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Sample records for care unit admission

  1. Causes Of Microbial Carriers During Admission To Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Panagiotopoulou, Efthymia; Nteves, Ioannis; Kadda, Olga; Kapadohos, Theodore; Vasilopoulos, Georgios; Marvaki, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The recording of microbial agent upon patients admission in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) can be useful for the prevention and reduction of dispersion, forecasting new colonization or infection respectively bacteria and guide empirical antimicrobial therapy. Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the factors associated with microbial colonization of patients admitting to ICU. Material and Method: The studied sample consisted of 72 patients admitted to the I...

  2. Frequency of admission in Intensive Care Unit due to road accident

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    Vasilios Tziallas; Dimitrios Karagiorgis; Stergios Voutos; Othon Vlachopoulos; Dimitrios Tziallas; Mariana Ntokou

    2011-01-01

    During recent years, it has been noticed a remarkable increase in admission of the young in Intensive Care Unit due to road accident. The aim of the present study was to explore the injuries, the special conditions of admission of young 18-40 years old that were admitted to Intensive Care Unit due to road accident. Method and material: The sample studied consisted of young individuals 18-40 years old that were admitted in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of public hospitals in the area of Attica...

  3. Deciding intensive care unit-admission for critically ill cancer patients

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    Thiery Guillaume

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 15 years, the management of critically ill cancer patients requiring intensive care unit admission has substantially changed. High mortality rates (75-85% were reported 10-20 years ago in cancer patients requiring life sustaining treatments. Because of these high mortality rates, the high costs, and the moral burden for patients and their families, ICU admission of cancer patients became controversial, or even clearly discouraged by some. As a result, the reluctance of intensivists regarding cancer patients has led to frequent refusal admission in the ICU. However, prognosis of critically ill cancer patients has been improved over the past 10 years leading to an urgent need to reappraise this reluctance. In this review, the authors sought to highlight that critical care management, including mechanical ventilation and other life sustaining therapies, may benefit to cancer patients. In addition, criteria for ICU admission are discussed, with a particular emphasis to potential benefits of early ICU-admission.

  4. Impact of Hospital Admission Care At a Pediatric Unit: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías, Marta; Zornoza, Carmen; Rodriguez, Elena; García, José A; Fernández, José A; Luque, Rafaela; Collado, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    The time of admission to a hospital, especially when unplanned, has been reported as the most stressful moment of hospitalization for both parents and children (Odievre, 2001). This qualitative study explored parents and hospital staff's perceptions and experiences related to the process of admission to a pediatric unit. Focus groups, two with parents (total n = 12) and one with health care professionals (n = 6), were conducted, and content analysis inspired by Graneheim and Lundman (2004) was performed. Parents identified four categories of perceptions: 1) management of an uncertain situation at the time of admission, 2) feelings related to the child's illness, 3) parent perception of professional's performance, and 4) parent experience of their role. Health care professionals identified two categories: 1) hospital admission as a continuous care process, and 2) undertaking improvements in the admission process. A common theme emerged about the importance of parents' trust in professionals in order to build a therapeutic relationship. Findings underscore the need for strategies to improve the hospital pediatric admission process based on a parent-professional relationship of trust and confidence through continuous quality communication and support. These strategies would include providing a nurse in charge of the admission process to assure continuity of care throughout the child's hospitalization.

  5. Admission clinicopathological data, length of stay, cost and mortality in an equine neonatal intensive care unit

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    M.N. Saulez; Gummow, B.; Slovis, N.M.; T.D. Byars; M. Frazer; K. MacGillivray; F.T. Bain

    2007-01-01

    Veterinary internists need to prognosticate patients quickly and accurately in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). This may depend on laboratory data collected on admission, the cost of hospitalisation, length of stay (LOS) and mortality rate experienced in the NICU. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective study of 62 equine neonates admitted to a NICU of a private equine referral hospital to determine the prognostic value of venous clinicopathological data collected on admission before th...

  6. Fluid balance of pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients and intensive care unit admission.

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    Benoit, Geneviève; Phan, Véronique; Duval, Michel; Champagne, Martin; Litalien, Catherine; Merouani, Aicha

    2007-03-01

    Fluid administration is essential in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Admission to pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) is required for 11-29% of pediatric HSCT recipients and is associated with high mortality. The objective of this study was to determine if a positive fluid balance acquired during the HSCT procedure is a risk factor for PICU admission. The medical records of 87 consecutive children who underwent a first HSCT were reviewed retrospectively for the following periods: from admission for HSCT to PICU admission for the first group (PICU group), and from admission for HSCT to hospital discharge for the second group (non-PICU group). Fluid balance was determined on the basis of weight gain (WG) and fluid overload (FO). PICU group consisted of 19 patients (21.8%). Among these, 13 (68.4%) developed>or=10% WG prior to PICU admission compared with 15 (22.1%) in the non-PICU group (por=10% FO prior to PICU admission compared with 31 (45.6%) in the non-PICU group (p=0.075). Following multivariate analysis, >or=10% WG (p=0.018) and cardiac dysfunction on admission for HSCT (p=0.036) remained independent risk factors for PICU admission. Smaller children (p=0.033) and patients with a twofold increase in serum creatinine (p=0.026) were at risk of developing>or=10% WG. This study shows that WG is a risk factor for PICU admission in pediatric HSCT recipients. Further research is needed to better understand the pathophysiology of WG in these patients and to determine the impact of WG prevention on PICU admission. PMID:17123119

  7. Evaluation of obstetric admissions to intensive care unit of a tertiary referral center in coastal India

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    Poornima B Ramachandra Bhat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: To evaluate the occurrence, indications, course, interventions, and outcome of obstetric patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU. Design: Retrospective study. Setting: ICU of a Medical College Hospital. Materials and Methods: The data collected were age, parity, obstetric status, primary diagnosis, interventions, and outcome of obstetric patients admitted to the ICU from Jan 2005 to June 2011. Results: Total deliveries were 16,804 in 6.5 years. Obstetric admissions to the ICU were (n = 65 which constitutes 0.39% of deliveries. Majority of the admissions were in the postpartum period (n = 46, 70.8%. The two common indications for admission were obstetric hemorrhage (n = 18, 27.7% and pregnancy related hypertension with its complications (n = 17, 26.2%. The most common intervention was artificial ventilation (n = 41, 63%. The mortality among obstetric admissions in the ICU was (33.8% (22/65. The patients appropriate for High Dependency Unit (HDU care was (32.3% (21/65. The statistical analysis was done by fractional percentage and Chi-square test. Conclusions: Hemorrhage and pregnancy-related hypertension with its complications are the two common indications for ICU admissions. The need for a HDU should be considered.

  8. Epidemiology of Australian Influenza-Related Paediatric Intensive Care Unit Admissions, 1997-2013.

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    Marlena C Kaczmarek

    Full Text Available Influenza virus predictably causes an annual epidemic resulting in a considerable burden of illness in Australia. Children are disproportionately affected and can experience severe illness and complications, which occasionally result in death.We conducted a retrospective descriptive study using data collated in the Australian and New Zealand Paediatric Intensive Care (ANZPIC Registry of influenza-related intensive care unit (ICU admissions over a 17-year period (1997-2013, inclusive in children <16 years old. National laboratory-confirmed influenza notifications were used for comparison.Between 1997 and 2013, a total of 704 influenza-related ICU admissions were recorded, at a rate of 6.2 per 1,000 all-cause ICU admissions. Age at admission ranged from 0 days and 15.9 years (median = 2.1 years, with 135 (19.2% aged <6 months. Pneumonia/pneumonitis and bronchiolitis were the most common primary diagnoses among influenza-related admissions (21.9% and 13.6%, respectively. More than half of total cases (59.2% were previously healthy (no co-morbidities recorded, and in the remainder, chronic lung disease (16.7% and asthma (12.5% were the most common co-morbidities recorded. Pathogen co-detection occurred in 24.7% of cases, most commonly with respiratory syncytial virus or a staphylococcal species. Median length of all ICU admissions was 3.2 days (range 2.0 hours- 107.4 days and 361 (51.3% admissions required invasive respiratory support for a median duration of 4.3 days (range 0.2 hours- 107.5 days. There were 27 deaths recorded, 14 (51.9% in children without a recorded co-morbidity.Influenza causes a substantial number of ICU admissions in Australian children each year with the majority occurring in previously healthy children.

  9. Glycated hemoglobin A: A predictor of outcome in trauma admissions to intensive care unit

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    Karen Ruby Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Although large studies have demonstrated the association between hyperglycemia and adverse intensive care unit (ICU outcomes, it is yet unclear which subset of patients benefit from tight sugar control in ICU. Recent evidence suggests that stress induced hyperglycemia (SIH and co-incidentally detected diabetes mellitus are different phenomena with different prognoses. Differentiating SIH from diabetic hyperglycemia is challenging in ICU settings. We followed a cohort of trauma patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit (SICU to evaluate if initial glycated hemoglobin A (HbA 1 c level predicts the outcome of admission. Materials and Methods: A cohort of 120 consecutive admissions to SICU following trauma were recruited and admission blood sugar and HbA 1 c were measured. Outcomes were prospectively measured by blinded ICU doctors. A logistic regression model was developed to assess if HbA 1 c predicts poor outcomes in these settings. Results: Nearly 24% of the participants had HbA 1 c ≥ 6. Those with HbA 1 c ≥ 6 had 3.14 times greater risk of poor outcome at the end of hospital stay when compared to those with HbA 1 c < 6 and this risk increased to an odds ratio of 4.57 on adjusting for other significant predictors: Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II, injury severity score, admission blood sugar and age at admission. Conclusions: Substantial proportion of trauma admissions has underlying diabetes. HbA 1 c, a measure of pre admission glycaemic status is an important predictor of ICU outcome in trauma patients.

  10. Acute kidney injury on admission to the intensive care unit: where to go from here?

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    Ostermann, Marlies

    2008-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common problem, especially in critically ill patients. In Critical Care, Kolhe and colleagues report that 6.3% of 276,731 patients in 170 intensive care units (ICUs) in the UK had evidence of severe AKI within the first 24 hours of admission to ICU. ICU and hospital mortality as well as length of stay in hospital were significantly increased. In light of this serious burden on individuals and the health system in general, the following commentary discusses the current state of knowledge of AKI in ICU and calls for more attention to preventive strategies.

  11. Patients with hematological disorders requiring admission to medical intensive care unit: Characteristics, survival and prognostic factors

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    Subhash H

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This retrospective chart review assessed the characteristics and outcome of patients with hematological disorders who required admission to medical intensive care unit over a 4 year period (January 1998 to December 2001. Results: There were a total of 104 patients, 67 (64% male, 37 (36% female subjects, with a mean age of 36.3 ± 15.3 years (range 10 to 65 years. The mean duration from hospital admission to ICU transfer was 11 days. Sixty-nine (66% had malignant and 35 (34% had non-malignant conditions. Respiratory distress was the commonest reason for ICU admission 58 (56%. The other indications were hemodynamic instability 38 (36%, low sensorium 22 (21%, following cardio-pulmonary arrest 12 (11.5% and generalized tonic-clonic seizures 5 (5%. Forty-three (42% patients had absolute neutophil count (ANC less than 500, 48 (47.5% had platelet count < 20000. The mean duration of ICU stay was 4 days (range < 24 hours to 28 days. Sixty-nine (66% patients required mechanical ventilation, 61 (59% required hemodynamic support. Pneumonia or sepsis was diagnosed in 71 (68%. Twenty-five (24% survived ICU stay and 20 (19% survived to hospital discharge. ICU admission following cardio-pulmonary arrest, advanced malignancy, requirement of mechanical ventilation, vasopressor support, ANC count < 500 and platelet count < 20000 were the predictors of adverse outcome. Associated organ dysfunction further increases the mortality.

  12. Frequency of admission in Intensive Care Unit due to road accident

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    Vasilios Tziallas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, it has been noticed a remarkable increase in admission of the young in Intensive Care Unit due to road accident. The aim of the present study was to explore the injuries, the special conditions of admission of young 18-40 years old that were admitted to Intensive Care Unit due to road accident. Method and material: The sample studied consisted of young individuals 18-40 years old that were admitted in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU of public hospitals in the area of Attica for 3 years. Data were collected by the completion of a special designed questionnaire that apart from demographic variables, the record of injuries and the conditions of treatment it also included variables concerning the type of vehicle that caused the road accident as well as the outcome of patients' course. Data analysis was performed by the statistical package SPSS 13 and the method x2 and t-test. Results: The sample studied consisted of 555 young individuals, of the 13,1% of total admissions in ICU. Of the participants 82,2% were men and 17,8% women, with mean age 26,5 years. Regarding the frequency of various types of injuries, 24,7% of the participants had injuries of upper limbs and 26,4% of lower. 30,2% of the sample had more than 3 fractures, while the 6,9% more than 5. 75,7% of the participants had head injury. Moreover, it was found that the frequency of head injuries was statistical significant lower among those wearing helmet (64,5% compared to those not wearing (82,5%, p<0,05. Intubation had the 17,9% of he sample, while in coma was the 11,6%. Finally, it was found that patients admitted in ICU from operation room (36,2% were more likely with statistical significant more to die compared to those admitted by Emergency department (17,8% by hospital of other town (16,7% by other hospital (14,3%, or other clinic department (12,5%. Conclusions: Road accidents consist the main reason for admission of the young in ICU. The majority of individuals

  13. Risk factors for neonatal intensive care unit admission in Amman, Jordan.

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    Quinn, C E; Sivasubramaniam, P; Blevins, M; Al Hajajra, A; Znait, A Taleb; Khuri-Bulos, N; Faouri, S; Halasa, N

    2016-03-01

    A better understanding of risk factors for neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission can inform interventions to improve neonatal survival. This study aimed to describe a population of newborns admitted to a NICU in Amman, Jordan, and compare them with newborns discharged to home. Newborns born within 96 hours at Al-Bashir Hospital were enrolled from February 2010 to June 2011. Demographic and clinical data were collected for mothers and newborns. Of 5466 enrolled neonates, 373 (6.8%) were admitted to the NICU. The median gestational age of NICU infants was 36 weeks, median birth weight was 2.2 kg and 49.5% were delivered by non-elective caesarean section. Lower gestational age, lower birth weight, delivery by caesarean section and birth in the month of May were statistically significant risk factors for NICU admission. Risk factors for NICU admission were consistent with other populations worldwide; however, median gestational age and birth weight were higher than in developed countries. PMID:27334073

  14. Admission clinicopathological data, length of stay, cost and mortality in an equine neonatal intensive care unit

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    M.N. Saulez

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Veterinary internists need to prognosticate patients quickly and accurately in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. This may depend on laboratory data collected on admission, the cost of hospitalisation, length of stay (LOS and mortality rate experienced in the NICU. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective study of 62 equine neonates admitted to a NICU of a private equine referral hospital to determine the prognostic value of venous clinicopathological data collected on admission before therapy, the cost of hospitalisation, LOS and mortality rate. The WBC count, total CO2 (TCO2 and alkaline phosphatase (ALP were significantly higher (P < 0.05 and anion gap lower in survivors compared with nonsurvivors. A logistic regression model that included WBC count, hematocrit, albumin / globulin ratio, ALP, TCO2, potassium, sodium and lactate, was able to correctly predict mortality in 84 % of cases. Only anion gap proved to be an independent predictor of neonatal mortality in this study. In the study population, the overall mortality rate was 34 % with greatest mortality rates reported in the first 48 hours and again on day 6 of hospitalisation. Amongst the various clinical diagnoses, mortality was highest in foals after forced extraction during correction of dystocia. Median cost per day was higher for nonsurvivors while total cost was higher in survivors.

  15. The Eldicus prospective, observational study of triage decision making in European intensive care units: Part I-European Intensive Care Admission Triage Scores (EICATS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprung, Charles L; Baras, Mario; Iapichino, Gaetano;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: Life and death triage decisions are made daily by intensive care unit physicians. Scoring systems have been developed for prognosticating intensive care unit mortality but none for intensive care unit triage. The objective of this study was to develop an intensive care unit triage...... decision rule based on 28-day mortality rates of admitted and refused patients. DESIGN:: Prospective, observational study of triage decisions from September 2003 until March 2005. SETTING:: Eleven intensive care units in seven European countries. PATIENTS:: All patients >18 yrs with a request for intensive...... care unit admission. INTERVENTIONS:: Admission or rejection to an intensive care unit. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:: Clinical, laboratory, and physiological variables and data from severity scores were collected. Separate scores for accepted and rejected patients with 28-day mortality end point were...

  16. HIV/AIDS and admission to intensive care units: A comparison of India, Brazil and South Africa

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    Kantharuben Naidoo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In resource-constrained settings and in the context of HIV-infected patients requiring intensive care, value-laden decisions by critical care specialists are often made in the absence of explicit policies and guidelines. These are often based on individual practitioners’ knowledge and experience, which may be subject to bias. We reviewed published information on legislation and practices related to intensive care unit (ICU admission in India, Brazil and South Africa, to assess access to critical care services in the context of HIV. Each of these countries has legal instruments in place to provide their citizens with health services, but they differ in their provision of ICU care for HIV-infected persons. In Brazil, some ICUs have no admission criteria, and this decision vests solely on the ‘availability, and the knowledge and the experience’ of the most experienced ICU specialist at the institution. India has few regulatory mechanisms to ensure ICU care for critically ill patients including HIV-infected persons. SA has made concerted efforts towards non-discriminatory criteria for ICU admissions and, despite the shortage of ICU beds, HIV-infected patients have relatively greater access to this level of care than in other developing countries in Africa, such as Botswana. Policymakers and clinicians should devise explicit policy frameworks to govern ICU admissions in the context of HIV status. S Afr J HIV Med 2013;14(1:15-16. DOI:10.7196/SAJHIVMED.887

  17. Obstetric indications for admission to the intensive care unit of a tertiary referral center; an Iranian experience

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    Sousan Rasooli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the obstetric admissions to the intensive care unit (ICU in the setting of a tertiary referral hospital in an attempt to identify the risk factors influencing maternal outcome.Method: In a prospective, cross-sectional study, all parturient patients during pregnancy and up to 6 weeks postpartum admitted to the ICU of a tertiary referral hospital between 2013 and 2014 were evaluated. Demographic data, medical histories, pregnancy, and intrapartum and postpartum data were collected. Moreover, interventions and fetomaternal outcomes were noted.Results: Ninety nine obstetric patients were admitted to the ICU. Fifty seven percent of the admissions were postpartum. The main indications for admission were hypertensive disorders (37.3%, and obstetric hemorrhage (13.1%. Non-obstetric indications of ICU admission were the cardiac diseases.Conclusion: The major obstetric indications for admission in our study were hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and obstetric hemorrhage.  Keywords: Pregnancy; Intensive care unit; maternal mortality; morbidity

  18. An audit of intensive care unit admission in a pediatric cardio-thoracic population in Enugu, Nigeria

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    Azike Jerome

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The study aimed to perform an audit of intensive care unit admissions in the paediatric cardio-thoracic population in Enugu, Nigeria and examine the challenges and outcome in this high risk group. Ways of improvement based on this study are suggested. METHODS: The hospital records of consecutive postoperative pediatric cardiothoracic admissions to the multidisciplinary and cardiothoracic intensive care units of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH Enugu, Nigeria to determine their Intensive Care Unit management and outcome over a 2 year span - June 2002 to June 2004 were retrospectively reviewed. Data collected included patient demographics, diagnosis, duration of stay in the intensive care unit, therapeutic interventions and outcome. RESULTS: There were a total of thirty consecutive postoperative paediatric admissions to the intensive care unit over the 2 year study period. The average age of the patients was 5.1 years with a range of 2 weeks to 13 years. Twelve patients had cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB, three patients had colon transplant, four patients had pericardiotomy/pericardicectomy, and five patients had diagnostic/therapeutic bronchoscopy. The remaining patients had the following surgeries, thoracotomy for repair of diaphragmatic hernia/decortications, delayed primary repair of esophageal atresia and gastrostomy. Two patients had excision of a cervical teratoma and cystic hygroma. The average duration of stay in the intensive care unit was 6.2 days. Ten patients (33% received pressor agents for organ support. Five patients (17% had mechanical ventilation, while twenty-five patients (83% received oxygen therapy via intranasal cannula or endotracheal tube. Seven patients (23% received blood transfusion in the ICU. There was a 66% survival rate with ten deaths. CONCLUSION: Paediatric cardio-thoracic services in Nigeria suffer from the problems of inadequate funding and manpower flight to better

  19. Risk Factors for Persistent MRSA Colonization in Children with Multiple Intensive Care Unit Admissions

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    Popoola, Victor O; Tamma, Pranita; Reich, Nicholas G.; Perl, Trish M.; Milstone, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    We studied MRSA colonized children with multiple ICU admissions to assess the persistence of MRSA colonization. Our data found that children with more than one year between ICU admissions had a higher MRSA colonization prevalence than the overall ICU population, supporting empiric contact precautions for children with prior MRSA colonization.

  20. Five Years of Acute Stroke Unit Care: Comparing ASU and Non-ASU Admissions and Allied Health Involvement

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    Isobel J. Hubbard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Evidence indicates that Stroke Units decrease mortality and morbidity. An Acute Stroke Unit (ASU provides specialised, hyperacute care and thrombolysis. John Hunter Hospital, Australia, admits 500 stroke patients each year and has a 4-bed ASU. Aims. This study investigated hospital admissions over a 5-year period of all strokes patients and of all patients admitted to the 4-bed ASU and the involvement of allied health professionals. Methods. The study retrospectively audited 5-year data from all stroke patients admitted to John Hunter Hospital (n=2525 and from nonstroke patients admitted to the ASU (n=826. The study’s primary outcomes were admission rates, length of stay (days, and allied health involvement. Results. Over 5 years, 47% of stroke patients were admitted to the ASU. More male stroke patients were admitted to the ASU (chi2=5.81; P=0.016. There was a trend over time towards parity between the number of stroke and nonstroke patients admitted to the ASU. When compared to those admitted elsewhere, ASU stroke patients had a longer length of stay (z=−8.233; P=0.0000 and were more likely to receive allied healthcare. Conclusion. This is the first study to report 5 years of ASU admissions. Acute Stroke Units may benefit from a review of the healthcare provided to all stroke patients. The trends over time with respect to the utilisation of the John Hunter Hospitall’s ASU have resulted in a review of the hospitall’s Stroke Unit and allied healthcare.

  1. Cocaine-related admissions to an intensive care unit: a five-year study of incidence and outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Galvin, S

    2010-02-01

    Cocaine misuse is increasing and it is evidently considered a relatively safe drug of abuse in Ireland. To address this perception, we reviewed the database of an 18-bed Dublin intensive care unit, covering all admissions from 2003 to 2007. We identified cocaine-related cases, measuring hospital mortality and long-term survival in early 2009. Cocaine-related admissions increased from around one annually in 2003-05 to 10 in 2007. Their median (IQR [range]) age was 25 (21-35 [17-47]) years and 78% were male. The median (IQR [range]) APACHE II score was 16 (11-27 [5-36]) and length of intensive care stay was 5 (3-9 [1-16]) days. Ten patients died during their hospital stay. A further five had died by the time of follow-up, a median of 24 months later. One was untraceable. Cocaine toxicity necessitating intensive care is increasingly common in Dublin. Hospital mortality in this series was 52%. These findings may help to inform public attitudes to cocaine.

  2. Avoidable causes on the waiting list for admissions to intensive care units

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    Guido Luis Gomes Otto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate occurrence of avoidable-mortality causes on the waiting list of patients at the intensive care units. Methods: one thousand, two hundred and twelve enrollments of patients from all age groups were analyzed and classified according to the Brazilian Health System for causes of avoidable mortality. Descriptive statistics for simple, relative and mean frequency rates were employed for the comparative analysis of the variables. Results: cases of non-communicable diseases, among the avoidable-mortality causes, occupied more than 80.0% of intensive care unit´s beds. Hospitalizations comprised illnesses of the circulatory and respiratory apparatus, especially in patients over 40 years old, together with the external causes and consequences of pregnancy and puerperium with mortality rates within the 15-39 age group. Conclusion: the high proportion of patients with diseases from avoidable causes on the waiting list for intensive care units hospitalization suggest that improvements in the programs involved with the prevention of diseases, especially non-communicable diseases, are needed.

  3. Preoperative predictive factors for intensive care unit admission after pulmonary resection

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    Liana Pinheiro

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine whether the use of a set of preoperative variables can predict the need for postoperative ICU admission. Methods: This was a prospective observational cohort study of 120 patients undergoing elective pulmonary resection between July of 2009 and April of 2012. Prediction of ICU admission was based on the presence of one or more of the following preoperative characteristics: predicted pneumonectomy; severe/very severe COPD; severe restrictive lung disease; FEV1 or DLCO predicted to be < 40% postoperatively; SpO2 on room air at rest < 90%; need for cardiac monitoring as a precautionary measure; or American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status ≥ 3. The gold standard for mandatory admission to the ICU was based on the presence of one or more of the following postoperative characteristics: maintenance of mechanical ventilation or reintubation; acute respiratory failure or need for noninvasive ventilation; hemodynamic instability or shock; intraoperative or immediate postoperative complications (clinical or surgical; or a recommendation by the anesthesiologist or surgeon to continue treatment in the ICU. Results: Among the 120 patients evaluated, 24 (20.0% were predicted to require ICU admission, and ICU admission was considered mandatory in 16 (66.6% of those 24. In contrast, among the 96 patients for whom ICU admission was not predicted, it was required in 14 (14.5%. The use of the criteria for predicting ICU admission showed good accuracy (81.6%, sensitivity of 53.3%, specificity of 91%, positive predictive value of 66.6%, and negative predictive value of 85.4%. Conclusions: The use of preoperative criteria for predicting the need for ICU admission after elective pulmonary resection is feasible and can reduce the number of patients staying in the ICU only for monitoring.

  4. Relationship between glycated hemoglobin, Intensive Care Unit admission blood sugar and glucose control with ICU mortality in critically ill patients

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    Mahmoodpoor, Ata; Hamishehkar, Hadi; Shadvar, Kamran; Beigmohammadi, Mohammadtaghi; Iranpour, Afshin; Sanaie, Sarvin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The association between hyperglycemia and mortality is believed to be influenced by the presence of diabetes mellitus (DM). In this study, we evaluated the effect of preexisting hyperglycemia on the association between acute blood glucose management and mortality in critically ill patients. The primary objective of the study was the relationship between HbA1c and mortality in critically ill patients. Secondary objectives of the study were relationship between Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission blood glucose and glucose control during ICU stay with mortality in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: Five hundred patients admitted to two ICUs were enrolled. Blood sugar and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) concentrations on ICU admission were measured. Age, sex, history of DM, comorbidities, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, sequential organ failure assessment score, hypoglycemic episodes, drug history, mortality, and development of acute kidney injury and liver failure were noted for all patients. Results: Without considering the history of diabetes, nonsurvivors had significantly higher HbA1c values compared to survivors (7.25 ± 1.87 vs. 6.05 ± 1.22, respectively, P < 0.001). Blood glucose levels in ICU admission showed a significant correlation with risk of death (P < 0.006, confidence interval [CI]: 1.004–1.02, relative risk [RR]: 1.01). Logistic regression analysis revealed that HbA1c increased the risk of death; with each increase in HbA1c level, the risk of death doubled. However, this relationship was not statistically significant (P: 0.161, CI: 0.933–1.58, RR: 1.2). Conclusions: Acute hyperglycemia significantly affects mortality in the critically ill patients; this relation is also influenced by chronic hyperglycemia. PMID:27076705

  5. Relationship between glycated hemoglobin, Intensive Care Unit admission blood sugar and glucose control with ICU mortality in critically ill patients

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    Ata Mahmoodpoor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The association between hyperglycemia and mortality is believed to be influenced by the presence of diabetes mellitus (DM. In this study, we evaluated the effect of preexisting hyperglycemia on the association between acute blood glucose management and mortality in critically ill patients. The primary objective of the study was the relationship between HbA1c and mortality in critically ill patients. Secondary objectives of the study were relationship between Intensive Care Unit (ICU admission blood glucose and glucose control during ICU stay with mortality in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: Five hundred patients admitted to two ICUs were enrolled. Blood sugar and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c concentrations on ICU admission were measured. Age, sex, history of DM, comorbidities, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, sequential organ failure assessment score, hypoglycemic episodes, drug history, mortality, and development of acute kidney injury and liver failure were noted for all patients. Results: Without considering the history of diabetes, nonsurvivors had significantly higher HbA1c values compared to survivors (7.25 ± 1.87 vs. 6.05 ± 1.22, respectively, P < 0.001. Blood glucose levels in ICU admission showed a significant correlation with risk of death (P < 0.006, confidence interval [CI]: 1.004–1.02, relative risk [RR]: 1.01. Logistic regression analysis revealed that HbA1c increased the risk of death; with each increase in HbA1c level, the risk of death doubled. However, this relationship was not statistically significant (P: 0.161, CI: 0.933–1.58, RR: 1.2. Conclusions: Acute hyperglycemia significantly affects mortality in the critically ill patients; this relation is also influenced by chronic hyperglycemia.

  6. HIV testing and clinical status upon admission to a specialized health care unit in Pará, Brazil

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    Paulo Afonso Martins Abati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the clinical and laboratory characteristics of HIV-infected individuals upon admission to a reference health care center. METHODS This cross-sectional study was conducted between 1999 and 2010 on 527 individuals with confirmed serological diagnosis of HIV infection who were enrolled in an outpatient health care service in Santarém, PA, Northern Brazil. Data were collected from medical records and included the reason for HIV testing, clinical status, and count of peripheral CD4+ T lymphocytes upon enrollment. The data were divided into three groups, according to the patient’s year of admission – P1 (1999-2002, P2 (2003-2006, and P3 (2007-2010 – for comparative analysis of the variables of interest. RESULTS In the study group, 62.0% of the patients were assigned to the P3 group. The reason for undergoing HIV testing differed between genders. In the male population, most tests were conducted because of the presence of symptoms suggesting infection. Among women, tests were the result of knowledge of the partner’s seropositive status in groups P1 and P2. Higher proportion of women undergoing testing because of symptoms of HIV/AIDS infection abolished the difference between genders in the most recent period. A higher percentage of patients enrolling at a more advanced stage of the disease was observed in P3. CONCLUSIONS Despite the increased awareness of the number of HIV/AIDS cases, these patients have identified their serological status late and were admitted to health care units with active disease. The HIV/AIDS epidemic in Pará presents specificities in its progression that indicate the complex characteristics of the epidemic in the Northern region of Brazil and across the country.

  7. Custody, care and country of origin: demographic and diagnostic admission statistics at an inner-city adult psychiatry unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brendan D; Emechebe, Afam; Anamdi, Chike; Duffy, Richard; Murphy, Niamh; Rock, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Involuntary detention is a feature of psychiatric care in many countries. We previously reported an involuntary admission rate of 67.7 per 100,000 population per year in inner-city Dublin (January 2008-December 2010), which was higher than Ireland's national rate (38.5). We also found that the proportion of admissions that was involuntary was higher among individuals born outside Ireland (33.9%) compared to those from Ireland (12.0%), apparently owing to increased diagnoses of schizophrenia in the former group. In the present study (January 2011-June 2013) we again found that the proportion of admissions that was involuntary was higher among individuals from outside Ireland (32.5%) compared to individuals from Ireland (9.9%) (p<0.001), but this is primarily attributable to a lower rate of voluntary admission among individuals born outside Ireland (206.1 voluntary admissions per 100,000 population per year; deprivation-adjusted rate: 158.5) compared to individuals from Ireland (775.1; deprivation-adjusted rate: 596.2). Overall, admission rates in our deprived, inner-city catchment area remain higher than national rates and this may be attributable to differential effects of Ireland's recent economic problems on different areas within Ireland. The relatively low rate of voluntary admission among individuals born outside Ireland may be attributable to different patterns of help-seeking which mental health services in Ireland need to take into account in future service-planning. Other jurisdictions could also usefully focus attention not just on rates on involuntary admission among individuals born elsewhere, but also rates of voluntary admission which may provide useful insights for service-planning and delivery.

  8. The WHO near miss criteria are appropriate for admission of critically ill pregnant women to intensive care units in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yong-qing; GE Qing-gang; WANG Jing; NIU Ji-hong; HUANG Chao; ZHAO Yang-yu

    2013-01-01

    Background Evaluation of the severity of the pregnant women with suitable admission to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU)is very important for obstetricians.By now there are no criteria for critically ill obstetric patients admitted to the ICU.In this article,we investigated the admission criteria of critically ill patients admitted to the ICU in order to provide a referral basis of reasonable use of the ICU.Methods A retrospective analysis of critically ill pregnant women admitted to the ICU in Perking University Third Hospital in China in the last 6 years (from January 2006 to December 2011) was performed,using acute physiology and chronic health evaluation Ⅱ (APACHE-Ⅱ),Marshall and WHO near miss criteria to assess the severity of illness of patients.Results There were 101 critically ill pregnant patients admitted to the ICU.Among them,25.7% women were complicated with internal or surgical diseases,and 23.8% women were patients of postpartum hemorrhage and 23.8% women were patients of pregnancy-induced hypertension.Sixty-nine cases (68.3%) were administrated with adjunct respiration with a respirator.Sixteen cases (15.8%) required 1-2 types of vasoactive drugs.Fifty-five cases (54.5%)required a hemodynamic monitoring.Seventy-three cases (72.3%) had multiple organ dysfunctions (MODS).The average duration in ICU was (7.5±3.0) days.A total of 12.9%,23.8% and 74.3% of women were diagnosed as critically ill according to the APACHE-Ⅱ,Marshall and WHO near miss criteria,respectively.The rate was significantly different according to the three criteria (P<0.01).Conclusions The WHO near miss criteria can correctly reflect the severity of illness of pregnant women,and the WHO near miss criteria are appropriate for admission of critically ill pregnant women to ICU in China.

  9. [Structure, organization and capacity problems in emergency medical services, emergency admission and intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, W

    1994-01-01

    Emergency medicine is subjected worldwide to financial stringencies and organizational evaluations of cost-effectiveness. The various links in the chain of survival are affected differently. Bystander assistance or bystander CPR is available in only 30% of the emergencies, response intervals--if at all required by legislation--are observed to only a limited degree or are too extended for survival in cardiac arrest. A single emergency telephone number is lacking. Too many different phone numbers for emergency reporting result in confusion and delays. Organizational realities are not fully overcome and impair efficiency. The position of the emergency physician in the EMS System is inadequately defined, the qualification of too many emergency physicians are unsatisfactory. In spite of this, emergency physicians are frequently forced to answer out-of-hospital emergency calls. Conflicts between emergency physicians and EMTs may be overcome by providing both groups with comparable qualifications as well as by providing an explicit definition of emergency competence. A further source of conflict occurs at the juncture of prehospital and inhospital emergency care in the emergency department. Deficiencies on either side play a decisive role. At least in principle there are solutions to the deficiencies in the EMSS and in intensive care medicine. They are among others: Adequate financial compensation of emergency personnel, availability of sufficient numbers of highly qualified personnel, availability of a central receiving area with an adjacent emergency ward, constant information flow to the dispatch center on the number of available emergency beds, maintaining 5% of all beds as emergency beds, establishing intermediate care facilities. Efficiency of emergency physician activities can be demonstrated in polytraumatized patients or in patients with ventricular fibrillation or acute myocardial infarction, in patients with acute myocardial insufficiency and other emergency

  10. Insomnia among patients with advanced disease during admission in a Palliative Care Unit: a prospective observational study on its frequency and association with psychological, physical and environmental factors

    OpenAIRE

    Renom-Guiteras, Anna; Planas, José; Farriols, Cristina; Mojal, Sergi; Miralles, Ramón; Silvent, Maria A; Ruiz-Ripoll, Ada I

    2014-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were: 1) to assess the frequency of insomnia among patients during admission in a Palliative Care Unit (PCU); 2) to study the association between emotional distress and insomnia, taking physical, environmental and other psychological factors into account. Methods Prospective observational study including patients consecutively admitted to a PCU during eight months, excluding those with severe cognitive problems or too low performance status. Insomnia was asse...

  11. Trend in admissions, clinical features and outcome of preeclampsia and eclampsia as seen from the intensive care unit of the Douala General Hospital, Cameroon

    OpenAIRE

    Priso, Eugene Belley; Njamen, Theophile Nana; Tchente, Charlotte Nguefack; Kana, Albert Justin; Landry, Tchuenkam; Tchawa, Ulrich Flore Nyaga; Hentchoya, Romuald; Beyiha, Gerard; Halle, Marie Patrice; Aminde, Leopold; Dzudie, Anastase

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy (HDP) are a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. We aimed at determining the trends in admission, profiles and outcomes of women admitted for preeclampsia and eclampsia to an intensive care unit (ICU) in Cameroon. Methods A retrospective study involving 74 women admitted to the ICU of the Douala General Hospital for severe preeclampsia and eclampsia from January 2007 to December 2014. Clinical profiles and outcome data were obtained...

  12. Assessment of risk factors related to healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection at patient admission to an intensive care unit in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogura Hiroshi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA infection in intensive care unit (ICU patients prolongs ICU stay and causes high mortality. Predicting HA-MRSA infection on admission can strengthen precautions against MRSA transmission. This study aimed to clarify the risk factors for HA-MRSA infection in an ICU from data obtained within 24 hours of patient ICU admission. Methods We prospectively studied HA-MRSA infection in 474 consecutive patients admitted for more than 2 days to our medical, surgical, and trauma ICU in a tertiary referral hospital in Japan. Data obtained from patients within 24 hours of ICU admission on 11 prognostic variables possibly related to outcome were evaluated to predict infection risk in the early phase of ICU stay. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent risk factors for HA-MRSA infection. Results Thirty patients (6.3% had MRSA infection, and 444 patients (93.7% were infection-free. Intubation, existence of open wound, treatment with antibiotics, and steroid administration, all occurring within 24 hours of ICU admission, were detected as independent prognostic indicators. Patients with intubation or open wound comprised 96.7% of MRSA-infected patients but only 57.4% of all patients admitted. Conclusions Four prognostic variables were found to be risk factors for HA-MRSA infection in ICU: intubation, open wound, treatment with antibiotics, and steroid administration, all occurring within 24 hours of ICU admission. Preemptive infection control in patients with these risk factors might effectively decrease HA-MRSA infection.

  13. Why routine intensive care unit admission after elective open infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm repair is no longer an evidence based practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, David

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Elective open infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) repair is major surgery performed on high-risk patients. Routine ICU admission postoperatively is the current accepted standard of care. Few of these patients actually require a level of care that cannot be provided just as effectively in a surgical high dependency unit (HDU). Our aim was to determine, \\'can high risk patients that will require ICU admission postoperatively be reliably identified preoperatively?\\'. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of all elective open infrarenal AAA repairs in our institution over a 3-year period was performed. The Estimation of Physiological Ability and Surgical Stress (E-PASS) model was used as our risk stratification tool for predicting post-operative morbidity. Renal function was also considered as a predictor of outcome, independent of the E-PASS. RESULTS: 80% (n = 16) were admitted to ICU. Only 30% (n = 6) of the total study population necessitated intensive care. There were 9 complications in 7 patients in our study. The E-PASS comprehensive risk score (CRS)\\/Surgical stress score (SSS) were found to be significantly associated with the presence of a complication (p = 0.009)\\/(p = 0.032) respectively. Serum creatinine (p = 0.013) was similarly significantly associated with the presence of a complication. CONCLUSIONS: The E-PASS model possessing increasing external validity is an effective risk stratification tool in safely deciding the appropriate level of post-operative care for elective infrarenal AAA repairs.

  14. Deliberate drug poisoning with slight symptoms on admission: are there predictive factors for intensive care unit referral? A three-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maignan, Maxime; Pommier, Philippe; Clot, Sandrine; Saviuc, Philippe; Debaty, Guillaume; Briot, Raphaël; Carpentier, Françoise; Danel, Vincent

    2014-03-01

    Deliberate drug poisoning leads to 1% of emergency department (ED) admissions. Even if most patients do not exhibit any significant complication, 5% need to be referred to an intensive care unit (ICU). Emergency physicians should distinguish between low- and high-acuity poisoned patients at an early stage to avoid excess morbidity. Our aim was to identify ICU transfer factors in deliberately self-poisoned patients without life-threatening symptoms on admission. We performed a 3-year retrospective observational study in a university hospital. Patients over 18 years of age with a diagnosis of deliberate drug poisoning were included. Clinical and toxicological data were analysed with univariate tests between groups (ED stay versus ICU transfer). Factors associated with ICU admission were then included in a logistic regression analysis. Two thousand five hundred and sixty-five patients were included. 63.2% were women, and median age was 40 (28-49). 142 patients (5.5%) were transferred to ICU. Cardiac drugs [adjusted OR (aOR) = 19.81; 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 7.93-49.50], neuroleptics (aOR = 2.78; 95% CI: 1.55-4.97) and meprobamate (aOR = 2.71; 95% CI: 1.27-5.81) ingestions were significantly linked to ICU admission. A presumed toxic dose ingestion (aOR = 2.27; 95% CI: 1.28-4.02), number of ingested tablets (aOR = 1.01; 95% CI: 1.01-1.02 for each tablet) and delay between ingestion and ED arrival <2 hr (aOR = 2.85; 95%CI: 1.62-5.03) were also factors for ICU referral. The Glasgow Coma Scale was the only clinical feature associated with ICU admission (aOR = 1.57; 95% CI: 1.44-1.70 for each point loss). These results suggest that emergency physicians should pay particular attention to toxicological data on ED admission to distinguish between low- and high-acuity self-poisoned patients. PMID:23998644

  15. The differential effects of maternal age, race/ethnicity and insurance on neonatal intensive care unit admission rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Jongh Beatriz E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal race/ethnicity, age, and socioeconomic status (SES are important factors determining birth outcome. Previous studies have demonstrated that, teenagers, and mothers with advanced maternal age (AMA, and Black/Non-Hispanic race/ethnicity can independently increase the risk for a poor pregnancy outcome. Similarly, public insurance has been associated with suboptimal health outcomes. The interaction and impact on the risk of a pregnancy resulting in a NICU admission has not been studied. Our aim was, to analyze the simultaneous interactions of teen/advanced maternal age (AMA, race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status on the odds of NICU admission. Methods The Consortium of Safe Labor Database (subset of n = 167,160 live births was used to determine NICU admission and maternal factors: age, race/ethnicity, insurance, previous c-section, and gestational age. Results AMA mothers were more likely than teenaged mothers to have a pregnancy result in a NICU admission. Black/Non-Hispanic mothers with private insurance had increased odds for NICU admission. This is in contrast to the lower odds of NICU admission seen with Hispanic and White/Non-Hispanic pregnancies with private insurance. Conclusions Private insurance is protective against a pregnancy resulting in a NICU admission for Hispanic and White/Non-Hispanic mothers, but not for Black/Non-Hispanic mothers. The health disparity seen between Black and White/Non-Hispanics for the risk of NICU admission is most evident among pregnancies covered by private insurance. These study findings demonstrate that adverse pregnancy outcomes are mitigated differently across race, maternal age, and insurance status.

  16. Retrospective study on prognostic importance of serum procalcitonin and amino - terminal pro - brain natriuretic peptide levels as compared to Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IV Score on Intensive Care Unit admission, in a mixed Intensive Care Unit population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra Mehta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Timely decision making in Intensive Care Unit (ICU is very essential to improve the outcome of critically sick patients. Conventional scores like Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE IV are quite cumbersome with calculations and take minimum 24 hours. Procalcitonin has shown to have prognostic value in ICU/Emergency department (ED in disease states like pneumonia, sepsis etc. NTproBNP has demonstrated excellent diagnostic and prognostic importance in cardiac diseases. It has also been found elevated in non-cardiac diseases. We chose to study the prognostic utility of these markers on ICU admission. Settings and Design: Retrospective observational study. Materials and Methods: A Retrospective analysis of 100 eligible patients was done who had undergone PCT and NTproBNP measurements on ICU admission. Their correlations with all cause mortality, length of hospital stay, need for ventilator support, need for vasopressors were performed. Results: Among 100 randomly selected ICU patients, 28 were non-survivors. NTproBNP values on admission significantly correlated with all cause mortality (P = 0.036, AUC = 0.643 and morbidity (P = 0.000, AUC = 0.763, comparable to that of APACHE-IV score. PCT values on admission did not show significant association with mortality, but correlated well with morbidity and prolonged hospital length of stay (AUC = 0.616, P = 0.045. Conclusion: The current study demonstrated a good predictive value of NTproBNP, in terms of mortality and morbidity comparable to that of APACHE-IV score. Procalcitonin, however, was found to have doubtful prognostic importance. These findings need to be confirmed in a prospective larger study.

  17. Ethical problems in intensive care unit admission and discharge decisions: a qualitative study among physicians and nurses in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, A.J.; Sluisveld, N. van; Leeuwen, E.S. van; Wollersheim, H.C.; Dekkers, W.J.M.; Zegers, M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There have been few empirical studies into what non-medical factors influence physicians and nurses when deciding about admission and discharge of ICU patients. Information about the attitudes of healthcare professionals about this process can be used to improve decision-making about res

  18. Abnormal vital signs are strong predictors for intensive care unit admission and in-hospital mortality in adults triaged in the emergency department - a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barfod Charlotte

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Assessment and treatment of the acutely ill patient have improved by introducing systematic assessment and accelerated protocols for specific patient groups. Triage systems are widely used, but few studies have investigated the ability of the triage systems in predicting outcome in the unselected acute population. The aim of this study was to quantify the association between the main component of the Hillerød Acute Process Triage (HAPT system and the outcome measures; Admission to Intensive Care Unit (ICU and in-hospital mortality, and to identify the vital signs, scored and categorized at admission, that are most strongly associated with the outcome measures. Methods The HAPT system is a minor modification of the Swedish Adaptive Process Triage (ADAPT and ranks patients into five level colour-coded triage categories. Each patient is assigned a triage category for the two main descriptors; vital signs, Tvitals, and presenting complaint, Tcomplaint. The more urgent of the two determines the final triage category, Tfinal. We retrieved 6279 unique adult patients admitted through the Emergency Department (ED from the Acute Admission Database. We performed regression analysis to evaluate the association between the covariates and the outcome measures. Results The covariates, Tvitals, Tcomplaint and Tfinal were all significantly associated with ICU admission and in-hospital mortality, the odds increasing with the urgency of the triage category. The vital signs best predicting in-hospital mortality were saturation of peripheral oxygen (SpO2, respiratory rate (RR, systolic blood pressure (BP and Glasgow Coma Score (GCS. Not only the type, but also the number of abnormal vital signs, were predictive for adverse outcome. The presenting complaints associated with the highest in-hospital mortality were 'dyspnoea' (11.5% and 'altered level of consciousness' (10.6%. More than half of the patients had a Tcomplaint more urgent than Tvitals

  19. An audit of obstetric admissions to intensive care unit in a medical college hospital of central India: lessons in preventing maternal morbidity and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Jain

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The spectrum of causes leading to maternal morbidity and mortality may be well reflected in the clinical profile of obstetric patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU. An audit of these patients may help in devising intervention strategies and implementing preventive measures. This is expected to contribute to the ongoing concerted multipronged efforts towards reducing maternal mortality as a step towards the millennium development goals. The aim was to study the clinical and demographic profile of antenatal and postpartum women requiring admission to the ICU, the interventions required in these women and the final outcome. The overall goal is to identify the contributing factors towards maternal morbidity and mortality. Methods: A retrospective analysis of hospital records of all antenatal, post-abortal and postpartum women admitted to the ICU at People's hospital, Bhopal over a period of 3 years (June 2011 to May 2014. Results: A total of 157 records were identified and analyzed: 22 (14% antenatal, seven (4% post-abortion, 114 (73% postpartum, and 14(9% post-laparotomy women. The mean age was 25 years (Range 18-38 years; SD 4.49, two thirds being from rural areas. Majority (78% had no earlier visit. The gestational age at admission to ICU ranged from 6-43 weeks (Mean 31 weeks; SD 9.06. One third (24% of patients had severe anemia, 18 patients needed ventilation, 25 required inotropic support, 4 required dialysis and 17 underwent surgical intervention. Blood or blood component therapy was needed in 60% cases with total blood units transfused being 225. The average duration of stay in intensive care unit was 79 hours. Analyzing as organ-system dysfunctions: Cardiovascular dysfunction (22%, hematological (20%, hepatic (16%, neurological (11%, septicemia (11%, renal (9%. There were 19 maternal deaths. Conclusions: Maternal anemia and consequences still contribute significantly to maternal morbidity. Non-utilization of

  20. The impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on intensive care unit admission and 30-day mortality in patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Platon, Anna Maria; Erichsen, Rune; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo;

    2014-01-01

    all patients undergoing CRC surgery in the period 2005-2011, identified through medical databases. We categorised the patients according to the history of COPD. We assessed the rate of complications within 30 days. We computed 30-day mortality among patients with/without COPD using the Kaplan......-Meier method. We used Cox regression to compute HRs for death, controlling for age, gender, type of admission, cancer stage, hospital volume, alcohol-related diseases, obesity and Charlson comorbidity score. RESULTS: We identified 18 302 CRC surgery patients. Of these, 7.9% had a prior diagnosis of COPD. Among...... patients with COPD, 16.1% were admitted postoperatively to the intensive care unit, 1.9% were treated with mechanical ventilation, and 3.6% were treated with non-invasive ventilation. In patients without COPD, the corresponding proportions were 9.7%, 1.1% and 1.1%. The reoperation rate was 10.6% among...

  1. Perfil das admissões em uma unidade de terapia intensiva obstétrica de uma maternidade brasileira Admission profile in an obstetrics intensive care unit in a maternity hospital of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melania Maria Ramos de Amorim

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: descrever a experiência de três anos com terapia intensiva em obstetrícia em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva em setor que permite que obstetras continuem conduzindo as pacientes obstétricas criticamente enfermas. MÉTODOS: estudo avaliando 933 pacientes atendidas na UTI obstétrica do Instituto Materno Infantil Prof. Fernando Figueira (IMIP de setembro de 2002 a fevereiro de 2005. As variáveis foram idade, paridade, diagnóstico de admissão, época da admissão, diagnósticos e complicações durante o internamento, procedimentos invasivos empregados e resultado final. RESULTADOS: as três principais causas de internamento foram hipertensão (87%, hemorragia obstétrica (4,9% e infecção (2,1%. A idade média foi 25 anos e 65% dos partos, cesarianas. Anemia foi achado freqüente (58,4%. Outros diagnósticos: insuficiência renal, doença tromboembólica, cardiopatia, edema agudo de pulmão, sepse, choque hemorrágico. Das 814 pacientes admitidas com hipertensão associada à gestação, 65% tinham pré-eclâmpsia grave, 16% pré-eclâmpsia leve e 11% eclâmpsia. Síndrome HELLP ocorreu em 46%. Ventilação mecânica foi necessária em 3,6% e hemotransfusão em 17%. A duração média do internamento foi cinco dias (1-41. A taxa de óbito foi 2,4%. CONCLUSÕES: a taxa de morte foi relativamente baixa, sugerindo que uma UTI conduzida por obstetras pode ser uma estratégia factível para reduzir a mortalidade materna.OBJECTIVES: to describe a three-year experience with obstetric Intensive Care Units (ICU, a unit allowing obstetricians to continue to care for critically ill obstetrics patients. METHODS: the study evaluated all admissions (933 to the Obstetric ICU, in the Instituto Materno Infantil Prof. Fernando Figueira (IMIP, from September 2002 to February 2005. Age, parity, diagnosis, admission time, diagnosis during ICU stay, associated complications, invasive procedures utilized, and final outcome were analyzed. RESULTS

  2. Admission of hematopoietic cell transplantation patients to the intensive care unit at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Karen; Rojas, Patricio; Ernst, Daniel; Bertin, Pablo; Nervi, Bruno; Jara, Veronica; Garcia, Maria Jose; Ocqueteau, Mauricio; Sarmiento, Mauricio; Ramirez, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can have complications that require management in the intensive care unit (ICU). We conducted a retrospective study of patients undergoing HCT between 2007 and 2011 with admission to the ICU. We analyzed 97 patients, with an average age of 37 (range, 15 to 68). The main indications for HCT were hematologic malignancies (84%, n = 82). Ninety percent (n = 87) received myeloablative conditioning. Thirty-one percent were admitted (autologous transplant recipients 15%, allogeneic transplant recipients 34%, and umbilical cord blood [UCB] transplant recipients 48%) with an average length of stay of 19 days (range, 1 to 73 days). The average time between transplantation and transfer was 15 days. The main causes of admission were acute respiratory failure (63%) and septic shock (20%). ICU mortality was 20% for autologous transplantations and 64% for allogeneic transplantations (adult donor and UCB combined). On average, patients died 108 days after the transplantation (range, 4 to 320 days). One-year overall survival, comparing patients entering the ICU with those never admitted, was 16% versus 82% (P < .0001) for allogeneic transplantations (adult donor and UCB combined) and 80% versus 89% (P = not significant) for autologous transplantations. Acute graft-versus-host disease was significantly associated with death in ICU after UCB HCT. ICU support is satisfactory in about one half of patients admitted, characterized by a short and medium term prognosis not as unfavorable as has been previously reported.

  3. Influenza in hospitalized children in Ireland in the pandemic period and the 2010/2011 season: risk factors for paediatric intensive-care-unit admission.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rebolledo, J

    2013-11-11

    SUMMARY Influenza causes significant morbidity and mortality in children. This study\\'s objectives were to describe influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 during the pandemic, to compare it with circulating influenza in 2010\\/2011, and to identify risk factors for severe influenza defined as requiring admission to a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Children hospitalized with influenza during the pandemic were older, and more likely to have received antiviral therapy than children hospitalized during the 2010\\/2011 season. In 2010\\/2011, only one child admitted to a PICU with underlying medical conditions had been vaccinated. The risk of severe illness in the pandemic was higher in females and those with underlying conditions. In 2010\\/2011, infection with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 compared to other influenza viruses was a significant risk factor for severe disease. An incremental relationship was found between the number of underlying conditions and PICU admission. These findings highlight the importance of improving low vaccination uptake and increasing the use of antivirals in vulnerable children.

  4. The differential effects of maternal age, race/ethnicity and insurance on neonatal intensive care unit admission rates

    OpenAIRE

    de Jongh Beatriz E; Locke Robert; Paul David A; Hoffman Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Maternal race/ethnicity, age, and socioeconomic status (SES) are important factors determining birth outcome. Previous studies have demonstrated that, teenagers, and mothers with advanced maternal age (AMA), and Black/Non-Hispanic race/ethnicity can independently increase the risk for a poor pregnancy outcome. Similarly, public insurance has been associated with suboptimal health outcomes. The interaction and impact on the risk of a pregnancy resulting in a NICU admission ...

  5. The differential effects of maternal age, race/ethnicity and insurance on neonatal intensive care unit admission rates

    OpenAIRE

    de Jongh, Beatriz E; Locke, Robert; Paul, David A; Hoffman, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Background Maternal race/ethnicity, age, and socioeconomic status (SES) are important factors determining birth outcome. Previous studies have demonstrated that, teenagers, and mothers with advanced maternal age (AMA), and Black/Non-Hispanic race/ethnicity can independently increase the risk for a poor pregnancy outcome. Similarly, public insurance has been associated with suboptimal health outcomes. The interaction and impact on the risk of a pregnancy resulting in a NICU admission has not b...

  6. Comparison of reasons of admission of young, age 18-30 years old in Intensive Care Unit to young adult, age 31-40 years old due to road accident

    OpenAIRE

    Vaios Douloudis; Catherina Kastanioti; Vasiliki Ligga; Dimitrios Tziallas; Vasilios Tziallas; Aggelos Tsalkanis

    2010-01-01

    During recent years, it has been noticed a remarkable increase in frequency of admission of young individuals in Intensive Care Units (ICU) due to road accidents. The aim of the present study was to compare the reasons of admission of young individuals 18-30 years old to young adults 31-40 years old in ICU due to road accident. Method and material: The sample studied consisted of individuals 18-40 years old that were hospitalized in ICU due to road accident. Data were collected by the complet...

  7. Clinical presentation and predictors of outcome in patients with severe acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease requiring admission to intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamity Ranjit

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AE-COPD is a common reason for emergency room (ER visit about which little has been documented from India. Methods Prospective study of the clinical presentation and predictors of outcome in 116 patients presenting with severe AE-COPD requiring admission to the medical intensive care unit between January 2000 and December 2004. Results Their mean age was 62.1 ± 9.8 years. There were 102 males. Mean duration of COPD was 7.2 ± 5.8 years. All males were smokers (22.3 ± 11.2 pack years; 35.2% smoked cigarettes and 64.8% smoked bidis. All women were exposed to domestic fuel. Associated co-morbid illnesses were present in 81 patients (69.8%; 53(45.7% had one co-morbid illness and the remaining 28 (54.3% had two or more co-morbid illnesses. Evidence of past pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB was present in 28.4% patients; 5 patients who also had type II diabetes mellitus had active PTB. Arterial blood gas analysis revealed respiratory failure in 40 (33.8% patients (type I 17.5% and type II 82.5%. Invasive mechanical ventilation was required in 18 patients. Sixteen (13.7% patients died. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed need for invasive ventilation (OR 45.809, 95%CI 607.46 to 3.009;p Conclusion Co-morbid conditions and metabolic abnormalities render the diagnosis of AE-COPD difficult and also contribute to mortality. High prevalence of past PTB and active PTB in patients with AE-COPD suggests an intriguing relationship between smoking, PTB and COPD which merits further study.

  8. Admission Volume and Quality of Mental Health Care Among Danish Patients With Recently Diagnosed Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mette; Mainz, Jan; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The relationship between admission volume and the quality of mental health care remains unclear. This study examined the association between admission volume of psychiatric hospital units and quality of mental health care among patients with recently diagnosed schizophrenia (past year......) admitted to units in Denmark. METHODS: In a nationwide population-based cohort study, 3,209 patients admitted to psychiatric hospital units between 2004 and 2011 were identified from the Danish Schizophrenia Registry. Admission volume was categorized into four quartiles according to the individual unit...... care was defined as having received processes of care recommended in guidelines. RESULTS: Compared with patients admitted to low-volume psychiatric hospital units, patients admitted to very-high-volume units were more likely to receive high overall quality of mental health care (≥80% of recommended...

  9. Admissibility, stable units and connected components

    CERN Document Server

    Xarez, J J

    2011-01-01

    Consider a reflection from a finitely-complete category $\\mathbb{C}$ into its full subcategory $\\mathbb{M}$, with unit $\\eta :1_\\mathbb{C}\\rightarrow HI$. Suppose there is a left-exact functor $U$ into the category of sets, such that $UH$ reflects isomorphisms and $U(\\eta_C)$ is a surjection, for every $C\\in\\mathbb{C}$. If, in addition, all the maps $\\mathbb{M}(T,M)\\rightarrow \\mathbf{Set}(1,U(M))$ induced by the functor $UH$ are surjections, where $T$ and 1 are respectively terminal objects in $\\mathbb{C}$ and $\\mathbf{Set}$, for every object $M$ in the full subcategory $\\mathbb{M}$, then it is true that: the reflection $H\\vdash I$ is semi-left-exact (admissible in the sense of categorical Galois theory) if and only if its connected components are "connected"; it has stable units if and only if any finite product of connected components is "connected". Where the meaning of "connected" is the usual in categorical Galois theory, and the definition of connected component with respect to the ground structure wil...

  10. [Theophylline overdoses on admission to a resuscitation unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laaban, J P; Dupeyron, J P; Coignet, M C; Bedos, J P; Poirier, T; Rochemaure, J

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess in a prospective fashion the causes and the frequency of overdosage with Theophylline on admission to intensive care units, in patients on long term treatment with oral Theophylline and/or had previously received an intravenous injection (IV) of Aminophylline. In 72 patients [52 chronic airflow obstruction (or BPCO), 21 asthmatics] admitted for acute respiratory insufficiency (IRA) the blood level of Theophylline on admission to intensive care (T0) was determined systematically, and was in the toxic range (greater than 29 mg/l) in 17% of cases (12/72). In patients with T0 greater than 20 mg/l, repeat measurements of Theophylline clearance were carried out: 12 hours after admission by studying the fall in plasma levels (Cl1), then after 8 days (+/- 5) while perfusing IV Aminophylline at a constant flow (Cl2) and finally after changing over to slow release oral Theophylline 18 days (+/- 10) after admission (Cl3). Cl1 was less than 35 ml/kg/h in 9 patients (group I) and greater than 55 ml/kg/h in 3 patients (group II). All the patients in group I were on oral Theophylline in a dose which was not excessive (mean 10.6 +/- 3.3 mg/kg/24 h) and only one patient received an injection of IV Aminophylline. In group I, the clearance of Theophylline was very low initially (Cl1 = 18.6 +/- 9.6 ml/kg/h) and finally rose (Cl2 = 34.7 +/- 14 ml/kg/h p less than 0.02; and Cl3 = 46.9 +/- 24 ml/kg/h p less than 0.02).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3616118

  11. Off-hours admission and mortality in two pediatric intensive care units without 24-h in-house senior staff attendance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, Babette; Jansen, Nicolaas J. G.; Bollen, Casper W.; van Vught, Adrianus J.; van der Heide, Douwe; Albers, Marcel J. I. J.

    2010-01-01

    To compare risk-adjusted mortality of children non-electively admitted during off-hours with risk-adjusted mortality of children admitted during office hours to two pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) without 24-h in-house attendance of senior staff. Prospective observational study, performed bet

  12. Orthognathic Surgery Patients (Maxillary Impaction and Setback Plus Mandibular Advancement Plus Genioplasty Need More Intensive Care Unit (ICU Admission after Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Eftekharian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Due to shortage of ICU beds in hospitals, knowing what kind of orthognathic surgery patients more need ICU care after surgery would be important for surgeons and hospitals to prevent unnecessary ICU bed reservation. Purpose: The aim of the present study was to determine what kinds of orthognathic surgery patients would benefit more from ICU care after surgery. Materials and Method: 210 patients who were admitted to Chamran Hospital, Shiraz, for bimaxillary orthognathic surgery (2008-2013 were reviewed based on whether they had been admitted to ICU or maxillofacial surgery ward. Operation time, sex, intraoperative Estimated Blood Loss (EBL, postoperative complications, ICU admission, and unwanted complications resulting from staying in ICU were assessed. Results: Of 210 patients undergoing bimaxillary orthognathic surgery, 59 patients (28.1% were postoperatively admitted to the ICU and 151 in the maxillofacial ward (71.9%. There was not statistically significant difference in age and sex between the two groups (p> 0.05. The groups were significantly different in terms of operation time (p< 0.001. Blood loss For ICU admitted patients was 600.00±293.621mL and for those who were hospitalized in the ward was 350.00±298.397 mL. Statistically significant differences were found between the two groups (p< 0.001. Moreover, there was a direct linear correlation between operation time and intraoperative estimated blood loss and this relationship was statistically significant (r=0.42, p< 0.001. Patients with maxillary impaction and setback plus mandibular advancement plus genioplasty were among the most ICU admitted patients (44%, while these patients were only 20% of all patients who were admitted to the ward. As a final point, the result illustrated that patients who were admitted to the ICU experienced more complication such as bleeding, postoperative nausea, and pain (p< 0.001. Conclusion: Orthognathic surgery patients

  13. Maternal mortality and morbidity: epidemiology of intensive care admissions in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senanayake, H; Dias, T; Jayawardena, A

    2013-12-01

    Maternal mortality reviews are used globally to assess the quality of health-care services. With the decline in the number of maternal deaths, it has become difficult to derive meaningful conclusions that could have an impact on quality of care using maternal mortality data. The emphasis has recently shifted to severe acute maternal morbidity (SAMM), as an adjunct to maternal mortality reviews. Due to its heterogeneity, there are difficulties in recognising SAMM. The problem of identifying SAMM accurately is the main issue in investigating them. However, admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) provides an unambiguous, management-based inclusion criterion for a SAMM. ICU data are available across health-care settings prospectively and retrospectively, making them a tool that could be studied readily. However, admission to the ICU depends on many factors, such as accessibility and the availability of high-dependency units, which will reduce the need for ICU admission. Thresholds for admission vary widely and are generally higher in facilities that handle a heavier workload. In addition, not all women with SAMM receive intensive care. However, women at the severe end of the spectrum of severe morbidity will almost invariably receive intensive care. Notwithstanding these limitations, the epidemiology of intensive care admissions in pregnancy will provide valuable data about women with severe morbidity. The overall rate of obstetric ICU admission varies from 0.04% to 4.54%.

  14. Modeling in-Hospital Patient Survival During the First 28 Days After Intensive Care Unit Admission: a Prognostic Model for Clinical Trials in General Critically Ill Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno, R; Metnitz, P; Metnitz, B; Bauer, P.; Afonso de Carvalho, S; Hoechtl, A; SAPS 3 Investigators

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to develop a model for estimating patient 28-day in-hospital mortality using 2 different statistical approaches. DESIGN: The study was designed to develop an outcome prediction model for 28-day in-hospital mortality using (a) logistic regression with random effects and (b) a multilevel Cox proportional hazards model. SETTING: The study involved 305 intensive care units (ICUs) from the basic Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) 3 cohort. ...

  15. Retrospective study on prognostic importance of serum procalcitonin and amino - terminal pro - brain natriuretic peptide levels as compared to Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IV Score on Intensive Care Unit admission, in a mixed Intensive Care Unit population

    OpenAIRE

    Chitra Mehta; Babita Dara; Yatin Mehta; Tariq, Ali M.; George V Joby; Singh, Manish K

    2016-01-01

    Background: Timely decision making in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is very essential to improve the outcome of critically sick patients. Conventional scores like Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE IV) are quite cumbersome with calculations and take minimum 24 hours. Procalcitonin has shown to have prognostic value in ICU/Emergency department (ED) in disease states like pneumonia, sepsis etc. NTproBNP has demonstrated excellent diagnostic and prognostic importance in cardiac d...

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARDS AS A CAUSE OF PEDIATRIC INTENSIVE CARE ADMISSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Ali Haidar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Children are exposed to several environmental hazards with variable effects from mild to severe manifestations leading to death. The aim of this study is to study the pattern of Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU admission due to environmental hazards and its mortality rate. Methods: This is a hospital-based study conducted during a 5 years period in Al-Madinah Al-Munwarah, Saudi Arabia. Results: Out of total PICU admissions, 9% were due to environmental hazards. Bronchial asthma which is triggered mostly by environmental factors, was the most common (35.3% followed by: trauma (27%, poisoning (15.3% and submersion injuries (9.7%. Males were significantly more exposed to environmental hazard than females (χ2= 13, p = 0.021. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference in the frequency of environmental hazards between summer and winter (χ2= 12, p = 0.033. Trauma, poisoning, submersion injuries, stings and bites were more in summer compared to winter. However, bronchial asthma had higher frequency in winter. The Median length of PICU stay ranges from 1.6 – 12.5 days depending on the type of hazard. Overall mortality rate was 8.8% with the highest rate among trauma followed by submersion injury patients with no fatality in drug ingestion or food poisoning. Conclusion: Environmental hazards represent a preventable major health problem with significant mortality and burden in health economics by long PICU stay and its sequel.

  17. Vitamin D deficiency at pediatric intensive care admission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corsino Rey

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:to assess whether 25hydroxivitaminD or 25(OHvitD deficiency has a high prevalence at pediatric intensive care unit (PICU admission, and whether it is associated with increased prediction of mortality risk scores.METHOD:prospective observational study comparing 25(OHvitD levels measured in 156 patients during the 12 hours after critical care admission with the 25(OHvitD levels of 289 healthy children. 25(OHvitD levels were also compared between PICU patients with pediatric risk of mortality III (PRISM III or pediatric index of mortality 2 (PIM 2 > p75 [(group A; n = 33 vs. the others (group B; n = 123]. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as < 20 ng/mL levels.RESULTS:median (p25-p75 25(OHvitD level was 26.0 ng/mL (19.2-35.8 in PICU patients vs. 30.5 ng/mL (23.2-38.6 in healthy children (p = 0.007. The prevalence of 25(OHvitD < 20 ng/mL was 29.5% (95% CI: 22.0-37.0 vs. 15.6% (95% CI: 12.2-20.0 (p = 0.01. Pediatric intensive care patients presented an odds ratio (OR for hypovitaminosis D of 2.26 (CI 95%: 1.41-3.61. 25(OHvitD levels were 25.4 ng/mL (CI 95%: 15.5-36.0 in group A vs. 26.6 ng/mL (CI 95%: 19.3-35.5 in group B (p = 0.800.CONCLUSIONS:hypovitaminosis D incidence was high in PICU patients. Hypovitaminosis D was not associated with higher prediction of risk mortality scores.

  18. Comparison of reasons of admission of young, age 18-30 years old in Intensive Care Unit to young adult, age 31-40 years old due to road accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaios Douloudis

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, it has been noticed a remarkable increase in frequency of admission of young individuals in Intensive Care Units (ICU due to road accidents. The aim of the present study was to compare the reasons of admission of young individuals 18-30 years old to young adults 31-40 years old in ICU due to road accident. Method and material: The sample studied consisted of individuals 18-40 years old that were hospitalized in ICU due to road accident. Data were collected by the completion of a specially designed clinical protocol for the needs of the research. For the analysis of data the statistical package SPSS 13 was used and the x2 method. Results: 81,2% of the sample-studied were men and 18,8% women. Regarding nationality, 80,1 % were Greek and 19,9% foreigner. 34,6% of the participants were unemployed, 21,2% were working in private sector, 20,1% were free-lancers and 16,2% students. 46,3% of individuals were admitted in ICU after transfer of another hospital. In 69,7% of the participants age 18-30 years old and 74,5% of 31-40 years old road took place accident at night and 77,3% 18-30 years old and 77,0% of 31-40 years old road accident took place on the way to entertainment. The statistical analysis of data showed that : road accidents were the main reason for admission in ICU of young individuals of age 18-30 years old with statistically significant difference compared to those 31-40 years old, p<0,001. Brain injuries as well as admission of motorcycle drivers were more frequent in individuals of age 18-30 years old with statistically significant difference compared to those 31-40 years old, p=0,018 and p=0,041, respectively. On the contrary, admission of car-drivers and those who had consumed alcohol were more frequent in individuals of age 31-40 years old with statistically significant difference compared to group 18-30 years old, p=0,041 and , p<0,001, respectively. Conclusions: More often admitted in ICU motorcycle drivers of

  19. The health and social consequences of an alcohol related admission to critical care: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    McPeake, Joanne; Forrest, Ewan; Quasim, Tara; Kinsella, John; O'Neill, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the impact of critical care on future alcohol-related behaviour. Further, it aimed to explore patterns of recovery for patients with and without alcohol use disorders beyond the hospital environment. Design: In-depth, semistructured interviews with participants ( patients) 3–7 months post intensive care discharge. Setting: The setting for this study was a 20-bedded mixed intensive care unit (ICU), in a large teaching hospital in Scotland. On admission, patients ...

  20. Health and social consequences of an alcohol-related admission to critical care: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    McPeake, Joanne; Forrest, Ewan; Quasim, Tara; Kinsella, John; O'Neill, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the impact of critical care on future alcohol-related behaviour. Further, it aimed to explore patterns of recovery for patients with and without alcohol use disorders beyond the hospital environment. Design In-depth, semistructured interviews with participants (patients) 3–7 months post intensive care discharge. Setting The setting for this study was a 20-bedded mixed intensive care unit (ICU), in a large teaching hospital in Scotland. On admission, patients were allocate...

  1. Abnormal vital signs are strong predictors for Intensive Care Unit admission and in-hospital mortality in adults triaged in the Emergency Department - A prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Charlotte; Laurtizen, Marlene Mp; Danker, Jakob K;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Assessment and treatment of the acutely ill patient have improved by introducing systematic assessment and accelerated protocols for specific patient groups. Triage systems are widely used, but few studies have investigated the ability of the triage systems in predicting...... for the two main descriptors; vital signs, Tvitals, and presenting complaint, Tcomplaint. The more urgent of the two determines the final triage category, Tfinal. We retrieved 6279 unique adult patients admitted through the Emergency Department (ED) from the Acute Admission Database. We performed regression...

  2. Evaluation of a Medical and Mental Health Unit compared with standard care for older people whose emergency admission to an acute general hospital is complicated by concurrent 'confusion': a controlled clinical trial. Acronym: TEAM: Trial of an Elderly Acute care Medical and mental health unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladman John RF

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with delirium and dementia admitted to general hospitals have poor outcomes, and their carers report poor experiences. We developed an acute geriatric medical ward into a specialist Medical and Mental Health Unit over an eighteen month period. Additional specialist mental health staff were employed, other staff were trained in the 'person-centred' dementia care approach, a programme of meaningful activity was devised, the environment adapted to the needs of people with cognitive impairment, and attention given to communication with family carers. We hypothesise that patients managed on this ward will have better outcomes than those receiving standard care, and that such care will be cost-effective. Methods/design We will perform a controlled clinical trial comparing in-patient management on a specialist Medical and Mental Health Unit with standard care. Study participants are patients over the age of 65, admitted as an emergency to a single general hospital, and identified on the Acute Medical Admissions Unit as being 'confused'. Sample size is 300 per group. The evaluation design has been adapted to accommodate pressures on bed management and patient flows. If beds are available on the specialist Unit, the clinical service allocates patients at random between the Unit and standard care on general or geriatric medical wards. Once admitted, randomised patients and their carers are invited to take part in a follow up study, and baseline data are collected. Quality of care and patient experience are assessed in a non-participant observer study. Outcomes are ascertained at a follow up home visit 90 days after randomisation, by a researcher blind to allocation. The primary outcome is days spent at home (for those admitted from home, or days spent in the same care home (if admitted from a care home. Secondary outcomes include mortality, institutionalisation, resource use, and scaled outcome measures, including quality of

  3. An Integrative Literature Review of Organisational Factors Associated with Admission and Discharge Delays in Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltonen, Laura-Maria; McCallum, Louise; Siirala, Eriikka; Haataja, Marjaana; Lundgrén-Laine, Heljä; Salanterä, Sanna; Lin, Frances

    2015-01-01

    The literature shows that delayed admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) and discharge delays from the ICU are associated with increased adverse events and higher costs. Identifying factors related to delays will provide information to practice improvements, which contribute to better patient outcomes. The aim of this integrative review was to explore the incidence of patients' admission and discharge delays in critical care and to identify organisational factors associated with these delays. Seven studies were included. The major findings are as follows: (1) explanatory research about discharge delays is scarce and one study on admission delays was found, (2) delays are a common problem mostly due to organisational factors, occurring in 38% of admissions and 22-67% of discharges, and (3) redesigning care processes by improving information management and coordination between units and interdisciplinary teams could reduce discharge delays. In conclusion, patient outcomes can be improved through efficient and safe care processes. More exploratory research is needed to identify factors that contribute to admission and discharge delays to provide evidence for clinical practice improvements. Shortening delays requires an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the whole patient flow process. Conclusions should be made with caution due to the limited number of articles included in this review. PMID:26558286

  4. An Integrative Literature Review of Organisational Factors Associated with Admission and Discharge Delays in Critical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura-Maria Peltonen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature shows that delayed admission to the intensive care unit (ICU and discharge delays from the ICU are associated with increased adverse events and higher costs. Identifying factors related to delays will provide information to practice improvements, which contribute to better patient outcomes. The aim of this integrative review was to explore the incidence of patients’ admission and discharge delays in critical care and to identify organisational factors associated with these delays. Seven studies were included. The major findings are as follows: (1 explanatory research about discharge delays is scarce and one study on admission delays was found, (2 delays are a common problem mostly due to organisational factors, occurring in 38% of admissions and 22–67% of discharges, and (3 redesigning care processes by improving information management and coordination between units and interdisciplinary teams could reduce discharge delays. In conclusion, patient outcomes can be improved through efficient and safe care processes. More exploratory research is needed to identify factors that contribute to admission and discharge delays to provide evidence for clinical practice improvements. Shortening delays requires an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the whole patient flow process. Conclusions should be made with caution due to the limited number of articles included in this review.

  5. Cytomegalovirus infection in patients with sepsis due to bloodstream infections: lower risk and better outcomes in new versus already hospitalised intensive care unit admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R, Osawa; M, Wagener; Ns, Singh

    2016-09-01

    Few studies have examined cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation exclusively in immunocompetent patients with sepsis due to bloodstream infections. In a cohort of CMV-seropositive critically ill otherwise non-immunosuppressed patients with sepsis due to bloodstream infection, weekly testing for CMV viraemia was performed. Outcomes were assessed at 30 days or until death/discharge from the intensive care unit (ICU). CMV viraemia developed in 20% (20/100) of the patients. Age (P=0.044) and blood transfusions (P=0.022) were significantly associated with CMV viraemia. There was no difference in the primary endpoint (mortality and/or multi-organ failure) between patients with and without CMV viraemia (P=0.49). However, CMV viraemia was associated with significantly fewer ICU-free days (P=0.023) and fewer ventilator-free days (P=0.031). Patients hospitalised in the ICU for more than 48 hours prior to the onset of bloodstream infection were more likely to develop CMV viraemia (P=0.006), have high-grade viraemia (P=0.010), and fewer ICU-free days (P=0.018) and ventilator-free days (P=0.029) than those admitted within 48 hours of bloodstream infection. Thus, CMV reactivation was associated with fewer ICU- and ventilator-free days, however overall mortality was not affected. Patients already in the ICU at the onset of sepsis had higher risk of CMV reactivation and worse outcomes than new ICU-bound patients suggesting that a targeted approach for interventions for CMV could conceivably be directed towards those with a more protracted course of illness. PMID:27608339

  6. Reasons for refusal of admission to intensive care and impact on mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iapichino, Gaetano; Corbella, Davide; Minelli, Cosetta; Mills, Gary H.; Artigas, Antonio; Edbooke, David L.; Pezzi, Angelo; Kesecioglu, Jozef; Patroniti, Nicol; Baras, Mario; Sprung, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    To identify factors influencing triage decisions and investigate whether admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) could reduce mortality compared with treatment on the ward. A multicentre cohort study in 11 university hospitals from seven countries, evaluating triage decisions and outcomes of pati

  7. Variability of intensive care admission decisions for the very elderly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Boumendil

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Although increasing numbers of very elderly patients are requiring intensive care, few large sample studies have investigated ICU admission of very elderly patients. Data on pre triage by physicians from other specialities is limited. This observational cohort study aims at examining inter-hospital variability of ICU admission rates and its association with patients' outcomes. All patients over 80 years possibly qualifying for ICU admission who presented to the emergency departments (ED of 15 hospitals in the Paris (France area during a one-year period were prospectively included in the study. Main outcome measures were ICU eligibility, as assessed by the ED and ICU physicians; in-hospital mortality; and vital and functional status 6 months after the ED visit. 2646 patients (median age 86; interquartile range 83-91 were included in the study. 94% of participants completed follow-up (n = 2495. 12.4% (n = 329 of participants were deemed eligible for ICU admission by ED physicians and intensivists. The overall in-hospital and 6-month mortality rates were respectively 27.2% (n = 717 and 50.7% (n = 1264. At six months, 57.5% (n = 1433 of patients had died or had a functional deterioration. Rates of patients deemed eligible for ICU admission ranged from 5.6% to 38.8% across the participating centers, and this variability persisted after adjustment for patients' characteristics. Despite this variability, we found no association between level of ICU eligibility and either in-hospital death or six-month death or functional deterioration. In France, the likelihood that a very elderly person will be admitted to an ICU varies widely from one hospital to another. Influence of intensive care admission on patients' outcome remains unclear. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00912600.

  8. Admission to intensive care can be reliably predicted using only clinical judgment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Not all patients in need of critical care arrive in clinical distress and some deteriorate after arrival. Identifying these patients early in their clinical course could potentially improve outcome. The present study was performed with the aim of assessing whether nursing and physician...... staffwere able to identify patients in need of critical care using only clinical judgment and to compare this with the National Early Warning Score (NEWS). Methods This was a prospective cohort study of all adult patients with a first-time admission to a medical admission unit at a 450-bed regional teaching...... hospital over a 3-month period in 2010. All subspecialties of internal medicine are present as well as a level 2 ICU. Upon first contact with the patient after arrival, nursing staffand physicians were asked to report their estimation of the probability of ICU admission (0 to 100%). Survival status...

  9. 42 CFR 456.481 - Admission certification and plan of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Individuals Under Age 21: Admission and Plan of Care Requirements § 456.481 Admission certification and plan of care. If a facility provides inpatient psychiatric services to a recipient under age 21— (a) The... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Admission certification and plan of care....

  10. Off-hours admission and quality of hip fracture care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Nina Sahlertz; Kristensen, Pia Kjær; Nørgård, Bente Mertz;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Higher risks of adverse outcomes have been reported for patients admitted acutely during off-hours. However, in relation to hip fracture, the evidence is inconsistent. We examined whether time of admission influenced compliance with performance measures, surgical delay and 30-day morta...... the excess 30-day mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Patients admitted off-hours and on-hours received similar quality of care. The risk of surgical delay and 30 days mortality was higher among patients admitted during weekends; explanations need to be clarified.......OBJECTIVE: Higher risks of adverse outcomes have been reported for patients admitted acutely during off-hours. However, in relation to hip fracture, the evidence is inconsistent. We examined whether time of admission influenced compliance with performance measures, surgical delay and 30-day.......01 [95% CI: 0.99-1.02]. When comparing admission on weekdays (evenings and nights vs. days), off-hours admission was associated with a lower risk of surgical delay (adjusted OR 0.75 [95% CI: 0.66-0.85]) while no differences in 30-day mortality was found (adjusted OR 0.91 [95% CI: 0.80-1.04]. When...

  11. Off-Hours Admission and Acute Stroke Care Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Nina Sahlertz; Mainz, Jan; Nørgård, Bente Mertz;

    2014-01-01

    stroke care processes, including the effect of a systematic quality improvement program, and to examine 30 days case-fatality. Methods-A population-based historical cohort study, including patients admitted to Danish hospitals with a first ever acute stroke (January 1, 2003, to December 31, 2011; N=64...... of care. However, the admission time-related differences in care were substantially reduced over time, and the differences in 30 days case-fatality appeared primarily to be explained by differences in stroke severity....... 975). Off-hours were weekends and evening and nighttime shifts on weekdays. Compliance with performance measures was compared using general linear modeling, and odds ratios for 30 days case-fatality were obtained using multivariable logistic regression. Results-Patients admitted off-hours had a lower...

  12. Homecare Nurses' Decision-Making During Admission Care Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockolow, Paulina; Bass, Ellen J; Eberle, Carl L; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2016-01-01

    The re-hospitalization rate of homecare patients within 60 days of hospital discharge is 30%. Enhanced care planning based on better information may reduce this rate. However, very little is known about the homecare admission and care planning processes. The research team collected data during observations of three nursing visits to admit homecare patients in Camden NJ, and conducted thematic content analysis on these data. Human factors methods helped to identify nurse decision-making related to selection of the plan of care problems, non-nursing resources, and the nursing visit pattern. They identified how the electronic health record (EHR) assisted the nurse in visit pattern frequency decisions. Major themes that emerged included reduced efficiency due to use of redundant intra-team communication methods to augment EHR documentation, redundant documentation, and workarounds and reorganization of clinical workflow. PMID:27332156

  13. Homecare Nurses' Decision-Making During Admission Care Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockolow, Paulina; Bass, Ellen J; Eberle, Carl L; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2016-01-01

    The re-hospitalization rate of homecare patients within 60 days of hospital discharge is 30%. Enhanced care planning based on better information may reduce this rate. However, very little is known about the homecare admission and care planning processes. The research team collected data during observations of three nursing visits to admit homecare patients in Camden NJ, and conducted thematic content analysis on these data. Human factors methods helped to identify nurse decision-making related to selection of the plan of care problems, non-nursing resources, and the nursing visit pattern. They identified how the electronic health record (EHR) assisted the nurse in visit pattern frequency decisions. Major themes that emerged included reduced efficiency due to use of redundant intra-team communication methods to augment EHR documentation, redundant documentation, and workarounds and reorganization of clinical workflow.

  14. Colonização orofaríngea de crianças à admissão em uma unidade de cuidados intensivos Colonización de la orofaringe de niños admitidos en una unidad de cuidados intensivos pediátricos Children's oropharyngeal colonization upon admission at a pediatric intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Miyuki Kusahara

    2007-12-01

    ón microbiológico de la colonización orofaríngea de los niños en la admisión a la UCIP, con todo se verificó que los niños portadores de microorganismos patógenos presentaron tiempo de internamiento hospitalario mayor (p=0,020 que aquellos colonizados solamente por especies de la flora normal.Objectives: This study aimed to identify the microbiological oropharyngeal colonization pattern in children admitted at a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU and to verify the influence of children's and implemented therapies' characteristics before admission at the UCIP on this pattern. Prospective study realized at a PICU of a university hospital. METHODS: Samples of oropharyngeal secretion were obtained in the first 24 hours of the children's admission. Variables related to the children's and the therapies' characteristics were investigated. RESULTS: The majority of the children had normal nutritional state, admitted in the hospital in emergencies situations, with chronic diseases and without alterations in the clinical conditions of the oral cavity. CONCLUSION: The children who were colonized by pathogenic microorganisms presented a longer hospital stay (p=0,020 than those with cultures with normal flora species. The investigated characteristics of the children did not exert any significant influence the microbiological oropharyngeal colonization pattern.

  15. Analysis of factors influencing admission to intensive care following convulsive status epilepticus in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tirupathi, Sandya

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify clinical features and therapeutic decisions that influence admission to the Intensive Care unit (ICU) in children presenting with convulsive status epilepticus (CSE). METHODS: We evaluated 47 admissions with status epilepticus to a tertiary paediatric hospital A&E over a three year period (2003-2006). Following initial management 23 episodes required admission to ICU and 24 were managed on a paediatric ward. We compared clinical, demographic data and compliance with our CSE protocol between the ICU and ward groups. RESULTS: Median age at presentation in the ICU group was 17 months (range 3 months-11 years) compared to 46 months in the ward group (range 3 months-10 years). Fifty per cent of patients in both groups had a previous history of seizures. Median duration of pre-hospital seizure activity was 30 min in both groups. More than two doses of benzodiazepines were given as first line medication in 62% of the ICU group and 33% of the ward group. Among children admitted to ICU with CSE, 26% had been managed according to the CSE protocol, compared to 66% of children who were admitted to a hospital ward. Febrile seizures were the most common aetiology in both groups. CONCLUSION: Younger age at presentation, administration of more than two doses of benzodiazepines and deviation from the CSE protocol appear to be factors which influence admission of children to ICU. Recognition of pre-hospital administration of benzodiazepines and adherence to therapeutic guidelines may reduce the need for ventilatory support in this group.

  16. Burns ITU admissions: length of stay in specific levels of care for adult and paediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maan, Zeshaan N; Frew, Quentin; Din, Asmat H; Unluer, Zeynep; Smailes, Sarah; Philp, Bruce; El-Muttardi, Naguib; Dziewulski, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Prediction of total length of stay (LOS) for burns patients based on the total burn surface area (TBSA) is well accepted. Total LOS is a poor measure of resource consumption. Our aim was to determine the LOS in specific levels of care to better inform resource allocation. We performed a retrospective review of LOS in intensive treatment unit (ITU), burns high dependency unit (HDU) and burns low dependency unit (LDU) for all patients requiring ITU admission in a regional burns service from 2003 to 2011. During this period, our unit has admitted 1312 paediatric and 1445 adult patients to our Burns ITU. In both groups, ITU comprised 20% of the total LOS (mean 0.23±0.02 [adult] and 0.22±0.02 [paediatric] days per %burn). In adults, 33% of LOS was in HDU (0.52±0.06 days per %burn) and 48% (0.68±0.06 days per %burn) in LDU, while in children, 15% of LOS was in HDU (0.19±0.03 days per %burn) and 65% in LDU (0.70±0.06 days per %burn). When considering Burns ITU admissions, resource allocation ought to be planned according to expected LOS in specific levels of care rather than total LOS. The largest proportion of stay is in low dependency, likely due to social issues.

  17. Pathways to Care for Critically Ill or Injured Children: A Cohort Study from First Presentation to Healthcare Services through to Admission to Intensive Care or Death.

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Hodkinson; Andrew Argent; Lee Wallis; Steve Reid; Rafael Perera; Sian Harrison; Matthew Thompson; Mike English; Ian Maconochie; Alison Ward

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Critically ill or injured children require prompt identification, rapid referral and quality emergency management. We undertook a study to evaluate the care pathway of critically ill or injured children to identify preventable failures in the care provided. Methods A year-long cohort study of critically ill and injured children was performed in Cape Town, South Africa, from first presentation to healthcare services until paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission or emergency dep...

  18. A medical admission unit reduces duration of hospital stay and number of readmissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vork, Jan C; Brabrand, Mikkel; Folkestad, Lars;

    2011-01-01

    Political initiatives promoting a more efficient emergency admission process have triggered a reorganisation of the Danish health system with a view to creating fewer and larger admission units counting more experienced physicians. At our hospital, a medical admission unit (MAU) was established. ...... present the effect of this on the length of hospital stay, mortality rates and the number of readmissions for the last year with the previous structure and the first year of the new MAU structure....

  19. Maternal Psychological Problems Associated with Neonatal Intensive Care Admission

    OpenAIRE

    Ziya Yurdakul; Ipek Akman; M. Kemal Kuşçu; Aytul Karabekiroglu; Gulsum Yaylalı; Figen Demir; Eren Özek

    2009-01-01

    Background. Mothers of infants admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are believed to have heightened distress. The purpose of this paper was to determine depression and anxiety symptoms and attachment style in NICU mothers. Methods. The NICU group consisted of mothers whose infants were admitted to the NICU and the control group consisted of mothers of healthy term infants. The psychosocial assessments were done at the first month. Results. The mean Edinburgh Postpartum ...

  20. Factors influencing nursing care in a surgical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj John

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The total time spent in nursing care depends on the type of patient and the patient′s condition. We analysed factors that influenced the time spent in nursing a patient. Aims : To analyse the factors in a patient′s condition that influenced time spent in nursing a patient. Materials and Methods: This study was performed in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary referral centre, over a period of one month. The total time spent on a patient in nursing care for the first 24 hours of admission, was recorded. This time was divided into time for routine nursing care, time for interventions, time for monitoring and time for administering medications. Statistical analysis used: A backward stepwise linear regression analysis using the age, sex, diagnosis, type of admission and ventilatory status as variables, was done. Results: Patients admitted after elective surgery required less time (852.4 ± 234.1 minutes, than those admitted after either emergency surgery (1069.5 ± 187.3 minutes, or directly from the ward or the emergency room (1253.7 ± 42.1 minutes. Patients who were ventilated required more time (1111.5 ± 132.5 minutes, than those brought on a T-piece (732.2 ± 134.8 minutes or extubated (639.5 ± 155.6 minutes. The regression analysis showed that only the type of admission and the ventilatory status significantly affected the time. Conclusions : This study showed that the type of admission and ventilatory status significantly influenced the time spent in nursing care. This will help optimal utilization of nursing resources.

  1. Admission to a psychiatric unit and changes in tobacco smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owens David

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Smoking and withdrawal from smoking complicates the assessment and treatment of mental illness. We aimed to establish whether psychiatric inpatients smoke different amounts after admission than beforehand and, if so, to find out why. Forty-three inpatients on a working age adult psychiatry ward completed self-report questionnaires about smoking habits. Those who smoked a different amount after admission had a follow-up interview to find out why they thought this had occurred. The interview incorporated qualitative and quantitative aspects which were analysed accordingly. Fifty-six percent of participants were smokers before admission, rising to 70% afterwards. Of the smokers, 17% smoked less after admission, and 63% smoked more. The average number of cigarettes smoked per person per day increased from five to thirteen. The main reasons for smoking more were boredom, stress and the wish to socialise.

  2. Pathways to Care for Critically Ill or Injured Children: A Cohort Study from First Presentation to Healthcare Services through to Admission to Intensive Care or Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hodkinson

    Full Text Available Critically ill or injured children require prompt identification, rapid referral and quality emergency management. We undertook a study to evaluate the care pathway of critically ill or injured children to identify preventable failures in the care provided.A year-long cohort study of critically ill and injured children was performed in Cape Town, South Africa, from first presentation to healthcare services until paediatric intensive care unit (PICU admission or emergency department death, using expert panel review of medical records and caregiver interview. Main outcomes were expert assessment of overall quality of care; avoidability of severity of illness and PICU admission or death and the identification of modifiable factors.The study enrolled 282 children, 252 emergency PICU admissions, and 30 deaths. Global quality of care was graded good in 10% of cases, with half having at least one major impact modifiable factor. Key modifiable factors related to access to care and identification of the critically ill, assessment of severity, inadequate resuscitation, and delays in decision making and referral. Children were transferred with median time from first presentation to PICU admission of 12.3 hours. There was potentially avoidable severity of illness in 185 (74% of children, and death prior to PICU admission was avoidable in 17/30 (56.7% of children.The study presents a novel methodology, examining quality of care across an entire system, and highlighting the complexity of the pathway and the modifiable events amenable to interventions, that could reduce mortality and morbidity, and optimize utilization of scarce critical care resources; as well as demonstrating the importance of continuity and quality of care.

  3. A study of the impact of long-term tobacco smoking on postoperative intensive care admission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, A M; Pedersen, T; Villebro, N;

    2003-01-01

    Smoking is a risk factor for intra-operative pulmonary complications and a wide range of postoperative pulmonary, cardiovascular, infection and wound-related complications. These may all lead to unplanned postoperative intensive care admission. We tested the hypothesis that smokers have...... an increased incidence of postoperative intensive care admission and more postoperative complications than nonsmokers in a general and orthopaedic surgical population. The following information was assessed in 6026 surgical patients: age, sex and smoking status (pack-years), history of heart and lung disease......, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical classification, intensive care admission and postoperative complications. Two thousand five hundred and twenty-six (46%) were smokers but for 620 patients (10.3%) smoking status was not confirmed. Postoperative intensive care admission was required...

  4. Implementation of a Diabetes Educator Care Model to Reduce Paediatric Admission for Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Asma Deeb; Hana Yousef; Layla Abdelrahman; Mary Tomy; Shaker Suliman; Salima Attia; Hana Al Suwaidi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious complication that can be life-threatening. Management of DKA needs admission in a specialized center and imposes major constraints on hospital resources. Aim. We plan to study the impact of adapting a diabetes-educator care model on reducing the frequency of hospital admission of children and adolescents presenting with DKA. Method. We have proposed a model of care led by diabetes educators for children and adolescents with diabetes. The ...

  5. National surveillance of pandemic influenza A(H1N1) infection-related admissions to intensive care units during the 2009-10 winter peak in Denmark: two complementary approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gubbels, S; Perner, A; Valentiner-Branth, Palle;

    2010-01-01

    Surveillance of 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) in Denmark was enhanced during the 2009–10 winter season with a system monitoring the burden of the pandemic on intensive care units (ICUs), in order to inform policymakers and detect shortages in ICUs in a timely manner. Between week 46 of 2009...... and week 11 of 2010, all 36 relevant Danish ICUs reported in two ways: aggregate data were reported online and case-based data on paper. Cases to be reported were defined as patients admitted to an ICU with laboratory-confirmed 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) infection or clinically suspected illness after...

  6. [Intermediate care units and noninvasive ventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Heinrich F; Schönhofer, Bernd; Vogelmeier, Claus

    2006-04-15

    Intermediate care units (IMC) have been introduced to provide optimal patient management according to disease severity and to bridge the gap between intensive care (ICU) and general wards. Most patients that are referred to an IMC need monitoring and intensive analgetic treatment. Over the past years noninvasive ventilation (NIV) and weaning have emerged as important new forms of active treatment in the IMC. Most studies that have been published so far demonstrate that an IMC improves patient outcome and lowers costs, although randomized controlled trials are missing. NIV reduces mortality, the need for intubation as well as ICU and hospital length of stay in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other disorders that cause respiratory failure. In many cases NIV can be performed in the IMC, a fact that reduces the number of ICU admissions, lowers costs and improves patient care. The high prevalence of pulmonary diseases and NIV emphasizes the importance of pneumologists as directors of both ICU and IMC.

  7. Point-of-care testing of HbA1c in diabetes care and preventable hospital admissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Troels; Rose Olsen, Kim

    there is a link between preventable hospital admissions and POCT of HbA1c in general practice. Preventable hospital admissions were assessed through the ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) classification of hospital admissions. We include independent variables such as gender, age, ethnicity......Background: Point-of-care testing (POCT) of HbA1c may result in improved diabetic control, better patient outcomes and enhanced clinical efficiency with fewer patient visits and subsequent reductions in hospitalizations and costs. In 2008, the Danish regulators agreed to create a new tariff...... for the remuneration of POCT of HbA1c in primary care. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess whether there is an association between the use of POCT of HbA1c and preventable hospital admissions among diabetes patients in general practice. Method: We apply logistic regression analyses to examine whether...

  8. Increased Plasma Levels of Heparin-Binding Protein on Admission to Intensive Care Are Associated with Respiratory and Circulatory Failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Tydén

    Full Text Available Heparin-binding protein (HBP is released by granulocytes and has been shown to increase vascular permeability in experimental investigations. Increased vascular permeability in the lungs can lead to fluid accumulation in alveoli and respiratory failure. A generalized increase in vascular permeability leads to loss of circulating blood volume and circulatory failure. We hypothesized that plasma concentrations of HBP on admission to the intensive care unit (ICU would be associated with decreased oxygenation or circulatory failure.This is a prospective, observational study in a mixed 8-bed ICU. We investigated concentrations of HBP in plasma at admission to the ICU from 278 patients. Simplified acute physiology score (SAPS 3 was recorded on admission. Sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA scores were recorded daily for three days.Median SAPS 3 was 58.8 (48-70 and 30-day mortality 64/278 (23%. There was an association between high plasma concentrations of HBP on admission with decreased oxygenation (p<0.001 as well as with circulatory failure (p<0.001, after 48-72 hours in the ICU. There was an association between concentrations of HBP on admission and 30-day mortality (p = 0.002. ROC curves showed areas under the curve of 0,62 for decreased oxygenation, 0,65 for circulatory failure and 0,64 for mortality.A high concentration of HBP in plasma on admission to the ICU is associated with respiratory and circulatory failure later during the ICU care period. It is also associated with increased 30-day mortality. Despite being an interesting biomarker for the composite ICU population it's predictive value at the individual patient level is low.

  9. A pilot study on peritraumatic dissociation and coping styles as risk factors for posttraumatic stress, anxiety and depression in parents after their child's unexpected admission to a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Last Bob F

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim To study the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, anxiety and depression in parents three months after pediatric intensive care treatment of their child and examine if peritraumatic dissocation and coping styles are related to these mental health problems. Methods This is a prospective cohort study and included parents of children unexpectedly admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU from January 2006 to March 2007. At three months follow-up parents completed PTSD (n = 115, anxiety and depression (n = 128 questionnaires. Immediately after discharge, parents completed peritraumatic dissocation and coping questionnaires. Linear regression models with generalized estimating equations examined risk factors for mental health problems. Results Over 10% of the parents were likely to meet criteria for PTSD and almost one quarter for subclinical PTSD. Respectively 15% to 23% of the parents reported clinically significant levels of depression and anxiety. Peritraumatic dissocation was most strongly associated with PTSD, anxiety as well as depression. Avoidance coping was primarily associated with PTSD. Conclusion A significant number of parents have mental health problems three months after unexpected PICU treatment of their child. Improving detection and raise awareness of mental health problems is important to minimize the negative effect of these problems on parents' well-being.

  10. The Eldicus prospective, observational study of triage decision making in European intensive care units. Part II: Intensive care benefit for the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprung, Charles L; Artigas, Antonio; Kesecioglu, Jozef;

    2012-01-01

    for intensive care unit admission. INTERVENTIONS:: Admission or rejection to intensive care unit. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:: Demographic, clinical, hospital, physiologic variables, and 28-day mortality were obtained on consecutive patients. There were 8,472 triages in 6,796 patients, 5,602 (82%) were......RATIONALE:: Life and death triage decisions are made daily by intensive care unit physicians. Admission to an intensive care unit is denied when intensive care unit resources are constrained, especially for the elderly. OBJECTIVE:: To determine the effect of intensive care unit triage decisions...... on mortality and intensive care unit benefit, specifically for elderly patients. DESIGN:: Prospective, observational study of triage decisions from September 2003 until March 2005. SETTING:: Eleven intensive care units in seven European countries. PATIENTS:: All patients >18 yrs with an explicit request...

  11. The Impact of a Proactive Chronic Care Management Program on Hospital Admission Rates in a German Health Insurance Society

    OpenAIRE

    Hamar, Brent; Wells, Aaron; Gandy, William; Haaf, Andreas; Coberley, Carter; Pope, James E.; Rula, Elizabeth Y.

    2010-01-01

    Hospital admissions are the source of significant health care expenses, although a large proportion of these admissions can be avoided through proper management of chronic disease. In the present study, we evaluate the impact of a proactive chronic care management program for members of a German insurance society who suffer from chronic disease. Specifically, we tested the impact of nurse-delivered care calls on hospital admission rates. Study participants were insured individuals with corona...

  12. Wide Variability in Emergency Physician Admission Rates: A New Target To Reduce Healthcare Costs Without Adversely Affecting Quality of Care

    OpenAIRE

    Richman, Mark; Guterman, Jeffrey James; Lundberg, Scott Ryan; Talan, David Andrew; Gross-Schulman, Sandra Geri; Wang, Chien-Ju; Scheib, Geoffrey Paul

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Attending physician judgment is the traditional standard of care for Emergency Department (ED) admission decisions. The extent to which variability in admission decisions affect cost and quality is not well understood. METHODS We sought to determine the impact of variability in admission decisions on cost and quality. We performed a retrospective observational study of patients presenting to a u...

  13. Incidence and preventability of adverse events requiring intensive care admission

    OpenAIRE

    Vlayen, Annemie; Verelst, Sandra; Bekkering, Geertruida E; Schrooten, Ward; Hellings, Johan; Claes, Neree

    2011-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives: Adverse events are unintended patient injuries or complications that arise from health care management resulting in death, disability or prolonged hospital stay. Adverse events that require critical care are a considerable financial burden to the health care system, but also their global impact on patients and society is probably underestimated. The objectives of this systematic review were to synthesize the best available evidence regarding the estimates of th...

  14. National surveillance of pandemic influenza A(H1N1) infection-related admissions to intensive care units during the 2009-10 winter peak in Denmark: two complementary approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gubbels, S; Perner, A; Valentiner-Branth, Palle;

    2010-01-01

    Surveillance of 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) in Denmark was enhanced during the 2009–10 winter season with a system monitoring the burden of the pandemic on intensive care units (ICUs), in order to inform policymakers and detect shortages in ICUs in a timely manner. Between week 46 of 2009...... and week 11 of 2010, all 36 relevant Danish ICUs reported in two ways: aggregate data were reported online and case-based data on paper. Cases to be reported were defined as patients admitted to an ICU with laboratory-confirmed 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) infection or clinically suspected illness after......, of whom 53 were laboratory confirmed. The proportion of beds used for influenza patients did not exceed 4.5% of the national capacity. Hospitals with cases used a median of 11% of bed capacity (range: 3–40%). Of the patients for whom information was available, 15 of 48 patients developed renal...

  15. Trends in elderly psychiatric admissions to the Brazilian public health care system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro L. Ritter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate trends in psychiatric bed occupancy by elderly inpatients in the Brazilian public health care system between 2000 and 2010 and to determine the leading psychiatric diagnosis for hospital admissions. Methods: Data from all 895,476 elderly psychiatric admissions recorded in the Brazilian Public Health Care Database (DATASUS between January 2000 and February 2010 were analyzed. Polynomial regression models with estimated curve models were used to determine the trends. The number of inpatient days was calculated for the overall psychiatric admissions and according to specific diagnoses. Results: A moderate decreasing trend (p < 0.001 in the number of inpatient days was observed in all geriatric psychiatric admissions (R2 = 0.768 and in admissions for organic mental disorders (R2 = 0.823, disorders due to psychoactive substance use (R2 = 0.767, schizophrenia (R2 = 0.680, and other diagnoses (R2 = 0.770, but not for mood disorders (R2 = 0.472. Most admissions (60 to 65% were due to schizophrenia. Conclusion: There was a decreasing trend in inpatient days for elderly psychiatric patients between 2000 and 2010. The highest bed occupancy was due to schizophrenia, schizotypal, and delusional disorders.

  16. CHANGES IN THE COSTS OF HYPERTENSIVE CRISIS THERAPY DUE TO OPTIMIZATION OF DRUG SUPPLY IN THE PRE-ADMISSION CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Gaponova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the changes in the costs of treatment of patients with hypertensive crisis (HC in pre-admission care in Moscow from 2005 to 2010. Material and methods. Comparative analysis of the treatment costs was performed depending on outcomes in patients with HC at Moscow Emergency Medical Care Station named after A.S. Puchkov. HC arresting excluding the need of admission was taken into account in addition to antihypertensive effect and safety in evaluation of pre-admission care efficacy. Results. Introduction in practice of modern algorithms of emergency pre-admission care, supply of ambulance crews with modern antihypertensive drugs reduced the rate of admission from 71% in 2005 to 44% in 2010 among patients with HC. Total savings amounted to 403,691,808 rubles. Conclusion. Introduction of modern technologies in the emergency pre-admission care for patients with HC is economically reasonable.

  17. CHANGES IN THE COSTS OF HYPERTENSIVE CRISIS THERAPY DUE TO OPTIMIZATION OF DRUG SUPPLY IN THE PRE-ADMISSION CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Gaponova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the changes in the costs of treatment of patients with hypertensive crisis (HC in pre-admission care in Moscow from 2005 to 2010. Material and methods. Comparative analysis of the treatment costs was performed depending on outcomes in patients with HC at Moscow Emergency Medical Care Station named after A.S. Puchkov. HC arresting excluding the need of admission was taken into account in addition to antihypertensive effect and safety in evaluation of pre-admission care efficacy. Results. Introduction in practice of modern algorithms of emergency pre-admission care, supply of ambulance crews with modern antihypertensive drugs reduced the rate of admission from 71% in 2005 to 44% in 2010 among patients with HC. Total savings amounted to 403,691,808 rubles. Conclusion. Introduction of modern technologies in the emergency pre-admission care for patients with HC is economically reasonable.

  18. Dermatology in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The intensive care unit (ICU represents a special environment for patients. We analyzed patients in the ICU/ high care unit (HCU with respect to dermatology counselling and skin problems.Setting: Academic Teaching Hospital over a 10 month period.Methods: The total number of patients of the ICU was 1,208 with a mean stay of 4.1 days. In the HCU the mean stay was 16 days. Diagnosis leading to admission were analyzed. All files of dermatological counselling were evaluated in detail.Results: Fifty-five patients with dermatologic problems were identified: 19 women and 26 males. The age ranged from 22 to 90 years of life (mean ± standard deviation: 67.2 ± 17.4 years. The total number of consultations were 85. The range of repeated dermatological consultation ranged from two to ten. The major reasons were skin and soft tissue infections, adverse drug reactions, chronic wounds including pressure sores and skin irritation or dermatitis. Pre-existing skin conditions may complicate the treatment and care during ICU/HCU stay.Conclusion: A tight collaboration between of the medical staff of ICU/HCU and dermatology department will ensure a rapid diagnosis and treatment of various skin conditions in the ICU, without increasing the costs significantly. Interdisciplinary education of nursing staff contributes to improved skin care in the ICU/HCU and helps to prevent acute skin failure.

  19. 42 CFR 35.6 - Admissions; determination of eligibility for care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS HOSPITAL AND STATION MANAGEMENT General § 35.6 Admissions; determination of... of this chapter, the officer in charge of the station or hospital to which application is made is... responsible for administration of the station or hospital concerned upon referral made by the officer...

  20. "In the beginning...": tools for talking about resuscitation and goals of care early in the admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jocelyn; Fromme, Erik K

    2013-11-01

    Quality standards no longer allow physicians to delay discussing goals of care and resuscitation. We propose 2 novel strategies for discussing goals and resuscitation on admission. The first, SPAM (determine Surrogate decision maker, determine resuscitation Preferences, Assume full care, and advise them to expect More discussion especially with clinical changes), helps clinicians discover patient preferences and decision maker during routine admissions. The second, UFO-UFO (Understand what they know, Fill in knowledge gaps, ask about desired Outcomes, Understand their reasoning, discuss the spectrum Feasible Outcomes), helps patients with poor or uncertain prognosis or family-team conflict. Using a challenging case example, this article illustrates how SPAM and UFO-UFO can help clinicians have patient-centered resuscitation and goals of care discussions at the beginning of care. PMID:23236089

  1. "In the beginning...": tools for talking about resuscitation and goals of care early in the admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jocelyn; Fromme, Erik K

    2013-11-01

    Quality standards no longer allow physicians to delay discussing goals of care and resuscitation. We propose 2 novel strategies for discussing goals and resuscitation on admission. The first, SPAM (determine Surrogate decision maker, determine resuscitation Preferences, Assume full care, and advise them to expect More discussion especially with clinical changes), helps clinicians discover patient preferences and decision maker during routine admissions. The second, UFO-UFO (Understand what they know, Fill in knowledge gaps, ask about desired Outcomes, Understand their reasoning, discuss the spectrum Feasible Outcomes), helps patients with poor or uncertain prognosis or family-team conflict. Using a challenging case example, this article illustrates how SPAM and UFO-UFO can help clinicians have patient-centered resuscitation and goals of care discussions at the beginning of care.

  2. Preventing compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient care through psycho-education and crisis focused monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lay Barbara

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high number of involuntary placements of people with mental disorders in Switzerland and other European countries constitutes a major public health issue. In view of the ethical and personal relevance of compulsory admission for the patients concerned and given the far-reaching effects in terms of health care costs, innovative interventions to improve the current situation are much needed. A number of promising approaches to prevent involuntary placements have been proposed that target continuity of care by increasing self-management skills of patients. However, the effectiveness of such interventions in terms of more robust criteria (e.g., admission rates has not been sufficiently analysed in larger study samples. The current study aims to evaluate an intervention programme for patients at high risk of compulsory admission to psychiatric hospitals. Effectiveness will be assessed in terms of a reduced number of psychiatric hospitalisations and days of inpatient care in connection with involuntary psychiatric admissions as well as in terms of cost-containment in inpatient mental health care. The intervention furthermore intends to reduce the degree of patients’ perceived coercion and to increase patient satisfaction, their quality of life and empowerment. Methods/Design This paper describes the design of a randomised controlled intervention study conducted currently at four psychiatric hospitals in the Canton of Zurich. The intervention programme consists of individualised psycho-education focusing on behaviours prior to and during illness-related crisis, the distribution of a crisis card and, after inpatient admission, a 24-month preventive monitoring of individual risk factors for compulsory re-admission to hospital. All measures are provided by a mental health care worker who maintains permanent contact to the patient over the course of the study. In order to prove its effectiveness the intervention programme will be

  3. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness: early diagnosis, symptomatology and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Wieske

    2014-01-01

    During admission to an intensive care unit (ICU), many critically ill patients develop generalized muscle weakness, a condition called intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICU-AW). ICU-AW can be caused by muscle problems, peripheral nerve problems or a combination of both. As the name of the condi

  4. An intervention to improve care and reduce costs for high-risk patients with frequent hospital admissions: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostrowski Shannon

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A small percentage of high-risk patients accounts for a large proportion of Medicaid spending in the United States, which has become an urgent policy issue. Our objective was to pilot a novel patient-centered intervention for high-risk patients with frequent hospital admissions to determine its potential to improve care and reduce costs. Methods Community and hospital-based care management and coordination intervention with pre-post analysis of health care utilization. We enrolled Medicaid fee-for-service patients aged 18-64 who were admitted to an urban public hospital and identified as being at high risk for hospital readmission by a validated predictive algorithm. Enrolled patients were evaluated using qualitative and quantitative interview techniques to identify needs such as transportation to/advocacy during medical appointments, mental health/substance use treatment, and home visits. A community housing partner initiated housing applications in-hospital for homeless patients. Care managers facilitated appropriate discharge plans then worked closely with patients in the community using a harm reduction approach. Results Nineteen patients were enrolled; all were male, 18/19 were substance users, and 17/19 were homeless. Patients had a total of 64 inpatient admissions in the 12 months before the intervention, versus 40 in the following 12 months, a 37.5% reduction. Most patients (73.3% had fewer inpatient admissions in the year after the intervention compared to the prior year. Overall ED visits also decreased after study enrollment, while outpatient clinic visits increased. Yearly study hospital Medicaid reimbursements fell an average of $16,383 per patient. Conclusions A pilot intervention for high-cost patients shows promising results for health services usage. We are currently expanding our model to serve more patients at additional hospitals to see if the pilot's success can be replicated. Trial registration

  5. Are We Being Informed Correctly During the Patient Transfer to the Intensive Care Units?

    OpenAIRE

    Münire Babayiğit; Zehra Baykal Tutal; Necla Dereli; Handan Güleç; Mustafa Alparslan Babayiğit; Eyüp Horasanlı

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to demonstrate to what extent do the right information in patients’ inter-hospital transfers due to the intensive care indications Material and Method: In this study, 38 patients who applied to our general intensive care unit (ICU) from the other hospitals were included. The demographic data of patients, declarations before ICU admission and diagnosis after admission, the reason and accuracy of the transfer, the overall stay time and the treatments in ICU were recorded....

  6. Dementia Special Care Units in Residential Care Communities: United States, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Order from the National Technical Information Service NCHS Dementia Special Care Units in Residential Care Communities: United ... Facilities Seventeen percent of residential care communities had dementia special care units. Figure 1. Number and percent ...

  7. What Does Change with Nutrition Team in Intensive Care Unit?

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Fatih Yılmaz; Ertuğrul Kılıç; Sema Gürsel; Nazlı Tiryaki

    2016-01-01

    Intrroduction: Clinical nutrition is the nutrition support therapy provided to patients under medical supervision at the hospital or home setting. It is a multidisciplinary task performed under the control of the physician, dietician, pharmacist and nurse. In this study, the changes in the patient admission statistics to the general intensive care unit (GICU), the exitus ratios, decubitus ulcer formation rates, albumin use rates, duration of the hospital stay, Acute Physiology and Chronic Hea...

  8. Preventing seclusion in psychiatry: a care ethics perspective on the first five minutes at admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskes, Yolande; Kemper, Martijn; Landeweer, Elleke G M; Widdershoven, Guy A M

    2014-11-01

    In this article, an intervention aimed at improving quality of care to prevent seclusion in psychiatry by focusing on the first five minutes at admission is analyzed from a care ethics perspective. Two cases are presented from an evaluation study in a psychiatric hospital. In both cases, the nurses follow the intervention protocol, but the outcome is different. In the first case, the patient ends up in the seclusion room. In the second case, this does not happen. Analyzing the cases from a care ethics perspective, we conclude that applying the intervention in the right way implies more than following the steps laid down in the protocol. It requires a new way of thinking and acting, resulting in new relationships between nurses and patients. Care ethics theory can help clarify what good care is actually about and keep in mind what is needed to apply the intervention. Thus, care ethics theory can be highly practical and helpful in changing and improving healthcare practice.

  9. Patterns in admission delays to outpatient methadone treatment in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryczynski, Jan; Schwartz, Robert P; Salkever, David S; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Jaffe, Jerome H

    2011-12-01

    Waiting lists for methadone treatment have existed in many U.S. communities, but little is known nationally about what patient and service system factors are related to admission delays that stem from program capacity shortfalls. Using a combination of national data sources, this study examined patterns in capacity-related admission delays to outpatient methadone treatment in 40 U.S. metropolitan areas (N = 28,920). Patient characteristics associated with admission delays included racial/ethnic minority status, lower education, criminal justice referral, prior treatment experience, secondary cocaine or alcohol use, and co-occurring psychiatric problems. Injection drug users experienced fewer delays, as did self-pay patients and referrals from health care and addiction treatment providers. Higher community-level utilization of methadone treatment was associated with delay, whereas delays were less common in communities with higher utilization of alternative modalities. These findings highlight potential disparities in timely admission to outpatient methadone treatment. Implications for improving treatment access and service system monitoring are discussed. PMID:21821378

  10. Pediatric Palliative Care in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Kevin; Wolfe, Joanne; Collura, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    The chronicity of illness that afflicts children in Pediatric Palliative Care and the medical technology that has improved their lifespan and quality of life make prognostication extremely difficult. The uncertainty of prognostication and the available medical technologies make both the neonatal intensive care unit and the pediatric intensive care unit locations where many children will receive Pediatric Palliative Care. Health care providers in the neonatal intensive care unit and pediatric intensive care unit should integrate fundamental Pediatric Palliative Care principles into their everyday practice. PMID:26333755

  11. The influence of primary care quality on hospital admissions for people with dementia in England: a regression analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Kasteridis

    Full Text Available To test the impact of a UK pay-for-performance indicator, the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF dementia review, on three types of hospital admission for people with dementia: emergency admissions where dementia was the primary diagnosis; emergency admissions for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs; and elective admissions for cataract, hip replacement, hernia, prostate disease, or hearing loss.Count data regression analyses of hospital admissions from 8,304 English general practices from 2006/7 to 2010/11. We identified relevant admissions from national Hospital Episode Statistics and aggregated them to practice level. We merged these with practice-level data on the QOF dementia review. In the base case, the exposure measure was the reported QOF register. As dementia is commonly under-diagnosed, we tested a predicted practice register based on consensus estimates. We adjusted for practice characteristics including measures of deprivation and uptake of a social benefit to purchase care services (Attendance Allowance.In the base case analysis, higher QOF achievement had no significant effect on any type of hospital admission. However, when the predicted register was used to account for under-diagnosis, a one-percentage point improvement in QOF achievement was associated with a small reduction in emergency admissions for both dementia (-0.1%; P=0.011 and ACSCs (-0.1%; P=0.001. In areas of greater deprivation, uptake of Attendance Allowance was consistently associated with significantly lower emergency admissions. In all analyses, practices with a higher proportion of nursing home patients had significantly lower admission rates for elective and emergency care.In one of three analyses at practice level, the QOF review for dementia was associated with a small but significant reduction in unplanned hospital admissions. Given the rising prevalence of dementia, increasing pressures on acute hospital beds and poor outcomes associated with

  12. Children's Post-Traumatic Stress and the Role of Memory Following Admission to Intensive Care: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Belinda; Kenardy, Justin; Long, Deborah; Le Brocque, Robyne

    2012-01-01

    Although our understanding of children's psychological outcomes following intensive care lags significantly behind advances in medicine, there is a growing awareness that intensive care admission impacts children beyond the boundaries of physical well-being. Intensive care presents a variety of disease-related, treatment-related, and…

  13. APACHE II: preliminary report on 100 intensive care unit cases in University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, G S; Mah, K K; abd Majid, S; Streram; Yee, M K

    1991-03-01

    A good overall assessment of the severity of illnesses of patients admitted to a general intensive care unit (ICU) is not without problems. The APACHE (acute physiology and chronic health evaluation) prognostic scoring system enables us to stratify acutely ill patients and compare efficiency of ICU therapy in different hospitals. This preliminary study carried out on 100 consecutive admissions to the ICU in University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur showed the spectrum of ICU admissions and the direct relationship between APACHE II score and mortality.

  14. Sleep in intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyko, Yuliya; Jennum, Poul; Nikolic, Miki;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine if improving intensive care unit (ICU) environment would enhance sleep quality, assessed by polysomnography (PSG), in critically ill mechanically ventilated patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Randomized controlled trial, crossover design. The night intervention "quiet routine......" protocol was directed toward improving ICU environment between 10pm and 6am. Noise levels during control and intervention nights were recorded. Patients on mechanical ventilation and able to give consent were eligible for the study. We monitored sleep by PSG.The standard (American Association of Sleep...... Medicine) sleep scoring criteria were insufficient for the assessment of polysomnograms. Modified classification for sleep scoring in critically ill patients, suggested by Watson et al. (Crit Care Med 2013;41:1958-1967), was used. RESULTS: Sound level analysis showed insignificant effect...

  15. Can the US minimum data set be used for predicting admissions to acute care facilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, P A; Quirolgico, S; Candidate, D; Manchand, R; Canfield, K; Adya, M

    1998-01-01

    This paper is intended to give an overview of Knowledge Discovery in Large Datasets (KDD) and data mining applications in healthcare particularly as related to the Minimum Data Set, a resident assessment tool which is used in US long-term care facilities. The US Health Care Finance Administration, which mandates the use of this tool, has accumulated massive warehouses of MDS data. The pressure in healthcare to increase efficiency and effectiveness while improving patient outcomes requires that we find new ways to harness these vast resources. The intent of this preliminary study design paper is to discuss the development of an approach which utilizes the MDS, in conjunction with KDD and classification algorithms, in an attempt to predict admission from a long-term care facility to an acute care facility. The use of acute care services by long term care residents is a negative outcome, potentially avoidable, and expensive. The value of the MDS warehouse can be realized by the use of the stored data in ways that can improve patient outcomes and avoid the use of expensive acute care services. This study, when completed, will test whether the MDS warehouse can be used to describe patient outcomes and possibly be of predictive value. PMID:10384674

  16. The Value of Admission Clinical Data for Diagnosing Heart Failure in Long-term Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, George A.; Foebel, Andrea D.; Dubin, Joel A.; Ng, Jennifer; Turpie, Irene D.; Hussack, Patricia; McKelvie, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) is common in long-term care (LTC). Diagnostic uncertainty is important barrier to optimal HF management, stemming from inadequate health information transfer upon LTC admission. We determine the utility of admission clinical information to confirm a HF diagnosis in new LTC residents. Methods This was a prospective cohort study. From February 2004 to November 2006, information about new residents from 41 LTC homes in Ontario, Canada, was collected from residents and caregivers, and all available health records. A prior HF diagnosis was confirmed by consensus review of available data by two independent experts. Multivariate modelling was utilized to determine the utility of the admission clinical assessment in confirming a prior HF diagnosis. Results A total of 449 residents were included for analysis, aged 84.3±6.5 years, and 21.6% had a prior HF diagnosis. The most useful clinical item for diagnosing HF was a “history of HF”. The final model included “history of HF’ (OR [odds ratio] 13.66, 95% CI 6.61–28.24), “fluid on the lungs” (OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.04–3.89), “orthopnea” (OR 1.76, 95% CI 0.93–3.33), “taking β-blocker” (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.10–3.94), “taking loop diuretics” (OR 2.11, 95% CI 1.12–3.98), and “history of coronary artery disease” (OR 2.83, 95% CI 1.42–5.64). Conclusion Elements of the clinical assessment for new LTC residents can help confirm a prior HF diagnosis. An admission history of HF is highly predictive. PMID:24278092

  17. Admission cell free DNA levels predict 28-day mortality in patients with severe sepsis in intensive care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avital Avriel

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study is to assess the mortality prediction accuracy of circulating cell-free DNA (CFD level at admission measured by a new simplified method.CFD levels were measured by a direct fluorescence assay in severe sepsis patients on intensive care unit (ICU admission. In-hospital and/or twenty eight day all-cause mortality was the primary outcome.Out of 108 patients with median APACHE II of 20, 32.4% have died in hospital/or at 28-day. CFD levels were higher in decedents: median 3469.0 vs. 1659 ng/ml, p<0.001. In multivariable model APACHE II score and CFD (quartiles were significantly associated with the mortality: odds ratio of 1.05, p = 0.049 and 2.57, p<0.001 per quartile respectively. C-statistics for the models was 0.79 for CFD and 0.68 for APACHE II. Integrated discrimination improvement (IDI analyses showed that CFD and CFD+APACHE II score models had better discriminatory ability than APACHE II score alone.CFD level assessed by a new, simple fluorometric-assay is an accurate predictor of acute mortality among ICU patients with severe sepsis. Comparison of CFD to APACHE II score and Procalcitonin (PCT, suggests that CFD has the potential to improve clinical decision making.

  18. Area of admission and short-term care: an integral part of the internal medicine ward organized to intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Serafini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The analysis of the production related to health care activities in the Medicine ward of dell’Angelo Hospital (Mestre-Venezia, Italy in the year 2010 reveals that the short-term hospitalization, less than 3 days, corresponds to 18% of all inpatient admissions.Objectives The short-term hospitalization approach need to be “governed”, both in terms of effectiveness and efficiency. In our department we have identified an area called “Admission and Short Stay Area”, where the discharge follows a comprehensive diagnostic and therapeutic pathway. Accordingly, we plan to extend the number of beds dedicated to the short stay in hospital, in order to decrease the average duration of stay avoiding the risk of increasing the readmissions, to share new pathways between health care workers.Materials and methods Within the department we have identified 8 beds for patients admitted from the emergency room. In the same beds triage is performed. In these beds the maximum duration of stay is 3 days. To achieve this goal we used clinical pathways shared between health workers, and bedside diagnostic procedures such as ultrasounds.Results In 2011 than to year 2010 there was an increased rate of short-term hospitalization (22–18%. Despite that the mean hospital stay was unchanged (10.3–10.6 days. The number of readmission within 90 days was also unchanged when we considered the most common diseases. More than 90% of health care workers followed the pre-established clinical care pathways.Conclusions The presence of a small number of beds within the medicine ward was dedicated to perform triage that allows to identify clinical care the needs of the patient. Among these some can be resolved in 3 days, rewarding patients and saving human and financial resources. To achieve this goal it is necessary that health care providers share clinical pathways, and that the bedside ultrasound is accessible.

  19. A Review of Visiting Policies in Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaleghparast, Shiva; Joolaee, Soodabeh; Ghanbari, Behrooz; Maleki, Majid; Peyrovi, Hamid; Bahrani, Naser

    2016-01-01

    Admission to intensive care units is potentially stressful and usually goes together with disruption in physiological and emotional function of the patient. The role of the families in improving ill patients' conditions is important. So this study investigates the strategies, potential challenges and also the different dimensions of visiting hours' policies with a narrative review. The search was carried out in scientific information databases using keywords "visiting policy", "visiting hours" and "intensive care unit" with no time limitation on accessing the published studies in English or Farsi. Of a total of 42 articles, 22 conformed to our study objectives from 1997 to 2013. The trajectory of current research shows that visiting in intensive care units has, since their inception in the 1960s, always considered the nurses' perspectives, patients' preferences and physiological responses, and the outlook for families. However, little research has been carried out and most of that originates from the United States, Europe and since 2010, a few from Iran. It seems that the need to use the research findings and emerging theories and practices is necessary to discover and challenge the beliefs and views of nurses about family-oriented care and visiting in intensive care units. PMID:26755480

  20. Platelet counts and outcome in the pediatric intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrawal Shruti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Thrombocytopenia is commonly observed in critically ill patients. This study was undertaken to evaluate the variation in platelet counts and the risk factors associated with thrombocytopenia and mortality in pediatric intensive care patients. In addition, prognostic value of platelet counts for outcome in pediatric intensive care unit was studied. Study Design: Prospective, observational cohort analysis. Setting: 8- bedded pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital. Patients: All consecutively admitted patients (n=138 staying in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU for at least 48h over a 7 months period were studied. Measurements and Main Results: Thrombocytopenia was defined as platelet counts < 150.0/nL. Median 1 st day Pediatric Risk of Mortality Score (PRISM was 5 (range 0-30 and median ICU stay was 4 days (range 2-98 days. Twenty five percent patients had at least one episode of thrombocytopenia during the stay. Twenty percent of these patients had thrombocytopenia on admission and rest (80% developed it during the PICU stay. Seventy one percent (19 of the patients developed thrombocytopenia by fourth day of admission. Patients with PICU acquired thrombocytopenia had statistically significant lower baseline, nadir and 4th day platelet counts and a significantly higher drop in platelet counts (56% vs. 6% P< 0.001 as compared to non thrombocytopenic patients. PRISM score, long PICU stay, sepsis, coagulopathy, and creatinine levels were significantly associated with occurrence of thrombocytopenia. Patients with thrombocytopenia had higher probability of bleeding (34% vs. 15%, P=0.01. Higher platelet counts on admission were associated with significantly reduced risk of thrombocytopenia (P=0.00 Baseline, nadir and day-4 platelet counts, presence of thrombocytopenia on admission, sepsis, coagulopathy and a higher mean PRISM score on univariate analysis were significantly associated with mortality

  1. Japanese Bereaved Family Members' Perspectives of Palliative Care Units and Palliative Care: J-HOPE Study Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Satomi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Sato, Kazuki; Shoji, Ayaka; Chiba, Yurika; Miyazaki, Tamana; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    The study purpose was to understand the perspectives of bereaved family members regarding palliative care unit (PCU) and palliative care and to compare perceptions of PCU before admission and after bereavement. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted, and the perceptions of 454 and 424 bereaved family members were obtained regarding PCU and palliative care, respectively. Family members were significantly more likely to have positive perceptions after bereavement (ranging from 73% to 80%) compared to before admission (ranging from 62% to 71%). Bereaved family members who were satisfied with medical care in the PCU had a positive perception of the PCU and palliative care after bereavement. Respondents younger than 65 years of age were significantly more likely to have negative perceptions of PCU and palliative care.

  2. Japanese Bereaved Family Members' Perspectives of Palliative Care Units and Palliative Care: J-HOPE Study Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Satomi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Sato, Kazuki; Shoji, Ayaka; Chiba, Yurika; Miyazaki, Tamana; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    The study purpose was to understand the perspectives of bereaved family members regarding palliative care unit (PCU) and palliative care and to compare perceptions of PCU before admission and after bereavement. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted, and the perceptions of 454 and 424 bereaved family members were obtained regarding PCU and palliative care, respectively. Family members were significantly more likely to have positive perceptions after bereavement (ranging from 73% to 80%) compared to before admission (ranging from 62% to 71%). Bereaved family members who were satisfied with medical care in the PCU had a positive perception of the PCU and palliative care after bereavement. Respondents younger than 65 years of age were significantly more likely to have negative perceptions of PCU and palliative care. PMID:25852202

  3. Elevated procalcitonin is associated with increased mortality in patients with scrub typhus infection needing intensive care admission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Victor Peter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Procalcitonin is a biomarker of bacterial sepsis. It is unclear if scrub typhus, a rickettsial illness, is associated with elevated procalcitonin levels. Aim: To assess if scrub typhus infection is associated with high procalcitonin levels and whether high levels portend a poorer prognosis. Setting and Design: Retrospective study of patients with severe scrub typhus infection, admitted to the medical intensive care unit of a tertiary care university affiliated teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Eighty-four patients with severe scrub typhus infection that also had procalcitonin levels were assessed. Statistical Analysis: Relationship between procalcitonin and mortality explored using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The mean (±standard deviation age was 40.0 ± 15.5 years. Patients were symptomatic for 8.3 ± 4.3 days prior to presentation. The median admission procalcitonin level was 4.0 (interquartile range 1.8 to 8.5 ng/ml; 59 (70.2% patients had levels >2 ng/ml. Invasive mechanical ventilation was required in 65 patients; 20 patients died. On univariate analysis, admission procalcitonin was associated with increased odds of death [odds ratio (OR 1.09, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.03 to 1.18]. On multivariate logistic regression analysis including procalcitonin and APACHE-II score, the APACHE-II score was significantly associated with mortality (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.30, P = 0.004 while a trend was observed with procalcitonin (OR 1.05, 95%CI 1.01 to 1.13, P = 0.09. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve, AUC, for mortality was 0.77 for procalcitonin and 0.78 for APACHE-II. Conclusions: Procalcitonin is elevated in severe scrub typhus infection and may be associated with higher mortality.

  4. The case against segregation in "specialized" care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lines, R

    Canadian public officials are demanding that prisons segregate HIV-positive individuals and require mandatory HIV testing similar to the procedures used in correctional institutions in the United States. These measures have been consistently rejected as ineffective and punitive in Canada. The commissioner of the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) does not consider forced testing or segregation as a useful part of their HIV/AIDS strategy. The issue raises concerns about prisoners' rights. Proponents of segregation say that creating specialized care units in some Federal institutions would guarantee state-of-the-art care; others charge that it is an admission of substandard care throughout the system. Voluntary segregation forces prisoners to choose between health care and proximity to family. It also deters voluntary testing, as some prisoners will decline testing if they do not want to be moved to another facility. Segregation stigmatizes everyone associated with an institution that has a specialized care unit. There are also problems associated with combining prisoners of varying security levels in the same unit. Compassionate release is preferable to segregation. PMID:11365291

  5. Demographic profile and utilization statistics of a Canadian inpatient palliative care unit within a tertiary care setting

    OpenAIRE

    Napolskikh, J.; Selby, D.; Bennett, M.; Chow, E.; Harris, K; Sinclair, E.; Myers, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Canadian data describing inpatient palliative care unit (pcu) utilization are scarce. In the present study, we performed a quality assessment of a 24-bed short-term pcu with a 3-months-or-less life expectancy policy in a tertiary care setting. Methods Using a retrospective chart review, we explored wait time (wt) for admission (May 2005 to April 2006), length of stay [los (February 2005 to January 2006)], and patient demographics. Results The wt data showed 508 referrals, with 242 ...

  6. Transfusional profile in different types of intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilusca Cardoso de Paula

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: anemia is a common clinical finding in intensive care units. The red blood cell transfusion is the main form of treatment, despite the associated risks. Thus, we proposed to evaluate the profile of transfusional patients in different intensive care units. Methods: prospective analysis of patients admitted in the intensive care units of a tertiary university hospital with an indication for transfusion of packed red blood cells. Demographic profile and transfusional profile were collected, a univariate analysis was done, and the results were considered significant at p = 0.05. Results: 408 transfusions were analyzed in 71 patients. The mean hemoglobin concentration on admission was 9.7 ± 2.3 g/dL and the pre-transfusional concentration was 6.9 ± 1.1 g/dL. The main indications for transfusion were hemoglobin concentration (49% and active bleeding (32%. The median number of units transfused per episode was 2 (1-2 and the median storage time was 14 (7-21 days. The number of patients transfused with hemoglobin levels greater than 7 g/dL and the number of bags transfused per episode were significantly different among intensive care units. Patients who received three or more transfusions had longer mechanical ventilation time and intensive care unit stay and higher mortality after 60 days. There was an association of mortality with disease severity but not with transfusional characteristics. Conclusions: the practice of blood products transfusion was partially in agreement with the guidelines recommended, although there are differences in behavior between the different profiles of intensive care units. Transfused patients evolved with unfavorable outcomes. Despite the scarcity of blood in blood banks, the mean storage time of the bags was high.

  7. Mobility decline in patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Fábio Santos; Paim, Daniel de Macedo; Brito, Juliana de Oliveira; Barros, Idiel de Araujo; Nogueira, Thiago Barbosa; Martinez, Bruno Prata; Pires, Thiago Queiroz

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the variation in mobility during hospitalization in an intensive care unit and its association with hospital mortality. Methods This prospective study was conducted in an intensive care unit. The inclusion criteria included patients admitted with an independence score of ≥ 4 for both bed-chair transfer and locomotion, with the score based on the Functional Independence Measure. Patients with cardiac arrest and/or those who died during hospitalization were excluded. To measure the loss of mobility, the value obtained at discharge was calculated and subtracted from the value obtained on admission, which was then divided by the admission score and recorded as a percentage. Results The comparison of these two variables indicated that the loss of mobility during hospitalization was 14.3% (p < 0.001). Loss of mobility was greater in patients hospitalized for more than 48 hours in the intensive care unit (p < 0.02) and in patients who used vasopressor drugs (p = 0.041). However, the comparison between subjects aged 60 years or older and those younger than 60 years indicated no significant differences in the loss of mobility (p = 0.332), reason for hospitalization (p = 0.265), SAPS 3 score (p = 0.224), use of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.117), or hospital mortality (p = 0.063). Conclusion There was loss of mobility during hospitalization in the intensive care unit. This loss was greater in patients who were hospitalized for more than 48 hours and in those who used vasopressors; however, the causal and prognostic factors associated with this decline need to be elucidated. PMID:27410406

  8. Integrated patient unit care in schizophrenia population vs a non-integrated patient unit care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waago-Hansen C

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have described the benefits of integrated care in chronic conditions. Keeping the patients out of hospital is considered to increase value to the patient and is also benefit to the society and the healthcare provider.As we have an increase in the treatment options, costs, age and demand, an optimized treatment model is required if we want to maintain or obtain a sustainable system. The objective of this study was to describe how costs of treatment and value to the patient, to the hospital and the society differs in a non integrated patient unit (IPU vs an IPU system.Methods: Contact data of schizophrenic patients (n=51 from the hospital's electronic medical records (EMRs was accessed (from October 2010 till March 2012 and analyzed. All financial data was obtained from the finance department. Time driven activity based costing (TDABC as used to calculate the costs.Results: The study examined 1,149 out-patient consultations and 4,386 days of occupancy. By adopting an IPU approach, the costs were significantly reduced compared to the non-IPU approach. Increased complexity benefitted significantly from IPU. These patients had a higher frequency of contact but lower degrees of admission, whilst the non-IPU had significantly higher admission rates and duration of stay.Conclusions: This study shows a striking difference in the resources used on patients treated with an IPU vs a non-IPU approach. In almost every aspect, the IPU approach is by far superior to the non-IPU approach.

  9. Current physiotherapy approaches in intensive care units

    OpenAIRE

    Yurdalan, S. Ufuk

    2011-01-01

    Physiotherapy is a part of the multidisciplinary treatment in different intensive care units. Respiratory, cardiovascular and neuromusculoskeletal- focused physiotherapy programmes and prevention of the respiratory, neuromuscular complications which may be possible, developing the exercise capacity related to inspiratory muscle function in critically patients internalized and postoperative cases in intensive care unit are clinical targets. It is known that physiotherapy initiated early is rel...

  10. How to reduce avoidable admissions due to acute diabetes complications?: Interrelation between primary and specialized attention in a diabetes unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. García-Talavera Espín

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus is a serious health problem. In the year 2030 it will affect 366 million people around the world. Objective: Evaluate the effectiveness of a mixed intervention and reducing the amount and seriousness of acute complications in diabetics from our Health Area. Materials and method: Protocols of action as well as information documents were produced. Diabetes Unit coordinated educational activities in the different support levels of the Area VII of Murcia. Information talks were provided for the people in charge of the Diabetes Unit in every Care Center and Service of the Health Area. Personalized training was provided for patients treated in the differet Care levels. The study comprised three stages. Information leaflets were spread and talks offered to the patient regarding in house handling of hypo and hyper glycemia. Results: A reduction of 39% of the emergencies due to acute non complicated diabetes was achieved, as well as a reduction of 47.6% of hospital admissions. There was a reduction of 67.8% of the amount of total hospital stays for the group of patients under 35 years who were admitted into the hospital due to type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus that didn't show any complications (GRD295. Conclusions: There was a reduction of more than thirty percent in the emergencies due to acute decompensations in the disease and a significant reduction in the avoidable hospital stays in the young adult, thus improving the patients' life quality and reducing the social cost of the diabetic patient.

  11. Nosocomial Infections in Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    OpenAIRE

    Ioanna Paulopoulou; Christina Nanou

    2013-01-01

    Neonates, especially prematures, requiring care in Intensive Care Unit are a highly vulnerable population group at increased risk for nosocomial infections. In recent decades become one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Aim: Highlighting the severity of nosocomial infections for hospitalized infants and the imprinting of risk factors that affects their development. Material-Methods: Searched for studies published in international scientific ...

  12. From stroke unit care to stroke care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Keyser, J; Sulter, G.

    1999-01-01

    In some stroke units continuous monitoring of blood pressure, electrocardiogram, body temperature, and oxygen saturation has become an integral part of the management of acute stroke. In addition, regular measurements of blood glucose are performed. Stroke units equipped with such monitoring facilit

  13. Patients with diabetes in the intensive care unit; not served by treatment, yet protected?

    OpenAIRE

    Siegelaar, S.E.; DeVries, J. H.; Hoekstra, J.B.

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with severe complications and decreased life expectancy. However, in the previous issue of Critical Care, Vincent and colleagues report no difference in mortality between patients with insulin-treated diabetes and patients without diabetes in the intensive care unit ( ICU), despite larger severity of illness in the diabetes group at admission. This study contributes to the growing evidence that diabetes in itself is not a risk factor for ICU mortality, although the mech...

  14. PO02 - Clinical profile of children admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit due to acute clinical deterioration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Claus Sixtus; Aagaard, Hanne; Olesen, Hanne Vebert;

    2016-01-01

    Theme: Intensive care Background: There has been an increased number of critically ill patients admitted to paediatric departments. Only a few studies have described the various causes of unplanned admission to paediatric intensive care units (PICU) due to clinical deterioration. However, an...... critical ill children in paediatric wards....

  15. Measuring and benchmarking safety culture: application of the safety attitudes questionnaire to an acute medical admissions unit.

    OpenAIRE

    Relihan, E; Glynn, S; Daly, D.; Silke, B; Ryder, Sheila Anne

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the safety culture in an acute medical admissions unit (AMAU) of a teaching hospital in order to benchmark results against international data and guide a unit-based, integrated, risk management strategy. Methods: The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ), a validated instrument for the measurement of safety culture, was applied to an AMAU. All AMAU healthcare staff (n = 92) were surveyed: doctors, nurses, healthcare assistants (HCAs) and allied healthcare professiona...

  16. Family members' lived experience in the intensive care unit: a phemenological study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKiernan, Margaret

    2012-01-31

    AIM: To describe the lived experience of family members of patients in the intensive care unit. BACKGROUND: Admission of a critically ill relative to an intensive care unit causes anxiety and stress to family members. Nursing care is initially focused on maintaining the physiological stability of the patient and less on the needs and concerns of family members. Understanding how families make sense of this experience may help nurses focus on the delivery of family centred care. METHODOLOGY: A phenomenological method was used to describe the lived experiences of family members of patients in an intensive care unit. In-depth interviews were conducted with six family members and analysed using qualitative thematic analysis. RESULTS: Four main themes emerged from the data: the need to know, making sense of it all, being there with them and caring and support. Family members needed honest information about the patient\\'s progress and outcome to make the situation more bearable for them. Making sense of the situation was a continuous process which involved tracking and evaluating care given. Being with their relative sustained their family bond and was a way to demonstrate love and support. Caring reassurance provided by the nurses enabled a sense of security. Support was needed by family members to assist them in coping. CONCLUSION: The research provided an insight into how family members viewed the impact of the admission and how they subsequently found ways of dealing with the situation. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Using a holistic approach to nursing assessment and care delivery in intensive care necessitates that nurses interact with and care for family members of patients. Development of a philosophy of family centred care is necessary, with formal assessment of families to take place soon after admission and an appropriate plan of care drawn up at this time.

  17. Frequency of candidemias in a tertiary care intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the frequency of fungal infections in intensive care unit (ICU) of Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, a tertiary care health facility. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Intensive Care Department of Military Hospital Rawalpindi from 01 Jan 2012 to 30 Jun 2012. Methodology: A total of 89 patients were screened with stay of more than 5 days in intensive care unit. Thirty cases were enrolled in the study for investigation of fungal infections that had fever even after 05 days of being on broad spectrum antibiotics. Culture was done on blood, urine and catheter tip samples as per clinical condition of a patient. Results: Candida infection was found in 23.4% of study cases. The mean age of study patients was 41.2 +- 20.0 years while 63.4% were female patients as compared to 36.7% males. Conclusion: Fungal infections especially candidemias are quite frequent in the intensive care units. (author)

  18. Risk factors for pediatric intensive care admission in children with acute asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.E. van den Bosch (Gerbrich); P.J.F.M. Merkus (Peter); C.M.P. Buysse (Corinne); A.L. Boehmer; A.A.P.H. Vaessen-Verberne (Anja); L. van Veen (Leoniek); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); M. de Hoog (Matthijs)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractINTRODUCTION: Severe acute asthma in children is associated with substantial morbidity and may require pediatric ICU (PICU) admission. The aim of the study was to determine risk factors for PICU admission. METHODS: The study used a retrospective multicenter case-control design. The cases

  19. Risk factors for pediatric intensive care admission in children with acute asthma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, G.E. van den; Merkus, P.J.F.M.; Buysse, C.M.; Boehmer, A.L.; Vaessen-Verberne, A.A.; Veen, L.N. van; Hop, W.C.J.; Hoog, M. de

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Severe acute asthma in children is associated with substantial morbidity and may require pediatric ICU (PICU) admission. The aim of the study was to determine risk factors for PICU admission. METHODS: The study used a retrospective multicenter case-control design. The cases included ch

  20. Impact of North Carolina's motorcycle helmet law on hospital admissions and charges for care of traumatic brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Rebecca B; Marshall, Stephen W; Proescholdbell, Scott K; Austin, Anna; Creppage, Kathleen

    2015-04-01

    BACKGROUND North Carolina requires motorcyclists of all ages to wear federally approved safety helmets. The purpose of this article is to estimate the impact of this state law in terms of hospital admissions for traumatic brain injury (TBI) and associated hospital charges. METHODS Hospital admissions of North Carolina motorcyclists with TBIs and associated hospital charges in 2011 were extracted from the North Carolina Hospital Discharge Data system. We estimated hospital admissions and charges for the same year under the counterfactual condition of North Carolina without a universal motorcycle helmet law by using various substitutes (Florida, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina residents treated in North Carolina). RESULTS North Carolina's universal helmet law prevented an estimated 190 to 226 hospital admissions of North Carolina motorcyclists with TBI in 2011. Averted hospital charges to taxpayer-funded sources (ie, government and public charges) were estimated to be between $9.5 million and $11.6 million for 2011, and total averted hospital charges for 2011 were estimated to be between $25.3 million and $31.0 million. LIMITATIONS Cost estimates are limited to inpatients during the initial period of hospital care. This study was unable to capture long-term health care costs and productivity losses incurred by North Carolina's TBI patients and their caregivers. CONCLUSIONS North Carolina's universal motorcycle helmet law generates health and economic benefits for the state and its taxpayers.

  1. Prevalence of Methicillin-resistant Staphyloccocus Aureus and associated risk factors on admission to a specialist care eye hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staphyloccocus aureus is known to be a frequent pathogen in hospital settings, with its well-known and resistant forms to the anti-staphylococcal penicillins. Reports on community carriage outside hospital settings have been feared to be on the increase due to the due to the frequency of reported cases on admission to hospitals. We undertook this study to determine the prevalence of and to establish predictors for, nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant S.aureus (MRSA) at the time of admission to a specialist care eye hospital. A prospective survey was conducted at King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital (KKESH), Riyadh during the three differing weeks randomly selected from the year 1999. The first 100 patients admitted during those three weeks were selected according to inclusion criteria. The hospital is a 220-bed tertiary ophthalmic care facility, with an average 7,500admission per year. Nasal bacterial swabs were taken within 48 hours of admission and tested for all strains of S.aureus and sensitivity to methicillin. Detailed interviews were conducted about medical history and habitual environment. Of 306 nasal cultures tested, none was isolated for MRSA and 102 (33%) were sensitive to methicillin (MSSA).We found 0% nasal carriage rate for MRSA. Respondents have difficulty with questions related to antibiotic administration. No identifiable medical or environmental risk factors could be found. Nasal swabs of patients admitted to KKESH did not reveal MRSA colonization, indicating that MRSA may not be prevalent in the community at present. (author)

  2. Health Risk Behaviors in Family Caregivers During Patients’ Stay in Intensive Care Units: A Pilot Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, JiYeon; Hoffman, Leslie A.; Schulz, Richard; Ren, Dianxu; Donahoe, Michael P.; Given, Barbara; Sherwood, Paula R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies of family caregivers of the critically ill have mainly focused on the psychological impact of the patients’ stay in the intensive care unit and related stress. Despite known associations between stress and physical health, limited attention has been paid to the need to promote and maintain physical health in these caregivers. Objective To explore how family caregivers’ health risk behaviors are associated with patients’ preexisting care needs and the caregivers’ depressive symptoms and burden. Methods During the intensive-care-unit stay of critically ill patients (who required mechanical ventilation for ≥4 days), 50 family caregivers were surveyed to determine the caregivers’ depressive symptoms, burden, and health risk behaviors. Data were also collected on patients’ care needs before admission to the intensive care unit. Results One or more health risk behaviors were reported by 94% of family caregivers. More than 90% of caregivers reported depressive symptoms above the score indicating risk for clinical depression. A high level of burden was reported by 36% of caregivers. More health risk behaviors were associated with higher scores of depressive symptoms and burden (P<.001 for both). Caregivers’ responses did not differ according to patients’ preexisting care needs. Conclusion Health risk behaviors of family caregivers are associated with greater perceptions of burden and/or depressive symptoms but not with patients’ care needs before admission to the intensive care unit. PMID:23283087

  3. Stressors in the relatives of patients admitted to an intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Angélica Adam; Weigel, Bruna Dorfey; Dummer, Claus Dieter; Machado, Kelly Campara; Tisott, Taís Montagner

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify and stratify the main stressors for the relatives of patients admitted to the adult intensive care unit of a teaching hospital. Methods Cross-sectional descriptive study conducted with relatives of patients admitted to an intensive care unit from April to October 2014. The following materials were used: a questionnaire containing identification information and demographic data of the relatives, clinical data of the patients, and 25 stressors adapted from the Intensive Care Unit Environmental Stressor Scale. The degree of stress caused by each factor was determined on a scale of values from 1 to 4. The stressors were ranked based on the average score obtained. Results The main cause of admission to the intensive care unit was clinical in 36 (52.2%) cases. The main stressors were the patient being in a state of coma (3.15 ± 1.23), the patient being unable to speak (3.15 ± 1.20), and the reason for admission (3.00 ± 1.27). After removing the 27 (39.1%) coma patients from the analysis, the main stressors for the relatives were the reason for admission (2.75 ± 1.354), seeing the patient in the intensive care unit (2.51 ± 1.227), and the patient being unable to speak (2.50 ± 1.269). Conclusion Difficulties in communication and in the relationship with the patient admitted to the intensive care unit were identified as the main stressors by their relatives, with the state of coma being predominant. By contrast, the environment, work routines, and relationship between the relatives and intensive care unit team had the least impact as stressors.

  4. Hyperglycemia in the Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Rainer Lenhardt; Ozan Akca

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is frequently encountered in the intensive care unit. In this disease, after severe injury and during diabetes mellitus homeostasis is impaired; hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia and glycemic variability may ensue. These three states have been shown to independently increase mortality and morbidity. Patients with diabetics admitted to the intensive care unit tolerate higher blood glucose values without increase of mortality. Stress hyperglycemia may occur in patients with or without d...

  5. Performance and burnout in intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, GJ; Schaufeli, WB; LeBlanc, P; Zwerts, C; Miranda, DR

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between three different performance measures and burnout was explored in 20 Dutch Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Burnout (i.e. emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) proved to be significantly related to nurses' perceptions of performance as well as to objectively assessed unit p

  6. Rising United States Hospital Admissions for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Recent Trends and Economic Impact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith S Kaye

    Full Text Available The number of ambulatory patients seeking treatment for skin and skin structure infections (SSSI are increasing. The objective of this study is to determine recent trends in hospital admissions and healthcare resource utilization and identify covariates associated with hospital costs and mortality for hospitalized adult patients with a primary SSSI diagnosis in the United States.We performed a retrospective cross-sectional analysis (years 2005-2011 of data from the US Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project National Inpatient Sample. Recent trends, patient characteristics, and healthcare resource utilization for patients hospitalized with a primary SSSI diagnosis were evaluated. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were conducted to assess patient and hospital characteristics.A total of 1.8% of hospital admissions for the years 2005 through 2011 were for adult patients with a SSSI primary diagnosis. SSSI-related hospital admissions significantly changed during the study period (P < .001 for trend ranging from 1.6% (in 2005 to 2.0% (in 2011. Mean hospital length of stay (LOS decreased from 5.4 days in the year 2005 to 5.0 days in the year 2011 (overall change, P < .001 with no change in hospital costs. Patients with postoperative wound infections had the longest hospital stays (adjusted mean, 5.81 days; 95% confidence interval (CI, 5.80-5.83 and highest total costs (adjusted mean, $9388; 95% CI, $9366-$9410. Year of hospital admission was strongly associated with mortality; infection type, all patient refined diagnosis related group severity of illness level, and LOS were strongly associated with hospital costs.Hospital admissions for adult patients in the United States with a SSSI primary diagnosis continue to increase. Decreasing hospital inpatient LOS and mortality rate may be due to improved early treatment. Future research should focus on identifying alternative treatment processes for patients with SSSI that could shift management from

  7. Heart rate dynamics preceding hemorrhage in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Travis J; Clark, Matthew T; Lake, Douglas E; Moorman, J Randall; Calland, J Forrest

    2015-01-01

    Occult hemorrhage in surgical/trauma intensive care unit (STICU) patients is common and may lead to circulatory collapse. Continuous electrocardiography (ECG) monitoring may allow for early identification and treatment, and could improve outcomes. We studied 4,259 consecutive admissions to the STICU at the University of Virginia Health System. We collected ECG waveform data captured by bedside monitors and calculated linear and non-linear measures of the RR interbeat intervals. We tested the hypothesis that a transfusion requirement of 3 or more PRBC transfusions in a 24 hour period is preceded by dynamical changes in these heart rate measures and performed logistic regression modeling. We identified 308 hemorrhage events. A multivariate model including heart rate, standard deviation of the RR intervals, detrended fluctuation analysis, and local dynamics density had a C-statistic of 0.62. Earlier detection of hemorrhage might improve outcomes by allowing earlier resuscitation in STICU patients. PMID:26342251

  8. Admission Patterns and Outcomes of Paediatric Patients Admitted at the Diarrhea Unit of Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH )

    OpenAIRE

    Sanyiwa, John; Penza, Nuru

    2008-01-01

    To determine patterns of admissions due to diarrhea and their outcomes of paediatric patients at uhimbili National Hospital (MNH). A hospital-based prospective study including all children admitted to the Diarrhea Unit during the study period. Data was collected using content analysis checklists. Ethical clearance was sought from MNH and confidentiality in handling the information was observed. Data was analyzed using Epi-info 2002 statistical software. A total of 50 children were admitted d...

  9. How many schools adopt interviews during the student admission process across the health professions in the United States of America?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Greer; Startsman, Laura F; Bankston, Karen; Michaels, Julia; Danek, Jennifer C; Fair, Malika

    2016-01-01

    Health profession schools use interviews during the admissions process to identify certain non-cognitive skills that are needed for success in diverse, inter-professional settings. This study aimed to assess the use of interviews during the student admissions process across health disciplines at schools in the United States of America in 2014. The type and frequency of non-cognitive skills assessed were also evaluated. Descriptive methods were used to analyze a sample of interview rubrics collected as part of a national survey on admissions in the health professions, which surveyed 228 schools of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing, and public health. Of the 228 schools, 130 used interviews. The most desirable non-cognitive skills from 34 schools were identified as follows: communication skills (30), motivation (22), readiness for the profession (17), service (12), and problem-solving (12). Ten schools reported using the multiple mini-interview format, which may indicate potential for expanding this practice. Disparities in the use of interviewing across health professions should be verified to help schools adopt interviews during student admissions processes.

  10. How many schools adopt interviews during the student admission process across the health professions in the United States of America?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greer Glazer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Health profession schools use interviews during the admissions process to identify certain non-cognitive skills that are needed for success in diverse, inter-professional settings. This study aimed to assess the use of interviews during the student admissions process across health disciplines at schools in the United States of America in 2014. The type and frequency of non-cognitive skills assessed were also evaluated. Descriptive methods were used to analyze a sample of interview rubrics collected as part of a national survey on admissions in the health professions, which surveyed 228 schools of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing, and public health. Of the 228 schools, 130 used interviews. The most desirable non-cognitive skills from 34 schools were identified as follows: communication skills (30, motivation (22, readiness for the profession (17, service (12, and problem-solving (12. Ten schools reported using the multiple mini-interview format, which may indicate potential for expanding this practice. Disparities in the use of interviewing across health professions should be verified to help schools adopt interviews during student admissions processes.

  11. Nosocomial Infections in Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioanna Paulopoulou

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Neonates, especially prematures, requiring care in Intensive Care Unit are a highly vulnerable population group at increased risk for nosocomial infections. In recent decades become one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Aim: Highlighting the severity of nosocomial infections for hospitalized infants and the imprinting of risk factors that affects their development. Material-Methods: Searched for studies published in international scientific journals during the period 2004-2013. As a main tool of retraction of bibliography was used the internet. Specific web sites and library databases: PubMed, Cinahl and Google scholar with key-words: "prevent nosocomial infections", "infection control", "neonatal care", "nursing care prematurity", "neonates nosocomial infections", "neonatal intensive care unit" (NICU. Methodology was applied thematic content analysis, which provides a careful reading of the material and recording the recurring risk factors Neonatal Neonatal Unit. Results: All researchers agree that nosocomial infections of hospitalized infants are a result of interaction of intrinsic and extrinsic factors risk. The intrinsic factors predisposing to infection is the immaturity of the immune system, the barriers of the skin and mucous membranes. Furthermore, multiple external factors contribute to the development of infection, such as low birth weight, underlying disease, broad-spectrum antibiotics, prolonged hospitalization, invasive techniques, parenteral nutrition, numerical insufficiency of staff, and poor compliance with medical professionals on hand hygiene. In recent years, the use of protocols and guidelines for each intervention in newborns has dramatically reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections. Conclusions: Nosocomial infections constitute serious threat to the population of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Surveillance of infections and the use of protocols will help control

  12. Intensive care unit nurses' opinions about euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaş, Gülşah; Oztunç, Gürsel; Nazan Alparslan, Z

    2007-09-01

    This study was conducted to gain opinions about euthanasia from nurses who work in intensive care units. The research was planned as a descriptive study and conducted with 186 nurses who worked in intensive care units in a university hospital, a public hospital, and a private not-for-profit hospital in Adana, Turkey, and who agreed to complete a questionnaire. Euthanasia is not legal in Turkey. One third (33.9%) of the nurses supported the legalization of euthanasia, whereas 39.8% did not. In some specific circumstances, 44.1% of the nurses thought that euthanasia was being practiced in our country. The most significant finding was that these Turkish intensive care unit nurses did not overwhelmingly support the legalization of euthanasia. Those who did support it were inclined to agree with passive rather than active euthanasia (P = 0.011).

  13. Interdisciplinary communication in the intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Reader, Tom W; Flin, R; Mearns, Kathryn; Cuthbertson, Brian H

    2007-01-01

    Background. Patient safety research has shown poor communication among intensive care unit (ICU) nurses and doctors to be a common causal factor underlying critical incidents in intensive care. This study examines whether ICU doctors and nurses have a shared perception of interdisciplinary communication in the UK ICU. Methods. Cross-sectional survey of ICU nurses and doctors in four UK hospitals using a previously established measure of ICU interdisciplinary collaboration. Results. A sample o...

  14. Factors Affecting Intensive Care Units Nursing Workload

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadkarim BAHADORI; RAVANGARD, Ramin; Raadabadi, Mehdi; Mosavi, Seyed Masod; Gholami Fesharaki, Mohammad; Mehrabian, Fardin

    2014-01-01

    Background: The nursing workload has a close and strong association with the quality of services provided for the patients. Therefore, paying careful attention to the factors affecting nursing workload, especially those working in the intensive care units (ICUs), is very important. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the factors affecting nursing workload in the ICUs of the hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional a...

  15. Hyperglycemia in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Lenhardt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia is frequently encountered in the intensive care unit. In this disease, after severe injury and during diabetes mellitus homeostasis is impaired; hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia and glycemic variability may ensue. These three states have been shown to independently increase mortality and morbidity. Patients with diabetics admitted to the intensive care unit tolerate higher blood glucose values without increase of mortality. Stress hyperglycemia may occur in patients with or without diabetes and has a strong association with increased mortality in the intensive care unit patients. Insulin is the drug of choice to treat hyperglycemia in the intensive care unit. In patients with moderate hyperglycemia a basal–bolus insulin concept can be used. Close glucose monitoring is of paramount importance throughout the intensive care unit stay of the patient. In the guidelines for glycemic control based on meta-analyses it was shown that a tight glycemic control does not have a significant mortality advantage over conventional treatment. Given the controversy about optimal blood glucose goals in the intensive care unit setting, it seems reasonable to target a blood glucose level around 140 mg/dL to avoid episodes of hypoglycemia and minimize glycemic variability. The closed loop system with continuous glucose monitoring and algorithm based insulin application by an infusion pump is a promising new concept with the potential to further reduce mortality and morbidity due to hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia and glycemic variability. The goal of this review was to give a brief overview about pathophysiology of hyperglycemia and to summarize current guidelines for glycemic control in critically ill patients.

  16. Admissions Standards and the Use of Key Marketing Techniques by United States' Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldgehn, Leslie A.

    1989-01-01

    A survey of admissions deans and directors investigated the use and perceived effectiveness of 15 well-known marketing techniques: advertising, advertising research, a marketing plan, market positioning, market segmentation, marketing audit, marketing research, pricing, program and service accessibility, program development, publicity, target…

  17. Functional level at admission is a predictor of survival in older patients admitted to an acute geriatric unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, Lars E; Jepsen, Ditte B; Ryg, Jesper;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Functional decline is associated with increased risk of mortality in geriatric patients.Assessment of activities of daily living (ADL) with the Barthel Index (BI) at admission wasstudied as a predictor of survival in older patients admitted to an acute geriatric unit. METHODS......: All first admissions of patients with age >65 years between January 1st 2005 and December31st 2009 were included. Data on BI, sex, age, and discharge diagnoses were retrieved fromthe hospital patient administrative system, and data on survival until September 6th 2010 wereretrieved from the Civil...... Personal Registry. Co-morbidity was measured with Charlson ComorbidityIndex (CCI). Patients were followed until death or end of study. RESULTS: 5,087 patients were included, 1,852 (36.4%) men and 3,235 (63.6%) women with mean age(SD) 82.0 (6.8) and 84.0 (7.0) years respectively. The median [IQR] length...

  18. Fast Hugs with Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimet Şenoğlu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mnemonics are commonly used in medical procedures as cognitive aids to guide clinicians all over the world. The mnemonic ‘FAST HUG’ (Feeding, Analgesia, Sedation, Thromboembolic prophylaxis, Head-of-bed elevation, stress Ulcer prevention, and Glycemic control was proposed almost ten years ago for patient care in intensive care units and have been commonly used worldwide. Beside this, new mnemonics were also determined for improving routine care of the critically ill patients. But none of this was accepted as much as “FAST HUGS”. In our clinical practice we delivered an another mnemonic as FAST HUGS with ICU (Feeding, Analgesia, Sedation, Thromboembolic prophylaxis, Head-of-bed elevation, Stress ulcer prevention, and Glucose control, Water balance, Investigation and Results, Therapy, Hypo-hyper delirium, Invasive devices, Check the daily infection parameters, Use a checklist for checking some of the key aspects in the general care of intensive care patients. In this review we summarized these mnemonics.

  19. Parents’ experiences of communication with neonatal intensive-care unit staff: an interview study

    OpenAIRE

    Wigert, Helena; Dellenmark Blom, Michaela; Bry, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Background An infant’s admission to a neonatal intensive-care unit (NICU) inevitably causes the parents emotional stress. Communication between parents and NICU staff is an essential part of the support offered to the parents and can reduce their emotional stress. The aim of this study was to describe parents’ experiences of communication with NICU staff. Methods A hermeneutic lifeworld interview study was performed with 18 families whose children were treated in the level III NICU at a unive...

  20. Supporting-emotional needs of Iranian parents with premature infants admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    OpenAIRE

    Aliabadi, Faranak; Kamali, Mohammad; Borimnejad, Leili; Rassafiani, Mehdi; Rasti, Mehdi; Shafaroodi, Narges; Rafii, Foroogh; Askary Kachoosangy, Reihaneh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Having an infant in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is a stressful and painful experience. Unlike to normal births, this birth is associated with admission and separation of infant from parents. The aim of this study was to compile the supporting-emotional needs of Iranian parents who have a premature infant admitted in (NICU). Methods: This study was performed using qualitative research approach. Twelve participants including 9 parents whose infant had been hospitalized i...

  1. Providing music therapy to the unconscious child in the paediatric intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Kennelly, Jeanette; Edwards, Jane

    1997-01-01

    peer-reviewed This paper describes techniques used in the provision of music therapy to two children in a Paediatric Intensive Care Unit during the phase of admission when they were unconscious. The presentation of known songs and adaptations of known songs elicited a range of responses in these children. Further study of the role and effects of music with this patient group is required following positive outcomes for these children receiving music therapy while unconscious ...

  2. Using transprofessional care in the emergency department to reduce patient admissions: A retrospective audit of medical histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphet, Julia; Griffiths, Debra Lee; Crawford, Kimberley; Williams, Allison; Jones, Tamsin; Berry, Belinda; Innes, Kelli

    2016-01-01

    The demand for emergency department (ED) services has increased significantly, due to our increasingly ageing population and limited access to primary care. This article reports outcomes from a transprofessional model of care in an ED in Victoria, Australia. Nurses, physiotherapists, social workers, and occupational therapists undertook additional education to increase the range of services they could provide and thereby expedite patient flow through the ED. One hundred patients who received this service were matched against 50 patients who did not. The most common reasons for patient admission were limb injury/limb pain (n = 47, 23.5%) and falls (n = 46, 23.0%). Transprofessional interventions included applying supportive bandages, slings, zimmer splints and controlled ankle motion (CAM) boots, and referral to new services such as case management and mental health teams. The rate of hospital admissions was significantly lower in the transprofessional group (n = 27, 18.0%) than in the reference group (n = 19, 38%, p = 0.005). This group also had a slightly lower re-presentation rate (n = 4, 2.7%) than patients in the reference group (n = 2, 4.0%). There are many benefits that support this model of care that in turn reduces ED overcrowding and work stress. A transprofessional model may offer a creative solution to meeting the varied needs of patients presenting for emergency care. PMID:26954260

  3. Performance and burnout in intensive care units

    OpenAIRE

    Keijsers, G.J.; Schaufeli, W.B.; LeBlanc, P; Zwerts, C.; Miranda, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between three different performance measures and burnout was explored in 20 Dutch Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Burnout (i.e. emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) proved to be significantly related to nurses' perceptions of performance as well as to objectively assessed unit performance. Subjective performance measures relate negatively to burnout levels of nurses, whereas an objective performance measure relates positively to burnout. Furthermore, subjectively assessed...

  4. Central nervous system infections in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Vengamma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurological infections constitute an uncommon, but important aetiological cause requiring admission to an intensive care unit (ICU. In addition, health-care associated neurological infections may develop in critically ill patients admitted to an ICU for other indications. Central nervous system infections can develop as complications in ICU patients including post-operative neurosurgical patients. While bacterial infections are the most common cause, mycobacterial and fungal infections are also frequently encountered. Delay in institution of specific treatment is considered to be the single most important poor prognostic factor. Empirical antibiotic therapy must be initiated while awaiting specific culture and sensitivity results. Choice of empirical antimicrobial therapy should take into consideration the most likely pathogens involved, locally prevalent drug-resistance patterns, underlying predisposing, co-morbid conditions, and other factors, such as age, immune status. Further, the antibiotic should adequately penetrate the blood-brain and blood- cerebrospinal fluid barriers. The presence of a focal collection of pus warrants immediate surgical drainage. Following strict aseptic precautions during surgery, hand-hygiene and care of catheters, devices constitute important preventive measures. A high index of clinical suspicion and aggressive efforts at identification of aetiological cause and early institution of specific treatment in patients with neurological infections can be life saving.

  5. [Primary care in the United Kingdom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-03-01

    The inadequate planning of health professionals in Spain has boosted the way out of doctors overseas. The United Kingdom is one of the countries chosen by Spanish doctors to develop their job. The National Health Service is a health system similar to the Spanish one. Health care services are financing mainly through taxes. The right to health care is linked to the citizen condition. The provision of health care is a mix-up of public and private enterprises. Primary Care is much closed to Spanish Primary Care. Doctors are "self-employed like" professionals. They can set their surgeries in a free area previously designed by the government. They have the right to make their own team and to manage their own budget. Medical salary is linked to professional capability and curriculum vitae. The main role of a General Practitioner is the prevention. Team work and coordination within primary and specialised care is more developed than in Spain. The access to diagnostic tests and to the specialist is controlled through waiting lists. General Practitioners work as gate-keepers. Patients may choose freely their doctor and consultations and hospital care are free at the point of use. Within the United Kingdom there are also health regions with problems due to inequalities to access and to treatment. There is a training path and the access to it is by Curricula. The number of training jobs is regulated by the local needs. Continuing education is compulsory and strictly regulated local and nationally. The National Health Service was the example for the Spanish health reform in 1986. While Spanish Primary health care is of quality, the efficiency of the health system would improve if staff in Primary Care settings were managed in a similar way to the British's. PMID:26412408

  6. [Primary care in the United Kingdom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-03-01

    The inadequate planning of health professionals in Spain has boosted the way out of doctors overseas. The United Kingdom is one of the countries chosen by Spanish doctors to develop their job. The National Health Service is a health system similar to the Spanish one. Health care services are financing mainly through taxes. The right to health care is linked to the citizen condition. The provision of health care is a mix-up of public and private enterprises. Primary Care is much closed to Spanish Primary Care. Doctors are "self-employed like" professionals. They can set their surgeries in a free area previously designed by the government. They have the right to make their own team and to manage their own budget. Medical salary is linked to professional capability and curriculum vitae. The main role of a General Practitioner is the prevention. Team work and coordination within primary and specialised care is more developed than in Spain. The access to diagnostic tests and to the specialist is controlled through waiting lists. General Practitioners work as gate-keepers. Patients may choose freely their doctor and consultations and hospital care are free at the point of use. Within the United Kingdom there are also health regions with problems due to inequalities to access and to treatment. There is a training path and the access to it is by Curricula. The number of training jobs is regulated by the local needs. Continuing education is compulsory and strictly regulated local and nationally. The National Health Service was the example for the Spanish health reform in 1986. While Spanish Primary health care is of quality, the efficiency of the health system would improve if staff in Primary Care settings were managed in a similar way to the British's.

  7. Nosocomial urinary tract infection in the intensive care unit: when should Pseudomonas aeruginosa be suspected? Experience of the French national surveillance of nosocomial infections in the intensive care unit, Rea-Raisin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venier, A-G; Lavigne, T; Jarno, P; L'heriteau, F; Coignard, B; Savey, A; Rogues, A-M

    2012-01-01

    Individual and ward risk factors for P. aeruginosa-induced urinary tract infection in the case of nosocomial urinary tract infection in the intensive care unit were determined with hierarchical (multilevel) logistic regression. The 2004-2006 prospective French national intensive care unit nosocomial infection surveillance dataset was used and 3252 patients with urinary tract infection were included; 16% were infected by P. aeruginosa. Individual risk factors were male sex, duration of stay, antibiotics at admission and transfer from another intensive care unit. Ward risk factors were patient turnover and incidence of P. aeruginosa-infected patients.

  8. Burnout in the intensive care unit professionals

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    Kalpalatha K Guntupalli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Professional burnout has been widely explored in health care. We conducted this study in our hospital intensive care unit (ICU in United States to explore the burnout among nurses and respiratory therapists (RT. Materials and Methods: A survey consisting of two parts was used to assess burnout. Part 1 addressed the demographic information and work hours. Part 2 addressed the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Service Survey. Results: The analysis included 213 total subjects; Nurses 151 (71% and RT 62 (29%. On the emotional exhaustion (EE scale, 54% scored "Moderate" to "High" and 40% scored "Moderate" to "High" on the depersonalization (DP scale. Notably 40.6% scored "Low" on personal accomplishment (PA scale. Conclusion: High level of EE, DP and lower PAs were seen among two groups of health care providers in the ICUs.

  9. Neonatal intensive care unit nosocomial bacterial infections

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    Ghazvini

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nosocomial infections increase patients' morbidity, mortality and length of hospital stay especially in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs and have become a matter of major concern. Controlling and preventing nosocomial infections need enough information about epidemiology of these infections. This study aims at estimating the incidence rate and the most frequent bacteria which cause these infections in neonatal intensive care unit of Ghaem university hospital, Mashhad. Methods: In this study which is performed during a twelve month period in 2004 and 2005 at neonatal intensive care unit of Ghaem hospital, 971 hospitalized neonates were studied. Data were collected considering the standard surveillance protocols. Early onset neonatal nosocomial infections and late onset neonatal infections were defined as illness appearing from birth to seven days and from eight to twenty-eight days postnatal age respectively. Statistical analysis was performed using the χ2 test. Results: In this study 32 cases of nosocomial infections were identified so the incidence rate of nosocomial infection in this ward was 3.29%. Fifteen babies identified with early onset neonatal nosocomial infection and the rest have presented with late onset neonatal infections. In order of frequency, the sites of infection were: primary bloodstream (84.4% and pneumonia (15.62%. Coagulase negative staphylococci were the most common bacteria (43.74% isolated in these patients. Other isolated bacteria were Klebsiella pneumonia (31.42% and other gram negative bacilli such as E.coli, Pseudomonas aeroginosa and Acintobacter spp. The mechanical ventilation and umbilical catheter were associated with nosocomial infections as risk factors in our study (p<0.01. Conclusion: Our findings show that the neonatal intensive care unit of Ghaem hospital has low rate of nosocomial infections. However, as neonatal intensive care unit is an area of great concern in terms of nosocomial

  10. Benefitting From Monitorization in Intensive Care Unit

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    Mois Bahar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The most essential matter about following a patient in intensive care unit is a fine and correct monitorization. While benefitting from monitorization is the main objective of every intensive care physician, it should be discussed how successful we are when we do not take monitorization as a subject of interest sufficiently. This physicians who are both performing medical care and education has a very important role regarding the matter: To question and confirm the correctness of the parameters that are being followed and to use this data for choosing the treatment type. The vital parameters that are found necessary to be followed usually do not present us the sufficient utility. For purpose, implementing monitorization in a way of whole perspective including Examining, Questioning, Reading (Observing, Repeating, Recalling will maintain to receive consequences for the benefit of the patient. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9: 110-5

  11. Home care patients in four Nordic capitals – predictors of nursing home admission during one-year followup

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    Liv W Sørbye

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Liv W Sørbye1, Torunn Hamran2, Nils Henriksen2, Astrid Norberg2,31Diakonhjemmet University College, Oslo, Norway; 2Department of Health and Care Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, Norway; 3Umeå University, Umeå, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, SwedenAbstract: The aim was to predict nursing home admission (NHA for home care patients after a 12-month follow-up study. This Nordic study is derived from the aged in home care (AdHOC project conducted in 2001–2003 with patients at 11 sites in Europe. The participants in the cohort study were randomly selected individuals, aged 65 years or older, receiving homecare in Oslo, Stockholm, Copenhagen, and Reykjavik. The Resident Assessment Instrument for Home Care (version 2.0 was used. Epidemiological and medical characteristics of patients and service utilization were recorded for 1508 home care patients (participation rate 74%. In this sample 75% were female. The mean age was 82.1 (6.9 years for men and 84.0 (6.6 for women. The most consistent predictor of NHA was receiving skilled nursing procedures at baseline (help with medication and injections, administration or help with oxygen, intravenous, catheter and stoma care, wounds and skin care (adjusted odds ratio = 3.7, 95% confidence interval: 1.7–7.8; P < 0.001. In this Nordic material, stronger emphasizing on higher qualified nurses in a home care setting could prevent or delay NHA.Keywords: aged, home care, cross-sectional study, self-rated health, level of care, care burden, comprehensive assessment, RAI, Nordic

  12. Nosocomial Infections in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

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    Emine Parlak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nosocomial infections are one of the important mortality and morbidity reasons among newborns. For this reason recognition of infection factors and the resistance to antimicrobials in intensive care unit is very important in terms of rational antibiotic use. Materials and Methods: Nosocomial infections seen in our neonatal intensive care unit between 2009 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. Isolated strains, antibiotic sensitivities, the use of invasive tool, infectious species and infection rates were determined according to the data provided by National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance Control Unit. Results: A total of 4258 patients were observed for 34625 patient days, 6536 ventilator days, 98 urinary catheter days, 601 central venous catheter days and 590 umbilical catheter days. The infection rate was 3.26% (139/4258 and the incident density was 4.01‰. Pneumonia was on the first rank (61; 43% and it was in ventilator association form. 36 strains were isolated as the infectious agents. The rates of gram negative factors was 23 (63.88%, gram positive factors was 8 (22.22% and Candida spp. was 5 (13.88 %. The most frequently isolated gram negative strains were Klebsiella spp. (7; 19.4% and Pseudomonas spp. (7; 19.4 %. The most effective antibiotics in Enterobactericeae spp. were meropenem and imipenem. In enteric gram-negative rods, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase positivity was 63.64%. In the neonatal intensive care unit, ventilator-associated pneumonia rate was 6.73% and the ventilator use ratio was 19%. Conclusions: In conclusion, each intensive care unit should determne the factors and follow antimicrobial resistant patterns. Empiric antibiotic treatment strategy should be established. Decreasing or totally preventing hospital infections would be possible by active surveillance system, adoption infection control guidelines, limitation of instrument use and rational antibiotic use rules. (The Jo­ur­nal of Cur

  13. Sedation in neurological intensive care unit

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    Birinder S Paul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analgesia and sedation has been widely used in intensive care units where iatrogenic discomfort often complicates patient management. In neurological patients maximal comfort without diminishing patient responsiveness is desirable. In these patients successful management of sedation and analgesia incorporates a patient based approach that includes detection and management of predisposing and causative factors, including delirium, monitoring using sedation scales, proper medication selection, emphasis on analgesia based drugs and incorporation of protocols or algorithms. So, to optimize care clinician should be familiar with the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variables that can affect the safety and efficacy of analgesics and sedatives.

  14. Triumph of hope over experience: learning from interventions to reduce avoidable hospital admissions identified through an Academic Health and Social Care Network

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    Woodhams Victoria

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internationally health services are facing increasing demands due to new and more expensive health technologies and treatments, coupled with the needs of an ageing population. Reducing avoidable use of expensive secondary care services, especially high cost admissions where no procedure is carried out, has become a focus for the commissioners of healthcare. Method We set out to identify, evaluate and share learning about interventions to reduce avoidable hospital admission across a regional Academic Health and Social Care Network (AHSN. We conducted a service evaluation identifying initiatives that had taken place across the AHSN. This comprised a literature review, case studies, and two workshops. Results We identified three types of intervention: pre-hospital; within the emergency department (ED; and post-admission evaluation of appropriateness. Pre-hospital interventions included the use of predictive modelling tools (PARR – Patients at risk of readmission and ACG – Adjusted Clinical Groups sometimes supported by community matrons or virtual wards. GP-advisers and outreach nurses were employed within the ED. The principal post-hoc interventions were the audit of records in primary care or the application of the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP within the admission ward. Overall there was a shortage of independent evaluation and limited evidence that each intervention had an impact on rates of admission. Conclusions Despite the frequency and cost of emergency admission there has been little independent evaluation of interventions to reduce avoidable admission. Commissioners of healthcare should consider interventions at all stages of the admission pathway, including regular audit, to ensure admission thresholds don’t change.

  15. Parkinson’s disease permanent care unit: managing the chronic-palliative interface

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    Lökk J

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Johan LökkDepartment of Neurobiology, Caring Sciences, and Society, Karolinska Institutet; Geriatric Department, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, SwedenBackground: Parkinson’s disease (PD eventually leads to severe functional decline and dependence. Specialized care units for PD patients in need of permanent care are lacking.Methods: Patients with severe PD are referred to the PD permanent care unit harboring 30 patients with specialized medical and health care provided by trained staff. Patients need to have intensive medical and care needs, and be no longer able to stay at home or at an ordinary institution. A written and continuously reviewed care plan is made for each patient at admission, with the overriding aim to preserve quality of life and optimize functionality.Results: After five years, the PD permanent care unit has cared for 70 patients (36 men and 34 women with a mean age of 76.6 years and a mean duration of Parkinsonism of 11.8 years. Hoehn and Yahr severity of disease was 3.7, cognition was 25.3 (Mini-Mental State Examination, and the mean daily levodopa dose was 739 mg. The yearly fatality rate was seven, and the mean duration of stay was 26.9 months. Only five patients moved out from the unit.Conclusion: A specially designed and staffed care unit for Parkinsonism patients seems to fill a need for patients and caregivers, as well as for social and health care authorities. This model is sensitive to the changing needs and capacities of patients, ensuring that appropriate services are available in a timely manner. There was a rather short duration of patient stay and remaining life span after admission to the unit. Despite the chronic/palliative state of patients at the PD permanent care unit, there are many therapeutic options, with the overriding objective being to allow the patients to end their days in a professional and comfortable environment.Keywords: Parkinsonism, palliative care, end-stage disease

  16. Prediction of chronic critical illness in a general intensive care unit

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    Sérgio H. Loss

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the incidence, costs, and mortality associated with chronic critical illness (CCI, and to identify clinical predictors of CCI in a general intensive care unit. METHODS: This was a prospective observational cohort study. All patients receiving supportive treatment for over 20 days were considered chronically critically ill and eligible for the study. After applying the exclusion criteria, 453 patients were analyzed. RESULTS: There was an 11% incidence of CCI. Total length of hospital stay, costs, and mortality were significantly higher among patients with CCI. Mechanical ventilation, sepsis, Glasgow score < 15, inadequate calorie intake, and higher body mass index were independent predictors for cci in the multivariate logistic regression model. CONCLUSIONS: CCI affects a distinctive population in intensive care units with higher mortality, costs, and prolonged hospitalization. Factors identifiable at the time of admission or during the first week in the intensive care unit can be used to predict CCI.

  17. The importance of parents in the neonatal intensive care units

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    Hercília Guimarães

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The premature birth and the hospitalization in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU are potential risk factors for the development and behavior of the newborn, as has been shown in recent studies. Premature birth of an infant is a distressing event for the family. Several feelings are experienced by parents during hospitalization of their baby in the NICU. Feelings of guilt, rejection, stress and anxiety are common. Also the attachment processes have the potential to be disrupted or delayed as a result of the initial separation of the premature newborn and the mother after the admission to the NICU. Added to these difficulties, there is the distortion of infant’s “ideal image”, created by the family, in contrast with the real image of the preterm. This relationship-based family-centered approach, the Neonatal Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP, promotes the idea that infants and their families are collaborators in developing an individualized program to maximize physical, mental, and emotional growth and health and to improve long-term outcomes for the high risk newborns. The presence of parents in NICUs and their involvement caring their babies, in a family centered care philosophy, is vital to improve the outcome of their infants and the relationships within each family. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Gavino Faa (Cagliari, Italy, Antonio Giordano (Philadelphia, USA

  18. Ethical issues recognized by critical care nurses in the intensive care units of a tertiary hospital during two separate periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Won; Moon, Jae Young; Ku, Eun Yong; Kim, Sun Jong; Koo, Young-Mo; Kim, Ock-Joo; Lee, Soon Haeng; Jo, Min-Woo; Lim, Chae-Man; Armstrong, John David; Koh, Younsuck

    2015-04-01

    This research aimed to investigate the changes in ethical issues in everyday clinical practice recognized by critical care nurses during two observation periods. We conducted a retrospective analysis of data obtained by prospective questionnaire surveys of nurses in the intensive care units (ICU) of a tertiary university-affiliated hospital in Seoul, Korea. Data were collected prospectively during two different periods, February 2002-January 2003 (Period 1) and August 2011-July 2012 (Period 2). Significantly fewer cases with ethical issues were reported in Period 2 than in Period 1 (89 cases [2.1%] of 4,291 ICU admissions vs. 51 [0.5%] of 9,302 ICU admissions, respectively; P ethical issues in both Periods occurred in MICU. The major source of ethical issues in Periods 1 and 2 was behavior-related. Among behaviorrelated issues, inappropriate healthcare professional behavior was predominant in both periods and mainly involved resident physicians. Ethical issue numbers regarding end-oflife (EOL) care significantly decreased in the proportion with respect to ethical issues during Period 2 (P = 0.044). In conclusion, the decreased incidence of cases with identified ethical issues in Period 2 might be associated with ethical enhancement related with EOL and improvements in the ICU care environment of the studied hospital. However, behaviorrelated issues involving resident physicians represent a considerable proportion of ethical issues encountered by critical care nurses. A systemic approach to solve behavior-related issues of resident physicians seems to be required to enhance an ethical environment in the studied ICU.

  19. Hospital infections in neonatal intensive care units

    OpenAIRE

    Đurišić Jasna; Marković-Denić Ljiljana N.; Ilić Slobodanka; Ramadani Ruždi

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Sick newborn babies in the neonatal intensive care units (NICU) are al increased risk for hospital-acquired infections (HI). The aim of our study was to determine the incidence and localization of neonatal hospital infections in NICU. Material and methods A prospective, six-month study was carried out in a NICU. All patients hospitalized in NICU longer then 48 hours were examined according to their basic descriptive-epidemiological characteristics and the incidence of all hospita...

  20. Diarrhea in neonatal intensive care unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Annalisa; Passariello; Gianluca; Terrin; Maria; Elisabetta; Baldassarre; Mario; De; Curtis; Roberto; Paludetto; Roberto; Berni; Canani

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the frequency,etiology,and current management strategies for diarrhea in newborn.METHODS:Retrospective,nationwide study involving 5801 subjects observed in neonatal intensive care units during 3 years.The main anamnesis and demographic characteristics,etiology and characteristics of diarrhea,nutritional and therapeutic management,clinical outcomes were evaluated.RESULTS:Thirty-nine cases of diarrhea(36 acute,3 chronic) were identified.The occurrence rate of diarrhea was 6.72 per 1000 hosp...

  1. Music Inside an Intensive Care Unit

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    Ana Maria Loureiro De Souza Delabary

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the music therapy work performed in the intensive care unit of a university hospital. Clinical practice is inserted with in the hospital psychology department and acts jointly with some of the other health departments in the same hospital. The text presents the employed methodology, techniques, and repertoire, along with some considerations, comments, and observations on the practical side of the treatment. Music therapy imposes itself as a valuable element for the health area and becomes particularly meaningful as a part of the hospital's humanization program which is being developed in the institution. Striving for care quality, all the while it helps integrating all involved personnel interacting with the patients, music can be a powerful stimulus for the improvement of health care, particularly in the reception and support of the difficult situations terminal patients are faced with.

  2. Rehabilitation starts in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozeboom, Nathan; Parenteau, Kathy; Carratturo, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Each year between 10 000 and 12 000 spinal cord injuries occur in the United States. Once injured, many of these patients will receive a portion of their care in an intensive care unit (ICU), where their treatment will begin. Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, Washington, provides comprehensive care to approximately 60 to 70 cervical spinal cord injuries each year. Because of many factors such as hemodynamic instability, pulmonary complications, and risk of infection, patients with cervical spinal cord injuries can spend up to 2 or more weeks in the ICU before they transfer to a rehabilitation unit. To achieve optimal outcomes, it is imperative that members of the interdisciplinary team work together in a consistent, goal-oriented, collaborative manner. This team includes physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, physical and occupational therapists, speech pathologists, dieticians, and rehabilitation psychologists. An individual plan is developed for each patient and rehabilitation starts in the ICU as soon as the patient is medically stable. This article will highlight the management strategies used in the neuroscience ICU at Harborview Medical Center and will include a case study as an example of the typical experience for our patients with high cervical cord injury.

  3. Unmet need for mental health care in schizophrenia: an overview of literature and new data from a first-admission study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojtabai, Ramin; Fochtmann, Laura; Chang, Su-Wei; Kotov, Roman; Craig, Thomas J; Bromet, Evelyn

    2009-07-01

    We present an overview of the literature on the patterns of mental health service use and the unmet need for care in individuals with schizophrenia with a focus on studies in the United States. We also present new data on the longitudinal course of treatments from a study of first-admission patients with schizophrenia. In epidemiological surveys, approximately 40% of the respondents with schizophrenia report that they have not received any mental health treatments in the preceding 6-12 months. Clinical epidemiological studies also find that many patients virtually drop out of treatment after their index contact with services and receive little mental health care in subsequent years. Clinical studies of patients in routine treatment settings indicate that the treatment patterns of these patients often fall short of the benchmarks set by evidence-based practice guidelines, while at least half of these patients continue to experience significant symptoms. The divergence from the guidelines is more pronounced with regard to psychosocial than medication treatments and in outpatient than in inpatient settings. The expansion of managed care has led to further reduction in the use of psychosocial treatments and, in some settings, continuity of care. In conclusion, we found a substantial level of unmet need for care among individuals with schizophrenia both at community level and in treatment settings. More than half of the individuals with this often chronic and disabling condition receive either no treatment or suboptimal treatment. Recovery in this patient population cannot be fully achieved without enhancing access to services and improving the quality of available services. The recent expansion of managed care has made this goal more difficult to achieve.

  4. A multifaceted intervention to implement guidelines and improve admission paediatric care in Kenyan district hospitals: a cluster randomised trial.

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    Philip Ayieko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In developing countries referral of severely ill children from primary care to district hospitals is common, but hospital care is often of poor quality. However, strategies to change multiple paediatric care practices in rural hospitals have rarely been evaluated. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This cluster randomized trial was conducted in eight rural Kenyan district hospitals, four of which were randomly assigned to a full intervention aimed at improving quality of clinical care (evidence-based guidelines, training, job aides, local facilitation, supervision, and face-to-face feedback; n  =  4 and the remaining four to control intervention (guidelines, didactic training, job aides, and written feedback; n  =  4. Prespecified structure, process, and outcome indicators were measured at baseline and during three and five 6-monthly surveys in control and intervention hospitals, respectively. Primary outcomes were process of care measures, assessed at 18 months postbaseline. In both groups performance improved from baseline. Completion of admission assessment tasks was higher in intervention sites at 18 months (mean  =  0.94 versus 0.65, adjusted difference 0.54 [95% confidence interval 0.05-0.29]. Uptake of guideline recommended therapeutic practices was also higher within intervention hospitals: adoption of once daily gentamicin (89.2% versus 74.4%; 17.1% [8.04%-26.1%]; loading dose quinine (91.9% versus 66.7%, 26.3% [-3.66% to 56.3%]; and adequate prescriptions of intravenous fluids for severe dehydration (67.2% versus 40.6%; 29.9% [10.9%-48.9%]. The proportion of children receiving inappropriate doses of drugs in intervention hospitals was lower (quinine dose >40 mg/kg/day; 1.0% versus 7.5%; -6.5% [-12.9% to 0.20%], and inadequate gentamicin dose (2.2% versus 9.0%; -6.8% [-11.9% to -1.6%]. CONCLUSIONS: Specific efforts are needed to improve hospital care in developing countries. A full, multifaceted intervention was associated

  5. Families' experiences of intensive care unit quality of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Irene; Gerritsen, Rik T; Koopmans, Matty;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of the study is to adapt and provide preliminary validation for questionnaires evaluating families' experiences of quality of care for critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study took place in 2 European ICUs. Based on literature...... and qualitative interviews, we adapted 2 previously validated North American questionnaires: "Family Satisfaction with the ICU" and "Quality of Dying and Death." Family members were asked to assess relevance and understandability of each question. Validation also included test-retest reliability and construct...... validity. RESULTS: A total of 110 family members participated. Response rate was 87%. For all questions, a median of 97% (94%-99%) was assessed as relevant, and a median of 98% (97%-100%), as understandable. Median ceiling effect was 41% (30%-47%). There was a median of 0% missing data (0%-1%). Test...

  6. Incidence and preventability of adverse events requiring intensive care admission: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Vlayen, Annemie; Verelst, Sandra; Bekkering, Geertruida E; Schrooten, Ward; Hellings, Johan; Claes, Neree

    2012-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives Adverse events are unintended patient injuries or complications that arise from health care management resulting in death, disability or prolonged hospital stay. Adverse events that require critical care are a considerable financial burden to the health care system, but also their global impact on patients and society is probably underestimated. The objectives of this systematic review were to synthesize the best available evidence regarding the estimates of the...

  7. Rehabilitation in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochester, Carolyn L

    2009-12-01

    Critical illness has many devastating sequelae, including profound neuromuscular weakness and psychological and cognitive disturbances that frequently result in long-term functional impairments. Early rehabilitation begun in the intensive care unit (ICU) is emerging as an important strategy both to prevent and to treat ICU-acquired weakness, in an effort to facilitate and improve long-term recovery. Rehabilitation may begin with range of motion and bed mobility exercise, then may progress when the patient is fully alert and able to participate actively to include sitting and posture-based exercise, bed to chair transfers, strength and endurance exercises, and ambulation. Electrical muscle stimulation and inspiratory muscle training are additional techniques that may be employed. Studies conducted to date suggest that such ICU-based rehabilitation is feasible, safe, and effective for carefully selected patients. Further research is needed to identify the optimal patient candidates and procedures and for providing rehabilitation in the ICU.

  8. Ethical issues in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Xin-Xin; Wang, Xin-Ling

    2016-07-01

    On one hand, advances in neonatal care and rescue technology allow for the healthy survival or prolonged survival time of critically ill newborns who, in the past, would have been non-viable. On the other hand, many of the surviving critically ill infants have serious long-term disabilities. If an infant eventually cannot survive or is likely to suffer severe disability after surviving, ethical issues in the treatment process are inevitable, and this problem arises not only in developed countries but is also becoming increasingly prominent in developing countries. In addition, ethical concerns cannot be avoided in medical research. This review article introduces basic ethical guidelines that should be followed in clinical practice, including respecting the autonomy of the parents, giving priority to the best interests of the infant, the principle of doing no harm, and consent and the right to be informed. Furthermore, the major ethical concerns in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in China are briefly introduced. PMID:26382713

  9. [Nosocomial infections in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, Rafael; Ramírez, Paula; López-Pueyo, María Jesús

    2014-05-01

    Nosocomial infections (NI) still have a high incidence in intensive care units (ICUs), and are becoming one of the most important problems in these units. It is well known that these infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients, and are associated with increases in the length of stay and excessive hospital costs. Based on the data from the ENVIN-UCI study, the rates and aetiology of the main nosocomial infections have been described, and include ventilator-associated pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and both primary and catheter related bloodstream infections, as well as the incidence of multidrug-resistant bacteria. A literature review on the impact of different nosocomial infections in critically ill patients is also presented. Infection control programs such as zero bacteraemia and pneumonia have been also analysed, and show a significant decrease in NI rates in ICUs.

  10. Acute kidney injury biomarkers for patients in a coronary care unit: a prospective cohort study.

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    Tien-Hsing Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Renal dysfunction is an established predictor of all-cause mortality in intensive care units. This study analyzed the outcomes of coronary care unit (CCU patients and evaluated several biomarkers of acute kidney injury (AKI, including neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL, interleukin-18 (IL-18 and cystatin C (CysC on the first day of CCU admission. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Serum and urinary samples collected from 150 patients in the coronary care unit of a tertiary care university hospital between September 2009 and August 2010 were tested for NGAL, IL-18 and CysC. Prospective demographic, clinical and laboratory data were evaluated as predictors of survival in this patient group. The most common cause of CCU admission was acute myocardial infarction (80%. According to Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria, 28.7% (43/150 of CCU patients had AKI of varying severity. Cumulative survival rates at 6-month follow-up following hospital discharge differed significantly (p<0.05 between patients with AKI versus those without AKI. For predicting AKI, serum CysC displayed an excellent areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC (0.895 ± 0.031, p < 0.001. The overall 180-day survival rate was 88.7% (133/150. Multiple Cox logistic regression hazard analysis revealed that urinary NGAL, serum IL-18, Acute Physiology, Age and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II and sodium on CCU admission day one were independent risk factors for 6-month mortality. In terms of 6-month mortality, urinary NGAL had the best discriminatory power, the best Youden index, and the highest overall correctness of prediction. CONCLUSIONS: Our data showed that serum CysC has the best discriminative power for predicting AKI in CCU patients. However, urinary NGAL and serum IL-18 are associated with short-term mortality in these critically ill patients.

  11. Challenges encountered by critical care unit managers in the large intensive care units

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    Mokgadi C. Matlakala

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses in intensive care units (ICUs are exposed regularly to huge demands interms of fulfilling the many roles that are placed upon them. Unit managers, in particular, are responsible for the efficient management of the units and have the responsibilities of planning, organising, leading and controlling the daily activities in order to facilitate the achievement of the unit objectives.Objectives: The objective of this study was to explore and present the challenges encountered by ICU managers in the management of large ICUs.Method: A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study was conducted at five hospital ICUs in Gauteng province, South Africa. Data were collected through individual interviews from purposively-selected critical care unit managers, then analysed using the matic coding.Results: Five themes emerged from the data: challenges related to the layout and structure of the unit, human resources provision and staffing, provision of material resources, stressors in the unit and visitors in the ICU.Conclusion: Unit managers in large ICUs face multifaceted challenges which include the demand for efficient and sufficient specialised nurses; lack of or inadequate equipment that goes along with technology in ICU and supplies; and stressors in the ICU that limit the efficiency to plan, organise, lead and control the daily activities in the unit. The challenges identified call for multiple strategies to assist in the efficient management of large ICUs.

  12. Candida colonization in intensive care unit patients' urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xisto Sena Passos

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify possible predisposing factors for candiduria in intensive care unit (ICU patients from Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, Brazil, during one year. Urine samples from 153 ICU patients were obtained by catheterization on admission day and every seven days. Data such as sex, age, antifungal therapy, and variables as antibiotics, underlying diseases or comorbid conditions and stay in the hospital, were collected from patients who had at least one urine culture that yielded > 10³ yeast colonies/ml. Candiduria was recovered in 68 patients and the commonest predisposing factors were antibiotic therapy (100% and indwelling urinary catheter (92.6%. The percentage of Candida spp. isolation increased during the extended periods in which patients remained in the ICU. C. albicans was isolated in 69.1%, and the other species non-albicans as C. glabrata, C. kefyr, C. parapsilosis, C. famata, C. guilliermondii, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis were isolated in lower percentage. The high frequency of candiduria and the possible predisposing factors found in ICU patients show that candiduria surveillance should be performed to help reducing nosocomial infections.

  13. Antimicrobial usage in an intensive care unit: a prospective analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conrick-Martin, I

    2012-01-31

    Antimicrobial therapies in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) need to be appropriate in both their antimicrobial cover and duration. We performed a prospective observational study of admissions to our semi-closed ICU over a three-month period and recorded the indications for antimicrobial therapy, agents used, duration of use, changes in therapy and reasons for changes in therapy. A change in therapy was defined as the initiation or discontinuation of an antimicrobial agent. There were 51 patients admitted during the three-month study period and all received antimicrobial therapy. There were 135 changes in antimicrobial therapy. 89 (66%) were made by the ICU team and 32 (24%) were made by the primary team. Changes were made due to a deterioration or lack of clinical response in 41 (30%) cases, due to the completion of prescribed course in 36 (27%) cases, and in response to a sensitivity result in 25 (19%) cases. Prophylactic antibiotic courses (n=24) were of a duration greater than 24 hours in 15 (63%) instances. In conclusion, the majority of changes in antimicrobial therapy were not culture-based and the duration of surgical prophylaxis was in excess of current recommended guidelines.

  14. Evaluation of incoming calls to intensive care unit for emergency assistance

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    Cevdet Düger

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine mean admission time after calls, resuscitation success rate, and determine the rate of medical emergency team (MET calls of clinics in hospital by assessing the incoming calls to MET at intensive care unit. Methods. This study was conducted by collecting emergency call forms of 147 patients. The data including age, gender, medical diagnosis, the name of the caller department, cause of call, occurrence time, call time, attending time, medical care termination time and the outcomes were extracted from the forms or patient files. Event declaration time was accepted as minute time difference between occurrence time and call time. Duration of admission was accepted as minute time difference between call times and attending time. Duration of resuscitation was accepted as minute time difference between attending time and medical care termination time. Results. Mean event declaration time was 3.3 ± 3.0 minutes. Mean duration of admission was 3.7 ± 1.6 minutes. Mean duration of resuscitation was 20.5 ± 12.7 minutes. The resuscitation of 84 patients (63.6% was successful while 48 patients (36.4% died at the end of resuscitation. It was found that the patients with a result of successful resuscitation were significantly younger and their duration of resuscitation was significantly shorter. Conclusion. We indicate that MET system is an essential part of in-hospital emergency medical care system. We suggest that a blue code call system should be established by intensive care unit members and announced to all hospital staff.

  15. The prevalence of long QT interval in post-operative intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Julius Cuong; Banks, Michael C; Narotsky, David L; Dorman, Todd; Winters, Bradford D

    2016-08-01

    The severity of patient illnesses and medication complexity in post-operative critically ill patients increase the risk for a prolonged QT interval. We determined the prevalence of prolonged QTc in surgical intensive care unit (SICU) patients. We performed a prospective cross-sectional study over a 15-month period at a major academic center. SICU pre-admission and admission EKGs, patient demographics, and laboratory values were analyzed. QTc was evaluated as both a continuous and dichotomous outcome (prolonged QTc > 440 ms). 281 patients were included in the study: 92 % (n = 257) post-operative and 8 % (n = 24) non-operative. On pre-admission EKGs, 32 % of the post-operative group and 42 % of the non-operative group had prolonged QTc (p = 0.25); on post-admission EKGs, 67 % of the post-operative group but only 33 % of the non-operative group had prolonged QTc (p experience increases the risk for long QTc. PMID:26169292

  16. Acid sphingomyelinase serum activity predicts mortality in intensive care unit patients after systemic inflammation: a prospective cohort study.

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    Matthias Kott

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Acid sphingomyelinase is involved in lipid signalling pathways and regulation of apoptosis by the generation of ceramide and plays an important role during the host response to infectious stimuli. It thus has the potential to be used as a novel diagnostic marker in the management of critically ill patients. The objective of our study was to evaluate acid sphingomyelinase serum activity (ASM as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in a mixed intensive care unit population before, during, and after systemic inflammation. METHODS: 40 patients admitted to the intensive care unit at risk for developing systemic inflammation (defined as systemic inflammatory response syndrome plus a significant procalcitonin [PCT] increase were included. ASM was analysed on ICU admission, before (PCT before, during (PCT peak and after (PCT low onset of SIRS. Patients undergoing elective surgery served as control (N = 8. Receiver-operating characteristics curves were computed. RESULTS: ASM significantly increased after surgery in the eight control patients. Patients from the intensive care unit had significantly higher ASM on admission than control patients after surgery. 19 out of 40 patients admitted to the intensive care unit developed systemic inflammation and 21 did not, with no differences in ASM between these two groups on admission. In patients with SIRS and PCT peak, ASM between admission and PCT before was not different, but further increased at PCT peak in non-survivors and was significantly higher at PCT low compared to survivors. Survivors exhibited decreased ASM at PCT peak and PCT low. Receiver operating curve analysis on discrimination of ICU mortality showed an area under the curve of 0.79 for ASM at PCT low. CONCLUSIONS: In summary, ASM was generally higher in patients admitted to the intensive care unit compared to patients undergoing uncomplicated surgery. ASM did not indicate onset of systemic inflammation. In contrast to PCT however

  17. Nutrition in the neurocritical care unit

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    Swagata Tripathy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of intensive care is to support the physiology of the body till the treatment or the reparative process of the body kicks in to the rescue. Maintaining an adequate nutrition during this period is of vital importance to counteract the catabolic effect of the critical disease process. The guidelines for nutritional care in the neuro intensive care unit (ICU are sparse. This article collates the current evidence and best practice recommendations as applicable to the critically ill patient in the neuro ICU. The use of screening tests to identify patients at a risk of malnutrition and related complications is presently recommended for all patients with an emphasis on early initiation of caloric support. Over-aggressive feeding in an attempt to revert the catabolic effects of critical illness have not proven beneficial, just as the attempts to improve patient outcomes by altering the routes of nutrition administration. Special patient population such as traumatic brain injury, stroke, subarachnoid haemorrhage or spinal cord injury may have varying nutritional requirements; individualised approach in the neurocritical ICU with the help of the intensivist, nutritionist and pharmacology team may be of benefit.

  18. Acinetobacter infections as an emerging threat in intensive care units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosocomial infections caused by Acinetobacter species (Spp.) is an emerging threat in health care setups especially intensive care units (ICU). The objective of this observational study was to determine the pattern of Acinetobacter infections and its association with length of stay in patients admitted to our medical ICU from January to August 2011. Methods: All patients above 16 years of age with stay of more than 48 hours were checked for any development of new infections not present or incubating at the time of admission. Nosocomial infections were documented in the light of clinical findings and lab results. Data was analysed using statistical software SPSS 15.0. Results: A total of 146 patients had a stay of at least 48 hours; frequency of nosocomial infection was 30.8% out of which 57.8% were Acinetobacter infections. Respiratory system was most commonly involved. Acinetobacter Spp showed high resistance (96.2%) to penicillins, cephalosporins and even extended spectrum antibiotics including carbepenems, quinolones and piperacillin plus tazobactam. Extended drug resistance was seen in 92.3% isolates; while we found high susceptibility to tigecycline (88.5%) and polymyxins (100%). Acinetobacter Spp. infected patients had mean length of stay (LOS) of 12.92 days when compared to patients with other nosocomial infections and no infection with mean LOS of 7.05 days (p=0.05) and 4.86 days (p=0.00) respectively. Conclusions: Acinetobacter Spp infections increase with longer duration of stay in ICU. Emergence of multi-drug and extended-drug resistant Acinetobacter Spp is alarming and overwhelming at this rate for already stretched out health system with its economic and health implications. (author)

  19. What Makes a Good Palliative Care Physician? A Qualitative Study about the Patient's Expectations and Needs when Being Admitted to a Palliative Care Unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva K Masel

    Full Text Available The aims of the study were to examine a patients' knowledge of palliative care, b patients' expectations and needs when being admitted to a palliative care unit, and c patient's concept of a good palliative care physician.The study was based on a qualitative methodology, comprising 32 semistructured interviews with advanced cancer patients admitted to the palliative care unit of the Medical University of Vienna. Interviews were conducted with 20 patients during the first three days after admission to the unit and after one week, recorded digitally, and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using NVivo 10 software, based on thematic analysis enhanced with grounded theory techniques.The results revealed four themes: (1 information about palliative care, (2 supportive care needs, (3 being treated in a palliative care unit, and (4 qualities required of palliative care physicians. The data showed that patients lack information about palliative care, that help in social concerns plays a central role in palliative care, and attentiveness as well as symptom management are important to patients. Patients desire a personal patient-physician relationship. The qualities of a good palliative care physician were honesty, the ability to listen, taking time, being experienced in their field, speaking the patient's language, being human, and being gentle. Patients experienced relief when being treated in a palliative care unit, perceived their care as an interdisciplinary activity, and felt that their burdensome symptoms were being attended to with emotional care. Negative perceptions included the overtly intense treatment.The results of the present study offer an insight into what patients expect from palliative care teams. Being aware of patient's needs will enable medical teams to improve professional and individualized care.

  20. Risk of bloodstream infection in children admitted to paediatric intensive care units in England and Wales following emergency inter-hospital transfer.

    OpenAIRE

    Harron, K.; Mok, Q; Parslow, R.; Muller-Pebody, B; Gilbert, R.; Ramnarayan, P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Adherence to full sterile procedures may be compromised when central venous catheters are inserted as part of emergency resuscitation and stabilisation, particularly outside the intensive care unit. Half of emergency admissions to paediatric intensive care units (PICU) in the UK occur after stabilisation at other hospitals. We determined whether bloodstream infection (BSI) occurred more frequently in children admitted to PICU after inter-hospital transfer compared to within-hospital a...

  1. NOSOCOMIAL ACINETOBACTER INFECTIONS IN INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

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    Nwadike V. Ugochukwu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter plays an important role in the infection of patients admitted to hospitals. Acinetobacter are free living gram-negative coccobacilli that emerge as significant nosocomial pathogens in the hospital setting and are responsible for intermittent outbreaks in the Intensive Care Unit. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Acinetobacter in patients admitted into the Intensive Care Unit and determine their role in infections in the ICU. A total of one hundred patients were recruited for the study, catheter specimen urine, tracheal aspirate and blood culture were collected aseptically from the patients. The specimens were cultured on blood and MacConkey and the organisms identified using Microbact 12E (0xoid. The Plasmid analysis was done using the TENS miniprep method. Fourteen (14% of the 100 patients recruited into the study, developed Acinetobacter infection. Acinetobacter spp constituted 9% of the total number of isolates. Twelve (86% of the isolates were recovered from tracheal aspirate, 1(7% from urine and 1(7% from blood. All of the isolates harbor plasmids of varying molecular sizes. Ten of the fourteen Acinetobacter were isolated at about the same period of time in the ICU with 6(42.7% having plasmid size in the 23.1kb band and all showed similar pattern revealing that the isolates exhibit some relatedness. The clonal nature of the isolates suggest that strict infection control practices must be adopted in ICU, also an antibiotic policy must be developed for the ICU to prevent abuse of antibiotics that may lead to selection of resistant bacteria.

  2. Intensive Care Unit Infections and Antibiotic Use

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    Ayşegül Yeşilkaya

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Burn wound infections is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in burn trauma patients. Although burn wound is sterile at the beginning, because of risk factors such as prolonged hospital stay, immunesuppression and burn affecting large body surface area, colonisation firstly with Staphylococcus aureus and then Pseudomonas aeruginosa will occur later. Delay in wound closure and treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotic will result wound colonisation with antibiotic-resistant bacteria. To control colonization and to prevent burn wound infection topical antimicrobial dressings are used. The criteria used for the diagnosis of sepsis and wound infections are different in burn victims. Surface swabs from burn wounds must be cultured for the early assestment of infection. Although histopathological examination and quantitative culture of wound tissue biopsy has been known as the gold standard for the verification of invasive burn wound infection, many burn centers cannot do histopathological examination. When the traditional treatment modalities such as debridement of necrotic tissue, cleaning of wound and topical antimicrobial dressing application fails in the management of burn patient, cultures must be taken from possible foci of infection for the early diagnosis. After specimen collection, empirical bactericidal systemic antibiotic treatment should be started promptly. Inappropriate utilization of antibiotics may cause selection of resistant bacteria in the flora of the patient and of the burn unit which facilitates an infection or an outbreak at the end. Infection control in the burn unit includes surveillance cultures, cohort patient care staff, standard isolation precautions, strict hand hygiene compliance and appropariate antibiotic utilization. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 55-61

  3. Sleep in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Margaret A; Friese, Randall S; Gehlbach, Brian K; Schwab, Richard J; Weinhouse, Gerald L; Jones, Shirley F

    2015-04-01

    Sleep is an important physiologic process, and lack of sleep is associated with a host of adverse outcomes. Basic and clinical research has documented the important role circadian rhythm plays in biologic function. Critical illness is a time of extreme vulnerability for patients, and the important role sleep may play in recovery for intensive care unit (ICU) patients is just beginning to be explored. This concise clinical review focuses on the current state of research examining sleep in critical illness. We discuss sleep and circadian rhythm abnormalities that occur in ICU patients and the challenges to measuring alterations in circadian rhythm in critical illness and review methods to measure sleep in the ICU, including polysomnography, actigraphy, and questionnaires. We discuss data on the impact of potentially modifiable disruptors to patient sleep, such as noise, light, and patient care activities, and report on potential methods to improve sleep in the setting of critical illness. Finally, we review the latest literature on sleep disturbances that persist or develop after critical illness.

  4. Circumstances surrounding dying in the paediatric intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plötz Frans B

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Death is inevitable in the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU. We aimed to describe the circumstances surrounding dying in a PICU. Method The chart records of all patients less than 18 years of age who died at the PICU between January first 2000 and July first 2005 were retrospectively analyzed. Information regarding sex, age, length of stay, admission, diagnosis, and the way a patient died was registered. Post mortem information regarding natural versus unnatural death, autopsy and donation was obtained. Non-survivors were allocated in five groups: do-not-resuscitate (DNR, withholding and/or withdrawal of therapy (W/W, failed cardiopulmonary resuscitation (failed CPR, brain death (BD, and terminal organ failure (TOF. Results During the study period 87 (4.4% of the 1995 admitted patients died. Non-survivors were more often admitted during the day (54% and the week (68%. W/W was found in 27.6%, TOF in 26.4%, BD in 23.0%, failed CPR in 18.4%, and DNR in 4.6%. Forty-three percent died in the first two days, of which BD (40.5% and failed CPR (37.8% were most common. Seventy-five children (86% died due to a natural cause. Autopsy permission was obtained in 19 of 54 patients (35%. The autopsies confirmed the clinical diagnosis in 11 patients, revealed new information in 5 patients, and in 3 patients the autopsy did not provide additional information. Nine patients were medically suitable for organ donation and 24 patients for tissue donation, whereas consent was only obtained in 2 cases in both groups. Conclusion We observed that 43% of the patients died within the first two days of admission due to BD and failed CPR, whereas after 4 days most patients died after W/W. Autopsy remains an useful tool to confirm clinical diagnoses or to provide new information. Only a small percentage of the deceased children is suitable for organ donation.

  5. Determinants of mortality for adults with cystic fibrosis admitted in Intensive Care Unit: a multicenter study

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    Rabbat Antoine

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intensive care unit (ICU admission of adults with cystic fibrosis (CF is controversial because of poor outcome. This appraisal needs re-evaluation following recent changes in both CF management and ICU daily practice. Objectives were to determine long-term outcome of adults with CF admitted in ICU and to identify prognostic factors. Methods Retrospective multicenter study of 60 ICU hospitalizations for 42 adult CF patients admitted between 2000 and 2003. Reason for ICU admission, ventilatory support provided and one-year survival were recorded. Multiple logistic analysis was used to determine predictors of mortality. Results Prior to ICU admission, all patients (mean age 28.1 ± 8 yr had a severe lung disease (mean FEV1 28 ± 12% predicted; mean PaCO2 47 ± 9 mmHg. Main reason for ICU hospitalization was pulmonary infective exacerbation (40/60. At admission, noninvasive ventilation was used in 57% of cases and was successful in 67% of patients. Endotracheal intubation was implemented in 19 episodes. Overall ICU mortality rate was 14%. One year after ICU discharge, 10 of the 28 survivors have been lung transplanted. Among recognized markers of CF disease severity, only the annual FEV1 loss was associated with a poor outcome (HR = 1.47 [1.18–1.85], p = 0.001. SAPSII (HR = 1.08 [1.03–1.12], p Conclusion Despite advanced lung disease, adult patients with CF admitted in ICU have high survival rate. Endotracheal intubation is associated with a poor prognosis and should be used as the last alternative. Although efforts have to be made in selecting patients with CF likely to benefit from ICU resources, ICU admission of these patients should be considered.

  6. Outcome and prognostic indicators of patients with hematopoietic stem cell transplants admitted to the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Thanh N; Weigt, S Sam; Belperio, John A; Territo, Mary; Keane, Michael P

    2009-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCTs) who require admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) has been regarded as extremely poor. We sought to re-evaluate recent outcomes and predictive factors in a retrospective cohort study. Among the 605 adult patients that received an HSCT between 2001 and 2006, 154 required admission to the ICU. Of these, 47% were discharged from the ICU, 36% were discharged from the hospital, and 19% survived 6 months. Allogeneic transplant, mechanical ventilation, vasopressor-use, and neutropenia were each associated with increased mortality, and the mortality of patients with all four characteristics was 100%. Hemodialysis was also associated with increased mortality in a Kaplan-Meier analysis but did not appear important in a multivariate tree analysis. A final Cox model confirmed that allogeneic transplant, mechanical ventilation, and vasopressor-use were each independent risk factors for mortality in the 6 months following ICU admission. PMID:20130763

  7. Enfermeiro instrutor no processo de treinamento admissional do enfermeiro em unidade de terapia intensiva Enfermero instructor en el proceso de entrenamiento de admisión del enfermero en una unidad de Cuidados Intensivos Nurse instructor in the process of admission training of nurses in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Marília Bucchi

    2011-01-01

    autonomía de acción, siendo el papel del instructor transmitir esos valores a los ingresantes.OBJECTIVE: To define and analyze the profile of the nurse-instructor training for nurses on admission to the ICU. METHODS: The study was developed from the perspective of action research, adopting the technique of focus group dialogue and the use of electronic data collection. The sample included 29 nurses: 11 in the focus group sessions and 18 in the electronic interchange. RESULTS: Among the responsibilities of the instructor, defined by the group, the updated scientific and technical knowledge were highlighted, along with ethics and the ability to teach; the instructor was identified as having a key role in the process of admission training. CONCLUSIONS: The research has promoted reflection by the group and the researchers on the issues involved in education and about the identity of the group characterized by the charitable role and autonomy of action, and the role of the instructor to transmit these values to new nurses.

  8. Care of severe head injury patients in the Sarawak General Hospital: intensive care unit versus general ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, S K; Lim, S L; Lee, H K; Liew, D; Wong, A

    2011-06-01

    Intensive care for severe head injury patients is very important in the prevention and treatment of secondary brain injury. However, in a resources constraint environment and limited availability of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds in the hospitals, not all severe head injury patients will receive ICU care. This prospective study is aimed to evaluate the outcome of severe head injured patients who received ICU and general ward care in Sarawak General Hospital (SGH) over a 6-month period. A total of thirty five severe head injury patients were admitted. Twenty three patients (65.7%) were ventilated in general ward whereas twelve patients (34.3%) were ventilated in ICU. Overall one month mortality in this study was 25.7%. Patients who received ICU care had a lower one month mortality than those who received general ward care (16.7% vs 30.4%), although it was not statistically different. Multivariate analysis revealed only GCS on admission (OR 0.731; 95% CI 0.460 to 0.877; P=0.042) as the independent predictive factor for one month mortality in this study.

  9. The Bariatric Patient in the Intensive Care Unit: Pitfalls and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompilio, Carlos E; Pelosi, Paolo; Castro, Melina G

    2016-09-01

    The increasing number of bariatric/metabolic operations as important alternatives for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes brought several concerns about the intensive care of patients undergoing those procedures. Intensive Care Unit admission criteria are needed in order to better allocate resources and avoid unnecessary interventions. Furthermore, well-established protocols, helpful in many clinical situations, are not directly applicable to obese patients. Indeed, difficult airway management, mechanical ventilation, fluid therapy protocols, prophylaxis, and treatment of venous thromboembolic events have unique aspects that should be taken into consideration. Finally, new data related to planning nutrition therapy of the critically obese have been highlighted and deserve consideration. In this review, we provide an outline of recent studies related to those important aspects of the care of the bariatric/metabolic patients in critical conditions. PMID:27464648

  10. Obstetric critical care: A prospective analysis of clinical characteristics, predictability, and fetomaternal outcome in a new dedicated obstetric intensive care unit

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    Sunanda Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 1 year prospective analysis of all critically ill obstetric patients admitted to a newly developed dedicated obstetric intensive care unit (ICU was done in order to characterize causes of admissions, interventions required, course and foetal maternal outcome. Utilization of mortality probability model II (MPM II at admission for predicting maternal mortality was also assessed.During this period there were 16,756 deliveries with 79 maternal deaths (maternal mortality rate 4.7/1000 deliveries. There were 24 ICU admissions (ICU utilization ratio 0.14% with mean age of 25.21±4.075 years and mean gestational age of 36.04±3.862 weeks. Postpartum admissions were significantly higher (83.33% n=20, P<0.05 with more patients presenting with obstetric complications (91.66%, n=22, P<0.01 as compared to medical complications (8.32% n=2. Obstetric haemorrhage (n=15, 62.5% and haemodynamic instability (n=20, 83.33% were considered to be significant risk factors for ICU admission (P=0.000. Inotropic support was required in 22 patients (91.66% while 17 patients (70.83% required ventilatory support but they did not contribute to risk factors for poor outcome. The mean duration of ventilation (30.17±21.65 h and ICU stay (39.42±33.70 h were of significantly longer duration in survivors (P=0.01, P=0.00 respectively versus non-survivors. The observed mortality (n=10, 41.67% was significantly higher than MPM II predicted death rate (26.43%, P=0.002. We conclude that obstetric haemorrhage leading to haemodynamic instability remains the leading cause of ICU admission and MPM II scores at admission under predict the maternal mortality.

  11. Withholding or withdrawing therapy in intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Irene; Ammentorp, Jette; Erlandsen, Mogens;

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the views of intensive care nurses, intensivists, and primary physicians regarding collaboration and other aspects of withholding and withdrawing therapy in the intensive care unit (ICU).......The purpose of the study was to determine the views of intensive care nurses, intensivists, and primary physicians regarding collaboration and other aspects of withholding and withdrawing therapy in the intensive care unit (ICU)....

  12. The Palliative-Supportive Care Unit in a Comprehensive Cancer Center as Crossroad for Patients’ Oncological Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Adile, Claudio; Caruselli, Amanda; Ferrera, Patrizia; Costanzi, Andrea; Marchetti, Paolo; Casuccio, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to assess how an admission to an acute palliative-supportive care unit (APSCU), may influence the therapeutic trajectory of advanced cancer patients. Methods A consecutive sample of advanced cancer patients admitted to APCU was assessed. The following parameters were collected: patients demographics, including age, gender, primary diagnosis, marital status, and educational level, performance status and reasons for and kind of admission, data about care-givers, recent anticancer treatments, being on/off treatment or uncertain, the previous care setting, who proposed the admission to APSCU. Physical and psychological symptoms were evaluated at admission and at time of discharge. The use of opioids was also recorded. Hospital staying was also recorded. At time of discharge the parameters were recorded and a follow-up was performed one month after discharge. Results 314 consecutive patients admitted to the APSCU were surveyed. Pain was the most frequent reason for admission. Changes of ESAS were highly significant, as well as the use of opioids and breakthrough pain medications (p patients was reported, and concomitantly a significant number of “off-therapy” patients increased. At one month follow-up, 38.9% patients were at home, 19.7% patients were receiving palliative home care, and 1.6% patients were in hospice. 68.5% of patients were still living. Conclusion Data of this study suggest that the APSCU may have a relevant role for managing the therapeutic trajectory of advanced cancer patients, limiting the risk of futile and aggressive treatment while providing an appropriate care setting. PMID:27332884

  13. Short- and Long-Term Validity of High School GPA for Admission to Colleges outside the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hattami, Abdulghani

    2014-01-01

    High school GPA is the only admission criterion that is currently used by many colleges in Yemen to select their potential students. Its predictive validity was investigated to ensure the accuracy of the admission decisions in these colleges. The relationship between students' persistence in the 4 years of college and high school GPA was studied…

  14. VENTILATOR ASSOCIATED PNEUMONIA IN INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

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    Syed Ali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Knowledge of the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP and its associated risk factors is imperative for the development and use of more effective preventive measures. METHODOLOGY We conducted a prospective cohort study over a period of 12 months to determine the incidence and the risk factors for development of VAP in critically ill adult patients admitted in intensive care units (ICUs in Chalmeda Anand Rao Institute of Medical Sciences, Karimnagar, we included 150 patients, on mechanical ventilation for more than 48 hours. VAP was diagnosed according to the current diagnostic criteria. RESULTS The study cohort comprised of 150 patients of various cases of cerebrovascular accident, poisoning, neurological disorders, sepsis and others. VAP was diagnosed when a score of ≥6 was obtained in the clinical pulmonary infection scoring system having six variables and a maximum score of 12. The mean age of the patients was 40 years. Of the 150 patients, 28 patients developed VAP during the ICU stay. The incidence of VAP in our study was 18.8%. The risk factor in our study was decrease in the PaO2/FiO2 ratio, duration of mechanical ventilation, impaired consciousness, tracheostomy, re-intubation, emergency intubation, nasogastric tube, emergency intubation and intravenous sedatives were found to be the specific risk factors for early onset VAP, while tracheostomy and re-intubation were the independent predictors of late-onset VAP, The most predominant organisms in our study was Pseudomonas (39.2%. CONCLUSIONS Knowledge of these risk factors may be useful in implementing simple and effective preventive measures. Precaution during emergency intubation, minimizing the occurrence of reintubation, avoidance of tracheostomy as far as possible, and minimization of sedation. The ICU clinicians should be aware of the risk factors for VAP, which could prove useful in identifying patients at high risk for VAP, and modifying patient care to

  15. Fatigue in Family Caregivers of Adult Intensive Care Unit Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, JiYeon; Tate, Judith A.; Hoffman, Leslie A.; Schulz, Richard; Ren, Dianxu; Donahoe, Michael P.; Given, Barbara A.; Sherwood, Paula R.

    2014-01-01

    Context Family caregivers are a vital resource in the recovery of intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. Of concern, the stress associated with this role can negatively affect caregiver health. Fatigue, an important health indicator, has been identified as a predictor of various illnesses, greater use of health services, and early mortality. Examining the impact of fatigue on caregivers’ physical health can assist in identifying critical time points and potential targets for intervention. Objectives To describe self-reported fatigue in caregivers of ICU survivors from patients’ ICU admission to ≤ two weeks, two- and four-months post-ICU discharge. Methods Patient-caregiver pairs were enrolled from a medical ICU. Caregiver fatigue was measured using the Short-Form-36 Health Survey Vitality subscale (SF-36 Vitality). Caregiver psychobehavioral stress responses included depressive symptoms, burden, health risk behaviors, and sleep quality. Patient data included self-reported physical symptoms and disposition (home vs. institution). Results Forty seven patient-caregiver pairs were initially enrolled. Clinically significant fatigue (SF-36 Vitality ≤ 45) was reported by 43% to 53% of caregivers across the time points and these caregivers reported worse scores in measures of depressive symptoms, burden, health risk behaviors and sleep quality, and patients’ symptom burden. In 26 caregivers with data for all time points (55% of the total sample), SF-36 Vitality scores showed trends of improvement when the patient returned home and greater impairment when institutionalization continued. Conclusion In caregivers of ICU survivors, fatigue is common and potentially linked with poor psychobehavioral responses. Worsening fatigue was associated with greater symptom distress and long-term patient institutionalization. PMID:24439845

  16. Co-colonization by multidrug-resistant bacteria in two Greek intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou-Olivgeris, M; Spiliopoulou, I; Christofidou, M; Logothetis, D; Manolopoulou, P; Dodou, V; Fligou, F; Marangos, M; Anastassiou, E D

    2015-10-01

    Our goal was to identify the risk factors for co-colonization by KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC-Kp), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) upon intensive care unit (ICU) admission and during stay. Rectal and nasal samples were taken from each patient upon admission at two Greek ICUs and each week afterwards, and were inoculated onto chromogenic agar. Representative colonies were characterized with standard methods and Vitek-2 technology. The presence of the bla KPC gene (K. pneumoniae isolates), vanA and vanB (Enterococcus faecium and E. faecalis isolates), and mecA (S. aureus isolates) was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Upon ICU admission, among 481 patients, 59 (12%), 63 (13%), and 20 (4%) were colonized by KPC-Kp, VRE, or MRSA, respectively. Simultaneous colonization by KPC-Kp and VRE upon admission (34 patients) was associated with the number of co-morbidities [adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 1.5; confidence interval (CI) 1.0-2.5], administered antibiotics (aOR: 1.7; CI 1.3-2.3), and prior KPC-Kp infection (aOR: 24.4; CI 1.5-396.0). Among patients with an ICU stay of more than 6 days, 181 (73%), 31 (13%), and 9 (4%) became KPC-Kp, VRE, or MRSA colonized during ICU stay, respectively. KPC-Kp colonization was an independent risk factor for VRE colonization upon admission (aOR: 2.7; CI 1.0-7.2) and during stay (aOR: 7.4; CI 2.0-27.4), whereas VRE colonization was a risk factor for KPC-Kp upon admission (aOR: 5.1; CI 1.9-13.9) and MRSA colonization upon admission (aOR: 3.5; CI 1.2-10.1) and during ICU stay (aOR: 14.5; CI 2.1-100.1). Colonization by a multidrug pathogen could promote colonization by another. PMID:26173689

  17. Probiotics in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Lee E; Gogineni, Vijaya; Malesker, Mark A

    2012-04-01

    Probiotics are living microorganisms that, when ingested in adequate amounts, provide benefits to the host. The benefits include either a shortened duration of infections or decreased susceptibility to pathogens. Proposed mechanisms of beneficial effects include improving gastrointestinal barrier function, modification of the gut flora by inducing host cell antimicrobial peptides and/or local release of probiotic antimicrobial factors, competition for epithelial adherence, and immunomodulation. With increasing intensive care unit (ICU) antibacterial resistance rates and fewer new antibiotics in the research pipeline, focus has been shifted to non-antibiotic approaches for the prevention and treatment of nosocomial infections. Probiotics offer promise to ICU patients for the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, Clostridium difficile infections, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and ventilator-associated pneumonia. Our current understanding of probiotics is confounded by inconsistency in probiotic strains studied, optimal dosages, study durations, and suboptimal sample sizes. Although probiotics are generally safe in the critically ill, adverse event monitoring must be rigorous in these vulnerable patients. Delineation of clinical differences of various effective probiotic strains, their mechanisms of action, and optimal dosing regimens will better establish the role of probiotics in various disorders. However, probiotic research will likely be hindered in the future given a recent ruling by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  18. Evaluation of nosocomial infection risk using APACHE II scores in the neurological intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Ying; Li, Shu-Juan; Yang, Nan; Hu, Wen-Li

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of using the Acute Physiology, Age and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scoring system for predicting the risk of nosocomial infection in the neurological intensive care unit (NICU), 216 patients transferred to NICU within 24hours of admission were retrospectively evaluated. Based on admission APACHE II scores, they were classified into three groups, with higher APACHE II scores representing higher infectious risk. The device utilization ratios and device-associated infection ratios of NICU patients were analyzed and compared with published reports on patient outcome. Statistical analysis of nosocomial infection ratios showed obvious differences between the high-risk, middle-risk and low-risk groups (pAPACHE II model in predicting the risk of nosocomial infection was 0.81, which proved to be reliable and consistent with the expectation. In addition, we found statistical differences in the duration of hospital stay (patient-days) and device utilization (device-days) between different risk groups (pAPACHE II scoring system was validated in predicting the risk of nosocomial infection, duration of patient-days and device-days, and providing accurate assessment of patients' condition, so that appropriate prevention strategies can be implemented based on admission APACHE II scores.

  19. Vital Signs Directed Therapy: Improving Care in an Intensive Care Unit in a Low-Income Country.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Baker

    Full Text Available Global Critical Care is attracting increasing attention. At several million deaths per year, the worldwide burden of critical illness is greater than generally appreciated. Low income countries (LICs have a disproportionally greater share of critical illness, and yet critical care facilities are scarce in such settings. Routines utilizing abnormal vital signs to identify critical illness and trigger medical interventions have become common in high-income countries but have not been investigated in LICs. The aim of the study was to assess whether the introduction of a vital signs directed therapy protocol improved acute care and reduced mortality in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU in Tanzania.Prospective, before-and-after interventional study in the ICU of a university hospital in Tanzania. A context-appropriate protocol that defined danger levels of severely abnormal vital signs and stipulated acute treatment responses was implemented in a four week period using sensitisation, training, job aids, supervision and feedback. Acute treatment of danger signs at admission and during care in the ICU and in-hospital mortality were compared pre and post-implementation using regression models. Danger signs from 447 patients were included: 269 pre-implementation and 178 post-implementation. Acute treatment of danger signs was higher post-implementation (at admission: 72.9% vs 23.1%, p<0.001; in ICU: 16.6% vs 2.9%, p<0.001. A danger sign was five times more likely to be treated post-implementation (Prevalence Ratio (PR 4.9 (2.9-8.3. Intravenous fluids were given in response to 35.0% of hypotensive episodes post-implementation, as compared to 4.1% pre-implementation (PR 6.4 (2.5-16.2. In patients admitted with hypotension, mortality was lower post-implementation (69.2% vs 92.3% p = 0.02 giving a numbers-needed-to-treat of 4.3. Overall in-hospital mortality rates were unchanged (49.4% vs 49.8%, p = 0.94.The introduction of a vital signs directed therapy protocol

  20. Strange and scary memories of the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Helle; Egerod, Ingrid; Dreyer, Pia

    2016-01-01

    of the Intensive Care Unit. CONCLUSIONS: Analysis based on Ricoeurian phenomenological hermeneutics provided insights into themes in intensive care unit patients' memories of delusions. More studies are needed to understand the meaning of memories of delusions, the commonality of themes and the association between...

  1. Glucose variability is associated with intensive care unit mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Hermanides; T.M. Vriesendorp; R.J. Bosman; D.F. Zandstra; J.B. Hoekstra; J.H. DeVries

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mounting evidence suggests a role for glucose variability in predicting intensive care unit (ICU) mortality. We investigated the association between glucose variability and intensive care unit and in-hospital deaths across several ranges of mean glucose. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study

  2. Inpatient Transfers to the Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Michael P; Gooder, Valerie J; McBride, Karen; James, Brent; Fisher, Elliott S

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine if delayed transfer to the intensive care unit (ICU) after physiologic deterioration is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. DESIGN Inception cohort. SETTING Community hospital in Ogden, Utah. PATIENTS Ninety-one consecutive inpatients with noncardiac diagnoses at the time of emergent transfer to the ICU. We determined the time when each patient first met any of 11 pre-specified physiologic criteria. We classified patients as “slow transfer” when patients met a physiologic criterion 4 or more hours before transfer to the ICU. Patients were followed until discharge. INTERVENTIONS None. MEASUREMENTS In-hospital mortality, functional status at hospital discharge, hospital resources. MAIN RESULTS At the time when the first physiologic criterion was met on the ward, slow- and rapid-transfer patients were similar in terms of age, gender, diagnosis, number of days in hospital prior to ICU transfer, prehospital functional status, and APACHE II scores. By the time slow-transfer patients were admitted to the ICU, they had significantly higher APACHE II scores (21.7 vs 16.2; P = .002) and were more likely to die in-hospital (41% vs 11%; relative risk [RR], 3.5; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.4 to 9.5). Slow-transfer patients were less likely to have had their physician notified of deterioration within 2 hours of meeting physiologic criteria (59% vs 31%; P = .001) and less likely to have had a bedside physician evaluation within the first 3 hours after meeting criteria (23% vs 83%; P = .001). CONCLUSIONS Slow transfer to the ICU of physiologically defined high-risk hospitalized patients was associated with increased risk of death. Slow response to physiologic deterioration may explain these findings. PMID:12542581

  3. Repertoire of intensive care unit pneumonia microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Bousbia

    Full Text Available Despite the considerable number of studies reported to date, the causative agents of pneumonia are not completely identified. We comprehensively applied modern and traditional laboratory diagnostic techniques to identify microbiota in patients who were admitted to or developed pneumonia in intensive care units (ICUs. During a three-year period, we tested the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL of patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia, community-acquired pneumonia, non-ventilator ICU pneumonia and aspiration pneumonia, and compared the results with those from patients without pneumonia (controls. Samples were tested by amplification of 16S rDNA, 18S rDNA genes followed by cloning and sequencing and by PCR to target specific pathogens. We also included culture, amoeba co-culture, detection of antibodies to selected agents and urinary antigen tests. Based on molecular testing, we identified a wide repertoire of 160 bacterial species of which 73 have not been previously reported in pneumonia. Moreover, we found 37 putative new bacterial phylotypes with a 16S rDNA gene divergence ≥ 98% from known phylotypes. We also identified 24 fungal species of which 6 have not been previously reported in pneumonia and 7 viruses. Patients can present up to 16 different microorganisms in a single BAL (mean ± SD; 3.77 ± 2.93. Some pathogens considered to be typical for ICU pneumonia such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus species can be detected as commonly in controls as in pneumonia patients which strikingly highlights the existence of a core pulmonary microbiota. Differences in the microbiota of different forms of pneumonia were documented.

  4. Communication of bed allocation decisions in a critical care unit and accountability for reasonableness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swota Alissa H

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Communication may affect perceptions of fair process for intensive care unit bed allocation decisions through its impact on the publicity condition of accountability for reasonableness. Methods We performed a qualitative case study to describe participant perceptions of the communication of bed allocation decisions in an 18-bed university affiliated, medical-surgical critical care unit at Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre. Interviewed participants were 3 critical care physicians, 4 clinical fellows in critical care, 4 resource nurses, 4 "end-users" (physicians who commonly referred patients to the unit, and 3 members of the administrative staff. Median bed occupancy during the study period (Jan-April 2003 was 18/18; daily admissions and discharges (median were 3. We evaluated our description using the ethical framework "accountability for reasonableness" (A4R to identify opportunities for improvement. Results The critical care physician, resource nurse, critical care fellow and end-users (trauma team leader, surgeons, neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists functioned independently in unofficial "parallel tracks" of bed allocation decision-making; this conflicted with the official designation of the critical care physician as the sole authority. Communication between key decision-makers was indirect and could exclude those affected by the decisions; notably, family members. Participants perceived a lack of publicity for bed allocation rationales. Conclusion The publicity condition should be improved for critical care bed allocation decisions. Decision-making in the "parallel tracks" we describe might be unavoidable within usual constraints of time, urgency and demand. Formal guidelines for direct communication between key participants in such circumstances would help to improve the fairness of these decisions.

  5. Applying the new concept of maternal near-miss in an intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Aparecida Lotufo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The World Health Organization has recommended investigating near-misses as a benchmark practice for monitoring maternal healthcare and has standardized the criteria for diagnosis. We aimed to study maternal morbidity and mortality among women admitted to a general intensive care unit during pregnancy or in the postpartum period, using the new World Health Organization criteria. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, 158 cases of severe maternal morbidity were classified according to their outcomes: death, maternal near-miss, and potentially life-threatening conditions. The health indicators for obstetrical care were calculated. A bivariate analysis was performed using the Chi-square test with Yate's correction or Fisher's exact test. A multiple regression analysis was used to calculate the crude and adjusted odds ratios, together with their respective 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: Among the 158 admissions, 5 deaths, 43 cases of maternal near-miss, and 110 cases of potentially lifethreatening conditions occurred. The near-miss rate was 4.4 cases per 1,000 live births. The near-miss/death ratio was 8.6 near-misses for each maternal death, and the overall mortality index was 10.4%. Hypertensive syndromes were the main cause of admission (67.7% of the cases, 107/158; however, hemorrhage, mainly due to uterine atony and ectopic pregnancy complications, was the main cause of maternal near-misses and deaths (17/43 cases of near-miss and 2/5 deaths. CONCLUSIONS: Hypertension was the main cause of admission and of potentially life-threatening conditions; however, hemorrhage was the main cause of maternal near-misses and deaths at this institution, suggesting that delays may occur in implementing appropriate obstetrical care.

  6. Communication skills and error in the intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Reader, Tom W; Flin, Rhona; Cuthbertson, Brian H

    2007-01-01

    Purpose of review: Poor communication in critical care teams has been frequently shown as a contributing factor to adverse events. There is now a strong emphasis on identifying the communication skills that can contribute to, or protect against, preventable medical errors. This review considers communication research recently conducted in the intensive care unit and other acute domains. Recent findings: Error studies in the intensive care unit have shown good communication to be crucial for e...

  7. Nursing workload in a trauma intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Luana Loppi Goulart; Roberta Nazário Aoki; Camila Fernanda Lourençon Vegian; Edinêis de Brito Guirardello

    2014-01-01

    Severely injured patients with multiple and conflicting injuries present themselves to nursing professionals at critical care units faced with care management challenges. The goal of the present study is to evaluate nursing workload and verify the correlation between workload and the APACHE II severity index. It is a descriptive study, conducted in the Trauma Intensive Care Unit of a teaching hospital. We used the Nursing Activities Score and APACHE II as instruments. The sample comprised 32 ...

  8. Care of the newborn in perinatal units in New Brunswick

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen, David L.

    1986-01-01

    A survey of 23 perinatal units in New Brunswick hospitals was conducted by means of a mailed questionnaire to determine the type of care provided to newborns. The results showed various degrees of conformity with published guidelines for the care of newborns. Deficiencies were noted in several areas of care: failing to give or improperly giving vitamin K1 prophylaxis (in 7 of the units), flushing the eyes after silver nitrate prophylaxis (in 10), using hexachlorophene to bathe newborns (in 11...

  9. Impact of Market Competition on Continuity of Care and Hospital Admissions for Asthmatic Children: A Longitudinal Analysis of Nationwide Health Insurance Data 2009-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung Hee Cho

    Full Text Available Ambulatory care-sensitive conditions, including asthma, can be managed with timely and effective outpatient care, thereby reducing the need for hospitalization.This study assessed the relationship between market competition, continuity of care (COC, and hospital admissions in asthmatic children according to their health care provider.A longitudinal design was employed with a 5-year follow-up period, between 2009 and 2013, under a Korean universal health insurance program. A total of 253 geographical regions were included in the analysis, according to data from the Korean Statistical Office. Data from 9,997 patients, aged ≤ 12 years, were included. We measured the COC over a 5-year period using the Usual Provider Continuity (UPC index. Random intercept models were calculated to assess the temporal and multilevel relationship between market competition, COC, and hospital admission rate.Of the 9,997 patients, 243 (2.4% were admitted to the hospital in 2009. In the multilevel regression analysis, as the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index increased by 1,000 points (denoting decreased competitiveness, UPC scores also increased (ß = 0.001; p < 0.0001. In multilevel logistic regression analysis, the adjusted odds ratio (OR for hospital admissions for individuals with lower COC scores (≥ 2 ambulatory visits and a UPC index score of < 1 was 3.61 (95% CI: 2.98-4.38 relative to the reference group (≥ 2 ambulatory visits and a UPC index score of 1.Market competition appears to reduce COC; decreased COC was associated with a higher OR for hospital admissions.

  10. Effect of tele health care on exacerbations and hospital admissions in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringbæk, Thomas; Green, Allan; Laursen, Lars Christian;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Tele monitoring (TM) of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has gained much interest, but studies have produced conflicting results. Our aim was to investigate the effect of TM with the option of video consultations on exacerbations and hospital...... during the study period. RESULTS: Most of the enrolled patients had severe COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 second <50%pred in 86% and ≥hospital admission for COPD in the year prior to enrollment in 45%, respectively, of the patients). No difference in drop-out rate and mortality was found between the...... groups. With regard to the primary outcome, no significant difference was found in hospital admissions for COPD between the groups (P=0.74), and likewise, no difference was found in time to first admission or all-cause hospital admissions. Compared with the control group, TM group patients had more...

  11. Orientation behaviors in residents relocated to a redesigned dementia care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Margaret C; MacLean, Jill; Borrie, Michael; Geiger, Julia

    2004-01-01

    This descriptive study took advantage of a scheduled environmental renovation in a secured dementia care unit. A convenience sample of 19 residents who were relocated to the unit completed a performance-based orientation task involving locating their own room. The study included a brief structured interview and tests of psychological function (cognition, depression, and visual-spatial ability) two months after admission. Intrusions (uninvited entry into another resident's room) were tracked for one week. Eighty-four percent of participants were able to find their own rooms during the orientation task. The majority of participants reported use of color (n = 13) and structure (n = 12) as cues for locating their rooms. Thirty-eight percent of those who could find their own rooms also intruded into others' rooms; these intrusions were most commonly related to seeking social interaction. The results attest to the importance of understanding the multiple factors that determine environmental use in this population. PMID:15002345

  12. Predictors of mortality of patients with acute respiratory failure secondary to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admitted to an intensive care unit: A one year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banga Amit

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD commonly require hospitalization and admission to intensive care unit (ICU. It is useful to identify patients at the time of admission who are likely to have poor outcome. This study was carried out to define the predictors of mortality in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD and to device a scoring system using the baseline physiological variables for prognosticating these patients. Methods Eighty-two patients with acute respiratory failure secondary to COPD admitted to medical ICU over a one-year period were included. Clinical and demographic profile at the time of admission to ICU including APACHE II score and Glasgow coma scale were recorded at the time of admission to ICU. In addition, acid base disorders, renal functions, liver functions and serum albumin, were recorded at the time of presentation. Primary outcome measure was hospital mortality. Results Invasive ventilation was required in 69 patients (84.1%. Fifty-two patients survived to hospital discharge (63.4%. APACHE II score at the time of admission to ICU {odds ratio (95 % CI: 1.32 (1.138–1.532; p Conclusion APACHE II score at admission and SA levels with in 24 hrs after admission are independent predictors of mortality for patients with COPD admitted to ICU. The equation derived from these two parameters is useful for predicting outcome of these patients.

  13. Nursing management and organizational ethics in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlody, Ginger Schafer

    2007-02-01

    This article describes organizational ethics issues involved in nursing management of an intensive care unit. The intensive care team and medical center management have the dual responsibility to create an ethical environment in which to provide optimum patient care. Addressing organizational ethics is key to creating that ethical environment in the intensive care unit. During the past 15-20 yrs, increasing costs in health care, competitive markets, the effect of high technology, and global business changes have set the stage for business and healthcare organizational conflicts that affect the ethical environment. Studies show that critical care nurses experience moral distress and are affected by the ethical climate of both the intensive care unit and the larger organization. Thus, nursing moral distress may result in problems related to recruitment and retention of staff. Other issues with organizational ethics ramifications that may occur in the intensive care unit include patient safety issues (including those related to disruptive behavior), intensive care unit leadership style, research ethics, allocation of resources, triage, and other economic issues. Current organizational ethics conflicts are discussed, a professional practice model is described, and multidisciplinary recommendations are put forth. PMID:17242604

  14. Health Care Indicators for the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Maple, Brenda T.; Levit, Katharine R.

    1992-01-01

    Contained in this regular feature of the journal is a section on each of the following four topics community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators.

  15. Molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii in central intensive care unit in Kosova teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lul Raka

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Infections caused by bacteria of genus Acinetobacter pose a significant health care challenge worldwide. Information on molecular epidemiological investigation of outbreaks caused by Acinetobacter species in Kosova is lacking. The present investigation was carried out to enlight molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacterbaumannii in the Central Intensive Care Unit (CICU of a University hospital in Kosova using pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. During March - July 2006, A. baumannii was isolated from 30 patients, of whom 22 were infected and 8 were colonised. Twenty patients had ventilator-associated pneumonia, one patient had meningitis, and two had coinfection with bloodstream infection and surgical site infection. The most common diagnoses upon admission to the ICU were politrauma and cerebral hemorrhage. Bacterial isolates were most frequently recovered from endotracheal aspirate (86.7%. First isolation occurred, on average, on day 8 following admission (range 1-26 days. Genotype analysis of A. baumannii isolates identified nine distinct PFGE patterns, with predominance of PFGE clone E represented by isolates from 9 patients. Eight strains were resistant to carbapenems. The genetic relatedness of Acinetobacter baumannii was high, indicating cross-transmission within the ICU setting. These results emphasize the need for measures to prevent nosocomial transmission of A. baumannii in ICU.

  16. Prevalence and risk factors of pneumothorax among patients admitted to a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nawawy, Ahmed Ahmed; Al-Halawany, Amina Sedky; Antonios, Manal Abdelmalik; Newegy, Reem Gamal

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Pneumothorax should be considered a medical emergency and requires a high index of suspicion and prompt recognition and intervention. Aims: The objective of the study was to evaluate cases developing pneumothorax following admission to a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) over a 5-year period. Settings and Design: Case notes of all PICU patients (n = 1298) were reviewed, revealing that 135 cases (10.4%) developed pneumothorax, and these were compared with those patients who did not. The most common tool for diagnosis used was chest X-ray followed by a clinical examination. Subjects and Methods: Case notes of 1298 patients admitted in PICU over 1-year study. Results: Patients with pneumothorax had higher mortality rate (P pediatric index of mortality 2 score on admission (P pediatric logistic organ dysfunction score (P patients without pneumothorax, ventilated patients who developed pneumothorax had a longer duration of MV care (P patients, especially in those on MV and emphasized the importance of the strict application of protective lung strategies among ventilated patients to minimize the risk of pneumothorax.

  17. The organizational context of ethical dilemmas: a role-playing simulation for the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strosberg, M A

    2001-01-01

    The allocation of health care resources often requires decision makers to balance conflicting ethical principles. The resource-constrained intensive care unit (ICU) provides an ideal setting to study how decision makers go about their balancing act in a complex and dynamic environment. The author presents a role-playing simulation exercise which models ICU admission and discharge decision making. Designed for the class-room, the simulation engages a variety of ethical, managerial, and public policy issues including end-of-life decision making, triage, and rationing. The simulation is based on a sequence of scenarios or "decision rounds" delineating conditions in the ICU in terms of disposition of ICU patients, number of available ICU beds, prognoses of candidates for admission, and other physiological and organizational information. Students, playing the roles of attending physician, hospital administrator, nurse manager, triage officer, and ethics committee member, are challenged to reach consensus in the context of multiple power centers and conflicting goals. An organization theory perspective, incorporated into the simulation, provides insight on how decisions are actually made and stimulates discussion on how decision making might be improved.

  18. Molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii in central intensive care unit in Kosova Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raka, Lul; Kalenć, Smilja; Bosnjak, Zrinka; Budimir, Ana; Katić, Stjepan; Sijak, Dubravko; Mulliqi-Osmani, Gjyle; Zoutman, Dick; Jaka, Arbëresha

    2009-12-01

    Infections caused by bacteria of genus Acinetobacter pose a significant health care challenge worldwide. Information on molecular epidemiological investigation of outbreaks caused by Acinetobacter species in Kosova is lacking. The present investigation was carried out to enlight molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii in the Central Intensive Care Unit (CICU) of a University hospital in Kosova using pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). During March - July 2006, A. baumannii was isolated from 30 patients, of whom 22 were infected and 8 were colonised. Twenty patients had ventilator-associated pneumonia, one patient had meningitis, and two had coinfection with bloodstream infection and surgical site infection. The most common diagnoses upon admission to the ICU were politrauma and cerebral hemorrhage. Bacterial isolates were most frequently recovered from endotracheal aspirate (86.7%). First isolation occurred, on average, on day 8 following admission (range 1-26 days). Genotype analysis of A. baumannii isolates identified nine distinct PFGE patterns, with predominance of PFGE clone E represented by isolates from 9 patients. Eight strains were resistant to carbapenems. The genetic relatedness of Acinetobacter baumannii was high, indicating cross-transmission within the ICU setting. These results emphasize the need for measures to prevent nosocomial transmission of A. baumannii in ICU. PMID:20464330

  19. The Living, Dynamic and Complex Environment Care in Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marli Terezinha Stein Backes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to understand the meaning of the Adult Intensive Care Unit environment of care, experienced by professionals working in this unit, managers, patients, families and professional support services, as well as build a theoretical model about the Adult Intensive Care Unit environment of care.METHOD: Grounded Theory, both for the collection and for data analysis. Based on theoretical sampling, we carried out 39 in-depth interviews semi-structured from three different Adult Intensive Care Units.RESULTS: built up the so-called substantive theory "Sustaining life in the complex environment of care in the Intensive Care Unit". It was bounded by eight categories: "caring and continuously monitoring the patient" and "using appropriate and differentiated technology" (causal conditions; "Providing a suitable environment" and "having relatives with concern" (context; "Mediating facilities and difficulties" (intervenienting conditions; "Organizing the environment and managing the dynamics of the unit" (strategy and "finding it difficult to accept and deal with death" (consequences.CONCLUSION: confirmed the thesis that "the care environment in the Intensive Care Unit is a living environment, dynamic and complex that sustains the life of her hospitalized patients".

  20. Direct and indirect nursing care time in an Intensive Care Unit1

    OpenAIRE

    Luciana Emi Kakushi; Yolanda Dora Martinez Évora

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to identify the direct and indirect nursing care time in an Intensive Care Unit. METHOD: a descriptive/exploratory study conducted at a private hospital. The Nursing Activities Score classification system was used to estimate the direct care time, and electronic health records were used to estimate the indirect care time. The data were collected from March to June 2011. RESULTS: the findings indicate that the average nursing care time was 29.5 hours, consisting of 27.4 hou...

  1. Posttraumatic stress disorder among spouses of patients discharged from the intensive care unit after six months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dithole, Kefalotse; Thupayagale-Tshweneagae, Gloria; Mgutshini, Tennyson

    2013-01-01

    The Intensive Care Unit (ICU) can be traumatic, not only for patients, but also their closest relatives, especially spouses. Within Botswana, a developing country with very few ICUs and not so sophisticated machinery or a generalised lack of counselling for relatives, the ICU experience can be more traumatic. This study reports on the proportion of spouses who continued to experience mental distress, including the incidence of posttraumatic stress disorder, at six months after the discharge of their spouse from an intensive care unit. Mixed data collected approaches were used on a convenience sample of 28 spouses of patients who had been hospitalised at the Princess Marina Hospital ICU, Gaborone, Botswana, in the six months prior to the interview sessions. Participants were interviewed six months after the discharge of their spouse from the Intensive Care Unit using the PCL-S (PTSD Checklist). All the patients had been mechanically ventilated and had been hospitalised in the ICU for more than three days. Fifteen spouses reported intrusive memories of ICU and avoided reminders of the experience six months later. Ten spouses reported feeling anxious for a short while after their spouse's discharge but that they had come to terms with the experience. In order to mitigate the trauma experienced by spouses the study suggests that pre- and post-counselling for close relatives, especially spouses, should be implemented at the point of hospitalisation, during admission, and after discharge for a period of at least six months. PMID:23301567

  2. Epidemiology of acute kidney injury in Hungarian intensive care units: a multicenter, prospective, observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bencsik Gabor

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the substantial progress in the quality of critical care, the incidence and mortality of acute kidney injury (AKI continues to rise during hospital admissions. We conducted a national, multicenter, prospective, epidemiological survey to evaluate the importance of AKI in intensive care units (ICUs in Hungary. The objectives of this study were to determine the incidence of AKI in ICU patients; to characterize the differences in aetiology, illness severity and clinical practice; and to determine the influencing factors of the development of AKI and the patients' outcomes. Methods We analysed the demographic, morbidity, treatment modality and outcome data of patients (n = 459 admitted to ICUs between October 1st, 2009 and November 30th, 2009 using a prospectively filled in electronic survey form in 7 representative ICUs. Results The major reason for ICU admission was surgical in 64.3% of patients and medical in the remaining 35.7%. One-hundred-twelve patients (24.4% had AKI. By AKIN criteria 11.5% had Stage 1, 5.4% had Stage 2 and 7.4% had Stage 3. In 44.0% of patients, AKI was associated with septic shock. Vasopressor treatment, SAPS II score, serum creatinine on ICU admission and sepsis were the independent risk factors for development of any stage of AKI. Among the Stage 3 patients (34 50% received renal replacement therapy. The overall utilization of intermittent renal replacement therapy was high (64.8%. The overall in-hospital mortality rate of AKI was 49% (55/112. The ICU mortality rate was 39.3% (44/112. The independent risk factors for ICU mortality were age, mechanical ventilation, SOFA score and AKI Stage 3. Conclusions For the first time we have established the incidence of AKI using the AKIN criteria in Hungarian ICUs. Results of the present study confirm that AKI has a high incidence and is associated with high ICU and in-hospital mortality.

  3. Post-traumatic pulmonary embolism in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabrouk Bahloul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the predictive factors, clinical manifestations, and the outcome of patients with post-traumatic pulmonary embolism (PE admitted in the intensive care unit (ICU. Methods: During a four-year prospective study, a medical committee of six ICU physicians prospectively examined all available data for each trauma patient in order to classify patients according to the level of clinical suspicion of pulmonary thromboembolism. During the study period, all trauma patients admitted to our ICU were classified into two groups. The first group included all patients with confirmed PE; the second group included patients without clinical manifestations of PE. The diagnosis of PE was confirmed either by a high-probability ventilation/perfusion (V/Q scan or by a spiral computed tomography (CT scan showing one or more filling defects in the pulmonary artery or its branches. Results: During the study period, 1067 trauma patients were admitted in our ICU. The diagnosis of PE was confirmed in 34 patients (3.2%. The mean delay of development of PE was 11.3 ± 9.3 days. Eight patients (24% developed this complication within five days of ICU admission. On the day of PE diagnosis, the clinical examination showed that 13 patients (38.2% were hypotensive, 23 (67.7% had systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, three (8.8% had clinical manifestations of deep venous thrombosis (DVT, and 32 (94% had respiratory distress requiring mechanical ventilation. In our study, intravenous unfractionated heparin was used in 32 cases (94% and low molecular weight heparin was used in two cases (4%. The mean ICU stay was 31.6 ± 35.7 days and the mean hospital stay was 32.7 ± 35.3 days. The mortality rate in the ICU was 38.2% and the in-hospital mortality rate was 41%. The multivariate analysis showed that factors associated with poor prognosis in the ICU were the presence of circulatory failure (Shock (Odds ratio (OR = 9.96 and thrombocytopenia (OR = 32

  4. What Does Change with Nutrition Team in Intensive Care Unit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Fatih Yılmaz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Intrroduction: Clinical nutrition is the nutrition support therapy provided to patients under medical supervision at the hospital or home setting. It is a multidisciplinary task performed under the control of the physician, dietician, pharmacist and nurse. In this study, the changes in the patient admission statistics to the general intensive care unit (GICU, the exitus ratios, decubitus ulcer formation rates, albumin use rates, duration of the hospital stay, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II scores, rate of usege of parenteral and enteral products, and the change in expenses per patient within the first year of activity of the nutrition team in comparison to the previous year was presented. Material and Method: In this study a 6-bed GICU was used. The patients who was admitted through retrospective file scanning between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2012 and between 1 January 2013 and 31 December 2013 were compared. Results: The number of the patients admitted to the GICU was 341 in 2012 and 369 in 2013. The number of the patients who died in 2012 was 86 (25.2%, while it was 106 in 2013 (28.7%. In 2012, 122 patients (35.7% had decubitus ulcers, while this number was 92 (24.7% in 2013. Human albumin usage was reduced by 23% for the 100 mL (225 in 2012, 175 in 2013 and by 33% for the 50 mL doses (122 in 2012, 82 in 2013. Duration of stay in the hospital was 6.3±0.9 vs. 5.8±0.9 (days (p=0.06. The mean APACHE II scores were observed to be 24.7±6.9 vs. 30.5±11.4 (p=0.03. When the distribution of product types were analyzed, it was observed that the ratio of parenteral products: enteral products was 2:1 in 2012, however the ratio of enteral products to parenteral products was 2:1 in 2013. The daily expense of a patient decreased from 100 TL to 55 TL. Conclusion: The nutrition team directly influences the clinical process outcomes of patients under treatment in the ICU. It was thought that using appropriate nutritional

  5. Quality of life after stay in surgical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro Maria A

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to mortality, Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL has increasingly been claimed as an important outcome variable. The aim of this study was to assess HRQOL and independence in activities of daily living (ADL six months after discharge from an Intensive Care Unit (ICU, and to study its determinants. Methods All post-operative adult patients admitted to a surgical ICU between October 2004 and July 2005, were eligible for the study. The following variables were recorded on admission: age, gender, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status (ASA-PS, type and magnitude of surgical procedure, ICU and hospital length of stay (LOS, mortality and Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II. Six months after discharge, a Short Form-36 questionnaire (SF-36 and a questionnaire to assess dependency in ADL were sent to all survivors. Descriptive statistics was used to summarize data. Patient groups were compared using non-parametric tests. A logistic regression analysis was performed to identify covariate effects of each variable on dependency in personal and instrumental ADL, and for the change-in-health question of SF-36. Results Out of 333 hospital survivors, 226 completed the questionnaires. Fifty-nine percent reported that their general level of health was better on the day they answered the questionnaire than 12 months earlier. Patients with greater co-morbidities (ASA-PS III/IV, had lower SF-36 scores in all domains and were more frequently dependent in instrumental and personal ADL. Logistic regression showed that SAPS II was associated with changes in general level of health (OR 1.06, 95%CI, 1.01 – 1.11, p = 0,016. Six months after ICU discharge, 60% and 34% of patients, respectively, were dependent in at least one activity in instrumental ADL (ADLI and personal ADL (ADLP. ASA-PS (OR 3.00, 95%CI 1.31 – 6.87, p = 0.009 and age (OR 2.36, 95%CI, 1.04 – 5.34, p = 0.04 were associated with dependency in

  6. Health care data in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, D P

    1983-06-01

    This article serves as an introduction to the following article, An Inventory of U.S. Health Care Data Bases. As an introduction, this article-reviews the characteristics of U.lS. Health Care Data. These characteristics include a lack of common definition and uniformity of reporting of observations, systems that are sometimes duplicative, and a resistance to data sharing on the part of collecting agencies, arising from the pluralistic American health care economy. Yet federal, state, and local governments as well as private organizations need health data to operate and evaluate their programs. Moreover, recent shifts to block grants and cutbacks in federal funding without accountability requirements will adversely affect our ability to adequately monitor the impact of these programs on the nation's health. The article discusses these data issues, but also emphasizes the need for coordination between the government and private sectors. PMID:10261971

  7. Effect of Magnesium Level to the Development of Delirium in Patients Under Sedation in Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zümrüt Ela Aslan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Delirium is a state not to be neglected which can cause severe consequences that is related to critical illness in intensive care unit with acute cerebral dysfunction. Magnesium (Mg plays an important role in many physiological events affecting the brain. In this study, we retrospectively investigated the incidence of delirium development and its relationship with the serum Mg levels. Material and Method: Patients who admitted to intensive care unit (ICU were divided in to two groups according to their serum Mg levels (0.7 normomagnesemia. Delirium was assessed using Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale and Confusion Assessment Method for ICU. We identified the duration of mechanical ventilation, applied sedation, age, gender, sepsis, shock, malignancy, ICU requirement after operation, admission SOFA score, admission APACHE II score, admission of Mg and mean Mg levels as secondary outcome measures whether they affected delirium incidence. Results: A total of 178 patients were assessed, 72 of them were found delirium positive. The incidence of delirium was found 45% in patients with hypomagnesaemia; this was found 25% in patients with normomagnesaemia. Duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU stay, and mortality rate were found higher in patients with delirium than those in individuals without delirium. Conclusion: We retrospectively investigated delirium incidence in critically ill patients and the percentage was found remarkably high. Our findings were parallel with the other studies that, delirium has a negative impact on morbidity and mortality rates.

  8. Reducing medication errors in the neonatal intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, J.; Lynch, R; Grant, J; Alroomi, L

    2004-01-01

    Background: Medication errors are common in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Various strategies to reduce errors have been described in adult and paediatric patients but there are few published data on their effect in the NICU.

  9. Infants in a neonatal intensive care unit: parental response

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, J; Mulder, R; Bartram, A; Darlow, B

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the psychosocial functioning of the parents (mother and father) of infants admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) with the parents of infants born at term and not admitted to the NICU.

  10. Health-related quality of life before planned admission to intensive care: memory over three and six months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadini Laura

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The validity of Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL recalled by ICU admitted patients have not been published. The aim of this study was to compare the baseline HRQOL measured before surgery and ICU admission with that recalled at 3 and 6 months in a population of patients with planned ICU admission after surgery. Methods This prospective study was performed in three Italian centres on patients who had undergone General, Orthopaedic or Urologic surgery. All adult patients with planned ICU admission between October 2007 and July 2008 were considered for enrolment. At hospital admission, the Mini Mental Status Examination and EuroQoL (EQ questionnaire (referring to the last two weeks were administered to the patients who consented. Three and six months after ICU admission, the researchers administered by phone the EQ questionnaire and Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome 14 questions Inventory, asking the patients to rate their HRQOL before surgery and ICU admission. Past medical history demographic and clinical ICU-related variables were collected. Statistical analysis Chi-square test and non parametric statistics were used to compare groups of patients. The EQ-5D was transformed in the time trade-off (TTO to obtain a continuous variable, subsequently analysed using the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC. Results Of the 104 patients assessed at baseline and discharged from the hospital, 93 had the EQ administered at 3 months, and 89 at 6 months. The ICC for TTO recalled at 3 months vs pre-ICU TTO was 0.851, and that for TTO recalled at 6 months vs pre-ICU TTO was 0.833. The ICC for the EQ-VAS recalled at 3 months vs pre-ICU EQ-VAS was 0.648, and that for the EQ-VAS recalled at 6 months vs pre-ICU EQ-VAS was 0.580. Forty-two (45% patients assessed at 3 months gave the same score in all EQ-5D items as at baseline. They underwent mainly orthopaedic surgery (p 0.011, and perceived the severity of their illness as lower (p 0

  11. Implementation of an electronic logbook for intensive care units.

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, Carrie J.; Stansfield, Dennis; Gibb Ellis, Kathryn A.; Clemmer, Terry P.

    2002-01-01

    Logbooks of patients treated in acute care units are commonly maintained; the data may be used to justify resource use, analyze patient outcomes, and encourage clinical research. We report herein the conversion of a paper-based logbook to an electronic logbook in three hospital intensive care units. The major difference between the paper logbook and electronic logbook data was the addition of clinician-entered data to the electronic logbook. Despite extensive computerization of patient inform...

  12. Pathophysiology of intensive care unit-acquired anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Fink, Mitchell P.

    2004-01-01

    The formation of red blood cells (RBCs) in the bone marrow is regulated by erythropoietin in response to a cascade of events. Anemia in the intensive care unit can be caused by a host of factors. Patients in the intensive care unit may have decreased RBC production and a blunted response to erythropoietin. Administration of recombinant human erythropoietin may stimulate erythropoiesis, increase hematocrit levels and hemoglobin concentration, and reduce the need for RBC transfusions.

  13. BURNOUT MIDWIVES WORKING IN NEONATAL INTESIVE CARE UNIT

    OpenAIRE

    Nanou, Christina; Gourounti, Kleanthi; Palaska, Ermioni; Mallidou, Anastasia; Sarantaki, Antigoni

    2015-01-01

    Abstract  Introduction: The considerably low proportion of midwives in closed wards in Greek hospitals in combination with the highly stressful environment may lead to burnout syndrome (BS).  Aim: It was to explore burnout syndrome (BS) that experience midwives working in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) and the factors associated with its' occurrence.  Methods: The sample studied consisted of midwives working in Νeonatal Intensive Care Unit in hospitals ...

  14. Respiratory virology and microbiology in intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østby, Anne-Cathrine; Gubbels, Sophie; Baake, Gerben;

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the frequency of 12 common respiratory viruses in patients admitted to intensive care units with respiratory symptoms, evaluate the clinical characteristics and to compare the results to routine microbiological diagnostics. Throat swabs from 122 intensive care-patients >18...

  15. Physical Therapy Intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Eilish; Garber, June

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Intervention section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy interventions presented in this path are evidence-based and the suggested timing of these interventions is primarily based on practice knowledge from expert…

  16. [The organization of a post-intensive care rehabilitation unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnay, Claire; Luauté, Jacques; Tell, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    When a patient is admitted to a post-intensive care rehabilitation unit, the functional outcome is the main objective of the care. The motivation of the team relies on strong cohesion between professionals. Personalised support provides a heightened observation of the patient's progress. Listening and sharing favour a relationship of trust between the patient, the team and the families. PMID:26365639

  17. [The difficulties of staff retention in neonatal intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deparis, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care units attract nurses due to the technical and highly specific nature of the work. However, there is a high turnover in these departments. Work-related distress and the lack of team cohesion are the two main causes of this problem. Support from the health care manager is essential in this context. PMID:26183101

  18. Perceptions of Appropriateness of Care Among European and Israeli Intensive Care Unit Nurses and Physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piers, Ruth D.; Azoulay, Elie; Ricou, Bara; Ganz, Freda DeKeyser; Decruyenaere, Johan; Max, Adeline; Michalsen, Andrej; Maia, Paulo Azevedo; Owczuk, Radoslaw; Rubulotta, Francesca; Depuydt, Pieter; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Reyners, Anna K.; Aquilina, Andrew; Bekaert, Maarten; Van den Noortgate, Nele J.; Schrauwen, Wim J.; Benoit, Dominique D.

    2011-01-01

    Context Clinicians in intensive care units (ICUs) who perceive the care they provide as inappropriate experience moral distress and are at risk for burnout. This situation may jeopardize patient quality of care and increase staff turnover. Objective To determine the prevalence of perceived inappropr

  19. Environmental Design for Patient Families in Intensive Care Units

    OpenAIRE

    Rashid, Mahbub

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to define the role of environmental design in improving family integration with patient care in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). It argues that it is necessary to understand family needs, experience and behavioral responses in ICUs to develop effective models for family integration. With its two components—the “healing culture” promoting effective relationships between caregivers and care seekers, and the “environmental design” supporting the healing culture—a “healin...

  20. Management practices and the quality of care in cardiac units

    OpenAIRE

    McConnell, K. John; Lindrooth, Richard C; Wholey, Douglas R; Maddox, Thomas M.; Bloom, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Importance:- To improve the quality of health care, many researchers have suggested that health care institutions adopt management approaches that have been successful in the manufacturing and technology sectors. However, relatively little information exists about how these practices are disseminated in hospitals and whether they are associated with better performance. Objectives:- To describe the variation in management practices among a large sample of hospital cardiac care units; asses...

  1. (Dis) connections between management and care in a surgical intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Borges, Maria Cristina Leite Araujo; Silva, Lucilane Maria Sales da

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to understand the perception of the nursing team on the (dis)connections between management actions and care performed by nurses in a surgical intensive care unit. Method: Exploratory research with qualitative approach carried out in a surgical intensive care unit of a hospital in the public net of Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Data was collected between March and July 2011, through semi-structured interviews and systematic observations, with 20 nursing ...

  2. Profile of Congenital Surgical Anomalies in Neonates Admitted to Tertiary Care Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Saurashtra Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zalak Shah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital surgical anomaly is a major indication for admission of a neonate to an intensive care unit. Profile of surgical conditions is variable by system affecting the neonate and outcomes of the individual conditions depending upon treatment and post surgical facilities. This study was undertaken to highlight the surgical conditions, their burden and their prognosis encountered in our newborn care unit. Methodology: This study is a cross sectional study. All information was collected from the case records of all neonates admitted in newborn care unit of our centre between 1st April, 2011 and 31st October, 2014 with congenital surgical conditions and the following information extracted: surgical condition, age, sex, maturity, birth weight, its treatment and outcome, and other associated features were studied. Result: A total of 9213 neonates were admitted in the study period, of which 328 neonates (3.6% had surgical conditions. Surgery was performed in 225 neonates. Commonest congenital surgical condition was of gastrointestinal tract (GIT. Commonest GIT anomalies were tracheo-oesophageal fistula (28.6%, intestinal obstruction (23.7%, anorectal malformation (17.9%, and omphalocoele (7%. The overall mortality in neonates with congenital surgical condition in this study was 51.2%. Significantly, more deaths occurred in preterm than in term neonates (P = 0.00003 and low birth weight babies more than normal weight (p=0.0002. Conclusion: High mortality is found in neonates suffering from surgical conditions. Commonest anomaly includes conditions of Gastrointestinal tract. Prematurity and low birth weight is a significant factor associated with high mortality. [Natl J Med Res 2016; 6(2.000: 168-170

  3. Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Concept Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Tahereh; Hadian Shirazi, Zahra; Sabet Sarvestani, Raheleh; Moattari, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The concept of family- centered care in neonatal intensive care unit has changed drastically in protracted years and has been used in various contexts differently. Since we require clarity in our understanding, we aimed to analyze this concept. Methods: This study was done on the basis of developmental approach of Rodgers’s concept analysis. We reviewed the existing literature in Science direct, PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, and Iran Medex databases from 1980 to 2012. The keywords were family-centered care, family-oriented care, and neonatal intensive care unit. After all, 59 out of 244 English and Persian articles and books (more than 20%) were selected. Results: The attributes of family-centered care in neonatal intensive care unit were recognized as care taking of family (assessment of family and its needs, providing family needs), equal family participation (participation in care planning, decision making, and providing care from routine to special ones), collaboration (inter-professional collaboration with family, family involvement in regulating and implementing care plans), regarding family’s respect and dignity (importance of families’ differences, recognizing families’ tendencies), and knowledge transformation (information sharing between healthcare workers and family, complete information sharing according to family learning style). Besides, the recognized antecedents were professional and management-organizational factors. Finally, the consequences included benefits related to neonate, family, and organization. Conclusion: The findings revealed that family centered-care was a comprehensive and holistic caring approach in neonatal intensive care. Therefore, it is highly recommended to change the current care approach and philosophy and provide facilities for conducting family-centered care in neonatal intensive care unit.  PMID:25349870

  4. Nutrition in the intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Weissman, Charles

    1999-01-01

    Nutritional support has become a routine part of the care of the critically ill patient. It is an adjunctive therapy, the main goal of which is to attenuate the development of malnutrition, yet the effectiveness of nutritional support is often thwarted by an underlying hostile metabolic milieu. This requires that these metabolic changes be taken into consideration when designing nutritional regimens for such patients. There is also a need to conduct large, multi-center studies to acquire more...

  5. Adherence to stress-related mucosal damage prophylaxis guideline in patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafinazari, Niloofar; Abbasi, Saeed; Farsaei, Shadi; Mansourian, Marjan; Adibi, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Concern about adverse effects of the inconsistent use of stress-related mucosal damage prophylaxis in intensive care unit (ICU) is increasing. Hence, this study was designed to prospectively evaluate the rate of inappropriate stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) administration upon ICU admission, at ICU discharge and determine the adherence to American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) guideline during ICU stay. Methods: In this study, 200 patients were randomly selected from all ICU admissions during 9 months. Risk factors of stress ulcer were recorded daily during ICU stay and appropriateness of SUP administration was assessed according to the ASHP criteria. Findings: Of all 160 (80%) patients who received SUP, 44.4% did not have indication; and among 95 patients with an indication for SUP administration, 6.3% did not receive it upon ICU admission. Consequently, 77 (38.5%) of 200 patients received inappropriate prophylaxis on ICU admission. In addition, 53.5% of patients had appropriate adherence to ASHP guideline during all days of ICU stay (44% and 2.5% of patients received SUP more than 120% and administration included both overutilization and underutilization in this ICU, but high prevalence of SUP overutilization caused unnecessary hospital costs, personal monetary burden, and may increase adverse drug reactions. Therefore, educating physicians and cooperation of clinical pharmacists regarding implementing standard protocols could improve patterns of SUP administration.

  6. Clinical risk assessment in intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Asefzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical risk management focuses on improving the quality and safety of health care services by identifying the circumstances and opportunities that put patients at risk of harm and acting to prevent or control those risks. The goal of this study is to identify and assess the failure modes in the ICU of Qazvin′s Social Security Hospital (Razi Hospital through Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA. Methods: This was a qualitative-quantitative research by Focus Discussion Group (FDG performed in Qazvin Province, Iran during 2011. The study population included all individuals and owners who are familiar with the process in ICU. Sampling method was purposeful and the FDG group members were selected by the researcher. The research instrument was standard worksheet that has been used by several researchers. Data was analyzed by FMEA technique. Results: Forty eight clinical errors and failure modes identified, results showed that the highest risk probability number (RPN was in respiratory care "Ventilator′s alarm malfunction (no alarm" with the score 288, and the lowest was in gastrointestinal "not washing the NG-Tube" with the score 8. Conclusions: Many of the identified errors can be prevented by group members. Clinical risk assessment and management is the key to delivery of effective health care.

  7. Acute Surgical Unit: a new model of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Michael R; Cook, Lyn; Dobson, Jennifer; Lambrakis, Paul; Ganesh, Shanthan; Cregan, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    The traditional on-call system for the management of acute general surgical admissions is inefficient and outdated. A new model, Acute Surgical Unit (ASU), was developed at Nepean Hospital in 2006. The ASU is a consultant-driven, independent unit that manages all acute general surgical admissions. The team has the same make up 7 days a week and functions the same every day, including weekends and public holidays. The consultant does a 24-h period of on-call, from 7 pm to 7 pm. They are on remote call from 7 pm to 7 am and are in the hospital from 7 am to 7 pm with their sole responsibility being to the ASU. The ASU has a day team with two registrars, two residents and a nurse practitioner. All patients are admitted and stay in the ASU until discharge or transfer to other units. Handover of the patients at the end of each day is facilitated by a comprehensive ASU database. The implementation of the ASU at Nepean Hospital has improved the timing of assessment by the surgical unit. There has been significant improvement in the timing of operative management, with an increased number and proportion of cases being done during daylight hours, with an associated reduction in the proportion of cases performed afterhours. There is greater trainee supervision with regard to patient assessment, management and operative procedures. There has been an improvement in the consultants' work conditions. The ASU provides an excellent training opportunity for surgical trainees, residents and interns in the assessment and management of acute surgical conditions. PMID:20618194

  8. Advising and Admission: Partners in Enrollment Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Joseph E.

    1987-01-01

    Focuses on marketing strategies for college admission and examines the essential interaction between admission and academic units as a means of enhancing retention and producing informed, satisfied consumers/students. (KS)

  9. Intensive care unit telemedicine: review and consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Joseph; Krsek, Cathleen; Vermoch, Kathy; Matuszewski, Karl

    2007-01-01

    Intensive care unit telemedicine involves nurses and physicians located at a remote command center providing care to patients in multiple, scattered intensive care units via computer and telecommunication technology. The command center is equipped with a workstation that has multiple monitors displaying real-time patient vital signs, a complete electronic medical record, a clinical decision support tool, a high-resolution radiographic image viewer, and teleconferencing for every patient and intensive care unit room. In addition to communication functions, the video system can be used to view parameters on ventilator screens, infusion pumps, and other bedside equipment, as well as to visually assess patient conditions. The intensivist can conduct virtual rounds, communicate with on-site caregivers, and be alerted to important patient conditions automatically via software-monitored parameters. This article reviews the technology's background, status, significance, clinical literature, financial effect, implementation issues, and future developments. Recommendations from a University HealthSystem Consortium task force are also presented. PMID:17656728

  10. Use of web services for computerized medical decision support, including infection control and antibiotic management, in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steurbaut, Kristof; Van Hoecke, Sofie; Colpaert, Kirsten; Lamont, Kristof; Taveirne, Kristof; Depuydt, Pieter; Benoit, Dominique; Decruyenaere, Johan; De Turck, Filip

    2010-01-01

    The increasing complexity of procedures in the intensive care unit (ICU) requires complex software services, to reduce improper use of antibiotics and inappropriate therapies, and to offer earlier and more accurate detection of infections and antibiotic resistance. We investigated whether web-based software can facilitate the computerization of complex medical processes in the ICU. The COSARA application contains the following modules: Infection overview, Thorax, Microbiology, Antibiotic therapy overview, Admission cause with comorbidity and admission diagnosis, Infection linking and registration, and Feedback. After the implementation and test phase, the COSARA software was installed on a physician's office PC and then on the bedside PCs of the patients. Initial evaluation indicated that the services had been integrated easily into the daily clinical workflow of the medical staff. The use of a service oriented architecture with web service technology for the development of advanced decision support in the ICU offers several advantages over classical software design approaches. PMID:20086264

  11. Acquired Muscle Weakness in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit: Nosology, Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Hassan; Moreno-Duarte, Ingrid; Latronico, Nicola; Zafonte, Ross; Eikermann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Muscle weakness is common in the surgical intensive care unit (ICU). Low muscle mass at ICU admission is a significant predictor of adverse outcomes. The consequences of ICU-acquired muscle weakness depend on the underlying mechanism. Temporary drug-induced weakness when properly managed may not affect outcome. Severe perioperative acquired weakness that is associated with adverse outcomes (prolonged mechanical ventilation, increases in ICU length of stay, and mortality) occurs with persistent (time frame: days) activation of protein degradation pathways, decreases in the drive to the skeletal muscle, and impaired muscular homeostasis. ICU-acquired muscle weakness can be prevented by early treatment of the underlying disease, goal-directed therapy, restrictive use of immobilizing medications, optimal nutrition, activating ventilatory modes, early rehabilitation, and preventive drug therapy. In this article, the authors review the nosology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and prevention of ICU-acquired weakness in surgical ICU patients.

  12. Acquired Muscle Weakness in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit: Nosology, Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Hassan; Moreno-Duarte, Ingrid; Latronico, Nicola; Zafonte, Ross; Eikermann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Muscle weakness is common in the surgical intensive care unit (ICU). Low muscle mass at ICU admission is a significant predictor of adverse outcomes. The consequences of ICU-acquired muscle weakness depend on the underlying mechanism. Temporary drug-induced weakness when properly managed may not affect outcome. Severe perioperative acquired weakness that is associated with adverse outcomes (prolonged mechanical ventilation, increases in ICU length of stay, and mortality) occurs with persistent (time frame: days) activation of protein degradation pathways, decreases in the drive to the skeletal muscle, and impaired muscular homeostasis. ICU-acquired muscle weakness can be prevented by early treatment of the underlying disease, goal-directed therapy, restrictive use of immobilizing medications, optimal nutrition, activating ventilatory modes, early rehabilitation, and preventive drug therapy. In this article, the authors review the nosology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and prevention of ICU-acquired weakness in surgical ICU patients. PMID:26445385

  13. Effects of early physiotherapy with respect to severity of pneumonia of elderly patients admitted to an intensive care unit: a single center study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigira, Yusuke; Takai, Tomoko; Igusa, Hironobu; Dobashi, Kunio

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] We performed early physiotherapy for elderly patients with pneumonia admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU), and examined the effects of this early physiotherapy on the severity of pneumonia. [Subjects and Methods] Patients for whom physiotherapy was started the day after admission to the ICU (acute phase) were assigned to the early intervention group and compared with patients in the standard intervention group. All patients were divided into three groups (Groups I, II, and III) based on the severity of pneumonia. We evaluated the ICU admission period, hospitalization period, and activities of daily living (ADL) before and after admission. [Results] With respect to the severity of pneumonia, Group II showed significant differences in the ICU admission period and rates of change in the operating range, cognitive domain, and Functional Independence Measure (FIM). Group III showed significant differences in the ICU admission period and rate of change in the cognitive domain (FIM item). The results were more favorable in the early intervention group than in the standard intervention group. [Conclusion] The ICU admission period was shorter and a reduction in the ADL level was prevented in Groups II, and III compared to Group I. This may have occurred because of the early rehabilitation. PMID:26311924

  14. Modeling Safety Outcomes on Patient Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Anita; Effken, Judith; Carley, Kathleen; Lee, Ju-Sung

    In its groundbreaking report, "To Err is Human," the Institute of Medicine reported that as many as 98,000 hospitalized patients die each year due to medical errors (IOM, 2001). Although not all errors are attributable to nurses, nursing staff (registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and technicians) comprise 54% of the caregivers. Therefore, it is not surprising, that AHRQ commissioned the Institute of Medicine to do a follow-up study on nursing, particularly focusing on the context in which care is provided. The intent was to identify characteristics of the workplace, such as staff per patient ratios, hours on duty, education, and other environmental characteristics. That report, "Keeping Patients Safe: Transforming the Work Environment of Nurses" was published this spring (IOM, 2004).

  15. The epidemiological profile of pediatric patients admitted to the general intensive care unit in an Ethiopian university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abebe T

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Teshome Abebe, Mullu Girmay, Girma G/Michael, Million Tesfaye Department of Anesthesia, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia Background: In least developing countries, there are few data on children's critical care. This makes the provision of aid and improvement of outcome difficult. Objectives: To describe admission and outcome patterns of children managed in a general intensive care unit at Jimma University Specialized Hospital (JUSH, Ethiopia, over a 5-year period. Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study design was used. All children from birth to 14 years of age who were admitted to the general ICU of the hospital from 2009–2013 were included. Patient charts and ICU documentation log were reviewed. Results: A total of 170 children were admitted to the ICU of JUSH over the study period. The greater share was taken by males (54.7%, with a male-to-female ratio of 1.2:1. The overall mortality rate was 40%. The majority of the children were in the age range of 10–14 years (38.8%. Of the total number of patients admitted, 34.7% were trauma cases, 45.8% of whom died. The highest percentage, 69.5%, of trauma patients were admitted for head injuries. Among the trauma cases, burn and polytrauma were the second and third leading causes (15.3% of admission. Postoperative patients and medical patients accounted for the rest of the admitted cases (28.2% and 27.6% of the cases respectively. Conclusion: The leading cause of admission and death was trauma. Postoperative and medical causes of admission were also significant. The mortality rate in the ICU was very high, and this could be due to various factors. Further research benchmarking and interventions are highly recommended. Keywords: trauma, critical care, pediatric, ICU, ventilation, oxygenation

  16. The outcomes of patients with severe dengue admitted to intensive care units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chin-Ming; Chan, Khee-Siang; Yu, Wen-Liang; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Chao, Hui-Chun; Yeh, Chiu-Yin; Lai, Chih-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Outcomes of adult patients with dengue infections requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admissions remain unclear. We assessed the clinical manifestations and prognostic factors of patients critically ill with severe dengue. This retrospective study was done in a tertiary referral hospital with 96 adult ICU beds. All of the patients with laboratory-confirmed severe dengue infections and admitted to the ICU were enrolled between July 31 and November 31, 2015, during the large outbreak period. The medical records of all the recruited patients were reviewed for the following information: age, gender, clinical manifestations, disease severity scores, underlying conditions, laboratory examinations, and outcomes. The primary endpoint was to find the predictors of ICU mortality. During the study period, 4787 patients with dengue infections required ICU admission. One hundred forty-three (2.99%) were critically ill (mean age: 69.7 years). Hypertension (n = 90, 62.9%) and diabetes mellitus (n = 70, 49.0%) were the 2 most common underlying diseases. Eighty critically ill patients (55.9%) had cobacterial infections, and 33 had cobacteremia. The hematologic system failed most often, followed by thoracic and cardiovascular systems. Fever was the most common presentation (n = 112; 78.3%), followed by anorexia (n = 47; 32.9%) and abdominal pain (n = 46; 32.2%). Overall, 33 patients died (mortality rate: 23.1%). Multivariate analysis showed that ICU mortality was significantly associated with lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores, lower platelet counts before ICU discharge, and more organ failures. The number of severe dengue patients who require ICU admission remains high. The mortality rate was associated with lower GCS scores, lower platelet counts, and more organ failures. In addition, more than half of the critically ill dengue patients had comorbid bacterial infections. PMID:27495047

  17. The outcomes of patients with severe dengue admitted to intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chin-Ming; Chan, Khee-Siang; Yu, Wen-Liang; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Chao, Hui-Chun; Yeh, Chiu-Yin; Lai, Chih-Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Outcomes of adult patients with dengue infections requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admissions remain unclear. We assessed the clinical manifestations and prognostic factors of patients critically ill with severe dengue.This retrospective study was done in a tertiary referral hospital with 96 adult ICU beds. All of the patients with laboratory-confirmed severe dengue infections and admitted to the ICU were enrolled between July 31 and November 31, 2015, during the large outbreak period. The medical records of all the recruited patients were reviewed for the following information: age, gender, clinical manifestations, disease severity scores, underlying conditions, laboratory examinations, and outcomes. The primary endpoint was to find the predictors of ICU mortality.During the study period, 4787 patients with dengue infections required ICU admission. One hundred forty-three (2.99%) were critically ill (mean age: 69.7 years). Hypertension (n = 90, 62.9%) and diabetes mellitus (n = 70, 49.0%) were the 2 most common underlying diseases. Eighty critically ill patients (55.9%) had cobacterial infections, and 33 had cobacteremia. The hematologic system failed most often, followed by thoracic and cardiovascular systems. Fever was the most common presentation (n = 112; 78.3%), followed by anorexia (n = 47; 32.9%) and abdominal pain (n = 46; 32.2%). Overall, 33 patients died (mortality rate: 23.1%). Multivariate analysis showed that ICU mortality was significantly associated with lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores, lower platelet counts before ICU discharge, and more organ failures.The number of severe dengue patients who require ICU admission remains high. The mortality rate was associated with lower GCS scores, lower platelet counts, and more organ failures. In addition, more than half of the critically ill dengue patients had comorbid bacterial infections. PMID:27495047

  18. Parental involvement and kangaroo care in European neonatal intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallás-Alonso, Carmen R; Losacco, Valentina; Maraschini, Alice;

    2012-01-01

    To compare, in a large representative sample of European neonatal intensive care units, the policies and practices regarding parental involvement and holding babies in the kangaroo care position as well as differences in the tasks mothers and fathers are allowed to carry out.......To compare, in a large representative sample of European neonatal intensive care units, the policies and practices regarding parental involvement and holding babies in the kangaroo care position as well as differences in the tasks mothers and fathers are allowed to carry out....

  19. Strengthening the admissions process in health care professional education: focus on a premier Pacific Island medical college

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Chinyere Ezeala

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Relying solely on measures of intellectual aptitude and academic performance in university admissions can be disadvantageous to underprivileged students. The Fiji School of Medicine primarily uses such measures to evaluate and select student applicants, and the introduction of supplementary assessments could provide better access for students from disadvantaged backgrounds. This study examined the need for supplementary assessments in the admission process, types of additional assessments needed, and stakeholders??views on a multi-entry multi-exit strategy currently in use at the Fiji School of Medicine. A survey of the key stakeholders was conducted in February and March 2012 using closed and open ended questionnaire. One hundred and twenty-two validated questionnaires were self-administered by key stakeholders from the College of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences (CMNHS and Fiji Ministries of Education and Health, with a response rate of 61%. Returned questionnaires were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. Sixty-five percent of respondents supported the introduction of supplementary assessments, 49% favoured admissions test, and 16% preferred assessing non-academic factors. Many respondents supported the School?占퐏 multi-entry multi-exit strategy as a ?占퐂ood policy??that provided ?占퐀lexibility??and opportunity for students, but should be better regulated. These findings demonstrate the need for supplementary assessments in the selection process and for continued support for the use of multi-entry multi-exit strategy at the school.

  20. Measurement of muscle strength in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Edward A; Martyn, Jeevendra A; George, Edward; Frontera, Walter R; Eikermann, Matthias

    2009-10-01

    Traditional (indirect) techniques, such as electromyography and nerve conduction velocity measurement, do not reliably predict intensive care unit-acquired muscle weakness and its clinical consequences. Therefore, quantitative assessment of skeletal muscle force is important for diagnosis of intensive care unit-acquired motor dysfunction. There are a number of ways for assessing objectively muscle strength, which can be categorized as techniques that quantify maximum voluntary contraction force and those that assess evoked (stimulated) muscle force. Important factors that limit the repetitive evaluation of maximum voluntary contraction force in intensive care unit patients are learning effects, pain during muscular contraction, and alteration of consciousness.The selection of the appropriate muscle is crucial for making adequate predictions of a patient's outcome. The upper airway dilators are much more susceptible to a decrease in muscle strength than the diaphragm, and impairment of upper airway patency is a key mechanism of extubation failure in intensive care unit patients. Data suggest that the adductor pollicis muscle is an appropriate reference muscle to predict weakness of muscles that are typically affected by intensive care unit-acquired weakness, i.e., upper airway as well as extremity muscles. Stimulated (evoked) force of skeletal muscles, such as the adductor pollicis, can be assessed repetitively, independent of brain function, even in heavily sedated patients during high acuity of their disease. PMID:20046117

  1. Anaesthesia for procedures in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chollet-Rivier, M; Chioléro, R L

    2001-08-01

    Taking in charge severely ill patients in the intensive care environment to manage complex procedures is a performance requiring highly specific knowledge. Close collaboration between anaesthetists and intensive care specialists is likely to improve the safety and quality of medical care. Three forms of anaesthetic care should be considered in clinical practice: sedation and analgesia; monitored anaesthetic care; and general anaesthesia or conduction block anaesthesia. Even in the field of sedation and analgesia, the anaesthesiologist can offer expertise on new anaesthetic techniques like: the most recent concepts of balanced anaesthesia in terms of pharmacokinetics and dynamics, favouring the use of short-acting agents and of sedative-opioid combinations. New modes of administration and monitoring intravenous anaesthesia have been developed, with potential application in the intensive care unit. These include the use of target-controlled administration of intravenous drugs, and of electroencephalographic signals to monitor the level of sedation.

  2. [Antibiotic multiresistance in critical care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pueyo, M J; Barcenilla-Gaite, F; Amaya-Villar, R; Garnacho-Montero, J

    2011-01-01

    The presence of microorganisms with acquired resistance to multiple antibiotics complicates the management and outcome of critically ill patients. The intensivist, in his/her daily activity, is responsible for the prevention and control of the multiresistance and the challenge of prescribing the appropriate treatment in case of an infection by these microorganisms. We have reviewed the literature regarding the definition, important concepts related to transmission, recommendations on general measures of control in the units and treatment options. We also present data on the situation in our country known primarily through the ENVIN-UCI register. Addressing the multiresistance not only requires training but also teamwork with other specialists and adaptation to the local environment. PMID:21215489

  3. Outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in the intensive care unit: a multi-level strategic management approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molter, G; Seifert, H; Mandraka, F; Kasper, G; Weidmann, B; Hornei, B; Öhler, M; Schwimmbeck, P; Kröschel, P; Higgins, P G; Reuter, S

    2016-02-01

    An outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAb) occurred in an interdisciplinary intensive care unit, affecting 10 patients. Within hours of recognition of the spread of CRAb an intervention team was instituted for collection of available data, decision-making, communication and monitoring of all interventions performed, including cohorting, temporary stop of admissions, staff education, and enforcement of infection control measures. An area was defined for cohortation of patients colonized with CRAb, with a separate nursing team and a second set of mobile equipment. New transmissions were no longer observed after only four days into the institution of enhanced infection control measures. PMID:26778130

  4. Roy in the postanesthesia care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, D A

    1990-06-01

    The adaptation model developed by Sister Callista Roy, RN, PhD, was used as the organizing framework for developing a preoperative assessment tool for PACU nurses. The purpose of preoperative assessment of a surgical patient by a PACU nurse is to determine the patient's location on the health-illness continuum. This is done by analyzing data regarding the patient's biopsychosocial needs, evaluating the data, and determining from that information what problems need intervention. Roy's theory advocates assessing the patient's biopsychosocial needs using four different adaptive modes: self-concept, physiological function, role function, and interdependence (level I assessment). After completing the PACU preoperative assessment tool, each mode in level I assessment is identified as either positive (adaptive) or negative (maladaptive) depending on the patient's behavior identified by the tool. If a maladaptive behavior is identified during the preoperative assessment, a level II assessment is made to collect data regarding focal, contextual, and residual stimuli. A nursing diagnosis, expected outcomes, nursing interventions, and evaluation are listed on the patient care plan based on the data obtained from the assessment.

  5. Acute gastrointestinal injury in the intensive care unit: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen HS

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available HuaiSheng Chen,1,* HuaDong Zhang,1,* Wei Li,1 ShengNan Wu,1 Wei Wang2 1Intensive Care Unit, 2Endocrinology Department, Second Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Shenzhen People’s Hospital, Shenzhen, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Acute gastrointestinal injury (AGI is a common problem in the intensive care unit (ICU. This study is a review of the gastrointestinal function of patients in critical care, with the aim to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of grading criteria developed by the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM Working Group on Abdominal Problems (WGAP. Methods: Data of patients who were admitted to the ICU of Shenzhen People’s Hospital, Shenzhen, People’s Republic of China, from January 2010 to December 2011 were reviewed. A total of 874 patients were included into the current study. Their sex, age, ICU admissive causes, complication of diabetes, AGI grade, primary or secondary AGI, mechanical ventilation (MV, and length of ICU stay (days were recorded as risk factors of death. These risk factors were studied by unconditioned logistic regression analysis. Results: All the risk factors affected mortality rate. Unconditional logistic regression analysis revealed that the mortality rate of secondary AGI was 71 times higher than primary AGI (odds ratio [OR] 4.335, 95% CI [1.652, 11.375]. When the age increased by one year, the mortality probability would increase fourfold. Mortality in patients with MV was 63-fold higher than for patients with non-MV. Mortality rate increased 0.978 times with each additional day of ICU stay. Conclusion: Secondary AGI caused by severe systemic conditions can result in worsened clinical outcomes. The 2012 ESICM WGAP AGI recommendations were to some extent feasible and effective in guiding clinical practices, but the grading system lacked the support of objective laboratory outcomes. Keywords: critical care, acute

  6. Measuring technical efficiency of output quality in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junoy, J P

    1997-01-01

    Presents some examples of the implications derived from imposing the objective of maximizing social welfare, subject to limited resources, on ethical care patients management in respect of quality performance of health services. Conventional knowledge of health economics points out that critically ill patients are responsible for increased use of technological resources and that they receive a high proportion of health care resources. Attempts to answer, from the point of view of microeconomics, the question: how do we measure comparative efficiency in the management of intensive care units? Analyses this question through data from an international empirical study using micro-economic measures of productive efficiency in public services (data envelopment analysis). Results show a 28.8 per cent level of technical inefficiency processing data from 25 intensive care units in the USA. PMID:10169231

  7. Neonatal intensive care unit lighting: update and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Roberto G; Pattini, Andrea E

    2016-08-01

    Achieving adequate lighting in neonatal intensive care units is a major challenge: in addition to the usual considerations of visual performance, cost, energy and aesthetics, there appear different biological needs of patients, health care providers and family members. Communicational aspects of light, its role as a facilitator of the visual function of doctors and nurses, and its effects on the newborn infant physiology and development were addressed in order to review the effects of light (natural and artificial) within neonatal care with a focus on development. The role of light in regulating the newborn infant circadian cycle in particular and the therapeutic use of light in general were also reviewed. For each aspect, practical recommendations were specified for a proper well-lit environment in neonatal intensive care units. PMID:27399015

  8. Perception of nurses regarding risk classification in emergency care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Lúcia Mottin Duro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess nurses’ perception regarding the risk classification in emergency care units. It is a descriptive study that used a qualitative approach and that was conducted with 55 nurses from emergency care units in the south of Brazil. Data were collected between July and October, 2011, through open questions, answered in writing. The data collected were submitted to the thematic analysis technique. Results indicate that the risk classification contributes to the organization of the service flow provided to patients, intervening in severe cases and preventing sequelae. Difficulties were described, such as: inadequate physical installations, overcrowding, disagreement in the definition of priorities among doctors and nurses and lack of articulation between the emergency care network and basic health care. It is highlighted the need to improve the physical structure, the quantity of human resources and the implementation of public policies to overcome these challenges.

  9. Developing a team performance framework for the intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Reader, Tom W; Flin, Rhona; Mearns, Kathryn; Cuthbertson, Brian H

    2009-01-01

    Objective: There is a growing literature on the relationship between teamwork and patient outcomes in intensive care, providing new insights into the skills required for effective team performance. The purpose of this review is to consolidate the most robust findings from this research into an intensive care unit (ICU) team performance framework. Data Sources: Studies investigating teamwork within the ICU using PubMed, Science Direct, and Web of Knowledge databases. Study Selection: Studies i...

  10. Symptomatic and asymptomatic candidiasis in a pediatric intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Arslankoylu Ali Ertug; Kuyucu Necdet; Yilmaz Berna; Erdogan Semra

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction This study aimed to examine the incidence, epidemiology, and clinical characteristics of symptomatic and asymptomatic candidiasis in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU), and to determine the risk factors associated with symptomatic candidiasis. Methods This retrospective study included 67 patients from a 7-bed PICU in a tertiary care hospital that had Candida-positive cultures between April 2007 and July 2009. Demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients, ...

  11. Correlation of APACHE II and SOFA scores with length of stay in various surgical intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milić, Morena; Goranović, Tatjana; Holjevac, Jadranka Katancić

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of using Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score as the predictors of length of stay (LOS) in various surgical intensive care units (ICUs) and to test the hypothesis that the significance of scoring for predicting LOS is greater in specialized surgical ICUs. We scored patients in a non-specialized general surgical ICU (n = 328) and in a specialized cardiosurgical ICU (n = 158) consecutively on admission (APACHE II-1st day; SOFA-1st day) and on third day of stay (APACHE II-3rd day; SOFA-3rd day) in a 4-month period. LOS and APACHE II/SOFA scores were significantly correlated both on admission and on third day of stay in the general surgical ICU (APACHE II-1st day r = 0.289; SOFA-1st day r = 0.306; APACHE II-3rd day r = 0.728; SOFA-3rd day r = 0.725). LOS and APACHE II on admission were not significantly correlated in the cardiosurgical ICU (APACHE II-1st day r = 0.092), while SOFA on admission and APACHE II and SOFA on third day were significantly correlated (SOFA-1st day r = 0.258; APACHE II-3rd day r = 0.716; SOFA-3rd day r = 0.719). Usefulness of scoring for predicting LOS in ICU varied between different surgical ICUs. Contrary to our hypothesis, scoring had greater value for predicting LOS in the non-specialized general surgical ICU. APACHE II score on admission had no value for predicting LOS in the cardiosurgical ICU.

  12. Economic analysis of the cost of Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazetas D.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The cost of Intensive Care Units has the greatest impact on overall medical costs and the overall cost for the health of a country and an increasing number of studies from around the world presenting the quantification of these costs. Aim: Review of the Economic Analysis of the Cost of Intensive Care Units. Method: Search was made in the SCOPUS, MEDLINE and CINAHL databases using the key-words “Intensive Care Units (ICU”, “Cost”, “Cost Analysis”, “Health Care Costs”, “Health Resources”, “ICU resources”. The study was based on articles published in English from 2000 to 2011 investigating the Economic Analysis of the Cost of Intensive Care Units. Results: The cost of ICU is a significant percentage of gross domestic product in developed countries. Most cost analysis studies that relate to plans that include the study of staff costs, duration of stay in the ICU, the clinical situations of hospitalized patients, engineering support, medications and diagnostic tests costing scales and in relation to the diagnostic criteria. Conclusions: most studies conclude that the remuneration of staff, particularly nurses, in the ICU is the largest cost of ICU, while for the duration of stay in the ICU results are conflicting. The analysis on the cost-effectiveness of ICU can help to better apply these findings to the therapeutic context of ICU.

  13. Oral care in patients on mechanical ventilation in intensive care unit: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Atay

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available intensive care patients needs to oral assessment and oral care for avoid complications caused by orafarengeal bacteria. In this literature review, it is aimed to determine the practice over oral hygiene in mechanical ventilator patients in intensive care unit. For the purpose of collecting data, Medline/pub MED and EBSCO HOST databases were searched with the keywords and lsquo;oral hygiene, oral hygiene practice, mouth care, mouth hygiene, intubated, mechanical ventilation, intensive care and critical care and rdquo; between the years of 2000- 2012. Inclusion criteria for the studies were being performed in adult intensive care unit patients on mechanical ventilation, published in peer-reviewed journals in English between the years of 2000-2012, included oral care practice and presence of a nurse among researchers. A total of 304 articles were identified. Six descriptive evaluation studies, three randomised controlled trials, four literature reviews, three meta-Analysis randomized clinical trials, one qualitative study and one semi-experimental study total 18 papers met all of the inclusion criteria. Oral care is emphasized as an infection control practice for the prevention of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP. In conclusion, we mention that oral care is an important nursing practice to prevent VAP development in intensive care unit patients; however, there is no standard oral evaluation tool and no clarity on oral care practice frequency, appropriate solution and appropriate material. It can be recommended that the study projects on oral care in intensive care patients to have high proof level and be experimental, and longitudinal. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(3.000: 822-829

  14. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Nienke L; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; van Duijn, Pleun J; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to classical infection prevention protocols and surveillance programs, counterintuitive interventions, such as selective decontamination with antibiotics and antibiotic rotation have been applied and investigated to control the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review provides an overview of selective oropharyngeal and digestive tract decontamination, decolonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic rotation as strategies to modulate antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit.

  15. Acinetobacter septicemia in neonates admitted to intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal B Shete

    2009-01-01

    Results: A total of 26 Acinetobacter septicemia cases were identified by blood culture. Acb complex strains predominated. Institutional birth and preterm birth were identified as the most frequent significant risk factors. 11.3% mortality rate was recorded. Acb complex strains exhibited a multi-drug resistant pattern. No carbapenem resistance was observed. Conclusion: Acinetobacter should be added to the list of organisms causing severe nosocomial infection in neonatal intensive care units. Continuous bacteriological surveillance, implementation of infection control policies, careful disinfection of intensive care equipment, and rational antibiotic use are required for control of such infections.

  16. [Systematization of nursing assistance in critical care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truppel, Thiago Christel; Meier, Marineli Joaquim; Calixto, Riciana do Carmo; Peruzzo, Simone Aparecida; Crozeta, Karla

    2009-01-01

    This is a methodological research, which aimed at organizing the systematization of nursing assistance in a critical care unit. The following steps were carried out: description of the nursing practice; transcription of nursing diagnoses; elaboration of a protocol for nursing diagnosis based in International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP); determination of nursing prescriptions and the elaboration of guidelines for care and procedures. The nursing practice and care complexity in ICU were characterized. Thus, systematization of nursing assistance is understood as a valuable tool for nursing practice.

  17. [Epidemiology of nosocomial bacterial infection in a neonatal intensive care unit in Morocco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maoulainine, F-M-R; Elidrissi, N-S; Chkil, G; Abba, F; Soraa, N; Chabaa, L; Amine, M; Aboussad, A

    2014-09-01

    In neonatal intensive care units, the incidence of nosocomial infection is high. This study aimed to determine the epidemiology of a nosocomial bacterial infection in the neonatal intensive care unit of Mohamed VI university hospital. A total of 702 newborns were included in this study. Of the 702 neonates studied, 91 had developed a nosocomial infection. The incidence rate was 13% and incidence density was 21.2 per 1000 patient-days. The types of infection were: bloodstream infections (89%), pneumonia (6.6%), meningitis (3.3%), and urinary tract infections (1.1%). Nosocomial infection was particularly frequent in cases of low birth weight, prematurity, young age at admission, umbilical venous catheter, and mechanical ventilation. Multiresistant bacteria included enterobacteria producing betalactamase (76.9%), especially enterobacteria that were dominated by Klebsiella pneumoniae (39.7%). The mortality rate was 52.7% in nosocomial infections, 19 (20.87%) of whom had septic shock. The results of this study show that nosocomial infection is an intrahospital health problem that could be remedied by a prevention strategy.

  18. Patients with hypertensive crises who are admitted to a coronary care unit: clinical characteristics and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Pacheco, Héctor; Morales Victorino, Neisser; Núñez Urquiza, Juan Pablo; Altamirano Castillo, Alfredo; Juárez Herrera, Ursulo; Arias Mendoza, Alexandra; Azar Manzur, Francisco; Briseño de la Cruz, Jose Luis; Martínez Sánchez, Carlos

    2013-03-01

    Patients with hypertensive crises, especially hypertensive emergencies, require immediate admittance to an intensive care unit for rapid blood pressure (BP) control. The authors analyzed the prevalence of hypertensive crisis, the clinical characteristics, and the evolution of patients with hypertensive emergencies and urgencies. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to their BP values: group I, predominant systolic hypertension (≥180/≤119 mm Hg); group II, severe systolic and diastolic hypertension (≥180/≥120 mm Hg); and group III, predominant diastolic hypertension (≤179/≥120 mm Hg). Of all of the patients admitted to a coronary care unit, 538 experienced a hypertensive crisis, which represented 5.08% of all admissions. Hypertensive emergency was predominant in 76.6% of the cases, which corresponded to acute coronary syndrome and acute decompensated heart failure in 59.5% and 25.2% of the cases, respectively. A pattern of predominant systolic hypertension (≥180/≤119 mm Hg) was most commonly observed in the hypertensive crisis group (71.4%) and the hypertensive emergency group (72.1%). The medications that were most commonly used at onset included intravenous vasodilators (nitroglycerin in 63.4% and sodium nitroprusside in 16.4% of the patients). The overall mortality rate was 3.7%. The mortality rate was 4.6% for hypertensive emergency cases and 0.8% for hypertensive urgencies cases.

  19. Ventilator-associated pneumonia: A persistent healthcare problem in Indian Intensive Care Units!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashu Sara Mathai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is the most common nosocomial infection acquired by patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU. However, there are scarce clinical data, particularly from Indian ICUs on the occurrence of this infection. Aims: To collect data on the incidence, microbiological profile, and outcomes of patients with VAP. Settings and Design: Tertiary level, medical-surgical ICU; prospective, observational study. Subjects and Methods: All patients who were mechanically ventilated for >48 h in the ICU during the study were enrolled. VAP was diagnosed according to the Centre for Disease Control (CDC criteria. Results: A total of 95 (38% patients developed VAP infections, an incidence of 40.1 VAP infections/1000 mechanical ventilation days. These were predominantly caused by Gram-negative organisms, especially the Acinetobacter species (58 isolates, 53.2%. Many of the VAP-causing isolates (27.3% demonstrated multidrug resistance. Patients with VAP infections experienced a significantly longer ICU stay (13 days [Interquartile Range (IQ range = 10-21] vs. 6 days [IQ = 4-8], P 60 years and those with higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores at admission had significantly greater mortality rates if they acquired a VAP infection (P = 0.010. Conclusions: VAP continues to be a major threat to patients who are admitted for mechanical ventilation into the critical care unit, emphasizing the urgent need for infection control measures.

  20. Education of trainees in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croley, W Christopher; Rothenberg, David M

    2007-02-01

    The focus on improving education in critical care medicine must begin early in medical school training and further be promoted during residency if there is to be an increase in intensivists in the hospital workforce. This is "critical" to healthcare reform movements that are endorsing full-time critical care coverage in U.S. urban intensive care units. There is, therefore, a need for more novel approaches in educating trainees in critical care medicine to better prepare future physicians to manage acutely ill patients and improve patient safety. This article will review methods to improve educational designs in teaching critical care medicine to medical students, residents, and fellows, including the use of simulation technology to enhance cognition and procedural skills. PMID:17242600

  1. Oropharyngeal or gastric colonization and nosocomial pneumonia in adult intensive care unit patients. A prospective study based on genomic DNA analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Garrouste-Orgeas, Maïté; Chevret, S; Arlet, G; Marie, O.; Rouveau, M.; Popoff, N.; Schlemmer, B

    1997-01-01

    Colonization of the digestive tract has been supposed to be the source of many hospital-acquired infections, especially nosocomial pneumonia. To assess the relationship between oropharyngeal and gastric colonization and subsequent occurrence of nosocomial pneumonia, we prospectively studied 86 ventilated, intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Oropharyngeal or gastric colonizations were detected and quantified on admission and twice weekly during ICU stay. When nosocomial pneumonia was suspected...

  2. Effects of early physiotherapy with respect to severity of pneumonia of elderly patients admitted to an intensive care unit: a single center study in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Chigira, Yusuke; Takai, Tomoko; Igusa, Hironobu; Dobashi, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] We performed early physiotherapy for elderly patients with pneumonia admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU), and examined the effects of this early physiotherapy on the severity of pneumonia. [Subjects and Methods] Patients for whom physiotherapy was started the day after admission to the ICU (acute phase) were assigned to the early intervention group and compared with patients in the standard intervention group. All patients were divided into three groups (Groups I, II, and III) ...

  3. The Leapfrog initiative for intensive care unit physician staffing and its impact on intensive care unit performance: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperino, James

    2011-10-01

    The field of critical care has changed markedly in recent years to accommodate a growing population of chronically critically ill patients. New administrative structures have evolved to include divisions, departments, and sections devoted exclusively to the practice of critical care medicine. On an individual level, the ability to manage complex multisystem critical illnesses and to introduce invasive monitoring devices defines the intensivist. On a systems level, critical care services managed by an intensivist-led multidisciplinary team are now recognized by their ability to efficiently utilize hospital resources and improve patient outcomes. Due to the numerous cost and quality issues related to the delivery of critical care medicine, intensive care unit physician staffing (IPS) has become a charged subject in recent years. Although the federal government has played a large role in regulating best practices by physicians, other third parties have entered the arena. Perhaps the most influential of these has been The Leapfrog Group, a consortium representing 130 employers and 65 Fortune 500 companies that purchase health care for their employees. This group has proposed specific regulatory guidelines for IPS that are purported to result in substantial cost containment and improved quality of care. This narrative review examines the impact of The Leapfrog Group's recommendations on critical care delivery in the United States.

  4. A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF CLINICAL DIAGNOSIS, PREDICTABILITY AND FETO MATERNAL OUTCOME IN A CRITICAL PATIENT S ADMITTED IN OBSTETRIC INTENSIVE CARE UNIT IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayasree

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Care of the critically ill parturient is a unique challenge in obstetrics particularly because of its unpredictability. Hemorrhage , toxemia , anemia and septicemia are common causes of mortality and morbidity in these patients. Obstetric critical care in developing countries continues to be ra dically different from developed countries. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To analyze all cases of critically ill obstetric patients admitted to an obstetric intensive care unit in relation to causes for admissions, interventions required, course during their ICU st ay and fetal maternal outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS : A one year retrospective analysis of all obstetric admissions to the ICU at our referral hospital was conducted, observations made and results were analyzed . RESULTS AND ANALYSIS : There were 24 ICU admi ssions with mean age of 25.21±4.075 years and mean gestational age of 36.04±3.862 weeks. Postpartum admissions were significantly higher (83.33%, n=20, P <0.05 with more patients presenting with obstetric complications (91.66%, n=22, P <0.01 as compared to medical complications (8.32%, n=2. Obstetric hemorrhage (n=15, 62.5% and hemodynamic instability (n=20, 83.33% were considered to be significant risk factors for ICU admission ( P =0.000. Inotropic support was required in 22 patients (91.66% while 17 p atients (70.83% required ventilatory support. The mean duration of ventilation (30.17±21.65 h and ICU stay (39.42±33.70 h were of significantly longer duration in survivors ( P =0.01, P =0.00 respectively versus non - survivors. The observed mortality n=10, 41.67% was significantly higher since ours is a referral tertiary center and delay in reaching the tertiary center from the place of occurrence of the mishap is a usual occurrence. CONCLUSION: Obstetric hemorrhage leading to hemodynamic instability remains the leading cause of ICU admissions and maternal mortality.

  5. Prevalence of Hospital Acquired Infections in Anesthesiology Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    ÇELİK, İlhami; İNCİ, Nuran; Denk, Affan; SEVİM, Erol; YAŞAR, Demet; YAŞAR, M. Akif

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of infections, predominant organisms and their resistance pattern. Materials and Methods: Prospective cohort study. All patients over 16 years old were occupying an intensive care unit bed over a 24-hour period. All patients admitted to the unit were evaluated on a daily basis for nosocomial infections in compliance with National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System (NNISS) methodology. Infection site definitions were in agreement with Center fo...

  6. Off hour admission to an intensivist-led ICU is not associated with increased mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Meynaar; J.I. van der Spoel; J.H. Rommes; M. van Spreuwel-Verheijen; R.J. Bosman; P.E. Spronk

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Caring for the critically ill is a 24-hour-a-day responsibility, but not all resources and staff are available during off hours. We evaluated whether intensive care unit (ICU) admission during off hours affects hospital mortality. Methods This retrospective multicentre cohort study was

  7. Caregiver distress. Related to disruptive behaviors on special care units versus traditional long-term care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, J I; Stewart, N J; Richardson, J S

    1999-03-01

    The link between staff stress and exposure to disruptive behaviors is an important issue in long-term care settings. This study compared the perceptions of two groups of formal caregivers (staff) regarding their distress from the behaviors of residents in their care. Staff on special care units for dementia were less distressed with disruptive behaviors than comparable staff on traditional units, although they reported higher exposure to these behaviors. These results were related to different perceptions of intent to harm and expectations of physical aggression as "part of the job." Implications for nursing include education and support for staff to enhance the quality of life for residents and staff on units where disruptive behaviors occur. PMID:10362970

  8. IMBALANCES IN PROTEIN METABOLISM IN CRITICAL CARE PATIENT WITH SYSTEMIC INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE SYNDROME AT ADMISSION IN INTENSIVE CARE UNIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouharras El Idrissi, Hicham; Molina López, Jorge; Pérez Moreno, Irene; Florea, Daniela Ioana; Lobo Támer, Gabriela; Herrera-Quintana, Lourdes; Pérez De La Cruz, Antonio; Rodríguez Elvira, Manuel; Planells Del Pozo, Elena María

    2015-12-01

    Antecedentes: el trauma y las infecciones severas causan cambios metabólicos notables en los pacientes con SRIS como una respuesta adaptativa dirigida a controlar la enfermedad subyacente, la reparación del tejido dañado y para sintetizar sustratos. Si el ataque es intenso y sostenido y el paciente tiene un estado nutricional comprometido puede evolucionar a insuficiencia orgánica múltiple y muerte. Objetivo: evaluación del estado nutricional proteico y la participación de las proteínas y los factores inflamatorios en pacientes críticamente enfermos. Método: estudio analítico observacional multicéntrico en pacientes enfermos críticos en la admisión en la UCI. Resultados y discusión: los pacientes mostraron alteraciones en los parámetros nutricionales clínicos que confirman su situación hipercatabólica, mostrando malnutrición a la admisión en UCI, donde el 42,9% tenían niveles plasmáticos de prealbúmina por debajo de la referencia. Los aminoácidos se encuentran por debajo de los valores de referencia y el 99% de los pacientes presentaron bajos niveles plasmáticos de transferrina. Se observaron diferencias significativas en los niveles de proteína total, ferritina y transferrina ajustados por los niveles de PCR, siendo mayor cuando los pacientes presentaron altos valores de inflamación, en el caso de la ferritina, y lo opuesto para el resto de parámetros. Al estratificar por las puntuaciones APACHE y SOFA de acuerdo a la gravedad baja, media y alta, los resultados mostraron diferencias significativas en creatinina, urea y transferrina, siendo menor cuanto mayor era el grado de severidad para la transferrina. Conclusión: la enfermedad crítica se caracteriza por un alto grado de estrés y la degradación acelerada de proteínas que causan malnutrición, inflamación sistémica y la disfunción de órganos, con una asociación significativa entre albúmina, ferritina y transferrina.

  9. Decreasing Psychiatric Admission Wait Time in the Emergency Department by Facilitating Psychiatric Discharges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, Pamela R; Harpin, Scott

    2015-12-01

    Limited capacity in a psychiatric unit contributes to long emergency department (ED) admission wait times. Regulatory and accrediting agencies urge hospitals nationally to improve patient flow for better access to care for all types of patients. The purpose of the current study was to decrease psychiatric admission wait time from 10.5 to 8 hours and increase the proportion of patients discharged by 11 a.m. from 20% to 50%. The current study compared pre- and post-intervention data. Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles aimed to improve discharge processes and timeliness through initiation of new practices. Admission wait time improved to an average of 5.1 hours (t = 3.87, p = 0.006). The proportion of discharges occurring by 11 a.m. increased to 46% (odds ratio = 3.42, p planning processes and timeliness in a psychiatric unit significantly decreased admission wait time from the ED, improving access to psychiatric care. PMID:26505524

  10. Documentation of best interest by intensivists: a retrospective study in an Ontario critical care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scales Damon C

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intensive care physicians often must rely on substitute decision makers to address all dimensions of the construct of "best interest" for incapable, critically ill patients. This task involves identifying prior wishes and to facilitate the substitute decision maker's understanding of the incapable patient's condition and their likely response to treatment. We sought to determine how well such discussions are documented in a typical intensive care unit. Methods Using a quality of communication instrument developed from a literature search and expert opinion, 2 investigators transcribed and analyzed 260 handwritten communications for 105 critically ill patients who died in the intensive care unit between January and June 2006. Cohen's kappa was calculated before analysis and then disagreements were resolved by consensus. We report results on a per-patient basis to represent documented communication as a process leading up to the time of death in the ICU. We report frequencies and percentages for discrete data, median (m and interquartile range (IQR for continuous data. Results Our cohort was elderly (m 72, IQR 58-81 years and had high APACHE II scores predictive of a high probability of death (m 28, IQR 23-36. Length of stay in the intensive care unit prior to death was short (m 2, IQR 1-5 days, and withdrawal of life support preceded death for more than half (n 57, 54%. Brain death criteria were present for 18 patients (17%. Although intensivists' communications were timely (median 17 h from admission to critical care, the person consenting on behalf of the incapable patient was explicitly documented for only 10% of patients. Life support strategies at the time of communication were noted in 45% of charts, and options for their future use were presented in 88%. Considerations relevant to determining the patient's best interest in relation to the treatment plan were not well documented. While explicit survival estimates were

  11. Human-centered environment design in intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; Albayrak, A.; Goossens, R.H.M.; Xiao, D.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Because of high risk and instability of the patients in Intensive care unit(ICU), the design of ICU is very difficult. ICU design, auxiliary building design, lighting design, noise control and other aspects can also enhance its management. In this paper, we compare ICU design in China and Holland ba

  12. Importance of recognizing and managing delirium in intensive care unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Guo-hao; FANG Xiang-ming

    2009-01-01

    @@ Delirium is an acute and fluctuating change in mental status, with inattention and altered levels of consciousness. It is a common comorbidity in intensive care units (ICU), resulting in delayed withdrawal of mechanical ventilation, prolonged length of stay in ICU, increased ICU mortality and impaired long-term cognitive function of the survivors.

  13. Pet Care Teaching Unit: 1st-3rd Grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peninsula Humane Society, San Mateo, CA.

    Activities in this unit are designed to familiarize primary grade students with the responsibilities involved in pet ownership. Teaching plans are provided for a total of 12 lessons involving social studies, language arts, math, and health sciences. Activities adaptable for readers and non-readers focus on pet overpopulation, care of pets when…

  14. [Benefits of aromatherapy in dementia special care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilien, Corinne; Depas, Nathalie; Delaporte, Ghislaine; Baptiste, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Aromatherapy is classed as a non-pharmacological treatment, recognised as a therapy for certain disorders. This practice was the subject of a study in a special care unit for patients with dementia. The objective was to demonstrate the benefit of aromatherapy diffusion on major behavioural disorders. PMID:27173630

  15. Sleep in the Intensive Care Unit measured by polysomnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J H; Boesen, Hans Christian Toft; Olsen, Karsten Skovgaard

    2013-01-01

    Sleep deprivation has deleterious effects on most organ systems. Patients in the Intensive care unit (ICU) report sleep deprivation as the second worst experience during their stay only superseded by pain. The aim of the review is to provide the clinician with knowledge of the optimal sleep-frien...

  16. Glucocorticoid-induced myopathy in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eddelien, Heidi Shil; Hoffmeyer, Henrik Westy; Lund, Eva Charlotte Løbner;

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are used for intensive care unit (ICU) patients on several indications. We present a patient who was admitted to the ICU due to severe respiratory failure caused by bronchospasm requiring mechanical ventilation and treated with methylprednisolone 240 mg/day in addition to ant......, and muscle strength gradually returned. The patient made full recovery from the quadriplegia a few months later....

  17. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, Nienke L.; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; Van Duijn, Pleun J.; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to cl

  18. Increasing fungal infections in the intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pauw, B.E. de

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Yeasts and molds now rank among the most common pathogens in intensive care units. Whereas the incidence of Candida infections peaked in the late 1970s, aspergillosis is still increasing. METHOD: Review of the pertinent English-language literature. RESULTS: Most factors promoting an inva

  19. Review of noise in neonatal intensive care units - regional analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez Abril, A [National Technological University, Regional Bioengineering Institute, Mendoza (Argentina); Terron, A; Boschi, C [National Technological University, Regional Bioengineering Institute, Mendoza (Argentina); Gomez, M [National Technological University, La Rioja (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    This work is about the problem of noise in neonatal incubators and in the environment in the neonatal intensive care units. Its main objective is to analyse the impact of noise in hospitals of Mendoza and La Rioja. Methodology: The measures were taken in different moments in front of higher or lower severity level in the working environment. It is shown that noise produces severe damages and changes in the behaviour and the psychological status of the new born babies. Results: The noise recorded inside the incubators and the neonatal intensive care units together have many components but the noise of motors, opening and closing of access gates have been considered the most important ones. Values above 60 db and and up to 120 db in some cases were recorded, so the need to train the health staff in order to manage the new born babies, the equipment and the instruments associated with them very carefully is revealed.

  20. Risk factors affecting nasal colonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus when admitted in intensive care unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Qiang; Zhuang Taifeng; Lin Ying; Xi Jingjing; Yao Gaiqi

    2014-01-01

    Background Colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a risk factor for subsequent invasive MRSA infection,particularly in patients admitted for critical care.The purpose of this study was to investigate the risk factors affecting nasal colonization of MRSA in patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU).Methods Between August 1,2011 and June 30,2012,we screened for MRSA nasal colonization in 350 patients by Real-time PCR within 24 hours of admission by means of swab samples taken from the anterior nares.According to the results of PCR,the patients were divided into 2 groups:the positive group with nasal MRSA colonization and the negative group without nasal MRSA colonization.The 31 (8.86%) patients were MRSA positive.The risk factors evaluated included thirteen variables,which were analyzed by t test for continuous variables and X2 test for discrete variables.The variables with significance (P <0.05) were analyzed with stepwise Logistic regression.Results There were differences (P <0.05) in four variables between two groups.The duration of stay in hospital prior to ICU admission in the positive group was (35.7±16.1) days,vs.(4.5±3.1) days in the negative group.The average blood albumin level was (28.4±2.9) g/L in the positive group,vs.(30.5±4.3) g/L in the negative group.Of 31 patients in the positive group,seven had been treated with antibiotics longer than seven days vs.34 of 319 patients in the negative group.In the positive group,four of 31 patients received treatment with more than two classes of antibiotics prior to admission in ICU,contrasted to 13 of 319 patients in the negative group.Furthermore,stepwise Logistic regression analysis for these four variables indicates that the duration of stay in hospital prior to ICU admission may be an independent risk factor.Conclusions MRSA colonization in ICU admission may be related to many factors.The duration of stay in hospital prior to ICU admission is an independent risk

  1. Implementation of an electronic logbook for intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Carrie J.; Stansfield, Dennis; Gibb Ellis, Kathryn A.; Clemmer, Terry P.

    2002-01-01

    Logbooks of patients treated in acute care units are commonly maintained; the data may be used to justify resource use, analyze patient outcomes, and encourage clinical research. We report herein the conversion of a paper-based logbook to an electronic logbook in three hospital intensive care units. The major difference between the paper logbook and electronic logbook data was the addition of clinician-entered data to the electronic logbook. Despite extensive computerization of patient information extant in the participating units, there was considerable reluctance to replace the paper-based logbook. The project's success can be attributed to the use of feedback from the clinical users in the development and implementation process to create accessible, high quality data. These data provide clinicians with the capability to monitor trends in a variety of patient groups. Advantages of the electronic logbook include more efficient data access, higher data quality and increased ability to conduct quality improvement and clinical research activities. PMID:12463943

  2. Burden of Hospital Acquired Infections and Antimicrobial Use in Vietnamese Adult Intensive Care Units.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vu Dinh Phu

    Full Text Available Vietnam is a lower middle-income country with no national surveillance system for hospital-acquired infections (HAIs. We assessed the prevalence of hospital-acquired infections and antimicrobial use in adult intensive care units (ICUs across Vietnam.Monthly repeated point prevalence surveys were systematically conducted to assess HAI prevalence and antimicrobial use in 15 adult ICUs across Vietnam. Adults admitted to participating ICUs before 08:00 a.m. on the survey day were included.Among 3287 patients enrolled, the HAI prevalence was 29.5% (965/3266 patients, 21 missing. Pneumonia accounted for 79.4% (804/1012 of HAIs Most HAIs (84.5% [855/1012] were acquired in the survey hospital with 42.5% (363/855 acquired prior to ICU admission and 57.5% (492/855 developed during ICU admission. In multivariate analysis, the strongest risk factors for HAI acquired in ICU were: intubation (OR 2.76, urinary catheter (OR 2.12, no involvement of a family member in patient care (OR 1.94, and surgery after admission (OR 1.66. 726 bacterial isolates were cultured from 622/1012 HAIs, most frequently Acinetobacter baumannii (177/726 [24.4%], Pseudomonas aeruginosa (100/726 [13.8%], and Klebsiella pneumoniae (84/726 [11.6%], with carbapenem resistance rates of 89.2%, 55.7%, and 14.9% respectively. Antimicrobials were prescribed for 84.8% (2787/3287 patients, with 73.7% of patients receiving two or more. The most common antimicrobial groups were third generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, and carbapenems (20.1%, 19.4%, and 14.1% of total antimicrobials, respectively.A high prevalence of HAIs was observed, mainly caused by Gram-negative bacteria with high carbapenem resistance rates. This in combination with a high rate of antimicrobial use illustrates the urgent need to improve rational antimicrobial use and infection control efforts.

  3. Burden of Hospital Acquired Infections and Antimicrobial Use in Vietnamese Adult Intensive Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Mattias; Nadjm, Behzad; Dinh, Quynh-Dao; Nilsson, Lennart E.; Rydell, Ulf; Le, Tuyet Thi Diem; Trinh, Son Hong; Pham, Hung Minh; Tran, Cang Thanh; Doan, Hanh Thi Hong; Tran, Nguyen Thua; Le, Nhan Duc; Huynh, Nhuan Van; Tran, Thao Phuong; Tran, Bao Duc; Nguyen, Son Truong; Pham, Thao Thi Ngoc; Dang, Tam Quang; Nguyen, Chau Van Vinh; Lam, Yen Minh; Thwaites, Guy; Van Nguyen, Kinh; Hanberger, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Vietnam is a lower middle-income country with no national surveillance system for hospital-acquired infections (HAIs). We assessed the prevalence of hospital-acquired infections and antimicrobial use in adult intensive care units (ICUs) across Vietnam. Methods Monthly repeated point prevalence surveys were systematically conducted to assess HAI prevalence and antimicrobial use in 15 adult ICUs across Vietnam. Adults admitted to participating ICUs before 08:00 a.m. on the survey day were included. Results Among 3287 patients enrolled, the HAI prevalence was 29.5% (965/3266 patients, 21 missing). Pneumonia accounted for 79.4% (804/1012) of HAIs Most HAIs (84.5% [855/1012]) were acquired in the survey hospital with 42.5% (363/855) acquired prior to ICU admission and 57.5% (492/855) developed during ICU admission. In multivariate analysis, the strongest risk factors for HAI acquired in ICU were: intubation (OR 2.76), urinary catheter (OR 2.12), no involvement of a family member in patient care (OR 1.94), and surgery after admission (OR 1.66). 726 bacterial isolates were cultured from 622/1012 HAIs, most frequently Acinetobacter baumannii (177/726 [24.4%]), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (100/726 [13.8%]), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (84/726 [11.6%]), with carbapenem resistance rates of 89.2%, 55.7%, and 14.9% respectively. Antimicrobials were prescribed for 84.8% (2787/3287) patients, with 73.7% of patients receiving two or more. The most common antimicrobial groups were third generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, and carbapenems (20.1%, 19.4%, and 14.1% of total antimicrobials, respectively). Conclusion A high prevalence of HAIs was observed, mainly caused by Gram-negative bacteria with high carbapenem resistance rates. This in combination with a high rate of antimicrobial use illustrates the urgent need to improve rational antimicrobial use and infection control efforts. PMID:26824228

  4. Reorganisation of acute referral to an emergency department resulted in fewer admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease but in higher rates of non-invasive ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Titlestad, Ingrid Louise; Bryde, Jonas; Oberg-Hansen, Bo;

    2014-01-01

    .3%) compared with 2010 (36 admissions; 4.5%), but no referrals to the intensive care unit or deaths were registered during the hospitalisation in either of the groups, but one patient died within 30 days after admission from the DEM. FUNDING: This project was funded by an Odense University Hospital research...

  5. Candida bloodstream infections in intensive care units: analysis of the extended prevalence of infection in intensive care unit study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kett, D.H.; Azoulay, E.; Echeverria, P.M.; Vincent, J.L.; Pickkers, P.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To provide a global, up-to-date picture of the prevalence, treatment, and outcomes of Candida bloodstream infections in intensive care unit patients and compare Candida with bacterial bloodstream infection. DESIGN: A retrospective analysis of the Extended Prevalence of Infection in the I

  6. Reflecting on healthcare and self-care in the Intensive Care Unit: our story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Peterkin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Health care professionals working in Intensive Care Units (ICUs are exposed to high levels of stress-provoking stimuli. Some may unconsciously employ negative coping skill s which may contribute to burnout and negatively affect patient care. We chose to explore ways of facilitating and encouraging self-reflective practice in an effort to increase empathic traits and enhance communication. A narrative medicine series, which included six sessions that were focused on different narrative approaches, was organized for staff of an academic teaching hospital. Totally, 132 interdisciplinary ICU staff attended the sessions. They were generally open to exploring the selected approaches and discussing their reflections within the interdisciplinary environment. The narrative medicine series provided tools for health care professionals to enhance self-reflective skills utilizing a team-based learning approach. The anticipated outcomes were improved self-care, increased empathy and communication skills, enhanced team functioning, which all contribute to better patient care at the bedside.

  7. Nosocomial outbreak of Serratia marcescens in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: what to do not to close the unit when cohorting is not enough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza Pugni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Serratia marcescens, a Gram-negative organism, is a well-recognized nosocomial pathogen, especially in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs. Even if multiple point sources have been identified, the source of an outbreak often remains unknown. Because an outbreak of S. marcescens can spread rapidly, closing the Unit sometimes is necessary. Here, we report on an outbreak of S. marcescens occurred in our NICU and describe the control measures taken to stop the epidemic without closing the Unit. Material and Methods. Our Unit is a 56-bed Unit composed of two areas: a 23-bed (4 rooms intensive-care and a 33-bed (6 rooms intermediate-care area. After some cases of S. marcescens infection were identified during a 3-month period, a prospective epidemiological study was performed in both areas during a period of 8 months. Surveillance cultures were obtained from all neonates (pharynx, rectum, eyes, ears at admission, at room-changing and twice weekly, from medical and nursing staff (pharynx, rectum and from the environment (sinks, ventilators, incubators, soap dispensers, disinfectants, breast pumps, work surfaces. The following control measures were also taken: universal precautions were intensified (handwashing, gloves, masks, education of the staff was stressed, a survey was instituted to check the observance of the control measures, admissions to the NICU were limited and infected/colonized babies were strictly cohorted. Because the outbreak continued despite these control measures, we separated new admissions from hospitalized babies by using two ways in the Unit: a clean way (green and a dirty way (red with nurses, rooms and everything different between the green and the red babies. Results. During the study period, 589 neonates underwent surveillance cultures (14.156 samples; 32/589 (5% infants had positive swabs. Four (12.5% of the 32 colonized infants had clinical signs of infection: sepsis-like symptoms (2 cases and conjunctivitis

  8. Intensive care unit research ethics and trials on unconscious patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, G R

    2015-05-01

    There are widely acknowledged ethical issues in enrolling unconscious patients in research trials, particularly in intensive care unit (ICU) settings. An analysis of those issues shows that, by and large, patients are better served in units where research is actively taking place for several reasons: i) they do not fall prey to therapeutic prejudices without clear evidential support, ii) they get a chance of accessing new and potentially beneficial treatments, iii) a climate of careful monitoring of patients and their clinical progress is necessary for good clinical research and affects the care of all patients and iv) even those not in the treatment arm of a trial of a new intervention must receive best current standard care (according to international evidence-based treatment guidelines). Given that we have discovered a number of 'best practice' regimens of care that do not optimise outcomes in ICU settings, it is of great benefit to all patients (including those participating in research) that we are constantly updating and evaluating what we do. Therefore, the practice of ICU-based clinical research on patients, many of whom cannot give prospective informed consent, ticks all the ethical boxes and ought to be encouraged in our health system. It is very important that the evaluation of protocols for ICU research should not overlook obvious (albeit probabilistic) benefits to patients and the acceptability of responsible clinicians entering patients into well-designed trials, even though the ICU setting does not and cannot conform to typical informed consent procedures and requirements.

  9. How the United States exports managed care to developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitzkin, H; Iriart, C

    2001-01-01

    As their expansion slows in the United States, managed care organizations will continue to enter new markets abroad. Investors view the opening of managed care in Latin America as a lucrative business opportunity. As public-sector services and social security funds are cut back, privatized, and reorganized under managed care, with the support of international lending agencies such as the World Bank, the effects of these reforms on access to preventive and curative services will hold great importance throughout the developing world. Many groups in Latin America are working on alternative projects that defend health as a public good, and similar movements have begun in Africa and Asia. Increasingly, this organizing is being recognized not only as part of a class struggle but also as part of a struggle against economic imperialism--which has now taken on the new appearance of rescuing less developed countries from rising health care costs and inefficient bureaucracies through the imposition of neoliberal managed-care solutions exported from the United States. PMID:11562002

  10. Taiwanese nurses' appraisal of a lecture on spiritual care for patients in critical care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, F J; Gau, M L; Mao, H C; Chen, C H

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a lecture on spiritual care for adult critical care trainees, and to evaluate the trainees' appraisal of the effectiveness of this lecture in preparing them to provide spiritual care for their clients in a critical care setting. A between-method triangulation research design encompassing a questionnaire and descriptive qualitative content analysis was used. A convenience sample consisting of 64 registered nurses who attended an adult critical care nurse training programme in a leading medical centre in northern Taiwan were invited to participate in this study. A total of 64 female participants completed the questionnaire. Ninety-two per cent (59) of the subjects considered the lecture on spiritual care to be helpful in assisting them to provide holistic care for critically ill patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Three types of help were identified by the subjects: (1) help in clarifying the abstract concepts related to spiritual care (86%); (2) help in self-disclosing the nurses' personal beliefs and values regarding life goals, nursing, and spiritual needs (67%); (3) help in learning how to provide spiritual care to patients in a critical care setting (34%). Twenty per cent of the subjects thought that inclusion of the following content in the lecture would have been helpful to provide a more comprehensive picture of spiritual care: religious practices and rituals (11%); the culturally bonded nursing care plan (9%); the development of human spirituality (3%); patients' families' spiritual needs in the ICU (3%); and resources for nurses in providing spiritual care (2%). Thirteen per cent of the subjects suggested that the instructor might employ the following strategies to improve the quality of teaching: providing more empirical examples (5%); discussion with the students in classes of smaller size following the lecture or extending the instruction time (5%); and providing a syllabus with detailed information (3%).

  11. Status of neonatal intensive care units in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez A

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal mortality in India accounts for 50% of infant mortality, which has declined to 84/1000 live births. There is no prenatal care for over 50% of pregnant women, and over 80% deliver at home in unsafe and unsanitary conditions. Those women who do deliver in health facilities are unable to receive intensive neonatal care when necessary. Level I and Level II neonatal care is unavailable in most health facilities in India, and in most developing countries. There is a need in India for Level III care units also. The establishment of neonatal intensive care units (NICUs in India and developing countries would require space and location, finances, equipment, staff, protocols of care, and infection control measures. Neonatal mortality could be reduced by initially adding NICUs at a few key hospitals. The recommendation is for 30 NICU beds per million population. Each bed would require 50 square feet per cradle and proper climate control. Funds would have to be diverted from adult care. The largest expenses would be in equipment purchase, maintenance, and repair. Trained technicians would be required to operate and monitor the sophisticated ventilators and incubators. The nurse-patient ratio should be 1:1 and 1:2 for other infants. Training mothers to work in the NICUs would help ease the problems of trained nursing staff shortages. Protocols need not be highly technical; they could include the substitution of radiant warmers and room heaters for expensive incubators, the provision of breast milk, and the reduction of invasive procedures such as venipuncture and intubation. Nocosomial infections should be reduced by vacuum cleaning and wet mopping with a disinfectant twice a day, changing disinfectants periodically, maintaining mops to avoid infection, decontamination of linen, daily changing of tubing, and cleaning and sterilizing oxygen hoods and resuscitation equipment, and maintaining an iatrogenic infection record book, which could be used to

  12. What can the postanesthesia care unit manager do to decrease costs in the postanesthesia care unit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macario, A; Glenn, D; Dexter, F

    1999-10-01

    The economic structure of the PACU dictates whether a cost-reducing intervention (e.g., reducing the length of time patients stay in the PACU) is likely to decrease hospital costs. Cost-reducing interventions, such as changes in medical practice patterns (e.g., to reduce PACU length of stay), only impact variable costs. How PACU nurses are paid (e.g., salaried v hourly) affects which strategies to decrease PACU staffing costs will actually save money. For example, decreases in PACU labor costs resulting from increases in the number of patients that bypass the PACU vary depending on how the staff is compensated. The choice of anesthetic drugs and the elimination of low morbidity side effects of anesthesia, such as postoperative nausea, are likely to have little effect on the peak numbers of patients in a PACU and PACU staffing costs. Because the major determinant of labor productivity in the PACU is hour-to-hour and day-to-day variability in the timing of admissions from the operating room, a more even inflow of patients into the PACU could be attained by appropriate sequencing of cases in the operating room suite (e.g., have long cases scheduled at the beginning of the day). However, this mathematically proven solution may not be desirable. Surgeons, for example, may not want to lose control over the order of their cases. Guidelines for analysis of past daily peak numbers of patients are provided that will provide data to predict the minimum adequate number of nurses needed. Though many managers already do this manually on an ad hoc basis statistical methods summarized in this article may increase the accuracy.

  13. Health-related quality of life after prolonged pediatric intensive care unit stay.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conlon, Niamh P

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the long-term health-related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes for patients requiring at least 28 days of pediatric intensive care. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort and prospective follow-up study. SETTING: A 21-bed pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) in a university-affiliated, tertiary referral pediatric hospital. PATIENTS: One hundred ninety-three patients who spent 28 days or longer in the PICU between January 1, 1997 and December 31, 2004. INTERVENTIONS: Quality of life was measured using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (Peds QL 4.0) parent-proxy version at 2 to 10 yrs after discharge. The PedsQL 4.0 is a modular measure of HRQOL, which is reliable in children aged 2 to 18 yrs. It generates a total score and physical, emotional, social, school, and psychosocial subscores. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Of the 193 patients, 41 died during their PICU admission and 27 died between PICU discharge and follow-up. Quality of life questionnaires were posted to parents of 108 of the 125 survivors and 70 were returned completed. Forty children (57.1%) had scores indicating a normal quality of life, whereas 30 (42.9%) had scores indicating impaired HRQOL. Of these, 14 (20%) had scores indicating poor quality of life with ongoing disabling health problems requiring hospitalization or the equivalent. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that, while long PICU stay is associated with significant mortality, the long-term HRQOL is normal for the majority of surviving children.

  14. Avaliação do impacto da polimedicação nas verbas de internamento nas unidades de longa duração e manutenção Evaluación del impacto de la polimedicación sobre la financiación de las unidades de hospitalización y mantenimiento a largo plazo Assessment of the impact of polypharmacy on funding for admission in a long-term care and maintenance unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Manuel de Lima Ferreira

    2012-03-01

    ón en esta población, es decir, un promedio de 6 medicamentos recetados por paciente. Haciendo el cálculo, por cada 10 EUR de gastos diarios atribuidos, se obtiene el porcentaje significativo de 37% del impacto sobre el presupuesto asignado por el Estado. Conclusión: es necesario comprender los patrones de prescripción en otros contextos, así como conocer las razones/motivos que llevan a prescribir más que un medicamento.Context: the financial situation of welfare states obliges them to undertake a careful analysis and reflection of the whole field of health to ensure that their sustainability is possible. In Portugal there is, as elsewhere in Europe, a progressive aging of the population, a consequence of increased life expectancy and low birth rate. Objectives: to evaluate the impact of polypharmacy in daily sums charged to a long-term care and maintenance unit. Method: this was an exploratory case study with 65 users admitted to the Long-term Care and Maintenance Unit - Dona Elvira da Câmara Lopes of Santa Casa da Misericórdia da Póvoa de Lanhoso. Results: there is major polypharmacy in this population, including an average of six prescription drugs per patient. Calculation, based on a daily allowance of 10 EUR, gives a high percentage impact of 37% on the budget allocated by the state. Conclusion: it is necessary to understand prescribing patterns in other contexts as well as to ascertain the reasons/motives that lead to prescribing more than one drug.

  15. Posttraumatic stress in intensive care unit survivors - a prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratzer, Mette; Brink, Ole; Knudsen, Linda;

    2014-01-01

    of PTSD. Conclusions: High levels of PTSD symptoms occurred in 19.2% of respondents in six months following traumatic injury requiring ICU admission. Screening for the variables gender, length of sedation, dissociation, hypervigilance, and locus of control after ICU admission following traumatic injuries...

  16. Intentional Poisoning as a Cause of Admission to Accident and Emergency in a Tertiary Care Hospital within a Year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niveditha

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Poisoning is a common medico social problem nowadays and is often distressing for both family members and medical staff. The present study aims to evaluate the pattern of self poisoning with special preference to psychoactive drugs. Methodology: Study sample comprised of all episodes of self poisoning that had resulted in admission between January to December 2008.Pateints taking any toxic/pharmacological substance by accident or ignorance were excluded. Results: Out of 1206 patients admitted to accident and emergency during the study period, 140 were due to intentional poisoning (11.6% Age of the patients varied from 16-65 years. The maximum incidence was between 21-30 years. The male: female ratio was 1.18:1.Most common substance used was organophosphate compound (OPC (31.7% followed by benzodiazepines (BZD (20.7% and household articles comprised of 18.5%. Multiple drug combinations with alcohol was 30%.Around 13.5% had history of mental illness. Conclusion: At present due to vast development in all fields of life like industries, medicine and agriculture, a significant number of new compounds have appeared as new poisonous substances, which have led to more number of poisoning cases. Although there are restrictions on sale of drugs in India, vulnerability to insecticide cannot be ignored.

  17. An analysis of clinical activity, admission rates, length of hospital stay, and economic impact after a temporary loss of 50% of the non-operative podiatrists from a tertiary specialist foot clinic in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Gooday

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Podiatrists form an integral part of the multidisciplinary foot team in the treatment of diabetic foot–related complications. A set of unforeseen circumstances within our specialist diabetes foot service in the United Kingdom caused a loss of 50% of our non-operative podiatry team for almost 7 months during 2010. Some of this time was filled by non-specialist community non-operative podiatrists. Methods: We assessed the economic impact of this loss by examining data for the 5 years prior to this 7-month interruption, and for the 2 years after ‘normal service’ was resumed. Results: Our data show that the loss of the non-operative podiatrists led to a significant rise in the numbers of admissions into hospital, and hospital length of stay also increased. At our institution a single bed day cost is £275. During the time that the numbers of specialist non-operative podiatry staff were depleted, and for up to 6 months after they returned to normal activities, the extra costs increased by just less than £90,000. The number of people admitted directly from specialist vascular and orthopaedic clinics is likely to have increased due to the lack of capacity to manage them in the diabetic foot clinic. Our data were unable to assess these individuals and did not look at the costs saved from avoiding surgery. Thus the actual costs incurred are likely to be higher. Conclusions: Our data suggest that specialist non-operative podiatrists involved in the treatment of the diabetic foot may prevent unwarranted hospital admission and increased hospitalisation rates by providing skilled assessment and care in the outpatient clinical settings.

  18. Procalcitonin use in a pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cies, Jeffrey J; Chopra, Arun

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated whether procalcitonin (PCT) might aid diagnosing serious bacterial infections in a general pediatric intensive care unit population. Two-hundred and one patients accounted for 332 PCT samples. A PCT ≥1.45 ng/mL had a positive predictive value of 30%, a negative predictive value of 93% and a sensitivity of 72% and a specificity of 75%. These data suggest PCT can assist in identifying patients without serious bacterial infections and limit antimicrobial use.

  19. Intensive Care Unit Acquired Weakness: Under or Overdiagnosed?

    OpenAIRE

    Morgado, S; Moura, S.

    2010-01-01

    Intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICU-AW) is recognized as an important and common clinical problem, associated with an increased morbidity in critical ill patients. This muscle weakness has been described in a wide range of clinical settings and therefore, has many different terminologies such as “critical illness myopathy – CIM”, “critical illness polyneuropathy - CIP”, “acute quadriplegic myopathy”, among others. Nowadays, these designations are considered somewhat restric...

  20. Human-centered environment design in intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Y.; Albayrak, A.; Goossens, R.H.M.; D. Xiao; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Because of high risk and instability of the patients in Intensive care unit(ICU), the design of ICU is very difficult. ICU design, auxiliary building design, lighting design, noise control and other aspects can also enhance its management. In this paper, we compare ICU design in China and Holland based on related standards. We also premeditate the indoor environment from planning perspective, analyze patients, their families, medical staff and space requirement to conduct research in ICU desi...

  1. Post-traumatic pulmonary embolism in the intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Mabrouk Bahloul; Anis Chaari; Hassen Dammak; Fatma Medhioub; Leila Abid; Hichem Ksibi; Sondes Haddar; Hatem Kallel; Hedi Chelly; Chokri Ben Hamida; Mounir Bouaziz

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the predictive factors, clinical manifestations, and the outcome of patients with post-traumatic pulmonary embolism (PE) admitted in the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods: During a four-year prospective study, a medical committee of six ICU physicians prospectively examined all available data for each trauma patient in order to classify patients according to the level of clinical suspicion of pulmonary thromboembolism. During the study period, all trauma patients ...

  2. Bedside Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Surgery- Myth or Reality!

    OpenAIRE

    Shandip Kumar Sinha; Sujoy Neogi

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal transport is associated with complications, more so in sick and unstable neonates who need immediate emergency surgery. To circumvent these problems, surgery in Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is proposed for these neonates. This article reviews the literature regarding feasibility of this novel concept and based on the generated evidence, suggest the NICU planners to always include infrastructure for this. Also neonatal surgical team can be developed that could be transported.

  3. Nutritional support of children in the intensive care unit.

    OpenAIRE

    Seashore, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Nutritional support is an integral and essential part of the management of 5-10 percent of hospitalized children. Children in the intensive care unit are particularly likely to develop malnutrition because of the nature and duration of their illness, and their inability to eat by mouth. This article reviews the physiology of starvation and the development of malnutrition in children. A method of estimating the nutritional requirements of children is presented. The techniques of nutritional su...

  4. Renal replacement therapy in the intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Pannu, Neesh; Gibney, RT Noel

    2005-01-01

    Acute renal failure is a common complication in the intensive care unit (ICU). Over the last 25 years, there have been significant technological advances in the delivery of renal replacement therapy, particularly as it pertains to the critically ill patient population. Despite these advances, acute renal failure in critically ill patients continues to carry a poor prognosis. In this article, we review the current literature about timing and initiation of renal replacement therapy in the ICU a...

  5. Non-invasive respiratory monitoring in paediatric intensive care unit.

    OpenAIRE

    Nadkarni U; Shah A; Deshmukh C

    2000-01-01

    Monitoring respiratory function is important in a Paediatrics Intensive Care Unit (PICU), as majority of patients have cardio-respiratory problems. Non-invasive monitoring is convenient, accurate, and has minimal complications. Along with clinical monitoring, oxygen saturation using pulse oximetry, transcutaneous oxygenation (PtcO2) and transcutaneous PCO2 (PtcCO2) using transcutaneous monitors and end-tidal CO2 using capnography are important and routine measurements done in most PICUs. Cons...

  6. Physiotherapy practices in Intensive Care Units across Maharashtra

    OpenAIRE

    Ujwal Lakshman Yeole; Ankita Ramesh Chand; Nandi, Biplab B.; Pravin P Gawali; Adkitte, Roshan G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To find out the current physiotherapy practices in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) across Maharashtra. Materials and Methods: Study design was exploratory cross-sectional survey. Questionnaires were sent to the physiotherapists working in hospitals across Maharashtra state, India. Four weeks for completion of questionnaire was given in an attempt to ensure good response rates. Result: Of 200, 73 questionnaires were received representing a 36% response rate. The study revealed that 76% of t...

  7. Eye injury treatment in intensive care unit patients

    OpenAIRE

    L. K. Moshetova; S. A. Kochergin; A. S. Kochergin

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To describe eye injuries in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with multitrauma, to study conjunctival microflora in these patients, and to develop etiologically and pathogenically targeted treatment and prevention of wound complications.Materials and methods. Study group included 50 patients (54 eyes) with combined mechanical cerebral and eye injury. All patients underwent possible ophthalmological examination (biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy and ocular fundus photographing with portative...

  8. Stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Morten Brøgger; Perner, A; Wetterslev, J;

    2013-01-01

    Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is regarded as standard of care in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, recent randomized, clinical trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses have questioned the rationale and level of evidence for this recommendation. The aim of the present systematic review was to evaluate...... Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation, and risk of random errors in cumulative meta-analyses was assessed with trial sequential analysis. A total of 57 studies were included in the review. The literature on SUP in the ICU includes limited trial data and methodological weak...... intervention?; (4) Do intensive care patients benefit from SUP with proton pump inhibitors as compared with other SUP interventions? Systematic reviews of possible interventions and well-powered observational studies and RCTs are needed....

  9. The role of memories on health-related quality of life after intensive care unit care: an unforgettable controversy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orwelius L

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lotti Orwelius,1-4 Armando Teixeira-Pinto,2,5 Cristina Lobo,2 Altamiro Costa-Pereira,1,2 Cristina Granja,1,2,6,7 1Department of Health Information and Decision Sciences, Faculty of Medicine of Porto, Porto, Portugal; 2CINTESIS – Centre for Research in Health Technologies and Health Systems, Faculty of Medicine of Porto, Porto, Portugal; 3Department of Intensive Care, Linköping University, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden; 4Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 5Screening and Test Evaluation Program, Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 6Department of Emergency and Intensive Care Medicine, Algarve Hospital Centre, Algarve, Portugal; 7Department of Biomedical Sciences and Medicine, University of Algarve, Algarve, Portugal Background: Decreased health-related quality of life (HRQoL is a significant problem after an intensive care stay and is affected by several known factors such as age, sex, and previous health-state. The objective of this study was to assess the association between memory and self-reported perceived HRQoL of patients discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU. Methods: A prospective, multicenter study involving nine general ICUs in Portugal. All adult patients with a length of stay >48 hours were invited to participate in a 6-month follow-up after ICU discharge by answering a set of structured questionnaires, including EuroQol 5-Dimensions and ICU memory tool. Results: A total of 313 (52% of the eligible patients agreed to enter the study. The median age of patients was 60 years old, 58% were males, the median Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II was 38, and the median length of stay was 8 days for ICU and 21 days for total hospital stay. Eighty-nine percent (n=276 of the admissions were emergencies. Seventy-eight percent (n=234 of the patients had memories associated with the ICU stay. Patients with

  10. Hypothermia as a predictor for mortality in trauma patients at admittance to the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Balvers

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To study the impact of hypothermia upon admission to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU on early and late mortality and to develop a prediction model for late mortality in severely injured trauma patients. Materials and Methods: A multicenter retrospective cohort study was performed in adult trauma patients admitted to the ICU of two Level-1 trauma centers between 2007 and 2012. Hypothermia was defined as a core body temperature of ≤35° Celsius. Logistic regression analyses were performed to quantify the effect of hypothermia on 24-hour and 28-day mortality and to develop a prediction model. Results: A total of 953 patients were included, of which 354 patients had hypothermia (37% upon ICU admission. Patients were divided into a normothermic or hypothermic group. Hypothermia was associated with a significantly increased mortality at 24 hours and 28 days (OR 2.72 (1.18-6.29 and OR 2.82 (1.83-4.35 resp.. The variables included in the final prediction model were hypothermia, age, APACHE II score (corrected for temperature, INR, platelet count, traumatic brain injury and Injury Severity Score. The final prediction model discriminated between survivors and non-survivors with high accuracy (AUC = 0.871, 95% CI 0.844-0.898. Conclusions: Hypothermia, defined as a temperature ≤35° Celsius, is common in critically ill trauma patients and is one of the most important physiological predictors for early and late mortality in trauma patients. Trauma patients admitted to the ICU may be at high risk for late mortality if the patient is hypothermic, coagulopathic, severely injured and has traumatic brain injury or an advanced age.

  11. Hypothermia as a predictor for mortality in trauma patients at admittance to the Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balvers, Kirsten; Van der Horst, Marjolein; Graumans, Maarten; Boer, Christa; Binnekade, Jan M.; Goslings, J. Carel; Juffermans, Nicole P.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To study the impact of hypothermia upon admission to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) on early and late mortality and to develop a prediction model for late mortality in severely injured trauma patients. Materials and Methods: A multicenter retrospective cohort study was performed in adult trauma patients admitted to the ICU of two Level-1 trauma centers between 2007 and 2012. Hypothermia was defined as a core body temperature of ≤35° Celsius. Logistic regression analyses were performed to quantify the effect of hypothermia on 24-hour and 28-day mortality and to develop a prediction model. Results: A total of 953 patients were included, of which 354 patients had hypothermia (37%) upon ICU admission. Patients were divided into a normothermic or hypothermic group. Hypothermia was associated with a significantly increased mortality at 24 hours and 28 days (OR 2.72 (1.18-6.29 and OR 2.82 (1.83-4.35) resp.). The variables included in the final prediction model were hypothermia, age, APACHE II score (corrected for temperature), INR, platelet count, traumatic brain injury and Injury Severity Score. The final prediction model discriminated between survivors and non-survivors with high accuracy (AUC = 0.871, 95% CI 0.844-0.898). Conclusions: Hypothermia, defined as a temperature ≤35° Celsius, is common in critically ill trauma patients and is one of the most important physiological predictors for early and late mortality in trauma patients. Trauma patients admitted to the ICU may be at high risk for late mortality if the patient is hypothermic, coagulopathic, severely injured and has traumatic brain injury or an advanced age. PMID:27512330

  12. Postpartum depression on the neonatal intensive care unit: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahirkheli NN

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Noor N Tahirkheli,1 Amanda S Cherry,1 Alayna P Tackett,2 Mary Anne McCaffree,3 Stephen R Gillaspy11Section of General and Community Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA; 2Department of Psychology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, USA; 3Section of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USAAbstract: As the most common complication of childbirth affecting 10%–15% of women, postpartum depression (PPD goes vastly undetected and untreated, inflicting long-term consequences on both mother and child. Studies consistently show that mothers of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU experience PPD at higher rates with more elevated symptomatology than mothers of healthy infants. Although there has been increased awareness regarding the overall prevalence of PPD and recognition of the need for health care providers to address this health issue, there has not been adequate attention to PPD in the context of the NICU. This review will focus on an overview of PPD and psychological morbidities, the prevalence of PPD in mothers of infants admitted to NICU, associated risk factors, potential PPD screening measures, promising intervention programs, the role of NICU health care providers in addressing PPD in the NICU, and suggested future research directions.Keywords: neonatal intensive care unit, postpartum depression, mothers

  13. Primary nursing in Intensive Care Unit: measuring nurses' attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zetta, S.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Intensive Care Units have been identified as having advantages for the use of primary nursing. Nursing staff play an important role οn the successful implementation of primary nursing. It is important to know in advance of the implementation plan the attitudes and opinions of the nurses. Such knowledge would adequately inform the management and enable them to use the right approaches to achieve successful implementation. Aim and Method The current study is a non-experimental, cross-sectional descriptive research design aiming to identify nurses’ attitudes towards primary nursing. The study was conducted in an 8-beded Intensive Care Unit (ICU part of a University Hospital in Scotland. The sample consisted of all 38 registered and enrolled nurse working at the unit at the time. Results Results indicated that nurses were aware and identified benefits and shortcomings of primary nursing which have been seen in the primary care literature. Nurses’ attitudes towards implementation of primary nursing were positive and appeared to agree with the positive impact of primary nursing to the patients either in term of patient satisfaction or patient autonomy. Conclusions Primary nursing advocates a shift away from the traditional system of hierarchical task allocation. Nurses are willing to change and want to learn more in order to improve patients’ outcomes.

  14. [Nurses' perspective on interprofessional communication on an intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Martin; Lendner, Ilka

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to explore experience in nurses' interdisciplinary/interprofessional communication on an intensive care unit. The structure of communication and influencing factors were shown and interpreted from the perspective of the nurses. Nurses working on an internal medical intensive care unit at a teaching facility in central Germany were questioned by means of semi-structured interviews. One main result was that for nurses the culture of communication in the investigation unit was characterized primarily by hierarchical structures imposed by the physicians. This dominance was identified in all nursing activities resulting in a considerable adverse effect on the flow of information concerning the patient between nurses and physicians. Especially within the context of daily rounds nurses were confronted with barriers to participate actively with their knowledge and professional competence in the process of decision-making. The problems described are well known in everyday nursing practice and have been dealt with in the English research literature. However, this study's aim is to present and summarize the gained insights and to transfer them in a practice-oriented way into a selected field of work. Possible solutions for the problems of inter-professional communication are suggested in subsequent work steps in order to optimize patient care. PMID:18850538

  15. Family, caring and ageing in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Tony; Powell, Jason L

    2005-03-01

    This paper provides a critical exploration of the assumptions and narratives underpinning the development of social policy initiatives targeting caring relationships based upon family ties. Using a narrative approach attention is drawn to the ways in which family identities are open to a far greater range of negotiation than is assumed by policy. Drawing on the United Kingdom as a case example, questions are posed about intergenerational relations and the nature of late life citizenship. The comparatively recent invention of narratives supporting 'informal care' and the link with neo-liberal and 'third way' notions of active citizenship are explored. As is the failure of policy developments to take into account the diversity of care giving styles and the complexity of caring relationships. It is argued that the uneven and locally specific ways in which policy develops enables the co-existence of a complex range of narratives about family, caring and ageing which address diverse aspects of the family life of older people in often contradictory ways.

  16. Insurance coverage for male infertility care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, James M

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a common condition experienced by many men and women, and treatments are expensive. The World Health Organization and American Society of Reproductive Medicine define infertility as a disease, yet private companies infrequently offer insurance coverage for infertility treatments. This is despite the clear role that healthcare insurance plays in ensuring access to care and minimizing the financial burden of expensive services. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of how male infertility care is covered by insurance in the United States. We begin with an appraisal of the costs of male infertility care, then examine the state insurance laws relevant to male infertility, and close with a discussion of why insurance coverage for male infertility is important to both men and women. Importantly, we found that despite infertility being classified as a disease and males contributing to almost half of all infertility cases, coverage for male infertility is often excluded from health insurance laws. Excluding coverage for male infertility places an undue burden on their female partners. In addition, excluding care for male infertility risks missing opportunities to diagnose important health conditions and identify reversible or irreversible causes of male infertility. Policymakers should consider providing equal coverage for male and female infertility care in future health insurance laws. PMID:27030084

  17. Insurance coverage for male infertility care in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Dupree

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infertility is a common condition experienced by many men and women, and treatments are expensive. The World Health Organization and American Society of Reproductive Medicine define infertility as a disease, yet private companies infrequently offer insurance coverage for infertility treatments. This is despite the clear role that healthcare insurance plays in ensuring access to care and minimizing the financial burden of expensive services. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of how male infertility care is covered by insurance in the United States. We begin with an appraisal of the costs of male infertility care, then examine the state insurance laws relevant to male infertility, and close with a discussion of why insurance coverage for male infertility is important to both men and women. Importantly, we found that despite infertility being classified as a disease and males contributing to almost half of all infertility cases, coverage for male infertility is often excluded from health insurance laws. Excluding coverage for male infertility places an undue burden on their female partners. In addition, excluding care for male infertility risks missing opportunities to diagnose important health conditions and identify reversible or irreversible causes of male infertility. Policymakers should consider providing equal coverage for male and female infertility care in future health insurance laws.

  18. The Admission and Academic Placement of Students from: Bahrain, Oman, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Yemen Arab Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. K., Ed.

    Information is provided on the educational systems of Bahrain, Oman, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, and the Yemen Arab Republic in order to assist U.S. colleges and universities as they work with international student agencies and representatives from these countries. For each country, placement recommendations are offered, along with notes to…

  19. Managed care, deficit financing, and aggregate health care expenditure in the United States: a cointegration analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, N R; Okunade, A A

    2000-09-01

    We applied a battery of cointegration tests comprising those of Johansen and Juselius [19], Phillips and Hansen [35], and Engle and Granger [6], to model aggregate health care expenditure using 1960-96 US data. The existence of a stable long-run economic relationship or cointegration is confirmed, in the United States, between aggregate health care expenditure and real GDP, population age distribution, managed care enrollment, number of practicing physicians, and government deficits. The evidence of cointegration among these variables, chosen on the theoretical basis of prior studies, implies that while they are individually non-stationary in levels, together they are highly correlated and move, in the long run to form an economic equilibrium relationship of US aggregate health care expenditure. More specifically, and for the first time in this line of inquiry, (i) managed care enrollment is found to be negatively associated with the level of health care spending, (ii) supply disinduced demand effects of physicians tend to moderate health expenditure, and (iii) government deficit financing is positively related to health care spending. The observed sign and magnitude of the income coefficient are consistent with health care being a luxury good.

  20. Nurses' experiences of futile care at intensive care units: a phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekefallah, Leili; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Manoochehri, Houman; Hamid, Alavi Majd

    2015-01-01

    The concept and meaning of futile care depends on the existing culture, values, religion, beliefs, medical achievements and emotional status of a country. We aimed to define the concept of futile care in the viewpoints of nurses working in intensive care units (ICUs). In this phenomenological study, the experiences of 25 nurses were explored in 11 teaching hospitals affiliated to Social Security Organization in Ghazvin province in the northwest of Iran. Personal interviews and observations were used for data collection. All interviews were recorded as well as transcribed and codes, subthemes and themes were extracted using Van Manen's analysis method. Initially, 191 codes were extracted. During data analysis and comparison, the codes were reduced to 178. Ultimately, 9 sub-themes and four themes emerged: uselessness, waste of resources, torment, and aspects of futility.Nurses defined futile care as "useless, ineffective care giving with wastage of resources and torment of both patients and nurses having nursing and medical aspects" As nurses play a key role in managing futile care, being aware of their experiences in this regard could be the initial operational step for providing useful care as well as educational programs in ICUs. Moreover, the results of this study could help nursing managers adopt supportive approaches to reduce the amount of futile care which could in turn resolve some of the complications nurses face at these wards such as burnout, ethical conflicts, and leave. PMID:25946928

  1. Managed care, deficit financing, and aggregate health care expenditure in the United States: a cointegration analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, N R; Okunade, A A

    2000-09-01

    We applied a battery of cointegration tests comprising those of Johansen and Juselius [19], Phillips and Hansen [35], and Engle and Granger [6], to model aggregate health care expenditure using 1960-96 US data. The existence of a stable long-run economic relationship or cointegration is confirmed, in the United States, between aggregate health care expenditure and real GDP, population age distribution, managed care enrollment, number of practicing physicians, and government deficits. The evidence of cointegration among these variables, chosen on the theoretical basis of prior studies, implies that while they are individually non-stationary in levels, together they are highly correlated and move, in the long run to form an economic equilibrium relationship of US aggregate health care expenditure. More specifically, and for the first time in this line of inquiry, (i) managed care enrollment is found to be negatively associated with the level of health care spending, (ii) supply disinduced demand effects of physicians tend to moderate health expenditure, and (iii) government deficit financing is positively related to health care spending. The observed sign and magnitude of the income coefficient are consistent with health care being a luxury good. PMID:11105414

  2. Confronting youth gangs in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    Youth gang violence has continued its upward trend nationwide. It was once thought that gangs convened only in selected areas, which left churches, schools, and hospitals as "neutral" territory. Unfortunately, this is a fallacy. The results of gang violence pour into hospitals and into intensive care units regularly. The media portrays California as having a gang violence problem; however, throughout the United States, gang violence has risen more than 35% in the past year. Youth gang violence continues to rise dramatically with more and more of our youth deciding to join gangs each day. Sadly, every state has gangs, and the problem is getting much worse in areas that would never have thought about gangs a year ago. These "new generation" of gang members is younger, much more violent, and staying in the gang longer. Gangs are not just an urban problem. Gang activity is a suburban and rural problem too. There are more than 25 500 gangs in the United States, with a total gang membership of 850 000. Ninety-four percent of gang members are male and 6% are female. The ethnic composition nationwide includes 47% Latino, 31% African American, 13% White, 7% Asian, and 2% "mixed," according to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention of the U.S. Department of Justice. As a result of the ongoing proliferation of youth street gangs in our communities, it is imperative that critical care nurses and others involved with the direct care become educated about how to identify gang members, their activities, and understand their motivations. Such education and knowledge will help provide solutions to families and the youth themselves, help eradicate the problem of gang violence, and keep health care professionals safe.

  3. Confronting youth gangs in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    Youth gang violence has continued its upward trend nationwide. It was once thought that gangs convened only in selected areas, which left churches, schools, and hospitals as "neutral" territory. Unfortunately, this is a fallacy. The results of gang violence pour into hospitals and into intensive care units regularly. The media portrays California as having a gang violence problem; however, throughout the United States, gang violence has risen more than 35% in the past year. Youth gang violence continues to rise dramatically with more and more of our youth deciding to join gangs each day. Sadly, every state has gangs, and the problem is getting much worse in areas that would never have thought about gangs a year ago. These "new generation" of gang members is younger, much more violent, and staying in the gang longer. Gangs are not just an urban problem. Gang activity is a suburban and rural problem too. There are more than 25 500 gangs in the United States, with a total gang membership of 850 000. Ninety-four percent of gang members are male and 6% are female. The ethnic composition nationwide includes 47% Latino, 31% African American, 13% White, 7% Asian, and 2% "mixed," according to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention of the U.S. Department of Justice. As a result of the ongoing proliferation of youth street gangs in our communities, it is imperative that critical care nurses and others involved with the direct care become educated about how to identify gang members, their activities, and understand their motivations. Such education and knowledge will help provide solutions to families and the youth themselves, help eradicate the problem of gang violence, and keep health care professionals safe. PMID:25463004

  4. Different Nursing Care Methods for Prevention of Keratopathy Among Intensive Care Unit Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhori, Reza Pourmirza; Ehsani, Sohrab; Daneshgar, Farid; Ashtarian, Hossein; Rezaei, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with reduced consciousness level suffer from eye protection disorder and Keratopathy. This study was conducted to compare effect of three eye care techniques in prevention of keratopathy in the patients hospitalized in intensive care unit of Kermanshah. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted in 2013 with sample size of 96 persons in three random groups. Routine care included washing of eyes with normal saline and three eye care methods were conducted with poly ethylene cover, liposic ointment, and artificial tear drop randomly on one eye of each sample and a comparison was made with the opposite eye as the control. Eyes were controlled for 5 days in terms of keratopathy. Data collection instrument was keratopathy severity index. Data statistical analysis was performed with SPSS-16 software and chi-squared test, Fisher’s exact test, ANOVA and Kruskal–Wallis one-way analysis of variance. Findings: The use of poly ethylene cover (0.59±0.665) was significantly more effective in prevention of keratopathy than other methods (P=0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between two care interventions of liposic ointment and artificial tear drop (P=0.844) but the results indicated the more effective liposic ointment (1.13±0.751) than the artificial tear drop (1.59±0.875) in prevention of corneal abrasion (Phospitalized in intensive care unit.

  5. Comparison of Risk Factors in Necrotizing Enterocolitis among Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferda Ozlu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Necrotizing enterocolitis is one of the important problems of premature infants. The incidence is about 1-5% in infants followed in neonatal care units and inversely related to gestational age and birth weight. Materials and Methods: In this study, 31 infants with necrotizing enterocolitis and 31 infants with similar gestational age and birth weight as control group hospitalized in Cukurova University Neonatal Care Unit between 1 January 2001-31 January 2004 were evaluated. Results: The incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis in this period was 1.4 (31/2214 admission. Mean gestational age was 30.5  3.2 weeks (25-36, mean birth weight was 1331  384 (730-2150 grams while 71% was younger than 32 gestational weeks and 67.7% was under 1500 grams. The signs of NEC were detected at a mean of 11.2  10. (2-38 days. Twenty-six (83.9% were being fed at the time of the necrotizing enterocolitis signs appeared. According to the Walsh and Kliegman classification, 19 (61.3% infants were in stage 1 (17 were 1a, 2 were 1b; 3 (9.6% infants were in stage 2a, 9 (%29.1 infants were in stage 3 (7 were in 3b. Blood culture was positive in 7 (%22.6 infants with predominance of gram negative microorganisms (5 infants. Eleven (%35.5 infants were exitus, 12 were discharged. Hypoxia, respiratory distress syndrome, intraventricular hemorrhage and umbilical catheterization were significant risk factors in necrotizing enterocolitis . Thrombocytopenia, leucopenia and high C-reactive protein levels were significantly high in necrotizing enterocolitis group. Breast feeding is significantly high in control group. Conclusion: Necrotizing enterocolitis, is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in neonatal intensive care units. Early breast feeding with small amounts, increasing amount of milk slowly, antenatal steroids, caring hygiene rules can prevent the development of it. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(4.000: 642-647

  6. Outcome of Very Lov Birth Weight Infants in Neonatal Care Unit of Dicle University Faculty of Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selahattin Katar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Our purpose was to determine mortality and morbidity rates and selected outcome variables for infants weighing less than 1500 g, who were admitted to the neonatal care unit of our hospital from April 2005 to February 2006.The number of VLBW admissions to the our neonatal care unit was 91, fourty one percent female and %49 were male. The mean birth weight was 1191±261 g and gestational age was 29±2.4 weeks. The mortality rate was 37.3 %. Antenatal steroids had been given to only 8% of mothers. The most important maternal risk factors were preeclampsia/eclampsia 30%, premature rupture of membranes 13%, hemorhage 8%. Respiratory distress syndrome was diagnosed 47%, surfactant was given to 40% of these infants. The major causes of death were sepsis, respiratuar distres syndrome, and extreme prematurity.Compared with reports from other developed NICU, VLBW infants at our center had higher mortality rates. We conclude that, the major cause of high mortality rate depends on low-social –cultural –education conditions associated with insufficient prenatal care, neonatal care and inaccurate neonatal transport in our region.

  7. Evaluation of Nutritional Status in a Teaching Hospital Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Rafati

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background:Extrauterine growth restriction remains a common and serious problem in newborns especially who are small, immature, and critically ill. Very low birth weight infants (VLBW had 97% and 40% growth failure at 36 weeks and 18-22 months post-conceptual age respectively. The postnatal development of premature infants is critically dependent on an adequate nutritional intake that mimics a similar gestational stage. Deficient protein or amino acid administration over an extended period may cause significant growth delay or morbidity in VLBW infants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate current nutritional status in the neonatal intensive care unit in a teaching hospital.Methods:During this prospective observational study, the nutritional status of 100 consecutive critically ill neonates were evaluated by anthropometric and biochemical parameters in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit. Their demographic characteristics (weight, height and head circumference, energy source (dextrose and lipid and protein were recorded in the first, 5th, 10th, 15th and 20th days of admission and blood samples were obtained to measure serum albumin and prealbumin. The amount of calorie and protein were calculated for all of preterm and term neonates and compared to standard means separately. Results: The calorie and amino acids did not meet in the majority of the preterm and term neonates and mean daily parenteral calorie intake was 30% or lower than daily requirements based on neonates’ weight. Mortality rate was significantly higher in neonates with lower serum albumin and severity of malnutrition but not with serum prealbumin concentration. Conclusion: Infants were studied did not receive their whole of daily calorie and protein requirements and it is recommended early and enough administration of calorie source (dextrose, lipids and amino acids. Prealbumin was a more benefit biochemical parameter than albumin to evaluate short term nutrition

  8. Evaluation of Nutritional Status in a Teaching Hospital Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Rafati

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extrauterine growth restriction remains a common and serious problem in newborns especially who are small, immature, and critically ill. Very low birth weight infants (VLBW had 97% and 40% growth failure at 36 weeks and 18-22 months post-conceptual age respectively. The postnatal development of premature infants is critically dependent on an adequate nutritional intake that mimics a similar gestational stage. Deficient protein or amino acid administration over an extended period may cause significant growth delay or morbidity in VLBW infants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate current nutritional status in the neonatal intensive care unit in a teaching hospital. Methods: During this prospective observational study, the nutritional status of 100 consecutive critically ill neonates were evaluated by anthropometric and biochemical parameters in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit. Their demographic characteristics (weight, height and head circumference, energy source (dextrose and lipid and protein were recorded in the first, 5th, 10th, 15th and 20th days of admission and blood samples were obtained to measure serum albumin and prealbumin. The amount of calorie and protein were calculated for all of preterm and term neonates and compared to standard means separately. Results: The calorie and amino acids did not meet in the majority of the preterm and term neonates and mean daily parenteral calorie intake was 30% or lower than daily requirements based on neonates’ weight. Mortality rate was significantly higher in neonates with lower serum albumin and severity of malnutrition but not with serum prealbumin concentration. Conclusion: Infants were studied did not receive their whole of daily calorie and protein requirements and it is recommended early and enough administration of calorie source (dextrose, lipids and amino acids. Prealbumin was a more benefit biochemical parameter than albumin to evaluate short term nutrition

  9. The Use of Modafinil in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, Michal; Weinhouse, Gerald

    2016-02-01

    As patients recover from their critical illness, the focus of intensive care unit (ICU) care becomes rehabilitation. Fatigue, excessive daytime somnolence (EDS), and depression can delay their recovery and potentially worsen outcomes. Psychostimulants, particularly modafinil (Provigil), have been shown to alleviate some of these symptoms in various patient populations, and as clinical trials are underway exploring this novel use of the drug, we present a case series of 3 patients in our institution's Thoracic Surgery Intensive Care Unit. Our 3 patients were chosen as a result of their fatigue, EDS, and/or depression, which prolonged their ICU stay and precluded them from participating in physical therapy, an integral component of the rehabilitative process. The patients were given 200 mg of modafinil each morning to increase patient wakefulness, encourage their participation, and enable a more restful sleep during the night. Although the drug was undoubtedly not the sole reason why our patients became more active, the temporal relationship between starting the drug and our patients' clinical improvement makes it likely that it contributed. Based on our observations with these patients, the known effects of modafinil, its safety profile, and the published experiences of others, we believe that modafinil has potential benefits when utilized in some critically ill patients and that the consequences of delayed patient recovery and a prolonged ICU stay may outweigh the risks of potential modafinil side effects.

  10. Costing of consumables: use in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, S A

    1999-08-01

    In 1991, the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at Middlemore Hospital manually costed the treatment and care of asthmatic patients. This was long-winded and labour-intensive, but provided hard data to support anecdotal beliefs that intensive care patients are more expensive than was currently believed or accepted. It is a known problem that funder and provider organizations see a huge disparity on the funding issue. With additional accurate information on the actual cost of individual patients, which can be grouped into disease categories, funding applications can be backed with accurate, up-to-date quantitative data. After a long preparation time, we are now costing individual patient stays in the ICU. Each individual resource was established, costed and entered into an MS ACCESS computerized database. Schedules have been prepared for updating prices, as these change. The final report available gives a detailed list of resource use within certain categories. Some items proved to be impractical to cost on an individual patient basis, and these have been grouped together, costed, and divided by the number of patient days for the last year, and assigned to each individual patient as an hourly unit cost. Believed to be a world-first, this information now forms the basis for variance reporting and pricing. PMID:10786509

  11. The Use of Modafinil in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, Michal; Weinhouse, Gerald

    2016-02-01

    As patients recover from their critical illness, the focus of intensive care unit (ICU) care becomes rehabilitation. Fatigue, excessive daytime somnolence (EDS), and depression can delay their recovery and potentially worsen outcomes. Psychostimulants, particularly modafinil (Provigil), have been shown to alleviate some of these symptoms in various patient populations, and as clinical trials are underway exploring this novel use of the drug, we present a case series of 3 patients in our institution's Thoracic Surgery Intensive Care Unit. Our 3 patients were chosen as a result of their fatigue, EDS, and/or depression, which prolonged their ICU stay and precluded them from participating in physical therapy, an integral component of the rehabilitative process. The patients were given 200 mg of modafinil each morning to increase patient wakefulness, encourage their participation, and enable a more restful sleep during the night. Although the drug was undoubtedly not the sole reason why our patients became more active, the temporal relationship between starting the drug and our patients' clinical improvement makes it likely that it contributed. Based on our observations with these patients, the known effects of modafinil, its safety profile, and the published experiences of others, we believe that modafinil has potential benefits when utilized in some critically ill patients and that the consequences of delayed patient recovery and a prolonged ICU stay may outweigh the risks of potential modafinil side effects. PMID:25716122

  12. Structure and Function: Planning a New Intensive Care Unit to Optimize Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Kesecioğlu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To survey the recent medical literature reporting effects of intensive care unit (ICU design on patients’ and family members’ well-being, safety and functionality. Features of ICU design linked to the needs of patients and their family are single-rooms, privacy, quiet surrounding, exposure to daylight, views of nature, prevention of infection, a family area and open visiting hours. Other features such as safety, working procedures, ergonomics and logistics have a direct impact on the patient care and the nursing and medical personnel. An organization structured on the needs of the patient and their family is mandatory in designing a new intensive care. The main aims in the design of a new department should be patient centered care, safety, functionality, innovation and a future-proof concept.

  13. 76 FR 13209 - United States and State of Texas v. United Regional Health Care System; Proposed Final Judgment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... an intensive care unit, OB suite, and cardiology department. Today, Kell West has 41 beds. As alleged... beds and additional services, such as additional intensive care capabilities, cardiology services,...

  14. Nasal colonization of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA does not predict subsequent infection in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fisseha Ghidey

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hospital acquired infections with Staphylococcus aureus; especially methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The aim of this study was compare the rates of MRSA infections between MRSA colonized and not-colonized patients. A retrospective, electronic and paper chart review of all adult patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU from 2007 to 2010 was screened for MRSA. Endpoints were pyogenic pneumonia, sepsis, endocarditis, skin and soft tissue infections, osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. Patients who were not screened for MRSA were excluded from the study. A total of 1203 patients were admitted and screened for MRSA colonization on admission to the ICU from 2007 to 2010. Two main groups were made for between colonized and not-colonized based on MRSA screening. Fifty-seven (57 positive colonized and 122 not-colonized patients' charts were randomly selected. The mean age of the study population was 61.7 ± 18.4 (range, 19–94; there were 80 (44.69% males and 99 (55.31% females. The occurrence of infection with MRSA with either lower respiratory tract infection or blood stream infection identified on the time of ICU admission was similar for patients with and without MRSA nasal colonization 3.51% vs. 2.46%; p = 0.459. There was no observed difference in the rates of MRSA infection between those who tested colonized and not-colonized.

  15. Assessment of surfactant use in preterm infants as a marker of neonatal intensive care unit quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorch Scott A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proposed neonatal quality measures have included structural measures such as average daily census, and outcome measures such as mortality and rates of complications of prematurity. However, process measures have remained largely unexamined. The objective of this research was to examine variation in surfactant use as a possible process measure of neonatal quality. Methods We obtained data on infants 30 to 34 weeks gestation admitted with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS within 48 hours of birth to 16 hospitals participating in the Pediatric Health Information Systems database from 2001-2006. Models were developed to describe hospital variation in surfactant use and identify patient and hospital predictors of use. Another cohort of all infants admitted within 24 hours of birth was used to obtain adjusted neonatal intensive care unit (NICU mortality rates. To assess the construct validity of surfactant use as a quality metric, adjusted hospital rates of mortality and surfactant use were compared using Kendall's tau. Results Of 3,633 infants, 46% received surfactant. For individual hospitals, the adjusted odds of surfactant use varied from 2.2 times greater to 5.9 times less than the hospital with the median adjusted odds of surfactant use. Increased annual admissions of extremely low birth weight infants to the NICU were associated with greater surfactant use (OR 1.80, 95% CI 1.02-3.19. The correlation between adjusted hospital rates of surfactant use and in-hospital mortality was 0.37 (Kendall's tau p = 0.051. Conclusions Though results were encouraging, efforts to examine surfactant use in infants with RDS as a process measure reflecting quality of care revealed significant challenges. Difficulties related to adequate measurement including defining RDS using administrative data, accounting for care received prior to transfer, and adjusting for severity of illness will need to be addressed to improve the utility of this

  16. Intensive care unit capacity in low-income countries: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Murthy

    Full Text Available Access to critical care is a crucial component of healthcare systems. In low-income countries, the burden of critical illness is substantial, but the capacity to provide care for critically ill patients in intensive care units (ICUs is unknown. Our aim was to systematically review the published literature to estimate the current ICU capacity in low-income countries.We searched 11 databases and included studies of any design, published 2004-August 2014, with data on ICU capacity for pediatric and adult patients in 36 low-income countries (as defined by World Bank criteria; population 850 million. Neonatal, temporary, and military ICUs were excluded. We extracted data on ICU bed numbers, capacity for mechanical ventilation, and information about the hospital, including referral population size, public accessibility, and the source of funding. Analyses were descriptive.Of 1,759 citations, 43 studies from 15 low-income countries met inclusion criteria. They described 36 individual ICUs in 31 cities, of which 16 had population greater than 500,000, and 14 were capital cities. The median annual ICU admission rate was 401 (IQR 234-711; 24 ICUs with data and median ICU size was 8 beds (IQR 5-10; 32 ICUs with data. The mean ratio of adult and pediatric ICU beds to hospital beds was 1.5% (SD 0.9%; 15 hospitals with data. Nepal and Uganda, the only countries with national ICU bed data, had 16.7 and 1.0 ICU beds per million population, respectively. National data from other countries were not available.Low-income countries lack ICU beds, and more than 50% of these countries lack any published data on ICU capacity. Most ICUs in low-income countries are located in large referral hospitals in cities. A central database of ICU resources is required to evaluate health system performance, both within and between countries, and may help to develop related health policy.

  17. The anatomy of health care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Hamilton; Matheson, David H M; Dorsey, E Ray; George, Benjamin P; Sadoff, David; Yoshimura, Satoshi

    2013-11-13

    Health care in the United States includes a vast array of complex interrelationships among those who receive, provide, and finance care. In this article, publicly available data were used to identify trends in health care, principally from 1980 to 2011, in the source and use of funds ("economic anatomy"), the people receiving and organizations providing care, and the resulting value created and health outcomes. In 2011, US health care employed 15.7% of the workforce, with expenditures of $2.7 trillion, doubling since 1980 as a percentage of US gross domestic product (GDP) to 17.9%. Yearly growth has decreased since 1970, especially since 2002, but, at 3% per year, exceeds any other industry and GDP overall. Government funding increased from 31.1% in 1980 to 42.3% in 2011. Despite the increases in resources devoted to health care, multiple health metrics, including life expectancy at birth and survival with many diseases, shows the United States trailing peer nations. The findings from this analysis contradict several common assumptions. Since 2000, (1) price (especially of hospital charges [+4.2%/y], professional services [3.6%/y], drugs and devices [+4.0%/y], and administrative costs [+5.6%/y]), not demand for services or aging of the population, produced 91% of cost increases; (2) personal out-of-pocket spending on insurance premiums and co-payments have declined from 23% to 11%; and (3) chronic illnesses account for 84% of costs overall among the entire population, not only of the elderly. Three factors have produced the most change: (1) consolidation, with fewer general hospitals and more single-specialty hospitals and physician groups, producing financial concentration in health systems, insurers, pharmacies, and benefit managers; (2) information technology, in which investment has occurred but value is elusive; and (3) the patient as consumer, whereby influence is sought outside traditional channels, using social media, informal networks, new public sources

  18. The anatomy of health care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Hamilton; Matheson, David H M; Dorsey, E Ray; George, Benjamin P; Sadoff, David; Yoshimura, Satoshi

    2013-11-13

    Health care in the United States includes a vast array of complex interrelationships among those who receive, provide, and finance care. In this article, publicly available data were used to identify trends in health care, principally from 1980 to 2011, in the source and use of funds ("economic anatomy"), the people receiving and organizations providing care, and the resulting value created and health outcomes. In 2011, US health care employed 15.7% of the workforce, with expenditures of $2.7 trillion, doubling since 1980 as a percentage of US gross domestic product (GDP) to 17.9%. Yearly growth has decreased since 1970, especially since 2002, but, at 3% per year, exceeds any other industry and GDP overall. Government funding increased from 31.1% in 1980 to 42.3% in 2011. Despite the increases in resources devoted to health care, multiple health metrics, including life expectancy at birth and survival with many diseases, shows the United States trailing peer nations. The findings from this analysis contradict several common assumptions. Since 2000, (1) price (especially of hospital charges [+4.2%/y], professional services [3.6%/y], drugs and devices [+4.0%/y], and administrative costs [+5.6%/y]), not demand for services or aging of the population, produced 91% of cost increases; (2) personal out-of-pocket spending on insurance premiums and co-payments have declined from 23% to 11%; and (3) chronic illnesses account for 84% of costs overall among the entire population, not only of the elderly. Three factors have produced the most change: (1) consolidation, with fewer general hospitals and more single-specialty hospitals and physician groups, producing financial concentration in health systems, insurers, pharmacies, and benefit managers; (2) information technology, in which investment has occurred but value is elusive; and (3) the patient as consumer, whereby influence is sought outside traditional channels, using social media, informal networks, new public sources

  19. Intermittent Demand Forecasting in a Tertiary Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chen-Yang; Chiang, Kuo-Liang; Chen, Meng-Yin

    2016-10-01

    Forecasts of the demand for medical supplies both directly and indirectly affect the operating costs and the quality of the care provided by health care institutions. Specifically, overestimating demand induces an inventory surplus, whereas underestimating demand possibly compromises patient safety. Uncertainty in forecasting the consumption of medical supplies generates intermittent demand events. The intermittent demand patterns for medical supplies are generally classified as lumpy, erratic, smooth, and slow-moving demand. This study was conducted with the purpose of advancing a tertiary pediatric intensive care unit's efforts to achieve a high level of accuracy in its forecasting of the demand for medical supplies. On this point, several demand forecasting methods were compared in terms of the forecast accuracy of each. The results confirm that applying Croston's method combined with a single exponential smoothing method yields the most accurate results for forecasting lumpy, erratic, and slow-moving demand, whereas the Simple Moving Average (SMA) method is the most suitable for forecasting smooth demand. In addition, when the classification of demand consumption patterns were combined with the demand forecasting models, the forecasting errors were minimized, indicating that this classification framework can play a role in improving patient safety and reducing inventory management costs in health care institutions. PMID:27562485

  20. Intermittent Demand Forecasting in a Tertiary Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chen-Yang; Chiang, Kuo-Liang; Chen, Meng-Yin

    2016-10-01

    Forecasts of the demand for medical supplies both directly and indirectly affect the operating costs and the quality of the care provided by health care institutions. Specifically, overestimating demand induces an inventory surplus, whereas underestimating demand possibly compromises patient safety. Uncertainty in forecasting the consumption of medical supplies generates intermittent demand events. The intermittent demand patterns for medical supplies are generally classified as lumpy, erratic, smooth, and slow-moving demand. This study was conducted with the purpose of advancing a tertiary pediatric intensive care unit's efforts to achieve a high level of accuracy in its forecasting of the demand for medical supplies. On this point, several demand forecasting methods were compared in terms of the forecast accuracy of each. The results confirm that applying Croston's method combined with a single exponential smoothing method yields the most accurate results for forecasting lumpy, erratic, and slow-moving demand, whereas the Simple Moving Average (SMA) method is the most suitable for forecasting smooth demand. In addition, when the classification of demand consumption patterns were combined with the demand forecasting models, the forecasting errors were minimized, indicating that this classification framework can play a role in improving patient safety and reducing inventory management costs in health care institutions.

  1. Nurses Empathy and Family Needs in the Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Moghaddasian

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The patients’ families in intensive care units (ICUs experience excessive stress which may disrupt their performance in daily life. Empathy is basic to the nursing role and has been found to be associated with improved patient outcomes and greater satisfaction with care in patient and his/her family. However, few studies have investigated the nursing empathy with ICU patients. This study aimed to assess nursing empathy and its relationship with the needs, from the perspective of families of patients in ICU.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 418 subjects were selected among families of patients admitted to ICUs in Tabriz, Iran, by convenience sampling, from May to August 2012. Data were collected through Barrett-Lennard Relationship inventory (BLRI empathy scale and Critical Care Family Needs Intervention (CCFNI inventories and were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistical tests. Results: Findings showed that most of the nurses had high level of empathy to the patients (38.8%. There was also statistically significant relationship between nurses’ empathy and needs of patients’ families (p < 0.001. Conclusion: In this study we found that by increasing the nurse’s empathy skills, we would be able to improve providing family needs. Through empathic communication, nurses can encourage family members to participate in planning for the care of their patients. However, further studies are necessary to confirm the results.

  2. Acceptable long-term outcome in elderly intensive care unit patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Morten; Poulsen, Jesper Brøndum; Perner, Anders

    2011-01-01

    The number of elderly intensive care unit (ICU) patients is increasing. We therefore assessed the long-term outcome in the elderly following intensive care.......The number of elderly intensive care unit (ICU) patients is increasing. We therefore assessed the long-term outcome in the elderly following intensive care....

  3. [Information system at Department of Cardiac Surgery Intensive Care Unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokozić, Josipa

    2014-03-01

    This paper analyzes the aspects of using computer technology in nursing practice. Transfer and managing of data, information and knowledge in nursing is enabled by using modern technology and suitable applications. Cardio applications at the Intensive Care Unit of Department of Cardiac Surgery in Osijek enables nurses/technicians to gain insight into patient personal data, medical history, microbiological findings, interventions that have been made as well as those scheduled in the field of health care, all this by using a few simple connections. Nurses/technicians are those who enter patient data into his/her Electronic Health Record. There are multiple contributions of cardiac system. In comparison with previous paper-based managing of nursing documentation, this program has considerably facilitated and improved nursing practice.

  4. Acinetobacter baumannii Infection in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMK AL Jarousha

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: To perform a prospective case control study of blood stream infection to determine the infection rate of Acine­tobac­ter baumannii and the risk factors associated with mortality."nMethods:   From February 2004 to January 2005, 579 consecutive episodes of blood stream infection were obtained at two neo­na­tal intensive care units Al Nasser and Al Shifa hospitals in Gaza City. Forty (6.9% isolates of A. baumannii were ob­tained from the neonates under 28 d. Most of the isolates (92% were from hospitalized patients in the intensive care units."nResults: Community acquired infection was 8%.  Sixty three percent of the patients were males. The isolates of A. bauman­nii were resistant to commonly used antibiotics while being sensitive to meropenem (92.5%, imipenem (90%, chloram­pheni­col (80%, ciprofloxacin (75%, gentamicin (57.5%, ceftriaxone (50%, amikacin (37.5%, cefuroxime and ce­fo­taxime (35%. Over all crude mortality rate was 20% with much higher crude mortality among patients with noso­co­mial infec­tion.  Based on logistic regression, the following factors were statistically significant: weight < 1500g, age < 7 d, mean of hospitalization equal 20 days, antibiotic use, and mechanical ventilation, when compared to the control group (P< 0.05."nConclusion:  Infection rate of nosocomial blood stream infection was considerable and alarming in neonatal intensive care unit infants and associated with a significant excess length of NICU stay and a significant economic burden.  

  5. The influence of care interventions on the continuity of sleep of intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Luiza Hamze

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify care interventions, performed by the health team, and their influence on the continuity of sleep of patients hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit.Method: descriptive study with a sample of 12 patients. A filming technique was used for the data collection. The awakenings from sleep were measured using the actigraphy method. The analysis of the data was descriptive, processed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software.Results: 529 care interventions were identified, grouped into 28 different types, of which 12 (42.8% caused awakening from sleep for the patients. A mean of 44.1 interventions/patient/day was observed, with 1.8 interventions/patient/hour. The administration of oral medicine and food were the interventions that caused higher frequencies of awakenings in the patients.Conclusion: it was identified that the health care interventions can harm the sleep of ICU patients. It is recommended that health professionals rethink the planning of interventions according to the individual demand of the patients, with the diversification of schedules and introduction of new practices to improve the quality of sleep of Intensive Care Unit patients.

  6. Stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, M; Perner, A; Wetterslev, J;

    2015-01-01

    frequent reason for discontinuing SUP, but 19% (18/97) continued SUP upon ICU discharge. The majority expressed concern about nosocomial pneumonia and Clostridium difficile infection with the use of SUP. CONCLUSIONS: In this international survey, most participating ICUs reported using SUP, primarily proton......BACKGROUND: Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) may decrease the incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients in the intensive care unit (ICU), but the risk of infection may be increased. In this study, we aimed to describe SUP practices in adult ICUs. We hypothesised that patient selection...

  7. Assessment of brain death in the neurocritical care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, David Y; Gilmore, Emily J; Greer, David M

    2013-07-01

    This article reviews current guidelines for death by neurologic criteria and addresses topics relevant to the determination of brain death in the intensive care unit. The history of brain death as a concept leads into a discussion of the evolution of practice parameters, focusing on the most recent 2010 update from the American Academy of Neurology and the practice variability that exists worldwide. Proper transition from brain death determination to possible organ donation is reviewed. This review concludes with a discussion regarding ethical and religious concerns and suggestions on how families of patients who may be brain dead might be optimally approached. PMID:23809039

  8. Non-invasive respiratory monitoring in paediatric intensive care unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadkarni U

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring respiratory function is important in a Paediatrics Intensive Care Unit (PICU, as majority of patients have cardio-respiratory problems. Non-invasive monitoring is convenient, accurate, and has minimal complications. Along with clinical monitoring, oxygen saturation using pulse oximetry, transcutaneous oxygenation (PtcO2 and transcutaneous PCO2 (PtcCO2 using transcutaneous monitors and end-tidal CO2 using capnography are important and routine measurements done in most PICUs. Considering the financial and maintenance constraints pulse oximetry with end tidal CO2 monitoring can be considered as most feasible.

  9. 76 FR 35017 - United States et al. v. United Regional Health Care System; Public Comments and Response on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-15

    ... effectively prevented insurers from contracting with United Regional's competitors (``exclusionary contracts... entry of its competitors, likely leading to higher health-care costs and higher health insurance... competitors. The Complaint sought to enjoin United Regional from entering exclusionary contracts with...

  10. Target value design: applications to newborn intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybkowski, Zofia K; Shepley, Mardelle McCuskey; Ballard, H Glenn

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for greater understanding of the health impact of various design elements in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) as well as cost-benefit information to make informed decisions about the long-term value of design decisions. This is particularly evident when design teams are considering the transition from open-bay NICUs to single-family-room (SFR) units. This paper introduces the guiding principles behind target value design (TVD)-a price-led design methodology that is gaining acceptance in healthcare facility design within the Lean construction methodology. The paper also discusses the role that set-based design plays in TVD and its application to NICUs.

  11. Target value design: applications to newborn intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybkowski, Zofia K; Shepley, Mardelle McCuskey; Ballard, H Glenn

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for greater understanding of the health impact of various design elements in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) as well as cost-benefit information to make informed decisions about the long-term value of design decisions. This is particularly evident when design teams are considering the transition from open-bay NICUs to single-family-room (SFR) units. This paper introduces the guiding principles behind target value design (TVD)-a price-led design methodology that is gaining acceptance in healthcare facility design within the Lean construction methodology. The paper also discusses the role that set-based design plays in TVD and its application to NICUs. PMID:23224803

  12. Antibiotic prescription and cost patterns in a general intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krivoy N

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic prescription habits, cost pattern, and the prospective intervention in an Intensive Care Unit were analyzed. Methods: Data on antibiotic utilization and costs were collected prospectively from individual electronic charts from August 2003 to January 2004, and retrospectively from August to December 2002. Results: A total of 180 and 107 patients were surveyed in 2002 and 2003. In 2002, Piperacillin-Tazobactam (13.8% and Imipenem/Cilastin (11.2% were the most prescribed medications; while, in 2003, Vancomycin (12.6% and Imipenem/Cilastin (11.3% were prescribed, respectively. Total defined daily dose (DDD and Drug Utilization 90% (DU90% index for 2002 and 2003 were 2031.15 and 2325.90 DDDs (p>0.1 and 1777.57 and 2079.61 DU90%, respectively (p>0.1. The Median Total Cost /100 admission days (CI 95% were NIS13,310 (11,110;18,420 and NIS13,860 (6,710;18,020 (p=0.66, respectively. Conclusions: Interventional programs should focus on promoting infectious control with rational antibiotic prescription aimed at minimizing the future emergence of bacterial resistance and futile expenses.

  13. Cerebral Malaria Treated with Artemisinin in the Intensive Care Unit: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çizmeci, Elif Ayşe; Kelebek Girgin, Nermin; Ceylan, Ilkay; Tuncel, Tekin; Alver, Oktay; Akalin, Emin Halis

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a parasitic disease that is starting to be encountered in intensive care units (ICU) worldwide, owing to increasing globalisation. Severe malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum, is characterised by cerebral malaria, acute renal failure, hypoglycaemia, severe anaemia, splenomegaly and alveolar oedema. We present the case of a 25-yr old male patient who presented to the Emergency Department of Uludag University in Bursa, Turkey in the winter of 2014 with complaints of fever for three days. His medical history revealed a 14-month stay in Tanzania. Staining of blood smears revealed characteristic gametocytes in accordance with P. falciparum infection. The day after admission, he had an epileptic seizure after which his Glasgow Coma Scale was 6, so he was intubated and transferred to the ICU. A computerized tomography scan revealed findings of cerebral oedema. Intravenous mannitol was administered for 6 days. Intravenous artemisinin was continued for 10 days. Due to refractory fevers, anti-malarial treatment was switched to quinine and doxycycline on the 14th day and on the 16th day the fevers ceased. This case emphasizes that cerebral malaria should be suspected in cases of seizures accompanying malaria, and treatment should be initiated in the ICU. Furthermore, resistance of P. falciparum to artemisinin should be in mind when a response to therapy is lacking. PMID:27095978

  14. Acute medical assessment units: an efficient alternative to in-hospital acute medical care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Watts, M

    2011-02-01

    Acute Medical Assessment Units (AMAUs) are being proposed as an alternative to congested Emergency Departments (EDs for the assessment of patients with a range of acute medical problems. We retrospectively reviewed the discharge destination of patients referred to a newly established AMAU during a six-month period. During the same period we contrasted activity in the ED for a similar group of patients. 1,562 patients were assessed in the AMAU. 196 (12.5%) were admitted to an in-patient bed and 1,148 (73.5%) were entered into specific diagnosis-driven out-patient pathways. 1,465 patients attended the ED and 635 (43.3%) were admitted. Out-patient alternatives to expensive in-patient care need to be provided at the \\'coal face" of acute referral. The AMAU provides this, and as a consequence admission rates are relatively low. This is achieved by directly communicating with GPs, accessing senior clinical decision makers, and providing immediate access to diagnostically driven outpatient pathways.

  15. Cerebral Malaria Treated with Artemisinin in the Intensive Care Unit: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Ayşe ÇİZMECİ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a parasitic disease that is starting to be encountered in intensive care units (ICU worldwide, owing to increasing globalisation. Severe malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum, is characterised by cerebral malaria, acute renal failure, hypoglycaemia, severe anaemia, splenomegaly and alveolar oedema. We present the case of a 25-yr old male patient who presented to the Emergency Department of Uludag University in Bursa, Turkey in the winter of 2014 with complaints of fe­ver for three days. His medical history revealed a 14-month stay in Tanzania. Staining of blood smears revealed characteristic gametocytes in accordance with P. falciparum infection. The day after admission, he had an epileptic seizure after which his Glasgow Coma Scale was 6, so he was intubated and transferred to the ICU. A computerized tomography scan revealed findings of cerebral oedema. Intravenous mannitol was administered for 6 days. Intravenous artemisinin was continued for 10 days. Due to refractory fevers, anti-malarial treatment was switched to quinine and doxycycline on the 14th day and on the 16th day the fe­vers ceased. This case emphasizes that cerebral malaria should be suspected in cases of seizures accompanying malaria, and treatment should be initiated in the ICU. Furthermore, resistance of P. falciparum to artemisinin should be in mind when a response to therapy is lacking.

  16. Acute Bronchiolitis. Which Patients Should Be Admitted to Intensive Care Units?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Efrén Uriarte Méndez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bronchiolitis is the most common viral infection of the lower respiratory tract in childhood; it is considered the most severe respiratory condition that affects children under 2 years of age. In general, mortality from bronchiolitis is low, but it can reach up to 30% in patients at risk. Twenty children have died from this condition in the pediatric hospital of Cienfuegos in the last 30 years. Bronchiolitis-related deaths account for approximately 4 % of all deaths from 2010 to date. This fact has led to the implementation of administrative measures to reduce deaths from this cause, which have not solved the problem. The aim of this paper is to present a set of criteria for admission of bronchiolitis patients to intensive care units in order to be considered by the administrators of the institution. These criteria based on the authors’ experience and scientific evidence reflected in the literature focus on preventing overcrowding of this service with patients not showing signs of serious condition, and on the contrary, timely identifying those likely to have an unfavourable outcome.

  17. RAPID MOLECULAR DETECTION OF METHICILLIN-RESISTANT S. AUREUS IN THE INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective Molecular detection of methicillin-resistant S. aureus(MRSA)in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU)will be helpful for the control of transmission among patients. Methods Both mecA and femB genes of 233 patients in ICU were examined ICU by polymerase chain reaction(PCR) for the presence of MRSA. Swabs were taken from various sites, such as axilla,nose , skin lesions and throat, and incubated over night in salt broth cultures. Results One hundred and five of patients(45.06%) were positive for mecA gene, twenty six(11. 16%)were femB positive and fifteen (6%) patients were positive for MRSA, and such screening data were available within 6~ 7 h fol- lowing admission. Conclusion Specific PCR approaches is helpful for routine conventional diagnosis of MRSA, mecA/femB PCR detection offers a rapid and specific alternative for screening MRSA from patients in high-risk ar- eas.

  18. Cerebral Malaria Treated with Artemisinin in the Intensive Care Unit: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çizmeci, Elif Ayşe; Kelebek Girgin, Nermin; Ceylan, Ilkay; Tuncel, Tekin; Alver, Oktay; Akalin, Emin Halis

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a parasitic disease that is starting to be encountered in intensive care units (ICU) worldwide, owing to increasing globalisation. Severe malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum, is characterised by cerebral malaria, acute renal failure, hypoglycaemia, severe anaemia, splenomegaly and alveolar oedema. We present the case of a 25-yr old male patient who presented to the Emergency Department of Uludag University in Bursa, Turkey in the winter of 2014 with complaints of fever for three days. His medical history revealed a 14-month stay in Tanzania. Staining of blood smears revealed characteristic gametocytes in accordance with P. falciparum infection. The day after admission, he had an epileptic seizure after which his Glasgow Coma Scale was 6, so he was intubated and transferred to the ICU. A computerized tomography scan revealed findings of cerebral oedema. Intravenous mannitol was administered for 6 days. Intravenous artemisinin was continued for 10 days. Due to refractory fevers, anti-malarial treatment was switched to quinine and doxycycline on the 14th day and on the 16th day the fevers ceased. This case emphasizes that cerebral malaria should be suspected in cases of seizures accompanying malaria, and treatment should be initiated in the ICU. Furthermore, resistance of P. falciparum to artemisinin should be in mind when a response to therapy is lacking.

  19. [Evaluation of the status of patients with severe infection, criteria for intensive care unit admittance. Spanish Society for Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology. Spanish Society of Intensive and Critical Medicine and Coronary Units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaechea, Pedro M; Alvarez-Lerma, Francisco; Sánchez, Miguel; Torres, Antonio; Palomar, Mercedes; Fernández, Pedro; Miró, José M; Cisneros, José Miguel; Torres, Manuel

    2009-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that early attention in patients with serious infections is associated with a better outcome. Assistance in intensive care units (ICU) can effectively provide this attention; hence patients should be admitted to the ICU as soon as possible, before clinical deterioration becomes irreversible. The objective of this article is to compile the recommendations for evaluating disease severity in patients with infections and describe the criteria for ICU admission, updating the criteria published 10 years ago. A literature review was carried out, compiling the opinions of experts from the Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica (SEIMC, Spanish Society for Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology) and the Sociedad Española de Medicina Intensiva, Crítica y Unidades Coronarias (SEMICYUC, Spanish Society for Intensive Medicine, Critical Care and Coronary Units) as well as the working groups for infections in critically ill patients (GEIPC-SEIMC and GTEI-SEMICYUC). We describe the specific recommendations for ICU admission related to the most common infections affecting patients, who will potentially benefit from critical care. Assessment of the severity of the patient's condition to enable early intensive care is stressed.

  20. Variation in the use of alternative levels of hospital care for newborns in a managed care organization.

    OpenAIRE

    Roblin, D. W.; Richardson, D K; Thomas, E; Fitzgerald, F; Veintimilla, R.; Hulac, P.; Bemis, G.; Leon, L.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE(S): To assess the extent to which variation in the use of neonatal intensive care resources in a managed care organization is a consequence of variation in neonatal health risks and/or variation in the organization and delivery of medical care to newborns. STUDY DESIGN: Data were collected on a cohort of all births from four sites in Kaiser Permanente by retrospective medical chart abstraction of the birth admission. Likelihood of admission into a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)...

  1. Utility of electroencephalogram in altered states of consciousness in intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapadia F

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: EEG is an investigative tool for assessing cerebral activity. Although certain EEG patterns may have a specific diagnostic or prognostic inference, they may not be precise for any sole etiology in majority of cases and may need clinical correlation. OBJECTIVE: Aim of this study was to assess the severity and prognosis of cerebral dysfunction in patients admitted to Intensive Care Unit (ICU and to evaluate the incidence of non-convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE. DESIGN: A prospective study, wherein we analyzed EEG characteristics in a series of 70 patients. SETTING: A tertiary care hospital in Mumbai, India. PATIENTS: EEG characteristics of 70 patients admitted in ICU over a period of 9 months were comprehensively analyzed. These patients were clinically examined and a questionnaire was completed without knowledge of the EEG findings. EEGs were requested for by neurologist or intensivist and our inclusion criteria were (i patients with altered sensorium of varying etiology, (ii unconscious patients at risk for non-convulsive status epilepticus (those with a history of epilepsy, and (iii unconscious patients with involuntary jerky eye movements. RESULTS: Of the various clinical presentations on ICU admission, there were 20 patients with seizures, 15 with metabolic disorders, 13 with infective causes, 9 with hypoxia, 9 with cerebro-vascular accident on presentation, 1 patient with alcohol/drug overdose, 2 with intra-cerebral space occupying lesion and 1 with ambiguous etiology on admission (there being an overlap among the presentation. Mean duration from presentation to performing EEG was 13 hours. 64 (91.42% patients had abnormal EEGs. 32(50% patients had EEG slowing and 4(6.25% patient had electro cerebral inactivity. Eleven (21.87% patients had epileptiform activity on the EEG of which seven did not have overt seizures (NCSE. Follow-up EEGs of these patients showed resolution of the epileptiform activity. CONCLUSIONS: EEG is useful

  2. Arterial pulmonary hypertension in noncardiac intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola V Tsapenko

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Mykola V Tsapenko1,5, Arseniy V Tsapenko2, Thomas BO Comfere3,5, Girish K Mour1,5, Sunil V Mankad4, Ognjen Gajic1,51Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine; 3Division of Critical Care Medicine; 4Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Epidemiology and Translational Research in Intensive Care (M.E.T.R.I.C, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Brown University, Miriam Hospital, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Pulmonary artery pressure elevation complicates the course of many complex disorders treated in a noncardiac intensive care unit. Acute pulmonary hypertension, however, remains underdiagnosed and its treatment frequently begins only after serious complications have developed. Significant pathophysiologic differences between acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension make current classification and treatment recommendations for chronic pulmonary hypertension barely applicable to acute pulmonary hypertension. In order to clarify the terminology of acute pulmonary hypertension and distinguish it from chronic pulmonary hypertension, we provide a classification of acute pulmonary hypertension according to underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, clinical features, natural history, and response to treatment. Based on available data, therapy of acute arterial pulmonary hypertension should generally be aimed at acutely relieving right ventricular (RV pressure overload and preventing RV dysfunction. Cases of severe acute pulmonary hypertension complicated by RV failure and systemic arterial hypotension are real clinical challenges requiring tight hemodynamic monitoring and aggressive treatment including combinations of pulmonary vasodilators, inotropic agents and systemic arterial vasoconstrictors. The choice of vasopressor and inotropes in patients with acute pulmonary hypertension should take into consideration their effects on vascular resistance and cardiac output when used alone or in

  3. Quality of care assessment in geriatric evaluation and management units: construction of a chart review tool for a tracer condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latour Judith

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of elderly people requiring hospital care is growing, so, quality and assessment of care for elders are emerging and complex areas of research. Very few validated and reliable instruments exist for the assessment of quality of acute care in this field. This study's objective was to create such a tool for Geriatric Evaluation and Management Units (GEMUs. Methods The methodology involved a reliability and feasibility study of a retrospective chart review on 934 older inpatients admitted in 49 GEMUs during the year 2002–2003 for fall-related trauma as a tracer condition. Pertinent indicators for a chart abstraction tool, the Geriatric Care Tool (GCT, were developed and validated according to five dimensions: access to care, comprehensiveness, continuity of care, patient-centred care and appropriateness. Consensus methods were used to develop the content. Participants were experts representing eight main health care professions involved in GEMUs from 19 different sites. Items associated with high quality of care at each step of the multidisciplinary management of patients admitted due to falls were identified. The GCT was tested for intra- and inter-rater reliability using 30 medical charts reviewed by each of three independent and blinded trained nurses. Kappa and agreement measures between pairs of chart reviewers were computed on an item-by-item basis. Results Three quarters of 169 items identifying the process of care, from the case history to discharge planning, demonstrated good agreement (kappa greater than 0.40 and agreement over 70%. Indicators for the appropriateness of care showed less reliability. Conclusion Content validity and reliability results, as well as the feasibility of the process, suggest that the chart abstraction tool can gather standardized and pertinent clinical information for further evaluating quality of care in GEMU using admission due to falls as a tracer condition. However, the GCT

  4. [DEVELOPMENTAL CARE IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT ACCORDING TO NEWBORN INDIVIDUALIZED DEVELOPMENTAL CARE AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM (NIDCAP)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Dalia; Litmanovitz, Ita

    2016-01-01

    During hospitalization in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), the brain of the preterm infant undergoes a particularly vulnerable and sensitive period of development. Brain development might be negatively influenced by direct injury as well as by complications of prematurity. Over the past few years, stress has come to be increasingly recognized as a potential risk factor. The NICU environment contains numerous stress factors due to maternal deprivation and over-stimulation, such as light, sound and pain, which conflict with the brain's developmental requirements. Developmental care is a caregiving approach that addresses the early developmental needs of the preterm infant as an integral component of quality neonatal care. NIDCAP (Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program) is a comprehensive program that aims to reduce environmental stress, to support the infant's neuro-behavioral maturation and organization, and to promote early parent-infant relationships. The implementation of developmental care based on NIDCAP principles is a gradual, in-depth systems change process, which affects all aspects of care in the NICU. This review describes the theoretical basis of the NIDCAP approach, summarizes the scientific evidence and addresses some of the implications of the transition from a traditional to a developmental care NICU.

  5. Outcomes of an innovative model of acute delirium care: the Geriatric Monitoring Unit (GMU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong MS

    2014-04-01

    s recovery from the delirium episode. Conclusion: This study shows the benefits of a specialized delirium management unit for older persons. The GMU model is thus a relevant system of care for rapidly “graying” nations with high rates of frail elderly hospital admissions, which can be easily transposed across acute care settings. Keywords: delirium, function, elderly

  6. Measuring the quality of therapeutic apheresis care in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussmane, Jeffrey B; Torbati, Dan; Gitlow, Howard S

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to measure the quality of care provided in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) during Therapeutic Apheresis (TA). We described the care as a step by step process. We designed a flow chart to carefully document each step of the process. We then defined each step with a unique clinical indictor (CI) that represented the exact task we felt provided quality care. These CIs were studied and modified for 1 year. We measured our performance in this process by the number of times we accomplished the CI vs. the total number of CIs that were to be performed. The degree of compliance, with these clinical indicators, was analyzed and used as a metric for quality by calculating how close the process is running exactly as planned or "in control." The Apheresis Process was in control (compliance) for 47% of the indicators, as measured in the aggregate for the first observational year. We then applied the theory of Total Quality Management (TQM) through our Design, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control (DMAIC) model. We were able to improve the process and bring it into control by increasing the compliance to > 99.74%, in the aggregate, for the third and fourth quarter of the second year. We have implemented TQM to increase compliance, thus control, of a highly complex and multidisciplinary Pediatric Intensive Care therapy. We have shown a reproducible and scalable measure of quality for a complex clinical process in the PICU, without additional capital expenditure.

  7. Measuring the quality of therapeutic apheresis care in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussmane, Jeffrey B; Torbati, Dan; Gitlow, Howard S

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to measure the quality of care provided in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) during Therapeutic Apheresis (TA). We described the care as a step by step process. We designed a flow chart to carefully document each step of the process. We then defined each step with a unique clinical indictor (CI) that represented the exact task we felt provided quality care. These CIs were studied and modified for 1 year. We measured our performance in this process by the number of times we accomplished the CI vs. the total number of CIs that were to be performed. The degree of compliance, with these clinical indicators, was analyzed and used as a metric for quality by calculating how close the process is running exactly as planned or "in control." The Apheresis Process was in control (compliance) for 47% of the indicators, as measured in the aggregate for the first observational year. We then applied the theory of Total Quality Management (TQM) through our Design, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control (DMAIC) model. We were able to improve the process and bring it into control by increasing the compliance to > 99.74%, in the aggregate, for the third and fourth quarter of the second year. We have implemented TQM to increase compliance, thus control, of a highly complex and multidisciplinary Pediatric Intensive Care therapy. We have shown a reproducible and scalable measure of quality for a complex clinical process in the PICU, without additional capital expenditure. PMID:22095668

  8. Nurses’ Burnout in Oncology Hospital Critical Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeliz İrem Tunçel

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Burnout is common in intensive care units (ICU because of high demands and difficult working conditions. The aim of this study was to analyse nurses’ burnout in our oncology ICU and to determine which factors are associated with. Material and Method: The study was carried out in Ankara Oncology Hospital ICU. A self- reporting questionnaire in an envelope was used for the evaluation of burnout (Turkish- language version of Maslach Burnout Inventory and depression (Beck Depression Scale. Results: From a total of 37 ICU nurses, 35 participated in the study (%94,5 response rate. High levels of emotional exhaustion in 82% and depersonalization in 51,4% of nurses was determined. Personal accomplishment was higher at 80%. Mild to moderate emotional state and mild anxiety was revealed. Years in profession,finding salary insufficient, finding the profession in its proper, choosing the profession of his own accord, work environment satisfaction and finding the social activity adequate were associated with burnout (p≤0.05. Conclusion: In our study, intensive care unit nurses’ burnout scores were found to be higher. Burnout was rare in nurses that choose the profession of his own accord, find the nursing profession in its proper, and social activity adequate and are satisfied with the work environment. Therefore, we believe that attention should be given to individual needs and preferences in the selection of ICU staff.

  9. Relation between volume and outcome for patients with severe sepsis in United Kingdom: retrospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Shahin, Jason; Harrison, David A.; Rowan, Kathryn M

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether a relation exists between volume and outcome for admissions with severe sepsis to adult general critical care units in the United Kingdom. Design Retrospective cohort study using data from a pooled case mix and outcome database. Setting Adult general critical care units participating in the case mix programme. Participants Consecutive admissions to participating units for the years 2008-09 meeting objective, standardised criteria for severe sepsis. Main outcome m...

  10. Validity and reliability of the Thai version of the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit (CAM-ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pipanmekaporn T

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Tanyong Pipanmekaporn,1 Nahathai Wongpakaran,2 Sirirat Mueankwan,3 Piyawat Dendumrongkul,2 Kaweesak Chittawatanarat,3 Nantiya Khongpheng,3 Nongnut Duangsoy31Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 2Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 3Division of Surgical Critical Care and Trauma, Department of Surgery, Chiang Mai University Hospital, Chiang Mai, ThailandPurpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the validity and reliability of the Thai version of the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit (CAM-ICU, when compared to the diagnoses made by delirium experts.Patients and methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in both surgical intensive care and subintensive care units in Thailand between February–June 2011. Seventy patients aged 60 years or older who had been admitted to the units were enrolled into the study within the first 48 hours of admission. Each patient was randomly assessed as to whether they had delirium by a nurse using the Thai version of the CAM-ICU algorithm (Thai CAM-ICU or by a delirium expert using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision.Results: The prevalence of delirium was found to be 18.6% (n=13 by the delirium experts. The sensitivity of the Thai CAM-ICU’s algorithms was found to be 92.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] =64.0%-99.8%, while the specificity was 94.7% (95% CI =85.4%-98.9%. The instrument displayed good interrater reliability (Cohen’s κ=0.81; 95% CI =0.64-0.99. The time taken to complete the Thai CAM-ICU was 1 minute (interquatile range, 1-2 minutes.Conclusion: The Thai CAM-ICU demonstrated good validity, reliability, and ease of use when diagnosing delirium in a surgical intensive care unit setting. The use of this diagnostic tool should be encouraged for daily, routine use, so as to promote the early detection

  11. [Nursing care systematization at the intensive care unit (ICU) based on Wanda Horta's theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amante, Lúcia Nazareth; Rossetto, Annelise Paula; Schneider, Dulcinéia Ghizoni

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement the Nursing Care Systematization--Sistematização da Assistência de Enfermagem (SAE)--with Wanda Aguiar Horta's Theory of Basic Human Necessities and the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association's (NANDA) Nursing Diagnosis as its references. The starting point was the evaluation of the knowledge of the nursing team about the SAE, including their participation in this process. This is a qualitative study, performed in the Intensive Care Unit in a hospital in the city of Brusque, Santa Catarina, from October, 2006 to March, 2007. It was observed that the nursing professionals know little about SAE, but they are greatly interested in learning and developing it in their daily practice. In conclusion, it was possible to execute the healthcare systematization in an easy way, with the use of simple brochures that provided all the necessary information for the qualified development of nursing care.

  12. [Treatment in the Intensive Care Unit: continue or withdraw?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelkoul, Claudia; de Graeff, Nienke; Kompanje, Erwin J O; Tjan, Dave H T

    2016-01-01

    End-of-life decision-making in the Intensive Care Unit is a common and complex process. The step-by-step process of decision-making leading to withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment is illustrated in this paper by a clinical case. A variety of factors influences the decision to adjust the initial curative treatment policy towards withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy and the pursuit of comfort care. For a smooth decision-making process, it is necessary to make a prognosis and obtain consensus amongst the healthcare team. Withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment is ultimately a medical decision and a consensual decision should be reached by all medical staff and nurses, and preferably also by the patient and family. Timely involvement of a legal representative of the patient is essential for an uncomplicated decision-making process. Advance care planning and advance directives provide opportunities for patients to express their preferences beforehand. It is important to realise that end-of-life decisions are significantly influenced by personal and cultural values. PMID:27050494

  13. Let Them In: Family Presence during Intensive Care Unit Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beesley, Sarah J; Hopkins, Ramona O; Francis, Leslie; Chapman, Diane; Johnson, Joclynn; Johnson, Nathanael; Brown, Samuel M

    2016-07-01

    Families have for decades advocated for full access to intensive care units (ICUs) and meaningful partnership with clinicians, resulting in gradual improvements in family access and collaboration with ICU clinicians. Despite such advances, family members in adult ICUs are still commonly asked to leave the patient's room during invasive bedside procedures, regardless of whether the patient would prefer family to be present. Physicians may be resistant to having family members at the bedside due to concerns about trainee education, medicolegal implications, possible effects on the technical quality of procedures due to distractions, and procedural sterility. Limited evidence from parallel settings does not support these concerns. Family presence during ICU procedures, when the patient and family member both desire it, fulfills the mandates of patient-centered care. We anticipate that such inclusion will increase family engagement, improve patient and family satisfaction, and may, on the basis of studies of open visitation, pediatric ICU experience, and family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, decrease psychological distress in patients and family members. We believe these goals can be achieved without compromising the quality of patient care, increasing provider burden significantly, or increasing risks of litigation. In this article, we weigh current evidence, consider historical objections to family presence at ICU procedures, and report our clinical experience with the practice. An outline for implementing family procedural presence in the ICU is also presented. PMID:27104301

  14. Effectiveness of pre-admission data and letters of recommendation to predict students who will need professional behavior intervention during clinical rotations in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhard, Chalee; Leugers, Rebecca; Stephan, Jenna

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed at finding the value of letters of recommendation in predicting professional behavior problems in the clinical portion of a Doctor of Physical Therapy program learning cohorts from 2009-2014 in the United States. De-identified records of 137 Doctor of Physical Therapy graduates were examined by the descriptive statistics and comparison analysis. Thirty letters of recommendation were investigated based on grounded theory from 10 student applications with 5 randomly selected students of interest and 5 non-students of interest. Critical thinking, organizational skills, and judgement were statistically significant and quantitative differentiating characteristics. Qualitatively, significant characteristics of the student of interest included effective communication and cultural competency. Meanwhile, those of nonstudents of interest included conflicting personality descriptor, commitment to learning, balance, teamwork skills, potential future success, compatible learning skills, effective leadership skills, and emotional intelligence. Emerged significant characteristics did not consistently match common non-professional behavior issues encountered in clinic. Pre-admission data and letters of recommendation appear of limited value in predicting professional behavior performance in clinic.

  15. Effectiveness of pre-admission data and letters of recommendation to predict students who will need professional behavior intervention during clinical rotations in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalee Engelhard

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at finding the value of letters of recommendation in predicting professional behavior problems in the clinical portion of a Doctor of Physical Therapy program learning cohorts from 2009-2014 in the United States. De-identified records of 137 Doctor of Physical Therapy graduates were examined by the descriptive statistics and comparison analysis. Thirty letters of recommendation were investigated based on grounded theory from 10 student applications with 5 randomly selected students of interest and 5 non-students of interest. Critical thinking, organizational skills, and judgement were statistically significant and quantitative differentiating characteristics. Qualitatively, significant characteristics of the student of interest included effective communication and cultural competency. Meanwhile, those of nonstudents of interest included conflicting personality descriptor, commitment to learning, balance, teamwork skills, potential future success, compatible learning skills, effective leadership skills, and emotional intelligence. Emerged significant characteristics did not consistently match common non-professional behavior issues encountered in clinic. Pre-admission data and letters of recommendation appear of limited value in predicting professional behavior performance in clinic.

  16. Effectiveness of pre-admission data and letters of recommendation to predict students who will need professional behavior intervention during clinical rotations in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhard, Chalee; Leugers, Rebecca; Stephan, Jenna

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed at finding the value of letters of recommendation in predicting professional behavior problems in the clinical portion of a Doctor of Physical Therapy program learning cohorts from 2009-2014 in the United States. De-identified records of 137 Doctor of Physical Therapy graduates were examined by the descriptive statistics and comparison analysis. Thirty letters of recommendation were investigated based on grounded theory from 10 student applications with 5 randomly selected students of interest and 5 non-students of interest. Critical thinking, organizational skills, and judgement were statistically significant and quantitative differentiating characteristics. Qualitatively, significant characteristics of the student of interest included effective communication and cultural competency. Meanwhile, those of nonstudents of interest included conflicting personality descriptor, commitment to learning, balance, teamwork skills, potential future success, compatible learning skills, effective leadership skills, and emotional intelligence. Emerged significant characteristics did not consistently match common non-professional behavior issues encountered in clinic. Pre-admission data and letters of recommendation appear of limited value in predicting professional behavior performance in clinic. PMID:27378011

  17. Profile and severity of the patients of intensive care units: prospective application of the APACHE II index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Freitas, Eliane Regina Ferreira Sernache

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to understand the profile and severity of patients in physiotherapy treatment after their admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) by applying the APACHE II index. One hundred and forty six subjects, with a mean age of 60.5 +/- 19.2 years, were evaluated. The APACHE II index was applied in the first 24 hours to evaluate the severity and mortality risk score. Patients were monitored until hospital discharge or death. The mean APACHE II score was 20+/-7.3 with an estimated risk of death of 32.4% and observed mortality of 58.2%. The mean hospital stay was 27.8+/-25.2 days. The patients in physiotherapy at the institution studied were predominantly male, elderly, from the emergency service for treatment (non-surgical), and had clear severity, suggested by the APACHE II score and the observed mortality.

  18. Long-term consequences of an intensive care unit stay in older critically ill patients: design of a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hantikainen Virpi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modern methods in intensive care medicine often enable the survival of older critically ill patients. The short-term outcomes for patients treated in intensive care units (ICUs, such as survival to hospital discharge, are well documented. However, relatively little is known about subsequent long-term outcomes. Pain, anxiety and agitation are important stress factors for many critically ill patients. There are very few studies concerned with pain, anxiety and agitation and the consequences in older critically ill patients. The overall aim of this study is to identify how an ICU stay influences an older person's experiences later in life. More specific, this study has the following objectives: (1 to explore the relationship between pain, anxiety and agitation during ICU stays and experiences of the same symptoms in later life; and (2 to explore the associations between pain, anxiety and agitation experienced during ICU stays and their effect on subsequent health-related quality of life, use of the health care system (readmissions, doctor visits, rehabilitation, medication use, living situation, and survival after discharge and at 6 and 12 months of follow-up. Methods/Design A prospective, longitudinal study will be used for this study. A total of 150 older critically ill patients in the ICU will participate (ICU group. Pain, anxiety, agitation, morbidity, mortality, use of the health care system, and health-related quality of life will be measured at 3 intervals after a baseline assessment. Baseline measurements will be taken 48 hours after ICU admission and one week thereafter. Follow-up measurements will take place 6 months and 12 months after discharge from the ICU. To be able to interpret trends in scores on outcome variables in the ICU group, a comparison group of 150 participants, matched by age and gender, recruited from the Swiss population, will be interviewed at the same intervals as the ICU group. Discussion Little

  19. A risk factor analysis of healthcare-associated fungal infections in an intensive care unit: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Su-Pen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of fungal healthcare-associated infection (HAI has increased in a major teaching hospital in the northern part of Taiwan over the past decade, especially in the intensive care units (ICUs. The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that were responsible for the outbreak and trend in the ICU. Methods Surveillance fungal cultures were obtained from “sterile” objects, antiseptic solutions, environment of infected patients and hands of medical personnel. Risk factors for comparison included age, gender, admission service, and total length of stay in the ICU, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II scores at admission to the ICU, main diagnosis on ICU admission, use of invasive devices, receipt of hemodialysis, total parenteral nutrition (TPN use, history of antibiotic therapy before HAI or during ICU stay in no HAI group, and ICU discharge status (ie, dead or alive. Univariable analysis followed by multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the independent risk factors for ICU fungal HAIs and ICU mortality. Results There was a significant trend in ICU fungal HAIs from 1998 to 2009 (P Candida albicans (27.3%, Candida tropicalis (6.6%, Candida glabrata (6.6%, Candida parapsilosis (1.9%, Candida species (0.8%, and other fungi (1.9%. Candida albicans accounted for 63% of all Candida species. Yeasts were found in the environment of more heavily infected patients. The independent risk factors (P P  Conclusions There was a secular trend of an increasing number of fungal HAIs in our ICU over the past decade. Patients with ICU fungal HAIs had a significantly higher mortality rate than did patients without ICU HAIs. Total parenteral nutrition was a significant risk factor for all types of ICU fungal HAIs, and its use should be monitored closely.

  20. Outcome of Recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplants Who Require Intensive Care Unit Support: A Single Institution Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Becerra, Samantha; Labastida-Mercado, Nancy; Rosales-Padrón, Jaime; García-Chavez, Jessica; Soto-Vega, Elena; Rivadeneyra-Espinoza, Liliana; León-Peña, Andres A; Fernández-Lara, Danitza; Dominguez-Cid, Monica; Anthon-Méndez, Javier; Arizpe-Bravo, Daniel; Ruiz-Delgado, Guillermo J; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J

    2015-01-01

    Admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) of a patient who has been grafted with hematopoietic stem cells is a serious event, but the role of the ICU in this setting remains controversial. Data were analyzed from patients who underwent autologous or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation at the Centro de Hematología y Medicina Interna de Puebla, México, between May 1993 and October 2014. In total, 339 patients were grafted: 150 autografts and 189 allografts; 68 of the grafted patients (20%) were admitted to the ICU after transplantation: 27% of the allografted and 11% of the autografted patients (p = 0.2). Two of 17 autografted patients (12%) and 5 of 51 allografted patients (10%) survived. All patients who required insertion of an endotracheal tube died, whereas 7 of 11 patients without invasive mechanical ventilation survived (p = 0.001). Only 10% of the grafted patients survived their stay in the ICU; this figure is lower than those reported from other centers and may reflect several facts, varying from the quality of the ICU support to ICU admission criteria to the initial management of all the grafts in an outpatient setting, which could somehow delay the arrival of patients to the hospital.

  1. Correlates of Performance of Healthcare Workers in Emergency, Triage, Assessment and Treatment plus Admission Care (ETAT+ Course in Rwanda: Context Matters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celestin Hategekimana

    Full Text Available The Emergency, Triage, Assessment and Treatment plus Admission care (ETAT+ course, a comprehensive advanced pediatric life support course, was introduced in Rwanda in 2010 to facilitate the achievement of the fourth Millennium Development Goal. The impact of the course on improving healthcare workers (HCWs knowledge and practical skills related to providing emergency care to severely ill newborns and children in Rwanda has not been studied.To evaluate the impact of the ETAT+ course on HCWs knowledge and practical skills, and to identify factors associated with greater improvement in knowledge and skills.We used a one group, pre-post test study using data collected during ETAT+ course implementation from 2010 to 2013. The paired t-test was used to assess the effect of ETAT+ course on knowledge improvement in participating HCWs. Mixed effects linear and logistic regression models were fitted to explore factors associated with HCWs performance in ETAT+ course knowledge and practical skills assessments, while accounting for clustering of HCWs in hospitals.374 HCWs were included in the analysis. On average, knowledge scores improved by 22.8/100 (95% confidence interval (CI 20.5, 25.1. In adjusted models, bilingual (French & English participants had a greater improvement in knowledge 7.3 (95% CI 4.3, 10.2 and higher odds of passing the practical skills assessment (adjusted odds ratio (aOR = 2.60; 95% CI 1.25, 5.40 than those who were solely proficient in French. Participants who attended a course outside of their health facility had higher odds of passing the skills assessment (aOR = 2.11; 95% CI 1.01, 4.44 than those who attended one within their health facility.The current study shows a positive impact of ETAT+ course on improving participants' knowledge and skills related to managing emergency pediatric and neonatal care conditions. The findings regarding key factors influencing ETAT+ course outcomes demonstrate the importance of considering key

  2. Primary care consultation, hospital admission, sick leave and disability pension owing to neck and low back pain: a 12-year prospective cohort study in a rural population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmberg Sara AC

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neck and low back pain are common musculoskeletal complaints generating large societal costs in Western populations. In this study we evaluate the magnitude of long-term health outcomes for neck and low back pain, taking possible confounders into account. Method A cohort of 2,351 Swedish male farmers and rural non-farmers (40–60 years old was established in 1989. In the first survey, conducted in 1990–91, 1,782 men participated. A 12-year follow-up survey was made in 2002–03 and 1,405 men participated at both times. After exclusion of 58 individuals reporting a specific back diagnosis in 1990–91, the study cohort encompassed 1,347 men. The health outcomes primary care consultation, hospital admission, sick leave and disability pension were assessed in structured interviews in 2002–03 (survey 2. Symptoms and potential confounders were assessed at survey 1, with the exception of rating of depression and anxiety, which was assessed at survey 2. Multiple logistic regression generating odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI was performed to adjust the associations between reported symptoms and health outcomes for potential confounders (age, farming, workload, education, demand and control at work, body mass index, smoking, snuff use, alcohol consumption, psychiatric symptoms and specific back diagnoses during follow up. Results Of the 836 men reporting current neck and/or low back pain at survey 1, 21% had had at least one primary care consultation for neck or low back problems, 7% had been on sick leave and 4% had disability pension owing to the condition during the 12 year follow up. Current neck and/or low back pain at survey 1 predicted primary care consultations (OR = 4.10, 95% CI 2.24–7.49 and sick leave (OR = 3.22, 95% CI 1.13–9.22 after potential confounders were considered. Lower education and more psychiatric symptoms were independently related to sick leave. Lower education and snuff use

  3. Optimal physicians schedule in an Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidri, L.; Labidi, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we consider a case study for the problem of physicians scheduling in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). The objective is to minimize the total overtime under complex constraints. The considered ICU is composed of three buildings and the physicians are divided accordingly into six teams. The workload is assigned to each team under a set of constraints. The studied problem is composed of two simultaneous phases: composing teams and assigning the workload to each one of them. This constitutes an additional major hardness compared to the two phase's process: composing teams and after that assigning the workload. The physicians schedule in this ICU is used to be done manually each month. In this work, the studied physician scheduling problem is formulated as an integer linear program and solved optimally using state of the art software. The preliminary experimental results show that 50% of the overtime can be saved.

  4. End-of-life decisions in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Irene

    2012-01-01

    Background When making end-of-life decisions in intensive care units, the different staff groups have different roles in the decision-making process and may not always assess the situation identically. Practice recommendations for withholding or withdrawing therapy state that decisions should...... regarding considerations of: o What should induce withholding or withdrawing therapy. o The multidisciplinary collaboration regarding end-of-life decisions. o Interventions that may improve collaboration and decision-making. • Examine and evaluate different methods to improve interdisciplinary collaboration...... and decision-making. Hypotheses • Nurses, intensivists, and primary physicians have different experiences of interdisciplinary collaboration regarding end-of-life decision-making in the ICU. • Specific interventions targeting end-of-life decision-making in the ICU, such as interdisciplinary audits...

  5. Chest roentgenology in the intensive care unit: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maffessanti, M. [Istituto di Radiologia, Universita di Trieste, Ospedale di Cattinara, I-34 100 Trieste (Italy); Berlot, G. [Istituto di Anestesia e Rianimazione, Universita di Trieste, Ospedale di Cattinara, I-34 100 Trieste (Italy); Bortolotto, P. [Servizio di Radiologia, Ospedale Maggiore, I-34 100 Trieste (Italy)

    1998-02-01

    Chest roentgenology in the intensive care unit is a real challenge for the general radiologist. Beyond the basic disease, the critically ill is at risk for developing specific cardiopulmonary disorders, all presenting as chest opacities, their diagnosis often being impossible if based only on the radiological aspect. To make things harder, their appearance can vary with the subject`s position and the mechanical ventilation. Patients require a continuous monitoring of the vital functions and their mechanical and pharmacological support, for which they are connected to different instruments. The radiologist should know the normal position of these devices, and promptly recognize when they are misplaced or when complications from their insertion occurred. Our aim is to suggest for each of the above-mentioned conditions a guideline of interpretation based not only on the radiological aspect and distribution of the lesions, but also on the physiopathological and clinical grounds. (orig.) With 13 figs., 58 refs.

  6. Difficult airway management from Emergency Department till Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasis Pradhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of "can ventilate but can′t intubate" situation which was successfully managed in the Emergency Department and Intensive Care Unit by the use of ProSeal laryngeal mask airway and Frova Intubating Introducer as bridging rescue devices. Use of appropriate technique while strictly following the difficult airway algorithm is the mainstay of airway management in unanticipated difficult airway situations. Although the multiple airway devices were used but each step took not more than 2 min and "don′t struggle, skip to the next step principle" was followed. With the availability of many advanced airway management tools, the intensivists should have a training and experience along with preparedness in order to perform such lifesaving airway managements.

  7. Peripartum Cardiomyopathy in Intensive Care Unit: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinic, Vesna; Markovic, Danica; Savic, Nenad; Kutlesic, Marija; Jankovic, Radmilo J.

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a systolic heart failure that occurs during the last month of pregnancy or within 5 months after delivery. It is an uncommon disease of unknown etiopathogenesis and has a very high rate of maternal mortality. Because of similarity between symptoms of PPCM and physiological discomforts during pregnancy, the early diagnosis of PPCM presents a major challenge. Since hemodynamic changes during PPCM can vitally jeopardize the mother and the fetus, patients with severe forms of PPCM require a multidisciplinary approach in intensive care units. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge about the diagnosis, monitoring, and the treatment of PPCM. Having reviewed the recent researches, it gives insight into the new treatment strategies of this rare disease. PMID:26636086

  8. Acute renal failure in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbord, Steven D; Palevsky, Paul M

    2006-06-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common complication in critically ill patients, with ARF requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT) developing in approximately 5 to 10% of intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that ARF is an independent risk factor for mortality. Interventions to prevent the development of ARF are currently limited to a small number of settings, primarily radiocontrast nephropathy and rhabdomyolysis. There are no effective pharmacological agents for the treatment of established ARF. Renal replacement therapy remains the primary treatment for patients with severe ARF; however, the data guiding selection of modality of RRT and the optimal timing of initiation and dose of therapy are inconclusive. This review focuses on the epidemiology and diagnostic approach to ARF in the ICU and summarizes our current understanding of therapeutic approaches including RRT.

  9. Supporting Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Parents Through Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzubaty, Dolores R

    2016-01-01

    Parents of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit may often find themselves seeking healthcare information from online and social media sources. Social media applications are available to healthcare consumers and their families, as well as healthcare providers, in a variety of formats. Information that parents gather on their own, and information that is explained by providers, is then used when parents make healthcare decisions regarding their infants. Parents also seek support from peers and family while making healthcare decisions. The combination of knowledge obtained and social support given may empower the parent to feel more confident in their decision making. Healthcare professionals can guide parents to credible resources. The exchange of information between providers and parents can occur using a variety of communication methods. Misperceptions can be corrected, support given, open sharing of information occurs, and parent empowerment may result. PMID:27465452

  10. MRSA infection in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffrè, Mario; Bonura, Celestino; Cipolla, Domenico; Mammina, Caterina

    2013-05-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is well known as one of the most frequent etiological agents of healthcare-associated infections. The epidemiology of MRSA is evolving with emergence of community-associated MRSA, the clonal spread of some successful clones, their spillover into healthcare settings and acquisition of antibacterial drug resistances. Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) patients are at an especially high risk of acquiring colonization and infection by MRSA. Epidemiology of MRSA in NICU can be very complex because outbreaks can overlap endemic circulation and make it difficult to trace transmission routes. Moreover, increasing prevalence of community-associated MRSA can jeopardize epidemiological investigation, screening and effectiveness of control policies. Surveillance, prevention and control strategies and clinical management have been widely studied and are still the subject of scientific debate. More data are needed to determine the most cost-effective approach to MRSA control in NICU in light of the local epidemiology.

  11. Modes of death in neonatal intensive care units.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Finan, E

    2006-04-01

    With the ever-increasing availability of aggressive medical treatment and technical support, neonatologists are offered an increasing ability to prolong life. While "end-of-life" decisions within NICUs have been studied internationally, there is limited data available for Ireland. Through the auspices of the Irish Faculty of Paediatrics 2002 Neonatal Mortality Ouestionnaire, decisions made around the time of death in Irish Neonatal Intensive Care Units were examined. The overall response rate to the questionnaire was 96% (n=25). One hundred and eighty seven deaths were reported for 2002. Information pertaining to the mode of death was available in 53% of cases. Seventy seven percent of those paediatricians who answered this question, reported either withdrawing or withholding treatment in babies thought to have a hopeless outcome, with the greatest proportion of these deaths occurring in premature infants (n=30) and babies with congenital defects (n=40).

  12. Pilot Study of Behavioral Treatment in Dementia Care Units.(practice Concepts)(author Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Peter A.; Kemp-Havican, Julie; MacNeill, Susan E.; Johnson, Amanda Schafer

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This article reports on the development and use of behavioral treatment as a well-being intervention for individuals with dementia residing at special care units in a nursing home. Design and Methods: The project took place upon the construction and opening of two new homelike units for dementia care in a rural community-care center.…

  13. Associations of Special Care Units and Outcomes of Residents with Dementia: 2004 National Nursing Home Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huabin; Fang, Xiangming; Liao, Youlian; Elliott, Amanda; Zhang, Xinzhi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We compared the rates of specialized care for residents with Alzheimer's disease or dementia in special care units (SCUs) and other nursing home (NH) units and examined the associations of SCU residence with process of care and resident outcomes. Design and Methods: Data came from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey. The indicators of…

  14. Ethics of drug research in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiber, Niina; Tromp, Krista; Mooij, Miriam G; van de Vathorst, Suzanne; Tibboel, Dick; de Wildt, Saskia N

    2015-02-01

    Critical illness and treatment modalities change pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of medications used in critically ill children, in addition to age-related changes in drug disposition and effect. Hence, to ensure effective and safe drug therapy, research in this population is urgently needed. However, conducting research in the vulnerable population of the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) presents with ethical challenges. This article addresses the main ethical issues specific to drug research in these critically ill children and proposes several solutions. The extraordinary environment of the PICU raises specific challenges to the design and conduct of research. The need for proxy consent of parents (or legal guardians) and the stress-inducing physical environment may threaten informed consent. The informed consent process is challenging because emergency research reduces or even eliminates the time to seek consent. Moreover, parental anxiety may impede adequate understanding and generate misconceptions. Alternative forms of consent have been developed taking into account the unpredictable reality of the acute critical care environment. As with any research in children, the burden and risk should be minimized. Recent developments in sample collection and analysis as well as pharmacokinetic analysis should be considered in the design of studies. Despite the difficulties inherent to drug research in critically ill children, methods are available to conduct ethically sound research resulting in relevant and generalizable data. This should motivate the PICU community to commit to drug research to ultimately provide the right drug at the right dose for every individual child.

  15. Bedside Diagnosis in the Intensive Care Unit. Is Looking Overlooked?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metkus, Thomas S; Kim, Bo Soo

    2015-10-01

    Bedside diagnosis, including but not limited to the physical examination, can be lifesaving in the setting of critical illness and is a core competency in both medical school and at the postgraduate level. Data as to the clinical usefulness of bedside diagnosis in the modern intensive care unit (ICU) is sparse, however, and there are no clinical guidelines addressing performance, interpretation, and usefulness of the bedside assessment in critically ill patients. Bedside assessment and physical examination are used in a heterogeneous manner across institutions and even across ICUs within the same institution, which has implications for medical education, patient care, and the overuse/misuse of diagnostic testing. In this commentary, we review the existing data addressing bedside diagnosis in the ICU, describe various models of bedside assessment use in the ICU based on our clinical practice and on the limited evidence base, share our practical "checklist-based" approach to bedside assessment in the critically ill patient, and advocate for more formal study of physical examination and bedside assessment in the ICU to enhance clinical practice. PMID:26389653

  16. [Neonatal intensive care unit--therapeutical success and what next?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swietliński, Janusz; Sitko-Rudnicka, Magdalena; Maruniak-Chudek, Iwona

    2004-01-01

    The increasing number of successfully treated newborns with disturbances of the adaptive period can measure effectiveness of neonatal intensive care units (NICU). The authors summarized some health problems of the former NICU patients. Central nervous system (CNS) of the premature, especially low (LBW) and very low birth weight (VLBW) infant, is in serious danger of improper development. The lack of neurological disturbances in early infancy does not exclude further pathological events and such patients require long-term observation and follow-up. High-risk newborns are of great need of precise imaging and diagnosis of CNS, which should be performed before discharge. Early stimulation and developmental care program are the crucial points in the management of newborns with neurological abnormalities. Sensorial problems, especially the rate of vision and hearing impairments, can be significantly reduced when prophylactic schedule is applied. Both, etiological factors leading to respiratory insufficiency and some iatrogenic effects of the therapy, can influence respiratory system. Symptoms of different intensity--from sneezing caused by nasal mucous membrane edema to the severe forms of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD)--may last for a long time and influence the child's general condition. The surgical closure of Botall's duct (persistent ductus arteriosus--PDA) usually normalizes the circulatory system. In serious heart defects or isolated shunt-type defects, the compensation of the circulatory system can easily be disturbed. Digestive tract problems belong to the two main groups: first--connected with the prematurity and immature interstitial functioning (necrotizing enterocolitis, digestive and absorption abnormalities, hepatic cholestasis), and second--caused by congenital defects requiring immediate surgical intervention. Despite different types of the diseases, the treatment and care have to be focused on necessary for the growing organism, optimal nutrients and

  17. Quality improvement in radiography in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loovere, L.; Boyle, E.M. [Dept. of Pediatrics, McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Blatz, S. [Dept. of Pediactrics, McMaster Children' s Hospital, Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Bowslaugh, M.; Kereliuk, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Diagnostic Imaging, Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Paes, B. [Dept. of Pediatrics, McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: paes@mcmaster.ca

    2008-10-15

    The primary objective of this study was to ensure that X-rays performed consistently adhere to established technological quality standards and are achieved without compromising patient care while minimizing exposure risks. The secondary objective was to evaluate whether educational sessions targeting areas deemed suboptimal would facilitate improvement. A retrospective, 1-week review of all neonatal X-rays and documentation of clinical information on X-ray requisitions (n = 132) was completed in a tertiary care neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), by a single observer. Standards for X-ray evaluation were defined a priori based on radiographic principles and essential documented medical information for correct interpretation. Targeted areas for improvement were identified and addressed through brief educational sessions and printed pamphlets. The review was repeated after recommendations were implemented. 1 month (n = 93) and 1 year (n = 76) later. Improvements were evident in both the completion of X-ray requisitions and image quality. In particular, there was a statistically significant improvement in requisition legibility (P = 0.019), completeness of the medical history (P < 0.001), reduction in X-ray rotation (P < 0.001), collimation to the specific area of interest (P <0.001), gonadal shielding (P < 0.001), and decrease in monitor leads or artifacts obscuring views (P < 0.001). These improvements were sustained both 1 month and 1 year following the educational sessions. A neonatal X-ray audit is a simple, effective way to evaluate radiographic technique and encourage provision of basic clinical information for diagnostic interpretation by radiologists and neonatologists. As well, structured, collaborative educational sessions between radiology and neonatology staff appear to be a successful and sustainable method to effect overall improvement. (author)

  18. Quality improvement in radiography in a neonatal intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of this study was to ensure that X-rays performed consistently adhere to established technological quality standards and are achieved without compromising patient care while minimizing exposure risks. The secondary objective was to evaluate whether educational sessions targeting areas deemed suboptimal would facilitate improvement. A retrospective, 1-week review of all neonatal X-rays and documentation of clinical information on X-ray requisitions (n = 132) was completed in a tertiary care neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), by a single observer. Standards for X-ray evaluation were defined a priori based on radiographic principles and essential documented medical information for correct interpretation. Targeted areas for improvement were identified and addressed through brief educational sessions and printed pamphlets. The review was repeated after recommendations were implemented. 1 month (n = 93) and 1 year (n = 76) later. Improvements were evident in both the completion of X-ray requisitions and image quality. In particular, there was a statistically significant improvement in requisition legibility (P = 0.019), completeness of the medical history (P < 0.001), reduction in X-ray rotation (P < 0.001), collimation to the specific area of interest (P <0.001), gonadal shielding (P < 0.001), and decrease in monitor leads or artifacts obscuring views (P < 0.001). These improvements were sustained both 1 month and 1 year following the educational sessions. A neonatal X-ray audit is a simple, effective way to evaluate radiographic technique and encourage provision of basic clinical information for diagnostic interpretation by radiologists and neonatologists. As well, structured, collaborative educational sessions between radiology and neonatology staff appear to be a successful and sustainable method to effect overall improvement. (author)

  19. Protocolized eye care prevents corneal complications in ventilated patients in a medical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Feroz Azfar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eye care is an essential component in the management of critically ill patients. Standardized eye care can prevent corneal complications in ventilated patients. Objective: This study was designed to compare old and new practices of corneal care for reduction in corneal complications in ventilated patients. Methods: This study was done in three phases each of six month duration. Phase 1 was the ongoing practice of eye care in the unit. Before the start of phase 2, a new protocol was made for eye care. Corneal complications were observed in terms of haziness, dryness, and ulceration. All nursing staffs were educated and made compliant with the new protocol. In phase 2, a follow-up audit was done to check the effectiveness and compliance to protocol. In phase 3, a follow-up audit was started 3 months after phase 2. Results: In phase 1, total ventilated patients were 40 with 240 ventilator days. The corneal dryness rate was 40 per 1000 ventilator days while the haziness and ulceration rate was 16 per 1000 ventilator days each. In the second phase 2, total ventilated patients were 53 making 561 ventilator days. The rate of corneal haziness and dryness was 3.52 and 1.78 per 1000 ventilator days, respectively, with no case of corneal ulceration. In phase 3, the number of ventilated patients was 91 with 1114 ventilator days. The corneal dryness rate was 2.69 while the haziness and ulceration rate was 1.79 each. Conclusion: Protocolized eye care can reduce the risk of corneal complications in ventilated patients.

  20. Neonatal Mortality Risk Assessment in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Eshrati

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to assess the utility of a scoring system as predictor of neonatal mortality rate among the neonates admitted within one year to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU of the Childrens Medical Center in Tehran, Iran.Material & Methods: Data were gathered from 213 newborns admitted to the NICU from September 2003 to August 2004. In addition to demographic data, Apgar scores at 1 minute and 5 minutes, history and duration of previous hospitalization, initial diagnosis and final diagnosis, and scoring system by using the score for the neonatal acute physiology-perinatal extension II (SNAP-PE II were carried out within 12 hours after admission to the NICU. All of the parameters were prospectively applied to the admitted newborns. The exclusion criteria were discharge or death in less than 24 hours after NICU admission.Findings: 198 newborn infants met the inclusion criteria. The mean and standard deviation (SD of the variables including postnatal age, birth weight, SNAP, and finally Apgar scores at 1 minute and 5 minutes of neonates under this study were 7.6 (0.5 days, 2479.8 (29.4 grams, 21.6 (1.1, 7.47 0.08(, and 7.71 (0.06, respectively. Twenty five of the 198 patients died (12.6%. Gestational age (P=0.03, birth weight (P=0.02, Apgar score at 5 minutes (0.001, and SNAP-PE II (P=0.04 were significantly related to the mortality rate. By Analyzing through logistic regression to evaluate the predictive value of these variables in relation to the risk of mortality, it was shown that only SNAP-PE II and Apgar score at 5 minutes could significantly predict the neonatal mortality.Conclusion: According to this study SNAP-PE II and Apgar score at 5 minutes can be used to predict mortality among the NICU patients. SNAP-PE II score had the best performance in predicting mortality in this study. More studies with larger samples are suggested to evaluate all of the above-mentioned parameters among neonates who are admitted to NICUs

  1. Benefits of High-Intensity Intensive Care Unit Physician Staffing under the Affordable Care Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Logani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Affordable Care Act signed into law by President Obama, with its value-based purchasing program, is designed to link payment to quality processes and outcomes. Treatment of critically ill patients represents nearly 1% of the gross domestic product and 25% of a typical hospital budget. Data suggest that high-intensity staffing patterns in the intensive care unit (ICU are associated with cost savings and improved outcomes. We evaluate the literature investigating the cost-effectiveness and clinical outcomes of high-intensity ICU physician staffing as recommended by The Leapfrog Group (a consortium of companies that purchase health care for their employees and identify ways to overcome barriers to nationwide implementation of these standards. Hospitals that have implemented the Leapfrog initiative have demonstrated reductions in mortality and length of stay and increased cost savings. High-intensity staffing models appear to be an immediate cost-effective way for hospitals to meet the challenges of health care reform.

  2. Bloodstream Infections in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Sah Ižpek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the pattern of bloodstream infections (BSIs and antimicrobial susceptibility of pathogens in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU.Material and Method: Positive hemoculture of neonates diagnosed with nosocomial sepsis from March 2011 to March 2014 in the NICU of Diyarbakir Maternity and Children%u2019s Hospital, in the southeastern region of Anatolia, Turkey, were retrospectively reviewed. Results: A total of 148 pathogens were isolated in 142 neonates. The most common microorganisms isolated were Klebsiella pneumoniae (40.5% and Acinetobacter baumannii (29.7% which was a result of a hospital outbreak. Multi-drug resistant (MDR strains accounted for 20.0% of K. pneumoniae isolates and 93.2% of A. baumannii isolates. The sepsis-attributable mortality rate was higher in cases infected with MDR strains than in cases infected without MDR strains or Candida spp (24% vs. 9.7%, p=0.032. Discussion: In our unit, BSIs were more often caused by Gram negative bacteria. BSIs caused by MDR strains were associated with a higher rate of sepsis-attributable mortality.

  3. 29 CFR 103.30 - Appropriate bargaining units in the health care industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appropriate bargaining units in the health care industry... Appropriate Bargaining Units § 103.30 Appropriate bargaining units in the health care industry. (a) This... such by either Joint Committee on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations or by Commission...

  4. Care of the gut in the surgical intensive care unit: fact or fashion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, O K; Meakins, J L

    1991-06-01

    The traditional approach to the care of the gastrointestinal tract in the intensive care unit has been one of neglect. However, recent evidence has linked enteric flora to the generation of clinical sepsis in the absence of other infectious foci. The role of the bowel as an efficient barrier to the invasion of its own flora is addressed in this paper. A variety of insults disrupt the integrity of the barrier function of the gut, allowing the entry of bowel organisms or endotoxins, or both, into the portal and systemic circulatory systems. In animal and early clinical studies, a number of interventions, aimed at altering the enteric flora and enhancing the bowel's barrier function, have been shown to modulate the host's resistance to different insults and may even improve clinical outcome. Such interventions include maintenance of enteral feeding, glutamine supplementation of hyperalimentation solutions and selective bacterial decontamination of the bowel.

  5. Primary care and ophthalmology in the United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Riad, S F; Dart, J K G; Cooling, R J

    2003-01-01

    The National Health Service is now primary care led. There are different definitions for primary care and in this review they are analysed and related to ophthalmology to produce a working definition for ophthalmic primary care, summarised as the provision of first contact care for all ophthalmic conditions and follow up, preventive, and rehabilitative care of selected ophthalmic conditions, in a variety of settings, by a diverse workforce. The attributes of primary care are first contact, ac...

  6. Full-cost determination of different levels of care in the intensive care unit. An activity-based costing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, J J; Casciano, J P; Arikian, S R; Mauskopf, J; Paul, J E

    1996-10-01

    We applied an activity-based costing methodology to determine the full cost of intensive care service at a community hospital, a university hospital and a health maintenance organisation (HMO)-affiliated hospital. A total of 5 patient care units were analysed: the intensive care unit (ICU) and surgical ICU (SICU) at the university setting, the ICU at the community setting, and the SICU and cardiac care unit at the HMO setting. The selection of the different ICU types was based on the types of critical care units that were found in each setting (e.g. the HMO did not have an ICU). Institution-specific cost data and clinical management parameters were collected through surveys and site visits from the 3 respective organisation types. The analysis revealed a marked increase in patient-minute cost associated with mechanical ventilation. Higher costs associated with prolonged neuromuscular blockade have important economic implications with respect to selection of an appropriate neuromuscular blocking agent.

  7. Paediatric oncology and intensive care treatments: changing trends

    OpenAIRE

    Keengwe, I.; Stansfield, F.; EDEN, O; Nelhans, N.; Dearlove, O.; Sharples, A.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To review the outcome of patients with childhood malignancy requiring intensive care treatment and to assess whether there is any secular trend for improved outcome.
DESIGN—Retrospective chart reviews of 74 consecutive admissions to a paediatric intensive care unit from a regional paediatric oncology centre between 1990 and 1997. During the same period there were 6419 admissions to the oncology unit, 814 of whom were new cases.
RESULTS—The overall survival a...

  8. National trends in inpatient admissions following stereotactic radiosurgery and the in-hospital patient outcomes in the United States from 1998 to 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Allen L.; Li, Alexander Y.; Sussman, Eric S.; Pendharkar, Arjun V.; Iyer, Aditya; Thompson, Patricia A.; Tayag, Armine T.; Chang, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study sought to examine trends in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and in-hospital patient outcomes on a national level by utilizing national administrative data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database. Methods and materials Using the NIS database, all discharges where patients underwent inpatient SRS were included in our study from 1998 – 2011 as designated by the ICD9-CM procedural codes. Trends in the utilization of primary and adjuvant SRS, in-hospital complications and mortality, and resource utilization were identified and analyzed. Results Our study included over 11,000 hospital discharges following admission for primary SRS or for adjuvant SRS following admission for surgery or other indication. The most popular indication for SRS continues to be treatment of intracranial metastatic disease (36.7%), but expansion to primary CNS lesions and other non-malignant pathology beyond trigeminal neuralgia has occurred over the past decade. Second, inpatient admissions for primary SRS have declined by 65.9% over this same period of time. Finally, as inpatient admissions for SRS become less frequent, the complexity and severity of illness seen in admitted patients has increased over time with an increase in the average comorbidity score from 1.25 in the year 2002 to 2.29 in 2011, and an increase in over-all in-hospital complication rate of 2.8 times over the entire study period. Conclusions As the practice of SRS continues to evolve, we have seen several trends in associated hospital admissions. Overall, the number of inpatient admissions for primary SRS has declined while adjuvant applications have remained stable. Over the same period, there has been associated increase in complication rate, length of stay, and mortality in inpatients. These associations may be explained by an increase in the comorbidity-load of admitted patients as more high-risk patients are selected for admission at inpatient centers while more stable patients are

  9. Antidepressant or Antipsychotic Overdose in the Intensive Care Unit - Identification of Patients at Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Linda; Julkunen, Anna; Madsen, Kristian Rørbaek;

    2016-01-01

    adverse signs at hospital admission that turned out to need intensive care treatment. The effect of the antidepressants overdose risk assessment (ADORA) system was evaluated in patients with antidepressant as well as antipsychotic overdose. Our hypothesis was that patients with low ADORA do not need...... obvious need of intensive care. Of the 157 patients included, 12 patients (8%) developed events during the ICU stay. Only 3 patients received intubation, vasoactive drugs and/or dialysis. None developed ventricular dysrhythmias. There were no fatalities. All the patients with low-risk assessment by ADORA...

  10. Management of neutropenic patients in the intensive care unit (NEWBORNS EXCLUDED) recommendations from an expert panel from the French Intensive Care Society (SRLF) with the French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care Emergencies (GFRUP), the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care (SFAR), the French Society of Hematology (SFH), the French Society for Hospital Hygiene (SF2H), and the French Infectious Diseases Society (SPILF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, David; Azoulay, Elie; Benoit, Dominique; Clouzeau, Benjamin; Demaret, Pierre; Ducassou, Stéphane; Frange, Pierre; Lafaurie, Matthieu; Legrand, Matthieu; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Mokart, Djamel; Naudin, Jérôme; Pene, Frédéric; Rabbat, Antoine; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Ribaud, Patricia; Richard, Jean-Christophe; Vincent, François; Zahar, Jean-Ralph; Darmon, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Neutropenia is defined by either an absolute or functional defect (acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome) of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and is associated with high risk of specific complications that may require intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Specificities in the management of critically ill neutropenic patients prompted the establishment of guidelines dedicated to intensivists. These recommendations were drawn up by a panel of experts brought together by the French Intensive Care Society in collaboration with the French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care Emergencies, the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, the French Society of Hematology, the French Society for Hospital Hygiene, and the French Infectious Diseases Society. Literature review and formulation of recommendations were performed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Each recommendation was then evaluated and rated by each expert using a methodology derived from the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method. Six fields are covered by the provided recommendations: (1) ICU admission and prognosis, (2) protective isolation and prophylaxis, (3) management of acute respiratory failure, (4) organ failure and organ support, (5) antibiotic management and source control, and (6) hematological management. Most of the provided recommendations are obtained from low levels of evidence, however, suggesting a need for additional studies. Seven recommendations were, however, associated with high level of evidences and are related to protective isolation, diagnostic workup of acute respiratory failure, medical management, and timing surgery in patients with typhlitis.

  11. Management of neutropenic patients in the intensive care unit (NEWBORNS EXCLUDED) recommendations from an expert panel from the French Intensive Care Society (SRLF) with the French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care Emergencies (GFRUP), the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care (SFAR), the French Society of Hematology (SFH), the French Society for Hospital Hygiene (SF2H), and the French Infectious Diseases Society (SPILF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, David; Azoulay, Elie; Benoit, Dominique; Clouzeau, Benjamin; Demaret, Pierre; Ducassou, Stéphane; Frange, Pierre; Lafaurie, Matthieu; Legrand, Matthieu; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Mokart, Djamel; Naudin, Jérôme; Pene, Frédéric; Rabbat, Antoine; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Ribaud, Patricia; Richard, Jean-Christophe; Vincent, François; Zahar, Jean-Ralph; Darmon, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Neutropenia is defined by either an absolute or functional defect (acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome) of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and is associated with high risk of specific complications that may require intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Specificities in the management of critically ill neutropenic patients prompted the establishment of guidelines dedicated to intensivists. These recommendations were drawn up by a panel of experts brought together by the French Intensive Care Society in collaboration with the French Group for Pediatric Intensive Care Emergencies, the French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, the French Society of Hematology, the French Society for Hospital Hygiene, and the French Infectious Diseases Society. Literature review and formulation of recommendations were performed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Each recommendation was then evaluated and rated by each expert using a methodology derived from the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method. Six fields are covered by the provided recommendations: (1) ICU admission and prognosis, (2) protective isolation and prophylaxis, (3) management of acute respiratory failure, (4) organ failure and organ support, (5) antibiotic management and source control, and (6) hematological management. Most of the provided recommendations are obtained from low levels of evidence, however, suggesting a need for additional studies. Seven recommendations were, however, associated with high level of evidences and are related to protective isolation, diagnostic workup of acute respiratory failure, medical management, and timing surgery in patients with typhlitis. PMID:27638133

  12. Oral care practices for patients in Intensive Care Units: A pilot survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Franco Miranda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the level of knowledge and difficulties concerning hospitalized patients regarding preventive oral health measures among professionals working in Intensive Care Units (ICUs. Study Population and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 71 health professionals working in the ICU. A self-administered questionnaire was used to determine the methods used, frequency, and attitude toward oral care provided to patients in Brazilian ICUs. The variables were analyzed using descriptive statistics (percentages. A one-sample t-test between proportions was used to assess significant differences between percentages. t-statistics were considered statistically significant for P < 0.05. Bonferroni correction was applied to account for multiple testing. Results: Most participants were nursing professionals (80.3% working 12-h shifts in the ICU (70.4%; about 87.3% and 66.2% reported having knowledge about coated tongue and nosocomial pneumonia, respectively (P < 0.05. Most reported using spatulas, gauze, and toothbrushes (49.3% or only toothbrushes (28.2% with 0.12% chlorhexidine (49.3% to sanitize the oral cavity of ICU patients (P < 0.01. Most professionals felt that adequate time was available to provide oral care to ICU patients and that oral care was a priority for mechanically ventilated patients (80.3% and 83.1%, respectively, P < 0.05. However, most professionals (56.4% reported feeling that the oral cavity was difficult to clean (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The survey results suggest that additional education is necessary to increase awareness among ICU professionals of the association between dental plaque and systemic conditions of patients, to standardize oral care protocols, and to promote the oral health of patients in ICUs.

  13. Intoxicated children at an intensive care unit: popular medicine risks, complications and costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consuelo de Rovetto

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Hospital Universitario del Valle (HUV at the Pediatrics Intensive Care Unit (PICU admits intoxicated patients, erroneously medicated by «teguas» or family members with serious aggravation of basic diseases or generating severe intoxications. Absent reports of these practices in Colombia motivated the publication of this case seriesObjective: To report a series of pediatric intoxication cases secondary to oral or dermatological application of varied substances by healers («teguas» or family members, leading to admission at the PICU, and to describe complications and hospital costs of these events.Methodology: Clinical charts of patients admitted to the PICU with diagnosis of exogenous intoxication during May 2001 to September 2004, were reviewed. Of 28 registered cases during that time, only 14 clinical charts were recovered. Variables evaluated included: age, gender, proceeding, administered substance, person responsible for the administration, complications, days of mechanical ventilation, total days at the intensive care unit and average costs. Of the 14 medical records with exogenous intoxications only 5 cases were involuntary and 9 were related to the administration of substances by quacks or family members; these are the ones reported in this series.Results: We report a total of 9 intoxicated patients, 5 girls and 4 boys, with an age range from 1 to 24 months, all from Cali. Topical administered substances: alcohol 6/9, vinegar 1/9; oral: aspirin 2/9, paico 1/9, and unidentified herbs 1/9. Administered substances by teguas: 6 patients; 3 by family members. All patients had metabolic acidosis with an increased anion gap: 27 in average (range from 21 to 32. All required mechanical ventilation (2 to 32 day range. Average hospital day costs were $6’657,800 pesos (around U$3,000.oo. Three patients died and 4 presented acute renal failure, 2 convulsions, 2 nosocomial infections, 1 subglotic stenosis.Conclusions and

  14. Intoxicated children at an intensive care unit: popular medicine risks, complications and costs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consuelo de Rovetto

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Hospital Universitario del Valle (HUV at the Pediatrics Intensive Care Unit (PICU admits intoxicated patients, erroneously medicated by «teguas» or family members with serious aggravation of basic diseases or generating severe intoxications. Absent reports of these practices in Colombia motivated the publication of this case series Objective: To report a series of pediatric intoxication cases secondary to oral or dermatological application of varied substances by healers («teguas» or family members, leading to admission at the PICU, and to describe complications and hospital costs of these events. Methodology: Clinical charts of patients admitted to the PICU with diagnosis of exogenous intoxication during May 2001 to September 2004, were reviewed. Of 28 registered cases during that time, only 14 clinical charts were recovered. Variables evaluated included: age, gender, proceeding, administered substance, person responsible for the administration, complications, days of mechanical ventilation, total days at the intensive care unit and average costs. Of the 14 medical records with exogenous intoxications only 5 cases were involuntary and 9 were related to the administration of substances by quacks or family members; these are the ones reported in this series. Results: We report a total of 9 intoxicated patients, 5 girls and 4 boys, with an age range from 1 to 24 months, all from Cali. Topical administered substances: alcohol 6/9, vinegar 1/9; oral: aspirin 2/9, paico 1/9, and unidentified herbs 1/9. Administered substances by teguas: 6 patients; 3 by family members. All patients had metabolic acidosis with an increased anion gap: 27 in average (range from 21 to 32. All required mechanical ventilation (2 to 32 day range. Average hospital day costs were $6’657,800 pesos (around U$3,000.oo. Three patients died and 4 presented acute renal failure, 2 convulsions, 2 nosocomial infections, 1 subglotic stenosis. Conclusions and

  15. Protocol on the constipation in an oncology palliative care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Cordero Ponce

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Constipation is a problem relatively common even in healthy people, mainly in the western world, influenced mainly by the nutritional diets and the diminution of the physical activity. It is a symptom of difficult valuation by its subjective nature and the difficulty to establish a normality pattern.The incidence is high. It is observed in a 70 - 80% of the patients in terminal situation, the 40 - 50% of the patients with disease outpost and in 90% of the patients dealing with opiate.As nurses in of a palliative care unit we detected the high number of patients which they present/display the symptom and the time that takes in its diagnose and treatment, increasing the incidence-appearance of fecal impactación and intestinal obstruction. It is one of the symptoms that worry to our patients more.We take too frequently the “rectal measures,” being more painful and a little shameful for these patients, instead of using preventive measures, precocious oral treatment and continuous evaluation of the symptom. The knowledge that these patients have of the constipation is in many deficient cases. In order to be able to educate and to take care of to the oncology terminal patient in terminal state with constipation it is essential that we know its physiopathology, causes and complications. Also we will deepen in the most suitable treatment according to the consistency, the effort that the patient must make when defecating and the symptoms that presents/displays, trying that the treatment is customized and individual, although starting off of a previous protocol of performance decided by the health professionals who are going to treat the patient.

  16. Hemodynamic monitoring in the intensive care unit: a Brazilian perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Fernando Suparregui; Rezende, Ederlon Alves de Carvalho; Mendes, Ciro Leite; Silva Jr., João Manoel; Sanches, Joel Lyra

    2014-01-01

    Objective In Brazil, there are no data on the preferences of intensivists regarding hemodynamic monitoring methods. The present study aimed to identify the methods used by national intensivists, the hemodynamic variables they consider important, the regional differences, the reasons for choosing a particular method, and the use of protocols and continued training. Methods National intensivists were invited to answer an electronic questionnaire during three intensive care events and later, through the Associação de Medicina Intensiva Brasileira portal, between March and October 2009. Demographic data and aspects related to the respondent preferences regarding hemodynamic monitoring were researched. Results In total, 211 professionals answered the questionnaire. Private hospitals showed higher availability of resources for hemodynamic monitoring than did public institutions. The pulmonary artery catheter was considered the most trusted by 56.9% of the respondents, followed by echocardiograms, at 22.3%. Cardiac output was considered the most important variable. Other variables also considered relevant were mixed/central venous oxygen saturation, pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, and right ventricular end-diastolic volume. Echocardiography was the most used method (64.5%), followed by pulmonary artery catheter (49.3%). Only half of respondents used treatment protocols, and 25% worked in continuing education programs in hemodynamic monitoring. Conclusion Hemodynamic monitoring has a greater availability in intensive care units of private institutions in Brazil. Echocardiography was the most used monitoring method, but the pulmonary artery catheter remains the most reliable. The implementation of treatment protocols and continuing education programs in hemodynamic monitoring in Brazil is still insufficient. PMID:25607264

  17. Attitude of resident doctors towards intensive care units' alarm settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rakesh; Bhalotra, Anju R; Goel, Nitesh; Pruthi, Amit; Bhadoria, Poonam; Anand, Raktima

    2010-11-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) monitors have alarm options to intimate the staff of critical incidents but these alarms needs to be adjusted in every patient. With this objective in mind, this study was done among resident doctors, with the aim of assessing the existing attitude among resident doctors towards ICU alarm settings. This study was conducted among residents working at ICU of a multispeciality centre, with the help of a printed questionnaire. The study involved 80 residents. All residents were in full agreement on routine use of ECG, pulse oximeter, capnograph and NIBP monitoring. 86% residents realised the necessity of monitoring oxygen concentration, apnoea monitoring and expired minute ventilation monitoring. 87% PGs and 70% SRs routinely checked alarm limits for various parameters. 50% PGs and 46.6% SRs set these alarm limits. The initial response to an alarm among all the residents was to disable the alarm temporarily and try to look for a cause. 92% of PGs and 98% of SRs were aware of alarms priority and colour coding. 55% residents believed that the alarm occurred due to patient disturbance, 15% believed that alarm was due to technical problem with monitor/sensor and 30% thought it was truly related to patient's clinical status. 82% residents set the alarms by themselves, 10% believed that alarms should be adjusted by nurse, 4% believed the technical staff should take responsibility of setting alarm limits and 4% believed that alarm levels should be pre-adjusted by the manufacturer. We conclude that although alarms are an important, indispensable, and lifesaving feature, they can be a nuisance and can compromise quality and safety of care by frequent false positive alarms. We should be familiar of the alarm modes, check and reset the alarm settings at regular interval or after a change in clinical status of the patient. PMID:21224968

  18. Impact of clinical pharmacist in an Indian Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: A critically ill patient is treated and reviewed by physicians from different specialties; hence, polypharmacy is a very common. This study was conducted to assess the impact and effectiveness of having a clinical pharmacist in an Indian Intensive Care Unit (ICU. It also evaluates the clinical pharmacist interventions with a focus on optimizing the quality of pharmacotherapy and patient safety. Materials and Methods: The prospective, observational study was carried out in medical and surgical/trauma ICU over a period of 1 year. All detected drug-related problems and interventions were categorized based on the Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe system. Results: During the study period, average monthly census of 1032 patients got treated in the ICUs. A total of 986 pharmaceutical interventions due to drug-related problems were documented, whereof medication errors accounted for 42.6% (n = 420, drug of choice problem 15.4% (n = 152, drug-drug interactions were 15.1% (n = 149, Y-site drug incompatibility was 13.7% (n = 135, drug dosing problems were 4.8% (n = 47, drug duplications reported were 4.6% (n = 45, and adverse drug reactions documented were 3.8% (n = 38. Drug dosing adjustment done by the clinical pharmacist included 140 (11.9% renal dose, 62 (5.2% hepatic dose, 17 (1.4% pediatric dose, and 104 (8.8% insulin dosing modifications. A total of 577 drug and poison information queries were answered by the clinical pharmacist. Conclusion: Clinical pharmacist as a part of multidisciplinary team in our study was associated with a substantially lower rate of adverse drug event caused by medication errors, drug interactions, and drug incompatibilities.

  19. Intraocular infections in the neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sisk RA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hassan A Aziz1, Audina M Berrocal1,2, Robert A Sisk1, Kristin Hartley1, Magaly Diaz-Barbosa2, Rose A Johnson2, Ditte Hess1, Sander R Dubovy1, Timothy G Murray1, Harry W Flynn Jr11Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 2Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to report on the incidence and treatment outcomes of endogenous endophthalmitis among newborns in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU of a single medical center.Methods: This was a noncomparative, retrospective case series of endogenous endophthalmitis among infants at the Jackson Memorial Hospital NICU treated between March 1, 2002 and March 1, 2007.Results: Of 4323 infants admitted to the NICU, seven eyes of six (0.139% infants (two males, four females were diagnosed with endophthalmitis during the study period. Four patients were born prematurely with a mean gestational age of 27.5 weeks and a mean birth weight of 1153 g. Retinopathy of prematurity was reported in two of the six patients. Mean follow-up was 3.5 years. The diagnosis was confirmed by positive cultures or polymerase chain reaction testing at a median age of 34 postnatal days. Positive cultures included Candida albicans (n = 4, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 1, and Herpes simplex type 2 (n = 1. All patients received systemic treatment and five received adjunctive ophthalmic interventions, including intravitreal antibiotics in five eyes of four patients and vitrectomy with pars plana lensectomy in three eyes. One patient underwent primary enucleation and another had delayed evisceration. In the remaining five eyes, there was a normal appearing posterior segment and normal intraocular pressures at last follow-up.Conclusion: Endogenous endophthalmitis is a rare complication in infants in the NICU, but may occur in patients with candidemia, bacteremia, retinopathy of prematurity, and low birth weight. Despite early and

  20. Are managed care organizations in the United States impeding the delivery of primary care by nurse practitioners? A 2012 update on managed care organization credentialing and reimbursement practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen-Turton, Tine; Ware, Jamie; Bond, Lisa; Doria, Natalie; Cunningham, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    In 2014, the Affordable Care Act will create an estimated 16 million newly insured people. Coupled with an estimated shortage of over 60,000 primary care physicians, the country's public health care system will be at a challenging crossroads, as there will be more patients waiting to see fewer doctors. Nurse practitioners (NPs) can help to ease this crisis. NPs are health care professionals with the capability to provide important and critical access to primary care, particularly for vulnerable populations. However, despite convincing data about the quality of care provided by NPs, many managed care organizations (MCOs) across the country do not credential NPs as primary care providers, limiting the ability of NPs to be reimbursed by private insurers. To assess current credentialing practices of health plans across the United States, a brief telephone survey was administered to 258 of the largest health maintenance organizations (HMOs) in the United States, operated by 98 different MCOs. Results indicated that 74% of these HMOs currently credential NPs as primary care providers. Although this represents progress over prior assessments, findings suggest that just over one fourth of major HMOs still do not recognize NPs as primary care providers. Given the documented shortage of primary care physicians in low-income communities in the United States, these credentialing policies continue to diminish the ability of NPs to deliver primary care to vulnerable populations. Furthermore, these policies could negatively impact access to care for thousands of newly insured Americans who will be seeking a primary care provider in 2014.

  1. Framing the issue of ageing and health care spending in Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusmano, Michael K; Allin, Sara

    2014-07-01

    Political debates about the affordability of health care programmes in high-income countries often point to population ageing as a threat to sustainability. Debates in the United States, in particular, highlight concerns about intergenerational equity, whereby spending on older people is perceived as a threat to spending on the young. This paper compares how the problem of health spending is defined in Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States by presenting the results of a content analysis of print media during the period 2005-2010. We found that population ageing was cited as an important source of health care cost increases in all three countries but was cited less frequently in Canadian newspapers than in the UK or US papers. Direct claims about intergenerational equity are infrequent among the articles we coded, but newspaper articles in the United States were more likely than those in Canada and the United Kingdom to claim that of high health care spending on older people takes resources away from younger people. In Canada a much larger percentage of articles in our sample either claimed that high health care spending is crowding out other types of government expenditure. Finally, we found that almost no articles in the United States challenged the view that population ageing causes health care spending, whereas in both Canada and the United Kingdom a small, but steady stream of articles challenged the idea that population ageing is to blame for health care spending increases. PMID:24759155

  2. Antidepressant or Antipsychotic Overdose in the Intensive Care Unit - Identification of Patients at Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Linda; Julkunen, Anna; Rørbaek Madsen, Kristian; Strøm, Thomas; Toft, Palle

    2016-07-01

    It is often advised that patients who have ingested an overdose of antidepressants (AD) or antipsychotics (AP) are monitored with continuous ECG for minimum of 12-24 hr. These patients are often observed in an ICU. Our aim was to identify the number of patients with AD and/or AP overdose without adverse signs at hospital admission that turned out to need intensive care treatment. The effect of the antidepressants overdose risk assessment (ADORA) system was evaluated in patients with antidepressant as well as antipsychotic overdose. Our hypothesis was that patients with low ADORA do not need intensive care treatment. This retrospective study was conducted in adult patients admitted to the ICU at Odense University Hospital after an overdose with AP and/or AD between 1 January 2009 and 1 September 2014. Patients with predefined adverse signs in the emergency department were excluded due to obvious need of intensive care. Of the 157 patients included, 12 patients (8%) developed events during the ICU stay. Only 3 patients received intubation, vasoactive drugs and/or dialysis. None developed ventricular dysrhythmias. There were no fatalities. All the patients with low-risk assessment by ADORA within the first 6 hr did not develop events within the first 24 hr after hospital admission. The vast majority of patients with AD and/or AP overdose and no adverse signs at admission did not require intensive care treatment. Low-risk ADORA identified patients with antidepressant as well as antipsychotic overdose who would not require initial intensive care treatment. This is the first time the ADORA system has been evaluated in patients with antidepressant as well as antipsychotic overdose. PMID:26663682

  3. An Exploration of the Viewpoints of Parents and Nurses on Care Provision in Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haydeh Heidari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infants are regarded as a vulnerable group in need of nursing care, particularly during NICU admission. Parents of these infants often experience emotional, psychological and physical upheavals. Therefore, nurses can be of great help to the parents and facilitate a healthy transition from this period. Improper communication with parents, who seek information on their infant’s condition, intensifies their stress, fear and misunderstanding. In fact, inadequate communication with healthcare providers and lack of family support are major issues for the parents of NICU-admitted infants. Methods: In this qualitative study, via content analysis, we objectively selected and collected data from parents, physicians and nurses, residing in Isfahan, Iran in 2012. Data saturation was reached after conducting 25 in-depth, semi-structured interviews. Results: Based on the findings, five major categories were extracted: 1 care provision in NICUs; 2 diagnostic difficulties; 3 NICU admission process; 4 challenges of hospitalization; and 5 maintenance of infant viability. Conclusion: Nurses’ proper response to parents’ questions about the infant's condition reduced stress among parents. Based on the findings, training is essential to healthy family dynamics and infant’s well-being, particularly for younger parents who support their infants at home. Also, regular updates on infant’s condition could help reduce parents’ stress and discomfort.

  4. Cardiac Risk Assessment, Morbidity Prediction, and Outcome in the Vascular Intensive Care Unit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dover, Mary

    2013-09-17

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to examine the predictive value of the Lee revised cardiac risk index (RCRI) for a standard vascular intensive care unit (ICU) population as well as assessing the utility of transthoracic echocardiography and the impact of prior coronary artery disease (CAD) and coronary revascularization on patient outcome. Design: This is a retrospective review of prospectively maintained Vascubase and prospectively collected ICU data. Materials and Methods: Data from 363 consecutive vascular ICU admissions were collected. Findings were used to calculate the RCRI, which was then correlated with patient outcomes. All patients were on optimal medical therapy (OMT) in the form of cardioselective β-blocker, aspirin, statin, and folic acid. Results: There was no relationship found between a reduced ejection fraction and patient outcome. Mortality was significantly increased for patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) as identified on echo (14.9% vs 6.5%, P = .028). The overall complication rates were significantly elevated for patients with valvular dysfunction. Discrimination for the RCRI on receiver-operating characteristic analysis was poor, with an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve of .621. Model calibration was reasonable with an Hosmer-Lemeshow Ĉ statistic of 2.726 (P = .256). Of those with known CAD, 41.22% of the patients receiving best medical treatment developed acute myocardial infarction (AMI) compared to 35.3% of those who previously underwent percutaneous cardiac intervention and 23.5% of those who had undergone coronary artery bypass grafting. There was 3-fold increase in major adverse clinical events in patients with troponin rise and LVH. Conclusions: The RCRI\\'s discriminatory capacity is low, and this raises difficulties in assessing cardiac risk in patients undergoing vascular intervention. The AMI is highest in the OMT group without prior cardiac intervention, which mandates protocols to

  5. Fenoldopam use in a burn intensive care unit: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotant Casey L

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fenoldopam mesylate is a highly selective dopamine-1 receptor agonist approved for the treatment of hypertensive emergencies that may have a role at low doses in preserving renal function in those at high risk for or with acute kidney injury (AKI. There is no data on low-dose fenoldopam in the burn population. The purpose of our study was to describe our use of low-dose fenoldopam (0.03-0.09 μg/kg/min infusion in critically ill burn patients with AKI. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients admitted to our burn intensive care unit (BICU with severe burns from November 2005 through September 2008 who received low-dose fenoldopam. Data obtained included systolic blood pressure, serum creatinine, vasoactive medication use, urine output, and intravenous fluid. Patients on concomitant continuous renal replacement therapy were excluded. Modified inotrope score and vasopressor dependency index were calculated. One-way analysis of variance with repeated measures, Wilcoxson signed rank, and chi-square tests were used. Differences were deemed significant at p Results Seventy-seven patients were treated with low-dose fenoldopam out of 758 BICU admissions (10%. Twenty (26% were AKI network (AKIN stage 1, 14 (18% were AKIN stage 2, 42 (55% were AKIN stage 3, and 1 (1% was AKIN stage 0. Serum creatinine improved over the first 24 hours and continued to improve through 48 hours (p p p p = NS. Modified inotrope score and vasopressor dependency index both decreased over 48 hours (p p = 0.0012. Conclusions These findings suggest that renal function was preserved and that urine output improved without a decrease in systolic blood pressure, increase in vasoactive medication use, or an increase in resuscitation requirement in patients treated with low-dose fenoldopam. A randomized controlled trial is required to establish the efficacy of low-dose fenoldopam in critically ill burn patients with AKI.

  6. How is mechanical ventilation employed in a pediatric intensive care unit in Brazil?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafne Cardoso Bourguignon da Silva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to investigate the relationship between mechanical ventilation and mortality and the practice of mechanical ventilation applied in children admitted to a high-complexity pediatric intensive care unit in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study of all consecutive patients admitted to a Brazilian high-complexity PICU who were placed on mechanical ventilation for 24 hours or more, between October 1st, 2005 and March 31st, 2006. RESULTS: Of the 241 patients admitted, 86 (35.7% received mechanical ventilation for 24 hours or more. Of these, 49 met inclusion criteria and were thus eligible to participate in the study. Of the 49 patients studied, 45 had chronic functional status. The median age of participants was 32 months and the median length of mechanical ventilation use was 6.5 days. The major indication for mechanical ventilation was acute respiratory failure, usually associated with severe sepsis / septic shock. Pressure ventilation modes were the standard ones. An overall 10.37% incidence of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome was found, in addition to tidal volumes > 8 ml/kg, as well as normo- or hypocapnia. A total of 17 children died. Risk factors for mortality within 28 days of admission were initial inspiratory pressure, pH, PaO2/FiO2 ratio, oxygenation index and also oxygenation index at 48 hours of mechanical ventilation. Initial inspiratory pressure was also a predictor of mechanical ventilation for periods longer than 7 days. CONCLUSION: Of the admitted children, 35.7% received mechanical ventilation for 24 h or more. Pressure ventilation modes were standard. Of the children studied, 91% had chronic functional status. There was a high incidence of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, but a lung-protective strategy was not fully implemented. Inspiratory pressure at the beginning of mechanical ventilation was a predictor of mortality within 28 days and of a longer course of mechanical ventilation.

  7. Clinical, epidemiological and evolution of severe nosocomial pneumonia in intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Arroyo- Sanchez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics, evolution and to identify mortality factors associated in patients with SNP. Material and Methods: Descriptive study of a serie of cases of the Intensive Care Unit (ICU of a General Hospital. Medical records of patients which received medical attention and who meet the selection criteria were reviewed Results: Forty-one clinical records were evaluated. The average age was 69 old, predominantly male (68,3%. SNP was the reason of admission in 60.9% and 95.1% required mechanical ventilation. Hospital stay prior to diagnosis was 10 days, 65% of patients had some risk factor for multi resistence organisms, CPIS of entry was 9.3, cultures were positive in 39% of the cases and of these, 48.8% received proper antibiotic according to culture results. The days of stay in ICU were 20.6 days and 20 of the 41 medical records were for death patients. The clinical and epidemiological characteristics were similar between death and alive patients. An analysis of factors that could be associated with mortality SNP was made and it was found that for an age ≥ 70 years, the presence of any risk factor for multidrug resistence organism and control CPIS ≥ 6 were associated with higher mortality; while acquisition of the ICU was associated to lower mortality. Conclusions: The clinical, epidemiological characteristics and evolution of patients with SNP in our ICU were similar to those describe in the literature. Three factors associated with mortality in the ICU were identified.

  8. An Application of Bayesian Approach in Modeling Risk of Death in an Intensive Care Unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowena Syn Yin Wong

    Full Text Available There are not many studies that attempt to model intensive care unit (ICU risk of death in developing countries, especially in South East Asia. The aim of this study was to propose and describe application of a Bayesian approach in modeling in-ICU deaths in a Malaysian ICU.This was a prospective study in a mixed medical-surgery ICU in a multidisciplinary tertiary referral hospital in Malaysia. Data collection included variables that were defined in Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IV (APACHE IV model. Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC simulation approach was applied in the development of four multivariate logistic regression predictive models for the ICU, where the main outcome measure was in-ICU mortality risk. The performance of the models were assessed through overall model fit, discrimination and calibration measures. Results from the Bayesian models were also compared against results obtained using frequentist maximum likelihood method.The study involved 1,286 consecutive ICU admissions between January 1, 2009 and June 30, 2010, of which 1,111 met the inclusion criteria. Patients who were admitted to the ICU were generally younger, predominantly male, with low co-morbidity load and mostly under mechanical ventilation. The overall in-ICU mortality rate was 18.5% and the overall mean Acute Physiology Score (APS was 68.5. All four models exhibited good discrimination, with area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC values approximately 0.8. Calibration was acceptable (Hosmer-Lemeshow p-values > 0.05 for all models, except for model M3. Model M1 was identified as the model with the best overall performance in this study.Four prediction models were proposed, where the best model was chosen based on its overall performance in this study. This study has also demonstrated the promising potential of the Bayesian MCMC approach as an alternative in the analysis and modeling of in-ICU mortality outcomes.

  9. [Enterovirus nosocomial infections in a neonatal care unit: from diagnosis to evidence, from a clinical observation of a central nervous system infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farcy, C; Mirand, A; Marque Juillet, S; Henquell, C; Neulier, C; Foucaud, P; Peigue-Lafeuille, H

    2012-09-01

    Although enteroviruses generally cause asymptomatic or mild disease, neonates are at higher risk for severe illnesses, among which systemic disease characterized by multiorgan involvement is a potentially fatal condition. Enterovirus neonatal infections may be the source of nosocomial infections in neonatology or in pediatric intensive care units. We report central nervous system infections due to Echovirus 11 in two neonates and the molecular evidence of nosocomial transmission of this strain in a neonatal unit by enterovirus genotyping and phylogenetic analysis. This report illustrates the importance of including enterovirus genome detection in the sepsis screening concomitantly with bacteriological investigations performed at admission of a neonate. Rapid diagnosis and subsequent genotyping could have a beneficial impact on clinical practices at the individual level (reducing the length of antibiotic therapy) and public health policy at the collective level by reinforcing hygiene measures to prevent nosocomial infections, with nurseries and neonatal units being at greater risks.

  10. Long-Term Impact of Acute, Critical Illness and Admission to an Intensive Care Unit. Perspectives of Patients and Partners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ågård, Anne Sophie

    2013-01-01

    and refining progress and recovery. The first year was characterized by training, perseverance, and continued hope of recovery. Most of the ICU survivors had comprehensive physical or neuropsychological rehabilitation needs requiring months of trai-ning in hospital, rehabilitation facilities, and in community...... and rehabilitation pro-fessionals in hospitals and community-based services to consider the best content, timing, and organization of supportive measures aimed at assisting spouses in their support of recovering patients. To broaden the overall insight into the recovery of the heterogeneous population of ICU......ENGLISH SUMMARY The focus of the study was to describe post-ICU recovery as seen from the perspective of ICU survivors and their spouses in a Danish setting. The aims were to describe the trajectories of the participating patients and spouses and generate theoretical accounts of their main concerns...

  11. Karakteristik Dengue Berat yang Dirawat di Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzulfikar D. Lukmanul Hakim

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viral infections affect all age groups and produce a spectrum of clinical illness that ranges from asymptomatic to severe and occasionally fatal disease. Severe dengue characterized by plasma leakage, hemoconcentration, and hemostatic disorder. The aim of this study was to know the characteristic of severe dengue patients admitted to Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung during January 2009 to December 2010. This was a retrospective descriptive study based on the data collected from the medical records. Twenty-one severe dengue cases in two years were admitted 15/21 girls and 6/21 boys, and 5/21 of them died during hospitalization because of dengue shock syndrome (DSS and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC. Most of them were 1−5 years old with good nutritional status. Hepatomegaly was found in all cases with mean hematocrit was 38%. In this research, the most manifestation of severe dengue were DSS (15/21, DIC (11/21, encephalopathy (6/21, pleural effusion (5/21, myocarditis (3/21, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (3/21. In conclusions, severe dengue are more common in girls, 1–5 years old, and well-nourished children. The most common clinical manifestation of severe dengue are shock, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and encephalopathy.

  12. Eye injury treatment in intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. K. Moshetova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To describe eye injuries in intensive care unit (ICU patients with multitrauma, to study conjunctival microflora in these patients, and to develop etiologically and pathogenically targeted treatment and prevention of wound complications.Materials and methods. Study group included 50 patients (54 eyes with combined mechanical cerebral and eye injury. All patients underwent possible ophthalmological examination (biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy and ocular fundus photographing with portative fundus camera, tonometry, cranial CT and MRT, and bacteriological study of conjunctival smears. Results. Modern methods of ophthalmological examination of ICU patients provided correct diagnosis and prediction of wound healing. Eye injury treatment schedule provided maximum possible results in all ICU patients. Hospitalacquired infection results in asymptomatic dissemination of pathogenic microbes on ocular surface. Conclusions. 14-day topical treatment with antimicrobials, steroids, and NSAIDs reduces posttraumatic inflammation caused by mechanical eye injuries in ICU patients. Bacteriological studies of conjunctival smears demonstrate the presence of pathogenic flora in ICU patients. In these patients, the most effective antibacterial agents are third-generation fluoroquinolones. 

  13. Elective open bedside tracheostomy in the neurosurgical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niran Maharjan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available JCMSBackground and Objectives: Tracheostomy is electively performed in critically ill patients requiring prolonged respiratory support. The risk of transporting, the increasing associated cost and operative room schedule are some of the obstacles for wider acceptance of this procedure. The use of rigid selection criteria exclude many patients who would benefit of this approach. The present study was designed to determine the safety of open bedside tracheostomy (OBT as a routine intensive care units (ICU procedure without any selection criteria, considering its peri and postoperative complications.Materials & Methods: Retrospective medical chart review of all patients that underwent elective tracheostomy between June 2014 and January 2015.Results: The study group comprised 52 patients with a mean age of 40.4±15.1 years. The incidence of intra-procedure complications was 5.7% and post-procedure complications was 3.8%.Conclusions: Open bedside tracheostomy seems to be a safe and simple procedure, even when performed by a trained resident under controlled circumstances, and should be considered as an option for ICU patients.JCMS Nepal. 2015;11(1: 9-11

  14. Eye injury treatment in intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. K. Moshetova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To describe eye injuries in intensive care unit (ICU patients with multitrauma, to study conjunctival microflora in these patients, and to develop etiologically and pathogenically targeted treatment and prevention of wound complications.Materials and methods. Study group included 50 patients (54 eyes with combined mechanical cerebral and eye injury. All patients underwent possible ophthalmological examination (biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy and ocular fundus photographing with portative fundus camera, tonometry, cranial CT and MRT, and bacteriological study of conjunctival smears. Results. Modern methods of ophthalmological examination of ICU patients provided correct diagnosis and prediction of wound healing. Eye injury treatment schedule provided maximum possible results in all ICU patients. Hospitalacquired infection results in asymptomatic dissemination of pathogenic microbes on ocular surface. Conclusions. 14-day topical treatment with antimicrobials, steroids, and NSAIDs reduces posttraumatic inflammation caused by mechanical eye injuries in ICU patients. Bacteriological studies of conjunctival smears demonstrate the presence of pathogenic flora in ICU patients. In these patients, the most effective antibacterial agents are third-generation fluoroquinolones. 

  15. Challenges of Rural Cancer Care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Mary; Schlichting, Jennifer; Chioreso, Catherine; Ward, Marcia; Vikas, Praveen

    2015-09-01

    Rural cancer patients face many challenges in receiving care, including limited availability of cancer treatments and cancer support providers (oncologists, social workers, mental healthcare providers, palliative care specialists, etc), transportation barriers, financial issues, and limited access to clinical trials. Oncologists and other cancer care providers experience parallel challenges in delivering care to their rural cancer patients. Although no one approach fully addresses the many challenges of rural cancer care, a number of promising strategies and interventions have been developed that transcend the issues associated with long travel distances. These include outreach clinics, virtual tumor boards, teleoncology and other telemedicine applications, workforce recruitment and retention initiatives, and provider and patient education programs. Given the projected increase in demand for cancer care due to the aging population and increasing number of Americans with health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, expansion of these efforts and development of new approaches are critical to ensure access to high-quality care. PMID:26384798

  16. Pandemic influenza A(H1)pdm09 in hospitals and intensive care units – results from a new hospital surveillance, Germany 2009/2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlhoch, Cornelia; Wadl, Maria; Behnke, Michael; Peña Diaz, Luis Alberto; Clausmeyer, Jörg; Eckmanns, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Adlhoch et al. (2012) Pandemic influenza A(H1)pdm09 in hospitals and intensive care units – results from a new hospital surveillance, Germany 2009/2010. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(601), e162–e168. Objectives  The pandemic influenza A(H1)pdm09 (PI) was introduced to Germany in April 2009. The Robert Koch Institute (RKI) implemented a nationwide voluntary hospital sentinel surveillance for to assess the burden and severity of PI. Setting  Three modules were offered: a hospital module collected aggregated data from all hospital units on admissions and fatalities with and without PI; an intensive care module data on admissions, patient‐days, and ventilated patient‐days with and without PI; and a case‐based module retrieved clinical patient data of PI cases. A in‐patient with a PCR confirmation was defined as a PI case. Descriptive, trend, uni‐, and multivariable analysis were performed. Results  Between week 49/2009 and 13/2010, the hospitals reported 103 (0·07%) PI cases among 159 181 admissions and 59/16 728 (0·35%) PI‐related admissions in intensive care units (ICUs). The weekly average incidence decreased in hospitals by 21·5% and in ICUs by 19·2%. In ICUs, 1848/85 559 (2·2%) patient‐days were PI‐related, 94·8% of those with mechanical ventilation. Case‐based data on 43 recovered and 16 fatal PI cases were reported. Among recovered, 61% were admitted to ICUs, 51% were mechanically ventilated, and 16% received extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). All fatal cases were admitted to ICUs and received mechanical ventilation, 75% ECMO. Fatal outcome was rather associated with complications than with underlying medical conditions. Conclusion  The surveillance started shortly after the PI peak, which explains the small number of PI cases. The burden of PI disease was low, but higher in ICUs with a high proportion of severe cases needing ventilation and ECMO treatment. A continuous

  17. Chicken pox outbreak in the Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital: Lessons learnt the hard way

    OpenAIRE

    Sarit Sharma; Shruti Sharma; Deepinder Chhina; Chhina, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes 2 clinically and epidemiologically distinct forms of diseases. Chickenpox (varicella) is the disease that results from primary infection with the VZV. Herpes zoster (HZ) results from the reactivation of VZV latently infecting the dorsal root ganglia. We are reporting an outbreak of varicella infection among the health care workers (HCWs) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a tertiary care hospital. We found transmission of varicella among eight HCWs of pulm...

  18. Healthcare associated infections in Paediatric Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital in India: Hospital stay & extra costs

    OpenAIRE

    Jitender Sodhi; Sidhartha Satpathy; D K Sharma; Rakesh Lodha; Arti Kapil; Nitya Wadhwa; Shakti Kumar Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Healthcare associated infections (HAIs) increase the length of stay in the hospital and consequently costs as reported from studies done in developed countries. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of HAIs on length of stay and costs of health care in children admitted to Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of a tertiary care hospital in north India.Methods: This prospective study was done in the seven bedded PICU of a large multi-specialty tertia...

  19. Healthcare associated infections in Paediatric Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital in India: Hospital stay & extra costs

    OpenAIRE

    Sodhi, Jitender; Satpathy, Sidhartha; D K Sharma; Lodha, Rakesh; Kapil, Arti; Wadhwa, Nitya; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Healthcare associated infections (HAIs) increase the length of stay in the hospital and consequently costs as reported from studies done in developed countries. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of HAIs on length of stay and costs of health care in children admitted to Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of a tertiary care hospital in north India. Methods: This prospective study was done in the seven bedded PICU of a large multi-specialty terti...

  20. Admission Hyperglycemia in Head Injured Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousefzadeh Chabok Sh

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia, in trauma patient, is commonly associated with a hyper metabolic stress response. Our objective is to determine the effects of hyperglycemia on the overall outcome of head trauma patients. In this descriptive study data were collected from head trauma patients' admitted to Intensive Care Unit (ICU of Poursina University Hospital in a one-year period (Jan 2004-Jan 2005, retrospectively. All patients had stayed in the ICU for more than 48 hours post-injuries. They were divided into two groups according to their serum glucose levels at the time of admission (<200mg/dl or >200mg/dl, age, gender and Injury Severity Score (ISS. Patients with diabetes mellitus were excluded .We determined the outcome according to duration of hospitalization and ICU stay as well as mortality rates. Variables were analyzed with t-test and chi square test. Out of 115 patients, 89.6% were men. About 36 % of patients had serum glucose levels ≥ 200 mg/dl over the study period and this group had significantly greater mortality rate but without necessarily longer ICU or hospital stay. In this study we have shown that admission hyperglycemia has significant effect on patient's mortality but it is still unclear whether it can be a cause for longer ICU/hospital stay."n© 2009 Tehran University of Medical Sciences. All rights reserved.

  1. Volume of activity and occupancy rate in intensive care units. Association with mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iapichino, G; Gattinoni, L; Radrizzani, D; Simini, B; Bertolini, G; Ferla, L; Mistraletti, G; Porta, F; Miranda, DR

    2004-01-01

    Objective. Mortality after many procedures is lower in centers where more procedures are done. It is controversial whether this is true for intensive care units, too. We examined the relationship between the volume of activity of intensive care units (ICUs) and mortality by a measure of risk-adjuste

  2. Hypophosphatemia on the intensive care unit: individualized phosphate replacement based on serum levels and distribution volume.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bech, A.; Blans, M.; Raaijmakers, M.; Mulkens, C.; Telting, D.; Boer, H. de

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypophosphatemia occurs in about 25% of patients admitted to the intensive care unit. To date, a safe and validated phosphate replacement protocol is not available. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate an individualized phosphate replacement regimen. DESIGN: Fifty consecutive intensive care unit patie

  3. [Choice of Expiration for Cancer Patients under Home Medical Care - Palliative Care Unit or Home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okino, Takashi; Okagaki, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Hiromi; Okino, Akie

    2015-12-01

    Kohka Public Hospital(KPH)was rebuilt at a new place in April 2013. The Palliative Care Unit(PCU)was newly constructed during renovation. We examined the will and outcome of cancer patients, especially on expiration. A 123 patients died in 2014: 27 died at the PCU, and the remaining 7 at home. Of 27 patients, 20 were willing to die at the PCU, and one patient visited the hospital after judgment by the Visiting Nurse Center. Other 6 patients were admitted finally after their families experienced fatigue. Six of seven patients who died at home, showed a strong will to stay at home. We think that patients' will drives the clinical course, especially in their end-stage. In this context, the majority of the patients decided their terminal place based on their will. On the contrary, there were several cases whose requests were not fulfilled. To overcome the problem, we should discuss cancer patients' will to make a choice regarding death at the end-stage of their lives and the place of expiration in advance. We including the staff of social care and regional medical resources, should co-operate and share information on these patients to solve the problems. PMID:26809413

  4. Pneumothoraces in a Neonatal Tertiary Care Unit: Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehan Ali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Neonatal pneumothoraces are associated with high mortality. Prompt recognition to minimize its complications is paramount for ultimate outcome of these babies.Methods: A retrospective case series study was carried out at Aga khan University Hospital, from January 2010 to December 2010 to determine the etiology and outcome of neonates with pneumothorax in a neonatal tertiary care unit.Results: Ten neonates diagnosed radiologically with pneumothoraces were included. M: F ratio was 1:2.3. Birth weight ranged from 1750-3600 grams with a mean of 2100 grams. The occurrence of pneumothoraces was 50% on the left side, 20% on right, and 30% were bilateral. Primary etiology included pneumonia and sepsis (30%, hyaline membrane disease (20%, meconium aspiration syndrome (20% and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (10%. Spontaneous pneumothoraces were present in 20% of cases. In our study, the incidence of neonatal pneumothoraces was 2.5/1000 births compared to 10-15/1000 in Denmark, 10-20/1000 in Turkey and 6.3/1000 from Vermont Oxford Group. Despite the small number of cases, one incidental finding was the occurrence of pneumothorax, which declined in elective cesarean section after 37 weeks gestation i.e., 1.3 of 1000 births. Mortality was 60% determined mainly by the primary etiology and other co-morbid conditions.Conclusion: The study showed a higher number of mortality cases (60%. Although, it was difficult to draw a conclusion from the limited number of cases, there may be a benefit on neonatal respiratory outcome to be obtained by better selection of mothers and by waiting until 37 weeks before performing elective cesarean section. Adequate clinician training in soft ventilation strategies will reduce the occurrence of pneumothoraces.

  5. Physiotherapy practices in Intensive Care Units across Maharashtra

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    Ujwal Lakshman Yeole

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To find out the current physiotherapy practices in Intensive Care Unit (ICU across Maharashtra. Materials and Methods: Study design was exploratory cross-sectional survey. Questionnaires were sent to the physiotherapists working in hospitals across Maharashtra state, India. Four weeks for completion of questionnaire was given in an attempt to ensure good response rates. Result: Of 200, 73 questionnaires were received representing a 36% response rate. The study revealed that 76% of the respondents were bachelors qualified, 15% were masters in physiotherapy with only 4% specialized in cardio-respiratory physiotherapy; 82% had <5 years experience in ICU. Almost 19% had not at all attended any seminars/workshops related to ICU management while 61% attended up to three within last 2 years. The availability of a physiotherapist during the night was affirmed by 63%, 58% responded initiation of physiotherapy to be "always physician referred" and 39% mentioned "physiotherapist initiated." Almost 80% performed chest wall techniques, 86% positioning, 27% postural drainage, 5% manual hyperinflation, 12% application of nebulizer, and 56% bedsores management. Only 5% reported involvement in ventilator setting, 11% had their opinion sought before weaning from ventilator, 29% practiced noninvasive ventilation, 11% were involved in decision-making for extubation and 44% reported involvement in patient family education. Conclusion: The study showed that physiotherapists among the responding ICUs surveyed lack in experience and updated knowledge. Physician reference is necessary to initiate physiotherapy and there exists no established criteria for physiotherapy treatment in ICU. All physiotherapists were routinely involved in chest physiotherapy, mobilization, and positioning.

  6. Is fumigation enough for air conditioning units in operation theatres and Intensive care units?

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    Anasua Deb

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Strict asepsis is necessary in operating theatres (OT and intensive care units (ICU as the patients undergo invasive procedures. The filters of contaminated air conditioning (AC units provide a niche for proliferation of fungi and production of fungal spores. Methods: The routine procedure for maintenance of sterile atmosphere in our hospital, i.e. fumigation and mopping walls with disinfectants often fail to address these fungal spores of the AC filters. We therefore carried out a surveillance of the ACs in ICUs and OTs to find the level of contamination with fungal spores and also to improvise on intervention strategies to tackle the problem. Over 3 months period, 34 ACs from 7 OTs and 2 ICUs were screened by taking 2 swabs from each AC which were then tested for the presence of fungal spores as per standard methods. Results: The contamination rate was 88.2% before fumigation and 76.9% after fumigation. The fungal spore contamination rate was reduced to 20% (1 out of 5 ACs after servicing of the ACs was done. Aspergillus spp. was the most common fungal isolate. Conclusion: Based on the observations, we recommend regular servicing of the ACs as well as wet mopping of the ducts with sporicidal solution at regular intervals. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(5.000: 1583-1589

  7. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus introduced into intensive care units of a University Hospital

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    Silvana M.M. Cavalcanti

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is one of the principal human pathogens that colonize healthy individuals in the community in general, and it is responsible for severe infections in hospitalized patients. Due to an increase in the prevalence of strains of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, combating these microorganisms has become increasingly difficult. A descriptive study was carried out on 231 patients in intensive care at the Oswaldo Cruz University Hospital (HUOC in Recife, Brazil between January and April 2003 to determine the prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA and to evaluate risk factors for colonization by these bacteria when introduced into Intensive Care Units (ICUs. Body secretions were collected from the nostrils, axillary and perineal regions, and from broken skin lesions, of all patients during the first 48 hours following admission to the ICU. Samples were inoculated into blood agar and mannitol-salt-agar culture medium and identified by Gram staining, and by coagulase, DNAse and agglutination (Slidex Staph Test® tests. Growth in Mueller-Hinton agar with 4% sodium chloride and 6mg/L oxacillin was used to identify MRSA. In addition, the latex agglutination test was performed to identify penicillin-binding protein, PBP 2A. The prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA was 87/231 (37.7% and 30/231 (12.98%, respectively. There was no association between any risk factor studied (age, sex, origin of the patient - whether hospital or community, previous hospitalization, use of current or previous antibiotic therapy, corticotherapy and/or immunotherapy, reason for hospitalization and place of hospitalization and the presence of S. aureus. However, a significant association was established between previous hospitalization and the presence of MRSA (RR:1.85; CI:1.00-3.41; p=0.041. The nostrils were the principal site of colonization by both S. aureus (80.4% and MRSA (26.4%, followed by the perineal area, with rates of 27.6% and 12.6%, respectively. If only

  8. Applying Lean Six Sigma for innovative change to the post-anesthesia care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haenke, Roger; Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2015-04-01

    Many healthcare organizations are building or renovating patient care facilities. Using Lean Six Sigma methods, nurse leaders can eliminate unnecessary waste and improve work and patient care environments. Starting with a key department like the post-anesthesia care unit is a good way to expose staff and leaders to the potential of Lean.

  9. Nurses' experiences of caring for critically ill, non-sedated, mechanically ventilated patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laerkner, Eva; Egerod, Ingrid; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2015-01-01

    closeness. CONCLUSION: Despite the complexity of care, nurses preferred to care for more awake rather than sedated patients and appreciated caring for just one patient at a time. The importance of close collaboration between nurses and doctors to ensure patient comfort during mechanical ventilation......OBJECTIVE: The objective was to explore nurses' experiences of caring for non-sedated, critically ill patients requiring mechanical ventilation. DESIGN AND SETTING: The study had a qualitative explorative design and was based on 13 months of fieldwork in two intensive care units in Denmark where...... intubated patients included unpredictability, ambiguous needs and complex actions, while the rewarding aspects included personal interaction. Three sub-themes were identified: (i) caring for and with the patient, (ii) negotiating relational and instrumental care and (iii) managing physical and emotional...

  10. Implementing New Practices: An Empirical Study of Organizational Learning in Hospital Intensive Care Units

    OpenAIRE

    Tucker, Anita L; Nembhard, Ingrid M.; Amy C. Edmondson

    2007-01-01

    This paper contributes to research on organizational learning by investigating specific learning activities undertaken by improvement project teams in hospital intensive care units and proposing an integrative model to explain implementation success. Organizational learning is important in this context because medical knowledge changes constantly and hospital care units must learn new practices if they are to provide high-quality care. To develop a model of factors affecting improvement proje...

  11. Filipino Child Health in the United States: Do Health and Health Care Disparities Exist?

    OpenAIRE

    Javier, Joyce R.; Huffman, Lynne C; Mendoza, Fernando S

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Filipinos are the second largest Asian subgroup in the United States, but few studies have examined health and health care disparities in Filipino children. The objectives of this review are 1) to appraise current knowledge of Filipino children's health and health care and 2) to present the implications of these findings for research, clinical care, and policy. Methods We identified articles for review primarily via a Medline search emphasizing the terms Filipino and United State...

  12. Psychosocial factors and prevalence of burnout syndrome among nursing workers in intensive care units

    OpenAIRE

    da Silva, Jorge Luiz Lima; Soares, Rafael da Silva; Costa, Felipe dos Santos; Ramos, Danusa de Souza; Lima, Fabiano Bittencourt; Teixeira, Liliane Reis

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prevalence of burnout syndrome among nursing workers in intensive care units and establish associations with psychosocial factors. Methods This descriptive study evaluated 130 professionals, including nurses, nursing technicians, and nursing assistants, who performed their activities in intensive care and coronary care units in 2 large hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Data were collected in 2011 using a self-reported questionnaire. The Maslach Burnout...

  13. Improved nurse-parent communication in neonatal intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, Janne; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Egerod, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    and adjustment of nurse adherence to guided family-centred care was conducted by monitoring (1) knowledge, (2) delivery, (3) practice uptake and (4) certification. RESULTS: Implementation was improved by the development of a strategic framework and by adjusting the framework according to the real-life context...... family-centred care was developed to facilitate person-centred communication by bridging the gap between theory and practice in family-centred care. Main mechanisms of guided family-centred care are structured dialogue, reflection and person-centred communication. DESIGN: Qualitative and quantitative...... data were used to monitor participatory implementation of a systematic approach to training and certification of nurses delivering guided family-centred care. METHODS: Systematic implementation of guided family-centred care included workshops, supervised delivery and certification. Evaluation...

  14. End-of-life care in the United States: policy issues and model programs of integrated care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M. Wiener

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: End-of-life care financing and delivery in the United States is fragmented and uncoordinated, with little integration of acute and long-term care services. Objective: To assess policy issues involving end-of-life care, especially involving the hospice benefit, and to analyse model programs of integrated care for people who are dying. Methods: The study conducted structured interviews with stakeholders and experts in end-of-life care and with administrators of model programs in the United States, which were nominated by the experts. Results: The two major public insurance programs—Medicare and Medicaid—finance the vast majority of end-of-life care. Both programs offer a hospice benefit, which has several shortcomings, including requiring physicians to make a prognosis of a six month life expectancy and insisting that patients give up curative treatment—two steps which are difficult for doctors and patients to make—and payment levels that may be too low. In addition, quality of care initiatives for nursing homes and hospice sometimes conflict. Four innovative health systems have overcome these barriers to provide palliative services to beneficiaries in their last year of life. Three of these health systems are managed care plans which receive capitated payments. These providers integrate health, long-term and palliative care using an interdisciplinary team approach to management of services. The fourth provider is a hospice that provides palliative services to beneficiaries of all ages, including those who have not elected hospice care. Conclusions: End-of-life care is deficient in the United States. Public payers could use their market power to improve care through a number of strategies.

  15. Musculoskeletal problems in intensive care unit patients post discharge

    OpenAIRE

    Devine, H.; MacTavish, P.; Quasim, T.; Kinsella, J; McPeake, J.; Daniel, M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to examine the incidence of musculoskeletal problems (i.e. pain, weakness, decreased joint range of movement) in critical care patients post discharge. Post intensive care syndrome (PICS) is now a widely used term to describe the collection of problems patients develop due to their stay in intensive care. ICU survivors have been found to have a high risk of developing not only psychological problems but physical problems such as Int...

  16. The performance of customised APACHE II and SAPS II in predicting mortality of mixed critically ill patients in a Thai medical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khwannimit, B; Bhurayanontachai, R

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the performance of customised Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation HII (APACHE II) and Simplified Acute Physiology Score HII (SAPS II) in predicting hospital mortality of mixed critically ill Thai patients in a medical intensive care unit. A prospective cohort study was conducted over a four-year period. The subjects were randomly divided into calibration and validation groups. Logistic regression analysis was used for customisation. The performance of the scores was evaluated by the discrimination, calibration and overall fit in the overall group and across subgroups in the validation group. Two thousand and forty consecutive intensive care unit admissions during the study period were split into two groups. Both customised models showed excellent discrimination. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the customised APACHE II was greater than the customised SAPS II (0.925 and 0.892, P APACHE II in overall populations and various subgroups but insufficient calibration for the customised SAPS II. The customised SAPS II showed good calibration in only the younger, postoperative and sepsis patients subgroups. The overall performance of the customised APACHE II was better than the customised SAPS II (Brier score 0.089 and 0.109, respectively). Our results indicate that the customised APACHE II shows better performance than the customised SAPS II in predicting hospital mortality and could be used to predict mortality and quality assessment in our unit or other intensive care units with a similar case mix.

  17. Arterial pulmonary hypertension in noncardiac intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Tsapenko, Mykola

    2008-01-01

    Mykola V Tsapenko1,5, Arseniy V Tsapenko2, Thomas BO Comfere3,5, Girish K Mour1,5, Sunil V Mankad4, Ognjen Gajic1,51Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine; 3Division of Critical Care Medicine; 4Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Epidemiology and Translational Research in Intensive Care (M.E.T.R.I.C), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Brown University, Miriam Hospital, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Pulmonary artery pressure elev...

  18. PATIENT DATA MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN INTENSIVE CARE UNIT (ICU) USING LABVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Amritjot Kaur*, Shimi S. L

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new system that takes the benefits of data flow technology. Its objective is to collect the data from monitoring system in the intensive care unit (ICU) and store that data for further analysis. Then it will be available for medical personnel to analyze data and take the suitable medication for patients. In fact, the monitoring system in intensive care unit provides a large amount of data quickly and continuously. Most units operate with a very limited storage capacity w...

  19. Evaluation of functional independence after discharge from the intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Curzel, Juliane; Forgiarini Junior, Luiz Alberto; Rieder, Marcelo de Mello

    2013-01-01

    Objective 1) To evaluate the functional independence measures immediately after discharge from an intensive care unit and to compare these values with the FIMs 30 days after that period. 2) To evaluate the possible associated risk factors. Methods The present investigation was a prospective cohort study that included individuals who were discharged from the intensive care unit and underwent physiotherapy in the unit. Functional independence was evaluated using the functional independence meas...

  20. Early neonatal special care units and their scientific achievements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obladen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of sick neonates originated in maternity and foundling hospitals in the 19th century. Nosocomial infections and difficult logistics of wet-nursing prevented admission of neonates in most children's hospitals well into the 20th century. In this article, 31 hospitals are described, all located in large cities, in which preterm and sick neonates were treated before the Great Depression. Even though mostly initiated by private charity, these institutions performed research right from the start. Topics included warming and feeding preterm infants, collecting and distributing human milk, developing and storing breast milk substitutes, prevention of rickets and nosocomial infections, maternal and public education regarding infection control, pathoanatomic characterisation of diseases and malformations and epidemiologic studies of infant mortality. These pioneering hospitals, their founding dates, researchers and classic publications are presented in a table.