WorldWideScience

Sample records for care sedation guidelines

  1. Consensus guidelines on analgesia and sedation in dying intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemieux-Charles Louise

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intensivists must provide enough analgesia and sedation to ensure dying patients receive good palliative care. However, if it is perceived that too much is given, they risk prosecution for committing euthanasia. The goal of this study is to develop consensus guidelines on analgesia and sedation in dying intensive care unit patients that help distinguish palliative care from euthanasia. Methods Using the Delphi technique, panelists rated levels of agreement with statements describing how analgesics and sedatives should be given to dying ICU patients and how palliative care should be distinguished from euthanasia. Participants were drawn from 3 panels: 1 Canadian Academic Adult Intensive Care Fellowship program directors and Intensive Care division chiefs (N = 9; 2 Deputy chief provincial coroners (N = 5; 3 Validation panel of Intensivists attending the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group meeting (N = 12. Results After three Delphi rounds, consensus was achieved on 16 statements encompassing the role of palliative care in the intensive care unit, the management of pain and suffering, current areas of controversy, and ways of improving palliative care in the ICU. Conclusion Consensus guidelines were developed to guide the administration of analgesics and sedatives to dying ICU patients and to help distinguish palliative care from euthanasia.

  2. Towards computerizing intensive care sedation guidelines: design of a rule-based architecture for automated execution of clinical guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerckhove Wannes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computerized ICUs rely on software services to convey the medical condition of their patients as well as assisting the staff in taking treatment decisions. Such services are useful for following clinical guidelines quickly and accurately. However, the development of services is often time-consuming and error-prone. Consequently, many care-related activities are still conducted based on manually constructed guidelines. These are often ambiguous, which leads to unnecessary variations in treatments and costs. The goal of this paper is to present a semi-automatic verification and translation framework capable of turning manually constructed diagrams into ready-to-use programs. This framework combines the strengths of the manual and service-oriented approaches while decreasing their disadvantages. The aim is to close the gap in communication between the IT and the medical domain. This leads to a less time-consuming and error-prone development phase and a shorter clinical evaluation phase. Methods A framework is proposed that semi-automatically translates a clinical guideline, expressed as an XML-based flow chart, into a Drools Rule Flow by employing semantic technologies such as ontologies and SWRL. An overview of the architecture is given and all the technology choices are thoroughly motivated. Finally, it is shown how this framework can be integrated into a service-oriented architecture (SOA. Results The applicability of the Drools Rule language to express clinical guidelines is evaluated by translating an example guideline, namely the sedation protocol used for the anaesthetization of patients, to a Drools Rule Flow and executing and deploying this Rule-based application as a part of a SOA. The results show that the performance of Drools is comparable to other technologies such as Web Services and increases with the number of decision nodes present in the Rule Flow. Most delays are introduced by loading the Rule Flows

  3. Evidence and consensus-based German guidelines for the management of analgesia, sedation and delirium in intensive care--short version.

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinschmidt, Stefan; Koppert, Wolfgang; Kessler, Paul; Huth, Ralf; Hartl, Wolfgang; Haase, Ulrike; Garten, Lars; Engelmann, Lothar; Eichler, Ingolf; Eggers, Verena; Dictus, Christine; Dall, Peter; Bürkle, Hartmut; Biniek, Rolf; Bäsell, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    Targeted monitoring of analgesia, sedation and delirium, as well as their appropriate management in critically ill patients is a standard of care in intensive care medicine. With the undisputed advantages of goal-oriented therapy established, there was a need to develop our own guidelines on analgesia and sedation in intensive care in Germany and these were published as 2nd Generation Guidelines in 2005. Through the dissemination of these guidelines in 2006, use of monitoring was shown to hav...

  4. Evidence and consensus based guideline for the management of delirium, analgesia, and sedation in intensive care medicine. Revision 2015 (DAS-Guideline 2015) – short version

    OpenAIRE

    DAS-Taskforce 2015; Baron, Ralf; Binder, Andreas; Biniek, Rolf; Braune, Stephan; Buerkle, Hartmut; Dall, Peter; Demirakca, Sueha; Eckardt, Rahel; Eggers, Verena; Eichler, Ingolf; Fietze, Ingo; Freys, Stephan; Fründ, Andreas; Garten, Lars

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, under the guidance of the DGAI (German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine) and DIVI (German Interdisciplinary Association for Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine), twelve German medical societies published the "Evidence- and Consensus-based Guidelines on the Management of Analgesia, Sedation and Delirium in Intensive Care". Since then, several new studies and publications have considerably increased the body of evidence, including the new recommendations from th...

  5. Evidence and consensus based guideline for the management of delirium, analgesia, and sedation in intensive care medicine. Revision 2015 (DAS-Guideline 2015 – short version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAS-Taskforce 2015

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, under the guidance of the DGAI (German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine and DIVI (German Interdisciplinary Association for Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine, twelve German medical societies published the “Evidence- and Consensus-based Guidelines on the Management of Analgesia, Sedation and Delirium in Intensive Care”. Since then, several new studies and publications have considerably increased the body of evidence, including the new recommendations from the American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM in conjunction with Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM and American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP from 2013. For this update, a major restructuring and extension of the guidelines were needed in order to cover new aspects of treatment, such as sleep and anxiety management. The literature was systematically searched and evaluated using the criteria of the Oxford Center of Evidence Based Medicine. The body of evidence used to formulate these recommendations was reviewed and approved by representatives of 17 national societies. Three grades of recommendation were used as follows: Grade “A” (strong recommendation, Grade “B” (recommendation and Grade “0” (open recommendation. The result is a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, evidence and consensus-based set of level 3 guidelines. This publication was designed for all ICU professionals, and takes into account all critically ill patient populations. It represents a guide to symptom-oriented prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of delirium, anxiety, stress, and protocol-based analgesia, sedation, and sleep-management in intensive care medicine.

  6. Evidence and consensus based guideline for the management of delirium, analgesia, and sedation in intensive care medicine. Revision 2015 (DAS-Guideline 2015) – short version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Ralf; Binder, Andreas; Biniek, Rolf; Braune, Stephan; Buerkle, Hartmut; Dall, Peter; Demirakca, Sueha; Eckardt, Rahel; Eggers, Verena; Eichler, Ingolf; Fietze, Ingo; Freys, Stephan; Fründ, Andreas; Garten, Lars; Gohrbandt, Bernhard; Harth, Irene; Hartl, Wolfgang; Heppner, Hans-Jürgen; Horter, Johannes; Huth, Ralf; Janssens, Uwe; Jungk, Christine; Kaeuper, Kristin Maria; Kessler, Paul; Kleinschmidt, Stefan; Kochanek, Matthias; Kumpf, Matthias; Meiser, Andreas; Mueller, Anika; Orth, Maritta; Putensen, Christian; Roth, Bernd; Schaefer, Michael; Schaefers, Rainhild; Schellongowski, Peter; Schindler, Monika; Schmitt, Reinhard; Scholz, Jens; Schroeder, Stefan; Schwarzmann, Gerhard; Spies, Claudia; Stingele, Robert; Tonner, Peter; Trieschmann, Uwe; Tryba, Michael; Wappler, Frank; Waydhas, Christian; Weiss, Bjoern; Weisshaar, Guido

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, under the guidance of the DGAI (German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine) and DIVI (German Interdisciplinary Association for Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine), twelve German medical societies published the “Evidence- and Consensus-based Guidelines on the Management of Analgesia, Sedation and Delirium in Intensive Care”. Since then, several new studies and publications have considerably increased the body of evidence, including the new recommendations from the American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM) in conjunction with Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) from 2013. For this update, a major restructuring and extension of the guidelines were needed in order to cover new aspects of treatment, such as sleep and anxiety management. The literature was systematically searched and evaluated using the criteria of the Oxford Center of Evidence Based Medicine. The body of evidence used to formulate these recommendations was reviewed and approved by representatives of 17 national societies. Three grades of recommendation were used as follows: Grade “A” (strong recommendation), Grade “B” (recommendation) and Grade “0” (open recommendation). The result is a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, evidence and consensus-based set of level 3 guidelines. This publication was designed for all ICU professionals, and takes into account all critically ill patient populations. It represents a guide to symptom-oriented prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of delirium, anxiety, stress, and protocol-based analgesia, sedation, and sleep-management in intensive care medicine. PMID:26609286

  7. Development, dissemination and implementation of a sedation and analgesic guideline in a pediatric intensive care unit...it takes creativity and collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Margot; Dhanani, Sonny; Irwin, Danica; Writer, Hilary; Doherty, Dermot

    2010-01-01

    Sedation and analgesia are administered to critically ill children to provide comfort and pain relief, decrease anxiety and to promote patient safety in relation to life-saving treatments. A comprehensive practice guideline focused on ways to implement evidence-based sedation and analgesia practices was developed, disseminated and implemented by an interprofessional team in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) at the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) in Ottawa, Canada. The goals of this quality of care initiative were to (1) reduce inconsistent practices, (2) improve patient outcomes related to comfort, and (3) enhance collaboration among health care team members caring for critically ill children. An evidence-based sedation and analgesia management (SAM) guideline for critically ill, intubated and ventilated infants and children was developed over a six-month period by a team composed of PICU physicians, pharmacists and nurses. The quality of patient care initiative focused on consistent use of (a) validated sedation and analgesia assessment tools, (b) a goal-directed approach by identifying daily therapeutic target scores and titrating interventions accordingly, and (c) non-pharmacologic, pharmacologic and adjunctive measures. The authors describe their experience in the development, dissemination and implementation of an interprofessional guideline directed at improving sedation and analgesia and patient safety in the PICU. Tools developed to support the practice change, challenges and lessons learned are shared.

  8. Evidence and consensus-based German guidelines for the management of analgesia, sedation and delirium in intensive care – short version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleinschmidt, Stefan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Targeted monitoring of analgesia, sedation and delirium, as well as their appropriate management in critically ill patients is a standard of care in intensive care medicine. With the undisputed advantages of goal-oriented therapy established, there was a need to develop our own guidelines on analgesia and sedation in intensive care in Germany and these were published as 2nd Generation Guidelines in 2005. Through the dissemination of these guidelines in 2006, use of monitoring was shown to have improved from 8 to 51% and the use of protocol-based approaches increased to 46% (from 21%.Between 2006–2009, the existing guidelines from the DGAI (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Anästhesiologie und Intensivmedizin and DIVI (Deutsche Interdisziplinäre Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin were developed into 3rd Generation Guidelines for the securing and optimization of quality of analgesia, sedation and delirium management in the intensive care unit (ICU. In collaboration with another 10 professional societies, the literature has been reviewed using the criteria of the Oxford Center of Evidence Based Medicine. Using data from 671 reference works, text, diagrams and recommendations were drawn up. In the recommendations, Grade “A” (very strong recommendation, Grade “B” (strong recommendation and Grade “0” (open recommendation were agreed.As a result of this process we now have an interdisciplinary and consensus-based set of 3rd Generation Guidelines that take into account all critically illness patient populations.The use of protocols for analgesia, sedation and treatment of delirium are repeatedly demonstrated. These guidelines offer treatment recommendations for the ICU team. The implementation of scores and protocols into routine ICU practice is necessary for their success.

  9. Evidence and consensus-based German guidelines for the management of analgesia, sedation and delirium in intensive care – short version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jörg; Heymann, Anja; Bäsell, Katrin; Baron, Ralf; Biniek, Rolf; Bürkle, Hartmut; Dall, Peter; Dictus, Christine; Eggers, Verena; Eichler, Ingolf; Engelmann, Lothar; Garten, Lars; Hartl, Wolfgang; Haase, Ulrike; Huth, Ralf; Kessler, Paul; Kleinschmidt, Stefan; Koppert, Wolfgang; Kretz, Franz-Josef; Laubenthal, Heinz; Marggraf, Guenter; Meiser, Andreas; Neugebauer, Edmund; Neuhaus, Ulrike; Putensen, Christian; Quintel, Michael; Reske, Alexander; Roth, Bernard; Scholz, Jens; Schröder, Stefan; Schreiter, Dierk; Schüttler, Jürgen; Schwarzmann, Gerhard; Stingele, Robert; Tonner, Peter; Tränkle, Philip; Treede, Rolf Detlef; Trupkovic, Tomislav; Tryba, Michael; Wappler, Frank; Waydhas, Christian; Spies, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Targeted monitoring of analgesia, sedation and delirium, as well as their appropriate management in critically ill patients is a standard of care in intensive care medicine. With the undisputed advantages of goal-oriented therapy established, there was a need to develop our own guidelines on analgesia and sedation in intensive care in Germany and these were published as 2nd Generation Guidelines in 2005. Through the dissemination of these guidelines in 2006, use of monitoring was shown to have improved from 8 to 51% and the use of protocol-based approaches increased to 46% (from 21%). Between 2006–2009, the existing guidelines from the DGAI (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Anästhesiologie und Intensivmedizin) and DIVI (Deutsche Interdisziplinäre Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin) were developed into 3rd Generation Guidelines for the securing and optimization of quality of analgesia, sedation and delirium management in the intensive care unit (ICU). In collaboration with another 10 professional societies, the literature has been reviewed using the criteria of the Oxford Center of Evidence Based Medicine. Using data from 671 reference works, text, diagrams and recommendations were drawn up. In the recommendations, Grade “A” (very strong recommendation), Grade “B” (strong recommendation) and Grade “0” (open recommendation) were agreed. As a result of this process we now have an interdisciplinary and consensus-based set of 3rd Generation Guidelines that take into account all critically illness patient populations. The use of protocols for analgesia, sedation and treatment of delirium are repeatedly demonstrated. These guidelines offer treatment recommendations for the ICU team. The implementation of scores and protocols into routine ICU practice is necessary for their success. PMID:20200655

  10. Guidelines: In-office use of conscious sedation in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    In this time of heightened awareness of periodontal diseases and the potential consequences of untreated disease, a deterrent in the delivery of periodontal care continues to be patient anxiety concerning treatment and the fear of pain. These guidelines are intended for periodontists in the in-office use of enteral, inhalation, and/or parenteral conscious sedation in the delivery of care. The definitions, educational guidelines, and policies presented in these guidelines are consistent with the most current American Dental Association (ADA) documents Guidelines for the Use of Conscious Sedation, Deep Sedation and General Anesthesia for Dentists and the Guidelines for Teaching the Comprehensive Control of Anxiety and Pain in Dentistry available from the American Dental Association, 211 E. Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611 or http://www.ada.org, and for Revisions to Anesthesia Care Standards Comprehensive Accreditation Manual for Ambulatory Care, effective January 1, 2001, Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations, available through http://www.jcaho.org/standard/anesamb.html. This paper replaces the former position paper entitled "Guidelines for the Use of Conscious Sedation in Periodontics."

  11. Comfort and patient-centred care without excessive sedation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Shehabi, Yahya; Walsh, Timothy S;

    2016-01-01

    and Delirium guidelines, is conveyed in the mnemonic eCASH-early Comfort using Analgesia, minimal Sedatives and maximal Humane care. eCASH aims to establish optimal patient comfort with minimal sedation as the default presumption for intensive care unit (ICU) patients in the absence of recognised medical...

  12. Guidelines for sedation in gastroenterological endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Katsutoshi; Haruma, Ken; Irisawa, Atsushi; Kaise, Mitsuru; Gotoda, Takuji; Sugiyama, Masanori; Tanabe, Satoshi; Horiuchi, Akira; Fujita, Naotaka; Ozaki, Makoto; Yoshida, Masahiro; Matsui, Toshiyuki; Ichinose, Masao; Kaminishi, Michio

    2015-05-01

    Recently, the need for sedation in gastrointestinal endoscopy has been increasing. However, the National Health Insurance Drug Price list in Japan does not include any drug specifically used for the sedation. Although benzodiazepines are the main medication, their use in cases of gastrointestinal endoscopy has not been approved. This has led the Japan Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Society to develop the first set of guidelines for sedation in gastrointestinal endoscopy on the basis of evidence-based medicine in collaboration with the Japanese Society for Anesthesiologists. The present guidelines comprise 14 statements, five of which were judged to be valid on the highest evidence level and three on the second highest level. The guidelines are not intended to strongly recommend the use of sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy, but rather to indicate the policy as to the choice of appropriate procedures when such sedation is deemed necessary. In clinical practice, the final decision as to the use of sedation should be made by physicians considering patient willingness and physical condition.

  13. Sedation in neurological intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birinder S Paul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analgesia and sedation has been widely used in intensive care units where iatrogenic discomfort often complicates patient management. In neurological patients maximal comfort without diminishing patient responsiveness is desirable. In these patients successful management of sedation and analgesia incorporates a patient based approach that includes detection and management of predisposing and causative factors, including delirium, monitoring using sedation scales, proper medication selection, emphasis on analgesia based drugs and incorporation of protocols or algorithms. So, to optimize care clinician should be familiar with the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variables that can affect the safety and efficacy of analgesics and sedatives.

  14. A national guideline for palliative sedation in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerk, Marian; van Wijlick, Eric; Legemaate, Johan; de Graeff, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    The first national guideline on palliative sedation in The Netherlands has been adopted by the General Board of the Royal Dutch Medical Association. By law, the physician is obliged to take this guideline into consideration. In this paper, we present the main principles of the guideline. Palliative

  15. Palliative sedation : not just normal medical practice. Ethical reflections on the Royal Dutch Medical Association's guideline on palliative sedation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Rien; van Delden, Johannes J. M.; Widdershoven, Guy A. M.

    2012-01-01

    The main premise of the Royal Dutch Medical Association's (RDMA) guideline on palliative sedation is that palliative sedation, contrary to euthanasia, is normal medical practice. Although we do not deny the ethical distinctions between euthanasia and palliative sedation, we will critically analyse t

  16. Comfort and patient-centred care without excessive sedation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Shehabi, Yahya; Walsh, Timothy S

    2016-01-01

    and Delirium guidelines, is conveyed in the mnemonic eCASH-early Comfort using Analgesia, minimal Sedatives and maximal Humane care. eCASH aims to establish optimal patient comfort with minimal sedation as the default presumption for intensive care unit (ICU) patients in the absence of recognised medical...... contribute to the larger aims of eCASH by facilitating promotion of sleep, early mobilization strategies and improved communication of patients with staff and relatives, all of which may be expected to assist rehabilitation and avoid isolation, confusion and possible long-term psychological complications...... of an ICU stay. eCASH represents a new paradigm for patient-centred care in the ICU. Some organizational challenges to the implementation of eCASH are identified....

  17. Sedation in palliative care – a critical analysis of 7 years experience

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    Andres Inge

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The administration of sedatives in terminally ill patients becomes an increasingly feasible medical option in end-of-life care. However, sedation for intractable distress has raised considerable medical and ethical concerns. In our study we provide a critical analysis of seven years experience with the application of sedation in the final phase of life in our palliative care unit. Methods Medical records of 548 patients, who died in the Palliative Care Unit of GK Havelhoehe between 1995–2002, were retrospectively analysed with regard to sedation in the last 48 hrs of life. The parameters of investigation included indication, choice and kind of sedation, prevalence of intolerable symptoms, patients' requests for sedation, state of consciousness and communication abilities during sedation. Critical evaluation included a comparison of the period between 1995–1999 and 2000–2002. Results 14.6% (n = 80 of the patients in palliative care had sedation given by the intravenous route in the last 48 hrs of their life according to internal guidelines. The annual frequency to apply sedation increased continuously from 7% in 1995 to 19% in 2002. Main indications shifted from refractory control of physical symptoms (dyspnoea, gastrointestinal, pain, bleeding and agitated delirium to more psychological distress (panic-stricken fear, severe depression, refractory insomnia and other forms of affective decompensation. Patients' and relatives' requests for sedation in the final phase were significantly more frequent during the period 2000–2002. Conclusion Sedation in the terminal or final phase of life plays an increasing role in the management of intractable physical and psychological distress. Ethical concerns are raised by patients' requests and needs on the one hand, and the physicians' self-understanding on the other hand. Hence, ethically acceptable criteria and guidelines for the decision making are needed with special regard to

  18. Sedation with dexmedetomidine in the intensive care setting

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    Gerlach AT

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Anthony T Gerlach, Claire V Murphy The Ohio State University Medical Center, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA Abstract: Dexmedetomidine is an α-2 agonist that produces sedation and analgesia without compromising the respiratory drive. Use of dexmedetomidine as a sedative in the critically ill is associated with fewer opioid requirements compared with propofol and a similar time at goal sedation compared with benzodiazepines. Dexmedetomidine may produce negative hemodynamic effects including lower mean heart rates and potentially more bradycardia than other sedatives used in the critically ill. Recent studies have demonstrated that dexmedetomidine is safe at higher dosages, but more studies are needed to determine whether the efficacy of dexmedetomidine is dose dependent. In addition, further research is required to define dexmedetomidine's role in the care of delirious critically ill patients, as many, but not all, studies have indicated favorable outcomes. Keywords: dexmedetomidine, sedation, critical care

  19. Pediatric Sedation: A Global Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gozal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric sedation is a challenge which spans all continents and has grown to encompass specialties outside of anesthesia, radiology and emergency medicine. All sedatives are not universally available and local and national regulations often limit the sedation practice to specific agents and those with specific credentials. Some specialties have established certification and credentials for sedation delivery whereas most have not. Some of the relevant sedation guidelines and recommendations of specialty organizations worldwide will be explored. The challenge facing sedation care providers moving forward in the 21st century will be to determine how to apply the local, regional and national guidelines to the individual sedation practices. A greater challenge, perhaps impossible, will be to determine whether the sedation community can come together worldwide to develop standards, guidelines and recommendations for safe sedation practice.

  20. Primary care guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ijäs, Jarja; Alanen, Seija; Kaila, Minna

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the adoption of the national Hypertension Guideline in primary care and to evaluate the consistency of the views of the health centre senior executives on the guideline's impact on clinical practices in the treatment of hypertension in their health centres. DESIGN: A cross...... Guideline. RESULTS: Data were available from 143 health centres in Finland (49%). The views of head physicians and senior nursing officers on the adoption of the Hypertension Guideline were not consistent. Head physicians more often than senior nursing officers (44% vs. 29%, p ...: Hypertension Guideline recommendations that require joint agreements between professionals are less often adopted than simple, precise recommendations. More emphasis on effective multidisciplinary collaboration is needed....

  1. Combination of Midazolam and Butorphanol for Sedation for Tympanoplasty under Monitored Anaesthesia Care

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tympanoplasty is routinely done under local anaesthesia with sedation due to various advantages. Systemic analgesics and sedatives are generally given to improve the patient comfort. Aim & Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of combination of midazolam and butorphanol for sedation and to assess the sedation technique using midazolam and butorphanol for tympanoplasty under monitored anaesthesia care. Material and Methods: One hundred patients sched...

  2. The use of dexmedetomidine in intensive care sedation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Antonelli

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The goals and recommendations for ICU (Intensive Care Unit patients’ sedation and analgesia should be to have adequately sedated patients who are calm and arousal, so that they can guarantee a proper evaluation and an adequate control of pain. This way, it is also possible to perform their neurological evaluation, preserving intellectual faculties and helping them in actively participating to their care. Dexmedetomidine is a selective alpha-2 receptor agonist, member of theraputical cathegory: “other hypnotics and sedatives” (ATC: N05CM18. Dexmedetomidine is recommended for the sedation of adult ICU patients who need a sedation level not deeper than arousal in response to verbal stimulation (corresponding to Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale 0 to -3. After the EMA approval, some European government authorities have elaborated HTA on dexmedetomidine, based on clinical evidence derived from Prodex and Midex trials. Dexmedetomidine resulted to be as effective as propofol and midazolam in maintaining the target depth of sedation in ICU patients. The mean duration of mechanical ventilation with dexmedetomidine was numerically shorter than with propofol and significantly shorter than with midazolam. The resulting favourable economic profile of dexmedetomidine supported the clinical use in ICU. Dexmedetomidine seems to provide clinical benefits due to the reduction of mechanical ventilation and ventilator weaning duration. Within the present review, an economic analysis of costs associated to the use of dexmedetomidine was therefore performed also in the Italian care setting. Thus, four different analyses were carried out based on the quantification of the total number of days in ICU, the time spent on mechanical ventilation, the weighted average number of days with mechanical ventilation or not and TISS points (Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System. Despite the incremental cost for drug therapy associated with dexmedetomidine, a reduction of

  3. Nitrous Oxide-Oxygen Sedation: USAF Dental Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    prosthodontic tooth o rd ...r. 1-,t doA ,stry. Also, N20-0, sedation can be used a- . :., :> , ires -uch as periodontal scaling, orthodontic ad. ’ ci ... of...this demonstration and asked to use N 0 the next day when one of his teeth was to be extracted . Colton consented and the results were successful--Wells

  4. Distancing sedation in end-of-life care from physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Tze Ling Gwendoline Beatrice; Krishna, Lalit Kumar Radha; Sim, Shin Wei; Yee, Alethea Chung Peng

    2016-01-01

    Lipuma equates continuous sedation until death (CSD) to physician-assisted suicide/euthanasia (PAS/E) based on the premise that iatrogenic unconsciousness negates social function and, thus, personhood, leaving a patient effectively ‘dead’. Others have extrapolated upon this position further, to suggest that any use of sedation and/or opioids at the end of life would be analogous to CSD and thus tantamount to PAS/E. These posits sit diametrically opposite to standard end-of-life care practices. This paper will refute Lipuma’s position and the posits borne from it. We first show that prevailing end-of-life care guidelines require proportional and monitored use of sedatives and/or opioids to attenuate fears that the use of such treatment could hasten death. These guidelines also classify CSD as a last resort treatment, employed only when symptoms prove intractable, and not amenable to all standard treatment options. Furthermore, CSD is applied only when deemed appropriate by a multidisciplinary palliative medicine team. We also show that empirical data based on local views of personhood will discount concerns that iatrogenic unconsciousness is tantamount to a loss of personhood and death. PMID:27211055

  5. Assessment of Sedation and Analgesia in Mechanically Ventilated Patients in Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Post traumatic stress resulting from an intensive care unit(ICU) stay may be prevented by adequate level of sedation and analgesia. Aims of the study were reviewing the current practices of sedation and analgesia in our ICU setup and to assess level of sedation and analgesia to know the requirement of sedative and analgesics in mechani-cally ventilated ICU patients. This prospective observational study was conducted on 50 consecutive mechanically ventilated patients in ICU over a period of 6 ...

  6. The Comparison of Ramsay and Richmond Scales for Intensive Care Unit Sedation, the Consistency Between Doctors and Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Daily interruption and monitoring of sedation in intensive care unit (ICU) patients, especially in patients on mechanical ventilation, with the help of sedation scales is recommended for titration of sedative drugs. For this purpose, scales such as Richmond agitation-sedation scale (RASS) and the Ramsay sedation scale (RSS) are commonly used. Although these scales definitively describe sedation levels, perceptions and scores can differ among practitioners. The aim of this prospecti...

  7. Uniform guidelines improve client care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, B

    1994-12-01

    Uniform national guidelines on the delivery of family planning methods and services improve client care, assuming these guidelines are based on current scientific information. Compliance with these guidelines yields safe and efficient delivery of family planning services. Service providers need information, training, supplies, and guidelines to deliver quality services. Guidelines contribute to consistency among family planning programs in different settings. Even though clinics may not provide the same services, the guidelines allow them to provide the same standards of care. Specifically, eligibility criteria, contraindications, and follow-up schedules are the same regardless of the service delivery point. Various international health organizations (such as World Health Organization, USAID, Program for International Training in Health, International Planned Parenthood Federation, and Association for Voluntary Surgical Contraception) have developed guidelines for family planning service delivery. Governments can use these documents to develop national family planning guidelines and policies. They should adapt the guidelines to local needs and consider program resources. After development of the national guidelines, training, workshops, and dissemination of written materials should be provided for policymakers, physicians, nurses, and other health providers. Countries that have either developed or are working to draft their own national guidelines are Cameroon, Ghana, Mexico, and Nepal.

  8. Guidelines for conscious sedation and monitoring during gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, J Patrick; Baron, Todd H; Hirota, William K; Goldstein, Jay L; Jacobson, Brian C; Leighton, Jonathan A; Mallery, J Shawn; Faigel, Douglas O

    2003-09-01

    This is one of a series of statements discussing the utilization of GI endoscopy in common clinical situations. The Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy prepared this text. In preparing this guideline, a MEDLINE literature search was performed, and additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of the identified articles and from recommendations of expert consultants. When little or no data exist from well-designed prospective trials, emphasis is given to results from large series and reports from recognized experts. Guidelines for appropriate utilization of endoscopy are based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus. Further controlled clinical studies are needed to clarify aspects of this statement, and revision may be necessary as new data appear. Clinical consideration may justify a course of action at variance to these recommendations.

  9. Volatile Anesthetics. Is a New Player Emerging in Critical Care Sedation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerath, Angela; Parotto, Matteo; Wasowicz, Marcin; Ferguson, Niall D

    2016-06-01

    Volatile anesthetic agent use in the intensive care unit, aided by technological advances, has become more accessible to critical care physicians. With increasing concern over adverse patient consequences associated with our current sedation practice, there is growing interest to find non-benzodiazepine-based alternative sedatives. Research has demonstrated that volatile-based sedation may provide superior awakening and extubation times in comparison with current intravenous sedation agents (propofol and benzodiazepines). Volatile agents may possess important end-organ protective properties mediated via cytoprotective and antiinflammatory mechanisms. However, like all sedatives, volatile agents are capable of deeply sedating patients, which can have respiratory depressant effects and reduce patient mobility. This review seeks to critically appraise current volatile use in critical care medicine including current research, technical consideration of their use, contraindications, areas of controversy, and proposed future research topics.

  10. Sedation versus no sedation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laerkner, Eva; Stroem, Thomas; Toft, Palle

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Currently there is a trend towards less or no use of sedation of mechanically ventilated patients. Still, little is known about how different sedation strategies affect relatives' satisfaction with the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). AIM: To explore if there was a difference in relatives......' personal reactions and the degree of satisfaction with information, communication, surroundings, care and treatment in the ICU between relatives of patients who receive no sedation compared with relatives of patients receiving sedation during mechanical ventilation in the ICU. METHOD: A survey study using...... in relatives' personal reactions or in the degree of satisfaction with information, communication, care and treatment in the ICU between relatives of patients in the two groups. Relatives of patients treated with no sedation felt more bothered by disturbances in the surroundings compared with relatives...

  11. Tracheotomy does not affect reducing sedation requirements of patients in intensive care – a retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Veelo, Denise P; Dongelmans, Dave A; Binnekade, Jan M; Korevaar, Johanna C; Vroom, Margreeth B; Schultz, Marcus J

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Translaryngeal intubated and ventilated patients often need sedation to treat anxiety, agitation and/or pain. Current opinion is that tracheotomy reduces sedation requirements. We determined sedation needs before and after tracheotomy of intubated and mechanically ventilated patients. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of the use of morphine, midazolam and propofol in patients before and after tracheotomy. Results Of 1,788 patients admitted to our intensive care unit d...

  12. Delirium, sedation and analgesia in the intensive care unit: a multinational, two-part survey among intensivists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alawi Luetz

    Full Text Available Analgesia, sedation and delirium management are important parts of intensive care treatment as they are relevant for patients' clinical and functional long-term outcome. Previous surveys showed that despite this fact implementation rates are still low. The primary aim of the prospective, observational multicenter study was to investigate the implementation rate of delirium monitoring among intensivists. Secondly, current practice concerning analgesia and sedation monitoring as well as treatment strategies for patients with delirium were assesed. In addition, this study compares perceived and actual practice regarding delirium, sedation and analgesia management. Data were obtained with a two-part, anonymous survey, containing general data from intensive care units in a first part and data referring to individual patients in a second part. Questionnaires from 101 hospitals (part 1 and 868 patients (part 2 were included in data analysis. Fifty-six percent of the intensive care units reported to monitor for delirium in clinical routine. Fourty-four percent reported the use of a validated delirium score. In this respect, the survey suggests an increasing use of delirium assessment tools compared to previous surveys. Nevertheless, part two of the survey revealed that in actual practice 73% of included patients were not monitored with a validated score. Furthermore, we observed a trend towards moderate or deep sedation which is contradicting to guideline-recommendations. Every fifth patient was suffering from pain. The implementation rate of adequate pain-assessment tools for mechanically ventilated and sedated patients was low (30%. In conclusion, further efforts are necessary to implement guideline recommendations into clinical practice. The study was registered (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01278524 and approved by the ethical committee.

  13. Current practices of mobilization, analgesia, relaxants and sedation in Indian ICUs: A survey conducted by the Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine

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    Rajesh Chawla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Use of sedation, analgesia and neuromuscular blocking agents is widely practiced in Intensive Care Units (ICUs. Our aim is to study the current practice patterns related to mobilization, analgesia, relaxants and sedation (MARS to help in standardizing best practices in these areas in the ICU. Materials and Methods: A web-based nationwide survey involving physicians of the Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine (ISCCM and the Indian Society of Anesthesiologists (ISA was carried out. A questionnaire included questions on demographics, assessment scales for delirium, sedation and pain, as also the pharmacological agents and the practice methods. Results: Most ICUs function in a semi-closed model. Midazolam (94.99% and Fentanyl (47.04% were the most common sedative and analgesic agents used, respectively. Vecuronium was the preferred neuromuscular agent. Monitoring of sedation, analgesia and delirium in the ICU. Ramsay′s Sedation Scale (56.1% and Visual Analogue Scale (48.07% were the preferred sedation and pain scales, respectively. CAM (Confusion Assessment Method-ICU was the most preferred method of delirium assessment. Haloperidol was the most commonly used agent for delirium. Majority of the respondents were aware of the benefit of early mobilization, but lack of support staff and safety concerns were the main obstacles to its implementation. Conclusion: The results of the survey suggest that compliance with existing guidelines is low. Benzodiazepines still remain the predominant ICU sedative. The recommended practice of giving analgesia before sedation is almost non-existent. Delirium remains an underrecognized entity. Monitoring of sedation levels, analgesia and delirium is low and validated and recommended scales for the same are rarely used. Although awareness of the benefits of early mobilization are high, the implementation is low.

  14. [Analgesia, sedation and delir – Treatment of patients in the neuro intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungk, Christine

    2015-11-01

    Analgesia and sedation of patients in the neuro intensive care unit, in particular in case of intracranial hypertension, remains a challenge even today. A goal for analgesia and sedation should be set for each individual patient (RASS -5 in case of intracranial hypertension) and should be re-evaluated repeatedly based on standardized scores (RASS plus EEG monitoring where appropriate, NCS). There are no sufficient evidence-based sedation algorithms in this patient cohort. Remifentanil, sufentanil and fentanyl have been proven safe and effective for continuous application; however, bolus application should be avoided. (S-)Ketamin can be considered safe when mechanical ventilation and sedation with GABA receptor agonists are applied. Propofol and benzodiazepines are equally safe and effective with shorter wake up times for propofol. The use of barbitarutes is restricted to intractable intracranial hypertension or status epilepicus. Evidence for alpha-2-adrenoceptoragonists and inhalative sedation is poor and requires further research.

  15. Combination of Midazolam and Butorphanol for Sedation for Tympanoplasty under Monitored Anaesthesia Care

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    Vinay Dhakate

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tympanoplasty is routinely done under local anaesthesia with sedation due to various advantages. Systemic analgesics and sedatives are generally given to improve the patient comfort. Aim & Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of combination of midazolam and butorphanol for sedation and to assess the sedation technique using midazolam and butorphanol for tympanoplasty under monitored anaesthesia care. Material and Methods: One hundred patients scheduled for tympanoplasty under local anaesthesia were given bolus doses of intravenous midazolam 0.03 mg/kg and butorphanol 0.03 mg/kg followed by midazolam infusion at 0.01 mg/kg/hr. If required, additional bolus doses of 0.01 mg/kg of both midazolam and butorphanol were given to achieve desired sedation and analgesia. The total dosage of midazolam and butorphanol, vital parameters, sedation score using Ramsay sedation score, pain score and surgeon satisfaction score using Numeric rating scale were recorded. Results: Ninety nine patients underwent tympanoplasty satisfactorily with sedation technique. Only one patient needed conversion to general anaesthesia. The mean duration of surgery was 92.7±8.16 minutes. The total midazolam and butorphanol dosages were 2.45±0.233 mg and 1.65±0.179 mg respectively. The desired Ramsay Sedation Score (RSS of 3 and pain score Numerical Rating Scale (NRS = 2.82±0.72 were achieved within 4-8 minutes. No side effects of excessive sedation were observed. Conclusion: Combined use of midazolam and butorphanol in low doses produces adequate sedation for tympanoplasty under local anaesthesia without serious adverse effects.

  16. Assessment of Sedation and Analgesia in Mechanically Ventilated Patients in Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udita Naithani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Post traumatic stress resulting from an intensive care unit(ICU stay may be prevented by adequate level of sedation and analgesia. Aims of the study were reviewing the current practices of sedation and analgesia in our ICU setup and to assess level of sedation and analgesia to know the requirement of sedative and analgesics in mechani-cally ventilated ICU patients. This prospective observational study was conducted on 50 consecutive mechanically ventilated patients in ICU over a period of 6 months. Patient′s sedation level was assessed by Ramsay Sedation Scale (RSS = 1 : Agitated; 2,3 : Comfortable; 4,5,6 : Sedated and pain intensity by Behavioural Pain Scale (BPS = 3 :No pain, to 16 : Maximum pain. BPS, mean arterial pressure(MAP and heart rate(HR were assessed before and after painful stimulus (tracheal suction. Although no patient had received sedative and analgesics, mean Ramsay score was 3.52±1.92 with 30% patients categorized as ′agitated′, 12% as ′comfortable′ and 58% as ′sedated′ because of depressed consciousness level. Mean BPS at rest was 4.30±1.28 revealing background pain that further increased to 6.18±1.88 after painful stimulus. There was significant rise in HR (10.30%, MAP (7.56% and BPS (40.86% after painful stimulus, P< 0.0001. The correlation between BPS and Ramsay Score was negative and significant (P< 0.01. We conclude that there should be regular definition of the appropriate level of sedation and analgesia as well as monitoring of the desired level, using sedation and pain scales as a part of the total care for mechanically ventilated patients.

  17. COMPARISON OF DEXMEDETOMIDINE WITH FENTANYL FOR SEDATION IN TYMPANOPLASTY (ENT SURGERIES DONE UNDER MONITORED ANAESTHESIA CARE

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    Illendula

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Monitored anaesthesia care involves administering a combination of drugs for anxiolytic, hypnotic, amnestic and analgesic effect. Ideally it should result in less physiological disturbance and allow for more rapid recovery than general anaesthesia. It typically involves administration of local anaesthesia in combination with IV sedatives, anxiolytic and analgesic drugs which is a common practice during various ENT surgical procedures. AIM OF STUDY Is to “Compare Dexmedetomidine with Fentanyl for sedation in tympanoplasty (ENT Surgeries”. The objective of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of dexmedetomidine and fentanyl as an appropriate sedative drug for Monitored Anaesthesia Care in Tympanoplasty (ENT surgeries METHODS & MATERIALS A total of 60 patients are being recruited into this study with regards to assess, Pain, Discomfort, Sedation, Peripheral Oxygen Saturation (SPO2 & Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP, Diastolic blood pressure (DBP, Mean arterial blood pressure(MAP & Heart rate This study was undertaken at Govt. ENT Hospital Hyderabad. Sixty (60 patients undergoing Tympanoplasty surgery were taken for study. Thus the study contains 30 patients in Dexmedetomidine group-(Group D and 30 patients in Fentanyl group (Group F RESULT Dexmedetomidine provides less discomfort, better sedation, and analgesia when compared with fentanyl under monitored anaesthesia care (Conscious sedation. However, the risk of adverse effects requires monitoring for ready intervention. It provides a unique type of sedation, “conscious sedation” in which patients appear to be sleepy but are easily arousable, cooperative and communicative when stimulated. It is sedative and analgesic agent, with opioid-sparing properties and minimal respiratory depression.

  18. Sedative load of medications prescribed for older people with dementia in care homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevenson Elizabeth

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to determine the sedative load and use of sedative and psychotropic medications among older people with dementia living in (residential care homes. Methods Medication data were collected at baseline and at two further time-points for eligible residents of six care homes participating in the EVIDEM-End Of Life (EOL study for whom medication administration records were available. Regular medications were classified using the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification system and individual sedative loads were calculated using a previously published model. Results At baseline, medication administration records were reviewed for 115 residents; medication records were reviewed for 112 and 105 residents at time-points 2 and 3 respectively. Approximately one-third of residents were not taking any medications with sedative properties at each time-point, while a significant proportion of residents had a low sedative load score of 1 or 2 (54.8%, 59.0% and 57.1% at baseline and time-points 2 and 3 respectively. More than 10% of residents had a high sedative load score (≥ 3 at baseline (12.2%, and this increased to 14.3% at time-points 2 and 3. Approximately two-thirds of residents (66.9% regularly used one or more psychotropic medication(s. Antidepressants, predominantly selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs, were most frequently used, while antipsychotics, hypnotics and anxiolytics were less routinely administered. The prevalence of antipsychotic use among residents was 19.0%, lower than has been previously reported for nursing home residents. Throughout the duration of the study, administration of medications recognised as having prominent sedative adverse effects and/or containing sedative components outweighed the regular use of primary sedatives. Conclusions Sedative load scores were similar throughout the study period for residents with dementia in each of the care homes. Scores were

  19. Nurses' experiences of caring for critically ill, non-sedated, mechanically ventilated patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laerkner, Eva; Egerod, Ingrid; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to explore nurses' experiences of caring for non-sedated, critically ill patients requiring mechanical ventilation. DESIGN AND SETTING: The study had a qualitative explorative design and was based on 13 months of fieldwork in two intensive care units in Denmark where...... a protocol of no sedation is implemented. Data were generated during participant observation in practice and by interviews with 16 nurses. Data were analysed using thematic interpretive description. FINDINGS: An overall theme emerged: "Demanding, yet rewarding". The demanding aspects of caring for more awake...... closeness. CONCLUSION: Despite the complexity of care, nurses preferred to care for more awake rather than sedated patients and appreciated caring for just one patient at a time. The importance of close collaboration between nurses and doctors to ensure patient comfort during mechanical ventilation...

  20. The Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale: validity and reliability in adult intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessler, Curtis N; Gosnell, Mark S; Grap, Mary Jo; Brophy, Gretchen M; O'Neal, Pam V; Keane, Kimberly A; Tesoro, Eljim P; Elswick, R K

    2002-11-15

    Sedative medications are widely used in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Structured assessment of sedation and agitation is useful to titrate sedative medications and to evaluate agitated behavior, yet existing sedation scales have limitations. We measured inter-rater reliability and validity of a new 10-level (+4 "combative" to -5 "unarousable") scale, the Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale (RASS), in two phases. In phase 1, we demonstrated excellent (r = 0.956, lower 90% confidence limit = 0.948; kappa = 0.73, 95% confidence interval = 0.71, 0.75) inter-rater reliability among five investigators (two physicians, two nurses, and one pharmacist) in adult ICU patient encounters (n = 192). Robust inter-rater reliability (r = 0.922-0.983) (kappa = 0.64-0.82) was demonstrated for patients from medical, surgical, cardiac surgery, coronary, and neuroscience ICUs, patients with and without mechanical ventilation, and patients with and without sedative medications. In validity testing, RASS correlated highly (r = 0.93) with a visual analog scale anchored by "combative" and "unresponsive," including all patient subgroups (r = 0.84-0.98). In the second phase, after implementation of RASS in our medical ICU, inter-rater reliability between a nurse educator and 27 RASS-trained bedside nurses in 101 patient encounters was high (r = 0.964, lower 90% confidence limit = 0.950; kappa = 0.80, 95% confidence interval = 0.69, 0.90) and very good for all subgroups (r = 0.773-0.970, kappa = 0.66-0.89). Correlations between RASS and the Ramsay sedation scale (r = -0.78) and the Sedation Agitation Scale (r = 0.78) confirmed validity. Our nurses described RASS as logical, easy to administer, and readily recalled. RASS has high reliability and validity in medical and surgical, ventilated and nonventilated, and sedated and nonsedated adult ICU patients.

  1. Closed-loop control for cardiopulmonary management and intensive care unit sedation using digital imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Behnood

    This dissertation introduces a new problem in the delivery of healthcare, which could result in lower cost and a higher quality of medical care as compared to the current healthcare practice. In particular, a framework is developed for sedation and cardiopulmonary management for patients in the intensive care unit. A method is introduced to automatically detect pain and agitation in nonverbal patients, specifically in sedated patients in the intensive care unit, using their facial expressions. Furthermore, deterministic as well as probabilistic expert systems are developed to suggest the appropriate drug dose based on patient sedation level. Patients in the intensive care unit who require mechanical ventilation due to acute respiratory failure also frequently require the administration of sedative agents. The need for sedation arises both from patient anxiety due to the loss of personal control and the unfamiliar and intrusive environment of the intensive care unit, and also due to pain or other variants of noxious stimuli. In this dissertation, we develop a rule-based expert system for cardiopulmonary management and intensive care unit sedation. Furthermore, we use probability theory to quantify uncertainty and to extend the proposed rule-based expert system to deal with more realistic situations. Pain assessment in patients who are unable to verbally communicate is a challenging problem. The fundamental limitations in pain assessment stem from subjective assessment criteria, rather than quantifiable, measurable data. The relevance vector machine (RVM) classification technique is a Bayesian extension of the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm which achieves comparable performance to SVM while providing posterior probabilities for class memberships and a sparser model. In this dissertation, we use the RVM classification technique to distinguish pain from non-pain as well as assess pain intensity levels. We also correlate our results with the pain intensity

  2. Evaluating and monitoring analgesia and sedation in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessler, Curtis N; Grap, Mary Jo; Ramsay, Michael Ae

    2008-01-01

    Management of analgesia and sedation in the intensive care unit requires evaluation and monitoring of key parameters in order to detect and quantify pain and agitation, and to quantify sedation. The routine use of subjective scales for pain, agitation, and sedation promotes more effective management, including patient-focused titration of medications to specific end-points. The need for frequent measurement reflects the dynamic nature of pain, agitation, and sedation, which change constantly in critically ill patients. Further, close monitoring promotes repeated evaluation of response to therapy, thus helping to avoid over-sedation and to eliminate pain and agitation. Pain assessment tools include self-report (often using a numeric pain scale) for communicative patients and pain scales that incorporate observed behaviors and physiologic measures for noncommunicative patients. Some of these tools have undergone validity testing but more work is needed. Sedation-agitation scales can be used to identify and quantify agitation, and to grade the depth of sedation. Some scales incorporate a step-wise assessment of response to increasingly noxious stimuli and a brief assessment of cognition to define levels of consciousness; these tools can often be quickly performed and easily recalled. Many of the sedation-agitation scales have been extensively tested for inter-rater reliability and validated against a variety of parameters. Objective measurement of indicators of consciousness and brain function, such as with processed electroencephalography signals, holds considerable promise, but has not achieved widespread implementation. Further clarification of the roles of these tools, particularly within the context of patient safety, is needed, as is further technology development to eliminate artifacts and investigation to demonstrate added value.

  3. Tracheotomy does not affect reducing sedation requirements of patients in intensive care – a retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veelo, Denise P; Dongelmans, Dave A; Binnekade, Jan M; Korevaar, Johanna C; Vroom, Margreeth B; Schultz, Marcus J

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Translaryngeal intubated and ventilated patients often need sedation to treat anxiety, agitation and/or pain. Current opinion is that tracheotomy reduces sedation requirements. We determined sedation needs before and after tracheotomy of intubated and mechanically ventilated patients. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of the use of morphine, midazolam and propofol in patients before and after tracheotomy. Results Of 1,788 patients admitted to our intensive care unit during the study period, 129 (7%) were tracheotomized. After the exclusion of patients who received a tracheotomy before or at the day of admittance, 117 patients were left for analysis. The daily dose (DD; the amount of sedatives for each day) divided by the mean daily dose (MDD; the mean amount of sedatives per day for the study period) in the week before and the week after tracheotomy was 1.07 ± 0.93 DD/MDD versus 0.30 ± 0.65 for morphine, 0.84 ± 1.03 versus 0.11 ± 0.46 for midazolam, and 0.62 ± 1.05 versus 0.15 ± 0.45 for propofol (p < 0.01). However, when we focused on a shorter time interval (two days before and after tracheotomy), there were no differences in prescribed doses of morphine and midazolam. Studying the course in DD/MDD from seven days before the placement of tracheotomy, we found a significant decline in dosage. From day -7 to day -1, morphine dosage (DD/MDD) declined by 3.34 (95% confidence interval -1.61 to -6.24), midazolam dosage by 2.95 (-1.49 to -5.29) and propofol dosage by 1.05 (-0.41 to -2.01). After tracheotomy, no further decrease in DD/MDD was observed and the dosage remained stable for all sedatives. Patients in the non-surgical and acute surgical groups received higher dosages of midazolam than patients in the elective surgical group. Time until tracheotomy did not influence sedation requirements. In addition, there was no significant difference in sedation between different patient groups. Conclusion In our intensive care unit, sedation

  4. Use of propofol and other nonbenzodiazepine sedatives in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, G; Ketzler, J T; Coursin, D B

    2001-10-01

    Sedatives continue to be used on a routine basis in critically ill patients. Although many agents are available and some approach an ideal, none are perfect. Patients require continuous reassessment of their pain and need for sedation. Pathophysiologic abnormalities that cause agitation, confusion, or delirium must be identified and treated before unilateral administration of potent sedative agents that may mask potentially lethal insufficiencies. The routine use of standardized and validated sedation scales and monitors is needed. It is hoped that reliable objective monitors of patients' level of consciousness and comfort will be forthcoming. Each sedative agent discussed in this article seems to have a place in the ICU pharmacologic armamentarium to ensure the safe and comfortable delivery of care. Etomidate is an attractive agent for short-term use to provide the rapid onset and offset of sedation in critically ill patients who are at risk for hemodynamic instability but seem to need sedation or anesthesia to perform a procedure or manipulate the airway. Ketamine administered through intramuscular injection or intravenous infusion provides quick, intense analgesia and anesthesia and allows patients to tolerate limited but painful procedures. The risk/benefit ratio associated with the use of this neuroleptic agent must be weighed carefully. Ketamine is contraindicated in patients who lack normal intracranial compliance or who have significant myocardial ischemia. Barbiturates are reserved mainly to induce coma in patients at risk for severe CNS ischemia, which frequently is associated with refractory intracranial hypertension, or in patients with status epilepticus. When administered in high doses, these drugs have prolonged sedative and depressant effects. Judicious hemodynamic monitoring is required when barbiturate coma is induced. Haloperidol is indicated in the treatment of delirium. Patients should be monitored for extrapyramidal side effects and, when they

  5. Sedation and analgesia in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Joseph D

    2005-08-01

    Various clinical situations may arise in the PICU that necessitate the use of sedation, analgesia, or both. Although there is a large clinical experience with midazolam in the PICU population and it remains the most commonly used benzodiazepine in this setting, lorazepam may provide an effective alternative, with a longer half-life and more predictable pharmacokinetics without the concern of active metabolites. However, there are limited reports regarding its use in the PICU population, and concerns exist regarding the potential for toxicity related to its diluent, propylene glycol. Although the synthetic opioid fentanyl frequently is chosen for use in the PICU setting because of its hemodynamic stability, preliminary data suggest morphine may have a slower development of tolerance and may cause fewer withdrawal symptoms than fentanyl. Morphine's safety profile includes long-term follow-up studies that have demonstrated no adverse central nervous system developmental effects from its use in neonates and infants. In the critically ill infant at risk following surgery for congenital heart disease, clinical experience supports the use of the synthetic opioids, given their ability to modulate PVR and prevent pulmonary hypertensive crisis. Alternatives to the benzodiazepines and opioids include ketamine, pentobarbital, or dexmedetomidine. Ketamine may be useful for patients with hemodynamic instability or airway reactivity. There are limited reports regarding the use of pentobarbital in the PICU, with one study raising concerns of a high incidence of adverse effects associated with its use. Propofol has gained great favor in the adult population as a means of providing deep sedation while allowing for rapid awakening; however, its routine use is not recommended because of its potential association with "propofol infusion syndrome." As the pediatric experience increases, it appears that there will be a role for newer agents such as dexmedetomidine.

  6. Relative reliability of the auditory evoked potential and Bispectral Index for monitoring sedation level in surgical intensive care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, C-H; Ou-Yang, H-Y; Man, K-M; Hsiao, P-C; Ho, S-T; Wong, C-S; Liaw, W-J

    2008-07-01

    Sedation is an important adjunct therapy for patients in the intensive care unit. The objective of the present study was to observe correlation between an established subjective measure, the Ramsay Sedation Scale, and two objective tools for monitoring critically ill patients: the Bispectral Index (BIS) and auditory evoked potential. Ninety patients undergoing major surgery scheduled for postoperative mechanical ventilation and continuous sedation with propofol and fentanyl were selected. Electrodes for determining BIS and auditory evoked potential were placed on the foreheads of all patients according to manufacturer's specifications at least six hours after patients' arrival at the intensive care unit. Ramsay Sedation Scale, BIS, signal quality index, composite A-line autoregressive index (AAI) and electromyographic activities were recorded every five minutes for 30 minutes. BIS and AAI showed good correlation amongst readings (r(s)=0.697, P Ramsay Sedation Scale (BIS, tau=-0.689; AAI, tau=-0.621; P Ramsay Sedation Scale. However, the BIS and auditory evoked potential monitors do not perform adequately as a substitute in the assessment of sedated intensive care unit patients. These monitors could be used as part of an integrated approach for the evaluation of those patients especially when the subjective scales do not work well in the setting of neuromuscular blockade or may not be sufficiently sensitive to evaluate very deep sedation.

  7. 42 CFR 488.115 - Care guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Care guidelines. 488.115 Section 488.115 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... § 488.115 Care guidelines. EC01JA91.110 EC01JA91.111 EC01JA91.112 EC01JA91.113 EC01JA91.114...

  8. Sedation of mechanically ventilated adults in intensive care unit: a network meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongheng; Chen, Kun; Ni, Hongying; Zhang, Xiaoling; Fan, Haozhe

    2017-01-01

    Sedatives are commonly used for mechanically ventilated patients in intensive care units (ICU). However, a variety of sedatives are available and their efficacy and safety have been compared in numerous trials with inconsistent results. To resolve uncertainties regarding usefulness of these sedatives, we performed a systematic review and network meta-analysis. Randomized controlled trials comparing sedatives in mechanically ventilated ICU patients were included. Graph-theoretical methods were employed for network meta-analysis. A total of 51 citations comprising 52 RCTs were included in our analysis. Dexmedetomidine showed shorter MV duration than lorazepam (mean difference (MD): 68.7; 95% CI: 18.2–119.3 hours), midazolam (MD: 10.2; 95% CI: 7.7–12.7 hours) and propofol (MD: 3.4; 95% CI: 0.9–5.9 hours). Compared with dexmedetomidine, midazolam was associated with significantly increased risk of delirium (OR: 2.47; 95% CI: 1.17–5.19). Our study shows that dexmedetomidine has potential benefits in reducing duration of MV and lowering the risk of delirium. PMID:28322337

  9. Importance of the use of protocols for the management of analgesia and sedation in pediatric intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliana Motta

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Analgesia and sedation are essential elements in patient care in the intensive care unit (ICU, in order to promote the control of pain, anxiety and agitation, prevent the loss of devices, accidental extubation, and improve the synchrony of the patient with mechanical ventilation. However, excess of these medications leads to rise in morbidity and mortality. The ideal management will depend on the adoption of clinical and pharmacological measures, guided by scales and protocols. Objective: Literature review on the main aspects of analgesia and sedation, abstinence syndrome, and delirium in the pediatric intensive care unit, in order to show the importance of the use of protocols on the management of critically ill patients. Method: Articles published in the past 16 years on PubMed, Lilacs, and the Cochrane Library, with the terms analgesia, sedation, abstinence syndrome, mild sedation, daily interruption, and intensive care unit. Results: Seventy-six articles considered relevant were selected to describe the importance of using a protocol of sedation and analgesia. They recommended mild sedation and the use of assessment scales, daily interruptions, and spontaneous breathing test. These measures shorten the time of mechanical ventilation, as well as length of hospital stay, and help to control abstinence and delirium, without increasing the risk of morbidity and morbidity. Conclusion: Despite the lack of controlled and randomized clinical trials in the pediatric setting, the use of protocols, optimizing mild sedation, leads to decreased morbidity.

  10. Clinical Decision Support and Closed-Loop Control for Cardiopulmonary Management and Intensive Care Unit Sedation Using Expert Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Behnood; Bailey, James M; Haddad, Wassim M; Tannenbaum, Allen R

    2012-03-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) who require mechanical ventilation due to acute respiratory failure also frequently require the administration of sedative agents. The need for sedation arises both from patient anxiety due to the loss of personal control and the unfamiliar and intrusive environment of the ICU, and also due to pain or other variants of noxious stimuli. While physicians select the agent(s) used for sedation and cardiovascular function, the actual administration of these agents is the responsibility of the nursing staff. If clinical decision support systems and closed-loop control systems could be developed for critical care monitoring and lifesaving interventions as well as the administration of sedation and cardiopulmonary management, the ICU nurse could be released from the intense monitoring of sedation, allowing her/him to focus on other critical tasks. One particularly attractive strategy is to utilize the knowledge and experience of skilled clinicians, capturing explicitly the rules expert clinicians use to decide on how to titrate drug doses depending on the level of sedation. In this paper, we extend the deterministic rule-based expert system for cardiopulmonary management and ICU sedation framework presented in [1] to a stochastic setting by using probability theory to quantify uncertainty and hence deal with more realistic clinical situations.

  11. Improving patient care through the prism of psychology: application of Maslow's hierarchy to sedation, delirium, and early mobility in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, James C; Santoro, Michael J; Ely, Taylor M; Boehm, Leanne; Kiehl, Amy L; Anderson, Lindsay S; Ely, E Wesley

    2014-06-01

    The intensive care unit (ICU) is not only a place where lives are saved; it is also a site of harm and iatrogenic injury for millions of people treated in this setting globally every year. Increasingly, hospitals admit only the sickest patients, and although the overall number of hospital beds remains stable in the United States, the percentage of that total devoted to ICU beds is rising. These 2 realities engender a demographic imperative to address patient safety in the critical care setting. This article addresses the medical community's resistance to adopting a culture of safety in critical care with regard to issues surrounding sedation, delirium, and early mobility. Although there is currently much research and quality improvement in this area, most of what we know from these data and published guidelines has not become reality in the day-to-day management of ICU patients. This article is not intended to provide a comprehensive review of the literature but rather a framework to rethink our currently outdated culture of critical care by employing Maslow's hierarchy of needs, along with a few novel analogies. Application of Maslow's hierarchy will help propel health care professionals toward comprehensive care of the whole person not merely for survival but toward restoration of pre-illness function of mind, body, and spirit.

  12. Palliative sedation versus euthanasia: an ethical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Have, Henk; Welie, Jos V M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article was to review the ethical debate concerning palliative sedation. Although recent guidelines articulate the differences between palliative sedation and euthanasia, the ethical controversies remain. The dominant view is that euthanasia and palliative sedation are morally distinct practices. However, ambiguous moral experiences and considerable practice variation call this view into question. When heterogeneous sedative practices are all labeled as palliative sedation, there is the risk that palliative sedation is expanded to include practices that are actually intended to bring about the patients' death. This troublesome expansion is fostered by an expansive use of the concept of intention such that this decisive ethical concept is no longer restricted to signify the aim in guiding the action. In this article, it is argued that intention should be used in a restricted way. The significance of intention is related to other ethical parameters to demarcate the practice of palliative sedation: terminality, refractory symptoms, proportionality, and separation from other end-of-life decisions. These additional parameters, although not without ethical and practical problems, together formulate a framework to ethically distinguish a more narrowly defined practice of palliative sedation from practices that are tantamount to euthanasia. Finally, the article raises the question as to what impact palliative sedation might have on the practice of palliative care itself. The increasing interest in palliative sedation may reemphasize characteristics of health care that initially encouraged the emergence of palliative care in the first place: the focus on therapy rather than care, the physical dimension rather than the whole person, the individual rather than the community, and the primacy of intervention rather than receptiveness and presence.

  13. Danish national sedation strategy. Targeted therapy of discomfort associated with critical illness. Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine (DSIT) and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DASAIM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonsmark, Lise; Hein, Lars; Nibroe, Helle;

    2015-01-01

    Sedation of critically ill patients undergoing mechanical ventilation should be minimized or completely avoided. Only in selected situations is sedation indicated as first line therapy (increased intracranial pressure or therapeutic hypothermia). The critical care physicians primary objective sho...

  14. Delirium and Sedation in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU): survey of behaviors and attitudes of 1,384 healthcare professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, RP; Gambrell, M; Speroff, T; Scott, TA; Pun, BT; Okahashi, J; Strength, C; Pandharipande, P; Girard, TD; Burgess, H; Dittus, RS; Bernard, GR; Ely, EW

    2013-01-01

    Objective A 2001 survey found that most healthcare professionals considered ICU delirium as a serious problem, but only 16% used a validated delirium screening tool. Our objective was to assess beliefs and practices regarding ICU delirium and sedation management. Design and Setting Between October 2006 and May 2007, a survey was distributed to ICU practitioners in 41 North American hospitals, 7 international critical care meetings and courses, and the American Thoracic Society email database Study Participants A convenience sample of 1,384 health care professionals including 970 physicians, 322 nurses, 23 respiratory care practitioners, 26 pharmacists, 18 nurse practitioners and physicians’ assistants, and 25 others. Results A majority [59% (766/1300)] estimated that over 1 in 4 adult mechanically ventilated patients experience delirium. Over half [59% (774/1302)] screen for delirium, with 33% of those respondents (258/774) using a specific screening tool. A majority of respondents use a sedation protocol, but 29% (396/1355) still do not. A majority (76%, 990/1309) has a written policy on spontaneous awakening trials (SATs), but the minority of respondents (44%, 446/1019) practice SATs on more than half of ICU days. Conclusions Delirium is considered a serious problem by a majority of healthcare professionals, and the percent of practitioners using a specific screening tool has increased since the last published survey data. While most respondents have adopted specific sedation protocols and have an approved approach to stopping sedation daily, few report even modest compliance with daily cessation of sedation. PMID:19237884

  15. The progress of light sedation for critically ill adult patients in intensive care unit%重症加强治疗病房成人患者浅镇静治疗进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李双玲; 王东信; 杨拔贤

    2016-01-01

    The latest advance of sedation for critically ill adult patients in intensive care unit (ICU) was reviewed in order to provide certain clinical information for the ICU physicians about sedation. Guidelines, clinical research, Meta-analysis, and reviews in recent years were collected using electronic data base. Discussions included: ① the definition of light sedation, and its effects on clinical outcome, stress, sleep and delirium; ② light sedation strategies included: the target population, the target sedation strategy and daily sedation interruption, clinical assessment and monitoring of sedation, selection of sedative drugs, light sedation extenuation; ③ light sedation strategies and pain, agitation, delirium control bundles; ④ the problems and prospects of light sedation. Light sedation is the main principle of currently ICU sedation strategy in critically ill adult patients. Goal-directed light sedation should be considered as a routine therapy in most clinical situation, and its goal should be achieved as early as possible in the early stage of sedation. Routine use of benzodiazepines should be avoided, especially in patients with or at a risk of delirium. Prevention and treatment of agitation with a combination of non-pharmacologic or pharmacologic methods; ICU specification rules for pain, agitation and delirium prevention and treatment should be made. Light sedation is the main ICU sedation strategy in adult patients now, but must be individualized for each patient.%对重症加强治疗病房(ICU)成人患者镇静方面的最新进展进行综述,强调浅镇静策略是目前ICU危重患者镇静的主要治疗原则,其主要内容包括:①目标导向的浅镇静应常规化,尽可能在镇静早期即达标;②应摒弃常规使用苯二氮类药物,尤其对有谵妄风险或已经有谵妄的患者;③联合药物或非药物的有效方法预防和治疗躁动;④制定纳入疼痛、躁动和谵

  16. Sedation for pediatric endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Chul

    2014-03-01

    It is more difficult to achieve cooperation when conducting endoscopy in pediatric patients than adults. As a result, the sedation for a comfortable procedure is more important in pediatric patients. The sedation, however, often involves risks and side effects, and their prediction and prevention should be sought in advance. Physicians should familiarize themselves to the relevant guidelines in order to make appropriate decisions and actions regarding the preparation of the sedation, patient monitoring during endoscopy, patient recovery, and hospital discharge. Furthermore, they have to understand the characteristics of the pediatric patients and different types of endoscopy. The purpose of this article is to discuss the details of sedation in pediatric endoscopy.

  17. The Comparison of Ramsay and Richmond Scales for Intensive Care Unit Sedation, the Consistency Between Doctors and Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslı Hepkarşı

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Daily interruption and monitoring of sedation in intensive care unit (ICU patients, especially in patients on mechanical ventilation, with the help of sedation scales is recommended for titration of sedative drugs. For this purpose, scales such as Richmond agitation-sedation scale (RASS and the Ramsay sedation scale (RSS are commonly used. Although these scales definitively describe sedation levels, perceptions and scores can differ among practitioners. The aim of this prospective observational study was to evaluate these subjective assessments and the consistency between nurses, residents and specialists, and to evaluate the degree of ease of these scales. Material and Method: After ethic committee approval, a single-center prospective observational study was planned; 128 adult patients, who were conscious, and had no motor and sensory defects, were included in the study. Each patient was evaluated with the RASS and RSS scales by nurses, residents and specialists simultaneously and the scores and ease of scale were recorded in such a way which did not allow the participants to see each other. Data was analyzed by the medical informatics and statistics department of the university and the Weighted Kappa values between practitioners were measured. Results: A total of 482 observations were made from the 128 patients included in the study. Practitioners evaluated both sedation scales simultaneously. Upon comparison of the practitioners’ scale values, the consistency between the matching observation numbers showed a Weighted Kappa value between 0.71-0.77, which was found to be statistically significant and the consistency between participants was classified as “good”. The degree of ease of application for both scales was found to be “very easy”. Conclusion: This study reveals a correlation between RASS and RSS scores between practitioners with different educational levels. The implementation of both scales was found

  18. Guideline for stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbaek; Lorentzen, Kristian; Clausen, Niels;

    2014-01-01

    Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is commonly used in the intensive care unit (ICU), and is recommended in the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines 2012. The present guideline from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine sums...

  19. Addressing Palliative Sedation during Expert Consultation: A Descriptive Analysis of the Practice of Dutch Palliative Care Consultation Teams.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Hoek

    Full Text Available Since palliative sedation is considered a complex intervention, consultation teams are increasingly established to support general practice. This study aims to offer insight into the frequency and characteristics of expert consultations regarding palliative sedation.We performed a retrospective analysis of a longitudinal database. This database contained all patient-related consultations by Dutch Palliative Care Consultation teams, that were requested between 2004 and 2011. We described the frequency and characteristics of these consultations, in particular of the subgroup of consultations in which palliative sedation was addressed (i.e. PSa consultations. We used multivariate regression analysis to explore consultation characteristics associated with a higher likelihood of PSa consultations.Of the 44,443 initial consultations, most were requested by general practitioners (73% and most concerned patients with cancer (86%. Palliative sedation was addressed in 18.1% of all consultations. Palliative sedation was relatively more often discussed during consultations for patients with a neurologic disease (OR 1.79; 95% CI: 1.51-2.12 or COPD (OR 1.39; 95% CI: 1.15-1.69 than for patients with cancer. We observed a higher likelihood of PSa consultations if the following topics were also addressed during consultation: dyspnoea (OR 1.30; 95% CI: 1.22-1.40, agitation/delirium (OR 1.57; 95% CI: 1.47-1.68, exhaustion (OR 2.89; 95% CI: 2.61-3.20, euthanasia-related questions (OR 2.65; 95% CI: 2.37-2.96 or existential issues (OR 1.55; 95% CI: 1.31-1.83.In conclusion, PSa consultations accounted for almost one-fifth of all expert consultations and were associated with several case-related characteristics. These characteristics may help clinicians in identifying patients at risk for a more complex disease trajectory at the end of life.

  20. Application of sedation in pediatric intensive care unit%镇静在儿科重症监护病房的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    房军臣

    2012-01-01

    镇静在危重患儿的治疗过程中已越来越受到重视,也普遍应用于临床.各种镇静药物及其使用方法、镇静水平的评估、镇静风险的防治等都有不同的文献报道.目前苯二氮(革)类是镇静的主要药物,咪达唑仑静脉维持是常用的镇静方法,Rasmay评分、舒适量表评分和脑电双频指数常用于评价镇静水平,良好的镇静评估和心电呼吸监护是防治镇静风险的关键.%Sedation has been paid more and more attention in the treatment of critically ill children,and applied in clinical commonly.There are different reports in the literature about all kinds of sedation drug and method of use,Ramesay,prevention and control of the sedation risk.At present,benzodiazepines are the main sedation drug and constant intravenous infusion of midazolam is the commonly used method of sedation.Rasmay,Comfort scale and bispectral index are used in assessing sedation commonly.Sedation assessment and Ecg respiratory care is the key to prevent and control sedation risk.

  1. Family meetings in palliative care: Multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Hanlon Brendan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Support for family carers is a core function of palliative care. Family meetings are commonly recommended as a useful way for health care professionals to convey information, discuss goals of care and plan care strategies with patients and family carers. Yet it seems there is insufficient research to demonstrate the utlility of family meetings or the best way to conduct them. This study sought to develop multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines for conducting family meetings in the specialist palliative care setting based on available evidence and consensus based expert opinion. Methods The guidelines were developed via the following methods: (1 A literature review; (2 Conceptual framework; (3 Refinement of the guidelines based on feedback from an expert panel and focus groups with multidisciplinary specialists from three palliative care units and three major teaching hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. Results The literature review revealed that no comprehensive exploration of the conduct and utility of family meetings in the specialist palliative care setting has occurred. Preliminary clinical guidelines were developed by the research team, based on relevant literature and a conceptual framework informed by: single session therapy, principles of therapeutic communication and models of coping and family consultation. A multidisciplinary expert panel refined the content of the guidelines and the applicability of the guidelines was then assessed via two focus groups of multidisciplinary palliative care specialists. The complete version of the guidelines is presented. Conclusion Family meetings provide an opportunity to enhance the quality of care provided to palliative care patients and their family carers. The clinical guidelines developed from this study offer a framework for preparing, conducting and evaluating family meetings. Future research and clinical implications are outlined.

  2. Guidelines for Psychological Practice in Health Care Delivery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Psychologists practice in an increasingly diverse range of health care delivery systems. The following guidelines are intended to assist psychologists, other health care providers, administrators in health care delivery systems, and the public to conceptualize the roles and responsibilities of psychologists in these diverse contexts. These…

  3. [Guideline 'Wound Care': recommendations for 5 challenging areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brölmann, Fleur E; Vermeulen, Hester; Go, Peter M N Y H; Ubbink, Dirk T

    2013-01-01

    The interdisciplinary evidence-based guideline 'Wound Care' covers the treatment and management of acute wounds in adults and children and by all wound care disciplines. This guideline answers 5 basic questions with 38 recommendations covering wound cleansing, pain relief, instructing the patient, various dressings and the organisational aspects of wound care. The guideline recommendations include not to cleanse wounds that are primarily closed, to cleanse acute open wounds with clean tap water, to use the WHO pain ladder as the basis for the choice of analgesics for continuous wound pain, to administer lidocaine or prilocaine for localized pain relief during manipulation, not to cover primarily closed wounds with dressings, to use simple dressings for open wounds and to give the patient clear instructions. The guideline also advises about wound registration, documentation and hand-over of wound care, and recommends making clear agreements about referrals and responsibilities.

  4. Key articles and guidelines relative to intensive care unit pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erstad, Brian L; Jordan, Ché J; Thomas, Michael C

    2002-12-01

    Compilations of key articles and guidelines in a particular clinical practice area are useful not only to clinicians who practice in that area, but to all clinicians. We compiled pertinent articles and guidelines pertaining to drug therapy in the intensive care unit setting from the perspective of an actively practicing critical care pharmacist. This document also may serve to stimulate other experienced clinicians to undertake a similar endeavor in their practice areas.

  5. AAHA dental care guidelines for dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Steven E; Bellows, Jan; Colmery, Ben; Conway, M Lana; Knutson, Kate; Vitoux, Jeanne

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines for the practice of companion animal dentistry for the veterinary profession. Dental care is necessary to provide optimum health and quality of life. Diseases of the oral cavity, if left untreated, are often painful and can contribute to other local or systemic diseases. This paper includes guidelines for materials and equipment, dental cleaning and evaluation, client communication, and pet home care.

  6. Hair transplantation: Standard guidelines of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patwardhan Narendra

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Hair transplantation is a surgical method of hair restoration. Physician qualification : The physician performing hair transplantation should have completed post graduation training in dermatology; he should have adequate background training in dermatosurgery at a centre that provides education training in cutaneous surgery. In addition, he should obtain specific hair transplantation training or experience at the surgical table(hands on under the supervision of an appropriately trained and experienced hair transplant surgeon. In addition to the surgical technique, training should include instruction in local anesthesia and emergency resuscitation and care. Facility : Hair transplantation can be performed safely in an outpatient day case dermatosurgical facility. The day case theatre should be equipped with facilities for monitoring and handling emergencies. A plan for handling emergencies should be in place and all nursing staff should be familiar with the emergency plan. It is preferable, but not mandatory to have a standby anesthetist. Indication for hair transplantation is pattern hair loss in males and also in females. In female pattern hair loss, investigations to rule out any underlying cause for hair loss such as anemia and thyroid deficiency should be carried out. Hair transplantation can also be performed in selected cases of scarring alopecia, eyebrows and eye lashes, by experienced surgeons. Preoperative counseling and informed consent :Detailed consent form listing details about the procedure and possible complications should be signed by the patient. The consent form should specifically state the limitations of the procedure and if more procedures are needed for proper results, it should be clearly mentioned. Patient should be provided with adequate opportunity to seek information through brochures, computer presentations, and personal discussions. Need for concomitant medical therapy should be emphasized. Patients should understand

  7. Environmental Management of Pediatric Asthma: Guidelines for Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James R.; McCurdy, Leyla Erk

    2005-01-01

    These guidelines are the product of a new Pediatric Asthma Initiative aimed at integrating environmental management of asthma into pediatric health care. This document outlines competencies in environmental health relevant to pediatric asthma that should be mastered by primary health care providers, and outlines the environmental interventions…

  8. Sedation practice in Nordic and non-Nordic ICUs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Albarran, John W.; Ring, Mette;

    2013-01-01

    A trend towards lighter sedation has been evident in many intensive care units (ICUs). The aims of the survey were to describe sedation practice in European ICUs and to compare sedation practice in Nordic and non-Nordic countries....

  9. [An evaluation of the implementation of the 'Guidelines for oral care for patients dependent on care'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeksema, A R; Meijer, H J A; Vissink, A; Raghoebar, G M; Visser, A

    2016-05-01

    75% of older people being admitted to a nursing home are found to have oral care problems that have not been treated. Moreover, the Healthcare Inspectorate [in the Netherlands] reports that oral care for patients who depend on care in nursing homes is inadequate. The 'Guidelines for oral care for patients dependent on care in nursing homes', developed in 2007, appears to have been inadequately implemented. The goal of this research was to gain insight into the implementation of these guidelines in healthcare organisations. To that end, a questionnaire was distributed among the staff of 74 nursing homes. An analysis of the data revealed that people are -familiar with the guidelines and that oral care providers are often available. Oral care providers, however, often do not have access to reasonable dental care facilities. Patients are, moreover, generally not screened and/or monitored in accordance with the guidelines. Finally, it seems that the instruction of nurses and care-providers is insufficient. Research supports the conclusion that the nursing home staff is well-acquainted with the 'Guidelines for oral care for patients dependent on care' but that implementation of the guidelines in daily practice leaves much to be desired.

  10. Congenital Heart Disease: Guidelines of Care for Children with Special Health Care Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota State Dept. of Health, Minneapolis. Services for Children with Handicaps.

    These guidelines were written to help families coordinate the health care that may be needed by a child with congenital heart disease. The booklet begins with general information about congenital heart disease. It then discusses the goals of health care, the health care team, the importance of periodic health care, and record keeping procedures.…

  11. Spina Bifida: Guidelines of Care for Children with Special Health Care Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota State Dept. of Health, Minneapolis. Services for Children with Handicaps.

    These guidelines were written to help families coordinate the health care that may be needed by a child with spina bifida. The booklet begins with general information about spina bifida. It then discusses the goals of health care, the health care team, the importance of periodic health care, and record keeping procedures. The child's health care…

  12. [Update on Current Care Guideline: Insomnia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partinen, Markku; Huutoniemi, Anne; Kajaste, Soili; Lagerstedt, Rea; Markkula, Juha; Mäkinen, Erkki; Paakkari, Ilari; Partonen, Timo; Polo, Päivi; Saarenpää-Heikkilä, Outi; Seppälä, Maaria; Kukkonen-Harjula, Katriina; Tuunainen, Arja

    2016-01-01

    Insomnia symptoms must be differentiated from insomnia disorder. The correct aiagnosis or insomnia aisoraer is important, as insomnia may also be a symptom of many other diseases. Cognitive behavioral methods are recommended as first-line treatment options. Treatment of acute insomnia with hypnotics should not exceed two weeks. In elderly persons adverse effects of hypnotics may exceed their beneficial effects in long-term use. Antidepressive medications acting on the histamine-1 system may be used in very small doses. The new guideline includes e.g. insomnia in pregnant and menopausal women and in cancer patients, and driving issues.

  13. Guidelines for essential trauma care: progress in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshipura, Manjul

    2006-06-01

    The planning and development of trauma care systems in India has yet to gain attention and priority from the government, even though trauma is a major public health problem. Several efforts are under way to improve the delivery of trauma care for the injured. Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care has proved to be an ideal tool with which to begin the process of development for building a national system for the care of the injured in one of the most populous countries in the world, and one with a high burden of trauma deaths and disability. This article focuses on the impact of the Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care in efforts for improvement of the system in India.

  14. Review of palliative sedation and its distinction from euthanasia and lethal injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Michael P

    2012-01-01

    Palliative sedation evolved from within the practice of palliative medicine and has become adopted by other areas of medicine, such as within intensive care practice. Clinician's usually come across this practice for dying patients who are foregoing or having life support terminated. A number of intolerable and intractable symptom burdens can occur during the end of life period that may require the use of palliative sedation. Furthermore, when patients receive palliative sedation, the continued use of hydration and nutrition becomes an issue of consideration and there are contentious bioethical issues involved in using or withholding these life-sustaining provisions. A general understanding of biomedical ethics helps prevent abuse in the practice of palliative sedation. Various sedative drugs can be employed in the provision of palliative sedation that can produce any desired effect, from light sedation to complete unconsciousness. Although there are some similarities in the pharmacotherapy of palliative sedation, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, and lethal injection, there is a difference in how the drugs are administered with each practice. There are some published guidelines about how palliative sedation should be practiced, but currently there is not any universally accepted standard of practice.

  15. 2013 AAHA dental care guidelines for dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Steven E; Bellows, Jan; Juriga, Stephen; Knutson, Kate; Niemiec, Brook A; Perrone, Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    Veterinary dentistry is constantly progressing. The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines for the practice of companion animal dentistry for the veterinary profession. Dental care is necessary to provide optimum health and optimize quality of life. Untreated diseases of the oral cavity are painful and can contribute to local and systemic diseases. This article includes guidelines for preventive oral health care, client communication, evaluation, dental cleaning, and treatment. In addition, materials and equipment necessary to perform a medically appropriate procedure are described.

  16. [Results of a national survey about the use of sedation scales in emergency prehospital medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belpomme, V; Devaud, M-L; Pariente, D; Ricard-Hibon, A; Mantz, J

    2009-04-01

    The primary goal of sedation in emergency prehospital care is to guarantee the security of the mechanically ventilated patients by optimising their adaptation to the respirator. If the French prehospital guidelines are well codified, their applicability in routine clinical practice seem to be rather empirical. The aim of this national survey was to evaluate the use of the clinical sedation scales by the prehospital physicians. This prospective and clinical practice survey was begun in January 2005. An anonymous questionnaire was sent to the physicians working in the 377 Mobile Intensive Care Unit of the 105 French Emergency Medical Service System. The total response rate from physicians was 28% (n=497). Only 29% of the physicians (n=145) declared to use a sedation scale for a mechanically ventilated patient. The Ramsay score was used in 97% of the cases (n=141).The principal reasons given by the physicians for not using the sedation scales were their ignorance in 57% of the cases (n=200) and the systematic choice of a deep sedation in 42% of the cases (n=147). For 18% of them (n=62), the use of sedation scores was considered too complicated. The final results show that the utilisation ratio of the sedation scores is very low in emergency prehospital medicine and suggest that an effort toward improving the use of sedation in prehospital emergency medicine is necessary.

  17. Standard guidelines of care for vitiligo surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsad Davinder

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo surgery is an effective method of treatment for selected, resistant vitiligo patches in patients with vitiligo. Physician′s qualifications: The physician performing vitiligo surgery should have completed postgraduate training in dermatology which included training in vitiligo surgery. If the center for postgraduation does not provide education and training in cutaneous surgery, the training may be obtained at the surgical table (hands-on under the supervision of an appropriately trained and experienced dermatosurgeon at a center that routinely performs the procedure. Training may also be obtained in dedicated workshops. In addition to the surgical techniques, training should include local anesthesia and emergency resuscitation and care. Facility: Vitiligo surgery can be performed safely in an outpatient day care dermatosurgical facility. The day care theater should be equipped with facilities for monitoring and handling emergencies. A plan for handling emergencies should be in place, with which all nursing staff should be familiar. Vitiligo grafting for extensive areas may need general anesthesia and full operation theater facility in a hospital setting and the presence of an anesthetist is recommended in such cases. Indications for vitiligo surgery : Surgery is indicated for stable vitiligo that does not respond to medical treatment. While there is no consensus on definitive parameters for stability, the Task Force suggests the absence of progression of disease for the past one year as a definition of stability. Test grafting may be performed in doubtful cases to detect stability. Preoperative counseling and Informed consent: A detailed consent form elaborating the procedure and possible complications should be signed by the patient. The patient should be informed of the nature of the disease and that the determination of stability is only a vague guide. The consent form should specifically state the limitations of the procedure

  18. Hypertension guideline implementation: experiences of Finnish primary care nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alanen, Seija; Ijäs, Jarja; Kaila, Minna;

    2008-01-01

    RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: Evidence-based guidelines on hypertension have been developed in many western countries. Yet, there is little evidence of their impact on the clinical practices of primary care nurses. METHOD: We assessed the style of implementation and adoption of the national...... Hypertension Guideline (HT Guideline) in 32 Finnish health centres classified in a previous study as 'disseminators' (n = 13) or 'implementers' (n = 19). A postal questionnaire was sent to all nurses (n = 409) working in the outpatient services in these health centres. Additionally, senior nursing officers...... were telephoned to enquire if the implementation of the HT Guideline had led to a new division of labour between nurses and doctors. RESULTS: Questionnaires were returned from 327 nurses (80.0%), while all senior nursing officers (n = 32) were contacted. The majority of nurses were of the opinion...

  19. [Update on Current Care Guideline: Sinusitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hytönen, Maija; Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Huovinen, Pentti; Ilkko, Eero; Jousimaa, Jukkapekka; Kivistö, Juho; Korppi, Matti; Liira, Helena; Malmivaara, Antti; Numminen, Jura; Pirilä, Tapio

    2013-01-01

    Patients with common cold have often symptoms similar to sinusitis. These symptoms often resolve in time, but symptomatic treatment (e.g. analgesics, decongestants) may be used. If symptoms continue for over 10 days, or severe symptoms continue for over 3 days, or symptoms turn worse in the course of the disease, bacterial sinusitis should be suspected. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings, and can be confirmed with ultrasound examination. Amoxicillin, penicillin or doxicyclin are recommended for bacterial sinusitis. Patients with chronic or recurrent sinusitis should be referred to specialist care.

  20. An oral health care guideline for institutionalised older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschere, L.M. de; Putten, Gerard van der; Vanobbergen, J.N.; Schols, J.M.; Baat, C. de

    2011-01-01

    doi: 10.1111/j.1741-2358.2010.00406.x An oral health care guideline for institutionalised older people Institutionalized older people are prone to oral health problems and their negative impact due to frailty, disabilities, multi-morbidity, and multiple medication use. Until recently, no evidence-ba

  1. Curricular Guidelines for Dental Hygiene Care for the Handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for dental hygiene curriculum cover the scope and definitions of care for the handicapped, interrelationships between disciplines and courses, a curriculum overview, primary educational goals, prerequisites, a core content outline, specific behavioral objectives, sequencing, faculty, and…

  2. Evaluating and monitoring sedation, arousal, and agitation in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessler, Curtis N; Riker, Richard R; Ramsay, Michael A

    2013-04-01

    Optimal management of patient comfort and sedative drug therapy for intensive care unit (ICU) patients includes establishing a goal of therapy-often defined by a desired level of consciousness, with titration of medications to achieve this target. An assessment of the level of consciousness is best performed using a simple tool, such as a sedation scale that relies on observation of the patient to assign a level of conscious that ranges from alert to unarousable. Many sedation scales incorporate observation of the patient's response to stimulation, which typically escalates from simply calling the patient's name to physical stimulation. Many such tools also incorporate an assessment of the presence and intensity of agitated behavior. Implementation of sedation scales has been associated with improved outcomes, and the frequent assessment of level of consciousness using a sedation scale is strongly recommended in clinical practice guidelines. Further, selection of a sedation scale that has been demonstrated to be valid and reliable in your patient population is endorsed. Objective measures of consciousness, such as devices that use processed electroencephalography, are less well established for routine ICU management and are recommended only for selected situations.

  3. Effect of opioid prescribing guidelines in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jonathan H; Hom, Jason; Richman, Ilana; Asch, Steven M; Podchiyska, Tanya; Johansen, Nawal Atwan

    2016-08-01

    Long-term opioid use for noncancer pain is increasingly prevalent yet controversial given the risks of addiction, diversion, and overdose. Prior literature has identified the problem and proposed management guidelines, but limited evidence exists on the actual effectiveness of implementing such guidelines in a primary care setting.A multidisciplinary working group of institutional experts assembled comprehensive guidelines for chronic opioid prescribing, including monitoring and referral recommendations. The guidelines were disseminated in September 2013 to our medical center's primary care clinics via in person and electronic education.We extracted electronic medical records for patients with noncancer pain receiving opioid prescriptions (Rxs) in seasonally matched preintervention (11/1/2012-6/1/2013) and postintervention (11/1/2013-6/1/2014) periods. For patients receiving chronic (3 or more) opioid Rxs, we assessed the rates of drug screening, specialty referrals, clinic visits, emergency room visits, and quantity of opioids prescribed.After disseminating guidelines, the percentage of noncancer clinic patients receiving any opioid Rxs dropped from 3.9% to 3.4% (P = 0.02). The percentage of noncancer patients receiving chronic opioid Rxs decreased from 2.0% to 1.6% (P = 0.03). The rate of urine drug screening increased from 9.2% to 17.3% (P = 0.005) amongst noncancer chronic opioid patients. No significant differences were detected for other metrics or demographics assessed.An educational intervention for primary care opioid prescribing is feasible and was temporally associated with a modest reduction in overall opioid Rx rates. Provider use of routine drug screening increased, but overall rates of screening and specialty referral remained low despite the intervention. Despite national pressures to introduce opioid prescribing guidelines for chronic pain, doing so alone does not necessarily yield substantial changes in clinical practice.

  4. Standard guidelines of care for chemical peels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khunger Niti

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemical peeling is the application of a chemical agent to the skin, which causes controlled destruction of a part of or the entire epidermis, with or without the dermis, leading to exfoliation and removal of superficial lesions, followed by regeneration of new epidermal and dermal tissues. Indications for chemical peeling include pigmentary disorders, superficial acne scars, ageing skin changes, and benign epidermal growths. Contraindications include patients with active bacterial, viral or fungal infection, tendency to keloid formation, facial dermatitis, taking photosensitizing medications and unrealistic expectations. Physicians′ qualifications : The physician performing chemical peeling should have completed postgraduate training in dermatology. The training for chemical peeling may be acquired during post graduation or later at a center that provides education and training in cutaneous surgery or in focused workshops providing such training. The physician should have adequate knowledge of the different peeling agents used, the process of wound healing, the technique as well as the identification and management of complications. Facility : Chemical peeling can be performed safely in any clinic/outpatient day care dermatosurgical facility. Preoperative counseling and Informed consent : A detailed consent form listing details about the procedure and possible complications should be signed by the patient. The consent form should specifically state the limitations of the procedure and should clearly mention if more procedures are needed for proper results. The patient should be provided with adequate opportunity to seek information through brochures, presentations, and personal discussions. The need for postoperative medical therapy should be emphasized. Superficial peels are considered safe in Indian patients. Medium depth peels should be performed with great caution, especially in dark skinned patients. Deep peels are not recommended for

  5. The perspectives of clinical staff and bereaved informal care-givers on the use of continuous sedation until death for cancer patients: The study protocol of the UNBIASED study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Heide Agnes

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant minority of dying people experience refractory symptoms or extreme distress unresponsive to conventional therapies. In such circumstances, sedation may be used to decrease or remove consciousness until death occurs. This practice is described in a variety of ways, including: 'palliative sedation', 'terminal sedation', 'continuous deep sedation until death', 'proportionate sedation' or 'palliative sedation to unconsciousness'. Surveys show large unexplained variation in incidence of sedation at the end of life across countries and care settings and there are ethical concerns about the use, intentions, risks and significance of the practice in palliative care. There are also questions about how to explain international variation in the use of the practice. This protocol relates to the UNBIASED study (UK Netherlands Belgium International Sedation Study, which comprises three linked studies with separate funding sources in the UK, Belgium and the Netherlands. The aims of the study are to explore decision-making surrounding the application of continuous sedation until death in contemporary clinical practice, and to understand the experiences of clinical staff and decedents' informal care-givers of the use of continuous sedation until death and their perceptions of its contribution to the dying process. The UNBIASED study is part of the European Association for Palliative Care Research Network. Methods/Design To realize the study aims, a two-phase study has been designed. The study settings include: the domestic home, hospital and expert palliative care sites. Phase 1 consists of: a focus groups with health care staff and bereaved informal care-givers; and b a preliminary case notes review to study the range of sedation therapy provided at the end of life to cancer patients who died within a 12 week period. Phase 2 employs qualitative methods to develop 30 patient-centred case studies in each country. These involve

  6. The Impact of High Versus Low Sedation Dosing Strategy on Cognitive Dysfunction in Survivors of Intensive Care Units: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porhomayon Jahan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The practice of low vs. high sedation dosing strategy may impact the cognitive and mental health function in the intensive care unit (ICU. We aim to demonstrate that high sedation strategy will result in change of mental health function in ICU patients. Methods: We performed a systemic search and meta-analysis of medical databases in MEDLINE(from 1966 to March 2013 and EMBASE (from 1980 to March 2013, as well as the Cochrane Library using the MESH terms "Intensive Care Unit," and "Mental Health, for assessing the impact of sedation on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD or anxiety/depression and deliriumin the mix ICU setting including cardiac surgery patients. A total of 1216 patients were includedin the final analysis.Results: We included 11 studies in the final analysis and concluded that high dose sedationstrategy resulted in higher incidence of cognitive dysfunction with P value of 0.009. Theresult for subgroup of delirium showed P = 0.11 and PTSD/depression or anxiety of P = 0.001,Heterogeneity I2 was 64%. Overall analysis was statistically significant with a P value of 0.002.Conclusion: High sedation dosing strategy will negatively affect cognitive function in criticallyill patients. Large randomized trials are needed to address cognitive dysfunction in subgroup of patients with delirium.

  7. Sound & Vibration 20 Design Guidelines for Health Care Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Tocci, Gregory; Cavanaugh, William

    2013-01-01

    Sound, vibration, noise and privacy have significant impacts on health and performance. As a result, they are recognized as essential components of effective health care environments. However, acoustics has only recently become a prominent consideration in the design, construction, and operation of healthcare facilities owing to the absence, prior to 2010, of clear and objective guidance based on research and best practices. Sound & Vibration 2.0 is the first publication to comprehensively address this need. Sound & Vibration 2.0 is the sole reference standard for acoustics in health care facilities and is recognized by: the 2010 FGI Guidelines for the Design and Construction of Health Care Facilities (used in 60 countries); the US Green Building Council’s LEED for Health Care (used in 87 countries); The Green Guide for Health Care V2.2; and the International Code Council (2011). Sound & Vibration 2.0 was commissioned by the Facility Guidelines Institute in 2005, written by the Health Care Acous...

  8. Guidelines for Primary Health Care teaching in undergraduate medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Marcos Piva Demarzo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available These are a set of guidelines built by the Brazilian Association of Medical Education (ABEM and the Brazilian Society of Family and Community Medicine (SBMFC with the aim of supporting medical schools in a practical and objective manner, when elaborating pedagogical-political projects on Primary Health Care (PHC. The advent of the Brazilian National Curricular Guidelines for Medical Education, which are approved by the Ministry of Education in 2001 have since improved the teaching of undergraduate medical students on PHC, but there are still wide variations in implementation and quality of it in medical curricula. These guidelines by ABEM/SBMFC partnership can exert considerable influence on medical curricula by establishing minimum requirements and core competencies for PHC in Brazil.

  9. Sedation in the ICU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Standard treatment of critically ill patients undergoing mechanical ventilation is continuous sedation. This standard treatment to all patients has been greatly challenged over the last decade. At the general intensive care department at Odense University hospital the standard treatment has been ...

  10. [Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines in oral care 2: process and content of evidence-based guideline development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mettes, T.G.P.H.; Loveren, C. van; Oirschot, B.A.J.A. van; Maanen-Schakel, N.W. van; Weijden, F.G. van der; Bruers, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, an advisory report was published by a national working committee concerning how the current, applied method of evidence-based guideline development in healthcare can be used in oral care in a national guideline programme. In an independent Institute of Knowledge Translation in Oral Care, as

  11. Guidelines of care for the management of acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaenglein, Andrea L; Pathy, Arun L; Schlosser, Bethanee J; Alikhan, Ali; Baldwin, Hilary E; Berson, Diane S; Bowe, Whitney P; Graber, Emmy M; Harper, Julie C; Kang, Sewon; Keri, Jonette E; Leyden, James J; Reynolds, Rachel V; Silverberg, Nanette B; Stein Gold, Linda F; Tollefson, Megha M; Weiss, Jonathan S; Dolan, Nancy C; Sagan, Andrew A; Stern, Mackenzie; Boyer, Kevin M; Bhushan, Reva

    2016-05-01

    Acne is one of the most common disorders treated by dermatologists and other health care providers. While it most often affects adolescents, it is not uncommon in adults and can also be seen in children. This evidence-based guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in its management. Issues from grading of acne to the topical and systemic management of the disease are reviewed. Suggestions on use are provided based on available evidence.

  12. Improving fertility care. The role of guidelines, quality indicators and patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourad, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines can help improve the quality of care, and decrease variation in delivered care between settings. However, as guidelines do not implement themselves, efforts should be made to improve current guideline implementation. For clinical fertility care, we performed a large mult

  13. Nurse administered propofol sedation for pulmonary endoscopies requires a specific protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jeppe Thue; Banning, Anne-Marie; Clementsen, Paul;

    2012-01-01

    This study provides an evaluation and risk analysis of propofol sedation for endoscopic pulmonary procedures according to our unit's "gastroenterologic nurse-administered propofol sedation (NAPS) guideline".......This study provides an evaluation and risk analysis of propofol sedation for endoscopic pulmonary procedures according to our unit's "gastroenterologic nurse-administered propofol sedation (NAPS) guideline"....

  14. Developing the Botswana Primary Care Guideline: an integrated, symptom-based primary care guideline for the adult patient in a resource-limited setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsima BM

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Billy M Tsima,1 Vincent Setlhare,1 Oathokwa Nkomazana2 1Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, 2Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana Background: Botswana’s health care system is based on a primary care model. Various national guidelines exist for specific diseases. However, most of the guidelines address management at a tertiary level and often appear nonapplicable for the limited resources in primary care facilities. An integrated symptom-based guideline was developed so as to translate the Botswana national guidelines to those applicable in primary care. The Botswana Primary Care Guideline (BPCG integrates the care of communicable diseases, including HIV/AIDS and noncommunicable diseases, by frontline primary health care workers.Methods: The Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Botswana, together with guideline developers from the Knowledge Translation Unit (University of Cape Town collaborated with the Ministry of Health to develop the guideline. Stakeholder groups were set up to review specific content of the guideline to ensure compliance with Botswana government policy and the essential drug list.Results: Participants included clinicians, academics, patient advocacy groups, and policymakers from different disciplines, both private and public. Drug-related issues were identified as necessary for implementing recommendations of the guideline. There was consensus by working groups for updating the essential drug list for primary care and expansion of prescribing rights of trained nurse prescribers in primary care within their scope of practice. An integrated guideline incorporating common symptoms of diseases seen in the Botswana primary care setting was developed.Conclusion: The development of the BPCG took a broad consultative approach with buy in from relevant stakeholders. It is anticipated that implementation of the BPCG will translate into better

  15. [Critical issues in clinical practice guidelines for geriatric care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Ermellina

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia(BPSD) are one of the most disturbing issues in the management of patients, both for caregivers and health care personnel. Aim of this paper is to critically appraise the available guidelines on the non pharmacological management of BPSD. Some effective interventions such as person centred care, communication skills e dementia care mapping are not mentioned while interventions of dubious efficacy (aromatherapy, per therapy, light therapy or music therapy) are proposed. The variability in the expression of behavioral disorders and the different causes suggest an accurate tailoring of the interventions, based on the assessment of the patient, the organization and the environment. Further studies are necessary to improve the implementation of the non drug strategies for the management of BPSDs.

  16. Impact of different sedation protocols and perioperative procedures on patients admitted to the intensive care unit after maxillofacial tumor surgery of the lower jaw: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Tudor, Bianca; Krenn, Claus G; Roth, Georg A; Seemann, Rudolf

    2016-04-01

    Maxillofacial tumor surgery often necessitates prolonged invasive ventilation to prevent blockage of the respiratory tract. To tolerate ventilation, continuously administered sedatives are recommended. Half-time of sedative or analgesic medication is an important characteristic by which narcotic drugs are chosen, due to the fact that weaning period increases with half-time. The aim of our study was to investigate whether a change in sedation regimen would affect the length of invasive ventilation or intensive care unit stay and medical costs. Additionally, the impact of various surgical procedures was analyzed. Data of 157 patients after mandibular surgery were retrospectively analyzed over 5 years in count regression models. Of those patients, 84 received a sedation regimen with sufentanil and midazolam and 73 with remifentanil and propofol. The impact of the surgical procedures (tracheostomy, tumor resection, neck dissection and length of operation) and the patient age and sex were analyzed with respect to length of ventilation and ICU days. Cost savings were calculated. Our data show that patients receiving remifentanil/propofol had fewer ventilation days (2.5 ± 2.5 versus 6.1 ± 4.6 days, P < 0.001) and were discharged earlier from the intensive care unit than patients receiving sufentanil/midazolam (5.1 ± 3.8 versus 9.2 ± 6.2 days, P < 0.001), leading to calculated cost savings of about 8000 Euro per patient. Length of operation negatively influenced length of ICU stay (P < 0.001). In conclusion, short-acting drugs such as remifentanil/propofol, as well as tracheostoma and shortened surgery duration may reduce the postoperative need for invasive ventilation and length of intensive care unit stay.

  17. Sedation assessment using the Ramsay scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Rachel; von Fintel, Nicholas; Nairn, Stuart

    2010-06-01

    Patients undergoing sedation in emergency departments (EDs) must be monitored carefully to ensure that, when they are being transferred to different departments, they are safe and that information about them is accurate. However, sedation scoring, for which several tools are available, should not be confused with assessment of consciousness, which is undertaken using the Glasgow Coma Scale. This article considers the validity and reliability of sedation scoring tools, and discusses how ED staff can choose and integrate them into patient care pathways.

  18. ICU病人镇静治疗的护理对策%Nursing strategy of sedative therapy to intensive care units patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗杨; 洪蝶玫; 黄嘉佳

    2009-01-01

    To explore the nursing strategy of sedative therapy to intensive care units (ICU) patients. The clinical nursing of 197 ICU patients treated with midazolam or propofol were retrospectively summarized and analyzed, whose Sedation Scale scores were 1. After the treatment all indexes of 197 patients in respiration and circulation systerm were obviously improved. 197 patients had more compliance to the treatment and without unexpected extubation, endotracheal tube falling off and the comphcations such as bad memory and dyssemnia. The synthesis measures such as closely observing pafient's condition, enhancing clinical monitoring, promptly modulating the doses of sedatives and dealing with drug adverse reaction, carefully completing the whole mental nursing were the key points of ensuring safe sedative treating and less complications to ICU patients.%探讨ICU病人应用镇静治疗的护理对策.对2006年9月至2007年9月197例Ramsay评分标准1分的ICU病人应用咪唑安定或丙泊酚镇静治疗的临床护理行回顾性总结和分析.197例病人应用镇静治疗后呼吸和循环系统各项指标明显改善,病人能更好地配合治疗,无意外拔管和导管脱落,无不良记忆及睡眠障碍等并发症发生.严密观察病情、加强临床监护、及时调整镇静药物的剂量和处理药物不良反应、细致做好全程心理护理等综合措施,是保证ICU病人镇静治疗安全、减少并发症发生的关键.

  19. Attitudes toward guidelines in Finnish primary care nursing: a questionnaire survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seija, Alanen; Kaila, Minna; Välimäki, Marita

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence-based clinical guidelines have attracted international interest as tools for improving the quality of health care. Attitudes toward these guidelines are of great importance because attitudes are proven to be important predictors of guideline use. Attitudes are also believed...... as a reliable source of advice in patient care in Finnish primary care. It seems that implementation interventions improve attitudes toward guidelines and enhance guideline use. These interventions might also be important from another point of view; they presumably improve familiarity with guidelines, which...... to be shaped by perceptions of others, which makes the role of organizational implementation interventions interesting. AIMS: This article describes primary care nurses' attitudes toward guidelines among Finnish primary care nurses and the associations between attitudes, implementation interventions...

  20. [Guideline 'Medicinal care for drug addicts in penal institutions'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westra, Michel; de Haan, Hein A; Arends, Marleen T; van Everdingen, Jannes J E; Klazinga, Niek S

    2009-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the policy on care for prisoners who are addicted to opiates is still heterogeneous. The recent guidelines entitled 'Medicinal care for drug addicts in penal institutions' should contribute towards unambiguous and more evidence-based treatment for this group. In addition, it should improve and bring the care pathways within judicial institutions and mainstream healthcare more into line with one another. Each rational course of medicinal treatment will initially be continued in the penal institution. In penal institutions the help on offer is mainly focused on abstinence from illegal drugs while at the same time limiting the damage caused to the health of the individual user. Methadone is regarded at the first choice for maintenance therapy. For patient safety, this is best given in liquid form in sealed cups of 5 mg/ml once daily in the morning. Recently a combination preparation containing buprenorphine and naloxone - a complete opiate antagonist - has become available. On discontinuation of opiate maintenance treatment intensive follow-up care is necessary. During this period there is considerable risk of a potentially lethal overdose. Detoxification should be coupled with psychosocial or medicinal intervention aimed at preventing relapse. Naltrexone is currently the only available opiate antagonist for preventing relapse. In those addicted to opiates, who also take benzodiazepines without any indication, it is strongly recommended that these be reduced and discontinued. This can be achieved by converting the regular dosage into the equivalent in diazepam and then reducing this dosage by a maximum of 25% a week.

  1. Education guidelines for self-care living with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, B

    1983-03-01

    Educational processes for those with diabetes can occur in a variety of settings. Major problems in education and implementation of programs for this population continue to be discussed. Methods for assessing programs' effectiveness in establishing adherence to individual regimens are developing. Health care professionals have assumed that individuals who are better informed make better decisions. This assumption implies that exposure to a body of facts and opportunities to develop technical skills provide the necessary elements for self-care and thus responsibility for self-health-care. Until sufficient data either confirm or negate these assumptions, programs to develop these skills and knowledge will continue. Educational program planning should occur in a systematic way with the process of the learning experiences identified along with an evaluation of the outcome of the program objectives. This educational model described (SURVIVAL, HOME MANAGEMENT, and LIFE STYLE) provides a systematic method for developing educational programs in a variety of health care and community settings. Diabetes self-care programs can be evaluated for content, design, and process. Their outcome in terms of short-term health behavior skills can also be measured. The yet unanswered question remains: Do educational programs resulting in desirable individual behaviors (adherence) make a difference in the long-term effects, quality of life, and avoidance of disability in the diabetic population? The answers may come in the future through well controlled and defined evaluative research studies. The profession of dietetics is an important part of the future. Have we been effective in our counseling or educational endeavors and, if so, can that professional function be documented? Current economic trends are stimulating to cost-effective research. Although research studies to demonstrate such effectiveness are difficult to design, the current "Guidelines" provide a model for evaluating

  2. Comparison of sedation strategies for critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutton, Brian; Burry, Lisa D; Kanji, Salmaan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sedatives and analgesics are administered to provide sedation and manage agitation and pain in most critically ill mechanically ventilated patients. Various sedation administration strategies including protocolized sedation and daily sedation interruption are used to mitigate drug...... of interest include duration of mechanical ventilation, time to first extubation, ICU and hospital length of stay, re-intubation, tracheostomy, mortality, total sedative and opioid exposure, health-related quality of life, and adverse events. To inform our NMA, we will first conduct conventional pair......-wise meta-analyses using random-effects models. Where appropriate, we will perform Bayesian NMA using WinBUGS software. DISCUSSION: There are multiple strategies to optimize sedation for mechanically ventilated patients. Current ICU guidelines recommend protocolized sedation or daily sedation interruption...

  3. The use of sedation in the radiology department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patatas, K. [Radiology Academy, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); St James University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)], E-mail: kpatatas@hotmail.com; Koukkoulli, A. [St James University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-15

    The use of intravenous sedation and analgesia in patients undergoing interventional diagnostic and therapeutic procedures is increasing. Sedation by non-anaesthetists is considered to be safe, provided that they have received adequate training and have the necessary equipment, facilities, and personnel. This article aims to increase awareness of the safe use of sedative drugs in radiology and provide a practical guideline for minimal and moderate sedation.

  4. Quality Assurance in the Endoscopy Suite: Sedation and Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Zachary P; Liu, Julia; Saltzman, John R

    2016-07-01

    Recent development and expansion of endoscopy units has necessitated similar progress in the quality assurance of procedure sedation and monitoring. The large number of endoscopic procedures performed annually underlies the need for standardized quality initiatives focused on mitigating patient risk before, during, and immediately after endoscopic sedation, as well as improving procedure outcomes and patient satisfaction. Specific standards are needed for newer sedation modalities, including propofol administration. This article reviews the current guidelines and literature concerning quality assurance and endoscopic procedure sedation.

  5. Bispectral index monitoring in the management of sedation in an intensive care unit patient with locked-in syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quraishi, Sadeq A; Blosser, Sandralee A; Cherry, Robert A

    2011-11-01

    Locked-in syndrome is an extremely rare neurological state caused by injury of the ventral pons. The syndrome is characterized by quadriplegia and anarthria with concomitant preservation of cortical function. When a reversible underlying pathological abnormality is identified and managed aggressively, meaningful recovery is possible. Because patients retain consciousness throughout their illness, a dependable method for titrating sedation may improve their quality of life. The case presented suggests that bispectral index monitoring may be a cost-effective and reliable method for managing sedation in patients with locked-in syndrome.

  6. Conscious Sedation Procedures Using Intravenous Midazolam for Dental Care in Patients with Different Cognitive Profiles: A Prospective Study of Effectiveness and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Valérie; Faulks, Denise; Nicolas, Emmanuel; Hennequin, Martine

    2013-01-01

    The use of midazolam for dental care in patients with intellectual disability is poorly documented. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam in adults and children with intellectual disability (ID) compared to dentally anxious patients (DA). Ninety-eight patients with ID and 44 patients with DA programmed for intravenous midazolam participated in the study over 187 and 133 sessions, respectively. Evaluation criteria were success of dental treatment, cooperation level (modified Venham scale), and occurrence of adverse effects. The mean intravenous dose administered was 8.8±4.9 mg and 9.8±4.1 mg in ID and DA sessions respectively (t-test, NS). 50% N2O/O2 was administered during cannulation in 51% of ID sessions and 61% of DA sessions (NS, Fisher exact test). Oral or rectal midazolam premedication was administered for cannulation in 31% of ID sessions and 3% of DA sessions (p<0,001, Fisher exact test). Dental treatment was successful in 9 out of 10 sessions for both groups. Minor adverse effects occurred in 16.6% and 6.8% of ID and DA sessions respectively (p = 0.01, Fisher exact test). Patients with ID were more often very disturbed during cannulation (25.4% ID vs. 3.9% DA sessions) and were less often relaxed after induction (58.9% ID vs. 90.3% DA) and during dental treatment (39.5% ID vs. 59.7% DA) (p<0.001, Fisher exact test) than patients with DA. When midazolam sedation was repeated, cooperation improved for both groups. Conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam, with or without premedication and/or inhalation sedation (50% N2O/O2), were shown to be safe and effective in patients with intellectual disability when administered by dentists. PMID:23940729

  7. Conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam for dental care in patients with different cognitive profiles: a prospective study of effectiveness and safety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Collado

    Full Text Available The use of midazolam for dental care in patients with intellectual disability is poorly documented. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam in adults and children with intellectual disability (ID compared to dentally anxious patients (DA. Ninety-eight patients with ID and 44 patients with DA programmed for intravenous midazolam participated in the study over 187 and 133 sessions, respectively. Evaluation criteria were success of dental treatment, cooperation level (modified Venham scale, and occurrence of adverse effects. The mean intravenous dose administered was 8.8±4.9 mg and 9.8±4.1 mg in ID and DA sessions respectively (t-test, NS. 50% N₂O/O₂ was administered during cannulation in 51% of ID sessions and 61% of DA sessions (NS, Fisher exact test. Oral or rectal midazolam premedication was administered for cannulation in 31% of ID sessions and 3% of DA sessions (p<0,001, Fisher exact test. Dental treatment was successful in 9 out of 10 sessions for both groups. Minor adverse effects occurred in 16.6% and 6.8% of ID and DA sessions respectively (p = 0.01, Fisher exact test. Patients with ID were more often very disturbed during cannulation (25.4% ID vs. 3.9% DA sessions and were less often relaxed after induction (58.9% ID vs. 90.3% DA and during dental treatment (39.5% ID vs. 59.7% DA (p<0.001, Fisher exact test than patients with DA. When midazolam sedation was repeated, cooperation improved for both groups. Conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam, with or without premedication and/or inhalation sedation (50% N₂O/O₂, were shown to be safe and effective in patients with intellectual disability when administered by dentists.

  8. Conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam for dental care in patients with different cognitive profiles: a prospective study of effectiveness and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Valérie; Faulks, Denise; Nicolas, Emmanuel; Hennequin, Martine

    2013-01-01

    The use of midazolam for dental care in patients with intellectual disability is poorly documented. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam in adults and children with intellectual disability (ID) compared to dentally anxious patients (DA). Ninety-eight patients with ID and 44 patients with DA programmed for intravenous midazolam participated in the study over 187 and 133 sessions, respectively. Evaluation criteria were success of dental treatment, cooperation level (modified Venham scale), and occurrence of adverse effects. The mean intravenous dose administered was 8.8±4.9 mg and 9.8±4.1 mg in ID and DA sessions respectively (t-test, NS). 50% N₂O/O₂ was administered during cannulation in 51% of ID sessions and 61% of DA sessions (NS, Fisher exact test). Oral or rectal midazolam premedication was administered for cannulation in 31% of ID sessions and 3% of DA sessions (p<0,001, Fisher exact test). Dental treatment was successful in 9 out of 10 sessions for both groups. Minor adverse effects occurred in 16.6% and 6.8% of ID and DA sessions respectively (p = 0.01, Fisher exact test). Patients with ID were more often very disturbed during cannulation (25.4% ID vs. 3.9% DA sessions) and were less often relaxed after induction (58.9% ID vs. 90.3% DA) and during dental treatment (39.5% ID vs. 59.7% DA) (p<0.001, Fisher exact test) than patients with DA. When midazolam sedation was repeated, cooperation improved for both groups. Conscious sedation procedures using intravenous midazolam, with or without premedication and/or inhalation sedation (50% N₂O/O₂), were shown to be safe and effective in patients with intellectual disability when administered by dentists.

  9. Evidence-based primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: a comparative analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijnen, E.M. van; Paget, J.; Heijer, C.D. den; Stobberingh, E.E.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Europe, most antibiotics for human use are prescribed in primary care. Incorporating resistance data into treatment guidelines could improve appropriate prescribing, increase treatment effectiveness and control the development of resistance. OBJECTIVES: This study reviews primary care

  10. Evidence-based primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: a comparative analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijnen, E.M.E. van; Paget, J.; Heijer, C.D.J. den; Stobberingh, E.E.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In Europe, most antibiotics for human use are prescribed in primary care. Incorporating resistance data into treatment guidelines could improve appropriate prescribing, increase treatment effectiveness and control the development of resistance. Objectives: This study reviews primary care

  11. Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the American Cancer Society Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Lacchetti, Christina; Davis, Nancy B; Garvey, Thomas Q; Goldstein, David P; Nunnink, J Chris; Ninfea, Jose I Ruades; Salner, Andrew L; Salz, Talya; Siu, Lillian L

    2017-02-27

    Purpose This guideline provides recommendations on the management of adults after head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment, focusing on surveillance and screening for recurrence or second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, care coordination, and practice implications. Methods ASCO has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. The American Cancer Society (ACS) HNC Survivorship Care Guideline was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. An ASCO Expert Panel reviewed the content and recommendations, offering modifications and/or qualifying statements when deemed necessary. Results The ASCO Expert Panel determined that the ACS HNC Survivorship Care Guideline, published in 2016, is clear, thorough, clinically practical, and helpful, despite the limited availability of high-quality evidence to support many of the recommendations. ASCO endorsed the ACS HNC Survivorship Care Guideline, adding qualifying statements aimed at promoting team-based, multispecialty, multidisciplinary, collaborative head and neck survivorship care. Recommendations The ASCO Expert Panel emphasized that caring for HNC survivors requires a team-based approach that includes primary care clinicians, oncology specialists, otolaryngologists, dentists, and other allied professionals. The HNC treatment team should educate the primary care clinicians and patients about the type(s) of treatment received, the likelihood of potential recurrence, and the potential late and long-term complications. Primary care clinicians should recognize symptoms of recurrence and coordinate a prompt evaluation. They should also be prepared to manage late effects either directly or by referral to appropriate specialists. Health promotion is critical, particularly regarding tobacco cessation and dental care. Additional information is available at www

  12. Guidelines on anaemia : effect on primary-care midwives in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offerhaus, P; Fleuren, M; Wensing, M

    2005-01-01

    Objective: to assess the adherence and perceived barriers for implementation of a clinical-practice guideline on anaemia, which was the first national guideline for primary-care midwifery in The Netherlands. Design: cross-sectional survey study. Setting: primary-care midwifery in The Netherlands. Pa

  13. Guidelines on anaemia: effect on primary-care midwives in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offerhaus, P.M.; Fleuren, M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the adherence and perceived barriers for implementation of a clinical-practice guideline on anaemia, which was the first national guideline for primary-care midwifery in The Netherlands. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey study. SETTING: Primary-care midwifery in The Netherlands. PA

  14. [Position of guidelines under new law: consequences of new legislation on health care quality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legemaate, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Recent legislation in the Netherlands has led to the creation of an institute for health care quality ('Zorginstituut Nederland'). This institute maintains a public register of medical practice guidelines. The legislation does not influence the legal position of these guidelines, but may lead to problems with regard to the process of developing guidelines, and to the authority of the institute to accept guidelines without the full cooperation of the medical profession.

  15. Sedation and monitoring for gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amornyotin, Somchai

    2013-02-16

    The safe sedation of patients for diagnostic or therapeutic procedures requires a combination of properly trained physicians and suitable facilities. Additionally, appropriate selection and preparation of patients, suitable sedative technique, application of drugs, adequate monitoring, and proper recovery of patients is essential. The goal of procedural sedation is the safe and effective control of pain and anxiety as well as to provide an appropriate degree of memory loss or decreased awareness. Sedation practices for gastrointestinal endoscopy (GIE) vary widely. The majority of GIE patients are ambulatory cases. Most of this procedure requires a short time. So, short acting, rapid onset drugs with little adverse effects and improved safety profiles are commonly used. The present review focuses on commonly used regimens and monitoring practices in GIE sedation. This article is to discuss the decision making process used to determine appropriate pre-sedation assessment, monitoring, drug selection, dose of sedative agents, sedation endpoint and post-sedation care. It also reviews the current status of sedation and monitoring for GIE procedures in Thailand.

  16. Review on sedation for gastrointestinal tract endoscopy in children by non-anesthesiologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orel, Rok; Brecelj, Jernej; Dias, Jorge Amil; Romano, Claudio; Barros, Fernanda; Thomson, Mike; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To present evidence and formulate recommendations for sedation in pediatric gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy by non-anesthesiologists. METHODS: The databases MEDLINE, Cochrane and EMBASE were searched for the following keywords “endoscopy, GI”, “endoscopy, digestive system” AND “sedation”, “conscious sedation”, “moderate sedation”, “deep sedation” and “hypnotics and sedatives” for publications in English restricted to the pediatric age. We searched additional information published between January 2011 and January 2014. Searches for (upper) GI endoscopy sedation in pediatrics and sedation guidelines by non-anesthesiologists for the adult population were performed. RESULTS: From the available studies three sedation protocols are highlighted. Propofol, which seems to offer the best balance between efficacy and safety is rarely used by non-anesthesiologists mainly because of legal restrictions. Ketamine and a combination of a benzodiazepine and an opioid are more frequently used. Data regarding other sedatives, anesthetics and adjuvant medications used for pediatric GI endoscopy are also presented. CONCLUSION: General anesthesia by a multidisciplinary team led by an anesthesiologist is preferred. The creation of sedation teams led by non-anesthesiologists and a careful selection of anesthetic drugs may offer an alternative, but should be in line with national legislation and institutional regulations. PMID:26240691

  17. The importance of practice guidelines in clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciarra, Erica

    2012-01-01

    This position paper is a brief review of the importance of practice guidelines in clinical use. Emphasis is placed on evidence-based practice guidelines and research. This position paper attests to the importance of the use of guidelines that direct clinical nursing practice.

  18. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amornyotin, Somchai

    2013-11-16

    Sedation practices for gastrointestinal endoscopic (GIE) procedures vary widely in different countries depending on health system regulations and local circumstances. The goal of procedural sedation is the safe and effective control of pain and anxiety, as well as to provide an appropriate degree of memory loss or decreased awareness. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy, once occurred, can lead to significant morbidity and occasional mortality in patients. The risk factors of these complications include the type, dose and mode of administration of sedative agents, as well as the patient's age and underlying medical diseases. Complications attributed to moderate and deep sedation levels are more often associated with cardiovascular and respiratory systems. However, sedation-related complications during GIE procedures are commonly transient and of a mild degree. The risk for these complications while providing any level of sedation is greatest when caring for patients already medically compromised. Significant unwanted complications can generally be prevented by careful pre-procedure assessment and preparation, appropriate monitoring and support, as well as post-procedure management. Additionally, physicians must be prepared to manage these complications. This article will review sedation-related complications during moderate and deep sedation for GIE procedures and also address their appropriate management.

  19. [When guidelines are confronted with health care reality: purpose of guidelines from the perspective of a psychiatrist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönter, N

    2010-09-01

    The National Health Care guidelines on unipolar depression play a leading role regarding the multitude of players providing general care services, regarding scientific research and, last but not least, regarding common etiologic and therapeutic concepts as perceived by affected people and their relatives. In terms of health care, depression as a universal disorder comprises qualitative and quantitative aspects. For practicing neurologists/psychiatrists the guidelines provides many suggestions for different forms of treatment of the many kinds of depressive patients. When using a comprehensive approach, the criteria of evidence-based medicine are particularly important for practicing psychiatrists regarding the knowledge based on medical experience and patients preferences. It is important to point out that the hitherto fervently debated treatment dichotomy of psychotherapy versus pharmacotherapy is beginning to diminish. This is also reflected by the holistic perception of diseases and treatment approaches prevailing among established psychiatrists and the apparent development of health care quality towards individualized medicine.

  20. Key articles and guidelines relative to intensive care unit pharmacology--2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erstad, Brian L; Martin, Steven J; Brophy, Gretchen M; Haas, Curtis E; Jacobi, Judith; Welage, Lynda S; Thomas, Michael C

    2005-04-01

    Compilations of key articles and guidelines in a particular clinical practice area are useful not only to clinicians who practice in that area, but to all clinicians. We compiled pertinent articles and guidelines pertaining to drug therapy in the intensive care setting from the perspective of actively practicing critical care pharmacists. This document differs from the original 2002 version in that a broader assembly of intensive care practitioners was involved in the compilation.

  1. Key articles and guidelines relative to intensive care unit pharmacotherapy: 2009 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erstad, Brian L; Brophy, Gretchen M; Martin, Steven J; Haas, Curtis E; Devlin, John W; Welage, Lynda S; Dager, William E

    2009-10-01

    Compilations of key articles and guidelines in a particular clinical practice area are useful not only to clinicians who practice in that area, but also to all clinicians. We compiled pertinent articles and guidelines pertaining to drug therapy in the intensive care setting from the perspective of experienced critical care pharmacists. A broad assembly of practitioners with expertise in various areas of intensive care unit pharmacology were involved in the compilation of this update.

  2. Clinical study of midazolam sequential with dexmedetomidine for agitated patients undergoing weaning to implement light sedation in intensive care unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing Lu; Jun Li; Tong Li; Jie Zhang; Zhi-Bo Li; Xin-Jing Gao; Lei Xu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose:To evaluate midazolam sequential with dexmedetomidine for agitated patients undergoing weaning to implement light sedation in ICU.Methods:This randomized,prospective study was conducted in Tianjin Third Central Hospital,China.Using a sealed-envelope method,the patients were randomly divided into 2 groups (40 patients per group).Each patient of group A received an initial loading dose of midazolam at 0.3-3 mg/kg·h 24 h before extubation,followed by an infusion of dexmedetomidine at a rate of 0.2-1 μg/kg·h until extubation.Each patient of group B received midazolam at a dose of 0.3-3 mg/kg·h until extubation.The dose of sedation was regulated according to RASS sedative scores maintaining in the range of-2-1.All patients were continuously monitored for 60 min after extubation.During the course,heart rate (HR),mean artery pressure (MAP),extubation time,adverse reactions,ICU stay,and hospital stay were observed and recorded continuously at the following time points:24 h before extubation (T1),12 h before extubation (T2),extubation (T3),30 min after extubation (T4),60 min after extubation (T5).Results:Both groups reached the goal of sedation needed for ICU patients.Dexmedetomidine was associated with a significant increase in extubation quality compared with midazolam,reflected in the prevalence of delirium after extubation (20% (8/40) vs 45% (18/40)),respectively (p =0.017).There were no clinically significant decreases in HR and MAP after infusing dexmedetomidine or midazolam.In the group A,HR was not significantly increased after extubation;however,in the group B,HR was significantly increased compared with the preextubation values (p < 0.05).HR was significantly higher in the group B compared with the group A at 30 and 60 main after extubation (both,p < 0.05).Compared with preextubation values,MAP was significantly increased at extubation in the group B (p < 0.05) and MAP was significantly higher at T3,T4,T5 in the group B than group A (p < 0

  3. Guidelines across the health and social care divides: the example of the NICE-SCIE dementia guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Nick

    2011-08-01

    Increasingly, mental health services are delivered through multidisciplinary teams and settings. This creates particular challenges for the development of evidence-based practice guidelines when different professional groups represented within teams might have different traditions and cultures in relation to what counts as 'evidence', and how that might be synthesized to produce guidance that supports best practice across professional divides. These challenges are explored in relation to integration between health and social care services, where social work in particular has traditionally expressed scepticism about guideline development where it does not incorporate knowledge drawn from qualitative research and perspectives of stakeholders such as service users and carers. This article takes the NICE-SCIE guideline on dementia care as an exemplar of how an integrated process of guideline development can deliver guidance for best practice across integrated mental health services. Finally, some of the issues still facing inter-professional guideline development are considered, and pointers given to eclectic approaches that are beginning to emerge from within social work.

  4. The World Health Organization Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Health Care and their consensus recommendations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pittet, D.; Allegranzi, B.; Boyce, J.; Voss, A.

    2009-01-01

    The World Health Organization's Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Health Care have been issued by WHO Patient Safety on 5 May 2009 on the occasion of the launch of the Save Lives: Clean Your Hands initiative. The Guidelines represent the contribution of more than 100 international experts and provide a

  5. Pre-implementation guidelines for infectious disease point-of-care testing in medical institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A. Eijck (Annemiek); A. Tintu (Andrei); J.P. Hays (John)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractInfectious disease point-of-care test (ID-POCT) devices are becoming widely available, and in this respect, international quality standards and guidelines are available for consultation once ID-POCT has been implemented into medical institutions. However, specific guidelines for consulta

  6. Danish Guidelines 2015 for percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy in the Intensive Care Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbæk; Guldager, Henrik; Rewers, Mikael;

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy is a common procedure in intensive care. This updated Danish national guideline describes indications, contraindications and complications, and gives recommendations for timing, anaesthesia, and technique, use of fibre bronchoscopy and ultrasound guidance...

  7. [Update on current care guidelines: urinary tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuorela, Maarit; Kouri, Timo; Laato, Matti; Lipponen, Pertti; Sammalkorpi, Kari; Uhari, Matti; Uusitalo, Leena; Vuento, Risto

    2011-01-01

    This guideline is focused on the diagnostics and treatment of acute, recurrent and relapsing urinary tract infections in adults and children. Sexually transmitted diseases are not addressed, but must be considered in differential diagnostics. The resistance prevalence of the causative microbes and the ecological adverse effects of antimicrobial agents were considered important factors in selecting optimal therapeutic choices for the guideline. Diagnosis and management of cystitis in otherwise healthy women aged 18-65 years can be based on structured telephone interviews. Primary antimicrobiotic drugs are nitrofurantoin, pivmesillinam and trimetoprim for three days.

  8. Implementing Bright Futures guidelines for well-child care in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Jane Meschan

    2013-01-01

    The Bright Futures guidelines published by the American Academy of Pediatrics offer a comprehensive agenda for improving the health of people from birth to age 21 years. The guidelines are the culmination of a century of multidisciplinary, multiorganizational efforts in the United States to prevent illness and promote health in children and adolescents, and, in turn, the adults they become. Regulations interpreting the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) specifically state that group health plans must, at a minimum, provide coverage for the preventive services recommended in the Bright Futures guidelines. Thus the ACA will be an impetus for implementation of the guidelines. This issue brief describes the genesis, history, and development of the guidelines. In addition, it briefly touches on each of the commentaries and other articles contained in this issue of the NCMJ dedicated to the implementation of Bright Futures guidelines.

  9. Guidelines for Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy (PDT) from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine (DSIT) and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DASAIM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbæk; Guldager, Henrik; Rewers, Mikael;

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy is a common procedure in intensive care. This guideline from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine (DSIT) and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DASAIM) describes indications and contraindications, timing, complications...

  10. Comparison of the Adherence to the American Diabetes Association Guidelines of Diabetes Care in Primary Care and Subspecialty Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is a major public health problem with significant morbidity and mortality. Evidence based guidelines have been proposed to reduce the micro and macrovascular complications, but studies have shown that these goals are not being met. We sought to compare the adherence to the American Diabetes Association guidelines for measurement and control of glycohemoglobin (A1c), blood pressure (BP), lipids (LDL) and microalbuminuria (MA) by subspecialty and primary care clinic...

  11. Implementing clinical guidelines for nutrition in a neurosurgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annette, Hansson; Wenström, Yvonne

    2005-12-01

    Patients in neurosurgical intensive care have individual needs concerning nutrition because of their conditions. An important therapeutic goal is to prevent the development of malnutrition as it contributes to an increase in mortality and enhances the risk of complications in these patients. The health-care team has a mutual responsibility for this, although it is a complex task and a correct assessment of patients' nutritional needs is vital. Multidisciplinary clinical guidelines focused on nutrition might help the health-care staff in decision-making and allowing individualized treatment for patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the implementation and use of such a guideline. The results show that the guideline is used in varying degrees by the health-care team. Areas that focused on more practical aspects of nutritional support seemed to have a unified approach, whereas areas on nutritional assessment and routine nutrition orders demonstrated both a lack of knowledge and unclear role responsibilities. The results reveal how different professional groups in health care perceive the implementation of a clinical guideline. Some areas need further clarification, there needs to be continuing development of nutritional guidelines, and education of staff is needed in order to enhance the nutritional care of patients.

  12. Initial impact of the acute otitis externa clinical practice guideline on clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Neil; Kepnes, Lynn J

    2011-09-01

    Objectives. Determine the influence of the acute otitis externa clinical practice guideline on clinical care. Study Design. Cross-sectional study with historical controls. Setting. Outpatient departments in the United States. Methods. Cases of acute otitis externa occurring in 2004-2005 (before guideline publication) and 2007-2008 (after guideline publication) were extracted from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Care Survey. Prescribing rates for ototopical medications, analgesic recommendations, and oral antibiotics were determined and compared before and after guideline publication and relative to guideline recommendations. Results. An estimated 5.50 (standard error of the estimated mean, 0.38) million visits (mean age, 27.7 [1.7] years; 49.8% male) with a primary and singular coded diagnosis of acute otitis externa were studied (2.64 [0.26] million visits for 2004-2005 and 2.86 [0.28] million visits for 2007-2008). Prescribing rates for ototopical preparations were 67.2% (5.3%) and 67.6% (5.0%) before and after guideline publication, respectively (P = .955). Recommendation rates for analgesics were 14.2% (3.3%) and 20.6% (3.9%), respectively (P = .248). Prescription rates for oral antibiotics were 21.7% (4.8%) and 30.5% (3.6%), before and after, respectively (P = .166). Conclusion. Clinician behavior in the medical treatment of acute otitis externa has not significantly changed after guideline publication, despite clear, evidence-based guideline recommendations. These data have important implications for performance measures based on the guideline. Further efforts toward guideline dissemination are likely needed.

  13. Level of Discomfort Decreases After the Administration of Continuous Palliative Sedation: A Prospective Multicenter Study in Hospices and Palliative Care Units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deijck, R.H.P.D. van; Hasselaar, J.G.J.; Verhagen, S.; Vissers, K.C.P.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: A gold standard or validated tool for monitoring the level of discomfort during continuous palliative sedation (CPS) is lacking. Therefore, little is known about the course of discomfort in sedated patients, the efficacy of CPS, and the determinants of discomfort during CPS. OBJECTIVES: To

  14. Clinical guidelines, clinical pathways and protocols of care

    OpenAIRE

    Angélica Román

    2012-01-01

    The article points out that the importance of standardization of clinical practices has been established in clinical management, which helps solve the problems of variability by developing documents based on the available scientific evidence. The article claims that healthcare culture has increasingly recognized the importance of standardization of clinical practices and provides a conceptual difference between clinical practice guidelines, protocols and algorithms. Clinical pathways and clin...

  15. Danish national sedation strategy. Targeted therapy of discomfort associated with critical illness. Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine (DSIT) and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DASAIM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonsmark, Lise; Hein, Lars; Nibroe, Helle;

    2015-01-01

    should be to focus on the reversible causes of agitation, such as: pain, anxiety, delirium, dyspnea, withdrawal symptoms, sleep or gastrointestinal symptoms. If sedation is used a validated sedation scale is recommended. On a daily basis sedation should be interrupted and only restarted after a thorough...

  16. Sedation for Esophagogastroduodenal Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayfun Aydin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Different anesthetic techniques and drugs can be used for esophagogastroduedonal endoscopy. However, the scientists are still searching for appropriate drugs and protocols for sedation during esophagogastroduedonal endoscopy. The aim of this review is to discuss the topics related with sedation and esophagogastroduedonal endoscopy in the light of literature. Today standard procedure for diagnostic esophagogastroduedonal endoscopy usually consists of topical pharyngeal anesthesia, minimal sedation or anxiolysis, which may be complemented with analgesia when needed. When a prolonged, complex, or particularly troublesome or painful examination is foreseen, deeper sedation with multiple drugs and in closed observation of a staff may be required.

  17. Benzodiazepines: Sedation and Agitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Dental anxiety is common and frequently poses a barrier to necessary dental treatment. The increasing availability of conscious sedation in dental practice has made treatment much more accessible for anxious patients. At present, benzodiazepines are the most commonly used drugs in sedation practice and provide a pleasant experience for most, but not all, patients. An understanding of the mechanism of action of benzodiazepines should inform our practice and deepen our understanding of why and how sedation may fail. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: As an increasing number of dentists provide sedation for their patients an update on benzodiazepines is timely.

  18. 咪达唑仑用于重症监护患者镇静的效果评价%Efficacy Evaluation of Midazolam for Sedation in Intensive Care Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    娄林娟

    2013-01-01

    目的 观察咪达唑仑在重症监护患者中的镇静效果.方法 选择2010年1月至2011年12月收治的重症监护患者100例,给予药物镇静治疗,将患者随机分成两组,各50例.对照组给予异丙酚镇静治疗,治疗组给予咪达唑仑镇静治疗,观察两组患者镇静起效时间、达到满意深度时间、苏醒时间及镇静前后与镇静期间心率、平均动脉压、脉搏氧饱和度变化.结果 治疗组镇静起效时间、达到满意深度时间、苏醒时间与对照组相比,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);治疗组心率、平均动脉压、脉搏氧饱和度变化小于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 咪达唑仑对重症监护患者有较好的镇静效果,对心血管及呼吸循环抑制轻微,是重症监护患者理想的镇静剂.%Objective To investigate the sedative effect of midazolam for intensive care patients. Methods A hundred cases intensive care patients in our hospital from 2010 to 2011 were gaven the drug sedation, these patients were randomly divided into two groups, each group had 50 cases, the control group was given propofol sedation, the treatment group were gaven the microphone to midazolam sedation, the sedation onset time, satisfactory depth of time, recovery time, and calm before and after the sedation during the heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, pulse oxygen saturation of two groups of patients were observed. Results The sedation onset time, achieve satisfactory depth of time, wake time difference of treatment group was statistically significant (P < 0. 05) compared with control group; the heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, pulse oxygen saturation of treatment group was less than the control group, the difference had statistically significant ( P < 0. 05). Conclusion The microphone midazolam sedation in intensive care patients have a better effect, a slight inhibition on cardiovascular, respiratory and circulatory, it s ideal sedative for intensive

  19. The Association of Shelter Veterinarians' 2016 Veterinary Medical Care Guidelines for Spay-Neuter Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Brenda; Bushby, Philip A; McCobb, Emily; White, Sara C; Rigdon-Brestle, Y Karla; Appel, Leslie D; Makolinski, Kathleen V; Wilford, Christine L; Bohling, Mark W; Eddlestone, Susan M; Farrell, Kelly A; Ferguson, Nancy; Harrison, Kelly; Howe, Lisa M; Isaza, Natalie M; Levy, Julie K; Looney, Andrea; Moyer, Michael R; Robertson, Sheilah Ann; Tyson, Kathy

    2016-07-15

    As community efforts to reduce the overpopulation and euthanasia of unwanted and unowned cats and dogs have increased, many veterinarians have increasingly focused their clinical efforts on the provision of spay-neuter services. Because of the wide range of geographic and demographic needs, a wide variety of spay-neuter programs have been developed to increase delivery of services to targeted populations of animals, including stationary and mobile clinics, MASH-style operations, shelter services, community cat programs, and services provided through private practitioners. In an effort to promote consistent, high-quality care across the broad range of these programs, the Association of Shelter Veterinarians convened a task force of veterinarians to develop veterinary medical care guidelines for spay-neuter programs. These guidelines consist of recommendations for general patient care and clinical procedures, preoperative care, anesthetic management, surgical procedures, postoperative care, and operations management. They were based on current principles of anesthesiology, critical care medicine, infection control, and surgical practice, as determined from published evidence and expert opinion. They represent acceptable practices that are attainable in spay-neuter programs regardless of location, facility, or type of program. The Association of Shelter Veterinarians envisions that these guidelines will be used by the profession to maintain consistent veterinary medical care in all settings where spay-neuter services are provided and to promote these services as a means of reducing sheltering and euthanasia of cats and dogs.

  20. Integration of Palliative Care Into Standard Oncology Care: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Betty R; Temel, Jennifer S; Temin, Sarah; Alesi, Erin R; Balboni, Tracy A; Basch, Ethan M; Firn, Janice I; Paice, Judith A; Peppercorn, Jeffrey M; Phillips, Tanyanika; Stovall, Ellen L; Zimmermann, Camilla; Smith, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To provide evidence-based recommendations to oncology clinicians, patients, family and friend caregivers, and palliative care specialists to update the 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) provisional clinical opinion (PCO) on the integration of palliative care into standard oncology care for all patients diagnosed with cancer. Methods ASCO convened an Expert Panel of members of the ASCO Ad Hoc Palliative Care Expert Panel to develop an update. The 2012 PCO was based on a review of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) by the National Cancer Institute Physicians Data Query and additional trials. The panel conducted an updated systematic review seeking randomized clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses, as well as secondary analyses of RCTs in the 2012 PCO, published from March 2010 to January 2016. Results The guideline update reflects changes in evidence since the previous guideline. Nine RCTs, one quasiexperimental trial, and five secondary analyses from RCTs in the 2012 PCO on providing palliative care services to patients with cancer and/or their caregivers, including family caregivers, were found to inform the update. Recommendations Inpatients and outpatients with advanced cancer should receive dedicated palliative care services, early in the disease course, concurrent with active treatment. Referral of patients to interdisciplinary palliative care teams is optimal, and services may complement existing programs. Providers may refer family and friend caregivers of patients with early or advanced cancer to palliative care services.

  1. Sedation protocols versus daily sedation interruption: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar Junior, Antonio Paulo; Park, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to systematically review studies that compared a mild target sedation protocol with daily sedation interruption and to perform a meta-analysis with the data presented in these studies. Methods We searched Medline, Scopus and Web of Science databases to identify randomized clinical trials comparing sedation protocols with daily sedation interruption in critically ill patients requiring mechanical ventilation. The primary outcome was mortality in the intensive care unit. Results Seven studies were included, with a total of 892 patients. Mortality in the intensive care unit did not differ between the sedation protocol and daily sedation interruption groups (odds ratio [OR] = 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.60 - 1.10; I2 = 0%). Hospital mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit and hospital length of stay did not differ between the groups either. Sedation protocols were associated with an increase in the number of days free of mechanical ventilation (mean difference = 6.70 days; 95%CI 1.09 - 12.31 days; I2 = 87.2%) and a shorter duration of hospital length of stay (mean difference = -5.05 days, 95%CI -9.98 - -0.11 days; I2 = 69%). There were no differences in regard to accidental extubation, extubation failure and the occurrence of delirium. Conclusion Sedation protocols and daily sedation interruption do not appear to differ in regard to the majority of analyzed outcomes. The only differences found were small and had a high degree of heterogeneity. PMID:28099642

  2. Client Factors Affect Provider Adherence to Clinical Guidelines during First Antenatal Care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Amoakoh-Coleman

    Full Text Available The first antenatal clinic (ANC visit helps to distinguish pregnant women who require standard care, from those with specific problems and so require special attention. There are protocols to guide care providers to provide optimal care to women during ANC. Our objectives were to determine the level of provider adherence to first antenatal visit guidelines in the Safe Motherhood Protocol (SMP, and assess patient factors that determine complete provider adherence.This cross-sectional study is part of a cohort study that recruited women who delivered in eleven health facilities and who had utilized antenatal care services during their pregnancy in the Greater Accra region of Ghana. A record review of the first antenatal visit of participants was carried out to assess the level of adherence to the SMP, using a thirteen-point checklist. Information on their socio-demographic characteristics and previous pregnancy history was collected using a questionnaire. Percentages of adherence levels and baseline characteristics were estimated and cluster-adjusted odds ratios (OR calculated to identify determinants.A total of 948 women who had delivered in eleven public facilities were recruited with a mean age (SD of 28.2 (5.4 years. Overall, complete adherence to guidelines pertained to only 48.1% of pregnant women. Providers were significantly more likely to completely adhere to guidelines when caring for multiparous women [OR = 5.43 (1.69-17.44, p<0.01] but less likely to do so when attending to women with history of previous pregnancy complications [OR = 0.50 (0.33-0.75, p<0.01].Complete provider adherence to first antenatal visit guidelines is low across different facility types in the Greater Accra region of Ghana and is determined by parity and history of previous pregnancy complication. Providers should be trained and supported to adhere to the guidelines during provision of care to all pregnant women.

  3. The Association of Shelter Veterinarians veterinary medical care guidelines for spay-neuter programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, Andrea L; Bohling, Mark W; Bushby, Philip A; Howe, Lisa M; Griffin, Brenda; Levy, Julie K; Eddlestone, Susan M; Weedon, James R; Appel, Leslie D; Rigdon-Brestle, Y Karla; Ferguson, Nancy J; Sweeney, David J; Tyson, Kathy A; Voors, Adriana H; White, Sara C; Wilford, Christine L; Farrell, Kelly A; Jefferson, Ellen P; Moyer, Michael R; Newbury, Sandra P; Saxton, Melissa A; Scarlett, Janet M

    2008-07-01

    As efforts to reduce the overpopulation and euthanasia of unwanted and unowned dogs and cats have increased, greater attention has been focused on spay-neuter programs throughout the United States. Because of the wide range of geographic and demographic needs, a wide variety of programs have been developed to increase delivery of spay-neuter services to targeted populations of animals, including stationary and mobile clinics, MASH-style operations, shelter services, feral cat programs, and services provided through private practitioners. In an effort to ensure a consistent level of care, the Association of Shelter Veterinarians convened a task force of veterinarians to develop veterinary medical care guidelines for spay-neuter programs. The guidelines consist of recommendations for preoperative care (eg, patient transport and housing, patient selection, client communication, record keeping, and medical considerations), anesthetic management (eg, equipment, monitoring, perioperative considerations, anesthetic protocols, and emergency preparedness), surgical care (eg, operating-area environment; surgical-pack preparation; patient preparation; surgeon preparation; surgical procedures for pediatric, juvenile, and adult patients; and identification of neutered animals), and postoperative care (eg, analgesia, recovery, and release). These guidelines are based on current principles of anesthesiology, critical care medicine, microbiology, and surgical practice, as determined from published evidence and expert opinion. They represent acceptable practices that are attainable in spay-neuter programs.

  4. S3 guidelines for intensive care in cardiac surgery patients: hemodynamic monitoring and cardiocirculary system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, M; Alms, A; Braun, J; Dongas, A; Erb, J; Goetz, A; Goepfert, M; Gogarten, W; Grosse, J; Heller, A R; Heringlake, M; Kastrup, M; Kroener, A; Loer, S A; Marggraf, G; Markewitz, A; Reuter, D; Schmitt, D V; Schirmer, U; Wiesenack, C; Zwissler, B; Spies, C

    2010-06-15

    Hemodynamic monitoring and adequate volume-therapy, as well as the treatment with positive inotropic drugs and vasopressors are the basic principles of the postoperative intensive care treatment of patient after cardiothoracic surgery. The goal of these S3 guidelines is to evaluate the recommendations in regard to evidence based medicine and to define therapy goals for monitoring and therapy. In context with the clinical situation the evaluation of the different hemodynamic parameters allows the development of a therapeutic concept and the definition of goal criteria to evaluate the effect of treatment. Up to now there are only guidelines for subareas of postoperative treatment of cardiothoracic surgical patients, like the use of a pulmonary artery catheter or the transesophageal echocardiography. The German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Thorax-, Herz- und Gefässchirurgie, DGTHG) and the German Society for Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Anästhesiologie und lntensivmedizin, DGAI) made an approach to ensure and improve the quality of the postoperative intensive care medicine after cardiothoracic surgery by the development of S3 consensus-based treatment guidelines. Goal of this guideline is to assess the available monitoring methods with regard to indication, procedures, predication, limits, contraindications and risks for use. The differentiated therapy of volume-replacement, positive inotropic support and vasoactive drugs, the therapy with vasodilatators, inodilatators and calcium sensitizers and the use of intra-aortic balloon pumps will also be addressed. The guideline has been developed following the recommendations for the development of guidelines by the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF). The presented key messages of the guidelines were approved after two consensus meetings under the moderation of the Association of the Scientific Medical

  5. S3 guidelines for intensive care in cardiac surgery patients: hemodynamic monitoring and cardiocirculary system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitt, D. V.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemodynamic monitoring and adequate volume-therapy, as well as the treatment with positive inotropic drugs and vasopressors are the basic principles of the postoperative intensive care treatment of patient after cardiothoracic surgery. The goal of these S3 guidelines is to evaluate the recommendations in regard to evidence based medicine and to define therapy goals for monitoring and therapy. In context with the clinical situation the evaluation of the different hemodynamic parameters allows the development of a therapeutic concept and the definition of goal criteria to evaluate the effect of treatment. Up to now there are only guidelines for subareas of postoperative treatment of cardiothoracic surgical patients, like the use of a pulmonary artery catheter or the transesophageal echocardiography. The German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Thorax-, Herz- und Gefäßchirurgie, DGTHG and the German Society for Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Anästhesiologie und lntensivmedizin, DGAI made an approach to ensure and improve the quality of the postoperative intensive care medicine after cardiothoracic surgery by the development of S3 consensus-based treatment guidelines. Goal of this guideline is to assess the available monitoring methods with regard to indication, procedures, predication, limits, contraindications and risks for use. The differentiated therapy of volume-replacement, positive inotropic support and vasoactive drugs, the therapy with vasodilatators, inodilatators and calcium sensitizers and the use of intra-aortic balloon pumps will also be addressed. The guideline has been developed following the recommendations for the development of guidelines by the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF. The presented key messages of the guidelines were approved after two consensus meetings under the moderation of the Association of the

  6. Total quality in acute care hospitals: guidelines for hospital managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holthof, B

    1991-08-01

    Quality improvement can not focus exclusively on peer review and the scientific evaluation of medical care processes. These essential elements have to be complemented with a focus on individual patient needs and preferences. Only then will hospitals create the competitive advantage needed to survive in an increasingly market-driven hospital industry. Hospital managers can identify these patients' needs by 'living the patient experience' and should then set the hospital's quality objectives according to its target patients and their needs. Excellent quality program design, however, is not sufficient. Successful implementation of a quality improvement program further requires fundamental changes in pivotal jobholders' behavior and mindset and in the supporting organizational design elements.

  7. [Dutch Institute for Health Care Improvement revised guideline, 'Sexually transmitted diseases and neonatal herpes'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleker, O.P.; Meijden, W.I. van der; Wittenberg, J.; Bergen, J.E. van; Boeke, A.J.; Doornum, G.J.J. van; Henquet, C.J.; Galama, J.M.D.; Postma, M.J.; Prins, J.M.; Voorst Vader, P.C. van

    2003-01-01

    The Dutch Institute for Health Care Improvement revised guideline, 'Sexually transmitted diseases and neonatal herpes' summarises the current scientific position on the diagnosis and treatment of a great number of sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and neonatal herpes. Symptomatic treatment of susp

  8. Guidelines to facilitate self-care among older persons in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinda Rabie

    2015-06-01

    Implications for practice: The implementation of the self-care guidelines by the public health sector, professional nurses and older persons will improve the healthcare of older persons at home which will in turn improve their quality of life, reduce unintentional self-neglect, as well as assist in alleviating overcrowding in clinics because unnecessary visits to the clinic will drop.

  9. Anxiolytics, sedatives and hypnotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Absalom, Anthony; Adapa, R. M.

    2007-01-01

    Anxiolytics and sedatives are used in current anaesthetic practice for anxiolysis before surgery and as adjuvants during anaesthesia. The safety profile of these agents depends on their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles, patient comorbidity and the experience of the clinician. Sedative dr

  10. Provider adherence to first antenatal care guidelines and risk of pregnancy complications in public sector facilities : a Ghanaian cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amoakoh-Coleman, Mary; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Agyepong, Irene Akua; Kayode, Gbenga A; Grobbee, Diederick E; Ansah, Evelyn K

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guideline utilization aims at improvement in quality of care and better health outcomes. The objective of the current study was to determine the effect of provider complete adherence to the first antenatal care guidelines on the risk of maternal and neonatal complications in a low resour

  11. Bispectral index as a predictor of sedation depth during isoflurane or midazolam sedation in ICU patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackey, P V; Radell, P J; Granath, F; Martling, C R

    2007-06-01

    Bispectral index (BIS) is used for monitoring anaesthetic depth with inhaled anaesthetic agents in the operating room but has not been evaluated as a monitor of sedation depth in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting with these agents. If BIS could predict sedation depth in ICU patients, patient disturbances could be reduced and oversedation avoided. Twenty ventilator-dependent ICU patients aged 27 to 80 years were randomised to sedation with isoflurane via the AnaConDa or intravenous midazolam. BIS (A-2000 XP, version 3.12), electromyogram activity (EMG) and Signal Quality Index were measured continuously. Hourly clinical evaluation of sedation depth according to Bloomsbury Sedation Score (Bloomsbury) was performed. The median BIS value during a 10-minute interval prior to the clinical evaluation at the bedside was compared with Bloomsbury. Nurses performing the clinical sedation scoring were blinded to the BIS values. End-tidal isoflurane concentration was measured and compared with Bloomsbury. Correlation was poor between BIS and Bloomsbury in both groups (Spearman's rho 0.012 in the isoflurane group and -0.057 in the midazolam group). Strong correlation was found between BIS and EMG (Spearman's rho 0.74). Significant correlation was found between end-tidal isoflurane concentration and Bloomsbury (Spearman's rho 0.47). In conclusion, BIS XP does not reliably predict sedation depth as measured by clinical evaluation in non-paralysed ICU patients sedated with isoflurane or midazolam. EMG contributes significantly to BIS values in isoflurane or midazolam sedated, non-paralysed ICU patients. End-tidal isoflurane concentration appeared to be a better indicator of clinical sedation depth than BIS.

  12. Guidelines for a palliative approach for aged care in the community setting: a suite of resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Currow

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn Australia, many people ageing in their own homes are becoming increasingly frail and unwell, approaching the end of life. A palliative approach, which adheres to palliative care principles, is often appropriate. These principles provide a framework for proactive and holistic care in which quality of life and of dying is prioritised, as is support for families. A palliative approach can be delivered by the general practitioner working with the community aged care team, in collaboration with family carers. Support from specialist palliative care services is available if necessary. The Guidelines for a Palliative Approach for Aged Care in the Community Setting were published by the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing to inform practice in this area. There are three resource documents. The main document provides practical evidence based guidelines, good practice points, tools, and links to resources. This document is written for general practitioners, nurses, social workers, therapists, pastoral care workers, and other health professionals and responded to needs identified during national consultation. Evidence based guidelines were underpinned by systematic reviews of the research literature. Good practice points were developed from literature reviews and expert opinion. Two ‘plain English’ booklets were developed in a process involving consumer consultation; one is for older people and their families, the other for care workers. The resources are intended to facilitate home care that acknowledges and plans for the client’s deteriorating functional trajectory and inevitable death. At a time when hospitals and residential aged care facilities are under enormous pressure as the population ages, such a planned approach makes sense for the health system as a whole. The approach also makes sense for older people who wish to die in their own homes. Family needs are recognised and addressed. Unnecessary hospitalisations

  13. Atrial fibrillation in a primary care population: how close to NICE guidelines are we?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Loo, Bryan

    2009-06-01

    The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines for the management of atrial fibrillation were published in June 2006. It was anticipated that they would potentially lead to increased demand for echocardiography (ECHO), increased access to secondary care services (for example for cardioversion), and require additional resources for monitoring anticoagulation. A primary care survey was therefore initiated in South Devon, in advance of publication of the guidelines as a snapshot of existing practice, to determine any additional resources and education required to meet the new standards. The main aim was to determine what proportion of patients were managed exclusively in primary care, how frequently patients were investigated by ECHO and whether anticoagulation was being appropriately targeted at patients at high risk of thromboembolic events.

  14. Prolonged infusion of sedatives and analgesics in adult intensive care patients: A systematic review of pharmacokinetic data reporting and quality of evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Andrew H W; Ling, Lowell; Joynt, Gavin M; Lee, Anna

    2017-03-01

    Although pharmacokinetic (PK) data for prolonged sedative and analgesic agents in intensive care unit (ICU) has been described, the number of publications in this important area appear relatively few, and PK data presented is not comprehensive. Known pathophysiological changes in critically ill patients result in altered drug PK when compared with non-critically ill patients. ClinPK Statement was recently developed to promote consistent reporting in PK studies, however, its applicability to ICU specific PK studies is unclear. In this systematic review, we assessed the overall ClinPK Statement compliance rate, determined the factors affecting compliance rate, graded the level of PK evidence and assessed the applicability of the ClinPK Statement to future ICU PK studies. Of the 33 included studies (n=2016), 22 (67%) were low evidence quality descriptive studies (Level 4). Included studies had a median compliance rate of 80% (IQR 66% to 86%) against the ClinPK Statement. Overall pooled compliance rate (78%, 95% CI 73% to 83%) was stable across time (P=0.38), with higher compliance rates found in studies fitting three compartments models (88%, P<0.01), two compartments models (83%, P<0.01) and one compartment models (77%, P=0.17) than studies fitting noncompartmental or unspecified models (69%) (P<0.01). Data unique to the interpretation of PK data in critically ill patients, such as illness severity (48%), organ dysfunction (36%) and renal replacement therapy use (32%), were infrequently reported. Discrepancy between the general compliance rate with ClinPK Statement and the under-reporting of ICU specific parameters suggests that the applicability of the ClinPK Statement to ICU PK studies may be limited in its current form.

  15. Guidelines of care for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: Section 1. Overview of psoriasis and guidelines of care for the treatment of psoriasis with biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menter, Alan; Gottlieb, Alice; Feldman, Steven R; Van Voorhees, Abby S; Leonardi, Craig L; Gordon, Kenneth B; Lebwohl, Mark; Koo, John Y M; Elmets, Craig A; Korman, Neil J; Beutner, Karl R; Bhushan, Reva

    2008-05-01

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease with predominantly skin and joint manifestations affecting approximately 2% of the population. In this first of 5 sections of the guidelines of care for psoriasis, we discuss the classification of psoriasis; associated comorbidities including autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular risk, psychiatric/psychologic issues, and cancer risk; along with assessment tools for skin disease and quality-of-life issues. Finally, we will discuss the safety and efficacy of the biologic treatments used to treat patients with psoriasis.

  16. Intention, procedure, outcome and personhood in palliative sedation and euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materstvedt, Lars Johan

    2012-03-01

    Palliative sedation at the end of life has become an important last-resort treatment strategy for managing refractory symptoms as well as a topic of controversy within palliative care. Furthermore, palliative sedation is prominent in the public debate about the possible legalisation of voluntary assisted dying (physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia). This article attempts to demonstrate that palliative sedation is fundamentally different from euthanasia when it comes to intention, procedure, outcome and the status of the person. Nonetheless, palliative sedation in its most radical form of terminal deep sedation parallels euthanasia in one respect: both end the experience of suffering. However, only the latter intentionally ends life and also has this as its goal. There is the danger that deep sedation could bring death forward in time due to particular side effects of the treatment. Still that would, if it happens, not be intended, and accordingly is defensible in view of the doctrine of double effect.

  17. Inclusion of palliative care in Indian undergraduate physiotherapy curriculum-course guidelines and content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubia Veqar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the guidelines published by the WHO in 2010, palliative care has been defined as “an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial, and spiritual.” Intervention provided as a part of the palliative care has to be by health professionals who strictly work as a part of the multidisciplinary team and have been specifically trained to an optimal level of competency in the field. Two key problem areas in palliative care which a physiotherapist deals with are poor physical function and pain. This article deals with the following issues: (1 What is palliative care education and its importance? (2 Current scenario of palliative care in medical and allied fields internationally. (3 Current scenario of palliative care education in medical and allied fields in India. (4 Proposed curriculum guidelines for palliative care in physiotherapy.

  18. Guidelines for periodontal care and follow-up during orthodontic treatment in adolescents and young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liran Levin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive periodontitis is characterized by non-contributory medical history, rapid attachment loss and bone destruction and familial aggregation of cases. Aggressive periodontitis (both localized and generalized is usually diagnosed in a young population. This is frequently the age that an orthodontic care is provided to this population. The aim of the present paper is to draw guidelines for periodontal evaluation and monitoring prior to and during active orthodontic treatment. Strict adherence to these guidelines as a routine protocol for periodontal examination prior, during and following orthodontic treatment may dramatically decrease the severity and improve the prognosis of patients with aggressive periodontitis in orthodontic clinics.

  19. European Renal Best Practice Guideline on kidney donor and recipient evaluation and perioperative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowicz, Daniel; Cochat, Pierre; Claas, Frans H J; Heemann, Uwe; Pascual, Julio; Dudley, C; Harden, Paul; Hourmant, Marivonne; Maggiore, Umberto; Salvadori, Maurizio; Spasovski, Goce; Squifflet, Jean-Paul; Steiger, Jürg; Torres, Armando; Viklicky, Ondrej; Zeier, Martin; Vanholder, Raymond; Van Biesen, Wim; Nagler, Evi

    2015-11-01

    The European Best Practice Guideline group (EBPG) issued guidelines on the evaluation and selection of kidney donor and kidney transplant candidates, as well as post-transplant recipient care, in the year 2000 and 2002. The new European Renal Best Practice board decided in 2009 that these guidelines needed updating. In order to avoid duplication of efforts with kidney disease improving global outcomes, which published in 2009 clinical practice guidelines on the post-transplant care of kidney transplant recipients, we did not address these issues in the present guidelines.The guideline was developed following a rigorous methodological approach: (i) identification of clinical questions, (ii) prioritization of questions, (iii) systematic literature review and critical appraisal of available evidence and (iv) formulation of recommendations and grading according to Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE). The strength of each recommendation is rated 1 or 2, with 1 being a 'We recommend' statement, and 2 being a 'We suggest' statement. In addition, each statement is assigned an overall grade for the quality of evidence: A (high), B (moderate), C (low) or D (very low). The guideline makes recommendations for the evaluation of the kidney transplant candidate as well as the potential deceased and living donor, the immunological work-up of kidney donors and recipients and perioperative recipient care.All together, the work group issued 112 statements. There were 51 (45%) recommendations graded '1', 18 (16%) were graded '2' and 43 (38%) statements were not graded. There were 0 (0%) recommendations graded '1A', 15 (13%) were '1B', 19 (17%) '1C' and 17 (15%) '1D'. None (0%) were graded '2A', 1 (0.9%) was '2B', 8 (7%) were '2C' and 9 (8%) '2D'. Limitations of the evidence, especially the lack of definitive clinical outcome trials, are discussed and suggestions are provided for future research.We present here the complete recommendations about the

  20. Guidelines of care for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: Section 2. Psoriatic arthritis: overview and guidelines of care for treatment with an emphasis on the biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Alice; Korman, Neil J; Gordon, Kenneth B; Feldman, Steven R; Lebwohl, Mark; Koo, John Y M; Van Voorhees, Abby S; Elmets, Craig A; Leonardi, Craig L; Beutner, Karl R; Bhushan, Reva; Menter, Alan

    2008-05-01

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease with predominantly skin and joint manifestations affecting approximately 2% of the population. In this second of 5 sections of the guidelines of care for psoriasis, we give an overview of psoriatic arthritis including its cardinal clinical features, pathogenesis, prognosis, classification, assessment tools used to evaluate psoriatic arthritis, and the approach to treatment. Although patients with mild to moderate psoriatic arthritis may be treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and/or intra-articular steroid injections, the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, particularly methotrexate, along with the biologic agents, are considered the standard of care in patients with more significant psoriatic arthritis. We will discuss the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and the biologic therapies in the treatment of patients with moderate to severe psoriatic arthritis.

  1. Using a knowledge translation framework to implement asthma clinical practice guidelines in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licskai, Christopher; Sands, Todd; Ong, Michael; Paolatto, Lisa; Nicoletti, Ivan

    2012-10-01

    Quality problem International guidelines establish evidence-based standards for asthma care; however, recommendations are often not implemented and many patients do not meet control targets. Initial assessment Regional pilot data demonstrated a knowledge-to-practice gap. Choice of solutions We engineered health system change in a multi-step approach described by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research knowledge translation framework. Implementation Knowledge translation occurred at multiple levels: patient, practice and local health system. A regional administrative infrastructure and inter-disciplinary care teams were developed. The key project deliverable was a guideline-based interdisciplinary asthma management program. Six community organizations, 33 primary care physicians and 519 patients participated. The program operating cost was $290/patient. Evaluation Six guideline-based care elements were implemented, including spirometry measurement, asthma controller therapy, a written self-management action plan and general asthma education, including the inhaler device technique, role of medications and environmental control strategies in 93, 95, 86, 100, 97 and 87% of patients, respectively. Of the total patients 66% were adults, 61% were female, the mean age was 35.7 (SD = ± 24.2) years. At baseline 42% had two or more symptoms beyond acceptable limits vs. 17% (P< 0.001) post-intervention; 71% reported urgent/emergent healthcare visits at baseline (2.94 visits/year) vs. 45% (1.45 visits/year) (P< 0.001); 39% reported absenteeism (5.0 days/year) vs. 19% (3.0 days/year) (P< 0.001). The mean follow-up interval was 22 (SD = ± 7) months. Lessons learned A knowledge-translation framework can guide multi-level organizational change, facilitate asthma guideline implementation, and improve health outcomes in community primary care practices. Program costs are similar to those of diabetes programs. Program savings offset costs in a ratio of 2.1:1.

  2. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.

  3. A protocol of no sedation for critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, Thomas; Martinussen, Torben; Toft, Palle

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Standard treatment of critically ill patients undergoing mechanical ventilation is continuous sedation. Daily interruption of sedation has a beneficial effect, and in the general intesive care unit of Odense University Hospital, Denmark, standard practice is a protocol of no sedation....

  4. Guidelines for a Comprehensive Care Program to Ostomized Patients and Families: a Nursing proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Alvarenga de Figueiredo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: describe care needs and demands that mark the discursive practices of ostomized clients and family members and discuss guidelines for a comprehensive care program to ostomized clients and their families, organized by macrosociological categories. Method: Creative and Sensitive, involving 17 ostomized subjects and family members at a municipal outpatient clinic. The ethical aspects were complied with. A characterization form was used, as well as Creativity and Sensitivity Dynamics: "speaking map", "body-knowledge" and "calendar". Critical Discourse Analysis was applied. Results: the health needs and care demands of the ostomized patients and their family members, in their multiple dimensions, were constituted in the home and community, outpatient and social context, implying new orientations for nursing care. The unveiling of the data brought elements that constituted guidelines, in a macrosociological approach, to achieve the expanded integrality of nursing care. Conclusion: the ostomized clients are unique in their genre/peculiar from Latin sui generis, calling for strategies that respond to and distinguish their specificities. Elaborating a Public Health Policy that improves and reorganizes the care demands, taking into account these individual biopsychosocial and spiritual aspects, is a possible and irrevocable target in the attempt to achieve better conditions of health and wellbeing.

  5. [The guideline Oral Health Care for dependent residents in long term care facilities, 2007: dire necessity!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, GJ van der; Visschere, L De; Obbergen, J. van; Schols, J.G.J.H.; Baat, C. de

    2008-01-01

    The oral health status of residents in Dutch nursing homes is rather poor, especially of those depending on caregivers for their oral health care. Moreover, when care dependency is rising, the provision of good oral health care becomes more difficult. With more elderly people still having (parts of)

  6. Preconception care policy, guidelines, recommendations and services across six European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shawe, Jill; Delbaere, Ilse; Ekstrand, Maria

    2015-01-01

    for healthy women and men were fragmented and inconsistent. Preconception guidance was often included in antenatal and pregnancy guidelines. Differences between countries were seen with regard to nutritional and lifestyle advice particularly in relation to fish, caffeine and alcohol consumption, and vitamin......Objectives Preconception care is important for the screening, prevention and management of risk factors that affect pregnancy outcomes. We aimed to investigate pre-pregnancy care policies, guidelines, recommendations and services in six European countries. Methods In 2013, an electronic search......: Governmental policy and legislation; Professional bodies and organisations; Healthcare providers; Charitable organisations; Web-based public information and internet sites. Results All countries had preconception recommendations for women with chronic diseases, such as diabetes and epilepsy. Recommendations...

  7. Lung cancer management in limited resource settings: guidelines for appropriate good care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macbeth, Fergus R; Abratt, Raymond P; Cho, Kwan H; Stephens, Richard J; Jeremic, Branislav

    2007-02-01

    Lung cancer is a major cause of cancer death worldwide and is becoming an increasing problem in developing countries. It is important that, in countries where health care resources are limited, these resources are used most effectively and cost-effectively. The authors, with the support of the International Atomic Energy Agency, drew on existing evidence-based clinical guidelines, published systematic reviews and meta-analyses, as well as recent research publications, to summarise the current evidence and to make broad recommendations on the non-surgical treatment of patients with lung cancer. Tables were constructed which summarise the different treatment options for specific groups of patients, the increase in resource use for and the likely additional clinical benefit from each option. These tables can be used to assess the cost-effectiveness and appropriateness of different interventions in a particular health care system and to develop local clinical guidelines.

  8. Policies on Conflicts of Interest in Health Care Guideline Development: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morciano, Cristina; Basevi, Vittorio; Faralli, Carla; Hilton Boon, Michele; Tonon, Sabina; Taruscio, Domenica

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess whether organisations that develop health care guidelines have conflict of interest (COI) policies and to review the content of the available COI policies. Methods Survey and content analysis of COI policies available in English, French, Spanish, and Italian conducted between September 2014 and June 2015. A 24-item data abstraction instrument was created on the basis of guideline development standards. Results The survey identified 29 organisations from 19 countries that met the inclusion criteria. From these organisations, 19 policies were eligible for inclusion in the content analysis. Over one-third of the policies (7/19, 37%) did not report or did not clearly report whether disclosure was a prerequisite for membership of the guideline panel. Strategies for the prevention of COI such as divestment were mentioned by only two organisations. Only 21% of policies (4/19) used criteria to determine whether an interest constitutes a COI and to assess the severity of the risk imposed. Conclusions The finding that some organisations, in contradiction of widely available standards, still do not have COI policies publicly available is concerning. Also troubling were the findings that some policies did not clearly report critical steps in obtaining, managing and communicating disclosure of relationships of interest. This in addition to the variability encountered in content and accessibility of COI policies may cause confusion and distrust among guideline users. It is in the interest of guideline users and developers to design an agreed-upon, comprehensive, clear, and accessible COI policy. PMID:27846255

  9. Ethical Analysis of Analgesia and Sedation Therapy in Intensive Care Unit%ICU镇痛镇静治疗的伦理学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国民

    2016-01-01

    镇痛镇静是危重病人治疗的必要措施。实施镇痛镇静治疗时,应当尊重病人及家属的知情同意权。在病人利益最大化原则和生命权优先的前提下,优化镇痛镇静治疗方案,避免不良作用和并发症发生。同时注意保护病人隐私,加强医护协作,推行由医师制定方案并指导护士主导实施的镇痛镇静管理模式。%Analgesia and sedation is the necessary measure in critically ill patients. For implementation of an-algesia and sedation treatment, we should respect the patients′ and family members′rights to be informed. Under the premiseof profit maximization and priority to life,we should optimize the analgesic and sedative treatment, and avoid the adverse effects and complications as far as possible. At the same time, we should pay attention to protec-ting patients′privacy and strengthening the cooperation of physicians and nurses. Analgesia sedation management mode formulated and guided by physicians and nurses-led should be promoted.

  10. Guidelines to reduce sexually trasmitted infections at primary health care centres - Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.T.J. Molapo

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Sexually transmitted diseases are the second highest cause of death among women aged 15-44 years. The incidence and prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases is on the increase at many health care centres despite their dreadfulness and many preventative measures. According to the Scope of Practice of registered professional nurses working in a community health clinic, the registered professional nurse has a responsibility to prevent disease and promote health as well as do research. This paper aims to describe guidelines to reduce sexually transmitted infections at primary health care centres based on research done to investigate the community specific knowledge, attitudes and perceptions regarding sexually transmitted infections. Structured interviews were used to collect data from 1694 participants (males and females who were consulted at a primary health care clinic in Mamelodi, Gauteng province. Existing patients’ records were also utilised to calculate the incidence rate of sexually transmitted infections. Data were computerised and analysed quantitatively to reflect the results in frequencies and percentages as reported in Part 1 of this research. Guidelines to direct the practice of registered professional nurse were developed based on the findings of the results. These guidelines must underpin community specific interventions to reduce the incidence of sexually.

  11. Management of allergic and non-allergic rhinitis: a primary care summary of the BSACI guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angier, Elizabeth; Willington, Jenny; Scadding, Glenis; Holmes, Steve; Walker, Samantha

    2010-09-01

    Rhinitis is a common problem in primary care which is often managed sub-optimally. It causes considerable morbidity and has been shown to have a detrimental impact on people's ability to concentrate at school and at work. Rhinitis and asthma often present together, and symptomatic rhinitis can be associated with poor asthma control and increased risk of exacerbations. There is therefore a clear need to recognise and treat rhinitis according to guideline recommendations. This article is a primary care summary of the British Society for Allergy & Clinical Immunology (BSACI) Standards of Care Committee guideline on the management of rhinitis, written by a multi-disciplinary group of clinicians. It takes into account the time restrictions on assessment and the tests and equipment available in primary care, as well as the need for practical, clear and intuitive strategies for investigation and management. It recommends a stepwise approach to treatment, and highlights the relevance of less frequently prescribed treatments, including nasal douching leukotriene receptor antagonists and anticholinergics. Red flag symptoms are identified, together with indicators for referral. As with many other long term conditions, good communication between primary and secondary care in terms of timely and appropriate referral is a key factor for success.

  12. Barriers to the implementation of preconception care guidelines as perceived by general practitioners: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazza Danielle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite strong evidence of the benefits of preconception interventions for improving pregnancy outcomes, the delivery and uptake of preconception care and periconceptional folate supplementation remain low. General practitioners play a central role in the delivery of preconception care. Understanding general practitioners’ perceptions of the barriers and enablers to implementing preconception care allows for more appropriate targeting of quality improvement interventions. Consequently, the aim of this study was to examine the barriers and enablers to the delivery and uptake of preconception care guidelines from general practitioners’ perspective using theoretical domains related to behaviour change. Methods We conducted a qualitative study using focus groups consisting of 22 general practitioners who were recruited from three regional general practice support organisations. Questions were based on the theoretical domain framework, which describes 12 domains related to behaviour change. General practitioners’ responses were classified into predefined themes using a deductive process of thematic analysis. Results Beliefs about capabilities, motivations and goals, environmental context and resources, and memory, attention and decision making were the key domains identified in the barrier analysis. Some of the perceived barriers identified by general practitioners were time constraints, the lack of women presenting at the preconception stage, the numerous competing preventive priorities within the general practice setting, issues relating to the cost of and access to preconception care, and the lack of resources for assisting in the delivery of preconception care guidelines. Perceived enablers identified by general practitioners included the availability of preconception care checklists and patient brochures, handouts, and waiting room posters outlining the benefits and availability of preconception care consultations

  13. Respiratory clinical guidelines inform ward-based nurses' clinical skills and knowledge required for evidence-based care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alisha M; Smith, Sheree M S

    2016-09-01

    Respiratory clinical guidelines provide clinicians with evidence-based guidance for practice. Clinical guidelines also provide an opportunity to identify the knowledge and technical and non-technical skills required by respiratory ward-based registered nurses. The aim of this review was to use a systematic process to establish the core technical and non-technical skills and knowledge identified in evidence-based clinical guidelines that enable the care of hospitalised adult respiratory patients. 17 guidelines were identified in our systematic review. The quality assessment demonstrated variability in these guidelines. Common core knowledge and technical and non-technical skills were identified. These include pathophysiology, understanding of physiological measurements and monitoring, education, counselling, and ward and patient management. The knowledge and skills extracted from respiratory clinical guidelines may inform a curriculum for ward-based respiratory nursing to ensure optimal care of adult patients.

  14. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  15. Long term psychological effects of a no sedation protocol in critically ill Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroem, Thomas; Stylsvig, Mette; Toft, Palle

    2011-01-01

    was to test whether a strategy of no sedation alters long-term psychological outcome compared with a standard strategy with sedation. METHODS: During intensive care stay 140 patients requiring mechanical ventilation were randomized to either no sedation or sedation with daily interruption of sedation......ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: A protocol of no sedation has been shown to reduce the time patients receive mechanical ventilation and reduce intensive care and total hospital length of stay. The long term psychological effects of this strategy have not yet been described. The purpose of the study...... applied to critically ill patients undergoing mechanical ventilation does not increase the risk of long term psychological sequelae after intensive care compared to standard treatment with sedation....

  16. Guidelines of care for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: section 4. Guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with traditional systemic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menter, Alan; Korman, Neil J; Elmets, Craig A; Feldman, Steven R; Gelfand, Joel M; Gordon, Kenneth B; Gottlieb, Alice B; Koo, John Y M; Lebwohl, Mark; Lim, Henry W; Van Voorhees, Abby S; Beutner, Karl R; Bhushan, Reva

    2009-09-01

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease with predominantly skin and joint manifestations affecting approximately 2% of the population. In this fourth of 6 sections of the guidelines of care for psoriasis, we discuss the use of traditional systemic medications for the treatment of patients with psoriasis. Treatment should be tailored to meet individual patients' needs. We will discuss in detail the efficacy and safety, and offer recommendations for the use of the 3 most commonly used, and approved, traditional systemic agents: methotrexate, cyclosporine, and acitretin. We will also briefly discuss the available data for the use of azathioprine, fumaric acid esters, hydroxyurea, leflunomide, mycophenolate mofetil, sulfasalazine, tacrolimus, and 6-thioguanine in psoriasis.

  17. A study of patient attitudes towards fasting prior to intravenous sedation for dental treatment in a dental hospital department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKenna, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    Intravenous sedation is the most commonly used method of sedation for the provision of adult dental care. However, disparity exists in pre-operative fasting times in use for patients throughout the United Kingdom.

  18. Treating asthma by the guidelines: developing a medication management information system for use in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twiggs, Joan E; Fifield, J; Jackson, E; Cushman, R; Apter, A

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, implement, and assess an automated asthma medication management information system (MMIS) that provides patient-specific evaluative guidance based on 1997 NAEPP clinical consensus guidelines. MMIS was developed and implemented in primary care settings within a pediatric asthma disease management program. MMIS infrastructure featured a centralized database with Internet access. MMIS collects detailed patient asthma medication data, evaluates pharmacotherapy relative to practitioner-reported disease severity, symptom control and model of guideline-recommended severity-appropriate medications and produces a patient-specific "curbside consult" feedback report. A system algorithm translates actual detailed medication data into actual severity-specific medication-class combinations. A table-driven computer program compares actual medication-class combinations to a guideline-based medication-class combinations model. Methodology determines whether the patient was prescribed a "severity-appropriate" amount or an amount "more" or "less" medication than indicated for patient's reported severity. Feedback messages comment on comparison. Missing data, unrecognized amounts of controller medication or unrecognized medication combinations create error cases. Post hoc review analyzed error cases to determine prevalence of non-guideline medicating practices among these practitioners. Proportion of valid and error cases across two clinical visits before and after post hoc clinical review were measured, as well as proportion of severity-appropriate, out-of-severity and non-guideline medications. MMIS produced a valid feedback report for 83% of patient visits. Missing data accounted for 60% of error cases. Practitioners used severity-appropriate medications for 60% of cases. When non-severity-appropriate medications were used they tended to be "too much" rather than "too little" (22%, 5%), suggesting appropriate use of guideline-recommended "step

  19. World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of dementias in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ihl, Ralf; Bunevicius, Robertas; Frölich, Lutz;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To define a practice guideline for biological treatment of dementias for general practitioners in primary care. METHODS: This paper is a short and practical summary of the World Federation of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for the Biological treatment of Alzheimer's disease a...

  20. What factors increase Dutch child health care professionals' adherence to a national guideline on preventing child abuse and neglect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konijnendijk, Annemieke A J; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M; Fleuren, Margot A H; Haasnoot, Maria E; Need, Ariana

    2016-03-01

    Guidelines to support health care professionals in early detection of, and responses to, suspected Child Abuse and Neglect (CAN) have become increasingly widely available. Yet little is known about professionals' adherence to these guidelines or the determinants that affect their uptake. This study used a cross-sectional design to assess the adherence of Dutch Child Health Care (CHC) professionals to seven key activities described in a national guideline on preventing CAN. This study also examined the presence and strengths of determinants of guideline adherence. Online questionnaires were filled in between May and July 2013 by 164 CHC professionals. Adherence was defined as the extent to which professionals performed each of seven key activities when they suspected CAN. Thirty-three determinants were measured in relation to the guideline, the health professional, the organisational context and the socio-political context. Bivariate and multivariate regression analyses tested associations between determinants and guideline adherence. Most of the responding CHC professionals were aware of the guideline and its content (83.7%). Self-reported rates of full adherence varied between 19.5% and 42.7%. Stronger habit to use the guideline was the only determinant associated with higher adherence rates in the multivariate analysis. Understanding guideline adherence and associated determinants is essential for developing implementation strategies that can stimulate adherence. Although CHC professionals in this sample were aware of the guideline, they did not always adhere to its key recommended activities. To increase adherence, tailored interventions should primarily focus on enhancing habit strength.

  1. [New technical developments for inhaled sedation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiser, A; Bomberg, H; Volk, T; Groesdonk, H V

    2017-01-31

    The circle system has been in use for more than 100 years, whereas the first clinical application of an anaesthetic reflector was reported just 15 years ago. In the circle system, all breathing gas is rebreathed after carbon dioxide absorption. A reflector, on the other hand, with the breathing gas flowing to and fro, specifically retains the anaesthetic during expiration and resupplies it during the next inspiration. A high reflection efficiency (number of molecules resupplied/number of molecules exhaled, RE 80-90%) decreases consumption. In analogy to the fresh gas flow of a circle system, pulmonary clearance ((1-RE) × minute ventilation) defines the opposition between consumption and control of the concentration.It was not until reflection systems became available that volatile anaesthetics were used routinely in some intensive care units. Their advantages, such as easy handling, and better ventilatory capabilities of intensive care versus anaesthesia ventilators, were basic preconditions for this. Apart from AnaConDa™ (Sedana Medical, Uppsala, Sweden), the new MIRUS™ system (Pall Medical, Dreieich, Germany) represents a second, more sophisticated commercially available system.Organ protective effects, excellent control of sedation, and dose-dependent deep sedation while preserving spontaneous breathing with hardly any accumulation or induction of tolerance, make volatile anaesthetics an interesting alternative, especially for patients needing deep sedation or when intravenous drugs are no longer efficacious.But obviously, the outcome is most important. We know that deep intravenous sedation increases mortality, whereas inhalational sedation could prove beneficial. We now need prospective clinical trials examining mortality, but also the psychological outcome of those most critically ill patients sedated by inhalation or intravenously.

  2. Reflections from a Canadian visiting South Africa: Advancing sepsis care in Africa with the development of local sepsis guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Green

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to outline the key concepts in the care of the severely septic patient in the ED, and to provide “lessons learned” from an author of the Canadian Sepsis Guidelines. The goal for the African emergency physicians should be to develop local protocols and guidelines based on the resources and skill sets available in African communities in an attempt to provide timely and expert care for this patient population.

  3. Translating sickle cell guidelines into practice for primary care providers with Project ECHO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Shook

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Approximately 100,000 persons with sickle cell disease (SCD live in the United States, including 15,000 in the Midwest. Unfortunately, many patients experience poor health outcomes due to limited access to primary care providers (PCPs who are prepared to deliver evidence-based SCD care. Sickle Treatment and Outcomes Research in the Midwest (STORM is a regional network established to improve care and outcomes for individuals with SCD living in Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. Methods: STORM investigators hypothesized that Project ECHO® methodology could be replicated to create a low-cost, high-impact intervention to train PCPs in evidence-based care for pediatric and young adult patients with SCD in the Midwest, called STORM TeleECHO. This approach utilizes video technology for monthly telementoring clinics consisting of didactic and case-based presentations focused on the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI evidence-based guidelines for SCD. Results: Network leads in each of the STORM states assisted with developing the curriculum and are recruiting providers for monthly clinics. To assess STORM TeleECHO feasibility and acceptability, monthly attendance and satisfaction data are collected. Changes in self-reported knowledge, comfort, and practice patterns will be compared with pre-participation, and 6 and 12 months after participation. Conclusions: STORM TeleECHO has the potential to increase implementation of the NHLBI evidence-based guidelines, especially increased use of hydroxyurea, resulting in improvements in the quality of care and outcomes for children and young adults with SCD. This model could be replicated in other pediatric chronic illness conditions to improve PCP knowledge and confidence in delivering evidence-based care.

  4. Effect evaluation of a supervised versus non-supervised implementation of an oral health care guideline in nursing homes: a cluster randomised controlled clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschere, L. De; Schols, J.; Putten, G.J. van der; Baat, C. de; Vanobbergen, J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare a supervised versus a non-supervised implementation of an oral health care guideline in Flanders (Belgium). BACKGROUND: The key factor in realising good oral health is daily oral hygiene care. In 2007, the Dutch guideline 'Oral health care in care homes for elderly people' was

  5. Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations: Managing transitions of care following Stroke, Guidelines Update 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Jill I; O'Connell, Colleen; Foley, Norine; Salter, Katherine; Booth, Rhonda; Boyle, Rosemary; Cheung, Donna; Cooper, Nancy; Corriveau, Helene; Dowlatshahi, Dar; Dulude, Annie; Flaherty, Patti; Glasser, Ev; Gubitz, Gord; Hebert, Debbie; Holzmann, Jacquie; Hurteau, Patrick; Lamy, Elise; LeClaire, Suzanne; McMillan, Taylor; Murray, Judy; Scarfone, David; Smith, Eric E; Shum, Vivian; Taylor, Kim; Taylor, Trudy; Yanchula, Catherine; Teasell, Robert; Lindsay, Patrice

    2016-10-01

    Every year, approximately 62,000 people with stroke and transient ischemic attack are treated in Canadian hospitals. For patients, families and caregivers, this can be a difficult time of adjustment. The 2016 update of the Canadian Managing Transitions of Care following Stroke guideline is a comprehensive summary of current evidence-based and consensus-based recommendations appropriate for use by clinicians who provide care to patients following stroke across a broad range of settings. The focus of these recommendations is on support, education and skills training for patients, families and caregivers; effective discharge planning; interprofessional communication; adaptation in resuming activities of daily living; and transition to long-term care for patients who are unable to return to or remain at home. Unlike other modules contained in the Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations (such as acute inpatient care), many of these recommendations are based on consensus opinion, or evidence level C, highlighting the absence of conventional evidence (i.e. randomized controlled trials) in this area of stroke care. The quality of care transitions between stages and settings may have a direct impact on patient and family outcomes such as coping, readmissions and functional recovery. While many qualitative and non-controlled studies were reviewed, this gap in evidence combined with the fact that mortality from stoke is decreasing and more people are living with the effects of stroke, underscores the need to channel a portion of available research funds to recovery and adaptation following the acute phase of stroke.

  6. Documentation of competency on sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, David J

    2010-01-01

    There is general consensus in national and societal guidelines that training for sedation should be part of basic training for endoscopy. There is no clear consensus, however, on the structure of that training. More importantly, these same guidelines are often silent on the specific requirements to demonstrate competency for administration of sedation, ways to document that competency and measures to assure that competency is maintained. In the absence of data demonstrating improved outcomes with specific approaches, the process and principles in this paper are proposed as a starting point to be modified by future research and data.

  7. Quality of care of Egyptian asthmatic children: Clinicians adherence to asthma guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salama Ashraf A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the development and dissemination of guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma, a gap remains between current recommendations and actual practice. Objectives To assess the physicians attitude towards asthma guidelines and their adherence to its recommendations. Methods Three hundred and fifty two clinicians (101 General practitioners, 131 pediatric specialists, 35 pediatric consultants and 85 doctors did not report the qualification engaged in direct childhood asthma care in Cairo, Egypt were subjected to a self-administered questionnaire with 35 questions of which most were multiple choices, aiming at assessment of three important aspects about the involved physicians; physician's knowledge, practice and attitude. 165 of the clinicians were working in governmental hospitals, 68 clinicians work in private clinics and 119 clinicians work in both. Results Agreement with asthma guidelines was present in 76.2% of the studied physicians, however those who not in agreement with the guidelines claimed that this was mainly due to patient factors, firstly the poor socioeconomic standard of the patient (18.1% and secondly due to poor patient compliance (16%. Poor knowledge was found in 28.5%, poor practice was found in 43.6% and poor attitude was found in 14.4% of the studied physicians. There was positive highly significant correlation between qualification and knowledge, (p Conclusion The attitude of the studied physicians revealed agreement of their majority with the guidelines, while the disagreement was mainly explained by the poor socioeconomic standard of the patients. The degree of poor practice is more marked than that of poor knowledge or poor attitude reflecting resources limitations and applications obstacles in the physician's practice.

  8. The diagnostic work up of growth failure in secondary health care; An evaluation of consensus guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dekker Friedo W

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As abnormal growth might be the first manifestation of undetected diseases, it is important to have accurate referral criteria and a proper diagnostic work-up. In the present paper we evaluate the diagnostic work-up in secondary health care according to existing consensus guidelines and study the frequency of underlying medical disorders. Methods Data on growth and additional diagnostic procedures were collected from medical records of new patients referred for short stature to the outpatient clinics of the general paediatric departments of two hospitals (Erasmus MC – Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam and Spaarne Hospital, Haarlem between January 1998 and December 2002. As the Dutch Consensus Guideline (DCG is the only guideline addressing referral criteria as well as diagnostic work-up, the analyses were based on its seven auxological referral criteria to determine the characteristics of children who are incorrectly referred and the adequacy of workup of those who are referred. Results Twenty four percent of children older than 3 years were inappropriately referred (NCR. Of the correctly referred children 74–88% were short corrected for parental height, 40–61% had a height SDS Conclusion Existing guidelines for workup of children with suspected growth failure are poorly implemented. Although poorly implemented the DCG detects at least 5% pathologic causes of growth failure in children referred for short stature. New guidelines for referral are required with a better sensitivity and specificity, wherein distance to target height should get more attention. The general diagnostic work up for short stature should include testing for celiac disease in all children and for Turner syndrome in girls.

  9. Conscious sedation: A dying practice?

    OpenAIRE

    Manickam, Palaniappan; Kanaan, Ziad; Zakaria, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    Sedation practices vary according to countries with different health system regulations, the procedures done, and local circumstances. Interestingly, differences in the setting in which the practice of gastroenterology and endoscopy takes place (university-based vs academic practice) as well as other systematic practice differences influence the attitude of endoscopists concerning sedation practices. Conscious sedation using midazolam and opioids is the current standard method of sedation in ...

  10. Are primary care practitioners in Barbados following hypertension guidelines? - a chart audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Anne O

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About 55% of the population 40 to 80 years of age in Barbados is hypertensive. The quality of hypertension primary care compared to available practice guidelines is uncertain. Findings Charts of hypertensive and diabetic patients were randomly sampled at all public and 20 private sector primary care clinics. Charts of all hypertensive patients ≥ 40 years of age were then selected and processes of care and blood pressure (BP maintenance 343 charts of hypertensive patients (170 public, and 173 private were audited. Patients had the following characteristics: mean age 64 years, female gender 63%, mean duration of diagnosis 9.1 years, and diabetes diagnosed 58%. Patients had an average of 4.7 clinic visits per year, 70% were prescribed a thiazide diuretic, 42% a calcium channel blocker, 40% an angiotensin receptor blocker, and 19% a beta blocker. Public patients compared to private patients were more likely to be female (73% vs. 52%, p Conclusions Improvements are needed in following guidelines for basic interventions such as body mass assessment, accurate BP measurement, use of thiazide diuretics and lifestyle advice. BP control is inadequate.

  11. [Sedation in pediatric digestive endoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanari, F; Viola, L; Amarri, S

    2001-01-01

    Sedation for children doing diagnostic or operative pediatric gastrointestinal endoscopy (PE) procedures is performed differently over the world and no consensus is yet agreed on the best paediatric endoscopy sedation (PES). Some centres do not use any sedation, especially in infants, most centre use some form of sedation: conscious sedation, deep sedation and general anaesthesia. We review sedation drugs and describe our centre protocol on 188 consecutive PE: oral premedication with flunitrazepam (0.05 mg/kg/dose) at least 30 min before procedure, petidine (1 mg/kg) followed by increasing boluses of midazolam (0.05 mg/kg up to a maximal 0.2 mg/kg or 5 mg) were given i.v. to obtain a conscious sedation. All PE could be performed and ended safely, PES resulted satisfactory in approximately 65% of patient having conscious sedation. SaO2 Endoscopy and sedation was always performed by the PE team in the immediate vicinity of anaesthesiologists at work. PE can be safely performed with conscious sedation. Basic and advanced resuscitation skills are needed for the PE team who wish to perform both endoscopic and sedation procedures.

  12. Barriers to Primary Care Clinician Adherence to Clinical Guidelines for the Management of Low Back Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slade, Susan C; Kent, Peter; Patel, Shilpa;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Despite the availability of evidence-based guidelines for the management of low back pain that contain consistent messages, large evidence-practice gaps in primary care remain. OBJECTIVES: To perform a systematic review and meta-synthesis of qualitative studies that have explored...... and qualitative methods had been used for both data collection and analysis. We searched major databases up to July 2014. Pairs of reviewers independently screened titles and abstracts, extracted data, appraised method quality using the CASP checklist, conducted thematic analysis and synthesized the results...

  13. Scandinavian clinical practice guidelines for therapeutic hypothermia and post-resuscitation care after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castrén, M; Silfvast, T; Rubertsson, S;

    2009-01-01

    studies MTH has been proven to be safe, with few complications and improved survival, and is recommended by the International Liaison of Committee on Resuscitation. The aim of this paper is to recommend clinical practice guidelines for MTH treatment after cardiac arrest from the Scandinavian Society...... of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (SSAI). METHODS: Relevant studies were identified after two consensus meetings of the SSAI Task Force on Therapeutic Hypothermia (SSAITFTH) and via literature search of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Medline. Evidence was assessed and consensus...

  14. Pain management in trauma patients in (pre)hospital based emergency care: current practice versus new guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, A.C.; Berben, S.A.A.; Westmaas, A.H.; Grunsven, P.M.; Vaal, de E.T.; Rood, Pleunie P.M.; Hoogerwerf, N.; Doggen, C.J.M.; Schoonhoven, L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute pain in trauma patients in emergency care is still undertreated. Early pain treatment is assumed to effectively reduce pain in patients and improve long-term outcomes. In order to improve pain management in the chain of emergency care, a national evidence-based guideline was devel

  15. Pain management in trauma patients in (pre)hospital based emergency care: current practice versus new guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, A.C.; Berben, S.A.A.; Westmaas, A.H.; Grunsven, P.M. van; Vaal, E.T. de; Hoogerwerf, N.; Doggen, C.J.; Schoonhoven, L.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Acute pain in trauma patients in emergency care is still undertreated. Early pain treatment is assumed to effectively reduce pain in patients and improve long-term outcomes. In order to improve pain management in the chain of emergency care, a national evidence-based guideline was deve

  16. Ethnography of "Local Universality": Admission Practices in an Intensive Care Unit Among Guidelines, Routines, and Humour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Lusardi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the existing gap between the formal dimension of evidence-based medicine (EBM, as constituted by protocols, procedures, and guidelines, and actual professional practices in relation to a specific issue: the admission of patients to an intensive care unit (ICU. The results of a case study, carried out in the ICU of a hospital in the north of Italy between 2006 and 2007 are reported. The study was performed using ethnographic methods: participant observation, ethnographic interviews, and semi-structured interviews. Empirical data have been analysed using a grounded theory approach. The results show how three dimensions (macrosocial, organisational-interactional, and individual become intertwined with the operational guidelines that have been drafted on the basis of international evidence. The standardisation process that the guidelines presuppose results in the adoption of a variety of different local styles with respect to the approach that individual doctors take in relation to the admission of a patient to an ICU. These styles can range from strict adherence to the international criteria to a greater compliance with medical–legal, organisational, and individual needs. Furthermore, the results of the study demonstrate how relational knowledge, as a form of situated knowledge, can allow the personnel involved to activate local resources (organisational, professional, and personal in order to incorporate the formal prescriptions of EBM in professional practice. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1502261

  17. Adaptation of a best practice guideline to strengthen client-centered care in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athwal, Lorraine; Marchuk, Brenda; Laforêt-Fliesser, Yvette; Castanza, Joyce; Davis, Lori; LaSalle, Marg

    2014-01-01

    Best practice guidelines (BPGs) were developed by the Registered Nurses Association of Ontario (RNAO) to support evidence-based nursing practice. One Ontario public health unit chose to implement the BPG on client-centered care (CCC). A critical review of this BPG revealed issues that would hinder successful implementation within a public health setting. These included a focus on the client as an individual, the predominance of acute care exemplars and training resources that were not representative of public health nursing practice, and the need to reconcile the enforcement roles of public health with the BPG principles. The purpose of this article is to describe the process of adapting the CCC BPG to more accurately reflect the broad scope of public health nursing practice. A model for CCC in public health nursing context is presented and processes for implementing, evaluating, and sustaining CCC are described.

  18. ICU机械通气患者镇静效果观察与护理%Sedative effect of patients with mechanical ventilation in ICU and nursing care

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶玲; 赵金花

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the sedative effect of propofol, midazolam for ICU patients with mechanical ventilation and the nursing experience.Methods Totals of 120 patients of ICU from June 2012 to December 2012 were randomly selected and divided into experiment group ( n =60 ) and control group ( n=60), experiment group were given propofol injection sedation, control group were given midazolam sedation, using Ramsay sedation score, compared two groups of patients the onset time of drug, recovery time after stopping drug, medicine adverse reaction and vital signs changes.Results In experiment group, the onset time was (23 ±8)s, the recovery time is (22 ±6)min, patients in control group were (48 ±9)s, (58 ±12)mins, and the differences between two groups were statistically significant (t =3.12,5.67,respectively;P<0.05).After sedation, heart rate (74 ±11) times/min, and breath (15 ±3) times/min of experiment group were slower than that of control group, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05).Conclusions Propofol sedation effect is good, and can fast acting, while it has a great influencing on the heart rate.%目的:探讨丙泊酚、咪达唑仑应用于机械通气患者镇静的疗效及护理体会。方法随机选择ICU机械通气患者120例,采用随机数字表法分为试验组与对照组,每组60例,试验组给予丙泊酚注射液镇静,对照组给予咪达唑仑镇静,采用Ramsay镇静评分比较两组患者用药后起效时间及停药后苏醒时间,比较两组用药后不良反应及生命体征变化。结果试验组患者起效时间、苏醒时间分别为(23±8)s,(22±6)min,对照组患者分别为(48±9)s,(58±12)min,两组比较差异有统计学意义(t值分别为3.12,5.67;P<0.05)。试验组患者镇静后心率(74±11)次/min,呼吸(15±3)次/min,较对照组出现减慢现象,差异有统计学意义(t值分别为-5.28,-4.17;P<0

  19. 脑电双频指数在儿科ICU镇静监测的临床应用价值%Sedation assessment by using bispectral index in the pediatric intensive care unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕国良; 姚军; 龚小慧; 张宇鸣

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨脑电双频指数(BIS)在儿科ICU危重患儿镇静深度监测中的应用价值.方法 前瞻性收集我院PICU的42例6个月~13岁的危重患儿,以咪唑安定持续静脉滴注镇静治疗,在应用镇静剂后的10个时间段以Ramsay评分评价镇静深度的同时进行BIS监测,分析BIS与Ramsay评分在儿童危重症镇静评估的相关性及影响因素.结果 42例危重症患儿中共采集420对BIS与Ramsay对照数据,并做Spearman等级相关分析,BIS与Ramsay评分呈明显负相关(r=-0.8879,P0.05);BIS范围在55~80之间为危重症患儿合适的镇静分值.结论 BIS与Ramsay评分在危重症镇静深度评估中具有较好相关性.BIS监测具有操作简单、省时、连续性好等优点,可作为PICU患儿镇静深度判断的客观指标.%Objective To evaluate the applicability of bispectral index (BIS) in assessing sedation in pediatric intensive care unit. Methods Patients in pediatric ICU,aged six months to thirteen years and requi-ring sedation were given midazolam as sedative drug. The Ramsay score was assessed by physicians after mi-dazolam was given at ten time interval and these data were compared with the blinded BIS score. Results A total of 42 children were included in the study,420 valid paired observation of BIS values and Ramsay score were performed. According to Spearman's scale analysis, the correlation coefficient between BIS value and Ramsay score was -0.887 9 (P0.05). Conclusion BIS values cor-relate fairly well with the Ramsay scores in PICU patient. With the advantages such as simpleness, time-sav-ing,continuity and etc,BIS monitoring is a good objective tool for judging sedation depth of PICU patients.

  20. Narcotrend指导重症呼吸科患者使用右美托咪定的相关性研究%Correlation study of Narcotrend to guide dexmedetomidine sedation in intensive care unit of respiratory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王润丰; 朱永忠; 杜成; 夏梦; 庞加磊; 王研

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨使用Narcotrend指导重症呼吸科患者使用右美托咪定镇静的个体化相关性研究,以达到降低药物副作用的目的。方法选取54例重症呼吸科患者,随机分为两组,给予右美托咪定镇静治疗,实验组以NTI值( Narcotrend检测仪根据镇静患者脑电信号量化形成的0~100的数值,用以客观反映镇静深度)75~85为目标调节泵速。对照组将Narcotrend监测仪显示屏幕反转,专人记录NTI数值,以镇静/警觉( OAA/S)评分3~4级为目标值调节泵速。分别记录生命体征,镇静深度,动脉血气变化情况,比较两组间上述指标差异。结果两组间比较,同一时间段NTI及OAA/S评分变化一致,差异无统计学意义( P>0.05)。结论 Narcotrend能准确有效显示重症呼吸科患者使用右美托咪定的镇静深度,且数据客观连续,为重症呼吸科患者镇静,提供新的依据。%Objective To explore the application value of Narcotrend in guiding the use of dexmedetomidine sedation in intensive care unit of respiratory. Methods 54 patients in respiratory IC were randomly divided into the experimental group and the control group. All patients were given dexmedetomidine sedation. The experimental group adjusted the dexmedetomidine dose to achieve NTI values 75~85 ( narcotrend detector displaying 0~100 according to EEG of patients to reflect the depth of sedation) , and the control group adjusted the dexmedetomidine dose to a-chieve OAA/S score 3~4 scale. The vital signs, degree of sedation and blood gas changes were recorded and comp-ered between the two groups. Results NTI and OAA/S score had no statistically significant difference between the two groups at the same time. Conclusion Narcotrend can accurately and effectively reflect the degree of sedation of patients in respiratory ICU, and the data are objective and continuous, which can provide a new means to guide seda-tion.

  1. Do health care providers adhere to the revised malaria control guidelines? '

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujoy Ray

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Malaria is a public health problem worldwide with India contributing to 77% cases in the South East Asian region of World Health Organization (WHO. Karnataka is one of the project states under World Bank with API>2. Statistics from the district of Udupi, which is the setting for this study, shows a rise in malaria cases from January-May 2009. There were a total of 1189 malaria cases reported of which 103 were positive for P. falciparum. The National Programme to control malaria has recently revised its strategies, thus involved personnel need to be aware of it for the programme to be effective.Objectives: Keeping in mind the emergence of Choloroquine resistant malaria, The National Malaria Control Programme has revised its strategy. This cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the awareness and practice of National Guidelines for malaria among health care providers in Urban Udupi, Karnataka (which is one of the project states under the World Bank for malaria control and the problems in implementation of these guidelines.Settings and design: Cross sectional study, Udupi district.Methods: Data was collected by personal interview (structured questionnaire after obtaining due consent.Statistical analysis used: Data was analyzed by SPSS software.ObservationsResults: Most respondents were from both Manipal and Udupi and had been practicing for over 5 years. Chills and headache were used as main guiding symptoms for diagnosis, all insisted on lab diagnosis with QBC being the most preferred test followed by smear. Cases were treated on pure clinical diagnosis in case of typical signs, unresponsiveness to other therapy, unwillingness or non-affordability of tests. Both species of Plasmodium were prevalent, Chloroquine being first line treatment for P. Vivax and Artemisinin compounds for Falciparum. Clinical failure was encountered against Falciparum due to chloroquine resistance and quinine was mainly used to combat it. Medical

  2. Conscious sedation: a dying practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Palaniappan; Kanaan, Ziad; Zakaria, Khalid

    2013-07-28

    Sedation practices vary according to countries with different health system regulations, the procedures done, and local circumstances. Interestingly, differences in the setting in which the practice of gastroenterology and endoscopy takes place (university-based vs academic practice) as well as other systematic practice differences influence the attitude of endoscopists concerning sedation practices. Conscious sedation using midazolam and opioids is the current standard method of sedation in diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy. Interestingly, propofol is a commonly preferred sedation method by endoscopists due to higher satisfaction rates along with its short half-life and thus lower risk of hepatic encephalopathy. On the other hand, midazolam is the benzodiazepine of choice because of its shorter duration of action and better pharmacokinetic profile compared with diazepam. The administration of sedation under the supervision of a properly trained endoscopist could become the standard practice and the urgent development of an updated international consensus regarding the use of sedative agents like propofol is needed.

  3. Sedation regimens for gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Sung-Hoon

    2014-03-01

    Sedation allows patients to tolerate unpleasant endoscopic procedures by relieving anxiety, discomfort, or pain. It also reduces a patient's risk of physical injury during endoscopic procedures, while providing the endoscopist with an adequate setting for a detailed examination. Sedation is therefore considered by many endoscopists to be an essential component of gastrointestinal endoscopy. Endoscopic sedation by nonanesthesiologists is a worldwide practice and has been proven effective and safe. Moderate sedation/analgesia is generally accepted as an appropriate target for sedation by nonanesthesiologists. This focused review describes the general principles of endoscopic sedation, the detailed pharmacology of sedatives and analgesics (focused on midazolam, propofol, meperidine, and fentanyl), and the multiple regimens available for use in actual practice.

  4. Training and Competency in Sedation Practice in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da, Ben; Buxbaum, James

    2016-07-01

    The practice of endoscopic sedation requires a thorough understanding of preprocedural assessment, sedation pharmacology, intraprocedure monitoring, adverse event management, and postprocedural care. The training process has become increasingly standardized and entails knowledge and practice-based components. The use of propofol in particular requires a higher level of structured training owing to its narrow therapeutic window. Simulation has increased opportunities for practice-based training in a controlled environment. After completion of training, the endoscopist must demonstrate competence in theoretical understanding and technical ability to administer sedation. Although individual institutions have certification processes, there is a lack of validated, standardized methods to confirm competence.

  5. Guidelines of care for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis Section 3. Guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with topical therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menter, A.; Korman, N.J.; Elmets, C.A.; Feldman, S.R.; Gelfand, J.M.; Gordon, K.B.; Gottlieb, A.; Koo, J.Y.M.; Lebwohl, M.; Lim, H.W.; Van Voorhees, A.S.; Beutner, K.R.; Bhushan, R. [University of Texas South West Medical Center Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic, inflammatory, multi-system disease with predominantly skin and joint manifestations affecting approximately 2% of the Population. In this third of 6 sections of the guidelines of care for psoriasis, we discuss the use of topical medications for the treatment of psoriasis. The majority of patients with psoriasis have limited disease (<5% body surface area involvement) and can be treated with topical agents, which generally provide a high efficacy-to-safety ratio. Topical agents may also be used adjunctively for patients with more extensive psoriasis undergoing therapy with either ultraviolet light, systemic or biologic medications. However, the use of topical agents as monotherapy in the setting of extensive disease or in the setting of limited, but recalcitrant, disease is not routinely recommended. Treatment should be tailored to meet individual patients' needs. We will discuss the efficacy and safety of as well as offer recommendations for the use of topical corticosteroids, vitamin D analogues, tazarotene, tacrolimus, pimecrolimus, emollients, salicylic acid, anthralin, coal tar, as well as combination therapy.

  6. Guidelines of care for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Section 3. Guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with topical therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menter, Alan; Korman, Neil J; Elmets, Craig A; Feldman, Steven R; Gelfand, Joel M; Gordon, Kenneth B; Gottlieb, Alice; Koo, John Y M; Lebwohl, Mark; Lim, Henry W; Van Voorhees, Abby S; Beutner, Karl R; Bhushan, Reva

    2009-04-01

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic, inflammatory, multi-system disease with predominantly skin and joint manifestations affecting approximately 2% of the population. In this third of 6 sections of the guidelines of care for psoriasis, we discuss the use of topical medications for the treatment of psoriasis. The majority of patients with psoriasis have limited disease (<5% body surface area involvement) and can be treated with topical agents, which generally provide a high efficacy-to-safety ratio. Topical agents may also be used adjunctively for patients with more extensive psoriasis undergoing therapy with either ultraviolet light, systemic or biologic medications. However, the use of topical agents as monotherapy in the setting of extensive disease or in the setting of limited, but recalcitrant, disease is not routinely recommended. Treatment should be tailored to meet individual patients' needs. We will discuss the efficacy and safety of as well as offer recommendations for the use of topical corticosteroids, vitamin D analogues, tazarotene, tacrolimus, pimecrolimus, emollients, salicylic acid, anthralin, coal tar, as well as combination therapy.

  7. Stress ulcer prophylaxis guidelines:Are they being implemented in Lebanese health care centers?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abeer; Zeitoun; Maya; Zeineddine; Hani; Dimassi

    2011-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the current practice of stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) in Lebanese Health care centers.METHODS:A multi-center prospective chart review study was conducted over 8 mo.A questionnaire was distributed to pharmacy students who collected data on demographics,SUP medications,dose,route,duration and associated risk factors.The appropriateness of SUP use was determined as per American Society of Health-System Pharmacists guidelines.Institutional review board approval was obtained from each hospital center.RESULTS:A total of 1004 patients were included.67% of the patients who received prophylaxis did not have an indication for SUP.The majority (71.6%) of the patients who were administered parenteral drugs can tolerate oral medications.Overall,the regimen of acid-suppressant drugs was suboptimal in 87.6% of the sample.This misuse was mainly observed in non-teaching hospitals.CONCLUSION:This study highlighted the need,in Lebanese hospitals,to establish clinical practice guidelines for the use of SUP;mainly in non-critical care settings.

  8. ASVCP guidelines: quality assurance for point-of-care testing in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatland, Bente; Freeman, Kathleen P; Vap, Linda M; Harr, Kendal E

    2013-12-01

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) refers to any laboratory testing performed outside the conventional reference laboratory and implies close proximity to patients. Instrumental POCT systems consist of small, handheld or benchtop analyzers. These have potential utility in many veterinary settings, including private clinics, academic veterinary medical centers, the community (eg, remote area veterinary medical teams), and for research applications in academia, government, and industry. Concern about the quality of veterinary in-clinic testing has been expressed in published veterinary literature; however, little guidance focusing on POCT is available. Recognizing this void, the ASVCP formed a subcommittee in 2009 charged with developing quality assurance (QA) guidelines for veterinary POCT. Guidelines were developed through literature review and a consensus process. Major recommendations include (1) taking a formalized approach to POCT within the facility, (2) use of written policies, standard operating procedures, forms, and logs, (3) operator training, including periodic assessment of skills, (4) assessment of instrument analytical performance and use of both statistical quality control and external quality assessment programs, (5) use of properly established or validated reference intervals, (6) and ensuring accurate patient results reporting. Where possible, given instrument analytical performance, use of a validated 13s control rule for interpretation of control data is recommended. These guidelines are aimed at veterinarians and veterinary technicians seeking to improve management of POCT in their clinical or research setting, and address QA of small chemistry and hematology instruments. These guidelines are not intended to be all-inclusive; rather, they provide a minimum standard for maintenance of POCT instruments in the veterinary setting.

  9. [Sedation and analgesia assessment tools in ICU patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuong, M

    2008-01-01

    Sedative and analgesic treatment administered to critically ill patients need to be regularly assessed to ensure that predefinite goals are well achieved as the risk of complications of oversedation is minimized. In most of the cases, which are lightly sedation patients, the goal to reach is a calm, cooperative and painless patient, adapted to the ventilator. Recently, eight new bedside scoring systems to monitor sedation have been developed and mainly tested for reliability and validity. The choice of a sedation scale measuring level of consciousness, could be made between the Ramsay sedation scale, the Richmond Agitation Sedation scale (RASS) and the Adaptation to The Intensive Care Environment scale-ATICE. The Behavioral Pain Scale (BPS) is a behavioral pain scale. Two of them have been tested with strong evidence of their clinimetric properties: ATICE, RASS. The nurses'preference for a convenient tool could be defined by the level of reliability, the level of clarity, the variety of sedation and agitation states represented user friendliness and speed. In fine, the choice between a simple scale easy to use and a well-defined and complex scale has to be discussed and determined in each unit. Actually, randomized controlled studies are needed to assess the potential superiority of one scale compared with others scales, including evaluation of the reliability and the compliance to the scale. The usefulness of the BIS in ICU for patients lightly sedated is limited, mainly because of EMG artefact, when subjective scales are more appropriated in this situation. On the other hand, subjective scales are insensitive to detect oversedation in patients requiring deep sedation. The contribution of the BIS in deeply sedation patients, patients under neuromuscular blockade or barbiturates has to be proved. Pharmacoeconomics studies are lacking.

  10. [Administration of intravenous sedation with midazolam by dentists is unsafe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broers, D L M; Plat, J; de Jongh, A; Zuidgeest, T G M; Blom, H C C M; Kraaijenhagen, A E; Pieterse, C M; Bildt, M M

    2015-03-01

    In the December issue of the Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Tandheelkunde (Dutch Journal of Dentistry) in 2014, an article was devoted to the use of light sedation with midazolam by dentists. A number of dentists who are active in the area of Special Dentistry (anxiety management, care of the disabled) and a anesthesiologist offer a response to the article and argue that the administration of intravenous sedation with midazolam by dentists is unsafe.

  11. Time to follow guidelines, protocols, and structured procedures in medical care and time to leap out

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobo-Greenhut A

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ayala Kobo-Greenhut,1–3 Amos Notea,2,3 Meir Ruach,4 Erez Onn,4 Yehunatan Hasin1 1Bar-Ilan University, Tel Aviv, Israel; 2Technion, Haifa, Israel; 3Kinneret College, Galilee, Israel; 4Baruch Padeh Medical Center, Poriya, Israel Abstract: Present medical practice encourages management according to written guidelines, protocols, and structured procedures (GPPs. Daily medical practice includes instances in which “leaping: from one patient management routine to another is a must. We define “frozen patient management:, when patient management leaping was required but was not performed. Frozen patient management may cause significant damage to patient safety and health and the treatment quality. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of GPP-guided medical practice and gives an explanation of the problem of frozen patient management in light of quality engineering, control engineering, and learning processes. Our analysis of frozen patient management is based on consideration of medical care as a process. By considering medical care processes as a closed-loop control process, it is possible to explain why, when an indication for deviation from the expected occurs, it does not necessarily attract the medical teams' attention, thereby preventing the realization that leaping to an alternative patient management is needed. We suggest that working according to GPPs intensifies the frozen patient management problem since working according to GPPs relates to “exploitation learning behavior”, while leaping to new patient management relates to “exploration learning behavior”. We indicate practice routines to be incorporated into GPP-guided medical care, to reduce frozen patient management. Keywords: guidelines, protocols, structured procedures, frozen patient management, close loop

  12. [Guidelines for evaluating the viability of health care centers: test in northern Cameroon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bene, T; Mevel, A; Yougouda, A; Fontaine, D

    1998-01-01

    A working group has developed a manual of practical guidelines for evaluating the viability of health care centers (HCC). These guidelines were tested in 1996 at the HCC in Badjouma, Cameroon. Viability is assessed in three dimensions, i.e. quality of care, cost-effectiveness, and institutional efficacy on the basis of the demand for services, staff requirements, cash flow, and supply costs. Regular evaluation of these parameters allows identification of areas requiring improvement to enhance the viability of the HCC. With only 0.29 visits per year per inhabitant, the attendance rate at the Badjouma facility is low. Public appeal is adversely affected by an under-qualified staff and poor equipment. Overall operating expenses are 6.8 million CFA francs per year and depreciation costs are 1.7 million CFA francs per year. Direct proceeds related to health care services (mainly sale of medication) are 4.1 million CFA francs. The remaining sources of revenue are state subsidies (2.5 million CFA francs) and international aid (0.4 million CFA francs). The deficit is 1.5 million CFA francs corresponding mainly to depreciation costs. Evaluation of the financial viability based on service-generated revenues alone (49%) and on combined domestic revenues, i.e. service revenues and state subsidies (79%), shows that the HCC depends mainly on depreciation costs. Analysis of institutional efficacy by comparing real activity with activity defined in official texts showed that the state was the main decision-maker but also revealed a tendency to pass off responsibility due to poorly defined command structure. The results of this test validate the proposed manual as a tool for global analysis of the activity and relevance of a HCC. Findings can be used to draw conclusions on the effects of national health policies at the local level.

  13. Enteral nutritional therapy in septic patients in the intensive care unit: compliance with nutritional guidelines for critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pasinato, Valeska Fernandes; Berbigier, Marina Carvalho; Rubin, Bibiana de Almeida; Castro, Kamila; Moraes,Rafael Barberena; Perry, Ingrid Dalira Schweigert

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the compliance of septic patients' nutritional management with enteral nutrition guidelines for critically ill patients. Methods Prospective cohort study with 92 septic patients, age ≥18 years, hospitalized in an intensive care unit, under enteral nutrition, evaluated according to enteral nutrition guidelines for critically ill patients, compliance with caloric and protein goals, and reasons for not starting enteral nutrition early or for discontinuing it. Prognostic scores...

  14. Current sedation and monitoring practice for colonoscopy: an International Observational Study (EPAGE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froehlich, F; Harris, JK; Wietlisbach, V;

    2006-01-01

    in endoscopy centers internationally. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This observational study included consecutive patients referred for colonoscopy at 21 centers in 11 countries. Endoscopists reported sedation and monitoring practice, using a standard questionnaire for each patient. RESULTS: 6004 patients were......BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Sedation and monitoring practice during colonoscopy varies between centers and over time. Knowledge of current practice is needed to ensure quality of care and help focus future research. The objective of this study was to examine sedation and monitoring practice...... included in this study, of whom 53 % received conscious/moderate sedation during colonoscopy, 30 % received deep sedation, and 17 % received no sedation. Sedation agents most commonly used were midazolam (47 %) and opioids (33 %). Pulse oximetry was done during colonoscopy in 77 % of patients, blood...

  15. Does type of instrument influence colonoscopy performance and sedation practice?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramesh P Arasaradnam; Paul D Hurlstone

    2007-01-01

    @@ TO THE EDITOR In the UK, clear guidelines exist as to the expected levelof competence an individual endoscopist should achieve.This is of utmost importance given the variance inpractice among endoscopic departments as highlightedby the National Colonoscopy audit in 2002[1]. The auditedvariables included sedation practice, caecal completion andcomtlication rates, but not the Wpe of instrument used.

  16. [Guidelines for the prevention and control of tuberculosis in health care workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Irma; Dominguez, Jose; Rodríguez, Soledad; Matllo, Joan; Altet, Neus

    2015-12-21

    Tuberculosis remains one of the communicable diseases that cause increased morbidity and mortality worldwide. With an incidence rate of 13,04 per 100,000 population, Spain ranks third among the most affected European countries. These data show a tendency to decrease meaning that it may go unnoticed with the potential to miss the appropriate preventive measures in a suspected case. In centers where patients are treated with tuberculosis, health care worker presents risk of transmission. This risk is higher in some areas or work units. The Occupational health physicians' services, which monitorize the health of health care workers, use different strategies in order to prevent and detect tuberculosis infection. The national guidelines include the tuberculin skin test as a screening test for tuberculosis infection with mention of new diagnostic tests based on the in vitro detection of gamma interferon (IGRA) for certain cases. The purpose of this guide is to establish common criteria for IGRA tests, as a supplementary aid to the tuberculin skin test in health care workers, from the evidence available today. Recommendations for its use have been adapted to the different situations faced by the professionals involved in monitoring the health of health workers.

  17. Time to follow guidelines, protocols, and structured procedures in medical care and time to leap out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobo-Greenhut, Ayala; Notea, Amos; Ruach, Meir; Onn, Erez; Hasin, Yehunatan

    2014-01-01

    Present medical practice encourages management according to written guidelines, protocols, and structured procedures (GPPs). Daily medical practice includes instances in which "leaping" from one patient management routine to another is a must. We define "frozen patient management", when patient management leaping was required but was not performed. Frozen patient management may cause significant damage to patient safety and health and the treatment quality. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of GPP-guided medical practice and gives an explanation of the problem of frozen patient management in light of quality engineering, control engineering, and learning processes. Our analysis of frozen patient management is based on consideration of medical care as a process. By considering medical care processes as a closed-loop control process, it is possible to explain why, when an indication for deviation from the expected occurs, it does not necessarily attract the medical teams' attention, thereby preventing the realization that leaping to an alternative patient management is needed. We suggest that working according to GPPs intensifies the frozen patient management problem since working according to GPPs relates to "exploitation learning behavior", while leaping to new patient management relates to "exploration learning behavior". We indicate practice routines to be incorporated into GPP-guided medical care, to reduce frozen patient management.

  18. [Invasive candidiasis in non-neutropenic adults : Guideline-based management in the intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glöckner, A; Cornely, O A

    2013-12-01

    Invasive Candida infections represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for clinicians particularly in the intensive care unit (ICU). Despite substantial advances in antifungal agents and treatment strategies, invasive candidiasis remains associated with a high mortality. Recent guideline recommendations on the management of invasive candidiasis by the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) from 2012, the German Speaking Mycological Society and the Paul Ehrlich Society for Chemotherapy (DMykG/PEG) from 2011 and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) from 2009 provide valuable guidance for diagnostic procedures and treatment of these infections but need to be interpreted in the light of the individual situation of the patient and the local epidemiology of fungal pathogens. The following recommendations for management of candidemia are common to all three guidelines. Any positive blood culture for Candida indicates disseminated infection or deep organ infection and requires antifungal therapy. Treatment should be initiated as soon as possible. Removal or changing of central venous catheters or other foreign material in the bloodstream is recommended whenever possible. Ophthalmological examination for exclusion of endophthalmitis and follow-up blood cultures during therapy are also recommended. Duration of therapy should be 14 days after clearance of blood cultures and resolution of symptoms. Consideration of surgical options and a prolonged antifungal treatment (weeks to months) are required when there is organ involvement. During the last decade several new antifungal agents were introduced into clinical practice. These innovative drugs showed convincing efficacy and favorable safety in randomized clinical trials. Consequently, they were integrated in recent therapeutic guidelines, often replacing former standard drugs as first-line options. Echinocandins have emerged as the generally preferred primary treatment in

  19. Performing bone marrow biopsies with or without sedation: a comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoutsos, I; Grech, H; Maboreke, T; Morgenstern, G

    2004-06-01

    Although intravenous sedation (ISED) in addition to a local anaesthetic (LA) is commonly used in the performance of a bone marrow aspirate and trephine (BMAT), it is not clear under what circumstances and in which way sedation may be most beneficial. In this study, information was gathered using a questionnaire, from 112 patients shortly after undergoing BMAT; the duration of the procedures and the length of the biopsy cores were measured and any complications noted. Most patients (68%) chose to receive LA only, and almost all (74/76) were happy with their decision. Patients who received sedation gave lower pain scores than patients receiving LA only (1 vs. 3) and were found to have lower levels of apprehension at the thought of having a repeat procedure. Patients having a repeat BMAT showed a slightly increased preference for having sedation compared with patients who were undergoing it for the first time. There is some concern that guidelines regarding the use of ISED for procedures other than BMAT are not always adhered to, and current practice may be best revealed by a large-scale audit of sedation practice for the performance of BMAT. Patients should be given the choice of having ISED if the appropriate resources are available, but in most cases the additional small risk of receiving sedation can be avoided.

  20. Nursing Activities Score: an updated guideline for its application in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Grillo Padilha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To describe nursing workload in Intensive Care Units (ICU in different countries according to the scores obtained with Nursing Activities Score (NAS and to verify the agreement among countries on the NAS guideline interpretation. Method This cross-sectional study considered 1-day measure of NAS (November 2012 obtained from 758 patients in 19 ICUs of seven countries (Norway, the Netherlands, Spain, Poland, Egypt, Greece and Brazil. The Delphi technique was used in expertise meetings and consensus. Results The NAS score was 72.8% in average, ranging from 44.5% (Spain to 101.8% (Norway. The mean NAS score from Poland, Greece and Egypt was 83.0%, 64.6% and 57.1%, respectively. The NAS score was similar in Brazil (54.0% and in the Netherlands (51.0%. There were doubts in the understanding of five out 23 items of the NAS (21.7% which were discussed until researchers’ consensus. Conclusion NAS score were different in the seven countries. Future studies must verify if the fine standardization of the guideline can have a impact on differences in the NAS results.

  1. Guidelines for conducting rigorous health care psychosocial cross-cultural/language qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriaza, Pablo; Nedjat-Haiem, Frances; Lee, Hee Yun; Martin, Shadi S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to synthesize and chronicle the authors' experiences as four bilingual and bicultural researchers, each experienced in conducting cross-cultural/cross-language qualitative research. Through narrative descriptions of experiences with Latinos, Iranians, and Hmong refugees, the authors discuss their rewards, challenges, and methods of enhancing rigor, trustworthiness, and transparency when conducting cross-cultural/cross-language research. The authors discuss and explore how to effectively manage cross-cultural qualitative data, how to effectively use interpreters and translators, how to identify best methods of transcribing data, and the role of creating strong community relationships. The authors provide guidelines for health care professionals to consider when engaging in cross-cultural qualitative research.

  2. EU guidelines for the care and welfare of an "exceptional invertebrate class" in scientific research. Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Alessandra; Vitale, Augusto; Carere, Claudio; Alleva, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Cephalopods have been defined as "advanced invertebrates" due to the complexity of their nervous system and to their sophisticated behavioural repertoire. However, until recently, the protection and welfare of this class of invertebrates has been mostly disregarded by EU regulations on the use of laboratory animals. The inclusion of "live cephalopods" in the Directive 2010/63/EU has been prompted by new scientific knowledge on the "sentience" of animals used for experimental or other scientific purposes, a fundamental criterion to which animal species are included or not under the protective umbrella of the Directive. In this scenario, the imminent publication of the Guidelines for the care and welfare of cephalopods in research as an initiative by the CephRes-FELASA-Boyd Group is a sign of ethical progress in the consideration of animals in research, and is likely to have a significant impact on both scientific and practical aspects of research conducted with these animals.

  3. Implementing nutrition guidelines for older people in residential care homes: a qualitative study using Normalization Process Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamford Claire

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimizing the dietary intake of older people can prevent nutritional deficiencies and diet-related diseases, thereby improving quality of life. However, there is evidence that the nutritional intake of older people living in care homes is suboptimal, with high levels of saturated fat, salt, and added sugars. The UK Food Standards Agency therefore developed nutrient- and food-based guidance for residential care homes. The acceptability of these guidelines and their feasibility in practice is unknown. This study used the Normalization Process Theory (NPT to understand the barriers and facilitators to implementing the guidelines and inform future implementation. Methods We conducted a process evaluation in five care homes in the north of England using qualitative methods (observation and interviews to explore the views of managers, care staff, catering staff, and domestic staff. Data were analyzed thematically and discussed in data workshops; emerging themes were then mapped to the constructs of NPT. Results Many staff perceived the guidelines as unnecessarily restrictive and irrelevant to older people. In terms of NPT, the guidelines simply did not make sense (coherence, and as a result, relatively few staff invested in the guidelines (cognitive participation. Even where staff supported the guidelines, implementation was hampered by a lack of nutritional knowledge and institutional support (collective action. Finally, the absence of observable benefits to clients confirmed the negative preconceptions of many staff, with limited evidence of reappraisal following implementation (reflexive monitoring. Conclusions The successful implementation of the nutrition guidelines requires that the fundamental issues relating to their perceived value and fit with other priorities and goals be addressed. Specialist support is needed to equip staff with the technical knowledge and skills required for menu analysis and development and to

  4. [Guidelines for intensive care in cardiac surgery patients: haemodynamic monitoring and cardio-circulatory treatment guidelines of the German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery and the German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, M; Alms, A; Braun, J; Dongas, A; Erb, J; Goetz, A; Göpfert, M; Gogarten, W; Grosse, J; Heller, A; Heringlake, M; Kastrup, M; Kröner, A; Loer, S; Marggraf, G; Markewitz, A; Reuter, M; Schmitt, D V; Schirmer, U; Wiesenack, C; Zwissler, B; Spies, C

    2007-03-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring and adequate volume-therapy, as well as the treatment with positive inotropic drugs and vasopressors, are the basic principles of the postoperative intensive care treatment of patient after cardiothoracic surgery. The goal of these S3 guidelines is to evaluate the recommendations in regard to evidence based medicine and to define therapy goals for monitoring and therapy. In context with the clinical situation the evaluation of the different hemodynamic parameters allows the development of a therapeutic concept and the definition of goal criteria to evaluate the effect of treatment. Up to now there are only guidelines for subareas of postoperative treatment of cardiothoracic surgical patients, like the use of a pulmonary artery catheter or the transesophageal echocardiography. The German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery and the German Society for Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine made an approach to ensure and improve the quality of the postoperative intensive care medicine after cardiothoracic surgery by the development of S3 consensus-based treatment guidelines. Goal of this guideline is to assess available monitoring methods and their risks as well as the differentiated therapy of volume-replacement, positive inotropic support and vasoactive drugs, the therapy with vasodilators, inodilators and calcium-sensitizers and the use of intra-aortic balloon pumps. The guideline has been developed according to the recommendations for the development of guidelines by the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF). The presented key messages of the guidelines were approved after two consensus meetings under the moderation of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF).

  5. Policies and guidelines outside the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry: influencing oral health care for persons with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keels, Martha Ann

    2007-01-01

    Organizations other than the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) have produced policies and guidelines regarding oral health care for persons with special health care needs (PSHCN). These organizations may be classified as: (1) educational groups; (2) legislative groups; (3) research-oriented groups; (4) industry groups; and (5) parent support groups. The other dental organization heavily advocating for oral health for PSHCN is the Special Care Dentistry Association. Diagnosis-based associations, such as the National Foundation for Ectodermal Dysplasia, also provide caregiver and patient support. Legislative agendas at the state and federal levels are aimed at improving the oral health of PSHCN. The purpose of this paper is to review the policies and guidelines outside AAPD influencing oral health care for PSHCN. AAPD should be aware of these activities and develop such policies in concert with other organizations where feasible.

  6. Supervised versus non-supervised implementation of an oral health care guideline in (residential care homes: a cluster randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Baat Cees

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increase of the proportion of elderly people has implications for health care services. Advances in oral health care and treatment have resulted in a reduced number of edentulous individuals. An increasing number of dentate elderly people have tooth wear, periodontal disease, oral implants, and sophisticated restorations and prostheses. Hence, they are in need of both preventive and curative oral health care continuously. Weakened oral health due to neglect of self care and professional care and due to reduced oral health care utilization is already present when elderly people are still community-dwelling. At the moment of (residential care home admittance, many elderly people are in need of oral health care urgently. The key factor in realizing and maintaining good oral health is daily oral hygiene care. For proper daily oral hygiene care, many residents are dependent on nurses and nurse aides. In 2007, the Dutch guideline "Oral health care in (residential care homes for elderly people" was developed. Previous implementation research studies have revealed that implementation of a guideline is very complicated. The overall aim of this study is to compare a supervised versus a non-supervised implementation of the guideline in The Netherlands and Flanders (Belgium. Methods/Design The study is a cluster randomized intervention trial with an institution as unit of randomization. A random sample of 12 (residential care homes accommodating somatic as well as psycho-geriatric residents in The Netherlands as well as in Flanders (Belgium are randomly allocated to an intervention or control group. Representative samples of 30 residents in each of the 24 (residential care homes are monitored during a 6-months period. The intervention consists of supervised implementation of the guideline and a daily oral health care protocol. Primary outcome variable is the oral hygiene level of the participating residents. To determine the

  7. Advanced Imaging and Receipt of Guideline Concordant Care in Women with Early Stage Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Trice Loggers

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. It is unknown whether advanced imaging (AI is associated with higher quality breast cancer (BC care. Materials and Methods. Claims and Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results data were linked for women diagnosed with incident stage I-III BC between 2002 and 2008 in western Washington State. We examined receipt of preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI or AI (defined as computed tomography [CT]/positron emission tomography [PET]/PET/CT versus mammogram and/or ultrasound (M-US alone and receipt of guideline concordant care (GCC using multivariable logistic regression. Results. Of 5247 women, 67% received M-US, 23% MRI, 8% CT, and 3% PET/PET-CT. In 2002, 5% received MRI and 5% AI compared to 45% and 12%, respectively, in 2008. 79% received GCC, but GCC declined over time and was associated with younger age, urban residence, less comorbidity, shorter time from diagnosis to surgery, and earlier year of diagnosis. Breast MRI was associated with GCC for lumpectomy plus radiation therapy (RT (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.08–2.26, and p=0.02 and AI was associated with GCC for adjuvant chemotherapy for estrogen-receptor positive (ER+ BC (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.17–2.59, and p=0.01. Conclusion. GCC was associated with prior receipt of breast MRI and AI for lumpectomy plus RT and adjuvant chemotherapy for ER+ BC, respectively.

  8. Realizing good care within a context of cross-cultural diversity: an ethical guideline for healthcare organizations in Flanders, Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denier, Yvonne; Gastmans, Chris

    2013-09-01

    In our globalizing world, health care professionals and organizations increasingly experience cross-cultural challenges in care relationships, which give rise to ethical questions regarding "the right thing to do" in such situations. For the time being, the international literature lacks examples of elaborated ethical guidelines for cross-cultural healthcare on the organizational level. As such, the ethical responsibility of healthcare organizations in realizing cross-cultural care remains underexposed. This paper aims to fill this gap by offering a case-study that illustrates the bioethical practice on a large-scale organizational level by presenting the ethical guideline developed in the period 2007-2011 by the Ethics Committee of Zorgnet Vlaanderen, a Christian-inspired umbrella organization for over 500 social profit healthcare organizations in Flanders, Belgium. The guideline offers an ethical framework within which fundamental ethical values are being analyzed within the context of cross-cultural care. The case study concludes with implications for healthcare practice on four different levels: (1) the level of the healthcare organization, (2) staff, (3) care receivers, and (4) the level of care supply. The study combines content-based ethics with process-based benchmarks.

  9. Guideline recommendations for long-term treatment of depression with antidepressants in primary care-a critical review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piek, Ellen; van der Meer, Klaas; Nolen, Willem A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Long-term treatment with antidepressants is considered effective in preventing recurrence of major depressive disorder (MDD). It is unclear whether this is true for primary care. Objectives: We investigated whether current guideline recommendations for long-term treatment with antidepres

  10. Review of Reports to COSPAR: COSPAR Policy and Guidelines for the Utilization and Care of Animals Used in Space Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Alex

    The purpose of this session is to review the reports by the various countries that have flown animals in space during the proceeding 2 years to be in compliance with the Cospar resolution: Cospar Policy and Guidelines for the Utilization and Care of Animals Used in Space Research.

  11. Review of the COSPAR policy and guidelines for the utilization and care of animals used in space research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Alex

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this session is to review reports by the various countries that have flown animals in space during the proceeding 2 years to be in compliance with the COSPAR resolution: COSPAR Policy and Guidelines for the Utilization and Care of Animals Used in Space Research.

  12. Adherence to safe handling guidelines by health care workers who administer antineoplastic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiano, James M; Steege, Andrea L; Sweeney, Marie H

    2014-01-01

    The toxicity of antineoplastic drugs is well documented. Many are known or suspected human carcinogens where no safe exposure level exists. Authoritative guidelines developed by professional practice organizations and federal agencies for the safe handling of these hazardous drugs have been available for nearly three decades. As a means of evaluating the extent of use of primary prevention practices such as engineering, administrative and work practice controls, personal protective equipment (PPE), and barriers to using PPE, the National Institute for Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted a web survey of health care workers in 2011. The study population primarily included members of professional practice organizations representing health care occupations which routinely use or come in contact with selected chemical agents. All respondents who indicated that they administered antineoplastic drugs in the past week were eligible to complete a hazard module addressing self-reported health and safety practices on this topic. Most (98%) of the 2069 respondents of this module were nurses. Working primarily in hospitals, outpatient care centers, and physician offices, respondents reported that they had collectively administered over 90 specific antineoplastic drugs in the past week, with carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel the most common. Examples of activities which increase exposure risk, expressed as percent of respondents, included: failure to wear nonabsorbent gown with closed front and tight cuffs (42%); intravenous (I.V.) tubing primed with antineoplastic drug by respondent (6%) or by pharmacy (12%); potentially contaminated clothing taken home (12%); spill or leak of antineoplastic drug during administration (12%); failure to wear chemotherapy gloves (12%); and lack of hazard awareness training (4%). The most common reason for not wearing gloves or gowns was "skin exposure was minimal"; 4% of respondents, however, reported skin contact during handling and

  13. The importance of evidence-based supportive care practice guidelines in childhood cancer-a plea for their development and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffen, E A H; Kremer, L C M; Mulder, R L; Font-Gonzalez, A; Dupuis, L L; Sung, L; Robinson, P D; van de Wetering, M D; Tissing, W J E

    2017-04-01

    As cure rates in pediatric oncology have improved substantially over the last decades, supportive care has become increasingly important to reduce morbidity and mortality and improve quality of life in children with cancer. Currently, large variations exist in pediatric oncology supportive care practice, which might negatively influence care. This plea underlines the importance of development and implementation of trustworthy supportive care clinical practice guidelines, which we believe is the essential next step towards better supportive care practice, and thus a higher quality of care. To facilitate international development and endorsement, the International Pediatric Oncology Guidelines in Supportive Care Network has been established.

  14. Clinical care for severe influenza and other severe illness in resource-limited settings: the need for evidence and guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Justin R; Jacob, Shevin T; West, T Eoin

    2013-09-01

    The 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic highlighted the importance of quality hospital care of the severely ill, yet there is evidence that the impact of the 2009 pandemic was highest in low- and middle-income countries with fewer resources. Recent data indicate that death and suffering from seasonal influenza and severe illness in general are increased in resource-limited settings. However, there are limited clinical data and guidelines for the management of influenza and other severe illness in these settings. Life-saving supportive care through syndromic case management is used successfully in high-resource intensive care units and in global programs such as the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI). While there are a variety of challenges to the management of the severely ill in resource-limited settings, several new international initiatives have begun to develop syndromic management strategies for these environments, including the World Health Organization's Integrated Management of Adult and Adolescent Illness Program. These standardized clinical guidelines emphasize syndromic case management and do not require high-resource intensive care units. These efforts must be enhanced by quality clinical research to provide missing evidence and to refine recommendations, which must be carefully integrated into existing healthcare systems. Realizing a sustainable, global impact on death and suffering due to severe influenza and other severe illness necessitates an ongoing and concerted international effort to iteratively generate, implement, and evaluate best-practice management guidelines for use in resource-limited settings.

  15. Transition guidelines: An important step in the future care for childhood cancer survivors. A comprehensive definition as groundwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, R L; van der Pal, H J H; Levitt, G A; Skinner, R; Kremer, L C M; Brown, M C; Bárdi, E; Windsor, R; Michel, G; Frey, E

    2016-02-01

    Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines are essential to ensure that childhood cancer survivors at risk of chronic health conditions receive effective long-term follow-up care. However, adult survivors of childhood cancer are not always engaged in recommended health promotion and follow-up practices, as many centres do not have a formal transition programme that prepares survivors and their families for successful transfer from child-centred to adult-oriented healthcare. The need for a specific pan-European guideline for the transition of care for childhood cancer survivors has been recognised. The first step is to define the concept of transition of care for survivors of childhood cancer based on existing evidence.

  16. Patient-ventilator asynchrony during daily interruption of sedation versus no sedation protocol

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Daily interruption of sedation could minimize the problem of sedatives accumulation. Nevertheless, whatever is the sedation strategy; sedation, particularly deep levels, has been associated with high frequency of patient-ventilator asynchrony. Extending these findings, one would expect that no sedation protocol could reduce the frequency of patient-ventilator asynchrony. Aim: To assess the effect of no sedation protocol compared with daily interruption of sedation on patient-ven...

  17. Pressure during decision making of continuous sedation in end-of-life situations in Dutch general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanker, Marco H.; Roessink, Marlies; Swart, Siebe J.; Zuurmond, Wouter W. A.; van der Heide, Agnes; Perez, Roberto S. G. M.; Rietjens, Judith A. C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Little is known about pressure from patients or relatives on physician's decision making of continuous palliative sedation. We aim to describe experienced pressure by general practitioners (GPs) in cases of continuous sedation after the introduction of the Dutch practice guideline, using

  18. [Nursing management of ventilation and sedation in patients suffering from septic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridey, Céline; Mathieu, Soulène; Steiger, Magali; Trari, Vanessa; Lavoivre, Christine; Ducrocq, Nicolas; Levy, Bruno; Gérard, Alain; Augros, Johann

    2012-06-01

    A significant number of intubated, ventilated and sedated patients suffering from septic shock develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The supervision by a multidisciplinary team optimises both the management of ventilation and the sedation analgesia of the patient. The nursing supervision and care related to this pathology are specific.

  19. Physician reports of terminal sedation without hydration or nutrition for patients nearing death in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van der Heide (Agnes); A.M. Vrakking (Astrid); B.D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen (Bregje); P.J. van der Maas (Paul); G. van der Wal (Gerrit); J.A.C. Rietjens (Judith)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Terminal sedation in patients nearing death is an important issue related to end-of-life care. OBJECTIVE: To describe the practice of terminal sedation in the Netherlands. DESIGN: Face-to-face interviews. SETTING: The Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Nationwide st

  20. [Guideline 'Incontinence urine and feces' of the Dutch Preventive Youth Health Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltman, Maaike; Deurloo, Jacqueline A; van Leerdam, Frank J M; Wierenga-van der Hoeven, Catelijne J; Bulk-Bunschoten, Anneke M W; Kamphuis, Mascha

    2012-01-01

    Continence problems can occur during childhood. This guideline is for the Dutch Youth Health Care (JGZ) and gives recommendations for the prevention, early detection and treatment of these problems. As a preventative measure advices for potty training should be started in children aged 18-24 months. If incontinence is present, it is important to take a history and carry out physical examination. In children over the age of 5 who are incontinent of urine the following are recommended: taking child out of bed, calendar with reward system, bedwetting alarm or voiding diary; children over the age of 8 can follow dry bed training. Faecal incontinence is often associated with constipation. Incontinent children with constipation are given advice about normal eating and exercise patterns. If this is not successful then laxatives are prescribed. The JGZ should refer further if there are indications of an underlying condition; if children over the age of 5 are wet during the day; if children are incontinent of faeces at night; if children are incontinent of faeces but not constipated; if children persistently wet the bed; if there is faecal incontinence despite counselling, and if medication needs to be prescribed.

  1. Sedation and Analgesia in Burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özkan Akıncı

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Burn injury is one of the most serious injuries that mankind may face. In addition to serious inflammation, excessive fluid loss, presence of hemodynamic instability due to intercurrent factors such as debridements, infections and organ failure, very different levels and intensities of pain, psychological problems such as traumatic stress disorder, depression, delirium at different levels that occur in patient with severe burn are the factors which make it difficult to provide the patient comfort. In addition to a mild to moderate level of baseline permanent pain in burn patients, which is due to tissue damage, there is procedural pain as well, which occurs by treatments such as grafting and dressings, that are severe, short-term burst style 'breakthrough' pain. Movement and tactile stimuli are also seen in burn injury as an effect to sensitize the peripheral and central nervous system. Even though many burn centers have established protocols to struggle with the pain, studies show that pain relief still inadequate in burn patients. Therefore, the treatment of burn pain and the prevention of possible emergence of future psychiatric problems suc as post-traumatic stress disorder, the sedative and anxiolytic agents should be used as a recommendation according to the needs and hemodynamic status of individual patient. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 26-30

  2. Analyzing the "CareGap": assessing gaps in adherence to clinical guidelines in adult soft tissue sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waks, Zeev; Goldbraich, Esther; Farkash, Ariel; Torresani, Michele; Bertulli, Rossella; Restifo, Nicola; Locatelli, Paolo; Casali, Paolo; Carmeli, Boaz

    2013-01-01

    Clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) are gaining popularity as tools that assist physicians in optimizing medical care. These systems typically comply with evidence-based medicine and are designed with input from domain experts. Nonetheless, deviations from CDSS recommendations are abundant across a broad spectrum of disorders, raising the question as to why this phenomenon exists. Here, we analyze this gap in adherence to a clinical guidelines-based CDSS by examining the physician treatment decisions for 1329 adult soft tissue sarcoma patients in northern Italy using patient-specific parameters. Dubbing this analysis "CareGap", we find that deviations correlate strongly with certain disease features such as local versus metastatic clinical presentation. We also notice that deviations from the guideline-based CDSS suggestions occur more frequently for patients with shorter survival time. Such observations can direct physicians' attention to distinct patient cohorts that are prone to higher deviation levels from clinical practice guidelines. This illustrates the value of CareGap analysis in assessing quality of care for subsets of patients within a larger pathology.

  3. Minimum standard guidelines of care on requirements for setting up a laser room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhepe Niteen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction, definition, rationale and scope: Lasers are now becoming an integral part of dermatological practice in India, with more and more dermatologists starting laser dermatology practice. Lasers, when are used with care, by properly trained operators, in carefully designed environment, can deliver a range of useful aesthetic and dermatologic treatments. Facility: Laser treatment is an office procedure, hence it does not require hospital set-up. The laser room facility requires careful planning keeping in mind safety of both patient and operator, convenience of operating, and optimum handling of costly equipments. The facility should be designed to handle procedures under local anesthesia and sedation. Facilities, staff and equipment to handle any emergencies should be available. Location: A room in existing dermatology clinic can be adequately converted to a laser room. Dimensions of laser room, its door and patient′s table should be such that it should facilitate easy movement of patient, machine trolley, operator and assistant in case of routine procedures and in emergency. Physician Qualification: Any dermatologist with MD or diploma in dermatology can do laser procedures, provided he/ she has acquired necessary skills by virtue of training, observing a competent dermatologist. Such training may be obtained during post graduation or later in specified workshops or courses under a competent dermatologist or at centre which routinely performs such procedures. Electricity and uninterrupted power supply: Laser equipments should be connected to stabilizer or UPS circuits only. Preferably an on line UPS as recommended by the laser company should be installed. Earthing of the equipment is essential to avoid damage to the equipment and electrical shocks to the operator. Sufficient power back up to complete the procedure if power is off midway, is essential. Air-conditioning: Laser machines should be operated in low ambient temperature, with

  4. Update: Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Infants and Children with Possible Zika Virus Infection--United States, February 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming-Dutra, Katherine E; Nelson, Jennifer M; Fischer, Marc; Staples, J Erin; Karwowski, Mateusz P; Mead, Paul; Villanueva, Julie; Renquist, Christina M; Minta, Anna A; Jamieson, Denise J; Honein, Margaret A; Moore, Cynthia A; Rasmussen, Sonja A

    2016-02-26

    CDC has updated its interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in areas with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy and expanded guidelines to include infants and children with possible acute Zika virus disease. This update contains a new recommendation for routine care for infants born to mothers who traveled to or resided in areas with Zika virus transmission during pregnancy but did not receive Zika virus testing, when the infant has a normal head circumference, normal prenatal and postnatal ultrasounds (if performed), and normal physical examination. Acute Zika virus disease should be suspected in an infant or child aged Zika virus during delivery is possible, acute Zika virus disease should also be suspected in an infant during the first 2 weeks of life 1) whose mother traveled to or resided in an affected area within 2 weeks of delivery and 2) who has ≥2 of the following manifestations: fever, rash, conjunctivitis, or arthralgia. Evidence suggests that Zika virus illness in children is usually mild. As an arboviral disease, Zika virus disease is nationally notifiable. Health care providers should report suspected cases of Zika virus disease to their local, state, or territorial health departments to arrange testing and so that action can be taken to reduce the risk for local Zika virus transmission. As new information becomes available, these guidelines will be updated: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/.

  5. Evaluation of adult outpatient magnetic resonance imaging sedation practices: are patients being sedated optimally?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middelkamp, J.E. [Univ. of British Columbia Diagnostic Radiology Residency Program, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Forster, B.B, E-mail: Bruce.Forster@vch.ca [Vancouver Hospital, Univ. of British Columbia site, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Keogh, C. [Brooke Radiology, Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada); Lennox, P.; Mayson, K. [Vancouver Hospital, Dept. of Anesthesia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2009-10-15

    To evaluate the use of anxiolytics in adult outpatient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) centres and to determine whether utilisation is optimal based on the pharmacology of the drugs used, who prescribes these drugs, and how patients are managed after administration. Identical paper and Web-based surveys were used to anonymously collect data about radiologists' use of anxiolytic agents for adult outpatient MRI examinations. The survey questions were about the type of facility, percentage of studies that require sedation, the drug used and route of administration, who orders the drug, timing of administration, patient monitoring during and observation after the study, use of a dedicated nurse for monitoring, and use of standard sedation and discharge protocols. The {chi}2 analysis for statistical association among variables was used. Eighty-five of 263 surveys were returned (32% response rate). The radiologist ordered the medication (53%) in slightly more facilities than the referring physician (44%) or the nurse. Forty percent of patients received medication 15-30 minutes before MRI, which is too early for peak effect of oral or sublingual drugs. Lorazepam was most commonly used (64% first choice). Facilities with standard sedation protocols (56%) were more likely to use midazolam than those without standard sedation protocols (17% vs 10%), to have a nurse for monitoring (P = .032), to have standard discharge criteria (P = .001), and to provide written information regarding adverse effects (P = .002). Many outpatients in MRI centres may be scanned before the peak effect of anxiolytics prescribed. A standard sedation protocol in such centres is associated with a more appropriate drug choice, as well as optimized monitoring and postprocedure care. (author)

  6. Reflexology: its effects on physiological anxiety signs and sedation needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin Korhan, Esra; Khorshid, Leyla; Uyar, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether reflexology has an effect on the physiological signs of anxiety and level of sedation in patients receiving mechanically ventilated support, a single blinded, randomized controlled design with repeated measures was used in the intensive care unit of a university hospital in Turkey. Patients (n = 60) aged between 18 and 70 years and were hospitalized in the intensive care unit and receiving mechanically ventilated support. Participants were randomized to a control group or an intervention group. The latter received 30 minutes of reflexology therapy on their feet, hands, and ears for 5 days. Subjects had vital signs taken immediately before the intervention and at the 10th, 20th, and 30th minutes of the intervention. In the collection of the data, "American Association of Critical-Care Nurses Sedation Assessment Scale" was used. The reflexology therapy group had a significantly lower heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and respiratory rate than the control group. A statistically significant difference was found between the averages of the scores that the patients included in the experimental and control groups received from the agitation, anxiety, sleep, and patient-ventilator synchrony subscales of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses Sedation Assessment Scale. Reflexology can serve as an effective method of decreasing the physiological signs of anxiety and the required level of sedation in patients receiving mechanically ventilated support. Nurses who have appropriate training and certification may include reflexology in routine care to reduce the physiological signs of anxiety of patients receiving mechanical ventilation.

  7. Cardiac Dysrhythmias With Midazolam Sedation

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo, Chandra R.; Rosenquist, Jan B.; Cheng, Chun Ho

    1990-01-01

    A randomized cross-over study was made of 32 young healthy Hong Kong Chinese to compare the incidence and nature of dysrhythmias that occurred during third molar surgery done under local anesthesia, alone or supplemented with midazolam sedation. The incidence of dysrhythmias during surgery was not significantly different during the two procedures. However prior to surgery, 25% of the patients had dysrhythmias during sedation with midazolam. The majority of dysrhythmias were infrequent unifoca...

  8. Intranasal sedatives in pediatric dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    AlSarheed, Maha A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To identify the intranasal (IN) sedatives used to achieve conscious sedation during dental procedures amongst children. Methods: A literature review was conducted by identifying relevant studies through searches on Medline. Search included IN of midazolam, ketamine, sufentanil, dexmedetomidine, clonidine, haloperidol and loranzepam. Studies included were conducted amongst individuals below 18 years, published in English, and were not restricted by year. Exclusion criteria were art...

  9. Intranasal sedatives in pediatric dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSarheed, Maha A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To identify the intranasal (IN) sedatives used to achieve conscious sedation during dental procedures amongst children. Methods: A literature review was conducted by identifying relevant studies through searches on Medline. Search included IN of midazolam, ketamine, sufentanil, dexmedetomidine, clonidine, haloperidol and loranzepam. Studies included were conducted amongst individuals below 18 years, published in English, and were not restricted by year. Exclusion criteria were articles that did not focus on pediatric dentistry. Results: Twenty studies were included. The most commonly used sedatives were midazolam, followed by ketamine and sufentanil. Onset of action for IN midazolam was 5-15 minutes (min), however, IN ketamine was faster (mean 5.74 min), while both IN sufentanil (mean 20 min) and IN dexmedetomidine (mean 25 min) were slow in comparison. Midazolam was effective for modifying behavior in mild to moderately anxious children, however, for more invasive or prolonged procedures, stronger sedatives, such as IN ketamine, IN sufentanil were recommended. In addition, ketamine fared better in overall success rate (89%) when compared with IN midazolam (69%). Intranasal dexmedetomidine was only used as pre-medication amongst children. While its’ onset of action is longer when compared with IN midazolam, it produced deeper sedation at the time of separation from the parent and at the time of anesthesia induction. Conclusion: Intranasal midazolam, ketamine and sufentanil are effective and safe for conscious sedation, while intranasal midazolam, dexmedetomidine and sufentanil have proven to be effective premedications. PMID:27570849

  10. Impact of the implementation of electronic guidelines for cardiovascular prevention in primary care: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Comin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background The electronic medical records software of the Catalan Institute of Health has recently incorporated an electronic version of clinical practice guidelines (e-CPGs. This study aims to assess the impact of the implementation of e-CPGs on the diagnosis, treatment, control and management of hypercholesterolaemia, diabetes mellitus type 2 and hypertension.Methods Eligible study participants are those aged 35–74 years assigned to family practitioners (FPs of the Catalan Institute of Health. Routinely collected data from electronic primary care registries covering 80% of the Catalan population will be analysed using two approaches: (1 a cross-sectional study to describe the characteristics of the sample before e-CPG implementation; (2 a controlled before-and-after study with 1-year follow-up to ascertain the effect of e-CPG implementation. Patients of FPs who regularly use the e-CPGs will constitute the intervention group; the control group will comprise patients assigned to FPs not regularly using the e-CPG. The outcomes are: (1 suspected and confirmed diagnoses, (2 control of clinical variables, (3 requests for tests and (4 proportions of patients with adequate drug prescriptions.Results This protocol should represent a reproducible process to assess the impact of the implementation of e-CPGs. We anticipate reporting results in late 2013.Conclusion This project will assess the effectiveness of e-CPGs to improve clinical decisions and healthcare procedures in the three disorders analysed. The results will shed light on the use of evidence-based medicine to improve clinical practice of FPs.

  11. Epidemiology of acute kidney injury in intensive care septic patients based on the KDIGO guidelines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Qianyi; Zhang Lina; Ai Yuhang; Zhang Lemeng

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of sepsis,which is associated with higher risks of adverse outcomes.Recently,kidney disease:improving global outcomes (KDIGO) recommended a new guideline forAKI,including a little modification on the AKI staging criteria.Methods This retrospective study included 211 septic patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) at Xiangya Hospital,Central South University from January 2008 to January 2011.AKI was diagnosed and classified according to the KDIGO or acute kidney injury network (AKIN) criteria.Differences between the AKI and non-AKI groups for baseline characteristics,laboratory examinations,etiology,outcomes,as well as the risk factors for AKI and 28-day mortality were analyzed.The reliability of the KDIGO criteria was also evaluated by comparing it with the AKIN criteria.Results The overall incidence of AKI in septic patients was 47.9%,and the 28-day mortality was 32.7%.The incidence of AKI was significantly higher in patients with more severe sepsis.Indicators of hepatic and respiratory function were significantly worse in the AKI group.Furthermore,a higher proportion of patients were infected with Enterobacter cloacae in the AKI group.The independent risk factors for AKI were shock,the number of organ failures,blood urea nitrogen (BUN)levels,and the use of vasopressors.The independent risk factors for mortality were BUN and creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB)levels.Both the KDIGO criteria and the AKIN criteria were significantly associated with 28-day mortality.Conclusions The incidence and 28-day mortality of AKI were very high in ICU septic patients.Greater attention should be paid to AKI-induced hepatic and respiratory dysfunction in clinical practice.Patients with an intra-abdominal source of infection were more likely to develop AKI.KDIGO criteria are reliable in AKI staging.

  12. [Dutch Preventive Youth Health Care Service guideline on children born too early and/or too small for gestational age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Pal, Sylvia M; Heerdink, Nen; Kamphuis, Mascha; Pols, Margreet A

    2014-01-01

    In children who are born prematurely or whose birth weight is too low for gestational age (small for gestational age (SGA)) intensive care and follow up are desirable.However, obstacles include the shared care of children born very preterm (care service (and other professionals) and the identification of possible late onset health problems in children born late preterm (32-37 weeks of gestation). This guideline is multidisciplinary and evidence based and is relevant to all professionals involved in the care of this group of children. The main recommendations are: (a) timely and complete transfer of information after discharge from hospital; (b) structured exchange of information in aftercare; (c) assigning a case manager to each child; (d) monitoring growth and development by adjusting age for preterm birth, and (e) using special growth charts for children born preterm to evaluate growth and development.

  13. Economic evaluation of an occupational health care guideline for prevention of weight gain among employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wier, M.F. van; Verweij, L.M.; Proper, K.I.; Hulshof, C.T.J.; Tulder, M.W. van; Mechelen, W. van

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: To determine the cost-effectiveness and the financial return of a guideline for occupational physicians (OPs), aimed at the prevention of weight gain among employees. METHODS:: The guideline consisted of a company-environment scan and up to five individual sessions with an OP. Sixteen OP

  14. Sedation of Pediatric Patients in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-03

    Nurse, Pediatric Flight 1989-1993 Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio Staff Nurse 1989 Medical/Surgical Unit...techniques have changed over the years. Twenty years ago male infants receiving a circumcision sucked on bourbon sponges for sedation, today regional

  15. Hypnotics and Sedatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabra, Pokar M.; Koo, Howard Y.; Marton, Laurence J.

    In recent years, most large hospitals have observed a marked increase in the admission of patients suffering from drug overdose. Overdose of narcotic drugs, such as the opiates, represent less of a problem on a day-to-day basis than do overdoses of prescribed drugs, such as sedatives and hypnotics. Clinical signs and symptoms for a narcotic drug overdose are very distinct, and in the majority of cases can be easily recognized by the attending physicians without the help of a toxicology laboratory. Loomis (1) reported that the majority of fatal poisonings owed to one, or a combination, of four agents: barbiturates, carbon monoxide, ethyl alcohol, and salicylates. Berry (2) estimated that 5-5'-disubstituted barbiturates were the second commonest cause of fatal poisoning in England, and that the frequency of their use was increasing. Other nonbarbiturate hypnotics involved in coma-producing incidents include glutethimide (Doriden®), methyprylon (Noludar®), and meprobamate (3, 4). In the last five years, diazepam (Valium®) has become one of the leading misused drugs (5).

  16. Update on dexmedetomidine: use in nonintubated patients requiring sedation for surgical procedures

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    Mohanad Shukry

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Mohanad Shukry, Jeffrey A MillerUniversity of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Department of Anesthesiology, Children’s Hospital of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK, USAAbstract: Dexmedetomidine was introduced two decades ago as a sedative and supplement to sedation in the intensive care unit for patients whose trachea was intubated. However, since that time dexmedetomidine has been commonly used as a sedative and hypnotic for patients undergoing procedures without the need for tracheal intubation. This review focuses on the application of dexmedetomidine as a sedative and/or total anesthetic in patients undergoing procedures without the need for tracheal intubation. Dexmedetomidine was used for sedation in monitored anesthesia care (MAC, airway procedures including fiberoptic bronchoscopy, dental procedures, ophthalmological procedures, head and neck procedures, neurosurgery, and vascular surgery. Additionally, dexmedetomidine was used for the sedation of pediatric patients undergoing different type of procedures such as cardiac catheterization and magnetic resonance imaging. Dexmedetomidine loading dose ranged from 0.5 to 5 μg kg-1, and infusion dose ranged from 0.2 to 10 μg kg-1 h-1. Dexmedetomidine was administered in conjunction with local anesthesia and/or other sedatives. Ketamine was administered with dexmedetomidine and opposed its bradycardiac effects. Dexmedetomidine may by useful in patients needing sedation without tracheal intubation. The literature suggests potential use of dexmedetomidine solely or as an adjunctive agent to other sedation agents. Dexmedetomidine was especially useful when spontaneous breathing was essential such as in procedures on the airway, or when sudden awakening from sedation was required such as for cooperative clinical examination during craniotomies.Keywords: dexmedetomidine, sedation, nonintubated patients

  17. Anxiety in Children Undergoing VCUG: Sedation or No Sedation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Herd

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Voiding cystourethrograms are distressing for children and parents. Nonpharmacological methods reduce distress. Pharmacological interventions for VCUG focus on sedation as well as analgesia, anxiolysis, and amnesia. Sedation has cost, time, and safety issues. Which agents and route should we use? Are we sure that sedation does not influence the ability to diagnose vesicoureteric reflux? Methods. Literature search of Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database. Review of comparative studies found. Results. Seven comparative studies including two randomised controlled trials were reviewed. Midazolam given orally (0.5-0.6 mg/kg or intranasally (0.2 mg/kg is effective with no apparent effect on voiding dynamics. Insufficient evidence to recommend other sedating agents was found. Deeper sedating agents may interfere with voiding dynamics. Conclusion. Midazolam reduces the VCUG distress, causes amnesia, and does not appear to interfere with voiding dynamics. Midazolam combined with simple analgesia is an effective method to reduce distress to children undergoing VCUG.

  18. Policy statements and practice guidelines for medical end-of-life decisions in Dutch health care institutions: Developments in the past decade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasman, H.R.W.; Wolf, de JT; Hesselink, B.A.M.; Heide, van der A.; Wal, van der G.; Maas, van der P.J.; Philipsen, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the existence of policy statements on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (EAS) and practice guidelines for all medical end-of-life decisions in Dutch health care institutions in 2005, whether the existence of practice guidelines is related to characteristics of institu

  19. Validity, reliability and applicability of Portuguese versions of sedation-agitation scales among critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Paulo Nassar Junior

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Sedation scales are used to guide sedation protocols in intensive care units (ICUs. However, no sedation scale in Portuguese has ever been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of Portuguese translations of four sedation-agitation scales, among critically ill patients: Glasgow Coma Score, Ramsay, Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale (RASS and Sedation-Agitation Scale (SAS. DESIGN AND SETTING: Validation study in two mixed ICUs of a university hospital. METHODS: All scales were applied to 29 patients by four different critical care team members (nurse, physiotherapist, senior critical care physician and critical care resident. We tested each scale for interrater reliability and for validity, by correlations between them. Interrater agreement was measured using weighted kappa (k and correlations used Spearman's test. RESULTS: 136 observations were made on 29 patients. All scales had at least substantial agreement (weighted k 0.68-0.90. RASS (weighted k 0.82-0.87 and SAS (weighted k 0.83-0.90 had the best agreement. All scales had a good and significant correlation with each other. CONCLUSIONS: All scales demonstrated good interrater reliability and were comparable. RASS and SAS showed the best correlations and the best agreement results in all professional categories. All these characteristics make RASS and SAS good scales for use at the bedside, to evaluate sedation-agitation among critically ill patients in terms of validity, reliability and applicability.

  20. A multicenter, prospective evaluation of quality of care and mortality in Japan based on the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishima, Seitaro; Gando, Satoshi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Kushimoto, Shigeki; Shiraishi, Shin-Ichiro; Ogura, Hiroshi; Takuma, Kiyotsugu; Kotani, Joji; Ikeda, Hiroto; Yamashita, Norio; Suzuki, Koichiro; Tsuruta, Ryosuke; Takeyama, Naoshi; Araki, Tsunetoshi; Suzuki, Yasushi; Miki, Yasuo; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Aikawa, Naoki

    2014-02-01

    To elucidate the standard Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines-based quality of care and mortality related to severe sepsis in Japan, we conducted a multicenter, prospective, observational study using a new web-based database between June 1, 2010, and December 31, 2011. A total of 1104 patients with severe sepsis were enrolled from 39 Japanese emergency and critical care centers. All-cause hospital mortality was 29.3% in patients with severe sepsis and 40.7% in patients with septic shock. Pulmonary, renal, hepatic, and hematological dysfunctions were associated with significantly higher mortality, and hematological dysfunction, especially coagulopathy, was associated with the highest odds ratio for mortality. Compliance with severe sepsis bundles in our study was generally low compared with that in a previous international sepsis registry study, and glycemic control was associated with lowest odds ratio for mortality. Despite higher complication rates of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and low compliance with severe sepsis bundles on the whole, mortality in our study was similar to that in the international sepsis registry study. From these results, we concluded that our prospective multicenter study was successful in evaluating SSC guidelines-based standard quality of care and mortality related to severe sepsis in Japan. Although mortality in Japan was equivalent to that reported worldwide in the above-mentioned international sepsis registry study, compliance with severe sepsis bundles was low. Thus, there is scope for improvement in the initial treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock in Japanese emergency and critical care centers.

  1. [Sedation using ketamine for pain procedures in Pediatric Oncology.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard, C; Tichit, R; Troncin, R; Bernard, F

    2009-09-01

    Procedural sedation and analgesia for children is widely practiced. Since 2005 to 2007, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of ketamine to control pain induced by diagnostic procedures in pediatric oncology patients. Eight hundred fifty procedures were carried out in 125 patients aged 2 to 16 years. We associated EMNO (inhaled equimolar mixture of nitrous oxide and oxygen), atropin (oral or rectal), midazolam (oral or rectal) and ketamin (intravenous). An anesthesiologist injected ketamin. Average dose of ketamine was 0.33 to 2 mg/kg depending on number and invasiveness of procedures. This method requires careful monitoring and proper precautions. With these conditions, no complication was observed. All patients were effectively sedated. These results indicate that ketamine - in association with EMNO, atropine and midazolam - is safe and effective in pain management induced by diagnostic procedures in pediatric oncology patients. The sedative regimen of intravenous ketamine has greatly reduced patient, family and practitioners anxiety for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.

  2. Benchmarking Prehospital and Emergency Department Care for Argentine Children with Traumatic Brain Injury: For the South American Guideline Adherence Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilala, Monica S.; Lujan, Silvia B.; Qiu, Qian; Petroni, Gustavo J.; Ballarini, Nicolás M.; Guadagnoli, Nahuel; Depetris, María Alejandra; Faguaga, Gabriela A.; Baggio, Gloria M.; Busso, Leonardo O.; García, Mirta E.; González Carrillo, Osvaldo R.; Medici, Paula L.; Sáenz, Silvia S.; Vanella, Elida E.; Fabio, Anthony; Bell, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is little information on the type of early care provided to children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in low middle income countries. We benchmarked early prehospital [PH] and emergency department [ED] pediatric TBI care in Argentina. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of data from patients previously enrolled in a prospective seven center study of children with TBI. Eligible participants were patients 0–18 years, and had diagnosis of TBI (admission Glasgow Coma scale score [GCS] 0). Outcomes were transport type, transport time, PH and ED adherence to best practice, and discharge Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category Scale (PCPC) and Pediatric Overall Performance category Scale (POPC). Results Of the 366 children, mean age was 8.7 (5.0) years, 58% were male, 90% had isolated TBI and 45.4% were transported by private vehicle. 50 (34.7%) of the 144 children with severe TBI (39.3% of all TBI patients) were transported by private vehicle. Most (267; 73%) patients received initial TBI care at an index hospital prior to study center admission, including children with severe (81.9%) TBI. Transport times were shorter for those patients who were directly transported by ambulance to study center than for the whole cohort (1.4 vs.5.5 hours). Ambulance blood pressure data were recorded in 30.9%. ED guideline adherence rate was higher than PH guideline adherence rate (84.8% vs. 26.4%). For patients directly transferred from scene to study trauma centers, longer transport time was associated with worse discharge outcome (PCPC aOR 1.10 [1.04, 1.18] and (POPC aOR 1.10 [1.04, 1.18]). There was no relationship between PH or ED TBI guideline adherence rate and discharge POPC and PCPC. Conclusion This study benchmarks early pediatric TBI care in Argentina and shows that many critically injured children with TBI do not receive timely or best practice PH care, that PH guideline adherence rate is low and that longer transport time was associated with poor

  3. Efficacy of Chloral Hydrate-Hydroxyzine and Chloral Hydrate-Midazolam in Pediatric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sedation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razieh FALLAH

    2014-04-01

    implications of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of procedural sedation agents in children. Curr Opin Pediatr 2012;24:225-32.3. Mason KP, Prescilla R, Fontaine PJ, Zurakowski D. Pediatric CT sedation: comparison of dexmedetomidine and pentobarbital. AJR Am J Roentgenol 2011;196(2:W194-8.4. Schulte-Uentrop L, Goepfert MS. Anaesthesia or sedation for MRI in children. Curr Opin Anaesthesiol 2010;23(4:513-7.5. Freeman JM. The risks of sedation for electroencephalograms: data at last. Pediatrics 2001; 108(1:178.6. Cortellazzi P, Lamperti M, Minati L, Falcone C, Pantaleoni C, Caldiroli D. Sedation of neurologically impaired children undergoing MRI: a sequential approach. Paediatr Anaesth 2007;17(7:630-6.7. Haselkorn T, Whittemore AS, Udaltsova N, Friedman GD. Short-term chloral hydrate administration and cancer in humans. Drug Saf 2006; 29(1:67-77.8. Costa LR, Costa PS, Brasileiro SV, Bendo CB, Viegas CM, Paiva SM. Post-Discharge Adverse Events following Pediatric Sedation with High Doses of Oral Medication. J Pediatr 2012;160(5:807-13.9. da Costa LR, da Costa PS, Lima AR. A randomized double-blinded trial of chloral hydrate with or without hydroxyzine versus placebo for pediatric dental sedation. Braz Dent J 2007;18(4:334-40.10. Klein EJ, Brown JC, Kobayashi A, Osincup D, Seidel K. A randomized clinical trial comparing oral, aerosolized intranasal, and aerosolized buccal midazolam. Ann Emerg Med 2011;58(4:323-9.11. Johnson E, Briskie D, Majewski R, Edwards S, Reynolds P. The physiologic and behavioral effects of oral and intranasal midazolam in pediatric dental patients. Pediatr Dent 2010;32(3:229-38.12. Wetzel RC. Anesthesia, Perioperative Care, and Sedation. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, Schor NF, St. Geme JW, Behrman RE, editors. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 19th ed. Philadelphia: Saunders; 2011. p. 359-60.13. Cote CJ, Wilson S. Guidelines for monitoring and management of pediatric patients during and after sedation for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures: an update

  4. Managing care pathways combining SNOMED CT, archetypes and an electronic guideline system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Knut; Andersen, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Today electronic clinical guideline systems exist, but they are not well integrated with electronic health records. This paper thus proposes that the patient's "position" in the pathway during the patient journey should be made visible to all involved healthcare parties and the patient. This requires that the generic knowledge, which is represented in the guidelines, is combined with the patient specific information - and then made accessible for all relevant parties. In addition to the decision support provided by the guideline system documentation support can be provided by templates based on archetypes. This paper provides a proposal for how the guideline system and the EHR can be integrated by the use of archetypes and SNOMED CT. SNOMED CT provides the common reference terminology and the semantic links between the systems. The proposal also includes the use of a National Patient Index for storing data about the patient's position in the pathway and for sharing this information by all involved parties.

  5. Update: Interim Guidelines for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women and Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure - United States, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oduyebo, Titilope; Petersen, Emily E; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Mead, Paul S; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Renquist, Christina M; Ellington, Sascha R; Fischer, Marc; Staples, J Erin; Powers, Ann M; Villanueva, Julie; Galang, Romeo R; Dieke, Ada; Muñoz, Jorge L; Honein, Margaret A; Jamieson, Denise J

    2016-02-12

    CDC has updated its interim guidelines for U.S. health care providers caring for pregnant women during a Zika virus outbreak (1). Updated guidelines include a new recommendation to offer serologic testing to asymptomatic pregnant women (women who do not report clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease) who have traveled to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission. Testing can be offered 2-12 weeks after pregnant women return from travel. This update also expands guidance to women who reside in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission, and includes recommendations for screening, testing, and management of pregnant women and recommendations for counseling women of reproductive age (15-44 years). Pregnant women who reside in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission have an ongoing risk for infection throughout their pregnancy. For pregnant women with clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease,* testing is recommended during the first week of illness. For asymptomatic pregnant women residing in areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission, testing is recommended at the initiation of prenatal care with follow-up testing mid-second trimester. Local health officials should determine when to implement testing of asymptomatic pregnant women based on information about levels of Zika virus transmission and laboratory capacity. Health care providers should discuss reproductive life plans, including pregnancy intention and timing, with women of reproductive age in the context of the potential risks associated with Zika virus infection.

  6. No-sedation during mechanical ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laerkner, Eva; Stroem, Thomas; Toft, Palle

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence is growing that less or no-sedation is possible and beneficial for patients during mechanical ventilation. AIM: To investigate if there was a difference in patient consciousness and nursing workload comparing a group of patients receiving no-sedation with a group of sedated...... patients with daily wake up, and also to estimate economic consequences of a no-sedation strategy. DESIGN AND METHODS: Data were collected during a prospective trial of 140 mechanically ventilated patients randomized to either no-sedation or to sedation with daily wake up. From day 1 to 7 in the intensive...

  7. Fluctuations in sedation levels may contribute to delirium in ICU patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, H; Egerod, Ingrid Eugenie; Videbech, P;

    2013-01-01

    Delirium in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) is a serious complication potentially increasing morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of fluctuating sedation levels on the incidence of delirium in ICU.......Delirium in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) is a serious complication potentially increasing morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of fluctuating sedation levels on the incidence of delirium in ICU....

  8. Evaluation of current care effectiveness: a survey of hypertension guideline implementation in Finnish health centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alanen, Seija I; Johannala-Kemppainen, Riitta; Ijäs, Jarja J;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the extent and style of implementation of the Hypertension Guideline (HT Guideline) in Finnish primary health centres, and to identify a scale of contrasting implementation styles in the health centres (with the two ends of the scale being referred to as information implement......OBJECTIVE: To assess the extent and style of implementation of the Hypertension Guideline (HT Guideline) in Finnish primary health centres, and to identify a scale of contrasting implementation styles in the health centres (with the two ends of the scale being referred to as information...... implementers or disseminators respectively). DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. Development of a questionnaire and criteria for assessing the extent and style of implementation of the HT Guideline. SETTING: Primary healthcare. SUBJECTS: All head physicians and senior nursing officers in Finnish health centres (n...... =290). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The extent of adoption of the HT Guideline in health centres and the characteristics associated with the implementation style. RESULTS: Responses were received from 410 senior medical staff (246 senior nursing officers and 164 head physicians) representing altogether 264...

  9. [Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of severe traumatic brain injury. Part 2. Intensive care and neuromonitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, A A; Krylov, V V; Gavrilov, A G; Kravchuk, A D; Likhterman, L B; Petrikov, S S; Talypov, A E; Zakharova, N E; Oshorov, A V; Sychev, A A; Aleksandrova, E V; Solodov, A A

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the major causes of death and disability in young and middle-aged people. The most problematic group is comprised of patients with severe TBI who are in a coma. The adequate diagnosis of primary brain injuries and timely prevention and treatment of the secondary injury mechanisms largely define the possibility of reducing mortality and severe disabling consequences. When developing these guidelines, we used our experience in the development of international and national recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of mild traumatic brain injury, penetrating gunshot wounds to the skull and brain, severe traumatic brain injury, and severe consequences of brain injuries, including a vegetative state. In addition, we used international and national guidelines for the diagnosis, intensive care, and surgical treatment of severe traumatic brain injury, which had been published in recent years. The proposed guidelines concern intensive care of severe TBI in adults and are particularly intended for neurosurgeons, neurologists, neuroradiologists, anesthesiologists, and intensivists who are routinely involved in the treatment of these patients.

  10. Insights about the process and impact of implementing nursing guidelines on delivery of care in hospitals and community settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ploeg Jenny

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the impact of implementing nursing-oriented best practice guidelines on the delivery of patient care in either hospital or community settings. Methods A naturalistic study with a prospective, before and after design documented the implementation of six newly developed nursing best practice guidelines (asthma, breastfeeding, delirium-dementia-depression (DDD, foot complications in diabetes, smoking cessation and venous leg ulcers. Eleven health care organisations were selected for a one-year project. At each site, clinical resource nurses (CRNs worked with managers and a multidisciplinary steering committee to conduct an environmental scan and develop an action plan of activities (i.e. education sessions, policy review. Process and patient outcomes were assessed by chart audit (n = 681 pre-implementation, 592 post-implementation. Outcomes were also assessed for four of six topics by in-hospital/home interviews (n = 261 pre-implementation, 232 post-implementation and follow-up telephone interviews (n = 152 pre, 121 post. Interviews were conducted with 83/95 (87% CRN's, nurses and administrators to describe recommendations selected, strategies used and participants' perceived facilitators and barriers to guideline implementation. Results While statistically significant improvements in 5% to 83% of indicators were observed in each organization, more than 80% of indicators for breastfeeding, DDD and smoking cessation did not change. Statistically significant improvements were found in > 50% of indicators for asthma (52%, diabetes foot care (83% and venous leg ulcers (60%. Organizations with > 50% improvements reported two unique implementation strategies which included hands-on skill practice sessions for nurses and the development of new patient education materials. Key facilitators for all organizations included education sessions as well as support from champions and managers while key barriers were lack

  11. Utilisation of the National Antiretroviral Therapy Guidelines among health care professionals working in Abuja treatment centres, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindiwe I. Zungu

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Access to and utilisations of the National Antiretroviral Treatment Guidelines (NATG are valuable factors for effective programme implementation. The objective of this study was to investigate the accessibility of the NATG and their utilisation by health care professionals from five treatment centres in Abuja, Nigeria.Method: A quantitative cross-sectional descriptive survey was conducted in 2007 using purposively sampled health care professionals. Questionnaires were self-administered to participants who consented in writing to participate in the survey.Results: 97 health care professionals participated in this study with about equal numbers of men and women: 48 (49.5% women and 49 (50.5% men. Of these, 21.6% were unaware of the existence of the NATG in their treatment centres. More than half (51.5% reported that they did not have access to the NATG as opposed to those (48.5% who had access to the guidelines. Furthermore, 16.5% of the participants confirmed that they had access to an institutional copy of the NATG while 14.4% indicated that they had individual copies and only 3.1% stated that they had individual copies and access to the hospital copy as well. Regarding utilisation of the NATG, 41.2% rarely used them, 32.9% never used them and only 25.7% often used them. The most frequent use of the NATG was among pharmacists (38.1% compared to the least frequent use among nurses (20.0%.Conclusion: Poor accessibility of the NATG may have a negative impact on guidelines utilisation among health care professionals in Nigeria.

  12. Communication between secondary and primary care following self-harm: are National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE guidelines being met?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Rita

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most patients contact their general practitioner (GP following presentation to an Emergency Department (ED after a self-harm incident, and strategies to help GPs manage these patients include efficient communication between services. The aim of this study was to assess the standard of documentation and communication to primary care from secondary care as recommended by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE guidelines on the short-term management of people who self-harm. Methods An audit of medical records (ED and Psychiatric on people aged 16 years and over who had presented to the ED following self-harm, benchmarked according to government guidelines, was performed. Data were collected over a 4-week period at a general teaching hospital. Results We collected data on 93 consecutive episodes of self-harm; 62% of episodes were communicated to primary care, 58% of these communications were within 24 h and most within 3 days. Patient identifying details and follow-up arrangements were specified in most cases. Communication via psychiatric staff was most detailed. ED clinicians provided few communications and were of limited content. Communication with the patient's GP was not made in half of those cases seen by a mental health specialist. Conclusion Government guidelines are only partially being met. Reliance on communication by ED staff would leave a substantial proportion of patients discharged from the ED with no or minimal communication to primary care. Psychiatric services need to improve the rate of communication to the patient's GP following assessment A national sample of National Health Service (NHS trusts would establish if this is a problem elsewhere.

  13. German Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruis, Wolfgang; Nguyen, Gia P; Leifeld, Ludger

    2016-10-01

    Because of its frequency, diverticular disease is a burden on health care systems. Only few formal guidelines covering all aspects of the disease exist. Here, some selected statements from the German guidelines are given. The guidelines include significant recommendations for the diagnosis and management of diverticular disease. Both diagnosis and management depend definitely on clear definitions of the situation of an individual patient. Therefore, a new classification is proposed that is based on earlier suggestions. An internationally established classification would not only enable better patient care but could also lead to studies with comparable results.

  14. Primary care summary of the British Thoracic Society Guideline on the management of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Adam T; Pasteur, Mark; Cornford, Charles; Welham, Sally; Bilton, Diana

    2011-06-01

    The British Thoracic Society (BTS) has recently published a guideline for the management of non-cystic fibrosis (non-CF) bronchiectasis in children and adults. This paper summarises the key recommendations applicable to the primary care setting. The key points are: • Think of the diagnosis of bronchiectasis in adults and children who present with a chronic productive cough or unexplained haemoptysis, and in children with asthma which responds poorly to treatment; • High resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scanning is needed to confirm the diagnosis • Sputum culture should be obtained at the start of an exacerbation prior to initiating treatment with antibiotics; Treatment should be started whilst awaiting the sputum result and should be continued for 14 days; • Patients with bronchiectasis have significant morbidity. Management in primary care is aimed at improving morbidity, and includes; patient education, treatment and monitoring, as well as appropriate referral to secondary care including assessment for long term antibiotics.

  15. A systematic scoping review of adherence to reporting guidelines in health care literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaan Z

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Zainab Samaan,1–3 Lawrence Mbuagbaw,2 Daisy Kosa,2,4 Victoria Borg Debono,2,5 Rejane Dillenburg,6 Shiyuan Zhang2, Vincent Fruci,7 Brittany Dennis,2 Monica Bawor,8 Lehana Thabane2,5,91Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, 3Population Genomics Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, 4Department of Nephrology, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, 5Department of Anesthesia, McMaster University, Hamilton, 6Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, 7Michael G DeGroote School of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, 8McMaster Integrative Neuroscience Discovery and Study (MiNDS Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, 9Centre for Evaluation of Medicines, Hamilton, ON, CanadaBackground: Reporting guidelines have been available for the past 17 years since the inception of the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials statement in 1996. These guidelines were developed to improve the quality of reporting of studies in medical literature. Despite the widespread availability of these guidelines, the quality of reporting of medical literature remained suboptimal. In this study, we assess the current adherence practice to reporting guidelines; determine key factors associated with better adherence to these guidelines; and provide recommendations to enhance adherence to reporting guidelines for future studies.Methods: We undertook a systematic scoping review of systematic reviews of adherence to reporting guidelines across different clinical areas and study designs. We searched four electronic databases (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Web of Science, Embase, and Medline from January 1996 to September 2012. Studies were included if they addressed adherence to one of the following guidelines: Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT, Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic

  16. Use of opioids and sedatives at End-of-Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Wei Sim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite their proven efficacy and safety, opioid and sedative use for palliation in patients afflicted with cancer in Singapore have been shown to be a fraction of that in other countries. This paper explores the various psychosocial and system-related factors that appear to propagate this conservative approach to care in what is largely a western-influenced care practice. A search for publications relating to sedative and opioid usage in Asia was performed on PubMed, Google, Google Scholar, World Health Organization, and Singapore′s government agency websites using search terms such as "opioids," "sedatives," "palliation," "end-of-life-care," "pain management," "palliative care," "cancer pain," "Asia," "Singapore," and "morphine." Findings were classified into three broad groups - system-related, physician-related, and patient-related factors. A cautious medico-legal climate, shortage of physicians trained in palliative care, and lack of instruments for symptom assessment of patients at the end of life contribute to system-related barriers. Physician-related barriers include delayed access to palliative care due to late referrals, knowledge deficits in non-palliative medicine physicians, and sub-optimal care provided by palliative physicians. Patients′ under-reporting of symptoms and fear of addiction, tolerance, and side effects of opioids and sedatives may lead to conservative opioid use in palliative care as well. System-related, physician-related, and patient-related factors play crucial roles in steering the management of palliative patients. Addressing and increasing the awareness of these factors may help ensure patients receive adequate relief and control of distressing symptoms.

  17. A multifaceted intervention to implement guidelines and improve admission paediatric care in Kenyan district hospitals: a cluster randomised trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Ayieko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In developing countries referral of severely ill children from primary care to district hospitals is common, but hospital care is often of poor quality. However, strategies to change multiple paediatric care practices in rural hospitals have rarely been evaluated. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This cluster randomized trial was conducted in eight rural Kenyan district hospitals, four of which were randomly assigned to a full intervention aimed at improving quality of clinical care (evidence-based guidelines, training, job aides, local facilitation, supervision, and face-to-face feedback; n  =  4 and the remaining four to control intervention (guidelines, didactic training, job aides, and written feedback; n  =  4. Prespecified structure, process, and outcome indicators were measured at baseline and during three and five 6-monthly surveys in control and intervention hospitals, respectively. Primary outcomes were process of care measures, assessed at 18 months postbaseline. In both groups performance improved from baseline. Completion of admission assessment tasks was higher in intervention sites at 18 months (mean  =  0.94 versus 0.65, adjusted difference 0.54 [95% confidence interval 0.05-0.29]. Uptake of guideline recommended therapeutic practices was also higher within intervention hospitals: adoption of once daily gentamicin (89.2% versus 74.4%; 17.1% [8.04%-26.1%]; loading dose quinine (91.9% versus 66.7%, 26.3% [-3.66% to 56.3%]; and adequate prescriptions of intravenous fluids for severe dehydration (67.2% versus 40.6%; 29.9% [10.9%-48.9%]. The proportion of children receiving inappropriate doses of drugs in intervention hospitals was lower (quinine dose >40 mg/kg/day; 1.0% versus 7.5%; -6.5% [-12.9% to 0.20%], and inadequate gentamicin dose (2.2% versus 9.0%; -6.8% [-11.9% to -1.6%]. CONCLUSIONS: Specific efforts are needed to improve hospital care in developing countries. A full, multifaceted intervention was associated

  18. Antibiotic prophylaxis for infective endocarditis: ethical care in the era of revised guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, David S

    Beginning in 1955, the American Heart Association recommended antibiotic prophylaxis among patients with certain structural heart diseases to decrease the likelihood of infective endocarditis (IE) following dental procedures. Over the ensuing 52 years, the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guidelines were revised to address gastrointestinal and genitourinary procedures and to modify the assessment of relative risks and specific regimens for prophylaxis. Throughout the various revisions, prophylaxis was recommended for individuals who were at increased risk of developing IE based on best evidence and consensus opinion, albeit in the absence of randomized controlled trials. In 2007, the AHA published a revised guideline statement dramatically restricting its recommendations for antibiotic prophylaxis against IE. In 2008, these views were incorporated in an ACC/AHA guideline update on the management of patients with heart valve disease. The revisions represent a dramatic shift in terms of the patients for whom antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended and the procedures for which it is recommended. What is striking about the new guidelines is that the change in recommendations was based not on new data, but on a change in philosophy despite the lack of new data. To some degree, the arguments for and against antibiotic prophylaxis become those of philosophy, ethics, and the role of evidence-based medicine. This manuscript attempts to briefly examine those arguments and discuss why the revised guidelines may fail to respect the ethical principles of beneficence and patient autonomy.

  19. Systematic Information to Health-Care Professionals about Vaccination Guidelines Improves Adherence in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Anti-TNFα Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Katrine R; Steenholdt, Casper; Buhl, Sine S

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Implementation of guidelines for prevention of infectious diseases during anti-TNFα therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is important but difficult. We investigated whether systematic information to health-care professionals about these guidelines improves patients...... vaccination guidelines at baseline and at 2-month intervals for 6 months, followed by reassessment of vaccination status (intervention group; n=99); (3) cross-sectional evaluation of representative gastroenterologists' knowledge of guidelines (n=53). Outcomes were assessed by validated questionnaires. RESULTS......: Patients' adherence to vaccination guidelines increased significantly after a period of systematic information to health-care professionals. Hence, complete adherence increased from 5 to 26%, partial adherence from 38 to 56%, and complete non-adherence decreased from 57 to 18% (P

  20. Non-Parenteral Medications for Procedural Sedation in Children- A Narrative: Review Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, Razieh; Ferdosian, Farzad; Shajari, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Procedural sedation may be needed in many diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in children. To make pediatric procedural sedation as safe as possible, protocols should be developed by institutions. Response to sedation in children is highly variable, while some become deeply sedated after minimal doses, others may need much higher doses. Child developmental status, clinical circumstances and condition of patient should be considered and then pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions for sedation be selected. Drug of choice and administration route depend on the condition of the child, type of procedure, and predicted pain degree. The drugs might be administered parenteral (intravenous or intramuscular) or non parenteral including oral, rectal, sublingual, aerosolized buccal and intranasal. The use of intravenous medication such propofol, ketamine, dexmedetomidine, or etomidate may be restricted in use by pediatric anesthesiologist or pediatric critical care specialists or pediatric emergency medicine specialists. In this review article we discuss on non-parenteral medications that can be used by non- anesthesiologist.

  1. Comparison of Intravenous Dexmedetomidine and Midazolam for Bispectral Index-Guided Sedation During Spinal Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Youn Yi; Lee, Dongchul; Jung, Wol Seon; Cho, Noo Ree; Kwak, Hyun Jeong

    2016-10-04

    BACKGROUND Despite the high frequency of hypotension during spinal anesthesia with proper sedation, no previous report has compared the hemodynamic effects of dexmedetomidine and midazolam sedation during spinal anesthesia. We compared the effects of bispectral index (BIS)-guided intravenous sedation using midazolam or dexmedetomidine on hemodynamics and recovery profiles in patients who underwent spinal anesthesia. MATERIAL AND METHODS One hundred and sixteen adult patients were randomly assigned to receive either midazolam (midazolam group; n=58) or dexmedetomidine (dexmedetomidine group; n=58) during spinal anesthesia. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures; heart rates; peripheral oxygen saturations; and bispectral index scores were recorded during surgery, and Ramsay sedation scores and postanesthesia care unit (PACU) stay were monitored. RESULTS Hypotension occurred more frequently in the midazolam group (Pmidazolam sedation.

  2. A framework for crafting clinical practice guidelines that are relevant to the care and management of people with multimorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlig, Katrin; Leff, Bruce; Kent, David; Dy, Sydney; Brunnhuber, Klara; Burgers, Jako S; Greenfield, Sheldon; Guyatt, Gordon; High, Kevin; Leipzig, Rosanne; Mulrow, Cynthia; Schmader, Kenneth; Schunemann, Holger; Walter, Louise C; Woodcock, James; Boyd, Cynthia M

    2014-04-01

    Many patients of all ages have multiple conditions, yet clinicians often lack explicit guidance on how to approach clinical decision-making for such people. Most recommendations from clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) focus on the management of single diseases, and may be harmful or impractical for patients with multimorbidity. A major barrier to the development of guidance for people with multimorbidity stems from the fact that the evidence underlying CPGs derives from studies predominantly focused on the management of a single disease. In this paper, the investigators from the Improving Guidelines for Multimorbid Patients Study Group present consensus-based recommendations for guideline developers to make guidelines more useful for the care of people with multimorbidity. In an iterative process informed by review of key literature and experience, we drafted a list of issues and possible approaches for addressing important coexisting conditions in each step of the guideline development process, with a focus on considering relevant interactions between the conditions, their treatments and their outcomes. The recommended approaches address consideration of coexisting conditions at all major steps in CPG development, from nominating and scoping the topic, commissioning the work group, refining key questions, ranking importance of outcomes, conducting systematic reviews, assessing quality of evidence and applicability, summarizing benefits and harms, to formulating recommendations and grading their strength. The list of issues and recommendations was reviewed and refined iteratively by stakeholders. This framework acknowledges the challenges faced by CPG developers who must make complex judgments in the absence of high-quality or direct evidence. These recommendations require validation through implementation, evaluation and refinement.

  3. Delivery of enteral nutrition after the introduction of practice guidelines and participation of dietitians in pediatric critical care clinical teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentles, Emma; Mara, Jackie; Diamantidi, Krystalia; Alfheeaid, Hani A; Spenceley, Neil; Davidson, Mark; Gerasimidis, Konstantinos

    2014-12-01

    Provision of optimal nutrition is often difficult to achieve in the critically ill child, but can improve with better nutritional support practices. This study evaluated the joint impact of the introduction of enteral feeding practice guidelines and participation of dietitians in daily ward rounds on enteral nutrition (EN) intake and practices in children in intensive care. Nutritional intake and EN practices were audited before (period A) and after (period B) the introduction of enteral feeding practice guidelines and participation of dietitians in daily ward rounds in a pediatric intensive care unit. Information was collected on a daily basis and nutritional intake was compared with predefined targets and the United Kingdom dietary reference values. There were 65 patients and 477 nutritional support days in period A and 65 patients and 410 nutritional support days in period B. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) energy requirements were achieved in a larger proportion of nutritional support days in period B (BMR achieved [% nutritional support days]; period A: 27% vs period B: 48.9%; Pnutritional intake in some patients in critical care, but can have limited benefit for children admitted for corrective heart surgery.

  4. Treatment of Lower Back Pain—The Gap between Guideline-Based Treatment and Medical Care Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Werber

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that unspecific low back pain is of important impact in general health care, this pain condition is often treated insufficiently. Poor efficiency has led to the necessity of guidelines addressing evidence-based strategies for treatment of lower back pain (LBP. We present some statements of the German medical care reality. Self-responsible action of the patient should be supported while invasive methods in particular should be avoided due to lacking evidence in outcome efficiency. However, it has to be stated that no effective implementation strategy has been established yet. Especially, studies on the economic impact of different implementation strategies are lacking. A lack of awareness of common available guidelines and an uneven distribution of existing knowledge throughout the population can be stated: persons with higher risk suffering from LBP by higher professional demands and lower educational level are not skilled in advised management of LBP. Both diagnostic imaging and invasive treatment methods increased dramatically leading to increased costs and doctor workload without being associated with improved patient functioning, severity of pain or overall health status due to the absence of a functioning primary care gate keeping system for patient selection. Opioids are prescribed on a grand scale and over a long period. Moreover, opioid prescription is not indicated properly, when predominantly persons with psychological distress like somatoform disorders are treated with opioids.

  5. The impact of national and international guidelines on newborn care in the nurseries of Piedmont and Aosta Valley, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabris Claudio

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Care procedures for preventing neonatal diseases are carried out according to nurseries' traditions and may be not consistent with the evidence based medicine issues. Methods A multi-centric survey was conducted in 2 Regions located in NW Italy (Piedmont and Aosta Valley in order to collect information on some healthy newborn care procedures. During 2001, a questionnaire was sent to the chief pediatrician in charge to the all 33 nurseries of the region asking the methods used during 2000 as prevention of ophthalmia neonatorum, early and late hemorrhagic disease of newborn, umbilical cord care and recommendations of vitamin D administration. Thereafter, during 2004 the same questionnaire was sent to the 34 chief pediatrician of nurseries to evaluate if the procedures were changed during 2003 according to guidelines. The nurseries care for 32,516 newborns in 2000 and 37,414 in 2003. Results Aminoglycoside eyes drops as prevention of ophthalmia neonatorum were the first choice in both periods (23 out 33 nurseries in 2000 and 24 out 34 in 2003 p > 0.05; the corresponding figures for newborns were18,984 out 32,516 newborns vs. 28,180 out of 37,414 p 0.05, (6,380 newborns, p 0.05. The numbers of parents of newborns who receive the recommendations of oral vitamin K during the first months life decreased from 2000 (25,516/30,606 to 2003 (29,808/37,414, p 0.05, the corresponding figures for Vitamin D were 15 and 14 (p > 0.05. Conclusion In the present study a large variability of procedures among the nurseries was observed. During the study periods, guidelines and evidence based medicine issues have only partially modified the neonatal care procedures In Piedmont and Aosta Valley nurseries. These observations suggest to implement local forum/consensus conference to standardized procedures as much as possible.

  6. Conscious sedation for endoscopic and non-endoscopic interventional gastrointestinal procedures: meeting patients' expectations, missing the standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriott, P.; Laasch, H.-U.; Wilbraham, L.; Marriott, A.; England, R.E.; Martin, D.F. E-mail: derrick.martin@smtr.nhs.uk

    2004-02-01

    AIM: To assess the level of sedation, patient satisfaction and frequency of unplanned events with conscious sedation for interventional procedures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and seventeen patients were assessed prospectively before, during and after procedures. Blood pressure, pulse, oxygen saturation and sedation level were monitored and patients followed up after 24 h. Sedation was scored after drugs were given in accordance with an established protocol. Doses were recorded, as were patients' weight, age and ASA grade and any unplanned events and their management. RESULTS: Seventy-six of the 117 patients (65%) had no unplanned event, 20 (17.1%) became agitated, 15 (12.8%) hypotensive, three (2.6%) hypoxic and three (2.6%) had more than one response. Twelve patients required active management. Fifty-two (44.4%) had a sedation level of {<=}3 (responsive to verbal commands), but 39 (33.3%) reached level 6. Median doses were midazolam 6 mg (1-20 mg) and pethidine 50 mg (12.5-100 mg). Ninety-three percent were satisfied with their sedation. No adverse effects were observed after 24 h. CONCLUSION: Despite using a sedation protocol, unplanned events occurred in 35% (95% CI=27-44%) of patients, although not all required active management. The sedation levels reached in some exceeded guidelines. Unplanned events were commoner with increased sedation level. Patient satisfaction was high and no permanent damage was observed.

  7. Sedation and Analgesia in Mechanical Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, Thomas; Toft, Palle

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, critically ill patients undergoing mechanical ventilation (MV) have received sedation. Over the last decade, randomized controlled trials have questioned continued use of deep sedation. Evidence shows that a nurse-driven sedation protocol reduces length of MV compared with standard...

  8. Sustainability of professionals' adherence to clinical practice guidelines in medical care: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ament, S.M.; Groot, J.J.A.M. de; Maessen, J.M.; Dirksen, C.D.; Weijden, T. van der; Kleijnen, J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate (1) the state of the art in sustainability research and (2) the outcomes of professionals' adherence to guideline recommendations in medical practice. DESIGN: Systematic review. DATA SOURCES: Searches were conducted until August 2015 in MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, Cochrane Centr

  9. Pediatric Asthma: Guidelines-Based Care, Omalizumab, and Other Potential Biologic Agents

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Over the past several decades, the evidence supporting rational pediatric asthma management has grown exponentially. As more is learned about the various phenotypes of asthma, the complexity of management will continue to grow. This review focuses on the evidence supporting the current guidelines-based pediatric asthma management and explores the future of asthma management with respect to phenotypic heterogeneity and biologics.

  10. Diagnostic Yield of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in an Autism Primary Care Practice: Which Guidelines to Implement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrew, Susan G.; Peters, Brittany R.; Crittendon, Julie A.; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Genetic testing is recommended for patients with ASD; however specific recommendations vary by specialty. American Academy of Pediatrics and American Academy of Neurology guidelines recommend G-banded karyotype and Fragile X DNA. The American College of Medical Genetics recommends Chromosomal Microarray Analysis (CMA). We determined the yield of…

  11. Carcinoma of the larynx: the Dutch national guideline for diagnostics, treatment, supportive care and rehabilitation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Hordijk, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: This evidence based guideline aims to facilitate proper management and to prevent diverging views concerning diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of carcinoma of the larynx between the major referral centers for head and neck cancer in The Netherlands. METHOD: A multidisciplinary committee wa

  12. Primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: congruence with antimicrobial resistance found in commensal Staphylococcus aureus in the community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijnen, E.M. van; Paget, W.J.; Heijer, C. den; Stobberingh, E.E.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.; team, A.s.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over 90% of antibiotics for human use in Europe are prescribed in primary care. We assessed the congruence between primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections and commensal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) antimicrobial resistance levels in community-dwelling persons. METHODS:

  13. Primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: congruence with antimicrobial resistance found in commensal Staphylococcus aureus in the community.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijnen, E.M.E. van; Paget, W.J.; Heijer, C.D.J. den; Stobberingh, E.E.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Over 90% of antibiotics for human use in Europe are prescribed in primary care. We assessed the congruence between primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections and commensal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) antimicrobial resistance levels in community-dwelling persons. Methods:

  14. Guideline concordant detection and management of depression among Alaska Native and American Indian people in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Y. Hiratsuka

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: A tribal health organization in Alaska implemented a primary care depression screening, detection and management initiative amongst 55,000 Alaska Native/American Indian people (AN/AIs. Objectives: (a To describe the proportion of AN/AIs screening positive for depression with depression noted or diagnosed and proportion with guideline concordant management and (b to assess whether management varied by patient and provider factors. Research design: Secondary analysis of electronic and paper medical record information of 400 AN/AIs. Measures: Provider variables, patient demographics and patient clinical factors were electronically queried. Manual chart audits assessed depression notation, diagnoses and management within 12 weeks of positive screening. Multilevel ordinal logistic modelling assessed management by patient and provider factors. Results: A depression diagnosis was present in 141 (35% charts and 151 (38% had depressive symptoms noted. Detection was higher among AN/AIs with moderate and severe depression (p<0.001. In total, 258 patients (66% received guideline concordant management, 32 (8% had some management, and 110 (28% received no management. Younger patient age and increased provider tenure increased odds of management. Conclusions: Most AN/AIs screening positive for depression received initial guideline concordant management. Additional outreach to older patients and additional support for providers newer to practices appears warranted.

  15. Food and nutritional care in hospitals: how to prevent undernutrition-report and guidelines from the Council of Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Balknas, U. N.; Furst, P.

    2001-01-01

    In 1999 the Council of Europe decided to collect information regarding Nutrition programmes in hospitals and for this purpose a network consisting of national experts from eight of the Partial Agreement member states was established. The aim was to review the current practice in Europe regarding...... hospital food provision, to highlight deficiencies and to issue guidelines to improve the nutritional care and support of hospitalized patients. Five major problems seemed to be common in this context: 1) lack of clearly defined responsibilities; 2) lack of sufficient education; 3) lack of influence...... of the patients; 4) lack of co-operation among all staff groups; and 5) lack of involvement from the hospital management. To solve the problems highlighted, a combined 'team-effort' is needed from national authorities and ail staff involved in the nutritional care and support, including hospital managers. (C...

  16. The CanPain SCI Clinical Practice Guideline for Rehabilitation Management of Neuropathic Pain after Spinal Cord: recommendations for model systems of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guy, S D; Mehta, S; Harvey, D;

    2016-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Clinical practice guidelines. OBJECTIVES: The project objectives were to develop the first Canadian recommendations on a model of care for the management of at- and below-level neuropathic pain in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). SETTING: The guidelines are relevant for inpatient...... process. RESULTS: The Working Group developed five recommendations for the organization of neuropathic pain rehabilitation care in people with SCI. CONCLUSIONS: The Working Group recommendations for a model of care for at- and below-level neuropathic pain after SCI should be used to inform clinical...

  17. Prophylaxis of Venous Thrombosis in Neurocritical Care Patients: An Evidence-Based Guideline: A Statement for Healthcare Professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyquist, Paul; Bautista, Cynthia; Jichici, Draga; Burns, Joseph; Chhangani, Sanjeev; DeFilippis, Michele; Goldenberg, Fernando D; Kim, Keri; Liu-DeRyke, Xi; Mack, William; Meyer, Kim

    2016-02-01

    The risk of death from venous thromboembolism (VTE) is high in intensive care unit patients with neurological diagnoses. This is due to an increased risk of venous stasis secondary to paralysis as well as an increased prevalence of underlying pathologies that cause endothelial activation and create an increased risk of embolus formation. In many of these diseases, there is an associated risk from bleeding because of standard VTE prophylaxis. There is a paucity of prospective studies examining different VTE prophylaxis strategies in the neurologically ill. The lack of a solid evidentiary base has posed challenges for the establishment of consistent and evidence-based clinical practice standards. In response to this need for guidance, the Neurocritical Care Society set out to develop and evidence-based guideline using GRADE to safely reduce VTE and its associated complications.

  18. P18.07PALLIATIVE SEDATION FOR BRAIN TUMOR PATIENTS AT THE END OF LIFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, A.; Villani, V.; Benincasa, D.; Di Pasquale, A.; Carapella, C.M.; Pompili, A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Therapeutic (or palliative) sedation in the context of palliative medicine is the monitored use of medications intended to induce a state of decreased or absent awareness (unconsciousness) in order to relieve the burden of otherwise intractable suffering in a manner that is ethically acceptable to the patient, family and health-care providers. There is a large debate about the use of palliative sedation, sometime defined as terminal sedation. There are very few data about the role of palliative sedation in brain tumor patients at the end of life. However, in brain tumor patients palliative sedation may be necessary in case of uncontrolled delirium, agitation, death rattle or refractory seizures. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical records of patients assisted at home until death by the Regina Elena Cancer Institute Palliative Home Care for brain tumor patients. All patients died for brain tumor in the last 2 years (2012-2013) were included in this study. RESULTS: Out of 190 brain tumor patients assisted at home in 2012-2013, 108 died and were included in this study. All patients were affected by malignant glioma. Palliative sedation was utilized in 12 cases (11%). In 8 cases for the control of refractory seizures and in 4 cases for delirium. Given the lack of advanced directives and low competence of patients, the decision about sedation was discussed by the care team with caregivers and family members. Palliative sedation was started with midazolam 0.5-1 mg/hr and prolonged until symptoms' control. CONCLUSION: The use of palliative sedation is relatively frequent in the practice of a neuro-oncologic palliative team. The most frequent refractory symptoms in this population of patients were seizures and delirium. The process of end of life treatment decisions in neuro-oncology requires to be better defined.

  19. Moving guidelines into action: a report from Cancer Care Ontario’s event Let’s Get Moving: Exercise and Rehabilitation for Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasone, J.R.; Zwaal, C.; Kim, G.; Yuen, D.; Sussman, J.; Segal, R.

    2017-01-01

    The need for an improved understanding of the rehabilitation services landscape in Ontario and for promotion of Cancer Care Ontario’s newly developed Exercise for People with Cancer guideline brought Cancer Care Ontario’s Psychosocial Oncology and Survivorship Programs together to host a knowledge translation and exchange event. The primary objectives of the event were to understand recommendations from Cancer Care Ontario’s new exercise guideline, to discuss key considerations and determine strategies for the implementation of the guideline recommendations, and to explore the current state and future directions of cancer rehabilitation in Ontario. The event was attended by 124 stakeholders, including clinicians, allied health care professionals, administrators, patients, community partners, and academics representing each of the 13 regional cancer programs in Ontario. Attendees participated in two small-group activities that focused on determining the best approach for implementing the guideline recommendations into practice and discussing current barriers and the future state of cancer rehabilitation in Ontario. The activities allowed for networking and collaboration between attendees. The event provided an opportunity for the Psychosocial Oncology and Survivorship Programs to learn about the types of goals and plans that could be feasible in implementing the guideline in each region, and about ways to prioritize gaps in access to rehabilitation services and the types of implementation strategies that might be used to address the gaps. Overall, attendees were highly satisfied with the event, and the findings are being used to help inform research and practice activities with respect to guideline implementation and rehabilitation practice.

  20. Are tuberculosis patients in a tertiary care hospital in Hyderabad, India being managed according to national guidelines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Kumar Kondapaka

    Full Text Available SETTING: A tertiary health care facility (Government General and Chest hospital in Hyderabad, India. OBJECTIVES: To assess a the extent of compliance of specialists to standardized national (RNTCP tuberculosis management guidelines and b if patients on discharge from hospital were being appropriately linked up with peripheral health facilities for continuation of anti-Tuberculosis (TB treatment. METHODS: A descriptive study using routine programme data and involving all TB patients admitted to inpatient care from 1(st January to 30(th June, 2010. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: There were a total of 3120 patients admitted of whom, 1218 (39% required anti-TB treatment. Of these 1104 (98% were treated with one of the RNTCP recommended regimens, while 28 (2% were treated with non-RNTCP regimens. The latter included individually tailored MDR-TB treatment regimens for 19 patients and adhoc regimens for nine patients. A total of 957 (86% patients were eventually discharged from the hospital of whom 921 (96% had a referral form filled for continuing treatment at a peripheral health facility. Formal feedback from peripheral health facilities on continuation of TB treatment was received for 682 (74% patients. In a tertiary health facility with specialists the great majority of TB patients are managed in line with national guidelines. However a number of short-comings were revealed and measures to rectify these are discussed.

  1. Do guidelines on first impression make sense? Implementation of a chest pain guideline in primary care: a systematic evaluation of acceptance and feasibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramer Lena

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most guidelines concentrate on investigations, treatment, and monitoring instead of patient history and clinical examination. We developed a guideline that dealt with the different aetiologies of chest pain by emphasizing the patient's history and physical signs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the guideline's acceptance and feasibility in the context of a practice test. Methods The evaluation study was nested in a diagnostic cross-sectional study with 56 General Practitioners (GPs and 862 consecutively recruited patients with chest pain. The evaluation of the guideline was conducted in a mixed method design on a sub-sample of 17 GPs and 282 patients. Physicians' evaluation of the guideline was assessed via standardized questionnaires and case record forms. Additionally, practice nursing staff and selected patients were asked for their evaluation of specific guideline modules. Quantitative data was analyzed descriptively for frequencies, means, and standard deviations. In addition, two focus groups with a total of 10 GPs were held to gain further insights in the guideline implementation process. The data analysis and interpretation followed the standards of the qualitative content analysis. Results The overall evaluation of the GPs participating in the evaluation study regarding the recommendations made in the chest pain guideline was positive. A total of 14 GPs were convinced that there was a need for this kind of guideline and perceived the guideline recommendations as useful. While the long version was partially criticized for a perceived lack of clarity, the short version of the chest pain guideline and the heart score were especially appreciated by the GPs. However, change of clinical behaviour as consequence of the guideline was inconsistent. While on a concrete patient related level, GPs indicated to have behaved as the guideline recommended, the feedback on a more general level was heterogeneous. Several

  2. Implementing the European guidelines for cardiovascular disease prevention in the primary care setting in Cyprus: Lessons learned from a health care services study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philalithis Anastasios

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent guidelines recommend assessment and treatment of the overall risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD through management of multiple risk factors in patients at high absolute risk. The aim of our study was to assess the level of cardiovascular risk in patients with known risk factors for CVD by applying the SCORE risk function and to study the implications of European guidelines on the use of treatment and goal attainment for blood pressure (BP and lipids in the primary care of Cyprus. Methods Retrospective chart review of 1101 randomly selected patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2, or hypertension or hyperlipidemia in four primary care health centres. The SCORE risk function for high-risk regions was used to calculate 10-year risk of cardiovascular fatal event. Most recent values of BP and lipids were used to assess goal attainment to international standards. Most updated medications lists were used to compare proportions of current with recommended antihypertensive and lipid-lowering drug (LLD users according to European guidelines. Results Implementation of the SCORE risk model labelled overall 39.7% (53.6% of men, 31.3% of women of the study population as high risk individuals (CVD, DM2 or SCORE ≥5%. The SCORE risk chart was not applicable in 563 patients (51.1% due to missing data in the patient records, mostly on smoking habits. The LDL-C goal was achieved in 28.6%, 19.5% and 20.9% of patients with established CVD, DM2 (no CVD and SCORE ≥5%, respectively. BP targets were achieved in 55.4%, 5.6% and 41.9% respectively for the above groups. There was under prescription of antihypertensive drugs, LLD and aspirin for all three high risk groups. Conclusion This study demonstrated suboptimal control and under-treatment of patients with cardiovascular risk factors in the primary care in Cyprus. Improvement of documentation of clinical information in the medical records as well as GPs training for implementation

  3. Helicobacter pylori infection and dyspepsia in primary care : studies on diagnosis and guideline implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijnen, Catherine Friderieke

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis various studies on the management of patients presenting with dyspepsia in primary care are described. Of all patients presenting with dyspepsia, only a minority has organic disease. Roughly 25% of the dyspeptic patients presenting in primary care is referred for endoscopy. At endosco

  4. Peaceful Death: Recommended Competencies and Curricular Guidelines for End-of-Life Nursing Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Washington, DC.

    A group of health care ethicists and palliative care experts convened by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing developed a set of competencies that should be achieved through nursing curricula. The purpose of the 15 competency statements is to assist nurse educators in incorporating end-of-life content into nursing curricula. Every…

  5. The use of clinical practice guidelines in primary care: professional mindlines and control mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Gené-Badia

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: Compliance with CPG recommendations would be improved if these documents were brief, non-compulsory, not cost-containment oriented, more based on nursing care models, sensitive to the specific needs of primary care patients, and integrated into the computer workstation.

  6. Adherence to Safe Handling Guidelines by Health Care Workers Who Administer Antineoplastic Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Boiano, James M.; Steege, Andrea L.; Sweeney, Marie H.

    2014-01-01

    The toxicity of antineoplastic drugs is well documented. Many are known or suspected human carcinogens where no safe exposure level exists. Authoritative guidelines developed by professional practice organizations and federal agencies for the safe handling of these hazardous drugs have been available for nearly three decades. As a means of evaluating the extent of use of primary prevention practices such as engineering, administrative and work practice controls, personal protective equipment ...

  7. [Update on current care guidelines: diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltunen-Back, Eija; Alanen, Anna; Heikkilä, Elina; Puolakkainen, Mirja; Reunala, Timo; Suni, Jukka; Suomalainen, Pekka; Valtonen, Kirsi; Varis, Tiina; Vuento, Risto

    2010-01-01

    Recognition of common sexually transmitted infection (STI) syndromes allows more efficient diagnosis and treatment. These evidence-based guidelines provide advice on the management of STIs, including the use of the appropriate diagnostic methods and therapeutic regimens. Early and appropriate therapy has the potential to significantly reduce the long-term complications of STIs. The prevention of further infection through the counselling and treatment of partners contributes to the sexual health of patients.

  8. [Irritable bowel syndrome: from guideline to made-to-measure care?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Leopold G

    2012-01-01

    The new guideline on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) advocates distinguishing IBS patients who predominantly suffer from constipation from those who mainly suffer from diarrhoea or from alternating bouts of diarrhoea and constipation. In the latter two groups, coeliac disease should be excluded, as should lactose intolerance if at all possible. Since there is no gold standard for the treatment of IBS a thorough explanation of the condition to patients is recommended.

  9. Nonmedical use of sedative-hypnotics and opiates among rural and urban women with protective orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Jennifer; Logan, T K

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence and risk factors for lifetime nonmedical use of sedative-hypnotics and opiates among a sample of rural and urban women with recent partner violence victimization (n=756). Nearly one third of the sample (32.8%) reported ever using illicit sedative-hypnotics or opiates. Nonmedical use of sedative-hypnotics and opiates was significantly associated with lifetime cumulative exposure to interpersonal victimization, rural Appalachian residency, past-year use of other substances and other substance-related problems, and lifetime unmet health care needs. Findings have implications for substance abuse prevention and treatment and victim advocacy programs.

  10. The perspectives of clinical staff and bereaved informal care-givers on the use of continuous sedation until death for cancer patients: The study protocol of the UNBIASED study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Seymour (Jane); J.A.C. Rietjens (Judith); J. Brown (Jayne); A. van der Heide (Agnes); S. Sterckx (Sigrid); L. Deliens (Luc)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: A significant minority of dying people experience refractory symptoms or extreme distress unresponsive to conventional therapies. In such circumstances, sedation may be used to decrease or remove consciousness until death occurs. This practice is described in a variety of way

  11. Comparison between the Comfort and Hartwig sedation scales in pediatric patients undergoing mechanical lung ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werther Brunow de Carvalho

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: A high number of hospitalized children do not receive adequate sedation due to inadequate evaluation and use of such agents. With the increase in knowledge of sedation and analgesia in recent years, concern has also risen, such that it is now not acceptable that incorrect evaluations of the state of children's pain and anxiety are made. OBJECTIVE: A comparison between the Comfort and Hartwig sedation scales in pediatric patients undergoing mechanical lung ventilation. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: A pediatric intensive care unit with three beds at an urban teaching hospital. PATIENTS: Thirty simultaneous and independent observations were conducted by specialists on 18 patients studied. DIAGNOSTIC TEST: Comfort and Hartwig scales were applied, after 3 minutes of observation. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Agreement rate (kappa. RESULTS: On the Comfort scale, the averages for adequately sedated, insufficiently sedated, and over-sedated were 20.28 (SD 2.78, 27.5 (SD 0.70, and 15.1 (SD 1.10, respectively, whereas on the Hartwig scale, the averages for adequately sedated, insufficiently sedated, and over-sedated were 16.35 (SD 0.77, 20.85 (SD 1.57, and 13.0 (SD 0.89, respectively. The observed agreement rate was 63% (p = 0.006 and the expected agreement rate was 44% with a Kappa coefficient of 0.345238 (z = 2.49. CONCLUSIONS: In our study there was no statistically significant difference whether the more complex Comfort scale was applied (8 physiological and behavioral parameters or the less complex Hartwig scale (5 behavioral parameters was applied to assess the sedation of mechanically ventilated pediatric patients.

  12. Interest of 50% nitrous oxide and oxygen premix sedation in gerodontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Emmanuel; Lassauzay, Claire

    2009-01-01

    Elderly patients presenting cardiovascular, respiratory, or neurological disorders require a specific dental care approach, especially patients presenting Alzheimer’s disease. Sedative procedures can prevent dental care-induced stress, even when there is effective pain control, but they have to be adapted to accommodate age-induced physiological modifications, age-related pathologies, and the concomitant treatments. In many situations, routine sedative prescriptions for dental care, such as benzodiazepine or antihistaminics, are not recommended for these patients. Nitrous oxide inhalation together with a specific behavioral threshold is currently the only sedative procedure adapted to cognitively-impaired elderly patients. Nitrous oxide is able to curb stress and its cardiovascular consequences, improve oxygenation, and optimize cooperation during dental care, making not only rehabilitation treatments but also routine dental care a viable option. PMID:19503768

  13. Interest of 50% nitrous oxide and oxygen premix sedation in gerodontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Emmanuel; Lassauzay, Claire

    2009-01-01

    Elderly patients presenting cardiovascular, respiratory, or neurological disorders require a specific dental care approach, especially patients presenting Alzheimer's disease. Sedative procedures can prevent dental care-induced stress, even when there is effective pain control, but they have to be adapted to accommodate age-induced physiological modifications, age-related pathologies, and the concomitant treatments. In many situations, routine sedative prescriptions for dental care, such as benzodiazepine or antihistaminics, are not recommended for these patients. Nitrous oxide inhalation together with a specific behavioral threshold is currently the only sedative procedure adapted to cognitively-impaired elderly patients. Nitrous oxide is able to curb stress and its cardiovascular consequences, improve oxygenation, and optimize cooperation during dental care, making not only rehabilitation treatments but also routine dental care a viable option.

  14. Altered Standards of Care: An Analysis of Existing Federal, State, and Local Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    surrounding altered standards of care from multiple federal, state, regulatory, and academic sources. Chapter III (Methodology) provides background...standards of care, the legal ramifications must be addressed, or the policies will break down at the caregiver level when malpractice risk is at...suggested that academics can assume clinical roles in providing assistance to patients, but there is no requirement that academic physicians have clinical

  15. Guidelines for the care and use of laboratory animals in biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Bolin, Susan

    2012-12-01

    This unit provides a general overview on topics related to the practical care and use of laboratory animals in biomedical research. These topics are briefly described and provide Web sites and/or research articles that can be accessed for more detailed information. While the primary focus is on the care and use of rats and mice bred for biomedical research, many of the Web sites listed provide information on other species used for this purpose.

  16. Local Anesthesia Combined With Sedation Compared With General Anesthesia for Ambulatory Operative Hysteroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Lone Dragnes; Thillemann, Theis Muncholm; Nikolajsen, Lone

    2016-01-01

    anesthesia combined with sedation (group LA + S; n = 76) or general anesthesia (group GA; n = 77). Primary outcome was the worst pain intensity score in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) rated by the patients on a numerical rating scale. FINDING: Data from 144 patients were available for analysis (LA + S...... was shorter (P anesthesia with sedation can be recommended as a first choice anesthetic technique for operative ambulatory hysteroscopy....

  17. Trends in Continuous Deep Sedation until Death between 2007 and 2013: A Repeated Nationwide Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenzo Robijn

    Full Text Available Continuous deep sedation until death is a highly debated medical practice, particularly regarding its potential to hasten death and its proper use in end-of-life care. A thorough analysis of important trends in this practice is needed to identify potentially problematic developments. This study aims to examine trends in the prevalence and practice characteristics of continuous deep sedation until death in Flanders, Belgium between 2007 and 2013, and to study variation on physicians' degree of palliative training.Population-based death certificate study in 2007 and 2013 in Flanders, Belgium. Reporting physicians received questionnaires about medical practices preceding the patient's death. Patient characteristics, clinical characteristics (drugs used, duration, artificial nutrition/hydration, intention and consent, and palliative care training of attending physician were recorded. We posed the following question regarding continuous deep sedation: 'Was the patient continuously and deeply sedated or kept in a coma until death by the use of one or more drugs'.After the initial rise of continuous deep sedation to 14.5% in 2007 (95%CI 13.1%-15.9%, its use decreased to 12.0% in 2013 (95%CI 10.9%-13.2%. Compared with 2007, in 2013 opioids were less often used as sole drug and the decision to use continuous deep sedation was more often preceded by patient request. Compared to non-experts, palliative care experts more often used benzodiazepines and less often opioids, withheld artificial nutrition/hydration more often and performed sedation more often after a request from or with the consent of the patient or family.Worldwide, this study is the first to show a decrease in the prevalence of continuous deep sedation. Despite positive changes in performance and decision-making towards more compliance with due care requirements, there is still room for improvement in the use of recommended drugs and in the involvement of patients and relatives in the

  18. Entropy correlates with Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ankur; Singh, Preet Mohinder; Trikha, Anjan; Rewari, Vimi; Chandralekha

    2014-04-01

    Sedation is routinely used in intensive care units. However due to absence of objective scoring systems like Bispectral Index and entropy our ability to regulate the degree of sedation is limited. This deficiency is further highlighted by the fact that agitation scores used in intensive care units (ICU) have no role in paralyzed patients. The present study compares entropy as a sedation scoring modality with Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS) in mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients in an ICU. Twenty-seven, mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients of either sex, 16-65 years of age, were studied over a period of 24 h. They received a standard sedation regimen consisting of a bolus dose of propofol 0.5 mg/kg and fentanyl 1 lg/kg followed by infusions of propofol and fentanyl ranging from 1.5 to 5 mg/kg/h and 0.5 to 2.0 lg/kg/h, respectively. Clinically relevant values of RASS for optimal ICU sedation (between 0 and -3) in non-paralyzed patients were compared to corresponding entropy values, to find if any significant correlation exists between the two. These entropy measurements were obtained using the Datex-Ohmeda-M-EntropyTM module. This module is presently not approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for monitoring sedation in ICU. A total of 527 readings were obtained. There was a statistically significant correlation between the state entropy (SE) and RASS [Spearman's rho/rs = 0.334, p\\0.0001]; response entropy (RE) and RASS [Spearman's rho/rs = 0.341, p\\0.0001]). For adequate sedation as judged by a RASS value of 0 to -3, the mean SE was 57.86 ± 16.50 and RE was 67.75 ± 15.65. The present study illustrates that entropy correlates with RASS (between scores 0 and -3) when assessing the level of sedation in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients.

  19. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Care of Elderly Patients Hospitalized with Delirium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Julio Romero Carbrera

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Delirium is a frequent disorder found in people of advanced age in the hospital setting. It is characterized by an acute disorder of consciousness and alterations in behavior, posing a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for the doctors that look after geriatric patients. A clinical practice guideline drawn up by consensus is presented. It highlights the clinical and therapeutic aspects of this complex syndrome. An algorithm that facilitates the management of this condition at Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima University General Hospital of Cienfuegos is included.

  20. Fresh Frozen Plasma Administration in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Evidence-Based Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Mario; Del Vecchio, Antonio; Chirico, Gaetano

    2015-09-01

    Neonates receiving fresh frozen plasma (FFP) should do so according to evidence-based guidelines so as to reduce inappropriate use of this life-saving and costly blood product and to minimize associated adverse effects. The consensus-based uses of FFP in neonatology involve neonates with active bleeding and associated coagulopathy. However, because of limited and poor-quality evidence, considerable FFP utilization occurs outside these recommendations. In this review, we describe what we conclude are currently the best practices for the use of FFP in neonates, including interpreting neonatal coagulation tests and strategies for reducing unnecessary FFP transfusions.

  1. Guidelines for conducting ethical research in psychosocial issues in palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parkes Colin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available While it is unethical to introduce services for the terminally ill and their families that are not well founded or evaluated there are special problems in research conducted with this population. This has deterred some from carrying out research in this field and has caused others to place obstacles in the way of would-be researchers. This paper describes the ethical difficulties and provides guidelines that should enable worthwhile research to be carried out without harm to those who offer their help and without vitiating the scientific value of the research.

  2. Guidelines for preventing health-care--associated pneumonia, 2003: recommendations of CDC and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tablan, Ofelia C; Anderson, Larry J; Besser, Richard; Bridges, Carolyn; Hajjeh, Rana

    2004-03-26

    This report updates, expands, and replaces the previously published CDC "Guideline for Prevention of Nosocomial Pneumonia". The new guidelines are designed to reduce the incidence of pneumonia and other severe, acute lower respiratory tract infections in acute-care hospitals and in other health-care settings (e.g., ambulatory and long-term care institutions) and other facilities where health care is provided. Among the changes in the recommendations to prevent bacterial pneumonia, especially ventilator-associated pneumonia, are the preferential use of oro-tracheal rather than naso-tracheal tubes in patients who receive mechanically assisted ventilation, the use of noninvasive ventilation to reduce the need for and duration of endotracheal intubation, changing the breathing circuits of ventilators when they malfunction or are visibly contaminated, and (when feasible) the use of an endotracheal tube with a dorsal lumen to allow drainage of respiratory secretions; no recommendations were made about the use of sucralfate, histamine-2 receptor antagonists, or antacids for stress-bleeding prophylaxis. For prevention of health-care--associated Legionnaires disease, the changes include maintaining potable hot water at temperatures not suitable for amplification of Legionella spp., considering routine culturing of water samples from the potable water system of a facility's organ-transplant unit when it is done as part of the facility's comprehensive program to prevent and control health-care--associated Legionnaires disease, and initiating an investigation for the source of Legionella spp. when one definite or one possible case of laboratory-confirmed health-care--associated Legionnaires disease is identified in an inpatient hemopoietic stem-cell transplant (HSCT) recipient or in two or more HSCT recipients who had visited an outpatient HSCT unit during all or part of the 2-10 day period before illness onset. In the section on aspergillosis, the revised recommendations

  3. The Evaluation of Efficacy and Safety Of Given Dexmedetomidine Sedation for Mechanical Ventilation in Intensive Care Medicine%右美托咪定镇静用于重症医学机械通气的效果及安全性评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丹

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the right sedative dexmedetomidine for sedation in mechanical y ventilated patients in critical care medicine and to evaluate its safety. Methods 50 cases treated in our hospital critical y il mechanical y ventilated ICU patients were randomly divided into two groups of control and experimental groups. Selection of the control group of patients in the conventional mechanical ventilation during midazolam sedation, the experimental group selection right dexmedetomidine sedative,calming effect two groups were compared, and the recovery time after stopping ventilation time and other indicators. Results The results of the two methods is quite calm, there was no significant difference; but after discontinuation of patients in the experimental group and ventilation recovery time was significantly shorter than the control group,P<0.05,statistically significant. Conclusion Right dexmedetomidine for sedation in mechanically ventilated patients with severe medical obvious calming effect, and can shorten the patient's recovery time and ventilation.%目的:分析右美托咪啶镇静对于重症医学机械通气患者的镇静效果并评价其安全性。方法将我院治疗的50例重症机械通气患者随机分为两组对照组和实验组。对照组患者在机械通气过程中选用常规的咪达唑仑镇静,实验组选用右美托咪啶镇静,比较两组患者的镇静效果、停药后苏醒时间及通气时间等指标。结果两种方法的镇静效果相当,无显著性差异;但实验组患者的停药后苏醒时间及通气时间均明显短于对照组,P<0.05,具有统计学意义。结论右美托咪啶镇静对于重症医学机械通气患者有明显的镇静效果,并可缩短患者的苏醒时间及通气时间。

  4. Dietary supplements and their future in health care: commentary on draft guidelines proposed by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umhau, John C; Garg, Keva; Woodward, Albert M

    2012-03-01

    The Dietary Supplement and Health and Education Act of 1994 gives the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) responsibility for oversight of the dietary supplement industry. Recent draft guidelines proposed by the FDA to insure the safety of new dietary ingredients would significantly alter the ability of manufacturers to bring new dietary ingredients to market, and may cause many products introduced since 1994 to be discontinued. These changes will have an impact on health care, but with limited research on dietary supplements and how their use affects the health care system, there is no way to predict what their overall effect on health will be. Since the natural raw materials for dietary supplements are often inexpensive and generally cannot be patented, manufactures have little incentive to conduct the research which might otherwise be warranted. Appropriate clinical trials that evaluate the use and efficacy of various supplements may be critical for our health care system. If inexpensive dietary supplements are found to be safe and effective, such research could yield significant cost savings as well as health benefits.

  5. Guidelines for the veterinary care of laboratory animals: report of the FELASA/ECLAM/ESLAV Joint Working Group on Veterinary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voipio, Hanna-Marja; Baneux, P; Gomez de Segura, I A; Hau, J; Wolfensohn, S

    2008-01-01

    Veterinary professionals working in partnership with other competent persons are essential for a successful animal care and use programme. A veterinarian's primary responsibilities are defined by their own professional regulatory bodies, but in this area of work there are further opportunities for contribution, which will assist in safeguarding the health and welfare of animals used in research. These guidelines are aimed not only at veterinarians to explain their duties, and outline the opportunities to improve the health and welfare of animals under their care, but also at employers and regulators to help them meet their responsibilities. They describe the desirability for postgraduate education towards specialization in laboratory animal medicine and detail the many competencies necessary to fulfil the role of the laboratory animal veterinarian. They detail the need for veterinary expertise to promote good health and good welfare of animals used in biomedical research during husbandry as well as when under experimental procedures. Regulatory and ethical aspects are covered as are the involvement of the veterinarian in education and training of others working in the animal care and use programme. Managerial aspects, including occupational health and safety, are also areas where the veterinarian's input can assist in the successful implementation of the programme.

  6. Palliative sedation in advanced cancer patients: Does it shorten survival time? - A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Barathi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with advanced cancer often suffer from multiple refractory symptoms in the terminal phase of their life. Palliative sedation is one of the few ways to relieve this refractory suffering. Objectives: This systematic review investigated the effect of palliative sedation on survival time in terminally ill cancer patients. Materials and Methods: Six electronic databases were searched for both prospective and retrospective studies which evaluated the effect of palliative sedation on survival time. Only those studies which had a comparison group that did not receive palliative sedation were selected for the review. Abstracts of all retrieved studies were screened to include the most relevant studies and only studies which met inclusion criteria were selected. References of all retrieved studies were also screened for relevant studies. Selected studies were assessed for quality and data extraction was done using the structured data extraction form. Results: Eleven studies including four prospective and seven retrospective studies were identified. Mean survival time (MST was measured as the time from last admission until death. A careful analysis of the results of all the 11 studies indicated that MST of sedated and non-sedated group was not statistically different in any of the studies. Conclusion: This systematic review supports the fact that palliative sedation does not shorten survival in terminally ill cancer patients. However, this conclusion needs to be taken with consideration of the methodology, study design, and the population studied of the included studies in this review.

  7. Hygiene guideline for the planning, installation, and operation of ventilation and air-conditioning systems in health-care settings – Guideline of the German Society for Hospital Hygiene (DGKH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Külpmann, Rüdiger

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the publication of the first “Hospital Hygiene Guideline for the implementation and operation of air conditioning systems (HVAC systems in hospitals” ( in 2002, it was necessary due to the increase in knowledge, new regulations, improved air-conditioning systems and advanced test methods to revise the guideline. Based on the description of the basic features of ventilation concepts, its hygienic test and the usage-based requirements for ventilation, the DGKH section “Ventilation and air conditioning technology” attempts to provide answers for the major air quality issues in the planning, design and the hygienically safe operation of HVAC systems in rooms of health care.

  8. Utilization Study of Antihypertensives in a South Indian Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital and Adherence to Standard Treatment Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Supratim

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Hypertension represents a major health problem primarily because of its role in contributing to the initiation and progression of major cardiovascular diseases. Concerns pertaining to hypertension and its sequelae can be substantially addressed and consequent burden of disease reduced by early detection and appropriate therapy of elevated blood pressure. This cross-sectional observational study aims at analyzing the utilization pattern of antihypertensives used for the treatment of hypertension at a tertiary care hospital in perspective of standard treatment guidelines. Materials and Methods: Prescriptions were screened for antihypertensives at the medicine outpatient department of a tertiary care teaching hospital. Medical records of the patients were scrutinized after which 286 prescriptions of patients suffering from hypertension were included. The collected data were sorted and analyzed on the basis of demographic characteristics and comorbidities. Results: The calcium channel blockers were the most frequently used antihypertensive class of drugs (72.3%). Amlodipine (55.6%) was the single most frequently prescribed antihypertensive agent. The utilization of thiazide diuretics was 9%. Adherence to the National List of Essential Medicines (NLEMs) was 65%. The combination therapy was used more frequently (51.5%) than monotherapy (48.8%). The use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin 2 receptor blockers (ACE-I/ARB) was 41.4% in diabetes. Conclusions: The treatment pattern, in general, conformed to standard treatment guidelines. Few areas, however, need to be addressed such as the underutilization of thiazide diuretics, need for more awareness of drugs from the NLEMs and enhanced use of ACE-I/ARB in diabetic hypertensives. PMID:28104972

  9. [Guideline 'Diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in adults'. II. Special situations and organisation of medical care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Gerard; Derijks, Luc J J; Houwert, Govert J; Wolf, Hans; van Bodegraven, Ad A

    2010-01-01

    The Dutch national practice guideline 'Diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in adults' describes the multidisciplinary approach for adult patients with (suspected) IBD, recommended following analysis of the literature according to the principles of evidence based guideline development. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are associated with temporary or permanent extra-intestinal disorders: reactive inflammatory conditions, associated conditions, and those arising as a consequence of long standing, inflammatory, intestinal disease. Treatment is aimed first at the IBD disease process and subsequently at the specific extra-intestinal conditions if complaints persist. The fertility of women with IBD who have not been operated is comparable with those without this complaint. With the exception of methotrexate in both sexes and of sulfasalazine in men, none of the usual medicines for IBD is known to adversely influence fertility. Fertility decreases following abdominal surgery. IBD patients are advised to restrict onset of pregnancy to a longstanding, quiet phase of the disease (ideally > 1 year). The risk of complications during pregnancy is not elevated when IBD is in remission, but is increased during active disease. Nulliparae with an ileoanal pouch have approximately 50% long term risk of developing faecal incontinence; a planned full-term Caesarean section may be beneficial in such cases. Complicated perianal disease is similarly an indication for non-vaginal delivery. The life expectancy for patients with ulcerative colitis is normal, but is slightly lower in patients with Crohn's disease. These positive findings have not yet been incorporated into the practice of life insurance providers. The diversity of IBD patient health care and its delivery by many professionals places stringent requirements on the organisation of care by hospitals and those providing treatment. The transfer process from paediatric specialist to gastroenterologist

  10. Colonoscopy ‘My Way’: Preparation, Anticoagulants, Antibiotics and Sedation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome D Waye

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Colonoscopy was introduced in the 1960s. The facility with which this technique is performed has been enhanced by vast improvements in instrumentation. In spite of this, physician attitudes concerning colonoscopy have changed little over the past several decades. The diet for precolonoscopic preparation has not been altered for 30 years. Colonoscopists have a great reluctance to use a new preparation instead of the 4 L electrolyte solution, perhaps because this was such a significant advance in colonoscopic cleansing, its predecessor being castor oil and enemas. Physicians continue to be wary of the patient who is taking acetylsalicylic acid in the absence of any studies that show that this is detrimental for polypectomy. The management of the patient on warfarin anticoagulation remains a subject for debate. As for antibiotic prophylaxis, most endoscopy units do not have a standardized approach, although there are good guidelines that, if followed, should decrease the risk of infective endocarditis. Sedation for the endoscopic examination is usually administered by the colonoscopist, although anesthesiologists may, in some countries (and in some defined areas of the United States be the primary administrators of sedation and analgesia. The present article is a personal approach to the following issues: the preparation of the colon for an examination, current thoughts about anticoagulation and acetylsalicylic acid, antibiotic prophylaxis for colonoscopy and the technique for sedation out of the hospital.

  11. Sedation in gastrointestinal endoscopy: current issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafillidis, John K; Merikas, Emmanuel; Nikolakis, Dimitrios; Papalois, Apostolos E

    2013-01-28

    Diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy can successfully be performed by applying moderate (conscious) sedation. Moderate sedation, using midazolam and an opioid, is the standard method of sedation, although propofol is increasingly being used in many countries because the satisfaction of endoscopists with propofol sedation is greater compared with their satisfaction with conventional sedation. Moreover, the use of propofol is currently preferred for the endoscopic sedation of patients with advanced liver disease due to its short biologic half-life and, consequently, its low risk of inducing hepatic encephalopathy. In the future, propofol could become the preferred sedation agent, especially for routine colonoscopy. Midazolam is the benzodiazepine of choice because of its shorter duration of action and better pharmacokinetic profile compared with diazepam. Among opioids, pethidine and fentanyl are the most popular. A number of other substances have been tested in several clinical trials with promising results. Among them, newer opioids, such as remifentanil, enable a faster recovery. The controversy regarding the administration of sedation by an endoscopist or an experienced nurse, as well as the optimal staffing of endoscopy units, continues to be a matter of discussion. Safe sedation in special clinical circumstances, such as in the cases of obese, pregnant, and elderly individuals, as well as patients with chronic lung, renal or liver disease, requires modification of the dose of the drugs used for sedation. In the great majority of patients, sedation under the supervision of a properly trained endoscopist remains the standard practice worldwide. In this review, an overview of the current knowledge concerning sedation during digestive endoscopy will be provided based on the data in the current literature.

  12. Our Sedation Experience on Mentally Retarded Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Metin Alkan

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The majority of dental treatments can be performed under local anesthesia. However, sedation or general anesthesia are often required for mentally retarded patients presenting a lack of cooperation. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the outcomes of mentally retarded patients treated under sedation. Material and Method: The records of the 214 mentally retarded patients that were treated under sedation between 2010-2012 were retrospectively evaluated. The retrospective ...

  13. Preprocedural Assessment for Sedation in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetzlaff, John E; Maurer, Walter G

    2016-07-01

    The role of the anesthesia service in sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy (GIE) has been steadily increasing. The goals of preprocedural assessment are determined by the specific details of the procedure, the issues related to the illness that requires the endoscopy, comorbidities, the goals for sedation, and the risk of complications from the sedation and the endoscopic procedure. Rather than consider these issues as separate entities, they should be considered as part of a continuum of preparation for GIE. This is told from the perspective of an anesthesiologist who regularly participates in the full range of sedation for GIE.

  14. The use of propofol as a sedative agent in gastrointestinal endoscopy: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daorong Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess the efficacy and safety of propofol sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy, we conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing propofol with traditional sedative agents. METHODS: RCTs comparing the effects of propofol and traditional sedative agents during gastrointestinal endoscopy were found on MEDLINE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and EMBASE. Cardiopulmonary complications (i.e., hypoxia, hypotension, arrhythmia, and apnea and sedation profiles were assessed. RESULTS: Twenty-two original RCTs investigating a total of 1,798 patients, of whom 912 received propofol only and 886 received traditional sedative agents only, met the inclusion criteria. Propofol use was associated with shorter recovery (13 studies, 1,165 patients; WMD -19.75; 95% CI -27.65, 11.86 and discharge times (seven studies, 471 patients; WMD -29.48; 95% CI -44.13, -14.83, higher post-anesthesia recovery scores (four studies, 503 patients; WMD 2.03; 95% CI 1.59, 2.46, better sedation (nine studies, 592 patients; OR 4.78; 95% CI 2.56, 8.93, and greater patient cooperation (six studies, 709 patients; WMD 1.27; 95% CI 0.53, 2.02, as well as more local pain on injection (six studies, 547 patients; OR 10.19; 95% CI 3.93, 26.39. Effects of propofol on cardiopulmonary complications, procedure duration, amnesia, pain during endoscopy, and patient satisfaction were not found to be significantly different from those of traditional sedative agents. CONCLUSIONS: Propofol is safe and effective for gastrointestinal endoscopy procedures and is associated with shorter recovery and discharge periods, higher post-anesthesia recovery scores, better sedation, and greater patient cooperation than traditional sedation, without an increase in cardiopulmonary complications. Care should be taken when extrapolating our results to specific practice settings and high-risk patient subgroups.

  15. Impact of a Provincial Asthma Guidelines Continuing Medical Education Project: The Ontario Asthma Plan of Action’s Provider Education in Asthma Care Project

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care funded the Ontario Lung Association to develop and implement a continuing medical education program to promote implementation of the Canadian asthma guidelines in primary care.OBJECTIVES: To determine baseline knowledge, preferred learning format, satisfaction with the program and reported impact on practice patterns.METHODS: A 3 h workshop was developed that combined didactic presentations and small group case discussions. Outcome...

  16. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Intensive care management of pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ali Al-Azem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension (PH in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU may be due to preexisting pulmonary vascular lung disease, liver disease, or cardiac diseases. PH also may be caused by critical illnesses, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, acute left ventricular dysfunction and pulmonary embolism, or may occur after cardiac or thoracic surgery. Regardless of the underlying cause of PH, the final common pathway for hemodynamic deterioration and death is RV failure, which is the most challenging aspect of patient management. Therapy is thus aimed at acutely relieving RV overload by decreasing PVR and reversing RV failure with pulmonary vasodilators and inotropes.

  17. [Update on current care guidelines. The tendon disorders of the shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepola, Vesa; Paloneva, Juha; Huuskonen, Marja-Liisa; Kallinen, Mauri; Karppinen, Jaro; Mattila, Kimmo; Mattila, Ville; Raittinen, Jukka; Rautiainen, Jari; Aärimaa, Ville

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative rotator cuff tendon disease (tendinopathy) is the most common disorder of the shoulder. A full-thickness tear of the rotator cuff may be caused by degeneration, or it may develop due to an acute trauma. The typical symptoms include pain and functional deficiencies. Diagnostics is based on clinical findings. The primary radiologic imaging is x-ray. Degenerative tendon diseases are primarily treated conservatively in primary health care, the most important treatment modality is physiotherapy-guided therapeutic rehabilitation. Surgical treatment is considered in full-thickness rotator cuff tears, especially after traumatic onset.

  18. A qualitative exploration of factors that facilitate and impede adherence to child abuse prevention guidelines in Dutch preventive child health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konijnendijk, Annemieke A.J.; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M.; Haasnoot-Smallegange, Riet M.E.; Need, Ariana

    2014-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives In the Netherlands, evidence-based child abuse prevention (CAP) guidelines have been developed to support child health care professionals (CHPs) in recognizing and responding to suspected child abuse. The aim of this study was to identify factors related to characteris

  19. Jgz-richtlijn: 'Signalering van en verwijscriteria bij kleine lichaamslengte' [Guideline for preventive child health care: 'Detection and referral criteria in short stature'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, M.; Obenhuijsen, N.H.; Dommelen, P. van; Buuren, S. van; Verkerk, P.H.; Jeugdgezondheidszorg

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this guideline for preventive child health care (PCHC) is to improve early detection of disorders that induce short stature. Based on research, evidence-based referral criteria for children aged 0-10 years with a short stature were formulated. These criteria are important for all pr

  20. Spinal opioids in adult patients with cancer pain: a systematic review: a European Palliative Care Research Collaborative (EPCRC) opioid guidelines project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, Geana Paula; Kaasa, Stein; Sjøgren, Per

    2011-01-01

    A systematic review, undertaken according to an initiative to revise European Association for Palliative Care guidelines on the use of opioids for cancer pain, which aimed to analyse analgesic efficacy and side effects of spinal opioids in adult cancer patients previously treated with systemic...

  1. Standard guidelines of care: CO 2 laser for removal of benign skin lesions and resurfacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupashankar D

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Resurfacing is a treatment to remove acne and chicken pox scars, and changes in the skin due to ageing. Machines : Both ablative and nonablative lasers are available for use. CO 2 laser is the gold standard in ablative lasers. Detailed knowledge of the machines is essential. Indications for CO 2 laser: Therapeutic indications: Actinic and seborrheic keratosis, warts, moles, skin tags, epidermal and dermal nevi, vitiligo blister and punch grafting, rhinophyma, sebaceous hyperplasia, xanthelasma, syringomas, actinic cheilitis angiofibroma, scar treatment, keloid, skin cancer, neurofibroma and diffuse actinic keratoses. CO 2 laser is not recommended for the removal of tattoos. Aesthetic indications: Resurfacing for acne, chicken pox and surgical scars, periorbital and perioral wrinkles, photo ageing changes, facial resurfacing. Physicians′ qualifications: Any qualified dermatologist (DVD or MD may practice CO 2 laser. The dermatologist should possess postgraduate qualification in dermatology and should have had specific hands-on training in lasers either during postgraduation or later at a facility which routinely performs laser procedures under a competent dermatologist/plastic surgeon, who has experience and training in using lasers. For the use of CO 2 lasers for benign growths, a full day workshop is adequate. As parameters may vary in different machines, specific training with the available machine at either the manufacturer′s facility or at another centre using the machine is recommended. Facility: CO 2 lasers can be used in the dermatologist′s minor procedure room for the above indications. However, when used for full-face resurfacing, the hospital operation theatre or day care facility with immediate access to emergency medical care is essential. Smoke evacuator is mandatory. Preoperative counseling and Informed consent Detailed counseling with respect to the treatment, desired effects, possible postoperative complications, should be

  2. Heel blood sampling in European neonatal intensive care units: compliance with pain management guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Losacco, Valentina; Cuttini, Marina; Greisen, Gorm

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the use of heel blood sampling and non-pharmacological analgesia in a large representative sample of neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in eight European countries, and compare their self-reported practices with evidence-based recommendations. Methods Information on use...... admissions per year were included in this analysis. Results Use of heel blood sampling appeared widespread. Most units in the Netherlands, UK, Denmark, Sweden and France predominantly adopted mechanical devices, while manual lance was still in use in the other countries. The two Scandinavian countries...... and France were the most likely, and Belgium and Spain the least likely to employ recommended combinations of evidence-based pain management measures. Conclusions Heel puncture is a common procedure in preterm neonates, but pain appears inadequately treated in many units and countries. Better compliance...

  3. The Surgical Care Improvement Project Antibiotic Guidelines: Should We Expect More Than Good Intentions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonberger, Robert B; Barash, Paul G; Lagasse, Robert S

    2015-08-01

    Since 2006, the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) has promoted 3 perioperative antibiotic recommendations designed to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections. Despite good evidence for the efficacy of these recommendations, the efforts of SCIP have not measurably improved the rates of surgical site infections. We offer 3 arguments as to why SCIP has fallen short of expectations. We then suggest a reorientation of quality improvement efforts to focus less on reporting, and incentivizing adherence to imperfect metrics, and more on creating local and regional quality collaboratives to educate clinicians about how to improve practice. Ultimately, successful quality improvement projects are behavioral interventions that will only succeed to the degree that they motivate individual clinicians, practicing within a particular context, to do the difficult work of identifying failures and iteratively working toward excellence.

  4. Brachytherapy for Patients With Prostate Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology/Cancer Care Ontario Joint Guideline Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Joseph; Rumble, R Bryan; Kollmeier, Marisa; Heath, Elisabeth; Efstathiou, Jason; Dorff, Tanya; Berman, Barry; Feifer, Andrew; Jacques, Arthur; Loblaw, D Andrew

    2017-03-27

    Purpose To jointly update the Cancer Care Ontario guideline on brachytherapy for patients with prostate cancer to account for new evidence. Methods An Update Panel conducted a targeted systematic literature review and identified more recent randomized controlled trials comparing dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with brachytherapy in men with prostate cancer. Results Five randomized controlled trials provided the evidence for this update. Recommendations For patients with low-risk prostate cancer who require or choose active treatment, low-dose rate brachytherapy (LDR) alone, EBRT alone, and/or radical prostatectomy (RP) should be offered to eligible patients. For patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer choosing EBRT with or without androgen-deprivation therapy, brachytherapy boost (LDR or high-dose rate [HDR]) should be offered to eligible patients. For low-intermediate risk prostate cancer (Gleason 7, prostate-specific antigen < 10 ng/mL or Gleason 6, prostate-specific antigen, 10 to 20 ng/mL), LDR brachytherapy alone may be offered as monotherapy. For patients with high-risk prostate cancer receiving EBRT and androgen-deprivation therapy, brachytherapy boost (LDR or HDR) should be offered to eligible patients. Iodine-125 and palladium-103 are each reasonable isotope options for patients receiving LDR brachytherapy; no recommendation can be made for or against using cesium-131 or HDR monotherapy. Patients should be encouraged to participate in clinical trials to test novel or targeted approaches to this disease. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/Brachytherapy-guideline and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki .

  5. Nurse-administered propofol sedation for endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J T; Vilmann, P; Horsted, T;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to perform a risk analysis during the implementation phase of nurse-administered propofol sedation (NAPS) and to validate our structured training program.......The aim of the present study was to perform a risk analysis during the implementation phase of nurse-administered propofol sedation (NAPS) and to validate our structured training program....

  6. Epileptic fits under intravenous midazolam sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, N D

    1996-09-07

    A case is presented of a patient who suffered from recurrent epileptic fits while being treated under intravenous sedation with midazolam. Those using sedation are advised to beware of the patient who gives a history of fits being provoked in the dental environment.

  7. Sedation in the ICU Less is more

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strom, T.

    2012-01-01

    . The intervention group received only bolus doses of morphine or haloperidol if delirium was suspected. The control group received standard infusion of sedatives to RAMSAY 3-4 and sedatives were interrupted on a daily basis. Both groups received morphine as intravenous bolus doses (2.5 to 5 mg). The primary outcome...

  8. Cultural changes in ICU sedation management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore physicians' views and perceptions of sedation, and offer a new approach to the understanding of issues of sedation. I used a qualitative, descriptive, and explorative multicenter design. Data were generated by seven key-informant interviews using a semistructu...

  9. Quality of dementia clinical guidelines and relevance to the care of older people with comorbidity: evidence from the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damiani G

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Gianfranco Damiani, Giulia Silvestrini, Lucrezia Trozzi, Donatella Maci, Lanfranco Iodice, Walter Ricciardi Department of Public Health, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Largo Agostino Gemelli, Rome, Italy Purpose: The aim of this paper was to explore the applicability of dementia clinical guidelines (CGs to older patients, to patients with one or several comorbidities, and to both targets in order to evaluate if an association between the applicability and quality of the CGs exists.Materials and methods: A systematic search strategy conducted on electronic databases identified CGs on diagnosis and treatment of dementia published from 2000 to 2013. In addition, websites of organizations devoted to the treatment and awareness of dementia were searched. The quality of evidence was assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation (AGREE instrument. Two investigators independently scored the relevance of the CGs by means of a specific tool. Descriptive and inferential analyses were performed (Mann–Whitney test, 0.05 α-level.Results: Twenty-two CGs met our inclusion criteria. On average, the quality of the CGs was higher than 70% in three of six domains measured by the AGREE tool. The domains with lower mean scores (less than 50% were “Applicability” and “Editorial independence”. Considering applicability to older patients, 20 CGs (91% addressed issues of treatment for older patients, five of them (23% classified older patients by age, and 13 CGs (60% addressed issues of comorbidity. Only seven (32% discussed the quality of evidence for patients with multiple comorbid conditions. Thirteen CGs (60% reported recommendations for patients with at least one comorbid condition, while seven of them (32% reported on several comorbid conditions. No statistically significant association between CG quality and relevance to care of older people with or without comorbidity was found (P>0.05.Conclusion: This study showed that

  10. The Adoption of Roles by Primary Care Providers during Implementation of the New Chronic Disease Guidelines in Urban Mongolia: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimeddamba, Oyun; Ayton, Darshini; Bazarragchaa, Nansalmaa; Dorjsuren, Bayarsaikhan; Peeters, Anna; Joyce, Catherine

    2016-04-07

    (1) BACKGROUND: In 2011, new chronic disease guidelines were introduced across Mongolia. No formal advice was provided regarding role delineation. This study aimed to analyse the roles that different primary care providers adopted, and the variations in these, in the implementation of the guidelines in urban Mongolia; (2) METHODS: Ten group interviews with nurses and ten individual interviews each with practice doctors and practice directors were conducted. Data was analysed using a thematic approach based on the identified themes relevant to role delineation; (3) RESULTS: There was some variability and flexibility in role delineation. Factors involving teamwork, task rotation and practice flexibility facilitated well the guideline implementation. However, factors including expectations and decision making, nursing shortage, and training gaps adversely influenced in the roles and responsibilities. Some role confusion and dissatisfaction was identified, often associated with a lack of training or staff turnover; (4) CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that adequate ongoing training is required to maximize the range of roles particular provider types, especially primary care nurses, are competent to perform. Ensuring that role delineation is specified in guidelines could remove confusion and enhance implementation of such guidelines.

  11. The Adoption of Roles by Primary Care Providers during Implementation of the New Chronic Disease Guidelines in Urban Mongolia: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyun Chimeddamba

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: In 2011, new chronic disease guidelines were introduced across Mongolia. No formal advice was provided regarding role delineation. This study aimed to analyse the roles that different primary care providers adopted, and the variations in these, in the implementation of the guidelines in urban Mongolia; (2 Methods: Ten group interviews with nurses and ten individual interviews each with practice doctors and practice directors were conducted. Data was analysed using a thematic approach based on the identified themes relevant to role delineation; (3 Results: There was some variability and flexibility in role delineation. Factors involving teamwork, task rotation and practice flexibility facilitated well the guideline implementation. However, factors including expectations and decision making, nursing shortage, and training gaps adversely influenced in the roles and responsibilities. Some role confusion and dissatisfaction was identified, often associated with a lack of training or staff turnover; (4 Conclusions: Findings suggest that adequate ongoing training is required to maximize the range of roles particular provider types, especially primary care nurses, are competent to perform. Ensuring that role delineation is specified in guidelines could remove confusion and enhance implementation of such guidelines.

  12. Adherence of primary health care physicians to hypertension management guidelines in the Aseer region of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid S Al-Gelban

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there has been significant progress in the management of hypertension, rates for control of this chronic disease in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA has been shown to be very low. This study was aimed to assess the knowledge of primary health care (PHC physicians and the extent of their adherence to the recommendations of clinical practice guidelines concerning care of hypertensive patients. The assessment was made in the Aseer region of KSA using a modified version of the World Health Organization "Physician Inquiry Questionnaire." Only 5.6% of the participants measured blood pressure (BP with the patient in sitting and other postures. Variable sphygmomanometer cuff sizes for different patients were used by 56.5% of the participants, while 74.8% correctly recorded the diastolic BP at Koratkoff sound, phase- 5. Among non- diabetics, the correct diagnosis of systolic and diastolic hypertension was reported by 76.7% and 81.4% respectively, of the PHC physicians. Among diabetics, the correct diagnosis of systolic and diastolic hypertension was reported by 36% and 17.1% of the PHC physicians, respectively. Most physicians inquired about cardiovascular risk factors. Several important items of patients′ clinical examination were not completely covered by physicians, e.g., fundus examination (75.2%. PHC physicians missed a few investigations and laboratory tests, e.g., ECG (87.9%, serum creatinine (88.2% and lipid profile (89.8%. Less than one- fifth of the physicians correctly chose the thiazide diuretics as the preferred initial anti- hypertensive agent (19.9%. Almost two- thirds of the physicians (65.2% emphasized the importance of BP self- measurement, 89.8% encouraged patients to use a reminder system while 96.3% motivated patients for BP control. Measures for lifestyle modification included weight reduction (98.8%, sodium restriction (97.5%, physical exercise (96.3% and behavioral improvement (87.6%. Our study suggests that continuing

  13. Evidence-based guidelines for the management of large hemispheric infarction : a statement for health care professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society and the German Society for Neuro-intensive Care and Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbey, Michel T; Bösel, Julian; Rhoney, Denise H; Rincon, Fred; Staykov, Dimitre; Amar, Arun P; Varelas, Panayiotis N; Jüttler, Eric; Olson, DaiWai; Huttner, Hagen B; Zweckberger, Klaus; Sheth, Kevin N; Dohmen, Christian; Brambrink, Ansgar M; Mayer, Stephan A; Zaidat, Osama O; Hacke, Werner; Schwab, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    Large hemispheric infarction (LHI), also known as malignant middle cerebral infarction, is a devastating disease associated with significant disability and mortality. Clinicians and family members are often faced with a paucity of high quality clinical data as they attempt to determine the most appropriate course of treatment for patients with LHI, and current stroke guidelines do not provide a detailed approach regarding the day-to-day management of these complicated patients. To address this need, the Neurocritical Care Society organized an international multidisciplinary consensus conference on the critical care management of LHI. Experts from neurocritical care, neurosurgery, neurology, interventional neuroradiology, and neuroanesthesiology from Europe and North America were recruited based on their publications and expertise. The panel devised a series of clinical questions related to LHI, and assessed the quality of data related to these questions using the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation guideline system. They then developed recommendations (denoted as strong or weak) based on the quality of the evidence, as well as the balance of benefits and harms of the studied interventions, the values and preferences of patients, and resource considerations.

  14. Our Sedation Experience on Mentally Retarded Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin Alkan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The majority of dental treatments can be performed under local anesthesia. However, sedation or general anesthesia are often required for mentally retarded patients presenting a lack of cooperation. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the outcomes of mentally retarded patients treated under sedation. Material and Method: The records of the 214 mentally retarded patients that were treated under sedation between 2010-2012 were retrospectively evaluated. The retrospective data included demographic variables, duriation of anesthesia, anti-epileptic drugs used, level of sedation, anesthetic agents, the type of dental treatment and adverse events during and after sedation. Results: In this study the mean age of patients was 22,49±9,54. The female/male ratio was 109/105. The number of ASA I, II, III patients were 43, 157 and 14 respectively. 16.8% of the patiens (n=36 was on one anti-epileptic drug regimen, while 29.9% of the patiens (n=54 was on more than one anti-epileptic drug regimen. The sedation levels were determined as minimal sedation (6.5%, n=14, moderate sedation (35%, n=75 and deep sedation (58.4%, n=125 respectively. The midazolam-ketamine combination was the most preferred anesthetic regimen (41.1%, n=88. Single dental extraction was the most performed dental treatment (58.4%, n=125. Postoperative nausea and vomiting was encountered in 3.7% of patients (n=8. Respiratuar depression occurred in 2 patients. Two patients developed bronchospasm, while one patient developed postoperative agitation, deep bradycardia and allergic reaction respectively. Discussion: We are of the opinion that sedation can be performed safely by choosing the appropriate drug and method without depressing respiration and reflexes.

  15. Prescribing patterns of the four most commonly used sedatives in endoscopic examination in Korea: propofol, midazolam, diazepam, and lorazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ju-Young; Lee, Shin Haeng; Shin, Sun Mi; Kim, Mi Hee; Park, Sung Geon; Park, Byung-Joo

    2015-04-01

    As the sedative use increases due to the effectiveness and relatively safe profile, the abuse potential is also increasing. This study was conducted to examine the usage of four sedative agents in endoscopic examination and to compare the propofol use with the other three sedatives. Using National Health Insurance claims data from 2008 to 2012, we identified the number of cases of conscious sedation during endoscopy using one or more of the following agents: propofol, midazolam, diazepam, and lorazepam. The general characteristics of patients and medical service providers were analyzed, and the regional and annual distributions of frequency of use were compared. We also identified patient cases with excessive number of endoscopic examinations. Among the total of 3,156,231 sedatives users, midazolam was the most commonly used agent (n=2,845,250, 90.1%). However, the largest increase in patient number, which increased from 11,410 in 2008 to 28,170 in 2012, was observed with propofol. While the majority of patients received an annual endoscopy, we identified several suspected abuse cases of patients receiving endoscopies repetitively as many as 114 times in five years. The rise of sedative use in endoscopic examinations and several patient cases of repeated sedative administration suggest a potential risk for abuse. Medical service providers should be cautious when using sedatives and carefully review each patient's medical history prior to the procedure.

  16. Propofol Use for Sedation during Endoscopy in Adults: A Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Position Statement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F Byrne

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, multiple clinical reports have demonstrated that the use of propofol sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy by gastroenterologists and trained endoscopy nurses is safe and effective in appropriately selected patients. Proposed benefits of propofol sedation include rapid onset of action, improved patient comfort and rapid clearance, as well as prompt recovery and discharge from the endoscopy unit. As a result of medical evidence, a number of international professional societies have endorsed the use of propofol in gastrointestinal endoscopy. In Canada, no formal guidelines currently exist. In the present article, the Clinical Affairs Committee of the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology presents a position statement, incorporating updated information on the use of propofol sedation for endoscopy in adult patients.

  17. [Guidelines for the early diagnosis of lung cancer for primary care physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a serious/medical and social problem. It belongs to the most common cancers. In the past decades, lung cancer has steadily held a leading place in the structure of cancer morbidity and mortality in our country and in the majority of European countries. Cigarette smoking remains to be the major if not only risk factor for lung cancer. Many attempts were previously made to set up systems for the early (timely) lung cancerdetection in risk groups through cytological and radiological examinations. Prophylactic fluorography and X-ray study have long been an important screening procedure in Russia and foreign countries. Recently this procedure has transformed into digital lung radiography. However, there have been no conclusive proofs for its efficiency in the early detection of lung cancer for a few decades. In the past decade, large-scale prospective randomized trials of low-dose computed tomography (CT) have been performed to screen lung cancer. These have shown that this technology can potentially reduce mortality from this disease. This encouraging result has caused a substantial change in the tactics of examining people at high risk for lung cancer. CT has fully replaced linear tomography and all others special X-ray procedures in the verified diagnosis of lung cancer. The indications for pre-examination CT have been considerably expanded in patients with X-ray detected pathology. The tactics for estimating the small lung tissue foci found at CT has been changed. Availability of CT, clear clinical indications for the study, and observance of the standard procedure have become important elements of the entire system for the early identification of lung cancer. These clinical recommendations largely deal just with organizational and methodological issues. The authors hope that the recommendations will serve as a guide for primary care physicians (therapists, pulmonologists,and radiologists) in the early diagnosis of lung cancer and in the optimization

  18. A Phase IIIb, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study evaluating the safety and efficacy of dexmedetomidine for sedation during awake fiberoptic intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergese, Sergio D; Candiotti, Keith A; Bokesch, Paula M; Zura, Andrew; Wisemandle, Wayne; Bekker, Alex Y

    2010-01-01

    GABA-mediated sedatives have respiratory depressant properties that may be detrimental in patients with difficult airways. In this randomized, double-blind, multicenter, Phase IIIb Food and Drug Administration study, safety and efficacy of dexmedetomidine compared with placebo were evaluated as the primary sedative for awake fiberoptic intubation (AFOI). Patients were randomized to receive dexmedetomidine or saline. Patients were sedated with dexmedetomidine or rescue midazolam to achieve targeted sedation (Ramsay Sedation Scale ≥ 2) before topicalization and throughout AFOI. Primary efficacy endpoint was percentage of patients requiring rescue midazolam; secondary efficacy endpoints were total dose of rescue midazolam, percentage requiring additional rescue nonmidazolam medications, anesthesiologist's assessment of ease of subject care, and patient recall and satisfaction 24 hours postoperatively. Less rescue midazolam was required to maintain Ramsay Sedation Scale ≥2 (47.3% vs. 86.0%, P sedated with midazolam. Patients and anesthesiologists showed favorable satisfaction responses in both groups. Adverse events and patient recall were similar in both groups. Dexmedetomidine is effective as the primary sedative in patients undergoing AFOI. Some patients may require small supplemental doses of midazolam, in addition to dexmedetomidine, to achieve sufficient sedation for AFOI. Dexmedetomidine provides another AFOI option for sedation of patients with difficult airways.

  19. Interest of 50% nitrous oxide and oxygen premix sedation in gerodontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Nicolas

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Emmanuel Nicolas1,2, Claire Lassauzay1,21CHU de Clermont-Ferrand, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France; 2Université Clermont 1, EA 3847, Faculty of Dentistry, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, FranceAbstract: Elderly patients presenting cardiovascular, respiratory, or neurological disorders require a specific dental care approach, especially patients presenting Alzheimer’s disease. Sedative procedures can prevent dental care-induced stress, even when there is effective pain control, but they have to be adapted to accommodate age-induced physiological modifications, age-related pathologies, and the concomitant treatments. In many situations, routine sedative prescriptions for dental care, such as benzodiazepine or antihistaminics, are not recommended for these patients. Nitrous oxide inhalation together with a specific behavioral threshold is currently the only sedative procedure adapted to cognitively-impaired elderly patients. Nitrous oxide is able to curb stress and its cardiovascular consequences, improve oxygenation, and optimize cooperation during dental care, making not only rehabilitation treatments but also routine dental care a viable option.Keywords: nitrous oxide, oxygen, premix, sedation, gerodontology, dental care

  20. Sedation for pediatric radiological procedures: analysis of potential causes of sedation failure and paradoxical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karian, V.E.; Burrows, P.E.; Connor, L. [Dept. of Radiology, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Zurakowski, D. [Dept. of Biostatistics, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Mason, K.P. [Dept. of Anesthesiology, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Background. Sedation for diagnostic imaging and interventional radiologic procedures in pediatrics has greatly increased over the past decade. With appropriate patient selection and monitoring, serious adverse effects are infrequent, but failure to sedate and paradoxical reactions do occur. Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine, among patients undergoing sedation for radiologic procedures, the incidence of sedation failure and paradoxical reaction to pentobarbital and to identify potentially correctable causes. Materials and methods. Records of 1665 patients who were sedated in the radiology department from 1 November 1997 to 1 July 1998 were reviewed. Patients failing sedation or experiencing paradoxical reaction were compared with respect to sex, age group, diagnosis, scan type, time of day, NPO status, use of IV contrast and type of sedation agent using the Fisher exact test, Pearson chi-square, analysis of variance (ANOVA), the Student t-test, and logistic regression. Results. Data analysis revealed a sedation failure rate of 1 % and paradoxical reaction rate of 1.2 %. Stepwise multiple logistic regression revealed that the only significant independent multivariate predictor of failure was the need for the administration of a combination of pentobarbital, fentanyl, and midazolam IV. Conclusion. The low rate of sedation failure and paradoxical reactions to pentobarbital was near optimal and probably cannot be improved with the currently available sedatives. (orig.)

  1. Moral differences in deep continuous palliative sedation and euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juth, Niklas; Lindblad, Anna; Lynöe, Niels; Sjöstrand, Manne; Helgesson, Gert

    2013-06-01

    In palliative care there is much debate about which end of life treatment strategies are legitimate and which are not. Some writers argue that there is an important moral dividing-line between palliative sedation and euthanasia, making the first acceptable and the latter not. We have questioned this. In a recent article, Lars Johan Materstvedt has argued that we are wrong on two accounts: first, that we fail to account properly for the moral difference between continuous deep palliative sedation at the end of life and euthanasia, and, second, that we fail to account properly for the difference between permanent loss of consciousness and death. Regarding the first objection, we argue that Materstvedt misses the point: we agree that there is a difference in terms of intentions between continuous deep palliative sedation and euthanasia, but we question whether this conceptual difference makes up for a moral difference. Materstvedt fails to show that it does. Regarding the second objection, we argue that if nothing else is at stake than the value of the patient's life, permanent unconsciousness and death are morally indifferent.

  2. Patient-centred care of patients with ventricular arrhythmias and risk of sudden cardiac death: What do the 2015 European Society of Cardiology guidelines add?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norekvål, Tone M; Kirchhof, Paulus; Fitzsimons, Donna

    2017-03-01

    Nurses and allied professionals are at the forefront of care delivery in patients with arrythmogenic risk and have a responsibility to deliver care that is focused on their individual needs. The 2015 European Society of Cardiology guideline on prevention of ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death heralds a step-change in patient and family focus and interdisciplinary involvement. This development reflects a recognition within the European Society of Cardiology that chronic care of patients with cardiovascular conditions can be improved by involving all stakeholders, making use of multidisciplinary interventions, and placing the patient at the centre of the care process. In this article, taskforce contributors discuss the latest evidence and highlight some of the most pertinent issues for nurses involved in patient-centred care of patients and families with ventricular arrhythmias and/or risk of sudden death.

  3. 咪达唑仑复合异丙酚镇静对ICU机械通气患者谵妄的影响%Effect of sedation with midazolam combined with propofol on delirium in mechanically ventilated patients in intensive care unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅小云; 胡杰; 苏德; 高飞; 杨学忠; 喻田

    2015-01-01

    目的 评价咪达唑仑复合异丙酚镇静对ICU机械通气患者谵妄的影响.方法 选择需行镇静镇痛气管插管、呼吸机辅助呼吸的ICU患者522例,年龄28~ 64岁,体重41~ 82 kg,性别不限,根据治疗期间的镇静方法分为2组:咪达唑仑镇静组(M组,n=240)和咪达唑仑+异丙酚镇静组(MP组,n=232).M组和MP组静脉输注咪达唑仑0.03 ~ 0.17 mg/min镇静,静脉输注舒芬太尼0.07~ 0.14 μg/min镇痛.MP组当循环稳定、压力支持8~ 10 cmH2O、潮气量>400 ml、通气频率<25次/min、吸入氧浓度<45%时,改为静脉输注异丙酚0.8~ 2.0 mg/min镇静,镇静时间12~24 h.机械通气期间维持Richmond躁动-镇静量表评分-1 ~-2分.记录谵妄的发生情况和持续时间,并根据Richmond躁动-镇静量表评分将其分为兴奋型、抑制型和混合型,记录不同类型谵妄的发生情况和持续时间.结果 2组谵妄发生率和持续时间比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).与M组比较,MP组兴奋型谵妄发生率降低(P<0.05),抑制型和混合型谵妄的发生率、不同类型谵妄持续时间差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 咪达唑仑复合异丙酚可降低ICU机械通气患者兴奋型谵妄的发生,但不能缩短谵妄持续时间.%Objective To evaluate the effect of sedation with midazolam combined with propofol on delirium in mechanically ventilated patients in the intensive care unit (ICU).Methods Five hundred and twenty-two patients who required sedation and analgesia,endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation used to assist respiration,aged 28-64 yr,weighing 41-82 kg,were randomized into 2 groups according to the sedation protocols during therapy:sedation with midazolam group (group M,n =240) and sedation with midazolam + propofol group (group MP,n=232).In M and MP groups,sedation was induced with midazolam infusion 0.03-0.17 mg/min,and analgesia was induced with sufentanil infusion 0.07-0.14 μg/min.In group MP

  4. Current role of non-anesthesiologist administered propofol sedation in advanced interventional endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtea, Daniela Elena; Dimitriu, Anca; Maloş, Anca Elena; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2015-08-10

    Complex and lengthy endoscopic examinations like endoscopic ultrasonography and/or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography benefit from deep sedation, due to an enhanced quality of examinations, reduced discomfort and anxiety of patients, as well as increased satisfaction for both the patients and medical personnel. Current guidelines support the use of propofol sedation, which has the same rate of adverse effects as traditional sedation with benzodiazepines and/or opioids, but decreases the procedural and recovery time. Non-anesthesiologist administered propofol sedation has become an option in most of the countries, due to limited anesthesiology resources and the increasing evidence from prospective studies and meta-analyses that the procedure is safe with a similar rate of adverse events with traditional sedation. The advantages include a high quality of endoscopic examination, improved satisfaction for patients and doctors, as well as decreased recovery and discharge time. Despite the advantages of non-anesthesiologist administered propofol, there is still a continuous debate related to the successful generalization of the procedures.

  5. Ketamine and midazolam sedation for pediatric gastroinntestinal endoscopy in the Arab world

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamad-Iqbal S Miqdady; Wail A Hayajneh; Ruba Abdelhadi; Mark A Gilger

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of intravenous ketamine-midazolam sedation during pediatric endoscopy in the Arab world. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of all pediatric endoscopic procedures performed between 2002-2008 at the shared endoscopy suite of King Abdullah University Hospital, Jordan University of Science & Technology, Jordan was conducted. All children were > 1 year old and weighed > 10 kg with American Society of Anesthesiologists class 1 or 2. Analysis was performed in terms of sedation-related complications (desaturation, respiratory distress, apnea, bradycardia, cardiac arrest, emergence reactions), adequacy of sedation, need for sedation reversal, or failure to complete the procedure. RESULTS: A total of 301 patients (including 160 males) with a mean age of 9.26 years (range, 1-18 years) were included. All were premedicated with atropine; and 79.4% (239/301) had effective and uneventful sedation. And 248 (82.4%) of the 301 patients received a mean dose of 0.16 mg/kg (range, 0.07-0.39) midazolam and 1.06 mg/kg (range, 0.31-2.67) ketamine, respectively within the recommended dosage guidelines. Recommended maximum midazolam dose was exceeded in 17.6% patients [34 female (F):19 male (M), P = 0.003] and ketamine in 2.7% (3 M:5 F). Maximum midazolam dose was more likely to be exceeded than ketamine (P 1 year and weighing > 10 kg without co-morbidities.

  6. Comparison of the process of care of acute severe asthma in adults admitted to hospital before and 1 yr after the publication of national guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, M G; Ryland, I; Harrison, B D

    1996-10-01

    This study set out to assess the effect of publication of the British Guidelines on Asthma Management on the processes and outcomes of the inpatient care of acute severe asthma in the U.K. A criterion-based audit of all acute asthma admissions during August and September 1990 (immediately before) and in 1991 (1 yr after publication of the Guidelines) using eight criteria of process and outcome was performed. Thirty-six teaching and district general hospitals in England, Scotland and Wales took part. In total, 766 patients admitted in 1990, and 900 patients admitted in 1991, were studied. The 1990 and 1991 cohorts were very similar demographically and had asthma of comparable severity. Respiratory physicians achieved similar high performance rates of between 75 and 91% for seven of the eight criteria for both years. Respiratory physicians were significantly more likely to provide patients with a written management plan in 1991. General physicians' performance was significantly lower in both years, but overall there was a very small, but just significant, improvement in their performance in 1991. Some hospitals performed consistently well in both years. It is concluded that respiratory physicians consistently provide better asthma care than general physicians. Though statistically significant, the small degree of improvement was disappointing. Possible reasons include: insufficient time for the Guidelines to be incorporated into practice; inaccessibility of the Guidelines to general physicians; failure to accept responsibility for implementing the good practice reflected in the Guidelines; and an explicit need for strategies to implement the Guidelines beyond publication in a widely-read general medical journal.

  7. Hygiene guideline for the planning, installation, and operation of ventilation and air-conditioning systems in health-care settings – Guideline of the German Society for Hospital Hygiene (DGKH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Külpmann, Rüdiger; Christiansen, Bärbel; Kramer, Axel; Lüderitz, Peter; Pitten, Frank-Albert; Wille, Frank; Zastrow, Klaus-Dieter; Lemm, Friederike; Sommer, Regina; Halabi, Milo

    2016-01-01

    Since the publication of the first “Hospital Hygiene Guideline for the implementation and operation of air conditioning systems (HVAC systems) in hospitals” (http://www.krankenhaushygiene.de/informationen/fachinformationen/leitlinien/12) in 2002, it was necessary due to the increase in knowledge, new regulations, improved air-conditioning systems and advanced test methods to revise the guideline. Based on the description of the basic features of ventilation concepts, its hygienic test and the usage-based requirements for ventilation, the DGKH section “Ventilation and air conditioning technology” attempts to provide answers for the major air quality issues in the planning, design and the hygienically safe operation of HVAC systems in rooms of health care. PMID:26958457

  8. Hygiene guideline for the planning, installation, and operation of ventilation and air-conditioning systems in health-care settings - Guideline of the German Society for Hospital Hygiene (DGKH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Külpmann, Rüdiger; Christiansen, Bärbel; Kramer, Axel; Lüderitz, Peter; Pitten, Frank-Albert; Wille, Frank; Zastrow, Klaus-Dieter; Lemm, Friederike; Sommer, Regina; Halabi, Milo

    2016-01-01

    Since the publication of the first "Hospital Hygiene Guideline for the implementation and operation of air conditioning systems (HVAC systems) in hospitals" (http://www.krankenhaushygiene.de/informationen/fachinformationen/leitlinien/12) in 2002, it was necessary due to the increase in knowledge, new regulations, improved air-conditioning systems and advanced test methods to revise the guideline. Based on the description of the basic features of ventilation concepts, its hygienic test and the usage-based requirements for ventilation, the DGKH section "Ventilation and air conditioning technology" attempts to provide answers for the major air quality issues in the planning, design and the hygienically safe operation of HVAC systems in rooms of health care.

  9. Short Report. Audit of Conscious Sedation Provision in a Salaried Dental Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Clinical audit is a tool that may be used to improve the quality of care and outcomes for patients in a health care setting as well as a mechanism for clinicians to reflect on their performance. The audit described in this short report involved the collection and analysis of data related to the administration of 1,756 conscious sedations, categorised as standard techniques, by clinicians employed by an NHS Trust-based dental service during the year 2014. Data collected included gender, age and medical status of subject, the type of care delivered, the dose of drug administered and the quality of the achieved sedation and any sedation-related complications. This was the first time that a service-wide clinical audit had been undertaken with the objective of determining the safety and effectiveness of this aspect of care provision. Evaluation of the analysed data supported the perceived view that such care was being delivered satisfactorily. This on-going audit will collect data during year 2016 on the abandonment of clinical sessions, in which successful sedation had been achieved, due to the failure to obtain adequate local anaesthesia.

  10. Guidance for commissioning NHS England dental conscious sedation services: a framework tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Conscious sedation is an integral part of modern day dental care and should be delivered through a high quality, effective and evidence-based approach. Commissioning of NHS dental services in England is currently under review by NHS England and the National Dental Commissioning Group. This group has identified the management of vulnerable people including anxious patients, as one of its priorities. The Society for the Advancement of Anaesthesia in Dentistry (SAAD) believes this provides an opportunity to influence the commissioning of NHS conscious sedation services. With this aim in mind,"Guidance for Commissioning NHS England Dental Conscious Sedation Services: A Framework Tool" was developed. This guidance proposes a common approach to the organisation of NHS dental conscious sedation services in England, advocating the provision of Tier 1 and Tier 2 services in all regions. Its ethos is a"hub and spoke" model of service delivery with patient assessment delivered by experienced and well trained dental sedationists at its core. In line with the recent Francis Report fundamental standards for all aspects of dental conscious sedation practice are outlined, supported by a robust and predictable quality assurance process. This work has been shared with key stakeholders in NHS England including the Chief Dental Officer and the Head of Primary Care Commissioning.

  11. Assessing emergency obstetric care provision in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review of the application of global guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Banke-Thomas, Aduragbemi; Wright, Kikelomo; Sonoiki, Olatunji; Banke-Thomas, Oluwasola; Ajayi, Babatunde; Ilozumba, Onaedo; Akinola, Oluwarotimi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lack of timely and quality emergency obstetric care (EmOC) has contributed significantly to maternal morbidity and mortality, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Since 2009, the global guideline, referred to as the ‘handbook’, has been used to monitor availability, utilization, and quality of EmOC. Objective: To assess application and explore experiences of researchers in LMICs in assessing EmOC. Design: Multiple databases of peer-reviewed literature were sys...

  12. Changes to the bispectral index and regional cerebral blood flow in a sedative state, caused by midazolam administration

    OpenAIRE

    池田, 淳子; イケダ, ジュンコ; Junko, IKEDA

    2006-01-01

    Psychosedation, as used in the field of dentistry, is intended to provide trouble-free dental care while maintaining a proper level of sedation. One drug used in psychosedation is midazolam, which is known to have a strong amnestic effect. In the current research, I sought to clarify whether the bispectral index (BIS) using EEC analysis can be used for assessment of optimal sedation in psychosedation, and what effects midazolam has on the cerebrum's mechanism of memory. The subjects were 17 h...

  13. Sedation and analgesia in gastrointestinal endoscopy: What’s new?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lorella; Fanti; Pier; Alberto; Testoni

    2010-01-01

    Various types of sedation and analgesia technique have been used during gastrointestinal endoscopy procedures.The best methods for analgesia and sedation during gastrointestinal endoscopy are still debated.Providing an adequate regimen of sedation/analgesia might be considered an art,influencing several aspects of endoscopic procedures: the quality of the examination,the patient’s cooperation and the patient’s and physician’s satisfaction with the sedation.The properties of a model sedative agent for endosc...

  14. Sedation and analgesia in gastrointestinal endoscopy: What’s new?

    OpenAIRE

    Fanti, Lorella; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Various types of sedation and analgesia technique have been used during gastrointestinal endoscopy procedures. The best methods for analgesia and sedation during gastrointestinal endoscopy are still debated. Providing an adequate regimen of sedation/analgesia might be considered an art, influencing several aspects of endoscopic procedures: the quality of the examination, the patient’s cooperation and the patient’s and physician’s satisfaction with the sedation. The properties of a model sedat...

  15. The Significance of Sedation Control in Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background Adequate assessment and control of sedation play crucial roles in the proper performance of mechanical ventilation. Methods A total of 30 patients with various pulmonary diseases were prospectively enrolled. The study population was randomized into two groups. The sedation assessment group (SAG) received active protocol-based control of sedation, and in the empiric control group (ECG), the sedation levels were empirically adjusted. Subsequently, daily interruption of sedation (DIS)...

  16. Ketamine Sedation in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman E. Eskander

    2016-07-01

    CONCLUSION: Ketamine sedation found to be safe for paediatric gastrointestinal endoscopy in Egyptian children without co-morbidities. Transient Hypoxia (13% may occur but easily reversed by nasal oxygen therapy.

  17. A survey of the management of urinary tract infection in children in primary care and comparison with the NICE guidelines.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennedy, Kieran M

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to establish current practices amongst general practitioners in the West of Ireland with regard to the investigation, diagnosis and management of urinary tract infection (UTI) in children and to evaluate these practices against recently published guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). METHODS: A postal survey was performed using a questionnaire that included short clinical scenarios. All general practices in a single health region were sent a questionnaire, cover letter and SAE. Systematic postal and telephone contact was made with non-responders. The data was analysed using SPSS version 15. RESULTS: Sixty-nine general practitioners were included in the study and 50 (72%) responded to the questionnaire. All respondents agreed that it is important to consider diagnosis of UTI in all children with unexplained fever. Doctors accurately identified relevant risk factors for UTI in the majority (87%) of cases. In collecting urine samples from a one year old child, 80% of respondents recommended the use of a urine collection bag and the remaining 20% recommended collection of a clean catch sample. Respondents differed greatly in their practice with regard to detailed investigation and specialist referral after a first episode of UTI. Co-amoxiclav was the most frequently used antibiotic for the treatment of cystitis, with most doctors prescribing a five day course. CONCLUSIONS: In general, this study reveals a high level of clinical knowledge amongst doctors treating children with UTI in primary care in the catchment area of County Mayo. However, it also demonstrates wide variation in practice with regard to detailed investigation and specialist referral. The common practice of prescribing long courses of antibiotics when treating lower urinary tract infection is at variance with NICE\\'s recommendation of a three day course of antibiotics for cystitis in children over three months of age when

  18. Is point of care testing in Irish hospitals ready for the laboratory modernisation process? An audit against the current national Irish guidelines.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Kelly, R A

    2013-04-11

    BACKGROUND: The Laboratory modernisation process in Ireland will include point of care testing (POCT) as one of its central tenets. However, a previous baseline survey showed that POCT was under-resourced particularly with respect to information technology (IT) and staffing. AIMS: An audit was undertaken to see if POCT services had improved since the publication of National Guidelines and if such services were ready for the major changes in laboratory medicine as envisaged by the Health Service Executive. METHODS: The 15 recommendations of the 2007 Guidelines were used as a template for a questionnaire, which was distributed by the Irish External Quality Assessment Scheme. RESULTS: Thirty-nine of a possible 45 acute hospitals replied. Only a quarter of respondent hospitals had POCT committees, however, allocation of staff to POCT had doubled since the first baseline survey. Poor IT infrastructure, the use of unapproved devices, and low levels of adverse incident reporting were still major issues. CONCLUSIONS: Point of care testing remains under-resourced, despite the roll out of such devices throughout the health service including primary care. The present high standards of laboratory medicine may not be maintained if the quality and cost-effectiveness of POCT is not controlled. Adherence to national Guidelines and adequate resourcing is essential to ensure patient safety.

  19. Pediatric oral conscious sedation: changes to come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, S F; Reggiardo, P

    1999-11-01

    Recent media attention has focused the public's attention on issues surrounding pediatric oral conscious sedation. Under a law passed in 1998 and taking affect on Jan. 1, 2000, California dentists will be subject to certification and procedural provisions designed to ensure the educational qualification of the provider and the standards under which the procedure is performed. This article discusses the history of concern and regulation regarding sedation of children in the dental office.

  20. 右美托咪定用于重症监护病房正颌外科术后留置气管插管患者的镇静%Dexmedetomidine for sedation during intubation period in postoperative patients receiving orthognathic surgery in intensive care unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方舒东; 朱也森; 徐辉; 姜虹

    2012-01-01

    AIM To study the effectiveness and safety of dexmedetomidine for sedation during intubation period in postoperative patients receiving orthognathic surgery admitted to intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS Forty post-operative patients undergoing orthognathic surgery with tracheal intubation in ICU were enrolled and randomized into 2 groups to receive either midazolam or dexmedetomidine. The dexmedetomidine group starting dose was 0.4μg·kg-1·h-1 without a loading dose and adjusted 0.2 to 0.7 μg ·kg·h-1. The midazolam group starting dose was 0.1 mg·kg-1·h-1 and adjusted 0.05 to 0.2 mg·kg·h-1, the dose of sedation was regulated by Ramsay Sedation Score (RSS) maintain 2 to 4 sedative score. During the course, RSS, heart rate (HR) , blood pressure, respiratory rate ( RR) and pulse oxygen saturation ( SpO2) were observed and registered continuously. The amount of the drug, and incidence of adverse reactions, such as hypotension, bradycardia, delirium, etc. were recorded in two groups. RESULTS The expected sedative scores were obtained in all patients in two groups. The HR and mean arterial blood pressures ( MAP) showed no significantly different between two groups before sedation (P > 0.05). The HR in the dexmedetomidine group at 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 16 h were lower compared with those in the midazolam group ( P < 0.05) . The MAP in the dexmedetomidine group at 1, 2, 3, and 4 h were lower than those in the midazolam group (P < 0.05) .The times of dose adjustment needed were significantly lower in the dexmedetomidine group ( 2 patients with 1 adjustment each) than those in the midazolam group ( 3 patients with 1 adjustment, 4 patients with 2 adjustments). Atropine was administered to 2 patients in the dexmedetomidine group because of bradycardia. No serious adverse reactions occurred in both groups. CONCLUSION Dexmedetomidine 0.4 μg · kg-1 · h-1 is effective sedatives for post-operative patients undergoing orthognathic surgery with tracheal intubation in

  1. Practice organisational characteristics can impact on compliance with the BTS/SIGN asthma guideline: Qualitative comparative case study in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillies John

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the BTS-SIGN asthma guideline is one of the most well known and widely respected guidelines in the world, implementation in UK primary care remains patchy. Building on extensive earlier descriptive work, we sought to explore the way teamwork and inter-professional relationships impact on the implementation of the BTS-SIGN guideline on asthma in general practice. Methods Qualitative comparative case study using nine in-depth interviews and 2 focus groups with general practitioners and practice nurses, involved in delivering asthma care. Participants were purposively recruited from practices in a Scottish health board with high and low compliance with the BTS-SIGN asthma guideline. Results There was a marked difference in the way respondents from practices with high compliance and respondents from practices with low compliance spoke about the value of guidelines and the challenges of implementing them. On both accounts, the former were more positive than the latter and were able to be more specific about the strategies they used to overcome barriers to implementation. We explored the reason for this difference in response and identified practice organisation, centring on delegation of work to nurses, as a factor mediating the practice's level of compliance. Effective delegation was underpinned by organisation of asthma work among practice members who have the appropriate level of skills and knowledge, know and understand each others' work and responsibilities, communicate well among themselves and trust each others' skills. It was the combination of these factors which made for successful delegation and guideline implementation, not any one factor in isolation. Conclusion In our sample of practices, teamwork and organisation of care within practices appeared to impact on guideline implementation and further larger studies are needed to explore this issue further. Isolated interventions such as measures to improve staff

  2. A mixed methods pilot study with a cluster randomized control trial to evaluate the impact of a leadership intervention on guideline implementation in home care nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tourangeau Ann

    2008-12-01

    study will provide vital information on which leadership strategies are well received to facilitate and support guideline implementation. The anticipated outcomes will provide information to assist with effective management of foot ulcers for people with diabetes. By tracking clinical outcomes associated with guideline implementation, health care administrators will be better informed to influence organizational and policy decision-making to support evidence-based quality care. Findings will be useful to inform the design of future multi-centered trials on various clinical topics to enhance knowledge translation for positive outcomes. Trial Registration Current Control Trials ISRCTN06910890

  3. Guidelines on acute gastroenteritis in children : a critical appraisal of their quality and applicability in primary care Epidemiology and research methodology in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Jose; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Reasons for poor guideline adherence in acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in children in high-income countries are unclear, but may be due to inconsistency between guideline recommendations, lack of evidence, and lack of generalizability of the recommendations to general practice. The aim of t

  4. The patient experience of intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Bergbom, Ingegerd; Lindahl, Berit

    2015-01-01

    countries have been particularly close to goals of lighter or no sedation and a more humane approach to intensive care. OBJECTIVES: The aim of our study was to systematically review and reinterpret newer Nordic studies of the patient experience of intensive care to obtain a contemporary description of human......: Nordic intensive care units. PARTICIPANTS: Patients in Nordic intensive care units. METHODS: We performed a literature search of qualitative studies of the patient experience of intensive care based on Nordic publications in 2000-2013. We searched the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, and Psyc......BACKGROUND: Sedation practices in the intensive care unit have evolved from deep sedation and paralysis toward lighter sedation and better pain management. The new paradigm of sedation has enabled early mobilization and optimized mechanical ventilator weaning. Intensive care units in the Nordic...

  5. Survey of anaesthetists' practice of sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, K; Allen, M L; Hessian, E; Lee, A Y-S

    2016-07-01

    We conducted a survey of Australian specialist anaesthetists about their practice of sedation for elective and emergency gastroscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), and colonoscopy. A 24-item survey was emailed to 1,000 anaesthetists in August 2015. Responses were received from 409 anaesthetists (response rate=41%) with responses from 395 anaesthetists analysed. Pulse oximetry and oxygen administration were routine for all procedures for all respondents. Blood pressure was routinely measured by most respondents during gastroscopy (elective=88%; emergency=97%), ERCP (elective=99%; emergency=99%) and colonoscopy (elective=91%; emergency=98%). The airway was routinely managed with jaw lift or oral or nasal airway by 99%, 76% and 97% of respondents during gastroscopy, ERCP and colonoscopy, whereas in emergency procedures endotracheal intubation was routine in 49%, 64% and 17% of procedures. Propofol was routinely administered by 99% of respondents for gastroscopy and 100% of respondents for ERCP and colonoscopy. A maximum depth of sedation in which patients were unresponsive to painful stimulation was targeted by the majority of respondents for all procedures except for elective gastroscopy. These results may be used to facilitate comparison of practice in Australia and overseas, and give an indication of compliance by Australian anaesthetists with the relevant Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists guideline.

  6. Physical examinations and laboratory tests in antenatal care visits in Denmark. Do reported practice and current official guidelines concord with results of literature reviews? A nationwide study of the public scheme of shared antenatal care in general practice, centres of midwifery and hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, F B; Andersen, K V; Andersen, A M

    1995-01-01

    To analyse physical examinations and laboratory tests reported in antenatal care visits in relation to official guidelines and reviews of appropriateness.......To analyse physical examinations and laboratory tests reported in antenatal care visits in relation to official guidelines and reviews of appropriateness....

  7. Comparison between intranasal and intravenous midazolam sedation (with or without patient control) in a dental phobia clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, E; Davidson, E; Sheinkman, Z; Magora, F

    1994-08-01

    Two new modes of sedation; patient-controlled sedation (PCS) and intranasal sedation (INS) were compared with the traditional bolus intravenous sedation (BIVS) while delivering dental care to apprehensive patients in a specialized dental fear clinic. Effective sedation was evaluated in a randomized, prospective study in 42 ASA 1 and 2 patients, in a factorial design. Eighteen patients were sedated with .5% midazolam INS. Ten patients received intravenous PCS via a patient-controlled analgesia pump containing midazolam, and 14 patients received intermittent intravenous boluses of 1 mg midazolam given as needed (BIVS). Appropriate local anesthetic nerve blocks with 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine, and supplementary inhalation of nitrous oxide and oxygen via a nasal mask, were also given to all patients in the study. The dosage requirement with PCS was higher than that found with INS or BIVS. However, PCS produced some anxiety reduction when compared with INS and BIVS. It also reduced interfering movements during treatment more effectively than the other sedation modes. No complications were detected in any of the patients and they were able to leave the clinic within 1 hour after completion of treatment.

  8. Characteristics of multiple-diseased elderly in Swedish hospital care and clinical guidelines: Do they make evidence-based priority setting a “mission impossible”?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlsson, Per

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In Sweden, an expected growing gap between available resources and greater potential for medical treatment has brought evidence-based guidelines and priority setting into focus. There are problems, however, in areas where the evidence base is weak and underlying ethical values are controversial. Based on a specified definition of multiple-diseased elderly patients, the aims of this study are: (i to describe and quantify inpatient care utilisation and patient characteristics, particularly regarding cardiovascular disease and co-morbidity; and (ii to question the applicability of evidence-based guidelines for these patients with regard to the reported characteristics (i.e. age and co-morbidity, and to suggest some possible strategies in order to tackle the described problem and the probable presence of ageism. We used data from three sources: (a a literature review, (b a register study, based on a unique population-based register of inpatient care in Sweden, and (c a national cost per patient database. The results show that elderly patients with multiple co-morbidities constitute a large and growing population in Swedish inpatient hospital care. They have multiple and complex needs and a large majority have a cardiovascular disease. There is a relationship between reported characteristics, i.e. age and co-morbidity, and limited applicability of evidence-based guidelines, and this can cause an under-use as well as an over-use of medical interventions. As future clinical studies will be rare due to methodological and financial factors, we consider it necessary to condense existing practical-clinical experiences of individual experts into consensus-based guidelines concerning elderly with multi-morbidity. In such priority setting, it will be important to consider co-morbidity and different degrees of frailty.

  9. Bispectral index monitoring for conscious sedation in intervention: better, safer, faster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, J.K.; Laasch, H.-U.; Wilbraham, L.; England, R.E.; Morris, J.A.; Martin, D.F. E-mail: derrick.martin@smtr.nhs.uk

    2004-12-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to compare subjective (Ramsay sedation score, RSS) with objective electroencephalogram-based bispectral index (BIS) assessment, and to validate the appropriate BIS range for measurement of conscious sedation in interventional procedures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred patients undergoing sedo-analgesia (midazolam and fentanyl) for interventional gastrointestinal procedures were divided into two groups. In group A (n=30) sedation was guided by the RSS with the operator blinded to the BIS recording. In group B (n=70) the operator titrated intravenous sedation to maintain an optimal BIS, predetermined from the results in group A. Recovery time, procedure duration, physiological parameters and unplanned events were recorded in both groups. RESULTS: There was a significant correlation between the BIS and RSS (p<0.001). BIS values of 87.2 and 80.9 corresponded to an RSS of 3 and 4, respectively. The optimal BIS level was defined as 80-85. Fifty-seven point five percent of readings were within this range in group B compared with 26.5% in group A (p<0.001). Sedation approaching general anaesthesia (BIS<60) occurred in 5.5% of patients in group A but not in group B. Mean recovery time, duration of procedure, midazolam and fentanyl doses were significantly reduced in group B. Unplanned events were reduced from 27 to 17%, but this was not statistically significant (p=0.29). CONCLUSION: BIS monitoring enables more effective titration of sedatives to maintain a suitable level of consciousness, whilst reducing procedure time. The BIS offers an objective, safe and reliable measure of sedation, without disturbing either patient or operator. BIS monitoring raises the standard of patient care, and in our view, should be used to augment standard assessment.

  10. Contrasting Perspectives of Anesthesiologists and Gastroenterologists on the Optimal Time Interval between Bowel Preparation and Endoscopic Sedation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Agrawal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The optimal time interval between the last ingestion of bowel prep and sedation for colonoscopy remains controversial, despite guidelines that sedation can be administered 2 hours after consumption of clear liquids. Objective. To determine current practice patterns among anesthesiologists and gastroenterologists regarding the optimal time interval for sedation after last ingestion of bowel prep and to understand the rationale underlying their beliefs. Design. Questionnaire survey of anesthesiologists and gastroenterologists in the USA. The questions were focused on the preferred time interval of endoscopy after a polyethylene glycol based preparation in routine cases and select conditions. Results. Responses were received from 109 anesthesiologists and 112 gastroenterologists. 96% of anesthesiologists recommended waiting longer than 2 hours until sedation, in contrast to only 26% of gastroenterologists. The main reason for waiting >2 hours was that PEG was not considered a clear liquid. Most anesthesiologists, but not gastroenterologists, waited longer in patients with history of diabetes or reflux. Conclusions. Anesthesiologists and gastroenterologists do not agree on the optimal interval for sedation after last drink of bowel prep. Most anesthesiologists prefer to wait longer than the recommended 2 hours for clear liquids. The data suggest a need for clearer guidelines on this issue.

  11. Descriptions by General Practitioners and Nurses of Their Collaboration in Continuous Sedation Until Death at Home: In-Depth Qualitative Interviews in Three European Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Anquinet (Livia); J.A.C. Rietjens (Judith); N. Mathers (Nigel); J. Seymour (Jane); A. van der Heide (Agnes); L. Deliens (Luc)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractContext: One palliative care approach that is increasingly being used at home for relieving intolerable suffering in terminally ill patients is continuous sedation until death. Its provision requires a multidisciplinary team approach, with adequate collaboration and communication. Howeve

  12. Postinjection Delirium/Sedation Syndrome with Olanzapine Depot Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangula, Sadhvi Mythili; Mythri, Starlin Vijay; Sanjay, Y.; Reddy, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    After 1 year of introduction of olanzapine long-acting injectable (LAI) in India, many psychiatrists believe that it is a very affordable, well-tolerated, and effective second generation long-acting antipsychotic depot compared to not well tolerated but cheap first generation antipsychotic depots and to other second generation depots which are costly. However, reports of its possible adverse events in clinical settings are not yet published. We report what probably might be the first case of postinjection delirium/sedation syndrome (PDSS) in India. Although the occurrence is uncommon, incorrect understanding of this event may hinder the future use of the potentially useful olanzapine LAI. We review the available literature on the proposed diagnostic guidelines, mechanism of this event, precautions, and management of PDSS. PMID:27570354

  13. Review on sedation for gastrointestinal tract endoscopy inchildren by non-anesthesiologists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    AIM To present evidence and formulate recommendationsfor sedation in pediatric gastrointestinal (GI)endoscopy by non-anesthesiologists.METHODS: The databases MEDLINE, Cochrane andEMBASE were searched for the following keywords"endoscopy, GI", "endoscopy, digestive system" AND"sedation", "conscious sedation", "moderate sedation","deep sedation" and "hypnotics and sedatives" forpublications in English restricted to the pediatric age.We searched additional information published between January 2011 and January 2014. Searches for (upper) GIendoscopy sedation in pediatrics and sedation guidelinesby non-anesthesiologists for the adult population wereperformed.RESULTS: From the available studies three sedationprotocols are highlighted. Propofol, which seems tooffer the best balance between efficacy and safety israrely used by non-anesthesiologists mainly becauseof legal restrictions. Ketamine and a combination ofa benzodiazepine and an opioid are more frequentlyused. Data regarding other sedatives, anesthetics andadjuvant medications used for pediatric GI endoscopyare also presented.CONCLUSION: General anesthesia by a multidisciplinaryteam led by an anesthesiologist is preferred. The creationof sedation teams led by non-anesthesiologists anda careful selection of anesthetic drugs may offer analternative, but should be in l

  14. Sedation and Monitoring in the Pediatric Patient during Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyun Kee; Lightdale, Jenifer R

    2016-07-01

    Sedation is a fundamental component of pediatric gastrointestinal procedures. The 2 main types of sedation for pediatric endoscopy remain general anesthesia and procedural sedation. Although anesthesiologist-administered sedation protocols are more common, there is no ideal regimen for endoscopy in children. This article discusses specific levels of sedation for endoscopy as well as various regimens that can be used to achieve each. Risks and considerations that may be specific to performing gastrointestinal procedures in children are reviewed. Finally, potential future directions for sedation and monitoring that may change the practice of pediatric gastroenterology and ultimately patient outcomes are examined.

  15. Sedation for pediatric diagnostic imaging: use of pediatric and nursing resources as an alternative to a radiology department sedation team

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruess, Lynne [Department of Radiology, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI (United States); Uniformed Services University of the Health Scsiences, Bethesda, MD (United States); O' Connor, Stephen C. [Department of Radiology, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI (United States); Mikita, Cecilia P. [Department of Pediatrics, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI (United States); Creamer, Kevin M. [Department of Pediatrics, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Objective. To develop a pathway to provide safe, effective, and efficient sedation for pediatric diagnostic imaging studies using non-radiology personnel. Materials and methods. A multidisciplinary team considered manpower and training requirements and national sedation standards before designing a sedation pathway, which included scheduling, pre-sedation history and physical, medication protocols, and monitoring. Oral and IV medication protocols were developed based on patient age and weight. Sedation delays were defined as >15 min (IV) or >30 min (PO) from start of sedation to start of imaging. A sedation failure resulted in an incomplete diagnostic imaging study. Failure rates of 124 sedations before and 388 sedations after the pathway were compared.Results. The sedation failure rate for 7 months prior to pathway initiation was 15% (19/124). In the first 25 months after pathway initiation, failures were significantly reduced to 1.5% (6/388) (P<0.0001). Three (50%) of the six failures after pathway initiation were long examinations (>55 min). Deviation from the recommended medication protocol accounted for most of the 115 delays. Only minor adverse events were seen (12/388, 3.1%).Conclusion. Implementing a pediatric sedation pathway significantly decreases the sedation failure rate. Pediatric residents and nurses can safely, effectively and efficiently sedate pediatric patients for routine diagnostic imaging procedures without the need for a radiology department sedation team in a department with a small-to-moderate volume of pediatric patients. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of a demonstration primary health care project in rural Guatemala: the influence of predisposing, enabling and need factors on immunization coverage, equitable use of health care services and application of treatment guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Meredith P; Grembowski, David; Heagerty, Patrick; Lim, Stephen S; Mercer, Mary Anne

    2012-09-01

    In high- and low-resource settings, care is often provided inequitably, with more and higher-quality services being offered to those who need them less. We evaluated the influence of predisposing, enabling and need characteristics on immunization coverage and use of health services in a population-based primary health care model called the Inclusive Health Model in rural Guatemala. We also analyzed providers' application of treatment guidelines for children with pneumonia. A longitudinal cohort design was used from 2006 to 2009 to analyze data from the model's two demonstration sites. We found a significant positive association between families' health risk level and their use of health care services, with the model providing more services to those with greater need. Services are not provided differentially for those families with a higher or lower wealth level or selected sociodemographic characteristics. Distance from a clinic is significantly associated with lower service use, but this constraint decreases with time. Implementation of treatment guidelines does not vary with different provider characteristics. The Inclusive Health Care model's aim of offering care equitably to families living in its catchment area is reflected in these findings. This study offers an approach and conceptual model for tracking equity in service delivery that may be applicable in other settings.

  17. Ketamine-propofol sedation in circumcision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handan Gulec

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To compare the therapeutic effects of ketamine alone or ketamine plus propofol on analgesia, sedation, recovery time, side effects in premedicated children with midazolam-ketamine-atropin who are prepared circumcision operation.METHODS: 60 American Society of Anaesthesiologists physical status I-II children, aged between 3 and 9 years, undergoing circumcision operations under sedation were recruited according to a randomize and double-blind institutional review board-approved protocol. Patients were randomized into two groups via sealed envelope assignment. Both groups were administered a mixture of midazolam 0.05 mg/kg + ketamine 3 mg/kg + atropine 0.02 mg/kg intramuscularly in the presence of parents in the pre-operative holding area. Patients were induced with propofol-ketamine in Group I or ketamine alone in Group II.RESULTS: In the between-group comparisons, age, weight, initial systolic blood pressure, a difference in terms of the initial pulse rate was observed (p > 0.050. Initial diastolic blood pressure and subsequent serial measurements of 5, 10, 15, 20th min, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and pulse rate in ketamine group were significantly higher (p < 0.050.CONCLUSION: Propofol-ketamine (Ketofol provided better sedation quality and hemodynamy than ketamine alone in pediatric circumcision operations. We did not observe significant complications during sedation in these two groups. Therefore, ketofol appears to be an effective and safe sedation method for circumcision operation.

  18. Clinical care guidelines for cystic fibrosis-related diabetes%囊性纤维化相关糖尿病的临床诊疗指南

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张健薇

    2012-01-01

    囊性纤维化相关糖尿病(CFRD)是囊性纤维化患者最常见的并发症.囊性纤维化基金会、美国糖尿病学会和儿童内分泌学会共同发表该临床治疗指南,对CFRD的筛查、诊断和医疗管理提出共识,并着重于CFRD的特殊管理.%Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) is the most common comorbidity in people with cystic fibrosis. These guidelines are the result of a joint effort between the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, the American Diabetes Association, and the Pediatric Endocrine Society. The guidelines include recommendations for screening, diagnosis, and medical management of CFRD. This report focuses on aspects of the clinical care unique to CFRD.

  19. General Anesthetic Versus Light Sedation: Effect on Pediatric Endoscopy Wait Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Edwards

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wait times are an important measure of health care system effectiveness. There are no studies describing wait times in pediatric gastroenterology for either outpatient visits or endoscopy. Pediatric endoscopy is performed under light sedation or general anesthesia. The latter is hypothesized to be associated with a longer wait time due to practical limits on access to anesthesia in the Canadian health care system.

  20. Interest of 50% nitrous oxide and oxygen premix sedation in gerodontology

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    Emmanuel Nicolas1,2, Claire Lassauzay1,21CHU de Clermont-Ferrand, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France; 2Université Clermont 1, EA 3847, Faculty of Dentistry, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, FranceAbstract: Elderly patients presenting cardiovascular, respiratory, or neurological disorders require a specific dental care approach, especially patients presenting Alzheimer’s disease. Sedative procedures can prevent dental care-induced stress, even when there is effective pain cont...

  1. Management of Traumatic Wounds and a Novel Approach to Delivering Wound Care in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabe, Kathryn Q; Desmarais, Thomas J; Keller, Martin S

    2014-04-01

    Significance: The costs and morbidity of pediatric traumatic wounds are not well known. The literature lacks a comprehensive review of the volume, management, and outcomes of children sustaining soft tissue injury. We briefly review the existing literature for traumatic wounds such as open fractures and burns. Such injuries require dedicated wound care and we propose a novel approach for more efficient and more effective delivery of dedicated pediatric wound care. Recent Advances: New pediatric literature is emerging regarding the long-term effects of wound care pain in traumatic injuries-especially burns. A variety of wound dressings and alternative management techniques exist and are geared toward reducing wound care pain. Our institution utilizes a unique model to provide adequate sedation and pain control through a dedicated pediatric wound care unit. We believe that this model reduces the cost of wound care by decreasing emergency department and operating room visits as well as hospital length of stay. Critical Issues: First, medical costs related to pediatric traumatic wound care are not insignificant. The need for adequate pain control and sedation in children with complex wounds is traditionally managed with operating room intervention. Afterward, added costs can be from a hospital stay for ongoing acute wound management. Second, morbidities of complex traumatic wounds are shown to be related to the acute wound care received. Future Directions: Further guidelines are needed to determine the most effective and efficient care of complex traumatic soft tissue injuries in the pediatric population.

  2. Working group reports: evaluation of the evidence to support practice guidelines for nutritional care of preterm infants-the Pre-B Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiten, Daniel J; Steiber, Alison L; Carlson, Susan E; Griffin, Ian; Anderson, Diane; Hay, William W; Robins, Sandra; Neu, Josef; Georgieff, Michael K; Groh-Wargo, Sharon; Fenton, Tanis R

    2016-02-01

    The "Evaluation of the Evidence to Support Practice Guidelines for the Nutritional Care of Preterm Infants: The Pre-B Project" is the first phase in a process to present the current state of knowledge and to support the development of evidence-informed guidance for the nutritional care of preterm and high-risk newborn infants. The future systematic reviews that will ultimately provide the underpinning for guideline development will be conducted by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' Evidence Analysis Library (EAL). To accomplish the objectives of this first phase, the Pre-B Project organizers established 4 working groups (WGs) to address the following themes: 1) nutrient specifications for preterm infants, 2) clinical and practical issues in enteral feeding of preterm infants, 3) gastrointestinal and surgical issues, and 4) current standards of infant feeding. Each WG was asked to 1) develop a series of topics relevant to their respective themes, 2) identify questions for which there is sufficient evidence to support a systematic review process conducted by the EAL, and 3) develop a research agenda to address priority gaps in our understanding of the role of nutrition in health and development of preterm/neonatal intensive care unit infants. This article is a summary of the reports from the 4 Pre-B WGs.

  3. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates, and the European Society of Anaesthesiology Guideline: Non-anesthesiologist administration of propofol for GI endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumonceau, J M; Riphaus, A; Aparicio, J R; Beilenhoff, U; Knape, J T A; Ortmann, M; Paspatis, G; Ponsioen, C Y; Racz, I; Schreiber, F; Vilmann, P; Wehrmann, T; Wientjes, C; Walder, B

    2010-11-01

    Propofol sedation by non-anesthesiologists is an upcoming sedation regimen in several countries throughout Europe. Numerous studies have shown the efficacy and safety of this sedation regimen in gastrointestinal endoscopy. Nevertheless, this issue remains highly controversial. The aim of this evidence- and consensus-based set of guideline is to provide non-anesthesiologists with a comprehensive framework for propofol sedation during digestive endoscopy. This guideline results from a collaborative effort from representatives of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), the European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates (ESGENA) and the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA). These three societies have endorsed the present guideline.

  4. Molecular determinants responsible for sedative and non-sedative properties of histamine H₁-receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesawa, Yoshihiro; Hishinuma, Shigeru; Shoji, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    There is argument whether non-sedative properties of histamine H1-receptor antagonists (antihistamines) are determined by their active extrusions from the brain via P-glycoprotein or their restricted penetration through the blood-brain barrier. We have reported that sedative and non-sedative antihistamines can be well discriminated by measuring changes in their binding to H1 receptors upon receptor internalization in intact cells, which depends on their membrane-penetrating ability. In this study, molecular determinants responsible for sedative and non-sedative properties of antihistamines were evaluated by quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses. Multiple regression analyses were applied to construct a QSAR model, taking internalization-mediated changes in the binding of antihistamines as objective variables and their structural descriptors as explanatory variables. The multiple regression model was successfully constructed with two explanatory variables, i.e., lipophilicity of the compounds at physiological pH (logD) and mean information content on the distance degree equality (IDDE) (r(2) = 0.753). The constructed model discriminated between sedative and non-sedative antihistamines with 94% accuracy for external validation. These results suggest that logD and IDDE concerning lipophilicity and molecular shapes of compounds, respectively, predominantly determine the membrane-penetrating ability of antihistamines for their side effects on the central nervous system.

  5. Executive summary: evaluation of the evidence to support practice guidelines for nutritional care of preterm infants-the Pre-B Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiten, Daniel J; Steiber, Alison L; Hand, Rosa K

    2016-02-01

    Preterm birth (infants born at States and globally. No universally accepted practice guidelines exist for the nutritional care of preterm infants. To address the current state of knowledge and to support systematic reviews that will be used to develop evidence-informed guidance, a consortium consisting of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the ASN, the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the Food and Drug Administration, the CDC, the USDA/Agricultural Research Service (USDA/ARS), and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development/NIH initiated the Pre-B Project. The project included the constitution of 4 thematic working groups charged with the following tasks: 1) develop a series of topics/questions for which there is sufficient evidence to support a systematic review process to be conducted by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' Evidence Analysis Library (EAL), leading to the development of new guidelines for nutritional care of preterm infants, and 2) develop a targeted research agenda to address priority gaps in our understanding of the role of nutrition in the health and development of preterm/neonatal intensive care unit infants. This review consists of a project overview including a summary of a workshop hosted by the USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center and summary reports of the 4 working groups established to address the following themes: 1) nutrient specifications, 2) clinical/practical issues in enteral feeding, 3) gastrointestinal and surgical issues, and 4) current standards for assessing infant feeding outcomes. These reports will serve as the basis for the ultimate guideline development process to be conducted by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' EAL.

  6. Challenges of implementing national guidelines for the control and prevention of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization or infection in acute care hospitals in the Republic of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, Fidelma

    2009-03-01

    Of the 49 acute care hospitals in Ireland that responded to the survey questionnaire drafted by the Infection Control Subcommittee of the Health Protection Surveillance Centre\\'s Strategy for the Control of Antimicrobial Resistance in Ireland, 43 reported barriers to the full implementation of national guidelines for the control and prevention of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection; these barriers included poor infrastructure (42 hospitals), inadequate laboratory resources (40 hospitals), inadequate staffing (39 hospitals), and inadequate numbers of isolation rooms and beds (40 hospitals). Four of the hospitals did not have an educational program on hand hygiene, and only 17 had an antibiotic stewardship program.

  7. A cluster randomized trial to improve adherence to evidence-based guidelines on diabetes and reduce clinical inertia in primary care physicians in Belgium: study protocol [NTR 1369

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanova Anna

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most quality improvement programs in diabetes care incorporate aspects of clinician education, performance feedback, patient education, care management, and diabetes care teams to support primary care physicians. Few studies have applied all of these dimensions to address clinical inertia. Aim To evaluate interventions to improve adherence to evidence-based guidelines for diabetes and reduce clinical inertia in primary care physicians. Design Two-arm cluster randomized controlled trial. Participants Primary care physicians in Belgium. Interventions Primary care physicians will be randomly allocated to 'Usual' (UQIP or 'Advanced' (AQIP Quality Improvement Programs. Physicians in the UQIP will receive interventions addressing the main physician, patient, and office system factors that contribute to clinical inertia. Physicians in the AQIP will receive additional interventions that focus on sustainable behavior changes in patients and providers. Outcomes Primary endpoints are the proportions of patients within targets for three clinical outcomes: 1 glycosylated hemoglobin Primary and secondary analysis Statistical analyses will be performed using an intent-to-treat approach with a multilevel model. Linear and generalized linear mixed models will be used to account for the clustered nature of the data, i.e., patients clustered withinimary care physicians, and repeated assessments clustered within patients. To compare patient characteristics at baseline and between the intervention arms, the generalized estimating equations (GEE approach will be used, taking the clustered nature of the data within physicians into account. We will also use the GEE approach to test for differences in evolution of the primary and secondary endpoints for all patients, and for patients in the two interventions arms, accounting for within-patient clustering. Trial Registration number: NTR 1369.

  8. An assessment of computer-assisted personalized sedation : a sedation delivery system to administer propofol for gastrointestinal endoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pambianco, Daniel J.; Whitten, Christopher J.; Moerman, Annelies; Struys, Michel M.; Martin, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Demand for colonoscopy and EGD procedures is increasing. Impediments to performing these examinations persist, Patients perceive these procedures as unpleasant and painful. The use of suboptimal sedatives results in inefficiency in endoscopy practices. Improving sedation methods utilizin

  9. Neural correlates of successful semantic processing during propofol sedation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adapa, Ram M.; Davis, Matthew H.; Stamatakis, Emmanuel A.; Absalom, Anthony R.; Menon, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Sedation has a graded effect on brain responses to auditory stimuli: perceptual processing persists at sedation levels that attenuate more complex processing. We used fMRI in healthy volunteers sedated with propofol to assess changes in neural responses to spoken stimuli. Volunteers were scanned awa

  10. TO ASSESS EFFECTIVENESS OF PLAN TEACHING PROGRAMME ON NATIONAL ACCREDITATION BOARD FOR HOSPITALS AND HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS (NABH GUIDELINES AMONG NEWLY RECRUITED STAFF NURSES AT KRISHNA HOSPITAL, KARAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Sanjay

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The continual improvement of service quality in healthcare units has become a prime consideration to ensure patient satisfaction across the world in the modern economic scenario. In India, health sector is one of the largest and fastest growing sector in which both the private and government care providers and hospitals put much emphasis on quality improvement and patient satisfaction. National Accreditation Board of Hospitals and Healthcare Providers (NABH along with Quality Council of India provided the criteria based on which quality standard of hospitals is determined. The study was conducted on 51 newly recruited staff nurses at Krishna Hospital, Karad. An evaluator survey approach was considered. Study design was used one group pre-test, post-test design. Purposive sampling technique was used. RESULTS The study was conducted on 51 newly recruited staff nurses at Krishna Hospital, Karad. An evaluator survey approach was considered. Study design was used one group pre-test, post-test design. Purposive sampling technique was used. CONCLUSION Study concludes majority of newly recruited nursing staff having 19.38% average knowledge and 17.85% having average practice towards NABH guidelines. Knowledge and practice score of newly recruited nursing staff between the pre-test and post-test was highly significant. OBJECTIVES 1 To assess newly recruited staff nurses knowledge and practice towards NABH guidelines. 2 To find an association of knowledge and practice between pre-test and post-test of PTP programme on NABH guidelines.

  11. The use of Midazolam as an Intranasal Sedative in Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Anwen

    2016-01-01

    The administration of midazolam intranasally exploits the unique structure of the nasopharynx thus ensuring rapid delivery to the systemic circulation (The Nose - Brain Pathway). The absorption of midazolam nasally is influenced by the volume and concentration of midazolam, its physicochemical properties and the characteristics of the nasal mucosa. Delivering midazolam intranasally is non-titratable. The level of conscious sedation may be equivalent to that achieved by intravenous routes but is approached in a less controlled manner. Randomised Control trials using intranasal sedation in children have shown the technique to be safe and effective in secondary care for dental procedures at concentrations varying from 0.2 mg/kg to 0.5 mg/kg. A combined technique of intranasal midazolam (to facilitate cannulation) and intravenous midazolam is used for adults with moderate to severe learning disabilities. This has revolutionised dental treatment for this group of patients as treatment under General Anaesthesia (GA) may be avoided. Intranasal delivery of midazolam is emerging as a significant tool in our dental armamentarium for the treatment of anxious children, phobic adult patients and patients with learning disabilities.

  12. Compliance with clinical practice guidelines for breast cancer treatment: a population-based study of quality-of-care indicators in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacerdote Carlotta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been documented that variations exist in breast cancer treatment despite wide dissemination of clinical practice guidelines. The aim of this population-based study was to evaluate the impact of regional guidelines (Piedmont guidelines, PGL for breast cancer diagnosis and treatment on quality-of-care indicators in the Northwestern Italian region of Piedmont. Methods We included two samples of women aged 50–69 years with incident breast cancer treated in Piedmont before and after the introduction of PGL: 600 in 2002 (pre-PGL and 621 in 2004 (post-PGL. Patients were randomly selected among all incident breast cancer cases identified through the hospital discharge records database. We extracted clinical data on breast cancer cases from medical charts and ascertained vital status through linkage with town offices. We assessed compliance with 14 quality-of-care indicators from PGL recommendations, before and after their introduction in clinical practice. Results Among patients with invasive lesions, 77.1% (N = 368 and 77.5% (N = 383 in the pre-PGL and post-PGL groups, respectively, received breast conservative surgery (BCS as a first-line treatment. Following BCS, 87.7% received radiotherapy in 2002, compared to 87.9% in 2004. Of all patients at medium-to-high risk of distant metastasis, 65.5% (N = 268 and 63.6% (N = 252 received chemotherapy in 2002 and in 2004, respectively. Among the 117 patients with invasive lesions and negative estrogen receptor status in 2002, hormonal therapy was prescribed in 23 of them (19.6%. The incorrect prescription of hormonal therapy decreased to 10.8% (N = 10 among the 92 estrogen receptor-negative patients in 2004 (p Compliance with PGL recommendations was already high in the pre-PGL group, although some quality-of-care indicators did not reach the standard. In the pre/post analysis, 8 out of 14 quality-of-care indicators showed an improvement from 2002 to 2004, but only 4 out of 14

  13. Monitoring sedation for bronchoscopy in mechanically ventilated patients by using the Ramsay sedation scale versus auditory-evoked potentials

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background Appropriate sedation benefits patients by reducing the stress response, but it requires an appropriate method of assessment to adjust the dosage of sedatives. The aim of this study was to compare the difference in the sedation of mechanically ventilated patients undergoing flexible bronchoscopy (FB) monitored by auditory-evoked potentials (AEPs) or the Ramsay sedation scale (RSS). Methods In a prospective, randomized, controlled study, all patients who underwent FB with propofol se...

  14. Midazolam sedates Passeriformes for field sampling but affects multiple venous blood analytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heatley JJ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available J Jill Heatley,1 Jennifer Cary,2,3 Lyndsey Kingsley,1 Hughes Beaufrere,4 Karen E Russell,5 Gary Voelker2,3 1Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, 2Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, 3Texas A&M Biodiversity Research and Teaching Collections, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA; 4Health Sciences Centre, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada; 5Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, College Station, TX, USA Abstract: Feasibility and effect of midazolam administration on blood analytes and for sedation of Passeriformes being collected in a larger study of genetic biodiversity was assessed. Midazolam (5.6±2.7 mg/kg was administered intranasally prior to sampling, euthanasia, and specimen preparation of 104 passerine birds. Each bird was assessed for sedation score and then multiple analytes were determined from jugular blood samples using the i-STAT® point of care analyzer at “bird side”. Most birds were acceptably sedated, sedation became more pronounced as midazolam dose increased, and only a single bird died. Electrolyte concentrations and venous blood gas analytes were affected by midazolam administration while blood pH, packed cell volume, hemoglobin, and calculated hematocrit were not. Intranasal midazolam gives adequate sedation and is safe for short-term use in free-living Passeriformes. Based on venous blood analyte data, sedation of Passeriformes prior to handling appears to reduce stress but also produces venous blood gas differences consistent with hypoventilation relative to birds which were not given midazolam. Further study is recommended to investigate midazolam's continued use in free-living avian species. Studies should include safety, reversal and recovery, effect upon additional endogenous analytes, and compatibility with studies of ecology and toxicology

  15. [Midazolam sedation in the general dental practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertens, J; Abraham-Inpijn, L; Meuwissen, P J

    1994-03-01

    The general dental practitioner is occasionally confronted with patients who, on the basis of psychological--and often somatic--criteria, are difficult to treat. Medicinal sedation in combination with anxiety reduction may be deemed appropriate for such patients. In the Netherlands inhalation sedation by means of a combination of oxygen and nitrous oxide is generally used. The limitations and disadvantages of this method have directed attention towards sedation by means of midazolam, a quick-acting benzodiazepine. In view of the complications which may accompany the administration of midazolam, the general practitioner working alone or in a group practice is advised against using midazolam sedation. Such use should be reserved for a dentist working in a hospital setting, who is able to consult with a physician regarding the advisability of administering midazolam. Even then, the safety of the patient requires that the practitioners have a proper insight into the physical state of the patient, work according to a protocol and in accordance with clearly defined responsibilities, and provide adequate accommodation during and after treatment.

  16. Nitrous oxide sedation and sexual phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastak, J T; Malamed, S F

    1980-07-01

    Nine cases of sexual phenomena that occurred with use of nitrous oxide and oxygen sedation are described. Dentists involved routinely used concentrations of nitrous oxide greater than 50% and did not have assistants in the room during dental procedures. Recommendations on the concentrations of nitrous oxide and the presence of an assistant are made.

  17. Maintenance time of sedative effects after an intravenous infusion of diazepam:A guide for endoscopy using diazepam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takahisa Furuta; Mutsuhiro Ikuma; Akira Hishida; Kyoichi Ohashi; Mitsushige Sugimoto; Akiko Nakamura; Naohito Shirai; Shingen Misaka; Shinya Uchida; Hiroshi Watanabe; Takashi Ishizaki

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To examine whether the sedative effects assessed by psychomotor tests would depend on the cytochrome P450(CYP)2C19 genotypes after an infusion regimen of diazepam commonly used for gastrointestinal endoscopy in Japan.METHODS:Fifteen healthy Japanese volunteers consisting of three different CYP2C19 genotype groups underwent a critical flicker fusion test,an eye movement analysis and a postural sway test as a test for physical sedative effects,and a visual analog scale(VAS)symptom assessment method as a test for mental sedative effects during the 336 h period after the intravenous infusion of diazepam(5 mg).RESULTS:The physical sedative effects assessed by the critical flicker test continued for 1h(t values of 5 min,30 min and 60 min later:4.35,5.00 and 3.19,respectively)and those by the moving radial area of a postural sway test continued for 3h(t values of 5 h,30 h,60 min and 3 h later:-4.05,-3.42,-2.17 and -2.58,respectively),which changed significantly compared with the baseline level before infusion(P<0.05).On the other hand,the mental sedative effects by the VAS method improved within 1 h.The CYP2C19 genotype-dependent differences in the postinfusion sedative effects were not observed in any of the four psychomotor function tests.CONCLUSION:With the psychomotor tests,the objective sedative effects of diazepam continued for 1 h to 3 h irrespective of CYP2C19 genotype status and the subjective sedative symptoms improved within 1 h.Up to 3 h of clinical care appears to be required after the infusion of diazepam,although patients feel subjectively improved.(C)2008 The W3G Press,All rights reserved.

  18. Developing process guidelines for trauma care in the Netherlands for severely injured patients : results from a Delphi study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogervorst, Elisabeth Maria; van Beeck, Eduard Ferdinand; Goslings, Johan Carel; Bezemer, Pieter Dirk; Bierens, Joost Jan Laurens Marie

    2013-01-01

    Background: In organised trauma systems the process of care is the key to quality. Nevertheless, the optimal process of trauma care remains unclear due to lack of or inconclusive evidence. Because monitoring and improving the performance of a trauma system is complex, this study aimed to develop con

  19. Introducing Evidence-Based Medicine and guidelines for maternal and newborn care in the Republic of Moldova

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bacci, A; Wyn Huws, D; Baltag, V;

    2005-01-01

    Familiarity with Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) concepts is low amongst key maternal and newborn care clinicians in Moldova. Simple interventions can increase the knowledge of EBM concepts there.......Familiarity with Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) concepts is low amongst key maternal and newborn care clinicians in Moldova. Simple interventions can increase the knowledge of EBM concepts there....

  20. Pain management in trauma patients in (pre)hospital based emergency care: Current practice versus new guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Scholten (Annemieke); S.A.A. Berben (Sivera); A.H. Westmaas (Alvin H); P.M. van Grunsven (Pierre); E.T. de Vaal; P.P.M. Rood (Pleunie); N. Hoogerwerf (N.); C.J.M. Doggen (Carine); R. van Schoonhoven (Renee)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction Acute pain in trauma patients in emergency care is still undertreated. Early pain treatment is assumed to effectively reduce pain in patients and improve long-term outcomes. In order to improve pain management in the chain of emergency care, a national evidence-based guideli

  1. Care of critically ill surgical patients using the 80-hour Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education work-week guidelines: a survey of current strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Chad R; Axelrad, Alex; Alexander, James B; Dellinger, R Phillip; Ross, Steven E

    2006-06-01

    As a result of the recently mandated work-hour restrictions, it has become more difficult to provide 24-hour intensive care unit (ICU) in-house coverage by the general surgical residents. To assess the current state of providing appropriate continuous care to surgical critical care patients during the era of resident work-hour constraints, a national survey was conducted by the Association of Program Directors of Surgery. The results revealed that 37 per cent of programs surveyed have residents other than general surgery housestaff providing cross-coverage and writing orders for surgical ICU patients. Residents in emergency medicine, anesthesia, family medicine, otorhinolaryngology, obstetrics/gynecology, internal medicine, urology, and orthopedic surgery have provided this cross-coverage. Some found it necessary to use physician extenders (i.e., nurse practitioners or physician assistants), thereby decreasing the burden of surgical housestaff coverage. The results indicated that 30 per cent use physician extenders to help cover the ICU during daytime hours and 11 per cent used them during nighttime hours. In addition, 24 per cent used a "night-float" system in an attempt to maintain continuous care, yet still adhere to the mandated guidelines. In conclusion, our survey found multiple strategies, including the use of physician extenders, a "night-float" system, and the use of nongeneral surgical residents in an attempt to provide continuous coverage for surgical ICU patients. The overall outcome of these new strategies still needs to be assessed before any beneficial results can be demonstrated.

  2. Patient-directed music therapy reduces anxiety and sedation exposure in mechanically-ventilated patients: a research critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullick, Janice G; Kwan, Xiu Xian

    2015-05-01

    This research appraisal, guided by the CASP Randomised Controlled Trial Checklist, critiques a randomised, controlled trial of patient-directed music therapy compared to either noise-cancelling headphones or usual care. This study recruited 373 alert, mechanically-ventilated patients across five intensive care units in the United States. The Music Assessment Tool, administered by a music therapist, facilitated music selection by participants in the intervention group. Anxiety was measured using the VAS-A scale. Sedation exposure was measured by both sedation frequency and by sedation intensity using a daily sedation intensity score. Context for the data was supported by an environmental scan form recording unit activity and by written comments from nurses about the patient's responses to the protocol. Patient-directed music therapy allowed a significant reduction in sedation frequency compared to noise-cancelling headphones and usual care participants. Patient-directed music therapy led to significantly lower anxiety and sedation intensity compared to usual care, but not compared to noise-cancelling headphones. This is a robust study with clear aims and a detailed description of research methods and follow-up. While no participants were lost to follow-up, not all were included in the analysis: 37% did not have the minimum of two anxiety assessments for comparison and 23% were not included in sedation analysis. While some participants utilised the intervention or active control for many hours-per-day, half the music therapy participants listened for 12min or less per day and half of the noise-cancelling headphone participants did not appear to use them. While the results suggest that patient-directed music therapy and noise-cancelling headphones may be useful and cost-effective interventions that lead to an overall improvement in anxiety and sedation exposure, these may appeal to a subset of ICU patients. The self-directed use of music therapy and noise

  3. Use of sevoflurane inhalation sedation for outpatient third molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzberg, S; Weaver, J; Beck, F M; McCaffrey, G

    1999-01-01

    This study attempted to determine if sevoflurane in oxygen inhaled via a nasal hood as a sole sedative agent would provide an appropriate level of deep sedation for outpatient third molar surgery. Twenty-four patients scheduled for third molar removal were randomly assigned to receive either nasal hood inhalation sevoflurane or an intravenous deep sedation using midazolam and fentanyl followed by a propofol infusion. In addition to measuring patient, surgeon, and dentist anesthesiologist subjective satisfaction with the technique, physiological parameters, amnesia, and psychomotor recovery were also assessed. No statistically significant difference was found between the sevoflurane and midazolam-fentanyl-propofol sedative groups in physiological parameters, degree of amnesia, reported quality of sedation, or patient willingness to again undergo a similar deep sedation. A trend toward earlier recovery in the sevoflurane group was identified. Sevoflurane can be successfully employed as a deep sedative rather than a general anesthetic for extraction of third molars in healthy subjects.

  4. An Evaluation of Intranasal Sufentanil and Dexmedetomidine for Pediatric Dental Sedation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Hitt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Conscious or moderate sedation is routinely used to facilitate the dental care of the pre- or un-cooperative child. Dexmedetomidine (DEX has little respiratory depressant effect, possibly making it a safer option when used as an adjunct to either opioids or benzodiazepines. Unlike intranasal (IN midazolam, IN application of DEX and sufentanil (SUF does not appear to cause much discomfort. Further, although DEX lacks respiratory depressive effects, it is an α2-agonist that can cause hypotension and bradycardia when given in high doses or during prolonged periods of administration. The aim of this feasibility study was to prospectively assess IN DEX/SUF as a potential sedation regimen for pediatric dental procedures. After IRB approval and informed consent, children (aged 3–7 years; n = 20 from our dental clinic were recruited. All patients received 2 μg/kg (max 40 μg of IN DEX 45 min before the procedure, followed 30 min later by 1 μg/kg (max 20 μg of IN SUF. An independent observer rated the effects of sedation using the Ohio State University Behavior Rating Scale (OSUBRS and University of Michigan Sedation Scale (UMSS. The dentist and the parent also assessed the efficacy of sedation. Dental procedures were well tolerated and none were aborted. The mean OSUBRS procedure score was 2.1, the UMSS procedure score was 1.6, and all scores returned to baseline after the procedure. The average dentist rated quality of sedation was 7.6 across the 20 subjects. After discharge, parents reported one child with prolonged drowsiness and one child who vomited at home. The use of IN DEX supplemented with IN SUF provided both an effective and tolerable form of moderate sedation. Although onset and recovery are slower than with oral (PO midazolam and transmucosal fentanyl, the quality of the sedation may be better with less risk of respiratory depression. Results from this preliminary study showed no major complications from IN delivery of these agents.

  5. With strengthened guidelines for health care workers, the CDC ups its game against the deadly Ebola virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Informed by the cases of two nurses who contracted Ebola virus disease (EVD) while caring for a patient with the disease in Dallas, TX, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA, has unveiled strengthened guidance for health care workers. Further, nursing organizations are pledging to work together to identify gaps and make system-level improvements to protect both patients and caregivers. The CDC's new recommendations emphasize rigorous training for health care workers in how to put on and take off personal protective equipment (PPE), and they state that this activity should always be carefully supervised by a monitor. The guidance also states that health care workers should use either an N-95' respirator mask or a powered air purifying respirator (PAPR) when they are providing care to a patient with Ebola. Experts stress that the new guidance does not change the fundamental issue that Ebola is transmitted through contact with infectious substances from patients. Nursing organizations are pledging to work together to identify problems and improve safety for both caregivers and patients.

  6. Cuidados paliativos oncológicos: elementos para o debate de diretrizes nesta área Palliative care in cancer: elements for debating the guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Corrêa Ferreira da Silva

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem como objetivo apresentar elementos para o debate de diretrizes em programas de cuidados paliativos no Brasil. Foi construído por meio de levantamento bibliográfico em base de dados (MEDLINE, LILACS e Biblioteca Cochrane, em sítios na Internet de organizações e instituições interessadas em cuidados paliativos, em textos de autores fundamentais na área, em livros de referência, em obras citadas nas referências destes mesmos livros e no Banco de Teses da CAPES. Os dados foram agrupados em quatro categorias temáticas: controle de sintomas, organização de serviços, aspectos psicossociais e espirituais. Com isso, procedeu-se a discussão do câncer como um problema de saúde pública e seu impacto no indivíduo, o conceito de cuidados paliativos e seu contexto na atenção à saúde, os modelos de programas e suas diretrizes, a morte e o morrer e os cuidados e cuidadores. O artigo termina apontando os desafios do sistema de saúde brasileiro em estruturar programas de cuidados ao final da vida em conseqüência do envelhecimento da população e do aumento da incidência do câncer.The aim of this study was to present elements for debating guidelines on palliative care programs for cancer. A literature survey searched various databases (MEDLINE, LILACS, and Cochrane Library, homepages of palliative care organizations, publications by renowned authors in this area, reference textbooks on the subject, relevant articles cited by these books, and the thesis/dissertation database of CAPES (the Brazilian Coordinating Body for Training University Level Personnel. The data were grouped into four thematic categories: symptomatic palliation, organization of services, psychosocial characteristics, and spiritual characteristics. The article then proceeds to discuss cancer as a public health problem and its impact on individuals, the concept of palliative care and its context in health care, program models and their guidelines, death

  7. [Guidelines for clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vleugels, A M

    1997-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are systematically developed statements that are intended to support medical decision making in well-defined clinical situations. Essentially, their object is to reduce the variability in medical practice, to improve quality, and to make appropriated control of the financial resources possible. Internationally, ever more organisations, associations, and institutions are concerned with the development of guidelines in many different areas of care. Making implicit knowledge explicit is one of the associated advantages of guidelines: they have a potential utility in training, in process evaluation, and in the reevaluation of outcome studies. In liability issues, their existence has a double effect: they can be used to justify medical behaviour, and they constitute a generally accepted reference point. A derivative problem is the legal liability of the compilers of the guidelines. The principle of the guideline approach can be challenged academically: science cannot give a definition of optimal care with absolute certainty. What is called objectivity often rests on methodologically disputable analyses; also the opinion of opinion leaders is not always a guarantee for scientific soundness. Moreover, patients are not all identical: biological variability, situational factors, patient expectations, and other elements play a role in this differentiation. Clinicians are often hesitant with respect to clinical guidelines: they are afraid of cookbook medicine and curtailment of their professional autonomy. Patients fear reduction of individualization of care and the use of guidelines as a rationing instrument. The effects of the introduction of clinical practice guidelines on medical practice, on the results and on the cost of care vary but are generally considered to be favourable. The choice of appropriate strategies in development, dissemination, and implementation turns out to be of critical importance. The article ends with concrete

  8. Physical illness in patients with severe mental disorders. II. Barriers to care, monitoring and treatment guidelines, plus recommendations at the system and individual level

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE HERT, MARC; COHEN, DAN; BOBES, JULIO; CETKOVICH-BAKMAS, MARCELO; LEUCHT, STEFAN; M. NDETEI, DAVID; W. NEWCOMER, JOHN; UWAKWE, RICHARD; ASAI, ITSUO; MÖLLER, HANS-JURGEN; GAUTAM, SHIV; DETRAUX, JOHAN; U. CORRELL, CHRISTOPH

    2011-01-01

    Physical disorders are, compared to the general population, more prevalent in people with severe mental illness (SMI). Although this excess morbidity and mortality is largely due to modifiable lifestyle risk factors, the screening and assessment of physical health aspects remains poor, even in developed countries. Moreover, specific patient, provider, treatment and system factors act as barriers to the recognition and to the management of physical diseases in people with SMI. Psychiatrists can play a pivotal role in the improvement of the physical health of these patients by expanding their task from clinical psychiatric care to the monitoring and treatment of crucial physical parameters. At a system level, actions are not easy to realize, especially for developing countries. However, at an individual level, even simple and very basic monitoring and treatment actions, undertaken by the treating clinician, can already improve the problem of suboptimal medical care in this population. Adhering to monitoring and treatment guidelines will result in a substantial enhancement of physical health outcomes. Furthermore, psychiatrists can help educate and motivate people with SMI to address their suboptimal lifestyle, including smoking, unhealthy diet and lack of exercise. The adoption of the recommendations presented in this paper across health care systems throughout the world will contribute to a significant improvement in the medical and related psychiatric health outcomes of patients with SMI. PMID:21633691

  9. Sedative-Hypnotics and Human Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    clobazam , diazepam , and lorazepam (drugs not marketed as sedative- hypnotics), the overall percent decrement is 30.9% and the order of sensitivity remains...medicine. Because of the widespread use of the benzodiazepines as anti-anxiety drugs, Kleinknecht & Donaldson (1975) reviewed the effects of diazepam on...cognitive and psychomotor performance, while, in an earlier review, McNalr (1973) included meprobamate in addition to the benzodiazepines, diazepam and

  10. Midazolam sedation for percutaneous liver biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, J A; Smith, B J

    1993-12-01

    Control of patient respiration is needed to safely perform percutaneous liver biopsy (PLB) and may be adversely affected by sedation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety of PLB with intravenous midazolam and to evaluate patient acceptance of PLB with and without sedation. Two hundred seventeen consecutive patients underwent 301 percutaneous liver biopsies. One hundred fifty-one of the biopsies were done after the patients were sedated with intravenous midazolam immediately before the biopsy. The last 61 patients were questioned after the biopsy to evaluate the discomfort of the procedure, their memory of the procedure, and their willingness to undergo another PLB. The major complication rate was similar in the midazolam-treated (0.7%) and untreated (0.7%) groups. The midazolam-treated patients had a numerically lower mean pain score (1.5 +/- 0.4 vs 4.0 +/- 0.7) (mean +/- SEM) (P = 0.07) and significantly lower mean memory score (4.8 +/- 0.7 vs 9.9 +/- 0.1) (P < 0.01) than the untreated patients. The treated and untreated groups had similar mean willingness for repeat PLB scores (9.3 +/- 0.3 vs 9.1 +/- 0.6). We conclude that: (1) there is no increased risk of PLB with midazolam and (2) patients have less memory of the procedure with midazolam.

  11. Medetomidine-midazolam sedation in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raekallio, M; Tulamo, R M; Valtamo, T

    1998-01-01

    Seven sheep were sedated 3 times: with medetomidine (15 micrograms kg-1), with midazolam (0.1 mg kg-1) and with a combination of the drugs. All drugs were administered intravenously. Heart and respiratory rates were measured. Arterial blood samples were collected, and PaO2, PaCO2, pH, haemoglobin concentration and saturation, and base excess were determined. Systolic and mean arterial pressures were recorded before and after the treatment with medetomidine-midazolam. Midazolam increased the time of recumbency induced by medetomidine. After administration of midazolam alone, 4 of the 7 sheep were sedated and the other 3 were excited. Heart rate decreased after both medetomidine and medetomidine-midazolam. One sheep suffered a cardiac arrest after medetomidine-midazolam injection, and it required resuscitation. PaO2 and haemoglobin oxygen saturation decreased after medetomidine, and medetomidine-midazolam caused a marked hypoxaemia. PaCO2 increased after medetomidine, both alone and combined with midazolam, but arterial pH was within the reference values after all drug administrations. Systolic and mean arterial pressures decreased after medetomidine-midazolam. This study indicates that though in sheep midazolam potentiates the sedative effect of medetomidine, the combination of medetomidine and midazolam also reduces the in PaO2 and haemoglobin oxygen saturation more than medetomidine alone. The results indicate that a medetomidine-midazolam combination is unsafe for sheep at the doses studied.

  12. [Diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in the mentally retarded: guidelines of a multidisciplinary consensus work group. Dutch Association of Physicians in Care of Mentally Handicapped].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimbel, H

    2000-06-10

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is more frequent among people with intellectual disability than among the intellectually normal population. Also GORD is more serious in this population. The diagnosis is often missed, because most intellectually disabled cannot express their complaints of GORD. For that reason a multidisciplinary working group of the Dutch Association of physicians active in the care of persons with a mental handicap has developed guidelines. The working group recommends endoscopy in case of a (alarm) symptoms: haematemesis, prolonged vomiting, irondeficiency anaemia e.c.i., and a 24 hour oesophageal pH test in case of b (aspecific) symptoms: recurrent pneumonia, refusal of food, regurgitation, rumination, dental erosions. In general most patients are cured with drug treatment (omeprazol or another proton pump inhibitor). If symptoms are not improved after 6 months of optimal treatment, surgical treatment may be considered.

  13. Knowledge of Pediatric Critical Care Nurses Regarding Evidence Based Guidelines for Prevention of Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Gehan EL Nabawy; Abosamra, Omyma Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is a costly, preventable, and often fatal consequence of medical therapy that increases hospital and intensive care stays in mechanically ventilated patients. The prevention of VAP is primarily the responsibility of the bedside nurse whose knowledge, beliefs, and practices influence the health outcome of ICU…

  14. Sociocognitive determinants of observed and self-reported compliance to hand hygiene guidelines in child day care centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer, T.P.; Erasmus, V.; Empelen, P. van; Looman, C.; Beeck, E.F. van; Tjon-A-Tsien, A.; Richardus, J.H.; Voeten, H.A.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although hand hygiene (HH) has proven to be an effective measure to prevent infections, HH compliance is generally low. We assessed sociocognitive determinants of caregivers' HH behavior in child day care centers (DCCs) to develop an effective HH intervention. Methods: Caregivers' compli

  15. Evaluation of rationality in prescribing, adherence to treatment guidelines, and direct cost of treatment in intensive cardiac care unit: A prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan P. Christian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs remain the most common cause of sudden death. Hence, appropriate drug therapy in intensive cardiac care unit (ICCU is crucial in managing cardiovascular emergencies and to decrease morbidity and mortality. Objective: To evaluate prescribing pattern of drugs and direct cost of therapy in patients admitted in ICCU. Materials and Methods: Patients admitted in ICCU of a tertiary care teaching hospital were enrolled. Demographic data, clinical history, and complete drug therapy received during their stay in ICCU were noted. Data were analyzed for drug utilization pattern and direct cost of treatment calculated using patient′s hospital and pharmacy bills. Rationality of therapy was evaluated based on American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA guidelines. Result: Data of 170 patients were collected over 2 months. Mean age of patients was 54.67 ± 13.42 years. Male to female ratio was 2.33:1. Most common comorbid condition was hypertension 76 (44.7%. Most common diagnosis was acute coronary syndrome (ACS 49.4%. Mean stay in ICCU was 4.42 ± 1.9 days. Mean number of drugs prescribed per patient was 11.43 ± 2.85. Antiplatelet drugs were the most frequently prescribed drug group (86.5%. Mean cost of pharmacotherapy per patient was `2701.24 ± 3111.94. Mean direct cost of treatment per patient was `10564.74 ± 14968.70. Parenteral drugs constituted 42% of total drugs and 90% of total cost of pharmacotherapy. Cost of pharmacotherapy was positively correlated with number of drugs (P = 0.000 and duration of stay (P = 0.027. Conclusion: Antiplatelet drugs were the most frequently prescribed drug group. Mean number of drugs per encounter were high, which contributed to the higher cost of pharmacotherapy. ACC/AHA guidelines were followed in majority of the cases.

  16. Sedation versus general anaesthesia in paediatric patients undergoing chest CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, W.W.M.; So, N.M.C.; Metreweli, C. [Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong, Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging (China); Chen, P.P. [Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care (China)

    1998-05-01

    Objective: CT of the chest in paediatric patients often requires sedation or general anaesthesia to minimize motion artefacts. Both sedation and general anaesthesia are associated with atelectasis which obscures the underlying pulmonary pathology. We conducted a prospective study to compare these two methods with respect to degree of motion artefacts and extent of atelectasis. Material and Methods: Nineteen patients undergoing 22 chest CT examinations were randomly selected for either sedation or general anaesthesia. The total area of atelectasis and the degree of motion artefacts were measured. Results: The mean percentage of atelectasis was 6.67% for general anaesthesia and 0.01% for sedation (p=0.01). There was no significant difference in the quality of the images between the sedation patients and the general anaesthesia patients. Conclusion: Whenever the clinical condition permits it, sedation rather than general anaesthesia should be given to paediatric patients undergoing chest CT. (orig.).

  17. Techniques to administer oral, inhalational, and IV sedation in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Krystyna Harbuz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Sedation in dentistry is a controversial topic given the variety of opinions regarding its safe practice. Aims This article evaluates the various techniques used to administer sedation in dentistry and specific methods practiced to form a recommendation for clinicians. Methods An extensive literature search was performed using PubMed, Medline, Google Scholar, Google, and local library resources. Results Most of the literature revealed a consensus that light sedation on low-risk American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA groups, that is ASA I, and possibly II, is the safest method for sedation in a dental outpatient setting. Conclusion Formal training is essential to achieve the safe practice of sedation in dentistry or medicine. The appropriate setting for sedation should be determined as there is an increased risk outside the hospital setting. Patients should be adequately assessed and medication titrated appropriately, based on individual requirements.

  18. Nurses' experiences of guideline implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alanen, Seija; Välimäki, Marita; Kaila, Minna

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of the study was to address the following questions: What kind of experiences do primary care nurses have of guideline implementation? What do nurses think are the most important factors affecting the adoption of guidelines? BACKGROUND: The implementation of clinical guidelines seems...... to local circumstances, seems to be crucial for successful implementation. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical guidelines can be promising tools in enhancing evidence-based nursing practice, as nurses see them as practical work tools in patient care and so are willing to adopt them. However, support from management...... and physicians is needed to ensure the successful implementation of guidelines into nursing practices. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Based on the findings of this study and previous knowledge of guideline implementation some practical recommendations are suggested. Select the most relevant guidelines...

  19. Fluid Resuscitation for Hemorrhagic Shock in Tactical Combat Casualty Care: TCCC Guidelines Change 14-01 - 2 June 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-02

    in routine blood banking practice and there- fore is not US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) compliant, the Assistant Secretary of Defense For...blood product wastage .101 DCR With Thawed Plasma or Liquid Plasma Transfusion of plasma is the standard of care for the treatment of the...Nursing. 2014;21. 60. Rice CL. Policy on the use of non–US Food and Drug Administration compliant blood products [letter]. Assis- tant Secretary of

  20. Use of sevoflurane inhalation sedation for outpatient third molar surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Ganzberg, S.; Weaver, J.; Beck, F. M.; McCaffrey, G

    1999-01-01

    This study attempted to determine if sevoflurane in oxygen inhaled via a nasal hood as a sole sedative agent would provide an appropriate level of deep sedation for outpatient third molar surgery. Twenty-four patients scheduled for third molar removal were randomly assigned to receive either nasal hood inhalation sevoflurane or an intravenous deep sedation using midazolam and fentanyl followed by a propofol infusion. In addition to measuring patient, surgeon, and dentist anesthesiologist subj...

  1. Augmenting sedation with hypnosis in drug-dependent patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, D. P.; Lu, G. P.; Hersh, E. V.

    1995-01-01

    The successful use of conscious sedation in patients physically dependent on centrally acting drugs is problematic for the dental anesthesiologist because of the concomitant development of tolerance to standard sedative agents. Dosage requirements necessary to adequately sedate these patients are often higher than recommended and carry an increased risk of drug overdose. The following report summarizes our experience with 18 drug-dependent patients in whom hypnosis was employed in conjunction...

  2. Prehospital Use of IM Ketamine for Sedation of Violent and Agitated Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth A. Scheppke

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Violent and agitated patients pose a serious challenge for emergency medical services (EMS personnel. Rapid control of these patients is paramount to successful prehospital evaluation and also for the safety of both the patient and crew. Sedation is often required for these patients, but the ideal choice of medication is not clear. The objective is to demonstrate that ketamine, given as a single intramuscular injection for violent and agitated patients, including those with suspected excited delirium syndrome (ExDS, is both safe and effective during the prehospital phase of care, and allows for the rapid sedation and control of this difficult patient population. Methods: We reviewed paramedic run sheets from five different catchment areas in suburban Florida communities. We identified 52 patients as having been given intramuscular ketamine 4mg/kg IM, following a specific protocol devised by the EMS medical director of these jurisdictions, to treat agitated and violent patients, including a subset of which would be expected to suffer from ExDS. Twenty-six of 52 patients were also given parenteral midazolam after medical control was obtained to prevent emergence reactions associated with ketamine. Results: Review of records demonstrated that almost all patients (50/52 were rapidly sedated and in all but three patients no negative side effects were noted during the prehospital care. All patients were subsequently transported to the hospital before ketamine effects wore off. Conclusion: Ketamine may be safely and effectively used by trained paramedics following a specific protocol. The drug provides excellent efficacy and few clinically significant side effects in the prehospital phase of care, making it an attractive choice in those situations requiring rapid and safe sedation especially without intravenous access. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:–0.

  3. Periodic cardiovascular and ventilatory activity during midazolam sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galletly, D C; Williams, T B; Robinson, B J

    1996-04-01

    We have examined the effects of sedation with midazolam 0.1 mg kg-1 and reversal with flumazenil 0.5 mg on beat-to-beat heart rate (HR) variability (HRV), systolic arterial pressure (SAP), finger photoplethysmograph amplitude (PLA) and impedence pneumography in eight volunteers. With the onset of sedation there was a small decrease in SAP and increase in HR (ns). Spectral analysis of the HR time series showed reductions in the proportion of power in the high (> 0.15 Hz) frequency "ventilatory" band consistent with midazolam causing vagolysis. During sedation, low frequency (midazolam sedation were reversed by administration of flumazenil.

  4. Fospropofol disodium injection for the sedation of patients undergoing colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitzky, Benjamin E; Vargo, John J

    2008-08-01

    Sedation plays a central role in making colonoscopy tolerable for patients and feasible for the endoscopist to perform. The array of agents used for endoscopic sedation continues to evolve. Fospropofol (FP), a prodrug of propofol with a slower pharmacokinetic profile, is currently under evaluation for use during endoscopic procedures. Preliminary data suggests that FP dosed at 6.5 mg/kg is well tolerated by most patients with perineal paresthesias being the most commonly experienced adverse effect. This article will examine the current literature on the use of FP for the sedation of patients undergoing colonoscopy, highlighting the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, risks, and common adverse events associated with the novel sedative/hypnotic.

  5. Patient-controlled sedation with propofol/remifentanil versus propofol/alfentanil for patients undergoing outpatient colonoscopy, a randomized, controlled double-blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif S Sultan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Many techniques are used for sedation of colonoscopies. Patient-controlled sedation (PCS is utilizing many drugs or drug combinations. Aims: The aim of this study is to compare the safety and feasibility of propofol/remifentanil versus propofol/alfentanil given to sedate patients undergoing outpatient colonoscopies through a patient-controlled technique. Settings and Design: Controlled randomized and double-blind study. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 patients were randomly divided into two groups; PA group received a combination of propofol/alfentanil and PR group received propofol/remifentanil combination. Patients were monitored for heart rate (HR, blood pressure (BP, oxygen saturation, and Ramsay sedation scale (RSS. Times of the following events were recorded; initiation of sedation, insertion and removal of the colonoscope, recovery and discharge. Five intervals were calculated; time to sedation, procedure time, postprocedure time, procedure room time, and postanesthesia care unit (PACU time. Endoscopist and patient satisfaction scores were obtained. Statistical Analysis Used: Unpaired Student′s t-test was used to compare between the two groups. Paired Student′s t-test was used to compare baseline readings with readings after 30 min of sedation in the same group when needed. Results: Both groups showed slowing of the HR and decrease in mean arterial BP. HR and mean arterial BP were significantly lower 5 and 10 min after initiation of sedation in PR group when compared with PA group. Both HR and mean arterial BP returned to presedation readings 30 min after initiation of sedation in PR group but not in PA group. No differences between the two groups concerning oxygen saturation, RSS, endoscopist and patient satisfaction scores. Postprocedure and PACU times were significantly prolonged in PA group. Conclusion: PCS with either remifentanil/propofol or alfentanil/propofol for patients undergoing outpatient colonoscopy is safe

  6. Optimal older adult emergency care: introducing multidisciplinary geriatric emergency department guidelines from the American College of Emergency Physicians, American Geriatrics Society, Emergency Nurses Association, and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Christopher R; Bromley, Marilyn; Caterino, Jeffrey M; Chun, Audrey; Gerson, Lowell W; Greenspan, Jason; Hwang, Ula; John, David P; Lyons, William L; Platts-Mills, Timothy F; Mortensen, Betty; Ragsdale, Luna; Rosenberg, Mark; Wilber, Scott

    2014-07-01

    In the United States and around the world, effective, efficient, and reliable strategies to provide emergency care to aging adults is challenging crowded emergency departments (EDs) and strained healthcare systems. In response, geriatric emergency medicine clinicians, educators, and researchers collaborated with the American College of Emergency Physicians, American Geriatrics Society, Emergency Nurses Association, and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine to develop guidelines intended to improve ED geriatric care by enhancing expertise, educational, and quality improvement expectations, equipment, policies, and protocols. These Geriatric Emergency Department Guidelines represent the first formal society-led attempt to characterize the essential attributes of the geriatric ED and received formal approval from the boards of directors of each of the four societies in 2013 and 2014. This article is intended to introduce emergency medicine and geriatric healthcare providers to the guidelines while providing recommendations for continued refinement of these proposals through educational dissemination, formal effectiveness evaluations, cost-effectiveness studies, and eventually institutional credentialing.

  7. [Guideline "Cancer rehabilitation"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Jan-Paul; Velthuis, Miranda J; Gijsen, Brigitte C M; Lindeman, Eline; van der Pol, Marjolein A; Hillen, Harry F P

    2011-01-01

    Initiated by IKNL (Integraal Kankercentrum Nederland), a multidisciplinary guideline for cancer rehabilitation for adult oncology patients has been developed. The guideline describes the rehabilitation care of adult patients with cancer, during and after treatment. The guideline focuses on (a) prevalence of complaints either resulting from cancer or the treatment, (b) detection of these complaints and indicated referral, (c) the intake procedure before cancer rehabilitation, (d) intervention and evaluation within cancer rehabilitation and (e) the importance of patient empowerment. The guideline is directed at all professionals giving care to patients with cancer. It concerns those (such as medical specialists, general practitioners and nurses) who are responsible for detecting cancer-related complaints and for referral to cancer rehabilitation, as well as health care professionals involved in cancer rehabilitation care (such as consultants in rehabilitation medicine, physiotherapists and psychologists). The main goal of the guideline is that every cancer patient or ex-cancer patient with (residual) complaints resulting from cancer or its treatment receives timely and appropriate cancer rehabilitation.

  8. Developing clinical practice guidelines: target audiences, identifying topics for guidelines, guideline group composition and functioning and conflicts of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, Martin P; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Shekelle, Paul; Schünemann, Holger J; Woolf, Steven

    2012-07-04

    Clinical practice guidelines are one of the foundations of efforts to improve health care. In 1999, we authored a paper about methods to develop guidelines. Since it was published, the methods of guideline development have progressed both in terms of methods and necessary procedures and the context for guideline development has changed with the emergence of guideline clearing houses and large scale guideline production organisations (such as the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence). It therefore seems timely to, in a series of three articles, update and extend our earlier paper. In this first paper we discuss: the target audience(s) for guidelines and their use of guidelines; identifying topics for guidelines; guideline group composition (including consumer involvement) and the processes by which guideline groups function and the important procedural issue of managing conflicts of interest in guideline development.

  9. Developing clinical practice guidelines: target audiences, identifying topics for guidelines, guideline group composition and functioning and conflicts of interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eccles Martin P

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Clinical practice guidelines are one of the foundations of efforts to improve health care. In 1999, we authored a paper about methods to develop guidelines. Since it was published, the methods of guideline development have progressed both in terms of methods and necessary procedures and the context for guideline development has changed with the emergence of guideline clearing houses and large scale guideline production organisations (such as the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. It therefore seems timely to, in a series of three articles, update and extend our earlier paper. In this first paper we discuss: the target audience(s for guidelines and their use of guidelines; identifying topics for guidelines; guideline group composition (including consumer involvement and the processes by which guideline groups function and the important procedural issue of managing conflicts of interest in guideline development.

  10. Physicians' and pharmacists' attitudes toward the use of sedation at the end of life: influence of prognosis and type of suffering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondeau, Danielle; Roy, Louis; Dumont, Serge; Godin, Gaston; Martineau, Isabelle

    2005-01-01

    End-of-life sedation remains a controversial and ill-defined clinical practice; its applications vary considerably. With this in mind, a study was conducted using a 2 x 2 experimental design. The variables experimented with were prognosis (short- or long-term) and type of suffering (physical or existential). The goal was to study the influence of the two independent variables on attitude toward sedation. Four clinical vignettes were completed by 124 clinicians, doctors, and pharmacists working in different palliative care environments in the Province of Quebec. The results indicate that the type of suffering influences a subject's attitude to end-of-life sedation. Thus, when a patient was suffering physically, the respondents were significantly in favour of sedation, whereas they were not in favour of this practice if the suffering was existential. Lastly, it is clear that health professionals are uncomfortable when confronted with their patients' existential suffering. This is an issue worth exploring in future studies.

  11. Visual and quantitative electroencephalographic analysis of healthy young and adult cats under medetomidine sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzosek, Marcin; Nicpon, Jozef; Bergamasco, Luciana; Sammartano, Federica; Cizinauskas, Sigitas; Jaggy, André

    2009-05-01

    A study was designed to investigate the effect of medetomidine sedation on quantitative electroencephalography (q-EEG) in healthy young and adult cats to determine objective guidelines for diagnostic EEG recordings and interpretation. Preliminary visual examination of EEG recordings revealed high-voltage low-frequency background activity. Spindles, k-complexes and vertex sharp transients characteristic of sleep or sedation were superimposed on a low background activity. Neither paroxysmal activity nor EEG burst-suppression were observed. The spectral analysis of q-EEG included four parameters, namely, relative power (%), and mean, median and peak frequency (Hz) of all four frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha and beta). The findings showed a prevalence of slow delta and theta rhythms as opposed to fast alpha and beta rhythms in both young (group A) and adult (group B) cats. A posterior gradient was reported for the theta band and an anterior gradient for the alpha and beta bands in both groups, respectively. The relative power value in group B compared to group A was significantly higher for theta, alpha and beta bands, and lower for the delta band. The mean and median frequency values in group B was significantly higher for delta, theta and beta bands and lower for the alpha band. The study has shown that a medetomidine sedation protocol for feline EEG may offer a method for investigating bio-electrical cortical activity. The use of q-EEG analysis showed a decrease in high frequency bands and increased activity of the low frequency band in healthy cats under medetomidine sedation.

  12. Sedative medications outside the operating room and the pharmacology of sedatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom G

    2015-01-01

    mention new drugs on the horizon. RECENT FINDINGS: There are many drugs available for procedural sedation; however, they all have drawbacks and shortcomings. Multiple adverse effects are associated with the use of these agents, hence monitoring is essential, and emergency equipment should be readily...

  13. Nurse-administered propofol sedation for endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J T; Vilmann, P; Horsted, T

    2011-01-01

    of hypoxemia were documented in 1764 patients (4.4%), in 56/983 upper endoscopies (5.7%) and 22/754 lower endoscopies (2.9%) (P = 0.007). Assisted ventilation was necessary in 19 cases (1.1%) and anesthesiologic assistance was requested 10 times. Two patients required endotracheal intubation. A change in blood....... In the implementation phase, data from 1822 endoscopic procedures in 1764 patients were prospectively collected. All adverse events related to sedation were recorded (defined as oxygen saturation intubation, change in blood pressure > 20 mmHg). RESULTS: 78 cases...

  14. New Asthma Guidelines: What You Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section New Asthma Guidelines: What You Should Know Past Issues / ... and chairs the Expert Panel that established the new guidelines. The report gives health care professionals new ...

  15. Moderate sedation for MRI in young children with autism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Allison Kinder [Duke University Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Anesthesia, Durham (United States); Hazlett, Heather Cody; Garrett, Nancy T. [University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Wilkerson, Christy [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States); Piven, Joseph [University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Departments of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2005-09-01

    Autism is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder. Because of the deficits associated with the condition, sedation of children with autism has been considered more challenging than sedation of other children. To test this hypothesis, we compared children with autism against clinical controls to determine differences in requirements for moderate sedation for MRI. Children ages 18-36 months with autism (group 1, n = 41) and children with no autistic behavior (group 2, n = 42) were sedated with a combination of pentobarbital and fentanyl per sedation service protocol. The sedation nurse was consistent for all patients, and all were sedated to achieve a Modified Ramsay Score of 4. Demographics and doses of sedatives were recorded and compared. There were no sedation failures in either group. Children in group 1 (autism) were significantly older than group 2 (32.02{+-}3.6 months vs 28.16{+-}6.7 months) and weighed significantly more (14.87{+-}2.1 kg vs 13.42{+-}2.2 kg). When compared on a per-kilogram basis, however, group 1 had a significantly lower fentanyl requirement than group 2 (1.25{+-}0.55 mcg/kg vs 1.57{+-}0.81 mcg/kg), but no significant difference was found in pentobarbital dosing between groups 1 and 2, respectively (4.92{+-}0.92 mg/kg vs 5.21{+-}1.6 mg/kg). Autistic children in this age range are not more difficult to sedate and do not require higher doses of sedative agents for noninvasive imaging studies. (orig.)

  16. A longitudinal study examining adherence to guidelines in diabetes care according to different definitions of adequacy and timeliness.

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    Grigory Sidorenkov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Performance indicators assessing quality of diabetes care often look at single processes, e.g. whether an HbA1c test was conducted. Adequate care, however, consists of consecutive processes which should be taken in time (clinical pathways. We assessed quality of diabetes care by looking at single processes versus clinical pathways. In addition, we evaluated the impact of time period definitions on this quality assessment. METHODOLOGY: We conducted a cohort study in 2007-2008 using the GIANTT (Groningen Initiative to Analyse type 2 diabetes Treatment database. Proportions of patients adequately managed for HbA1c, systolic blood pressure (SBP, LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C, and albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR were calculated for the pathway of (1 risk factor level testing, (2 treatment intensification when indicated, (3 response to treatment evaluation. Strict and wide time periods for each step were defined. Proportions of patients adequately managed regarding the overall pathway and single steps, using strict or wide time periods were compared using odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals. FINDINGS: Of 11,176 patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, 9439 with complete follow-up were included. The majority received annual examination of HbA1c (86% and SBP (86%, whereas this was 67% for LDL-C and 49% for ACR. Adequate management regarding the three-step pathway was observed in 73%, 53%, 46%, 41% of patients for HbA1c, SBP, LDL-C, and ACR respectively. Quality scores reduced significantly due to the second step (OR 0.43, 0.18, 0.44, 0.74, but were not much further reduced by the third step. Timely treatment evaluation occurred in 88% for HbA1c, 87% for SBP, 83% for LDL-C, and 76% for ACR. The overall score was not significantly changed by using strict time windows. CONCLUSION: Quality estimates of glycemic, blood pressure and cholesterol management are substantially reduced when looking at clinical pathways as compared to estimates based

  17. Diagnosis of post-traumatic sepsis according to "Sepsis guidelines": a cross-sectional survey of sepsis in a trauma intensive care unit

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    Hao TANG

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of post-traumatic sepsis, and to evaluate the rationality of the 1992, 2001 and 2012 international sepsis definitions in diagnosing post-traumatic sepsis in a trauma intensive care unit (ICU in China. Methods  A one-day cross-sectional survey of trauma patients who met the inclusion criteria was conducted from 8:00 a.m., June 16, 2014 to 8:00 a.m., June 17, 2014 in the trauma ICU of Daping Hospital. The survey data included demographic information, clinical characteristics, pertinent scores (APACHE Ⅱ, SOFA, GCS, ISS and injury mechanism. According to the definition of sepsis as depicted in the 1992, 2001, and 2012 "International Guideline of Sepsis", the patients were divided into A, B and C groups. The infection site, infection pathogens, and key medical treatment were recorded, the infection identified, and the 28day mortality recorded. A positive pathogen culture of respiratory and urinary tracts, blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and wound secretion was adopted as the diagnostic "gold standard" for septic infection. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the three versions of the guidelines were statistically analyzed and the diagnostic feasibility of each definition was assessed. Results  A total of 30 trauma patients were enrolled, twenty-three patients met the 1992 sepsis criteria, 22 met the 2001 criteria, and 20 met the 2012 criteria. The prevalence rates were 76.7%, 73.3%, and 66.7%, respectively, and there was no significant statistical difference. Four patients died within 28 days, which was in line with the diagnostic criteria of the three versions of the sepsis criteria. The 28-day mortality in the three sepsis guidelines groups was 17.4%, 18.2%, and 25.0%, respectively, indicating no statistical difference. By adopting culture-positive pathogens as the "gold standard" of septic infection, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the group A was 77.8% and 25

  18. The care of patients with varicose veins and associated chronic venous diseases: clinical practice guidelines of the Society for Vascular Surgery and the American Venous Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloviczki, Peter; Comerota, Anthony J; Dalsing, Michael C; Eklof, Bo G; Gillespie, David L; Gloviczki, Monika L; Lohr, Joann M; McLafferty, Robert B; Meissner, Mark H; Murad, M Hassan; Padberg, Frank T; Pappas, Peter J; Passman, Marc A; Raffetto, Joseph D; Vasquez, Michael A; Wakefield, Thomas W

    2011-05-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) and the American Venous Forum (AVF) have developed clinical practice guidelines for the care of patients with varicose veins of the lower limbs and pelvis. The document also includes recommendations on the management of superficial and perforating vein incompetence in patients with associated, more advanced chronic venous diseases (CVDs), including edema, skin changes, or venous ulcers. Recommendations of the Venous Guideline Committee are based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system as strong (GRADE 1) if the benefits clearly outweigh the risks, burden, and costs. The suggestions are weak (GRADE 2) if the benefits are closely balanced with risks and burden. The level of available evidence to support the evaluation or treatment can be of high (A), medium (B), or low or very low (C) quality. The key recommendations of these guidelines are: We recommend that in patients with varicose veins or more severe CVD, a complete history and detailed physical examination are complemented by duplex ultrasound scanning of the deep and superficial veins (GRADE 1A). We recommend that the CEAP classification is used for patients with CVD (GRADE 1A) and that the revised Venous Clinical Severity Score is used to assess treatment outcome (GRADE 1B). We suggest compression therapy for patients with symptomatic varicose veins (GRADE 2C) but recommend against compression therapy as the primary treatment if the patient is a candidate for saphenous vein ablation (GRADE 1B). We recommend compression therapy as the primary treatment to aid healing of venous ulceration (GRADE 1B). To decrease the recurrence of venous ulcers, we recommend ablation of the incompetent superficial veins in addition to compression therapy (GRADE 1A). For treatment of the incompetent great saphenous vein (GSV), we recommend endovenous thermal ablation (radiofrequency or laser) rather than high ligation and inversion stripping

  19. Case study of an inter-professional and inter-organisational programme to adapt, implement and evaluate clinical guidelines in secondary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, L; Eccles, M

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a clinical guideline across three acute Trusts. A Clinical Effectiveness Steering Group identified prevention of venous thromboembolism as a health priority. A local guideline development group adapted the recommendations of an existing review and produced a local guideline. Then, a multidisciplinary implementation group developed the practical aspects of implementing guidelines into routine daily practice. They identified appropriate staff to carry out risk assessment and to administer appropriate prophylaxis, as necessary. They also produced a "guideline pack" containing a training resource manual and implementation aids. Following this a multiple strategy implementation programme was used to introduce the guidelines, and an evaluation was carried out eight to ten months after the introduction of the guidelines. The evaluation identified a number of areas for improving current practice. Guideline implementation is a complex, time-consuming process.

  20. Endoscopy: consensus on approving propofol sedation by nonanesthesiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riphaus, Andrea

    2010-04-01

    Propofol sedation by nonanesthesiologists is still a highly controversial issue despite the fact that numerous studies have approved this sedation regimen for gastrointestinal endoscopy. A new position statement from a collaboration of four different American gastroenterology and hepatology societies outlines the latest recommendations for nonanesthesiologist administration of propofol.

  1. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates, and the European Society of Anaesthesiology Guideline: Non-anesthesiologist administration of propofol for GI endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumonceau, J.M.; Riphaus, A.; Aparicio, J.R.;

    2010-01-01

    Propofol sedation by non-anesthesiologists is an upcoming sedation regimen in several countries throughout Europe. Numerous studies have shown the efficacy and safety of this sedation regimen in gastrointestinal endoscopy. Nevertheless, this issue remains highly controversial. The aim of this evi......), the European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates (ESGENA) and the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA). These three societies have endorsed the present guideline....

  2. [Rapid headache guidelines. Neurology consensus between Neurology (SAN) and Primary Care (SEMERGEN Andalucía). Referral criteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil Campoy, J A; González Oria, C; Fernández Recio, M; Gómez Aranda, F; Jurado Cobo, C M; Heras Pérez, J A

    2012-01-01

    Headache is one of the most frequent reasons for consultation in our health centers, something which should not be surprising if we consider that is one of the most common symptoms experienced by the population. The main concern of the family physician and emergency physician is to reach a correct diagnosis by clinical history and a basic neurological examination and adapted to the time and means at its disposal. In case of diagnostic doubts or suspected secondary headache, the primary care physician or emergency medical have to refer the patient to be studied and/or treated for Neurology services, such referral shall be made with varying degrees of urgency depending on the presence, or not, of symptoms or signs of alarm. A working group consisting of Neurologists of Sociedad Andaluza de Neurología (SAN) to provide services in different hospitals in Andalucía and Family Physicians representatives of the Sociedad Andaluza de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria (SAMFyC) and the Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN Andalucía), has developed a Quick Guide headache, which addresses the more practical aspects for the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of patients with headache. We show you in this paper, the chapter that deals the alarm criteria and referral.

  3. Fospropofol disodium injection for the sedation of patients undergoing colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin E Levitzky

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Benjamin E Levitzky1, John J Vargo21Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 2Section of Therapeutic and Hepatobiliary Endoscopy, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: Sedation plays a central role in making colonoscopy tolerable for patients and feasible for the endoscopist to perform. The array of agents used for endoscopic sedation continues to evolve. Fospropofol (FP, a prodrug of propofol with a slower pharmacokinetic profi le, is currently under evaluation for use during endoscopic procedures. Preliminary data suggests that FP dosed at 6.5 mg/kg is well tolerated by most patients with perineal paresthesias being the most commonly experienced adverse effect. This article will examine the current literature on the use of FP for the sedation of patients undergoing colonoscopy, highlighting the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, risks, and common adverse events associated with the novel sedative/hypnotic.Keywords: fospropofol, Aquavan, propofol, sedation, colonoscopy

  4. Efficacy and safety of Dexmedetomidine and Midazolam for sedation in intensive care unit patients: a systematic review%右美托咪定和咪达唑仑用于ICU患者镇静效果的系统评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛锐; 夏中元; 周斌; 刘敏

    2012-01-01

    Objective To review the clinic efficacy and safety of Dexmedetomidine and Midazolam for sedation of the patients in intensive care unit (ICU). Methods Using the search terms "Dexmedetomidine or Midazolam, sedation, ICU", trials were collected through searches of PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), VIP, CNKI and WANFANG databases (from January 1, 1996 to March 31, 2012) for randomized controlled trials about the efficacy and safety of Dexmedetomidine and Midazolam. The included studies were evaluated with criteria and the extracted data were analyzed by RevMan 5.0.25. Results Ten studies involving 1 633 patients met the inclusion criteia. The results of meta-analyses showed that, ①efficacy indicator: compared with the Midazolam-treated patients, the Dexmedetomidine-treated patients had shorter the duration of mechanical ventilation [WMD = -1.90, 95%CI(-1.96, -1.83), P < 0.01] and shorter the length of ICU stay [WMD = -1.70, 95%CI (-1.79, -1.60), P < 0.01], while there were no statistical differences in the onset time of sedation and the awake time; ②safety indicator: the prevalence of delirium during treatment was lower in Dexmedetomidine-treated patients [RR = 0.29, 95%C7 (0.13, 0.62), P = 0.002], while there were no statistical differences in hypotension, incidences of braycardia and braycardia requiring treatment. Conclusion Dexmedetomidine can shorten the duration of mechanical ventilation, the length of ICU stay and reduce the incidences of delirium, which is beneficial for the outcome in ICU patients.%目的 比较右美托咪定和咪达唑仑用于重症医学科(ICU)患者镇静的有效性和安全性,为ICU患者合理镇静提供循证依据.方法 以右美托咪定或咪达唑仑、ICU、镇静为检索词,计算机检索PubMed、Embase、Cochrane 图书馆、VIP、CNKI、WANFANG 数据库,检索时限均为1996年1月1日~2012年3月31日,在按纳入和排除标准进行资料提取

  5. The health care setting rather than medical speciality impacts on physicians adherence to guideline-conform anticoagulation in outpatients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation: a cross sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerber Bernhard

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF at high risk for stroke guidelines consistently recommend long-term oral anticoagulation (OAC with a vitamin K antagonist. However recommendations remain ambiguous in respect to the precise OAC initiation regimens. Based on the clinical observation, that the initiation of OAC for NVAF varies considerably in daily practice, we aimed to assess the current practice in Switzerland. Methods Cross-sectional survey of randomly selected general practitioners, internists and cardiologists from different health care settings in an urban Swiss region that covers 1.4 million inhabitants. The main outcome measures were the preferred antithrombotic initiation regimen and long-term treatment in patients with newly diagnosed NVAF at high risk for stroke. Results We received 226 out of 388 (58.2% surveys. Compared to physicians working in a hospital setting (33.6% of respondents physicians in ambulatory care reported more years of experience and claimed lower-use (never or seldom of guidelines in general (47.6 vs. 12.2%. Regarding long-term thromboembolic prophylaxis 93.7% of all responders followed current recommendation by choosing an OAC. When focussing on guideline-consistent correct OAC initiation (either low-dose initial OAC or a combination of LMWH and OAC adherence dropped to 60.6% with hospital physicians demonstrating a significantly higher use of guideline-conform OAC regimens (79.7 vs. 51.0%. Medical speciality in non-hospital physicians was not related to correct guideline-use. Hospital setting remained independently associated with a guideline-conform OAC initiation regimen (OR 2.8, p = 0.023 when controlled for medical speciality, physicians' characteristics and clinical experience. Problems when starting an anticoagulation treatment were seldom reported (never or seldom accounting for 94.1% of all responses. Conclusions The guideline adherence with respect to OAC

  6. Guideline Implementation: Hand Hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Judith L

    2017-02-01

    Performing proper hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis is essential to reducing the rates of health care-associated infections, including surgical site infections. The updated AORN "Guideline for hand hygiene" provides guidance on hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis, the wearing of fingernail polish and artificial nails, proper skin care to prevent dermatitis, the wearing of jewelry, hand hygiene product selection, and quality assurance and performance improvement considerations. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel make informed decisions about hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis. The key points address the necessity of keeping fingernails and skin healthy, not wearing jewelry on the hands or wrists in the perioperative area, properly performing hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis, and involving patients and visitors in hand hygiene initiatives. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures.

  7. Sedation with a remifentanil infusion to facilitate rapid awakening and tracheal extubation in an infant with a potentially compromised airway

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    Naples J

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey Naples,1,2 Mark W Hall,1,2 Joseph D Tobias,3,4 1Department of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University, 2Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 3Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 4Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA Abstract: Sedation is generally required during endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation in infants and children. While there are many options for the provision of sedation, the most commonly used agents such as midazolam and fentanyl demonstrate a context-sensitive half-life, which may result in a prolonged effect when these agents are discontinued following a continuous infusion. We present a 20-month-old infant who required endotracheal intubation due to respiratory failure following seizures. At the referring hospital, multiple laryngoscopies were performed with the potential for airway trauma. To maximize rapid awakening and optimize respiratory function surrounding tracheal extubation, sedation was transitioned from fentanyl and midazolam to remifentanil for 18–24 hours prior to tracheal extubation. The unique pharmacokinetics of remifentanil are presented in this study, its use in this clinical scenario is discussed, and its potential applications in the pediatric intensive care unit setting are reviewed. Keywords: remifentanil, sedation, pediatric, airway, extubation

  8. A review of clinical guidelines.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Andrews, E J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Clinical guidelines are increasingly used in patient management but few clinicians are familiar with their origin or appropriate application. METHODS: A Medline search using the terms \\'clinical guidelines\\' and \\'practice guidelines\\' was conducted. Additional references were sourced by manual searching from the bibliographies of articles located. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Clinical guidelines originated in the USA in the early 1980s, initially as a cost containment exercise. Significant improvements in the process and outcomes of care have been demonstrated following their introduction, although the extent of improvement varies considerably. The principles for the development of guidelines are well established but many published guidelines fall short of these basic quality criteria. Guidelines are only one aspect of improving quality and should be used within a wider framework of promoting clinical effectiveness. Understanding their limitations as well as their potential benefits should enable clinicians to have a clearer view of their place in everyday practice.

  9. Prevention, diagnosis, therapy and follow-up care of sepsis: 1st revision of S-2k guidelines of the German Sepsis Society (Deutsche Sepsis-Gesellschaft e.V. (DSG and the German Interdisciplinary Association of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine (Deutsche Interdisziplinäre Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin (DIVI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhart, K.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Practice guidelines are systematically developed statements and recommendations that assist the physicians and patients in making decisions about appropriate health care measures for specific clinical circumstances taking into account specific national health care structures. The 1st revision of the S-2k guideline of the German Sepsis Society in collaboration with 17 German medical scientific societies and one self-help group provides state-of-the-art information (results of controlled clinical trials and expert knowledge on the effective and appropriate medical care (prevention, diagnosis, therapy and follow-up care of critically ill patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. The guideline had been developed according to the “German Instrument for Methodological Guideline Appraisal” of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies (AWMF. In view of the inevitable advancements in scientific knowledge and technical expertise, revisions, updates and amendments must be periodically initiated. The guideline recommendations may not be applied under all circumstances. It rests with the clinician to decide whether a certain recommendation should be adopted or not, taking into consideration the unique set of clinical facts presented in connection with each individual patient as well as the available resources.

  10. A cluster randomized trial to improve adherence to evidence-based guidelines on diabetes and reduce clinical inertia in primary care physicians in Belgium: study protocol [NTR 1369].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgermans, L.D.A.; Goderis, G.; Broeke, C.V.; Mathieu, C.; Aertgeerts, B.; Verbeke, G.; Carbonez, A.; Ivanova, A.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Heyrman, J.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Most quality improvement programs in diabetes care incorporate aspects of clinician education, performance feedback, patient education, care management, and diabetes care teams to support primary care physicians. Few studies have applied all of these dimensions to address clini

  11. Cocktail sedation containing propofol versus conventional sedation for ERCP: a prospective, randomized controlled study

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    Angsuwatcharakon Phonthep

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ERCP practically requires moderate to deep sedation controlled by a combination of benzodiazepine and opiod. Propofol as a sole agent may cause oversedation. A combination (cocktail of infused propofol, meperidine, and midazolam can reduce the dosage of propofol and we hypothesized that it might decrease the risk of oversedation. We prospectively compare the efficacy, recovery time, patient satisfactory, and side effects between cocktail and conventional sedations in patients undergoing ERCP. Methods ERCP patients were randomized into 2 groups; the cocktail group (n = 103 and the controls (n = 102. For induction, a combination of 25 mg of meperidine and 2.5 mg of midazolam were administered in both groups. In the cocktail group, a bolus dose of propofol 1 mg/kg was administered and continuously infused. In the controls, 25 mg of meperidine or 2.5 mg/kg of midazolam were titrated to maintain the level of sedation. Results In the cocktail group, the average administration rate of propofol was 6.2 mg/kg/hr. In the control group; average weight base dosage of meperidine and midazolam were 1.03 mg/kg and 0.12 mg/kg, respectively. Recovery times and patients’ satisfaction scores in the cocktail and control groups were 9.67 minutes and 12.89 minutes (P = 0.045, 93.1and 87.6 (P P Conclusions Cocktail sedation containing propofol provides faster recovery time and better patients’ satisfaction for patients undergoing ERCP. However, mild degree of desaturation may still develop. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01540084

  12. Terahertz spectroscopic study of benzodiazepine sedative hypnotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Fusheng; Shen, Jingling; Wang, Xianfeng

    2011-08-01

    Terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is used to the pure active ingredient of three benzodiazepine sedative hypnotics with similar molecular structure. The absorption spectra of them are studied in the range of 0.2~2.6THz. Based on the experiment, the theoretical simulation results of diazepam, nitrazepam and clonazepam are got by the Gaussian03 package of DFT/B3LYP/6-31G* method in single-molecule models. The experimental results show that even if the molecular structure and medicine property of them are similar, the accurate identification of them can still be done with their characteristic absorption spectra. Theoretical simulation results are well consistent with the experimental results. It demonstrates that absorption peaks of them in THz range mainly come from intra-molecular forces and are less affected by the intermolecular interaction and crystal effects.ô

  13. [CPR--guidelines 2000. New international guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, H W

    2001-03-01

    The "Guidelines 2000 for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. An International Consensus an Science" are the first true international CPR guidelines in the history of resuscitation medicine. Experts from major international resuscitation organizations (International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, ILCOR) achieved a consensus of recommendations which had to pass a rigorous review procedure applying the tools of evidence-based medicine: all proposed guidelines or guideline changes had to be based on critically appraised pieces of evidence which had to be integrated into a final class of recommendations. The most important changes compared to previous recommendations from either the European Resuscitation Council or the American Heart Association are presented and commented upon.

  14. Chloral hydrate sedation in radiology: retrospective audit of reduced dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, Jennifer [Children' s University Hospital, Radiology Department, Dublin (Ireland); Royal Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Heaslip, Ingrid; Ryan, Stephanie [Children' s University Hospital, Radiology Department, Dublin (Ireland)

    2012-03-15

    Chloral hydrate (CH) is safe and effective for sedation of suitable children. The purpose of this study was to assess whether adequate sedation is achieved with reduced CH doses. We retrospectively recorded outpatient CH sedations over 1 year. We defined standard doses of CH as 50 mg/kg (infants) and 75 mg/kg (children >1 year). A reduced dose was defined as at least 20% lower than the standard dose. In total, 653 children received CH sedation (age, 1 month-3 years 10 months), 42% were given a reduced initial dose. Augmentation dose was required in 10.9% of all children, and in a higher proportion of children >1 year (15.7%) compared to infants (5.7%; P < 0.001). Sedation was successful in 96.7%, and more frequently successful in infants (98.3%) than children >1 year (95.3%; P = 0.03). A reduced initial dose had no negative effect on outcome (P = 0.19) or time to sedation. No significant complications were seen. We advocate sedation with reduced CH doses (40 mg/kg for infants; 60 mg/kg for children >1 year of age) for outpatient imaging procedures when the child is judged to be quiet or sleepy on arrival. (orig.)

  15. Surgeon-administered conscious sedation and local anesthesia for ambulatory anorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hina, Miss; Hourigan, Jon S; Moore, Richard A; Stanley, J Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Anorectal procedures are often performed in an outpatient setting using a variety of anesthetic techniques. One technique that has not been well studied is surgeon-administered conscious sedation along with local anesthetic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of this technique with emphasis on safety, efficacy, and patient satisfaction. Chart review was performed on 133 consecutive patients who had anorectal procedures at an outpatient surgery center. Additionally, 65 patients were enrolled prospectively and completed a satisfaction survey. Inclusively, charts of 198 patients who underwent outpatient anorectal surgery under conscious sedation and local anesthesia under the direction of a colorectal surgeon from 2004 through 2008 were reviewed. Parameters related to patient and procedural characteristics, safety, efficacy, and satisfaction were evaluated. Surgeon-administered sedation consisted of combined fentanyl and midazolam in 90 per cent. Eighty per cent of procedures were performed in the prone position and 23 per cent were in combination with an endoscopic procedure. Eighty-two per cent were classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists Grade 1 or 2. Transient mild hypoxemia or hypotension occurred in 4 and 3 per cent of the patients, respectively. Mean operative time was 29 minutes with a mean stay in the postanesthesia care unit of 37 minutes. There were no early major cardiac or respiratory complications. Ninety-seven per cent of the patients surveyed reported a high degree of satisfaction. Surgeon-administered conscious sedation with local anesthesia was well tolerated for outpatient anorectal surgeries. Additional studies are needed to confirm the safety and efficacy of this technique.

  16. Are sedatives and hypnotics associated with increased suicide risk of suicide in the elderly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waern Margda

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While antidepressant-induced suicidality is a concern in younger age groups, there is mounting evidence that these drugs may reduce suicidality in the elderly. Regarding a possible association between other types of psychoactive drugs and suicide, results are inconclusive. Sedatives and hypnotics are widely prescribed to elderly persons with symptoms of depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance. The aim of this case-control study was to determine whether specific types of psychoactive drugs were associated with suicide risk in late life, after controlling for appropriate indications. Methods The study area included the city of Gothenburg and two adjacent counties (total 65+ population 210 703 at the start of the study. A case controlled study of elderly (65+ suicides was performed and close informants for 85 suicide cases (46 men, 39 women mean age 75 years were interviewed by a psychiatrist. A population based comparison group (n = 153 was created and interviewed face-to-face. Primary care and psychiatric records were reviewed for both suicide cases and comparison subjects. All available information was used to determine past-month mental disorders in accordance with DSM-IV. Results Antidepressants, antipsychotics, sedatives and hypnotics were associated with increased suicide risk in the crude analysis. After adjustment for affective and anxiety disorders neither antidepressants in general nor SSRIs showed an association with suicide. Antipsychotics had no association with suicide after adjustment for psychotic disorders. Sedative treatment was associated with an almost fourteen-fold increase of suicide risk in the crude analyses and remained an independent risk factor for suicide even after adjustment for any DSM-IV disorder. Having a current prescription for a hypnotic was associated with a four-fold increase in suicide risk in the adjusted model. Conclusion Sedatives and hypnotics were both associated with increased

  17. Response to intravenous midazolam sedation in general dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, S

    1996-06-08

    The object of this study was to grade the response of patients undergoing a variety of dental procedures with the aid of intravenous midazolam sedation in general dental practice and to explore any relationships between the patients preoperative anxiety assessment and the clinician's assessment of co-operation whilst under sedation. One hundred consecutive patients aged between 18 and 58 years (mean 32 years; sd 10 years) and in ASA Class I or II were prospectively studied. Results showed that despite attempts to grade patient's behaviour it was not possible to reliably predict patient's responses under intravenous sedation. In addition to these findings, the great individual variation in sensitivity to midazolam was confirmed.

  18. Clinical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    This article is part of the Advancing practice series which is aimed at exploring practice issues in more depth, considering topics that are frequently encountered and facilitating the development of new insights. Elaine Uppal focuses on the importance of all midwives developing guideline writing skills to ensure that local, national and international midwifery/maternity guidelines are up to date, relevant and reflect midwifery knowledge alongside 'gold' standard evidence. The article aims to consider the development, use and critical appraisal of clinical guidelines. It will define and explain guidelines; discuss their development and dissemination; and consider issues relating to their use in practice. Techniques to critique and develop guidelines using the AGREE tool will be outlined in the form of practice challenges to be undertaken by the individual or in a group.

  19. Using a learning needs assessment to identify knowledge deficits regarding procedural sedation for pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jest, Anne D; Tonge, Andrea

    2011-12-01

    Procedural sedation is a cost-effective method of providing sedation and analgesia for patients undergoing diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Sedation ranges on a continuum from minimal sedation to deep sedation, so procedural sedation can pose many risks for patients (eg, compromised airway, depressed respirations, hypotension). The unique variables inherent in the pediatric population and the associated risks of procedural sedation make it imperative that RNs be knowledgeable and competent in monitoring and managing these patients. Through the use of a learning needs assessment, perioperative resource nurses at a pediatric hospital in a large, southeast metropolitan area identified practice concerns associated with staff RNs' management of pediatric patients undergoing procedural sedation. As a result of these findings, the perioperative resource nurses are in the process of implementing annual sedation competency skills testing in a special procedures laboratory for all nurses who participate in sedation procedures.

  20. Anaesthesia for procedures in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chollet-Rivier, M; Chioléro, R L

    2001-08-01

    Taking in charge severely ill patients in the intensive care environment to manage complex procedures is a performance requiring highly specific knowledge. Close collaboration between anaesthetists and intensive care specialists is likely to improve the safety and quality of medical care. Three forms of anaesthetic care should be considered in clinical practice: sedation and analgesia; monitored anaesthetic care; and general anaesthesia or conduction block anaesthesia. Even in the field of sedation and analgesia, the anaesthesiologist can offer expertise on new anaesthetic techniques like: the most recent concepts of balanced anaesthesia in terms of pharmacokinetics and dynamics, favouring the use of short-acting agents and of sedative-opioid combinations. New modes of administration and monitoring intravenous anaesthesia have been developed, with potential application in the intensive care unit. These include the use of target-controlled administration of intravenous drugs, and of electroencephalographic signals to monitor the level of sedation.

  1. Improving the use of research evidence in guideline development: 1. Guidelines for guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oxman Andrew D

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The World Health Organization (WHO, like many other organisations around the world, has recognised the need to use more rigorous processes to ensure that health care recommendations are informed by the best available research evidence. This is the first of a series of 16 reviews that have been prepared as background for advice from the WHO Advisory Committee on Health Research to WHO on how to achieve this. Objectives We reviewed the literature on guidelines for the development of guidelines. Methods We searched PubMed and three databases of methodological studies for existing systematic reviews and relevant methodological research. We did not conduct systematic reviews ourselves. Our conclusions are based on the available evidence, consideration of what WHO and other organisations are doing and logical arguments. Key questions and answers We found no experimental research that compared different formats of guidelines for guidelines or studies that compared different components of guidelines for guidelines. However, there are many examples, surveys and other observational studies that compared the impact of different guideline development documents on guideline quality. What have other organizations done to develop guidelines for guidelines from which WHO can learn? • Establish a credible, independent committee that evaluates existing methods for developing guidelines or that updates existing ones. • Obtain feedback and approval from various stakeholders during the development process of guidelines for guidelines. • Develop a detailed source document (manual that guideline developers can use as reference material. What should be the key components of WHO guidelines for guidelines? • Guidelines for guidelines should include information and instructions about the following components: 1 Priority setting; 2 Group composition and consultations; 3 Declaration and avoidance of conflicts of interest; 4 Group processes; 5

  2. A Pilot Study of Ketamine versus Midazolam/Fentanyl Sedation in Children Undergoing GI Endoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Lightdale, Jenifer R; Mitchell, Paul D; Fredette, Meghan E.; Mahoney, Lisa B.; Zgleszewski, Steven E.; Lisa Scharff; Fox, Victor L

    2011-01-01

    Background. Ketamine sedation has been found superior by physician report to traditional sedation regimens for pediatric endoscopy. Goal. To objectively compare sedation with ketamine versus midazolam/fentanyl for children undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy. Study. Patients received one of two regimens and were independently monitored using a standardized rating scale. Results. There were 2 episodes of laryngospasm during ketamine sedation. Univariate analyses showed patients sedated with ...

  3. Moderate and deep nurse-administered propofol sedation is safe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jeppe Thue; Møller, Ann; Hornslet, Pernille;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Non-anaesthesiologist-administered propofol sedation (NAPS/NAAP) is increasingly used in many countries. Most regimens aim for light or moderate sedation. Little evidence on safety of deep NAPS sedation is available. The aim of this study was to explore the safety of intermittent deep...... dose was 331.6 mg (standard deviation = 179.4 mg). The overall rate of hypoxia was 3.2%, and the rate of hypotension was 3.1%. Assisted ventilation was needed in 0.5%. Age (p ... with a higher rate of adverse events. CONCLUSION: Safety during intermittent deep sedation with NAPS was good. Age, ASA class 3 and total propofol dose were correlated with a higher rate of adverse events. Patients aged 60 years or more needed more handling during adverse events. FUNDING: Arvid Nilsson...

  4. Summary guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsnaes, K.; Painuly, J.P.; Turkson, J.; Meyer, H.J.; Markandya, A.

    1999-09-01

    This document is a summary version of the methodological guidelines for climate change mitigation assessment developed as part of the Global Environment Facility (GEF) project Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations; Methodological Guidelines. The objectives of this project have been to develop a methodology, an implementing framework and a reporting system which countries can use in the construction of national climate change mitigation policies and in meeting their future reporting obligations under the FCCC. The methodological framework developed in the Methodological Guidelines covers key economic concepts, scenario building, modelling tools and common assumptions. It was used by several country studies included in the project. (au) 13 refs.

  5. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates, and the European Society of Anaesthesiology Guideline: Non-anaesthesiologist administration of propofol for GI endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumonceau, J M; Riphaus, A; Aparicio, J R; Beilenhoff, U; Knape, J T A; Ortmann, M; Paspatis, G; Ponsioen, C Y; Racz, I; Schreiber, F; Vilmann, P; Wehrmann, T; Wientjes, C; Walder, B

    2010-12-01

    Propofol sedation by non-anaesthesiologists is an upcoming sedation regimen in several countries throughout Europe. Numerous studies have shown the efficacy and safety of this sedation regimen in gastrointestinal endoscopy. Nevertheless, this issue remains highly controversial. The aim of this evidence- and consensus-based set of guideline is to provide non-anaesthesiologists with a comprehensive framework for propofol sedation during digestive endoscopy. This guideline results from a collaborative effort from representatives of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), the European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates (ESGENA) and the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA). These three societies have endorsed the present guideline.The guideline is published simultaneously in the Journals Endoscopy and European Journal of Anaesthesiology.

  6. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates, and the European Society of Anaesthesiology Guideline: Non-anaesthesiologist administration of propofol for GI endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumonceau, J.M.; Riphaus, A.; Aparicio, J.R.;

    2010-01-01

    of this evidence- and consensus-based set of guideline is to provide non-anaesthesiologists with a comprehensive framework for propofol sedation during digestive endoscopy. This guideline results from a collaborative effort from representatives of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE......Propofol sedation by non-anaesthesiologists is an upcoming sedation regimen in several countries throughout Europe. Numerous studies have shown the efficacy and safety of this sedation regimen in gastrointestinal endoscopy. Nevertheless, this issue remains highly controversial. The aim......), the European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates (ESGENA) and the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA). These three societies have endorsed the present guideline.The guideline is published simultaneously in the Journals Endoscopy and European Journal of Anaesthesiology....

  7. Mitral flow propagation velocity in non-sedated healthy cats

    OpenAIRE

    SILVA, A.C.; R.A.L. Muzzi; G. Oberlender; L.A.L. Muzzi; M.R. Coelho; R.B. Nogueira

    2014-01-01

    Mitral flow propagation velocity (Vp) is an index used to evaluate the left ventricular diastolic function. Its influence on human and small animal cardiopathies has been studied; however there are few reports evaluating this variable in domestic felines. In addition, there is a lack of studies in non-sedated healthy cats. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish values for Vp and its correlation with other echocardiographic indexes in non-sedated healthy cats in order to provide...

  8. Fospropofol disodium injection for the sedation of patients undergoing colonoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Levitzky, Benjamin E; Vargo, John J.

    2008-01-01

    Benjamin E Levitzky1, John J Vargo21Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 2Section of Therapeutic and Hepatobiliary Endoscopy, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: Sedation plays a central role in making colonoscopy tolerable for patients and feasible for the endoscopist to perform. The array of agents used for endoscopic sedation continues to evolve. Fospropofol (FP), a prodrug of propofol with a slower pharmacokin...

  9. Aminophylline Fails to Reverse Conscious Sedation with Midazolam in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo, Chandra R.; Rosenquist, Jan B.

    1986-01-01

    A double blind, randomized crossover study investigated whether aminophylline reverses the conscious sedation with midazolam in dentistry to result in quicker clinical recovery than when midazolam is used alone. Twenty-five patients between 17-30 years of age (ASA Grade 1) were sedated with midazolam for bilateral third molar extractions, one side being operated on one visit. Aminophylline or normal saline was given at the end of the surgical procedure on one visit and the alternative during ...

  10. Balanced propofol sedation administered by nonanesthesiologists: The first Italian experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repici, Alessandro; Pagano, Nico; Hassan, Cesare; Carlino, Alessandra; Rando, Giacomo; Strangio, Giuseppe; Romeo, Fabio; Zullo, Angelo; Ferrara, Elisa; Vitetta, Eva; Ferreira, Daniel de Paula Pessoa; Danese, Silvio; Arosio, Massimo; Malesci, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and safety of a balanced approach using midazolam in combination with propofol, administered by non-anesthesiologists, in a large series of diagnostic colonoscopies. METHODS: Consecutive patients undergoing diagnostic colonoscopy were sedated with a single dose of midazolam (0.05 mg/kg) and low-dose propofol (starter bolus of 0.5 mg/kg and repeated boluses of 10 to 20 mg). Induction time and deepest level of sedation, adverse and serious adverse events, as well as recovery times, were prospectively assessed. Cecal intubation and adenoma detection rates were also collected. RESULTS: Overall, 1593 eligible patients were included. The median dose of propofol administered was 70 mg (range: 40-120 mg), and the median dose of midazolam was 2.3 mg (range: 2-4 mg). Median induction time of sedation was 3 min (range: 1-4 min), and median recovery time was 23 min (range: 10-40 min). A moderate level of sedation was achieved in 1561 (98%) patients, whilst a deep sedation occurred in 32 (2%) cases. Transient oxygen desaturation requiring further oxygen supplementation occurred in 8 (0.46%; 95% CI: 0.2%-0.8%) patients. No serious adverse event was observed. Cecal intubation and adenoma detection rates were 93.5% and 23.4% (27.8% for male and 18.5% for female, subjects), respectively. CONCLUSION: A balanced sedation protocol provided a minimalization of the dose of propofol needed to target a moderate sedation for colonoscopy, resulting in a high safety profile for non-anesthesiologist propofol sedation. PMID:21987624

  11. Balanced propofol sedation administered by nonanesthesiologists: The first Italian experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alessandro Repici; Eva Vitetta; Daniel de Paula Pessoa Ferreira; Silvio Danese; Massimo Arosio; Alberto Malesci; Nico Pagano; Cesare Hassan; Alessandra Carlino; Giacomo Rando; Giuseppe Strangio; Fabio Romeo; Angelo Zullo; Elisa Ferrara

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and safety of a balanced approach using midazolam in combination with propofol, administered by non-anesthesiologists, in a large series of diagnostic colonoscopies.METHODS: Consecutive patients undergoing diagnostic colonoscopy were sedated with a single dose of midazolam (0.05 mg/kg) and low-dose propofol (starter bolus of 0.5 mg/kg and repeated boluses of 10 to 20 mg). Induction time and deepest level of sedation, adverse and serious adverse events, as well as recovery times, were prospectively assessed. Cecal intubation and adenoma detection rates were also collected.RESULTS: Overall, 1593 eligible patients were included. The median dose of propofol administered was 70 mg (range: 40-120 mg), and the median dose of midazolam was 2.3 mg (range: 2-4 mg). Median induction time of sedation was 3 min (range: 1-4 min), and median recovery time was 23 min (range: 10-40 min). A moderate level of sedation was achieved in 1561 (98%) patients, whilst a deep sedation occurred in 32 (2%) cases. Transient oxygen desaturation requiring further oxygen supplementation occurred in 8 (0.46%; 95% CI: 0.2%-0.8%) patients. No serious adverse event was observed. Cecal intubation and adenoma detection rates were 93.5% and 23.4% (27.8% for male and 18.5% for female, subjects), respectively.CONCLUSION: A balanced sedation protocol provided a minimalization of the dose of propofol needed to target a moderate sedation for colonoscopy, resulting in a high safety profile for non-anesthesiologist propofol sedation.

  12. November 2012 critical care journal club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raschke RA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Mehta S, Burry L, Cook D, Fergusson D, et al. Daily sedation interruption in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients cared for with a sedation protocol. JAMA 2012;308:1985-92. PDFThis study was a multi-center, randomized controlled trial that compared protocolized sedation with protocolized sedation plus daily sedation interruption. The protocol used to titrate benzodiazepine and opioid infusions incorporated a validated scale (Sedation-agitation Scale (SAS or Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS in order to maintain a comfortable but arousable state. Four hundred and thirty mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients were recruited from medical and surgical ICUs in 16 institutions in North America. The study showed no benefit in the group that underwent daily sedation interruption - length of intubation was 7 days, length of ICU stay was 10 days and length of hospital stay was 20 days in both groups. There was no significant difference in the incidence of delirium (53 vs. ...

  13. The Immediate Impact of the 2009 USPSTF Screening Guideline Change on Physician Recommendation of a Screening Mammogram: Findings from a National Ambulatory and Medical Care Survey-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Suja S; Suryavanshi, Manasi S; Karanth, Siddharth; Lairson, David R

    2016-08-26

    Regular screening is considered the most effective method to reduce the mortality and morbidity associated with breast cancer. Nevertheless, contradictory evidence about screening mammograms has led to periodic changes and considerable variations among different screening guidelines. This study is the first to examine the immediate impact of the 2009 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) guideline modification on physician recommendation of mammograms. The study included visits by women aged 40 years and older without prior breast cancer from the National Ambulatory and Medical Care Survey 2008-2010. Bivariate and multiple logistic regressions were used to determine the factors associated with mammography recommendation. Approximately 29,395 visits were included and mammography was recommended during 1350 visits; 50-64-year-old women had 72% higher odds, and 65-74-year-old women had twice the odds of getting a mammogram recommendation compared with 40-49-year-old women in 2009. However, there was no difference in recommendation by age groups in 2008 and 2010. Obstetricians and gynecologists did not modify their recommendation behavior in 2009, unlike all other specialists who reduced their recommendation for 40-49-year-old women in 2009. Other characteristics associated with mammogram recommendations were certain patient comorbidities, physician specialty and primary care physician status, health maintenance organization status of the clinic, and certain visit characteristics. This study demonstrated a temporary effect of the USPSTF screening guideline change on mammogram recommendation. However, in light of conflicting recommendations by different guidelines, the physicians erred toward the more rigorous guidelines and did not permanently reduce their mammogram recommendation for women aged 40-49 years.

  14. Metadata Guidelines

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document provides guidelines on metadata and metadata requirements for ServCat documents. Information on metadata is followed by an instructional flowchart and...

  15. Propofol for Anesthesia and Postoperative Sedation Resulted in Fewer Inflammatory Responses than Sevoflurane Anesthesia and Midazolam Sedation after Thoracoabdominal Esophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanuno, Ryuichi; Yasuda, Toshimichi; Hamada, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Ryuji; Saeki, Noboru; Kawamoto, Masashi

    2015-09-01

    Responses to surgical stress can be modulated by anesthetics. We prospectively compared the effects of two different anesthetic/sedative techniques on the peak postoperative bladder temperature (BT) and the postoperative C-reactive protein (CRP) level. Twenty patients who were scheduled to undergo elective thoracoabdominal esophagectomy were allocated to receive either propofol anesthesia followed by propofol sedation (PP group, n = 10) or sevoflurane anesthesia followed by midazolam sedation (SM group, n = 10). In each case, the patient's peak bladder temperature was measured on the morning after surgery, and their serum CRP levels were assessed on postoperative days (POD) 1, 2, and 3. The patients' postoperative clinical courses were also evaluated. The peak postoperative BT (degrees C) (37.6 ± 0.4 vs. 38.2 ± 0.6, respectively; p midazolam sedation.

  16. Using continuous sedation until death for cancer patients: A qualitative interview study of physicians' and nurses' practice in three European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Seymour (Jane); J.A.C. Rietjens (Judith); S.M. Bruinsma (Sophie); L. Deliens (Luc); S. Sterckx (Sigrid); F. Mortier (Freddy); J. Brown (Jayne); N. Mathers (Nigel); A. van der Heide (Agnes)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Extensive debate surrounds the practice of continuous sedation until death to control refractory symptoms in terminal cancer care. We examined reported practice of United Kingdom, Belgian and Dutch physicians and nurses. Methods: Qualitative case studies using interviews. Set

  17. Clinical recommendations for pain, sedation, withdrawal and delirium assessment in critically ill infants and children: an ESPNIC position statement for healthcare professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Harris (Julia); A.-S. Ramelet (Anne-Sylvie); M. van Dijk (Monique); P. Pokorna (Pavla); J.M. Wielenga (Joke); L.N. Tume (Lyvonne); D. Tibboel (Dick); E. Ista (Erwin)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: This position statement provides clinical recommendations for the assessment of pain, level of sedation, iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome and delirium in critically ill infants and children. Admission to a neonatal or paediatric intensive care unit (NICU, PICU) exposes a child

  18. Assessing emergency obstetric care provision in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review of the application of global guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aduragbemi Banke-Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lack of timely and quality emergency obstetric care (EmOC has contributed significantly to maternal morbidity and mortality, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs. Since 2009, the global guideline, referred to as the ‘handbook’, has been used to monitor availability, utilization, and quality of EmOC. Objective: To assess application and explore experiences of researchers in LMICs in assessing EmOC. Design: Multiple databases of peer-reviewed literature were systematically reviewed on EmOC assessments in LMICs, since 2009. Following set criteria, we included articles, assessed for quality based on a newly developed checklist, and extracted data using a pre-designed extraction tool. We used thematic summaries to condense our findings and mapped patterns that we observed. To analyze experiences and recommendations for improved EmOC assessments, we took a deductive approach for the framework synthesis. Results: Twenty-seven studies met our inclusion criteria, with 17 judged as high quality. The highest publication frequency was observed in 2015. Most assessments were conducted in Nigeria and Tanzania (four studies each and Bangladesh and Ghana (three each. Most studies (17 were done at subnational levels with 23 studies using the ‘handbook’ alone, whereas the others combined the ‘handbook’ with other frameworks. Seventeen studies conducted facility-based surveys, whereas others