of 11 patients were infected by XDRAB strains during this outbreak. Three patients in the ICU were found positive for XDRAB at the onset of the outbreak. Thereafter, infections were detected in 6 patients in the RICU, followed by reappearance of this strain in the ICU in 2 patients. All A baumannii strains isolated from patients and the environment were extensively drug resistant. MLST revealed them as ST368. After 3 rounds of environmental screening and cleaning, the laminar flow system connecting the ICU and RICU was found as the source of transmission. Successful control of this outbreak was achieved through multifaceted intervention measures. This study suggested the importance of thorough surveillance and disinfection of the environment, including concealed devices, in preventing the transmission of an outbreak. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Microbiological contamination of mobile phones of clinicians in intensive care units and neonatal care units in public hospitals in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyba, Mohammed; Ismaiel, Mohammad; Alotaibi, Abdulrahman; Mahmoud, Mohamed; Baqer, Hussain; Safar, Ali; Al-Sweih, Noura; Al-Taiar, Abdullah

    2015-10-15

    The objective of this study was to explore the prevalence of microbiological contamination of mobile phones that belong to clinicians in intensive care units (ICUs), pediatric intensive care units (PICUs), and neonatal care units (NCUs) in all public secondary care hospitals in Kuwait. The study also aimed to describe mobile phones disinfection practices as well as factors associated with mobile phone contamination. This is a cross-sectional study that included all clinicians with mobile phones in ICUs, PICUs, and NCUs in all secondary care hospitals in Kuwait. Samples for culture were collected from mobile phones and transported for microbiological identification using standard laboratory methods. Self-administered questionnaire was used to gather data on mobile phones disinfection practices. Out of 213 mobile phones, 157 (73.7 %, 95 % CI [67.2-79.5 %]) were colonized. Coagulase-negative staphylococci followed by Micrococcus were predominantly isolated from the mobile phones; 62.9 % and 28.6 % of all mobile phones, respectively. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Gram-negative bacteria were identified in 1.4 % and 7.0 % of the mobile phones, respectively. Sixty-eight clinicians (33.5 %) reported that they disinfected their mobile phones, with the majority disinfecting their mobile phones only when they get dirty. The only factor that was significantly associated with mobile phone contamination was whether a clinician has ever disinfected his/her mobile phone; adjusted odds ratio 2.42 (95 % CI [1.08-5.41], p-value = 0.031). The prevalence of mobile phone contamination is high in ICUs, PICUs, and NCUs in public secondary care hospitals in Kuwait. Although some of the isolated organisms can be considered non-pathogenic, various reports described their potential harm particularly among patients in ICU and NCU settings. Isolation of MRSA and Gram-negative bacteria from mobile phones of clinicians treating patients in high-risk healthcare

  16. Intensive care unit team perception of palliative care: the discourse of the collective subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulini, Juliana El Hage Meyer de Barros; Nascimento, Eliane Regina Pereira do; Moritz, Rachel Duarte; Rosa, Luciana Martins da; Silveira, Natyele Rippel; Vargas, Mara Ambrosina de Oliveira

    2017-05-25

    To learn the perception of health professionals in an intensive care unit towards palliative care. This was a descriptive and qualitative study based on the converging care approach conducted at an intensive care unit in the South of Brazil. Semi-structured interviews were used to investigate the understanding of the professionals about palliative care in this unit. The data were organized and analyzed using the discourse of the collective subject method with the help of Qualiquantisoft® software. Participants included 37 professionals (12 nurses, 11nursing technicians, 5 physical therapists and 9 doctors). The key ideas extracted from the interviews were: care in the end stage of life that avoids futile measures; comfort care; lack of standardized care and lack of team training. The professionals perceived palliative care as appropriate in the last stages of life, with no need for futile treatment or as comfort measures. However, they are aware of the lack of standardization and lack of capacity building in this area, which leads them to conceive palliative care as terminal care, and measures are recommended to break with this stigma. Conhecer a percepção dos profissionais de saúde de uma Unidade de Terapia Intensiva acerca do cuidado paliativo. Pesquisa descritiva, qualitativa do tipo Convergente Assistencial realizada em uma Unidade de Terapia Intensiva da região sul do Brasil. Utilizou-se de entrevista semiestruturada que investigou o entendimento e a compreensão sobre cuidado paliativo nesta unidade. Os dados foram organizados e analisados pela técnica do discurso do sujeito coletivo com auxílio do software Qualiquantisoft®. Participaram do estudo 37 profissionais (12 enfermeiros, 11 técnicos de enfermagem, cinco fisioterapeutas e nove médicos). As ideias centrais extraídas dos relatos: cuidado na fase terminal da vida sem medidas fúteis; cuidados de conforto; falta uniformizar a assistência e falta capacitação para a equipe. Os profissionais

  17. Users' participation in nursing care: an element of the Theory of Goal Attainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rodrigo Nogueira; Ferreira, Márcia de Assunção

    2016-02-01

    Users' participation in care has been acknowledged as a key factor to improve health services. To analyze the Theory of Goal Attainment and to discuss the explicit and implicit relations between the Theory and the phenomenon of users' participation in nursing care. Theoretical analysis of the Theory of Goal Attainment. The analysis phase of the Framework for Analysis and Evaluation of Nursing Theories was applied. Then, the explicit and implicit relations between the Theory and the phenomenon of users' participation were analyzed. Users' participation in nursing care is an element of the Theory of Goal Attainment, although limited to the goal setting and the means to achieve them. The choice for users' participation in care is a right defended in health policies around the world. The Theory of Goal Attainment is an appropriate guide to nurses in defense of users' participation in nursing care.

  18. Qigong in Cancer Care: Theory, Evidence-Base, and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope Klein

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this discussion is to explore the theory, evidence base, and practice of Qigong for individuals with cancer. Questions addressed are: What is qigong? How does it work? What evidence exists supporting its practice in integrative oncology? What barriers to wide-spread programming access exist? Methods: Sources for this discussion include a review of scholarly texts, the Internet, PubMed, field observations, and expert opinion. Results: Qigong is a gentle, mind/body exercise integral within Chinese medicine. Theoretical foundations include Chinese medicine energy theory, psychoneuroimmunology, the relaxation response, the meditation effect, and epigenetics. Research supports positive effects on quality of life (QOL, fatigue, immune function and cortisol levels, and cognition for individuals with cancer. There is indirect, scientific evidence suggesting that qigong practice may positively influence cancer prevention and survival. No one Qigong exercise regimen has been established as superior. Effective protocols do have common elements: slow mindful exercise, easy to learn, breath regulation, meditation, emphasis on relaxation, and energy cultivation including mental intent and self-massage. Conclusions: Regular practice of Qigong exercise therapy has the potential to improve cancer-related QOL and is indirectly linked to cancer prevention and survival. Wide-spread access to quality Qigong in cancer care programming may be challenged by the availability of existing programming and work force capacity.

  19. Integrative mental health care: from theory to practice, part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, James

    2007-01-01

    Integrative approaches will lead to more accurate and different understandings of mental illness. Beneficial responses to complementary and alternative therapies provide important clues about the phenomenal nature of the human body in space-time and disparate biological, informational, and energetic factors associated with normal and abnormal psychological functioning. The conceptual framework of contemporary Western psychiatry includes multiple theoretical viewpoints, and there is no single best explanatory model of mental illness. Future theories of mental illness causation will not depend exclusively on empirical verification of strictly biological processes but will take into account both classically described biological processes and non-classical models, including complexity theory, resulting in more complete explanations of the characteristics and causes of symptoms and mechanisms of action that result in beneficial responses to treatments. Part 1 of this article examines the limitations of the theory and contemporary clinical methods employed in Western psychiatry and discusses implications of emerging paradigms in physics and the biological sciences for the future of psychiatry. In part 2, a practical methodology for planning integrative assessment and treatment strategies in mental health care is proposed. Using this methodology the integrative management of moderate and severe psychiatric symptoms is reviewed in detail. As the conceptual framework of Western medicine evolves toward an increasingly integrative perspective, novel understandings of complex relationships between biological, informational, and energetic processes associated with normal psychological functioning and mental illness will lead to more effective integrative assessment and treatment strategies addressing the causes or meanings of symptoms at multiple hierarchic levels of body-brain-mind.

  20. Integrative mental health care: from theory to practice, Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, James

    2008-01-01

    Integrative approaches will lead to more accurate and different understandings of mental illness. Beneficial responses to complementary and alternative therapies provide important clues about the phenomenal nature of the human body in space-time and disparate biological, informational, and energetic factors associated with normal and abnormal psychological functioning. The conceptual framework of contemporary Western psychiatry includes multiple theoretical viewpoints, and there is no single best explanatory model of mental illness. Future theories of mental illness causation will not depend exclusively on empirical verification of strictly biological processes but will take into account both classically described biological processes and non-classical models, including complexity theory, resulting in more complete explanations of the characteristics and causes of symptoms and mechanisms of action that result in beneficial responses to treatments. Part 1 of this article examined the limitations of the theory and contemporary clinical methods employed in Western psychiatry and discussed implications of emerging paradigms in physics and the biological sciences for the future of psychiatry. In part 2, a practical methodology, for planning integrative assessment and treatment strategies in mental health care is proposed. Using this methodology the integrative management of moderate and severe psychiatric symptoms is reviewed in detail. As the conceptual framework of Western medicine evolves toward an increasingly integrative perspective, novel understanding of complex relationships between biological, informational, and energetic processes associated with normal psychological functioning and mental illness will lead to more effective integrative assessment and treatment strategies addressing the causes or meanings of symptoms at multiple hierarchic levels of body-brain-mind.

  1. Structure and Function: Planning a New Intensive Care Unit to Optimize Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Kesecioğlu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To survey the recent medical literature reporting effects of intensive care unit (ICU design on patients’ and family members’ well-being, safety and functionality. Features of ICU design linked to the needs of patients and their family are single-rooms, privacy, quiet surrounding, exposure to daylight, views of nature, prevention of infection, a family area and open visiting hours. Other features such as safety, working procedures, ergonomics and logistics have a direct impact on the patient care and the nursing and medical personnel. An organization structured on the needs of the patient and their family is mandatory in designing a new intensive care. The main aims in the design of a new department should be patient centered care, safety, functionality, innovation and a future-proof concept.

  2. Clinical Predictors of Intensive Care Unit Admission for Asthmatic Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hasan Kargar Maher

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionChildren with severe asthma attack are a challenging group of patients who could be difficult to treat and leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Asthma attack severity is qualitatively estimated as mild, moderate and severe attacks and respiratory failure based on conditions such as respiration status, feeling of dyspnea, and the degree of unconsciousness. part of which are subjective rather than objective. We investigated clinical findings as predictors of severe attack and probable requirement for Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU admission.Materials and MethodsIn a cross sectional and analytical study 120 patients with asthma attack were enrolled from April 2010 to April 2014 (80 admitted in the ward and 40 in pediatric intensive care unit. Predictors of PICU admission were investigated regarding to initial heart rate(HR, respiratory rate (RR, Arterial Oxygen Saturation(SaO2 and PaCo2 and clinically evident cyanosis.ResultsInitial heart rate(p-value=0.02, respiratory rate (p-value=0.03, Arterial Oxygen Saturation(p-value=0.02 and PaCo2(p-value=0.03 and clinically evident cyanosis were significantly different in two groups(Ward admitted and PICU admittedConclusion There was a significant correlation between initial vital sign and blood gas analysis suggesting usefulness of these factors as predictors of severe asthma attack and subsequent clinical course.

  3. Nurses’ Burnout in Oncology Hospital Critical Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeliz İrem Tunçel

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Burnout is common in intensive care units (ICU because of high demands and difficult working conditions. The aim of this study was to analyse nurses’ burnout in our oncology ICU and to determine which factors are associated with. Material and Method: The study was carried out in Ankara Oncology Hospital ICU. A self- reporting questionnaire in an envelope was used for the evaluation of burnout (Turkish- language version of Maslach Burnout Inventory and depression (Beck Depression Scale. Results: From a total of 37 ICU nurses, 35 participated in the study (%94,5 response rate. High levels of emotional exhaustion in 82% and depersonalization in 51,4% of nurses was determined. Personal accomplishment was higher at 80%. Mild to moderate emotional state and mild anxiety was revealed. Years in profession,finding salary insufficient, finding the profession in its proper, choosing the profession of his own accord, work environment satisfaction and finding the social activity adequate were associated with burnout (p≤0.05. Conclusion: In our study, intensive care unit nurses’ burnout scores were found to be higher. Burnout was rare in nurses that choose the profession of his own accord, find the nursing profession in its proper, and social activity adequate and are satisfied with the work environment. Therefore, we believe that attention should be given to individual needs and preferences in the selection of ICU staff.

  4. Noise pollution levels in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Bree; Joshi, Prashant; Heard, Christopher

    2016-12-01

    Patients and staff may experience adverse effects from exposure to noise. This study assessed noise levels in the pediatric intensive care unit and evaluated family and staff opinion of noise. Noise levels were recorded using a NoisePro DLX. The microphone was 1 m from the patient's head. The noise level was averaged each minute and levels above 70 and 80 dBA were recorded. The maximum, minimum, and average decibel levels were calculated and peak noise level great than 100 dBA was also recorded. A parent questionnaire concerning their evaluation of noisiness of the bedside was completed. The bedside nurse also completed a questionnaire. The average maximum dB for all patients was 82.2. The average minimum dB was 50.9. The average daily bedside noise level was 62.9 dBA. The average % time where the noise level was higher than 70 dBA was 2.2%. The average percent of time that the noise level was higher than 80 dBA was 0.1%. Patients experienced an average of 115 min/d where peak noise was greater than 100 dBA. The parents and staff identified the monitors as the major contribution to noise. Patients experienced levels of noise greater than 80 dBA. Patients experience peak noise levels in excess of 100 dB during their pediatric intensive care unit stay. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Use of the Culture Care Theory and ethnonursing method to discover how nursing faculty teach culture care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixer, Sandra J

    2008-04-01

    As the world becomes increasingly multicultural, transcultural nursing education is critical to ensuring a culturally competent workforce. This paper presents a comprehensive review of literature and results of an ethnonursing pilot study using the Culture Care Theory (CCT) to discover how nursing faculty teach culture care. The literature revealed that despite 50 years of transcultural nursing knowledge development through theory, research and practice, there remains a lack of formal, integrated culture education in nursing. The importance of faculty providing generic and professional care to nursing students and using an organising framework to teach culture care was discovered. Additionally, care was essential for faculty health and well-being to enable faculty to teach culture care. This unique use of the theory and method demonstrates its usefulness in discovering and describing the complex nature of teaching culture care. Larger scale studies are predicted to further substantiate the CCT, building the discipline of nursing.

  6. Functioning of primary health care in opinion of managers of primary health care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojar, I; Wdowiak, L; Kwiatosz-Muc, M

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the research is to get to know opinions of primary health care managers concerning working of primary health care and concerning quality of medical services offered by family doctors out-patient clinics. The research among managers of primary health care units took place in all out-patient clinics in Lublin province. Research instrument was survey questionnaire of authors own construction. Results were statistically analyzed. From 460 surveys sent, 108 questionnaires were accepted to analysis. Majority of managers of out-patient clinics of primary health care is satisfied with the way and the quality of work of employed staff. In opinion of 71.3% of managers access to family doctor services is very good. Availability of primary health care services is better estimated by managers of not public units. The occupied local provide comfortable work for the staff in opinion of 78.5% of surveyed managers of out-patient clinics. Managers estimate the level of their services as very good (37.96%) and good (37.96%) comparing to other such a subjects present in the market. Internal program of improving quality is run in 22% of out-patient clinics, which were investigated. Managers of primary health care units assess the quality of their services as good and very good. They estimate positively the comfort and politeness in serving patients as well as technical status of equipment and the lodging. They assess availability of their services as very good. Large group of managers of family doctors practices recognizes neighborhood practices as a competitors.

  7. The influence of care interventions on the continuity of sleep of intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamze, Fernanda Luiza; de Souza, Cristiane Chaves; Chianca, Tânia Couto Machado

    2015-01-01

    to identify care interventions, performed by the health team, and their influence on the continuity of sleep of patients hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit. descriptive study with a sample of 12 patients. A filming technique was used for the data collection. The awakenings from sleep were measured using the actigraphy method. The analysis of the data was descriptive, processed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. 529 care interventions were identified, grouped into 28 different types, of which 12 (42.8%) caused awakening from sleep for the patients. A mean of 44.1 interventions/patient/day was observed, with 1.8 interventions/patient/hour. The administration of oral medicine and food were the interventions that caused higher frequencies of awakenings in the patients. it was identified that the health care interventions can harm the sleep of ICU patients. It is recommended that health professionals rethink the planning of interventions according to the individual demand of the patients, with the diversification of schedules and introduction of new practices to improve the quality of sleep of Intensive Care Unit patients.

  8. The influence of care interventions on the continuity of sleep of intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Luiza Hamze

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify care interventions, performed by the health team, and their influence on the continuity of sleep of patients hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit.Method: descriptive study with a sample of 12 patients. A filming technique was used for the data collection. The awakenings from sleep were measured using the actigraphy method. The analysis of the data was descriptive, processed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software.Results: 529 care interventions were identified, grouped into 28 different types, of which 12 (42.8% caused awakening from sleep for the patients. A mean of 44.1 interventions/patient/day was observed, with 1.8 interventions/patient/hour. The administration of oral medicine and food were the interventions that caused higher frequencies of awakenings in the patients.Conclusion: it was identified that the health care interventions can harm the sleep of ICU patients. It is recommended that health professionals rethink the planning of interventions according to the individual demand of the patients, with the diversification of schedules and introduction of new practices to improve the quality of sleep of Intensive Care Unit patients.

  9. Relationship between job burnout, psychosocial factors and health care-associated infections in critical care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galletta, Maura; Portoghese, Igor; D'Aloja, Ernesto; Mereu, Alessandra; Contu, Paolo; Coppola, Rosa Cristina; Finco, Gabriele; Campagna, Marcello

    2016-06-01

    Burnout is a serious problem for critical care unit workers because they are exposed to chronic psychosocial stressors, including high responsibility, advanced technology and high patient acuity. Recent evidence showed that staff burnout was directly associated with hospital infections, thus affecting quality and safety of care provided. The research aim was to investigate how burnout was associated with some psychosocial factors and with health care-associated infections in hospitalised patients. A total of 130 healthcare professionals from critical care units completed a self-reported questionnaire. The infection data were collected prospectively over a six-month period. The results showed that emotional exhaustion was related to cynicism due to high work demands. Cynicism affected team communication, which in turn was positively related to team efficacy, thus acting as a mediator. Finally, team efficacy was negatively related to infections. The study showed that emotional exhaustion and cynicism were related to psychosocial aspects, which in turn had a significant impact on healthcare-associated infections. Our findings suggest how burnout can indirectly affect healthcare-related infections as a result of the quality of teamwork. Thus, reducing burnout can be a good strategy to decrease infections, thus increasing workers' well-being while improving patient care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The strategy role of transitional care units to support Integrated Care and Personalised pathways for frail persons

    OpenAIRE

    Morando, Verdiana; Tozzi, Valeria D.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents a comparative analysis of three models of transitional care units that have been set up in Italy in the last three years within the processes of Regional Healthcare Services and healthcare organisations’ reforms. The comparative analysis is worth of providing interesting insights and generalizable lessons learnt from integrated care in practice. The three cases of transitional care units belong to a similar background wherein greater needs for care coordination across the s...

  11. Medication administration errors in an intensive care unit in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agalu Asrat

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medication administration errors in patient care have been shown to be frequent and serious. Such errors are particularly prevalent in highly technical specialties such as the intensive care unit (ICU. In Ethiopia, the prevalence of medication administration errors in the ICU is not studied. Objective To assess medication administration errors in the intensive care unit of Jimma University Specialized Hospital (JUSH, Southwest Ethiopia. Methods Prospective observation based cross-sectional study was conducted in the ICU of JUSH from February 7 to March 24, 2011. All medication interventions administered by the nurses to all patients admitted to the ICU during the study period were included in the study. Data were collected by directly observing drug administration by the nurses supplemented with review of medication charts. Data was edited, coded and entered in to SPSS for windows version 16.0. Descriptive statistics was used to measure the magnitude and type of the problem under study. Results Prevalence of medication administration errors in the ICU of JUSH was 621 (51.8%. Common administration errors were attributed to wrong timing (30.3%, omission due to unavailability (29.0% and missed doses (18.3% among others. Errors associated with antibiotics took the lion's share in medication administration errors (36.7%. Conclusion Medication errors at the administration phase were highly prevalent in the ICU of Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Supervision to the nurses administering medications by more experienced ICU nurses or other relevant professionals in regular intervals is helpful in ensuring that medication errors don’t occur as frequently as observed in this study.

  12. Mothers’ perceptions of family centred care in neonatal intensive care units

    OpenAIRE

    Finlayson, Kenneth William; Dixon, Annie; Smith, Chris; Dykes, Fiona Clare; Flacking, Renee

    2014-01-01

    Objective\\ud \\ud To explore mothers’ perceptions of family centred care (FCC) in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in England.\\ud Design\\ud \\ud The qualitative experiences of 12 mothers from three NICUs in the UK were elicited using individual interviews. A thematic network analysis was conducted on the transcribed interviews\\ud Main outcome measures\\ud \\ud A central global theme supported by a number of organizing themes were developed reflecting the views of the mothers and their experi...

  13. Radiologic assessment in the pediatric intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markowitz, R.I.

    1984-01-01

    The severely ill infant or child who requires admission to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) often presents with a complex set of problems necessitating multiple and frequent management decisions. Diagnostic imaging plays an important role, not only in the initial assessment of the patient's condition and establishing a diagnosis, but also in monitoring the patient's progress and the effects of interventional therapeutic measures. Bedside studies obtained using portable equipment are often limited but can provide much useful information when a careful and detailed approach is utilized in producing the radiograph and interpreting the examination. This article reviews some of the basic principles of radiographic interpretation and details some of the diagnostic points which, when promptly recognized, can lead to a better understanding of the patient's condition and thus to improved patient care and management. While chest radiography is stressed, studies of other regions including the upper airway, abdomen, skull, and extremities are discussed. A brief consideration of the expanding role of new modality imaging (i.e., ultrasound, CT) is also included. Multiple illustrative examples of common and uncommon problems are shown

  14. Using Systems Theory to Examine Patient and Nurse Structures, Processes, and Outcomes in Centralized and Decentralized Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Kevin; Fay, Lindsey; Isaacs, Kathy; Carll-White, Allison; Schadler, Aric

    2018-01-01

    This study utilizes systems theory to understand how changes to physical design structures impact communication processes and patient and staff design-related outcomes. Many scholars and researchers have noted the importance of communication and teamwork for patient care quality. Few studies have examined changes to nursing station design within a systems theory framework. This study employed a multimethod, before-and-after, quasi-experimental research design. Nurses completed surveys in centralized units and later in decentralized units ( N = 26 pre , N = 51 post ). Patients completed surveys ( N = 62 pre ) in centralized units and later in decentralized units ( N = 49 post ). Surveys included quantitative measures and qualitative open-ended responses. Patients preferred the decentralized units because of larger single-occupancy rooms, greater privacy/confidentiality, and overall satisfaction with design. Nurses had a more complex response. Nurses approved the patient rooms, unit environment, and noise levels in decentralized units. However, they reported reduced access to support spaces, lower levels of team/mentoring communication, and less satisfaction with design than in centralized units. Qualitative findings supported these results. Nurses were more positive about centralized units and patients were more positive toward decentralized units. The results of this study suggest a need to understand how system components operate in concert. A major contribution of this study is the inclusion of patient satisfaction with design, an important yet overlooked fact in patient satisfaction. Healthcare design researchers and practitioners may consider how changing system interdependencies can lead to unexpected changes to communication processes and system outcomes in complex systems.

  15. Correlation of neonatal intensive care unit performance across multiple measures of quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profit, Jochen; Zupancic, John A F; Gould, Jeffrey B; Pietz, Kenneth; Kowalkowski, Marc A; Draper, David; Hysong, Sylvia J; Petersen, Laura A

    2013-01-01

    To examine whether high performance on one measure of quality is associated with high performance on others and to develop a data-driven explanatory model of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) performance. We conducted a cross-sectional data analysis of a statewide perinatal care database. Risk-adjusted NICU ranks were computed for each of 8 measures of quality selected based on expert input. Correlations across measures were tested using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Exploratory factor analysis was used to determine whether underlying factors were driving the correlations. Twenty-two regional NICUs in California. In total, 5445 very low-birth-weight infants cared for between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2007. Pneumothorax, growth velocity, health care-associated infection, antenatal corticosteroid use, hypothermia during the first hour of life, chronic lung disease, mortality in the NICU, and discharge on any human breast milk. The NICUs varied substantially in their clinical performance across measures of quality. Of 28 unit-level correlations, 6 were significant (ρ < .05). Correlations between pairs of measures of quality of care were strong (ρ ≥ .5) for 1 pair, moderate (range, ρ ≥ .3 to ρ < .5) for 8 pairs, weak (range, ρ ≥ .1 to ρ < .3) for 5 pairs, and negligible (ρ < .1) for 14 pairs. Exploratory factor analysis revealed 4 underlying factors of quality in this sample. Pneumothorax, mortality in the NICU, and antenatal corticosteroid use loaded on factor 1; growth velocity and health care-associated infection loaded on factor 2; chronic lung disease loaded on factor 3; and discharge on any human breast milk loaded on factor 4. In this sample, the ability of individual measures of quality to explain overall quality of neonatal intensive care was modest.

  16. An observational study of patient care outcomes sensitive to handover quality in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillibridge, Nichole; Botti, Mari; Wood, Beverley; Redley, Bernice

    2017-12-01

    To identify patient care outcome indicators sensitive to the quality of interprofessional handover between the anaesthetist and the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit nurse. The relationship between interprofessional clinical handover when patients are transferred from the operating theatre to the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit and patient outcomes of subsequent patient care delivery is not well understood. Naturalistic, exploratory descriptive design using observation. Observations of 31 patient journeys through Post-Anaesthetic Care Units across three public and private hospitals. Characteristics of interprofessional handover on arrival in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit, the trajectory of patient care activities in Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit and patient outcomes were observed. Of the 821 care activities observed across 31 "patient journeys" in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit, observations (assessments and vital signs) (52.5 %), communication (15.8 %) and pain management (assessment of pain and analgesic administration) (10.3%) were most common. Examination of patterns in handover communications and subsequent trajectories of patient care activities revealed three patient trajectory typologies and two patient outcome indicators expected to be sensitive to the quality of interprofessional handover communication in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit: pain on discharge from the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit and timely response to clinical deterioration. An additional process indicator, seeking missing information, was also identified. Patient's pain on discharge from Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit, escalation of care in response to early signs of deterioration and the need for nurses to seek out missing information to deliver care are indicators expected to be sensitive to the quality of interprofessional handover communication in the Post-Anaesthetic Care Unit. Future research should test these indicators. Patient outcomes sensitive to the quality of interprofessional handover on patient

  17. The importance of parents in the neonatal intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hercília Guimarães

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The premature birth and the hospitalization in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU are potential risk factors for the development and behavior of the newborn, as has been shown in recent studies. Premature birth of an infant is a distressing event for the family. Several feelings are experienced by parents during hospitalization of their baby in the NICU. Feelings of guilt, rejection, stress and anxiety are common. Also the attachment processes have the potential to be disrupted or delayed as a result of the initial separation of the premature newborn and the mother after the admission to the NICU. Added to these difficulties, there is the distortion of infant’s “ideal image”, created by the family, in contrast with the real image of the preterm. This relationship-based family-centered approach, the Neonatal Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP, promotes the idea that infants and their families are collaborators in developing an individualized program to maximize physical, mental, and emotional growth and health and to improve long-term outcomes for the high risk newborns. The presence of parents in NICUs and their involvement caring their babies, in a family centered care philosophy, is vital to improve the outcome of their infants and the relationships within each family. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Gavino Faa (Cagliari, Italy, Antonio Giordano (Philadelphia, USA

  18. Organizational and safety culture in Canadian intensive care units: relationship to size of intensive care unit and physician management model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodek, Peter M; Wong, Hubert; Jaswal, Danny; Heyland, Daren K; Cook, Deborah J; Rocker, Graeme M; Kutsogiannis, Demetrios J; Dale, Craig; Fowler, Robert; Ayas, Najib T

    2012-02-01

    The objectives of this study are to describe organizational and safety culture in Canadian intensive care units (ICUs), to correlate culture with the number of beds and physician management model in each ICU, and to correlate organizational culture and safety culture. In this cross-sectional study, surveys of organizational and safety culture were administered to 2374 clinical staff in 23 Canadian tertiary care and community ICUs. For the 1285 completed surveys, scores were calculated for each of 34 domains. Average domain scores for each ICU were correlated with number of ICU beds and with intensivist vs nonintensivist management model. Domain scores for organizational culture were correlated with domain scores for safety culture. Culture domain scores were generally favorable in all ICUs. There were moderately strong positive correlations between number of ICU beds and perceived effectiveness at recruiting/retaining physicians (r = 0.58; P organizational and safety culture. Differences in perceptions between staff in larger and smaller ICUs highlight the importance of teamwork across units in larger ICUs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Care bundle for ventilator-associated pneumonia in a medical intensive care unit in Northern Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Ping Zeng; Han Su; Chein-Wen Chen; Shu-Meng Cheng; Li-Fang Chang; Wen-Chii Tzeng; Bing-Hsiean Tzeng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) occurs in patients requiring mechanical ventilators for more than 48 h. VAP is the most common nosocomial infection and the leading cause of complications and death in intensive care units (ICUs). Materials and Methods: Two historical comparison groups of 375 patients who used mechanical ventilators for more than 48 h in the medical ICU (MICU) from December 1, 2011 to May 31, 2012 and December 1, 2013 to May 31, 2014 were enrolled in this stud...

  20. Establishment and assessment of cataract surgery in Day-care Unit at northwest of China

    OpenAIRE

    Xiu-Li Zhang; Xing Yang; Juan-Juan Yang; Bao-Jian Yan; Jing-Ming Li; Cheng Pei; Li Qin

    2018-01-01

    AIM: To describe the protocol and economic cost of the Day-care Unit cataract surgery procedure in northwest of China.METHODS: Patients who received phacoemulcification and intraocular lens implantation in both Day-care Unit and regular Unit were recruited from January 2016 to December 2016. The baseline data and average cost were recorded and analyzed. Furthermore, satisfaction questionnaire of patients were collected.RESULTS: Patients with Day-care Unit showed shorter registration duration,...

  1. Contemporary prophetic preaching theory in the United States of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article two homileticians – one from the United States of America (USA) and one from South Africa (SA) − enter into a dialog regarding how the task of prophetic preaching today might be revived, reframed and redefined in light of the Reformation principle of the viva vox Evangelii [living voice of the gospel].

  2. Digital scrapbooking as a standard of care in neonatal intensive care units: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhani, Muhammad T; Kanwal, Ifrah

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we describe a digital photo scrapbooking project as a standard of care for the parents of infants admitted in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Photographs were taken from birth until discharge or expiry at special moments during the infant's hospitalization and used to create a digital scrapbook with daily notes by the parents. The scrapbook and original photos were provided on a CD at discharge or at expiry. Parents and their families unanimously appreciated the photos and the opportunity to record their thoughts, and considered the CDs as a lifetime treasure. Digital photo journaling could be implemented as a standard of care at other institutions with a commitment from the nursing and ancillary staff of the NICU and labor and delivery department, with possible support from volunteers.

  3. Organisational and environmental characteristics of residential aged care units providing highly person-centred care: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Karin; Lindkvist, Marie; Sandman, Per-Olof; Zingmark, Karin; Edvardsson, David

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have empirically investigated factors that define residential aged care units that are perceived as being highly person-centred. The purpose of this study was to explore factors characterising residential aged care units perceived as being highly person-centred, with a focus on organisational and environmental variables, as well as residents' and staff' characteristics. A cross-sectional design was used. Residents ( n  = 1460) and staff ( n  = 1213) data from 151 residential care units were collected, as well as data relating to characteristics of the organisation and environment, and data measuring degree of person-centred care. Participating staff provided self-reported data and conducted proxy ratings on residents . Descriptive and comparative statistics, independent samples t-test, Chi 2 test, Eta Squared and Phi coefficient were used to analyse data. Highly person-centred residential aged care units were characterized by having a shared philosophy of care, a satisfactory leadership, interdisciplinary collaboration and social support from colleagues and leaders, a dementia-friendly physical environment, staff having time to spend with residents, and a smaller unit size. Residential aged care units with higher levels of person-centred care had a higher proportion of staff with continuing education in dementia care, and a higher proportion of staff receiving regular supervision, compared to units with lower levels of person-centred care. It is important to target organisational and environmental factors, such as a shared philosophy of care, staff use of time, the physical environment, interdisciplinary support, and support from leaders and colleagues, to improve person-centred care in residential care units. Managers and leaders seeking to facilitate person-centred care in daily practice need to consider their own role in supporting, encouraging, and supervising staff.

  4. Effects of Patient Care Unit Design and Technology on Nurse and Patient Care Technician Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Mary S; Doscher, Mindy

    2018-04-01

    The current study described RN and patient care technician (PCT) communication in centralized and hybrid decentralized workstation designs using hands-free communication technology and infrared locator badge technology to facilitate communication. New construction of an oncology unit provided the opportunity to compare staff communication in two different workstation designs. Observations and questionnaires compared nurse and PCT communication in the two-unit designs. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the differences. The hybrid decentralized unit had increased use of hands-free communication technology and hallway communication by nurses and PCTs, and increased patient room communication by nurses. Perceptions of communication between nurses and PCTs and congruency of priorities for care were similar for both units. The locator badge technology had limited adoption. Replacement of nurse workstations with new construction or remodeling impact staff communication patterns, necessitating that nurse leaders understand the impact of design and technology on communication. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 44(4), 17-22.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. An extended theory of planned behavior to predict consumers' willingness to buy mobile slaughter unit meat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, Djura L.; Gerritzen, Marien A.; Lokhorst, Anne Marike; Poortvliet, Marijn

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigated the determinants of consumers' intention to purchase meat from mobile slaughter units (MSU). The theory of planned behavior (TPB) and the value belief norm theory (VBN) were used as conceptual lenses to guide this investigation. We conducted a survey among 329

  6. The diversity and unit of reactor noise theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Zhifeng

    The study of reactor noise theory concerns questions about cause and effect relationships, and utilisation of random noise in nuclear reactor systems. The diversity of reactor noise theory arises from the variety of noise sources, the various mathematical treatments applied and various practical purposes. The neutron noise in zero- energy systems arises from the fluctuations in the number of neutrons per fission, the time between nuclear events, and the type of reactions. It can be used to evaluate system parameters. The mathematical treatment is based on the master equation of stochastic branching processes. The noise in power reactor systems is given rise by random processes of technological origin such as vibration of mechanical parts, boiling of the coolant, fluctuations of temperature and pressure. It can be used to monitor reactor behaviour with the possibility of detecting malfunctions at an early stage. The mathematical treatment is based on the Langevin equation. The unity of reactor noise theory arises from the fact that useful information from noise is embedded in the second moments of random variables, which lends the possibility of building up a unified mathematical description and analysis of the various reactor noise sources. Exploring such possibilities is the main subject among the three major topics reported in this thesis. The first subject is within the zero power noise in steady media, and we reported on the extension of the existing theory to more general cases. In Paper I, by use of the master equation approach, we have derived the most general Feynman- and Rossi-alpha formulae so far by taking the full joint statistics of the prompt and all the six groups of delayed neutron precursors, and a multiple emission source into account. The involved problems are solved with a combination of effective analytical techniques and symbolic algebra codes (Mathematica). Paper II gives a numerical evaluation of these formulae. An assessment of the

  7. Posttraumatic stress in intensive care unit survivors - a prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratzer, Mette; Brink, Ole; Knudsen, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Aims: This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of severe Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms and to identify factors associated with PTSD in survivors of intensive care unit (ICU) treatment following traumatic injury. Methods: Fifty-two patients who were admitted to an ICU through...... the emergency ward following traumatic injury were prospectively followed. Information on injury severity and ICU treatment were obtained through medical records. Demographic information and measures of acute stress symptoms, experienced social support, coping style, sense of coherence (SOC) and locus...... of control were assessed within one-month post-accident (T1). At the six months follow-up (T2), PTSD was assessed with the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ). Results: In the six months follow-up, 10 respondents (19.2%) had HTQ total scores reaching a level suggestive of PTSD (N = 52), and 11 respondents (21...

  8. Prescribing errors in a Brazilian neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Cezar Machado

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pediatric patients, especially those admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (ICU, are highly vulnerable to medication errors. This study aimed to measure the prescription error rate in a university hospital neonatal ICU and to identify susceptible patients, types of errors, and the medicines involved. The variables related to medicines prescribed were compared to the Neofax prescription protocol. The study enrolled 150 newborns and analyzed 489 prescription order forms, with 1,491 medication items, corresponding to 46 drugs. Prescription error rate was 43.5%. Errors were found in dosage, intervals, diluents, and infusion time, distributed across 7 therapeutic classes. Errors were more frequent in preterm newborns. Diluent and dosing were the most frequent sources of errors. The therapeutic classes most involved in errors were antimicrobial agents and drugs that act on the nervous and cardiovascular systems.

  9. Electronic Whiteboards and Intensive Care Unit follow up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Kija Lin; Brandrup, Morten

    -ended dry-erase whiteboard (make-up-your-own-sentences). In conclusion the primary feature in the two subjects is to optimize communication/collaboration and information between ICU and general wards in the transition. To make it a long term solution the content of such a support would need involvement...... of the end-users in the design process (Participatory Design). Hence these two findings, this review is setting the stage for further research on how electronic whiteboards can support the initial follow up when patients are transferred from an ICU to a general ward.......This paper is reviewing the existing literature on Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Outreach, in-hospital follow up 24 hours after the transition to a general ward from an ICU. It also touches upon the use of Electronic Whiteboards in a hospital setting and how the electronic whiteboards might support...

  10. Genetically enhanced T lymphocytes and the intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tat, Tiberiu; Li, Huming; Constantinescu, Catalin-Sorin; Onaciu, Anca; Chira, Sergiu; Osan, Ciprian; Pasca, Sergiu; Petrushev, Bobe; Moisoiu, Vlad; Micu, Wilhelm-Thomas; Berce, Cristian; Tranca, Sebastian; Dima, Delia; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Shen, Jianliang; Tomuleasa, Ciprian; Qian, Liren

    2018-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells (CAR-T cells) and donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) are important protocols in lymphocyte engineering. CAR-T cells have emerged as a new modality for cancer immunotherapy due to their potential efficacy against hematological malignancies. These genetically modified receptors contain an antigen-binding moiety, a hinge region, a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular costimulatory domain resulting in lymphocyte T cell activation subsequent to antigen binding. In present-day medicine, four generations of CAR-T cells are described depending on the intracellular signaling domain number of T cell receptors. DLI represents a form of adoptive therapy used after hematopoietic stem cell transplant for its anti-tumor and anti-infectious properties. This article covers the current status of CAR-T cells and DLI research in the intensive care unit (ICU) patient, including the efficacy, toxicity, side effects and treatment. PMID:29662667

  11. Modes of death in neonatal intensive care units.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Finan, E

    2006-04-01

    With the ever-increasing availability of aggressive medical treatment and technical support, neonatologists are offered an increasing ability to prolong life. While "end-of-life" decisions within NICUs have been studied internationally, there is limited data available for Ireland. Through the auspices of the Irish Faculty of Paediatrics 2002 Neonatal Mortality Ouestionnaire, decisions made around the time of death in Irish Neonatal Intensive Care Units were examined. The overall response rate to the questionnaire was 96% (n=25). One hundred and eighty seven deaths were reported for 2002. Information pertaining to the mode of death was available in 53% of cases. Seventy seven percent of those paediatricians who answered this question, reported either withdrawing or withholding treatment in babies thought to have a hopeless outcome, with the greatest proportion of these deaths occurring in premature infants (n=30) and babies with congenital defects (n=40).

  12. Stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, M; Perner, A; Wetterslev, J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) may decrease the incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients in the intensive care unit (ICU), but the risk of infection may be increased. In this study, we aimed to describe SUP practices in adult ICUs. We hypothesised that patient selection...... for SUP varies both within and between countries. METHODS: Adult ICUs were invited to participate in the survey. We registered country, type of hospital, type and size of ICU, preferred SUP agent, presence of local guideline, reported indications for SUP, criteria for discontinuing SUP, and concerns about...... adverse effects. Fisher's exact test was used to assess differences between groups. RESULTS: Ninety-seven adult ICUs in 11 countries participated (eight European). All but one ICU used SUP, and 64% (62/97) reported having a guideline for the use of SUP. Proton pump inhibitors were the most common SUP...

  13. Population pharmacokinetics of amikacin in neonatal intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Caceres Guido

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Amikacin treatment requires close monitoring of blood concentrations to increase the probability that levels achieved are both effective and safe. Aims We described population pharmacokinetics parameters of amikacin in newborns from a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with suspected or documented sepsis. Methods A nonlinear mixed-effect model approach was used to analyse the data. Results Twenty seven neonates were enrolled. Final parameter estimates were: Ke(h-1=0.232x(CR Exp-0.85; V(mL/kg=497. Conclusion Weight and serum creatinine are associated with neonatal amikacin volume of distribution and elimination constant rate, respectively. The presence of sepsis may decrease amikacin elimination, although this observation should be further explored. These results could help to individualize amikacin dosage for neonates.

  14. End-of-life decisions in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Irene

    2012-01-01

    be interdisciplinary, but the literature shows that this is not always the case. Research on end-of-life issues in Danish ICUs is limited. Aim The aims of this thesis were to • Examine Danish practices regarding end-of-life decisions in the ICU. • Examine the opinions of nurses and physicians who work in Danish ICUs...... and decision-making. Hypotheses • Nurses, intensivists, and primary physicians have different experiences of interdisciplinary collaboration regarding end-of-life decision-making in the ICU. • Specific interventions targeting end-of-life decision-making in the ICU, such as interdisciplinary audits......Background When making end-of-life decisions in intensive care units, the different staff groups have different roles in the decision-making process and may not always assess the situation identically. Practice recommendations for withholding or withdrawing therapy state that decisions should...

  15. [Infection prevention and control in neonatal intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, Elisiane; Lorenzini, Elisiane; da Costa, Tatiane Costa; da Silva, Eveline Franco

    2013-12-01

    This study was aimed to identify the knowledge of the nursing team of a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) on infection control, identijfying the factors that facilitate or hinder the prevention and control of Healthcare Associated Infections (HICAI). A descriptive study using a qualitative research method conducted with three nurses and 15 nurse technicians, who work in a NICU of a charitable organization, in southern Brazil. It became evident that the nursing staff had great knowledge about the factors that facilitate the prevention and control of HCAI in NICU, the most important factor being proper hand hygiene. Among the factors that hinder infection prevention and control are to overcrowding and excessive workload. The efficient performance of the nursing staff is an important part of the strategy for prevention and control of HCAI.

  16. Stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, M; Perner, A; Wetterslev, J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this statistical analysis plan, we aim to provide details of the pre-defined statistical analyses of the Stress Ulcer Prophylaxis in the Intensive Care Unit (SUP-ICU) trial. The aim of the SUP-ICU trial is to assess benefits and harms of stress ulcer prophylaxis with a proton pump......-year mortality, and a health economic analysis. Two formal interim analyses will be performed. The statistical analyses will be conducted according to the outlined pre-defined statistical analysis plan. The primary analysis will be a logistic regression analysis adjusted for stratification variables...... comparing the two intervention groups in the intention-to-treat population. In a secondary analysis, we will additionally adjust the primary outcome for potential random differences in baseline characteristics. The conclusion will be based on the intention-to-treat population. CONCLUSION: Stress ulcer...

  17. Radiofrequency exposure in the Neonatal Medium Care Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvente, I.; Vázquez-Pérez, A.; Fernández, M.F.; Núñez, M.I.; Múñoz-Hoyos, A.

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize electromagnetic fields of radiofrequency (RF-EMF) levels generated in a Neonatal Medium Care Unit and to analyze RF-EMF levels inside unit’s incubators. Spot and long-term measurements were made with a dosimeter. The spot measurement mean was 1.51±0.48 V/m. Higher values were found in the proximity to the window and to the incubator evaluated. Mean field strength for the entire period of 17 h was 0.81 (±0.07) V/m and the maximum value was 1.58 V/m for long-term RF-EMF measurements in the incubator. Values found during the night period were higher than those found during the day period. It is important to consider RF-EMF exposure levels in neonatal care units, due to some evidence of adverse health effects found in children and adults. Characterization of RF-EMF exposure may be important to further investigate the mechanisms and underlying effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) on infant health. A prudent avoidance strategy should be adopted because newborns are at a vulnerable stage of development and the actual impact of EMF on premature infants is unknown. - Highlights: • The increasing use of RF-EMF suggests an urgent need for more research in this field. • Health consequences of RF-EMF exposure on infants are not well known. • Description of RF-EMF exposure is vital in further study mechanisms on infant health. • Considering newborns vulnerability, it is wise to adopt a prudent avoidance strategy.

  18. Radiofrequency exposure in the Neonatal Medium Care Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvente, I. [Unit Research Support of the San Cecilio University Hospital, Biosanitary Institute of Granada (ibs.GRANADA), University Hospitals of Granada/University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Department of Radiology and Physical Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Granada, Av. de la Investigación, 11, torre A, planta 11, 18016 Granada (Spain); Vázquez-Pérez, A. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Granada (Spain); Fernández, M.F. [Unit Research Support of the San Cecilio University Hospital, Biosanitary Institute of Granada (ibs.GRANADA), University Hospitals of Granada/University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Department of Radiology and Physical Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Granada, Av. de la Investigación, 11, torre A, planta 11, 18016 Granada (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP) (Spain); Núñez, M.I., E-mail: isabeln@ugr.es [Unit Research Support of the San Cecilio University Hospital, Biosanitary Institute of Granada (ibs.GRANADA), University Hospitals of Granada/University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Department of Radiology and Physical Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Granada, Av. de la Investigación, 11, torre A, planta 11, 18016 Granada (Spain); Biopathology and Regenerative Medicine Institute (IBIMER), University of Granada (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP) (Spain); Múñoz-Hoyos, A. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Granada (Spain)

    2017-01-15

    The aims of this study were to characterize electromagnetic fields of radiofrequency (RF-EMF) levels generated in a Neonatal Medium Care Unit and to analyze RF-EMF levels inside unit’s incubators. Spot and long-term measurements were made with a dosimeter. The spot measurement mean was 1.51±0.48 V/m. Higher values were found in the proximity to the window and to the incubator evaluated. Mean field strength for the entire period of 17 h was 0.81 (±0.07) V/m and the maximum value was 1.58 V/m for long-term RF-EMF measurements in the incubator. Values found during the night period were higher than those found during the day period. It is important to consider RF-EMF exposure levels in neonatal care units, due to some evidence of adverse health effects found in children and adults. Characterization of RF-EMF exposure may be important to further investigate the mechanisms and underlying effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) on infant health. A prudent avoidance strategy should be adopted because newborns are at a vulnerable stage of development and the actual impact of EMF on premature infants is unknown. - Highlights: • The increasing use of RF-EMF suggests an urgent need for more research in this field. • Health consequences of RF-EMF exposure on infants are not well known. • Description of RF-EMF exposure is vital in further study mechanisms on infant health. • Considering newborns vulnerability, it is wise to adopt a prudent avoidance strategy.

  19. Multifaceted bench comparative evaluation of latest intensive care unit ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, M; Quesnel, C; Fulgencio, J-P; Degrain, M; Carteaux, G; Bonnet, F; Similowski, T; Demoule, A

    2015-07-01

    Independent bench studies using specific ventilation scenarios allow testing of the performance of ventilators in conditions similar to clinical settings. The aims of this study were to determine the accuracy of the latest generation ventilators to deliver chosen parameters in various typical conditions and to provide clinicians with a comprehensive report on their performance. Thirteen modern intensive care unit ventilators were evaluated on the ASL5000 test lung with and without leakage for: (i) accuracy to deliver exact tidal volume (VT) and PEEP in assist-control ventilation (ACV); (ii) performance of trigger and pressurization in pressure support ventilation (PSV); and (iii) quality of non-invasive ventilation algorithms. In ACV, only six ventilators delivered an accurate VT and nine an accurate PEEP. Eleven devices failed to compensate VT and four the PEEP in leakage conditions. Inspiratory delays differed significantly among ventilators in invasive PSV (range 75-149 ms, P=0.03) and non-invasive PSV (range 78-165 ms, Pventilation algorithms efficiently prevented the decrease in pressurization capacities and PEEP levels induced by leaks in, respectively, 10 and 12 out of the 13 ventilators. We observed real heterogeneity of performance amongst the latest generation of intensive care unit ventilators. Although non-invasive ventilation algorithms appear to maintain adequate pressurization efficiently in the case of leakage, basic functions, such as delivered VT in ACV and pressurization in PSV, are often less reliable than the values displayed by the device suggest. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Smoking cessation following admission to a coronary care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigotti, N A; Singer, D E; Mulley, A G; Thibault, G E

    1991-01-01

    To determine the impact of an episode of serious cardiovascular disease on smoking behavior and to identify factors associated with smoking cessation in this setting. Prospective observational study in which smokers admitted to a coronary care unit (CCU) were followed for one year after hospital discharge to determine subsequent smoking behavior. Coronary care unit of a teaching hospital. Preadmission smoking status was assessed in all 828 patients admitted to the CCU during one year. The 310 smokers surviving to hospital discharge were followed and their smoking behaviors assessed by self-report at six and 12 months. None. Six months after discharge, 32% of survivors were not smoking; the rate of sustained cessation at one year was 25%. Smokers with a new diagnosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) made during hospitalization had the highest cessation rate (53% vs. 31%, p = 0.01). On multivariate analysis, smoking cessation was more likely if patients were discharged with a diagnosis of CHD, had no prior history of CHD, were lighter smokers (less than 1 pack/day), and had congestive heart failure during hospitalization. Among smokers admitted because of suspected myocardial infarction (MI), cessation was more likely if the diagnosis was CHD than if it was noncoronary (37% vs. 19%, p less than 0.05), but a diagnosis of MI led to no more smoking cessation than did coronary insufficiency. Hospitalization in a CCU is a stimulus to long-term smoking cessation, especially for lighter smokers and those with a new diagnosis of CHD. Admission to a CCU may represent a time when smoking habits are particularly susceptible to intervention. Smoking cessation in this setting should improve patient outcomes because cessation reduces cardiovascular mortality, even when quitting occurs after the onset of CHD.

  1. Attachment Theory and Spirituality: Two Threads Converging in Palliative Care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Loetz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to discuss and explore the interrelation between two concepts, attachment theory and the concept of spirituality, which are important to palliative care and to founding a multivariate understanding of the patient’s needs and challenges. Both concepts have been treated by research in diverse and multiform ways, but little effort has yet been made to integrate them into one theoretical framework in reference to the palliative context. In this paper, we begin an attempt to close this scientific gap theoretically. Following the lines of thought in this paper, we assume that spirituality can be conceptualized as an adequate response of a person’s attachment pattern to the peculiarity of the palliative situation. Spirituality can be seen both as a recourse to securely based relationships and as an attempt to explore the ultimate unknown, the mystery of one’s own death. Thus, spirituality in the palliative context corresponds to the task of attachment behavior: to transcend symbiosis while continuing bonds and thus to explore the unknown environment independently and without fear. Spiritual activity is interpreted as a human attachment behavior option that receives special quality and importance in the terminal stage of life. Implications for clinical practice and research are discussed in the final section of the paper.

  2. Attachment theory and spirituality: two threads converging in palliative care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loetz, Cécile; Müller, Jakob; Frick, Eckhard; Petersen, Yvonne; Hvidt, Niels Christian; Mauer, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss and explore the interrelation between two concepts, attachment theory and the concept of spirituality, which are important to palliative care and to founding a multivariate understanding of the patient's needs and challenges. Both concepts have been treated by research in diverse and multiform ways, but little effort has yet been made to integrate them into one theoretical framework in reference to the palliative context. In this paper, we begin an attempt to close this scientific gap theoretically. Following the lines of thought in this paper, we assume that spirituality can be conceptualized as an adequate response of a person's attachment pattern to the peculiarity of the palliative situation. Spirituality can be seen both as a recourse to securely based relationships and as an attempt to explore the ultimate unknown, the mystery of one's own death. Thus, spirituality in the palliative context corresponds to the task of attachment behavior: to transcend symbiosis while continuing bonds and thus to explore the unknown environment independently and without fear. Spiritual activity is interpreted as a human attachment behavior option that receives special quality and importance in the terminal stage of life. Implications for clinical practice and research are discussed in the final section of the paper.

  3. The evaluation of primary care unit of Mahasarakham Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asavatanabodee, Paibool

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the one-year performance outcome of Community Medical Care Unit (CMU) in Mahasarakham Hospital. This cross-sectional descriptive study used the CIPP model. The target population was divided into two groups. The first group consisted of the executive committee of Mahasarakham Hospital including one director, five Vice-directors, and 16 CMU paramedical personnel and public health administrators. The second group consisted of 281 randomized people in the service area of CMU, Mahasarakham Hospital. The overall outcome evaluation of both groups was high with mean of 3.53 and 3.86, respectively. The evaluation of context, input, and output was ranked high in both groups while the process ranking was moderate in the first group and high in the other group. The present study proposed that project guidelines be explicit policies, improvement in behavioral service, appropriate workload, adequate parking lot, and network sharing of hospital data bank. The quality and efficiency of CMU project are dependent upon explicit policy, well-planned structure of organization, efficient-informative systems, good development plan, and adequate manpower. The personnel should plan the project process and continuously improve the system. CMU project would be neither successful nor beneficial for the development ofpublic health care system if it lacked the participation of the people in the community and associated networks. The results of the present study might be the useful data for improving and developing the pattern of community healthcare service in urban area.

  4. Evaluation of Intensive Care Unit Ventilators at Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeman, Thomas; Rodriquez, Dario; Petro, Michael; Branson, Richard

    Devices may forgo US military air worthiness and safety testing in an attempt to expedite the availability of critical assets such as mechanical ventilators with a waiver for one-time use in extenuating circumstances. We evaluated two Intensive Care Unit (ICU) level ventilators: Drager Evita XL and Puritan Bennett (PB) 840 in an altitude chamber at sea level and altitudes of 8,000 and 16,000 feet. Altitude affected delivered tidal volumes (VTs) in volume control mode (VCV) and Pressure Regulated Volume Controlled (PRVC) mode at altitude with the Evita XL but the differences were not considered clinically important with the PB 840. Sixty-seven percent of the V T s were outside the ASTM standard of ± 10% of set V T with the Evita XL at altitude. The PB 840 did not deliver V T s that were larger than the ASTM standard up to an altitude of 16,000 feet while the majority of the delivered V T s with the Därger XL were greater than the ASTM standard. This could present a patient safety issue. Caregivers must be aware of the capabilities and limitations of ICU ventilators when utilized in a hypobaric environment in order to provide safe care. Copyright © 2017 Air Medical Journal Associates. All rights reserved.

  5. Unitization of a common oil pool: Theory and evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deilami, I.

    1991-01-01

    When heterogeneous firms gain access to the same oil pool, they drill and drain the pool based on their own preferences. The anticipated result is over-capitalization and rent dissipation: the tragedy of the commons. Given the notion of rationality based upon self interest, the rational behavior of these firms might instead be to unitize, acting in a manner efficient to the group. Failure to do so can be attributed to prohibitive bargaining costs required to coordinate many firms; this is supported by studies of the oil industry in the 1930s. In contrast, if the oil industry in the 1950s to 1980s is studied, very different conclusions are reached. Today, joint operations on oil and gas are found in all phases of petroleum-production process. Why did there occur such a drastic change in the degree of success in unitization? In the early 1930s to the late 1940s, both the drilling cost of oil extraction and the price of oil were low, so the gains from unitization were not large enough to be profitable. However, by the late 1950s the real price of oil and the cost of drilling had doubled from what they were in the early 1930s. This made the loss from rent dissipation significant and forced the firms to reevaluate their noncooperative behavior

  6. Bloodstream Infections in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Sah Ižpek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the pattern of bloodstream infections (BSIs and antimicrobial susceptibility of pathogens in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU.Material and Method: Positive hemoculture of neonates diagnosed with nosocomial sepsis from March 2011 to March 2014 in the NICU of Diyarbakir Maternity and Children%u2019s Hospital, in the southeastern region of Anatolia, Turkey, were retrospectively reviewed. Results: A total of 148 pathogens were isolated in 142 neonates. The most common microorganisms isolated were Klebsiella pneumoniae (40.5% and Acinetobacter baumannii (29.7% which was a result of a hospital outbreak. Multi-drug resistant (MDR strains accounted for 20.0% of K. pneumoniae isolates and 93.2% of A. baumannii isolates. The sepsis-attributable mortality rate was higher in cases infected with MDR strains than in cases infected without MDR strains or Candida spp (24% vs. 9.7%, p=0.032. Discussion: In our unit, BSIs were more often caused by Gram negative bacteria. BSIs caused by MDR strains were associated with a higher rate of sepsis-attributable mortality.

  7. Quality improvement in radiography in a neonatal intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loovere, L.; Boyle, E.M.; Blatz, S.; Bowslaugh, M.; Kereliuk, M.; Paes, B.

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to ensure that X-rays performed consistently adhere to established technological quality standards and are achieved without compromising patient care while minimizing exposure risks. The secondary objective was to evaluate whether educational sessions targeting areas deemed suboptimal would facilitate improvement. A retrospective, 1-week review of all neonatal X-rays and documentation of clinical information on X-ray requisitions (n = 132) was completed in a tertiary care neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), by a single observer. Standards for X-ray evaluation were defined a priori based on radiographic principles and essential documented medical information for correct interpretation. Targeted areas for improvement were identified and addressed through brief educational sessions and printed pamphlets. The review was repeated after recommendations were implemented. 1 month (n = 93) and 1 year (n = 76) later. Improvements were evident in both the completion of X-ray requisitions and image quality. In particular, there was a statistically significant improvement in requisition legibility (P = 0.019), completeness of the medical history (P < 0.001), reduction in X-ray rotation (P < 0.001), collimation to the specific area of interest (P <0.001), gonadal shielding (P < 0.001), and decrease in monitor leads or artifacts obscuring views (P < 0.001). These improvements were sustained both 1 month and 1 year following the educational sessions. A neonatal X-ray audit is a simple, effective way to evaluate radiographic technique and encourage provision of basic clinical information for diagnostic interpretation by radiologists and neonatologists. As well, structured, collaborative educational sessions between radiology and neonatology staff appear to be a successful and sustainable method to effect overall improvement. (author)

  8. Hyperdynamic left ventricular ejection fraction in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paonessa, Joseph R; Brennan, Thomas; Pimentel, Marco; Steinhaus, Daniel; Feng, Mengling; Celi, Leo Anthony

    2015-08-07

    Limited information exists on the etiology, prevalence, and significance of hyperdynamic left ventricular ejection fraction (HDLVEF) in the intensive care unit (ICU). Our aim in the present study was to compare characteristics and outcomes of patients with HDLVEF with those of patients with normal left ventricular ejection fraction in the ICU using a large, public, deidentified critical care database. We conducted a longitudinal, single-center, retrospective cohort study of adult patients who underwent echocardiography during a medical or surgical ICU admission at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center using the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II database. The final cohort had 2867 patients, of whom 324 had HDLVEF, defined as an ejection fraction >70%. Patients with an ejection fraction <55% were excluded. Compared with critically ill patients with normal left ventricular ejection fraction, the finding of HDLVEF in critically ill patients was associated with female sex, increased age, and the diagnoses of hypertension and cancer. Patients with HDLVEF had increased 28-day mortality compared with those with normal ejection fraction in multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score, Elixhauser score for comorbidities, vasopressor use, and mechanical ventilation use (odds ratio 1.38, 95% confidence interval 1.039-1.842, p =0.02). The presence of HDLVEF portended increased 28-day mortality, and may be helpful as a gravity marker for prognosis in patients admitted to the ICU. Further research is warranted to gain a better understanding of how these patients respond to common interventions in the ICU and to determine if pharmacologic modulation of HDLVEF improves outcomes.

  9. Translation of oral care practice guidelines into clinical practice by intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Freda DeKeyser; Ofra, Raanan; Khalaila, Rabia; Levy, Hadassa; Arad, Dana; Kolpak, Orly; Ben Nun, Maureen; Drori, Yardena; Benbenishty, Julie

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there was a change in the oral care practices of intensive care unit (ICU) nurses for ventilated patients after a national effort to increase evidence-based oral care practices. Descriptive comparison of ICU nurses in 2004-2005 and 2012. Two convenience national surveys of ICU nurses were collected in 2004-2005 (n = 218) and 2012 (n = 233). After the results of the initial survey were reported, a national effort to increase awareness of evidence-based oral care practices was conducted that included in-service presentations; publication of an evidence-based protocol in a national nursing journal; publication of the survey findings in an international nursing journal; and reports to the local press. A repeat survey was conducted 7 to 8 years later. The same survey instrument was used for both periods of data collection. This questionnaire included questions about demographic and personal characteristics and a checklist of oral care practices. Nurses rated their perceived priority level concerning oral care on a scale from 0 to 100. An evidence-based practice (EBP)[O4] score was computed representing the sum of 14 items related to equipment, solutions, assessments, and techniques associated with the evidence. The EBP score, priority score, and oral care practices were compared between the two samples. A regression model was built based on those variables that were associated with the EBP score in 2012. There was a statistically significant increase in the use of EBPs as shown by the EBP score and in the perceived priority level of oral care. Increased EBPs were found in the areas of teeth brushing and oral assessment. Decreases were found in the use of non-evidence-based practices, such as the use of gauze pads, tongue depressors, lemon water, and sodium bicarbonate. No differences were found in the use of chlorhexidine, toothpaste, or the nursing documentation of oral care practices. A multiple regression model was

  10. Parental involvement and kangaroo care in European neonatal intensive care units: a policy survey in eight countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallás-Alonso, Carmen R; Losacco, Valentina; Maraschini, Alice; Greisen, Gorm; Pierrat, Veronique; Warren, Inga; Haumont, Dominique; Westrup, Björn; Smit, Bert J; Sizun, Jacques; Cuttini, Marina

    2012-09-01

    To compare, in a large representative sample of European neonatal intensive care units, the policies and practices regarding parental involvement and holding babies in the kangaroo care position as well as differences in the tasks mothers and fathers are allowed to carry out. Prospective multicenter survey. Neonatal intensive care units in eight European countries (Belgium, Denmark, France, Italy, The Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom). Patients were not involved in this study. None. A structured questionnaire was mailed to 362 units (response rate 78%); only units with ≥50 very-low-birth-weight annual admissions were considered for this study. Facilities for parents such as reclining chairs near the babies' cots, beds, and a dedicated room were common, but less so in Italy and Spain. All units in Sweden, Denmark, the United Kingdom, and Belgium reported encouraging parental participation in the care of the babies, whereas policies were more restrictive in Italy (80% of units), France (73%), and Spain (41%). Holding babies in the kangaroo care position was widespread. However, in the United Kingdom, France, Italy, and Spain, many units applied restrictions regarding its frequency (sometimes or on parents request only, rather than routinely), method (conventional rather than skin-to-skin), and clinical conditions (especially mechanical ventilation and presence of umbilical lines) that would prevent its practice. In these countries, fathers were routinely offered kangaroo care less frequently than mothers (p involvement as well as the role played by mothers and fathers varied within and between countries.

  11. Breaking down barriers: enabling care-by-parent in neonatal intensive care units in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Ying; Lee, Shoo; Yu, Hua-Feng; Ye, Xiang Y; Warre, Ruth; Liu, Xiang-Hong; Liu, Jian-Hong

    2017-04-01

    Denying parents access to their infant in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is a standard practice in most hospitals across China. Visitation is not usually permitted or may be strictly limited, and NICU care for most neonates is provided by health-care professionals with little participation of the parents. An exception to this rule is the level 2 "Room-In" ward in Qilu Children's Hospital, Shandong University, where parents have 24-hour access to their infants and participate in providing care. This retrospective cohort study compared the outcomes of infants who were admitted to the NICU and remained there throughout their stay (NICU-NICU group, n=428), admitted to the NICU and then transferred to the Room-In ward (NICU-RIn group, n=1018), or admitted straight to the Room-In ward (RIn only group, n=629). There were no significant differences in the rates of nosocomial infection, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, intraventricular hemorrhage, and retinopathy of prematurity between the NICU-NICU and NICU-RIn groups. The rate of necrotizing enterocolitis was significantly lower in the NICU-RIn group (P=0.04), while weight gain and duration of hospital stay were significantly higher (both Pneonatal care in China.

  12. Applying Organization Theory to Understanding the Adoption and Implementation of Accountable Care Organizations: Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortell, Stephen M

    2016-12-01

    This commentary highights the key arguments and contributions of institutional thoery, transaction cost economics (TCE) theory, high reliability theory, and organizational learning theory to understanding the development and evolution of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs). Institutional theory and TCE theory primarily emphasize the external influences shaping ACOs while high reliability theory and organizational learning theory underscore the internal fctors influencing ACO perfromance. A framework based on Implementation Science is proposed to conside the multiple perspectives on ACOs and, in particular, their abiity to innovate to achieve desired cost, quality, and population health goals. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Sustained Reduction in Bloodstream Infections in Infants at a Large Tertiary Care Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Sara; Haithcock, Sarah; Smith, P. Brian; Goldberg, Ronald; Bidegain, Margarita; Tanaka, David; Carriker, Charlene; Ericson, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Reduction of bloodstream infections (BSI) has emerged as an important patient safety goal. Implementation of central line insertion bundles, standardized line care protocols, and health care provider education programs have reduced BSI in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) around the country. The ability of large tertiary care centers to decrease nosocomial infections, including BSI, has been demonstrated. However, long-term BSI reductions in infants are not well documented. We sought to demonstrate that a low incidence of BSI can be maintained over time in a tertiary care NICU. Subjects 6,790 infants admitted to a large, tertiary care NICU between 2005 and 2013. Design Retrospective intervention study. Methods A staged, multifaceted infection prevention plan was implemented beginning in October 2007 under nursing leadership. The incidence of BSI was determined annually for 2005-2013. Results Baseline BSI incidence for infants admitted to the NICU was 5.15 and 6.08 episodes per 1,000 infant-days in 2005 and 2006, respectively. After protocol implementation, the incidence of BSI decreased to 2.14/1,000 infant-days and 2.44/1,000 infant-days in 2008 and 2009, respectively. Yearly incidence remained low over the next 4 years and decreased even further to 0.20-0.45 infections/1,000 infant days. This represents a 92% decrease in BSI over a period of >5 years. Conclusions Implementation of a nursing-led comprehensive infection control initiative can effectively produce and maintain a reduction in the incidence of BSI in infants at a large tertiary care NICU. What this study adds Long term reductions in neonatal BSI are possible with implementation of a multidisciplinary team approach and strong nursing leadership. PMID:25915573

  14. The theory of bureaucratic caring for nursing practice in the organizational culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, M A

    1989-01-01

    Changes in the health care environment have raised many questions related to patient care. How are political, economic, legal, and technological caring decisions made? How is spiritual caring fostered? How can ethical caring be the grounds on which moral decisions are made? What new policies must be designed to enhance the human perspective in corporate policy, and how will these principles and policies guide actions? The impact of the Theory of Bureaucratic Caring on the corporate enterprise will necessitate a system shift from a narrow to a broad focus where management and caring views can exist side by side and realistically represent the transformation of health care organizations to benefit humankind.

  15. Care bundle for ventilator-associated pneumonia in a medical intensive care unit in Northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ping Zeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP occurs in patients requiring mechanical ventilators for more than 48 h. VAP is the most common nosocomial infection and the leading cause of complications and death in intensive care units (ICUs. Materials and Methods: Two historical comparison groups of 375 patients who used mechanical ventilators for more than 48 h in the medical ICU (MICU from December 1, 2011 to May 31, 2012 and December 1, 2013 to May 31, 2014 were enrolled in this study. There were 194 adult patients in the control group that received traditional care, and there were 181 patients in the experimental VAP care bundle group. Our VAP care bundle entailed several preventive strategies including daily assessments of sedation, daily consideration of weaning and extubation by the doctors and respiratory therapists charged with the care of the patients, maintenance of the intra-cuff pressure values at approximately 20-30 cm H 2 O, hand hygiene, daily oral hygiene, personal protective equipment for suctioning, the placement of patients in semi-recumbent positions with the head of the bed elevated to at least 30°, aspiration of an endotracheal tube and oral cavity prior to position changes, daily cleaning of the ventilator and suction bottle with sterile distilled water, weekly replacement of the ventilator circuit and heater, sterilization of the circuit by pasteurization, and the use of an independent care room. The data were collected by reviewing the patients′ medical records and by retrieving information from the Nosocomial Infection Control Unit of one medical center in Northern Taiwan. Results: The incidence of VAP in the VAP care bundle group (0.281 cases per 1000 ventilator days was significantly lower than that in the control group (0.495 cases per 1000 ventilator days. We estimated that the occurrence of VAP in the MICU increased the medical costs by an average of NT $68317 per patient. Conclusions: VAP care bundle is an

  16. Homelessness as culture: How transcultural nursing theory can assist caring for the homeless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Kate; John, William

    2012-11-01

    The concepts of culture and homelessness are both complex and contested. This paper examines homelessness through the lens of transcultural nursing theory, increasing understanding of both homelessness and transcultural theory. We argue that homelessness can be usefully conceptualised as a culture and that the application of transcultural theory to caring for homeless people will add further to the utility of these theories. The application of transcultural theory can add to the repertoire of skills the nurse needs to care for not only homeless clients, but, for a diverse range of client groups. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Social Role Theory and Social Role Valorization for Care Management Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Thomas J; Dziadosz, Gregory M

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes that social role theory (SRT) and social role valorization (SRV) be established as organizing theories for care managers. SRT is a recognized sociological theory that has a distinctive place in care management practice. SRV is an adjunct for SRT that focuses on people who are devalued by being in a negative social position and supports behavior change and movement to a valued social position.

  18. Drug utilization study in a burn care unit of a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santoshkumar R Jeevangi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate drug utilization and associated costs for the treatment of patients admitted in burn care unit of a tertiary care hospital. Methods: A prospective cross sectional study was conducted for a period of 15 months at Basaweshwara Teaching and General Hospital (BTGH, Gulbarga and the data collected was analyzed for various drug use indicators. Results: A total of 100 prescriptions were collected with 44% belonging to males and 56% to females. The average number of drugs per prescription ranged from 4.5 to 9.5. 9.5% of generics and 92% of essential drugs were prescribed. The opioid analgesics and sedatives were prescribed to all the patients who were admitted in burn care unit. The (Defined daily dose DDD/1 000/day for amikacin (359 was the highest followed by diclofenac sodium (156, pantoprazole (144, diazepam (130, ceftazidime (124, tramadol (115, ceftriaxone (84 and for paracetamol (4 which was the lowest. Conclusions: Significant amount of the money was spent on procurement of drugs. Most of the money was spent on prescribed antibiotics. The prescription of generic drugs should be promoted, for cost effective treatment. Hence the results of the present study indicate that there is a considerable scope for improvement in the prescription pattern.

  19. Patient-care time allocation by nurse practitioners and physician assistants in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, David L; Gregg, Sara R; Owens, Daniel S; Buchman, Timothy G; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2012-02-15

    Use of nurse practitioners and physician assistants ("affiliates") is increasing significantly in the intensive care unit (ICU). Despite this, few data exist on how affiliates allocate their time in the ICU. The purpose of this study was to understand the allocation of affiliate time into patient-care and non-patient-care activity, further dividing the time devoted to patient care into billable service and equally important but nonbillable care. We conducted a quasi experimental study in seven ICUs in an academic hospital and a hybrid academic/community hospital. After a period of self-reporting, a one-time monetary incentive of $2,500 was offered to 39 affiliates in each ICU in which every affiliate documented greater than 75% of their time devoted to patient care over a 6-month period in an effort to understand how affiliates allocated their time throughout a shift. Documentation included billable time (critical care, evaluation and management, procedures) and a new category ("zero charge time"), which facilitated record keeping of other patient-care activities. At baseline, no ICUs had documentation of 75% patient-care time by all of its affiliates. In the 6 months in which reporting was tied to a group incentive, six of seven ICUs had every affiliate document greater than 75% of their time. Individual time documentation increased from 53% to 84%. Zero-charge time accounted for an average of 21% of each shift. The most common reason was rounding, which accounted for nearly half of all zero-charge time. Sign out, chart review, and teaching were the next most common zero-charge activities. Documentation of time spent on billable activities also increased from 53% of an affiliate's shift to 63%. Time documentation was similar regardless of during which shift an affiliate worked. Approximately two thirds of an affiliate's shift is spent providing billable services to patients. Greater than 20% of each shift is spent providing equally important but not reimbursable

  20. Realising participation within an action research project on two Care Innovation Units providing care for older people.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drs Miranda Snoeren; MSc Donna Frost

    2011-01-01

    Background: On two Care Innovation Units in the Netherlands, staff, students and Lecturer Practitioners work intensively together to provide care, create a rich learning environment, and to foster innovation and research. In striving to advance the quality of care and to develop person centred

  1. [Evaluation of the nurse working environment in health and social care intermediate care units in Catalonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullich-Marín, Ingrid; Miralles Basseda, Ramón; Torres Egea, Pilar; Planas-Campmany, Carme; Juvé-Udina, María Eulalia

    A favourable work environment contributes to greater job satisfaction and improved working conditions for nurses, a fact that could influence the quality of patient outcomes. The aim of the study is two-fold: Identifying types of centres, according to the working environment assessment made by nurses in intermediate care units, and describing the individual characteristics of nurses related to this assessment. An observational, descriptive, prospective, cross-sectional, and multicentre study was conducted in the last quarter of 2014. Nurses in intermediate care units were given a questionnaire containing the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI) which assesses five factors of the work environment using 31 items. Sociodemographic, employment conditions, professional and educational variables were also collected. From a sample of 501 nurses from 14 centres, 388 nurses participated (77% response). The mean score on the PES-NWI was 84.75. Nine centres scored a "favourable" working environment and five "mixed". The best valued factor was "work relations" and the worst was "resource provision/adaptation". Rotating shift work, working in several units at the same time, having management responsibilities, and having a master degree were the characteristics related to a better perception of the nursing work environment. In most centres, the working environment was perceived as favourable. Some employment conditions, professional, and educational characteristics of nurses were related to the work environment assessment. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Noninvasive ventilation for severely acidotic patients in respiratory intermediate care units : Precision medicine in intermediate care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masa, Juan F; Utrabo, Isabel; Gomez de Terreros, Javier; Aburto, Myriam; Esteban, Cristóbal; Prats, Enric; Núñez, Belén; Ortega-González, Ángel; Jara-Palomares, Luis; Martin-Vicente, M Jesus; Farrero, Eva; Binimelis, Alicia; Sala, Ernest; Serrano-Rebollo, José C; Barrot, Emilia; Sánchez-Oro-Gomez, Raquel; Fernández-Álvarez, Ramón; Rodríguez-Jerez, Francisco; Sayas, Javier; Benavides, Pedro; Català, Raquel; Rivas, Francisco J; Egea, Carlos J; Antón, Antonio; Peñacoba, Patricia; Santiago-Recuerda, Ana; Gómez-Mendieta, M A; Méndez, Lidia; Cebrian, José J; Piña, Juan A; Zamora, Enrique; Segrelles, Gonzalo

    2016-07-07

    Severe acidosis can cause noninvasive ventilation (NIV) failure in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with acute hypercapnic respiratory failure (AHRF). NIV is therefore contraindicated outside of intensive care units (ICUs) in these patients. Less is known about NIV failure in patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE) and obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS). Therefore, the objective of the present study was to compare NIV failure rates between patients with severe and non-severe acidosis admitted to a respiratory intermediate care unit (RICU) with AHRF resulting from ACPE, COPD or OHS. We prospectively included acidotic patients admitted to seven RICUs, where they were provided NIV as an initial ventilatory support measure. The clinical characteristics, pH evolutions, hospitalization or RICU stay durations and NIV failure rates were compared between patients with a pH ≥ 7.25 and a pH acidosis were similar among the groups (45 % in the ACPE group, 41 % in the COPD group, and 38 % in the OHS group). Most of the patients with severe acidosis had increased disease severity compared with those with non-severe acidosis: the APACHE II scores were 21 ± 7.2 and 19 ± 5.8 for the ACPE patients (p acidosis also exhibited worse arterial blood gas parameters: the PaCO2 levels were 87 ± 22 and 70 ± 15 in the ACPE patients (p acidosis required a longer duration to achieve pH normalization than those with non-severe acidosis (patients with a normalized pH after the first hour: ACPE, 8 % vs. 43 %, p acidosis in the three disease groups (ACPE, 16 % vs. 12 %; COPD, 7 % vs. 7 %; and OHS, 11 % vs. 4 %). No common predictive factor for NIV failure was identified among the groups. ACPE, COPD and OHS patients with AHRF and severe acidosis (pH ≤ 7.25) who are admitted to an RICU can be successfully treated with NIV in these units. These results may be used to determine precise RICU admission criteria.

  3. Modern Management and Diagnosis of Hypertension in the United Kingdom: Home Care and Self-care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, James P; Schwartz, Claire L; Tucker, Katherine L; McManus, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    The effective diagnosis and management of hypertension is one of the most important parts of cardiovascular prevention internationally and this is no different in the United Kingdom. Approximately 14% of the UK population currently receive treatment for hypertension. Recent UK guidelines from the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence have placed greater emphasis on the utilization of out-of-office measurement of blood pressure to more accurately diagnose hypertension. The aim of the present study was to provide a state-of-the-art review of the evidence for screening, diagnosing, and managing hypertension, as implemented in the United Kingdom, with an emphasis on the role of self-monitored and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in routine clinical care. Consideration was given to the use of ambulatory and home monitoring to confirm a diagnosis of hypertension and the use of self-monitoring and self-management to monitor and guide treatment. The evidence for the use of self-monitoring in patients with hypertension was examined, both in isolation, and in combination with lifestyle and treatment interventions. There is a place for self-monitored blood pressure in specific underresearched populations such as the elderly, specialist conditions, ethnic groups, and during pregnancy and this is discussed here. The evidence supporting the use of out-of-office monitoring in all aspects of routine clinical care has increased substantially in recent years and is reflected in increased utilization by patients and clinicians alike. Several areas require further research but it is clear that out-of-office monitoring is here to stay and is fast becoming an important part of hypertension management in the United Kingdom. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Care to patient in heart arrest at the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Taciana Rodrigues de Moura

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Care to heart arrest patient should be performed in a systematic way, based on basic protocol as well as advanced life support. The objective of this study is to assess the knowledge of the nursing staff of an intensive care unit in relation to the recognition of heart arrest and the establishment of resuscitation according to the protocols above. It is a descriptive and quantitative study which was conducted from April to June 2011. Of the 33 professionals who participated in the study, 54.5% had not undergone previous training on the theme, 93.9% partially agreed the rates of heart arrest, and only 15.2 % got all the maneuvers in ventilating intubated patient. The low hit total demonstrates the need to update the nursing staff, with periodical theoretical-practical training, and systematic assessments of the performance of the team.

  5. Benefits of High-Intensity Intensive Care Unit Physician Staffing under the Affordable Care Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Logani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Affordable Care Act signed into law by President Obama, with its value-based purchasing program, is designed to link payment to quality processes and outcomes. Treatment of critically ill patients represents nearly 1% of the gross domestic product and 25% of a typical hospital budget. Data suggest that high-intensity staffing patterns in the intensive care unit (ICU are associated with cost savings and improved outcomes. We evaluate the literature investigating the cost-effectiveness and clinical outcomes of high-intensity ICU physician staffing as recommended by The Leapfrog Group (a consortium of companies that purchase health care for their employees and identify ways to overcome barriers to nationwide implementation of these standards. Hospitals that have implemented the Leapfrog initiative have demonstrated reductions in mortality and length of stay and increased cost savings. High-intensity staffing models appear to be an immediate cost-effective way for hospitals to meet the challenges of health care reform.

  6. Needs of Parents in Caring for Their Children in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mery Luz Valderrama Sanabria

    Full Text Available Objective.This work sought to describe the needs of parents to participate in caring for their children hospitalized in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU. Methods. This is a qualitative study based on the ethno-nursing research method proposed by Leininger. For data collection and analysis, in-depth open interviews were used, along with field notes and enabler guidelines proposed by Leininger: stranger-friend, observation, participation, reflexion, and the Sunrise model. Parents of children hospitalized in a PICU in the city of Tunja (Boyacá, Colombia participated between February 2012 and October 2013. Results. The needs of parents to care for their children were described in the following themes: clear and timely communication, familiarization with technology, the value of the family, favoring the parent-children interaction during visits, and valuing and respecting generic (folk knowledge. Conclusion. The study provides knowledge, from the cultural perspective of parents with children hospitalized in PICU, as input to plan and develop care actions with them, according to their own needs.

  7. A Business Case Analysis of the Special Care Unit at Moncrief Army Community Hospital

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Unruh, Charles

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop and evaluate four courses of action (COA) in order to determine the most efficient and effective method to care for Moncrief Army Community Hospitals Special Care Unit (SCU) inpatients...

  8. Acinetobacter infections as an emerging threat in intensive care units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahseen, U.; Talib, M.T.

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial infections caused by Acinetobacter species (Spp.) is an emerging threat in health care setups especially intensive care units (ICU). The objective of this observational study was to determine the pattern of Acinetobacter infections and its association with length of stay in patients admitted to our medical ICU from January to August 2011. Methods: All patients above 16 years of age with stay of more than 48 hours were checked for any development of new infections not present or incubating at the time of admission. Nosocomial infections were documented in the light of clinical findings and lab results. Data was analysed using statistical software SPSS 15.0. Results: A total of 146 patients had a stay of at least 48 hours; frequency of nosocomial infection was 30.8% out of which 57.8% were Acinetobacter infections. Respiratory system was most commonly involved. Acinetobacter Spp showed high resistance (96.2%) to penicillins, cephalosporins and even extended spectrum antibiotics including carbepenems, quinolones and piperacillin plus tazobactam. Extended drug resistance was seen in 92.3% isolates; while we found high susceptibility to tigecycline (88.5%) and polymyxins (100%). Acinetobacter Spp. infected patients had mean length of stay (LOS) of 12.92 days when compared to patients with other nosocomial infections and no infection with mean LOS of 7.05 days (p=0.05) and 4.86 days (p=0.00) respectively. Conclusions: Acinetobacter Spp infections increase with longer duration of stay in ICU. Emergence of multi-drug and extended-drug resistant Acinetobacter Spp is alarming and overwhelming at this rate for already stretched out health system with its economic and health implications. (author)

  9. Ventilator-associated pneumonia in surgical emergency intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertugrul, Bulent M; Yildirim, Ayse; Ay, Pinar; Oncu, Serkan; Cagatay, Atahan; Cakar, Nahit; Ertekin, Cemalettin; Ozsut, Halit; Eraksoy, Haluk; Calangu, Semra

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the incidence, risk factors and the etiology of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in surgical emergency intensive care unit (ICU) patients. We conducted this prospective cohort study in the surgical emergency ICU of Istanbul Medical Faculty between December 1999 and May 2001. We included 100 mechanically ventilated patients in this study. We diagnosed VAP according to the current diagnostic criteria. We identified the etiology of VAP cases by both quantitative cultures of endotracheal aspiration and blood cultures. To analyze the predisposing factors for the development of VAP, we recorded the following variables: age, gender, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II score, Glasgow coma scale (GCS), sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score, serum albumin level, duration of mechanical ventilation (MV) prior to the development of VAP, and underlying diseases. We determined the VAP incidence rate as 28%. We found the APACHE II score and the duration of MV to be statistically significant variables for the development of VAP. There were no significant differences regarding age, gender, GCS, SOFA score, albumin level, or underlying diseases for the development of VAP. The isolated bacteria among VAP cases were as follows: Staphylococcus aureus (n=12, 43%), Acinetobacter spp. (n=6, 21%), coagulase-negative Staphylococci (n=4, 15%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=3, 10.7%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=3, 10.7%). Ventilator-associated pneumonia is a common infection, and certain interventions might affect the incidence of VAP. The ICU clinicians should be aware of the risk factors for VAP, which could prove useful in identifying patients at high risk for VAP, and modifying patient care to minimize the risk of VAP.

  10. [End-of-Life Care in Intensive Care Units: Nursing strategies of family involvement at the end of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyrol, Katharina; Fröhlich, Martin R; Piatti, Francesca; Imhof, Lorenz

    2018-06-01

    Background: Family members of people dying in the intensive care unit (ICU) are exposed to many stress factors and they often do not experience involvement in End-of-Life (EoL) situations. For example, they criticize a low degree of participation in patients care, delayed or incomplete information and lack of privacy. Even nursing staff is facing various obstacles in EoL situations in ICUs. Aim: This study investigates strategies used by ICU nursing staff in German-speaking Switzerland to increase family members participation in situations at the end of life. Method: Data was collected by conducting 12 semi-structured interviews using an approach based on Grounded Theory. A model was developed to explain nursing strategies for family involvement in EoL situations in the ICU. Conclusions: Nurses provide personal space and tranquillity for family members and allow them to be present at any time. Against this background, they support family members and enable them to say goodbye consciously to a loved one. Subsequent work should examine the effectiveness of the strategies described, particularly in terms of stress reactions displayed by family members in the aftermath of EoL situations. In practice, family members should be provided space for privacy. The entire healthcare team is recommended to identify and pursue common values and objectives. Moreover, intradisciplinary exchange and mentoring need to be encouraged. In order to prepare future nursing staff for EoL situations in the ICU, recognizing and promoting their educational skills is mandatory.

  11. Correlation of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Performance Across Multiple Measures of Quality of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profit, J; Zupancic, JAF; Gould, JB; Pietz, K; Kowalkowski, MA; Draper, D; Hysong, SJ; Petersen, LA

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether high performance on one measure of quality is associated with high performance on others and to develop a data-driven explanatory model of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) performance. Design We conducted a cross-sectional data analysis of a statewide perinatal care database. Risk-adjusted NICU ranks were computed for each of 8 measures of quality selected based on expert input. Correlations across measures were tested using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Exploratory factor analysis was used to determine whether underlying factors were driving the correlations. Setting Twenty-two regional NICUs in California. Patients In total, 5445 very low-birth-weight infants cared for between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2007. Main Outcomes Measures Pneumothorax, growth velocity, health care–associated infection, antenatal corticosteroid use, hypothermia during the first hour of life, chronic lung disease, mortality in the NICU, and discharge on any human breast milk. Results The NICUs varied substantially in their clinical performance across measures of quality. Of 28 unit-level correlations only 6 were significant (P quality measures were strong (ρ > .5) for 1 pair, moderate (.3 quality in this sample. Pneumothorax, mortality in the NICU, and antenatal corticosteroid use loaded on factor 1; growth velocity and health care–associated infection loaded on factor 2; chronic lung disease loaded on factor 3; and discharge on any human breast milk loaded on factor 4. Conclusion In this sample, the ability of individual measures of quality to explain overall quality of neonatal intensive care was modest. PMID:23403539

  12. Validation of Surgical Intensive Care-Infection Registry: a medical informatics system for intensive care unit research, quality of care improvement, and daily patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golob, Joseph F; Fadlalla, Adam M A; Kan, Justin A; Patel, Nilam P; Yowler, Charles J; Claridge, Jeffrey A

    2008-08-01

    We developed a prototype electronic clinical information system called the Surgical Intensive Care-Infection Registry (SIC-IR) to prospectively study infectious complications and monitor quality of care improvement programs in the surgical and trauma intensive care unit. The objective of this study was to validate SIC-IR as a successful health information technology with an accurate clinical data repository. Using the DeLone and McLean Model of Information Systems Success as a framework, we evaluated SIC-IR in a 3-month prospective crossover study of physician use in one of our two surgical and trauma intensive care units (SIC-IR unit versus non SIC-IR unit). Three simultaneous research methodologies were used: a user survey study, a pair of time-motion studies, and an accuracy study of SIC-IR's clinical data repository. The SIC-IR user survey results were positive for system reliability, graphic user interface, efficiency, and overall benefit to patient care. There was a significant decrease in prerounding time of nearly 4 minutes per patient on the SIC-IR unit compared with the non SIC-IR unit. The SIC-IR documentation and data archiving was accurate 74% to 100% of the time depending on the data entry method used. This accuracy was significantly improved compared with normal hand-written documentation on the non SIC-IR unit. SIC-IR proved to be a useful application both at individual user and organizational levels and will serve as an accurate tool to conduct prospective research and monitor quality of care improvement programs.

  13. Alarm management in a single-patient room intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pul, C.; Joshi, R.; Dijkman, W.; van de Mortel, H.; Mohns, T.; Andriessen, P.; Chen, Wei; Carlos Augusto, Juan; Seoane, Fernando; Lehocki, Fedor; Wolf, Klaus-Henderik; Arends, Johan; Ungureanu, Constantin; Wichert, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    An international trend in intensive care is the shift from open, bay area intensive care units towards single-patient room care, since this is considered optimal for patient healing and family privacy. However, in the intensive care setting, an increasing number of devices and parameters are being

  14. Rehabilitation of patients admitted to a respiratory intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, S

    1998-07-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation has been shown to be of benefit to clinically stable patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study examined the effect of pulmonary rehabilitation on some physiologic variables in COPD patients recovering from an episode of acute respiratory failure. A prospective, randomized study. A respiratory intensive care unit (RICU). Eighty COPD patients recovering from an episode of acute respiratory failure were randomized in a 3:1 fashion to receive stepwise pulmonary rehabilitation (group A, n=60 patients) or standard medical therapy (group B, n=20 patients). Improvements in exercise tolerance, sense of breathlessness, respiratory muscle function, and pulmonary function test values were measured, respectively, by exercise capacity (6-minute walking distance [6MWD]), dyspnea score (Visual Analog Scale [VAS]), maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and forced vital capacity (FVC). Group A received pulmonary rehabilitation that consisted of passive mobilization (step I), early deambulation (step II), respiratory and lower skeletal muscle training (step III), and if the patients were able, complete lower extremity training on a treadmill (step IV). Group B received standard medical therapy plus a basic deambulation program. Sixty-one of 80 patients were mechanically ventilated at admission to the unit and most of them were bedridden. Twelve of the 60 group A patients and 4 of the 20 group B patients died during their RICU stay, and 9 patients required invasive mechanical ventilation at home after their discharge. The total length of RICU stay was 38+/-14 days for patients in group A versus 33.2+/-11 days for those in group B. Most patients from both groups regained the ability to walk, either unaided or aided. At discharge, 6 MWD results were significantly improved (p respiratory failure and who, in most cases, required mechanical ventilation benefited from comprehensive early

  15. Application of Orem self-care theory on injection of interferon antiviral therapy in patients with

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujuan Tao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Guided by Orem self-care theory, the nursing staff evaluate the injection of interferon antiviral therapy in patients, finding that patients with the presence of self-care was insufficient, so effective nursing care in different periods of application of different nursing system was necessary.

  16. Allocation of nursing care hours in a combined ophthalmic nursing unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, V B; Stout, W A; Tolley, F M

    1995-04-01

    Traditional service configuration with separate nursing units for outpatient and inpatient care is becoming ineffective for new patient care delivery models. With the new configuration of a combined nursing unit, it was necessary to rethink traditional reporting methodologies and calculation of hours of care. This project management plan is an initial attempt to develop a standard costing/productivity model for a combined unit. The methodology developed from this plan measures nursing care hours for each patient population to determine the number of full time equivalents (FTEs) for a combined unit and allocates FTEs based on inpatient (IP), outpatient (OP), and emergency room (ER) volumes.

  17. Integrating palliative care within acute stroke services: developing a programme theory of patient and family needs, preferences and staff perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burton Christopher R

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Palliative care should be integrated early into the care trajectories of people with life threatening illness such as stroke. However published guidance focuses primarily on the end of life, and there is a gap in the evidence about how the palliative care needs of acute stroke patients and families should be addressed. Synthesising data across a programme of related studies, this paper presents an explanatory framework for the integration of palliative and acute stroke care. Methods Data from a survey (n=191 of patient-reported palliative care needs and interviews (n=53 exploring experiences with patients and family members were explored in group interviews with 29 staff from 3 United Kingdom stroke services. A realist approach to theory building was used, constructed around the mechanisms that characterise integration, their impacts, and mediating, contextual influences. Results The framework includes two cognitive mechanisms (the legitimacy of palliative care and individual capacity, and behavioural mechanisms (engaging with family; the timing of intervention; working with complexity; and the recognition of dying through which staff integrate palliative and stroke care. A range of clinical (whether patients are being ‘actively treated’, and prognostic uncertainty and service (leadership, specialty status and neurological focus factors appear to influence how palliative care needs are attended to. Conclusions Our framework is the first, empirical explanation of the integration of palliative and acute stroke care. The specification in the framework of factors that mediate integration can inform service development to improve the outcomes and experiences of patients and families.

  18. Collective labor supply and child care expenditures: theory and application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Klaveren, C.; Ghysels, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this study we examine the collective labor supply choices of dual-earner parents and take into account child care expenditures. We find that the individual labor supplies are hardly affected by changes in the prices of child care services. In addition, the child care price effects on the

  19. [Communication, information, and roles of parents in the pediatric intensive care unit: A review article].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béranger, A; Pierron, C; de Saint Blanquat, L; Jean, S; Chappuy, H

    2017-03-01

    Pediatric intensive care units (PICUs), whose accessibility to parents raises controversy, often operate under their own rules. Patients are under critical and unstable conditions, often in a life-threatening situation. In this context, the communication with the parents and their participation in the unit may be difficult. Information is a legal, deontological, and moral duty for caregivers, confirmed by the parents' needs. But the ability to enforce them is a challenge, and there is a gap between the theory and the reality. The communication between the parents and the physicians starts at the admission of the child with a family conference. According to the Société de réanimation de langue française (SRLF), the effectiveness of the communication is based on three criteria: the patients' comprehension, their satisfaction and their anxiety and depression. It has been shown that comprehension depends on multiple factors, related on the parents, the physicians, and the medical condition of the child. Regarding the parents' participation in the organization of the service, the parents' presence is becoming an important factor. In the PICU, the parents' status has evolved. They become a member of the care team, as a partner. The best interest of the child is always discussed with the parents, as the person knowing the best their child. This partnership gives them a responsibility, which is complementary to the physician's one, but does not substitute it. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Enhancing board oversight on quality of hospital care: an agency theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H Joanna; Lockee, Carlin; Fraser, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Community hospitals in the United States are almost all governed by a governing board that is legally accountable for the quality of care provided. Increasing pressures for better quality and safety are prompting boards to strengthen their oversight function on quality. In this study, we aimed to provide an update to prior research by exploring the role and practices of governing boards in quality oversight through the lens of agency theory and comparing hospital quality performance in relation to the adoption of those practices. Data on board practices from a survey conducted by The Governance Institute in 2007 were merged with data on hospital quality drawn from two federal sources that measured processes of care and mortality. The study sample includes 445 public and private not-for-profit hospitals. We used factor analysis to explore the underlying dimensions of board practices. We further compared hospital quality performance by the adoption of each individual board practice. Consistent with the agency theory, the 13 board practices included in the survey appear to center around enhancing accountability of the board, management, and the medical staff. Reviewing the hospital's quality performance on a regular basis was the most common practice. A number of board practices, not examined in prior research, showed significant association with better performance on process of care and/or risk-adjusted mortality: requiring major new clinical programs to meet quality-related criteria, setting some quality goals at the "theoretical ideal" level, requiring both the board and the medical staff to be as involved as management in setting the agenda for discussion on quality, and requiring the hospital to report its quality/safety performance to the general public. Hospital governing boards should examine their current practices and consider adopting those that would enhance the accountability of the board itself, management, and the medical staff.

  1. Important questions asked by family members of intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peigne, Vincent; Chaize, Marine; Falissard, Bruno; Kentish-Barnes, Nancy; Rusinova, Katerina; Megarbane, Bruno; Bele, Nicolas; Cariou, Alain; Fieux, Fabienne; Garrouste-Orgeas, Maite; Georges, Hugues; Jourdain, Merce; Kouatchet, Achille; Lautrette, Alexandre; Legriel, Stephane; Regnier, Bernard; Renault, Anne; Thirion, Marina; Timsit, Jean-Francois; Toledano, Dany; Chevret, Sylvie; Pochard, Frédéric; Schlemmer, Benoît; Azoulay, Elie

    2011-06-01

    Relatives often lack important information about intensive care unit patients. High-quality information is crucial to help relatives overcome the often considerable situational stress and to acquire the ability to participate in the decision-making process, most notably regarding the appropriate level of care. We aimed to develop a list of questions important for relatives of patients in the intensive care unit. This was a multicenter study. Questions asked by relatives of intensive care unit patients were collected from five different sources (literature, panel of 28 intensive care unit nurses and physicians, 1-wk survey of nurses and 1-wk survey of physicians in 14 intensive care units, and in-depth interviews with 14 families). After a qualitative analysis (framework approach and thematic analysis), questions were rated by 22 relatives and 14 intensive care unit physicians, and the ratings were analyzed using principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering. The five sources produced 2,135 questions. Removal of duplicates and redundancies left 443 questions, which were distributed among nine predefined domains using a framework approach ("diagnosis," "treatment," "prognosis," "comfort," "interaction," "communication," "family," "end of life," and "postintensive care unit management"). Thematic analysis in each domain led to the identification of 46 themes, which were reworded as 46 different questions. Ratings by relatives and physicians showed that 21 of these questions were particularly important for relatives of intensive care unit patients. This study increases knowledge about the informational needs of relatives of intensive care unit patients. This list of questions may prove valuable for both relatives and intensive care unit physicians as a tool for improving communication in the intensive care unit.

  2. Exemplars from an acute care geriatric psychiatry unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutillo-Schmitter, T A; Massara, E B; Wynne, P; Martin, P; Sliner, B J; Cunningham, F; Bigdeli, S P

    1996-04-01

    The exemplars in this article reflect caring contexts and creative nursing solutions to dementia, depression, and addiction, common mental health problems afflicting elderly patients and for which inpatient evaluation and treatment are necessitated. Optimal functioning and quality of life for elderly individuals depend substantially upon both physical and mental capacity. The coexistence of mental and physical illness leads to rapid impairment of functioning and interrupts the individual's zest for living. Although in most cases dementia is irreversible, other treatable comorbid conditions like delirium can exacerbate suffering and decline. Conversely, mental disorders, like depression and addiction, can amplify the negative effects associated with other health conditions, causing excess disability and mortality, and are associated with older individuals having the highest suicide rate of any age group in the United States. Nurses are well positioned to identify mental health problems and humanely treat primary and secondary symptoms associated with these disorders in their elderly patients. A document to guide medical professionals' assessment of mental disorders is now available (Spitzer et al., 1994). Remaining attentive to early identification of high-risk individuals and mobilizing resources in their behalf will substantially contribute to their well-being. There is ample research evidence on the benefits and efficacy of mental health interventions (Lebowitz, 1994). Much of the challenge and hard work for nurses lies in getting to know the patient, grasping what is happening for the individual and determining which treatment interventions will be most effective given the present circumstances surrounding the illness episode (Benner, 1984).

  3. Caffeine use in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Shaweesh, Jalal M; Martin, Richard J

    2017-10-01

    Caffeine is the most frequently used medication in the neonatal intensive care unit. It is used for the prevention and treatment of apnea, although this has been associated with lower incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and patent ductus arteriosus as well as intact survival at 18-21 months of life. Although neurodevelopmental advantage was no longer statistically significant at age 5 years, caffeine was associated with sustained improvement in co-ordination and less gross motor impairment than placebo. The mechanism of action of caffeine on prevention of apnea and activation of breathing seems to be through central inhibition of adenosine receptors. However, its impact on BPD and neurodevelopmental outcomes might be induced through its effects as anti-inflammatory mediator, protection of white matter, and induction of surfactant protein B. Whereas long-term studies have documented the safety of caffeine as used in current practice, further studies are clearly needed to identify optimum dosing, and time of starting and discontinuing caffeine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Applications of Temporal Reasoning to Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Juarez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Intensive Care Units (ICUs are hospital departments that focus on the evolution of patients. In this scenario, the temporal dimension plays an essential role in understanding the state of the patients from their temporal information. The development of methods for the acquisition, modelling, reasoning and knowledge discovery of temporal information is, therefore, useful to exploit the large amount of temporal data recorded daily in the ICU. During the past decades, some subfields of Artificial Intelligence have been devoted to the study of temporal models and techniques to solve generic problems and towards their practical applications in the medical domain. The main goal of this paper is to present our view of some aspects of practical problems of temporal reasoning in the ICU field, and to describe our practical experience in the field in the last decade. This paper provides a non-exhaustive review of some of the efforts made in the field and our particular contributions in the development of temporal reasoning methods to partially solve some of these problems. The results are a set of software tools that help physicians to better understand the patient's temporal evolution.

  5. Elective open bedside tracheostomy in the neurosurgical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niran Maharjan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available JCMSBackground and Objectives: Tracheostomy is electively performed in critically ill patients requiring prolonged respiratory support. The risk of transporting, the increasing associated cost and operative room schedule are some of the obstacles for wider acceptance of this procedure. The use of rigid selection criteria exclude many patients who would benefit of this approach. The present study was designed to determine the safety of open bedside tracheostomy (OBT as a routine intensive care units (ICU procedure without any selection criteria, considering its peri and postoperative complications.Materials & Methods: Retrospective medical chart review of all patients that underwent elective tracheostomy between June 2014 and January 2015.Results: The study group comprised 52 patients with a mean age of 40.4±15.1 years. The incidence of intra-procedure complications was 5.7% and post-procedure complications was 3.8%.Conclusions: Open bedside tracheostomy seems to be a safe and simple procedure, even when performed by a trained resident under controlled circumstances, and should be considered as an option for ICU patients.JCMS Nepal. 2015;11(1: 9-11

  6. Burnout syndrome in nurses in an Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustino Eduardo dos Santos

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify if nurses working in cardiac and general Intensive Care Units are subject to burnout, correlating it with demographic and occupational information. Methods: This is a descriptive exploratory, cross-sectional, prospective and correlational study utilizing  quantitative resources. The sample was composed of 34 nurses who answered the Maslach and Jackson inventory (MBI-HSS, which consists of 22 questions plus a questionnaire on demographic and occupational data. The study was carried out at a large private hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Rresults: Of 34 nurses, nine had high emotional exhaustion, nine high depersonalization, ten had a high score of reduced professional accomplishment (decreased personal fulfillment at work. Most nurses presented alterations in more than one dimension regarding burnout. Cconclusions: The majority of nurses presented burnout and there was a positive correlation between burnout and the variables: sex, advanced professional degrees, time working in nursing, workload and working at more than one hospital.

  7. Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing in intensive care unit patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Gert; Neuhuber, Andreas; Hirtenfelder, Sylvia; Schmedler, Brigitte

    2007-01-01

    Aspiration in critically ill patients frequently causes severe co-morbidity. We evaluated a diagnostic protocol using routine FEES in critically ill patients at risk to develop aspiration following extubation. We instructed intensive care unit physicians on specific risk factors for and clinical signs of aspiration following extubation in critically ill patients and offered bedside FEES for such patients. Over a 45-month period, we were called to perform 913 endoscopic examinations in 553 patients. Silent aspiration or aspiration with acute symptoms (cough or gag reflex as the bolus passed into the trachea) was detected in 69.3% of all patients. Prolonged non-oral feeding via a naso-gastric tube was initiated in 49.7% of all patients. In 13.2% of patients, a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was initiated as a result of FEES findings, and in 6.3% an additional tracheotomy to prevent aspiration had to be initiated. In 59 out of 258 patients (22.9%), tracheotomies were closed, and 30.7% of all 553 patients could be managed with the immediate onset of an oral diet and compensatory treatment procedures. Additional radiological examinations were not required. FEES in critically ill patients allows for a rapid evaluation of deglutition and for the immediate initiation of symptom-related rehabilitation or for an early resumption of oral feeding. PMID:17968575

  8. Antimicrobial usage in an intensive care unit: a prospective analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conrick-Martin, I

    2012-01-31

    Antimicrobial therapies in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) need to be appropriate in both their antimicrobial cover and duration. We performed a prospective observational study of admissions to our semi-closed ICU over a three-month period and recorded the indications for antimicrobial therapy, agents used, duration of use, changes in therapy and reasons for changes in therapy. A change in therapy was defined as the initiation or discontinuation of an antimicrobial agent. There were 51 patients admitted during the three-month study period and all received antimicrobial therapy. There were 135 changes in antimicrobial therapy. 89 (66%) were made by the ICU team and 32 (24%) were made by the primary team. Changes were made due to a deterioration or lack of clinical response in 41 (30%) cases, due to the completion of prescribed course in 36 (27%) cases, and in response to a sensitivity result in 25 (19%) cases. Prophylactic antibiotic courses (n=24) were of a duration greater than 24 hours in 15 (63%) instances. In conclusion, the majority of changes in antimicrobial therapy were not culture-based and the duration of surgical prophylaxis was in excess of current recommended guidelines.

  9. Eye injury treatment in intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. K. Moshetova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To describe eye injuries in intensive care unit (ICU patients with multitrauma, to study conjunctival microflora in these patients, and to develop etiologically and pathogenically targeted treatment and prevention of wound complications.Materials and methods. Study group included 50 patients (54 eyes with combined mechanical cerebral and eye injury. All patients underwent possible ophthalmological examination (biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy and ocular fundus photographing with portative fundus camera, tonometry, cranial CT and MRT, and bacteriological study of conjunctival smears. Results. Modern methods of ophthalmological examination of ICU patients provided correct diagnosis and prediction of wound healing. Eye injury treatment schedule provided maximum possible results in all ICU patients. Hospitalacquired infection results in asymptomatic dissemination of pathogenic microbes on ocular surface. Conclusions. 14-day topical treatment with antimicrobials, steroids, and NSAIDs reduces posttraumatic inflammation caused by mechanical eye injuries in ICU patients. Bacteriological studies of conjunctival smears demonstrate the presence of pathogenic flora in ICU patients. In these patients, the most effective antibacterial agents are third-generation fluoroquinolones. 

  10. Factors associated with mortality in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Emília Cavalcante Valença Fernandes

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To describe the factors associated with mortality of newborns hospitalized in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in the period from 2012 to 2015. Methods: This was a descriptive, quantitative study of secondary data, correlated with the causes of death and hospitalization according to classification by ICD-10.  The categorical variables were presented in absolute and relative frequencies, with measurements of central tendency and dispersion. Evaluation of the factors associated with neonatal death was made by the logit model of analysis with correction of robust errors by the statistical program Stata 12.0, considering values of p<0.05 and interval of confidence of 95%.  Results: Of the 563 newborns, 58.6% were of the male sex; 89.0% were early newborns, 73.0% were premature. 181 newborns died (32.3%. The main causes of hospitalization were: difficulties during birth, conditions of birth and immaturity (45.0%, pathologies associated with the respiratory system (21.1%, congenital malformations (9.7%. The main causes of death were: septicemia of the NB (40.4%, respiratory discomfort of the NB (22.4%. The significant associations for mortality were the use of ventilatory supports: Mechanical Ventilation (p=0.001, Hallo (p=0.000, CPAP (p=0.000, VNI (p=0.005. Conclusions: The major risk factors for neonatal mortality were associated with septicemia and use of mechanical ventilation.

  11. [Airway humidification practices in Chilean intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retamal, Jaime; Castillo, Juan; Bugedo, Guillermo; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2012-11-01

    In patients with an artificial airway, inspired gases can be humidified and heated using a passive (heat and moisture exchange filter - HMEF), or an active system (heated humidifier). To assess how humidification is carried out and what is the usual clinical practice in this field in Chilean intensive care units (ICUs). A specific survey to evaluate humidification system features as well as caregivers' preferences regarding humidification systems, was carried out on the same day in all Chilean ICUs. Fifty-five ICUs were contacted and 44 of them completed the survey. From a total of 367 patients, 254 (69%) required humidification because they were breathing through an artificial airway. A heated humidifier was employed only in 12 patients (5%). Forty-three ICUs (98%) used HMEF as their routine humidification system. In 52% of surveyed ICUs, heated humidifiers were not available. In Chile the main method to humidify and heat inspired gases in patients with an artificial airway is the HMEF. Although there are clear indications for the use of heated humidifiers, they are seldom employed.

  12. Radiation dose to neonates on a Special Care Baby Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.; Barry, J.L.; Smalley, P.

    1989-01-01

    The skin entrance dose to neonates on a special care baby unit was estimated from a knowledge of the technique factors, X-ray tube output and backscatter factors. Normalized organ dose data were employed to estimate radiation dose to a number of critical organs. Methods of reducing radiation dose to neonates were investigated. Initially, this involved changing the radiographic technique factors and introducing a lead rubber adjustable collimator, placed on top of the incubator, in addition to light beam diaphragms on the X-ray tube. These modifications to the examination technique appeared to reduce average entrance dose per radiograph from 92 μGy, to 58 μGy, a reduction of 37%. Later, a rare-earth film-screen combination was introduced to replace existing fast calcium tungstate screens. This enabled average entrance dose per radiograph to be reduced to 39 μGy, a further reduction of 33%. The mean radiation dose to a neonate is mainly determined by the number of radiographs. (author)

  13. Radiation dose to neonates on a Special Care Baby Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulkner, K.; Barry, J.L.; Smalley, P.

    1989-03-01

    The skin entrance dose to neonates on a special care baby unit was estimated from a knowledge of the technique factors, X-ray tube output and backscatter factors. Normalized organ dose data were employed to estimate radiation dose to a number of critical organs. Methods of reducing radiation dose to neonates were investigated. Initially, this involved changing the radiographic technique factors and introducing a lead rubber adjustable collimator, placed on top of the incubator, in addition to light beam diaphragms on the X-ray tube. These modifications to the examination technique appeared to reduce average entrance dose per radiograph from 92 ..mu..Gy, to 58 ..mu..Gy, a reduction of 37%. Later, a rare-earth film-screen combination was introduced to replace existing fast calcium tungstate screens. This enabled average entrance dose per radiograph to be reduced to 39 ..mu..Gy, a further reduction of 33%. The mean radiation dose to a neonate is mainly determined by the number of radiographs.

  14. Percutaneous drainage with ultrasound guidance in the intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Doo Kyung; Won, Je Hwan; Kim, Jai Keun; Lee, Kwang Hun; Kim, Ji Hyung

    2004-01-01

    To determine the efficacy and safety of bedside percutaneous drainage procedures with ultrasound guidance in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Sixty five percutaneous drainage procedures performed at the bedside, in 39 ICU patients, were evaluated. All of the procedures were performed with ultrasound guidance alone. The procedures consisted of percutaneous drainage of abdominal (n=35) and pleural (n=27) fluids, percutaneous cholecystostomy (n=2) and percutaneous nephrostomy (n=1). The clinical responses were classified as 'complete response', 'partial response', 'failure' or 'undetermined'. The medical records were reviewed retrospectively to evaluate the clinical response. Technical success was achieved in 64 of the 65 procedures (98.5%). The complication rate was 13.8% (9 cases). There was no immediate procedure-related death or worsening of the clinical condition of the patients. The clinical responses after drainage were 'complete response' in 39 cases (60.9%). 'partial response' in 14 (21.9%), 'failure' in 3 (4.7%), and 'undetermined' in 8 (12.5%). Bedside drainage procedures with ultrasound guidance are effective and safe to perform when patients are too critically ill to be moved from the ICU to the angiography room

  15. Breaking down barriers: enabling care-by-parent in neonatal intensive care units in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ying Li; Shoo Lee; Hua-Feng Yu; Xiang Y Ye; Ruth Warre; Xiang-Hong Liu; Jian-Hong Liu

    2017-01-01

    Background:Denying parents access to their infant in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is a standard practice in most hospitals across China.Visitation is not usually permitted or may be strictly limited,and NICU care for most neonates is provided by health-care professionals with little participation of the parents.An exception to this rule is the level 2 "Room-In" ward in Qilu Children's Hospital,Shandong University,where parents have 24-hour access to their infants and participate in providing care.Methods:This retrospective cohort study compared the outcomes of infants who were admitted to the NICU and remained there throughout their stay (NICU-NICU group,n=428),admitted to the NICU and then transferred to the Room-In ward (NICU-RIn group,n=1018),or admitted straight to the Room-In ward (RIn only group,n=629).Results:There were no significant differences in the rates of nosocomial infection,bronchopulmonary dysplasia,intraventricular hemorrhage,and retinopathy of prematurity between the NICU-NICU and NICURIn groups.The rate of necrotizing enterocolitis was significantly lower in the NICU-RIn group (P=0.04),while weight gain and duration of hospital stay were significantly higher (both P<0.001).Rates of adverse outcomes were lower in RIn-only infants due to their low severity of illness on admission.Conclusions:Allowing parents access to their infant in the NICU is feasible and safe in China,and may result in improvements in infant outcomes.Further studies are required to generate stronger evidence that can inform changes to neonatal care in China.

  16. Moral distress in end-of-life care in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Ledger, Una; Begley, Ann; Reid, Joanne; Prior, Lindsay; McAuley, Danny; Blackwood, Bronagh

    2013-08-01

    To explore moral distress in relatives doctors and nurses, in end-of-life care decision-making, in the adult intensive care unit. Many deaths in intensive care involve decisions about withholding and withdrawing therapy, potentially triggering moral distress. Moral distress occurs when individuals feel constrained from acting in accordance with moral choice, or act against moral judgement, generating painful, unresolved emotions, and problems that continue long after an event. Prior research has focused mainly on nurses; less is known about doctors' experiences and occurrence and impact on relatives is unknown. A narrative inquiry case study approach, funded by a Northern Ireland Health and Social Care Doctorate Fellowship Award (April 2011). In-depth digitally recorded interviews will be conducted with relatives, doctors, and nurses involved in end-of-life cases comprising: (1) withdrawal of therapy, including circulatory death organ donation; (2) non-escalation of therapy; and (3) brain stem death with a request for organ donation. Relatives will be offered the opportunity to share their experiences on 'Healthtalkonline' by copyrighting audio-visual interviews to the Health Experiences Research Group, Oxford University. Research Ethics Committee approval was obtained (April 2012). This is the first time that moral distress is explored, in a case approach, among relatives, doctors, and nurses intimately involved in end-of-life decisions in intensive care. Dissemination of findings will make a large contribution to international knowledge and understanding in this area and alert healthcare professionals and relatives to an otherwise under-recognized, but potentially detrimental, experience. Findings will inform education, practice, and policy. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Maternal Coping with Baby Hospitalization at a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Pinheiro Ramos

    Full Text Available Abstract: Coping is defined by actions of self-regulation of emotions, cognitions, behaviors, and motivational orientation under stress. This study analyzed the maternal coping with hospitalization of premature and low birth weight infants at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU, using the Motivational Theory of Coping. A questionnaire, a scale and an interview were applied to 25 mothers three times between birth and hospital discharge. The results showed that the mothers’ first visit to the NICU had strong emotional impact; longer hospitalization periods were linked to the decrease in Delegation coping strategies. There was more Support Seeking after the hospital discharge. Multiparous mothers and those who had a job appeared to be more vulnerable to stress. Predominantly adaptive coping responses were identified, even among two mothers whose babies had died, including Self-Reliance strategies, which were mediated by religious beliefs.

  18. The Situation-Specific Theory of Heart Failure Self-Care: Revised and Updated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegel, Barbara; Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Faulkner, Kenneth M

    2016-01-01

    Since the situation-specific theory of heart failure (HF) self-care was published in 2008, we have learned much about how and why patients with HF take care of themselves. This knowledge was used to revise and update the theory. The purpose of this article was to describe the revised, updated situation-specific theory of HF self-care. Three major revisions were made to the existing theory: (1) a new theoretical concept reflecting the process of symptom perception was added; (2) each self-care process now involves both autonomous and consultative elements; and (3) a closer link between the self-care processes and the naturalistic decision-making process is described. In the revised theory, HF self-care is defined as a naturalistic decision-making process with person, problem, and environmental factors that influence the everyday decisions made by patients and the self-care actions taken. The first self-care process, maintenance, captures those behaviors typically referred to as treatment adherence. The second self-care process, symptom perception, involves body listening, monitoring signs, as well as recognition, interpretation, and labeling of symptoms. The third self-care process, management, is the response to symptoms when they occur. A total of 5 assumptions and 8 testable propositions are specified in this revised theory. Prior research illustrates that all 3 self-care processes (ie, maintenance, symptom perception, and management) are integral to self-care. Further research is greatly needed to identify how best to help patients become experts in HF self-care.

  19. Establishment and assessment of cataract surgery in Day-care Unit at northwest of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Li Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To describe the protocol and economic cost of the Day-care Unit cataract surgery procedure in northwest of China.METHODS: Patients who received phacoemulcification and intraocular lens implantation in both Day-care Unit and regular Unit were recruited from January 2016 to December 2016. The baseline data and average cost were recorded and analyzed. Furthermore, satisfaction questionnaire of patients were collected.RESULTS: Patients with Day-care Unit showed shorter registration duration, less cost including housing and nursing charge as well as higher rate of patient satisfaction. Meanwhile, Day-care Unit shorten the time the doctors and nurses spending on filling the medical charts.CONCLUSION:Day-care Unit cataract surgery procedure could benefit both patients and medical staffs and is worthy to generalize.

  20. Closed-loop control for cardiopulmonary management and intensive care unit sedation using digital imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Behnood

    This dissertation introduces a new problem in the delivery of healthcare, which could result in lower cost and a higher quality of medical care as compared to the current healthcare practice. In particular, a framework is developed for sedation and cardiopulmonary management for patients in the intensive care unit. A method is introduced to automatically detect pain and agitation in nonverbal patients, specifically in sedated patients in the intensive care unit, using their facial expressions. Furthermore, deterministic as well as probabilistic expert systems are developed to suggest the appropriate drug dose based on patient sedation level. Patients in the intensive care unit who require mechanical ventilation due to acute respiratory failure also frequently require the administration of sedative agents. The need for sedation arises both from patient anxiety due to the loss of personal control and the unfamiliar and intrusive environment of the intensive care unit, and also due to pain or other variants of noxious stimuli. In this dissertation, we develop a rule-based expert system for cardiopulmonary management and intensive care unit sedation. Furthermore, we use probability theory to quantify uncertainty and to extend the proposed rule-based expert system to deal with more realistic situations. Pain assessment in patients who are unable to verbally communicate is a challenging problem. The fundamental limitations in pain assessment stem from subjective assessment criteria, rather than quantifiable, measurable data. The relevance vector machine (RVM) classification technique is a Bayesian extension of the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm which achieves comparable performance to SVM while providing posterior probabilities for class memberships and a sparser model. In this dissertation, we use the RVM classification technique to distinguish pain from non-pain as well as assess pain intensity levels. We also correlate our results with the pain intensity

  1. Illuminating the inner leadership journey by engaging intention and mindfulness as guided by caring theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipe, Teresa Britt

    2008-01-01

    Sustained, high-performance nursing leadership can be effectively guided by caring theory. While much of leadership performance is manifested by external behaviors, highly effective leaders are also grounded by internal work of self-reflection and growth. This article focuses primarily on the inward journey of leadership as guided by Jean Watson's Theory of Human Caring. Key elements of the theory are interpreted within the context of the emerging, urgent, high-stakes challenges of the current healthcare environment. The links between self-nurturance and caring-healing leadership of others are explored.

  2. Culture care theory: a major contribution to advance transcultural nursing knowledge and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leininger, Madeleine

    2002-07-01

    This article is focused on the major features of the Culture Care Diversity and Universality theory as a central contributing theory to advance transcultural nursing knowledge and to use the findings in teaching, research, practice, and consultation. It remains one of the oldest, most holistic, and most comprehensive theories to generate knowledge of diverse and similar cultures worldwide. The theory has been a powerful means to discover largely unknown knowledge in nursing and the health fields. It provides a new mode to assure culturally competent, safe, and congruent transcultural nursing care. The purpose, goal, assumptive premises, ethnonursing research method, criteria, and some findings are highlighted.

  3. Impact of Medicare Advantage penetration and hospital competition on technical efficiency of nursing care in US intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Ari; Scott, Linda D; Park, Chang; Vincent, Catherine; Ryan, Catherine J; Lee, Taewha

    2018-04-10

    This study aimed to evaluate technical efficiency of US intensive care units and determine the effects of environmental factors on technical efficiency in providing quality of nursing care. Data were obtained from the 2014 National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Data envelopment analysis was used to estimate technical efficiency for each intensive care unit. Multilevel modeling was used to determine the effects of environmental factors on technical efficiency. Overall, Medicare Advantage penetration and hospital competition in a market did not create pressure for intensive care units to become more efficient by reducing their inputs. However, these 2 environmental factors showed positive influences on technical efficiency in intensive care units with certain levels of technical efficiency. The implications of the study results for management strategies and health policy may vary according to the levels of technical efficiency in intensive care units. Further studies are needed to examine why and how intensive care units with particular levels of technical efficiency are differently affected by certain environmental factors. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Small scale homelike special care units and traditional special care units : effects on cognition in dementia; a longitudinal controlled intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jeroen S.; van Heuvelen, Marieke J. G.; Berg, Ina J.; Scherder, Erik J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evidence shows that living in small scale homelike Special Care Units (SCU) has positive effects on behavioural and psychological symptoms of patients with dementia. Effects on cognitive functioning in relation to care facilities, however, are scarcely investigated. The purpose of this

  5. [End-of-life care in a Spanish Pediatric Intensive Care Unit: staff and parental evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagarro García, A; Dorao Martínez-Romillo, P; Moraleda, S; López, P; Moreno, T; San-José, B; Martínez Biarge, M; Tapia Moreno, R; Ruza-Tarrío, F

    2008-04-01

    To evaluate end-of-life care in a Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). Retrospective study developed in a PICU. 41 workers from the PICU and parents of 26 deceased children (from 2001 to 2005). A questionnaire was designed to investigate end-of-life care. An age parents were with their children at the time of death; 64 % of all parents consider this "positive", and 13 % consider it "negative". Forty per cent of staff stated that it is "positive" for parents to be by the side of their child at the time of death, and 52 % do not know. Seventy-three per cent of staff, but only 29 % of parents want further professional psychological support for parents. Twenty per cent of children died following withdrawal of life support. The most important factors for this decision were the possibility of survival and quality of life. The majority (73 %) of caregivers express the view that often, this decision should be taken earlier. Analysis of staff opinions underlines the importance of the way news is communicated, the timing of withdrawal of life support, and the need for psychological support. Parents emphasized the role of the family during time spent in a PICU and during the last moments.

  6. Care and caring in the intensive care unit: Family members' distress and perceptions about staff skills, communication, and emotional support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Eve B; Spain, David A; Muhtadie, Luma; McDade-Montez, Liz; Macia, Kathryn S

    2015-06-01

    Family members of intensive care unit (ICU) patients are sometimes highly distressed and report lower satisfaction with communication and emotional support from staff. Within a study of emotional responses to traumatic stress, associations between family distress and satisfaction with aspects of ICU care were investigated. In 29 family members of trauma patients who stayed in an ICU, we assessed symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) during ICU care. Later, family members rated staff communication, support, and skills and their overall satisfaction with ICU care. Ratings of staff competence and skills were significantly higher than ratings of frequency of communication, information needs being met, and support. Frequency of communication and information needs being met were strongly related to ratings of support (rs = .75-.77) and staff skills (rs = .77-.85), and aspects of satisfaction and communication showed negative relationships with symptoms of depression (rs = -.31 to -.55) and PTSD (rs = -.17 to -.43). Although satisfaction was fairly high, family member distress was negatively associated with several satisfaction variables. Increased understanding of the effects of traumatic stress on family members may help staff improve communication and increase satisfaction of highly distressed family members. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Grounded Theory of Barriers and Facilitators to Mandated Implementation of Mental Health Care in the Primary Care Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin K. Benzer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. There is limited theory regarding the real-world implementation of mental health care in the primary care setting: a type of organizational coordination intervention. The purpose of this study was to develop a theory to conceptualize the potential causes of barriers and facilitators to how local sites responded to this mandated intervention to achieve coordinated mental health care. Methods. Data from 65 primary care and mental health staff interviews across 16 sites were analyzed to identify how coordination was perceived one year after an organizational mandate to provide integrated mental health care in the primary care setting. Results. Standardized referral procedures and communication practices between primary care and mental health were influenced by the organizational factors of resources, training, and work design, as well as provider-experienced organizational boundaries between primary care and mental health, time pressures, and staff participation. Organizational factors and provider experiences were in turn influenced by leadership. Conclusions. Our emergent theory describes how leadership, organizational factors, and provider experiences affect the implementation of a mandated mental health coordination intervention. This framework provides a nuanced understanding of the potential barriers and facilitators to implementing interventions designed to improve coordination between professional groups.

  8. Design and application of a theory-based case/care management model for home care: advanced practice for nurses as care managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Nancy A

    2002-01-01

    Case management has developed in a variety of health care, social service, and insurance industries. Its historical pattern of development has resulted in practices that are generally administrative and technical in nature as well as being relatively generic and often undifferentiated between being a role and process. Research over the last decade has resulted in the opportunity to move case management practice for home care into a structured theory-based model and practice. Design and implementation of a specialized advanced practice care management model reflective of care management research and theory design by British researchers is beginning to show clinical and systemic results that should be replicable in other regions.

  9. Identifying medication errors in the neonatal intensive care unit and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of the health care professional, patient, or consumer. ... Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Health Care Sciences, ..... patient safety. ... Clifton-Koeppel R. What nurses can do right now to reduce medication errors.

  10. Security giving in surrogacy motherhood process as a caring model for commissioning mothers: A theory synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandi, Mitra; Vanaki, Zohreh; Shiva, Marziyeh; Mohammadi, Eesa; Bagheri-Lankarani, Narges

    2016-07-01

    Despite the increasing use of surrogacy, there are no caring theories/models that serve as the basis for nursing care to surrogacy commissioning mothers. This study has designed a model for caring of surrogacy commissioning mothers in 2013. The theory synthesis of Walker and Avant's strategies of theory construction (2011) was used to design a caring model/theory. The theory synthesis includes three stages: (i) selection of focal concept (the concept of "security giving in motherhood" was selected); (ii) review of studies in order to identify factors related to focal concept relevant studies (42 articles and 13 books) were reviewed, statements and concepts related to focal concept were then extracted and classified, and their relations were specified; and (iii) organization of concepts and statements within a relevant general and effective manifestation of the phenomenon under study which led to developing of a model. In this caring model/theory, entitled "security giving in surrogacy motherhood", nurses roles were conceptualized within the conceptual framework that includes three main roles: (i) coordination; (ii) participation; and (iii) security giving (physical, emotional, and legal support; empowerment; presence; relationship management between both parties and advocacy). Training surrogacy specialist nurses and establishment of surrogacy care centers are important factors for implementation of the model. This model could help to provided better caring for surrogacy clients, especially for commissioning mothers. © 2016 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  11. Patient- and family-centred care in the intensive care unit: a challenge in the daily practice of healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mol, Margo Mc; Boeter, Trudi Gw; Verharen, Lisbeth; Kompanje, Erwin Jo; Bakker, Jan; Nijkamp, Marjan D

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the impact of supportive interventions perceived by both the intensive care unit patients' relatives and the healthcare providers, such as deferred intake interviews for providing information and discussing the emotional impacts, encouragement to keep a diary, and the introduction of weekly psychosocial rounds, on the perceptions of relatives of patients in the intensive care unit. Patient- and family-centred care is gaining interest, with a shift from provider-centric norms to care arranged around patients' and relatives individual beliefs and needs. This is expected to have a positive influence on the quality of care. Communication is one of the most important factors impacting the perceived quality of care in the intensive care unit from the perspective of patients' relatives. New interventions have been introduced to help the patients' relatives to meet their communication needs. A time-trend quantitative design. Two convenience samples of relatives were included (in 2012 and 2013) in four different intensive care units from a large university medical centre in the Netherlands. Survey data from 211 relatives (75% net response rate in 2012) and 123 relatives (66% net response rate in 2013) were used for the analysis. The second measurement showed significant improvements regarding informational aspects of care, clarification of roles in participatory caretaking and shared decision-making. The results suggest that the additional support offered to patients' relatives increased perceived quality of care, particularly with respect to informational needs. However, patient- and family-centred care still requires a change in the mindset of healthcare professionals. This new point of view should overcome perceived barriers and foster a culture of partnership with patients' relatives in the intensive care unit. Training in providing psychosocial support for the needs of relatives leads to a stronger perception of patient-centredness. © 2016 John Wiley

  12. Epidemiology, Patterns of Care, and Mortality for Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Intensive Care Units in 50 Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellani, Giacomo; Laffey, John G.; Pham, Tài; Fan, Eddy; Brochard, Laurent; Esteban, Andres; Gattinoni, Luciano; van Haren, Frank; Larsson, Anders; McAuley, Daniel F.; Ranieri, Marco; Rubenfeld, Gordon; Thompson, B. Taylor; Wrigge, Hermann; Slutsky, Arthur S.; Pesenti, Antonio; Francois, Guy M.; Rabboni, Francesca; Madotto, Fabiana; Conti, Sara; Sula, Hektor; Nunci, Lordian; Cani, Alma; Zazu, Alan; Dellera, Christian; Insaurralde, Carolina S.; Alejandro, Risso V.; Daldin, Julio; Vinzio, Mauricio; Fernandez, Ruben O.; Cardonnet, Luis P.; Bettini, Lisandro R.; Bisso, Mariano Carboni; Osman, Emilio M.; Setten, Mariano G.; Lovazzano, Pablo; Alvarez, Javier; Villar, Veronica; Pozo, Norberto C.; Grubissich, Nicolas; Plotnikow, Gustavo A.; Vasquez, Daniela N.; Ilutovich, Santiago; Tiribelli, Norberto; Chena, Ariel; Pellegrini, Carlos A.; Saenz, María G.; Estenssoro, Elisa; Simonis, Fabienne D.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Limited information exists about the epidemiology, recognition, management, and outcomes of patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). OBJECTIVES To evaluate intensive care unit (ICU) incidence and outcome of ARDS and to assess clinician recognition, ventilation

  13. Hypertension and Health Outcomes in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, Brett J.; Selewski, David T; Troost, Jonathan P.; Hieber, Susan M.; Gipson, Debbie S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Reports of the burden of hypertension in hospitalized children are emerging, but the prevalence and significance of this condition within the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) are not well understood. The aims of this study were to validate a definition of hypertension in the PICU and assess the associations between hypertension and acute kidney injury (AKI), PICU length of stay (LOS), and mortality. Design and Setting Single center retrospective study using a database of PICU discharges between July 2011 and February 2013. Patients All children discharged from the PICU with LOS > 6 hours, aged 1 month through 17 years. Exclusions were traumatic brain injury, incident renal transplant, or hypotension. Measurements and Main Results Potential definitions of hypertension utilizing combinations of standardized cutoff percentiles, durations, initiation or dose escalation of antihypertensives, and/or billing diagnosis codes for hypertension were compared using receiver operator characteristic curves against a manual medical record review. Multivariable logistic and linear regression analyses were conducted using the selected definition of hypertension to assess its independent association with AKI and PICU LOS, respectively. A definition requiring 3 systolic and/or diastolic readings above standardized 99th percentiles plus 5 mmHg over 1 day was selected (area under the curve 0.91, sensitivity 94%, specificity 87%). Among the 1,215 patients in this analysis, the prevalence of hypertension was 25%. Hypertension was independently associated with AKI (OR 2.89, 95% CI 1.64–5.09, Phypertension group—but were statistically different (P=0.02). Conclusions Hypertension is common in the PICU and is associated with worse clinical outcomes. Future studies are needed to confirm these results. PMID:24717906

  14. Bacterial diversity in two Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krissi M Hewitt

    Full Text Available Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs are particularly susceptible to opportunistic infection. Infected infants have high mortality rates, and survivors often suffer life-long neurological disorders. The causes of many NICU infections go undiagnosed, and there is debate as to the importance of inanimate hospital environments (IHEs in the spread of infections. We used culture-independent next-generation sequencing to survey bacterial diversity in two San Diego NICUs and to track the sources of microbes in these environments. Thirty IHE samples were collected from two Level-Three NICU facilities. We extracted DNA from these samples and amplified the bacterial small subunit (16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence using 'universal' barcoded primers. The purified PCR products were pooled into a single reaction for pyrosequencing, and the data were analyzed using QIIME. On average, we detected 93+/-39 (mean +/- standard deviation bacterial genera per sample in NICU IHEs. Many of the bacterial genera included known opportunistic pathogens, and many were skin-associated (e.g., Propionibacterium. In one NICU, we also detected fecal coliform bacteria (Enterobacteriales in a high proportion of the surface samples. Comparison of these NICU-derived sequences to previously published high-throughput 16S rRNA amplicon studies of other indoor environments (offices, restrooms and healthcare facilities, as well as human- and soil-associated environments, found the majority of the NICU samples to be similar to typical building surface and air samples, with the notable exception of the IHEs which were dominated by Enterobacteriaceae. Our findings provide evidence that NICU IHEs harbor a high diversity of human-associated bacteria and demonstrate the potential utility of molecular methods for identifying and tracking bacterial diversity in NICUs.

  15. Adverse respiratory events in a post-anesthesia care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xará, Daniela; Santos, Alice; Abelha, Fernando

    2015-02-01

    Adverse respiratory events (ARE) are a leading causes of postoperative morbidity and mortality. This study investigated the incidence and determinants of postoperative ARE. This observational prospective study was conducted in a post anesthesia care unit (PACU). A total of 340 adult subjects were admitted consecutively, and AREs were measured after elective surgery. Population demographics, perioperative parameters, ARE occurrence, and length of stay in the postoperative PACU and in hospital were recorded. Data were analyzed descriptively using the Mann-Whitney U-test and the Chi-square or Fisher's exact test. Multivariate analyses were carried outusing logistic binary regression, and the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. Postoperative AREs occurred in 67 subjects (19.7%). AREs were more frequent after high-risk procedures (42% vs 24%; P=.003), in patients undergoing major surgery (37% vs 25%; P=.041), those receiving general anesthesia (85% vs 67%; P=.004), and in patients administered intraoperative muscle relaxants (79% vs 55%; P<.001) and neostigmine (69% vs 49%; P=.002). Hypoactive emergence (13% vs 5%; P=.015) and residual neuromuscular blockade (46% versus 11%; P<.001) were more frequent in subjects with postoperative ARE. On multivariate analyses, residual neuromuscular blockade was an independent risk factor for ARE in the PACU (OR 6.4; CI 3.0-13.4; P<.001). ARE is an important and common postoperative complication. Residual neuromuscular blockade was an independent risk factor for ARE in the PACU. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiation Dose to Newborns in Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahreyni Toossi, M. T.; Malekzadeh, M.

    2012-01-01

    With the increase of X-ray use for medical diagnostic purposes, knowing the given doses is necessary in patients for comparison with reference levels. The concept of reference doses or diagnostic reference levels has been developed as a practical aid in the optimization of patient protection in diagnostic radiology. To assess the radiation doses to neonates from diagnostic radiography (chest and abdomen). This study has been carried out in the neonatal intensive care unit of a province in Iran. Entrance surface dose was measured directly with thermoluminescent dosimeters. The population included 195 neonates admitted for a diagnostic radiography, in eight NICUs of different hospital types. The mean entrance surface dose for chest and abdomen examinations were 76.3 μGy and 61.5 μGy, respectively. Diagnostic reference levels for neonate in NICUs of the province were 88 μGy for chest and 98 μGy for abdomen examinations that were slightly higher than other studies. Risk of death due to radiation cancer incidence of abdomens examination was equal to 1.88 × 10 -6 for male and 4.43 × 10 -6 for female. For chest X-ray, it was equal to 2.54 × 10 -6 for male and 1.17 × 10 -5 for female patients. Diagnostic reference levels for neonates in our province were slightly higher than values reported by other studies such as European national diagnostic reference levels and the NRPB reference dose. The main reason was related to using a high mAs and a low kVp applied in most departments and also a low focus film distance. Probably lack of collimation also affected some exams in the NICUs.

  17. Diabetic ketoacidosis in a pediatric intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarice L.S. Lopes

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To describe the characteristics of children aged 0-14 years diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis and compare the following outcomes between children with prior diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus and children without prior diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus length of hospital stay, severity on admission, insulin dosage, time of continuous insulin use, volume of fluids infused during treatment, and complications. Methods: A retrospective descriptive study with review of medical records of patients admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit of a referral hospital from June 2013 to July 2015. The following data regarding 52 admissions were analyzed: age, sex, weight, body surface area, signs, symptoms and severity on admission, blood gas, blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin, serum osmolarity, and index of mortality. The insulin dosage, time of continuous insulin use, volume administered in the expansion phase and in the first 24 h, length of stay, and complications such as electrolyte disturbances, hypoglycemia, cerebral edema, and death were compared between the two groups. Results: Patients without a previous diagnosis of DM1 were younger at admission, with mean age of 8.4 years (p < 0.01, reported more nausea or vomiting, polydipsia and polyuria, and showed more weight loss (p < 0.01. This study also observed a higher prevalence of hypokalemia (p < 0.01 and longer hospital stay in this group. Conclusions: No differences in severity between groups were observed. The study showed that children without prior diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus were younger at admission, had more hypokalemia during the course of treatment, and had greater length of hospital stay.

  18. Fatigue in family caregivers of adult intensive care unit survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, JiYeon; Tate, Judith A; Hoffman, Leslie A; Schulz, Richard; Ren, Dianxu; Donahoe, Michael P; Given, Barbara A; Sherwood, Paula R

    2014-09-01

    Family caregivers are a vital resource in the recovery of intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. Of concern, the stress associated with this role can negatively affect caregiver health. Fatigue, an important health indicator, has been identified as a predictor of various illnesses, greater use of health services, and early mortality. Examining the impact of fatigue on caregivers' physical health can assist in identifying critical time points and potential targets for intervention. To describe self-reported fatigue in caregivers of ICU survivors from patients' ICU admission to ≤ 2 weeks, two- and four-months post-ICU discharge. Patient-caregiver pairs were enrolled from a medical ICU. Caregiver fatigue was measured using the Short-Form 36 Health Survey Vitality subscale (SF-36 Vitality). Caregiver psychobehavioral stress responses included depressive symptoms, burden, health risk behaviors, and sleep quality. Patient data included self-reported physical symptoms and disposition (home vs. institution). Forty-seven patient-caregiver pairs were initially enrolled. Clinically significant fatigue (SF-36 Vitality ≤ 45) was reported by 43%-53% of caregivers across the time points, and these caregivers reported worse scores in measures of depressive symptoms, burden, health risk behaviors and sleep quality, and patients' symptom burden. In 26 caregivers with data for all time points (55% of the total sample), SF-36 Vitality scores showed trends of improvement when the patient returned home and greater impairment when institutionalization continued. In caregivers of ICU survivors, fatigue is common and potentially linked with poor psychobehavioral responses. Worsening fatigue was associated with greater symptom distress and long-term patient institutionalization. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Patient ethnicity and three psychiatric intensive care units compared: the Tompkins Acute Ward Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowers, L.; Simpson, A.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Hall, C.

    2008-01-01

    Psychiatric care units provide care to disturbed patients in a context of higher security and staffing levels. Although such units are numerous, few systematic comparisons have been made, and there are indications that ethnic minority groups may be over-represented. The aim of this study was to

  20. The Magnitude and Time Course of Muscle Cross-section Decrease in Intensive Care Unit Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaf, D. Ten; Hemmen, B.; Meent, H. van de; Bovend'Eerdt, T.J.H.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Bedriddenness and immobilization of patients at an intensive care unit may result in muscle atrophy and devaluation in quality of life. The exact effect of immobilization on intensive care unit patients is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate the magnitude and time course

  1. [Continuity, coordination and integration of care: from theory to practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Philippe; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel

    2008-09-24

    If the Swiss health care system has reached several important objectives, fragmentation of its organization alter its efficacy, its effectiveness and its quality. Numerous experts put forward the necessity of coordinating care and services, particularly for complex and, most often, chronic diseases. Physicians have a key role to play in that coordination, but the exponential growth of medical knowledge, together with a more and more sophisticated technology, requires this role to be based on interdisciplinarity and network organization. This article proposes a model to implement, around the primary care physician, a first level organization of care to ensure this organization. Such a model may better meet future challenges of the Swiss health care system.

  2. Well-being of nursing staff on specialized units for older patients with combined care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, J; de Vugt, M E; Schols, J M G A; Engelen, G J J A; Winkens, B; Verhey, F R J

    2018-03-01

    Working in long-term care is seen as a stressful, physically and mentally demanding occupation, and thus, nursing staff are at risk for work and stress-related diseases. In older patients, psychiatric illnesses often occur in combination with physical illnesses, requiring nursing care that is specific to these combined care needs. The impact of caring for these patients on the mental well-being of nurses is unknown. Nursing staff working on specialized units for patients with combined care needs experience high levels of self-efficacy in combination with strong feelings of self-rated competence. Although levels of burnout are relatively low, mental healthcare nursing staff is more at risk for burnout when working in specialized settings for patients with combined care needs than nursing home staff working in specialized settings for these patients. Nursing staff characteristics, such as years of working experience and age, seem more important in relation to staff well-being than patient characteristics in specialized settings for combined care needs. Staff well-being might benefit from specializing care, so that patients with similar care needs are placed together and care is focused. The presence of specialized care units for older patients with combined care needs can allow for both targeted and focused allocation of nursing staff to these units and provision of specific training. Introduction In older patients, psychiatric illnesses frequently exist in tandem with physical illnesses, requiring nursing care that is specific to these combined care needs. The impact of caring for these patients on the mental well-being of nursing staff is unknown. To investigate whether care characteristics of patients with combined care needs are related to the mental well-being of nursing staff. Well-being of nursing staff was studied within a larger exploratory observational cross-sectional study that examined the differences and similarities of specialized combined care units

  3. Culture care theory: a framework for expanding awareness of diversity and racism in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancellotti, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    As American society becomes increasingly diverse, and the nursing profession does not, there has been a focus on promoting both cultural competence and diversity within the profession. Although culture and diversity are widely discussed in nursing education, the issue of racism may be avoided or suppressed. Institutionalized racism within nursing education must be acknowledged and discussed before nursing education may be transformed. Madeleine Leininger's Culture Care Theory is an established nursing theory that emphasizes culture and care as essential concepts in nursing. Theoretical frameworks abound in nursing, and Culture Care Theory may be underutilized and misunderstood within nursing education. This article examines the issue of racism in nursing education and recommends Culture Care Theory as a relevant framework for enhancing both cultural competence and diversity.

  4. Health care mergers and acquisitions: implications of robbers cave realistic conflict theory and prisoner's dilemma game theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creasy, Todd; Kinard, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Many health care mergers and acquisitions have proven highly successful because of the geographic proximity of the institutions, coalignment strategies, complementary services, and improved financial performance. Other health care mergers and acquisitions, however, have been dismal failures. This article seeks to explain a primary cause of less successful mergers or acquisitions through the prism of a multiscale, iterative prisoner's dilemma that occurs between department managers. Aspects of "Coping Theory," "Resource (Conservation) Theory," and "Social Comparison Theory" are used to analyze the experience of employees charged with making mergers or acquisitions successful. Lastly, this article suggests possible culture clash remedies drawn from the realistic conflict experiment conducted by Muzafer Sherif near Robbers Cave State Park in Oklahoma.

  5. Linkage in the chain of care: a grounded theory of professional cooperation between antenatal care, postpartum care and child health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Barimani

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this article is to present a Swedish study exploring health care professionals’ cooperation in the chain of care for expectant and new parents between antenatal care (AC, postpartum care (PC and child health care (CHC. Furthermore, the rationale was to conceptualise barriers and facilitators of cooperation in order to generate a comprehensive theoretical model which may explain variations in the care providers’ experiences. Methods: Thirty-two midwives and CHC nurses were interviewed in five focus group – and two individual interviews in a suburb of a large Swedish city. Grounded Theory was applied as the research methodology. Results: One core category was discerned: linkage in the chain of care, including six categories with subcategories. Despite the fact that midwives as well as CHC nurses have common visions about linkage, cooperation is not achieved because of interacting barriers that have different influences on the three links in the chain. Conclusions: Barriers to linkage are lack of professional gain, link perspective and first or middle position in the chain, while facilitators are chain perspective, professional gain and last position in the chain. As the last link, CHC nurses promote a linkage most strongly and have the greatest gain from such linking.

  6. Applying Bureaucratic Caring Theory and the Chronic Care Model to Improve Staff and Patient Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Marcia A; Wilson, Candy

    Patient activation and engagement can be powerful enablers for health outcomes that are just as important as staff engagement and satisfaction. The authors applied the Bureaucratic Caring Theory and the Chronic Care Model to a process improvement project designed to link activation, engagement, satisfaction, and health outcomes. Twenty-two adults with diabetes and 7 staff members caring for them participated in a 12-week process improvement project that incorporated a time-based element of longitudinal care with skill-based competencies to provide collaborative, team-based care to patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients completed satisfaction surveys at the end of their clinical encounters. Staff members completed satisfaction surveys pre- and postimplementation. The authors analyzed hemoglobin A1C levels pre- and postimplementation. As engagement and activation increased for both staff and patients, hemoglobin A1C levels decreased. The clinical implication is that the use of Bureaucratic Caring Theory may foster caring while broad application of the Chronic Care Model may improve self-efficacy, create healthier populations, and reduce health care costs.

  7. Practical ethical theory for nurses responding to complexity in care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Roseanne Moody

    2010-05-01

    In the context of health care system complexity, nurses need responsive leadership and organizational support to maintain intrinsic motivation, moral sensitivity and a caring stance in the delivery of patient care. The current complexity of nurses' work environment promotes decreases in work motivation and moral satisfaction, thus creating motivational and ethical dissonance in practice. These and other work-related factors increase emotional stress and burnout for nurses, prompting both new and seasoned nurse professionals to leave their current position, or even the profession. This article presents a theoretical conceptual model for professional nurses to review and make sense of the ethical reasoning skills needed to maintain a caring stance in relation to the competing values that must coexist among nurses, health care administrators, patients and families in the context of the complex health care work environments in which nurses are expected to practice. A model, Nurses' Ethical Reasoning Skills, is presented as a framework for nurses' thinking through and problem solving ethical issues in clinical practice in the context of complexity in health care.

  8. Using drawings to understand the child's experience of child-centred care on admission to a paediatric high dependency unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Mandie; Whitehead, Lisa

    2018-01-01

    Family- and child-centred care are philosophies of care used within paediatrics where the family and/or the child are central to healthcare delivery. This study explored the lived experience of hospitalized school-aged children admitted to a paediatric high dependency unit in New Zealand to gain insight into child-centred care from a child's perspective. An interpretive thematic approach was used where the child was asked to draw a picture of 'a person in the hospital' that was further explored through interviews. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim with an inductive thematic analysis completed, drawing on the child-centred care framework. Twenty-six school-aged children participated. The pictures included drawings of family, staff, children and themselves. The themes generated from the interviews were relationships with themselves, family and staff and psychosocial, emotional and physical support. Children described themselves as co-creators of their own healthcare experience, consistent with child-centred care, while drawing on the principles of family-centred care. Further exploration of the concepts of 'participation versus protection' and 'child as becoming versus child as being' will contribute to translation and integration of child-centred care and family-centred care principles into practice, theory, research and policy.

  9. Open intensive care units: a global challenge for patients, relatives, and critical care teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellini, Elena; Bambi, Stefano; Lucchini, Alberto; Milanesio, Erika

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the current status of intensive care unit (ICU) visiting hours policies internationally and to explore the influence of ICUs' open visiting policies on patients', visitors', and staff perceptions, as well as on patients' outcomes. A review of the literature was done through MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases. The following keywords were searched: "visiting," "hours," "ICU," "policy," and "intensive care unit." Inclusion criteria for the review were original research paper, adult ICU, articles published in the last 10 years, English or Italian language, and available abstract. Twenty-nine original articles, mainly descriptive studies, were selected and retrieved. In international literature, there is a wide variability about open visiting policies in ICUs. The highest percentage of open ICUs is reported in Sweden (70%), whereas in Italy there is the lowest rate (1%). Visiting hours policies and number of allowed relatives are variable, from limits of short precise segments to 24 hours and usually 2 visitors. Open ICUs policy/guidelines acknowledge concerns with visitor hand washing to prevent the risk of infection transmission to patients. Patients, visitors, and staff seem to be inclined to support open ICU programs, although physicians are more inclined to the enhancement of visiting hours than nurses. The percentages of open ICUs are very different among countries. It can be due to local factors, cultural differences, and lack of legislation or hospital policy. There is a need for more studies about the impact of open ICUs programs on patients' mortality, length of stay, infections' risk, and the mental health of patients and their relatives.

  10. The motivation to care: application and extension of motivation theory to professional nursing work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Roseanne C; Pesut, Daniel J

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to describe a model of nurses' work motivation relevant to the human caring stance of professional nursing work. The model was derived from selected theories of behavioral motivation and work motivation. Evidence-based theory addressing nurses' work motivation and nurses' motivational states and traits in relation to characteristics of organizational culture and patient health outcomes is suggested in an effort to make a distinct contribution to health services research. An integrated review of selected theories of motivation is presented, including conceptual analyses, theory-building techniques, and the evidence supporting the theoretical propositions and linkages among variables intrinsic to nurses' work motivation. The model of the Motivation to Care for Professional Nursing Work is a framework intended for empirical testing and theory building. The model proposes specific leadership and management strategies to support a culture of motivational caring and competence in health care organizations. Attention to motivation theory and research provides insights and suggests relationships among nurses' motivation to care, motivational states and traits, individual differences that influence nurses' work motivation, and the special effects of nurses' work motivation on patient care outcomes. Suggestions for nursing administrative direction and research are proposed.

  11. Critical care management of major disasters: a practical guide to disaster preparation in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Shawn P; Niven, Alexander S; Reese, Jason M

    2012-02-01

    Recent events and regulatory mandates have underlined the importance of medical planning and preparedness for catastrophic events. The purpose of this review is to provide a brief summary of current commonly identified threats, an overview of mass critical care management, and a discussion of resource allocation to provide the intensive care unit (ICU) director with a practical guide to help prepare and coordinate the activities of the multidisciplinary critical care team in the event of a disaster.

  12. Ecological Systems Theory: Using Spheres of Influence to Support Small-unit Climate and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    identifying the model’s elements and influential individuals, define spheres of influence and construct a model that details the ecological systems...Research Report 1997 Ecological Systems Theory: Using Spheres of Influence to Support Small-unit Climate and Training...Technical review by: Sena Garven, U.S. Army Research Institute Michael D. Wood , Walter Reed Army Institute of Research

  13. An Application of Durkheim's Theory of Suicide to Prison Suicide Rates in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaro, Christine; Lester, David

    2005-01-01

    E. Durkheim (1897) suggested that the societal rate of suicide might be explained by societal factors, such as marriage, divorce, and birth rates. The current study examined male prison suicide rates and suicide rates for men in the total population in the United States and found that variables based on Durkheim's theory of suicide explained…

  14. Applying Lean Six Sigma for innovative change to the post-anesthesia care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haenke, Roger; Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2015-04-01

    Many healthcare organizations are building or renovating patient care facilities. Using Lean Six Sigma methods, nurse leaders can eliminate unnecessary waste and improve work and patient care environments. Starting with a key department like the post-anesthesia care unit is a good way to expose staff and leaders to the potential of Lean.

  15. Consumer Education: A Teaching-Learning Unit on Consumer Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennessee Univ., Knoxville.

    This health education handbook covers the following topics: (1) the consumer and health care; (2) diet and nutrition; (3) additives, supplements, and health foods; (4) prescription drugs; (5) over-the-counter drugs; (6) doctors, hospitals, and surgery; and (7) providing and paying for health care. A teacher's supplement health care unit is…

  16. Use of primary care data for detecting impetigo trends, United kingdom, 1995-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shallcross, Laura J; Petersen, Irene; Rosenthal, Joe; Johnson, Anne M; Freemantle, Nick; Hayward, Andrew C

    2013-10-01

    Using a primary care database, we identified a major increase in impetigo in the United Kingdom during 1995-2010. Despite a doubled rate of primary care consultations, this increase was not identified by routine surveillance. Primary care databases are a valuable and underused source of surveillance data on infectious diseases.

  17. The care unit in nursing home research: evidence in support of a definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estabrooks, Carole A; Morgan, Debra G; Squires, Janet E; Boström, Anne-Marie; Slaughter, Susan E; Cummings, Greta G; Norton, Peter G

    2011-04-14

    Defining what constitutes a resident care unit in nursing home research is both a conceptual and practical challenge. The aim of this paper is to provide evidence in support of a definition of care unit in nursing homes by demonstrating: (1) its feasibility for use in data collection, (2) the acceptability of aggregating individual responses to the unit level, and (3) the benefit of including unit level data in explanatory models. An observational study design was used. Research (project) managers, healthcare aides, care managers, nursing home administrators and directors of care from thirty-six nursing homes in the Canadian prairie provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba provided data for the study. A definition of care unit was developed and applied in data collection and analyses. A debriefing session was held with research managers to investigate their experiences with using the care unit definition. In addition, survey responses from 1258 healthcare aides in 25 of the 36 nursing homes in the study, that had more than one care unit, were analyzed using a multi-level modeling approach. Trained field workers administered the Alberta Context Tool (ACT), a 58-item self-report survey reflecting 10 organizational context concepts, to healthcare aides using computer assisted personal interviews. To assess the appropriateness of obtaining unit level scores, we assessed aggregation statistics (ICC(1), ICC(2), η², and ω²), and to assess the value of using the definition of unit in explanatory models, we performed multi-level modeling. In 10 of the 36 nursing homes, the care unit definition developed was used to align the survey data (for analytic purposes) to specific care units as designated by our definition, from that reported by the facility administrator. The aggregation statistics supported aggregating the healthcare aide responses on the ACT to the realigned unit level. Findings from the multi-level modeling further supported unit level aggregation. A

  18. Early hospital mortality prediction of intensive care unit patients using an ensemble learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Aya; Bader-El-Den, Mohamed; McNicholas, James; Briggs, Jim

    2017-12-01

    Mortality prediction of hospitalized patients is an important problem. Over the past few decades, several severity scoring systems and machine learning mortality prediction models have been developed for predicting hospital mortality. By contrast, early mortality prediction for intensive care unit patients remains an open challenge. Most research has focused on severity of illness scoring systems or data mining (DM) models designed for risk estimation at least 24 or 48h after ICU admission. This study highlights the main data challenges in early mortality prediction in ICU patients and introduces a new machine learning based framework for Early Mortality Prediction for Intensive Care Unit patients (EMPICU). The proposed method is evaluated on the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II (MIMIC-II) database. Mortality prediction models are developed for patients at the age of 16 or above in Medical ICU (MICU), Surgical ICU (SICU) or Cardiac Surgery Recovery Unit (CSRU). We employ the ensemble learning Random Forest (RF), the predictive Decision Trees (DT), the probabilistic Naive Bayes (NB) and the rule-based Projective Adaptive Resonance Theory (PART) models. The primary outcome was hospital mortality. The explanatory variables included demographic, physiological, vital signs and laboratory test variables. Performance measures were calculated using cross-validated area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) to minimize bias. 11,722 patients with single ICU stays are considered. Only patients at the age of 16 years old and above in Medical ICU (MICU), Surgical ICU (SICU) or Cardiac Surgery Recovery Unit (CSRU) are considered in this study. The proposed EMPICU framework outperformed standard scoring systems (SOFA, SAPS-I, APACHE-II, NEWS and qSOFA) in terms of AUROC and time (i.e. at 6h compared to 48h or more after admission). The results show that although there are many values missing in the first few hour of ICU admission

  19. [Complexity of care and organizational effectiveness: a survey among medical care units in nine Lombardy region hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Sara; Capitoni, Enrica; Tiraboschi, Giuseppina; Alborghetti, Adriana; De Luca, Giuseppe; Di Mauro, Stefania

    2017-01-01

    Eleven medical care units of nine Lombardy Region hospitals organized by levels of care model or by the traditional departmental model have been analyzed, in order to evaluate if methods for complexity of patient-care evaluation represent an index factor of nursing organizational effectiveness. Survey with nine Nurses in managerial position was conducted between Nov. 2013-Jan. 2014. The following factors have been described: context and nursing care model, staffing, complexity evaluation, patient satisfaction, staff well-being. Data were processed through Microsoft Excel. Among Units analysed ,all Units in levels of care and one organized by the departmental model systematically evaluate nursing complexity. Registered Nurses (RN) and Health Care Assistants (HCA) are on average numerically higher in Units that measure complexity (0.55/ 0.49 RN, 0.38/0.23 HCA - ratio per bed). Adopted measures in relation to changes in complexity are:rewarding systems, supporting interventions, such as moving personnel within different Units or additional required working hours; reduction in number of beds is adopted when no other solution is available. Patient satisfaction is evaluated through Customer Satisfaction questionnaires. Turnover, stress and rate of absenteeism data are not available in all Units. Complexity evaluation through appropriate methods is carried out in all hospitals organized in levels of care with personalized nursing care models, though complexity is detected with different methods. No significant differences in applied managerial strategies are present. Patient's satisfaction is evaluated everywhere. Data on staffing wellbeing is scarcely available. Coordinated regional actions are recommended in order to gather comparable data for research, improve decision making and effectiveness of Nursing care.

  20. Self-care practice of ostomy patients: contributions of the Orem’s theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Catunda Gomes Menezes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the conditioning factors to self-care practice of ostomy patients, and verify knowledge and practices on stoma care. Descriptive and qualitative study, referencing the Orem’s Self-Care Theory, carried out at the Ostomy Association of Fortaleza-CE, Brazil, in June and July 2007. We identified as the main conditioning factors for self-care: male, aged over 51 years, low education, from the capital city/metropolitan area, married, and with low family income. From the participants’ statements, emerged three categories: Learning to take care of stoma: education-support system; Stoma Care: knowledge and practices; and Difficulties found in the practice of self-care. It was concluded that ostomy patients require a multidimensional and individualized nursing care, which enables them to perform self-care effectively.

  1. Impact of a clinical microbiology-intensive care consulting program in a cardiothoracic intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Fabio; Scolletta, Sabino; Marchetti, Luca; Galano, Angelo; Maglioni, Enivarco; Giani, Tommaso; Corsi, Elisabetta; Lombardi, Silvia; Biagioli, Bonizella; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2015-09-01

    A preintervention-postintervention study was carried out over a 4-year period to assess the impact of an antimicrobial stewardship intervention, based on clinical microbiologist ward rounds (clinical microbiology-intensive care partnership [CMICP]), at a cardiothoracic intensive care unit. Comparison of clinical data for 37 patients with diagnosis of bacteremia (18 from preintervention period, 19 from postintervention period) revealed that CMICP implementation resulted in (1) significant increase of appropriate empirical treatments (+34%, P = .029), compliance with guidelines (+28%, P = .019), and number of de-escalations (+42%, P = .032); and (2) decrease (average = 2.5 days) in time to optimization of antimicrobial therapy and levofloxacin (Δ 2009-2012 = -74 defined daily dose [DDD]/1,000 bed days) and teicoplanin (Δ 2009-2012 = -28 DDD/1,000 bed days) use. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Immobility syndrome in patients being care for in a home care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez Pedrazuela, C; Lázaro del Nogal, M; Verdejo Bravo, C; Royuela Arte, T; Torrijos Torrijos, M; Ribera Casado, J M

    1995-10-01

    to asses in a group of elderly patients included in a Home Care Unit, the level of immobility, the functional status based on the Katz's index and the Red Cross scale, and their medical, psychological and social consequences. assessment of elderly patients visited during three consecutive months, through and standardized protocol with 14 items related with the previous aspects. 114 elderly patients (71% females) were visited during this time. The mean age was 82.4 years. 71 patients (65.7%) had immobility, with a mean age of 83.4 years and females predominance. Based on the level of immobility, 24 patients were in bed and 44 patients were able to be in bed-armchair. 74% of the patients were severely disabled on the activities daily living (Katz G); 85% of the patients had a severe physical disability (Red Cross scale 4-5), whereas a lower percentage (36%) had severe mental disability (Red Cross scale 4-5). Neurological disorders were the most frequent etiology of immobility (72%), with only one cause in 27 patients, two causes in 20 patients and more than three causes in 24 patients. Medical consequences were the most frequent, mainly urinary and chest infections, pressure sores and constipation. Immobility's syndrome represents a common medical problem in the geriatric care, related specially with the neurological and osteo-articular disorders, conditioning a high mobility.

  3. Improving delirium care in the intensive care unit: The design of a pragmatic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Siu L

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delirium prevalence in the intensive care unit (ICU is high. Numerous psychotropic agents are used to manage delirium in the ICU with limited data regarding their efficacy or harms. Methods/Design This is a randomized controlled trial of 428 patients aged 18 and older suffering from delirium and admitted to the ICU of Wishard Memorial Hospital in Indianapolis. Subjects assigned to the intervention group will receive a multicomponent pharmacological management protocol for delirium (PMD and those assigned to the control group will receive no change in their usual ICU care. The primary outcomes of the trial are (1 delirium severity as measured by the Delirium Rating Scale revised-98 (DRS-R-98 and (2 delirium duration as determined by the Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU (CAM-ICU. The PMD protocol targets the three neurotransmitter systems thought to be compromised in delirious patients: dopamine, acetylcholine, and gamma-aminobutyric acid. The PMD protocol will target the reduction of anticholinergic medications and benzodiazepines, and introduce a low-dose of haloperidol at 0.5-1 mg for 7 days. The protocol will be delivered by a combination of computer (artificial intelligence and pharmacist (human intelligence decision support system to increase adherence to the PMD protocol. Discussion The proposed study will evaluate the content and the delivery process of a multicomponent pharmacological management program for delirium in the ICU. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00842608

  4. Prevention of nosocomial infections in intensive care unit and nursing practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevilay Yüceer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections which are considered as the primary indicator of the quality of care in hospitals, cause to prolong hospitalization at intensive care unit and hospital, increase morbidity, mortality, and the cost of treatment. Although only 5-10% of the patients are treated in the intensive care units, 20-25% of all nosocomial infections are seen in these units. Preventing nosocomial infections in intensive care units is a process started at the patient acceptance to unit that requires an interdisciplinary team approach of intensive care staffs’ and Infection Control Committee members.Intensive care nurses who are in constant contact with patients have important responsibilities in preventing nosocomial infections. Intensive care nurses should be aware that the nosocomial infections can be prevented. They should have current knowledge about universal precautions related to prevention and control of infections, which are accepted by the entire world and they reinforce this knowledge by practice and should provide the most effective care to patients.In this article, nursing practices for prevention of nosocomial infections in intensive care units are discussed based on universal precautions.

  5. Markets and medicine: the politics of health care reform in Britain, Germany, and the United States

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giaimo, Susan

    2002-01-01

    ...: The Limits of Markets in Health Care 193 Appendix: Information on Interviews and Methodology 225 Notes 233 Bibliography 263 Index 293 List of TablesTables I. Physicians' Earnings Relative to Other Occupations in the United Kingdom, Germany, and the United States, 1965-92 13 2. Physicians' Mean Gross Income in the United Kingdom, Germany, and...

  6. [Audit of artificial nutrition in an intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesa Malpica, A L; Salaverría Garzón, I; Prado López, L M; Simón García, M J; Reta Pérez, O; Ramos Polo, J

    2001-01-01

    To study compliance with an artificial nutrition protocol at an Intensive Care Unit. During a second stage and after introducing the modifications considered appropriate in the protocol, to verify its implementation and compare both series. REFERENCE POPULATION: All patients with artificial nutrition support were included. Artificial nutrition (AN) was deemed to be the dispensation of commercial preparations for enteral nutrition, formulas with amino acids and glucose and the parenteral provision of fat, including propofol in this case, even where it was the only source of energy. The provision of crystalloid solutions was not considered to be AN. The period of observation was two months in both cases. The provision of AN to all such patients was systematically recorded on a daily basis. After analysis of the first series, the members at the unit agreed to increase the nitrogen provision. A second series was recorded, with the data being collected for patients with AN during a similar period. The study of the first series revealed the provisions of energy and nitrogen were below theoretical levels (both in the corrected Harris-Benedict test and at the fixed prescription of 25 kcal/kg). In the second series, there was greater agreement between the theoretical values and the amounts actually received. The deviation in energy and nitrogen was significantly less in the second series. And although the total nitrogen load per patient did not reveal any differences, there were discrepancies in the daily provision per patient. On most days, the diet provided covered over 75% of the energy requirements. With parenteral nutrition on its own or in combination with enteral nutrition, the requirements of energy and nitrogen were exceeded. There were no differences between the two series. The type of provision was enteral on 55% of the days and parenteral on 18%. There was no difference in the type of provision between the two series, although there was a difference in the type

  7. The Eldicus prospective, observational study of triage decision making in European intensive care units. Part II: Intensive care benefit for the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprung, Charles L; Artigas, Antonio; Kesecioglu, Jozef

    2012-01-01

    on mortality and intensive care unit benefit, specifically for elderly patients. DESIGN:: Prospective, observational study of triage decisions from September 2003 until March 2005. SETTING:: Eleven intensive care units in seven European countries. PATIENTS:: All patients >18 yrs with an explicit request......RATIONALE:: Life and death triage decisions are made daily by intensive care unit physicians. Admission to an intensive care unit is denied when intensive care unit resources are constrained, especially for the elderly. OBJECTIVE:: To determine the effect of intensive care unit triage decisions...... care unit rejections than younger patients and have a higher mortality when admitted, the mortality benefit appears greater for the elderly. Physicians should consider changing their intensive care unit triage practices for the elderly....

  8. What Does Change with Nutrition Team in Intensive Care Unit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Fatih Yılmaz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Intrroduction: Clinical nutrition is the nutrition support therapy provided to patients under medical supervision at the hospital or home setting. It is a multidisciplinary task performed under the control of the physician, dietician, pharmacist and nurse. In this study, the changes in the patient admission statistics to the general intensive care unit (GICU, the exitus ratios, decubitus ulcer formation rates, albumin use rates, duration of the hospital stay, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II scores, rate of usege of parenteral and enteral products, and the change in expenses per patient within the first year of activity of the nutrition team in comparison to the previous year was presented. Material and Method: In this study a 6-bed GICU was used. The patients who was admitted through retrospective file scanning between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2012 and between 1 January 2013 and 31 December 2013 were compared. Results: The number of the patients admitted to the GICU was 341 in 2012 and 369 in 2013. The number of the patients who died in 2012 was 86 (25.2%, while it was 106 in 2013 (28.7%. In 2012, 122 patients (35.7% had decubitus ulcers, while this number was 92 (24.7% in 2013. Human albumin usage was reduced by 23% for the 100 mL (225 in 2012, 175 in 2013 and by 33% for the 50 mL doses (122 in 2012, 82 in 2013. Duration of stay in the hospital was 6.3±0.9 vs. 5.8±0.9 (days (p=0.06. The mean APACHE II scores were observed to be 24.7±6.9 vs. 30.5±11.4 (p=0.03. When the distribution of product types were analyzed, it was observed that the ratio of parenteral products: enteral products was 2:1 in 2012, however the ratio of enteral products to parenteral products was 2:1 in 2013. The daily expense of a patient decreased from 100 TL to 55 TL. Conclusion: The nutrition team directly influences the clinical process outcomes of patients under treatment in the ICU. It was thought that using appropriate nutritional

  9. Quality of life after stay in surgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelha, Fernando J; Santos, Cristina C; Maia, Paula C; Castro, Maria A; Barros, Henrique

    2007-07-24

    In addition to mortality, Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) has increasingly been claimed as an important outcome variable. The aim of this study was to assess HRQOL and independence in activities of daily living (ADL) six months after discharge from an Intensive Care Unit (ICU), and to study its determinants. All post-operative adult patients admitted to a surgical ICU between October 2004 and July 2005, were eligible for the study. The following variables were recorded on admission: age, gender, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status (ASA-PS), type and magnitude of surgical procedure, ICU and hospital length of stay (LOS), mortality and Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II). Six months after discharge, a Short Form-36 questionnaire (SF-36) and a questionnaire to assess dependency in ADL were sent to all survivors. Descriptive statistics was used to summarize data. Patient groups were compared using non-parametric tests. A logistic regression analysis was performed to identify covariate effects of each variable on dependency in personal and instrumental ADL, and for the change-in-health question of SF-36. Out of 333 hospital survivors, 226 completed the questionnaires. Fifty-nine percent reported that their general level of health was better on the day they answered the questionnaire than 12 months earlier. Patients with greater co-morbidities (ASA-PS III/IV), had lower SF-36 scores in all domains and were more frequently dependent in instrumental and personal ADL. Logistic regression showed that SAPS II was associated with changes in general level of health (OR 1.06, 95%CI, 1.01-1.11, p = 0,016). Six months after ICU discharge, 60% and 34% of patients, respectively, were dependent in at least one activity in instrumental ADL (ADLI) and personal ADL (ADLP). ASA-PS (OR 3.00, 95%CI 1.31-6.87, p = 0.009) and age (OR 2.36, 95%CI, 1.04-5.34, p = 0.04) were associated with dependency in ADLI. For ADLP, only ASA-PS (OR 4.58, 95%CI, 1

  10. Acute Kidney Injury in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar Kes

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common clinical syndrome with a broad aetiological profile. It complicates about 5% of hospital admissions and 30% of admissions to intensive care units (ICU. During last 20 years has been a significant change in the spectrum of severe AKI such that it is no longer mostly a single organ phenomenon but rather a complex multisystem clinical problem. Despite great advances in renal replacement technique (RRT, mortality from AKI, when part of MOF, remains over 50%. The changing nature of AKI requires a new approach using the new advanced technology. Clinicians can provide therapies tailored to time constraints (intermittent, continuous, or extended intermittent, haemodynamic, and metabolic requirements and aimed at molecules of variable molecular weight. Peritoneal dialysis (PD is technically the simplest form of RRT and is still commonly used worldwide. The problems include difficulty in maintaining dialysate flow, peritoneal infection, leakage, protein losses, and restricted ability to clear fluid and uraemic wastes. PD is the preferred treatment modality for AKI in pediatric practice. Patients that are hemodynamically stable can be managed with intermittent hemodyalisis (IHD, whereby relatively short (3 to 4 h dialysis sessions may be performed every day or every other day. Patients who are haemodynamically unstable are best managed using continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT, which allow for continuous fine-tuning of intravascular volume, easier correction of hypervolemia, better solute removal, more accurately correction of metabolic acidosis, and offers possibilities for unlimited energy support. Recently, “hybrid” or sustained low-efficiency dialysis (SLED was introduced as a method which combines the advantages of IHD with those of CRRT. In this technique, classic dialysis hardware is used at low blood and dialysate flow rates, for prolonged period of time (6 to 12 h/day. SLED offers more haemodynamic

  11. Assessment Of Nurses Performance During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation In Intensive Care Unit And Cardiac Care Unit At The Alexandria Main University Hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Nagla Hamdi Kamal Khalil El- Meanawi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiopulmonary resuscitation one of the most emergency management the nurse has a pivotal role and should be highly qualified in performing these procedures. The aim of the study is to assess performance of nurses during Cardio pulmonary resuscitation for patient with cardiac arrest In Intensive Care Unit and Cardiac Care Unit at the Alexandria main university hospital. To answer the question what are the most common area of satisfactory and area of neglection in nurses performance during Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation. The sample consists of 53 staff nurses working in Intensive care unit amp cardiac care unit at Alexandria main university hospital. The tools of data collection were structured of questionnaire sheet and observational cheek list. The results showed that unsatisfactory performance between nurses in both units. The study concluded that all nurses need to improve their performance during cardiopulmonary resuscitation for patient with cardiac arrest it is crucial for nursing staff to participate in CPR courses in order to refresh and update their theoretical knowledge and performance skills and consequently to improve the safety and effectiveness of care. The study recommended that continuous evaluation of nurses knowledge and performance is essential the optimal frequency with which CPR training should be implemented at least every 6 months in order to avoid deterioration in nurses CPR knowledge and skills.

  12. A systematic review of instruments for assessing parent satisfaction with family-centred care in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Oglio, Immacolata; Mascolo, Rachele; Gawronski, Orsola; Tiozzo, Emanuela; Portanova, Anna; Ragni, Angela; Alvaro, Rosaria; Rocco, Gennaro; Latour, Jos M

    2018-03-01

    This systematic review synthesised and described instruments measuring parent satisfaction with the increasing standard practice of family-centred care (FCC) in neonatal intensive care units. We evaluated 11 studies published from January 2006 to March 2016: two studies validated a parent satisfaction questionnaire, and nine developed or modified previous questionnaires to use as outcome measures in their local settings. Most instruments were not tested on reliability and validity. Only two validated instruments included all six of the FCC principles and could assess parent satisfaction with FCC in neonatal intensive care units and be considered as outcome indicators for further research. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Do critical care units play a role in the management of gynaecological oncology patients? The contribution of gynaecologic oncologist in running critical care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovic-Grigoraki, Miona; Thomakos, Nikolaos; Haidopoulos, Dimitrios; Vlahos, Giorgos; Rodolakis, Alexandros

    2017-03-01

    Routine post-operative care in high dependency unit (HDU), surgical intensive care unit (SICU) and intensive care unit (ICU) after high-risk gynaecological oncology surgical procedures may allow for greater recognition and correct management of post-operative complications, thereby reducing long-term morbidity and mortality. On the other hand, unnecessary admissions to these units lead to increased morbidity - nosocomial infections, increased length of hospital stay and higher hospital costs. Gynaecological oncology surgeons continue to look after their patient in the HDU/SICU and have the final role in decision-making on day-to-day basis, making it important to be well versed in critical care management and ensure the best care for their patients. Post-operative monitoring and the presence of comorbid illnesses are the most common reasons for admission to the HDU/SICU. Elderly and malnutritioned patients, as well as, bowel resection, blood loss or greater fluid resuscitation during the surgery have prolonged HDU/SICU stay. Patients with ovarian cancer have a worse survival outcome than the patients with other types of gynaecological cancer. Dependency care is a part of surgical management and it should be incorporated formally into gynaecologic oncology training programme. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Clinical profile of dermatological emergencies and intensive care unit admissions in a tertiary care center - an Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samudrala, Suvarna; Dandakeri, Sukumar; Bhat, Ramesh M

    2018-05-01

    Although dermatology is largely considered as an outpatient specialty, dermatological conditions comprise 5-8% of cases presenting to the emergency department. The need for a dermatological intensive care unit is widely acknowledged due to the increasing incidence of acute skin failure. Very few studies have been done to characterize the common conditions seen in the emergency department and intensive care units. We undertook this study to analyze the spectrum of dermatological conditions presenting to the emergency department and the clinical profile of patients admitted to the intensive care unit. A prospective study was conducted for 9 months. Patients requiring primary dermatological consultation in the emergency department and patients admitted in the dermatology intensive care unit were examined, and their clinical variables were statistically analyzed. A total of 248 cases were seen in the emergency department, out of which 72 (29.1%) cases were admitted and 176 (70.9%) were treated in the emergency department on an outpatient basis. The most common condition seen in non-admitted patients was acute urticaria (28.9%). The most common cause for admission in patients presenting to the emergency department was erythroderma (23.6%). Sixty-two patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, the most common diagnosis being erythroderma (40.3%). This prospective study aimed to provide an insight into the types of cases evaluated in the emergency department by dermatologists in a large tertiary care hospital in coastal Karnataka in South India. © 2018 The International Society of Dermatology.

  15. Nurses\\' perception of caring behaviors in intensive care units in hospitals of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadi SE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Caring is the core of nursing however, different individules have different perceptions of it. Continuous assessment and measurement of caring behaviors results in the identification of their problems. The careful planning of interventions and problem solving will improve care. The aim of this study was to identify nurses' perception of caring behaviors in the intensive care units. Materials and Method: In this descriptive-analytic study, 140 nurses were selected from intensive care units of hospitals affiliated to Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Iran, using the census method in 2012. The data collection tool was the Caring Behaviors Inventory for Elders (CBI-E. This questionnaire consisted of two parts including demographic information and 28 items related to care. Face and content validity of the Persian version of the questionnaire were provided by professionals, and after deletion of 4 items a 24-item questionnaire was provided. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was calculated to assess reliability (&alpha = 0.71. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 18 and descriptive-analytic statistics (Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test. Results: Based on the findings, nurses paid more attention to the physical–technical aspects (95.71 ± 12.76 of care in comparison to its psychosocial aspects (75.41 ± 27.91. Nurses had the highest score in care behavior of "timely performance of medical procedures and medication administration". Conclusion: Since nurses paid more attention to the technical aspects of care than its psychosocial aspects, by providing nurses with a correct perception of care, patients can be provided with needs-based care. This will increase patient satisfaction with nursing care, and indirectly result in the positive attitude of patients and society toward the nursing profession and its services. Moreover, nursing education officials can use these results to assist nurses in meeting

  16. Branding Palliative Care Units by Avoiding the Terms "Palliative" and "Hospice".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ying-Xiu; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Lin, Ming-Hwai

    2017-01-01

    The term "palliative care" has a negative connotation and may act as a barrier to early patient referrals. Rebranding has thus been proposed as a strategy to reduce the negative perceptions associated with palliative care. For example, using the term "supportive care" instead of "palliative care" in naming palliative care units has been proposed in several studies. In Taiwan, terms other than "palliative" and "hospice" are already widely used in the names of palliative care units. With this in mind, this study investigated the characteristics of palliative care unit names in order to better understand the role of naming in palliative care. Relevant data were collected from the Taiwan Academy of Hospice Palliative Medicine, the National Health Insurance Administration of the Ministry of Health and Welfare, and the open database maintained by the government of Taiwan. We found a clear phenomenon of avoiding use of the terms "palliative" and "hospice" in the naming of palliative care units, a phenomenon that reflects the stigma attached to the terms "palliative" and "hospice" in Taiwan. At the time of the study (September, 2016), there were 55 palliative care units in Taiwan. Only 20.0% (n = 11) of the palliative care unit names included the term "palliative," while 25.2% (n = 14) included the term "hospice." Religiously affiliated hospitals were less likely to use the terms "palliative" and "hospice" (χ 2 = 11.461, P = .001). There was also a lower prevalence of use of the terms "palliative" and "hospice" for naming palliative care units in private hospitals than in public hospitals (χ 2 = 4.61, P = .032). This finding highlights the strong stigma attached to the terms "palliative" and "hospice" in Taiwan. It is hypothesized that sociocultural and religious factors may partially account for this phenomenon.

  17. Compassion fatigue, moral distress, and work engagement in surgical intensive care unit trauma nurses: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Virginia M; Leslie, Gail; Clark, Kathleen; Lyons, Pat; Walke, Erica; Butler, Christina; Griffin, Martha

    2014-01-01

    Preparation for replacing the large proportion of staff nurses reaching retirement age in the next few decades in the United States is essential to continue delivering high-quality nursing care and improving patient outcomes. Retaining experienced critical care nurses is imperative to successfully implementing the orientation of new inexperienced critical care nurses. It is important to understand factors that affect work engagement to develop strategies that enhance nurse retention and improve the quality of patient care. Nurses' experience of moral distress has been measured in medical intensive care units but not in surgical trauma care units, where nurses are exposed to patients and families faced with sudden life-threatening, life-changing patient consequences.This pilot study is a nonexperimental, descriptive, correlational design to examine the effect of compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, moral distress, and level of nursing education on critical care nurses' work engagement. This is a partial replication of Lawrence's dissertation. The study also asked nurses to describe sources of moral distress and self-care strategies for coping with stress. This was used to identify qualitative themes about the nurse experiences. Jean Watson's theory of human caring serves as a framework to bring meaning and focus to the nursing-patient caring relationship.A convenience sample of 26 of 34 eligible experienced surgical intensive care unit trauma nurses responded to this survey, indicating a 77% response rate. Twenty-seven percent of the nurses scored high, and 73% scored average on compassion satisfaction. On compassion fatigue, 58% scored average on burnout and 42% scored low. On the secondary traumatic stress subscale, 38% scored average, and 62% scored low. The mean moral distress situations subscale score was 3.4, which is elevated. The mean 9-item Utrecht Work Engagement Scale total score, measuring work engagement, was 3.8, which is considered low

  18. 'What women want': Using image theory to develop expectations of maternity care framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kim; Beatty, Shelley; Reibel, Tracy

    2015-05-01

    to develop, in consultation with women, a theoretically-grounded framework to guide the assessment of women's maternity-care experiences. qualitative research was undertaken with women to examine the appropriateness of Image Theory as a heuristic for understanding how women plan and evaluate their maternity-care experiences. maternity-care services in metropolitan and regional communities in Western Australia. an Episodes of Maternity Care Framework grounded in Image Theory was established that addressed various domains of women's perceptions and expectations of their maternity-care experience. previously-identified weaknesses of methods used to measure patient satisfaction were addressed and a valid framework for investigating women's perception of their maternity-services experiences was developed. This framework has the potential to contribute to the ongoing development and improvement of maternity-care service. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Options analysis of managed care contracting and regulation: theory and evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, R A; Magiera, F T

    2000-08-01

    Managed care contracts can be represented as bundles of options. In particular, the managed care provider is short a call option. To hedge the risk involved in such contracts, managed care contractors can construct several types of virtual put options, among them the ownership of facilities. Agency theory and options theory suggest that for-profit managed care plans, in the presence of debt, will engage in less hedging activity than will other managed care plans. Here, the authors test that hypothesis, using data for Florida HMOs in 1995, and they reject the null hypothesis. That managed care organizations act as if they are short a call option raises interesting regulatory issues, including the possibility of using a hedge-based regulatory scheme in place of a net-worth-based scheme.

  20. Uncovering the decision-making work of transferring dying patients home from critical care units: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yanxia; Myall, Michelle; Jarrett, Nikki

    2017-12-01

    To understand how decisions are made to transfer dying patients home from critical care units. Many people prefer a home death, but a high proportion die in critical care units. Transferring dying patients home is recognized to be complex but transfer decision-making itself remains unclear. Integrative review. Seven bibliographic databases (origin-2015), grey literature and reference lists were searched. An integrative review method was used to synthesize data from diverse sources. Papers were selected through title and abstract screening and full-text reviewing, using inclusion and exclusion criteria derived from review questions. Following quality appraisal, data were extracted and synthesized using normalization process theory as a framework. The number of patients transferred home ranged from 1-346, with most papers reporting on the transfer of one or two patients. Four themes regarding transfer decision-making work were generated: divergent views and practice, multiple stakeholders' involvement in decision-making, collective work and limited understanding of individuals' experiences. The practice of transferring patients home to die and its decision-making varies internationally and is usually influenced by the care system, culture or religion. It is less common to transfer patients home to die from critical care units in western societies. A better understanding of the decision-making work was obtained but mainly from the perspective of hospital-based healthcare professionals. Further research is needed to develop decision-making practice guidance to facilitate patients' wishes to die at home. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Organisational Leadership and Chaos Theory: Let's Be Careful

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Peter

    2004-01-01

    This article addresses issues associated with applications of ideas from "chaos theory" to educational administration and leadership as found in the literature. Implications are considered in relation to claims concerning the behaviour of non-linear dynamic systems, and to the nature of the interpretations and recommendations that are made. To aid…

  2. Ethics and incentives: an evaluation and development of stakeholder theory in the health care industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elms, Heather; Berman, Shawn; Wicks, Andrew C

    2002-10-01

    This paper utilizes a qualitative case study of the health care industry and a recent legal case to demonstrate that stakeholder theory's focus on ethics, without recognition of the effects of incentives, severely limits the theory's ability to provide managerial direction and explain managerial behavior. While ethics provide a basis for stakeholder prioritization, incentives influence whether managerial action is consistent with that prioritization. Our health care examples highlight this and other limitations of stakeholder theory and demonstrate the explanatory and directive power added by the inclusion of the interactive effects of ethics and incentives in stakeholder ordering.

  3. A Descriptive Study of Decision-Making Conversations during Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Family Conferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael A; Clayman, Marla L; Frader, Joel; Arenson, Melanie; Haber-Barker, Natalie; Ryan, Claire; Emanuel, Linda; Michelson, Kelly

    2018-06-19

    Little is known about how decision-making conversations occur during pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) family conferences (FCs). Describe the decision-making process and implementation of shared decision making (SDM) during PICU FCs. Observational study. University-based tertiary care PICU, including 31 parents and 94 PICU healthcare professionals involved in FCs. We recorded, transcribed, and analyzed 14 PICU FCs involving decision-making discussions. We used a modified grounded theory and content analysis approach to explore the use of traditionally described stages of decision making (DM) (information exchange, deliberation, and determining a plan). We also identified the presence or absence of predefined SDM elements. DM involved the following modified stages: information exchange; information-oriented deliberation; plan-oriented deliberation; and determining a plan. Conversations progressed through stages in a nonlinear manner. For the main decision discussed, all conferences included a presentation of the clinical issues, treatment alternatives, and uncertainty. A minority of FCs included assessing the family's understanding (21%), assessing the family's need for input from others (28%), exploring the family's desired decision-making role (35%), and eliciting the family's opinion (42%). In the FCs studied, we found that DM is a nonlinear process. We also found that several SDM elements that could provide information about parents' perspectives and needs did not always occur, identifying areas for process improvement.

  4. Needs of Parents in Caring for Their Children in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valderrama Sanabria, Mery Luz; Muñoz de Rodríguez, Lucy

    2016-04-01

    This work sought to describe the needs of parents to participate in caring for their children hospitalized in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). This is a qualitative study based on the ethno-nursing research method proposed by Leininger. For data collection and analysis, in-depth open interviews were used, along with field notes and enabler guidelines proposed by Leininger: stranger-friend, observation, participation, reflexion, and the Sunrise model. Parents of children hospitalized in a PICU in the city of Tunja (Boyacá, Colombia) participated between February 2012 and October 2013. The needs of parents to care for their children were described in the following themes: clear and timely communication, familiarization with technology, the value of the family, favoring the parent-children interaction during visits, and valuing and respecting generic (folk) knowledge. The study provides knowledge, from the cultural perspective of parents with children hospitalized in PICU, as input to plan and develop care actions with them, according to their own needs.Objetivo.Describir las necesidades de padres para participar del cuidado de sus hijos hospitalizados en la Unidad de Cuidado Intensivo Pediátrico (UCIP). Métodos. Investigación cualitativa basada en el método de la etnoenfermería propuesto por Leininger. Para la recolección y análisis de la información se utilizaron la entrevista abierta a profundidad, las notas de campo y guías facilitadoras propuestas por Leininger: Extraño amigo, Observación, Participación Reflexión y el modelo del sol naciente. Participaron los padres de niños hospitalizados en una UCIP de Tunja (Boyacá, Colombia) entre febrero de 2012 y Octubre de 2013. Resultados. Se describen las necesidades de los padres para cuidar a sus hijos en los siguientes temas: Comunicación clara y oportuna, Familiarización con la Tecnología, El valor de la familia, Favorecer la interacción de padres-hijos durante la visita y Valorar y

  5. The adolescent and young adult HIV cascade of care in the United States: exaggerated health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoni, Brian C; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2014-03-01

    Little is known about how adolescents and young adults contribute to the declines in the cascade of care from HIV-1 diagnosis to viral suppression. We reviewed published literature from the Unites States reporting primary data for youth (13-29 years of age) at each stage of the HIV cascade of care. Approximately 41% of HIV-infected youth in the United States are aware of their diagnosis, while only 62% of those diagnosed engage medical care within 12 months of diagnosis. Of the youth who initiate antiretroviral therapy, only 54% achieve viral suppression and a further 57% are not retained in care. We estimate less than 6% of HIV-infected youth in the United States remain virally suppressed. We explore the cascade of care from HIV diagnosis through viral suppression for HIV-infected adolescents and young adults in the United States to highlight areas for improvement in the poor engagement of the infected youth population.

  6. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses Working in an Open Ward: Stress and Work Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Feeley, Nancy; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Genest, Christine; Robins, Stéphanie; Fréchette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is some research on the impact of open-ward unit design on the health of babies and the stress experienced by parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care units. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in open-ward neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors are associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in an open-ward neonatal intensive care unit. A cross-sectional correlational design was used in this study. Participants were nurses employed in a 34-bed open-ward neonatal intensive care unit in a major university-affiliated hospital in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. A total of 94 nurses were eligible, and 86 completed questionnaires (91% response rate). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the participants' characteristics. To identify factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction, correlational analysis and multiple regression analyses were performed with the Nurse Stress Scale and the Global Work Satisfaction scores as the dependent variables. Different factors predict neonatal intensive care unit nurses' stress and job satisfaction, including support, family-centered care, performance obstacles, work schedule, education, and employment status. In order to provide neonatal intensive care units nurses with a supportive environment, managers can provide direct social support to nurses and influence the culture around teamwork.

  7. Views of parents and health-care providers regarding parental presence at bedside rounds in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzyb, M J; Coo, H; Rühland, L; Dow, K

    2014-02-01

    To examine the views of parents and health-care providers regarding parental presence during neonatal intensive care rounds. Cross-sectional survey of parents whose children were admitted to a tertiary-care neonatal intensive care unit (n=81). Medical trainees (n=67) and nurses (n=28) were also surveyed. The majority of parents reported that attending rounds reduced their anxiety and increased their confidence in the health-care team. Nurses were more likely than medical trainees to support parental presence at rounds (P=0.02). About three-quarters of medical trainees and nurses thought discussion is inhibited and 69% of trainees felt teaching is decreased when parents attend rounds. Most parents who attended rounds found the experience beneficial, but medical trainees' views were mixed. The positive impact on parents, and the learning opportunities created in family-centered care and communication when parents are present on rounds, should be highlighted for trainees and other neonatal intensive care personnel.

  8. Estimating the cost-effectiveness of stroke units in France compared with conventional care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launois, R; Giroud, M; Mégnigbêto, A C; Le Lay, K; Présenté, G; Mahagne, M H; Durand, I; Gaudin, A F

    2004-03-01

    The incidence of stroke in France is estimated at between 120 000 and 150 000 cases per year. This modeling study assessed the clinical and economic benefits of establishing specialized stroke units compared with conventional care. Data from the Dijon stroke registry were used to determine healthcare trajectories according to the degree of autonomy and organization of patient care. The relative risks of death or institutionalization or death or dependence after passage through a stroke unit were compared with conventional care. These risks were then inserted with the costing data into a Markov model to estimate the cost-effectiveness of stroke units. Patients cared for in a stroke unit survive more trimesters without sequelae in the 5 years after hospitalization than those cared for conventionally (11.6 versus 8.28 trimesters). The mean cost per patient at 5 years was estimated at 30 983 for conventional care and 34 638 in a stroke unit. An incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for stroke units of 1359 per year of life gained without disability was estimated. The cost-effectiveness ratio for stroke units is much lower than the threshold (53 400 ) of acceptability recognized by the international scientific community. This finding justifies organizational changes in the management of stroke patients and the establishment of stroke units in France.

  9. End-of-life care in the United States: policy issues and model programs of integrated care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M. Wiener

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: End-of-life care financing and delivery in the United States is fragmented and uncoordinated, with little integration of acute and long-term care services. Objective: To assess policy issues involving end-of-life care, especially involving the hospice benefit, and to analyse model programs of integrated care for people who are dying. Methods: The study conducted structured interviews with stakeholders and experts in end-of-life care and with administrators of model programs in the United States, which were nominated by the experts. Results: The two major public insurance programs—Medicare and Medicaid—finance the vast majority of end-of-life care. Both programs offer a hospice benefit, which has several shortcomings, including requiring physicians to make a prognosis of a six month life expectancy and insisting that patients give up curative treatment—two steps which are difficult for doctors and patients to make—and payment levels that may be too low. In addition, quality of care initiatives for nursing homes and hospice sometimes conflict. Four innovative health systems have overcome these barriers to provide palliative services to beneficiaries in their last year of life. Three of these health systems are managed care plans which receive capitated payments. These providers integrate health, long-term and palliative care using an interdisciplinary team approach to management of services. The fourth provider is a hospice that provides palliative services to beneficiaries of all ages, including those who have not elected hospice care. Conclusions: End-of-life care is deficient in the United States. Public payers could use their market power to improve care through a number of strategies.

  10. The effect of a supportive educational intervention developed based on the Orem's self-care theory on the self-care ability of patients with myocardial infarction: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour, Ali; Rahmati Sharghi, Narjes; Khosravan, Shahla; Alami, Ali; Akhond, Majid

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a supportive educational intervention developed based on the Orem's self-care theory on the self-care ability of patients with myocardial infarction. Patients with cardiovascular disease suffer from the lack of knowledge about the disease and consequently are not able to fulfil their own self-care needs. This was a randomised controlled trial conducted in 2012. We recruited a random sample of 66 patients with myocardial infarction who had been recently discharged from coronary care unit. The study setting was two university hospitals located in Khorasan, Iran. Patients were randomly allocated to either the experimental or the control groups. Patients in the experimental group received education, support, and counselling while patients in the control group received no intervention. We employed a demographic questionnaire and the Myocardial Infarction Self-Care Ability Questionnaire for data collection and spss version 16.00 for data analysis. After the study, patients in the experimental group had higher levels of self-care knowledge, motivation and skills compared to the prestudy readings and the control group. The supportive educational intervention developed based on the Orem's self-care theory can improve nonhospitalised patients' self-care ability and positively affect public health outcomes. Consequently, using the developed programme for providing follow-up care to nonhospitalised patients is recommended. Having the ability to develop caring systems based on the nursing theories is a prerequisite to standard nursing practice. Identifying patients' educational needs is a fundamental prerequisite to patient education. Our findings revealed that the supportive educational intervention developed based on the Orem's self-care theory can help health care providers identify and fulfil patients' self-care needs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Guiding the Process of Culturally Competent Care With Hispanic Patients: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Linda L; Metzler Sawin, Erika

    2016-05-01

    To explore nursing care actions that lead to culturally competent care for Hispanic patients. Nurses report apprehension when delivering nursing care because of language barriers and a lack of Hispanic cultural understanding. Research is needed to inform culturally aware nursing practice actions for Hispanic patients. The study used a qualitative, grounded theory design to address the questions: (a) What cultural knowledge should nurses have when caring for Hispanic patients and families and (b) What nursing actions should nurses take to provide culturally competent care? Hispanic lay health promoters and Hispanic community members were interviewed to make recommendations for care. A model was identified that informs culturally competent nursing care. "Connectedness," the central phenomenon, describes nursing actions and contains subthemes explaining influences on nursing care. "Up to You" and "At the Mercy of the System" are descriptive themes influencing connectedness. Connectedness is central to culturally well-informed nurse-patient interactions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Using attachment theory in medical settings: implications for primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Lisa M; Tomek, Sara; Newman, Caroline R

    2012-02-01

    Mental health researchers, clinicians and clinical psychologists have long considered a good provider-patient relationship to be an important factor for positive treatment outcomes in a range of therapeutic settings. However, primary care physicians have been slow to consider how attachment theory may be used in the context of patient care in medical settings. In the current article, John Bowlby's attachment theory and proposed attachment styles are proffered as a framework to better understand patient behaviors, patient communication styles with physicians and the physician-patient relationship in medical settings. The authors recommend how primary care physicians and other health care providers can translate attachment theory to enhance practice behaviors and health-related communications in medical settings.

  13. Patient-centered Fertility Care: From Theory to Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Jafarzadeh-Kenarsari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Healthcare areas, especially fertility care (commonly accompanied with high emotions, as well as long-term and recurring treatment periods could exclusively benefit from patient-centered care (PCC. Despite evident advantages of PCC, this approach has not been practiced as a routine procedure in current clinical environments yet, even in western developed countries. Therefore, this review aimed to evaluate the significance and different aspects of PCC, while emphasizing on patient-centered fertility care, its challenges, and applicable recommendations in this regard. Methods: This narrative review was conducted on 29 relevant medical and clinical papers (published during 1990-2015 collected using various national and international databases (e.g., SID, Magiran, Medlib, Google scholar, Proquest, Pubmed, Wiley, Science direct, and Scopus. Key words and phrases used in this review were “infertility”, “fertility care”, “childlessness”, “patient-centered care”, “patient-centered fertility care” “shared decision-making”, “infertile patient preferences”, and “patient involvement in fertility care”. Results: According to the literature, implementation challenges of patient-centered fertility care were reported as different individual and organizational factors. These factors include lack of professional motivation to change, underestimating the significance of patient-centeredness by healthcare professionals, difficulty in translation of feedback into concrete measures, lack of time and financial resources, insufficient experience of healthcare professionals with regard to identification of needs and preferences of patients, traditional organizational culture, and common misconceptions. Conclusion: Promotion of patient-centered fertility services requires the identification of infertile needs and priorities of individuals, designation of interventional and supportive programs based on sociocultural

  14. Intensive care unit ventilation for the non-intensivist

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mode classification: volume versus pressure targeting. There is no evidence to ... and so most modern ventilators can be set up by the technician to directly display the .... mechanics: transpulmonary pressure and lung volume. Crit Care. 2013 ...

  15. Health care in the United States: organization, management, and policy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greenwald, Howard P

    2010-01-01

    .... Through an accessible approach, this text clarifies the complexities of health care services and health system finance, as well as presents an overview of how all of the components fit together...

  16. Residents Living in Residential Care Facilities: United States, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... analyses, the 12% of residents chair-ridden or bedridden were defined as receiving assistance in the transferring ... MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2011. Mollica R, Sims-Kastelein K, O'Keeffe J. Residential care ...

  17. Myasthenic crisis patients who require intensive care unit management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Hideya; Yamashita, Satoshi; Hirano, Teruyuki; Nakajima, Makoto; Kimura, En; Maeda, Yasushi; Uchino, Makoto

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this report was to investigate predictive factors that necessitate intensive care in myasthenic crisis (MC). We retrospectively reviewed MC patients at our institution and compared ICU and ward management groups. Higher MG-ADL scale scores, non-ocular initial symptoms, infection-triggered findings, and higher MGFA classification were observed more frequently in the ICU group. In patients with these prognostic factors, better outcomes may be obtained with early institution of intensive care. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Ethics and law in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danbury, C M; Waldmann, C S

    2006-12-01

    Intensive Care Medicine epitomises the difficulties inherent in modern medicine. In this chapter we examine some key medicolegal and ethical areas that are evolving. The principles of autonomy and consent are well established, but developments in UK caselaw have shown that the courts may be moving away from their traditional deference of the medical profession. We examine some recent cases and discuss the impact that these cases may have on practice in Intensive Care.

  19. Caring for our youngest: public attitudes in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, K

    2001-01-01

    Families make choices about employment and care for their children in a context that is shaped by public policies and colored by public opinion. Debates over whether the government should increase funding for child care or do more to help parents stay home with their children reflect tensions among strongly held ideas about family life, work, and the role of government. This article summarizes the results of public opinion polls that probe attitudes about parent and government roles and responsibilities with respect to children's care. The polling findings yield three main lessons: The American public believes that parents should be the primary influence in their children's lives and that it is best if mothers can be home to care for the very young. The public also values family self-sufficiency and understands that low-income families may need child care assistance to balance child rearing and employment responsibilities. However, skepticism about the appropriateness of government involvement in family life limits public support for proposals that the government act directly to provide or improve child care. From these lessons, the author draws several conclusions for policymakers: Policies focused on caregiving should respect the rights of parents to raise their children by ensuring that an array of options is available. Public programs should help families who are struggling economically to balance their obligations to work and family. Rather than directly providing child care services, government should fund community-based child care programs, and provide flexible assistance to help families secure the services they need and want.

  20. Dutch care innovation units in elderly care: A qualitative study into students' perspectives and workplace conditions for learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoeren, Miranda; Volbeda, Patricia; Niessen, Theo J H; Abma, Tineke A

    2016-03-01

    To promote workplace learning for staff as well as students, a partnership was formed between a residential care organisation for older people and several nursing faculties in the Netherlands. This partnership took the form of two care innovation units; wards where qualified staff, students and nurse teachers collaborate to integrate care, education, innovation and research. In this article, the care innovation units as learning environments are studied from a student perspective to deepen understandings concerning the conditions that facilitate learning. A secondary analysis of focus groups, held with 216 nursing students over a period of five years, revealed that students are satisfied about the units' learning potential, which is formed by various inter-related and self-reinforcing affordances: co-constructive learning and working, challenging situations and activities, being given responsibility and independence, and supportive and recognisable learning structures. Time constraints had a negative impact on the units' learning potential. It is concluded that the learning potential of the care innovation units was enhanced by realising certain conditions, like learning structures and activities. The learning potential was also influenced, however, by the non-controllable and dynamic interaction of various elements within the context. Suggestions for practice and further research are offered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Navigating in the landscape of care: a critical reflection on theory and practise of care and ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skærbæk, Eva

    2011-03-01

    The theory and practise of care is defined and enacted differently in different national as well as cultural contexts, illuminating how differently constructed the personal and societal structures in Europe are. A common trait is however that care work paid or non-paid, private or public is identified with women. To navigate in the landscape of care and ethics requires taking into account the constitutive relation between one's identity, embodiment and position. The author suggests conceiving care as an existential condition of life demanded from all human beings. This will free care from the identification with women and pave a way towards a more gender equal and just society with less gender segregation in the labour market and at the arena of education.

  2. Ward social workers' views of what facilitates or hinders collaboration with specialist palliative care team social workers: A grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firn, Janice; Preston, Nancy; Walshe, Catherine

    2017-07-14

    Inpatient, generalist social workers in discharge planning roles work alongside specialist palliative care social workers to care for patients, often resulting in two social workers being concurrently involved in the same patient's care. Previous studies identifying components of effective collaboration, which impacts patient outcomes, care efficiency, professional job satisfaction, and healthcare costs, were conducted with nurses and physicians but not social workers. This study explores ward social workers' perceptions of what facilitates or hinders collaboration with palliative care social workers. Grounded theory was used to explore the research aim. In-depth qualitative interviews with masters trained ward social workers (n = 14) working in six hospitals located in the Midwest, United States were conducted between February 2014 and January 2015. A theoretical model of ward social workers' collaboration with palliative care social workers was developed. The emerging model of collaboration consists of: 1) trust, which is comprised of a) ability, b) benevolence, and c) integrity, 2) information sharing, and 3) role negotiation. Effective collaboration occurs when all elements of the model are present. Collaboration is facilitated when ward social workers' perceptions of trust are high, pertinent information is communicated in a time-sensitive manner, and a flexible approach to roles is taken. The theoretical model of collaboration can inform organisational policy and social work clinical practice guidelines, and may be of use to other healthcare professionals, as improvements in collaboration among healthcare providers may have a positive impact on patient outcomes.

  3. Nosocomial Infections in Patients Admitted in Intensive Care Unit of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    9] ... Detailed history and physical examination notes were reviewed in all ... related. UTI was related to the catheter and pneumonia to ventilator. ... protein. UTI: Urinary tract infection, CVP: Central venous pressure, CFU: Colony-forming unit,.

  4. Auditing the standard of anaesthesia care in obstetric units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörch-Siddall, J; Corbitt, N; Bryson, M R

    2001-04-01

    We undertook an audit of 15 obstetric units in the north of England over a 10-month period to ascertain to what extent they conformed to the Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association 'Recommended Minimum Standards for Obstetric Anaesthetic Services' using a quality assurance approach. We demonstrated that all units conformed to the majority of standards but did not conform in at least one major and minor area.

  5. Quality Improvement Process in a Large Intensive Care Unit: Structure and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Anita J; Guzman, Jorge A

    2016-11-01

    Quality improvement in the health care setting is a complex process, and even more so in the critical care environment. The development of intensive care unit process measures and quality improvement strategies are associated with improved outcomes, but should be individualized to each medical center as structure and culture can differ from institution to institution. The purpose of this report is to describe the structure of quality improvement processes within a large medical intensive care unit while using examples of the study institution's successes and challenges in the areas of stat antibiotic administration, reduction in blood product waste, central line-associated bloodstream infections, and medication errors. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Differences in nursing practice environment among US acute care unit types: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, JiSun; Boyle, Diane K

    2014-11-01

    The hospital nursing practice environment has been found to be crucial for better nurse and patient outcomes. Yet little is known about the professional nursing practice environment at the unit level where nurses provide 24-hour bedside care to patients. To examine differences in nursing practice environments among 11 unit types (critical care, step-down, medical, surgical, combined medical-surgical, obstetric, neonatal, pediatric, psychiatric, perioperative, and emergency) and by Magnet status overall, as well as four specific aspects of the practice environment. Cross-sectional study. 5322 nursing units in 519 US acute care hospitals. The nursing practice environment was measured by the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index mean composite and four subscale scores were computed at the unit level. Two statistical approaches (one-way analysis of covariance and multivariate analysis of covariance analysis) were employed with a Tukey-Kramer post hoc test. In general, the nursing practice environment was favorable in all unit types. There were significant differences in the nursing practice environment among the 11 unit types and by Magnet status. Pediatric units had the most favorable practice environment and medical-surgical units had the least favorable. A consistent finding across all unit types except neonatal units was that the staffing and resource adequacy subscale scored the lowest compared with all other Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index subscales (nursing foundations for quality of care, nurse manager ability, leadership, and support, and nurse-physician relations). Unit nursing practice environments were more favorable in Magnet than non-Magnet hospitals. Findings indicate that there are significant variations in unit nursing practice environments among 11 unit types and by hospital Magnet status. Both hospital-level and unit-specific strategies should be considered

  7. Quality of stroke care at an Irish Regional General Hospital and Stroke Rehabilitation Unit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, T

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Robust international data support the effectiveness of stroke unit (SU) care. Despite this, most stroke care in Ireland are provided outside of this setting. Limited data currently exist on the quality of care provided. AIM: The aim of this study is to examine the quality of care for patients with stroke in two care settings-Regional General Hospital (RGH) and Stroke Rehabilitation Unit (SRU). METHODS: A retrospective analysis of the stroke records of consecutive patients admitted to the SRU between May-November 2002 and April-November 2004 was performed applying the UK National Sentinel Audit of Stroke (NSAS) tool. RESULTS: The results of the study reveal that while SRU processes of care was 74% compliant with standards; compliance with stroke service organisational standards was only 15 and 43% in the RGH and SRU, respectively. CONCLUSION: The quality of stroke care in our area is deficient. Comprehensive reorganisation of stroke services is imperative.

  8. [Therapeutic restraint management in Intensive Care Units: Phenomenological approach to nursing reality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Nuevo, M; González-Gil, M T; Solís-Muñoz, M; Láiz-Díez, N; Toraño-Olivera, M J; Carrasco-Rodríguez-Rey, L F; García-González, S; Velasco-Sanz, T R; Martínez-Álvarez, A; Martin-Rivera, B E

    2016-01-01

    To identify nursing experience on physical restraint management in Critical Care Units. To analyse similarities and differences in nursing experience on physical restraint management according to the clinical context that they are involved in. A multicentre phenomenological study was carried out including 14 Critical Care Units in Madrid, classified according to physical restraint use: Common/systematic use, lacking/personalised use, and mixed use. Five focus groups (23 participants were selected following purposeful sampling) were convened, concluding in data saturation. Data analysis was focused on thematic content analysis following Colaizzi's method. Six main themes: Physical restraint meaning in Critical Care Units, safety (self-retreat vital devices), contribution factors, feelings, alternatives, and pending issues. Although some themes are common to the 3 Critical Care Unit types, discourse differences are found as regards to indication, feelings, systematic use of pain and sedation measurement tools. In order to achieve real physical restraint reduction in Critical Care Units, it is necessary to have a deep understanding of restraints use in the specific clinical context. As self-retreat vital devices emerge as central concept, some interventions proposed in other settings could not be effective, requiring alternatives for critical care patients. Discourse variations laid out in the different Critical Care Unit types could highlight key items that determine the use and different attitudes towards physical restraint. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  9. Guidelines for the Institutional Implementation of Developmental Neuroprotective Care in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Part A: Background and Rationale. A Joint Position Statement From the CANN, CAPWHN, NANN, and COINN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milette, Isabelle; Martel, Marie-Josée; Ribeiro da Silva, Margarida; Coughlin McNeil, Mary

    2017-06-01

    The use of age-appropriate care as an organized framework for care delivery in the neonatal intensive care unit is founded on the work of Heidelise Als, PhD, and her synactive theory of development. This theoretical construct has recently been advanced by the work of Gibbins and colleagues with the "universe of developmental care" conceptual model and developmental care core measures which were endorsed by the National Association of Neonatal Nurses in their age-appropriate care of premature infant guidelines as best-practice standards for the provision of high-quality care in the neonatal intensive care unit. These guidelines were recently revised and expanded. In alignment with the Joint Commission's requirement for health-care professionals to provide age-specific care across the lifespan, the core measures for developmental care suggest the necessary competencies for those caring for the premature and critically ill hospitalized infant. Further supported by the Primer Standards of Accreditation and Health Canada, the institutional implementation of theses core measures requires a strong framework for institutional operationalization, presented in these guidelines. Part A of this article will present the background and rationale behind the present guidelines and their condensed table of recommendations.

  10. Organizational dimensions of relationship-centered care. Theory, evidence, and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, Dana Gelb; Miller, William; Beckman, Howard

    2006-01-01

    Four domains of relationship have been highlighted as the cornerstones of relationship-centered health care. Of these, clinician-patient relationships have been most thoroughly studied, with a rich empirical literature illuminating significant linkages between clinician-patient relationship quality and a wide range of outcomes. This paper explores the realm of clinician-colleague relationships, which we define to include the full array of relationships among clinicians, staff, and administrators in health care organizations. Building on a stream of relevant theories and empirical literature that have emerged over the past decade, we synthesize available evidence on the role of organizational culture and relationships in shaping outcomes, and posit a model of relationship-centered organizations. We conclude that turning attention to relationship-centered theory and practice in health care holds promise for advancing care to a new level, with breakthroughs in quality of care, quality of life for those who provide it, and organizational performance.

  11. Social influence in child care centers: a test of the theory of normative social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinski, Maria Knight; Anderson, Jenn; Shugart, Alicia; Todd, Ewen

    2014-01-01

    Child care centers are a unique context for studying communication about the social and personal expectations about health behaviors. The theory of normative social behavior (TNSB; Rimal & Real, 2005 ) provides a framework for testing the role of social and psychological influences on handwashing behaviors among child care workers. A cross-sectional survey of child care workers in 21 centers indicates that outcome expectations and group identity increase the strength of the relationship between descriptive norms and handwashing behavior. Injunctive norms also moderate the effect of descriptive norms on handwashing behavior such that when strong injunctive norms are reported, descriptive norms are positively related to handwashing, but when weak injunctive norms are reported, descriptive norms are negatively related to handwashing. The findings suggest that communication interventions in child care centers can focus on strengthening injunctive norms in order to increase handwashing behaviors in child care centers. The findings also suggest that the theory of normative social behavior can be useful in organizational contexts.

  12. Insights on compassion and patient-centred nursing in intensive care: A constructivist grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakimowicz, Samantha; Perry, Lin; Lewis, Joanne

    2018-04-01

    To explore patient-centred nursing, compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue from intensive care nurses' perspectives. Compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue can influence critical care nurses' decisions to either continue or leave the profession, and could impact the compassionate patient-centred nursing care patients receive during their ICU admission. This qualitative research design was informed by Charmaz's Grounded Theory Constructivist methodology. In-depth interviews were conducted with 21 critical care nurses of two ICUs in Australia during 2016. Interview data were analysed using grounded theory processes. Findings reflected positive and negative impacts on critical care nurses' ability to deal compassionately with their patients. Effects on patient-centred nursing and critical care nurses' own well-being were revealed. A core category of "Expectations" emerged, explaining the tension between critical care nurses' biomedical, clinical skills and knowledge versus compassionate, patient-centred nursing care. This tension was clarified and expanded in subcategories of "Life in the Balance," "Passion and Pressure," "Understanding and Advocacy" and "Tenacity and Fragility". Providing patient-centred nursing may enhance critical care nurses' experience of compassion satisfaction, in turn impacting delivery of compassionate patient-centred nursing to generate a virtuous circle. Critical care nurses who feel respected and supported by their management team and colleagues experience feelings of compassion satisfaction, leading to greater engagement and care towards their patient. Systematically addressing critical care nurses' needs to successfully balance biomedical with compassionate nursing care may lead to greater well-being in the critical care nursing workforce and improve patient experience of intensive care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Participation of radiotherapy in interdisciplinary palliative care units. Challenge and chance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momm, F.; Frommhold, H.; Becker, G.; Ewald, H.; Baumgartner, J.; Adamietz, I.A.

    2004-01-01

    Background: in Germany, a sufficient system of palliative care does not exist. Possibilities for participation of radiooncologists in the further development of this promising part of medical action are reported. Material and methods: experiences from interdisciplinary work in the field of palliative care are described. This experience is communicated for use in the actual discussion about the future of palliative care in Germany, especially in the field of radiooncology. Results: a palliative care unit can only work in a team of different professions, which means different physicians, but also nurses, social workers, psychologists or pastors. A palliative care unit will benefit from working with radiooncologists as well as radiooncologists will do from working in the field of palliative care. Conclusion: in times of growing interest in and need for palliative care, radiooncologists should actively participate in the development of palliative care units in Germany. The aim of this participation should be to reasonably arrange the treatment of incurably ill patients with the chances of modern radiotherapy. Another aim should be to improve the treatment of ''classic'' radiation oncology patients by ideas of pallative care. The further development of palliative care in Germany should not take place without the participation of radiooncologists. This will meet the interests of palliative care and radiotherapy and - most importantly - the patients' interests. (orig.) [de

  14. Understanding health-care access and utilization disparities among Latino children in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langellier, Brent A; Chen, Jie; Vargas-Bustamante, Arturo; Inkelas, Moira; Ortega, Alexander N

    2016-06-01

    It is important to understand the source of health-care disparities between Latinos and other children in the United States. We examine parent-reported health-care access and utilization among Latino, White, and Black children (≤17 years old) in the United States in the 2006-2011 National Health Interview Survey. Using Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition, we portion health-care disparities into two parts (1) those attributable to differences in the levels of sociodemographic characteristics (e.g., income) and (2) those attributable to differences in group-specific regression coefficients that measure the health-care 'return' Latino, White, and Black children receive on these characteristics. In the United States, Latino children are less likely than Whites to have a usual source of care, receive at least one preventive care visit, and visit a doctor, and are more likely to have delayed care. The return on sociodemographic characteristics explains 20-30% of the disparity between Latino and White children in the usual source of care, delayed care, and doctor visits and 40-50% of the disparity between Latinos and Blacks in emergency department use and preventive care. Much of the health-care disadvantage experienced by Latino children would persist if Latinos had the sociodemographic characteristics as Whites and Blacks. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Patients' family satisfaction with needs met at the medical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaila, Rabia

    2013-05-01

    The current study investigated the perceived importance and the perceived met needs of family members in the medical intensive care unit and assessed family members' satisfaction with needs met. Studies conducted throughout the world over the past 30 years indicate that family needs are still neglected. Unmet needs of family members of patients in the intensive care unit lead to dissatisfaction with care. A cross-sectional study. A total of 70 family members of critically ill patients were included in this study conducted in a medical intensive care unit in Israel between October 2007-September 2008, using a structured interview. Three outcomes measured by the Family Satisfaction in the Intensive Care Unit Inventory were regressed separately for baseline variables and family needs met subscales as measured by the Critical Care Family Needs Inventory. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to detect factors that could have predicted each outcome. The results showed differences between the perceived importance and the perceived met needs of family members. Satisfaction with care was positively related to meeting all needs domains except the information need. However, satisfaction with information and decision-making was related only to meeting information and emotional support needs. Continued unmet needs of family members of intensive care unit patients have a negative impact on family satisfaction. Only sweeping changes in clinical practice will succeed in meeting the unmet needs of patients' families. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Pressures on the dental care system in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotman, S; Goldman, H

    1982-07-01

    A number of significant pressures are creating tensions in the dental profession and the dental care delivery system. These pressures may be categorized in five major areas: 1) regulation and deregulation pressures involve changes in the state dental practice acts, court decisions concerning antitrust and advertising, and the inclusion of consumers on State professional regulatory boards; 2) cost of services includes factors involving the out-of-pocket cost of dental care and the growth of dental insurance; 3) dentist-related factors include the increased number of dentists and the indebtedness of dental graduates; 4) the pressures of changes in the American populations include the decline in population growth and the increase in proportion of elderly people; 5) changes in the distribution of dental care are based on new epidemiologic data concerning dental caries and progress in the prevention of periodontal disease. Many of these pressures are inducing competition in the dental care system. It is clear that the dental care system is in the process of change as it responds to these complex pressures.

  17. The changing nature of relationships between parents and healthcare providers when a child dies in the paediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Ashleigh E; Hall, Helen; Copnell, Beverley

    2018-01-01

    To explore bereaved parents' interactions with healthcare providers when a child dies in a paediatric intensive care unit. Although most children admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit will survive, 2-5% will die during their stay. The parents of these children interact and form relationships with numerous healthcare staff during their child's illness and death. Although previous studies have explored the parental experience of child death in intensive care generally, the nature of their relationships with healthcare providers during this time remains unknown. This study used a constructivist grounded theory approach. Data were collected via semi-structured, audio-recorded interviews with 26 bereaved parents from four paediatric intensive care units over 18 months in 2015-2016. Constant comparative analysis and theoretical memos were used to analyse the data. The theory "Transitional togetherness" demonstrates the changing nature of the parent-healthcare provider relationship across three key phases of the parents' journey. Phase one, "Welcoming expertise," focuses on the child's medical needs, with the healthcare provider dominant in the relationship. Phase two, "Becoming a team," centres around the parents' need to recreate a parental role and work collaboratively with healthcare providers. Finally, "Gradually disengaging" describes the parents' desire for the relationship to continue after the child's death as a source of support until no longer needed. Findings from this study offer valuable insights into the changing nature of the parent-healthcare provider relationship and highlight the key foci of the relationship at each stage of the parental journey. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Changes in patient safety culture after restructuring of intensive care units: Two cross-sectional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vifladt, Anne; Simonsen, Bjoerg O; Lydersen, Stian; Farup, Per G

    2016-02-01

    Compare changes in registered nurses' perception of the patient safety culture in restructured and not restructured intensive care units during a four-year period. Two cross-sectional surveys were performed, in 2008/2009 (time 1) and 2012/2013 (time 2). During a period of 0-3 years after time 1, three of six hospitals merged their general and medical intensive care units (restructured). The other hospitals maintained their structure of the intensive care units (not restructured). Intensive care units in hospitals at one Norwegian hospital trust. The safety culture was measured with Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. At times 1 and 2, 217/302 (72%) and 145/289 (50%) registered nurses participated. Restructuring was negatively associated with change in the safety culture, in particular, the dimensions of the safety culture within the unit level. The dimensions most vulnerable for restructuring were manager expectations and actions promoting safety, teamwork within hospital units and staffing. In this study, the restructuring of intensive care units was associated with a negative impact on the safety culture. When restructuring, the management should be particularly aware of changes in the safety culture dimensions manager expectations and actions promoting safety, teamwork within hospital units and staffing. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluating fundamentals of care: The development of a unit-level quality measurement and improvement programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Jenny M; Bell, Jeanette; Koziol-McLain, Jane

    2018-06-01

    The project aimed to develop a unit-level quality measurement and improvement programme using evidence-based fundamentals of care. Feedback from patients, families, whānau, staff and audit data in 2014 indicated variability in the delivery of fundamental aspects of care such as monitoring, nutrition, pain management and environmental cleanliness at a New Zealand District Health Board. A general inductive approach was used to explore the fundamentals of care and design a measurement and improvement programme, the Patient and Whānau Centred Care Standards (PWCCS), focused on fundamental care. Five phases were used to explore the evidence, and design and test a measurement and improvement framework. Nine identified fundamental elements of care were used to define expected standards of care and develop and test a measurement and improvement framework. Four six-monthly peer reviews have been undertaken since June 2015. Charge Nurse Managers used results to identify quality improvements. Significant improvement was demonstrated overall, in six of the 27 units, in seven of the nine standards and three of the four measures. In all, 89% (n = 24) of units improved their overall result. The PWCCS measurement and improvement framework make visible nursing fundamentals of care in line with continuous quality improvement to increase quality of care. Delivering fundamentals of care is described by nurses as getting ?back to basics'. Patient and family feedback supports the centrality of fundamentals of care to their hospital experience. Implementing a unit-level fundamentals of care quality measurement and improvement programme clarifies expected standards of care, highlights the contribution of fundamentals of care to quality and provides a mechanism for ongoing improvements. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Coalition of distributed generation units to virtual power players - a game theory approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morais, Hugo; Sousa, Tiago M; Santos, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    and the existence of new management players such as several types of aggregators. This paper proposes a methodology to facilitate the coalition between distributed generation units originating Virtual Power Players (VPP) considering a game theory approach. The proposed approach consists in the analysis...... strategies, size and goals, each parameter has different importance. VPP can also manage other type of energy resources, like storage units, electric vehicles, demand response programs or even parts of the MV and LV distribution network. A case study with twelve VPPs with different characteristics and one...

  1. Health care-associated infections in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael T

    2005-06-01

    Neonates represent a unique and highly vulnerable patient population. Advances in medical technology that have occurred over the last few decades have improved the survival and quality of life for neonates, particularly those infants born with extreme prematurity or with congenital defects. Although immunologic immaturity and altered cutaneous barriers play some role in the vulnerability of neonates to nosocomial infections, clearly, therapeutic interventions that have proven to be lifesaving for these fragile infants also appear to be associated with the majority of infectious complications resulting in neonatal morbidity and mortality. Rates of infections in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) have varied from 6% to 40% of neonatal patients, with the highest rates in those facilities having larger proportions of very low-birth-weight infants (birthweight NICU infants include the following: (1) optimal infection control practices, especially good hand hygiene and good nursery design; (2) prudent use of invasive interventions with particular attention to early removal of invasive devices after they are no longer essential; and (3) judicious use of antimicrobial agents, with an emphasis on targeted (narrow spectrum) rather than broad-spectrum antibiotics and appropriate indications (proven or suspected bacterial infections).

  2. Investigation and management of gastro-oesophageal reflux in United Kingdom neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossor, Thomas; Andradi, Gwendolyn; Bhat, Ravindra; Greenough, Anne

    2018-01-01

    In 2004, wide variation in the investigation and management of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) of infants on UK major neonatal units was demonstrated. Our aim was to resurvey neonatal practitioners to determine current practice and whether it was now evidence based. A questionnaire was sent to all 207 UK neonatal units. Responses were obtained from 84% of units. The most frequent 'investigation' was a trial of therapy (83% of units); pH studies were used in 38%, upper GI contrast studies in 19% and multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII)/pH studies in 5%. Only six units suggested a threshold for an abnormal pH study and two units for an abnormal MII study. Infants were commenced on antireflux medication without investigation always in 32% of units, often in 29%, occasionally in 19% and only never in 1%. Gaviscon was used as first line treatment in 60% of units, and other medications included ranitidine in 53%, thickening agents in 27%, proton pump inhibitors in 23%, domperidone in 22% and erythromycin in 6%. There remains a wide variation in diagnostic and treatment strategies for infants with suspected GOR on neonatal intensive care units, emphasising the need for randomised trials to determine appropriate GOR management. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Prevalence of health promotion programs in primary health care units in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Gomes, Grace Angélica de Oliveira; Bracco, Mário M; Florindo, Alex Antonio; Mielke, Gregore Iven; Parra, Diana C; Lobelo, Felipe; Simoes, Eduardo J; Hallal, Pedro Curi

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Assessment of prevalence of health promotion programs in primary health care units within Brazil’s health system. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study based on telephone interviews with managers of primary care units. Of a total 42,486 primary health care units listed in the Brazilian Unified Health System directory, 1,600 were randomly selected. Care units from all five Brazilian macroregions were selected proportionally to the number of units in each region. We examined whether any of the following five different types of health promotion programs was available: physical activity; smoking cessation; cessation of alcohol and illicit drug use; healthy eating; and healthy environment. Information was collected on the kinds of activities offered and the status of implementation of the Family Health Strategy at the units. RESULTS Most units (62.0%) reported having in place three health promotion programs or more and only 3.0% reported having none. Healthy environment (77.0%) and healthy eating (72.0%) programs were the most widely available; smoking and alcohol use cessation were reported in 54.0% and 42.0% of the units. Physical activity programs were offered in less than 40.0% of the units and their availability varied greatly nationwide, from 51.0% in the Southeast to as low as 21.0% in the North. The Family Health Strategy was implemented in most units (61.0%); however, they did not offer more health promotion programs than others did. CONCLUSIONS Our study showed that most primary care units have in place health promotion programs. Public policies are needed to strengthen primary care services and improve training of health providers to meet the goals of the agenda for health promotion in Brazil. PMID:25372175

  4. When Less is More in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emir Festic

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In parallel to technological advances in late twentieth century, medical diagnostics and therapeutic options greatly improved. A surge of evidence-based research in intensive care medicine provided additional opportunities and the “best” medical practice has been changing rapidly. However, the primary focus of Hippocrates: “Primum non nocere” (first do no harm is often neglected at the bedside. It became apparent that lesser intervention in the ICU may actually mean more for the patient. Multiple examples of the concept “when less is more in the ICU” are described here in an ABC format. Critical care providers have an obligation to keenly and closely follow the results of new investigative studies and to carefully incorporate those into our practice. However, they have to be sensitive to individual circumstances, patient and family preferences, and avoidance of harm.

  5. History of technology in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Nitin; Puri, Vinod; Dellinger, R P

    2009-01-01

    Critical care medicine is a young specialty and since its inception has been heavily reliant upon technology. Invasive monitoring has its humble beginnings in the continuous monitoring of heart rate and rhythm. From the development of right heart catheterization to the adaption of the echocardiogram for use in shock, intensivists have used technology to monitor hemodynamics. The care of the critically ill has been buoyed by investigators who sought to offer renal replacement therapy to unstable patients and worked to improve the monitoring of oxygen saturation. The evolution of mechanical ventilation for the critically ill embodies innumerable technological advances. More recently, critical care has insisted upon rigorous testing and cost-benefit analysis of technological advances.

  6. Family-centered bereavement practices in Danish intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Kaldan, Gudrun; Coombs, Maureen

    2018-01-01

    : Self-administered computerized cross-sectional nation-wide survey of Danish ICUs. RESULTS: Nurses at 46 of 48 (96%) ICUs in Denmark responded. Bereavement care at the time of patient death included viewing the patient in ICU (100%), and in the hospital mortuary (59%). Information about hospital...... of death, a letter of condolence, a phone call to the family, referral to a priest or clergyman, or referral to other counseling. Although many interventions were common, there were variations within the elements offered. Nurses and physicians were the most consistent health care staff involved...

  7. Stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Mette; Perner, Anders; Møller, Morten H

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is considered standard of care in the majority of critically ill patients in the ICU. In this review, we will present the current evidence for the use of SUP in ICU patients, including data on the prevalence of gastrointestinal bleeding and the ba......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is considered standard of care in the majority of critically ill patients in the ICU. In this review, we will present the current evidence for the use of SUP in ICU patients, including data on the prevalence of gastrointestinal bleeding...

  8. Innovative practice: exploring acculturation theory to advance rehabilitation from pediatric to adult "cultures" of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tram; Baptiste, Sue

    2015-01-01

    This perspective paper explores the application of acculturation and the inherent concepts and ideas associated with this theory in rehabilitation to provide a framework for interpreting patient circumstances, responses and behaviours as they move from one culture to the next. Traditionally acculturation theory has been use to examine changes in culture in an ethnic or country sense, however, this paper is among the first to apply acculturation theory to the rehabilitation service cultures from pediatric to adult care for youth with chronic health conditions. The objectives of this paper are threefold: (1) to critically appraise key literature in the development of acculturation theory, (2) to discuss how acculturation theory can be applied in rehabilitation practice through a clinical vignette, and finally (3) to discuss how acculturation theory can advance rehabilitation by enhancing client-centered practice. Acculturation theory can provide insight into how patients are experiencing a change in health care "cultures", in the context of their overarching life circumstances. This, coming from a broader societal perspective can in turn inform an optimal approach to client-centered practice, and the application of rehabilitation-specific team inputs. This theoretical framework can heighten practitioners' awareness of patients' unique worldviews related to their expectations for care and treatment thus reducing fear of diversity to establish positive partnerships between patients and clinicians. An understanding of patients' acculturation processes will add new insight into how we can best deliver services and supports to optimise health, opportunities and experiences for youth with chronic conditions.

  9. Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy without fiber optic bronchoscopy-Evaluation of 80 intensive care units cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Calvache (Jose Andrés); R.A. Molina García (Rodrigo); A.L. Trochez (Adolfo); J. Benitez (Javier); L.A. Flga (Lucía Arroyo)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The development of percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy techniques (PDT) has facilitated the procedure in Intensive Care Units (ICU). Objective: To describe the early intra and post-operative complications in ICU patients requiring percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy

  10. Decontamination of cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae during selective digestive tract decontamination in intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostdijk, E.A.; Smet, A.M. de; Kesecioglu, J.; Bonten, M.J.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Pickkers, P.; Sturm, P.D.; Voss, A.; et al.,

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Prevalences of cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae are increasing globally, especially in intensive care units (ICUs). The effect of selective digestive tract decontamination (SDD) on the eradication of cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae from the intestinal tract is

  11. Decontamination of cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae during selective digestive tract decontamination in intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostdijk, Evelien A. N.; de Smet, Anne Marie G. A.; Kesecioglu, Jozef; Bonten, Marc J. M.

    Prevalences of cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae are increasing globally, especially in intensive care units (ICUs). The effect of selective digestive tract decontamination (SDD) on the eradication of cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae from the intestinal tract is unknown. We

  12. Does appropriate empiric antibiotic therapy modify intensive care unit-acquired Enterobacteriaceae bacteraemia mortality and discharge?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, K B; Van Kleef, E; Vansteelandt, S; Batra, R; Edgeworth, J D; Smieszek, T; Robotham, J V

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conflicting results have been found regarding outcomes of intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired Enterobacteriaceae bacteraemia and the potentially modifying effect of appropriate empiric antibiotic therapy. AIM: To evaluate these associations while adjusting for potential time-varying

  13. The needs of family members of intensive care unit patients: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ARTICLE. 44 SAJCC November 2016, Vol. 32, No. 2. The needs of family members of intensive care unit patients: A ... loved one will be survival, disability or death.[1] .... the participants of this study (the constructivist paradigm, which was.

  14. Predictors of Self-care among the Elderly with Diabetes Type 2: Using Social Cognitive Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borhaninejad, Vahidreza; Iranpour, Abedin; Shati, Mohsen; Tahami, Ahmad Naghibzadeh; Yousefzadeh, Gholamrezan; Fadayevatan, Reza

    Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases among the elderly and is also a very serious health problem. Adopting theory-based self-care behaviors is an effective means in managing such diseases. This study aimed to determine the predictors of diabetes self-care in the elderly in Kerman based on a social cognitive theory. In this cross-sectional study, 384 elderly diabetic patients who had referred to health screening centers in Kerman were chosen via cluster sampling. To collect information about self-care and its predictors, Toobert Glasgow's diabetes self-efficacy scale as well as a questionnaire was used which was based on social cognitive theory constructs. The validity and reliability of the questionnaire was confirmed. The data were analyzed using Pearson correlation and linear regression analysis in SPSS software 17. Among the subjects, 67.37% (252) had poor self-care ability; 29.14% (109) had average ability, and 3.40% (13) enjoyed a proper level of self- care ability. There was a significant relationship between the constructs of the social cognitive theory (knowledge, self- efficacy, social support, outcome expectations, outcome expectancy and self-regulation) and the self-care score. Furthermore, the mentioned constructs could predict 0.47% of the variance of the self-care behaviors. self-care behaviors in this study were poor. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an educational intervention based on cognitive theory constructs with the goal of properly managing diabetes in the elderly patients. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Nurse Activism in the newborn intensive care unit: actions in response to an ethical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settle, Peggy Doyle

    2014-03-01

    Nurses working in a newborn intensive care unit report that treatment decision disagreements for infants in their care may lead to ethical dilemmas involving all health-care providers. Applying Rest's Four-Component Model of Moral Action as the theoretical framework, this study examined the responses of 224 newborn intensive care unit nurses to the Nurses Ethical Involvement Survey. The three most frequent actions selected were as follows: talking with other nurses, talking with doctors, and requesting a team meeting. The multiple regression analysis indicates that newborn intensive care unit nurses with greater concern for the ethical aspects of clinical practice (p = .001) and an increased perception of their ability to influence ethical decision making (p = .018) were more likely to display Nurse Activism. Future research is necessary to identify other factors leading to and inhibiting Nurse Activism as these findings explained just 8.5% of the variance.

  16. 10 CFR 455.141 - Grant awards for units of local government, public care institutions, and coordinating agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Grant awards for units of local government, public care... CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOLS AND HOSPITALS AND BUILDINGS OWNED BY UNITS OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC CARE INSTITUTIONS Grant Awards § 455.141 Grant awards for units of local government, public care...

  17. Computerized nursing process in the Intensive Care Unit: ergonomics and usability

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida,Sônia Regina Wagner de; Sasso,Grace Teresinha Marcon Dal; Barra,Daniela Couto Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE Analyzing the ergonomics and usability criteria of the Computerized Nursing Process based on the International Classification for Nursing Practice in the Intensive Care Unit according to International Organization for Standardization(ISO). METHOD A quantitative, quasi-experimental, before-and-after study with a sample of 16 participants performed in an Intensive Care Unit. Data collection was performed through the application of five simulated clinical cases and an evalua...

  18. Postoperative hypoxia and length of intensive care unit stay after cardiac surgery: the underweight paradox?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ranucci

    Full Text Available Cardiac operations with cardiopulmonary bypass can be associated with postoperative lung dysfunction. The present study investigates the incidence of postoperative hypoxia after cardiac surgery, its relationship with the length of intensive care unit stay, and the role of body mass index in determining postoperative hypoxia and intensive care unit length of stay.Single-center, retrospective study.University Hospital. Patients. Adult patients (N = 5,023 who underwent cardiac surgery with CPB.None.According to the body mass index, patients were attributed to six classes, and obesity was defined as a body mass index >30. POH was defined as a PaO2/FiO2 ratio <200 at the arrival in the intensive care unit. Postoperative hypoxia was detected in 1,536 patients (30.6%. Obesity was an independent risk factor for postoperative hypoxia (odds ratio 2.4, 95% confidence interval 2.05-2.78, P = 0.001 and postoperative hypoxia was a determinant of intensive care unit length of stay. There is a significant inverse correlation between body mass index and PaO2/FiO2 ratio, with the risk of postoperative hypoxia increasing by 1.7 folds per each incremental body mass index class. The relationship between body mass index and intensive care unit length of stay is U-shaped, with longer intensive care unit stay in underweight patients and moderate-morbid obese patients.Obese patients are at higher risk for postoperative hypoxia, but this leads to a prolonged intensive care unit stay only for moderate-morbid obese patients. Obese patients are partially protected against the deleterious effects of hemodilution and transfusions. Underweight patients present the "paradox" of a better lung gas exchange but a longer intensive care unit stay. This is probably due to a higher severity of their cardiac disease.

  19. Branding Palliative Care Units by Avoiding the Terms “Palliative” and “Hospice”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ying-Xiu; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Lin, Ming-Hwai

    2017-01-01

    The term “palliative care” has a negative connotation and may act as a barrier to early patient referrals. Rebranding has thus been proposed as a strategy to reduce the negative perceptions associated with palliative care. For example, using the term “supportive care” instead of “palliative care” in naming palliative care units has been proposed in several studies. In Taiwan, terms other than “palliative” and “hospice” are already widely used in the names of palliative care units. With this in mind, this study investigated the characteristics of palliative care unit names in order to better understand the role of naming in palliative care. Relevant data were collected from the Taiwan Academy of Hospice Palliative Medicine, the National Health Insurance Administration of the Ministry of Health and Welfare, and the open database maintained by the government of Taiwan. We found a clear phenomenon of avoiding use of the terms “palliative” and “hospice” in the naming of palliative care units, a phenomenon that reflects the stigma attached to the terms “palliative” and “hospice” in Taiwan. At the time of the study (September, 2016), there were 55 palliative care units in Taiwan. Only 20.0% (n = 11) of the palliative care unit names included the term “palliative,” while 25.2% (n = 14) included the term “hospice.” Religiously affiliated hospitals were less likely to use the terms “palliative” and “hospice” (χ2 = 11.461, P = .001). There was also a lower prevalence of use of the terms “palliative” and “hospice” for naming palliative care units in private hospitals than in public hospitals (χ2 = 4.61, P = .032). This finding highlights the strong stigma attached to the terms “palliative” and “hospice” in Taiwan. It is hypothesized that sociocultural and religious factors may partially account for this phenomenon. PMID:28140730

  20. Physiotherapy practice in South African intensive care units

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Care focuses largely on mobilisation, exercise therapy and multimodality respiratory therapy. ... use in an SA setting and conducted a pilot survey to determine the scope of practice of ..... be the goal for all survey-based studies.[20] The current ...

  1. Efficacy beliefs predict collaborative practice among intensive care unit nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Blanc, Pascale M.; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.; Salanova, Marisa; Llorens, Susana; Nap, Raoul E.

    P>Aim. This paper is a report of an investigation of whether intensive care nurses' efficacy beliefs predict future collaborative practice, and to test the potential mediating role of team commitment in this relationship. Background. Recent empirical studies in the field of work and organizational

  2. Economic implications of neonatal intensive care unit collaborative quality improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogowski, JA; Horbar, JD; Plsek, PE; Baker, LS; Deterding, J; Edwards, WH; Hocker, J; Kantak, AD; Lewallen, P; Lewis, W; Lewit, E; McCarroll, CJ; Mujsce, D; Payne, NR; Shiono, P; Soll, RF; Leahy, K

    Objective. To make measurable improvements in the quality and cost of neonatal intensive care using a multidisciplinary collaborative quality improvement model. Design. Interventional study. Data on treatment costs were collected for infants with birth weight 501 to 1500 g for the period of January

  3. Protecting an adult identity: A grounded theory of supportive care for young adults recently diagnosed with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soanes, Louise; Gibson, Faith

    2018-05-01

    For adolescents and young adults living in high-income countries cancer remains the most common disease-related death. Increasing survival rates and projected longevity are positive outcomes, although long-term consequences of cancer and/or its treatment will likely increase the global burden of cancer. In low and middle-income countries the impact and needs of young adults with cancer are largely unknown and require further attention. However, universal studies have revealed that cancer-related needs for this group are multifactorial, complex and largely unmet. In response to these findings, the body of work on supportive care for young adults with cancer is growing. Yet, there is no published research in the context of the United Kingdom, regarding the role young adults play in managing their supportive cancer care needs. To explore the experience, purpose and meaning of supportive cancer care to young adults recently diagnosed with cancer. Using constructivist grounded theory, data were collected in one to one interviews with eleven young adults (seven women and four men aged 19-24 years) being treated for cancer in two English hospitals. Data were analyzed using open and focused coding, constant comparison, theoretical coding and memoing, and this enabled construction of a subjective theory. Young adults in this study interpreted cancer as an interruption to the events, experiences and tasks forming the biographical work of their adult identity. Data analysis led to the construction of the theory, 'protecting an adult identity: self in relation to a diagnosis of cancer in young adulthood'. This theory arose from three categories: fragility of self, maintaining self in an altered reality and mobilizing external resources. Young adults faced the loss of their early adult identity. Interpreting cancer as a temporary interruption, they sought to re-establish their identity by directly and indirectly managing their supportive care needs. These findings contribute to

  4. Antibiotic prescription in intensive care units in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Curcio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The intensive care units (ICUs are often considered as the epicenters of antibiotic resistance. Therefore, the total antibiotic consumption is approximately ten fold greater in ICU wards than in general hospital wards. The aim of this study was to evaluate the current use of antibiotics in Latin American ICUs. Three cross-sectional (one-day point prevalence studies were undertaken in 43 Latin American ICUs. Of 1644 patients admitted, 688 received antibiotic treatment on the days of the study (41.8 % and, 392 cases (57 % were due to nosocomial-acquired infections. Of all infections, 22 % (151/688 corresponded to septic shock; and 22 % (151/688 to nosocomial pneumonia (50/151 [33 %], ventilator-associated pneumonia. In 485 patients (70.5 %, cultures were performed before starting antibiotic treatment. The most common microorganisms isolated were extended-spectrum ß-lactamase Enterobacteriaceae, (30.5 %, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (17 %. Carbapenems (imipenem or meropenem were the antibiotics most frequently prescribed (151/688, 22 %, followed by vancomycin (103/688, 15 %, piperacillin-tazobactam (86/688, 12.5 % and broad-spectrum cephalosporins (mainly cefepime (83/688, 12 %. In summary, carbapenems were the most frequent antibiotics prescribed in Latin American ICUs. This practice seems justified for the high rates of ESBL-producing Gram-negatives found in our patients. Beyond this reason, the problem of bacterial resistance in LA requires that physicians improve the use of carbapenems. The high prevalence of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa in the region, along with the prevalence of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, have increased markedly. A comprehensive evidence-based stewardship program based on local antimicrobial use and resistance problems should be implemented in our clinical settings.Prescripción de antibióticos en unidades de cuidados intensivos de Latinoamérica. Las unidades de cuidados intensivos (UCI

  5. [Admission, discharge and triage guidelines for paediatric intensive care units in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Oliva, Pedro; Cambra-Lasaosa, Francisco José; Quintana-Díaz, Manuel; Rey-Galán, Corsino; Sánchez-Díaz, Juan Ignacio; Martín-Delgado, María Cruz; de Carlos-Vicente, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Rastrollo, Ramón; Holanda-Peña, María Soledad; Pilar-Orive, Francisco Javier; Ocete-Hita, Esther; Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio; Serrano-González, Ana; Blanch, Luis

    2018-05-01

    A paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) is a separate physical facility or unit specifically designed for the treatment of paediatric patients who, because of the severity of illness or other life-threatening conditions, require comprehensive and continuous inten-sive care by a medical team with special skills in paediatric intensive care medicine. Timely and personal intervention in intensive care reduces mortality, reduces length of stay, and decreases cost of care. With the aim of defending the right of the child to receive the highest attainable standard of health and the facilities for the treatment of illness and rehabilitation, as well as ensuring the quality of care and the safety of critically ill paediatric patients, the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (AEP), Spanish Society of Paediatric Intensive Care (SECIP) and Spanish Society of Critical Care (SEMICYUC) have approved the guidelines for the admission, discharge and triage for Spanish PICUs. By using these guidelines, the performance of Spanish paediatric intensive care units can be optimised and paediatric patients can receive the appropriate level of care for their clinical condition. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Admission, discharge and triage guidelines for paediatric intensive care units in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Oliva, Pedro; Cambra-Lasaosa, Francisco José; Quintana-Díaz, Manuel; Rey-Galán, Corsino; Sánchez-Díaz, Juan Ignacio; Martín-Delgado, María Cruz; de Carlos-Vicente, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Rastrollo, Ramón; Holanda-Peña, María Soledad; Pilar-Orive, Francisco Javier; Ocete-Hita, Esther; Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio; Serrano-González, Ana; Blanch, Luis

    2018-05-01

    A paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) is a separate physical facility or unit specifically designed for the treatment of paediatric patients who, because of the severity of illness or other life-threatening conditions, require comprehensive and continuous inten-sive care by a medical team with special skills in paediatric intensive care medicine. Timely and personal intervention in intensive care reduces mortality, reduces length of stay, and decreases cost of care. With the aim of defending the right of the child to receive the highest attainable standard of health and the facilities for the treatment of illness and rehabilitation, as well as ensuring the quality of care and the safety of critically ill paediatric patients, the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (AEP), Spanish Society of Paediatric Intensive Care (SECIP) and Spanish Society of Critical Care (SEMICYUC) have approved the guidelines for the admission, discharge and triage for Spanish PICUs. By using these guidelines, the performance of Spanish paediatric intensive care units can be optimised and paediatric patients can receive the appropriate level of care for their clinical condition. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  7. Developing collaborative person-centred practice: a pilot project on a palliative care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Pippa; Weaver, Lynda; Gravelle, Debbie; Thibault, Hélène

    2007-02-01

    Maximizing interprofessional collaborative patient-centred practice holds promise for improving patient care and creating satisfying work roles. In Canada's evolving health care system, there are demands for increased efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and quality improvement. Interprofessional collaboration warrants re-examination because maximizing interprofessional collaboration, especially nurse-physician collaboration, holds promise for improving patient care and creating satisfying work roles. A palliative care team seized the opportunity to pilot a different approach to patient and family care when faced with a reduction in medical staff. Grounded in a collaborative patient-centred practice approach, the Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association's National Model to Guide Hospice Palliative Care (2002), and outcomes from program retreats and workgroups, a collaborative person-centred model of care was developed for a 12-bed pilot project. Preliminary findings show that the pilot project team perceived some specific benefits in continuity of care and interprofessional collaboration, while the presence of the physician was reduced to an average of 3.82 hours on the pilot wing, compared with 8 hours on the non-pilot wings. This pilot study suggests that a person-centred model, when focused on the physician-nurse dyad, may offer improved efficiency, job satisfaction and continuity of care on a palliative care unit. Incorporating all team members and developing strategies to successfully expand the model across the whole unit are the next challenges. Further research into the impact of these changes on the health care professionals, management and patients and families is essential.

  8. The Phase of Illness Paradigm: A Checklist Centric Model to Improve Patient Care in the Burn Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    high cognitive workload associated with information overload and miscommunication. • Multidisciplinary Rounds (MDR) in the Burn Intensive Care Unit...for the POIP using cognitive systems engineering methodologies and iteration. To validate the model, we will measure clinician perception of patient...communication, teamwork, cognitive work load, and provider quality of life before and after units implement the POIP. To assess the model’s effect, we

  9. The Intensive Care Unit of the University Teaching Hospital, Ilorin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2001). This period marks the first decade of the establishment of our ICU. The purpose of this study is to describe the pattern of admission of patients into the ICU, highlighting the variety of cases, indications for admission, outcome and causes of death, and the problems of medical and administrative management of the unit.